Science.gov

Sample records for agencies professional societies

  1. Professional Scientific Societies, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frye, Robert E.; And Others

    Reported are the findings of a study of scientific societies in the United States. Some 449 professional organizations were considered of which 284 conformed to the validation criteria for inclusion. Data gathering was most successful on membership, current dues, society history, and purpose and less successful on topics related to society income…

  2. Continuing Professional Education Programs of Voluntary Health Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL.

    Organizational objectives and professional continuing education programs of ten voluntary health agencies--Allergy Foundation of America, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, Arthritis Foundation, National Association for Mental Health, National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, National Society for the Prevention of Blindness,…

  3. Implementing a national program to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infection: a quality improvement collaboration of state hospital associations, academic medical centers, professional societies, and governmental agencies.

    PubMed

    Fakih, Mohamad G; George, Christine; Edson, Barbara S; Goeschel, Christine A; Saint, Sanjay

    2013-10-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) represents a significant proportion of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The US Department of Health and Human Services issued a plan to reduce HAIs with a target 25% reduction of CAUTI by 2013. Michigan's successful collaborative to reduce unnecessary use of urinary catheters and CAUTI was based on a partnership between diverse hospitals, the state hospital association (SHA), and academic medical centers. Taking the lessons learned from Michigan, we are now spreading this work throughout the 50 states. This national spread leverages the expertise of different groups and organizations for the unified goal of reducing catheter-related harm. The key components of the project are (1) centralized coordination of the effort and dissemination of information to SHAs and hospitals, (2) data collection based on established definitions and approaches, (3) focused guidance on the technical practices that will prevent CAUTI, (4) emphasis on understanding the socioadaptive aspects (both the general, unit-wide issues and CAUTI-specific challenges), and (5) partnering with specialty organizations and governmental agencies who have expertise in the relevant subject area. The work may serve in the future as a model for other large improvement efforts to address other hospital-acquired conditions, such as venous thromboembolism and falls.

  4. The Code of Professional Conduct for the Neurocritical Care Society.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Michael; Bonomo, Jordan; Bar, Barak; Collins, Edward; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Garvin, Rachel; Glickman, Scott; Grossman, Jonah; Henderson, Galen; Lawson, Tom; Mahanes, Dea; McFarlin, Jessica; Monchar, Sarah; Peled, Harry; Szalados, James

    2015-10-01

    Part of the responsibility of a professional society is to establish the expectations for appropriate behavior for its members. Some codes are so essential to a society that the code itself becomes the central document defining the organization and its tenets, as we see with the Hippocratic Oath. In that tradition, we have revised the code of professional conduct for the Neurocritical Care Society into its current version, which emphasizes guidelines for personal behavior, relationships with fellow members, relationships with patients, and our interactions with society as a whole. This will be a living document and updated as the needs of our society change in time.Available online: http://www.neurocriticalcare.org/about-us/bylaws-procedures-and-code-professional-conduct (1) Code of professional conduct (this document) (2) Leadership code of conduct (3) Disciplinary policy.

  5. The role of professional societies in limiting indication creep.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Kevin R; Ubel, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    New technology is a major driver of health care inflation. One contributor to this inflation is indication creep, the diffusion of interventions that have been proven beneficial in specific patient populations into untested broader populations who may be less likely to benefit. Professional societies sometimes promote indication creep, as we illustrate with the case of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Professional societies are in a unique position to limit indication creep. We propose that, at a minimum, professional societies should refrain from recommending new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies in their guidelines until they have been proven beneficial in the targeted populations. In some circumstances, professional societies could be more active in combatting indication creep, either recommending against expanded use of clinical interventions when evidence is lacking, or coordinating efforts to collect data in these broader populations.

  6. Addressing dual agency: getting specific about the expectations of professionalism.

    PubMed

    Tilburt, Jon C

    2014-01-01

    Professionalism requires that physicians uphold the best interests of patients while simultaneously insuring just use of health care resources. Current articulations of these obligations like the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation's Physician Charter do not reconcile how these obligations fit together when they conflict. This is the problem of dual agency. The most common ways of dealing with dual agency: "bunkering"--physicians act as though societal cost issues are not their problem; "bailing"--physicians assume that they are merely agents of society and deliver care typically based on a strongly consequentialist public health ethic; or "balancing"--a vaguely specified attempt to uphold both patient welfare and societal need for judicious resource use simultaneously--all fail. Here I propose how the problem of dual agency might begin to be addressed with rigor and consistency. Without dealing with the dual agency problem and getting more specific about how to reconcile its norms when they conflict, the expectations of professionalism risk being written off as cute, nonbinding aphorisms from the medical profession. PMID:25127273

  7. Addressing dual agency: getting specific about the expectations of professionalism.

    PubMed

    Tilburt, Jon C

    2014-01-01

    Professionalism requires that physicians uphold the best interests of patients while simultaneously insuring just use of health care resources. Current articulations of these obligations like the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation's Physician Charter do not reconcile how these obligations fit together when they conflict. This is the problem of dual agency. The most common ways of dealing with dual agency: "bunkering"--physicians act as though societal cost issues are not their problem; "bailing"--physicians assume that they are merely agents of society and deliver care typically based on a strongly consequentialist public health ethic; or "balancing"--a vaguely specified attempt to uphold both patient welfare and societal need for judicious resource use simultaneously--all fail. Here I propose how the problem of dual agency might begin to be addressed with rigor and consistency. Without dealing with the dual agency problem and getting more specific about how to reconcile its norms when they conflict, the expectations of professionalism risk being written off as cute, nonbinding aphorisms from the medical profession.

  8. The Changing Role of a Professional Society Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lees, Nigel

    1997-01-01

    Describes developments in the United Kingdom's Royal Society of Chemistry's Library and Information Centre that has changed from a professional and learned society library into a business center. Development of a priced information service, electronic sources of information including online databases and the Internet, and marketing and promotion…

  9. Geoethics and the Role of Professional Geoscience Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieffer, S. W.; Palka, J. M.; Geissman, J. W.; Mogk, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Codes of Ethics (Conduct) for geoscientists are formulated primarily by professional societies and the codes must be viewed in the context of the Goals (Missions, Values) of the societies. Our survey of the codes of approximately twenty-five societies reveals that most codes enumerate principles centered on practical issues regarding professional conduct of individuals such as plagiarism, fabrication, and falsification, and the obligation of individuals to the profession and society at large. With the exception of statements regarding the ethics of peer review, there is relatively little regarding the ethical obligations of the societies themselves. In essence, the codes call for traditionally honorable behavior of individual members. It is striking, given that the geosciences are largely relevant to the future of Earth, most current codes of societies fail to address our immediate obligations to the environment and Earth itself. We challenge professional organizations to consider the ethical obligations to Earth in both their statements of goals and in their codes of ethics. Actions by societies could enhance the efforts of individual geoscientists to serve society, especially in matters related to hazards, resources and planetary stewardship. Actions we suggest to be considered include: (1) Issue timely position statements on topics in which there is expertise and consensus (some professional societies such as AGU, GSA, AAAS, and the AMS, do this regularly, yet others not at all.); (2) Build databases of case studies regarding geoethics that can be used in university classes; (3) Hold interdisciplinary panel discussions with ethicists, scientists, and policy makers at annual meetings; (4) Foster publication in society journals of contributions relating to ethical questions; and (5) Aggressively pursue the incorporation of geoethical issues in undergraduate and graduate curricula and in continuing professional development.

  10. Professional Academic Societies: Stewards of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Steven G.; Germain, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Academic disciplines are vulnerable in the 21st century to the forces Barnett called supercomplexity, and we argue that academic societies such as the National Association for Kinesiology in Higher Education are especially well positioned to prepare 21st century scholars to respond to contemporary changes in the disciplines and in institutions of…

  11. How Do Novice Teachers in Finland Perceive Their Professional Agency?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eteläpelto, Anneli; Vähäsantanen, Katja; Hökkä, Päivi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated novice teachers' perceptions of their professional agency during the initial years of their work in schools. The research questions were: (i) How do novice teachers perceive their professional agency within their work, and what do they see as the main restrictions and resources affecting that agency? (ii) How do novice…

  12. APS Activities with Other Professional Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slakey, Francis

    2006-03-01

    In 1981, the APS Council issued a statement that opposed ``equal time'' presentation in public school science classes of creationism and evolution. The statement clarified that ``Scientific inquiry and religious beliefs are two distinct elements of the human experience. Attempts to present them in the same context can only lead to misunderstandings of both.'' The APS Council revisited the issue in 1999 when a school board in Kansas attempted to eliminate the Big Bang, among other issues, from the science curriculum. Since that time, the APS has been more directly involved in confronting efforts that would dilute the teaching of science in public school science classes. This talk will review the APS activities and describe a developing multi-science society activity.

  13. Teacher Activist Organizations and the Development of Professional Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Rand; Carl, Nicole Mittenfelner

    2015-01-01

    Teacher professional agency refers to the ability of teachers to control their work within structural constraints. In this paper, we show how teacher activist organizations can assist in the development of professional agency. We focus on a teacher activist organization in a large urban district in the United States and identify three…

  14. Enhancing professionalism among engineering students through involvements in technical societies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sreejita; Samineni, Anvesh; Mandal, Subhamoy; Murari, Bhaskar Mohan

    2015-08-01

    A student chapter can be considered to be a miniature enterprise; however without the latter's major financial risks. Involvement in the student chapter of a professional society like IEEE at undergraduate level plays a pivotal role in the overall professional development of the student by keeping the students informed about the various career possibilities. A student chapter shapes the hitherto naive students into industry ready professionals and to suitable candidates for some of the best grad schools worldwide. This assertion has been discussed in-depth taking the example of IEEE EMBS Student Branch chapter of VIT University. It has been described how the entire process, - starting from inception of an idea to its materialization in to an activity, has shaped the volunteers and participants into better professionals.

  15. Doctors in society. Medical professionalism in a changing world.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    Medicine bridges the gap between science and society. Indeed, the application of scientific knowledge to human health is a crucial aspect of clinical practice. Doctors are one important agent through which that scientific understanding is expressed. But medicine is more than the sum of our knowledge about disease. Medicine concerns the experiences, feelings, and interpretations of human beings in often extraordinary moments of fear, anxiety, and doubt. In this extremely vulnerable position, it is medical professionalism that underpins the trust the public has in doctors. This Working Party was established to define the nature and role of medical professionalism in modern society. Britain's health system is undergoing enormous change. The entry of multiple health providers, the wish for more equal engagement between patients and professionals, and the ever-greater contribution of science to advances in clinical practice all demand a clear statement of medicine's unifying purpose and doctors' common values. What is medical professionalism and does it matter to patients? Although evidence is lacking that more robust professionalism will inevitably lead to better health outcomes, patients certainly understand the meaning of poor professionalism and associate it with poor medical care. The public is well aware that an absence of professionalism is harmful to their interests. The Working Party's view, based on the evidence it has received, is that medical professionalism lies at the heart of being a good doctor. The values that doctors embrace set a standard for what patients expect from their medical practitioners. The practice of medicine is distinguished by the need for judgement in the face of uncertainty. Doctors take responsibility for these judgements and their consequences. A doctor's up-to-date knowledge and skill provide the explicit scientific and often tacit experiential basis for such judgements. But because so much of medicine's unpredictability calls for

  16. Women on professional society and journal editorial boards.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Melinda J.; Sonnad, Seema S.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Membership on a professional medical society or journal editorial board is a marker of influence and prestige for those in academic medicine. This study presents the first comprehensive quantification of women on these boards and the implications for women in medicine. METHODS: The numbers of women and men on professional society and journal editorial boards across 28 specialties (March 2004) were counted. The number of women holding multiple roles on these boards and the number of women holding top leadership positions on these boards were counted, and these proportions were compared. RESULTS: Three-thousand-four-hundred-seventy-three individuals on 39 professional medical society boards and 54 journal editorial boards were included. Eighty-three percent (2,884) of board members were male. Men occupied > 80% of top leadership positions on these boards. Thirty-five of the 589 women in the study held multiple roles. Anesthesiology (p < 0.0025), pediatrics (p < 0.0001), dermatology (p = 0.0001), obstetrics/ gynecology (p = 0.05), medical genetics (p < 0.015) and rehabilitation medicine (p < 0.03) had significantly lower proportions of women on boards in comparison to the total women in the specialty. Internal medicine, plastic surgery, cardiology and general surgery had nearly equivalent proportions; in otolaryngology and family medicine, female board members slightly exceeded the proportion of women in the field. CONCLUSION: Women's representation on society and editorial boards does not always reflect their presence in medical specialties, and it is critically lacking in certain specialties. Efforts should be made to attain parity of women leaders on these boards. Further efforts should be made to eliminate barriers to women's leadership in medicine. PMID:17668642

  17. 45 CFR 73.735-707 - Holding office in professional societies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Holding office in professional societies. 73.735... STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Outside Activities § 73.735-707 Holding office in professional societies. (a) Employees may be members of professional societies and be elected or appointed to office in such a...

  18. 45 CFR 73.735-707 - Holding office in professional societies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Holding office in professional societies. 73.735... STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Outside Activities § 73.735-707 Holding office in professional societies. (a) Employees may be members of professional societies and be elected or appointed to office in such a...

  19. 45 CFR 73.735-707 - Holding office in professional societies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Holding office in professional societies. 73.735... STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Outside Activities § 73.735-707 Holding office in professional societies. (a) Employees may be members of professional societies and be elected or appointed to office in such a...

  20. 45 CFR 73.735-707 - Holding office in professional societies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Holding office in professional societies. 73.735... STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Outside Activities § 73.735-707 Holding office in professional societies. (a) Employees may be members of professional societies and be elected or appointed to office in such a...

  1. 45 CFR 73.735-707 - Holding office in professional societies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Holding office in professional societies. 73.735... STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Outside Activities § 73.735-707 Holding office in professional societies. (a) Employees may be members of professional societies and be elected or appointed to office in such a...

  2. Doctors in society. Medical professionalism in a changing world.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    Medicine bridges the gap between science and society. Indeed, the application of scientific knowledge to human health is a crucial aspect of clinical practice. Doctors are one important agent through which that scientific understanding is expressed. But medicine is more than the sum of our knowledge about disease. Medicine concerns the experiences, feelings, and interpretations of human beings in often extraordinary moments of fear, anxiety, and doubt. In this extremely vulnerable position, it is medical professionalism that underpins the trust the public has in doctors. This Working Party was established to define the nature and role of medical professionalism in modern society. Britain's health system is undergoing enormous change. The entry of multiple health providers, the wish for more equal engagement between patients and professionals, and the ever-greater contribution of science to advances in clinical practice all demand a clear statement of medicine's unifying purpose and doctors' common values. What is medical professionalism and does it matter to patients? Although evidence is lacking that more robust professionalism will inevitably lead to better health outcomes, patients certainly understand the meaning of poor professionalism and associate it with poor medical care. The public is well aware that an absence of professionalism is harmful to their interests. The Working Party's view, based on the evidence it has received, is that medical professionalism lies at the heart of being a good doctor. The values that doctors embrace set a standard for what patients expect from their medical practitioners. The practice of medicine is distinguished by the need for judgement in the face of uncertainty. Doctors take responsibility for these judgements and their consequences. A doctor's up-to-date knowledge and skill provide the explicit scientific and often tacit experiential basis for such judgements. But because so much of medicine's unpredictability calls for

  3. Educational Psychologists and Multi-Agency Working: Exploring Professional Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskell, Sarah; Leadbetter, Jane

    2009-01-01

    This research was conducted in the light of the Every Child Matters (Department for Education and Skills, London, 2003) agenda which highlights the importance of multi-agency working. The research explored the professional identity of Educational Psychologists (EPs) with experience of multi-agency working in six Local Authorities within the…

  4. Summer enrichment partnership (SEP) - society of hispanic professional engineers (SHPE)

    SciTech Connect

    Vela, C.E.

    1994-12-31

    SEP recruits talented Hispanic high school students in the Washington metropolitan area and seeks to increase the number of Hispanics who enter graduate programs in engineering and science. New students are exposed to engineering, experimental science and business, and visit R&D centers and corporations. Returning students take college level courses, such as Vector-Based Analytic Geometry and Probability and Statistics. Advanced students work on special projects. Hispanic engineers, scientists, and managers offer career guidance. Parental participation is actively encouraged. Students are selected based on: (a) commitment to succeed, (b) academic record, and (c) willingness to attend the program through graduation. Courses are taught by university faculty, with one teacher assistant per five students. Program evaluation encompasses: (1) student participation and performance, (2) school achievement, and (3) continuation to college. SEP is a partnership between the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, The Catholic University of America, NASA, school districts, parents and students, and Hispanic professionals.

  5. Recognising and Realising Teachers' Professional Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Anne

    2015-01-01

    This reflection on the eight papers in this special issue examines the theoretical stances and methodological resources to be found in them. It offers a definition of agency which emphasises commitment, responsibility, strong judgements, self-evaluation, connection to the common good and attention to what people do. Having examined how the papers…

  6. National Aerospace Professional Societies and Associations and Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Arthur J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    This session will highlight several highly recognized National Technical and Professional Aerospace Societies, Associations and Organizations that are dedicated to the advancement of the theories, practices and unique applications of Science, Engineering and related Aerospace Activities ongoing in the United States. The emphasis will be on at least three (3) Aerospace Organizations, while reference many others. This paper will provide a wealth of educational references, information, opportunities and services available through many of the National and Local Chapter Affiliates, associated with the respective associations. Again, all experience and knowledge levels (K-12) will benefit from this information and reference material. Reference materials and other points of contact will be made available to all attendees.

  7. The Edelman Galileoscope Education Program: A Collaboration Among Professional Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Marvel, K. B.; Fienberg, R. T.; Arion, D. N.; Herrold, A.; Kruse, B.; Sparks, R. T.; Dugan, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Edelman Galileoscope Education Program is an ongoing national effort to provide K-12 teachers with Galileoscope refractor kits and the proper training to use them effectively for teaching scientific concepts and observational skills. As such it represents a strategic effort to excite children about astronomy and provides them with a powerful tool to increase science literacy. The program was made possible by a generous gift from Jean and Ric Edelman to the American Astronomical Society (AAS). The AAS teamed with the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO); Galileoscope, LLC; the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA); and the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) to distribute telescopes, mainly during teacher workshops. Through the professional development efforts of NESTA, ASP, and NOAO's Teaching With Telescopes program some 1,400 teachers received Galileoscopes and hands-on training on how to teach optics and astronomy with them. All participating teachers received Galileoscopes free of charge. Another 1,500 or so teachers not connected with these organizations also received telescopes free of charge through an Internet ordering system, paying only for shipping. Under this combination of programs more than 15,000 Galileoscopes have been given to active teachers, reaching an estimated 300,000 students. The professional development program uses a combination of face-to-face workshops, a train-the-trainer model, and Internet-based self-paced instruction. We describe the Edelman Galileoscope Education Program design, training materials, and distribution networks, as well as the geographic distribution of the teachers who received Galileoscopes. This program represents an efficient and effective model for quickly distributing valuable science teaching materials to urban, suburban, and rural teachers _ including homeschoolers _ across the United States.

  8. Experiences in Improving Student Engagement in Professional Societies and Taking the Next Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, C. M.; Gonzales, L. M.; Houlton, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    The "Great Crew Change" in the geosciences workforce is already underway based on demographic and employment data for government agencies and academia, and for the resource industries, the great loss of existing professional experience will begin to "cut to the bone" within the next five years. In addition to this loss of professional experience, the profession's demographics do not allow for traditional mentoring and employee development programs to completely fill the gap. In response to these critical issues, AGI has been focusing on improving career and professional development awareness of new geoscience majors. AGI's program has included efforts to greatly expand student participation in geoscience professional societies early in their academic career, an effort that patterns itself after many engineering discipline best practices. The results of AGI's activities over the last several years have been mixed and reflect a widely varying understanding of students' motivations and their perceptions of actual careers in the geosciences, the nature of the skill portfolio needed for success, and the aptitude of geoscience faculty to advise students in the pursuit of non-academic careers. The dynamics of these efforts have led to several newly emerging programs at AGI, including enhancing the on-campus effort to improve career education in geoscience programs and a collaborative program with the American Institute of Professional Geologists to adopt SLOAN-C best practices in developing online asynchronous, synchronous, and hybrid courses focused on professional development topics that can be taken either as supplemental courses in a degree program or as early-career professional seminars.

  9. Professional dermatology societies in the USA: an overview.

    PubMed

    Al Aboud, Ahmad; Al Aboud, Khalid

    2015-11-18

    This is a concise overview in a table format for the current membership-based dermatology societies in the USA. The primary objective of these societies is to provide continuous medical education. These societies serve all health care providers in dermatology care, including physician assistants and nurses. There is a clear need for establishing more societies which focus on different aspect of dermatology. There is always a potential for improving the educational activities of these societies.

  10. 78 FR 2379 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Impact Evaluation of Math Professional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Impact Evaluation of Math Professional... of Collection: Impact Evaluation of Math Professional Development. OMB Control Number: 1850-NEW. Type..., and teachers for a study of math professional development. The study will provide...

  11. What Contributes to First-Year Student Teachers' Sense of Professional Agency in the Classroom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soini, Tiina; Pietarinen, Janne; Toom, Auli; Pyhältö, Kirsi

    2015-01-01

    This study explores Finnish first-year primary teacher students' (N = 244) sense of professional agency in the classroom. In addition, the interrelation between student teachers' sense of professional agency and the perceptions of teacher education as a learning environment is explored. The sense of professional agency in the classroom…

  12. Features and News: Professional Biological Societies and Environmental Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granholm, Nels H.

    1973-01-01

    Presents concrete suggestions regarding the role of individuals and groups within the Division of Invertebrate Zoology (DIZ) of the American Society of Zoologists (ASZ) regarding their contributions toward constructive environmental action. (Author/EB)

  13. The Challenges and Opportunities for Professional Societies in Higher Education in Australasia: A PEST Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Iain; Steel, Caroline; Parrish, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Professional societies, established to support academic and professional staff in higher education, need to be vigilant of regional and international trends that affect their core business. In this paper, we provide an analysis of political, economic, social and technological factors that are impacting upon the Australasian higher education…

  14. 49 CFR 89.31 - Use of professional debt collection agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... agencies except for those debts owed by State and local governments, other Federal agencies, current... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of professional debt collection agencies. 89... FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT Collection of Claims § 89.31 Use of professional debt collection...

  15. 49 CFR 89.31 - Use of professional debt collection agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... agencies except for those debts owed by State and local governments, other Federal agencies, current... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of professional debt collection agencies. 89... FEDERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION ACT Collection of Claims § 89.31 Use of professional debt collection...

  16. Professional Societies, Political Action Committees, and Party Preferences.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Steven L; Barsky, Carol L; Powell, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    Societies representing physician specialties and other health care personnel commonly have political action committees (PACs). These PACs seek to advance their members' interests through advocacy and campaign contributions. We examined contribution data for health care workers' PACs from the 2010 to 2012 election cycles and found that higher annual income was strongly associated with greater giving to Republican candidates. Patterns of giving may offer insights into various medical workers' party preferences, political leanings, and views of health care reform.

  17. 78 FR 47676 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; National Professional Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; National Professional Development Program: Grantee Performance Report AGENCY: Office of English Language Acquisition (OLEA), Department of...

  18. Defining New Roles for Scientific Professional Organizations in Society?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robock, A.; Byrne, J.

    2007-12-01

    The obfuscation of authentic science information in North America has reached epidemic proportions. The global warming debate is a classic example - there are a virtual unanimity and overwhelming evidence from scientific community that the Earth is warming rapidly and humans are an important cause, but there is confusion in the media and the public, partly as a result of disinformation campaigns by greenhouse gas polluters. Should the role of scientists in informing the public change in response to this? What should be the role of scientific societies, such as the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society, or the American Association for the Advancement of Science? Should we continue doing what we are doing, or be more proactive in using new technology to educate the public on important scientific issues? Should we devote resources to television advertisements? Should we support ads in the print media? This talk will discuss the pros and cons of individual and group actions in making the case in public for science, and suggest some new directions.

  19. Building Professionalism in a Knowledge Society: Examining Discourses of Knowledge in Four Professional Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karseth, Berit; Nerland, Monika

    2007-01-01

    This article explores how contemporary professional associations employ discourses of knowledge as a means of promoting professionalism. By analysing policy documents from the Norwegian associations for teachers, nurses, engineers and accountants, we reveal dominant knowledge discourses and discuss how they serve to position the associations in…

  20. The Role of Agency in Determining and Enacting the Professional Identities of Early Career Aboriginal Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Cathie

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the role of agency in early career Aboriginal teachers expressions of their professional identity. It argues that in the context of teaching, opportunities to exercise personal agency are critical to the development and maintenance of a "healthy" professional identity, particularly for those traditionally disempowered…

  1. Invisible but Essential: The Role of Professional Networks in Promoting Faculty Agency in Career Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niehaus, Elizabeth; O'Meara, KerryAnn

    2015-01-01

    The benefits of professional networks are largely invisible to the people embedded in them (O'Reilly 1991), yet professional networks may provide key benefits for faculty careers. The purpose of the study reported here was to explore the role of professional networks in faculty agency in career advancement, specifically focusing on the overall…

  2. Teachers' Professional Learning in a European Learning Society: The Case of Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makopoulou, Kyriaki; Armour, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the contemporary "knowledge-driven" European society, the quality and relevance of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for teachers and Physical Education teachers (PE-CPD) has come under scrutiny. National contexts within Europe vary considerably, however, so there is a need to gain analytical insights into PE-CPD structures…

  3. The Professional Transspective of the Students in the Conflicting Realities of the Post-Industrial Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinnatova, Mariya V.; Konovalova, Maria E.; Makarova, Nataliya V.

    2016-01-01

    The topicality of the issue under investigation is determined by the rising demand of the Russian society in the mastering and controlling conflicting realities that are capable of changing the integral notional structure of an individual, leading to the evolution or degradation of such individual's social and professional life activity. The…

  4. Attitudes of Professional Men and Women toward Women's Roles in Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shann, Mary H.

    To study internal psychological barriers to women's equity in formerly male education and occupational domains, Matthew's scale of attitudes toward women's roles in society was administered to 294 male and 261 female graduate students pursuing degrees in one of six professional areas, three male-dominated and three traditionally female-dominated.…

  5. Career development for early career academics: benefits of networking and the role of professional societies.

    PubMed

    Ansmann, Lena; Flickinger, Tabor E; Barello, Serena; Kunneman, Marleen; Mantwill, Sarah; Quilligan, Sally; Zanini, Claudia; Aelbrecht, Karolien

    2014-10-01

    Whilst effective networking is vitally important for early career academics, understanding and establishing useful networks is challenging. This paper provides an overview of the benefits and challenges of networking in the academic field, particularly for early career academics, and reflects on the role of professional societies in facilitating networking.

  6. The role of Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine in training of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Ford, Carol A

    2016-08-01

    The Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM) was created by health professionals committed to identifying and better addressing the health needs of adolescents and young adults, and this work has continued for nearly 50 years. The society initially focused primarily on clinical education, but has evolved to include educational activities providing clinical, research, policy, advocacy, and professional development content. Strategies have included high-quality annual meetings designed to meet the educational needs of its multi-disciplinary membership, publishing an internationally recognized journal, and developing strategic collaborations to advocate for legitimacy of the field and reform in health profession education. Historically, SAHM has been most successful at increasing specialized training in the United States among physicians, and primarily pediatricians, likely driven by the nuances of the development of adolescent medicine in this country. Successes are often linked to strategic collaborations with other professional organizations, and have been facilitated by federally funded initiatives to improve adolescent and young adult health. Recent efforts to improve professional training are focused on the use of technology, and SAHM is also currently exploring strategies to directly reach adolescents, young adults, and their parents. As the society becomes increasingly multidisciplinary and international, members have extraordinary opportunities to learn from each other, build upon lessons learned, and collaborate. Descriptions of the history of SAHM's training-focused efforts, selected highlights, and current priorities will be used to illustrate this long-standing commitment to the training of health professionals.

  7. Health professionals' roles and relationships with other agencies.

    PubMed

    Twomey, Mary S; Weber, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Health professionals play a vital role in addressing elder abuse by identifying and reporting elder abuse and caring for survivors. However, most are unaware of the opportunities to work with allied professionals in elder abuse intervention. This article discusses the various roles of interdisciplinary members and the contribution of health care professionals in these teams. Terminology used in elder abuse teamwork is discussed. PMID:25439648

  8. Professional Ethics Activities in the Scientific and Engineering Societies. AAAS Professional Ethics Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalk, Rosemary; And Others

    Presented is an overview of the depth and range of the ethics activities undertaken by societies affiliated with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Included in this report are: (1) reviews of previous surveys of organizations which had adopted codes of ethics; (2) descriptions of the methodology and findings of the…

  9. Local Vocational Education Agencies and Professional Personnel Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraska, Marie F.

    Dalton Junior College, Georgia, has developed a comprehensive staff development plan for professionals in the vocational-technical division to relate student needs to professional competencies and meet certification requirements. The plan consists of a rationale or stated need and general goals, policies, and procedures. As a component of the…

  10. Professional Learning within Multi-Agency Children's Services: Researching into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leadbetter, Jane; Daniels, Harry; Edwards, Anne; Martin, Deirdre; Middleton, David; Popova, Anna; Warmington, Paul; Apostolov, Apostol; Brown, Steve

    2007-01-01

    Background: This article is concerned with professional learning within multi-agency settings. Since the publication of the government document "Every child matters" in 2003, professionals involved in working with children and young people have been moving into newly organized services that are required to deliver improved services for vulnerable…

  11. Inter-Professional Work with Young Children in Hospital: The Role of "Relational Agency"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Joce

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports from the first phase of a study of the inter-professional work of hospital play specialists (HPSs). In this phase, the author aimed to test the utility of Edwards' concept of "relational agency" in inter-professional work in hospital settings. Individual HPSs in two London hospitals were observed for half-day…

  12. Fostering Structurally Transformative Teacher Agency through Science Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera Maulucci, Maria S.; Brotman, Jennie S.; Fain, Shoshana Sprague

    2015-01-01

    This study draws on data from a 10-month critical narrative inquiry of science teaching and learning in a third grade, dual language, integrated co-teaching classroom. The teachers were participants in a 14-week science professional development seminar that enrolled inservice and preservice teachers and focused on enhancing science teaching and…

  13. Quality Assessment of Clinical Practice Guidelines Developed by Professional Societies in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yaşar, Ilknur; Kahveci, Rabia; Baydar Artantaş, Aylin; Ayhan Başer, Duygu; Gökşin Cihan, Fatma; Şencan, Irfan; Koç, Esra Meltem; Özkara, Adem

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are systematically developed statements to assist practitioner and patient decisions about appropriate healthcare for specific clinical circumstances. There is a limited number of studies on guidelines in Turkey. The quality of Ministry of Health guidelines have formerly been assessed whereas there is no information on the other guidelines developed in the country. Aim This study aims to assess the quality of CPGs that are developed by professional societies that work for the health sector in Turkey, and compare the findings with international guidelines. Methodology Professional societies that work for the health sector were determined by using the data obtained from the Ministry of Internal Affairs. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined for selecting the CPGs. Guidelines containing recommendations about disease management to the doctors, accessible online, developed within the past 5 years, citing references for recommendations, about the diseases over 1% prevalence according to the “Statistical Yearbook of Turkey 2012” were included in the study. The quality of CPGs were assessed with the AGREE II instrument, which is an internationally recognized tool for this purpose. Four independent reviewers, who did not participate in the development of the selected guidelines and were trained in CPG appraisal, used the AGREE instrument for assessment of the selected guidelines. Findings 47 professional societies were defined which provided access to CPGs in their websites; 3 of them were only open to members so these could not be reached. 8 CPGs from 7 societies were selected from a total of 401 CPGs from 44 societies. The mean scores of the domains of the guidelines which were assessed by the AGREE II tool were; Scope and purpose: 64%, stakeholder involvement: 37.9%, rigour of development: 35.3%, clarity and presentation: 77.9%, applicability: 49.0% and editorial independence: 46.0%. Conclusion This is the first

  14. Conceptualizing Agency: Preservice Social Studies Teachers' Thinking about Professional Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, J. Spencer

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated preservice social studies teachers' thinking about personal agency. This study used a case study design and was conducted in a semester long undergraduate social studies methods course. The findings drew upon data from eight participants. The participants were selected based on their stated purpose for teaching…

  15. Professionalism, Profession and Quality Assurance Practitioners in External Quality Assurance Agencies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Jordan C. M.

    2015-01-01

    This article seeks to spark a dialectic discussion on the establishment of a set of professional competencies for quality assurance practitioners who serve in external quality assurance agencies in higher education. Such a need is identified due to the shortage of relevant and sufficient coverage in the quality assurance literature. To…

  16. 78 FR 77442 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; The Impact of Professional Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... information collection requirements and provide the requested data in the desired format. ED is soliciting... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; The Impact of Professional Development in... Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. chapter 3501 et seq.), ED is proposing a new information collection....

  17. The Teacher Training Agency, Continuing Professional Development Policy and the Definition of Competences for Serving Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Jim

    1996-01-01

    Questions how England's Secretary of State for Education uses the Teacher Training Agency (TTA) to define and control inservice teacher competency requirements, suggesting that this leads to teacher deprofessionalization. Recommends identifying threats to professional autonomy and preventing the TTA from moving to the next phase of regulation. (SM)

  18. Teacher Agency and Professional Learning: Rethinking Fidelity of Implementation as Multiplicities of Enactment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buxton, Cory A.; Allexsaht-Snider, Martha; Kayumova, Shakhnoza; Aghasaleh, Rouhollah; Choi, Youn-Jeng; Cohen, Allan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we use practice theory, with its focus on the interplay of structure and agency, to theorize about teacher engagement in professional learning and teacher enactment of pedagogical practices as an alternative to framing implementation research in terms of program adherence and fidelity of implementation. Practice theory allowed us to…

  19. Comprehensive School Teachers' Professional Agency in Large-Scale Educational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyhältö, Kirsi; Pietarinen, Janne; Soini, Tiina

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how comprehensive school teachers' sense of professional agency changes in the context of large-scale national educational change in Finland. We analysed the premises on which teachers (n = 100) view themselves and their work in terms of developing their own school, catalysed by the large-scale national change. The study…

  20. Assuming Agency: The Power of Strategy and Networks in the Professional Lives of Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terosky, Aimee LaPointe; O'Meara, KerryAnn

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss some manifestations of agency in the faculty career and the potential importance of its role in faculty career development. They define faculty professional growth as a change occurring in a person throughout his or her career and life that allows him or her to bring new and diverse knowledge, skills, values,…

  1. The Oncology Nursing Society Leadership Competency project: developing a road map to professional excellence.

    PubMed

    Day, Donald D; Hand, Mikel W; Jones, Ann R; Harrington, Nancy Kay; Best, Robyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B

    2014-08-01

    Combining the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine's report on the future of nursing, an Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) leadership think tank, and current evidence, the ONS Leadership Competencies were developed to provide all nurses with a pathway to advance their leadership skills and abilities. Generated through a systematic approach of literature review, data synthesis, and peer and expert review, the ONS Leadership Competencies are divided into five domains: vision, knowledge, interpersonal effectiveness, systems thinking, and personal mastery. Each of the competencies can be measured at the individual, group, and governance levels. They serve as a means of self-assessment, growth, future planning, and professional development. This article describes the process used to develop the ONS Leadership Competencies and offers examples of how they may be used in practice. PMID:25095296

  2. The Oncology Nursing Society Leadership Competency project: developing a road map to professional excellence.

    PubMed

    Day, Donald D; Hand, Mikel W; Jones, Ann R; Harrington, Nancy Kay; Best, Robyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B

    2014-08-01

    Combining the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine's report on the future of nursing, an Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) leadership think tank, and current evidence, the ONS Leadership Competencies were developed to provide all nurses with a pathway to advance their leadership skills and abilities. Generated through a systematic approach of literature review, data synthesis, and peer and expert review, the ONS Leadership Competencies are divided into five domains: vision, knowledge, interpersonal effectiveness, systems thinking, and personal mastery. Each of the competencies can be measured at the individual, group, and governance levels. They serve as a means of self-assessment, growth, future planning, and professional development. This article describes the process used to develop the ONS Leadership Competencies and offers examples of how they may be used in practice.

  3. Monitoring physiology trainee needs to focus professional society responses: the APS Trainee Needs Surveys.

    PubMed

    Matyas, Marsha L; Lowy, Melinda E; Sweazea, Karen L; Alvarez, Diego F

    2011-06-01

    In 2004 and 2007, the American Physiological Society (APS) Trainee Advisory Committee (TAC) conducted surveys of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and new investigators in physiology to identify topics and issues important to those trainees. Two major trends emerged from the data. First, trainees in 2007 expressed somewhat greater interest in professional development information than did those in 2004. Second, needs expressed by trainees in both years were closely related to their specific career development stage. Survey findings guided the TAC and other APS committees and groups to focus their efforts toward the issues that were of the greatest interest to trainees. It also led to improved communication with trainees and increased involvement of trainees in APS governance.

  4. Use Of Pre-operative Testing And Physicians’ Response To Professional Society Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Sigmund, Alana E.; Stevens, Elizabeth R.; Blitz, Jeanna; Ladapo, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance The value of routine pre-operative testing prior to most surgical procedures is widely considered to be low. To improve the quality of pre-operative care and reduce waste, two professional societies released guidance in 2002, but researchers and policymakers remain concerned about the health and cost burden of low-value care in the pre-operative setting. Objective To examine the long-term, national impact of 2002 professional guidance from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), on physicians’ use of routine pre-operative testing. Design, Setting, Participants U.S. adults evaluated in pre-operative visits in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) between 1997-2010. A quasi-experimental, differences-in-differences (DID) approach evaluated whether professional guidance in 2002 was associated with changes in pre-operative testing patterns, while adjusting for temporal trends in routine testing, as captured by testing patterns in general medical exams. Main Measures Physician orders for outpatient plain radiography, hematocrit, urinalysis, electrocardiogram (ECG), and cardiac stress testing. Results Over the 14-year period, the average annual number of pre-operative visits in the US increased from 6.8 million in 1997-1999, to 9.8 million in 2002-2004, to 14.3 million in 2008-2010. After accounting for temporal trends in routine testing, we found no statistically significant overall changes in the use of plain radiography (11.3% in 1997-2002 to 9.9% in 2003-2010, DID=−1.0-per-100-visits 95% CI-4.1,2.2), hematocrit (9.4% in 1997-2002 to 4.1% in 2003-2010, DID=+1.2-per-100-visits 95% CI-2.2,4.7), urinalysis (12.2% in 1997-2002 to 8.9% in 2003-2010, DID=+2.7-per-100-visits 95% CI-1.7,7.1), or cardiac stress testing (1.0% in 1997-2002 to 2.0% in 2003-2010, DID=+0.7-per-100-visits 95% CI-0.1,1.5) after

  5. PROFESSIONAL REGISTRATION OF GOVERNMENT ENGINEERS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchanan, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    The American Society of Civil Engineers views professional registration as an appropriate requirement for engineers, including those in government. The National Society of Professional Engineers makes registration a requirement for the grade of member and full privileges in the society. Some Federal agencies require engineering registration for certain positions in their agencies. Engineers in government service should consider the value of engineering registration to themselves and to their agencies and take pride in their professions and in their own capabilities by becoming registered engineers. They should also take steps to encourage their agencies to give more attention to engineering registration.

  6. The impact of gender and nationality on winning a professional society award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Mary Anne; McKenzie, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Women are under-represented for science awards and fellow status in professional science societies (accounting for career stage) and are over-represented for teaching and service awards (Ball et al., 2015; Lincoln et al., 2012; Holmes et al., 2011). In addition, for the American Geophysical Union, non-U.S. members are under-represented among all awardees. Gender bias in evaluation processes are well-documented (e.g., Valian, 1999), and cultural differences are at play in the under-representation of non U.S. members. U.S. members are more likely to nominate their peers for awards, and to write effusive letters to support the nomination (Ball et al., 2015). There are effective mechanisms to reduce bias in both nomination and evaluation processes, a few of which are: 1) separate the nomination and evaluation processes by creating nomination committees of a diverse group of people who actively seek potential nominees and promote their nominations; this expands the pool of nominees; 2) educate nomination and evaluation committees on the research that demonstrates the impact of implicit bias on nomination and selection processes (e.g., http://www.enei.org.uk/pages/unconscious-bias.html; http://wiseli.engr.wisc.edu/bias.php); 3) minimize use of simple bibliometric indices, which are known to exhibit gender bias (men self-cite more than women; Maliniak et al., 2013) and nationality bias (papers in English language journals are more likely to be cited than non-English journals (Bornmann et al., 2012; González-Alcaide et al., 2012); 4) members of the selection committee should understand the effects of gender on the quality of letters written for women (Trix and Psenka, 2003); 5) establish and follow clear criteria for the award. Professional societies can promote fairness and inclusion by self-study: find and compile the data on the gender, race, ethnicity and nationality of members who are nominated for and win awards, as well as on who is doing the nominating. Compare

  7. Understanding the Social Implications of ICT in Medicine and Health: The Role of Professional Societies.

    PubMed

    O'connell, Brian M; Laxminarayan, Swamy

    2005-01-01

    In past times, engineers and other ICT professionals could normally function exclusively within an environment of purely technical dimensions. This sphere could be easily delineated from those involving policy, political or social questions. Consequently, these professions could well be characterized as generally isolated from mainstream society, engendering a condition that Zussman (1985) has described as a "technical rationality that is the engineer's stock-in-trade requir[ing] the calculation of means for the realization of given ends. But it requir[ing] no broad insight into those ends or their consequences". This condition has often led to a perceived technical mindset that according to Florman (1976), draws upon "the comfort that comes with the total absorption in a mechanical environment. The world becomes reduced and manageable, controlled and unchaotic".In a relatively short period of time, ICT has been radically transformed in both its capabilities and reach. Specifically, within the context of this event, the permeation of digital technologies into nearly every aspect of bioengineering and healthcare delivery have broken down the borders between technological pursuits and the larger dynamics of society. This has in turn has produced, according to Williams (2000) a discipline that has "evolved into an open-ended Profession of Everything in a world where technology shades into science, into art, and into management, with no strong institutions to define an overarching mission". Within ICT, H.C. von Baeyer (2003) affirms this status in noting "the frustration of engineers who have at their disposal a variety of methods for measuring the amount of information in a message, but to none deal with its meaning".

  8. Understanding the Social Implications of ICT in Medicine and Health: The Role of Professional Societies.

    PubMed

    O'connell, Brian M; Laxminarayan, Swamy

    2005-01-01

    In past times, engineers and other ICT professionals could normally function exclusively within an environment of purely technical dimensions. This sphere could be easily delineated from those involving policy, political or social questions. Consequently, these professions could well be characterized as generally isolated from mainstream society, engendering a condition that Zussman (1985) has described as a "technical rationality that is the engineer's stock-in-trade requir[ing] the calculation of means for the realization of given ends. But it requir[ing] no broad insight into those ends or their consequences". This condition has often led to a perceived technical mindset that according to Florman (1976), draws upon "the comfort that comes with the total absorption in a mechanical environment. The world becomes reduced and manageable, controlled and unchaotic".In a relatively short period of time, ICT has been radically transformed in both its capabilities and reach. Specifically, within the context of this event, the permeation of digital technologies into nearly every aspect of bioengineering and healthcare delivery have broken down the borders between technological pursuits and the larger dynamics of society. This has in turn has produced, according to Williams (2000) a discipline that has "evolved into an open-ended Profession of Everything in a world where technology shades into science, into art, and into management, with no strong institutions to define an overarching mission". Within ICT, H.C. von Baeyer (2003) affirms this status in noting "the frustration of engineers who have at their disposal a variety of methods for measuring the amount of information in a message, but to none deal with its meaning". PMID:15923754

  9. Preparing FCS Professionals for a Multilingual Society: Building Community through the Experiences of Multilingual Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Janine; Duncan, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    As demographics in the United States shift, family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals must be prepared to foster healthy communities that embrace multilingual families. Because hegemonic language ideologies challenge multilingual families, FCS professionals need to know how to inclusively reframe communities to honor multilingual families.…

  10. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health Care Professionals: A Call for Action.

    PubMed

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health care professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health care professionals and for patients. PMID:27369038

  11. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Healthcare Professionals: A Call for Action.

    PubMed

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of healthcare professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care healthcare professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care healthcare professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care healthcare professionals and for patients. PMID:27309157

  12. A Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health-care Professionals. A Call for Action.

    PubMed

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health-care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health-care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health-care professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health-care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health-care professionals and for patients. PMID:27367887

  13. Professional nursing societies and evidence-based practice: strategies to cross the quality chasm.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Gail A

    2010-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) published Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health Care System for the 21st Century nearly 10 years ago. Nursing societies are in a unique position to promote evidence-based practice (EBP). The purpose of this article is to describe EBP strategies that nursing societies can use to improve the quality of health care, thus decreasing the gap between research knowledge and practice. Nursing societies can take the lead in two key EBP activities: (1) development of evidence-based syntheses, systematic reviews, and guidelines for EBP; and (2) development, implementation, and testing strategies for these EBP resources to become available and used in clinical decision-making. The Oncology Nursing Society will be discussed as an exemplar of developing EBP programs and increasing knowledge of EBP and practice change resources for its members. The discussion stresses the importance of nursing society members and leaders in guiding their societies to contribute to the closing of the US health care quality chasm.

  14. Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics at AGU - The Establishment and Evolution of an Ethics Program at a Large Scientific Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael; Leinen, Margaret; McEntee, Christine; Townsend, Randy; Williams, Billy

    2016-04-01

    The American Geophysical Union, a scientific society of 62,000 members worldwide, has established a set of scientific integrity and professional ethics guidelines for the actions of its members, for the governance of the union in its internal activities, and for the operations and participation in its publications and scientific meetings. This presentation will provide an overview of the Ethics program at AGU, highlighting the reasons for its establishment, the process of dealing ethical breaches, the number and types of cases considered, how AGU helps educate its members on Ethics issues, and the rapidly evolving efforts at AGU to address issues related to the emerging field of GeoEthics. The presentation will also cover the most recent AGU Ethics program focus on the role for AGU and other scientific societies in addressing sexual harassment, and AGU's work to provide additional program strength in this area.

  15. Sustaining Peace through School and Civil Society: Mortar, Bricks and Human Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nkomo, Mokubung; Weber, Everard; Malada, Brutus

    2007-01-01

    South Africa has been a high-conflict society for nearly 350 years. The first 300 years were characterised by colonial rule with all the attendant conflicts inherent in such polities where dominance over the subjects was achieved by coercive means. This was followed by a more virulent form of racial domination, called apartheid, which…

  16. Social and health care professionals' views on responsible agency in the process of ending intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Virkki, Tuija

    2015-06-01

    This article examines social and health care professionals' views, based on their encounters with both victims and perpetrators, on the division of responsibility in the process of ending intimate partner violence. Applying discourse analysis to focus group discussions with a total of 45 professionals on solutions to the problem, several positions of responsible agency in which professionals place themselves and their clients are identified. The results suggest that one key to understanding the complexities involved in violence intervention lies in a more adequate theorization of the temporal and intersubjective dimensions of the process of assigning responsibility for the problem. PMID:25827611

  17. United States - The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society: Working with patients, carers and hospital professionals to improve awareness, treatment and patient choice.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    By working locally with patients and carers from diagnosis and treatment through to aftercare, helping professionals to improve their knowledge and awareness about blood cancers and best practice treatment, while also advocating at the national level, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is working to strengthen coordination between patients, carers and professionals along the whole care pathway. By helping patients to become more engaged and empowered to make informed choices, improve treatment for blood cancers through education, LLS is working to enhance patient-centred care in a largely privatized and fragmented health services system in the United States. By providing web-based resources and a free national helpline, alongside a face to face local support network, LLS is helping patients to learn more about their condition, treatment choices and the care pathways they can access. Free professional development and education seminars are also offered to nurses, oncologists and social workers in hospitals, highlighting new approaches to treatment and care with a patient-centred approach.

  18. The World Informatics Scene: ICSU, International Unions and Associations, Professional Society Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P.; Barton, C.

    2009-04-01

    Now that the Electronic Geophysical Year (2007-2008) has concluded, a substantial number of new coordination efforts under the heading of informatics have emerged. These efforts range from divisions/ sections in societies such as the Geological Society of America, the American Geophysical Union and the European Geosciences Union devoted to all aspects of informatics. In each case there has been a strong community response at their regular meetings. These society efforts are closer to the working scientists, technologists and data producers, and managers. At the same time, in a recognition for the need of a sustained activity such as eGY, the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) has formed a Union Commission for Data and Information and the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) approved a Task Group on eGY Earth and Space Science Data Interoperability. The International Council of Science's (ICSU) Strategic Committee on Information and Data (SCID) implementation report was approved by the ICSU general assembly in October 2008. ICSU's priority area assessment strategy for ICSU to play a leadership role in the coordination of data and information efforts world-wide. This report is being implemented and influences entities such as CODATA, and forms a new World Data System. This presentation will give details on the abovementioned activities and indicate an emerging synergy for Informatics across many discipline and the advancement of science and societal goals.

  19. A Retrospective Examination of Two Professional Society-Sponsored Fellowships for Predoctoral Microbiology Students.

    PubMed

    Chang, Amy L

    2016-05-01

    At the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), fellowships are a key means of providing immersive research opportunities for the student sector. To assess the impact of ASM student activities and inform their planning, the Society commissioned a study of two long-standing initiatives in 2015, namely the ASM Undergraduate Research Fellowship (URF), established in 1993, and the ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship (Watkins) Program, established in 1980. A mixed-methods approach was used to collect data about the participants' fellowship experience, track educational and employment status, and determine program impacts from 325 individuals (223 URF and 73 Watkins fellows). Challenges presented by the study include the fact that inherent in fellowships is the provision of financial support that affords participants opportunities that might otherwise be unavailable to them. As a result, participant feelings of indebtedness to the Society may have introduced biased study responses. In addition, some respondents were asked to reflect on experiences from 20 to 30 years ago-a lapse in time that may have challenged their memories. Based on measures such as enrollment in or completion of advanced degree programs, employment in science, and publication and presentation history, project participants show evidence of accomplishment. Participants also reported gains in affective behaviors such as confidence and belonging.

  20. A Retrospective Examination of Two Professional Society-Sponsored Fellowships for Predoctoral Microbiology Students.

    PubMed

    Chang, Amy L

    2016-05-01

    At the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), fellowships are a key means of providing immersive research opportunities for the student sector. To assess the impact of ASM student activities and inform their planning, the Society commissioned a study of two long-standing initiatives in 2015, namely the ASM Undergraduate Research Fellowship (URF), established in 1993, and the ASM Robert D. Watkins Graduate Research Fellowship (Watkins) Program, established in 1980. A mixed-methods approach was used to collect data about the participants' fellowship experience, track educational and employment status, and determine program impacts from 325 individuals (223 URF and 73 Watkins fellows). Challenges presented by the study include the fact that inherent in fellowships is the provision of financial support that affords participants opportunities that might otherwise be unavailable to them. As a result, participant feelings of indebtedness to the Society may have introduced biased study responses. In addition, some respondents were asked to reflect on experiences from 20 to 30 years ago-a lapse in time that may have challenged their memories. Based on measures such as enrollment in or completion of advanced degree programs, employment in science, and publication and presentation history, project participants show evidence of accomplishment. Participants also reported gains in affective behaviors such as confidence and belonging. PMID:27158299

  1. The World Informatics Scene: ICSU, International Unions and Associations, Professional Society Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Peter

    In the lead up to, and during, the Electronic Geophysical Year (2007-2008), a substantial number of new coordinated efforts under the heading of informatics (defined as: ) have emerged. These efforts range from the formation of divisions/ sections in societies such as the Geological Society of America, the American Geophysical Union and the European Geosciences Union devoted to all aspects of informatics and have seen strong community response at their regular meetings. These society efforts are closer to the working scientists, technologists and data producers, and managers. At the same time, in a recognition for the need of a sustained activity such as eGY, two ad-hoc committees produced proposals for a) the formation of a Union Commission for Data and Information within the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) and b) the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) approved a Working Group on XX, with the intent that it will become a Task Group after the 2008 CODATA general assembly. The International Council of Science's (ICSU) Strategic Committee on Information and Data (SCID) will deliver its report on implementation ICSU's priority area assessment strategy for ICSU to play a leadership role in the coordination of data and information efforts world-wide. This report will influence entities such as CODATA, the World Data Centres, the Federation of Astrophysical and Geophysical Data Services (FAGS) and, most likely, all ICSU Unions. This presentation will give details on the abovementioned activities and indicate an emerging synergy for Informatics across many discipline and the advancement of science and societal goals. The presentation will also include suggestions for the COSPAR community to engage in on-going activities.

  2. On the role of professional societies in optics and photonics education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantel, Marc; Robinson, Kathleen

    2012-10-01

    Professional associations can play an important role in the optics and photonics education landscape, enhancing the work done at traditional institutions like colleges and universities. In what way can they best contribute? Should they concentrate on school-children, on working scientists/engineers, or on undergraduate and graduate students? How does one measure the success of their programs? We will present an overview of some programs available, with an eye on their place in the continuum of optics and photonics education and training; we will place a particular emphasis on the need to measure the impact and outcomes of these learning tools, and will drill down on SPIE's case.

  3. Professional relationships in dangerous times: C. G. Jung and the Society for Psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Ann C

    2012-02-01

    Relying in part on previously unpublished documents of the 1930s, this paper(1) describes the origins and mission of the General Medical Society for Psychotherapy, both as it existed before Hitler's rise to power and as it was transformed afterward. Jung accepted the Society's presidency in 1933-34, on condition that it be restructured as an international, politically neutral organization, free from the laws of Gleichschaltung (Nazi conformity). The paper also contains a close study of Jung's collaboration with one interesting German colleague, Walter Cimbal. Cimbal, a neurologist, was briefly a member of the Nazi Party and, judging from his early letters to Jung, a Hitler enthusiast. Yet he also seems to have tried, together with Jung, to alleviate the difficulties of German Jewish colleagues whose lives were disrupted by the Hitler revolution. The paper includes translated passages from Cimbal's previously unpublished letters from 1933-36 and the post-war years. It also includes a first-person account by Wladimir Rosenbaum, the Zurich lawyer who assisted Jung in 1934, when Jung tried to mitigate the impact of anti-Jewish laws on his German Jewish colleagues. In the primary materials of this period one discovers more evidence of moral shadow-and also less-than is sometimes assumed. PMID:22288543

  4. History of research centers and professional hypnosis societies in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hilgard, E R

    1993-07-01

    The brief history of hypnosis in America begins with William James's chapter in his Principles of Psychology that got hypnosis off to a good start as a legitimate part of psychology. In the 20th century, before World War II, the idea of performing scientific investigations of hypnosis took place at Harvard University through William McDougall, at the University of Wisconsin and Yale University under Clark Hull, and, in its clinical aspects particularly, through the personal efforts of Milton H. Erickson. The resurgence after World War II is related to the use of hypnosis with war casualties during the war and with the development of clinical psychology. The aspects of the history emphasized here are the founding of continuing institutes and research centers, some theoretical cleavages that have persisted to this day, and the establishment of hypnosis societies with their journals, annual meetings, and workshops, including an International Society of Hypnosis. The history of Division 30 within the American Psychological Association brings the story up to date.

  5. For society, state and self: juggling the logics of professionalism in general practice appraisal.

    PubMed

    Entwistle, Tom; Matthews, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Sociologists repeatedly appeal to notions of altruism, bureaucratisation and self interest in their efforts to explain the changing place of the professions in contemporary society. We treat these three readings as institutional logics that are key to understanding the way in which doctors respond to the appraisal system at the heart of the UK's approach to revalidation. Our analysis of a survey of 998 general practitioners (GPs) working in Wales finds an altruistic commitment to learning and improvement, bureaucratic demands for reporting information and self-regarding resentment of changes in the occupational package provided by general practice. But the data also demonstrate that the maintenance of the appraisal regime is dependent on the preparedness and capacity of individual GPs to do micro-level institutional work on all fronts.

  6. Using resources of public health centers for education and professional societies to incorporate homeland security topics into public teacher continuing education.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Margaret E

    2003-08-01

    The Department of Education, the Association of Schools of Public Health, and national professional societies dedicated to teaching and dissemination of information for health and education in the public sector can form a clearinghouse on information and manpower on Homeland Security by affiliation with Centers for Public Health Preparedness (CPHP). The state licensed or regional societies can contribute further information and guidelines. In the HPS the Science Teacher Workshop (STW) and Public Education (PEC) Committees can assist a CPHP on radiation issues.

  7. Educational background and professional participation by federal wildlife biologists: Implications for science, management, and The Wildlife Society

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmutz, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Over 2,000 people are employed in wildlife biology in the United States federal government. The size of this constituency motivated me to examine the amount of formal education federal biologists have received and the extent of continuing education they undertake by reading journals or attending scientific meetings. Most federal biologists who are members of The Wildlife Society (TWS) have a graduate degree. However, one-third have only a Bachelor of Science degree, despite the current trend toward hiring people with graduate degrees. Most federal biologists are not research biologists. Numbers of journals subscribed to was positively related to educational level. Less than one-third of all wildlife biologists employed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service are members of TWS or subscribe to any of its journals. In contrast, the majority of presenters at the TWS 2000 Annual Conference were research biologists and members of TWS. The failure of many federal wildlife biologists to read scientific literature or attend professional meetings indicates a failure to promote the importance of continuing education in the federal workplace. I identify 2 potential adverse impacts of this failing: an inability to recognize important and relevant scientific contributions and an ineffectiveness in carrying out adaptive management.

  8. Activism: working to reduce maternal mortality through civil society and health professional alliances in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sunanda; Madzimbamuto, Farai; Fonn, Sharon

    2012-06-01

    Partnerships between civil society groups campaigning for reproductive and human rights, health professionals and others could contribute more to the strengthening of health systems needed to bring about declines in maternal deaths in Africa. The success of the HIV treatment literacy model developed by the Treatment Action Campaign in South Africa provides useful lessons for activism on maternal mortality, especially the combination of a right-to-health approach with learning and capacity building, community networking, popular mobilisation and legal action. This paper provides examples of these from South Africa, Botswana, Kenya and Uganda. Confidential enquiries into maternal deaths can be powerful instruments for change if pressure to act on their recommendations is brought to bear. Shadow reports presented during UN human rights country assessments can be used in a similar way. Public protests and demonstrations over avoidable deaths have succeeded in drawing attention to under-resourced services, shortages of supplies, including blood for transfusion, poor morale among staff, and lack of training and supervision. Activists could play a bigger role in holding health services, governments, and policy-makers accountable for poor maternity services, developing user-friendly information materials for women and their families, and motivating appropriate human resources strategies. Training and support for patients' groups, in how to use health facility complaints procedures is also a valuable strategy. PMID:22789081

  9. Activism: working to reduce maternal mortality through civil society and health professional alliances in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sunanda; Madzimbamuto, Farai; Fonn, Sharon

    2012-06-01

    Partnerships between civil society groups campaigning for reproductive and human rights, health professionals and others could contribute more to the strengthening of health systems needed to bring about declines in maternal deaths in Africa. The success of the HIV treatment literacy model developed by the Treatment Action Campaign in South Africa provides useful lessons for activism on maternal mortality, especially the combination of a right-to-health approach with learning and capacity building, community networking, popular mobilisation and legal action. This paper provides examples of these from South Africa, Botswana, Kenya and Uganda. Confidential enquiries into maternal deaths can be powerful instruments for change if pressure to act on their recommendations is brought to bear. Shadow reports presented during UN human rights country assessments can be used in a similar way. Public protests and demonstrations over avoidable deaths have succeeded in drawing attention to under-resourced services, shortages of supplies, including blood for transfusion, poor morale among staff, and lack of training and supervision. Activists could play a bigger role in holding health services, governments, and policy-makers accountable for poor maternity services, developing user-friendly information materials for women and their families, and motivating appropriate human resources strategies. Training and support for patients' groups, in how to use health facility complaints procedures is also a valuable strategy.

  10. Community Engagement as Catalyst for Professional Learning, Reflection, and Agency in Preservice-Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klehr, Mary

    2015-01-01

    I am a public elementary teacher currently serving as a school-based supervisor for a Professional Development School (PDS) undergraduate elementary-teacher-education program in Madison, Wisconsin, where our charge is to leverage the intersecting contexts of school, university, and community to prepare skilled and caring teachers for urban…

  11. A Situated Account of Teacher Agency and Learning: Critical Reflections on Professional Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riveros, Augusto; Newton, Paul; Burgess, David

    2012-01-01

    We propose a practice-based focus for professional learning communities in schools. We start with a brief historical review of the approaches that have deemed peer collaboration as crucial for school improvement and explore how teachers' practices have been characterised in past reform initiatives. Second, we highlight the importance of "teacher…

  12. The Informal Curriculum: A Case Study on Tutor Reflexivity, Corporate Agency and Medical Professionalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Professionalism is a focus for student learning in many disciplines. It is known, furthermore, that interpersonal interactions between staff and students constitute an informal curriculum that has a significant influence on students. But the origins of this informal curriculum are not fully apparent. This article offers a multiple case study that…

  13. [Museum, library, and archives of the German Society of Urology as a corporate museum : A neglected, sizeable dimension of scientific collections owened by professional societies].

    PubMed

    Moll, F H; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2016-05-01

    Corporate museums make important contributions to science history and daily life. They are an essential part of the historical marketing of organizations, including scientific associations. The museum for the history of urology organized and housed by the German Society of Urology (DGU) can be compared to a corporate museum, because the institution serves two purposes: it represents the society to a wider public and it helps to reconstruct and analyze the history of urology and the history of the society. In a close collaboration with medical historians from all over the world the museum serves as a research institution for the history of urology. The institution is founded at the frontier between a commercial corporate museum similar to that of international companies and a classical scientific museum. The paper describes these aspects of the museum and discusses the inherent value of a museum for a scientific association.

  14. [Museum, library, and archives of the German Society of Urology as a corporate museum : A neglected, sizeable dimension of scientific collections owened by professional societies].

    PubMed

    Moll, F H; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2016-05-01

    Corporate museums make important contributions to science history and daily life. They are an essential part of the historical marketing of organizations, including scientific associations. The museum for the history of urology organized and housed by the German Society of Urology (DGU) can be compared to a corporate museum, because the institution serves two purposes: it represents the society to a wider public and it helps to reconstruct and analyze the history of urology and the history of the society. In a close collaboration with medical historians from all over the world the museum serves as a research institution for the history of urology. The institution is founded at the frontier between a commercial corporate museum similar to that of international companies and a classical scientific museum. The paper describes these aspects of the museum and discusses the inherent value of a museum for a scientific association. PMID:27138631

  15. Community matrons: inter-professional and inter-agency working (part five).

    PubMed

    Masterson, Abigail

    2007-10-01

    This is the penultimate article developed from a series of masterclasses organised and funded by the Department of Health for community matrons during summer 2006. The articles synthesise the masterclass content in order to describe the areas of practice that are common to the community matron role and which have to be practiced with high levels of knowledge and skill if community matrons are to deliver the expected benefits to patients and to the NHS. It uses a case study to explore the fundamental concepts of accountability, teamwork; knowing the system; assertiveness; advocacy and empowerment which community matrons identified consistently as being significant in ensuring successful interprofessional and inter-agency working.

  16. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement-Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health-care Professionals: A Call for Action.

    PubMed

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health-care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health-care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health-care professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health-care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health-care professionals and for patients. PMID:27396776

  17. The current and future role of the medical oncologist in the professional care for cancer patients: a position paper by the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).

    PubMed

    Popescu, R A; Schäfer, R; Califano, R; Eckert, R; Coleman, R; Douillard, J-Y; Cervantes, A; Casali, P G; Sessa, C; Van Cutsem, E; de Vries, E; Pavlidis, N; Fumasoli, K; Wörmann, B; Samonigg, H; Cascinu, S; Cruz Hernández, J J; Howard, A J; Ciardiello, F; Stahel, R A; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    The number of cancer patients in Europe is rising and significant advances in basic and applied cancer research are making the provision of optimal care more challenging. The concept of cancer as a systemic, highly heterogeneous and complex disease has increased the awareness that quality cancer care should be provided by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of highly qualified healthcare professionals. Cancer patients also have the right to benefit from medical progress by receiving optimal treatment from adequately trained and highly skilled medical professionals. Built on the highest standards of professional training and continuing medical education, medical oncology is recognised as an independent medical specialty in many European countries. Medical oncology is a core member of the MDT and offers cancer patients a comprehensive and systemic approach to treatment and care, while ensuring evidence-based, safe and cost-effective use of cancer drugs and preserving the quality of life of cancer patients through the entire 'cancer journey'. Medical oncologists are also engaged in clinical and translational research to promote innovation and new therapies and they contribute to cancer diagnosis, prevention and research, making a difference for patients in a dynamic, stimulating professional environment. Medical oncologists play an important role in shaping the future of healthcare through innovation and are also actively involved at the political level to ensure a maximum contribution of the profession to Society and to tackle future challenges. This position paper summarises the multifarious and vital contributions of medical oncology and medical oncologists to today's and tomorrow's professional cancer care.

  18. A program of professional accreditation of hospital wards by the Italian Society of Internal Medicine (SIMI): self- versus peer-evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, Massimo; Traisci, Giancarlo; Franchini, Alberto; Benetti, Gianpiero; Serra, Pietro; Monti, Maria Alice

    2012-02-01

    The Italian Society of Internal Medicine has developed a voluntary program of professional accreditation of the medical units run by its constituency. Participation in the program, which is meant to foster staff involvement in clinical governance, includes all the medical personnel and nurses. Accreditation is awarded provided the candidate unit is able to adhere to a pre-established set of quality standards, meet a number of clinical and organizational requirements and monitor specific indicators. Self-evaluation is the first step in the program, followed by a site visit by a team of peer internists experienced in quality auditing. The program, which has involved so far 19 units, has considered a number of clinical requirements related to the three most frequent diseases in Italian internal medicine wards: chronic heart failure (CHF), exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and hepatic cirrhosis with ascites (HCA). The comparison between self- and peer-evaluation witnessed less discrepancies for disease-related than for organizational requirements, the latter being met to a smaller degree by most units. In particular, concordance was higher for requirements and indicators pertaining to CHF and HCA than to COPD. This program of professional accreditation developed by the Italian Society of Internal Medicine has the potential to describe, monitor and improve clinical and organizational performances in internal medicine. It should also be seen as a contribution to implement the strategy of professional governance in hospitals.

  19. Review for the Korean Health Professionals and International Cooperation Doctors Dispatched to Peru by the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA).

    PubMed

    Kim, Bongyoung

    2015-04-01

    South Korea dispatches Korean nationals to partner developing countries as an Official Development Assistance (ODA) project through the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA). In the health sector, KOICA dispatches international cooperation doctors (ICDs), nurses, physical therapists, radiologic technologists, nutritionists, medical laboratory technologists, occupational therapists, and dental hygienists. A total of 216 ICDs were dispatched over 19 times from 1995 until 2013. There were 19 areas of specialties among the ICDs. The most common specialty was internal medicine (61/216, 28.2%), the second most common specialty was general surgery (43/216, 19.9%), followed by oriental medicine (27/216, 12.5%), pediatrics (17/216, 7.9%), orthopedics (16/216, 7.4%), family medicine (16/216, 7.4%), and odontology (14/216, 6.5%). The ICDs have worked in 21 countries. KOICA dispatched the highest number of ICDs to Asia (97/216, 44.9%), followed by Africa (50/216, 23.1%), Latin America (34/216, 15.7%), the commonwealth of independent states (31/216, 14.4%), and Oceania (4/216, 1.9%). Nobody was dispatched to the Middle East. A total of 134 KOICA health professionals were dispatched to Peru from 1996 until October 1, 2014. Of these, 19.4% (26/134) were ICDs, 44.8% (60/216) were nurses, 20.1% (27/134) were physical therapists, 6.7% (9/134) were radiologic technologists, 2.2% (3/134) were nutritionists, and 6.7% (9/134) were medical laboratory. ICDs' specialties comprised internal medicine (13/26, 50%), family medicine (8/26, 30.8%), pediatrics (2/26, 7.7%), otorhinolaryngology (1/26, 3.8%), orthopedics (1/26, 3.8%), and oriental medicine (1/26, 3.8%). Most of the dispatched health professionals worked at institutions that were supported by KOICA. For this reason, the proportion of health professionals who worked at public health centers (PHCs) was the highest (58.2%, 78/134) when classified by workplace type. Other KOICA health professionals worked at hospitals

  20. Review for the Korean Health Professionals and International Cooperation Doctors Dispatched to Peru by the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA).

    PubMed

    Kim, Bongyoung

    2015-04-01

    South Korea dispatches Korean nationals to partner developing countries as an Official Development Assistance (ODA) project through the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA). In the health sector, KOICA dispatches international cooperation doctors (ICDs), nurses, physical therapists, radiologic technologists, nutritionists, medical laboratory technologists, occupational therapists, and dental hygienists. A total of 216 ICDs were dispatched over 19 times from 1995 until 2013. There were 19 areas of specialties among the ICDs. The most common specialty was internal medicine (61/216, 28.2%), the second most common specialty was general surgery (43/216, 19.9%), followed by oriental medicine (27/216, 12.5%), pediatrics (17/216, 7.9%), orthopedics (16/216, 7.4%), family medicine (16/216, 7.4%), and odontology (14/216, 6.5%). The ICDs have worked in 21 countries. KOICA dispatched the highest number of ICDs to Asia (97/216, 44.9%), followed by Africa (50/216, 23.1%), Latin America (34/216, 15.7%), the commonwealth of independent states (31/216, 14.4%), and Oceania (4/216, 1.9%). Nobody was dispatched to the Middle East. A total of 134 KOICA health professionals were dispatched to Peru from 1996 until October 1, 2014. Of these, 19.4% (26/134) were ICDs, 44.8% (60/216) were nurses, 20.1% (27/134) were physical therapists, 6.7% (9/134) were radiologic technologists, 2.2% (3/134) were nutritionists, and 6.7% (9/134) were medical laboratory. ICDs' specialties comprised internal medicine (13/26, 50%), family medicine (8/26, 30.8%), pediatrics (2/26, 7.7%), otorhinolaryngology (1/26, 3.8%), orthopedics (1/26, 3.8%), and oriental medicine (1/26, 3.8%). Most of the dispatched health professionals worked at institutions that were supported by KOICA. For this reason, the proportion of health professionals who worked at public health centers (PHCs) was the highest (58.2%, 78/134) when classified by workplace type. Other KOICA health professionals worked at hospitals

  1. Entrustable professional activities and curricular milestones for fellowship training in pulmonary and critical care medicine: executive summary from the Multi-Society Working Group.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Henry E; Addrizzo-Harris, Doreen; Beck, James M; Buckley, John D; Pastores, Stephen M; Piquette, Craig A; Rowley, James A; Spevetz, Antoinette

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of graduate medical trainee progress via the accomplishment of competency milestones is an important element of the Next Accreditation System of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. This article summarizes the findings of a multisociety working group that was tasked with creating the entrustable professional activities and curricular milestones for fellowship training in pulmonary medicine, critical care medicine, and combined programs. Using the Delphi process, experienced medical educators from the American College of Chest Physicians, American Thoracic Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine, and Association of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Program Directors reached consensus on the detailed curricular content and expected skill set of graduates of these programs. These are now available to trainees and program directors for the purposes of curriculum design, review, and trainee assessment. PMID:25226119

  2. The Emergence of Cambodian Civil Society within Global Educational Governance: A Morphogenetic Approach to Agency and Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, D. Brent, Jr.; Brehm, William C.

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses Margaret Archer's morphogenetic approach to analyze the emergence of civil society within global educational governance. The purpose is to understand the intersection of historical structures with global actors and spaces that have accompanied the globalization of education. Based on findings from a study on the impact in…

  3. The Influence of Lived Experience with Addiction and Recovery on Practice-Related Decisions among Professionals Working in Addiction Agencies Serving Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotna, Gabriela; Dobbins, Maureen; Jack, Susan M.; Sword, Wendy; Niccols, Alison; Brooks, Sandy; Henderson, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The study objectives were to: (1) understand the value attributed to the lived experience of addiction and recovery among professionals working in addiction agencies serving women in Canada and (2) describe how lived experience influence practice-related decision-making. Methods: A descriptive qualitative study was conducted with a…

  4. Educational Preparation for Learning Disability Nursing: Outcomes Evaluation of the Contribution of Learning Disability Nurses within the Multi-Professional, Multi-Agency Team. Research Highlights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English National Board for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting, London.

    A research project examined the current roles of learning disability nurses within multi-professional and multi-agency teams in a range of care settings in the United Kingdom (UK). It also studied the effectiveness of current educational provision for this branch of nursing, in terms of current roles and activities, and the perceived needs of…

  5. The role of the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency and healthcare professionals in post-marketing safety.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Meguru; Horiuchi, Naoya; Tamura, Atsushi; Kutsumi, Hiromu

    2014-04-01

    The development of drugs and medical devices is necessary for medical progress; however, safety measures need to be put in place to protect the health of the population. In order to ensure the safety of drugs and medical devices, it is important to determine measures for appropriate management of risks at any time during the development phase, the regulatory review and the post-marketing phase. Adverse events detected in clinical trials are limited due to the restricted numbers of patients enrolled in the trials. Therefore, it is almost impossible to predict rare serious adverse events during the post-marketing phase. The revised Pharmaceutical Affairs Act was established in Japan in November 20, 2013. The new act focuses on increased safety of drugs and medical devices. The Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) is the regulatory authority in Japan that promotes safety measures from the development phase through to the post-marketing phase. In the post-marketing phase, the PMDA collects information from the medical product companies and healthcare professionals, as well as instructing and advising them with regard to post-marketing safety measures for each drug and medical device. Since Japan has a national health insurance system, a new drug or a medical device is available throughout the country when the drug price or medical fee is listed in the National Health Insurance price list. Healthcare professionals in medical institutions must learn about the drugs and medical devices they handle, and should make an effort to maintain patient safety. The PMDA medi-navi is a very useful electronic mail delivery service that provides critical information for protecting patients from health hazards caused by adverse events. The 'risk management plan' is also important as it contains important information about safety profile and post-marketing measures of a new drug. PMID:26183623

  6. The role of the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency and healthcare professionals in post-marketing safety.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Meguru; Horiuchi, Naoya; Tamura, Atsushi; Kutsumi, Hiromu

    2014-04-01

    The development of drugs and medical devices is necessary for medical progress; however, safety measures need to be put in place to protect the health of the population. In order to ensure the safety of drugs and medical devices, it is important to determine measures for appropriate management of risks at any time during the development phase, the regulatory review and the post-marketing phase. Adverse events detected in clinical trials are limited due to the restricted numbers of patients enrolled in the trials. Therefore, it is almost impossible to predict rare serious adverse events during the post-marketing phase. The revised Pharmaceutical Affairs Act was established in Japan in November 20, 2013. The new act focuses on increased safety of drugs and medical devices. The Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) is the regulatory authority in Japan that promotes safety measures from the development phase through to the post-marketing phase. In the post-marketing phase, the PMDA collects information from the medical product companies and healthcare professionals, as well as instructing and advising them with regard to post-marketing safety measures for each drug and medical device. Since Japan has a national health insurance system, a new drug or a medical device is available throughout the country when the drug price or medical fee is listed in the National Health Insurance price list. Healthcare professionals in medical institutions must learn about the drugs and medical devices they handle, and should make an effort to maintain patient safety. The PMDA medi-navi is a very useful electronic mail delivery service that provides critical information for protecting patients from health hazards caused by adverse events. The 'risk management plan' is also important as it contains important information about safety profile and post-marketing measures of a new drug.

  7. Making Room at the Inn: Implications of "Christian Legal Society v. Martinez" for Public College and University Housing Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Michael D.; Russo, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    The supreme court's ruling in "Christian Legal Society v. Martinez", its most important case to date on student associational activities, upheld a policy at a public law school in California that required recognized student organizations (or clubs) to admit "all-comers" even if they disagreed with organizational goals and…

  8. Social-Strata-Related Cardiovascular Health Disparity and Comorbidity in an Aging Society: Implications for Professional Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ai, Amy L.; Carrigan, Lynn T.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is on the rise in the aging population of the United States. Heart disease is the leading cause of death, hospital bed use, and social security disability. Enhancing knowledge about CVD may improve social work's professional role in the health care system. This article focuses on a pressing CVD-related issue that needs…

  9. Conflict of interest between professional medical societies and industry: a cross-sectional study of Italian medical societies’ websites

    PubMed Central

    Fabbri, Alice; Gregoraci, Giorgia; Tedesco, Dario; Ferretti, Filippo; Gilardi, Francesco; Iemmi, Diego; Lisi, Cosima; Lorusso, Angelo; Natali, Francesca; Shahi, Edit; Rinaldi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe how Italian medical societies interact with pharmaceutical and medical device industries through an analysis of the information available on their websites. Design Cross sectional study. Setting Italy. Participants 154 medical societies registered with the Italian Federation of Medical-Scientific Societies. Main outcome measures Indicators of industry sponsorship (presence of industry sponsorship in the programme of the last medical societies’ annual conference; presence of manufacturers’ logos on the homepage; presence of industry sponsorship of satellite symposia during the last annual conference). Results 131 Italian medical societies were considered. Of these, 4.6% had an ethical code covering relationships with industry on their websites, while 45.6% had a statute that mentioned the issue of conflict of interest and 6.1% published the annual financial report. With regard to industry sponsorship, 64.9% received private sponsorship for their last conference, 29.0% had manufacturers’ logos on their webpage, while 35.9% had industry-sponsored satellite symposia at their last conference. The presence of an ethical code on the societies’ websites was associated with both an increased risk of industry sponsorship of the last conference (relative risk (RR) 1.22, 95% CIs 1.01 to 1.48 after adjustment) and of conferences and/or satellite symposia (RR 1.22, 95% CIs 1.02 to 1.48 after adjustment) but not with the presence of manufacturers’ logos on the websites (RR 1.79, 95% CIs 0.66 to 4.82 after adjustment). No association was observed with the other indicators of governance and transparency. Conclusions This survey shows that industry sponsorship of Italian medical societies’ conferences is common, while the presence of a structured regulatory system is not. Disclosure of the amount of industry funding to medical societies is scarce. The level of transparency therefore needs to be improved and the whole relationship between medical

  10. Hurricanes: Science and Society - An Online Resource Collaboratively Developed By Scientists, Education and Outreach Professionals, and Educators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowcroft, G.; Ginis, I.; Knowlton, C. W.; Yablonsky, R. M.; Morin, H.

    2010-12-01

    There are many models for engaging scientists in education and outreach activities that can assist them in achieving broader impacts of their research. Successful models provide the participating scientists with an opportunity to contribute their expertise in such a way that there are long lasting effects and/or useful products from their engagement. These kinds of experiences encourage the scientific community to continue participating in education and outreach activities. Hurricanes: Science and Society is an education and outreach program funded by the National Science Foundation that has successfully assisted scientists in broadening the impacts of their work. It has produced a new online educational resource (the Hurricanes: Science and Society website) that was launched in October 2010. This multi-disciplinary tool has been developed with the guidance and input from a panel of leading U.S. hurricane researchers and the participation of U.S. formal and informal science educators. This educational resource is expected to become a classroom tool for those both teaching and learning hurricane science. It contains information tailored for specific audiences including middle school through undergraduate educators and students, the general public, and the media. In addition to the website, a 12-page publication for policymakers and other stakeholders has been produced along with an accompanying CD-ROM/DVD to assist formal and informal science educators in maximizing the use of this new resource. Hurricanes: Science and Society can play a substantial role in the effort to educate both students and adults about the science and impacts of hurricanes and the importance of pre-hurricane planning and mitigation. The model used for engaging the hurricane scientists in this education and outreach effort and in the production of the Hurricanes: Science and Society educational resources will be discussed. Screen shot from http://www.hurricanescience.org

  11. The Power of Teacher Agency: Why We Must Transform Professional Learning So That It Really Supports Educator Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    The education industry has produced volumes of research describing what professional learning should look like, and, for the most part, researchers agree about many of the critical components. In 2011, Learning Forward updated--and most states since have adopted--Standards for Professional Learning that align with this research. The standards call…

  12. Mid-Career Teachers' Perceptions of Self-Guided Professional Growth: Strengthening a Sense of Agency through Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strahan, David

    2016-01-01

    Opportunities for self-guided professional development provided a context for exploring ways that mid-career teachers designed learning projects and articulated their perceptions of professional growth. In their applications for small grants for materials and released time, participants identified their own personal goals for improving…

  13. Building Common Knowledge at the Boundaries between Professional Practices: Relational Agency and Relational Expertise in Systems of Distributed Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The article develops an earlier account of relational agency ("IJER" 2005). Its starting point is a view of practices as knowledge-laden and emotionally freighted sites of purposeful and expert activity. Arguments therefore draw on cultural historical analyses of activities, practices and the institutions that shape them. Relational agency in…

  14. An Enquiry into the Professional Competence of Inclusive Education Teachers in Beijing: Attitudes, Knowledge, Skills, and Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mu, Guanglun Michael; Wang, Yan; Wang, Zhiqiang; Feng, Yajing; Deng, Meng; Liang, Songmei

    2015-01-01

    Attitudes, knowledge, and skills are widely recognised as the three pillars of professional competence of inclusive education teachers. Studies emerging from the Chinese context consider these three pillars important for the practice of Learning in Regular Classrooms--an idiosyncratic Chinese form of inclusive education. Our mixed methods study…

  15. Practices and Institutional Effects of Function-Implementation by the Professional Staff of Statewide Coordinating Agencies for Public Junior Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuckman, Jeffrey Alan

    The implementation of selected coordinating functions by the professional staffs of state Junior College Boards in Florida and Illinois, and effects of the implementation practices on individual community-junior college integrity were investigated in this study. A survey of the literature revealed the generally recognized functions for which state…

  16. Giving Our Students Professional Voice: Development and Implementation of a BSW Course on Writing for Agency Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Jeanne L.; Schuster, Elizabeth O.; Fuller, Alison R.

    2016-01-01

    In social work practice, writing is a tool for advocacy, communication with clients, and other professionals, and accountability. In virtually all practice settings, workers at every organizational level invest significant time and effort in writing. However, the social work education literature reveals little attention to teaching BSW students to…

  17. Shared Agency and Collaboration between the Family and Professionals in Medical Rehabilitation of Children with Severe Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvikoski, Aila; Martin, Marjatta; Autti-Ramo, Ilona; Harkapaa, Kristiina

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of medical rehabilitation for children with severe disabilities, arranged by the Social Insurance Institution of Finland, is based on collaboration of the family with several professionals and organizations providing the necessary services. Therefore, it sets special challenges for service provision. Parents' experiences of…

  18. Relational Agency and Teacher Development: A CHAT Analysis of a Collaborative Professional Inquiry Project with Biology Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNicholl, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Teacher quality largely determines student outcomes and many argue for high quality teacher training and professional development (PD). Much PD has been heavily critiqued and what constitutes effective provision for teachers remains contested. Disenfranchisement of teachers, through neglect of prior expertise and failure to acknowledge teachers'…

  19. Government control over health-related not-for-profit organisations: Agency for International Development v. Alliance for Open Society International Inc 570 US_(2013).

    PubMed

    Vines, Tim; Donohoo, Angus M; Faunce, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between government and the not-for-profit (NFP) sector has important implications for society, especially in relation to the delivery of public health measures and the protection of the environment. In key health-related areas such as provision of medical services, welfare, foreign aid and education, governments have traditionally preferred for the NFP sector to act as service partners, with the relationship mediated through grants or funding agreements. This service delivery arrangement is intended to provide a diversity of voices, and encourage volunteerism and altruism, in conjunction with the purposes and objectives of the relevant NGO. Under the pretence of "accountability", however, governments increasingly are seeking to impose intrusive conditions on grantees, which limit their ability to fulfil their mission and advocate on behalf of their constituents. This column examines the United States Supreme Court decision, Agency for International Development v Alliance for Open Society International Inc 570 US_(2013), and compares it to the removal of gag clauses in Australian federal funding rules. Recent national changes to the health-related NFP sector in Australia are then discussed, such as those found in the Charities Act 2013 (Cth) and the Not-for-Profit Sector Freedom to Advocate Act 2013 (Cth). These respectively include the establishment of the Australian Charities and Not-For-Profit Commission, the modernising of the definition of "charity" and statutory blocks on "gag" clauses. This analysis concludes with a survey of recent moves by Australian States to impose new restrictions on the ability of health-related NFPs to lobby against harmful government policy Among the responses considered is the protection afforded by s 51l(xxiiiA) of the Australian Constitution. This constitutional guarantee appears to have been focused historically on preventing medical and dental practitioners and related small businesses being practically coerced

  20. Government control over health-related not-for-profit organisations: Agency for International Development v. Alliance for Open Society International Inc 570 US_(2013).

    PubMed

    Vines, Tim; Donohoo, Angus M; Faunce, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between government and the not-for-profit (NFP) sector has important implications for society, especially in relation to the delivery of public health measures and the protection of the environment. In key health-related areas such as provision of medical services, welfare, foreign aid and education, governments have traditionally preferred for the NFP sector to act as service partners, with the relationship mediated through grants or funding agreements. This service delivery arrangement is intended to provide a diversity of voices, and encourage volunteerism and altruism, in conjunction with the purposes and objectives of the relevant NGO. Under the pretence of "accountability", however, governments increasingly are seeking to impose intrusive conditions on grantees, which limit their ability to fulfil their mission and advocate on behalf of their constituents. This column examines the United States Supreme Court decision, Agency for International Development v Alliance for Open Society International Inc 570 US_(2013), and compares it to the removal of gag clauses in Australian federal funding rules. Recent national changes to the health-related NFP sector in Australia are then discussed, such as those found in the Charities Act 2013 (Cth) and the Not-for-Profit Sector Freedom to Advocate Act 2013 (Cth). These respectively include the establishment of the Australian Charities and Not-For-Profit Commission, the modernising of the definition of "charity" and statutory blocks on "gag" clauses. This analysis concludes with a survey of recent moves by Australian States to impose new restrictions on the ability of health-related NFPs to lobby against harmful government policy Among the responses considered is the protection afforded by s 51l(xxiiiA) of the Australian Constitution. This constitutional guarantee appears to have been focused historically on preventing medical and dental practitioners and related small businesses being practically coerced

  1. Implementing Transfer of Learning in Training and Professional Development in a US Public Child Welfare Agency: What Works?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, Virginia; Bosco-Ruggiero, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    In-service training in public child welfare agencies in the United States has long been viewed as an important vehicle for the improvement of job satisfaction and organizational commitment, and therefore as important to retention in child welfare. This article examines the critical role of transfer of learning strategies in such training and…

  2. The Role of Professional Journals and Societies in the Future of a Field: A Reflection on the Partnership Between the American Journal of Epidemiology and the Society for Epidemiologic Research.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Kristen A; Galea, Sandro

    2016-03-01

    On this, the 100th anniversary of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, we take the opportunity to reflect on the ties between the School, the American Journal of Epidemiology, and the Society for Epidemiologic Research. We discuss briefly the intersection of the School, the Journal, and the Society throughout their histories, with the aim of providing some insight into how the Journal and the Society have contributed to the evolution of the field. In so doing, we articulate the challenges that the Journal and the Society jointly face today, with an eye to finding opportunities in these challenges that can be helpful in coming decades. PMID:26841948

  3. The Role of Professional Journals and Societies in the Future of a Field: A Reflection on the Partnership Between the American Journal of Epidemiology and the Society for Epidemiologic Research.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Kristen A; Galea, Sandro

    2016-03-01

    On this, the 100th anniversary of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, we take the opportunity to reflect on the ties between the School, the American Journal of Epidemiology, and the Society for Epidemiologic Research. We discuss briefly the intersection of the School, the Journal, and the Society throughout their histories, with the aim of providing some insight into how the Journal and the Society have contributed to the evolution of the field. In so doing, we articulate the challenges that the Journal and the Society jointly face today, with an eye to finding opportunities in these challenges that can be helpful in coming decades.

  4. Evidence-informed decision-making by professionals working in addiction agencies serving women: a descriptive qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Effective approaches to the prevention and treatment of substance abuse among mothers have been developed but not widely implemented. Implementation studies suggest that the adoption of evidence-based practices in the field of addictions remains low. There is a need, therefore, to better understand decision making processes in addiction agencies in order to develop more effective approaches to promote the translation of knowledge gained from addictions research into clinical practice. Methods A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to explore: 1) the types and sources of evidence used to inform practice-related decisions within Canadian addiction agencies serving women; 2) how decision makers at different levels report using research evidence; and 3) factors that influence evidence-informed decision making. A purposeful sample of 26 decision-makers providing addiction treatment services to women completed in-depth qualitative interviews. Interview data were coded and analyzed using directed and summative content analysis strategies as well as constant comparison techniques. Results Across all groups, individuals reported locating and using multiple types of evidence to inform decisions. Some decision-makers rely on their experiential knowledge of addiction and recovery in decision-making. Research evidence is often used directly in decision-making at program management and senior administrative levels. Information for decision-making is accessed from a range of sources, including web-based resources and experts in the field. Individual and organizational facilitators and barriers to using research evidence in decision making were identified. Conclusions There is support at administrative levels for integrating EIDM in addiction agencies. Knowledge transfer and exchange strategies should be focussed towards program managers and administrators and include capacity building for locating, appraising and using research evidence, knowledge brokering, and

  5. Astronomy in the society and culture of Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leedjärv, Laurits

    2011-06-01

    History and present state of astronomy in a small North-Eastern European country are considered. There is a rather big number (about 35) of professional astronomers in Estonia, including 21 IAU members. Through some outstanding persons, astronomy in Estonia has significant relations with the society. The same can be said about the culture. Well-developed astronomy has contributed into the cooperation of Estonia with the European Space Agency, and thus, has an indirect effect to the country's economy.

  6. Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañedo, Luis

    2008-08-01

    In July 2007 physicians, biologists and physicists that have collaborated in previous meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society constituted the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism with the purpose of promote scientific study of the interaction of electromagnetic energy (at frequencies ranging from zero Hertz through those of visible light) and acoustic energy with biological systems. A second goal was to increase the contribution of medical and biological professionals in the meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society. The following paragraphs summarize some objectives of the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism for the next two years.

  7. Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Canedo, Luis

    2008-08-11

    In July 2007 physicians, biologists and physicists that have collaborated in previous meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society constituted the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism with the purpose of promote scientific study of the interaction of electromagnetic energy (at frequencies ranging from zero Hertz through those of visible light) and acoustic energy with biological systems. A second goal was to increase the contribution of medical and biological professionals in the meetings of the medical branch of the Mexican Physical Society. The following paragraphs summarize some objectives of the Mexican Society of Bioelectromagnetism for the next two years.

  8. [Structure of pain management facilities in Germany : Classification of medical and psychological pain treatment services-Consensus of the Joint Commission of the Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine].

    PubMed

    Müller-Schwefe, G H H; Nadstawek, J; Tölle, T; Nilges, P; Überall, M A; Laubenthal, H J; Bock, F; Arnold, B; Casser, H R; Cegla, T H; Emrich, O M D; Graf-Baumann, T; Henning, J; Horlemann, J; Kayser, H; Kletzko, H; Koppert, W; Längler, K H; Locher, H; Ludwig, J; Maurer, S; Pfingsten, M; Schäfer, M; Schenk, M; Willweber-Strumpf, A

    2016-06-01

    On behalf of the Medical/Psychological Pain Associations, Pain Patients Alliance and the Professional Association of Pain Physicians and Psychologists, the Joint Commission of Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine, working in close collaboration with the respective presidents, has developed verifiable structural and process-related criteria for the classification of medical and psychological pain treatment facilities in Germany. Based on the established system of graded care in Germany and on existing qualifications, these criteria also argue for the introduction of a basic qualification in pain medicine. In addition to the first-ever comprehensive description of psychological pain facilities, the criteria presented can be used to classify five different levels of pain facilities, from basic pain management facilities, to specialized institutions, to the Centre for Interdisciplinary Pain Medicine. The recommendations offer binding and verifiable criteria for quality assurance in pain medicine and improved pain treatment.

  9. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: revised 2014 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in nutrition support.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Susan L; Russell, Mary K; Mogensen, Kris M; Wooley, Jennifer A; Bobo, Elizabeth; Chen, Yimin; Malone, Ainsley; Roberts, Susan; Romano, Michelle M; Taylor, Beth

    2014-12-01

    This 2014 revision of the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) in Nutrition Support represents an update of the 2007 Standards composed by content experts of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The revision is based on the Revised 2012 SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP for RDs, which incorporates the Nutrition Care Process and the following six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. These SOP and SOPP are designed to promote the provision of safe, effective, and efficient nutrition support services; facilitate evidence-based practice; and serve as a professional evaluation resource for RDNs who specialize in or wish to specialize in nutrition support therapy. These standards should be applied in all patient/client care settings in which RDNs in nutrition support provide care. These settings include, but are not limited to, acute care, ambulatory/outpatient care, and home and alternate site care. The standards highlight the value of the nutrition support RDN's roles in quality management, regulatory compliance, research, teaching, consulting, and writing for peer-reviewed professional publications. The standards assist the RDN in nutrition support to distinguish his or her level of practice (competent, proficient, or expert) and would guide the RDN in creating a personal development plan to achieve increasing levels of knowledge, skill, and ability in nutrition support practice.

  10. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Nutrition Support.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Susan L; Russell, Mary K; Mogensen, Kris M; Wooley, Jennifer A; Bobo, Elizabeth; Chen, Yimin; Malone, Ainsley; Roberts, Susan; Romano, Michelle M; Taylor, Beth

    2014-12-01

    This 2014 revision of the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitians Nutritionists (RDNs) in Nutrition Support represents an update of the 2007 Standards composed by content experts of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The revision is based upon the Revised 2012 SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP for RDs, which incorporates the Nutrition Care Process and the six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. These SOP and SOPP are designed to promote the provision of safe, effective, and efficient nutrition support services, facilitate evidence-based practice, and serve as a professional evaluation resource for RDNs who specialize or wish to specialize in nutrition support therapy. These standards should be applied in all patient/client care settings in which RDNs in nutrition support provide care. These settings include, but are not limited to, acute care, ambulatory/outpatient care, and home and alternate site care. The standards highlight the value of the nutrition support RDN's roles in quality management, regulatory compliance, research, teaching, consulting, and writing for peer-reviewed professional publications. The standards assist the RDN in nutrition support to distinguish his or her level of practice (competent, proficient, or expert) and would guide the RDN in creating a personal development plan to achieve increasing levels of knowledge, skill, and ability in nutrition support practice.

  11. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Nutrition Support.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Susan L; Russell, Mary K; Mogensen, Kris M; Wooley, Jennifer A; Bobo, Elizabeth; Chen, Yimin; Malone, Ainsley; Roberts, Susan; Romano, Michelle M; Taylor, Beth

    2014-12-01

    This 2014 revision of the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitians Nutritionists (RDNs) in Nutrition Support represents an update of the 2007 Standards composed by content experts of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The revision is based upon the Revised 2012 SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP for RDs, which incorporates the Nutrition Care Process and the six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. These SOP and SOPP are designed to promote the provision of safe, effective, and efficient nutrition support services, facilitate evidence-based practice, and serve as a professional evaluation resource for RDNs who specialize or wish to specialize in nutrition support therapy. These standards should be applied in all patient/client care settings in which RDNs in nutrition support provide care. These settings include, but are not limited to, acute care, ambulatory/outpatient care, and home and alternate site care. The standards highlight the value of the nutrition support RDN's roles in quality management, regulatory compliance, research, teaching, consulting, and writing for peer-reviewed professional publications. The standards assist the RDN in nutrition support to distinguish his or her level of practice (competent, proficient, or expert) and would guide the RDN in creating a personal development plan to achieve increasing levels of knowledge, skill, and ability in nutrition support practice. PMID:25362700

  12. Environment U.S.A. A Guide to Agencies, People, and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulson, Glenn L., Ed.; And Others

    The institutionalization of environmental concern is now widespread in American society. This reference was written to help professionals and laymen locate important sources of environmental information. Among the sources covered in the book are federal and state government agencies, private environmental and conservation organizations,…

  13. Professional Environment for Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Teaching and training are at the heart of the knowledge society where the continuing professional development of teachers and trainers provides the cornerstone for the development of a high quality education and training systems. The Aim of the Study. To identify a design of professional environment for teacher professional…

  14. ISS Update: American Physical Society

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot talks with Becky Thompson, head of Public Outreach for the American Physical Society, a professional organization for physicists whose web site hosts astronaut ...

  15. Critical Appraisal of Microbiology Guidelines Endorsed by two Professional Organisations: Société Française De Microbiologie (SFM) and American Society of Microbiology (ASM)

    PubMed Central

    Fonfrède, Michèle; Couaillac, Jean Paul; Augereau, Christine; Lepargneur, Jean Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Medical practice guidelines (GLs) being tools that are mainly designed to evaluate medical professionals, it sounds logical, and fair, that professionals should in turn evaluate GLs. Microbiology being a medical discipline, we used the AGREE instrument, i.e. an established evaluation tool for GLs, in order to evaluate the quality of two major microbiology guidelines, i.e. the SFM GLs and the ASM GLs). Both guidelines remain sub-optimal in their levels of quality, and obtain scores that are not very different from the average scores obtained by many other guidelines in various medical disciplines. We therefore believe that both guidelines need to be modified before they can be recommended without provisos. A higher degree of multi-disciplinary work, including a more formal implication of methodologists, as well as of infectious disease clinicians, and of economists, might perhaps enable future editions of these guidelines to reach higher levels of quality.

  16. [Continuing medical education (CME) in neurology. Concept of the German Society of Neurology (DGN) and the Neurology Section of the Professional League of German Neurologic Medicine (BVDN)].

    PubMed

    Reuther, P; Diener, H C; Franz, P; Hacke, W; Hofmann, W; Hopf, H C; Jungmann, F; Wiethölter, H

    1999-10-01

    Continuous medical education in Neurology (CME-Neurology) has been promoted in a concept organized by both the German society of neurology, German association for occupational interests of neurologists and psychiatrists). CME-Neurology has been started in January 1999 and is closely adapted to the CME guidelines of neurology section of UEMS and EFNS. The program shall serve to the maintenance and upgrading of knowledge skills and competence of postgraduate training in neurology.

  17. [The pharmacist: health professional and citizen].

    PubMed

    Rozenfeld, Suely

    2008-04-01

    This text was presented at the V Congress on Pharmacy Care/Riopharma with the intent to approach some aspects important for discussing the role of the pharmacist as health professional and citizen capable of acting in society. To this purpose we decided to recall some of the cornerstones of the Brazilian health reform; the pressure of the industry on health professionals and regulatory agencies; the inequity in the distribution of medicaments among the different social classes. Some of the changes proposed in this paper are: to widen the role the pharmacist plays in pharmacotherapy; to prohibit drug advertising; a global and independent evaluation of the national regulatory agency; inclusion of information about medicament consumption during hospitalizations in the national databases. PMID:21936158

  18. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: revised 2014 standards of practice and standards of professional performance for registered dietitian nutritionists (competent, proficient, and expert) in nutrition support.

    PubMed

    Brantley, Susan L; Russell, Mary K; Mogensen, Kris M; Wooley, Jennifer A; Bobo, Elizabeth; Chen, Yimin; Malone, Ainsley; Roberts, Susan; Romano, Michelle M; Taylor, Beth

    2014-12-01

    This 2014 revision of the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) in Nutrition Support represents an update of the 2007 Standards composed by content experts of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The revision is based on the Revised 2012 SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP for RDs, which incorporates the Nutrition Care Process and the following six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. These SOP and SOPP are designed to promote the provision of safe, effective, and efficient nutrition support services; facilitate evidence-based practice; and serve as a professional evaluation resource for RDNs who specialize in or wish to specialize in nutrition support therapy. These standards should be applied in all patient/client care settings in which RDNs in nutrition support provide care. These settings include, but are not limited to, acute care, ambulatory/outpatient care, and home and alternate site care. The standards highlight the value of the nutrition support RDN's roles in quality management, regulatory compliance, research, teaching, consulting, and writing for peer-reviewed professional publications. The standards assist the RDN in nutrition support to distinguish his or her level of practice (competent, proficient, or expert) and would guide the RDN in creating a personal development plan to achieve increasing levels of knowledge, skill, and ability in nutrition support practice. PMID:25443567

  19. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of large hemispheric infarction : a statement for health care professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and the German Society for Neuro-intensive Care and Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Torbey, Michel T; Bösel, Julian; Rhoney, Denise H; Rincon, Fred; Staykov, Dimitre; Amar, Arun P; Varelas, Panayiotis N; Jüttler, Eric; Olson, DaiWai; Huttner, Hagen B; Zweckberger, Klaus; Sheth, Kevin N; Dohmen, Christian; Brambrink, Ansgar M; Mayer, Stephan A; Zaidat, Osama O; Hacke, Werner; Schwab, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    Large hemispheric infarction (LHI), also known as malignant middle cerebral infarction, is a devastating disease associated with significant disability and mortality. Clinicians and family members are often faced with a paucity of high quality clinical data as they attempt to determine the most appropriate course of treatment for patients with LHI, and current stroke guidelines do not provide a detailed approach regarding the day-to-day management of these complicated patients. To address this need, the Neurocritical Care Society organized an international multidisciplinary consensus conference on the critical care management of LHI. Experts from neurocritical care, neurosurgery, neurology, interventional neuroradiology, and neuroanesthesiology from Europe and North America were recruited based on their publications and expertise. The panel devised a series of clinical questions related to LHI, and assessed the quality of data related to these questions using the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation guideline system. They then developed recommendations (denoted as strong or weak) based on the quality of the evidence, as well as the balance of benefits and harms of the studied interventions, the values and preferences of patients, and resource considerations.

  20. Patient safety in women's health-care: professional colleges can make a difference. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada MORE(OB) program.

    PubMed

    Milne, J K; Lalonde, A B

    2007-08-01

    The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada has played a leadership role in advancing patient safety at the national level with the launching of their obstetric patient safety program 'Managing Obstetric Risks Efficiently' (MORE(OB)). Developed over a 2-year period and launched as a pilot in 2002, the program has extended to 126 hospitals in five provinces that provide care for 48% of the births in Canada. The end-point for the program is to change the culture of blame to a focused and sustained patient safety culture, where patient safety is everyone's responsibility, with observed reductions in events and improved quality of care. The program has integrated the principles of high reliability organizations (HROs), systems error theory, team function, and communities of practice (CoPs) as values for the work environment. In this chapter we describe how the program was developed, the role of the national specialty society in the development, and the funding, structure and implementation of the program, and we report on the impact of the program over the first 3 years. In these first 3 years, knowledge enhancement in all disciplines and in all practice environments, with a significant reduction in variance among the disciplines, has been demonstrated. Culture change has occurred in all practice settings and has continued to improve over time. Using liability claims information from the hospitals, a reduction trend has been observed in liability carrier (hospital) incurred costs.

  1. Patient safety in women's health-care: professional colleges can make a difference. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada MORE(OB) program.

    PubMed

    Milne, J K; Lalonde, A B

    2007-08-01

    The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada has played a leadership role in advancing patient safety at the national level with the launching of their obstetric patient safety program 'Managing Obstetric Risks Efficiently' (MORE(OB)). Developed over a 2-year period and launched as a pilot in 2002, the program has extended to 126 hospitals in five provinces that provide care for 48% of the births in Canada. The end-point for the program is to change the culture of blame to a focused and sustained patient safety culture, where patient safety is everyone's responsibility, with observed reductions in events and improved quality of care. The program has integrated the principles of high reliability organizations (HROs), systems error theory, team function, and communities of practice (CoPs) as values for the work environment. In this chapter we describe how the program was developed, the role of the national specialty society in the development, and the funding, structure and implementation of the program, and we report on the impact of the program over the first 3 years. In these first 3 years, knowledge enhancement in all disciplines and in all practice environments, with a significant reduction in variance among the disciplines, has been demonstrated. Culture change has occurred in all practice settings and has continued to improve over time. Using liability claims information from the hospitals, a reduction trend has been observed in liability carrier (hospital) incurred costs. PMID:17376746

  2. Prophylaxis of Venous Thrombosis in Neurocritical Care Patients: An Evidence-Based Guideline: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society.

    PubMed

    Nyquist, Paul; Bautista, Cynthia; Jichici, Draga; Burns, Joseph; Chhangani, Sanjeev; DeFilippis, Michele; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Kim, Keri; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Mack, William; Meyer, Kim

    2016-02-01

    The risk of death from venous thromboembolism (VTE) is high in intensive care unit patients with neurological diagnoses. This is due to an increased risk of venous stasis secondary to paralysis as well as an increased prevalence of underlying pathologies that cause endothelial activation and create an increased risk of embolus formation. In many of these diseases, there is an associated risk from bleeding because of standard VTE prophylaxis. There is a paucity of prospective studies examining different VTE prophylaxis strategies in the neurologically ill. The lack of a solid evidentiary base has posed challenges for the establishment of consistent and evidence-based clinical practice standards. In response to this need for guidance, the Neurocritical Care Society set out to develop and evidence-based guideline using GRADE to safely reduce VTE and its associated complications.

  3. Prophylaxis of Venous Thrombosis in Neurocritical Care Patients: An Evidence-Based Guideline: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society.

    PubMed

    Nyquist, Paul; Bautista, Cynthia; Jichici, Draga; Burns, Joseph; Chhangani, Sanjeev; DeFilippis, Michele; Goldenberg, Fernando D; Kim, Keri; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Mack, William; Meyer, Kim

    2016-02-01

    The risk of death from venous thromboembolism (VTE) is high in intensive care unit patients with neurological diagnoses. This is due to an increased risk of venous stasis secondary to paralysis as well as an increased prevalence of underlying pathologies that cause endothelial activation and create an increased risk of embolus formation. In many of these diseases, there is an associated risk from bleeding because of standard VTE prophylaxis. There is a paucity of prospective studies examining different VTE prophylaxis strategies in the neurologically ill. The lack of a solid evidentiary base has posed challenges for the establishment of consistent and evidence-based clinical practice standards. In response to this need for guidance, the Neurocritical Care Society set out to develop and evidence-based guideline using GRADE to safely reduce VTE and its associated complications. PMID:26646118

  4. Research in cardiovascular care: a position statement of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professionals of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Tiny; Deaton, Christi; Fitzsimmons, Donna; Fridlund, Bengt; Hardig, Bjarne M; Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Moons, Philip; Noureddine, Samar; O'Donnell, Sharon; Pedersen, Susanne S; Stewart, Simon; Strömberg, Anna; Thompson, David R; Tokem, Yasemin; Kjellström, Barbro

    2014-02-01

    To deliver optimal patient care, evidence-based care is advocated and research is needed to support health care staff of all disciplines in deciding which options to use in their daily practice. Due to the increasing complexity of cardiac care across the life span of patients combined with the increasing opportunities and challenges in multidisciplinary research, the Science Committee of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professionals (CCNAP) recognised the need for a position statement to guide researchers, policymakers and funding bodies to contribute to the advancement of the body of knowledge that is needed to further improve cardiovascular care. In this paper, knowledge gaps in current research related to cardiovascular patient care are identified, upcoming challenges are explored and recommendations for future research are given.

  5. Science and Society Colloquium

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  6. Science and Society Colloquium

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-10

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  7. The Insertion and Management of External Ventricular Drains: An Evidence-Based Consensus Statement : A Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society.

    PubMed

    Fried, Herbert I; Nathan, Barnett R; Rowe, A Shaun; Zabramski, Joseph M; Andaluz, Norberto; Bhimraj, Adarsh; Guanci, Mary McKenna; Seder, David B; Singh, Jeffrey M

    2016-02-01

    External ventricular drains (EVDs) are commonly placed to monitor intracranial pressure and manage acute hydrocephalus in patients with a variety of intracranial pathologies. The indications for EVD insertion and their efficacy in the management of these various conditions have been previously addressed in guidelines published by the Brain Trauma Foundation, American Heart Association and combined committees of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. While it is well recognized that placement of an EVD may be a lifesaving intervention, the benefits can be offset by procedural and catheter-related complications, such as hemorrhage along the catheter tract, catheter malposition, and CSF infection. Despite their widespread use, there are a lack of high-quality data regarding the best methods for placement and management of EVDs to minimize these risks. Existing recommendations are frequently based on observational data from a single center and may be biased to the authors' view. To address the need for a comprehensive set of evidence-based guidelines for EVD management, the Neurocritical Care Society organized a committee of experts in the fields of neurosurgery, neurology, neuroinfectious disease, critical care, pharmacotherapy, and nursing. The Committee generated clinical questions relevant to EVD placement and management. They developed recommendations based on a thorough literature review using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system, with emphasis placed not only on the quality of the evidence, but also on the balance of benefits versus risks, patient values and preferences, and resource considerations. PMID:26738503

  8. Annual Salary Study and Survey of Selected Personnel Issues, 1981. A Report on Administrative and Professional Staff and Salaries in Voluntary CWLA Member Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddow, Susan; Jones, Mary Ann

    This publication reports findings, primarily in tabular form, of the 1981 Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) survey of salaries and personnel issues. The study was conducted with the voluntary member agencies of the CWLA. Survey forms were sent to 210 voluntary accredited and provisional members of the CWLA and to 17 agencies that are members…

  9. Planetary Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  10. Autism Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... age, and provide the latest information regarding treatment, education, research, and advocacy. Learn more Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ...

  11. Medical professionalism: a Parsonian view.

    PubMed

    Latham, Stephen R

    2002-11-01

    This paper argues for a normative conception of medical professionalism based on the work of sociologist Talcott Parsons. Such a conception grounds medical professionalism on the expert authority of the physician; the concept of authority is therefore discussed at length. Parsons view also lays much stress on the fact that the proper exercise of medical authority nearly always involves aligning the interests of individual patients with those of society at large. Parsonian professionalism looks to professional institutions such as medical schools, societies and journals to secure the competence and ethical behavior of professionals, and to help ensure that professionals exercise of authority is never biased by private financial interests or by public political power. Professional institutions should encourage professionals to develop a set of preferences and desires (e.g., for respect of their peers, and not for power or financial gain) that will tend to make them trustworthy authorities. PMID:12429954

  12. Government-Based Training Agencies and the Professional Development of Indonesian Teachers of English for Young Learners: Perspectives from Complexity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zein, Mochamad Subhan

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify suggestions to improve PD programmes held by government-based training agencies to help enhance Indonesian EYL teachers' instructional practice. For the purpose of the study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 51 participants. The findings suggest the theorisation of a PD model that involves complex…

  13. The role of early inter-professional and inter-agency encounters in increasing students' awareness of the clinical and community context of medicine.

    PubMed

    Thandi, Charankumal Singh; Forrest, Simon; Williamson, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Coordinated input from a variety of health and social care professionals into medical education helps students to become strong, effective, successful and competent future practitioners able to function within the multi-disciplinary environment which characterizes modern medicine. This paper presents a new model of teaching developed within the context of the Phase 1 Medicine Programme at Durham, which has been used to help prepare students for this by intertwining a selection of lectures and activities run by external organizations with additional clinical exposure and experience. This one-week learning journey was called the Additional Clinical Experience (ACE) week, and now forms an integral part of the curriculum at Durham University. PMID:27432369

  14. SHEA conference on antimicrobial resistance. Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

    PubMed

    Gerding, D N; Martone, W J

    2000-05-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem in healthcare institutions and in the community. Public concern about resistance is also increasing. The issue is broad and complex and not readily addressed by government, industry, or professional societies alone. On October 29-30, 1998, 19 representatives of various professional societies and governmental agencies met under the auspices of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) at Brook Lodge Conference Center in Augusta, Michigan. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the current status of antimicrobial resistance in the United States and Canada, including present society and governmental efforts to address the problem. Representatives exchanged experiences through presentations and discussions on the first day, then on the second day held a brainstorming session to address future needs and priorities in addressing the resistance problem. It was agreed that a national coordinated effort was needed. As part of this national effort, representatives called for the creation of a National Coalition on Antibiotic Resistance (NCAR) to combat antibiotic resistance through education, research, prevention, and advocacy. Priorities for NCAR were focused in four areas: (1) education of the public and professionals; (2) support of basic and applied research; (3) provision of an information resource and clearinghouse; and (4) advocacy initiatives. At the recommendation of the SHEA Board, discussions with the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases for the joint development of NCAR have begun.

  15. America's Scholarly Societies Raise Their Flags Abroad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurtrie, Beth

    2000-01-01

    Reports that greater numbers of scholarly societies, though American in name, are increasingly international in membership and outlook. Suggests that this trend has been driven by the expanding global outlook of scholars, the collapse of communism, and growth of the Internet. Efforts to encourage local professional societies, fears of American…

  16. Professional Skills Needed by Our Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Donald R.; Briedis, Daina; Perna, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Accreditation agencies have outlined professional skills that should be possessed by engineering graduates. The question this paper addresses is "What professional skills do our recent graduates actually use and value as being important?" Young engineering professionals, as well as professionals in many different professions, were asked…

  17. Conflict of interest and the Society for Vascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Bruce M

    2011-09-01

    Specialty medical societies such as Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) are instrumental in the development and dissemination of medical knowledge through scientific presentations, publication of rigorously peer-reviewed writings, awarding competitive research and training grants, and the provision of high-quality continuing medical education (CME). It is vital that in these roles the SVS remain in fact and in perception completely free of all influence and bias from industry. While independence from bias has always been necessary, the increasing focus by governmental agencies, industry organizations, and society has made it important for the SVS to address this issue in a formal way. In June 2010, the SVS Board of Directors approved a set of guidelines specifically designed to address management of conflict of interest among its members and its leaders. These guidelines, included in this article, were based on currently available information and policies put forth by legislative bodies, academic medical centers, industry groups, and other professional medical societies, and were designed to safeguard against abuse while maintaining valuable collaboration between vascular surgeons and their industry partners. The guidelines are included in this article.

  18. Professionalism in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Sean; Southgate, Lesley

    2007-01-01

    Medical professionalism in today's society requires the exhibition of a range of qualities deployed in the service of patients, rather than more traditionally defined aspects such as mastery, autonomy and self-regulation. These qualities incorporate demonstrated clinical competence; aspiring to excellence in practice while demonstrating humility…

  19. Abuse and neglect of elderly individuals: guidelines for oral health professionals.

    PubMed

    Glassman, Paul D; Chávez, Elisa M; Hawks, Doris

    2004-04-01

    The number of elderly individuals in our society is growing rapidly. This demographic change presents a number of challenges to our society and our health care systems. One of these is elder abuse and neglect, a serious and growing problem. In California, there are a number of state agencies responsible for oversight of care provided to elderly individuals and several systems for reporting suspected abuse and neglect depending on where the suspected abuse or neglect is occurring. Dental professionals are mandated reporters and therefore must understand how to recognize and--where possible prevent--abuse and neglect in their older patients and know how to report these suspicions.

  20. Cryptozoology Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

  1. Professional Language in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The use of 3-5 languages that involves professional language to form varied cooperative networks for the creation of new knowledge is of the greatest importance for the development of humans, institutions and society (Maslo, 2006). Aim of the Study: To identify and analyze professional language in engineering education on the…

  2. [What is professionalism?].

    PubMed

    Ohbu, Sadayoshi

    2012-01-01

    What is a profession? According to Cruess, it is an occupation whose core element is work that is based on the mastery of a complex body of knowledge and skills. It is a vocation in which knowledge of some department of science or learning, or the practice of an art founded on it, is used in the service of others. Its members profess a commitment to competence, integrity, morality, altruism, and the promotion of the public good within their domain. These commitments form the basis of a social contract between a profession and society, which in return grants the profession autonomy in practice and the privilege of self-regulation. Although medical professionals share the role of healer, there are wide variations between individuals. Professionalism is the basis of medicine's contract with society. Public trust is essential to that contract, and public trust depends on the integrity of both individual professionals and the whole profession. The introduction to this important symposium includes definitions of professions and of medical professionalism. It also includes discussions of reciprocal altruism, conflicts of interest in medical societies, the theory of cognitive dissonance, and the moral foundations of professionalism.

  3. [Medical ethics as professional ethics].

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ivo

    2012-09-25

    Contemporary medical ethics is far from the traditional concept of "In-Sul (benevolent art)" or "Yul-Li (倫, ethics), which emphasizes so much the personality or the character of a doctor. Nowadays, medical ethics should be considered as "professional ethics" which regulates the acts and medical practices of ordinary doctors in their daily practice. The key concepts of the professional ethics are "autonomy", "integrity", and "professional standard" established by medical organizations such as medical societies or associations. Most of Korean doctors have not been familiar with the concept of professional ethics or professionalism, which is due to the modern history of Korea. However, the concept of professional ethics is really critical to Korean doctors from the perspective of professional dignity and social respect to this profession. The current healthcare system of Korea is suffering from many problems of both private and public sector. Nonetheless, the professional ethics is urgently demanded for that very reason.

  4. 77 FR 48538 - Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The State Historical Society of... culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact the State Historical Society of...

  5. [Medical education and professionalism].

    PubMed

    Martins e Silva, João

    2013-01-01

    Is briefly analyzed the evolution that the objectives, strategies and models of medical education have had since their presentation and subsequent implementation of the famous model of Abraham Flexner, is now 103 years. Although globally accepted in their original pedagogical principles and instruments, that model does not have avoided the continuing dissatisfaction by the medical community and students and, most markedly in recent decades, the demanding of a most efficient health care by society, in general, and by patients in particular. In response to these ambitions, the medical community felt that it was essential to review the traditional criteria of medical professionalism, adapting them to a new paradigm of society and an appropriate and more efficient model of medical education. In this respect, are analyzed strategies and methodologies, apparently more suitable proposals for the inclusion of the principles and responsibilities of medical professionalism since the early period of pre-graduated medical education. It is assumed that the emphasis in teaching and practice of reflection throughout the course will have positive and lasting repercussions during active working life. However, the author believes that the success of the measures to be introduced in medical education programs to a new model of professionalism continues to depend, above all, of the humanistic and cognitive attributes of the students to be chosen, and the pedagogical quality, professional and academic of their teachers.

  6. Globalisation, economics and professionalism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chay-Hoon; Macneill, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effect of globalisation and attendant economic factors on the global practice of medicine, medical education, medical ethics and medical professionalism. The authors discuss the implications of these trends, citing case scenarios in the healthcare insurance, medical tourism, pharmaceutical industries, and the educational systems as well as in clinical practice, to illustrate the impact of globalisation and economics on professionalism. Globalisation, on the one hand, offers benefits for the global practice of medicine and for medical education. On the other, globalisation can have negative effects, particularly when the main driver is to maximise profitability across national boundaries rather than concern for human well-being. Appraising the effect of globalisation on professionalism involves assessing its effects at the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and institutional levels, and its effect on society at large. PMID:26075950

  7. Globalisation, economics and professionalism.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chay-Hoon; Macneill, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effect of globalisation and attendant economic factors on the global practice of medicine, medical education, medical ethics and medical professionalism. The authors discuss the implications of these trends, citing case scenarios in the healthcare insurance, medical tourism, pharmaceutical industries, and the educational systems as well as in clinical practice, to illustrate the impact of globalisation and economics on professionalism. Globalisation, on the one hand, offers benefits for the global practice of medicine and for medical education. On the other, globalisation can have negative effects, particularly when the main driver is to maximise profitability across national boundaries rather than concern for human well-being. Appraising the effect of globalisation on professionalism involves assessing its effects at the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and institutional levels, and its effect on society at large.

  8. International Transplant Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... and professional practice in nursing." Demonstration of professional development support and clinical advancement programs are hallmarks of a professional nursing practice environment and critical components of Nursing Magnet status. The ...

  9. Leadership Education Priorities for a Democratic Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenlink, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Determining the priorities for leadership education in a democratic society is a complex, challenging responsibility, not a task to be taken lightly. It is complex on one level in that to be a leader in schools "today is to understand a profoundly human as well as a professional responsibility." It is challenging on another level in that preparing…

  10. Continuing professional development: best practices.

    PubMed

    Filipe, Helena P; Silva, Eduardo D; Stulting, Andries A; Golnik, Karl C

    2014-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) involves not only educational activities to enhance medical competence in medical knowledge and skills, but also in management, team building, professionalism, interpersonal communication, technology, teaching, and accountability. This paper aims at reviewing best practices to promote effective CPD. Principles and guidelines, as already defined by some professional societies and world organizations, are emphasized as core actions to best enhance an effective lifelong learning after residency. The personal learning plan (PLP) is discussed as the core of a well-structured CPD and we describe how it should be created. Fundamental CPD principles and how they are integrated in the framework of every physician's professional life will be described. The value of systematic and comprehensive CPD documentation and assessment is emphasized. Accreditation requirements and professional relationships with commercial sponsors are discussed.

  11. Continuing Professional Development: Best Practices

    PubMed Central

    Filipe, Helena P.; Silva, Eduardo D.; Stulting, Andries A.; Golnik, Karl C.

    2014-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) involves not only educational activities to enhance medical competence in medical knowledge and skills, but also in management, team building, professionalism, interpersonal communication, technology, teaching, and accountability. This paper aims at reviewing best practices to promote effective CPD. Principles and guidelines, as already defined by some professional societies and world organizations, are emphasized as core actions to best enhance an effective lifelong learning after residency. The personal learning plan (PLP) is discussed as the core of a well-structured CPD and we describe how it should be created. Fundamental CPD principles and how they are integrated in the framework of every physician's professional life will be described. The value of systematic and comprehensive CPD documentation and assessment is emphasized. Accreditation requirements and professional relationships with commercial sponsors are discussed. PMID:24791104

  12. Professional Identification for Biomedical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Francis M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses four methods of professional identification in biomedical engineering including registration, certification, accreditation, and possible membership qualification of the societies. Indicates that the destiny of the biomedical engineer may be under the control of a new profession, neither the medical nor the engineering. (CC)

  13. Changing Roles of Mental Health Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garai, Josef E.

    The roles that mental health professionals must play to facilitate the prevention of mental illness and the introduction of mentally healthy attitudes in our society is discussed. Mental health professionals must re-examine the meaning of mental health in the context of the current world situation and ask themselves to what extent they are…

  14. Professional Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frowe, Ian

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of professional trust and argues that trust is an essential component of what it means to be a professional. The first part of the paper discusses the nature of trust in general and attempts to establish two main points: that we are all involved in relationships of trust and that all trust involves risk. The second…

  15. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

  16. Design, Implementation and Impact of the MS PHD’S Professional Development Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson Whitney, V.

    2009-12-01

    The Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S)® in Earth System Science initiative facilitates the involvement of underrepresented minority undergraduate and graduate Earth system science students in a series of activities designed to: (1) increase exposure to and engagement in the Earth system science community, via participation in scientific conferences, mentoring relationships, virtual activities, and field trips; (2) enhance professional skills, grantsmanship, oral and written communication; (3) provide funding, education and career opportunity resources; (4) facilitate networking opportunities with established researchers and educators; (5) and sustain on-going interaction, communication and support via membership within a virtual community comprised of peers, junior/senior-level researchers, and educators actively involved in facilitating full participation of minorities in the Earth system sciences. These activities, conducted in three phases, occur during professional society meetings, field trips, visits to several federal agencies, and a 'capstone' event at the National Academies. Nearly 150 Earth system science undergraduate, graduate and recent minority graduates have participated in MS PHD’S activities and are better prepared to successfully achieve their academic and professional goals. It is also expected that because of mentor-mentee partnerships, science exposure, and networking activities, MS PHD'S participants will remain actively engaged in their fields of specialization and respective professional societies. Evaluation data for MS PHD’S activities indicate that virtual and face-to-face mentoring, on-site professional development and community-building activities resulted in increased participant exposure to and engagement in the Earth system science professional community and served to better equip student participants to make informed post-baccalaureate academic and professional career decisions.

  17. Learner Agency within the Design of an EAP Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seppälä, Riina

    2015-01-01

    To meet the demands of today's society and working life, higher education should support the development of learner agency. How the agency of individual learners emerges in university courses and what kind of agency empowers the learners to face new challenges should be considered. In this article, the focus is on learner agency enabled and…

  18. Annual Salary Study and Survey of Selected Personnel Issues, 1982: A Report on Administrative and Professional Staff and Salaries in Voluntary CWLA Member Agencies as of January 1, 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddow, Susan; Jones, Mary Ann

    This publication reports findings of the 1982 Child Welfare League of America's (CWLA) annual study of salaries and personnel issues conducted with the League's voluntary member agencies. Survey forms were sent to 220 voluntary accredited and provisional members of the CWLA and to the Florence Crittenton Division of the CWLA. Each agency was asked…

  19. The challenge of teaching professionalism.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, G

    2004-11-01

    The medical profession has been conscious of all the changes happening in society in the last quarter of the 20th century and has tried to cope with it. Numerous criticisms about the profession and its professionals have stimulated a revision of the professional's behaviour and professionalism. The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada has launched its own proposal under the name of CanMEDS 2000. Among the revised roles and competences one find professionalism. This theme is at the heart of our profession since the early days of the 20th century when medicine became a modern profession. Responsibility for the patient remains fundamental for any doctor but, today, society expects more accountability from the medical profession. We have the obligation to educate our residents not only for healing and caring of patients but also for active participation in managing the healthcare system. In this paper, we examine this renewed post-modern professionalism. My intention is to propose a visual approach for the teaching of professionalism.

  20. Awareness and enforcement of guidelines for publishing industry-sponsored medical research among publication professionals: the Global Publication Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Elizabeth; Woolley, Karen; Adshead, Viv; Cairns, Angela; Fullam, Josh; Gonzalez, John; Grant, Tom; Tortell, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To gather information about current practices and implementation of publication guidelines among publication professionals working in or for the pharmaceutical industry. Design/setting Web-based survey publicised via email and social media to members of the International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) and other organisations from November 2012 to February 2013. Participants 469 individuals involved in publishing industry-sponsored research in peer-reviewed journals, mainly working in pharmaceutical or device companies (‘industry’, n=144), communication agencies (‘agency’, n=238), contract research organisations (CRO, n=15) or as freelancers (n=34). Most respondents (78%) had worked on medical publications for ≥5 years and 62% had a PhD/MD. Results Over 90% of industry, agency and CRO respondents routinely refer to Good Publication Practice (GPP2) and the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors’ Uniform Requirements. Most respondents (78% industry, 79% agency) received mandatory training on ethical publication practices. Over 90% of respondents’ companies had publication guidelines or policies and required medical writing support to be acknowledged in publications (96% industry, 99% agency). Many industry respondents used publication management tools to monitor compliance with company guidelines and about half (46%) stated that their company had formal publication audits. Fewer agencies audited adherence to guidelines but 20% of agency respondents reported audits of employees and 6% audits of freelancers. Of concern, 37% of agency respondents reported requests from authors or sponsors that they believed were unethical, although 93% of these requests were withdrawn after respondents explained the need for compliance with guidelines. Most respondents’ departments (63% industry, 58% agency, 60% CRO) had been involved in publishing studies with negative or inconclusive results. Conclusions Within this sample

  1. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Its Intense Demands New Website from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Puts the Power of Information ... Hotel Discount for STS Members Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. All rights reserved. Expanded Proprietary ...

  2. Society of Interventional Radiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... comments to CMS on two MACRA coding issues; society is engaged with CMS as they develop codes ... radiology case studies Developed by ACR Copyright © 2016 Society of Interventional Radiology. All rights reserved. 3975 Fair ...

  3. National Rosacea Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Materials Professional Materials Professional Membership Membership Form [PDF] Classification of Rosacea Grading of Rosacea Management Options for ... Program Awarded Grants Research Results How to Apply Classification of Rosacea Management Options for Rosacea Rosacea Treatment ...

  4. Defining professional nursing accountability: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Krautscheid, Lorretta C

    2014-01-01

    Professional nursing accountability is described by both professional nursing organizations and nursing education credentialing agencies as a core aspect that underpins professional nursing practice. Although accountability is foundational to professional practice, a review of the literature revealed no consistent language or definition regarding professional nursing accountability. Instead, the literature itself reveals that professional nursing accountability is challenging to both describe and define. The ambiguity surrounding how to define professional nursing accountability contributes to challenges associated with both teaching and evaluating student nurse accountability within nursing education curricula. This article provides a reliable and comprehensive definition of professional nursing accountability derived from a synthesis of the literature. Recommendations for nursing education practice and recommendations for nursing education research are proposed. PMID:24503314

  5. Professional Review Program for Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triton Coll., River Grove, IL.

    The faculty review program at Triton College fulfills responsibilities to accrediting and/or approving agencies while helping to maintain teaching effectiveness and to promote instructional improvement. The professional review consists of a comprehensive assessment of the instructor's total job performance as indicated through student, peer,…

  6. Professional Standards in Environmental Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petulla, Joseph M.

    1985-01-01

    Focuses on the technical and ethical professional standards that guide industry, public agencies, and environmental consulting firms in their work in environmental management. Explores the role that university curricular programs have in creating environmental management standards, advocating a critical thinking, problem-solving, interdisciplinary…

  7. When a man encounters a woman, Satan is also present: clinical relationships in Bedouin society.

    PubMed

    Mass, M; al-Krenawi, A

    1994-07-01

    Professional encounters in Bedouin society between male therapists and their female clients are discussed in terms of the conflict between clinical precepts and Bedouin codes of social conduct. The effects of the conflict on the transference relationship are examined by means of case presentations, and rules of conduct acceptable in both the professional realm and Bedouin society are proposed as an avenue toward resolution.

  8. Engineering Societies Move toward Program Cooperation in Legislative, Employment Practices, and Other Areas of Professionwide Concern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, J. T., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the movement of the numerous engineering societies toward program cooperation through The National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE), Engineers Joint Council (EJC), Engineers' Council for Professional Development (ECPD), and Association for Cooperation in Engineering (ACE). Briefly describes the history, development, and goals of…

  9. A History of the American Society for Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierking, Angela Lynn

    Originally called the American Documentation Institute, over the years the American Society for Information Science (ASIS) has changed its emphasis from documentation to information science. During its 40 year history, the society has incorporated into its membership numerous individuals and agencies whose activities include classification,…

  10. Professional support framework: improving access to professional support for professionals.

    PubMed

    Hall, Fiona; Bell, Karen

    2013-11-01

    From an organisational point of view, professional support is an important aspect of clinical governance and a tool for maximising service delivery quality. As a key factor in staff retention and recruitment, access to professional support is also regarded as an important tool for facilitating workforce growth in a competitive health workforce market. While some work units provide appropriate professional support such as in-service, professional supervision is a key challenge for a large organisation employing many health professionals to ensure equitable and relevant access to finite professional support resources. The goal of this paper is to describe the Professional Support Program designed and implemented by Queensland Health. This program seeks to support professionals who may not previously have had optimal engagement in professional support and to enhance the quality of professional support activities available. Evaluation indicates that the Professional Support Program has been successful in facilitating participation in, and quality of professional support activities. PMID:23680624

  11. What the American Society for Reproductive Medicine does for you.

    PubMed

    Rebar, Robert W

    2013-05-01

    The American Society for Reproductive Medicine, one of the older professional medical societies in the United States, is devoted to education, support of research, and advocacy in the field of reproductive medicine. It is also the oldest and largest medical society devoted to reproductive medicine in the world. A multidisciplinary organization, the Society is composed of ∼8000 members from the United States and more than a hundred other countries and undertakes a large number of activities aimed at advancing the discipline of reproductive medicine.

  12. Professional Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilstrap, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews five books for teachers: "Connecting the Curriculum through Interdisciplinary Instruction" (Lounsbury); "Caring for Our Children. National Health and Safety Performance Standards: Guidelines for Out-of-Home Child Care Programs"; "Families and Schools in a Pluralistic Society" (Chavkin); "Team Building through Physical Challenges" (Glover…

  13. Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Chris, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This serial issue contains 12 articles on the theme of "Professional Development," specifically about how teachers in the Bread Loaf Rural Teacher Network (BLRTN) are fostering their own and each other's development as teachers. The BLRTN consists of approximately 260 rural teachers in Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, New…

  14. Professional Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Counseling and Development, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Contains five personal accounts: (1) "From Intern to Senior Staff: Movement toward Self-Nurturance" (William Holahan); (2) "Toward the Emergence of Professional Identity" (Marya Barey Kyril); (3) "Selling My Private Practice: When Less is More" (Lynn Rew); (4) "Mid-Life Career Change: Taking the Plunge" (Richard Weigel); and (5) "A Chance…

  15. Professional Whining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenz, Sarah

    2000-01-01

    Whining about not being treated as professionals buys teachers little respect. Teaching is hard work, but confers some plush benefits, while discouraging voluntary self-improvement efforts. The notion that pay should be commensurate with work is a noble delusion. Nannies and mothers are also underpaid. (MLH)

  16. Professional Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilstrap, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews four professional books: (1) "Changing Teaching, Changing Schools. Bringing Early Childhood Practice into Public Education: Case Studies from the Kindergarten" (O'Connell); (2) "Whole Language Plus: Essays on Literacy in the United States and New Zealand" (Cazden); (3) "Audacious Kids: Coming of Age in America's Classic Children's Books"…

  17. 75 FR 5104 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Madison County Historical Society, Edwardsville, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Madison County Historical Society, Edwardsville, IL... inventory of human remains in the possession of the Madison County Historical Society, Edwardsville, IL. The... made by Madison County Historical Society professional staff in consultation with representatives...

  18. Popularizing dissent: A civil society perspective.

    PubMed

    Motion, Judy; Leitch, Shirley; Weaver, C Kay

    2015-05-01

    This article theorizes civil society groups' attempts to popularize opposition to genetic modification in New Zealand as deliberative interventions that seek to open up public participation in science-society governance. In this case, the popularization strategies were designed to intensify concerns about social justice and democratic incursions, mobilize dissent and offer meaningful mechanisms for navigating and participating in public protest. Such civic popularization efforts, we argue, are more likely to succeed when popularity and politicization strategies are judiciously integrated to escalate controversy, re-negotiate power relations and provoke agency and action.

  19. Popularizing dissent: A civil society perspective.

    PubMed

    Motion, Judy; Leitch, Shirley; Weaver, C Kay

    2015-05-01

    This article theorizes civil society groups' attempts to popularize opposition to genetic modification in New Zealand as deliberative interventions that seek to open up public participation in science-society governance. In this case, the popularization strategies were designed to intensify concerns about social justice and democratic incursions, mobilize dissent and offer meaningful mechanisms for navigating and participating in public protest. Such civic popularization efforts, we argue, are more likely to succeed when popularity and politicization strategies are judiciously integrated to escalate controversy, re-negotiate power relations and provoke agency and action. PMID:25394361

  20. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  1. Teachers' Professional Identity Negotiations in Two Different Work Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vähäsantanen, Katja; Hökkä, Päivi; Eteläpelto, Anneli; Rasku-Puttonen, Helena; Littleton, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have described professional identity as the interplay between individual agency and social context. However, we need to understand how these are intertwined in different kinds of work settings. This paper focuses on teachers' professional identity negotiations as involving the work organisation, the professional community and…

  2. Geologists' Role in Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bally, A. W.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    At a meeting sponsored by the Geological Society of America, earth scientists examined their function in society. Participants concluded that earth scientists are not providing a rationale for value judgments concerning the use and limitations of the earth and a program aimed at understanding solid-Earth resource systems is needed. (BT)

  3. Schools, Violence, and Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Allan M., Ed.

    The seeming increase of violence in American society and its schools has become a pressing issue. Some researchers argue that the American education system mirrors the dynamics of society. The articles in this book address the following issues: the extent of violence in American schools; the forms that violence takes; its root causes; the effects…

  4. Navigating the Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Joyce

    This paper explores the idea of an information society from different perspectives, raises issues that are relevant to university libraries, and offers a way forward to some future developments. The first section provides a sketch of the information society in Australia and presents statistics on readiness, intensity, and impacts from reports…

  5. Environment, energy, and society

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, C.R.; Buttel, F.R.

    1986-01-01

    This book delineates the major ways in which human society and the environment affect each other. To study the structure of societies, it employs three conceptual models, or sociological paradigms, conservative, liberal, and radical. The book explains the courses in environmental sociology, international development, natural resources, agriculture, and urban or regional planning.

  6. Professions as the conscience of society.

    PubMed Central

    Sieghart, P

    1985-01-01

    Ethics is no less of a science than any other. It has its roots in conflicts of interest between human beings, and in their conflicting urges to behave either selfishly or altruistically. Resolving such conflicts leads to the specification of rules of conduct, often expressed in terms of rights and duties. In the special case of professional ethics, the paramount rule of conduct is altruism in the service of a 'noble' cause, and this distinguishes true professions from other trades or occupations. If professional ethics come into conflict with national laws, the professional today can test the legitimacy of such laws by reference to internationally agreed legal standards in the field of human rights, and so help to perform the role of 'professions as the conscience of society'. PMID:4057214

  7. Extend a Helping Hand to Society

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Joseph L.

    1989-01-01

    This article is intended as an informational and inspirational message to graduating black health professionals, especially dentists and physicians. The author highlights the continuing and urgent need to practice and render first-rate care in the areas of greatest need where the population is primarily black. The importance of black health professionals providing leadership in community affairs, the political arena, civic affairs, and social interaction and development are stressed. Young black health professionals are urged to make a firm commitment to improving the quality of life for all by bridging the gap for equal opportunity, social justice, and unification of the health professions in a comprehensive health team for the greatest benefit to society.

  8. Discussing Terms: Professions, Professionals, Professionalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bledstein, Burton J.

    Throughout history there have always been confusion and even contradictions concerning professionalism. An occupation can be considered a profession in one country and not another, and in one historical period and not another. One contribution to this confusion is the explanation of the social system by Talcott Parsons and others, which has framed…

  9. Agency in Paul and Implications for Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck-McClain, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    Agency is a particular concern for ministry with adolescent girls because they rarely see themselves as subjects of their own lives. Human agency is often emphasized in churches as a way to explain human sinful action. As a population treated as objects by society, it is important for young women to embrace and exercise their agency in order to be…

  10. The Importance of Orientation: Implications of Professional Identity on Classroom Practice and for Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Betina

    2015-01-01

    Previous work on new teacher professional identity has focused on identity as a process of negotiation between individual and contextual factors. These negotiations are often filled with a struggle between personal agency and structures that prevent the enactment of an ideal professional self. This study introduces and discusses three teacher…

  11. Impaired black health professionals: vulnerabilities and treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Bell, C C

    1986-10-01

    The impaired black health professional is in a unique position in American society. Factors that contribute to this uniqueness include: the small number of black health professionals, which limits resources for program development and referrals; overt and covert racism in society and in medical school curriculums; differences in black and white drug and alcohol abuse and suicide patterns; and upward mobility, which tends to isolate the black professional from black support systems. These factors need to be recognized by the health care profession. Bias-free investigations are needed to provide more information on ethnic differences so that impaired health professional programs and services may give more appropriate treatment.

  12. Impaired Black Health Professionals: Vulnerabilities and Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    The impaired black health professional is in a unique position in American society. Factors that contribute to this uniqueness include: the small number of black health professionals, which limits resources for program development and referrals; overt and covert racism in society and in medical school curriculums; differences in black and white drug and alcohol abuse and suicide patterns; and upward mobility, which tends to isolate the black professional from black support systems. These factors need to be recognized by the health care profession. Bias-free investigations are needed to provide more information on ethnic differences so that impaired health professional programs and services may give more appropriate treatment. PMID:3783748

  13. The History of the Soil Science Society of Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okechukwu Chude, Victor

    2013-04-01

    The Soil Science Society of Nigeria (SSSN) founded in 1968, is a registered member of the African Soil Science Association, International Union of Soil Science and the Global Soil Partnership. The Society aims at promoting and fostering better understanding of basic and applied Soil Science in Nigeria. The society also strives to enhance the dissemination of knowledge in all aspects of Soil science and shares ideas with National and International Societies through conferences, symposium, lectures, seminars and journal publications. The numerical strength of the society is 600 members (student, ordinary ,life and corporate). The soil science society of Nigeria has provided invaluable services in the formulation of agricultural land and fertilizer use strategies and policies of the country. The existing reconnaissance soil map of Nigeria typifies one of the major professional services rendered to the country by the society and its members. Despite the numerous contributions the society has made to the advancement of soil science in the country, the larger society is not aware of the its existence. This is largely because of our limited soil extension activities to land users due to lack of funds. If the society can attract donor funds, this will go a long way in enhancing the capacity and capability of the society.

  14. Radiation and Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Edward I.

    1974-01-01

    Presents a discussion of the risks, to society, from radiation-associated technologies and urges that science teachers help the public understand the decision-making process relative to nuclear power as well as the problems and alternatives. (PEB)

  15. Ehlers-Danlos Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical and Scientific Board Staff Volunteer Leaders The Ehlers-Danlos Society Center for EDS Research & Clinical Care Our History Close Ehlers-Danlos Info What is EDS? EDS Diagnostics EDS Types ...

  16. National Multiple Sclerosis Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join the Community Stay Informed Corporate Support National Multiple Sclerosis Society Our Mission: People affected by MS can ... 10.5 Million in New Research to Stop Multiple Sclerosis, Restore Function and End MS Forever October 11, ...

  17. Changing anthropology, changing society.

    PubMed

    Varughese, Heather

    2009-12-01

    Fifty years after the founding of the field of medical anthropology, the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association held its first independent meeting on September 24-27, 2009, at Yale University.

  18. National MPS Society (Mucopolysaccharidoses)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2017 National MPS Society board of directors. The election will run through Nov. 1, and all voting ... Survey Results Board of Directors Board of Directors Election 2016 Financial Information 2014 – 2015 Financial Report Annual ...

  19. National Rosacea Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... opinion counts! Help us learn more about social perceptions of rosacea. How to Donate to the Society ... Your Opinion Count Take the survey on social perceptions of rosacea. arrow Your initial visit to the ...

  20. American Epilepsy Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... View the poster schedule and more information here . Epilepsy Currents Generic Substitution of AEDs: Is it Time ... Predict Their Risk of Severe Psychiatric Conditions More Epilepsy Professional News AES Releases New Guildeline for Treatment ...

  1. North American Spine Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... top spine care professionals from around the world starts here. Become a Member Now. Spinal injections and stimulation techniques. Didactics, hands-on training and discussions. Register Now A new way for patients to search, filter, and make ...

  2. American Geriatrics Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Map About Us Health Care Professionals Advocacy Public Policy Public Education Featured The AGS Annual Scientific Meeting ... MyAGSOnline October 20th, 2016 This Week in Advocacy & Public Policy October 20th, 2016 Why Incontinence Gets No Respect... ...

  3. Consumption in the Information Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zherebin, V. M.; Ermakova, N. A.; Makhrova, O. N.

    2010-01-01

    The current state of the economy in the developed countries make it possible to characterize them using concepts and terms such as the postindustrial society, the new economy, the service economy, the creative economy, the posteconomic society, the information society, the knowledge society, and the consumer society. Among these terms and…

  4. [Medical professionalism-on social responsibilities viewed from historical perspective].

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Han

    2015-03-01

    What is medical professionalism and does it matter to the patients? Medical professionals take responsibility for their judgements and the consequences that ensue. Traditionally medical professionalism is defined as a set of values, behaviors, and relationships which support the trust the public has in doctors. The public is well aware that absence of professionalism is harmful to their interests. However, the exercise of medical professionalism is endangered by the political and cultural environment. The values of professionalism have been changed throughout the medical history and the meaning of it was also changed according to social theories. Traditional medical professionalism was based on the virtue of autonomy, self-regulation and competency etc. However, in the new millenium era, the meaning of professionalism has changed under the concept of responsibility which includes the classical virtues. The meaning of professionalism nowadays is only based on the structure and conflicting theories which cannot solve all the issues surrounding professionalism in medical practice. The conditions of medical practice are critical determinants for the future of professionalism. The interaction between doctor and patient is central to the medical care, and medical professionalism has roots in almost every aspect of medical care. I argue that doctors have responsibility to act according to the values which have been determined by the medical profession, history and surrounding society. The new millennium medical professionalism which based on the responsibility could initiate a public dialogue about the role of the doctor in creating a fairer society. PMID:25797380

  5. Professional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jin Hee; Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2013-03-01

    The three sessions of the professional development workshop series were each designed for a different audience. The purpose of the first session was to help mid-career physicists aspire for and achieve leadership roles. The second session brought together students, postdoctoral fellows, and early-career physicists to help them plan their career goals and navigate the steps important to launching a successful career. The final session sought to increase awareness of the results of physics education research, and how to use them to help students-especially women-learn physics better. The presentations and discussions were valuable for both female and male physicists.

  6. Professional Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Joan S.; And Others

    Aspects of professional competence and professional socialization that are being emphasized in professional education programs are summarized. Of concern are generic outcomes of professional preparation, outcome-related issues and trends common to professional education in diverse fields, some problems that concern professional educators, and…

  7. 78 FR 44596 - Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The State Historical Society of... associated funerary objects should submit a written request to the State Historical Society of Wisconsin....

  8. 78 FR 48900 - Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-12

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. ] SUMMARY: The State Historical Society of... control of these human remains should submit a written request to the State Historical Society...

  9. Understanding global health and development partnerships: Perspectives from African and global health system professionals.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Amy; Brown, Garrett W; Harman, Sophie

    2016-06-01

    Partnership is a key idea in current debates about global health and development assistance, yet little is known about what partnership means to those who are responsible for operationalising it or how it is experienced in practice. This is particularly the case in the context of African health systems. This paper explores how health professionals working in global health hubs and the health systems of South Africa, Tanzania and Zambia understand and experience partnership. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 101 professionals based in each country, Washington DC and Geneva between October 2012 and June 2013, the paper makes four key arguments. First, partnership has a legitimating function in global health policy processes for international development institutions, government agencies and civil society organisations alike. Second, the practice of partnership generates idiosyncratic and complicated relationships that health professionals have to manage and navigate, often informally. Third, partnership is shaped by historical legacies, critical events, and independent consultants. Fourth, despite being an accepted part of global health policy, there is little shared understanding of what good partnership is meant to include or resemble in practice. Knowing more about the specific socio-cultural and political dynamics of partnership in different health system contexts is critical to equip health professionals with the skills to build the informal relations that are essential to effective partnership engagement. PMID:27155226

  10. Does gender bias influence awards given by societies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Mary Anne; Asher, Pranoti; Farrington, John; Fine, Rana; Leinen, Margaret S.; LeBoy, Phoebe

    2011-11-01

    AGU is a participant in a U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project called Advancing Ways of Awarding Recognition in Disciplinary Societies (AWARDS), which seeks to examine whether gender bias affects selection of recipients of society awards. AGU is interested in learning why there is a higher proportion of female recipients of service and education awards over the past 2 decades. Combined with a lower rate of receipt of research awards, these results suggest that implicit (subconscious) bias in favor of male candidates still influences awardee selection. Six other professional societies (American Chemical Society, American Mathematical Society, American Society of Anesthesiologists, Mathematical Association of America, Society for Neuroscience, and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) are participating in the project. Volunteers from each participant society attended an Association for Women in Science (AWIS)-sponsored workshop in May 2010 to examine data and review literature on best practices for fair selection of society awardees. A draft proposal for implementing these practices will be brought before the AGU Council and the Honors and Recognition Committee at their upcoming meetings.

  11. 78 FR 16842 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ... and Approval; Comment Request; Impact Evaluation of Math Professional Development AGENCY: Institute of Education Sciences (IES), Department of Education (ED). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with the... of Collection: Impact Evaluation of Math Professional Development. OMB Control Number:...

  12. The open society.

    PubMed

    Opel, J R

    1984-07-27

    The open society, unlike the closed society, requires constant citizen thought and action to ensure that it will continue to survive and prosper. Today in the United States we should give particular attention to three immediate problems. We should reinvigorate our national economic health and international competitiveness, particularly by reducing our unprecedented budget deficits and reforming our tax system. We must strengthen our scientific and engineering vitality, particularly in graduate engineering education and in secondary school instruction in science and mathematics. And we should work with our allies in the free industrialized world to keep our international open society as open as possible, encouraging a flow of people and information and ideas across national boundaries while instituting sensible and efficient safeguards against leakage of critical military technology to the Soviet Union. PMID:17813240

  13. Advanced information society(2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  14. Tsunami Science for Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, E. N.

    2014-12-01

    As the decade of mega-tsunamis has unfolded with new data, the science of tsunami has advanced at an unprecedented pace. Our responsibility to society should guide the use of these new scientific discoveries to better prepare society for the next tsunami. This presentation will focus on the impacts of the 2004 and 2011 tsunamis and new societal expectations accompanying enhanced funding for tsunami research. A list of scientific products, including tsunami hazard maps, tsunami energy scale, real-time tsunami flooding estimates, and real-time current velocities in harbors will be presented to illustrate society's need for relevant, easy to understand tsunami information. Appropriate use of these tsunami scientific products will be presented to demonstrate greater tsunami resilience for tsunami threatened coastlines. Finally, a scientific infrastructure is proposed to ensure that these products are both scientifically sound and represent today's best practices to protect the scientific integrity of the products as well as the safety of coastal residents.

  15. 77 FR 45612 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Professional Employee Compensation Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... Regulation; Information Collection; Professional Employee Compensation Plan AGENCY: Department of Defense... Compensation Plan. Public comments are particularly invited on: Whether this collection of information is..., Professional Employee Compensation Plan by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  16. 75 FR 16078 - Reestablishment of the Census Advisory Committee of Professional Associations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of the Census Reestablishment of the Census Advisory Committee of Professional Associations AGENCY... succeeds the Census Advisory Committee of Professional Associations (CACPA). The charter for the...

  17. Designing CBE for Continuing Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Keith

    Deakin Australia (DA) CBE (Continuing Business Education) programs are designed for use in conjunction with print and audio materials which are distributed as distance learning packages to business studies graduates working or planning to work as accountants, who are enrolled in the professional licensing program run by the Australian Society of…

  18. Student Professionalism Competencies in Optometric Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Register, Shilpa J.

    2012-01-01

    Society has high expectations of health care practitioners leaving the burden of proof on healthcare educational institutions. As educators, it is our responsibility to ensure that students acquire the cognitive and affective domains associated with professionalism through the acquisition of appropriate skills and knowledge leading to the…

  19. Virtues, Teacher Professional Expertise, and Socioscientific Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melville, Wayne; Yaxley, Bevis; Wallace, John

    2007-01-01

    This article develops the notion that virtues can be utilized as a means of understanding the professional expertise that science teachers demonstrate when they deal with socioscientific issues. Socioscientific issues are those contentious issues that connect science to the society in which it operates--environmental issues being a prime example.…

  20. Needed: A New Professionalism in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dwight W.

    Education as a professional endeavor must undergo radical changes which will institutionalize change so that it becomes an integral part of the educational structure, thereby meeting the needs of society and individual students as they arise. These priorities seem essential: dynamic definitions of and distinctions among educational roles and…

  1. Society's expectations of health

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Edmund

    1975-01-01

    Sir Edmund Leach argues that doctors in the modern world, fortified by the traditional concept that the life of the sick person must at all costs be preserved, are to some extent guilty of the false antitheses current today between youth and age. Moreover youth means health, age illness and senility. Until this imbalance is corrected society will be in danger of `a kind of civil war between the generations'. Society must be taught again that mortality cannot be avoided or conquered by medical science, and at the same time that `health' is not enshrined in the young alone. PMID:1177271

  2. Advanced information society(7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  3. Debating Professional Designations for Evaluators: Reflections on the Canadian Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, J. Bradley; Cullen, Jim; Malik, Sumbal; Maicher, Brigitte

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a reflective account of a consultation process on professional designations for evaluators initiated and coordinated by the Canadian Evaluation Society (CES). Described are: (1) the forces leading CES to generate discussion and debate about professional designations for Canadian evaluators, (2) the process of developing and…

  4. Motivational Strategies for Young Professionals in the Human Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherniss, Cary

    Many of the caring and socializing functions formerly provided by primary groups, such as the family or church, now are assumed by formal institutions. The quality of life in our society increasingly has been influenced by human service professionals. Motivational problems for these professionals can adversely affect their performance and can…

  5. Press Responsibility Based on Professionalism--A Typology of Attributes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Beer, Arnold S.

    Arguing that professionalism constitutes a method according to which journalism is able to consolidate its position in society and gain the confidence of governments and the public, this paper discusses some theoretical parameters that can serve as a conceptual basis for journalistic professionalization. Noting that according to the sociology of…

  6. Donning the White Coat: The Narrative Threads of Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaff, Pamela

    2006-01-01

    Much has been written recently about medical professionalism, about how we define it, and about how to educate our students in this domain. While there seems to be consensus as to what constitutes professionalism, there remains a good deal of uncertainty as to how best to teach students to meet their obligations to their patients, to society, and…

  7. The Teacher as a Professional in the Caribbean Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Confederation of Organizations of the Teaching Profession, Morges (Switzerland).

    The changing patterns of Caribbean society have affected and will continue to influence the concept of professionalism as it is applied to teaching. Teachers' organizations should promote the professional development of their members, as implied through acceptance of standards of personal conduct, competence on the job, and commitment to student…

  8. Professionalism Marks vs. Participation Marks: Transforming the University Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Elizabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    As well as content, what are we teaching our students and what opportunities can we take to influence their current and future success as graduate students, professionals, and contributors to a wider society? One thing we can teach them is a sense of professionalism; however, that is defined in different disciplines and varying career paths. By…

  9. Precursors of Professionalism in College Seniors: Influence of Major, Gender, and Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nino, Lana S.

    2013-01-01

    Professionalism is a desirable quality linked to the evolution of democratic society and values (Brint, 1996; Freidson, 2001; Millerson, 1964). Nearly 68% of senior-level undergraduate students are driven to enter the professional world and serve society in their respective areas of expertise such as nursing, engineering, education, and business…

  10. American Society of Echocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    American Society of Echocardiography Join Ase Member Portal Log In Membership Member Portal Log In Join ASE Renew Benefits Rates FASE – Fellow ... 2016 · Executive Theme · Genesis Framework by StudioPress · WordPress · Log in Membership ▼ Member Portal Log In Join ASE ...

  11. Teaching Global Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peet, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Describes the course, "Global Society," for first-year International Studies students at a Massachusetts liberal arts college. The course, which takes a historical approach, informs students about the nature, history, and present characteristics of the global system, taking theoretical, historical, and critical approaches that stress the…

  12. [The Closing Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Kingman, Jr.

    At the root of student unrest are two basic factors: (1) the "involuntary campus," and (2) the "manipulated society." Many students attend a university not because they want to, but because of parental pressure, to avoid the draft, to get the right job, or to satisfy the notion that in order to be really accomplished it is necessary to have a…

  13. Multiethnic Societies and Regions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanfield, John H., II

    1996-01-01

    Maintains that sociology must reconceptualize the meaning of multiethnic societies and regions and also advance theories about how such social organizations came into being and transform themselves through conflicting and peaceful processes. Briefly reviews traditional approaches and outlines new areas of study. (MJP)

  14. Mind, Society, and Racism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meacham, Jack

    1996-01-01

    Uses example of racism to compare Vygotsky's and Piaget's perspectives on the development of mind within the framework of questions regarding the mutual influence of societies and individuals. Notes that Vygotsky emphasizes knowledge transmission from older to younger, whereas Piaget emphasizes construction of new knowledge with potential for…

  15. Exploratory of society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cederman, L.-E.; Conte, R.; Helbing, D.; Nowak, A.; Schweitzer, F.; Vespignani, A.

    2012-11-01

    A huge flow of quantitative social, demographic and behavioral data is becoming available that traces the activities and interactions of individuals, social patterns, transportation infrastructures and travel fluxes. This has caused, together with innovative computational techniques and methods for modeling social actions in hybrid (natural and artificial) societies, a qualitative change in the ways we model socio-technical systems. For the first time, society can be studied in a comprehensive fashion that addresses social and behavioral complexity. In other words we are in the position to envision the development of large data and computational cyber infrastructure defining an exploratory of society that provides quantitative anticipatory, explanatory and scenario analysis capabilities ranging from emerging infectious disease to conflict and crime surges. The goal of the exploratory of society is to provide the basic infrastructure embedding the framework of tools and knowledge needed for the design of forecast/anticipatory/crisis management approaches to socio technical systems, supporting future decision making procedures by accelerating the scientific cycle that goes from data generation to predictions.

  16. Big Society, Big Deal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Political leaders like to put forward guiding ideas or themes which pull their individual decisions into a broader narrative. For John Major it was Back to Basics, for Tony Blair it was the Third Way and for David Cameron it is the Big Society. While Mr. Blair relied on Lord Giddens to add intellectual weight to his idea, Mr. Cameron's legacy idea…

  17. The Learning Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Zee, Hendrik

    1991-01-01

    Strategic issues in the development of a learning society are (1) broadening the definition of learning; (2) making the goal of learning growth toward completeness; (3) increasing collective competence; (4) fostering autonomy in learners; and (5) stressing a political approach to learning (the right to learn as a civil right). (SK)

  18. Science Serves Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sneed, G. C.

    This book discusses how some of the topics taught in a conventional physics course have been used to solve interesting technical problems in industry, medicine, agriculture, transportation, and other areas of society. The topics include heat, optics, magnetism and electricity, nuclear physics, and sound. (MLH)

  19. The Learning Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Inst. for Advanced Research, Toronto (Ontario).

    This publication focuses on the challenges faced by modern societies as they seek to plan for competing in the global economy, educating the population for new competencies, maintaining the social fabric for nurturing and socializing the next generation, and providing opportunities for the health and well-being of all citizens. Emphasis is placed…

  20. Researching Society and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, Clive, Ed.

    This book provides theoretically informed guidance to practicing the key research methods for investigating society and culture. It is a text in both methods and methodology, in which the importance of understanding the historical, theoretical and institutional context in which particular methods have developed is stressed. The contributors of the…

  1. Man--Society--Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taxis, Linda A., Ed.

    The 32nd annual American Industrial Arts Association (AIAA) Convention was held in Louisville in 1970. Topics for the AIAA general session addresses were: (1) "Industrial Arts--The Blender Between Social Form and Technical Function," (2) "Technology and Society: Present and Future Challenges," (3) "A Student-Oriented Industrial Arts," (4) "Man:…

  2. African Music: Negotiating a Space in Contemporary Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Dawn; Human, Rene

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the notion of African music as a way forward to negotiate a "space" in contemporary society. The word "space" is used as a metaphor to explore and experiment with the dynamics of culture and hybridity. The authors view themselves as "agents of change" and knowledgeable professionals in the teaching of African music, one based…

  3. American Indian Science & Engineering Society 1994 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Science and Engineering Society, Boulder, CO.

    The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. AISES educational programs provide opportunities for American Indians and Alaska Natives to pursue studies in science, engineering, and other academic arenas. The trained professionals become…

  4. Moral Choices in Contemporary Society: A Courses by Newspaper Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieff, Philip, Ed.; Finkle, Isaac, Ed.

    This reader, which contains 135 primary source readings about morality, is one of several college-level instructional materials developed to supplement a nationwide newspaper course on moral issues in contemporary society. The authors represent a diverse group including theologians, psychologists, politicians, professional athletes, lawyers, and…

  5. Scholarly Societies and Scholarly Communication: A Look Ahead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonfeld, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    In many academic and professional fields, the society-sponsored journal has for a century had a unique position in scholarly discourse. An annual meeting and conference provided intellectual exchange and social stimulation, while the journal provided a more formal mechanism to communicate, to review, to evaluate, and to certify. Changes in…

  6. Cultivating Citizenship: Paradox and Possibility in a Multicultural Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pun, Shuk-han

    2007-01-01

    This paper re-conceptualizes the relationship between the citizens and the state in view of praxes, dilemmas and contradictions found in modern multicultural societies. The new concept of citizenship is construed through a joint project for the state and human service professionals designated as organic intellectuals within a Gramscian framework…

  7. Satirizing the Debating Society in Eighteenth-Century England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Stephen H.

    1989-01-01

    Proposes satire as a form of argumentative practice. Examines eighteenth-century satirical attacks upon London's ubiquitous debating societies (formed among tradesmen, craftsmen, professionals, and small businessmen to "improve" themselves) as evidence of satire's public role in which the ideological struggle between social classes was waged. (SR)

  8. The Institutionalization of Comparative Education in Asia and the Pacific: Roles and Contributions of Comparative Education Societies and the WCCES

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Mark; Manzon, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The institutional framework of the field of comparative education has developed significantly in recent decades. One manifestation of development has been the establishment and activities of professional societies. This paper focuses on 12 societies that operate in Asia and the Pacific. Some of these societies have long histories while others are…

  9. David Mechanic: Professional Zombie Hunter.

    PubMed

    Hafferty, Frederic W; Tilburt, Jon

    2016-08-01

    Within the fields of medicine and sociology, the descriptor "profession" (along with its brethren: profession, professionalization, and professionalism) has had a rich etymological history, with terms taking on different meanings at different times-sometimes trespassing into shibboleth and jargon. This etymological journey has co-evolved with the career of David Mechanic to whom this issue of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law is devoted. We exploit a provocative metaphor applied to Mechanic's work on the challenges facing medicine as a profession as a playful exegesis on what we call "profession" to excavate an ensconced and encrusted domain of health jargon operating at the tensive interface of society and modern medical work.

  10. David Mechanic: Professional Zombie Hunter.

    PubMed

    Hafferty, Frederic W; Tilburt, Jon

    2016-08-01

    Within the fields of medicine and sociology, the descriptor "profession" (along with its brethren: profession, professionalization, and professionalism) has had a rich etymological history, with terms taking on different meanings at different times-sometimes trespassing into shibboleth and jargon. This etymological journey has co-evolved with the career of David Mechanic to whom this issue of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law is devoted. We exploit a provocative metaphor applied to Mechanic's work on the challenges facing medicine as a profession as a playful exegesis on what we call "profession" to excavate an ensconced and encrusted domain of health jargon operating at the tensive interface of society and modern medical work. PMID:27127250

  11. US Federal Agency Research on Ecosystem Services

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last decade, research and policy institutions across the globe have shown a dramatic increase in attention to the benefits that human society receives from ecosystems. In the U.S., a broad range of Federal resource management and environmental agencies are conducting r...

  12. The liberal arts and professional nursing: making the connections.

    PubMed

    Vande Zande, G A

    1995-02-01

    A liberal education is essential for professional nurses today. "Liberally educated nurses make informed and responsible ethical choices and help shape the future of society as well as the nursing profession" (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1986, p. 5). At our liberal arts college, through a seminar course taught from a multidisciplinary perspective, students integrate new knowledge from the liberal arts disciplines and from the discipline of nursing with professional nursing practice and with life in contemporary society. Thus, they make the connections between the liberal arts and professional nursing, an essential component of baccalaureate nursing education.

  13. When a man encounters a woman, Satan is also present: clinical relationships in Bedouin society.

    PubMed

    Mass, M; al-Krenawi, A

    1994-07-01

    Professional encounters in Bedouin society between male therapists and their female clients are discussed in terms of the conflict between clinical precepts and Bedouin codes of social conduct. The effects of the conflict on the transference relationship are examined by means of case presentations, and rules of conduct acceptable in both the professional realm and Bedouin society are proposed as an avenue toward resolution. PMID:7977659

  14. How to be a good professional: existentialist continuing professional development (CPD)

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    This article reflects on the construct and practice of continuing professional development (CPD) and its significance for the professional careers workforce. The article presents the idea of the CPD triad and considers how professional bodies, employers and individuals can each benefit from a practitioner's ongoing commitment to continuing professional development. The tension between the practitioner's quest for lifelong learning is set against professional body demands, leading to the conclusion that these are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Consideration is given to propositional, practical and procedural knowledge, and to overall competence. The article explores an existentialist approach to professional learning, and concludes that, along with personal agency, this could usefully be adopted by career practitioners to weather turbulent times. PMID:24009404

  15. How to be a good professional: existentialist continuing professional development (CPD).

    PubMed

    Mulvey, Rachel

    2013-06-01

    This article reflects on the construct and practice of continuing professional development (CPD) and its significance for the professional careers workforce. The article presents the idea of the CPD triad and considers how professional bodies, employers and individuals can each benefit from a practitioner's ongoing commitment to continuing professional development. The tension between the practitioner's quest for lifelong learning is set against professional body demands, leading to the conclusion that these are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Consideration is given to propositional, practical and procedural knowledge, and to overall competence. The article explores an existentialist approach to professional learning, and concludes that, along with personal agency, this could usefully be adopted by career practitioners to weather turbulent times.

  16. Activity Theory and Language Teacher Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feryok, Anne

    2012-01-01

    This article takes a broadly sociocultural perspective on the development of an Armenian English as a foreign language (EFL) teacher. It focuses on how experiences and actions outside the professional development classroom influence language teacher agency. The paper is framed within activity theory and specifically draws on Galperin's orienting…

  17. Guidelines for Working with Law Enforcement Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corn, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Many security professionals choose the career because of an interest in the technology of security. Few realize the degree to which a contemporary security office interacts with law enforcement agencies (LEAs) such as the FBI and state, local, and campus police. As the field of information security has matured, the language of risk management is…

  18. 5 CFR 362.201 - Agency programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agency programs. 362.201 Section 362.201 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PRESIDENTIAL MANAGEMENT FELLOWS... short-, medium-, and long-term senior leadership and related (senior policy, professional,...

  19. Rethinking Professional Standards to Promote Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forde, Christine; McMahon, Margery Anne; Hamilton, Gillian; Murray, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    This article explores some of the key issues that emerged in the revision of the professional standards in Scottish education. The revision of the professional standards was part of a wider project to build teacher professional learning in ways that had an impact on practice and on pupil learning. The article begins by examining the international…

  20. Counseling: Issues of Professionalism and Professionalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada, Theresa J.

    Professionalism and professionalization are two issues important to the field of counseling. A basic definition of a profession is necessary in order to understand the role of counseling as a profession. One theory on the development of professions in the western world begins with the priest as the prototypical professional. Professions then…

  1. Is it time to define veterinary professionalism?

    PubMed

    Mossop, Liz H

    2012-01-01

    The medical profession has spent much time and many resources engaging in a discourse of medical professionalism and debating the appropriate attitudes and behavior of physicians, but little has been published concerning the concept of veterinary professionalism. Physicians are commonly examined by social scientists and educationalists to establish definitions of medical professionalism in order to teach and assess these values within curricula. This challenging process has not been without criticism, however, with some calling the numerous definitions unhelpful, especially when these behaviors are not demonstrated in practice or the wider sociological implications of medical professionalism are ignored. Veterinary curricula often include professional skills, and there has been some discussion about their inclusion as well as the scope of veterinary surgeons and their role in society. Despite this, no true definition of veterinary professionalism exists, and the teaching of the values and behaviors expected of veterinary professionals may not be explicit. Regardless of the difficulties of engaging in such a discourse, perhaps it is time that this occurred and a realistic and usable definition of veterinary professionalism is established. This is a period of change for the veterinary profession, and a teachable and assessable definition can provide some clarity and assist educators within ever evolving veterinary curricula. PMID:22433745

  2. Shrinking societies favor procreation.

    PubMed

    Kent, M M

    1999-12-01

    Low birth rates and unprecedented improvements in life expectancy had brought a shrinking society to a rapidly expanding retirement-age population. In 1999, people aged 65 and older make up 15% or more of the populations in 19 countries. Furthermore, 14 country populations are already experiencing natural decrease, and a lot more will start to decline early in the 21st century. Due to this predicament, concerned countries have created policies that may encourage more childbearing by easing the opportunity costs of raising children. Among the policies are: 1) paid maternity and paternity leaves until a child is 2-3 years; 2) free child care; 3) tax breaks for large families; 4) family housing allowance; 5) cash paid to parents for raising a child. Governments of the shrinking societies believed that these policies could influence fertility because it affects the socioeconomic setting in which childbearing decisions are made. This paper also discusses Hungary, Japan, and Sweden fertility policies. PMID:12295635

  3. 78 FR 75568 - Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-12

    ...-clinical Environmental and public health professionals at the city, county and state levels Poison Control... professionals and Poison Control Center directors. Individual interviews will allow the agencies to gather in-depth information about state-level response structures and Poison Control Centers. Interviews will...

  4. Learning in and for Multi-Agency Working

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Harry; Leadbetter, Jane; Warmington, Paul; Edwards, Anne; Martin, Deirdre; Popova, Anna; Apostolov, Apostol; Middleton, David; Brown, Steve

    2007-01-01

    This study addresses the challenges faced by organisations and individual professionals, as new practices are developed and learned in multi-agency work settings. The practices examined in the paper involve working responsively across professional boundaries with at-risk young people. The paper draws on evidence from the Learning in and for…

  5. Quality and human society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoll, W.

    1991-02-01

    Quality of products and services is seen as a necessity in our modern world. Quality also has important cross-links to safety in our society. It is however suggested, that human beings are living in their industrial environment under the stress of a fractured personality with anxieties and frustrations. Some cultural comparisons with other industrial nations are given. Quality control tailored to human nature is recommended.

  6. Evolution, museums and society.

    PubMed

    MacFadden, Bruce J

    2008-11-01

    Visitors to natural history museums have an incomplete understanding of evolution. Although they are relatively knowledgeable about fossils and geological time, they have a poor understanding of natural selection. Museums in the 21st century can effectively increase public understanding of evolution through interactive displays, novel content (e.g. genomics), engaging videos and cyberexhibits that communicate to a broad spectrum of society, both within the exhibit halls as well as outside the museum.

  7. History society launches journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    A fledgling international organization plans to launch, in the next few months, a journal devoted to the study of the history of the earth sciences. The journal, to be published by the History of Earth Sciences Society (HESS), will be edited by Gerald M. Friedman ot the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.HESS will promote interest and scholarship in the history of the earth sciences by publishing the semiannual journal, by organizing meetings about the history of earth sciences, and by supporting the efforts of other associations displaying similar interests, according to the society's draft constitution. An organizational meeting to ratify the constitution and to elect officers will be held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in October. The interim officers and the proposed slate for 1983 include David B. Kitts (University of Oklahoma, Norman), president; Albert V. Carrozi (University of Illinois, Urbana), president-elect; and Ellis L. Yochelson (U.S. Geological Survey, National Museum of Natural History), secretary.

  8. The National Cardiac Societies of the European Society of Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Atar, Dan

    2015-06-01

    The National Cardiac Societies are one of the Constituent Bodies of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). They are the backbone of the ESC and together form the "Cardiology of Europe" in 56 European and Mediterranean countries.

  9. Disciplining Professional Vision in Architectural Work: Practices of Seeing and Seeing beyond the Visual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Styhre, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Professional communities are capable of maintaining their social status and role in society on the basis of a blend of technical and formal expertise, know-how, and an understanding of the non-professional's demands and expectations. In architectural work, professional expertise largely centres on the visual capacities of the architect,…

  10. Exploring the Issue of Failure to Fail in Professional Education Programs: A Multidisciplinary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luhanga, Florence L.; Larocque, Sylvie; MacEwan, Leigh; Gwekwerere, Yovita N.; Danyluk, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    There is a universal demand for well-prepared professionals in all disciplines, and society has entrusted professional schools with the task of preparing such individuals (Ralph, Walker, and Wimmer, 2008). Within this context, field or clinical instructors and university faculty have an academic and professional responsibility to teach, supervise,…

  11. Educating for Digital Futures: What the Learning Strategies of Digital Media Professionals Can Teach Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgstock, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how universities might engage more effectively with the imperative to develop students' twenty-first century skills for the information society, by examining learning challenges and professional learning strategies of successful digital media professionals. The findings of qualitative interviews with professionals from…

  12. Contributions of Public Health to Genetics Education for Health Care Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Wylie

    2005-01-01

    With growing knowledge about the role of genetics in health, genetics education for health care professionals has taken on increasing importance. Many efforts are under way to develop new genetics curricula. Although such efforts are primarily the responsibility of health professional schools and professional societies, the public health system is…

  13. Chi Sigma Iota Chapter Leadership and Professional Identity Development in Early Career Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Melissa; Goodrich, Kristopher M.

    2010-01-01

    As the academic and professional honor society of counseling, Chi Sigma Iota (CSI) has been recognized in developing advocacy, leadership, and professional identity in student and professional members. A qualitative, grounded theory study was conducted to investigate experiences of 15 early career counselors who were CSI chapter leaders as…

  14. The Knowledge Work of Professional Associations: Approaches to Standardisation and Forms of Legitimisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerland, Monika; Karseth, Berit

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how professional associations engage themselves in efforts to develop, regulate and secure knowledge in their respective domains, with special emphasis on standardisation. The general emphasis on science in society brings renewed attention to the knowledge base of professionals, and positions professional bodies as key…

  15. The Journal for the Professional Counselor, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldin, Eugene, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This publication of the New York Counseling Association is dedicated to providing in-depth articles about research on topics relevant to the profession. It is designed for use by professionals working in schools, colleges, and agency settings. The 1999 volume comprises two issues. Issue 1 is devoted to the topic of play therapy. Articles include:…

  16. The Journal for the Professional Counselor, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bordan, Terry, Ed.; Goldin, Eugene, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This refereed journal addresses the interests of counselors in school, college, and agency settings and deals with current professional issues, theory, scientific research, and innovative programs and practices. The 1997 volume is comprised of issues number 1 and 2. Number 1 includes the following articles: "Group Counseling for Children of…

  17. Towards a Framework for Professional Curriculum Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winch, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Recent reviews of vocational qualifications in England have noted problems with their restricted nature. However, the underlying issue of how to conceptualise professional agency in curriculum design has not been properly addressed, either by the Richard or the Whitehead reviews. Drawing on comparative work in England and Europe it is argued that…

  18. The Phenomenology of Professional Practice: A "Currere"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In the shift to a more clearly economic imperative for universities than social good, the relationship between higher education teaching and professional practice has become increasingly apparent. It is seen in the courses offered by universities, and the relationship with employment and employers advocated by government and funding agencies. From…

  19. Teaching professionalism in science courses: anatomy to zoology.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Cheryl C

    2012-02-01

    Medical professionalism is reflected in attitudes, behaviors, character, and standards of practice. It is embodied by physicians who fulfill their duties to patients and uphold societies' trust in medicine. Professionalism requires familiarity with the ethical codes and standards established by international, governmental, institutional, or professional organizations. It also requires becoming aware of and responsive to societal controversies. Scientific uncertainty may be used to teach aspects of professionalism in science courses. Uncertainty about the science behind, and the health impacts of, climate change is one example explored herein that may be used to teach both professionalism and science. Many medical curricula provide students with information about professionalism and create opportunities for students to reflect upon and strengthen their individually evolving levels of professionalism. Faculties in basic sciences are rarely called upon to teach professionalism or deepen medical students understanding of professional standards, competencies, and ethical codes. However they have the knowledge and experience to develop goals, learning objectives, and topics relevant to professionalism within their own disciplines and medical curricula. Their dedication to, and passion for, science will support basic science faculties in designing innovative and effective approaches to teaching professionalism. This paper explores topics and formats that scientists may find useful in teaching professional attitudes, skills, and competencies in their medical curriculum. It highlights goals and learning objectives associated with teaching medical professionalism in the basic sciences.

  20. Setting scientific standards: publishing in medical societies in nineteenth-century Belgium.

    PubMed

    Vandendriessche, Joris

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the publishing procedures of nineteenth-century medical societies, using the Medical Society of Ghent (Belgium) as a case study. It argues, more precisely, that the introduction of formalized review procedures in medical societies can be considered part of the emergence of a professional scientific culture in the first half of the nineteenth century. First, by participating in these procedures physicians took on different stylized roles, for example of the contributing author, the righteous judge, or the punctual secretary, and articulated new professional values such as contributing to science. Second, the publishing procedures of medical societies also provide insight into the mechanisms of reaching consensus in nineteenth-century medicine. By developing new scientific genres, such as the published meeting report, medical societies aimed to extend the community of peers beyond the group of society members and establish trust and agreement throughout the medical community.

  1. The history of the Nederlandse Vereniging voor Hypnose (Netherlands Society of Hypnosis).

    PubMed

    Korsen, A; Wilken, T

    2001-07-01

    The foundation and history of the Nederlandse Vereniging voor Hypnose (Netherlands Society of Hypnosis or Nvvh) is described. The year 2001 marks the 70th anniversary of the Nvvh's creation. The article describes the accomplishments, leadership, and philosophy of the Society across the decades. Current professional and training directions are discussed.

  2. Taking Steps towards the Knowledge Society: Reflections on the Process of Knowledge Development. CEDEFOP Reference Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyhan, Barry, Ed.

    This 11-chapter book is intended to explore the ways in which professional and vocational education and training (VET) can contribute toward building the emerging "knowledge society," particularly the ways in which the research and development community can take proactive steps to shape the emerging knowledge society. Part 1, on promoting…

  3. Distributed morality in an information society.

    PubMed

    Floridi, Luciano

    2013-09-01

    The phenomenon of distributed knowledge is well-known in epistemic logic. In this paper, a similar phenomenon in ethics, somewhat neglected so far, is investigated, namely distributed morality. The article explains the nature of distributed morality, as a feature of moral agency, and explores the implications of its occurrence in advanced information societies. In the course of the analysis, the concept of infraethics is introduced, in order to refer to the ensemble of moral enablers, which, although morally neutral per se, can significantly facilitate or hinder both positive and negative moral behaviours.

  4. Developing Environmental Agency and Engagement through Young People's Fiction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigger, Stephen; Webb, Jean

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the extent to which stories for young people encourage environmental engagement and a sense of agency. Our discussion is informed by the work of Paul Ricoeur (on hermeneutics and narrative), John Dewey (on primacy of experience) and John Macmurray (on personal agency in society). We understand fiction reading about place as…

  5. Examining the Satisfaction Levels of Continual Professional Development Provided by a Rural Accounting Professional Body

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halabi, Abdel K.

    2014-01-01

    The Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia (SPERA) recognises education as a lifelong process, and there is a need for continuing education and training to be available to rural communities. This paper examines the satisfaction levels of accounting continual professional development (CPD) when provided by a rural accounting…

  6. Faculty Agency: Departmental Contexts That Matter in Faculty Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Corbin M.; O'Meara, KerryAnn

    2014-01-01

    In a modern context of constrained resources and high demands, faculty exert agency to strategically navigate their careers (Baez 2000a; Neumann et al. 2006). Guided by the O'Meara et al. (2011) framework on agency in faculty professional lives, this study used Structural Equation Modeling to investigate which departmental factors…

  7. Faculty Agency: Departmental Contexts that Matter in Faculty Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Corbin M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the organizational factors that influence faculty sense of agency in their professional lives and whether the relationship between organizational factors and faculty agency manifests differently by gender. Past literature on faculty has largely taken an approach that was termed a "narrative of…

  8. Role of professional organizations in advocating for the nursing profession.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Jennifer H

    2012-01-31

    Professional organizations and associations in nursing are critical for generating the energy, flow of ideas, and proactive work needed to maintain a healthy profession that advocates for the needs of its clients and nurses, and the trust of society. In this article the author discusses the characteristics of a profession, reviews the history of professional nursing organizations, and describes the advocacy activities of professional nursing organizations. Throughout, she explains how the three foundational documents of the nursing profession emphasize nursing advocacy by the professional organizations as outlined in the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for Nurses With Interpretive Statements. The author concludes by encouraging all nurses to engage in their professional organizations and associations, noting how these organizations contribute to the accountability and voice of the profession to society.

  9. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePlus

    American Head & Neck Society Mission Statement: Advance Education, Research, and Quality of Care for the head and neck oncology patient. American Head & Neck Society | AHNS The mission of the AHNS is ...

  10. Science, Society and Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, K. S.; Teich, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    Apart from the journals they produce, scientific societies play an important role in communicating scientific findings and norms to the broader society. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) includes among its goals to promote and defend the integrity of science and its use; provide a voice for science on societal issues; promote the responsible use of science in public policy; and increase public engagement with science and technology. AAAS websites and programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (http://www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/wwc/book.htm) and ScienceCareers.org (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org), provide tools for scientists to become more directly engaged in effectively communicating their findings and involved in the policy process. Education programs work to build the next generation of scientists and a science-literate public. To bridge the current communication gap between scientists, the public and policymakers, AAAS, like other scientific societies, maintains policy and outreach programs with limited budgets and staff. AAAS works to engage policymakers and provide scientific underpinning to key issues through congressional briefings, meetings, policy briefs, and media outreach. AAAS responds to challenges to accepted scientific findings and processes through op-eds, letters to government officials, resolutions, and Board statements. Some of these initiatives occur on a local level in partnership with local civic leaders, whose endorsement makes them more powerful. On a national scale, they assure that the voice of science is included in the debate. The changing media landscape presents opportunities and challenges for future AAAS endeavors.

  11. Reasonable partiality in professional relationships.

    PubMed

    Almond, Brenda

    2005-04-01

    First, two aspects of the partiality issue are identified: (1) Is it right/reasonable for professionals to favour their clients' interests over either those of other individuals or those of society in general? (2) Are special non-universalisable obligations attached to certain professional roles? Second, some comments are made on the notions of partiality and reasonableness. On partiality, the assumption that only two positions are possible--a detached universalism or a partialist egoism--is challenged and it is suggested that partiality, e.g. to family members, lies between these two positions, being neither a form of egoism, nor of impersonal detachment. On reasonableness, it is pointed out that 'reasonable' is an ambiguous concept, eliding the notions of the 'morally right' and the 'rational.' Third, a series of practical examples are taken from counselling, medicine, law, education and religious practice and some common principles are abstracted from the cases and discussed. These include truth-telling, confidentiality, conflicts of interest between clients and particular others and between clients and society. It is concluded that while partiality can be justified as a useful tool in standard cases, particular circumstances can affect the final verdict.

  12. Rethinking Cells to Society

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Toni C.; Webster, Noah J.

    2015-01-01

    It is an exciting time to be a developmental scientist. We have advanced theoretical frameworks and developed ground-breaking methods for addressing questions of interest, ranging literally from cells to society. We know more now than we have ever known about human development and the base of acquired knowledge is increasing exponentially. In this paper we share some thoughts about where we are in the science of human development, how we got there, what may be going wrong and what may be going right. Finally, we offer some thoughts about where we go from here to assure that in the future we achieve the best developmental science possible. PMID:25642155

  13. Measurement and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Terence J.; Kovalevsky, Jean

    2004-10-01

    In modern society, metrology is a hidden infrastructure, that affects most human activities. Several domains in which measurements, and therefore metrology, play a crucial role are presented and illustrated with examples: manufacturing industries, navigation, telecommunications, medicine, environment, and scientific research. The BIPM and the national metrology institutes are at the top of traceability chains, which guarantee that all measurements are performed in conformity with the International System of Units (SI) and are therefore comparable. Finally, some indications of the economic benefits of metrology are given. To cite this article: T.J. Quinn, J. Kovalevsky, C. R. Physique 5 (2004).

  14. Advanced information society (9)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Hiroki

    This article discusses the U.S. and European national strategies and policies for information society. Coping with the declining competitiveness in high-tech products and Japanese technological advantages both have been trying hard to strengthen technology base and to deregulate the telecommunications services markets. The U.S. approach in 1980's, unlike its liberalist principle, has been characterized by technological protectlonism and defense-oriented policies. European Communities' approach has been more comprehensive and systematic, investing heavily telecommunication infrastructure, deregulating domestic market, and promoting cooperation of member countries. However, both of these approaches have, so far, been unable to achieve a considerable success.

  15. Activity Theory: A Framework for Understanding Multi-Agency Working and Engaging Service Users in Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhouse, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the quality of professional relationships between educational psychologists (EPs) and other professionals who work around children, young people and their families as part of a multi-agency team (MAT). The perceived barriers to, and facilitators of, effective multi-agency working are explored in relation to their potential…

  16. The Significance of Critical Incidents and Voice to Identity and Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisson, Jamie Huff

    2016-01-01

    Human agency is significant to the understanding of professional identities and actions. It is through human agency that individuals can become powerful in changing or authoring their own identities. Stemming from a larger narrative inquiry focused on understanding the professional identities of public preschool teachers, this paper draws on…

  17. The New Struggle for the Paraprofessional: Between the Community and the Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riessman, Frank

    Despite the difficulties emerging in relationships between paraprofessionals and agency professionals--difficulties related to basic social cleavages (black-white, community-professional, and participation-authority)--the utilization of paraprofessionals will continue to increase because of community desire to influence the staffs of the agency or…

  18. Education in a Technological Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Paul W., Ed.; Smith, Wil J., Ed.

    Technological change places increased responsibility on the educational system of a democratic society to prepare citizens for intelligent participation in government. This conference was held to analyze the nature of the technological society and the role of education in preparing the individual for membership in that society. The papers…

  19. Prospects for a Learning Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohliger, John

    1975-01-01

    The author raises six serious doubts about the directions adult education is taking toward a society mistakenly termed "learning society," which is in fact an "instructional society." An ominous vision of "womb-to-tomb" schooling is evoked by the author's quotations from prominent adult educators who criticize this trend. (Author/AJ)

  20. Creative Drama and Agricultural Societies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the interaction of culture and creative drama. Examines agricultural societies under three conditions: historically, from neolithic times; contemporary American Southwest Indian and Polynesian; and modern farming subcultures of European industrial societies. Asks how far agricultural life influences creative drama in agrarian societies.…

  1. 'What is professional ethics?'.

    PubMed

    Brecher, Bob

    2014-03-01

    The very term 'professional ethics' is puzzling with respect to what both 'professional' and 'ethics' might mean. I argue (1) that professionalism is ambiguous as to whether or not it is implicitly committed to ethical practice; (2) that to be 'professionally' ethical is at best ambiguous, if not in fact bizarre; and (3) that, taken together, these considerations suggest that professional ethics is something to be avoided rather than lauded.

  2. What opportunities are available for resident involvement in national orthopedic and subspecialty societies?

    PubMed

    Dy, Christopher J; Cross, Michael B; Osbahr, Daryl C; Parks, Michael L; Green, Daniel W

    2011-10-01

    As physician involvement in health policy grows, there will be an increasing need for future leaders in orthopedics. Interested orthopedic residents may be unaware of opportunities for leadership involvement in professional and subspecialty organizations. This article investigates whether national and subspecialty organizations offer membership to residents, allow residents to participate in committees, and provide opportunities for scholarly activity and mentorship. The authors surveyed 20 national orthopedic professional and subspecialty societies to evaluate the availability and cost of resident membership, meeting attendance and participation, research funding, committee membership, and mentorship opportunities. Each society's Web site was reviewed, and societies were contacted by phone if further inquiry was needed. Of the 20 orthopedic societies surveyed, 11 allowed resident membership. Five of 20 societies allowed residents to serve on committees, with a total of 14 total positions for residents. Four organizations provided formalized mentorship programs to residents. Although opportunities for resident involvement in subspecialty and professional societies are available in the majority of groups surveyed, the Orthopaedic Trauma Association and American Society for Surgery of the Hand provided the most comprehensive collection of opportunities. Residents should also pursue involvement in other organizations that may be more readily accessible, such as local, state, and regional orthopedic and medical societies. Increased resident participation in these organizations may help in increasing the 14 nationally available committee positions for orthopedic residents. Our orthopedic profession and societies should encourage motivated residents to pursue involvement and leadership at the national level.

  3. Professionalism for Medicine: Opportunities and Obligations*

    PubMed Central

    Cruess, Sylvia R; Cruess, Richard L; Johnston, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Physicians' dual roles-as healer and professional-are linked by codes of ethics governing behaviour and are empowered by science.Being part of a profession entails a societal contract. The profession is granted a monopoly over the use of a body of knowledge and the privilege of self-regulation and, in return, guarantees society professional competence, integrity and the provision of altruistic service.Societal attitudes to professionalism have changed from supportive to increasingly critical-with physicians being criticised for pursuing their own financial interests, and failing to self-regulate in a way that guarantees competence.Professional values are also threatened by many other factors. The most important are the changes in healthcare delivery in the developed world, with control shifting from the profession to the State and/or the corporate sector.For the ideal of professionalism to survive, physicians must understand it and its role in the social contract. They must meet the obligations necessary to sustain professionalism and ensure that healthcare systems support, rather than subvert, behaviour that is compatible with professionalism's values. PMID:15296199

  4. [The Taiwan Nurses Association and professional diplomacy].

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheuan

    2014-08-01

    The Taiwan Nurses Association (TWNA) is publishing a special centenary issue to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the association in 2014. For this issue, TWNA invited the author to write a review article that addresses the involvement of the TWNA in professional diplomacy and international exchange over the past century. The author reviews the history of both TWNA and the International Council of Nurses and introduces the contributions of the association in the field of professional diplomacy and the positive contributions of many Taiwan nursing leaders to global healthcare and society. The purpose of the paper is to convey the traditions and experiences of TWNA forward to the next generation. PMID:25125155

  5. [The Taiwan Nurses Association and professional diplomacy].

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheuan

    2014-08-01

    The Taiwan Nurses Association (TWNA) is publishing a special centenary issue to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the association in 2014. For this issue, TWNA invited the author to write a review article that addresses the involvement of the TWNA in professional diplomacy and international exchange over the past century. The author reviews the history of both TWNA and the International Council of Nurses and introduces the contributions of the association in the field of professional diplomacy and the positive contributions of many Taiwan nursing leaders to global healthcare and society. The purpose of the paper is to convey the traditions and experiences of TWNA forward to the next generation.

  6. The Value of a Master's Degree to Recreation Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Camilla J.; Hill, Brian J.; Brinton, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the nature of the relationship between earning advanced degrees and career outcomes such as salary, job satisfaction, social capital, and human capital among professionals in the parks and recreation field. The sample (n = 196) was drawn from parks and recreation agencies located in the United States. Agencies, excluding…

  7. Communicating Science to Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illingworth, Samuel; Muller, Jennifer; Leather, Kimberley; Morgan, William; O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David; Booth, Alastair; Llyod, Gary; Young, Dominique; Bannan, Thomas; Simpson, Emma; Percival, Carl; Allen, Grant; Clark, Elaine; Muller, Catherine; Graves, Rosemarie

    2014-05-01

    "Nothing in science has any value to society if it is not communicated." So goes the 1952 quote from Anne Roe, the noted twentieth century American psychologist and writer. She went on to say that "scientists are beginning to learn their social obligations", and now over 60 years later there is certainly evidence to support her assertions. As scientists, by communicating our research to the general public we not only better inform the tax payer where their money is being spent, but are also able to help put into context the topical environmental challenges and issues that society faces, as well as inspiring a whole new generation of future scientists. This process of communication is very much a two-way street; by presenting our work to people outside of our usual spheres of contemporaries, we expose ourselves to alternative thoughts and insights that can inspire us, as scientists, to take another look at our research from angles that we had never before considered. This work presents the results and experiences from a number of public engagement and outreach activities across the UK, in which geoscientists engaged and interacted with members of the general public. These include the design and implementation of Raspberry Pi based outreach activities for several hundred high school students; the process of running a successful podcast (http://thebarometer.podbean.com); hosting and participating in science events for thousands of members of the general public (e.g. http://www.manchestersciencefestival.com and http://sse.royalsociety.org/2013); and creating a citizen science activity that involved primary school children from across the UK. In communicating their research it is imperative that scientists interact with their audience in an effective and engaging manner, whether in an international conference, a classroom, or indeed down the pub. This work also presents a discussion of how these skills can be developed at an early stage in the careers of a research

  8. Medical education and society.

    PubMed

    Murray, T J

    1995-11-15

    As health care changes under the pressures of restraint and constraint our vision of the future of medical education should be based on the medical school's responsibility to the community. The medical school is "an academy in the community": as an academy, it fosters the highest standards in education and research; as an institution in the community, it seeks to improve public health and alleviate suffering. The author argues that to better achieve these goals medical schools need to become more responsible and responsive to the population they serve. Medical schools have been slow to accept fully the social contract by which, in return for their service to society, they enjoy special rights and benefits. This contract requires that medical educators listen to the public, talk honestly and constructively with government representatives and assess the needs and expectations of the community.

  9. Behaviorism and Society.

    PubMed

    Krapfl, Jon E

    2016-05-01

    A probable list of causes for the limited acceptance of behaviorism in our society is identified. This is followed by a summary review of the proposed solutions identified in other papers in this special issue of The Behavior Analyst, most of which relate to either better marketing of either the behavior analytic process or the results achieved as a consequence. One paper proposes a more broad conception of behavior analysis. This paper endorses the solutions identified in previous papers and then goes on to propose an even more broad conception of behavior analysis and makes the point that behavior analysis is unlikely to flourish unless behavior analysts understand a good deal more about the cultural and other contextual features of the environments in which they work. PMID:27606191

  10. Building a sustainable society

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    Mr. Brown feels the world needs a land ethic to guide resource planning and an ecological theology to serve as custodian over the thinning topsoil, spreading desert, and growing population. In a sustainable society, durability and recycling replace obsolescence as the economy's organizing principle, and virgin materials are seen not as a primary source of material but as a supplement to the existing stock. The key to national security is sustainability. If the biological underpinnings of the global economic system cannot be secured, and if new energy sources and systems are not in place as the oil wells go dry, then economic disruptions and breakdowns are inevitable. In effect, the traditional military concept of national security grows less adequate in the face of growing non-military threats. 154 notes and references, 6 figures, 41 tables.

  11. Science, Technology and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgstock, Martin; Burch, David; Forge, John; Laurent, John; Lowe, Ian

    1998-03-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the human, social and economic aspects of science and technology. It examines a broad range of issues from a variety of perspectives, using examples and experiences from around the world. The authors present complex issues, including the responsibilities of scientists, ethical dilemmas and controversies, the Industrial Revolution, economic issues, public policy, and science and technology in developing countries. The book ends with a thoughtful and provocative look toward the future. It features extensive guides to further reading, as well as a useful section on information searching skills. This book will provoke, engage, inform and stimulate thoughtful discussion about culture, society and science. Broad and interdisciplinary, it will be of considerable value to both students and teachers.

  12. The Development of Professional Foreign Language Competence for ESP Students: Case of Kazakh National Agrarian University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunanbayeva, Salima; Zhyltyrova, Zhanar

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of this paper is determined by the needs of modern society for qualified specialists who will fulfill professional tasks in a foreign language society at various intercultural levels. The purpose of the research is studying the development of professional foreign language competence for ESP students. The methodology of the research…

  13. An Investigation of Factors Involved When Educational Psychologists sSupervise Other Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callicott, Katie; Leadbetter, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Inter-professional supervision combines the social processes of supervision and multi-agency working: both complex and often poorly understood processes. This paper discusses the first author's research of inter-professional supervision, involving an educational psychologist (EP) supervising another professional and complements the recently…

  14. 78 FR 37885 - Approval of American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Code Cases

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... June 24, 2013 Part II Nuclear Regulatory Commission 10 CFR Part 50 Approval of American Society of..., 2013 / Proposed Rules#0;#0; ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 RIN 3150-AI72 Approval of American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Code Cases AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission....

  15. Software Engineering Code of Ethics and Professional Practice.

    PubMed

    2001-04-01

    The Software Engineering Code of Ethics and Professional Practice, intended as a standard for teaching and practicing software engineering, documents the ethical and professional obligations of software engineers. The code should instruct practitioners about the standards society expects them to meet, about what their peers strive for, and about what to expect of one another. In addition, the code should also inform the public about the responsibilities that are important to the profession. Adopted in 2000 by the IEEE Computer Society and the ACM--two leading international computing societies--the code of ethics is intended as a guide for members of the evolving software engineering profession. The code was developed by a multinational task force with additional input from other professionals from industry, government posts, military installations, and educational professions.

  16. The child abuse reporting laws: an ethical dilemma for professionals.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Cooper, I; Fugère, R; Cormier, B M

    1993-10-01

    A central issue in the development of family law and child protection in this country has been the right of the state to intervene in family life. The reporting laws, which were developed in the 1960s, made it mandatory for any citizen, including professionals, to report child abuse (physical and sexual) to the authorities. These laws have fundamentally altered the relationship between the clinician and families in need of help and have resulted in a dramatic increase in the number of cases assessed and treated by child welfare agencies. Because of the emphasis on case-finding, the limited resources have been stretched to the point where families with serious problems of child abuse do not get the services they require. Apparently, at least 60% of all reports turn out to be unfounded. Other criticisms of the current system include ineffective intervention, over-intervention and ignoring parents' rights. The legalization and bureaucratization of the child protection process has profoundly affected the relationship between troubled families and social workers who now must "investigate" them as well as help them. This role conflict is exacerbated even further in cases of alleged child sexual abuse, where social workers are often expected to inform the police of the allegations. The authors argue that the reporting laws have been useful in that society is aware of the problem, and they suggest that it may be more beneficial now to dispose of them.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8242531

  17. [The foundation of the German Society for Child Psychiatry and Therapeutic Education – Paul Schroeder’s road to foundation chairman].

    PubMed

    Schepker, Klaus; Fangerau, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    The reconstruction of the evolutionary history of this professional association lays its focus on the developments which contributed to the society’s formal foundation during the time of the patient killings in Germany after 1939. Methodologically the study follows strategies of historical network analysis including the main actors of the foundation process. The foundation of this society can be seen as the result of the interaction of a) the Reichs-Health-Agency, its president Hans Reiter, and Fritz Rott as National Socialist health politicians, b) the scientific development geared to this policy of a young discipline that shared its knowledge base as well as its medical ‘object’ with established specialties like psychiatry and pediatrics, c) a postulated need for character studies, prognosis and selection, and d) personal as well as professional-political interests of the main protagonists Schroeder and Villinger. Once more it is obvious that medicine and politics were not only interwoven, but in certain areas in accordance with each other. Borders could rather be established between social regulatory “instances”. The foundation of the DGKH (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Kinderpsychiatrie und Heilpädagogik; German Society for Child Psychiatry and Therapeutic Education) is an example of a ‘radical regulatory reasoning’ according to Raphael, that by means of “institutional arrangements at medium level” (Raphael, 2001) was supposed to implement the ‘new National-Socialist order’. PMID:26618481

  18. [The foundation of the German Society for Child Psychiatry and Therapeutic Education – Paul Schroeder’s road to foundation chairman].

    PubMed

    Schepker, Klaus; Fangerau, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    The reconstruction of the evolutionary history of this professional association lays its focus on the developments which contributed to the society’s formal foundation during the time of the patient killings in Germany after 1939. Methodologically the study follows strategies of historical network analysis including the main actors of the foundation process. The foundation of this society can be seen as the result of the interaction of a) the Reichs-Health-Agency, its president Hans Reiter, and Fritz Rott as National Socialist health politicians, b) the scientific development geared to this policy of a young discipline that shared its knowledge base as well as its medical ‘object’ with established specialties like psychiatry and pediatrics, c) a postulated need for character studies, prognosis and selection, and d) personal as well as professional-political interests of the main protagonists Schroeder and Villinger. Once more it is obvious that medicine and politics were not only interwoven, but in certain areas in accordance with each other. Borders could rather be established between social regulatory “instances”. The foundation of the DGKH (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Kinderpsychiatrie und Heilpädagogik; German Society for Child Psychiatry and Therapeutic Education) is an example of a ‘radical regulatory reasoning’ according to Raphael, that by means of “institutional arrangements at medium level” (Raphael, 2001) was supposed to implement the ‘new National-Socialist order’.

  19. Physician professionalism for a new century.

    PubMed

    Holsinger, James W; Beaton, Benjamin

    2006-07-01

    During the past 50 years, physicians have become increasingly dissatisfied with certain aspects of their profession. Dissatisfaction has intensified with the advent of managed care in the late 20th century, the medical liability crisis, and the growing divergence between the professional and personal expectations placed upon physicians and their practical ability to meet these expectations. These and other factors have encroached on physician autonomy, the formerly ascendant professional value within medicine. As the underlying values and practical realities of the broader American health care system have changed, the professional values and practices of physicians have failed to adapt correspondingly, resulting in a "professionalism gap" that contributes to physician dissatisfaction. To improve the outlook and efficacy of modern American physicians, the profession must adopt a new values framework that conforms to today's health care system. This means foregoing the 20th century's preferred "independent physician" model in favor of a new professional structure based on teamwork and collaboration. Convincing established physicians to embrace such a model will be difficult, but opportunities exist for significant progress among a new generation of physicians accustomed to the realities of managed care, flexible practice models, and health information technology. The teaching of clinical anatomy, given its incorporation of student collaboration at the earliest stages of medical education, offers a prime opportunity to introduce this generation to a reinvigorated code of professionalism that should reduce physician dissatisfaction and benefit society.

  20. Making the most of a professional meeting.

    PubMed

    Naseman, Ryan; Weber, Robert J

    2013-07-01

    The Director's Forum series is designed to guide pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems. During the early winter months, pharmacists will converge upon a major city and participate in the Midyear Clinical Meeting ("Midyear") of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. This meeting involves almost 21,000 students, residents, and new and seasoned professionals catching up with colleagues and classmates, networking for better practice solutions, and presenting their organization's successes. In this era of fiscal restraint, many hospitals are reducing travel expenses and limiting the participation of their staff in professional meetings. In the past, professional meetings may have been seen as a boondoggle, but they can benefit individuals at all stages of their career (student, mid-level, and late careers). Students can make vital career decisions through information received at professional meetings, mid-level career individuals will gain valuable ideas for practice model enhancement, and late career individuals can provide mentoring for younger and mid-level career professionals. If properly managed, attendance at a professional meeting can have very positive benefits on the career growth of pharmacy staff and help in the pharmacy department's development of effective patient-centered services. PMID:24421526

  1. Finding an Eye Care Professional

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information > Finding an Eye Care Professional Finding an Eye Care Professional Finding an Eye Care Professional PDF* The National Eye Institute does not provide referrals or recommend specific ...

  2. Professional Socialization in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edens, Geraldine E.

    Professional socialization is the process by which individuals acquire the specialized knowledge, skills, attitudes, values, norms, and interests needed to perform their professional roles acceptably. The following interacting domains of potential professional self-growth can be defined as outcomes of the socialization process: self-image, role…

  3. Planning Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Why does professional learning for educators have such a mixed history? Why is it so hard to find solid research evidence of professional development programs that actually improve student learning outcomes? Part of the answer, writes Thomas R. Guskey, is that professional learning experiences for educators are rarely well planned. Consequently,…

  4. Professionalism in Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koff, Susan R.; Mistry, Gianna Limone

    2012-01-01

    Professionalism in Dance Education is a complex construction. It can be imposed from the outside (degree completed, job status, salary) or can be identified from the professional herself. Seven graduate dance education students were interviewed with specific focus on the transition from student to professional and the feelings surrounding this…

  5. Professional Diversity in Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Paula T.

    1992-01-01

    Outlines issues of concern in the management of nonlibrarian professionals in research libraries, argued to be significantly different from the management of professional librarians. Differing professional value systems, conflicts and tension that can arise, and organizational teamwork are discussed with a focus on effective reward structures. (15…

  6. Competencies in Professional Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2004-01-01

    There has been a burgeoning interest in competency-based education and credentialing in professional psychology. This movement gained momentum at the Competencies Conference: Future Directions in Education and Credentialing in Professional Psychology. After defining professional competence, the author focuses on the identification and delineation…

  7. Climate Extremes and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mote, Philip

    2009-10-01

    In October 2005, as the United States still was reeling from Hurricane Katrina in August and as the alphabet was too short to contain all of that year's named Atlantic tropical storms (Hurricane Wilma was forming near Jamaica), a timely workshop in Bermuda focused on climate extremes and society (see Eos, 87(3), 25, 17 January 2006). This edited volume, which corresponds roughly to the presentations given at that workshop, offers a fascinating look at the critically important intersection of acute climate stress and human vulnerabilities. A changing climate affects humans and other living things not through the variable that most robustly demonstrates the role of rising greenhouse gases—globally averaged temperature—but through local changes, especially changes in extremes. The first part of this book, “Defining and modeling the nature of weather and climate extremes,” focuses on natural science. The second part, “Impacts of weather and climate extremes,” focuses on societal impacts and responses, emphasizing an insurance industry perspective because a primary sponsor of the workshop was the Risk Prediction Initiative, whose aim is to “support scientific research on topics of interest to its sponsors” (p. 320).

  8. American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... much more! class="box-li"> Journal of Nuclear Cardiology Official publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Clinical Guidelines Procedures, Appropriate Use Criteria, Information Statements ...

  9. Understanding engineering professionalism: a reflection on the rights of engineers.

    PubMed

    Stieb, James A

    2011-03-01

    Engineering societies such as the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) and associated entities have defined engineering and professionalism in such a way as to require the benefit of humanity (NSPE 2009a, Engineering Education Resource Document. NSPE Position Statements. Governmental Relations). This requirement has been an unnecessary and unfortunate "add-on." The trend of the profession to favor the idea of requiring the benefit of humanity for professionalism violates an engineer's rights. It applies political pressure that dissuades from inquiry, approaches to new knowledge and technologies, and the presentation, publication, and use of designs and research findings. Moreover, a more politically neutral definition of engineering and/or professionalism devoid of required service or benefit to mankind does not violate adherence to strong ethical standards. PMID:19821061

  10. The Significance of the Youth Society Movement in Finnish Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Numminen, Jaakko

    1980-01-01

    The influence of the Youth Society movement on Finnish cultural life is widespread. Three main areas can be observed in all Youth Society activities: moral education of Finnish youth, extending ideas of national awakening to everyone, and a tendency to bring different social circles closer together. (JOW)

  11. Knowledge, Society, Higher Education and the Society of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hostaker, Roar; Vabo, Agnete

    2008-01-01

    Research and higher education are, to a greater extent, being governed and evaluated by other than fellow scholars. These changes are discussed in relation to Gilles Deleuze's notion of a transition from "societies of discipline" to what he called "societies of control". This involves a shift from pyramid-shaped organisations, built upon…

  12. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Medical Learners and Practicing Physicians*

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement), good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional. Furthermore, professionalism is associated with better clinical outcomes. Hence, medical learners and practicing physicians should be taught and assessed for professionalism. A number of methods can be used to teach professionalism (e.g. didactic lectures, web-based modules, role modeling, reflection, interactive methods, etc.). Because of the nature of professionalism, no single tool for assessing it among medical learners and practicing physicians exists. Instead, multiple assessment tools must be used (e.g. multi-source feedback using 360-degree reviews, patient feedback, critical incident reports, etc.). Data should be gathered continuously throughout an individual’s career. For the individual learner or practicing physician, data generated by these tools can be used to create a “professionalism portfolio,” the totality of which represents a picture of the individual’s professionalism. This portfolio in turn can be used for formative and summative feedback. Data from professionalism assessments can also be used for developing professionalism curricula and generating research hypotheses. Health care leaders should support teaching and assessing professionalism at all levels of learning and practice and promote learning environments and institutional cultures that are consistent with professionalism precepts. PMID:25973263

  13. In Search of Patient Agency in the Rhetoric of Diabetes Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Mary Specker

    1997-01-01

    Examines the patient agency concept from a rhetorical perspective in lay/professional medical discourse relating to diabetes care. Shows that patient agency is related to patient compliance in the language of biomedicine. Finds that, in managed care, tension is evident between the trend toward greater patient agency and the constraints of…

  14. 34 CFR 602.23 - Operating procedures all agencies must have.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agencies must have. (a) The agency must maintain and make available to the public written materials... preaccreditation; and (5) The names, academic and professional qualifications, and relevant employment and... either in writing or at a public hearing, or both. (c) The accrediting agency must— (1) Review in...

  15. Amateur and professional astronomers meet at Mill Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyner, G.

    2000-12-01

    Nearly forty professional and amateur astronomers from around the UK converged on the Mill Hill Observatory of University College, London, on Saturday September 16, for a meeting set up by the Royal Astronomical Society and The Astronomer to promote and exchange ideas on professional?amateur collaboration in astronomy. Fields discussed included variable star research, gamma ray bursters, supernova searching, spectroscopy and minor planet and meteor work.

  16. Accounting for Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Kylie

    2011-01-01

    Children are increasingly described as agents and agency is important to arguments for children's rights and participation. Yet agency is rarely defined or theorised in childhood studies. This article reviews common uses and meanings of agency and argues that critical, social conceptualisations have yet to be extensively taken up in childhood…

  17. Bringing Geoethics into Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, Giuseppe; Bobrowsky, Peter; Kieffer, Susan; Peppoloni, Silvia; Tinti, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The responsibility and role of the scientific community in the proper exploitation of natural resources, in the defense against natural hazards and in building geoeducational strategies for the population are key themes of Geoethics. But, what is the awareness among Geoscientists about the importance of an ethical debate within Earth Sciences? With the goal to increase this awareness, in 2012 the IAPG - International Association for Promoting Geoethics was founded (http://www.iapg.geoethics.org). The IAPG aims to join forces of geoscientists all over the world, by creating an international, multidisciplinary and scientific platform for discussing on ethical problems and dilemmas in Earth Sciences, for promoting Geoethics themes through scientific publications and conferences, for strengthening the research base on Geoethics, for focusing on case-studies to be taken as models for the development of effective and operative strategies. The IAPG has obtained the status of affiliated organization by the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS), it is among the collaborative organizations of the IUGS - Task Group on Global Geoscience Professionalism (TGGGP), and it has been recognized as an International Associate Organization of the American Geosciences Institute (AGI). The IAPG network is growing fast and currently it is going to reach 500 members in more than 75 countries in 5 continents. The IAPG is working to offer its contribution in building a framework of values for a new model of development, more respectful towards the Geosphere. After 2 years of successful results and numerous ongoing activities, IAPG appears to be on the right way in promoting new ideas to research and practice geosciences. This work aims to give an overview on the IAPG activities, to illustrate the IAPG impact on public through web-statistics, to present publications, events and other initiatives on Geoethics carried out by its members.

  18. 40 CFR 36.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal agency or agency. 36.645 Section 36.645 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... Federal agency or agency. Federal agency or agency means any United States executive department,...

  19. Improving information access for public health professionals.

    PubMed

    Telleen, Sharon; Martin, Elaine

    2002-12-01

    Fundamental to our protection against biological weapons and the detection of disease outbreaks is the need to strengthen our surveillance systems. Improved electronic communications between local, state, and federal public health agencies provide a way for health officials to share information on unusual disease outbreaks and provide important health alert information. This article describes a model of a partnership between a regional medical library of the National Library of Medicine, a school of public health, and federally qualified community health centers. This project upgraded technology and provided public health professional training on Internet information and resources for local public health agencies.

  20. War, peace and professional responsibility.

    PubMed

    Cassel, C K

    1983-01-01

    The technology of modern weapons, especially nuclear weapons, poses a critical threat to the health of all people. In addition to the unprecedented risk of massive destruction to living things and to the ecosphere, the resources used in production of these arsenals cause an economic threat to the health of populations even if the weapons are never used. Medical and social scientists have a responsibility to work for the prevention of nuclear war and the reversal of the arms race. This may imply an obligation to work towards the prevention of war in general. Professional responsibility in this regard is based on (1) special expertise, (2) influence in society and (3) the symbolic power of the values of life, health and human dignity.

  1. Nuclear Society of Russia: Ten years in the world nuclear community

    SciTech Connect

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Gagarinski, A.Yu.

    2000-07-01

    A nuclear society, which is a nongovernmental organization of nuclear professionals, appeared in the Soviet Union at the end of the 1980s--when social conditions for such a society had matured. Deep changes in the entire country's social consciousness had promoted the specialists understanding of the need to unite in order to overcome the nuclear community's dissociation, the monopoly of the nuclear ministry, and the secrecy syndrome of all nuclear issues. The new public association announced the guiding principles of its activities to be openness and glasnost and completeness and truthfulness of information supplied to decision makers and to the society as a whole. Important to the information system of the NSR are topical meetings and seminars on quite varied but always actual problems of nuclear energy use, often with foreign participation. The variety of these NSR meeting subjects is illustrated by the titles of several meetings of the last 2 yr: Safety Culture in Nuclear Power, Youth and the Plutonium Challenge, Nuclear Fuel for Mankind, Nuclear Power in Space, Radiation Legacy of the Former-USSR, the Murmansk International Forum Nuclear Fleet and Ecology, and many others. A special place among NSR seminars belongs to the annual meeting, Nuclear Energy and Public Opinion, the Russian analog of the European PIME conference. Starting from distribution of ENS periodicals--the Nuclear Europe Worldscan magazine and Nucleus information sheet--among its members, the NSR soon began publishing its own Informational Bulletin (since 1989). Note that in the first years of the Nuclear Society's existence, it has been possible to publish periodicals, conference proceedings, and even books in English. Unfortunately, financial difficulties of the last years have frozen this most useful activity, which the NSR, however, hopes to resume. In the last period, the materials of the international information agency NucNet, which provides both regular information for the analysis of

  2. Numeracy in Society and Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Cath; Dole, Shelley; Geiger, Vince; Goos, Merrilyn

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a project that focuses on how a Society and Environment unit could develop required numeracy. This is more of an integrated unit organised around a theme rather than a Society and Environment unit that required specific aspects of numeracy. Suggested data sources for examining students numeracy development included (1) a…

  3. Education for a Learning Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempero, Howard E., Ed.

    The essays contained in this booklet are 1) "Education for a 'Learning Society': The Challenge" by Ernest Bayles in which he calls for focus on learning to live, developing skills of reflection and judgment applicable to vital issues, and reflective teaching; 2) "Teacher Education in a Learning Society" in which David Turney demands teacher…

  4. Making the Good Society Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, John

    2010-01-01

    Everyone is talking about civil society. Perhaps it's the election, and the shock of seeing more voters at the polling booths than anyone had expected. Now David Cameron's idea of a "big society" is being translated into some early policy measures. Does today's debate have anything to do with adult learning? The author believes that the debate…

  5. The Learning Society: Two Justifications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Ya-hui

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the view that has long been fashionable in related policies and literature that the establishment of the learning society is a necessary response to changing times. This article suggests that the association between the learning society and current change may be defensible but is limited. The justification of the learning…

  6. [Living in a Temporary Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennis, Warren G.

    Society is in the process of accelerated change and the institutionalization of this change through research and technology. Other factors affecting American society are an increase in affluence, an elevation of the educational level of the population, and a growing interdependence of institutions. The fact that this country is currently going…

  7. Education for an Open Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Della-Dora, Delmo, Ed.; House, James E., Ed.

    This yearbook focuses on the issue of opening the society for all people, particularly for those who have not been properly represented heretofore. Part 1 reviews some of the progress made toward an open society during the past two decades. It delineates the exasperatingly slow but important gains that have been registered since the Supreme Court…

  8. Multicultural Education in Western Societies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, James A., Ed.; Lynch, James, Ed.

    Western democratic societies share an egalitarian ideology which maintains that a major goal of the state is to protect human rights and promote equality and the structural inclusion of all racial, ethnic, and cultural groups into the fabric of society. Educational initiatives taken to implement reforms that reflect ethnic diversity and promote…

  9. The social life of the brain: Neuroscience in society.

    PubMed

    Pickersgill, Martyn

    2013-05-01

    Neuroscience is viewed by a range of actors and institutions as a powerful means of creating new knowledge about our selves and societies. This article documents the shifts in expertise and identities potentially being propelled by neuroscientific research. It details the framing and effects of neuroscience within several social domains, including education and mental health, discussing some of the intellectual and professional projects it has animated therein (such as neuroethics). The analysis attends to the cultural logics by which the brain is sometimes made salient in society; simultaneously, it points towards some of parameters of the territory within which the social life of the brain plays out. Instances of societal resistance and agnosticism are discussed, which may render problematic sociological research on neuroscience in society that assumes the universal import of neuroscientific knowledge (as either an object of celebration or critique). This article concludes with reflections on how sociotechnical novelty is produced and ascribed, and the implications of this.

  10. The social life of the brain: Neuroscience in society

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neuroscience is viewed by a range of actors and institutions as a powerful means of creating new knowledge about our selves and societies. This article documents the shifts in expertise and identities potentially being propelled by neuroscientific research. It details the framing and effects of neuroscience within several social domains, including education and mental health, discussing some of the intellectual and professional projects it has animated therein (such as neuroethics). The analysis attends to the cultural logics by which the brain is sometimes made salient in society; simultaneously, it points towards some of parameters of the territory within which the social life of the brain plays out. Instances of societal resistance and agnosticism are discussed, which may render problematic sociological research on neuroscience in society that assumes the universal import of neuroscientific knowledge (as either an object of celebration or critique). This article concludes with reflections on how sociotechnical novelty is produced and ascribed, and the implications of this. PMID:24285875

  11. Transitioning to independence and maintaining research careers in a new funding climate: american society of preventive oncology junior members interest group report.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jada G; Birmingham, Wendy C; Tehranifar, Parisa; Irwin, Melinda L; Klein, William M P; Nebeling, Linda; Chubak, Jessica

    2013-11-01

    The American Society of Preventive Oncology (ASPO) is a professional society for multi-disciplinary investigators in cancer prevention and control. The ASPO Junior Members Interest Group promotes the interests of predoctoral, postdoctoral, and junior faculty members within the Society, and provides them with career development and training opportunities. To this end, as part of the 37th ASPO Annual Meeting held in Memphis, Tennessee in March 2013, the Junior Members Interest Group organized a session designed to address issues faced by early-career investigators as they navigate the transition to become an independent, well-funded scientist with a sustainable program of research in the current climate of reduced and limited resources. Four speakers were invited to provide their complementary but distinct perspectives on this topic based on their personal experiences in academic, research-intensive positions and in federal funding agencies. This report summarizes the main themes that emerged from the speakers' presentations and audience questions related to mentoring; obtaining grant funding; publishing; developing expertise; navigating appointments, promotion, and tenure; and balancing demands. These lessons can be used by early-career investigators in cancer prevention and control as they transition to independence and build programs of fundable research. PMID:24190867

  12. Transitioning to independence and maintaining research careers in a new funding climate: american society of preventive oncology junior members interest group report.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Jada G; Birmingham, Wendy C; Tehranifar, Parisa; Irwin, Melinda L; Klein, William M P; Nebeling, Linda; Chubak, Jessica

    2013-11-01

    The American Society of Preventive Oncology (ASPO) is a professional society for multi-disciplinary investigators in cancer prevention and control. The ASPO Junior Members Interest Group promotes the interests of predoctoral, postdoctoral, and junior faculty members within the Society, and provides them with career development and training opportunities. To this end, as part of the 37th ASPO Annual Meeting held in Memphis, Tennessee in March 2013, the Junior Members Interest Group organized a session designed to address issues faced by early-career investigators as they navigate the transition to become an independent, well-funded scientist with a sustainable program of research in the current climate of reduced and limited resources. Four speakers were invited to provide their complementary but distinct perspectives on this topic based on their personal experiences in academic, research-intensive positions and in federal funding agencies. This report summarizes the main themes that emerged from the speakers' presentations and audience questions related to mentoring; obtaining grant funding; publishing; developing expertise; navigating appointments, promotion, and tenure; and balancing demands. These lessons can be used by early-career investigators in cancer prevention and control as they transition to independence and build programs of fundable research.

  13. Knowledge Production and Transmission in a Changing Society: Challenges Facing Law Lecturers in a Distance Education Environment in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Susan

    2006-01-01

    In this article I highlight the challenges facing a law lecturer in a multicultural society in transformation where the student is being prepared to serve society in different occupational fields as a professional person. I indicate that the law itself cannot effect change. For this we need properly trained lawyers. For an effective transformation…

  14. Views of professionalism: a veterinary institutional perspective.

    PubMed

    Roder, C; Whittlestone, K; May, S A

    2012-12-01

    In many western countries, there has been a marked change in the demographic profile of those entering the veterinary profession, with a shift from a predominantly male to a predominantly female intake. There have been parallel changes in society, with greater emphasis on human rights and work-life balance. It is, therefore, timely to consider what constitutes correct professional conduct for the profession, as there is the potential for problems to arise over the interpretation of 'professionalism' due to cultural and generational differences. A cross-section of staff and students within one veterinary institution were invited to take part in a survey exploring their prioritisation of 10 aspects of the professional role. A cluster analysis was performed, and four distinctly different profiles were established according to the views held by the cluster members. Cluster membership was found to significantly correlate to career stage, with altruism and social justice progressively giving way to professional autonomy and dominance. All four clusters in this educational environment prioritised technical and interpersonal competences above all other aspects of the professional role.

  15. Teaching professionalism to residents.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eileen J; Jackson, J Craig; Kratz, Lyn; Marcuse, Edgar K; McPhillips, Heather A; Shugerman, Richard P; Watkins, Sandra; Stapleton, F Bruder

    2003-01-01

    The need to teach professionalism during residency has been affirmed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which will require documentation of education and evaluation of professionalism by 2007. Recently the American Academy of Pediatrics has proposed the following components of professionalism be taught and measured: honesty/integrity, reliability/responsibility, respect for others, compassion/empathy, self-improvement, self-awareness/knowledge of limits, communication/collaboration, and altruism/advocacy. The authors describe a curriculum for introducing the above principles of professionalism into a pediatrics residency that could serve as a model for other programs. The curriculum is taught at an annual five-day retreat for interns, with 11 mandatory sessions devoted to addressing key professionalism issues. The authors also explain how the retreat is evaluated and how the retreat's topics are revisited during the residency, and discuss general issues of teaching and evaluating professionalism.

  16. Development of the Diabetes Technology Society Blood Glucose Monitor System Surveillance Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Klonoff, David C.; Lias, Courtney; Beck, Stayce; Parkes, Joan Lee; Kovatchev, Boris; Vigersky, Robert A.; Arreaza-Rubin, Guillermo; Burk, Robert D.; Kowalski, Aaron; Little, Randie; Nichols, James; Petersen, Matt; Rawlings, Kelly; Sacks, David B.; Sampson, Eric; Scott, Steve; Seley, Jane Jeffrie; Slingerland, Robbert; Vesper, Hubert W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inaccurate blood glucsoe monitoring systems (BGMSs) can lead to adverse health effects. The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) Surveillance Program for cleared BGMSs is intended to protect people with diabetes from inaccurate, unreliable BGMS products that are currently on the market in the United States. The Surveillance Program will provide an independent assessment of the analytical performance of cleared BGMSs. Methods: The DTS BGMS Surveillance Program Steering Committee included experts in glucose monitoring, surveillance testing, and regulatory science. Over one year, the committee engaged in meetings and teleconferences aiming to describe how to conduct BGMS surveillance studies in a scientifically sound manner that is in compliance with good clinical practice and all relevant regulations. Results: A clinical surveillance protocol was created that contains performance targets and analytical accuracy-testing studies with marketed BGMS products conducted by qualified clinical and laboratory sites. This protocol entitled “Protocol for the Diabetes Technology Society Blood Glucose Monitor System Surveillance Program” is attached as supplementary material. Conclusion: This program is needed because currently once a BGMS product has been cleared for use by the FDA, no systematic postmarket Surveillance Program exists that can monitor analytical performance and detect potential problems. This protocol will allow identification of inaccurate and unreliable BGMSs currently available on the US market. The DTS Surveillance Program will provide BGMS manufacturers a benchmark to understand the postmarket analytical performance of their products. Furthermore, patients, health care professionals, payers, and regulatory agencies will be able to use the results of the study to make informed decisions to, respectively, select, prescribe, finance, and regulate BGMSs on the market. PMID:26481642

  17. American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES) Programs: Outreach to Native Americans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacourse, S.

    2003-12-01

    AISES is a national non-profit organization which nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. Through its educational programs, AISES provides opportunities for American Indians and Native Alaskans to pursue studies in science, engineering, and technology arenas. The trained professionals then become technologically informed leaders within the Indian community. AISES' ultimate goal is to be a catalyst for the advancement of American Indians and Native Alaskans as they seek to become self-reliant and self-determined members of society. AISES' Higher Education Program consists of scholarships, college relations, leadership development, and internships. This session will focus on the value and impact of AISES internships for AISES students, including hands-on experience in the student's field of study, co-op opportunities, and entrance into graduate school. AISES currently offers internship placements with NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, the U.S. State Department, the Departments of Commerce and Veterans Affairs, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2004, AISES will also be offering placements at the Central Intelligence Agency.

  18. American Indian Science & Engineering Society (AISES) Programs: Outreach to Native Americans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacourse, S.

    2003-12-01

    AISES is a national non-profit organization which nurtures building of community by bridging science and technology with traditional Native values. Through its educational programs, AISES provides opportunities for American Indians and Native Alaskans to pursue studies in science, engineering, and technology arenas. The trained professionals then become technologically informed leaders within the Indian community. AISES' ultimate goal is to be a catalyst for the advancement of American Indians and Native Alaskans as they seek to become self-reliant and self-determined members of society. AISES' Higher Education Program consists of scholarships, college relations, leadership development, and internships. This session will focus on the value and impact of AISES internships for AISES students, including hands-on experience in the student's field of study, co-op opportunities, and entrance into graduate school. AISES currently offers internship placements with NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, the U.S. State Department, the Departments of Commerce and Veterans Affairs, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2004, AISES will also be offering placements at the Central Intelligence Agency.

  19. Professional Behavior in Nursing.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Karren

    2016-04-01

    Being clear about what constitutes professional behavior is a pathway to effective leadership. Not all nurses come out of educational programs with an understanding about what aspects of behavior signal true professionalism. This article uses the American Organization of Nurse Executives' Nurse Executive Competency for Processional Behavior to help professional development nurse faculty identify role modeling behavior and other aspects that new nurses can use to help them advance in their careers, while improving care to patients and families. PMID:27031029

  20. Professionalism, then and now.

    PubMed

    Newsome, P R H; Langley, P P

    2014-05-01

    For centuries only three professions were recognised as such: medicine, law and theology. Now that the word 'professional' is applied to all occupations it can be difficult to understand the meaning of professionalism within dentistry and healthcare. We simply cannot treat dentistry as a commodity or business when it is a highly specialised personal service. Now more than ever, dentistry is a team game and all dental professionals must maintain the values and codes that distinguish what we do from most other vocations.

  1. Space, ethics and society. A CMES study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnould, Jacques

    2001-03-01

    Ethical issues have for long been limited to the fields of medicine and biotechnology, whereas to-day such matters encompass a growing number of engineering activities. 21 st century citizens are more equiring about technoscientific claims and accomplishments. Has their impact on society and the ecological environment been measured and quantified? With all this accumulated knowledge and progress do they have the ability and means to resolve these self-created difficulties? Or will a totally new approach have to be sought? The debates include space activity not only because of the public funding needed but also because of the possible consequences on humans as well as the terrestrial, orbital or outer environment. Since the fall of 1998, CNES has undertaken the study of the role played by space activities in to-day's society and that of the future, seeking to clarify the objectives of the former with the expectations of the latter, and how they converge. The purpose of this study is to determine precisely the ethical responsibility of the space agencies and to pursue more sociological and philosophical research on the ethical scope of space activities.

  2. American Meteorological Society Embraces Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Robert; Fisher, Genene

    2011-02-01

    Eight years ago, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) tentatively reached out to the space weather community by scheduling a day-and-a-half Space Weather Symposium (SWS) at its Annual Meeting. That symposium included briefings from operational and research agencies involved with space weather as well as a variety of talks targeting areas of interest common to meteorology and space weather. Topics included data assimilation, connections between the lower and upper atmosphere, new space weather sensors and models, and the economic and social impacts of space weather. That highly successful symposium led to a follow-on SWS every year at the AMS Annual Meeting. These meetings, combined with the release of an AMS policy statement on space weather (see http://www.ametsoc.org/policy/2008spaceweather_amsstatement.html and Fisher [2008]) and related studies in the AMS Policy Program, led the AMS Council to vote on making the space weather discipline a regular part of the society by creating a new Space Weather Committee for the Scientific and Technological Activities Commission (STAC) (http://www.ametsoc.org/stacpges/CommitteeDisplay/CommitteeDisplay.aspx?CC=SW). This is AMS's first new STAC committee in 20 years.

  3. Open Dialogues in social networks: professional identity and transdisciplinary collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Holmesland, Anne-Lise; Seikkula, Jaakko; Nilsen, Øystein; Hopfenbeck, Mark; Erik Arnkil, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Aim The aim of this article is to explore the challenges connected to the transformation and emergence of professional identity in transdisciplinary multi-agency network meetings and the use of Open Dialogue. Introduction The empirical findings have been taken from a clinical project in southern Norway concerning multi-agency network meetings with persons between 14 and 25 years of age. The project explores how these meetings are perceived by professionals working in various sectors. Methodology Data was collected through three interviews conducted with two focus groups, the first comprising health care professionals and the second professionals from the social and educational sectors. Content analysis was used to create categories through condensation and interpretation. The two main categories that emerged were ‘professional role’ and ‘teamwork’. These were analysed and compared according to the two first meeting in the two focus groups. Results and discussion The results indicate different levels of motivation and understanding regarding role transformation processes. The realization of transdisciplinary collaboration is dependent upon the professionals' mutual reliance. The professionals' participation is affected by stereotypes and differences in their sense of belonging to a certain network, and thus their identity transformation seems to be strongly affected. To encourage the use of integrated solutions in mental health care, the professionals' preference for teamwork, the importance of familiarity with each other and knowledge of cultural barriers should be addressed. PMID:20922064

  4. Citizen Engagement: Driving Force of E-Society Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xiaolin

    Starting from the belief that e-inclusion should be the strategic choice, and full engagement of every citizen is the key to the success and healthy development of e-society, this paper puts forward that "Information Commons" model can be applied to a larger target group: the disadvantaged citizens for their information rights and e-literacy education. Three IC applications: residents' community IC, public library IC, and government agency IC are discussed.

  5. Online learning for professional development.

    PubMed

    Purkis, Nick; Gabb, Carol A

    This article addresses how nurses in the UK can use online learning to meet the changing requirements of continuing professional development. Recent changes in post-registration nurse education are due to two main reasons: financial cutbacks and reduced use of agency staff make it difficult for nurse managers to release nurses for study time away from the ward; and healthcare becoming increasingly diverse and complex, so pre-registration education has changed. Since September 2013, only degree-level pre-registration nursing programmes have been available in the UK. Degree-level education is intended to sharpen critical thinking skills to improve future healthcare but it may also disadvantage nurses without degrees. One response to these challenges is to provide online learning, such as online personal learning programmes. portfolios (e-portfolios) or other onlinen PMID:24592659

  6. Agency and intervention.

    PubMed

    Roskies, Adina L

    2015-09-19

    Novel ways to intervene on brain function raise questions about agency and responsibility. Here, I discuss whether direct brain interventions, and in particular, deep brain stimulation, pose a threat to agency in individual cases, or to our general conceptualization of what it is to be a responsible agent. While I do not currently see evidence that these interventions constitute a global challenge to our concept of agency, they do have the potential to diminish agency in individuals. I consider whether the lack of evidence for a global challenge ratifies our folk conceptions, or is a necessary consequence of them. In closing, I propose that our theoretical understanding of agency and our therapeutic approaches could be improved with a more nuanced, multidimensional view of agency. PMID:26240430

  7. Agency and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Roskies, Adina L.

    2015-01-01

    Novel ways to intervene on brain function raise questions about agency and responsibility. Here, I discuss whether direct brain interventions, and in particular, deep brain stimulation, pose a threat to agency in individual cases, or to our general conceptualization of what it is to be a responsible agent. While I do not currently see evidence that these interventions constitute a global challenge to our concept of agency, they do have the potential to diminish agency in individuals. I consider whether the lack of evidence for a global challenge ratifies our folk conceptions, or is a necessary consequence of them. In closing, I propose that our theoretical understanding of agency and our therapeutic approaches could be improved with a more nuanced, multidimensional view of agency. PMID:26240430

  8. A short history of the Australian Society of Soil Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennison, Linda

    2013-04-01

    in 1996, and which have been held subsequently every four years. A society logo was introduced for the national soil conference in 1984 and a competition was subsequently held to design a logo for the Society. The winning design was launched in 1986, replaced in 2006 and the rebranding of the Society continued into 2011 when the business name Soil Science Australia was adopted by the Society as the 'public name' of the organisation. Over the years the Society was approached to support a range of organisations. It was a founding member of the Australian GeoScience Council in 1982. In general the Society has maintained its focus on soil and limited its associations to kindred organisations. Technology has driven many of the recent changes in the Society. In 1996 the first web site was developed, housed on the University of Melbourne domain. The Society newsletter ceased to be printed on paper in 2002 and delivery to members was via email. Subscription notices are no longer issued and online collection of subscriptions due is via the internet. The administration of the Society was moved to a centralized office run by the Australian Institute of Agricultural Science in 1996 and whilst the Federal Council Executive continues to rotate across the branches of Australia the administration found a permanent home for the first time. In 1998 the first Executive Officer was appointed, whose role includes the administration of the Society. In 2010 the Governor of Queensland, Her Excellency Ms Penelope Wensley AC Governor of Queensland accepted the invitation to become the first Patron of the Society. A significant decision taken in 1996 to introduce the Certified Professional Soil Scientist (CPSS) accreditation program has seen the program burgeon primarily due to the increasing demand by Government authorities for certified professionals in soil and land management. Accreditation is only available to members with requirements for accreditation listed in the Standards for

  9. American Society of Human Genetics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Researchers Say October 20, 2016 Researchers Explore How Zika Infection Causes Microcephaly October 19, 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics, Incorporated 9650 Rockville Pike • Bethesda, Maryland 20814 ...

  10. The Engineering Societies & Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Engineer, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Gives a description of what the major engineering societies (ASCE, ASME, AICHE, and IEEE) are doing in the area of continuing education. The description includes the short courses, their costs, duration, type and scope of the content. (GA)

  11. Heart Failure Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Review Course in Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology is now available OnDemand! Monday, August 29, 2016! ... than expected, and the FDA... European Society of Cardiology – Heart Failure 2017 October 11, 2016 ESC: Heart ...

  12. Phoenix Society for Burn Survivors

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things I Learned at Phoenix UBelong This Week! 22 Oct 2016 Phoenix UBelong participants share the top 5 things they learned this week at Phoenix UBelong: Continue Reading The Phoenix Society, ...

  13. Technology transfer — bridging space and society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Students of Technology Transfer Design Project Team (ISU Summer Session 1997)

    Strategies, policies and methods by which technologies can be cross-fertilized between the space and non-space sectors were examined by students of the design project "Technology Transfer — Bridging Space and Society". This project was undertaken by students attending the 1997 10th Anniversary Summer Session Program of the International Space University. General issues relating to transfer of technology were discussed including definitions and mechanisms (push, pull, interactive and pro-active). As well as looking at case studies and the impact of national policies on space agencies, the design project also sought to look at technology transfer on a country-by-country basis, selecting various countries for scrutiny and reporting on their technology transfer status. The project report shows how transfer of technology varies between nations and when analyzed with the case studies identifies the general strategies, policies and methods in use and how they can be improved. Finally, the report seeks to recommend certain issues to governments, space agencies and industrial organizations to facilitate the transfer of technology. These include the development of a generic metrics system and the implementation of better appropriate procedures and mechanisms for a positive diffusion process between space and non-space sectors.

  14. Commentary: professionalism, unionization, and physicians' strikes.

    PubMed

    Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R

    2011-05-01

    Professionalism is the basis of medicine's social contract with society. The details of that contract are influenced by the presence or absence of a national health plan. In countries with such a plan, unlike in the United States, negotiations are dictated by the nature of medicine's contract with society and take place between the medical profession and society directly. This system has required that medicine be represented at the negotiating table, and, in most instances, it has resulted in the unionization of physicians. To influence these negotiations, the medical profession has used various forms of collective action, including strikes. As the United States continues on the path toward health care reform, it seems likely that the American medical profession will also require an organization to represent it at the negotiating table and will be under the same pressures to strike as are physicians in other countries. Because both unionization and strikes pose potential threats to the professionalism of students, residents and practicing physicians, such issues should be a part of the medical education curriculum at both the undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The authors briefly review the literature on strikes and job actions and share personal experiences to support this discussion. Students and residents should have an opportunity to consider these issues in a safe environment, both to understand the potential impact of a strike on patients and the profession and to determine their own personal course of action should such a situation arise.

  15. Requirements for Information Professionals in a Digital Environment: Some Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ataman, Bekir Kemal

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to point out the increasing need to provide information professionals with a sound grounding in the technological aspects of their profession. Design/methodology/approach: The paper sets out by describing the sudden increase in volumes of information that confront our society, and then looks at how the younger…

  16. Professionalizing Gerontology: Why AGHE Must Accredit Gerontology Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelham, Anabel; Schafer, Donna; Abbott, Pauline; Estes, Carroll

    2012-01-01

    The aging of society requires more trained aging specialists. Are higher education institutions prepared? Results of a comparison of gerontology programs in 2000 and 2010 indicate that the number of programs has declined and that higher education is not prepared. To address this challenge, the authors propose that gerontology be professionalized.…

  17. Factors of Engagement: Professional Standards and the Library Science Internship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotson, Kaye B.; Dotson-Blake, Kylie P.

    2015-01-01

    In today's technological world, school librarians planning to be leaders should be ready to keep up with advances in standards significant to the profession. The professional standards, specifically American Association of School Librarians (AASL) Standards and International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Standards for Coaches offer…

  18. Professional Development for Museum Educators: Unpinning the Underpinnings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevan, Bronwyn; Xanthoudaki, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Frontline museum floor staff people are critical agents in the field's efforts to catalyze greater community engagement and participation at the intersections of science, art, history, and society. Yet, coming from widely disparate backgrounds and often with little formal professional development in place, many museum-based education practices are…

  19. Ethics, Professional Expectations, and Graduate Education: Advancing Research in Kinesiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePauw, Karen P.

    2009-01-01

    The university is a social institution and as such has a social responsibility to advance knowledge through research that is ultimately meaningful and beneficial to society. As we seek to advance research and graduate education in kinesiology, we must accept ethical standards and professional expectations not only as an institutional value but as…

  20. Implementing a Professional Learning Community: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminski, Stacey A.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching, in the 21st century is a complex vocation that necessitates high quality professional development to fortify and sustain it. As a core profession, and a critical representative of change in contemporary society, it is apparent that leaving no child behind also entails leaving no teacher behind (Stoll & Seashore-Louis, Eds, 2007).…

  1. Civic Education Professional Development: The Lay of the Land

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Democracy requires well-informed citizens, with the habits and mind-set required to maintain a free and self-governing society. Teachers, in turn, are key to establishing those habits of heart and mind on which democracies rely. As such, teachers benefit from exposure to professional development (PD) opportunities that refresh and augment their…

  2. Child Sexual Abuse Assessment: Issues in Professional Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milchman, Madelyn Simring

    1995-01-01

    Coordinates ethical codes for psychiatry, psychology, and social work and discusses their implications for child sexual abuse assessment in child protection and divorce/custody/visitation cases. Guidelines developed by the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children are also considered. Confidentiality, protection from harm, and bias…

  3. The Civil Behavior of Students: A Survey of School Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Keely; Caldarella, Paul; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.; Young, K. Richard

    2010-01-01

    Many authors regard education as a way of increasing civility in society, and some have implemented interventions to improve civility in schools. However, very little empirical data exist on the extent and nature of students' civil behavior. The present study systematically gathered data from 251 school professionals regarding their perceptions of…

  4. Professional Obsolescence and Continuing Professional Development in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Discusses professional development in higher education; considers the work environment as the main site for professional development; and maintains that continuing professional development, in times of continuing professional obsolescence, is best served by attention to departmental cultures. Implications for staff development professionals are…

  5. The Design and Validation of an Instrument to Measure Teachers' Professional Development at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Arnoud T.; Kreijns, Karel; Van der Heijden, Béatrice I. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    After graduation, it is essential for teachers to continue working on their professional development since they need to be prepared for the requirements of tomorrow's knowledge- and technology-based society, a more varied student and pupil population creating new responsibilities, and higher social expectations from schools and the society as a…

  6. [125 years' of the Serbian Medical Society].

    PubMed

    Sulović, V; Pavlović, B

    1998-01-01

    In the second half of the last century and under the influence of the European civilization, Serbia abandoned the conservative and patriarchal way of life and began to introduce a new, contemporary political, cultural and social spirit into the country. The development of these civilizing features was under the influence of young intelectuals who, as former scholarship holders of the Serbian government, were educated in many European countries. Among them, there was a group of physicians who returned to the country after having completed their education. They were carriers and holders of the contemporary medical science in Serbia and the neighbouring areas. On April 22, 1872 a group of 15 physicians founded the Serbian Medical Society with the intention to offer an organized medical help and care to the population. The first president was Dr. Aćim Medović and the first secretary Dr. Vladan Dordević. At the meeting held on May 15, 1872 the text of the Statute of the Society was accepted and immediately submitted for approval to the Ministry of Internal Affairs. In the letter addressed to the minister of internal affairs the following reasons were cited: "... The Belgrade physicians feeling a need for having the main office for their professional and scientific meetings, for which they will find the opportunity and the funds, and in spite of their hard medical labor which requires almost all their time, decided to establish the Serbian Medical Society because they wish to be in trend and follow-up the medical progress and exchange the latest medical information not only among them but also with other graduated doctors living in areas with the Serblan population as well as with all scientists who are willing to contribute to the development of medical science in Serbia...". In the first year of its existence the Serbian Medical Society had 9 regular members, 1 honorary member and 34 corresponding members from Serbia, Slavic and other foreign countries. On August 5

  7. Online Learning Communities and Teacher Professional Development: Methods for Improved Education Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindberg, J. Ola, Ed.; Olofsson, Anders D., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    In today's society, the professional development of teachers is urgent due to the constant change in working conditions and the impact that information and communication technologies have in teaching practices. "Online Learning Communities and Teacher Professional Development: Methods for Improved Education Delivery" features innovative…

  8. Deterrents to Participation in Continuing Professional Education and Implications for Future Educational Program Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langsner, Stephen J.

    A survey was conducted of 338 professional members of the National Therapeutic Recreation Society (NTRS) to identify deterrents to participation in continuing professional education. The four top ranked factors in deterring participation were cost, work constraints, lack of quality, and lack of benefit, followed by family constraints and…

  9. Pastors and the "Perpetuum Mobile": The Dynamics of Professional Learning in Times of Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reite, Ingrid Chr.

    2015-01-01

    In a changing knowledge society, many workplaces experience a great number of reforms, implying improvement, new ways of working and professional learning. When a reform is introduced, however, does a professional act as an ever-moving machine--a "perpetuum mobile"--always learning with full energy? In this article, I ask the following:…

  10. Practical Recommendations to Improve the Quality of Training and Methodical Support of Professional Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grebennikov, Valery V.; Grudtsina, Ludmila Yu.; Marchuk, Nikolay N.; Sangadgiev, Badma V.; Kudyashev, Nail K.

    2016-01-01

    The research urgency is caused by the transition to the knowledge society and new demands for training and methodical provision of professional pedagogical education. The purpose of this paper is to develop practical recommendations to improve the quality of training and methodical support of professional pedagogical education. The leading…

  11. Professional Values: Key to Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Darlene; Schank, Mary Jane

    2002-01-01

    Affective domain learning, including values formation, is an important part of humanistic nursing education. The American Nurses Association code of ethics articulates professional values. For full embodiment of these values to occur, educators and the profession must work together. (Contains 30 references.) (SK)

  12. Professional Academic Development through Professional Journal Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruth, Damian; Naidoo, Kogi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the cooperative analysis by a lecturer and an academic development practitioner of a reflective journal dialogue over the 12 weeks of teaching a postgraduate course. Through a retrospective analysis of the journal the present paper explores the following issues: the framing of an inquiry; the personal-professional nexus; and…

  13. Tax Professional Internships and Subsequent Professional Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Philip H.; Blackwood, B. J.; Landy, Sharon D.

    2010-01-01

    How do internships influence the socialization and performance of accounting students employed in the tax department of a CPA firm? Previous research on accounting internships primarily focuses on auditing personnel. There is evidence in the literature that indicates audit and tax professionals have different work cultures. This paper examines the…

  14. Individual Professional Development Plans: Cultivating Professional Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargens, Taryl M.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last five years schools and districts have been under enormous pressure to improve student achievement scores on state accountability assessments. Educators agree that professional development plays a key role in providing the knowledge and skills needed to increase teacher effectiveness in the classroom. There is no reliable measure for…

  15. Certifying Enrollment Management Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Most current professionals who serve in an enrollment management leadership capacity likely were trained "on the job," or at professional development events, primarily because credit-bearing credentials, degrees, and other formal programs were nonexistent (Phair 2014). However, that landscape has since changed, and now there are multiple…

  16. Educators' Professional Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krishnaveni, R.; Anitha, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive model of professional characteristics of an educator that will prepare them for high standards of professional achievements, as all professions demand standardization and formulation of guidelines in today's competitive environment. Design/methodology/approach: Literature on essentials of an educator was sourced…

  17. Exploring digital professionalism.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Coral, Janet; Topps, David; Topps, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of digital media (both computing devices and the services they access) has blurred the boundaries between our personal and professional lives. Contemporary students are the last to remember a time before the widespread use of the Internet and they will be the first to practice in a largely e-health environment. This article explores concepts of digital professionalism and their place in contemporary medical education, and proposes a series of principles of digital professionalism to guide teaching, learning and practice in the healthcare professions. Despite the many risks and fears surrounding their use, digital media are not an intrinsic threat to medical professionalism. Professionals should maintain the capacity for deliberate, ethical, and accountable practice when using digital media. The authors describe a digital professionalism framework structured around concepts of proficiency, reputation, and responsibility. Digital professionalism can be integrated into medical education using strategies based on awareness, alignment, assessment, and accountability. These principles of digital professionalism provide a way for medical students and medical practitioners to embrace the positive aspects of digital media use while being mindful and deliberate in its use to avoid or minimize any negative consequences. PMID:26030375

  18. Exploring digital professionalism.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Coral, Janet; Topps, David; Topps, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of digital media (both computing devices and the services they access) has blurred the boundaries between our personal and professional lives. Contemporary students are the last to remember a time before the widespread use of the Internet and they will be the first to practice in a largely e-health environment. This article explores concepts of digital professionalism and their place in contemporary medical education, and proposes a series of principles of digital professionalism to guide teaching, learning and practice in the healthcare professions. Despite the many risks and fears surrounding their use, digital media are not an intrinsic threat to medical professionalism. Professionals should maintain the capacity for deliberate, ethical, and accountable practice when using digital media. The authors describe a digital professionalism framework structured around concepts of proficiency, reputation, and responsibility. Digital professionalism can be integrated into medical education using strategies based on awareness, alignment, assessment, and accountability. These principles of digital professionalism provide a way for medical students and medical practitioners to embrace the positive aspects of digital media use while being mindful and deliberate in its use to avoid or minimize any negative consequences.

  19. Professional Learning from within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korthagen, Fred A. J.

    2009-01-01

    In this commentary on the paper by the Bank Street Reading and Literacy Alumnae Group, Korthagen states that, while it provides an excellent example of how fruitful professional development can be when it is grounded in the needs and strengths of the people involved; regretfully, many traditional approaches to professional development are based on…

  20. NWEA Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Evaluation Association, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive brochure presents how the Northwest Evaluation Association's professional development offerings--plus flexible delivery options designed for busy lives--can make it easier to utilize data. This brochure explores a range of workshops, coaching, online learning, and professional development packages to meet educators' needs and…

  1. Leading Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael

    2006-01-01

    If the goal is to fundamentally change the culture inside schools, people need to move beyond the superficiality of professional learning communities and focus on a system of learners. Professional learning communities are in fact about establishing lasting new collaborative cultures. Collaborative cultures are ones that focus on building the…

  2. HRD Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on professional development of human resource development (HRD) professionals. "Lifelong Learning and Performance: The Role of Key Qualifications in Human Resource Development" (Simone J. van Zolingen, Wim J. Nijhof) argues that, besides being of interest to employers, key qualifications are also…

  3. Professionalism in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Paula F.

    That the quest for a general theory of educational administration has been a misdirection of effort and that the advancement of professionalism within this field would represent a more sensible endeavor for the production of useful knowledge is the focus of this essay. The advancement of professionalism would entail a reorientation of research…

  4. Parents: Dilemmas for Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Andrea

    1988-01-01

    A British educational psychologist critically examines her practices toward parents. Aspects of the power relationship are explored, including acting as a friend, the trappings of professionalism, privacy and confidentiality, interprofessional trust, and service provision. Professional survival is seen to be the underlying motive in these…

  5. Professional Development & Student Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroeger, Marianne, Ed.; Blaser, Stephanie, Ed.; Raack, Lenaya, Ed.; Cooper, Cinder, Ed.; Kinder, Ann, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Professional development is viewed from several perspectives--time, funding, planning, and student outcomes--and includes both an urban and a rural story. This issue provides a special pullout section designed as a checklist to help guide professional development planning activities. The following articles are included: "Perspectives on Managing…

  6. Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    The Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility SREI Members-only Forum Home About Us About SREI Vision and Mission ... Fact Sheets and Booklets SREI is an affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below ...

  7. Negotiating with Subscription Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQueen, Judy; Basch, N. Bernard

    1991-01-01

    This first in a two-part series on how librarians can negotiate services and prices with subscription agencies focuses on how vendors operate. Factors that influence agency costs, revenues, and service charges are described, including economies of scale, discounts from publishers, and prepayment and cash flow. (seven references) (LRW)

  8. Abortion in a just society.

    PubMed

    Hunt, M E

    1993-01-01

    A female Catholic theologian imagines a just society that does not judge women who decide to undergo an abortion. The Church, practitioners, and the courts must trust that women do make person-enhancing choices about the quality of life. In the last 15 years most progress in securing a woman's right to abortion has been limited to white, well-educated, and middle or upper middle class women. A just society would consider reproductive options a human right. Abortion providers are examples of a move to a just society; they are committed to women's well-being. There are some facts that make one pessimistic about achieving abortion in a just society. The US Supreme Court plans to review important decisions establishing abortion as a civil right. Further, some men insist on suing women who want to make their own reproductive decisions--an anti-choice tactic to wear away women's right to reproductive choice. Bombings of abortion clinics and harassment campaigns by anti-choice groups are common. These behaviors strain pro-choice proponents emotionally, psychically, and spiritually. Their tactics often lead to theologians practicing self-censorship because they fear backlash. Abortion providers also do this. Further, the reaction to AIDS is that sex is bad. Anti-abortion groups use AIDS to further their campaigns, claiming that AIDS is a punishment for sex. Strategies working towards abortion in a just society should be education and persuasion of policymakers and citizens about women's right to choose, since they are the ones most affected by abortion. Moreover, only women can secure their rights to abortion. In a just society, every health maintenance organization, insurance company, and group practice would consider abortion a normal service. A just society provides for the survival needs of the most marginalized.

  9. Agency, communion and entitlement.

    PubMed

    Żemojtel-Piotrowska, Magdalena A; Piotrowski, Jarosław P; Clinton, Amanda

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the relationship between agency, communion, and the active, passive, and revenge forms of entitlement is examined. Results indicate that active entitlement was positively related to agency, negatively to communion (Study 1), and unrelated to unmitigated agency and communion (Study 2). Passive entitlement was positively related to communion (in regular and unmitigated forms) and negatively related to agency (in both forms). Revenge entitlement was positively related to agency (unmitigated and regular), and negatively related to both regular and unmitigated communal orientations. Detected relationships were independent from self-esteem (Study 1). The findings are discussed in relation to distinctions between narcissistic and healthy entitlement, and within the context of the three-dimensional model of entitlement. PMID:25594535

  10. Enact, Discard, and Transform: A Critical Race Feminist Perspective on Professional Socialization among Tenured Black Female Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulé, Venice Thandi

    2014-01-01

    Through an analysis informed by critical race feminism, this paper examines the intersection of professional socialization and agency among tenured Black female faculty at Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs). Professional socialization entails the transmission and reproduction of professional norms. However, within PWIs, professional…

  11. [The insurance of professional responsibility of medical professionals in Russia].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the characteristics of implementation of mandatory insurance of professional risk of medical professionals. The possible directions in resolving actual problems are proposed in the elaboration of normative legal act on insurance of their professional responsibility.

  12. 78 FR 11166 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission to the Office of Management and Budget for Review and approval; Comment Request; Indian Education Professional Development Grants Program: GPRA...

  13. 77 FR 26043 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed collection; Comments Requested: CRS Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed collection; Comments Requested: CRS Customer Satisfaction Survey... Satisfaction Survey' will help CRS maintain the highest standards of professional conciliation and...

  14. [Society, medicine and caregiver stress].

    PubMed

    Mallet, D; Herbaut, A; Soyez, S; Delerue, M; Chekroud, H; Jacquemin, D

    2002-08-10

    CARING STAFF DISTRESS: Is a theme regularly discussed among those who care for patients. The current approach is in favor of the psychological interpretation of this distress. This approach is obviously pertinent, but could be widened to a more sociological vision: is the demand that society places on medicine excessive? THE SEARCH FOR AUTONOMY: The demand of the society emerges in a social universe that privileges the autonomy of the individual. Medicine serves this research for autonomy. Techniques, instrumentalization of the body, and the search for mastery engender the collective utopia of the perfect body; medicine has become a new faith, keeper of potential redemption measures. THE MEDIATOR FUNCTION OF CARING STAFF: Part of the caring staff distress is generated by the encounter between the utopia of health and the reality of suffering patients. In the present context of our society, one of the caring staff's missions is to act as mediator between the patient and the experience of the disease, the patient and the representation that he/she has of his/her body and health, and society and the expectations society projects on medicine.

  15. Beliefs about breastfeeding: a statewide survey of health professionals.

    PubMed

    Barnett, E; Sienkiewicz, M; Roholt, S

    1995-03-01

    A statewide project was implemented in 1993 to increase breastfeeding among low-income women in North Carolina through improved institutional policies and practices and professional lactation-management skills. A survey designed to ascertain professional beliefs about breastfeeding was mailed to 31 hospitals and 25 public health agencies. A total of 2209 health professionals completed the survey and met the study selection criteria. Nutritionists and pediatricians were most likely to have positive beliefs about breastfeeding, whereas hospital nurses were most likely to have negative beliefs. Personal breastfeeding experience contributed to positive beliefs. Professionals were least convinced of the emotional benefits of breastfeeding. Those with negative beliefs were most likely to advocate complete infant weaning from the breast before nine months of age. Although most health professionals had positive beliefs about breastfeeding, differences by profession, work environment, and personal breastfeeding experience indicate the need for comprehensive training in lactation management, and improvements in hospital and public health clinic environments. PMID:7741946

  16. Developing a Diverse Professoriate - Preliminary Outcomes from a Professional Development Workshop for Underrepresented Minorities in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, H. R.; Keane, C. M.; Seadler, A. R.; Wilson, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    A professional development workshop for underrepresented minority, future and early-career faculty in the geosciences was held in April of 2012. Twenty seven participants traveled to the Washington DC metro area and attended this 2.5 day workshop. Participants' career levels ranged from early PhD students to Assistant Professors, and they had research interests spanning atmospheric sciences, hydrology, solid earth geoscience and geoscience education. Race and ethnicity of the participants included primarily African American or Black individuals, as well as Hispanic, Native American, Native Pacific Islanders and Caucasians who work with underrepresented groups. The workshop consisted of three themed sessions led by prestigious faculty members within the geoscience community, who are also underrepresented minorities. These sessions included "Guidance from Professional Societies," "Instructional Guidance" and "Campus Leadership Advice." Each session lasted about 3 hours and included a mixture of presentational materials to provide context, hands-on activities and robust group discussions. Two additional sessions were devoted to learning about federal agencies. For the morning session, representatives from USGS and NOAA came to discuss opportunities within each agency and the importance of promoting geoscience literacy with our participants. The afternoon session gave the workshop attendees the fortunate opportunity to visit NSF headquarters. Participants were welcomed by NSF's Assistant Director for Geosciences and took part in small group meetings with program officers within the Geosciences Directorate. Participants indicated having positive experiences during this workshop. In our post-workshop evaluation, the majority of participants revealed that they thought the sessions were valuable, with many finding the sessions extremely valuable. The effectiveness of each session had similar responses. Preliminary results from 17 paired sample t-tests show increased

  17. Nurses' perceptions of their professional rights.

    PubMed

    Kangasniemi, Mari; Stievano, Alessandro; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study, which is part of a wider study of professional ethics, was to describe nurses' perceptions of their rights in Italy. The data were collected by open-ended focus group interviews and analyzed with inductive content analysis. Based on the analysis, three main themes were identified. The first theme "Unfamiliarity with rights" described nurses' perception that their rights mirrored historical roots, educational content, and nurses' and patients' position in the society. The second theme, "Rights reflected in legislation" highlighted that working and professional Italian legislation played a strong role. The third theme, "Managerial barriers for nurses' rights" underlined the nurses' perceptions that nursing management had the responsibility to create the conditions where nurses' rights could flourish. This study intends to contribute to the debate on this underexplored topic.

  18. Service-user and professional issues.

    PubMed

    Halstead, S

    2002-05-01

    A review of the current literature on service-user and professional issues revealed a distinctive pattern of concerns. Whilst these mainly have an origin in the wider world of disability, they have a relevance for forensic services. Advocacy, sexuality, abuse, offending, victimology, emergency management of behaviour, law, social exclusion, models of disability and research ethics dominated the literature. There was a paucity of work on professional development or service design, although this may have been an artefact resulting from the search methodology. In the view of the present author, the striking omissions were economics, the ethics of treatment and confidentiality, and the role of society in making decisions for those who cannot make decisions for themselves. The emphasis was on the 'libertarian' disability agenda and the more 'paternalistic' concerns of forensic services were somewhat neglected.

  19. Education of healthcare professionals and the public.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Cliodna A M; Cookson, Barry D; Lewis, Michael A O

    2012-07-01

    In the winter of 2007-08 a new public-facing antimicrobial campaign was agreed by the Advisory Committee on Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare-Associated Infection (ARHAI) Education sub-Group (later divided into subgroups for professional and public education): it comprised posters with a positive message on how the public could help themselves when they had a cold. However, the poster campaign, used in isolation in England, did not improve antibiotic use; therefore, the Public Education sub-Group took forward educational approaches to change the behaviour of the public and health professionals. Professionals have been encouraged to give patients clear information about the likely duration of symptoms, self-care, and benefits and harms of antibiotics, reinforcing the public poster campaigns in surgeries, hospitals and pharmacies. Since 2008, campaigns have been launched in England to coincide with European Antibiotic Awareness Day (EAAD) on 18 November, using Department of Health and EAAD materials. Professional education has been facilitated by the 2008 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence respiratory tract infection delayed prescribing guidance for general practitioners. A toolkit of materials for medicines management teams, to facilitate good antimicrobial stewardship in primary care (ASPIC), is being taken forward by the Public Education sub-Group and professional societies. After advice from ARHAI, in 2009 the General Medical Council requested that all postgraduate deans and Royal Colleges ensure infection prevention and control and antimicrobial prescribing become standard practice implemented in all clinical settings, and that they are emphasized strongly in undergraduate and postgraduate medical training. ARHAI has also taken a keen interest in reviewing, advising and leading on a number of European Union initiatives dealing with professional education. PMID:22855873

  20. [Health technology assessment agencies in the xxi century].

    PubMed

    Argimon, Josep Maria

    2015-11-01

    The origins of the health technology assessment (HTA) agencies date back to the 70s in the United States; in the European context, the current Agency for Quality and Health Assessment of Catalonia was among the pioneers in 1991. Epidemiological, social, technological and economic changes of recent years have led to the incorporation, by the agencies, of new functions, activities and projects that can offer better services (information and knowledge) to the various players in the healthcare system (patients, professionals, providers, insurers and policy-makers) in order to increase healthcare quality and preserve the sustainability of the health system.

  1. [Health technology assessment agencies in the xxi century].

    PubMed

    Argimon, Josep Maria

    2015-11-01

    The origins of the health technology assessment (HTA) agencies date back to the 70s in the United States; in the European context, the current Agency for Quality and Health Assessment of Catalonia was among the pioneers in 1991. Epidemiological, social, technological and economic changes of recent years have led to the incorporation, by the agencies, of new functions, activities and projects that can offer better services (information and knowledge) to the various players in the healthcare system (patients, professionals, providers, insurers and policy-makers) in order to increase healthcare quality and preserve the sustainability of the health system. PMID:26711062

  2. The culture of complexion: the impacts of society's role in shaping the definition of beauty.

    PubMed

    Carlock, Sarah; Russell, Brian

    2015-05-01

    The definition of beauty has evolved as the trends valued by the top of society change. For centuries, fair skin was a requirement of the Western definition of beauty; however, a shift in the 1920s made tanned skin the new standard. In this article, smoking and tanning are presented as risky behaviors that are perpetuated through industry advertising and exploitation of the authority of health professionals. The article further explores the culture of complexion in Western society before and after the 1920s as well as the consequences of tanning and efforts to rewrite society's definition of beauty.

  3. 34 CFR 84.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal agency or agency. 84.645 Section 84.645 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.645 Federal agency or agency. Federal agency or...

  4. 28 CFR 83.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal agency or agency. 83.645 Section 83.645 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 83.645 Federal agency or agency. Federal agency or...

  5. Support System for Mental Health Professionals*

    PubMed Central

    Dandekar, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    This paper talks of support systems for mental health professionals wherein the Bombay Psychiatric Society (BPS) should devote some meetings exclusively to problems pertaining to the profession, e.g., long and odd working hours leading to potentially hazardous practice schedules, unhealthy competitive attitudes and culture. A crash course in self-defence against potentially psychotic patients and drug addicts is advocated as also awareness of the potential hazards in dealing with the litigious paranoid patients, erotomaniacs and some of the difficult hysterical patients. Potential medicolegal problems arise in treating an uncooperative patient without his knowledge and consent on an outpatient department basis, admitting such an uncooperative patient to a nursing home or a hospital, administering electroconvulsive therapies, maintaining detailed clinical records of patients, and legal issues involving smaller psychiatric private nursing homes. This paper stresses on the use of Yoga as a recognised psycho-physiological therapy. Furthermore, it suggests on the need for BPS, as a professional body, to have a cell to guide and help aspiring young professionals in setting up private practice. It points out the need to evolve some concrete programmes that in the long run should help alleviate stresses and strains and promote positive comprehensive health amongst mental health professionals. PMID:25838730

  6. The Big Society Must Be a Learning Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubb, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The UK coalition government has stated its ambition to create a "Big Society". This represents an attempt to alter the relationship between citizen and state, loosening the vertical ties that exist between government and the individual while strengthening the informal bonds of neighbourhoods and communities. This agenda runs through the…

  7. 76 FR 58032 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The State Historical Society... believes itself to be culturally affiliated with the cultural item may contact the State Historical...

  8. Professionalism: challenges for dentistry in the future.

    PubMed

    Ozar, D T

    2012-11-01

    While countries varies significantly in the financing of dental care, they are much more alike in the delivery of dentistry. Dental care is principally provided in dental offices and clinics that are independent business entities whose business leaders are most often the dentists themselves. However society expects from dentists a level of professionalism (i.e. habitually acting ethically, both in terms of competence and conduct) in contrast to the methods and motivations of the marketplace. This is why the single most important challenge of dental professional ethics continues to be giving proper priority to patients' well being and building ethically correct decision-making relationships with patients while, at the same time, trying to maintain a successful business operation. If we look into dentistry's future, the centrality of this aspect of professional ethics is not likely to change, although the ways in which dentists might violate this trust will probably multiple as funding mechanisms become increasingly complex. It is important that dentists reflect with fresh eyes on their ethical commitments. One challenge is the increased availability of oral health information to the public and the fact that so many people are uncritical of the accuracy of information in the media and on the web. A second is the increase in the amount of health care advertising in many societies. A third is the growth of aesthetic dentistry that differs from standard oral health care in important and ethically significant ways. The fourth is insurance that frequently complicates the explanation of a patient's treatment alternatives and often brings a third party into the treatment decision relationship. The ethical challenges of each of these factors will be considered and ultimately tying it to the central theme of dental professionalism.

  9. Professionalism: challenges for dentistry in the future.

    PubMed

    Ozar, D T

    2012-11-01

    While countries varies significantly in the financing of dental care, they are much more alike in the delivery of dentistry. Dental care is principally provided in dental offices and clinics that are independent business entities whose business leaders are most often the dentists themselves. However society expects from dentists a level of professionalism (i.e. habitually acting ethically, both in terms of competence and conduct) in contrast to the methods and motivations of the marketplace. This is why the single most important challenge of dental professional ethics continues to be giving proper priority to patients' well being and building ethically correct decision-making relationships with patients while, at the same time, trying to maintain a successful business operation. If we look into dentistry's future, the centrality of this aspect of professional ethics is not likely to change, although the ways in which dentists might violate this trust will probably multiple as funding mechanisms become increasingly complex. It is important that dentists reflect with fresh eyes on their ethical commitments. One challenge is the increased availability of oral health information to the public and the fact that so many people are uncritical of the accuracy of information in the media and on the web. A second is the increase in the amount of health care advertising in many societies. A third is the growth of aesthetic dentistry that differs from standard oral health care in important and ethically significant ways. The fourth is insurance that frequently complicates the explanation of a patient's treatment alternatives and often brings a third party into the treatment decision relationship. The ethical challenges of each of these factors will be considered and ultimately tying it to the central theme of dental professionalism. PMID:23221268

  10. [Antiscientific attitudes in open society].

    PubMed

    Pérez Iglesias, Juan Ignacio

    2009-01-01

    The social controversy created in regard to the use and experiments with transgenic seeds and organisms serves as an example to illustrate the effects and consequences that can lead to antiscientific attitudes, which have gained great force in contemporary society. It has been suggested that the same functional relationship, from which the Enlightenment, science, and liberalism were born, is currently being applied in the opposite direction, so that the current antiscientific attitudes, along with the support they receive from post-modern thought, can end up undermining the bases of an open and democratic society. The consequences of this phenomenon are already manifested by the approval of certain regulations that lack scientific basis.

  11. Teachers' Talk of Experiencing: Conflict, Resistance and Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sannino, Annalisa

    2010-01-01

    This article draws on the concept of experiencing to highlight a positive connection between resistance and agency, and its potential for teachers' professional development and educational change. The article examines teachers' discourse during a Change Laboratory intervention aimed at developing teaching practices. The intervention was initiated…

  12. Differing Pupil Agency in the Face of Adult Positioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayton, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this article is children's positioning and agency in a Swedish school class. Drawing on ethnographic data generated during a year-long field study, the actions of three different children are used by the researcher to illustrate how children position themselves and are positioned by others. Using the concept of "professional pupils"…

  13. Public Health Programs and Licensed Professional Counselors: Practice Impact and Advocacy Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Counseling Association, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the impact of federal programs on individual counselors, including suggestions on advocating to improve the programs' recognition of professional mental health counselors. These are all separate programs, formulated under their own laws, regulations, and agencies.

  14. Professional Development of Nonformal Environmental Educators through School-based Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bainer, Deborah L.; Cantrell, Diane; Barron Pat

    2000-01-01

    Investigates whether partnerships enable natural resource professionals to better perform their roles as nonformal environmental educators and if partnerships benefit natural resource agencies and their employees in other ways. (Author/SAH)

  15. The New Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Lee

    1979-01-01

    Excerpts from interviews with Black students and graduates from Harvard Law and Medical Schools reveal the concern of these minority professionals as representatives of the Black community. Their experiences in graduate school and later in their professions are described. (JMF)

  16. What contributes to professionalism?

    PubMed

    LaSala, Kathleen B; Nelson, Jenenne

    2005-02-01

    Appearance, behavior, dress, and communication skills play an important role in the image that a nurse projects. As the nurse interacts with patients, families, community members, corporate personnel, and policymakers, he or she must reflect a professional image.

  17. [Limits of professionalism].

    PubMed

    Blume, Angelika

    2006-05-01

    On the basis of a case study, the author looks for parallels in her own biography. To what extent are professional helpers helpless when it comes to the point of dealing with one's own relatives? PMID:16830238

  18. Professional thieves and drugs.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, J A; Russe, B R

    1977-12-01

    The "professional thief" is a highly specialized predatory offender with a history that dates back to Elizabethan England. Although this type of criminal is generally associated with narcotic addiction, his drug-taking typically involved the use of heroin, morphine, and cocaine on an intermittent basis. However, trafficking in drugs was common to the "professional" underworld, and as a result this deviant fraternity had a notable impact on the impressment of a criminal model of drug use on twentieth century conceptions of the addict. The concept of "professional" theft is reviewed, the use of drugs by professional thieves is discussed, and the interaction between this underworld group and the early Federal Bureau of Narcotics is examined.

  19. Communicating with Professionals

    MedlinePlus

    ... rushed than you (or your professionals) want. Simple communication skills can help you get what you need – over ... at the hospital or during office visits. Good communication skills help you get better results from the time ...

  20. Graduate and Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College and University, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Proceedings of the 67th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers which relate to graduate and professional education are summarized. Names and institutions of conference participants are included. (MSE)

  1. Graduate and Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College and University, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Proceedings of the 66th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers which relate to graduate and professional education are summarized. Names and institutions of conference participants are included. (MSE)

  2. Professionalism in Computer Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, Alastair D.; Konstadopoulou, Anastasia

    The paper seeks to address the need to consider issues regarding professionalism in computer forensics in order to allow the discipline to develop and to ensure the credibility of the discipline from the differing perspectives of practitioners, the criminal justice system and in the eyes of the public. There is a need to examine and develop professionalism in computer forensics in order to promote the discipline and maintain the credibility of the discipline.

  3. 78 FR 65302 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Evaluation of a District Wide...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... of a Professional Learning Community Initiative AGENCY: Institute of Education Sciences (IES... Implementation of a Professional Learning Community Initiative. OMB Control Number: 1850--NEW. Type of Review: A... learning communities (PLCs) as a critical element in improving teacher quality and instruction,...

  4. Multi-agency voices: a thematic analysis of multi-agency working practices within the setting of a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Gill; Rapport, Frances

    2005-10-01

    This qualitative study aims to explore the types and purpose of discourse emerging when professionals from a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service meet with professionals from other agencies to discuss cases. The aim reflects current political and contextual agendas influencing agencies to work more closely together and obstacles to achieving this goal highlighted in the literature such as the need for agencies to develop a common language to discuss children of concern. Data were collected through eight audio-taped meetings involving CAMHS and members of other agencies such as social services and education. A thematic analysis identified nine themes, defined according to their discourse type, including: single agency discourse; case complexity discourse and multi-agency discourse. Results indicate that agencies are hindered from working more closely together and developing a common language for use in multi-agency meetings, because they tend to have different understandings of the terminology used and a common consensus about language and meaning is not usually negotiated within the meeting. There is a need for greater awareness amongst staff from different professional groups and agencies that meaning given by one group will often need to be clarified by others and assumptions about common understandings should not be made. PMID:16308167

  5. Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Violet; Liu, Ang; Groeber, Elizabeth; Moghaddam, Mehran; Schiller, James; Tweed, Joseph A; Walker, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Cambridge, MA, USA, 14-16 September 2015 The Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis (APA) conference took place at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Cambridge, MA, on 14-16 September 2015. The 3-day conference affords pharmaceutical professionals, academic researchers and industry regulators the opportunity to collectively participate in meaningful and relevant discussions impacting the areas of pharmaceutical drug development. The APA conference was organized in three workshops encompassing the disciplines of regulated bioanalysis, discovery bioanalysis (encompassing new and emerging technologies) and biotransformation. The conference included a short course titled 'Bioanalytical considerations for the clinical development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs)', an engaging poster session, several panel and round table discussions and over 50 diverse talks from leading industry and academic scientists. PMID:26853375

  6. Professional Ethics for Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvel, K. B.

    2005-05-01

    There is a growing recognition that professional ethics is an important topic for all professional scientists, especially physical scientists. Situations at the National Laboratories have dramatically proven this point. Professional ethics is usually only considered important for the health sciences and the legal and medical professions. However, certain aspects of the day to day work of professional astronomers can be impacted by ethical issues. Examples include refereeing scientific papers, serving on grant panels or telescope allocation committees, submitting grant proposals, providing proper references in publications, proposals or talks and even writing recommendation letters for job candidates or serving on search committees. This session will feature several speakers on a variety of topics and provide time for questions and answers from the audience. Confirmed speakers include: Kate Kirby, Director Institute for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics - Professional Ethics in the Physical Sciences: An Overview Rob Kennicutt, Astrophysical Journal Editor - Ethical Issues for Publishing Astronomers Peggy Fischer, Office of the NSF Inspector General - Professional Ethics from the NSF Inspector General's Point of View

  7. Socialization for the Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpov, Alexander O.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to give an overview and present special features of socialization of the research type that prepares young people for life in the knowledge society. Methods of cultural and historical epistemology, of hermeneutic and structural-functional analysis of social action have been used in the study, as well as elements of the…

  8. Society Membership Survey: 1986 Salaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skelton, W. Keith; And Others

    The fourth in a series of reports produced by the Education and Employment Statistics division of the American Insititute of Physics (AIP) is presented. Data are based on a stratified random sample survey of one-sixth of the U.S. and Canadian membership of the AIP member societies. In the spring of 1986, every individual in the sample received a…

  9. Science in Society, Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Science Education, Cambridge (England).

    This teacher's guide was designed for use in a course developed by The Science in Society Project. The aims of the project, course description and content, and suggestions for introducing the course are included in a general introduction. Objectives, content, commentary on supplementary reading materials developed specifically for the course,…

  10. Advertising: Art as Society's Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Catherine E. B.

    1998-01-01

    Provides a historical overview of U.S. print advertising from the 1890s to the 1990s. Demonstrates how advertisers adapt their messages and target audiences to the changes each era brings. Conveys that advertising reflects society by giving an image of an era as it aims to persuade. Offers six teaching activities. (CMK)

  11. Reconstructing Death in Postmodern Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Examines interaction between emerging thanatological movement and its sociohistorical context. Notes that thanatology will take on new shape as individuals and society attempt to cope with postmodernistic forces and deconstructive mentality. Considers prospect for authentic solidarity against distress in reconstructed death system. (Author/NB)

  12. The Society and the Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosvenor, Gilbert M.

    1985-01-01

    In this speech delivered at the 1984 meeting of the Association of American Geographers, the president of the National Geographic Society (NGS) discusses what geography needs to stay on its feet as an independent and useful discipline and what the NGS is doing to support geography. (RM)

  13. Credentialism in Our Ignorant Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marien, Michael

    All societies have procedures for selecting who will occupy important positions. The use of credentials characterizes our system of social selection, and our worship of them has created the following problems: an artificial demand for education, artificial restraints to learning, the overlooking of obsolescence, generational inversion (wherein the…

  14. Education for the Good Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Neal; Spours, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The Left is facing a crisis of its approach to education highlighted by the "education revolution" of the Coalition Government. The authors argue that it is important to step back and present a positive vision of education based on the key pillars of the Good Society--fairness, democracy, sustainability and well-being. This values-led agenda,…

  15. Adult Education in Croatian Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pongrac, Silvije, Ed.

    This document contains eight papers on adult education in Croatian society. "Basic Characteristics of Croatian Adult Education up to These Days" (Silvije Pongrac, Ilija Lavrnja) highlights key trends in the development of Croatian adult education. "Adult Education in Croatia Based on Social Changes" (Anita Klapan) discusses Croatian adult…

  16. Huntington's Disease Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... modifying drug for HD 09.19.16 New technology enables researchers to find ultra-rare mutations in the HD gene, distinct from the one causing HD 08.30.16 HD Support & Care Network and Huntington’s Disease Society of America Partner for Stronger HD Support Groups ...

  17. Educating in a Postconventional Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2006-01-01

    Today many people experience more frustration and confusion about many moral issues and norms than their ancestors. Traditional values and norms do not seem to serve Christian adults in today's situation. Christians are therefore challenged to develop Christian moral norms and values relevant to contemporary society and culture. In this article,…

  18. Marketing and Society. Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Robert S.; Blake, Rowland S.

    This self-instructional study guide is part of the materials for a college-level programmed course entitled "Marketing and Society." The study guide is intended for use by students in conjunction with a related textbook, a workbook, a review guide, and a series of instructional tape casettes. The study guide contains a brief introductory section…

  19. Shapes of a Renewable Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deudney, Daniel; Flavin, Christopher

    1983-01-01

    To rely on coal and nuclear power as sources of energy is to narrow society's future options and to present numerous problems. Renewable solar energy, on the other hand, can preserve rather than reduce options. More jobs, rising self-reliance, and new equalities between nations will be the result. (RM)

  20. White Resentment in Settler Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schick, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Teaching about the history and culture of aboriginal peoples in schools of white settler societies can serve as a counter to the dominant story that serves as the national narrative. Even though the actual teaching may well be among the least political and least disruptive type of curricular knowledge on offer, the inclusion of counter stories can…

  1. Psychology and homosexuality: the British Sexological Society.

    PubMed

    Weigle, D C

    1995-04-01

    The British Sexological Society was a largely unknown society composed of influential people of the early twentieth century in Great Britain. The present research is an archival study of the Society and its work concerning homosexuality. Issues addressed by the British Sexological Society are relevant to the early development of sexual emancipation movements as well as to issues of sexuality today.

  2. Participation of women in neurochemistry societies.

    PubMed

    Lees, Marjorie B

    2002-11-01

    Women have made important scientific contributions to the field of neurochemistry, and they have also been leaders in neurochemical societies throughout the world. Here I discuss women's involvement and leadership in six neurochemistry societies: American Society for Neurochemistry, Argentine Society for Neurochemistry, International Society for Neurochemistry, European Society for Neurochemistry, Japanese Society for Neurochemistry, and Asian-Pacific Society for Neurochemistry. The number of women who have been active in these societies and the level of their activity vary considerably. Neurochemical societies in the Western hemisphere, i.e., the American and the Argentine Society for Neurochemistry, have much greater numbers of women who have held office, been on council, or engaged in other leadership activities than in the rest of the world. The limited participation of women in the Japanese Neurochemistry Society relates to Japanese cultural views and was not unexpected. However, the relatively few women leaders in the International Society for Neurochemistry was a surprise. The European Society had a somewhat better record of female participation than did the International Society. The reasons for these differences are partly cultural, but factors related to when each society was formed, how it is organized, and how elections are structured undoubtedly play a role. Further analysis of these observations would be of interest from a sociological and a women's studies point of view.

  3. The need for professional doctors of public health.

    PubMed Central

    Roemer, M I

    1986-01-01

    Planning, organizing, and operating today's complex health care systems or heading Federal, State, and city public health agencies in the United States and other countries require professionals broadly prepared in the meaning, philosophy, and strategies of public health. It is and has been recognized that the best trained clinical physician could not be expected to know the policies and practices of official public health programs. The chief health official of a State or other jurisdiction, for example, deals with the epidemiology of many diseases; with all aspects of the environment; with hospitals, drugs, health manpower, and nutrition; with issues of health economics, finance, and politics; and with administration. For these tasks, most of medical education is irrelevant. To produce the needed specialists, candidates with a BA degree would be educated as doctors of public health. The proposed 5-year postgraduate curriculum is as demanding as the training for the MD degree, but completely different. The 38 subjects or courses in the curriculum are grouped into four categories: basic tools of social analysis, health and disease in populations, protection of health and prevention of disease, and health care systems and management. At present, MPH degree holders take only a handful of core and elective courses and emerge with little systematic knowledge about the majority of problems they face. The DrPH candidates at schools of public health spend most of their time on research and dissertation writing--adequate preparation for university teachers, but academia is not the goal of most candidates, nor the greatest need of society.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3080785

  4. The need for professional doctors of public health.

    PubMed

    Roemer, M I

    1986-01-01

    Planning, organizing, and operating today's complex health care systems or heading Federal, State, and city public health agencies in the United States and other countries require professionals broadly prepared in the meaning, philosophy, and strategies of public health. It is and has been recognized that the best trained clinical physician could not be expected to know the policies and practices of official public health programs. The chief health official of a State or other jurisdiction, for example, deals with the epidemiology of many diseases; with all aspects of the environment; with hospitals, drugs, health manpower, and nutrition; with issues of health economics, finance, and politics; and with administration. For these tasks, most of medical education is irrelevant. To produce the needed specialists, candidates with a BA degree would be educated as doctors of public health. The proposed 5-year postgraduate curriculum is as demanding as the training for the MD degree, but completely different. The 38 subjects or courses in the curriculum are grouped into four categories: basic tools of social analysis, health and disease in populations, protection of health and prevention of disease, and health care systems and management. At present, MPH degree holders take only a handful of core and elective courses and emerge with little systematic knowledge about the majority of problems they face. The DrPH candidates at schools of public health spend most of their time on research and dissertation writing--adequate preparation for university teachers, but academia is not the goal of most candidates, nor the greatest need of society. Recruits for the proposed new doctorate in public health may be found among the thousands of young people who want to do "community health work" but see no way to play a significant role without getting an MD degree first.

  5. Assessment of Capacity in an Aging Society

    PubMed Central

    Moye, Jennifer; Marson, Daniel C.; Edelstein, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, the assessment and scientific study of capacity in older adults has emerged as a distinct field of clinical and research activity for psychologists. This new field reflects the convergence of several trends: the aging of American society, the growing incidence and prevalence of dementia, and the patient rights, deinstitutionalization, and disability rights movements. Because of these forces, capacity issues now permeate the fabric of everyday life, whether in the form of guardianship petitions, questions of capacity to consent to treatment, the ability to make a new will, or participation in human research. In seeking to resolve these issues, families, clinicians, and legal professionals increasingly turn to psychologists to assess a capacity and to provide empirically supported judgments that properly balance autonomy and protection for the individual. Psychologists have taken a leading role in the development of functional assessment instruments that measure important aspects of the capacity construct. In addition, psychology has been a major contributor to the scientific study of capacity. In collaboration with colleagues from medicine and law, psychologists have articulated crucial theoretical frameworks that integrate legal, clinical, and ethical dimensions of the capacity problem. This article focuses on the evolution of theory, law, science, and practice in the evaluation of capacity in older adults and its recent culmination in a series of interdisciplinary handbooks sponsored by the American Psychological Association and the American Bar Association. PMID:23586491

  6. The Society of Nuclear Medicine in the new millennium.

    PubMed

    Carretta, R F

    2000-07-01

    The Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM), which was first organized in January 1954 by 12 men at the Davenport Hotel in Spokane, WA, has evolved into an international educational organization. It has more than 15,000 members, including physicians, scientists, technologists, and industrialists. The SNM has embarked on a new strategic plan that will make it the premier educational and scientific organization representing the specialty of nuclear medicine. The role of the Society in the new millennium and its relationship with other international nuclear medicine societies continue to evolve. The opportunity for joint educational programs, interchange of ideas, research, an international journal, educational activities, and the sharing of professional experiences awaits the SNM and its members in the new millennium. The Society has also reached out to other organizations and physicians who are involved in the clinical practice of nuclear medicine to forge new alliances that will strengthen the specialty of nuclear medicine. These alliances will allow nuclear medicine physicians to speak with a unified voice when faced with regulatory and reimbursement issues and will help in advancing the research, education, and clinical mission of the SNM. PMID:10928386

  7. Scientific Society Partnerships & Effective Strategies for Advancing Policy Objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, P. W.; Greenamoyer, J.

    2012-12-01

    From the perspective of Congress, science is just another interest group that seeks a generous slice of an increasingly shrinking federal budget pie. Traditionally, the science community has not been effective at lobbying for the legislative advances and federal appropriations that enable the R&D enterprise. However, over the last couple decades, science societies have become more strategic in their outreach to Congress and the President. Indeed, many societies have lobbyists on staff, many of whom have a background in science. Yet, while science societies are beginning to be more effective as a political interest group, their members have been much slower to come around to this perspective as an important component of their professional lives. In this talk, we will illustrate how the American Institute of Physics partners with AGU and other science societies to identify joint policy priorities and then reach out to Congress and the President to advance these priorities. The biggest issue is funding for R&D, but science education is increasingly important as is other issues such as publishing policy. We will draw from a number examples, such as the NSF budget, funding for Pu-238, K-12 physical science education policy, and Open Access to illustrate how partnerships work and how scientists can be engaged as powerful political actors in the process.

  8. [History of the German Spine Society].

    PubMed

    Wilke, H-J; Carstens, C

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize the history of the German Spine Society (DWG). This society resulted in the year 2006 after several attempts from the fusion of two established German societies, which were dealing with topics around the spine, der "German Society for Spine Research" founded in the year 1958 and the "German Society for Spine Surgery" founded in the year 1987. This fusion was the beginning of a success story, as from this time on the annual membership increased so much that the DWG became the largest spine society in Europe and one of all spine societies worldwide.

  9. Professional Development of Academic Library Professionals in Kerala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathew, K. Susan; Baby, M. D.; Pillai, S. Sreerekha

    2011-01-01

    The paper aims to bring out the problems and prospects of the professional development opportunities of academic library professionals in the Universities in Kerala. The study is a part of research undertaken to survey the professional development activities and educational needs of library professionals in the major Universities of Kerala in the…

  10. Professional Socialisation: An Influence on Professional Development and Role Definition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornelissen, J. J.; van Wyk, A. S.

    2007-01-01

    Professional socialisation refers to the acquisition of values, attitudes, skills and knowledge pertaining to a profession. This article reviews the definition and conceptualisation of professional socialisation through anticipatory and formal professional socialisation processes. It describes the core elements of professional socialisation such…

  11. Predictors of Professional Identity Development for Student Affairs Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Edward C.; Foubert, John D.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether professional involvement, supervision style, and mentoring predicted the professional identity of graduate students and new professionals in student affairs. Results of the study show that all three independent variables predicted the professional identity development of graduate students. Supervision style of a…

  12. Developing Professionalism through Reflective Practice and Ongoing Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleach, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to the debate on early years professionalism. It explores the impact of a continuous professional development (CPD) programme, in particular a module on professional practice, on early childhood care and education (ECCE) practitioners' identity as early years professionals. Action research informed the development of…

  13. [Certification for specialists on neurology by Japanese Society of Neurology].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norihiro

    2009-11-01

    In accordance with recent ever increasing numbers in elder population in Japan, number of patients of age-related neurological diseases such as stroke, dementia and neurodegenerative diseases, etc., also remarkably increasing. Naturally, social needs for medical intervention in neurological fields inevitably become indispensable. The role of the neurologists, especially specialists of neurology, must be substantially important in the near future. The Japanese Society of Neurology has already launched the system for quality-certified specialists for neurology in 1970's. The aim of the system to educate and certify specialists for neurology has been announced as follows; the specialist of neurology must widely experienced and practiced in clinical fields, and must properly diagnose and judge the neurological illness even they are so complicate and difficult to manage (Rinsho Shinkeigaku (Clinical Neurology) 38 (6): 593-619, 1998). However, in future, the specialists for neurology must cultivate and keep the minds of "Professionalism" of physicians as well as their skills for clinical neurology. The Professionalism consists of altruism, accountability, excellence, duty, honor and integrity, respect and a personal commitment to life-long learning (ABIM: American Board of Internal Medicine, Project Professionalism, 1990-). The specialists of neurology with recent privilege in clinical insurance system for their special ability and techniques for neurological examination, should not only share their clinical specialty but also provide their opinion based upon Professionalism to all over the world. PMID:20030199

  14. 75 FR 57289 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Pioneer Historical Society of Bent County, Las Animas, CO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... Society of Bent County professional staff in consultation with representatives of the Apache Tribe of..., Oklahoma; Forest County Potawatomi Community, Wisconsin; Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma; Hannahville... Nebraska; Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma; Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico; Kickapoo Tribe of Indians of...

  15. Actions for a New Industrial Engineering Curriculum Based on a Changing Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alt, Paulo Renato Campos; Massote, Alexandre Augusto; La Neve, Alessandro

    Engineering schools have been interacting, more and more, with society in a very intensive way in order to deal with its necessities, integrating them in these courses and, as a consequence, preparing professionals with an adequate profile. This paper shows the author's vision about the interactions between market and communities, and which are…

  16. Voices of Early Career Psychologists in Division 17, the Society of Counseling Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nathan Grant; Keller, Briana K.; Mollen, Debra; Bledsoe, Meredith L.; Buhin, Larisa; Edwards, Lisa M.; Levy, Jacob J.; Magyar-Moe, Jeana L.; Yakushko, Oksana

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of early career members of the Society of Counseling Psychology (SCP). Seventy early career psychologists completed a survey assessing the usefulness and climate of SCP, barriers to and facilitative factors for involvement in SCP, inclusiveness of SCP regarding cultural diversity and professional interests, degree…

  17. [On the history of foundation of the Russian Society of Forensic Medicine].

    PubMed

    Nazarov, V Iu

    2009-01-01

    This analysis of archive documents has revealed unknown facts from the history of the single professional association of forensic medical examiners that existed in the pre-revolutionary Russia. Special attention is given to the contribution made by specialists based at Sankt-Peterburg to the foundation of the Russian Society of Forensic Medicine.

  18. Contributions to Education from the Psychology of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, in Today's Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Fuente, Jesus; Vera, Manuel Mariano; Cardelle-Elawar, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The globalized Knowledge Society of the 21st century brings with it important changes in models of work and lifestyle, triggered by the revolution in Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs). It has led to new ways of understanding knowledge itself, human activity, and consequently, professional and economic activity. In this current…

  19. Creativity in Early Childhood Education: Teachers' Perceptions in Three Chinese Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chien, Chu-ying; Hui, Anna N. N.

    2010-01-01

    Recent emphasis on the development of creativity in Chinese students across various educational levels is highlighted in various Chinese societies, including Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Early childhood educators as important gatekeepers of fostering creative development in young children were invited to give their professional opinion on the…

  20. Black health professional families: assessment of strengths and stability.

    PubMed

    Carter, J H

    1992-01-01

    Despite pernicious racism, most black health professionals achieve professional success and most have stable marriages. A 19-item questionnaire was designed to assess this hypothesis following a lecture on the strengths and weaknesses of black health professional families to physicians, dentists, and their spouses (n = 38) at the 1990 annual meeting of the combined Old North State Medical and Dental Societies of North Carolina. Surprisingly, these families seemed eager to disclose feelings about themselves, their professions, and their marriages. Major preliminary findings were that these health professionals were more prone to indicate unhappiness than their spouses and less likely to see racism as an impediment to careers, and more willing to acknowledge that they would like to correct something in their lives.