Science.gov

Sample records for agency complex terrain

  1. Contributions by Wave Propagation Laboratory to EPA's (Environmental Protection Agency's) complex-terrain model-development project. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Eberhard, W.L.

    1986-12-01

    The Wave Propagation Laboratory (WPL) participated in the Environmental Protection Agency's Complex Terrain Model Development Project, whose objective is development of numerical air-quality models valid in complex terrain. Particular attention was given to impaction of elevated plumes on high terrain during stable (nocturnal) conditions. WPL operated a plume-mapping lidar, acoustic sounders (some with Doppler capability), sonic anemometers, a tethered sonde, and crosswind optical anemometers. Measurements were usually displayed in real time for experimental guidance and later processed with quality assurance for quantitative analysis. A synopsis of data acquisition and archiving is given for each experiment, including a review of the results of scientific analyses already completed.

  2. Atmospheric modeling in complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M. D.; Streit, G. E.

    1990-05-01

    Los Alamos investigators have developed several models which are relevant to modeling Mexico City air quality. The collection of models includes: meteorological models, dispersion models, air chemistry models, and visibility models. The models have been applied in several different contexts. They have been developed primarily to address the complexities posed by complex terrain. HOTMAC is the meteorological model which requires terrain and limited meteorological information. HOTMAC incorporates a relatively complete description of atmospheric physics to give good descriptions of the wind, temperature, and turbulence fields. RAPTAD is a dispersion code which uses random particle transport and kernel representations to efficiently provide accurate pollutant concentration fields. RAPTAD provides a much better description of tracer dispersion than do Gaussian puff models which fail to properly represent the effects of the wind profile near the surface. ATMOS and LAVM treat photochemistry and visibility respectively. ATMOS has been used to describe wintertime chemistry of the Denver brown cloud. Its description provided reasonable agreement with measurements for the high altitude of Denver. LAVM can provide both numerical indices or pictoral representations of visibility effects of pollutants. 15 refs., 74 figs.

  3. Mean Flow and Turbulence in Complex Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    basin in the Geysers geothermal area in Cali- fornia. That study was part of the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program and involved...Terrain at Geysers , CAL.," Boundary-Layer Meteorology, V. 21, pp. 207-213, 1981. 3. Scientific Report 7 (ISSN 0112-2398), Measurements on a Thirty Metre

  4. Wind turbine wake measurement in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, KS; Larsen, GC; Menke, R.; Vasiljevic, N.; Angelou, N.; Feng, J.; Zhu, WJ; Vignaroli, A.; W, W. Liu; Xu, C.; Shen, WZ

    2016-09-01

    SCADA data from a wind farm and high frequency time series measurements obtained with remote scanning systems have been analysed with focus on identification of wind turbine wake properties in complex terrain. The analysis indicates that within the flow regime characterized by medium to large downstream distances (more than 5 diameters) from the wake generating turbine, the wake changes according to local atmospheric conditions e.g. vertical wind speed. In very complex terrain the wake effects are often “overruled” by distortion effects due to the terrain complexity or topology.

  5. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  6. Carbon dioxide transport over complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Burns, Sean P.; Delany, A.C.; Oncley, S.P.; Turnipseed, A.; Stephens, B.; Guenther, A.; Anderson, D.E.; Monson, R.

    2004-01-01

    The nocturnal transport of carbon dioxide over complex terrain was investigated. The high carbon dioxide under very stable conditions flows to local low-ground. The regional drainage flow dominates the carbon dioxide transport at the 6 m above the ground and carbon dioxide was transported to the regional low ground. The results show that the local drainage flow was sensitive to turbulent mixing associated with local wind shear.

  7. Spectra over complex terrain in the surface layer

    SciTech Connect

    Panofsky, H.A.; Dutton, J.A.; Larko, D.; Lipschutz, R.; Stone, G.

    1982-09-01

    For design and control of Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS), the spectral distribution of wind speeds over frequencies needs to be known as well as velocity variances. Velocity spectra and other velocity statistics are estimated over three types of complex terrain: on tops of hills or escarpments; on land a short distance downwind from a water body; and over rolling farm land. The most important characteristics of turbulence models over uniform terrain are summarized briefly. Theoretical aspects of spectral characteristics over complex terrain are discussed, followed by detailed observations over complex terrain and procedures for their estimation. A theory is presented for calculation of response of engineering systems to wind fluctuations. (LEW)

  8. Synoptic Flow Interactions in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocut, C. M.; Silver, Z.; Wang, Y.; Creegan, E.; Felton, M.; Hoch, S.; Fernando, H. J.; Di Sabatino, S.; Leo, L.; Dimitrova, R.; Zsedrovits, T.; Pardyjak, E.; Huynh, G.

    2014-12-01

    In the spring of 2013, the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations Program (MATERHORN) conducted its second extensive field experiment at the Granite Mountain Atmospheric Science Testbed (GMAST), US Army Dugway Proving Grounds (DPG), Utah. Of particular interest to MATERHORN-X-2 were synoptic dominated conditions in which synoptic flows interacted with thermal circulations and the topography leading to modulations of the thermal circulations and external-flow generated lee and progressive waves and if the Froude number was low; eddies, large vortices, wakes and waves developed in the lee of Granite Mountain. To capture these phenomena, a suite of advanced instrumentation was used, which could characterize the upstream unmodified synoptic approach flow and identify the synoptic flow / mountain interactions. In addition to meteorological towers, Doppler LiDARs, placed at two locations to the east and in the lee of Granite Mountain were particularly useful, showing the horizontal spatial pattern and temporal evolution of the synoptic generated phenomena. WRF simulations were used to provide analysis guidance. This research was funded by Office of Naval Research Grant # N00014-11-1-0709 and the Air Force Weather Agency.

  9. Introduction Wind farms in complex terrains: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Alfredsson, P H; Segalini, A

    2017-04-13

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing sources of sustainable energy production. As more wind turbines are coming into operation, the best locations are already becoming occupied by turbines, and wind-farm developers have to look for new and still available areas-locations that may not be ideal such as complex terrain landscapes. In these locations, turbulence and wind shear are higher, and in general wind conditions are harder to predict. Also, the modelling of the wakes behind the turbines is more complicated, which makes energy-yield estimates more uncertain than under ideal conditions. This theme issue includes 10 research papers devoted to various fluid-mechanics aspects of using wind energy in complex terrains and illustrates recent progress and future developments in this important field.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  10. Modeling and Visualizing Flow of Chemical Agents Across Complex Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Kramer, Marc; Chaderjian, Neal

    2005-01-01

    Release of chemical agents across complex terrain presents a real threat to homeland security. Modeling and visualization tools are being developed that capture flow fluid terrain interaction as well as point dispersal downstream flow paths. These analytic tools when coupled with UAV atmospheric observations provide predictive capabilities to allow for rapid emergency response as well as developing a comprehensive preemptive counter-threat evacuation plan. The visualization tools involve high-end computing and massive parallel processing combined with texture mapping. We demonstrate our approach across a mountainous portion of North California under two contrasting meteorological conditions. Animations depicting flow over this geographical location provide immediate assistance in decision support and crisis management.

  11. Fluid Dynamics of Urban Atmospheres in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, H. J. S.

    2010-01-01

    A majority of the world's urban centers are located in complex terrain, in which local airflow patterns are driven by pressure gradients and thermal forcing, while being strongly influenced by topographic effects and human (anthropogenic) activities. A paradigm in this context is a city located in a valley surrounded by mountains, slopes, and escarpments, in which the airflow is determined by terrain-induced perturbations to synoptic (background) flow, mesoscale thermal circulation (valley/slope flows) generated by local heating or cooling, and by their interaction with factitious (e.g., buildings and roads) and natural (e.g., vegetation and terrain) elements. The dynamics of airflows intrinsic to urban areas in complex terrain is reviewed here by employing idealized flow configurations to illustrate fundamental processes. Urban flows span a wide range of space and time scales and the emphasis here is on mesoscales (1-100 km). Basic fluid dynamics plays a central role in explaining observations of urban flow and in developing subgrid parameterizations for predictive models.

  12. Introduction Wind farms in complex terrains: an introduction

    PubMed Central

    Alfredsson, P. H.; Segalini, A.

    2017-01-01

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing sources of sustainable energy production. As more wind turbines are coming into operation, the best locations are already becoming occupied by turbines, and wind-farm developers have to look for new and still available areas—locations that may not be ideal such as complex terrain landscapes. In these locations, turbulence and wind shear are higher, and in general wind conditions are harder to predict. Also, the modelling of the wakes behind the turbines is more complicated, which makes energy-yield estimates more uncertain than under ideal conditions. This theme issue includes 10 research papers devoted to various fluid-mechanics aspects of using wind energy in complex terrains and illustrates recent progress and future developments in this important field. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Wind energy in complex terrains’. PMID:28265020

  13. Evaluation of a puff dispersion model in complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Thuillier, R.H. )

    1992-03-01

    California's Pacific Gas and Electric Company has many power plant operations situated in complex terrain, prominent examples being the Geysers geothermal plant in Lake and Sonoma Counties, and the Diablo Canyon nuclear plant in San Luis Obispo County. Procedures ranging from plant licensing to emergency response require a dispersion modeling capability in a complex terrain environment. This paper describes the performance evaluation of such a capability, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company Modeling System (PGEMS), a fast response Gaussian puff model with a three-dimensional wind field generator. Performance of the model was evaluated for ground level and short stack elevated release on the basis of a special intensive tracer experiment in the complex coastal terrain surrounding the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant in San Luis Obispo County, California. The model performed well under a variety of meteorological and release conditions within the test region of 20-kilometer radius surrounding the nuclear plant, and turned in a superior performance in the wake of the nuclear plant, using a new wake correction algorithm for ground level and roof-vent releases a that location.

  14. Boundary Layer Measurements in Complex Terrain: Innsbruck-Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiperski, I.; Rotach, M. W.; Gohm, A.

    2012-04-01

    Planetary boundary layers in complex terrain remain one of the major challenges of today's boundary layer research. Our current knowledge of the characteristics of the turbulence structure and exchange processes in truly complex topography remains limited. Not only is there no suitable theory, it is not known if all the relevant processes such a theory should explain are accounted for. Meanwhile, the increasing resolution of both numerical weather prediction and regional climate models demands precisely such information for improving model performance. Except for a few recent field campaigns, limited both in time and focus, no measurement platform in highly complex terrain is available to date that would be able to provide a complete dataset of boundary layer information in sufficient complexity, resolution and covering all regimes of interest both for model validation and resolving the remaining scientific questions. The Dynamic Meteorology Group of the Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics, University of Innsbruck is presently setting up such a 'reference box', which aims to fill in this gap. It will consist of a combination of high-resolution long-term turbulence observations in an area in the vicinity of Innsbruck (hence the 'Innsbruck-Box') and high-resolution numerical modeling. Whereas the data provided by measurements will allow for improvements in process understanding and model validation, the numerical modeling will be used to fill the data gaps in areas where no measurements are possible or the current measurement techniques are inadequate. Also, numerical experiments using idealized terrain or settings can be performed in order to test hypotheses deduced from the observations. The Innsbruck-Box is designed to be a long-term reference platform for studying boundary layer processes in highly complex terrain with an integrated measurement approach. Sites are located in the Inn-Valley, an approximately East-West oriented valley in western Austria

  15. Innovative Solutions for Pulsed Wind Lidar Accuracy in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquet, M.

    2010-12-01

    Accuracy of Lidar remote sensors for wind energy has been previously reported. Coherent Doppler lidars have shown very high correlation with calibrated cup anemometers in flat terrain, both onshore and offshore. However, in more complex terrain, not only more turbulent air flow but also loss of flow homogeneity occurs, and remote sensors measurement process needs to be closely examined. We compare and simulate cup’s point and lidar’s volume measurements to understand and explain for the two sensor’s response. We emphasize the main error term in the horizontal and vertical wind speed retrieval. Geometrical optimizations of pulsed Lidar measurement process are also investigated to get more reliable wind speed estimations, such as finding the right cone angle to reduce the error. We show our conclusions and results of the CFD simulation performed on a Spanish complex terrain case. We see that there is at least one possibility to strongly reduce the relative error between Lidar and anemometer measurements. Indeed, accessing to the vertical wind speed variations leads to a considerable improvement in the linear correlation and dispersion.

  16. Atmospheric transport in complex terrain at Los Alamos, Area G

    SciTech Connect

    Vold, E.L.

    1997-03-01

    This report documents the atmospheric dispersion used in the Area G Performance Assessment for off-site airborne dose calculations. Potential airborne contaminants from the mesa top disposal facility disperse in the complex terrain dominated by narrow mesas in parallel to narrow canyons. The dispersion is characterized by site-specific values of X/Q [(Ci/m{sup 3})/(Ci/s)] at each of two designated receptor locations, a {open_quote}maximum off-site dose{close_quote} location and a nearby population center (White Rock, NM). The values of X/Q in each of the sixteen wind sectors are first estimated with the CAP-88 computer code using 1992 annual meteorologic data from Area G and assuming an area source for release. This data captures the dominant wind direction on the mesa tops from the SSW. These dispersion parameters are assumed to apply to open, flat terrain and must be corrected for the complex mesa and canyon terrain terrain surrounding the Area G site. Additional meteorologic data has been collected over two years from six remote temporary meteorological stations operated on the mesas and in the canyons immediately around Area G. These data indicate that the wind flow in the canyons is exclusively bimodel, flowing up canyon during the day and down canyon at night. It is conservatively assumed that all ground level releases from Area G which blow out across an adjacent canyon become entrained in the canyon flow. This effectively combines the contaminant release for several sectors into a single canyon flow which is upstream during the day or downstream at night. This canyon channeling mechanism is implemented in the model by summing the wind sector dispersion factors over those sectors appropriate to the geometry for a release from Area G toward either adjacent canyon.

  17. Capturing Wind Speed and Snow Accumulation Gradients across Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstral, A. H.; Marks, D. G.; Gurney, R. J.

    2009-12-01

    Wind speeds vary dramatically over short distances in mountain settings. Snow distribution is strongly affected by these disparate winds with drifts containing meters of snow-water-equivalence (SWE) often found adjacent to windward slopes containing minimal amounts of SWE. The heterogeneous snow distribution effects runoff, soil moisture, and vegetation patterns. Capturing these gradients in models is difficult due to the inherent complexity of wind fields and a general lack of data from high elevation, wind-exposed locations. This study was conducted in the Reynolds Mountain East research basin in southwest Idaho, USA. The basin is uniquely instrumented with a network of automated wind and snow depth sensors that capture a large range of variability. Additional manual snow surveys were conducted twice a year that captured the full gradient of snow distribution present in the basin. This unique dataset formed the foundation for establishing relationships between the variables of interest and readily available terrain and vegetation data. A significant relationship between upwind terrain structure and wind speed was established and further validated at two other sites. Snow accumulation rates were related to wind speed and terrain structure. Computationally efficient methods for distributing wind speed and snow accumulation from single point measurements were established from these findings. The algorithms were used to derive the spatial forcing fields for a distributed mass and energy balance snow model with effective results.

  18. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, M.J. ); Raman, S. . Dept. of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta's Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  19. Structure of the nocturnal boundary layer over a complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, M.J.; Raman, S.

    1992-08-01

    The complex nature of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) has been shown extensively in the literature Project STABLE was conducted in 1988 to study NBL turbulence and diffusion over the complex terrain of the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Augusta, Georgia. The third night of the study was particularly interesting because of the unusual phenomena observed in the structure of the NBL. Further analyses of microscale and mesoscale data from this night are presented using data from SRS network of eight 61 m towers over 900 km{sup 2}, from six launches of an instrumented tethersonde, from permanent SRL meteorological instrumentation at seven levels of the 304 m (1,000 ft) WJBF-TV tower near SRS, and additional data collected at 36 m (CC) by North Carolina State University (NCSU) including a one dimensional sonic anemometer, fine wire thermocouple, and a three dimensional propeller anemometer. Also, data from the nearby Plant Vogtle nuclear power plant observation tower and the National Weather Service at Augusta`s Bush Field (AGS) are presented. The passage of a mesoscale phenomenon, defined as a microfront (with an explanation of the nomenclature used), and a vertical composite schematic of the NBL which shows dual low level wind maxima, dual inversions, and a persistent, elevated turbulent layer over a complex terrain are described.

  20. Analysis on Turbulent Flows using Large-eddy Simulation on the Seaside Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamio, T.; Iida, M.; Arakawa, C.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is the Large-eddy Simulation (LES) of the turbulent wind on the complex terrain, and the first results of the simulation are described. The authors tried to apply the LES code, which was developed as an atmospheric simulator in Japan Agency for the Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), to the wind prediction for the wind energy. On the wind simulation, the highest problem would be the boundary conditions, and the case in this paper was simplified one. The case study in this paper is the west wind on a complex terrain site, which is the wind from sea for the site. The steady flow was employed for the inlet condition, because the wind on the sea is the low turbulent wind, and almost all the turbulence would be generated by the roughness of the ground surface. The wall function was employed as the surface condition on the ground surface. The computational domain size was about 8 × 3 × 2.5 km3, and the minimum cell size was about 10 × 10 × 3 m3. The computational results, the vertical profile of the averaged wind speed and the turbulence intensity, agreed with the measurement by the meteorological masts. Moreover, the authors tried the analysis of the turbulence characteristics. The power spectrum density model, and the cross spectrum analyses gave the knowledge of the turbulent characteristics on the complex terrain and the hints for the domain and grid of the numerical analysis.

  1. Evaluation of terrain complexity by autocorrelation. [geomorphology and geobotany

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The topographic complexity of various sections of the Ozark, Appalachian, and Interior Low Plateaus, as well as of the New England, Piedmont, Blue Ridge, Ouachita, and Valley and Ridge Provinces of the Eastern United States were characterized. The variability of autocorrelation within a small area (7 1/2-ft quadrangle) to the variability at widely separated and diverse areas within the same physiographic region was compared to measure the degree of uniformity of the processes which can be expected to be encountered within a given physiographic province. The variability of autocorrelation across the eight geomorphic regions was compared and contrasted. The total study area was partitioned into subareas homogeneous in terrain complexity. The relation between the complexity measured, the geomorphic process mix implied, and the way in which geobotanical information is modified into a more or less recognizable entity is demonstrated. Sampling strategy is described.

  2. Linearized simulation of flow over wind farms and complex terrains.

    PubMed

    Segalini, Antonio

    2017-04-13

    The flow over complex terrains and wind farms is estimated here by numerically solving the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The equations are linearized around the unperturbed incoming wind profile, here assumed logarithmic. The Boussinesq approximation is used to model the Reynolds stress with a prescribed turbulent eddy viscosity profile. Without requiring the boundary-layer approximation, two new linear equations are obtained for the vertical velocity and the wall-normal vorticity, with a reduction in the computational cost by a factor of 8 when compared with a primitive-variables formulation. The presence of terrain elevation is introduced as a vertical coordinate shift, while forestry or wind turbines are included as body forces, without any assumption about the wake structure for the turbines. The model is first validated against some available experiments and simulations, and then a simulation of a wind farm over a Gaussian hill is performed. The speed-up effect of the hill is clearly beneficial in terms of the available momentum upstream of the crest, while downstream of it the opposite can be said as the turbines face a decreased wind speed. Also, the presence of the hill introduces an additional spanwise velocity component that may also affect the turbines' operations. The linear superposition of the flow over the hill and the flow over the farm alone provided a first estimation of the wind speed along the farm, with discrepancies of the same order of magnitude for the spanwise velocity. Finally, the possibility of using a parabolic set of equations to obtain the turbulent kinetic energy after the linearized model is investigated with promising results.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  3. Meteorology and air quality modeling in complex terrain: a literature review

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarrais, G.A.; Clark, T.L.

    1982-04-01

    Modeling air quality in complex terrain has been and remains to be a difficult task simply because of the difficulty in parameterizing the complex wind flow regimes. Due to the complex terrain, significant submesoscale forces are established to perturb the mesoscale wind field. This literature review summarizes over 250 studies of meteorology and air quality modeling in complex terrain for the benefit of those who wish to broaden their knowledge of the subject.

  4. Numerical simulation of the falling snow deposition over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengshi; Huang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Snow is one of the most dynamic natural elements on the Earth's surface, and the variations in its distribution in time and space profoundly affect the hydrological cycle, climate system, and ecological evolution as well as other natural processes. Most previous studies have paid less attention to the process determining the distribution of snow on the ground as a result of the effect of nonuniform mountain wind on the trajectories of snow particles. In this paper, we present a numerical study on the falling snow deposition process involving snow particles of mixed grain sizes over complex terrain. A three-dimensional large-eddy simulation code was used to predict the wind field by considering the fluid-solid coupling effect, and the Lagrangian particle tracking method was employed to track the movement of each tracking snow particle. The grid resolution and model parameters were determined by the best fit with the field experiment, and the coupling effect between snow particles and wind field was found to be nonnegligible when the drifting snow occurred. In general, the preferential deposition on a single ridge showed a tendency from windward slope toward leeward slope with the increasing advection, while it was hard to describe the snow distribution over complex terrains with a unified deposition model due to the interaction of surrounding topographies and different atmospheric stabilities, and the particle tracking approach was substantially suitable for this issue. Our study significantly improved the understanding of the evolution of snow distributions at high levels of resolution.

  5. Challenges to autonomous navigation in complex urban terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jeremy P.; Karlsen, Robert E.; DiBerardino, Chip; Mottern, Edward; Kott, N. Joseph, III

    2012-06-01

    In the field of military Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV), military units are adapting their concept of operations to focus on their mission capabilities within populated cities and towns. These types of operations are referred to as MOUT (Military Operations on Urban Terrain). As more Soldiers seek to incorporate technology to enhance their mission capabilities, there then becomes a need for UGV systems to encompass an ability to autonomously navigate through urban terrains. Autonomous systems have the potential to increase Soldier safety by mitigating the risk of unnecessary enemy exposure during routine urban reconnaissance. This paper presents the development and methodology that the military has sought to increase mission capabilities by incorporating autonomy into manned/unmanned ground vehicles. The presented solution that has been developed through the Safe Operations of Unmanned systems for Reconnaissance in Complex Environments (SOURCE) Army Technology Objective (ATO) has the ability and has been tested to safely navigate through complex urban environments. This paper will also focus on the challenges the military has faced to develop the presented autonomous UGV.

  6. Complex terrain experiments in the New European Wind Atlas.

    PubMed

    Mann, J; Angelou, N; Arnqvist, J; Callies, D; Cantero, E; Arroyo, R Chávez; Courtney, M; Cuxart, J; Dellwik, E; Gottschall, J; Ivanell, S; Kühn, P; Lea, G; Matos, J C; Palma, J M L M; Pauscher, L; Peña, A; Rodrigo, J Sanz; Söderberg, S; Vasiljevic, N; Rodrigues, C Veiga

    2017-04-13

    The New European Wind Atlas project will create a freely accessible wind atlas covering Europe and Turkey, develop the model chain to create the atlas and perform a series of experiments on flow in many different kinds of complex terrain to validate the models. This paper describes the experiments of which some are nearly completed while others are in the planning stage. All experiments focus on the flow properties that are relevant for wind turbines, so the main focus is the mean flow and the turbulence at heights between 40 and 300 m. Also extreme winds, wind shear and veer, and diurnal and seasonal variations of the wind are of interest. Common to all the experiments is the use of Doppler lidar systems to supplement and in some cases replace completely meteorological towers. Many of the lidars will be equipped with scan heads that will allow for arbitrary scan patterns by several synchronized systems. Two pilot experiments, one in Portugal and one in Germany, show the value of using multiple synchronized, scanning lidar, both in terms of the accuracy of the measurements and the atmospheric physical processes that can be studied. The experimental data will be used for validation of atmospheric flow models and will by the end of the project be freely available.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  7. Learning from Demonstration for Autonomous Navigation in Complex Unstructured Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-24

    mentioned in the literature. With respect to costs defined over patches of terrain, the mapping to cost from terrain parameters or features is rarely...tempt to predict the consequences of a robot travers- ing a patch of terrain. Instead of requiring a mapping from perceptual features to cost, this can...the probability that interaction with a specified terrain patch would result in a vehicle failure (e.g. exceed a tip-over an- gle or known force

  8. Wind Power Curve Modeling in Simple and Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Bulaevskaya, V.; Wharton, S.; Irons, Z.; Qualley, G.

    2015-02-09

    Our previous work on wind power curve modeling using statistical models focused on a location with a moderately complex terrain in the Altamont Pass region in northern California (CA). The work described here is the follow-up to that work, but at a location with a simple terrain in northern Oklahoma (OK). The goal of the present analysis was to determine the gain in predictive ability afforded by adding information beyond the hub-height wind speed, such as wind speeds at other heights, as well as other atmospheric variables, to the power prediction model at this new location and compare the results to those obtained at the CA site in the previous study. While we reach some of the same conclusions at both sites, many results reported for the CA site do not hold at the OK site. In particular, using the entire vertical profile of wind speeds improves the accuracy of wind power prediction relative to using the hub-height wind speed alone at both sites. However, in contrast to the CA site, the rotor equivalent wind speed (REWS) performs almost as well as the entire profile at the OK site. Another difference is that at the CA site, adding wind veer as a predictor significantly improved the power prediction accuracy. The same was true for that site when air density was added to the model separately instead of using the standard air density adjustment. At the OK site, these additional variables result in no significant benefit for the prediction accuracy.

  9. Large-Eddy Simulations of Flows in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovic, B.; Lundquist, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulation as a methodology for numerical simulation of turbulent flows was first developed to study turbulent flows in atmospheric by Lilly (1967). The first LES were carried by Deardorff (1970) who used these simulations to study atmospheric boundary layers. Ever since, LES has been extensively used to study canonical atmospheric boundary layers, in most cases flat plate boundary layers under the assumption of horizontal homogeneity. Carefully designed LES of canonical convective and neutrally stratified and more recently stably stratified atmospheric boundary layers have contributed significantly to development of better understanding of these flows and their parameterizations in large scale models. These simulations were often carried out using codes specifically designed and developed for large-eddy simulations of horizontally homogeneous flows with periodic lateral boundary conditions. Recent developments in multi-scale numerical simulations of atmospheric flows enable numerical weather prediction (NWP) codes such as ARPS (Chow and Street, 2009), COAMPS (Golaz et al., 2009) and Weather Research and Forecasting model, to be used nearly seamlessly across a wide range of atmospheric scales from synoptic down to turbulent scales in atmospheric boundary layers. Before we can with confidence carry out multi-scale simulations of atmospheric flows, NWP codes must be validated for accurate performance in simulating flows over complex or inhomogeneous terrain. We therefore carry out validation of WRF-LES for simulations of flows over complex terrain using data from Askervein Hill (Taylor and Teunissen, 1985, 1987) and METCRAX (Whiteman et al., 2008) field experiments. WRF's nesting capability is employed with a one-way nested inner domain that includes complex terrain representation while the coarser outer nest is used to spin up fully developed atmospheric boundary layer turbulence and thus represent accurately inflow to the inner domain. LES of a

  10. Analyzing complex wake-terrain interactions and its implications on wind-farm performance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabib, Mandar; Rasheed, Adil; Fuchs, Franz

    2016-09-01

    Rotating wind turbine blades generate complex wakes involving vortices (helical tip-vortex, root-vortex etc.).These wakes are regions of high velocity deficits and high turbulence intensities and they tend to degrade the performance of down-stream turbines. Hence, a conservative inter-turbine distance of up-to 10 times turbine diameter (10D) is sometimes used in wind-farm layout (particularly in cases of flat terrain). This ensures that wake-effects will not reduce the overall wind-farm performance, but this leads to larger land footprint for establishing a wind-farm. In-case of complex-terrain, within a short distance (say 10D) itself, the nearby terrain can rise in altitude and be high enough to influence the wake dynamics. This wake-terrain interaction can happen either (a) indirectly, through an interaction of wake (both near tip vortex and far wake large-scale vortex) with terrain induced turbulence (especially, smaller eddies generated by small ridges within the terrain) or (b) directly, by obstructing the wake-region partially or fully in its flow-path. Hence, enhanced understanding of wake- development due to wake-terrain interaction will help in wind farm design. To this end the current study involves: (1) understanding the numerics for successful simulation of vortices, (2) understanding fundamental vortex-terrain interaction mechanism through studies devoted to interaction of a single vortex with different terrains, (3) relating influence of vortex-terrain interactions to performance of a wind-farm by studying a multi-turbine wind-farm layout under different terrains. The results on interaction of terrain and vortex has shown a much faster decay of vortex for complex terrain compared to a flatter-terrain. The potential reasons identified explaining the observation are (a) formation of secondary vortices in flow and its interaction with the primary vortex and (b) enhanced vorticity diffusion due to increased terrain-induced turbulence. The implications of

  11. Underestimation of Monostatic Sodar Measurements in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrens, Paul; O'Sullivan, J.; Archer, R.; Bradley, S.

    2012-04-01

    Recent investigations in complex terrain have found that remote sensing instrumentation commonly finds mean wind-speed differences when compared to cup anemometery. In many cases the difference is found to be an underestimation and varies from 2 to 9% depending on topology. We describe these differences in a theoretical sense for a five-beam sodar. An investigation is conducted on a New Zealand ridge with a five-beam sodar and three computational models, consisting of a potential flow model and two computational fluid dynamical simulations, OpenFOAM and the industry standard software WindSim. All models predict the difference to within 0.1-2.5%. A comparative assessment is made and it is found that, given the computing overheads, the potential flow model provides a good compromise in the prediction of mean wind-speed difference.

  12. Complex geomorphologic assemblage of terrains in association with the banded terrain in Hellas basin, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diot, X.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Schlunegger, F.; Norton, K. P.; Thomas, N.; Grindrod, P. M.; Chojnacki, M.

    2016-02-01

    Hellas basin acts as a major sink for the southern highlands of Mars and is likely to have recorded several episodes of sedimentation and erosion. The north-western part of the basin displays a potentially unique Amazonian landscape domain in the deepest part of Hellas, called "banded terrain", which is a deposit characterized by an alternation of narrow band shapes and inter-bands displaying a sinuous and relatively smooth surface texture suggesting a viscous flow origin. Here we use high-resolution (HiRISE and CTX) images to assess the geomorphological interaction of the banded terrain with the surrounding geomorphologic domains in the NW interior of Hellas to gain a better understanding of the geological evolution of the region as a whole. Our analysis reveals that the banded terrain is associated with six geomorphologic domains: a central plateau named Alpheus Colles, plain deposits (P1 and P2), reticulate (RT1 and RT2) and honeycomb terrains. Based on the analysis of the geomorphology of these domains and their cross-cutting relationships, we show that no widespread deposition post-dates the formation of the banded terrain, which implies that this domain is the youngest and latest deposit of the interior of Hellas. Therefore, the level of geologic activity in the NW Hellas during the Amazonian appears to have been relatively low and restricted to modification of the landscape through mechanical weathering, aeolian and periglacial processes. Thermophysical data and cross-cutting relationships support hypotheses of modification of the honeycomb terrain via vertical rise of diapirs such as ice diapirism, and the formation of the plain deposits through deposition and remobilization of an ice-rich mantle deposit. Finally, the observed gradual transition between honeycomb and banded terrain suggests that the banded terrain may have covered a larger area of the NW interior of Hellas in the past than previously thought. This has implications on the understanding of

  13. Numerical simulation of radiation fog in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Musson-Genon, L.; Carissimo, B.; Dupont, E.

    2009-09-01

    The interest for micro-scale modeling of the atmosphere is growing for environmental applications related, for example, to energy production, transport and urban development. The turbulence in the stable layers where pollutant dispersion is low and can lead to strong pollution events. This could be further complicated by the presence of clouds or fog and is specifically difficult in urban or industrial area due to the presence of buildings. In this context, radiation fog formation and dissipation over complex terrain were therefore investigated with a state-of-the-art model. This study is divided into two phases. The first phase is a pilot stage, which consist of employing a database from the ParisFog campaign which took place in the south of Paris during winter 2006-07 to assess the ability of the cloud model to reproduce the detailed structure of radiation fog. The second phase use the validated model for the study of influence of complex terrain on fog evolution. Special attention is given to the detailed and complete simulations and validation technique used is to compare the simulated results using the 3D cloud model of computational fluid dynamical software Code_Saturne with one of the best collected in situ data during the ParisFog campaign. Several dynamical, microphysical parameterizations and simulation conditions have been described. The resulting 3D cloud model runs at a horizontal resolution of 30 m and a vertical resolution comparable to the 1D model. First results look very promising and are able to reproduce the spatial distribution of fog. The analysis of the behavior of the different parameterized physical processes suggests that the subtle balance between the various processes is achieved.

  14. Atmospheric studies in complex terrain: a planning guide for future studies

    SciTech Connect

    Orgill, M.M.

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study is to assist the US Department of Energy in Conducting its atmospheric studies in complex terrain (ASCOT0 by defining various complex terrain research systems and relating these options to specific landforms sites. This includes: (1) reviewing past meteorological and diffusion research on complex terrain; (2) relating specific terrain-induced airflow phenomena to specific landforms and time and space scales; (3) evaluating the technical difficulty of modeling and measuring terrain-induced airflow phenomena; and (4) avolving severdal research options and proposing candidate sites for continuing and expanding field and modeling work. To evolve research options using variable candidate sites, four areas were considered: site selection, terrain uniqueness and quantification, definition of research problems and research plans. 36 references, 111 figures, 20 tables.

  15. Objective high Resolution Analysis over Complex Terrain with VERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Steinacker, R.; Steiner, A.

    2012-04-01

    VERA (Vienna Enhanced Resolution Analysis) is a model independent, high resolution objective analysis of meteorological fields over complex terrain. This system consists of a special developed quality control procedure and a combination of an interpolation and a downscaling technique. Whereas the so called VERA-QC is presented at this conference in the contribution titled "VERA-QC, an approved Data Quality Control based on Self-Consistency" by Andrea Steiner, this presentation will focus on the method and the characteristics of the VERA interpolation scheme which enables one to compute grid point values of a meteorological field based on irregularly distributed observations and topography related aprior knowledge. Over a complex topography meteorological fields are not smooth in general. The roughness which is induced by the topography can be explained physically. The knowledge about this behavior is used to define the so called Fingerprints (e.g. a thermal Fingerprint reproducing heating or cooling over mountainous terrain or a dynamical Fingerprint reproducing positive pressure perturbation on the windward side of a ridge) under idealized conditions. If the VERA algorithm recognizes patterns of one or more Fingerprints at a few observation points, the corresponding patterns are used to downscale the meteorological information in a greater surrounding. This technique allows to achieve an analysis with a resolution much higher than the one of the observational network. The interpolation of irregularly distributed stations to a regular grid (in space and time) is based on a variational principle applied to first and second order spatial and temporal derivatives. Mathematically, this can be formulated as a cost function that is equivalent to the penalty function of a thin plate smoothing spline. After the analysis field has been divided into the Fingerprint components and the unexplained part respectively, the requirement of a smooth distribution is applied to the

  16. Complex terrain experiments in the New European Wind Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Angelou, N.; Callies, D.; Cantero, E.; Arroyo, R. Chávez; Courtney, M.; Cuxart, J.; Dellwik, E.; Gottschall, J.; Ivanell, S.; Kühn, P.; Lea, G.; Matos, J. C.; Palma, J. M. L. M.; Peña, A.; Rodrigo, J. Sanz; Söderberg, S.; Vasiljevic, N.; Rodrigues, C. Veiga

    2017-01-01

    The New European Wind Atlas project will create a freely accessible wind atlas covering Europe and Turkey, develop the model chain to create the atlas and perform a series of experiments on flow in many different kinds of complex terrain to validate the models. This paper describes the experiments of which some are nearly completed while others are in the planning stage. All experiments focus on the flow properties that are relevant for wind turbines, so the main focus is the mean flow and the turbulence at heights between 40 and 300 m. Also extreme winds, wind shear and veer, and diurnal and seasonal variations of the wind are of interest. Common to all the experiments is the use of Doppler lidar systems to supplement and in some cases replace completely meteorological towers. Many of the lidars will be equipped with scan heads that will allow for arbitrary scan patterns by several synchronized systems. Two pilot experiments, one in Portugal and one in Germany, show the value of using multiple synchronized, scanning lidar, both in terms of the accuracy of the measurements and the atmospheric physical processes that can be studied. The experimental data will be used for validation of atmospheric flow models and will by the end of the project be freely available. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Wind energy in complex terrains’. PMID:28265025

  17. Spatio-temporal modelling of lightning climatologies for complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Thorsten; Umlauf, Nikolaus; Zeileis, Achim; Mayr, Georg J.; Schulz, Wolfgang; Diendorfer, Gerhard

    2017-03-01

    This study develops methods for estimating lightning climatologies on the day-1 km-2 scale for regions with complex terrain and applies them to summertime observations (2010-2015) of the lightning location system ALDIS in the Austrian state of Carinthia in the Eastern Alps. Generalized additive models (GAMs) are used to model both the probability of occurrence and the intensity of lightning. Additive effects are set up for altitude, day of the year (season) and geographical location (longitude/latitude). The performance of the models is verified by 6-fold cross-validation. The altitude effect of the occurrence model suggests higher probabilities of lightning for locations on higher elevations. The seasonal effect peaks in mid-July. The spatial effect models several local features, but there is a pronounced minimum in the north-west and a clear maximum in the eastern part of Carinthia. The estimated effects of the intensity model reveal similar features, though they are not equal. The main difference is that the spatial effect varies more strongly than the analogous effect of the occurrence model. A major asset of the introduced method is that the resulting climatological information varies smoothly over space, time and altitude. Thus, the climatology is capable of serving as a useful tool in quantitative applications, i.e. risk assessment and weather prediction.

  18. Power Curve Modeling in Complex Terrain Using Statistical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulaevskaya, V.; Wharton, S.; Clifton, A.; Qualley, G.; Miller, W.

    2014-12-01

    Traditional power output curves typically model power only as a function of the wind speed at the turbine hub height. While the latter is an essential predictor of power output, wind speed information in other parts of the vertical profile, as well as additional atmospheric variables, are also important determinants of power. The goal of this work was to determine the gain in predictive ability afforded by adding wind speed information at other heights, as well as other atmospheric variables, to the power prediction model. Using data from a wind farm with a moderately complex terrain in the Altamont Pass region in California, we trained three statistical models, a neural network, a random forest and a Gaussian process model, to predict power output from various sets of aforementioned predictors. The comparison of these predictions to the observed power data revealed that considerable improvements in prediction accuracy can be achieved both through the addition of predictors other than the hub-height wind speed and the use of statistical models. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and was funded by Wind Uncertainty Quantification Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-069.

  19. Three-dimensional modeling of canopy flow in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Yi, C.; Montagnani, L.

    2013-12-01

    Flows within and just above forest canopy over mountainous terrain are most complicated, which substantially influence the biosphere-atmosphere interaction of mass and energy. Due to the significant spatial variation, canopy flow in complex terrain is poorly understood based on the point-based tower measurement. We employ numerical model integrated with biogenic CO2 process to examine the impacts of topography, canopy structure, and synoptic atmospheric motion on canopy flow and associated CO2 transport in an alpine forest, with special focus on stable nocturnal condition when biogenic CO2 emission is active. Our model prediction is in better agreement with tower measurements when background synoptic wind is present, which leads to better larger-scale mixing, while local slope flow is just thermal-driven in the modeled domain by ignorance of surround mountain-valley. Our results show that large-scale synoptic wind is modified by local slope-canopy flow within and just above canopy. As the synoptic wind is down-slope (Figure 1a), recirculation is formed on the downwind slope with cool air and high accumulation of CO2 in front of tall and dense vegetation. As the synoptic wind is up-slope(Figure 1b), canopy flow at the higher elevation of the slope is in the same direction of synoptic wind, while canopy flow at the lower part of the slope blows down-slope. The upslope wind causes better mixing in the canopy and leads to smaller CO2 accumulation just close to the slope surface. The local down-slope wind (Figure 1c) causes rich and deep CO2 build-up in the downwind direction on the lower slope. Our numerical performance has demonstrated that three-dimensional CFD approach is a useful tool to understanding relationships between tower-point measurements and surrounding's field distributions. Acknowledgement: This research was supported by NSF Grants ATM-0930015, CNS-0958379 & CNS-0855217, PSC-CUNY ENHC-42-64 & CUNY HPCC. Figure 1 CO2 distribution within and just above

  20. Investigations into the Interaction of a Wind Turbine with Atmospheric Turbulence in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C.; Klein, L.; Weihing, P.; Lutz, Th

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the Delayed-Detached-Eddy-Simulations (DES) of a generic 2.4 MW wind turbine in a complex terrain site facing a turbulent atmospheric boundary layer. The boundary layer is generated based on measurement data derived at the complex terrain site. Further, the process of data preparation as well as the numerical setup are described. In the results the impact of complex terrain on the flow field is shown and estimations on the influence on the turbine performance are made. Afterwards, simulations of the turbine facing atmospheric inflow in flat and complex terrain are presented. An increase of loads resulting from a speed-up caused by the terrain as well as a clear change in the power spectrum of the turbine become visible in complex terrain compared to flat terrain. This finding is in agreement with the estimations derived previously. Moreover, the impact of inclined inflow caused by the local terrain slope can be seen in the load distribution vs. the azimuth angle, amongst others.

  1. Wake Dynamics in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey D.

    The goal of this research is to advance our understanding of atmospheric boundary layer processes over heterogeneous landscapes and complex terrain. The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is a relatively thin (˜ 1 km) turbulent layer of air near the earth's surface, in which most human activities and engineered systems are concentrated. Its dynamics are crucially important for biosphere-atmosphere couplings and for global atmospheric dynamics, with significant implications on our ability to predict and mitigate adverse impacts of land use and climate change. In models of the ABL, land surface heterogeneity is typically represented, in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, as changes in aerodynamic roughness length and surface heat and moisture fluxes. However, many real landscapes are more complex, often leading to massive boundary layer separation and wake turbulence, for which standard models fail. Trees, building clusters, and steep topography produce extensive wake regions currently not accounted for in models of the ABL. Wind turbines and wind farms also generate wakes that combine in complex ways to modify the ABL. Wind farms are covering an increasingly significant area of the globe and the effects of large wind farms must be included in regional and global scale models. Research presented in this thesis demonstrates that wakes caused by landscape heterogeneity must be included in flux parameterizations for momentum, heat, and mass (water vapor and trace gases, e.g. CO2 and CH4) in ABL simulation and prediction models in order to accurately represent land-atmosphere interactions. Accurate representation of these processes is crucial for the predictions of weather, air quality, lake processes, and ecosystems response to climate change. Objectives of the research reported in this thesis are: 1) to investigate turbulent boundary layer adjustment, turbulent transport and scalar flux in wind farms of varying configurations and develop an improved

  2. Wind Tunnel Modeling Of Wind Flow Over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, D.; Cochran, B.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation will describe the finding of an atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) wind tunnel study conducted as part of the Bolund Experiment. This experiment was sponsored by Risø DTU (National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark) during the fall of 2009 to enable a blind comparison of various air flow models in an attempt to validate their performance in predicting airflow over complex terrain. Bohlund hill sits 12 m above the water level at the end of a narrow isthmus. The island features a steep escarpment on one side, over which the airflow can be expected to separate. The island was equipped with several anemometer towers, and the approach flow over the water was well characterized. This study was one of only two only physical model studies included in the blind model comparison, the other being a water plume study. The remainder were computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, including both RANS and LES. Physical modeling of air flow over topographical features has been used since the middle of the 20th century, and the methods required are well understood and well documented. Several books have been written describing how to properly perform ABL wind tunnel studies, including ASCE manual of engineering practice 67. Boundary layer wind tunnel tests are the only modelling method deemed acceptable in ASCE 7-10, the most recent edition of the American Society of Civil Engineers standard that provides wind loads for buildings and other structures for buildings codes across the US. Since the 1970’s, most tall structures undergo testing in a boundary layer wind tunnel to accurately determine the wind induced loading. When compared to CFD, the US EPA considers a properly executed wind tunnel study to be equivalent to a CFD model with infinitesimal grid resolution and near infinite memory. One key reason for this widespread acceptance is that properly executed ABL wind tunnel studies will accurately simulate flow separation

  3. Ecohydrological Implications of Contrasting Slope and Aspect in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, M. S.; Link, T. E.; Klos, P. Z.; Patton, N. R.; Lohse, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how complex terrain affects ecohydrological processes is increasingly important as we attempt to understand how water and carbon fluxes are integrated across relatively large domains. Spatial variations of incoming solar radiation are well understood and quantified, but the understanding their impacts on ecohydrologic processes is primarily qualitative. We provide detailed, extensive data quantifying the effects of contrasting slope/aspect on the soil physical environment and document the implications of those differences on ecohydrological processes. The study site, Johnston Draw, is located in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed and CZO in southwest Idaho, USA (43° latitude). Johnston Draw flows over granitic bedrock nearly due east, resulting in steep (25 to 40°) side slopes oriented north-south. At the study elevation (1600 m) approximately 50% of the annual precipitation is snow. We measured meteorological variables, snow depth, soil water (SW) and temperature (ST) at three paired locations for two years. Each soil pair consisted of depth profiles from 5 cm to bedrock measured hourly which were supplemented with periodic extensive measurements. Hourly photographs were taken at two of the pairs for one year. Streamflow is monitored at the Johnston Draw outlet and precipitation was measured at stations at the topographic bottom and top of the watershed. Geophysical data were collected in a transect across both slopes. The ST was warmer all year on the south-facing slope, with a mean annual difference of 5°C. This ST difference is effectively equivalent to a 1000 m elevation difference in Reynolds Creek. Despite clear differences in evaporative demand and the timing of spring "green up", the timing of summer SW decline is similar on both slopes. Deeper soil on north-facing slopes resulted in more plant available water and a longer growing season, which is reflected in the vegetation. Geophysical data indicate much deeper weathering on the

  4. Accurate Wind Characterization in Complex Terrain Using the Immersed Boundary Method

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Kosovic, B

    2009-09-30

    This paper describes an immersed boundary method (IBM) that facilitates the explicit resolution of complex terrain within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Two different interpolation methods, trilinear and inverse distance weighting, are used at the core of the IBM algorithm. Functional aspects of the algorithm's implementation and the accuracy of results are considered. Simulations of flow over a three-dimensional hill with shallow terrain slopes are preformed with both WRF's native terrain-following coordinate and with both IB methods. Comparisons of flow fields from the three simulations show excellent agreement, indicating that both IB methods produce accurate results. However, when ease of implementation is considered, inverse distance weighting is superior. Furthermore, inverse distance weighting is shown to be more adept at handling highly complex urban terrain, where the trilinear interpolation algorithm breaks down. This capability is demonstrated by using the inverse distance weighting core of the IBM to model atmospheric flow in downtown Oklahoma City.

  5. Terrain complexity characterization in the eastern coast of Baja California Sur, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez Flores, G.; Nava-Sanchez, E. H.; Segovia Zavala, J. A.

    2013-05-01

    Terrain complexity is an important feature for geomorphological analysis and characterization, since it is associated with processes that control the landscape evolution, giving rise to geological formations of varying topographic complexity. In the geometrical sense, the terrain complexity depicts the shape of the landform surface or cross section, such as rugosity, curvature, fractal dimension, slope, aspect, etc. Moreover, the coastline complexity or indentation index has been used as an auxiliary parameter in coastline characterization. Currently, there are a variety of terrain and shoreline complexity indexes, derived from digital elevation models and digital coastlines, respectively, which usually are evaluated and interpreted independently. In this work the evaluation of these indexes was implemented in twenty watersheds of the eastern coast of the Mexican state of Baja California Sur. To evaluate the terrain complexity index, the slope, profile curvature and roughness were computed and weighted. For this purpose the digital elevation model of 30 m resolution, obtained from the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI) was used. The coastline complexity was assessed based on the variability of angles of coastline segments, as are defined in the Global Self-consistent, Hierarchical, High-resolution Geography Database (GSHHG). Five classes were identified for each index, whose distribution was represented by digital cartography. In general, the gullies have the highest terrain complexity, while the lower values correspond to areas of alluvial fans and other areas of sedimentation close to the shoreline. The spatial distribution of these indexes could be useful to mapping terrain classification and as support to analyze geological and oceanographic processes that influence this region.

  6. Large eddy simulation for atmospheric boundary layer flow over flat and complex terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yi; Stoellinger, Michael; Naughton, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present Large Eddy Simulation (LES) results of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow over complex terrain with neutral stratification using the OpenFOAM-based simulator for on/offshore wind farm applications (SOWFA). The complete work flow to investigate the LES for the ABL over real complex terrain is described including meteorological-tower data analysis, mesh generation and case set-up. New boundary conditions for the lateral and top boundaries are developed and validated to allow inflow and outflow as required in complex terrain simulations. The turbulent inflow data for the terrain simulation is generated using a precursor simulation of a flat and neutral ABL. Conditionally averaged met-tower data is used to specify the conditions for the flat precursor simulation and is also used for comparison with the simulation results of the terrain LES. A qualitative analysis of the simulation results reveals boundary layer separation and recirculation downstream of a prominent ridge that runs across the simulation domain. Comparisons of mean wind speed, standard deviation and direction between the computed results and the conditionally averaged tower data show a reasonable agreement.

  7. MELSAR: a mesoscale air quality model for complex terrain. Volume 2. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1985-04-01

    This final report is submitted as part of the Green River Ambient Model Assessment (GRAMA) project conducted at the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Environmental Protection Agency. The GRAMA Program has, as its ultimate goal, the development of validated air quality models that can be applied to the complex terrain of the Green River Formation of western Colorado, eastern Utah and southern Wyoming. The Green River Formation is a geologic formation containing large reserves of oil shale, coal, and other natural resources. Development of these resources may lead to a degradation of the air quality of the region. Air quality models are needed immediately for planning and regulatory purposes to assess the magnitude of these regional impacts. This report documents one of the models being developed for this purpose within GRAMA - specifically a model to predict short averaging time (less than or equal to 24 h) pollutant concentrations resulting from the mesoscale transport of pollutant releases from multiple sources. MELSAR has not undergone any rigorous operational testing, sensitivity analyses, or validation studies. Testing and evaluation of the model are needed to gain a measure of confidence in the model's performance. This report consists of two volumes. This volume contains the Appendices, which include listings of the FORTRAN code and Volume 1 contains the model overview, technical description, and user's guide. 13 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Downscaling surface wind predictions from numerical weather prediction models in complex terrain with WindNinja

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbrenner, Natalie S.; Forthofer, Jason M.; Lamb, Brian K.; Shannon, Kyle S.; Butler, Bret W.

    2016-04-01

    Wind predictions in complex terrain are important for a number of applications. Dynamic downscaling of numerical weather prediction (NWP) model winds with a high-resolution wind model is one way to obtain a wind forecast that accounts for local terrain effects, such as wind speed-up over ridges, flow channeling in valleys, flow separation around terrain obstacles, and flows induced by local surface heating and cooling. In this paper we investigate the ability of a mass-consistent wind model for downscaling near-surface wind predictions from four NWP models in complex terrain. Model predictions are compared with surface observations from a tall, isolated mountain. Downscaling improved near-surface wind forecasts under high-wind (near-neutral atmospheric stability) conditions. Results were mixed during upslope and downslope (non-neutral atmospheric stability) flow periods, although wind direction predictions generally improved with downscaling. This work constitutes evaluation of a diagnostic wind model at unprecedented high spatial resolution in terrain with topographical ruggedness approaching that of typical landscapes in the western US susceptible to wildland fire.

  9. Mesoscale modeling study of severe convection over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Meng, Zhiyong; Zhu, Peijun; Su, Tao; Zhai, Guoqing

    2016-11-01

    Short squall lines that occurred over Lishui, southwestern Zhejiang Province, China, on 5 July 2012, were investigated using the WRF model based on 1°×1° gridded NCEP Final Operational Global Analysis data. The results from the numerical simulations were particularly satisfactory in the simulated radar echo, which realistically reproduced the generation and development of the convective cells during the period of severe convection. The initiation of this severe convective case was mainly associated with the uplift effect of mesoscale mountains, topographic convergence, sufficient water vapor, and enhanced low-level southeasterly wind from the East China Sea. An obvious wind velocity gradient occurred between the Donggong Mountains and the southeast coastline, which easily enabled wind convergence on the windward slope of the Donggong Mountains; both strong mid-low-level southwesterly wind and low-level southeasterly wind enhanced vertical shear over the mountains to form instability; and a vertical coupling relation between the divergence on the upper-left side of the Donggong Mountains and the convergence on the lower-left side caused the convection to develop rapidly. The convergence centers of surface streams occurred over the mountain terrain and updrafts easily broke through the lifting condensation level (LCL) because of the strong wind convergence and topographic lift, which led to water vapor condensation above the LCL and the generation of the initial convective cloud. The centers of surface convergence continually created new convective cells that moved with the southwest wind and combined along the Donggong Mountains, eventually forming a short squall line that caused severe convective weather.

  10. Complex Burial and Exhumation of South Polar Cap Pitted Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This image is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left. The two prominent bright stripes at the left/center of the image are covered with bright frost and thus create the illusion that they are sunlit from the lower left.

    The large pits, troughs, and 'swiss cheese' of the south polar residual cap appear to have been formed in the upper 4 or 5 layers of the polar material. Each layer is approximately 2 meters (6.6 feet) thick. Some Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) images of this terrain show examples in which older pitted and eroded layers have been previously buried and are now being exhumed. The example shown here includes two narrow, diagonal slopes that trend from upper left toward lower right at the left/center portion of the frame. Along the bottoms of these slopes are revealed a layer that underlies them in which there are many more pits and troughs than in the upper layer. It is likely in this case that the lower layer formed its pits and troughs before it was covered by the upper layer. This observation suggests that the troughs, pits, and 'swiss cheese' features of the south polar cap are very old and form over long time scales.

    The picture is located near 84.6oS, 45.1oW, and covers an area 3 km by 5 km (1.9 x 3.1 mi) at a resolution of about 3.8 meters (12 ft) per pixel. The image was taken during southern spring on August 29, 1999.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  11. Some simple improvements to an emergency response model for use in complex coastal terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, N.L.

    1992-06-01

    The MACHWIND model (Meyers 1989) is one of a group of models used to compute regional wind fields from tower wind data and/or vertical wind profiles. The wind fields are in turn used to calculate atmospheric diffusion, to guide emergency responses. MACHWIND has performed acceptably in uniform terrain under steady, well mixed conditions. However, extension of the model to more complex situations is problematic. In coastal, hilly terrain like that near Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in southern California, calculations of the wind field can be enhanced significantly by several modifications to the original code. This report highlights the structure of MACHWIND and details the enhancements that were implemented.

  12. Numerical and Experimental Methods for Wake Flow Analysis in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Francesco; Astolfi, Davide; Piccioni, Emanuele; Terzi, Ludovico

    2015-06-01

    Assessment and interpretation of the quality of wind farms power output is a non-trivial task, which poses at least three main challenges: reliable comprehension of free wind flow, which is stretched to the limit on very complex terrains, realistic model of how wake interactions resemble on the wind flow, awareness of the consequences on turbine control systems, including alignment patterns to the wind and, consequently, power output. The present work deals with an onshore wind farm in southern Italy, which has been a test case of IEA- Task 31 Wakebench project: 17 turbines, with 2.3 MW of rated power each, are sited on a very complex terrain. A cluster of machines is investigated through numerical and experimental methods: CFD is employed for simulating wind fields and power extraction, as well as wakes, are estimated through the Actuator Disc model. SCADA data mining techniques are employed for comparison between models and actual performances. The simulations are performed both on the real terrain and on flat terrain, in order to disentangle the effects of complex flow and wake effects. Attention is devoted to comparison between actual alignment patterns of the cluster of turbines and predicted flow deviation.

  13. An Improved WRF for Urban-Scale and Complex-Terrain Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J K; Chow, F K; Mirocha, J D; Lundquist, K A

    2007-09-04

    Simulations of atmospheric flow through urban areas must account for a wide range of physical phenomena including both mesoscale and urban processes. Numerical weather prediction models, such as the Weather and Research Forecasting model (WRF), excel at predicting synoptic and mesoscale phenomena. With grid spacings of less than 1 km (as is required for complex heterogeneous urban areas), however, the limits of WRF's terrain capabilities and subfilter scale (SFS) turbulence parameterizations are exposed. Observations of turbulence in urban areas frequently illustrate a local imbalance of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), which cannot be captured by current turbulence models. Furthermore, WRF's terrain-following coordinate system is inappropriate for high-resolution simulations that include buildings. To address these issues, we are implementing significant modifications to the ARW core of the Weather Research and Forecasting model. First, we are implementing an improved turbulence model, the Dynamic Reconstruction Model (DRM), following Chow et al. (2005). Second, we are modifying WRF's terrain-following coordinate system by implementing an immersed boundary method (IBM) approach to account for the effects of urban geometries and complex terrain. Companion papers detailing the improvements enabled by the DRM and the IBM approaches are also presented (by Mirocha et al., paper 13.1, and K.A. Lundquist et al., paper 11.1, respectively). This overview of the LLNL-UC Berkeley collaboration presents the motivation for this work and some highlights of our progress to date. After implementing both DRM and an IBM for buildings in WRF, we will be able to seamlessly integrate mesoscale synoptic boundary conditions with building-scale urban simulations using grid nesting and lateral boundary forcing. This multi-scale integration will enable high-resolution simulations of flow and dispersion in complex geometries such as urban areas, as well as new simulation capabilities in

  14. Experimental characterization of atmospheric diffusion in complex terrain with land-sea interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.M.; Otamendi, E.; Alonso, L.A.; Ureta, I.

    1987-07-01

    The body of information presented in this paper is directed to scientists working in atmospheric dispersion research and model development. Two years of field measurements in the coastal area of Bilbao in northern Spain show that the diffusion behavior in this complex terrain can be classified into several well defined patterns, which correspond to certain meteorological conditions. The approach taken has been the systematic use of SO/sub 2/ remote sensors (COSPEC) and ground level monitors in moving platforms which are used to follow and document the flow of the air mass. Results to date show that complex reentry cycles can occur and that synoptically different flows may be indistinguishable by wind sensors at ground level (affected by channeling), and yet result in totally different observed pollution levels by a fixed monitoring network (affected by topographical effects). These results are being used to parameterize the cause-effect relationships and guide the modeling efforts in this area of complex terrain.

  15. Atmospheric studies in complex terrain: executive summary. Technical progress report, FY-1979 through FY-1983

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Dickerson, M.H.

    1983-08-01

    In 1978, the Office of Health and Environmental Research of the Assistant Secretary for Environment in the Department of Energy developed a program aimed specifically at atmospheric studies in complex terrain - ASCOT. The ASCOT program was designed to develop the technology needed to assess atmospheric properties and the impact of energy sources on air quality in areas of complex terrain. The ASCOT team is composed of scientists from DOE national laboratories, other federal laboratories, and university programs. To initiate the program, each participating laboratory and university was asked to redirect funds into an area focusing on research that involved atmospheric boundary layer flow subject to interactions with complicated underlying terrain. The two broad objectives under which the program was organized are: to improve fundamental knowledge of transport and dispersion processes in complex terrain; and to utilize this improved insight into the physics of terrain dominated flows to provide a methodology for performing air quality assessments. The initial focus of the ASCOT program has been on the transport and dispersion of pollutants entrained in or near nocturnal drainage flows. This phenomenon was selected on the basis of its importance for transporting pollutants from energy related facilities to population or agricultural centers that are generally situated within valleys. The Geysers geothermal area in northern California, a large geothermal power producing region situated within the coastal-mountain range was chosen as the primary field experimental area. Three series of major field experiments were conducted in this area; while smaller scale studies were carried out at Rattlesnake Mountain near Richland, Washington, Corral Gulch in western Colorado, and on Parajarito Mountain near Los Alamos, New Mexico to evaluate cold air drainage on relatively simple slopes. 1 figure, 4 tables.

  16. Water allocation for agriculture complex terrain under changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putu Santikayasa, I.; Perdinan; Basit, Rizki Abdul

    2017-01-01

    The current water resources management in Indonesia requires the government to pay more attention on sustainable water management. Agriculture as the highest water demand in the country need better water management as the impact of future changing climate. Furthermore, the water managers as well as policy makers may require integrating the climate change assessment into water resources allocation policy and management. Agropolitan in Malang district, East java – Indonesia is an agriculture which is characterized by complex agricultural system and was assigned as a case study. The supply-demand water allocation approach was applied on allocating water to different water users under current and future climatic condition. Both climate and the changing nature of water demand have affected the development and evolution of water allocation. The result shows that the water supply is expected to decrease under future climate comparing with the current condition. Furthermore, it is required to incorporate the future climate information on design the future water policy and management to reduce the adverse impact of changing climate. This study also suggested policy actions as recommendation to better manage current climate variability as well as future uncertainty from climate change impacts on water allocation and resources management.

  17. Investigation of Microphysical Parameters within Winter and Summer Type Precipitation Events over Mountainous [Complex] Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, James R.; Bossert, James E.

    1997-12-31

    In this study we investigate complex terrain effects on precipitation with RAMS for both in winter and summer cases from a microphysical perspective. We consider a two dimensional east-west topographic cross section in New Mexico representative of the Jemez mountains on the west and the Sangre de Cristo mountains on the east. Located between these two ranges is the Rio Grande Valley. In these two dimensional experiments, variations in DSDs are considered to simulate total precipitation that closely duplicate observed precipitation.

  18. Using Topographic Engineering to Achieve Dominance in Urban and Complex Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Information dominance and dominant maneuver are harder to achieve in urban and complex terrain, but there are measures we can take to give our soldiers important advantages. Engineer solutions include physical measures to interdict threat forces, such as countermine operations and emplacement of barriers, as well as command and control (C2) measures that can enhance our information dominance . This article focuses on how the topographic engineering component of information dominance helps achieve dominant maneuver in urban and

  19. Transferability of a Three-Dimensional Air Quality Model between Two Different Sites in Complex Terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Rolf

    1989-07-01

    The three-dimensional, diagnostic, particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model MATHEW/ADPIC is used to test its transferability from one site in complex terrain to another with different characteristics, under stable nighttime drainage flow conditions. The two sites were subject to extensive drainage flow tracer experiments under the multilaboratory Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program: the first being a valley in the Geysers geothermal region of northern California, and the second a canyon in western Colorado. The domain in each case is approximately 10 × 10 km. The 1980 Geysers model evaluation is only quoted. The 1984 Brush Creek model evaluation is described in detail.Results from comparing computed with measured concentrations from a variety of tracer releases indicate that 52% of the 4531 samples from five experiments in Brush Creek and 50% of the 831 samples from four experiments in the Geysers agreed within a factor of 5. When an angular 10° uncertainty, consistent with anemometer reliability limits in complex terrain, was allowed to be applied to the model results, model performance improved such that 78% of samples compared within a factor of 5 for Brush Creek and 77% for the Geysers. Looking at the range of other factors of concentration ratios, results indicate that the model is satisfactorily transferable without tuning it to a specific site.

  20. Plume Dispersion Anomalies in a Nocturnal Urban Boundary Layer in Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Dennis D.; Clawson, Kirk L.; Carter, Roger G.; Rich, Jason D.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2008-11-01

    The URBAN 2000 experiments were conducted in the complex urban and topographical terrain in Salt Lake City in stable nighttime conditions. Unexpected plume dispersion often arose due to the interaction of complex terrain and mountain-valley flow dynamics, drainage flows, synoptic influences, and urban canopy affects, all within a nocturnal boundary layer. It was found that plume dispersion was strongly influenced by topography, that dispersion can be significantly different than what might be expected based upon the available wind data, and that it is problematic to rely on any one urban area wind measurement to predict or anticipate dispersion. Small-scale flows can be very important in dispersion and the potential effects of the larger scale, synoptically-driven flow field, and its interactions with the smaller scales, needs to be carefully considered. Some of the anomalies observed include extremely slow dispersion, complicated recirculation dispersion patterns in which plume transport was in directions opposed to the measured winds, and flow decoupling. Some of the plume dispersion anomalies could only be attributed to small-scale winds that were not resolved by the existing meteorological monitoring network. The results shown will make clear the difficulties in modeling or planning for emergency response to toxic releases in a nocturnal urban boundary layer within complex terrain.

  1. Improved quantitative precipitation estimation over complex terrain using cloud-to-ground lightning data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minjarez-Sosa, Carlos Manuel

    Thunderstorms that occur in areas of complex terrain are a major severe weather hazard in the intermountain western U.S. Short-term quantitative estimation (QPE) of precipitation in complex terrain is a pressing need to better forecast flash flooding. Currently available techniques for QPE, that utilize a combination of rain gauge and weather radar information, may underestimate precipitation in areas where gauges do not exist or there is radar beam blockage. These are typically very mountainous and remote areas, that are quite vulnerable to flash flooding because of the steep topography. Lightning has been one of the novel ways suggested by the scientific community as an alternative to estimate precipitation over regions that experience convective precipitation, especially those continental areas with complex topography where the precipitation sensor measurements are scarce. This dissertation investigates the relationship between cloud-to-ground lightning and precipitation associated with convection with the purpose of estimating precipitation- mainly over areas of complex terrain which have precipitation sensor coverage problems (e.g. Southern Arizona). The results of this research are presented in two papers. The first, entitled Toward Development of Improved QPE in Complex Terrain Using Cloud-to-Ground Lighting Data: A case Study for the 2005 Monsoon in Southern Arizona, was published in the Journal of Hydrometeorology in December 2012. This initial study explores the relationship between cloud-to-ground lightning occurrences and multi-sensor gridded precipitation over southern Arizona. QPE is performed using a least squares approach for several time resolutions (seasonal---June, July and August---24 hourly and hourly) and for a 8 km grid size. The paper also presents problems that arise when the time resolution is increased, such as the spatial misplacing of discrete lightning events with gridded precipitation and the need to define a "diurnal day" that is

  2. The Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NVROI): Insights to understanding air pollution in complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Gustin, Mae Sexauer; Fine, Rebekka; Miller, Matthieu; Jaffe, Dan; Burley, Joel

    2015-10-15

    The Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NVROI) was established to better understand O3 concentrations in the Western United States (US). The major working hypothesis for development of the sampling network was that the sources of O3 to Nevada are regional and global. Within the framework of this overarching hypothesis, we specifically address two conceptual meteorological hypotheses: (1) The high elevation, complex terrain, and deep convective mixing that characterize Nevada, make this state ideally located to intercept polluted parcels of air transported into the US from the free troposphere; and (2) site specific terrain features will influence O3 concentrations observed at surface sites. Here, the impact of complex terrain and site location on observations are discussed. Data collected in Nevada at 6 sites (1385 to 2082 m above sea level (asl)) are compared with that collected at high elevation sites in Yosemite National Park and the White Mountains, California. Average daily maximum 1-hour concentrations of O3 during the first year of the NVROI ranged from 58 to 69 ppbv (spring), 53 to 62 ppbv (summer), 44 to 49 ppbv (fall), and 37 to 45 ppbv (winter). These were similar to those measured at 3 sites in Yosemite National Park (2022 to 3031 m asl), and at 4 sites in the White Mountains (1237 to 4342 m asl) (58 to 67 ppbv (summer) and 47 to 58 ppbv (fall)). Results show, that in complex terrain, collection of data should occur at high and low elevation sites to capture surface impacts, and site location with respect to topography should be considered. Additionally, concentrations measured are above the threshold reported for causing a reduction in growth and visible injury for plants (40 ppbv), and sustained exposure at high elevation locations in the Western USA may be detrimental for ecosystems.

  3. 9A.5 An Immersed Boundary Method for Flow Over Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K

    2008-08-06

    Most mesoscale numerical models use terrain-following coordinates to accommodate complex terrain. Terrain-following or sigma coordinates conform to the bottom topography and the coordinate lines gradually become smoother and flatter with distance from the ground. With very steep terrain, the coordinate lines retain a signature of the underlying surface shape even very far away from the ground. Coordinate transformations are introduced into the discretized equations and produce numerical truncation errors in addition to those associated with the chosen discretization scheme. Several methods have been proposed to reduce the truncation error arising from terrain-following coordinates. Schar et al. [2002] proposed a modified sigma coordinate in which grid distortion due to small scale terrain features decays with height more rapidly than distortion caused by large scale features. The modified coordinate flattens quickly with height and improves the accuracy of the solution. Klemp et al. [2003] investigated the errors that arise when numerical treatment of the metric terms is inconsistent with the discretization of other terms in the governing equations. Distortion seen in topographically induced gravity waves was reduced with consistent numerical treatment. Adcroft et al. [1997] used a shaved cell approach to represent topography on a Cartesian grid. This method eliminates grid distortion, but introduces complications in the numerical solution at the ground because the computational cells must be modified (shaved) where they intersect the topography. Here we introduce an alternative griding technique for flow over complex terrain using an immersed boundary method (IBM) in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. With this method, the terrain surface intersects the grid, and variables are adjusted near the immersed boundary so that the flow is diverted by the boundary. Grid distortion and the associated truncation errors are thus avoided. Additionally, the

  4. Comparison of Different Measurement Techniques and a CFD Simulation in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Christoph; Hofsäß, Martin; Anger, Jan; Rautenberg, Alexander; Lutz, Thorsten; Cheng, Po Wen; Bange, Jens

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with a comparison of data collected by measurements and a simulation for a complex terrain test site in southern Germany. Lidar, met mast, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) measurements of wind speed and direction and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) data are compared to each other. The site is characterised regarding its flow features and the suitability for a wind turbine test field. A Delayed-Detached-Eddy- Simulation (DES) was employed using measurement data to generate generic turbulent inflow. A good agreement of the wind profiles between the different approaches was reached. The terrain slope leads to a speed-up, a change of turbulence intensity as well as to flow angle variations.

  5. Final Report of the Grant: ''Vertical Transport and Mixing in Complex Terrain Airsheds''

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Joseph Harindra; Anderson, James; Boyer, Don; Berman, Neil

    2004-12-29

    Stable stratification associated with nocturnal thermal circulation in areas of complex terrain leads to interesting and important phenomena that govern local meteorology and contaminant dispersion. Given that most urban areas are in complex topography, understanding and prediction of such phenomena are of immediate practical importance. This project dealt with theoretical, laboratory, numerical and field experimental studies aimed at understanding stratified flow and turbulence phenomena in urban areas, with particular emphasis on flow, turbulence and contaminant transport and diffusion in such flows. A myriad of new results were obtained and some of these results were used to improve the predictive capabilities of the models.

  6. Evaluation of Single-Doppler Radar Wind Retrievals in Flat and Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, Rob K.; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Qing; Shaw, William J.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2014-08-01

    The accuracy of winds derived from NEXRAD level II data is assessed by comparison with independent observations from 915 MHz radar wind profilers. The evaluation is carried out at two locations with very different terrain characteristics. One site is located in an area of complex terrain within the State Line Wind Energy Center in northeast Oregon. The other site is located in an area of flat terrain on the east-central Florida coast. The National Severe Storm Laboratory’s 2DVar algorithm is used to retrieve wind fields from the KPDT (Pendleton OR) and KMLB (Melbourne FL) NEXRAD radars. Comparisons between the 2DVar retrievals and the radar profilers were conducted over a period of about 6 months and at multiple height levels at each of the profiler sites. Wind speed correlations at most observation height levels fell in the range from 0.7 to 0.8, indicating that the retrieved winds followed temporal fluctuations in the profiler-observed winds reasonably well. The retrieved winds, however, consistently exhibited slow biases in the range of1 to 2 ms-1. Wind speed difference distributions were broad with standard deviations in the range from 3 to 4 ms-1. Results from the Florida site showed little change in the wind speed correlations and difference standard deviations with altitude between about 300 and 1400 m AGL. Over this same height range, results from the Oregon site showed a monotonic increase in the wind speed correlation and a monotonic decrease in the wind speed difference standard deviation with increasing altitude. The poorest overall agreement occurred at the lowest observable level (~300 m AGL) at the Oregon site, where the effects of the complex terrain were greatest.

  7. Numerical investigation into effects of complex terrain on spatial and temporal variability of precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, J.R.; Bossert, J.E.; Reisner, J.M.

    1998-12-31

    This study is part of an ongoing research effort at Los Alamos to understand the hydrologic cycle at regional scales by coupling atmospheric, land surface, river channel, and groundwater models. In this study the authors examine how local variation of heights of the two mountain ranges representative of those that surround the Rio Grande Valley affects precipitation. The lack of observational data to adequately assess precipitation variability in complex terrain, and the lack of previous work has prompted this modeling study. Thus, it becomes imperative to understand how the local terrain affects snow accumulations and rainfall during winter and summer seasons respectively so as to manage this valuable resource in this semi-arid region. While terrain is three dimensional, simplifying the problem to two dimensions can provide some valuable insight into topographic effects that may exist at various transects across the Rio Grande Valley. The authors induce these topographic effects by introducing variations in heights of the mountains and the width of the valley using an analytical function for the topography. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) is used to examine these effects.

  8. Simulation of tracer dispersion from elevated and surface releases in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, J. F.; Cremades, L.; Baldasano, J. M.

    A new version of an advanced mesoscale dispersion modeling system for simulating passive air pollutant dispersion in the real atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL), is presented. The system comprises a diagnostic mass-consistent meteorological model and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LADISMO). The former version of LADISMO, developed according to Zannetti (Air pollution modelling, 1990), was based on the Monte Carlo technique and included calculation of higher-order moments of vertical random forcing for convective conditions. Its ability to simulate complex flow dispersion has been stated in a previous paper (Hernández et al. 1995, Atmospheric Environment, 29A, 1331-1341). The new version follows Thomson's scheme (1984, Q. Jl Roy. Met. Soc.110, 1107-1120). It is also based on Langevin equation and follows the ideas given by Brusasca et al. (1992, Atmospheric Environment26A, 707-723) and Anfossi et al. (1992, Nuovo Cemento 15c, 139-158). The model is used to simulate the dispersion and predict the ground level concentration (g.l.c.) of a tracer (SF 6) released from both an elevated source ( case a) and a ground level source ( case b) in a highly complex mountainous terrain during neutral and synoptically dominated conditions ( case a) and light and apparently stable conditions ( case b). The last case is considered as being a specially difficult task to simulate. In fact, few works have reported situations with valley drainage flows in complex terrains and real stable atmospheric conditions with weak winds. The model assumes that nearly calm situations associated to strong stability and air stagnation, make the lowest layers of PBL poorly diffusive (Brusasca et al., 1992, Atmospheric Environment26A, 707-723). Model results are verified against experimental data from Guardo-90 tracer experiments, an intensive field campaign conducted in the Carrion river valley (Northern Spain) to study atmospheric diffusion within a steep walled valley in mountainous

  9. Sandia National Laboratories ASCOT (atmospheric studies in complex terrain) field experiment, September 1980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, R. O.

    1982-04-01

    During the period September 8 through September 25, 1980, Sandia National Laboratories, Division 4774, participated in a series of experiments held in the Geysers area of California. These experiments, aimed at providing data on nighttime drainage flow in complex terrain, were intended to provide a reliable basis for mathematical fow modeling. Tracers were released at several points on a valley rim and sampled by a large number of stations at ground level. Sandia's contribution was to make it possible to derive vertical tracer profiles. This was done by taking air samples from a captive balloon at chosen altitudes between the surface and 450 meters above ground.

  10. A numerical study on the flow upstream of a wind turbine in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer Forsting, A. R.; Bechmann, A.; Troldborg, N.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of a wind turbine with the upstream flow-field in complex and flat terrain is studied using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations with a two equation turbulence closure. The complex site modelled is Perdigao (Portugal), where a turbine is located on one of two parallel running ridges. Simulating various wind directions with and without rotor, the impact of the rotor on the flow-field upstream is determined. This is compared and related to simulations with sheared and uniform inflow. The induction zones forming for these two inflows agree to such an extent, that shear could be interpreted as linear perturbation to the uniform inflow solution. However, for complex terrain this is not the case, as it is highly dependant on flow features caused by the topography and their interaction with the rotor. Separation in the lee of the ridge plays a crucial role, as it dictates the wind turbine wake trajectory which in turn governs the orientation of the induction zone.

  11. Evaluation of REMTECH PA-2 phased array SODAR performance in Complex Terrain using in-situ turbulence instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, D.R.; Catizone, P.A.; Hoffnagle, G.F.

    1994-12-31

    The introduction of the Complex Terrain Dispersion Model Plus Algorithms for Unstable Situations (CTDMPLUS model) by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created a need for detailed vertical profiles of wind speed, direction and turbulence for regulatory modeling. Most EPA models use only a single level of wind data, assume wind direction within the boundary layer is uniform and extrapolate wind speed based on logarithmic profiles. CTDMPLUS offers a more realistic paradigm for transport and dispersion in the boundary layer by utilizing measured wind profiles if available. Profile data used by CTDMPLUS must include the layer in which the plume is dispersing. For tall stack, heated effluent plume, the profile must extend to heights of several hundred meters above stack top. Doppler SOund Detection And Ranging (SODAR) systems provide a cost effective method for collecting the profile data. While EPA has approved the use of mean wind speed and direction data from SODARs for regulatory modeling purposes, the use of turbulence data has not been unconditionally accepted. In order to use turbulence data from a SODAR, the user must obtain concurrence from the agency that the turbulence data are acceptable and may be required to demonstrate that the data are reliable. This paper presents the results of a SODAR data evaluation project.

  12. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.

    2013-06-01

    This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

  13. Dispersion of particles in complex terrain: comparisons between WRF LES and simulations using different PBL schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L.; Kosovic, B.; Tessendorf, S. A.; Rasmussen, R.

    2015-12-01

    A key process in wintertime orographic cloud seeding using ground-based generators is the dispersion of silver iodide particles released from the generators in the mountainous area. The dispersion features determine the targeting efficiency and ultimately the seeding effect on the ground under favorable seeding conditions. Previous field experiments showed that the silver iodide plumes were narrow (spread angle was around 20 degrees) and were confined within the mountainous boundary layer (usually lower than 1 km AGL). The numerical simulation of the particle dispersion in complex terrain using weather models is challenging due to the stable atmosphere in winter, the unresolved terrain-flow interaction, and the inherent numerical diffusion close to the source point in the Eulerian framework. A recent study by Xue et al. (2014) showed that Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the particle dispersion in complex terrain with grid spacing of 100 m could reproduce most observed features while simulations using PBL schemes with 500 m grid spacing had difficulty reproducing the vertical dispersion. This study will simulate the same case using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in LES mode and with several PBL schemes. The differences between the LES-simulated dispersion results and the PBL results will be analyzed and presented. Especially, the difference attributed to the unrepresented sub-grid scale (SGS) topography information in the PBL will be studied in detail. The ultimate goal of this study is to incorporate the dispersion due to turbulent kinetic energy induced by SGS topography into the existing PBL schemes to better simulate the process in mountainous regions.

  14. Evaluating the accuracy and representativeness of Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar winds in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwin, K.; Emmitt, G. D.; Greco, S.; De Wekker, S.

    2013-12-01

    An Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar (ADWL) was flown during the MATERHORN experiment in October 2012. The ADWL was used to obtain profiles of u,v,w,σlos and aerosol structure between the surface and flight level (~2500m AGL). The lidar returns were processed to obtain a vertical resolution of 50m and a complete profile every 1.5km. The aircraft (Navy Twin Otter) was flown in a 'lawnmower' pattern near and over Granite Mountain located at the Dugway Proving Grounds, Utah. Combining multiple Lines of Sight (LOS) measurements to construct a vertical profile in complex terrain presents several challenges that must be met before using these data in numerical models. In addition to the wind profiles obtained with a nadir conical scan, we pointed the beam straight down to obtain a direct measure of the vertical velocity of the air. With a precision of < 10 cm/s, mountain waves, katabatic flows and other complex terrain induced flow features are resolved and provide validation of model resolved flow features. Examples of ADWL profile grids will be presented along with a discussion of the methodology(s) used to evaluate the accuracy and representativeness of the ADWL winds. We will also illustrate how we are making comparisons with numerical model wind fields (WRF) by using a forward operator with lidar LOS observations. Particular attention will be paid to interpreting the non-conventional ADWL's estimate(s) of turbulent kinetic energy.

  15. Perception and mobility research at Defence R&D Canada for UGVs in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trentini, Michael; Collier, Jack; Beckman, Blake; Digney, Bruce; Vincent, Isabelle

    2007-04-01

    The Autonomous Intelligent Systems Section at Defence R&D Canada - Suffield envisions autonomous systems contributing to decisive operations in the urban battle space. In this vision, teams of unmanned ground, air, and marine vehicles, and unattended ground sensors will gather and coordinate information, formulate plans, and complete tasks. The mobility requirement for ground-based mobile systems operating in urban settings must increase significantly if robotic technology is to augment human efforts in military relevant roles and environments. In order to achieve its objective, the Autonomous Intelligent Systems Section is pursuing research that explores the use of intelligent mobility algorithms designed to improve robot mobility. Intelligent mobility uses sensing and perception, control, and learning algorithms to extract measured variables from the world, control vehicle dynamics, and learn by experience. These algorithms seek to exploit available world representations of the environment and the inherent dexterity of the robot to allow the vehicle to interact with its surroundings and produce locomotion in complex terrain. However, a disconnect exists between the current state-of-the-art in perception systems and the information required for novel platforms to interact with their environment to improve mobility in complex terrain. The primary focus of the paper is to present the research tools, topics, and plans to address this gap in perception and control research. This research will create effective intelligence to improve the mobility of ground-based mobile systems operating in urban settings to assist the Canadian Forces in their future urban operations.

  16. The role of microphysical processes on the mesoscale simulation over the complex terrain, the Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, R. K.; Gallagher, M. W.; Connolly, P.

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of the four different cloud microphysical schemes (WSM3, WSM6, Morrison double moment and Lin scheme) within the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), as part of simulations of mesoscale weather systems across complex terrain in the Nepalese Himalayas. The Himalayas is characterized by a complex and rugged topography, with altitudes varying e.g. 70m in Southeastern Nepal, to the highest peak of the world, 8850m (Mt. Everest), and which extends from West to East covering many South and Central Asian countries: Afghanistan, Pakistan, China, India, Nepal, Bhutan, and Myanmar. Circulation in such a complex environment is complicated due to obstruction of flows by mountain ranges which in turn have wide ranging effects on cloud and rain formation and distribution. Monsoon rain is intrinsically linked to people’s daily life across the South Asia since more than 80% people depend on agriculture and majority of the agricultural systems are rainfall dependent. Modeling of the key microphysical process in this complex terrain provides insight into the general understanding of the processes and their spatial patterns, however there are many uncertainties in general. These uncertainties are even more pronounced when such models are applied to the complex terrain characteristic of the Himalayas. Numerical experiments are designed using the WRF model, with three nested domains (27, 9 and 3 km grid spacing). The performance of the four categories of microphysical schemes is examined in model experiments for (i) monsoon onset, (ii) monsoon decay and (iii) winter rainfall. The simulated results are compared with limited observed meteorological parameters such as rainfall, temperature, wind speed and wind direction, from ground-based meteorological stations situated within the high resolution (3km x 3km) domain. Results show that a) Simulated rainfall is very sensitive to the chosen microphysical scheme with rainfall

  17. TopoSCALE v.1.0: downscaling gridded climate data in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiddes, J.; Gruber, S.

    2014-02-01

    Simulation of land surface processes is problematic in heterogeneous terrain due to the the high resolution required of model grids to capture strong lateral variability caused by, for example, topography, and the lack of accurate meteorological forcing data at the site or scale it is required. Gridded data products produced by atmospheric models can fill this gap, however, often not at an appropriate spatial resolution to drive land-surface simulations. In this study we describe a method that uses the well-resolved description of the atmospheric column provided by climate models, together with high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs), to downscale coarse-grid climate variables to a fine-scale subgrid. The main aim of this approach is to provide high-resolution driving data for a land-surface model (LSM). The method makes use of an interpolation of pressure-level data according to topographic height of the subgrid. An elevation and topography correction is used to downscale short-wave radiation. Long-wave radiation is downscaled by deriving a cloud-component of all-sky emissivity at grid level and using downscaled temperature and relative humidity fields to describe variability with elevation. Precipitation is downscaled with a simple non-linear lapse and optionally disaggregated using a climatology approach. We test the method in comparison with unscaled grid-level data and a set of reference methods, against a large evaluation dataset (up to 210 stations per variable) in the Swiss Alps. We demonstrate that the method can be used to derive meteorological inputs in complex terrain, with most significant improvements (with respect to reference methods) seen in variables derived from pressure levels: air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and incoming long-wave radiation. This method may be of use in improving inputs to numerical simulations in heterogeneous and/or remote terrain, especially when statistical methods are not possible, due to lack of

  18. Estimation of wind shear components over complex terrain, and their removal to enhance wind profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, S.; Vallès, B.

    2010-09-01

    Wind profiles over complex terrain are currently impossible to obtain at requisite accuracy via remote sensing or flow models. We propose a new approach in which, in each sampled height plane, the 3 wind components (u, v, w) and their horizontal shear components (du/dx, du/dy, dv/dx, dv/dy, dw/dx, dw/dy) are estimated from a 9-beam ground-based remote-sensing system. Based on simulations and error-propagation, we show that this characterization of the spatially complex wind field to first order will allow improved estimation of (u, v, w). The effects of temporal fluctuations due to spatial coherence are also discussed. Planned field investigations and coupled CFD data interpretations are described.

  19. Performance of Precipitation Algorithms During IPHEx and Observations of Microphysical Characteristics in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlingis, J. M.; Gourley, J. J.; Kirstetter, P.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Kalogiros, J. A.; Anagnostou, M.

    2015-12-01

    An Intensive Observation Period (IOP) for the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx), part of NASA's Ground Validation campaign for the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission satellite took place from May-June 2014 in the Smoky Mountains of western North Carolina. The National Severe Storms Laboratory's mobile dual-pol X-band radar, NOXP, was deployed in the Pigeon River Basin during this time and employed various scanning strategies, including more than 1000 Range Height Indicator (RHI) scans in coordination with another radar and research aircraft. Rain gauges and disdrometers were also positioned within the basin to verify precipitation estimates and estimation of microphysical parameters. The performance of the SCOP-ME post-processing algorithm on NOXP data is compared with real-time and near real-time precipitation estimates with varying spatial resolutions and quality control measures (Stage IV gauge-corrected radar estimates, Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor System Quantitative Precipitation Estimates, and CMORPH satellite estimates) to assess the utility of a gap-filling radar in complex terrain. Additionally, the RHI scans collected in this IOP provide a valuable opportunity to examine the evolution of microphysical characteristics of convective and stratiform precipitation as they impinge on terrain. To further the understanding of orographically enhanced precipitation, multiple storms for which RHI data are available are considered.

  20. High-resolution dust modelling over complex terrains in West Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, S.; Vendrell, L.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The present work demonstrates the impact of model resolution in dust propagation in a complex terrain region such as West Asia. For this purpose, two simulations using the NMMB/BSC-Dust model are performed and analysed, one with a high horizontal resolution (at 0.03° × 0.03°) and one with a lower horizontal resolution (at 0.33° × 0.33°). Both model experiments cover two intense dust storms that occurred on 17-20 March 2012 as a consequence of strong northwesterly Shamal winds that spanned over thousands of kilometres in West Asia. The comparison with ground-based (surface weather stations and sunphotometers) and satellite aerosol observations (Aqua/MODIS and MSG/SEVIRI) shows that despite differences in the magnitude of the simulated dust concentrations, the model is able to reproduce these two dust outbreaks. Differences between both simulations on the dust spread rise on regional dust transport areas in south-western Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Oman. The complex orography in south-western Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Oman (with peaks higher than 3000 m) has an impact on the transported dust concentration fields over mountain regions. Differences between both model configurations are mainly associated to the channelization of the dust flow through valleys and the differences in the modelled altitude of the mountains that alters the meteorology and blocks the dust fronts limiting the dust transport. These results demonstrate how the dust prediction in the vicinity of complex terrains improves using high-horizontal resolution simulations.

  1. Eddy-Covariance Flux Measurements in the Complex Terrain of an Alpine Valley in Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, Rebecca; Zeeman, Matthias J.; Eugster, Werner

    2008-06-01

    We measured the surface energy budget of an Alpine grassland in highly complex terrain to explore possibilities and limitations for application of the eddy-covariance technique, also for CO2 flux measurements, at such non-ideal locations. This paper focuses on the influence of complex terrain on the turbulent energy measurements of a characteristic high Alpine grassland on Crap Alv (Alp Weissenstein) in the Swiss Alps during the growing season 2006. Measurements were carried out on a topographic terrace with a slope of 25◦ inclination. Flux data quality is assessed via the closure of the energy budget and the quality flag method used within the CarboEurope project. During 93% of the time the wind direction was along the main valley axis (43% upvalley and 50% downvalley directions). During the transition times of the typical twice daily wind direction changes in a mountain valley the fraction of high and good quality flux data reached a minimum of ≈50%, whereas during the early afternoon ≈70% of all records yielded good to highest quality (CarboEurope flags 0 and 1). The overall energy budget closure was 74 ± 2%. An angular correction for the shortwave energy input to the slope improved the energy budget closure slightly to 82 ± 2% for afternoon conditions. In the daily total, the measured turbulent energy fluxes are only underestimated by around 8% of net radiation. In summary, our results suggest that it is possible to yield realistic energy flux measurements under such conditions. We thus argue that the Crap Alv site and similar topographically complex locations with short-statured vegetation should be well suited also for CO2 flux measurements.

  2. When can a high-resolution simulation over complex terrain be called LES?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuxart, Joan

    2015-12-01

    The ceaseless rise of computational power leads to a continuous increase of the resolution of the numerical models of the atmosphere. It is found today that operational models are run at horizontal resolutions near 1 km whereas research exercises for flows over complex terrain use resolutions at the hectometer scale. Horizontal resolutions of 100 m or finer have been used to perform Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) for some specific regimes like, e.g., the atmospheric boundary-layer in idealized configurations. However, to use the name "Large-Eddy Simulation" implies to be able to resolve at least the largest turbulent energetic eddies, which is almost impossible to reach with resolutions of the order of 100m for a real case, where many different processes occur linked to different scales, many of them even smaller than 100 m. Therefore, LES is an inappropriate denomination for these numerical exercises, that may simply be called High-Resolution Mesoscale Simulations.

  3. Wind Power Forecasting techniques in complex terrain: ANN vs. ANN-CFD hybrid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellani, Francesco; Astolfi, Davide; Mana, Matteo; Burlando, Massimiliano; Meißner, Cathérine; Piccioni, Emanuele

    2016-09-01

    Due to technology developments, renewable energies are becoming competitive against fossil sources and the number of wind farms is growing, which have to be integrated into power grids. Therefore, accurate power forecast is needed and often operators are charged with penalties in case of imbalance. Yet, wind is a stochastic and very local phenomenon, and therefore hard to predict. It has a high variability in space and time and wind power forecast is challenging. Statistical methods, as Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), are often employed for power forecasting, but they have some shortcomings: they require data sets over several years and are not able to capture tails of wind power distributions. In this work a pure ANN power forecast is compared against a hybrid method, based on the combination of ANN and a physical method using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The validation case is a wind farm sited in southern Italy in a very complex terrain, with a wide spread turbine layout.

  4. Simulating pollutant transport in complex terrain with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szintai, B.; Kaufmann, P.; Rotach, M. W.

    2009-04-01

    Lagrangian particle dispersion models (LPDMs) are among the most sophisticated tools to simulate atmospheric dispersion of pollutants, and are widely used in emergency response systems. In these systems, LPDMs should be coupled with a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, which provides information from the mean wind as well as from the turbulence state of the atmosphere. Mean wind can directly be used from the NWP model, while turbulence characteristics have to be parameterized by a so-called meteorological pre-processor. In most cases, to diagnose turbulence variables, meteorological pre-processors use similarity theory approaches, which are based on turbulence datasets over flat and homogeneous surface. However, turbulence structure in complex terrain, such as in steep and narrow Alpine valleys, can be substantially different from flat conditions. In this study a new scaling approach from Weigel et al. (2007), based on measurements and model simulations of the Riviera Project in the framework of the Mesoscale Alpine Program (MAP), is investigated with respect to pollutant dispersion. In the Riviera Project, analysis of turbulence measurements in a steep and narrow Alpine valley showed that daytime profiles of Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) scale very well if the convective velocity scale w* is obtained from the sunlit eastern slope rather than from the surface directly under the measured profiles. This scaling behaviour was also reproduced by high-resolution Large Eddy Simulation runs. To improve the performance of the dispersion model in complex terrain, this new scaling approach is introduced in the meteorological pre-processor of the LPDM and results are validated with a real tracer experiment. For the evaluation of the dispersion model, the TRANSALP tracer experiment is used. During this experiment passive tracers were released and detected in an Alpine valley in Southern Switzerland on two days in October 1989. To simulate this case the operational

  5. Experimental and Numerical Modelling of Flow over Complex Terrain: The Bolund Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conan, Boris; Chaudhari, Ashvinkumar; Aubrun, Sandrine; van Beeck, Jeroen; Hämäläinen, Jari; Hellsten, Antti

    2016-02-01

    In the wind-energy sector, wind-power forecasting, turbine siting, and turbine-design selection are all highly dependent on a precise evaluation of atmospheric wind conditions. On-site measurements provide reliable data; however, in complex terrain and at the scale of a wind farm, local measurements may be insufficient for a detailed site description. On highly variable terrain, numerical models are commonly used but still constitute a challenge regarding simulation and interpretation. We propose a joint state-of-the-art study of two approaches to modelling atmospheric flow over the Bolund hill: a wind-tunnel test and a large-eddy simulation (LES). The approach has the particularity of describing both methods in parallel in order to highlight their similarities and differences. The work provides a first detailed comparison between field measurements, wind-tunnel experiments and numerical simulations. The systematic and quantitative approach used for the comparison contributes to a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of each model and, therefore, to their enhancement. Despite fundamental modelling differences, both techniques result in only a 5 % difference in the mean wind speed and 15 % in the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The joint comparison makes it possible to identify the most difficult features to model: the near-ground flow and the wake of the hill. When compared to field data, both models reach 11 % error for the mean wind speed, which is close to the best performance reported in the literature. For the TKE, a great improvement is found using the LES model compared to previous studies (20 % error). Wind-tunnel results are in the low range of error when compared to experiments reported previously (40 % error). This comparison highlights the potential of such approaches and gives directions for the improvement of complex flow modelling.

  6. Parameter Measurement and Estimation at Variable Scales: Example of Soil Temperature in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The issue of matching measurement scale to application scale is long standing and frequently revisited with advances in instrumentation and computing power. In the past we have emphasized the importance of understanding the dominant processes and amount and nature of parameter variability when addressing these issues. Landscape-scale distribution of carbon and carbon fluxes is a primary focus of the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory (RC CZO). Soil temperature (Ts) is a critical parameter of generally unknown variability. Estimates of Ts are often based on air temperature (Ta), but it is understood that other factors control Ts, especially in complex terrain, where solar radiation may be a major driver. Data were collected at the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW), which is 240 km2 in extent and covers a 1000 m elevation range. We used spatially extensive Ts data to evaluate correlations with Ta (915 m elevation gradient) on aspect neutral sites with similar vegetative cover. Effects of complex terrain were evaluated using a combination of fixed point measurements, fiber optic distributed temperature sensing and periodic, spatially distributed point measurements. We found that Ts over the elevation gradient followed Ta closely. However, within small subwatersheds with uniform Ta, Ts may be extremely variable, with a standard deviation of 8° C. This was strongly related to topographically associated land surface units (LSU's) and highly seasonal. Within LSU variability was generally low while there were seasonally significant differences between LSU's. The mean annual soil temperature difference between LSU's was greater than that associated with the 915 m elevation gradient. The seasonality of Ts variability was not directly related to solar radiation effects but rather to variations in cover. Scaling Ts requires high resolution accounting of topography in this environment. Spatial patterns of soil carbon at the RCEW are consistent with this.

  7. Payette River Basin Project: Improving Operational Forecasting in Complex Terrain through Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blestrud, D.; Kunkel, M. L.; Parkinson, S.; Holbrook, V. P.; Benner, S. G.; Fisher, J.

    2015-12-01

    Idaho Power Company (IPC) is an investor owned hydroelectric based utility, serving customers throughout southern Idaho and eastern Oregon. The University of Arizona (UA) runs an operational 1.8-km resolution Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) model for IPC, which is incorporated into IPC near and real-time forecasts for hydro, solar and wind generation, load servicing and a large-scale wintertime cloud seeding operation to increase winter snowpack. Winter snowpack is critical to IPC, as hydropower provides ~50% of the company's generation needs. In efforts to improve IPC's near-term forecasts and operational guidance to its cloud seeding program, IPC is working extensively with UA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to improve WRF performance in the complex terrain of central Idaho. As part of this project, NCAR has developed a WRF based cloud seeding module (WRF CS) to deliver high-resolution, tailored forecasts to provide accurate guidance for IPC's operations. Working with Boise State University (BSU), IPC is conducting a multiyear campaign to validate the WRF CS's ability to account for and disperse the cloud seeding agent (AgI) within the boundary layer. This improved understanding of how WRF handles the AgI dispersion and fate will improve the understanding and ultimately the performance of WRF to forecast other parameters. As part of this campaign, IPC has developed an extensive ground based monitoring network including a Remote Area Snow Sampling Device (RASSD) that provides spatially and temporally discrete snow samples during active cloud seeding periods. To quantify AgI dispersion in the complex terrain, BSU conducts trace element analysis using LA-ICP-MS on the RASSD sampled snow to provide measurements (at the 10-12 level) of incorporated AgI, measurements are compare directly with WRF CS's estimates of distributed AgI. Modeling and analysis results from previous year's research and plans for coming seasons will be presented.

  8. The Potential Utility of High Resolution Ensemble Sensitivities During Weak Flow in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, J.; Wile, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent expansion in availability of re-locatable near-surface atmospheric observing sensors introduces the question of where placement maximizes gain in forecast accuracy. Here the potential for ensemble sensitivity analysis (ESA) is examined for high-resolution (Δx=4 km) predictions in complex terrain. The primary objective is to determine whether a mesoscale ESA applied at these scales is useful for identifying potential observing locations in weak flow. ESA can be inaccurate when the underlying assumptions of linear dynamics (and Gaussian statistics) are violated, or when the sensitivity cannot be robustly sampled. A case study of a fog event at the Salt Lake City airport (KSLC) provides a useful period for examining these issues, with the additional influence of complex terrain. A realistic upper-air observing network is used in perfect-model ensemble data assimilation experiments, providing the statistics for ESA. Results show that water vapor mixing ratios over KSLC are sensitive to temperature on the first model layer tens of km away, 6 h prior to verification and prior to the onset of fog. Sensitivity 12 h prior is weaker but leads to qualitatively similar results. Temperatures are shown to be a predictor of inversion strength in the Salt Lake basin; the ESA predicts southerly flow and strengthened inversions with warmer temperatures in a few locations. Simple linearity tests show that small perturbations do not lead to the expected forecast change, but larger perturbations do, suggesting that noise can dominate a small perturbation. Assimilating a perfect observation at the maximum sensitivity location produces forecasts more closely agreeing with the ESA. Sampling error evaluation show that similar conclusions can be reached with ensembles as small as 48 members, but smaller ensembles do not produce accurate sensitivity estimates.

  9. MELSAR: a mesoscale air quality model for complex terrain. Volume 1. Overview, technical description and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K.J.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1985-04-01

    This final report is submitted as part of the Green River Ambient Model Assessment (GRAMA) program conducted at the US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Environmental Protection Agency. The GRAMA program has, as its ultimate goal, the development of validated air quality models that can be applied to the complex terrain of the Green River Formation of western Colorado, eastern Utah, and southern Wyoming. The Green River Formation is a geologic formation containing large reserves of oil shale, coal, and other natural resources. Development of these resources may lead to a degradation of the air quality of the region. Air quality models are needed immediately for planning and regulatory purposes to assess the magnitude of these regional impacts. This report documents one of the models being developed for this purpose within GRAMA - specifically a model to predict short averaging time (less than or equal to 24 h) pollutant concentrations resulting from the mesoscale transport of pollutant releases from multiple sources. MELSAR has not undergone any rigorous operational testing, sensitivity analyses, or validation studies. Testing and evaluation of the model are needed to gain a measure of confidence in the model's performance. This report consists of two volumes. Volume 1 contains the model overview, technical description, and user's guide, and Volume 2 contains the Appendices which include listings of the FORTRAN code. 51 refs., 31 figs., 35 tabs.

  10. Understanding Learner Agency as a Complex Dynamic System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to contribute to a fuller understanding of the nature of language learner agency by considering it as a complex dynamic system. The purpose of the study was to explore detailed situated data to examine to what extent it is feasible to view learner agency through the lens of complexity theory. Data were generated through a…

  11. Measurements of thermal updraft intensity over complex terrain using American white pelicans and a simple boundary-layer forecast model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shannon, H.D.; Young, G.S.; Yates, M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Seegar, W.

    2003-01-01

    An examination of boundary-layer meteorological and avian aerodynamic theories suggests that soaring birds can be used to measure the magnitude of vertical air motions within the boundary layer. These theories are applied to obtain mixed-layer normalized thermal updraft intensity over both flat and complex terrain from the climb rates of soaring American white pelicans and from diagnostic boundary-layer model-produced estimates of the boundary-layer depth zi and the convective velocity scale w*. Comparison of the flatland data with the profiles of normalized updraft velocity obtained from previous studies reveals that the pelican-derived measurements of thermal updraft intensity are in close agreement with those obtained using traditional research aircraft and large eddy simulation (LES) in the height range of 0.2 to 0.8 zi. Given the success of this method, the profiles of thermal vertical velocity over the flatland and the nearby mountains are compared. This comparison shows that these profiles are statistically indistinguishable over this height range, indicating that the profile for thermal updraft intensity varies little over this sample of complex terrain. These observations support the findings of a recent LES study that explored the turbulent structure of the boundary layer using a range of terrain specifications. For terrain similar in scale to that encountered in this study, results of the LES suggest that the terrain caused less than an 11% variation in the standard deviation of vertical velocity.

  12. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A

    2010-05-12

    Mesoscale models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are increasingly used for high resolution simulations, particularly in complex terrain, but errors associated with terrain-following coordinates degrade the accuracy of the solution. Use of an alternative Cartesian gridding technique, known as an immersed boundary method (IBM), alleviates coordinate transformation errors and eliminates restrictions on terrain slope which currently limit mesoscale models to slowly varying terrain. In this dissertation, an immersed boundary method is developed for use in numerical weather prediction. Use of the method facilitates explicit resolution of complex terrain, even urban terrain, in the WRF mesoscale model. First, the errors that arise in the WRF model when complex terrain is present are presented. This is accomplished using a scalar advection test case, and comparing the numerical solution to the analytical solution. Results are presented for different orders of advection schemes, grid resolutions and aspect ratios, as well as various degrees of terrain slope. For comparison, results from the same simulation are presented using the IBM. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional immersed boundary methods are then described, along with details that are specific to the implementation of IBM in the WRF code. Our IBM is capable of imposing both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Additionally, a method for coupling atmospheric physics parameterizations at the immersed boundary is presented, making IB methods much more functional in the context of numerical weather prediction models. The two-dimensional IB method is verified through comparisons of solutions for gentle terrain slopes when using IBM and terrain-following grids. The canonical case of flow over a Witch of Agnesi hill provides validation of the basic no-slip and zero gradient boundary conditions. Specified diurnal heating in a valley, producing anabatic winds, is used to validate the

  13. How does complex terrain influence responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are pursuing the ambitious goal of understanding how complex terrain influences the responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change. Our studies take place in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, an LTER (Long Term Ecological Research) site...

  14. Soil Temperature Variability in Complex Terrain measured using Distributed a Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfried, M. S.; Link, T. E.

    2013-12-01

    Soil temperature (Ts) exerts critical environmental controls on hydrologic and biogeochemical processes. Rates of carbon cycling, mineral weathering, infiltration and snow melt are all influenced by Ts. Although broadly reflective of the climate, Ts is sensitive to local variations in cover (vegetative, litter, snow), topography (slope, aspect, position), and soil properties (texture, water content), resulting in a spatially and temporally complex distribution of Ts across the landscape. Understanding and quantifying the processes controlled by Ts requires an understanding of that distribution. Relatively few spatially distributed field Ts data exist, partly because traditional Ts data are point measurements. A relatively new technology, fiber optic distributed temperature system (FO-DTS), has the potential to provide such data but has not been rigorously evaluated in the context of remote, long term field research. We installed FO-DTS in a small experimental watershed in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in the Owyhee Mountains of SW Idaho. The watershed is characterized by complex terrain and a seasonal snow cover. Our objectives are to: (i) evaluate the applicability of fiber optic DTS to remote field environments and (ii) to describe the spatial and temporal variability of soil temperature in complex terrain influenced by a variable snow cover. We installed fiber optic cable at a depth of 10 cm in contrasting snow accumulation and topographic environments and monitored temperature along 750 m with DTS. We found that the DTS can provide accurate Ts data (+/- .4°C) that resolves Ts changes of about 0.03°C at a spatial scale of 1 m with occasional calibration under conditions with an ambient temperature range of 50°C. We note that there are site-specific limitations related cable installation and destruction by local fauna. The FO-DTS provide unique insight into the spatial and temporal variability of Ts in a landscape. We found strong seasonal

  15. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2017-04-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model can be used to simulate atmospheric processes ranging from quasi-global to tens of m in scale. Here we employ large-eddy simulation (LES) using the WRF model, with the LES-domain nested within a mesoscale WRF model domain with grid spacing decreasing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). We simulate real-world conditions in the convective planetary boundary layer over an area of complex terrain. The WRF-LES model results are evaluated against observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study. Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and observations. One key result is to demonstrate that a systematic methodology needs to be applied to select the grid spacing and refinement ratio used between domains, to avoid having a grid resolution that falls in the grey zone and to minimize artefacts in the WRF-LES model solutions. Furthermore, the WRF-LES model variables show large variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. Analyses of WRF-LES model results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day as well as the distance from the inflow boundaries.

  16. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2016-11-25

    High resolution numerical simulation can provide insight into important physical processes that occur within the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The present work employs large eddy simulation (LES) using the Weather Forecasting and Research (WRF) model, with the LES domain nested within mesoscale simulation, to simulate real conditions in the convective PBL over an area of complex terrain. A multiple nesting approach has been used to downsize the grid spacing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). A careful selection of grid spacing in the WRF Meso domain has been conducted to minimize artifacts in the WRF-LES solutions. The WRF-LES results have been evaluated with in situ and remote sensing observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia BasinWind Energy Study (CBWES). Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function (PDF) of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and data. Furthermore, the WRF-LES variables show a great deal of variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. The WRF-LES results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day. In addition to basic studies related to boundary-layer meteorology, results from these simulations can be used in other applications, such as studying wind energy resources, atmospheric dispersion, fire weather etc.

  17. Comparison of Measured and Numerically Simulated Turbulence Statistics in a Convective Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Raj K.; Berg, Larry K.; Kosović, Branko; Mirocha, Jeffrey D.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Shaw, William J.

    2016-11-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model can be used to simulate atmospheric processes ranging from quasi-global to tens of m in scale. Here we employ large-eddy simulation (LES) using the WRF model, with the LES-domain nested within a mesoscale WRF model domain with grid spacing decreasing from 12.15 km (mesoscale) to 0.03 km (LES). We simulate real-world conditions in the convective planetary boundary layer over an area of complex terrain. The WRF-LES model results are evaluated against observations collected during the US Department of Energy-supported Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study. Comparison of the first- and second-order moments, turbulence spectrum, and probability density function of wind speed shows good agreement between the simulations and observations. One key result is to demonstrate that a systematic methodology needs to be applied to select the grid spacing and refinement ratio used between domains, to avoid having a grid resolution that falls in the grey zone and to minimize artefacts in the WRF-LES model solutions. Furthermore, the WRF-LES model variables show large variability in space and time caused by the complex topography in the LES domain. Analyses of WRF-LES model results show that the flow structures, such as roll vortices and convective cells, vary depending on both the location and time of day as well as the distance from the inflow boundaries.

  18. Imposing land-surface fluxes at an immersed boundary for improved simulations of atmospheric flow over complex terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D

    2008-06-05

    Boundary layer flows are greatly complicated by the presence of complex terrain which redirects mean flow and alters the structure of turbulence. Surface fluxes of heat and moisture provide additional forcing which induce secondary flows, or can dominate flow dynamics in cases with weak mean flows. Mesoscale models are increasingly being used for numerical simulations of boundary layer flows over complex terrain. These models typically use a terrain-following coordinate transformation, but these introduce numerical errors over steep terrain. An alternative is to use an immersed boundary method which alleviates errors associated with the coordinate transformation by allowing the terrain to be represented as a surface which arbitrarily passes through a Cartesian grid. This paper describes coupling atmospheric physics models to an immersed boundary method implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in previous work [Lundquist et al., 2007]. When the immersed boundary method is used, boundary conditions must be imposed on the immersed surface for velocity and scalar surface fluxes. Previous algorithms, such as those used by Tseng and Ferziger [2003] and Balaras [2004], impose no-slip boundary conditions on the velocity field at the immersed surface by adding a body force to the Navier-Stokes equations. Flux boundary conditions for the advection-diffusion equation have not been adequately addressed. A new algorithm is developed here which allows scalar surface fluxes to be imposed on the flow solution at an immersed boundary. With this extension of the immersed boundary method, land-surface models can be coupled to the immersed boundary to provide realistic surface forcing. Validation is provided in the context of idealized valley simulations with both specified and parameterized surface fluxes using the WRF code. Applicability to real terrain is illustrated with a fully coupled two-dimensional simulation of the Owens Valley in California.

  19. Wind Resource Assessment in Complex Terrain with a High-Resolution Numerical Weather Prediction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Karin; Serafin, Stefano; Grubišić, Vanda; Dorninger, Manfred; Zauner, Rudolf; Fink, Martin

    2014-05-01

    A crucial step in planning new wind farms is the estimation of the amount of wind energy that can be harvested in possible target sites. Wind resource assessment traditionally entails deployment of masts equipped for wind speed measurements at several heights for a reasonably long period of time. Simplified linear models of atmospheric flow are then used for a spatial extrapolation of point measurements to a wide area. While linear models have been successfully applied in the wind resource assessment in plains and offshore, their reliability in complex terrain is generally poor. This represents a major limitation to wind resource assessment in Austria, where high-altitude locations are being considered for new plant sites, given the higher frequency of sustained winds at such sites. The limitations of linear models stem from two key assumptions in their formulation, the neutral stratification and attached boundary-layer flow, both of which often break down in complex terrain. Consequently, an accurate modeling of near-surface flow over mountains requires the adoption of a NWP model with high horizontal and vertical resolution. This study explores the wind potential of a site in Styria in the North-Eastern Alps. The WRF model is used for simulations with a maximum horizontal resolution of 800 m. Three nested computational domains are defined, with the innermost one encompassing a stretch of the relatively broad Enns Valley, flanked by the main crest of the Alps in the south and the Nördliche Kalkalpen of similar height in the north. In addition to the simulation results, we use data from fourteen 10-m wind measurement sites (of which 7 are located within valleys and 5 near mountain tops) and from 2 masts with anemometers at several heights (at hillside locations) in an area of 1600 km2 around the target site. The potential for wind energy production is assessed using the mean wind speed and turbulence intensity at hub height. The capacity factor is also evaluated

  20. Multiscale Precipitation Processes Over Mountain Terrain - Landform and Vegetation Controls of Microphysics and Convection in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, A. P.; Wilson, A. M.; Sun, X.; Duan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent precipitation observations in mountainous regions do not exhibit the classical orographic enhancement with elevation, especially where fog and multi-layer clouds are persistent. The role of landform in modulating moisture convergence patterns and constraining the thermodynamic environment that supports the development of complex vertical structures of clouds and precipitation is discussed first using observations and model results from the IPHEx (Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment) field campaign in the Southern Appalachian Mountains (SAM). Analysis of the complex spatial heterogeneity of precipitation microphysics in the SAM suggests that seeder-feeder interactions (SFI) among stratiform precipitation, low level clouds (LLC), and fog play a governing role on the diurnal and seasonal cycles of observed precipitation regimes. Further, in the absence of synoptic-scale forcing, results suggest that evapotranspiration makes a significant contribution to the moisture budget in the lower atmosphere, creating super-saturation conditions favorable to CCN activation, LLC formation, and light rainfall. To investigate the role of evapotranspiration on the diurnal cycle of mountain precipitation further, range-scale modeling studies were conducted in the Central Andes. Specifically, high resolution WRF simulations for realistic and quasi-idealized ET withdrawal case-studies show that evapotranspiration fluxes modulated by landform govern convective activity in the lower troposphere, including cloud formation and precipitation processes that account for daily precipitation amounts as high as 50-70% depending on synoptic conditions and season. These studies suggest multiscale vegetation controls of orographic precipitation processes via atmospheric instability on the one hand, and low level super-saturation and local microphysics on the other. A conceptual model of multiscale interactions among vegetation, landform and moist processes over complex

  1. Evaluation of flash-flood discharge forecasts in complex terrain using precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, D.; Warner, T.T.; Brandes, E.A.; Leavesley, G.H.; Sun, Jielun; Mueller, C.K.

    2001-01-01

    Operational prediction of flash floods produced by thunderstorm (convective) precipitation in mountainous areas requires accurate estimates or predictions of the precipitation distribution in space and time. The details of the spatial distribution are especially critical in complex terrain because the watersheds are generally small in size, and small position errors in the forecast or observed placement of the precipitation can distribute the rain over the wrong watershed. In addition to the need for good precipitation estimates and predictions, accurate flood prediction requires a surface-hydrologic model that is capable of predicting stream or river discharge based on the precipitation-rate input data. Different techniques for the estimation and prediction of convective precipitation will be applied to the Buffalo Creek, Colorado flash flood of July 1996, where over 75 mm of rain from a thunderstorm fell on the watershed in less than 1 h. The hydrologic impact of the precipitation was exacerbated by the fact that a significant fraction of the watershed experienced a wildfire approximately two months prior to the rain event. Precipitation estimates from the National Weather Service's operational Weather Surveillance Radar-Doppler 1988 and the National Center for Atmospheric Research S-band, research, dual-polarization radar, colocated to the east of Denver, are compared. In addition, very short range forecasts from a convection-resolving dynamic model, which is initialized variationally using the radar reflectivity and Doppler winds, are compared with forecasts from an automated-algorithmic forecast system that also employs the radar data. The radar estimates of rain rate, and the two forecasting systems that employ the radar data, have degraded accuracy by virtue of the fact that they are applied in complex terrain. Nevertheless, the radar data and forecasts from the dynamic model and the automated algorithm could be operationally useful for input to surface

  2. Mesoscale ensemble sensitivity analysis for predictability studies and observing network design in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Joshua

    2013-04-01

    Ensemble sensitivity analysis (ESA) is emerging as a viable alternative to adjoint sensitivity. Several open issues face ESA for forecasts dominated by mesoscale phenomena, including (1) sampling error arising from finite-sized ensembles causing over-estimated sensitivities, and (2) violation of linearity assumptions for strongly nonlinear flows. In an effort to use ESA for predictability studies and observing network design in complex terrain, we present results from experiments designed to address these open issues. Sampling error in ESA arises in two places. First, when hypothetical observations are introduced to test the sensitivity estimates for linearity. Here the same localization that was used in the filter itself can be simply applied. Second and more critical, localization should be considered within the sensitivity calculations. Sensitivity to hypothetical observations, estimated without re-running the ensemble, includes regression of a sample of a final-time (forecast) metric onto a sample of initial states. Derivation to include localization results in two localization coefficients (or factors) applied in separate regression steps. Because the forecast metric is usually a sum, and can also include a sum over a spatial region and multiple physical variables, a spatial localization function is difficult to specify. We present results from experiments to empirically estimate localization factors for ESA to test hypothetical observations for mesoscale data assimilation in complex terrain. Localization factors are first derived for an ensemble filter following the empirical localization methodology. Sensitivities for a fog event over Salt Lake City, and a Colorado downslope wind event, are tested for linearity by approximating assimilation of perfect observations at points of maximum sensitivity, both with and without localization. Observation sensitivity is then estimated, with and without localization, and tested for linearity. The validity of the

  3. The effects of synoptical weather pattern and complex terrain on the formation of aerosol events in the Greater Taipei area.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ming-Tung; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Wang, Chu-Fang; Chang, E-E; Lee, Chung-Te

    2008-07-25

    The aerosol in the Taipei basin is difficult to transport outward under specific weather patterns owing to complex terrain blocking. In this study, seven weather patterns are identified from synoptic weather maps for aerosol events, which occurred from March 2002 to February 2005. Among the identified weather patterns, High Pressure Peripheral Circulation (HPPC), Warm area Ahead of a cold Front (WAF), TYPhoon (TYP), Pacific High Pressure system stretching westerly (PHP), Weak High Pressure system (WHP), and Weak Southern Wind (WSW) are related to terrain blocking. The remaining pattern is High Pressure system Pushing (HPP). The classification of the pollution origin of the air masses shows that 15% of event days were contributed by long-range transport (LRT), 20% by local pollution (LP), and 65% by LRT/LP mix. Terrain blocking causes aerosol accumulation from high atmospheric stability and weak winds occurring under HPPC, TYP, and PHP weather patterns when the Taipei basin is situated on the lee side of the Snow Mountains Chain (SMC). Terrain blocking also occurs when the Taipei basin is situated on the upwind of SMC and Mt. Da-Twen under WAF and WSW patterns. To study the variation of aerosol properties under the mixed influence of terrain and pollution origin, we conducted a field observation simultaneously at the urban, suburban, and background sites in the Greater Taipei area from April 14 to 23, 2004. Terrain blocking plays an important role in aerosol accumulation in the stagnant environment when the Taipei basin is on the lee side of SMC. On the other hand, the PM(2.5) sulfate level is stable with a fraction of 30% in PM(2.5) during the observation period at the urban (25%-33%) and background (25%-41%) sites. It indicates that background PM(2.5) sulfate is high on the West Pacific in winter.

  4. A Dispersion Model Evaluation Study for Real-Time Application in Complex Terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desiato, F.

    1991-08-01

    A few tracer experiments were carried out in autumn 1984 and summer 1985 at the Lago Brasimone site, on the Appennini Mountains approximately 50 km south of Bologna with the purpose assessing the atmospheric dispersion of pollutants under drainage flow conditions. The three-dimensional transport and diffusion model MATHEW/ADPIC (M/A) has been applied to selected tracer and meteorological data with the aim of assessing the model performance under complex terrain and meteorological conditions, and its sensitivity to input data available in real-time applications. Boundary layer input parameters were derived through standard algorithms based on tethersonde and pilot balloon measurements. Model simulations of the most significant tracer experiments have been assessed by means of several evaluation criteria, and the sensitivity to some input data has been investigated. The results show that if a limited spatial uncertainty in the computed concentration pattern is taken into account, M/A provides a good agreement with observed concentrations. The quality of the results is very sensitive to the presence of wind measurements where the deviation of the flow due to the shape of the valley is observed.

  5. Design of a WSN for the Sampling of Environmental Variability in Complex Terrain

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Tardío, Miguel A.; Felicísimo, Ángel M.

    2014-01-01

    In-situ environmental parameter measurements using sensor systems connected to a wireless network have become widespread, but the problem of monitoring large and mountainous areas by means of a wireless sensor network (WSN) is not well resolved. The main reasons for this are: (1) the environmental variability distribution is unknown in the field; (2) without this knowledge, a huge number of sensors would be necessary to ensure the complete coverage of the environmental variability and (3) WSN design requirements, for example, effective connectivity (intervisibility), limiting distances and controlled redundancy, are usually solved by trial and error. Using temperature as the target environmental variable, we propose: (1) a method to determine the homogeneous environmental classes to be sampled using the digital elevation model (DEM) and geometric simulations and (2) a procedure to determine an effective WSN design in complex terrain in terms of the number of sensors, redundancy, cost and spatial distribution. The proposed methodology, based on geographic information systems and binary integer programming can be easily adapted to a wide range of applications that need exhaustive and continuous environmental monitoring with high spatial resolution. The results show that the WSN design is perfectly suited to the topography and the technical specifications of the sensors, and provides a complete coverage of the environmental variability in terms of Sun exposure. However these results still need be validated in the field and the proposed procedure must be refined. PMID:25412218

  6. On the energy balance closure and net radiation in complex terrain

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Hammerle, Albin; Niedrist, Georg; Scholz, Katharina; Tomelleri, Enrico; Zhao, Peng

    2017-01-01

    In complex, sloping terrain, horizontal measurements of net radiation are not reflective of the radiative energy available for the conductive and convective heat exchange of the underlying surface. Using data from a grassland site on a mountain slope characterised by spatial heterogeneity in inclination and aspect, we tested the hypothesis that a correction of the horizontal net radiation measurements which accounts for the individual footprint contributions of the various surfaces to the measured sensible and latent heat eddy covariance fluxes will yield more realistic slope-parallel net radiation estimates compared to a correction based on the average inclination and aspect of the footprint. Our main result is that both approaches led to clear, but very similar improvements in the phase between available energy and the sum of the latent and sensible heat fluxes. As a consequence the variance in the sum of latent and sensible heat flux explained by available radiation improved by >10 %, while energy balance closure improved only slightly. This is shown to be mainly due to the average inclination and aspect corresponding largely with the inclination and aspect of the main flux source area in combination with a limited sensitivity of the slope correction to small angular differences in, particularly, inclination and aspect. We conclude with a discussion of limitations of the present approach and future research directions. PMID:28066093

  7. Hydrologic Simulations in Complex Terrain Conditioned on Different Precipitation Inputs During IPHEx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostou, E. N.; Erlingis, J. M.; Vergara, H. J.; Gourley, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    An Intensive Observation Period for the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx), part of NASA's Ground Validation campaign for the newly launched Global Precipitation Measurement Mission took place from May-June 2014 in the Smoky Mountains of western North Carolina. As part of the experiment, the National Severe Storms Laboratory's (NSSL) mobile dual-pol X-band radar, NOXP, was deployed in the Pigeon River Basin (PRB). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of different post-processing algorithms of NOXP data with the suite of observation platforms within the IPHEx domain. In addition, the impact of standard precipitation datasets (Stage IV gauge-corrected radar estimates, Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor System Quantitative Precipitation Estimates, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B42V7 rainfall, CMORPH, WRF, etc.) on the performance of the CREST hydrologic model at small basin scales in complex terrain will be examined. Hydrologic simulations using a version of CREST with a priori parameters were conducted in the three small catchments within the PRB previously studied by Tao and Barros (2013): the Cataloochee Creek Basin, the East Fork Pigeon River Basin, and the West Fork Pigeon River Basin.

  8. Turbulent transport and production/destruction of ozone in a boundary layer over complex terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhut, Gary K.; Jochum, Anne M.; Neininger, Bruno

    1994-01-01

    The first Intensive Observation Period (IOP) of the Swiss air pollution experiment POLLUMET took place in 1990 in the Aare River Valley between Bern and Zurich. During the IOP, fast response measurements of meteorological variables and ozone concentration were made within the boundary layer aboard a motorglider. In addition, mean values of meteorological variables and the concentrations of ozone and other trace species were measured using other aircraft, pilot balloons, tethersondes, and ground stations. Turbulent flux profiles of latent and sensible heat and ozone are calculated from the fast response data. Terms in the ozone mean concentration budget (time rate of change of mean concentration, horizontal advection, and flux divergence) are calculated for stationary time periods both before and after the passage of a cold front. The source/sink term is calculated as a residual in the budget, and its sign and magnitude are related to the measured concentrations of reactive trace species within the boundary layer. Relationships between concentration ratios of trace species and ozone concentration are determined in order to understand the influence of complex terrain on the processes that produce and destroy ozone.

  9. A physically-based hybrid framework to estimate daily-mean surface fluxes over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2016-06-01

    In this study we developed and examined a hybrid modeling approach integrating physically-based equations and statistical downscaling to estimate fine-scale daily-mean surface turbulent fluxes (i.e., sensible and latent heat fluxes) for a region of southern California that is extensively covered by varied vegetation types over a complex terrain. The selection of model predictors is guided by physical parameterizations of surface flux used in land surface models and analysis showing net shortwave radiation that is a major source of variability in the surface energy budget. Through a structure of multivariable regression processes with an application of near-surface wind estimates from a previous study, we successfully reproduce dynamically-downscaled 3 km resolution surface flux data. The overall error in our estimates is less than 20 % for both sensible and latent heat fluxes, while slightly larger errors are seen in high-altitude regions. The major sources of error in estimates include the limited information provided in coarse reanalysis data, the accuracy of near-surface wind estimates, and an ignorance of the nonlinear diurnal cycle of surface fluxes when using daily-mean data. However, with reasonable and acceptable errors, this hybrid modeling approach provides promising, fine-scale products of surface fluxes that are much more accurate than reanalysis data, without performing intensive dynamical simulations.

  10. Modeling snowpack evolution in complex terrain and forested Central Rockies: A model inter-comparison study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Barlage, M. J.; Tewari, M.; Rasmussen, R.; Bao, Y.; Jin, J.; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Livneh, B.; Lin, C.; Miguez-Macho, G.; Niu, G.; Wen, L.; Yang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    The timing and amount of spring snowmelt runoff in mountainous regions are critical for water resources and managements. Correctly capturing the snow-atmospheric interactions (through albedo and surface energy partitioning) is also important for weather and climate models. This study developed a unique, integrated data set including one-year (2007-2008) snow water equivalent (SWE) observations from 112 SNOTEL sites in the Colorado Headwaters region, 2004-2008 observations (surface heat fluxes, radiation budgets, soil temperature and moisture) from two AmeriFlux sites (Niwot Ridge and GLEES), MODIS snow cover, and river discharge. These observations were used to evaluate the ability of six widely-used land-surface/snow models (Noah, Noah-MP, VIC, CLM, SAST, and LEAF-2) in simulating the seasonal evolution of snowpacks in central Rockies. The overarching goals of this community undertaking are to: 1) understand key processes controlling the evolution of snowpack in this complex terrain and forested region through analyzing field data and various components of snow physics in these models, and 2) improve snowpack modeling in weather and climate models. This comprehensive data set allowed us to address issues that had not been possible in previous snow-model inter-comparison investigations (e.g., SnowMIPs). For instance, models displayed a large disparity in treating radiation and turbulence processes within vegetation canopies. Some models with an overly simplified tree-canopy treatment need to raise snow albedo helped to retain snow on the ground during melting phase. However, comparing modeled radiation and heat fluxes to long-term observations revealed that too-high albedo reduced 75% of solar energy absorbed by the forested surface and resulted in too-low surface sensible heat and longwave radiation returned to the atmosphere, which could be a crucial deficiency for coupled weather and climate models. Large differences were found in simulated SWE by the six LSMs

  11. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Birdwell, Kevin R.

    2011-05-01

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds

  12. Evaluation of MODIS aerosol optical depth for semi­-arid environments in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, H.; Loria Salazar, S. M.; Panorska, A. K.; Arnott, W. P.; Barnard, J.

    2015-12-01

    The use of satellite remote sensing to estimate spatially resolved ground level air pollutant concentrations is increasing due to advancements in remote sensing technology and the limited number of surface observations. Satellite retrievals provide global, spatiotemporal air quality information and are used to track plumes, estimate human exposures, model emissions, and determine sources (i.e., natural versus anthropogenic) in regulatory applications. Ground level PM2.5 concentrations can be estimated using columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) from MODIS, where the satellite retrieval serves as a spatial surrogate to simulate surface PM2.5 gradients. The spatial statistical models and MODIS AOD retrieval algorithms have been evaluated for the dark, vegetated eastern US, while the semi-arid western US continues to be an understudied region with associated complexity due to heterogeneous emissions, smoke from wildfires, and complex terrain. The objective of this work is to evaluate the uncertainty of MODIS AOD retrievals by comparing with columnar AOD and surface PM2.5 measurements from AERONET and EPA networks. Data is analyzed from multiple stations in California and Nevada for three years where four major wildfires occurred. Results indicate that MODIS retrievals fail to estimate column-integrated aerosol pollution in the summer months. This is further investigated by quantifying the statistical relationships between MODIS AOD, AERONET AOD, and surface PM2.5 concentrations. Data analysis indicates that the distribution of MODIS AOD is significantly (p<0.05) different than AERONET AOD. Further, using the results of distributional and association analysis the impacts of MODIS AOD uncertainties on the spatial gradients are evaluated. Additionally, the relationships between these uncertainties and physical parameters in the retrieval algorithm (e.g., surface reflectance, Ångström Extinction Exponent) are discussed.

  13. Weather, Topoclimate, and Phenology: Population Dynamics of Checkerspot Butterflies in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, S. B.

    2008-12-01

    The pathways leading from climate and weather to the distribution and abundance of organisms need to be clarified as rapid climate change affects ecosystems. This presentation describes population dynamics of the threatened Bay checkerspot butterfly, Euphydryas editha bayensis, in topographically complex habitat and demonstrates how weather and topoclimate drives those dynamics through phenology of butterflies and larval hostplants. We sampled densities of postdiapause larvae at sites in a 100 ha reserve, stratified by Mar 21 potential insolation, to estimate numbers and microdistribution of larvae. Larval numbers ranged from 27,000 to 900,000 over the 24-year study (1985-2008). Four consecutive drought years from 1987 to 1990 led to a 96% decrease in numbers, and sharp declines were observed following warmer than average growing seasons. Changes in larval numbers were negatively correlated to mean growing season temperatures (r2 = 0.36, p < 0.02), and the best stepwise regression model included April temperature, and November and April rainfall (r2 = 0.57, p < 0.001). Changes in the microdistribution of larvae cross the topoclimatic gradient was correlated with change in numbers (r2 = 0.41, p < 0.01) -- when larval numbers increased, the distribution of larvae shifted towards warmer slopes, and when numbers decreased, the distribution shifted toward cooler slopes. Larval densities were least variable on cooler slopes, indicating that cooler slopes provided core habitat and refugia from warm temperatures. The length of the phenological window between peak flight and hostplant senescence predicted population response (r2 = 0.44, p < 0.005). Hostplant senescence patterns across slopes - plants remain green for 4 or more weeks later on cool N-facing slopes than on warm S-facing slopes - explains microdistributional shifts. Many species depend on phenological coincidence with host resources, and occupy complex terrain as well, and these patterns and mechanisms may be

  14. Geolocation of man-made reservoirs across terrains of varying complexity using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mixon, David M.; Kinner, David A.; Stallard, Robert F.; Syvitski, James P. M.

    2008-10-01

    The Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) is one of the world's most comprehensive databases of reservoir sedimentation rates, comprising nearly 6000 surveys for 1819 reservoirs across the continental United States. Sediment surveys in the database date from 1904 to 1999, though more than 95% of surveys were entered prior to 1980, making RESIS largely a historical database. The use of this database for large-scale studies has been limited by the lack of precise coordinates for the reservoirs. Many of the reservoirs are relatively small structures and do not appear on current USGS topographic maps. Others have been renamed or have only approximate (i.e. township and range) coordinates. This paper presents a method scripted in ESRI's ARC Macro Language (AML) to locate the reservoirs on digital elevation models using information available in RESIS. The script also delineates the contributing watersheds and compiles several hydrologically important parameters for each reservoir. Evaluation of the method indicates that, for watersheds larger than 5 km 2, the correct outlet is identified over 80% of the time. The importance of identifying the watershed outlet correctly depends on the application. Our intent is to collect spatial data for watersheds across the continental United States and describe the land use, soils, and topography for each reservoir's watershed. Because of local landscape similarity in these properties, we show that choosing the incorrect watershed does not necessarily mean that the watershed characteristics will be misrepresented. We present a measure termed terrain complexity and examine its relationship to geolocation success rate and its influence on the similarity of nearby watersheds.

  15. Geolocation of man-made reservoirs across terrains of varying complexity using GIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mixon, D.M.; Kinner, D.A.; Stallard, R.F.; Syvitski, J.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) is one of the world's most comprehensive databases of reservoir sedimentation rates, comprising nearly 6000 surveys for 1819 reservoirs across the continental United States. Sediment surveys in the database date from 1904 to 1999, though more than 95% of surveys were entered prior to 1980, making RESIS largely a historical database. The use of this database for large-scale studies has been limited by the lack of precise coordinates for the reservoirs. Many of the reservoirs are relatively small structures and do not appear on current USGS topographic maps. Others have been renamed or have only approximate (i.e. township and range) coordinates. This paper presents a method scripted in ESRI's ARC Macro Language (AML) to locate the reservoirs on digital elevation models using information available in RESIS. The script also delineates the contributing watersheds and compiles several hydrologically important parameters for each reservoir. Evaluation of the method indicates that, for watersheds larger than 5 km2, the correct outlet is identified over 80% of the time. The importance of identifying the watershed outlet correctly depends on the application. Our intent is to collect spatial data for watersheds across the continental United States and describe the land use, soils, and topography for each reservoir's watershed. Because of local landscape similarity in these properties, we show that choosing the incorrect watershed does not necessarily mean that the watershed characteristics will be misrepresented. We present a measure termed terrain complexity and examine its relationship to geolocation success rate and its influence on the similarity of nearby watersheds. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling Spatial Patterns of Traffic-Related Air Pollutants in Complex Urban Terrain

    PubMed Central

    Zwack, Leonard M.; Paciorek, Christopher J.; Spengler, John D.; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between traffic emissions and mobile-source air pollutant concentrations is highly variable over space and time and therefore difficult to model accurately, especially in urban settings with complex terrain. Regression-based approaches using continuous real-time mobile measurements may be able to characterize spatiotemporal variability in traffic-related pollutant concentrations but require methods to incorporate temporally varying meteorology and source strength in a physically interpretable fashion. Objective We developed a statistical model to assess the joint impact of both meteorology and traffic on measured concentrations of mobile-source air pollutants over space and time. Methods In this study, traffic-related air pollutants were continuously measured in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York (USA), which is affected by traffic on a large bridge and major highway. One-minute average concentrations of ultrafine particulate matter (UFP), fine particulate matter [≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5)], and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured using a mobile-monitoring protocol. Regression modeling approaches to quantify the influence of meteorology, traffic volume, and proximity to major roadways on pollutant concentrations were used. These models incorporated techniques to capture spatial variability, long- and short-term temporal trends, and multiple sources. Results We observed spatial heterogeneity of both UFP and PM2.5 concentrations. A variety of statistical methods consistently found a 15–20% decrease in UFP concentrations within the first 100 m from each of the two major roadways. For PM2.5, temporal variability dominated spatial variability, but we observed a consistent linear decrease in concentrations from the roadways. Conclusions The combination of mobile monitoring and regression analysis was able to quantify local source contributions relative to background while

  17. Scalar Transport and Dispersion in Complex Terrain within a High Resolution Mass-Consistent Wind Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenbrenner, N. S.; Edburg, S. L.; Lamb, B.; Forthofer, J.

    2012-12-01

    In areas of complex terrain, fine-scale changes in topography or vegetation substantially alter the flow field, and in turn, the transport and dispersion of air pollutants, pheromones, or other scalars. Thus, accurate modeling of scalar transport in complex topography requires accurate prediction of the flow field at a high spatial resolution. Mesoscale weather models typically operate on horizontal grids of 4 km or larger and are not capable of handling the effects of sub-grid complex terrain, such as wind speed-up over ridges, flow channeling in valleys, flow separation around terrain obstacles, and enhanced surface roughness from vegetation. In this paper we describe a scalar transport algorithm (advection and turbulent diffusion) used with WindNinja, a high-resolution mass-consistent wind model. WindNinja operates on a terrain-following coordinate system with a hexahedral cell mesh that grows in vertical size with height above the ground. A variational calculus approach is used in WindNinja that results in fast run times on the order of one minute for a 50 km x 50 km domain and 100 m horizontal resolution. The advection-diffusion algorithm uses a first order closure scheme for turbulent diffusion, where diffusivities are parameterized based on mixing length theory and modified as a function of atmospheric stability. We initialize WindNinja simulations with output from mesoscale weather forecasts using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to capture the large-scale atmospheric flows and stability conditions. Model performance is evaluated against field data collected under a range of conditions at different locations including a multi-day continuous tracer gas dispersion experiment in an orchard located on rolling terrain in eastern Washington and a post-wildfire PM10 monitoring campaign in SE Idaho. The combination of fast run times, low computational demands, and explicit treatment of terrain and vegetation at a high spatial resolution are expected

  18. Improving Radar QPE's in Complex Terrain for Improved Flash Flood Monitoring and Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifelli, R.; Streubel, D. P.; Reynolds, D.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative Precipitation Estimation (QPE) is extremely challenging in regions of complex terrain due to a combination of issues related to sampling. In particular, radar beams are often blocked or scan above the liquid precipitation zone while rain gauge density is often too low to properly characterize the spatial distribution of precipitation. Due to poor radar coverage, rain gauge networks are used by the National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Centers as the principal source for QPE across the western U.S. The California Nevada River Forecast Center (CNRFC) uses point rainfall measurements and historical rainfall runoff relationships to derive river stage forecasts. The point measurements are interpolated to a 4 km grid using Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) data to develop a gridded 6-hour QPE product (hereafter referred to as RFC QPE). Local forecast offices can utilize the Multi-sensor Precipitation Estimator (MPE) software to improve local QPE’s and thus local flash flood monitoring and prediction. MPE uses radar and rain gauge data to develop a combined QPE product at 1-hour intervals. The rain gauge information is used to bias correct the radar precipitation estimates so that, in situations where the rain gauge density and radar coverage are adequate, MPE can take advantage of the spatial coverage of the radar and the “ground truth” of the rain gauges to provide an accurate QPE. The MPE 1-hour QPE analysis should provide better spatial and temporal resolution for short duration hydrologic events as compared to 6-hour analyses. These hourly QPEs are then used to correct radar derived rain rates used by the Flash Flood Monitoring and Prediction (FFMP) software in forecast offices for issuance of flash flood warnings. Although widely used by forecasters across the eastern U.S., MPE is not used extensively by the NWS in the west. Part of the reason for the lack of use of MPE across the west is that there has

  19. A New Methodology For Estimating CO2 Advective Fluxes In Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnani, L.; Manca, G.; Canepa, E.; Georgieva, E.; Kerschbaumer, G.; Minerbi, S.; Seufert, G.

    2007-12-01

    A key problem in using the eddy correlation (EC) technique for estimating the carbon dioxide Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) of terrestrial ecosystems is the potential bias caused by advective fluxes of CO2. Advective fluxes are often not considered since they are difficult to identify and to quantify, especially in complex mountainous terrain with highly variable wind patterns and drainage flows. We propose a methodology to estimate these fluxes based on a full 3-Dimensional (3D) approach applied to the topographically complex alpine forest site of Renon (1736 m a.s.l.). This is an aerodynamic method based on the computation of advective fluxes across the aerial faces of a control volume including the plant ecosystem. Data used for the computation of CO2 advective fluxes were collected during an extensive field campaign performed in 2005 in the framework of CarboEurope-IP research project. Vertical profiles of wind, air temperature and CO2 concentration have been measured at five towers and a spatial interpolation was performed in order to get 3D fields of such variables. The frame of reference used was orthogonal and the vertical direction was parallel to the gravity. Each anemometer was aligned in this frame of reference and no rotations were applied to the wind velocity components. The analysis of the 3D fields of wind velocity, CO2 mixing ratio and air density highlighted the spatial heterogeneity of CO2 source/sink strength and the strong de-coupling between air flow below and above the canopy during stable nights. The total CO2 advection calculated using the proposed methodology exhibited prevailing positive values during the night-time period. Advective fluxes estimated during windy nights were of the same magnitude and sign of vertical turbulent flux measured above canopy by the EC technique. This observation suggests that the friction velocity correction routinely applied to night-time periods may not be efficient at the Renon site. During light windy nights

  20. Modeling wind speed and snow accumulation gradients across complex terrain from typically collected meteorological data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mountain winds exhibit strong gradients over short distances due to the influence of terrain. In winter, the acceleration of wind over wind-exposed slopes and its consequent deceleration over lee slopes strongly influences snow distribution. The heterogeneous snow distribution effects soil moistur...

  1. Section Height Determination Methods of the Isotopographic Surface in a Complex Terrain Relief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syzdykova, Guldana D.; Kurmankozhaev, Azimhan K.

    2016-01-01

    A new method for determining the vertical interval of isotopographic surfaces on rugged terrain was developed. The method is based on the concept of determining the differentiated size of the vertical interval using spatial-statistical properties inherent in the modal characteristic, the degree of variability of apical heights and the chosen map…

  2. Cold air drainage and modeled nocturnal leaf water potential in complex forested terrain.

    PubMed

    Hubbart, Jason A; Kavanagh, Kathleen L; Pangle, Robert; Link, Tim; Schotzko, Alisa

    2007-04-01

    Spatial variation in microclimate caused by air temperature inversions plays an important role in determining the timing and rate of many physical and biophysical processes. Such phenomena are of particular interest in mountainous regions where complex physiographic terrain can greatly complicate these processes. Recent work has demonstrated that, in some plants, stomata do not close completely at night, resulting in nocturnal transpiration. The following work was undertaken to develop a better understanding of nocturnal cold air drainage and its subsequent impact on the reliability of predawn leaf water potential (Psi(pd)) as a surrogate for soil water potential (Psi(s)). Eight temperature data loggers were installed on a transect spanning a vertical distance of 155 m along a north facing slope in the Mica Creek Experimental Watershed (MCEW) in northern Idaho during July and August 2004. Results indicated strong nocturnal temperature inversions occurring from the low- to upper-mid-slope, typically spanning the lower 88 m of the vertical distance. Based on mean temperatures for both months, inversions resulted in lapse rates of 29.0, 27.0 and 25.0 degrees C km(-1) at 0000, 0400 and 2000 h, respectively. At this scale (i.e., < 1 km), the observed lapse rates resulted in highly variable nighttime vapor pressure deficits (D) over the length of the slope, with variable impacts on modeled disequilibrium between soil and leaf water potential. As a result of cold air drainage, modeled Psi(pd) became consistently more negative (up to -0.3 MPa) at higher elevations during the night based on mean temperatures. Nocturnal inversions on the lower- and mid-slopes resulted in leaf water potentials that were at least 30 and 50% more negative over the lower 88 m of the inversion layer, based on mean and maximum temperatures, respectively. However, on a cloudy night, with low D, the maximum decrease in Psi(pd) was -0.04 MPa. Our results indicate that, given persistent cold air

  3. Implications of Small-Scale Flow Features to Modeling Dispersion over Complex Terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, R. M.; Olivier, L. D.; Gudiksen, P. H.; Lange, R.

    1996-03-01

    Small-scale, topographically forced wind systems often have a strong influence on flow over complex terrain. A problem is that these systems are very difficult to measure, because of their limited spatial and temporal extent. They can be important, however, in the atmospheric transport of hazardous materials. For example, a nocturnal exit jet-a narrow stream of cold air-which flowed from Eldorado Canyon at the interface between the Rocky Mountains and the Colorado plains near the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), swept over RFP for about 3 h in the middle of the night of 4 5 February 1991. It extended in depth from a few tens of meters to approximately 800 m above the ground. Because the jet was so narrow (2 km wide), it was poorly sampled by the meteorological surface mesonet, but it did prove to have an effect on the dispersion of tracer material released from RFP, producing a secondary peak in measured concentration to the southeast of RFP. The existence and behavior of the jet was documented by Environment Technology Laboratoy's Doppler lidar system, a scanning, active remote-sensing system that provides fine-resolution wind measurements. The lidar was deployed as a part of a wintertime study of flow and dispersion in the RFP vicinity during February 1993.The MATHEW-ADPIC atmospheric dispersion model was run using the case study data from this night. It consists of three major modules: an interpolation scheme; MATHEW, a diagnostic wind-flow algorithm that calculates a mass-consistent interpolated flow; and ADPIC, a diffusion algorithm. The model did an adequate job of representing the main lobe of the tracer transport, but the secondary lobe resulting from the Eldorado Canyon exit jet was absent from the model result. Because the jet was not adequately represented in the input data, it did not appear in the modeled wind field. Thus, the effects of the jet on the transport of tracer material were not properly simulated by the diagnostic model.

  4. Modeling of extreme dust pollution in the complex terrain of the Dead Sea Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishcha, Pavel; Rieger, Daniel; Metzger, Jutta; Starobinets, Boris; Bangert, Max; Vogel, Heike; Schaettler, Ulrich; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Alpert, Pinhas; Vogel, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    surface dust concentration was reached in the western part of the valley. Therefore, our study indicates the difficulties in using satellite-based AOD for initializing dust concentration within numerical forecast systems over a region with complex terrain. Numerical model experiments with different domains and dust sources (both local and remote ones) permitted us to quantify the contribution of various source regions to the pronounced maximum of dust AOD in the Dead Sea valley. Specifically, the model showed that 30% of the maximum dust AOD stems from local emissions and about 70% from more remote ones from the upwind side of the Judean Mountains.

  5. Structure, Agency, Complexity Theory and Interdisciplinary Research in Education Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, John A.

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that Education Studies needs to develop its existing interdisciplinarity understanding of structures and agencies by giving greater attention to the modern process theories of self-organisation in the physical, biological, psychological and social sciences, sometimes given the umbrella term "complexity theory". The…

  6. The Utility of Remotely-Sensed Land Surface Temperature from Multiple Platforms For Testing Distributed Hydrologic Models over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, T.; Vivoni, E. R.; Gochis, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    for testing distributed hydrologic models in regions of complex terrain with seasonal changes in land surface conditions.

  7. Modelling of a Zonda wind event in a complex terrain region using WRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, R. P.; Cremades, P. G.; Lakkis, G.; Allende, D. G.; Santos, R.; Puliafito, S. E.

    2012-04-01

    The air quality modeling in a regional scale requires the coupling to Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models, mainly when a high spatial and temporal resolution is required, such as in those cases related to large pollutants emissions episodes or extreme weather events. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) is a last generation NWP model which computes temperature, pressure, humidity and wind fields in high spatial and temporal resolution. In order to perform simulations in complex terrain regions, WRF must be locally configured to obtain a proper representation of the physical processes, and an independent validation must be performed, both under common and extreme conditions. Once the local configuration is obtained, a full atmospheric chemistry modeling can be performed by means of WRF-Chem. In this work a mesoescale event of Zonda wind (similar to Foehn and Chinook winds) affecting the topographically complex mountainous region of Mendoza (Argentina) on February 15th, 2007 is represented using WRF. The model results are compared to the Argentine National Weather Service (SMN) observations at "El Plumerillo" station (WMO #87418), showing a good performance. A description of the local model configuration and most important physical parameterizations selected for the simulations is given, including the improvement of the default resolution of land use and land cover (LULC) fields. The high resolution modeling domain considered is centered at the city of Mendoza (32° 53' South, 68° 50' West), it extends 200 km N/S × 160 km E/W and includes a 3-nested domain downscaling of 36, 12 and 4 km resolution, respectively. The results for the Zonda wind episode show a very good performance of the model both in spatial and temporal scales. The temporal dew point variation (the physical variable that best describes the Zonda wind) shows a good agreement with the measured values, with a sharp decrease of 20 °C (from 16 °C to -4 °C) in 3 hours. A full 3-D regional

  8. Development of an Immersed Boundary Method to Resolve Complex Terrain in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lunquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D

    2007-09-04

    simulations, on the other hand, are performed by numerical weather prediction (NWP) codes, which cannot handle the geometry of the urban landscape, but do provide a more complete representation of atmospheric physics. NWP codes typically use structured grids with terrain-following vertical coordinates, include a full suite of atmospheric physics parameterizations, and allow for dynamic synoptic scale lateral forcing through grid nesting. Terrain following grids are unsuitable for urban terrain, as steep terrain gradients cause extreme distortion of the computational cells. In this work, we introduce and develop an immersed boundary method (IBM) to allow the favorable properties of a numerical weather prediction code to be combined with the ability to handle complex terrain. IBM uses a non-conforming structured grid, and allows solid boundaries to pass through the computational cells. As the terrain passes through the mesh in an arbitrary manner, the main goal of the IBM is to apply the boundary condition on the interior of the domain as accurately as possible. With the implementation of the IBM, numerical weather prediction codes can be used to explicitly resolve urban terrain. Heterogeneous urban domains using the IBM can be nested into larger mesoscale domains using a terrain-following coordinate. The larger mesoscale domain provides lateral boundary conditions to the urban domain with the correct forcing, allowing seamless integration between mesoscale and urban scale models. Further discussion of the scope of this project is given by Lundquist et al. [2007]. The current paper describes the implementation of an IBM into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is an open source numerical weather prediction code. The WRF model solves the non-hydrostatic compressible Navier-Stokes equations, and employs an isobaric terrain-following vertical coordinate. Many types of IB methods have been developed by researchers; a comprehensive review can be found in Mittal

  9. Development of the DUSTRAN GIS-Based Complex Terrain Model for Atmospheric Dust Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-10

    scenario and run the underlying models. Through the process of data layering, the model domain, sources, and results—including the calculated wind-vector...advection, diffusion, and deposition calculations . Figure 4.2 shows the linkages of these dust-dispersion models within DUSTRAN. CALMET...interface CALMET, CALPUFF, and CALGRID to routinely available terrain elevation and land-use datasets for use in model calculations . A post-processing

  10. Analysis of the inversion monitoring capabilities of a monostatic acoustic radar in complex terrain. [Tennessee River Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, D.; Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    A qualitative interpretation of the records from a monostatic acoustic radar is presented. This is achieved with the aid of airplane, helicopter, and rawinsonde temperature soundings. The diurnal structure of a mountain valley circulation pattern is studied with the use of two acoustic radars, one located in the valley and one on the downwind ridge. The monostatic acoustic radar was found to be sufficiently accurate in locating the heights of the inversions and the mixed layer depth to warrant use by industry even in complex terrain.

  11. N cycle and retention of croplands in complex terrain, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettering, J.; Arnhold, S.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Lee, B.; Lindner, S.; Ok, Y.; Ruidisch, M.; Tenhunen, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    The aims of our research are to gain a deeper understanding of processes and interactions in agricultural ecosystems as well as to make a contribution to sustainable agricultural production in changing environments. While crop production is highly desirable, negative effects include high input of nutrients, greater erosion rates, removal of nutrients and carbon in harvests, and decreases in the quality of soil organic matter. The field sites of this project are located in Haean basin in the central part of Korea, just south of the demilitarized zone. Intensive land use with high levels of fertilization together with distinctive erosion during the summer monsoon can be found on site. One part of this study focuses on general fertilizer budgets at catchment scale as well as on detailed information about the dynamics and pathways of nitrogen in soil-plant systems on upland slopes. These balances of elements and their fluxes are the main background information in soil-plant studies. The integrative approach of a general budget is based on a large spatial allocation of the field sites, different management types (conventional, organic), and on several typical crops of the Haean basin. In this project, various perspectives are combined (i.e. insects, weed, crops, nutrients). This allows representative conclusions for the entire catchment as well as for the modeling. The approach of a detailed N cycle uses an integrated experimental strategy within run-off plots. Charred biomass and synthetic polymers were additionally applied in these run-off plots to determine whether these additives can contribute significantly to sustainable farming methods in such complex terrain. Within this integrative approach, each treatment was tested for erosion prevention, soil hydrological parameters and flow systems, nutrient balances, as well as plant growth and yields. Finally, best agricultural management practices for sustainable land use of sloping uplands will be suggested. The methods

  12. Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the OpenFOAM-based Flow Solver of the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA): Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Churchfield, M. J.; Sang, L.; Moriarty, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver such that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with somepreliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simply set of hills.

  13. Estimation of spatially distributed latent energy flux over complex terrain using a scanning water-vapor Raman lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, D.I.; Eichinger, W.; Archuleta, J.; Cottingame, W.; Osborne, M.; Tellier, L.

    1995-09-01

    Evapotranspiration is one of the critical variables in both water and energy balance models of the hydrological system. The hydrologic system is driven by the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum, and as such is a spatially distributed process. Traditional techniques rely on point sensors to collect information that is then averaged over a region. The assumptions involved in spatially average point data is of limited value (1) because of limited sensors in the arrays, (2) the inability to extend and interpret the Measured scalars and estimated fluxes at a point over large areas in complex terrain, and (3) the limited understanding of the relationship between point measurements of spatial processes. Remote sensing technology offers the ability to collect detailed spatially distributed data. However, the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s volume-imaging, scanning water-vapor Raman lidar has been shown to be able to estimate the latent energy flux at a point. The extension of this capability to larger scales over complex terrain represents a step forward. This abstract Outlines the techniques used to estimate the spatially resolved latent energy flux. The following sections describe the site, model, data acquired, and lidar estimated latent energy ``map``.

  14. Complex terrain alters temperature and moisture limitations of forest soil respiration across a semiarid to subalpine gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berryman, Erin Michele; Barnard, H.R.; Adams, H.R.; Burns, M.A.; Gallo, E.; Brooks, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Forest soil respiration is a major carbon (C) flux that is characterized by significant variability in space and time. We quantified growing season soil respiration during both a drought year and a nondrought year across a complex landscape to identify how landscape and climate interact to control soil respiration. We asked the following questions: (1) How does soil respiration vary across the catchments due to terrain-induced variability in moisture availability and temperature? (2) Does the relative importance of moisture versus temperature limitation of respiration vary across space and time? And (3) what terrain elements are important for dictating the pattern of soil respiration and its controls? Moisture superseded temperature in explaining watershed respiration patterns, with wetter yet cooler areas higher up and on north facing slopes yielding greater soil respiration than lower and south facing areas. Wetter subalpine forests had reduced moisture limitation in favor of greater seasonal temperature limitation, and the reverse was true for low-elevation semiarid forests. Coincident climate poorly predicted soil respiration in the montane transition zone; however, antecedent precipitation from the prior 10 days provided additional explanatory power. A seasonal trend in respiration remained after accounting for microclimate effects, suggesting that local climate alone may not adequately predict seasonal variability in soil respiration in montane forests. Soil respiration climate controls were more strongly related to topography during the drought year highlighting the importance of landscape complexity in ecosystem response to drought.

  15. Enhanced method for multiscale wind simulations over complex terrain for wind resource assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Maradiaga, A.; Benoit, R.; Masson, C.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the natural variability of the wind, it is necessary to conduct thorough wind resource assessments to determine how much energy can be extracted at a given site. Lately, important advancements have been achieved in numerical methods of multiscale models used for high resolution wind simulations over steep topography. As a contribution to this effort, an enhanced numerical method was devised in the mesoscale compressible community (MC2) model of the Meteorological Service of Canada, adapting a new semi-implicit scheme with its imbedded large-eddy simulation (LES) capability for mountainous terrain. This implementation has been verified by simulating the neutrally stratified atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over flat terrain and a Gaussian ridge. These preliminary results indicate that the enhanced MC2-LES model reproduces efficiently the results reported by other researchers who use similar models with more sophisticated sub-grid scale turbulence schemes. The proposed multiscale method also provides a new wind initialization scheme and additional utilities to improve numerical accuracy and stability. The resulting model can be used to assess the wind resource at meso- and micro-scales, reducing significantly the wind speed overestimation in mountainous areas.

  16. Airborne Lidar-Based Estimates of Tropical Forest Structure in Complex Terrain: Opportunities and Trade-Offs for REDD+

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitold, Veronika; Keller, Michael; Morton, Douglas C.; Cook, Bruce D.; Shimabukuro, Yosio E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Carbon stocks and fluxes in tropical forests remain large sources of uncertainty in the global carbon budget. Airborne lidar remote sensing is a powerful tool for estimating aboveground biomass, provided that lidar measurements penetrate dense forest vegetation to generate accurate estimates of surface topography and canopy heights. Tropical forest areas with complex topography present a challenge for lidar remote sensing. Results: We compared digital terrain models (DTM) derived from airborne lidar data from a mountainous region of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil to 35 ground control points measured with survey grade GNSS receivers. The terrain model generated from full-density (approx. 20 returns/sq m) data was highly accurate (mean signed error of 0.19 +/-0.97 m), while those derived from reduced-density datasets (8/sq m, 4/sq m, 2/sq m and 1/sq m) were increasingly less accurate. Canopy heights calculated from reduced-density lidar data declined as data density decreased due to the inability to accurately model the terrain surface. For lidar return densities below 4/sq m, the bias in height estimates translated into errors of 80-125 Mg/ha in predicted aboveground biomass. Conclusions: Given the growing emphasis on the use of airborne lidar for forest management, carbon monitoring, and conservation efforts, the results of this study highlight the importance of careful survey planning and consistent sampling for accurate quantification of aboveground biomass stocks and dynamics. Approaches that rely primarily on canopy height to estimate aboveground biomass are sensitive to DTM errors from variability in lidar sampling density.

  17. The biomechanics of walking shape the use of visual information during locomotion over complex terrain

    PubMed Central

    Matthis, Jonathan Samir; Barton, Sean L.; Fajen, Brett R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how visual information is used to control stepping during locomotion over terrain that demands precision in the placement of the feet. More specifically, we sought to determine the point in the gait cycle at which visual information about a target is no longer needed to guide accurate foot placement. Subjects walked along a path while stepping as accurately as possible on a series of small, irregularly spaced target footholds. In various conditions, each of the targets became invisible either during the step to the target or during the step to the previous target. We found that making targets invisible after toe off of the step to the target had little to no effect on stepping accuracy. However, when targets disappeared during the step to the previous target, foot placement became less accurate and more variable. The findings suggest that visual information about a target is used prior to initiation of the step to that target but is not needed to continuously guide the foot throughout the swing phase. We propose that this style of control is rooted in the biomechanics of walking, which facilitates an energetically efficient strategy in which visual information is primarily used to initialize the mechanical state of the body leading into a ballistic movement toward the target foothold. Taken together with previous studies, the findings suggest the availability of visual information about the terrain near a particular step is most essential during the latter half of the preceding step, which constitutes a critical control phase in the bipedal gait cycle. PMID:25788704

  18. On the vertical exchange of heat, mass and momentum over complex, mountainous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotach, Mathias; Gohm, Alexander; Lang, Moritz; Leukauf, Daniel; Stiperski, Ivana; Wagner, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    The role of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the atmosphere-climate system is the exchange of heat, mass and momentum between 'the earth's surface' and the atmosphere. Traditionally, it is understood that turbulent transport is responsible for this exchange and hence the understanding and physical description of the turbulence structure of the boundary layer is key to assess the effectiveness of earth-atmosphere exchange. This understanding is rooted in the (implicit) assumption of a scale separation or spectral gap between turbulence and mean atmospheric motions, which in turn leads to the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous and flat (HHF) surface as a reference, for which both physical understanding and model parameterizations have successfully been developed over the years. Over mountainous terrain, however, the ABL is generically inhomogeneous due to both thermal (radiative) and dynamic forcing. This inhomogeneity leads to meso-scale and even sub-meso-scale flows such as slope and valley winds or wake effects. It is argued here that these (sub)meso-scale motions can significantly contribute to the vertical structure of the boundary layer and hence vertical exchange of heat and mass between the surface and the atmosphere. If model grid resolution is not high enough the latter will have to be parameterized (in a similar fashion as gravity wave drag parameterizations take into account the momentum transport due to gravity waves in large-scale models). In this contribution we summarize the available evidence of the contribution of (sub)meso-scale motions to vertical exchange in mountainous terrain from observational and numerical modeling studies. In particular, a number of recent simulation studies using idealized topography will be summarized and put into perspective - so as to identify possible limitations and areas of necessary future research.

  19. A method for obtaining distributed surface flux measurements in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. H.; Pardyjak, E.; Nadeau, D. F.; Barrenetxea, G.; Brutsaert, W. H.; Parlange, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Sonic anemometers and gas analyzers can be used to measure fluxes of momentum, heat, and moisture over flat terrain, and with the proper corrections, over sloping terrain as well. While this method of obtaining fluxes is currently the most accurate available, the instruments themselves are costly, making installation of many stations impossible for most campaign budgets. Small, commercial automatic weather stations (Sensorscope) are available at a fraction of the cost of sonic anemometers or gas analyzers. Sensorscope stations use slow-response instruments to measure standard meteorological variables, including wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity, surface skin temperature, and incoming solar radiation. The method presented here makes use of one sonic anemometer and one gas analyzer along with a dozen Sensorscope stations installed throughout the Val Ferret catchment in southern Switzerland in the summers of 2009, 2010 and 2011. Daytime fluxes are calculated using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory in conjunction with the surface energy balance at each Sensorscope station as well as at the location of the sonic anemometer and gas analyzer, where a suite of additional slow-response instruments were co-located. Corrections related to slope angle were made for wind speeds and incoming shortwave radiation measured by the horizontally-mounted cup anemometers and incoming solar radiation sensors respectively. A temperature correction was also applied to account for daytime heating inside the radiation shield on the slow-response temperature/humidity sensors. With these corrections, we find a correlation coefficient of 0.77 between u* derived using Monin-Obukhov similarity theory and that of the sonic anemometer. Calculated versus measured heat fluxes also compare well and local patterns of latent heat flux and measured surface soil moisture are correlated.

  20. Using High Resolution Regional Climate Models to Quantify the Snow Albedo Feedback in a Region of Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Letcher, T.; Minder, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution regional climate models are used to characterize and quantify the snow albedo feedback (SAF) over the complex terrain of the Colorado Headwaters region. Three pairs of 7-year control and pseudo global warming simulations (with horizontal grid spacings of 4, 12, and 36 km) are used to study how the SAF modifies the regional climate response to a large-scale thermodynamic perturbation. The SAF substantially enhances warming within the Headwaters domain, locally as much as 5 °C in regions of snow loss. The SAF also increases the inter-annual variability of the springtime warming within Headwaters domain under the perturbed climate. Linear feedback analysis is used quantify the strength of the SAF. The SAF attains a maximum value of 4 W m-2 K-1 during April when snow loss coincides with strong incoming solar radiation. On sub-seasonal timescales, simulations at 4 km and 12 km horizontal grid-spacing show good agreement in the strength and timing of the SAF, whereas a 36km simulation shows greater discrepancies that are tired to differences in snow accumulation and ablation caused by smoother terrain. An analysis of the regional energy budget shows that transport by atmospheric motion acts as a negative feedback to regional warming, damping the effects of the SAF. On the mesoscale, this transport causes non-local warming in locations with no snow. The methods presented here can be used generally to quantify the role of the SAF in other regional climate modeling experiments.

  1. Using the δ13C of ecosystem respiration to monitor ecosystem metabolism of entire watersheds in complex terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pypker, T. G.; Hauck, M.; Sulzman, E. W.; Unsworth, M. H.; Mix, A. C.; Kayler, Z.; Conklin, D.; Kennedy, A.; Barnard, H.; Phillips, C.; Bond, B. J.

    2007-12-01

    Complex terrain presents formidable challenges to ecosystem studies. Valleys, steep slopes, and windswept ridges impose wide variations in microclimate, soil properties, and plant communities; this variability greatly hinders strategies for systematic sampling and up-scaling. Our recent work in a deeply incised watershed (20 to 33° slopes) in Oregon's Cascade Mountains suggested the possibility of using the δ13CO2 of ecosystem respiration (δ13CER) in mountainous ecosystems as a tool to monitor seasonal and interannual variations in physiological processes in vegetation of entire watersheds. We demonstrated that nocturnal cold air drainage is persistent, occurs on greater than 80% of summer nights and is well mixed. Furthermore, nighttime air samples collected from the base of the watershed contain a representative sample of respired CO2 from most of the watershed. We also found that on most clear nights the range of CO2 concentrations over a single night is sufficient for using the Keeling Plot approach to determine the carbon isotopic composition of δ13CER. The goals of the current study were to determine if variations in δ13CER were correlated to environmental variables and could be used to predict expected variations in canopy-average stomatal conductance ( gs). As reported by other researchers, changes in δ13CER were significantly correlated to measured soil matric potential (ψm) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD) measured on the same day and six days earlier, respectively. Midday gs was estimated using a simple hydraulic model with only ψm and VPD as predictive variables. Midday gs from zero and five days earlier were correlated to δ13CER. To examine direct relationships between δ13CER and recent gs, we used models relating isotope discrimination to stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity at the leaf level to estimate values of stomatal conductance ("gs-I") that would be expected if respired CO2 were derived entirely from recent photosynthate

  2. Coupled snow dynamics, soil moisture, and soil temperatures in complex terrain of a semi-arid mountainous watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryden, S.; Link, T. E.; Seyfried, M. S.; McNamara, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Mid-elevation regions characterized by transient or relatively brief seasonal snow covers are likely to experience large hydrologic impacts from warming trends as these regions transition from snow to rain-dominated precipitation in winter. These regions in the western United States are often comprised of complex terrain, including a range of slopes, aspects, elevation, vegetation, geology, and soils over multiple scales. How snow dynamics (e.g. distribution and timing) are coupled with soil moisture and soil temperature in complex terrain is a topic that needs to be explored in order to better understand how climate variations and trends will alter the hydrologic states and fluxes in these mid-elevation transition zones. To address this question, automated hydrometeorological stations were installed in Johnston Draw, a subbasin of the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in southwestern Idaho. In addition to long-term precipitation records for the area, individual meteorological stations were installed on opposing north and south-facing slopes in the drainage at 50 meter elevation intervals, from 1550 to 1750 m amsl. Each station provides air temperature and vapor pressure, wind speed and direction, snow depth, and a profile of soil moisture and temperature at 5cm, 20cm, 35cm, and 50 cm depths, with some profiles extending to approximately 2 m where soils are deepest. Prior to a major mid-winter melt event in January 2011 snow depths averaged 45 cm on north-facing slopes and only 3 cm on south-facing slopes. Soil moisture was depleted near the surface and soil temperatures were just above freezing at all elevations and aspects. In mid-January, air temperatures rapidly increased from below freezing to daily averages from 3-6 °C for six consecutive days, coupled with very high wind speeds, and followed by a pulse of increased streamflow. This event completely ablated the snowpack on south-facing slopes and reduced the snowpack depth on north-facing slopes by 24 cm

  3. Spatial distribution of hydrogen sulfide from two geothermal power plants in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olafsdottir, S.; Gardarsson, S. M.; Andradottir, H. O.

    2014-01-01

    Concerns have arisen about the health impact and odor annoyance of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions associated with geothermal power production. Measurements have been made at stationary measuring stations in inhabited areas but little is known about the spatial behavior of the H2S plumes. This study presents field measurements of the spatial distribution of the ground concentration of H2S within a 30 km radius of two geothermal power plants during 20 distinct events spanning one year. The results showed that high H2S concentration was correlated with high air stability, low wind speed and absence of precipitation. The odor threshold (11 μg m-3) was exceeded in all events. The instantaneous measurements exceeded the 24-h average national health limit (50 μg m-3) up to 26 km from the power plants. The shape of the measured plumes at the same location was similar between events, indicating repeated patterns in plume distribution. Convergence of plumes was observed due to spatial variability in wind direction. Plumes were found to follow mountain passes and accumulate alongside a mountain range. AERMOD modeling demonstrated that narrower plumes with higher concentration can be expected for smoother terrain, such as lakes, consistent with measurements.

  4. Mixing Induced By Slope and Valley Flow Collisions in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, H. J.; Hocut, C. M.; Zhong, Q.; Hoch, S.; Leo, L.; Di Sabatino, S.; Pardyjak, E.; Whiteman, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    A fascinating observation made during the fall 2012 field campaign of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations Program (MATERHORN) was the collision of slope and valley flows that led to powerful but spasmodic turbulence generating events. The contributions of these collisions to overall basin (meso) scale mixing were studied using the MATERHORN field data as well as laboratory measurements conducted under controlled conditions using counter flowing gravity currents. The collisions cause localized shear layers and Kelvin Helmholtz billowing, which, together with turbulence generated by impingement of fronts on one another, generate a turbulence field that decays rapidly under local stable stratification. Buoyancy fluxes measured using these events are parameterized in terms of a suitably defined Richardson number and dimensionless geometric parameters. The time and lengthscales of initial turbulence as well as its decay time scale are measured and quantified using governing parameters. Mechanisms responsible for the recurrence of collision events are elicited based on data from a large number of flux towers, remote sensors and infrared cameras located in the domain of observations.

  5. Improved mapping of National Atmospheric Deposition Program wet-deposition in complex terrain using PRISM-gridded data sets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latysh, Natalie E.; Wetherbee, Gregory Alan

    2012-01-01

    High-elevation regions in the United States lack detailed atmospheric wet-deposition data. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) measures and reports precipitation amounts and chemical constituent concentration and deposition data for the United States on annual isopleth maps using inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation methods. This interpolation for unsampled areas does not account for topographic influences. Therefore, NADP/NTN isopleth maps lack detail and potentially underestimate wet deposition in high-elevation regions. The NADP/NTN wet-deposition maps may be improved using precipitation grids generated by other networks. The Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) produces digital grids of precipitation estimates from many precipitation-monitoring networks and incorporates influences of topographical and geographical features. Because NADP/NTN ion concentrations do not vary with elevation as much as precipitation depths, PRISM is used with unadjusted NADP/NTN data in this paper to calculate ion wet deposition in complex terrain to yield more accurate and detailed isopleth deposition maps in complex terrain. PRISM precipitation estimates generally exceed NADP/NTN precipitation estimates for coastal and mountainous regions in the western United States. NADP/NTN precipitation estimates generally exceed PRISM precipitation estimates for leeward mountainous regions in Washington, Oregon, and Nevada, where abrupt changes in precipitation depths induced by topography are not depicted by IDW interpolation. PRISM-based deposition estimates for nitrate can exceed NADP/NTN estimates by more than 100% for mountainous regions in the western United States.

  6. Spatial and seasonal variabilities of the stable carbon isotope composition of soil CO2 concentration and flux in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liyin L.; Riveros-Iregui, Diego A.; Risk, David A.

    2016-09-01

    Biogeochemical processes driving the spatial variability of soil CO2 production and flux are well studied, but little is known about the variability in the spatial distribution of the stable carbon isotopes that make up soil CO2, particularly in complex terrain. Spatial differences in stable isotopes of soil CO2 could indicate fundamental differences in isotopic fractionation at the landscape level and may be useful to inform modeling of carbon cycling over large areas. We measured the spatial and seasonal variabilities of the δ13C of soil CO2 (δS) and the δ13C of soil CO2 flux (δP) in a subalpine forest ecosystem located in the Rocky Mountains of Montana. We found consistently more isotopically depleted values of δS and δP in low and wet areas of the landscape relative to steep and dry areas. Our results suggest that the spatial patterns of δS and δP are strongly mediated by soil water and soil respiration rate. More interestingly, our analysis revealed different temporal trends in δP across the landscape; in high landscape positions δP became more positive, whereas in low landscape positions δP became more negative with time. These trends might be the result of differential dynamics in the seasonality of soil moisture and its effects on soil CO2 production and flux. Our results suggest concomitant yet independent effects of water on physical (soil gas diffusivity) and biological (photosynthetic discrimination) processes that mediate δS and δP and are important when evaluating the δ13C of CO2 exchanged between soils and the atmosphere in complex terrain.

  7. Improved mapping of National Atmospheric Deposition Program wet-deposition in complex terrain using PRISM-gridded data sets.

    PubMed

    Latysh, Natalie E; Wetherbee, Gregory Alan

    2012-01-01

    High-elevation regions in the United States lack detailed atmospheric wet-deposition data. The National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) measures and reports precipitation amounts and chemical constituent concentration and deposition data for the United States on annual isopleth maps using inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation methods. This interpolation for unsampled areas does not account for topographic influences. Therefore, NADP/NTN isopleth maps lack detail and potentially underestimate wet deposition in high-elevation regions. The NADP/NTN wet-deposition maps may be improved using precipitation grids generated by other networks. The Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) produces digital grids of precipitation estimates from many precipitation-monitoring networks and incorporates influences of topographical and geographical features. Because NADP/NTN ion concentrations do not vary with elevation as much as precipitation depths, PRISM is used with unadjusted NADP/NTN data in this paper to calculate ion wet deposition in complex terrain to yield more accurate and detailed isopleth deposition maps in complex terrain. PRISM precipitation estimates generally exceed NADP/NTN precipitation estimates for coastal and mountainous regions in the western United States. NADP/NTN precipitation estimates generally exceed PRISM precipitation estimates for leeward mountainous regions in Washington, Oregon, and Nevada, where abrupt changes in precipitation depths induced by topography are not depicted by IDW interpolation. PRISM-based deposition estimates for nitrate can exceed NADP/NTN estimates by more than 100% for mountainous regions in the western United States.

  8. Variability of precipitation in complex terrain and the investigation of representativeness of measurements for the Matre catchment area, Western Norway.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skjerdal, M.; Reuder, J.; Villanger, F.

    2009-04-01

    Orography is strongly affecting precipitation. Especially over complex terrain, the precipitation fields can show high spatial variability even over very small scales. Along the Western coast of Norway with its large precipitation amounts of up to above 3000 mm per year, an improved understanding of the spatial precipitation patterns is of large socio-economic impact, as it can improve both the prediction of floods and landslides and the water management for hydro power plants. The producers of hydroelectric power continuously want the water resources to be utilized in the best suited way. Control and supervision of the water resources are therefore of the utmost economic importance. To get an overview over the water resource situation, it is essential to know about the spatial and temporal distribution of precipitation. In cooperation with the Norwegian power company BKK, 20 HOBO rain gauges and two Aanderaa weather stations have been deployed between 22 and 898 meters above sea level in the catchment area for the Matre water system in Western Norway in the period May - October 2009. The main purpose of the project is to investigate the horizontal variability and the altitude dependence of precipitation in complex terrain under different synoptic conditions in this catchment area. Moreover, the representativeness of a few single point measurements on the total precipitation amount of the whole catchment area has been addressed. The total amount of precipitation recorded by the 20 rain gauges during the deployment period ranges between 535 mm and 1190 mm, which indicate the large variability within the catchment area. Analysis of the data with respect to wind direction shows that 75 % of the total precipitation amount during the measurement period arrives when the wind direction is S - SW. During a high precipitation event, which will be investigated in more detail, amounts of precipitation between 58 mm - 121 mm within a 24-hour period have been observed during a

  9. In situ monitoring and machine modeling of snowpack evolution in complex terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolik, J.; Skalka, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that snowpack evolution depends on variety of landscape conditions including tree cover, slope, wind exposure, etc. In this presentation we report on methods that combine modern in-situ sensor technologies with machine learning-based algorithms to obtain improved models of snowpack evolution. Snowcloud is an embedded data collection system for snow hydrology field research campaigns that leverages distributed wireless sensor network technology to provide data at low cost and high spatial-temporal resolution. The system is compact thus allowing it to be deployed readily within dense canopies and/or steep slopes. The system has demonstrated robustness for multiple-seasons of operation thus showing it is applicable to not only short-term strategic monitoring but extended studies as well. We have used data collected by Snowcloud deployments to develop improved models of snowpack evolution using genetic programming (GP). Such models can be used to augment existing sensor infrastructure to obtain better areal snow depth and snow-water equivalence estimations. The presented work will discuss three multi-season deployments and present data (collected at 1-3 hour intervals and a multiple locations) on snowdepth variation throughout the season. The three deployment sites (Eastern Sierra Mountains, CA; Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH; and Sulitjelma, Norway) are varied not only geographically but also terrain-wise within each small study area (~2.5 hectacre). We will also discuss models generated by inductive (GP) learning, including non-linear regression techniques and evaluation, and how short-term Snowcloud field campaigns can augment existing infrastructure.

  10. Cause Resolving of Typhoon Precipitation Using Principle Component Analysis under Complex Interactive Effect of Terrain, Monsoon and Typhoon Vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. L.; Hsu, N. S.

    2015-12-01

    This study develops a novel methodology to resolve the cause of typhoon-induced precipitation using principle component analysis (PCA) and to develop a long lead-time precipitation prediction model. The discovered spatial and temporal features of rainfall are utilized to develop a state-of-the-art descriptive statistical model which can be used to predict long lead-time precipitation during typhoons. The time series of 12-hour precipitation from different types of invasive moving track of typhoons are respectively precede the signal analytical process to qualify the causes of rainfall and to quantify affected degree of each induced cause. The causes include: (1) interaction between typhoon rain band and terrain; (2) co-movement effect induced by typhoon wind field with monsoon; (3) pressure gradient; (4) wind velocity; (5) temperature environment; (6) characteristic distance between typhoon center and surface target station; (7) distance between grade 7 storm radius and surface target station; and (8) relative humidity. The results obtained from PCA can detect the hidden pattern of the eight causes in space and time and can understand the future trends and changes of precipitation. This study applies the developed methodology in Taiwan Island which is constituted by complex diverse terrain formation and height. Results show that: (1) for the typhoon moving toward the direction of 245° to 330°, Causes (1), (2) and (6) are the primary ones to generate rainfall; and (2) for the direction of 330° to 380°, Causes (1), (4) and (6) are the primary ones. Besides, the developed precipitation prediction model by using PCA with the distributed moving track approach (PCA-DMT) is 32% more accurate by that of PCA without distributed moving track approach, and the former model can effectively achieve long lead-time precipitation prediction with an average predicted error of 13% within average 48 hours of forecasted lead-time.

  11. Vertical distribution of atmospheric constituents above complex terrain - Influence of a mesoscale system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkes, Florian; Hoor, Peter; Bozem, Heiko; Meixner, Franz; Weigel, Ralf; Sprenger, Michael; Lelieveld, Jos

    2014-05-01

    Measurements in and above the planetary boundary layer (PBL) are essential to fully understand the exchange and transport processes between the PBL and the free troposphere (FT). Here we discuss the impact of a mesoscale system on the local trace gas and particle distribution above the PBL over hilly terrain. During the field campaign PARADE (PArticles and RAdicals: Diel observations of the impact of urban and biogenic Emissions) in August and September 2011 measurements were conducted at the Taunus Observatory on Mount "Kleiner Feldberg (KF)" (825 m asl.), about 20 km northwest of Frankfurt am Main in Germany. For the vertical composition of the lowest 3000 m, high-resolution measurements were performed using 174 radio soundings. The measurements are complemented by continuous boundary layer observations of a ceilometer and a variety of reactive tracers (CO, NOx, O3, VOCs) on the mountain top. In addition, aircraft measurements of CO2, CO, O3, temperature, humidity and aerosol number concentration and size distribution were performed during the first week of September. The PBL height varied during the measurement campaign between 1 and 2.5 km. The variations are due to very changeable weather, synoptic fronts as well as local phenomena such as low clouds and fog. The analysis of the data from different instruments shows good agreement in determining the boundary layer height under windless high pressure conditions, as well as with certain restrictions on cloudy and windy days. Based on the PBL investigation, the aircraft-based trace gas measurements were used to identify transport and exchange processes between the free atmosphere and the boundary layer, additionally supported with high-resolution backward-trajectories initialized every 10 seconds along the flight track, based on the wind fields from the COSMO-EU model. On 2 September 2011 we observed an enhanced particle number concentration and low ozone in the free troposphere at two flights around KF. Local

  12. Does complex terrain matter for global terrestrial ecosystem models? Forest ecosystem dynamics in the White Mountains, NH. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietze, M. C.; Richardson, A. D.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    in valley-bottoms. A failure to include the effects of complex terrain is shown to result in a non-trivial overestimation of the net carbon sink. The model is then applied at a regional scale to forecast forest change under climate change scenarios. The addition of complex terrain is shown to buffer the effects of climate change on regional carbon fluxes. This effect occurs because climate change effects differ not only in magnitude but also in direction at a landscape-scale.

  13. A Non-Linear Mixed Spectral Finite-Difference 3-D Model of Planetary Boundary-Layer Flow over Complex Terrain and Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, W.; Taylor, P. A.

    2010-09-01

    Based on the early linear and Non-Linear Mixed Spectral Finite-Difference (MSFD and NLMSFD) models, a 3-D non-linear model of planetary boundary-layer flow (NLMSFD-PBL) was developed to study neutral PBL flow over complex terrain. The model assumes upwind or zero-order profiles of mean and turbulence variables about which perturbation quantities are calculated due to the effects of the terrain. In early models, the mean zero-order wind profile was assumed to be a simple logarithmic surface-layer profile and Reynolds stresses were constant throughout the depth of the model domain. This formally limits the applications of model to the surface-layer flow. The new model utilizes the results of early 1-D planetary boundary layer model of Weng and Taylor as the zero-order or upstream profiles of mean and turbulent quantities. The limitations associated with the original MSFD/NLMSFD model (e.g. logarithmic wind profile and constant shear stress layer) are relaxed. The effect of earth's rotation is also included in the model. Model results for planetary boundary-layer flow over complex terrain are discussed, particularly, the flow over Askervein hill - the site of a detailed and much referenced field study of flow over hills in the 1980s. This type of modelling of flow over complex terrain has important applications for wind energy resource assessment and wind farm design.

  14. Modeling and measuring the nocturnal drainage flow in a high-elevation, subalpine forest with complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yi, C.; Monson, Russell K.; Zhai, Z.; Anderson, D.E.; Lamb, B.; Allwine, G.; Turnipseed, A.A.; Burns, Sean P.

    2005-01-01

    The nocturnal drainage flow of air causes significant uncertainty in ecosystem CO2, H2O, and energy budgets determined with the eddy covariance measurement approach. In this study, we examined the magnitude, nature, and dynamics of the nocturnal drainage flow in a subalpine forest ecosystem with complex terrain. We used an experimental approach involving four towers, each with vertical profiling of wind speed to measure the magnitude of drainage flows and dynamics in their occurrence. We developed an analytical drainage flow model, constrained with measurements of canopy structure and SF6 diffusion, to help us interpret the tower profile results. Model predictions were in good agreement with observed profiles of wind speed, leaf area density, and wind drag coefficient. Using theory, we showed that this one-dimensional model is reduced to the widely used exponential wind profile model under conditions where vertical leaf area density and drag coefficient are uniformly distributed. We used the model for stability analysis, which predicted the presence of a very stable layer near the height of maximum leaf area density. This stable layer acts as a flow impediment, minimizing vertical dispersion between the subcanopy air space and the atmosphere above the canopy. The prediction is consistent with the results of SF6 diffusion observations that showed minimal vertical dispersion of nighttime, subcanopy drainage flows. The stable within-canopy air layer coincided with the height of maximum wake-to-shear production ratio. We concluded that nighttime drainage flows are restricted to a relatively shallow layer of air beneath the canopy, with little vertical mixing across a relatively long horizontal fetch. Insight into the horizontal and vertical structure of the drainage flow is crucial for understanding the magnitude and dynamics of the mean advective CO2 flux that becomes significant during stable nighttime conditions and are typically missed during measurement of the

  15. Landscape variability of the stable carbon isotope composition of soil CO2 concentrations and flux in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveros-Iregui, Diego; Liang, Liyin; Risk, David

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotopes are commonly used to understand how physical and biological processes mediate the exchange of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Numerous studies have described fundamental relationships between environmental variables, the carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of recently assimilated sugars in plants, litter, soil carbon, or recently respired CO2. However, studies that examine the landscape scale variability of the 13C content of forest soils are lacking. We report on measurements of the carbon isotopic composition of soil CO2 concentrations (δ13CC) and flux (δ13CJ) across a subalpine forest of the northern Rocky Mountains of Montana, United States. Our analysis demonstrates that soil moisture and the lateral redistribution of soil water are strong predictors of the spatial variability of both δ13CC and δ13CJ at the watershed scale. Our analysis suggests that there are concomitant yet independent effects of soil water on physical (i.e., soil gas diffusivity) and biological (i.e., photosynthetic activity) processes that mediate the 13C composition of forest soils. We show systematic spatial variability in the δ13C of forest soils at the landscape scale that can be useful to accurately predict and model land-atmosphere CO2 exchange over complex terrain.

  16. Evaluation of the diurnal variation of near-surface temperature and winds from WRF numerical simulations over complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Pace, C.; Pu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Near-surface atmospheric conditions, especially the temperature and winds, are characterized by their diurnal variations. Accurate representation and forecast of the diurnal variations are the essential components of numerical modeling and weather prediction. However, it is commonly challenging to accurately simulate and predict diurnal variations of near-surface atmospheric conditions over complex terrain, especially over the mountainous areas. In this study we evaluate the diurnal variation of near-surface temperature and winds from the numerical simulations generated by mesoscale community Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The model simulated surface temperature at 2-meter height and winds at 10-meter height are compared with these observations from surface mesonet observations in several different weather scenarios (winter inversion, cold front and low-level jet etc.) over the Inter-mountain West of US. Preliminary results show large discrepancies between model generated diurnal variations and observations in some cases. The mechanism and causes of these differences are further investigated. Implications of these results for model improvement and data assimilation are also discussed.

  17. Assessing regression kriging for its ability to represent precipitation fields over complex terrain using different gauging network densities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsanis, Ioannis; Grillakis, Manolis; Varouchakis, Emmanouil; Koutroulis, Aristeidis; Seiradakis, Kostantinos

    2015-04-01

    Distributed hydrological modeling require spatially continuous precipitation data of high quality. However, precipitation is usually measured locally at a limited number of stations. Especially in areas of complex terrain, where the topography plays key role in the precipitation process, the gauging network is usually sparse or malfunction. The need of reliable precipitation data has led to the development of various spatial interpolation techniques specially designed for precipitation. Methodologies that can combine precipitation data to secondary information have been developed improving the skill of the interpolation. Regression kriging is an interpolation methodology which uses variable point values by combining a regression approach with a geostatistical approach (i.e. measuring spatial autocorrelation by kriging). The methodology is simple to use and has been already implemented in R and ArcGIS environments, thus it has a wider board of potential users. The methodology is assessed for its ability to represent precipitation fields in various precipitation station densities. Moreover, the results of Regression Kriging interpolation are compared to other interpolation techniques such as IDW, Kriging, Natural neighbor and spline, implemented in ArcGIS toolbox.

  18. Horizontal heat fluxes over complex terrain computed using a simple mixed-layer model and a numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Fujio; Kuwagata, Tuneo

    1995-02-01

    The thermally induced local circulation over a periodic valley is simulated by a two-dimensional numerical model that does-not include condensational processes. During the daytime of a clear, calm day, heat is transported from the mountainous region to the valley area by anabatic wind and its return flow. The specific humidity is, however, transported in an inverse manner. The horizontal exchange rate of sensible heat has a horizontal scale similarity, as long as the horizontal scale is less than a critical width of about 100 km. The sensible heat accumulated in an atmospheric column over an arbitrary point can be estimated by a simple model termed the uniform mixed-layer model (UML). The model assumes that the potential temperature is both vertically and horizontally uniform in the mixed layer, even over the complex terrain. The UML model is valid only when the horizontal scale of the topography is less than the critical width and the maximum difference in the elevation of the topography is less than about 1500 m. Latent heat is accumulated over the mountainous region while the atmosphere becomes dry over the valley area. When the horizontal scale is close to the critical width, the largest amount of humidity is accumulated during the late afternoon over the mountainous region. 18 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Statistical and Spectral Analysis of Wind Characteristics Relevant to Wind Energy Assessment Using Tower Measurements in Complex Terrain

    DOE PAGES

    Belu, Radian; Koracin, Darko

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to investigate spatial and temporal characteristics of the wind speed and direction in complex terrain that are relevant to wind energy assessment and development, as well as to wind energy system operation, management, and grid integration. Wind data from five tall meteorological towers located in Western Nevada, USA, operated from August 2003 to March 2008, used in the analysis. The multiannual average wind speeds did not show significant increased trend with increasing elevation, while the turbulence intensity slowly decreased with an increase were the average wind speed. The wind speed and direction weremore » modeled using the Weibull and the von Mises distribution functions. The correlations show a strong coherence between the wind speed and direction with slowly decreasing amplitude of the multiday periodicity with increasing lag periods. The spectral analysis shows significant annual periodicity with similar characteristics at all locations. The relatively high correlations between the towers and small range of the computed turbulence intensity indicate that wind variability is dominated by the regional synoptic processes. Knowledge and information about daily, seasonal, and annual wind periodicities are very important for wind energy resource assessment, wind power plant operation, management, and grid integration.« less

  20. SToRM: A Model for Unsteady Surface Hydraulics Over Complex Terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    A two-dimensional (depth-averaged) finite volume Godunov-type shallow water model developed for flow over complex topography is presented. The model is based on an unstructured cellcentered finite volume formulation and a nonlinear strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme. The numerical discretization is founded on the classical and well established shallow water equations in hyperbolic conservative form, but the convective fluxes are calculated using auto-switching Riemann and diffusive numerical fluxes. The model’s implementation within a graphical user interface is discussed. Field application of the model is illustrated by utilizing it to estimate peak flow discharges in a flooding event of historic significance in Colorado, U.S.A., in 2013.

  1. The Temperature Gradient and Transition Timescales as a Function of Topography in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, C. W.; Hoch, S. W.; Pardyjak, E.

    2013-12-01

    Large portions of the Earth's surface are covered by mountainous areas, and understanding atmospheric flow over these regions is critical for weather prediction, (micro)climatological research, and dispersion modeling. Complex interactions between the topographic features, the synoptic forcing and the buoyant forcing drive flow patterns and flow regime transitions. As a part of the MATTERHORN field experiment, Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology was used to measure the vertical temperature gradient on an east facing slope across a 2km transect of granite ridge in the Utah west desert, from the base of the mountain to the middle slope. Thus, the temperature gradient is sampled above a wide range of topographic features, from valley formations to ridges, and over a wide range of slope and aspect angles. The relationship between these landforms and the timescales of morning and evening transitions is explored and presented.

  2. Complex mountain terrain and disturbance history drive variation in forest aboveground live carbon density in the western Oregon Cascades, USA

    PubMed Central

    Zald, Harold S.J.; Spies, Thomas A.; Seidl, Rupert; Pabst, Robert J.; Olsen, Keith A.; Steel, E. Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Forest carbon (C) density varies tremendously across space due to the inherent heterogeneity of forest ecosystems. Variation of forest C density is especially pronounced in mountainous terrain, where environmental gradients are compressed and vary at multiple spatial scales. Additionally, the influence of environmental gradients may vary with forest age and developmental stage, an important consideration as forest landscapes often have a diversity of stand ages from past management and other disturbance agents. Quantifying forest C density and its underlying environmental determinants in mountain terrain has remained challenging because many available data sources lack the spatial grain and ecological resolution needed at both stand and landscape scales. The objective of this study was to determine if environmental factors influencing aboveground live carbon (ALC) density differed between young versus old forests. We integrated aerial light detection and ranging (lidar) data with 702 field plots to map forest ALC density at a grain of 25 m across the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, a 6369 ha watershed in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon, USA. We used linear regressions, random forest ensemble learning (RF) and sequential autoregressive modeling (SAR) to reveal how mapped forest ALC density was related to climate, topography, soils, and past disturbance history (timber harvesting and wildfires). ALC increased with stand age in young managed forests, with much greater variation of ALC in relation to years since wildfire in old unmanaged forests. Timber harvesting was the most important driver of ALC across the entire watershed, despite occurring on only 23% of the landscape. More variation in forest ALC density was explained in models of young managed forests than in models of old unmanaged forests. Besides stand age, ALC density in young managed forests was driven by factors influencing site productivity, whereas variation in ALC density in old unmanaged forests

  3. Complex mountain terrain and disturbance history drive variation in forest aboveground live carbon density in the western Oregon Cascades, USA.

    PubMed

    Zald, Harold S J; Spies, Thomas A; Seidl, Rupert; Pabst, Robert J; Olsen, Keith A; Steel, E Ashley

    2016-04-15

    Forest carbon (C) density varies tremendously across space due to the inherent heterogeneity of forest ecosystems. Variation of forest C density is especially pronounced in mountainous terrain, where environmental gradients are compressed and vary at multiple spatial scales. Additionally, the influence of environmental gradients may vary with forest age and developmental stage, an important consideration as forest landscapes often have a diversity of stand ages from past management and other disturbance agents. Quantifying forest C density and its underlying environmental determinants in mountain terrain has remained challenging because many available data sources lack the spatial grain and ecological resolution needed at both stand and landscape scales. The objective of this study was to determine if environmental factors influencing aboveground live carbon (ALC) density differed between young versus old forests. We integrated aerial light detection and ranging (lidar) data with 702 field plots to map forest ALC density at a grain of 25 m across the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, a 6369 ha watershed in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon, USA. We used linear regressions, random forest ensemble learning (RF) and sequential autoregressive modeling (SAR) to reveal how mapped forest ALC density was related to climate, topography, soils, and past disturbance history (timber harvesting and wildfires). ALC increased with stand age in young managed forests, with much greater variation of ALC in relation to years since wildfire in old unmanaged forests. Timber harvesting was the most important driver of ALC across the entire watershed, despite occurring on only 23% of the landscape. More variation in forest ALC density was explained in models of young managed forests than in models of old unmanaged forests. Besides stand age, ALC density in young managed forests was driven by factors influencing site productivity, whereas variation in ALC density in old unmanaged forests

  4. Comparing model-based predictions of a wind turbine wake to LiDAR measurements in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Andrew; Jones, Paddy; Boyce, Dean; Bowman, Neil

    2013-04-01

    The application of remote sensing techniques to the measurement of wind characteristics offers great potential to accurately predict the atmospheric boundary layer flow (ABL) and its interactions with wind turbines. An understanding of these interactions is important for optimizing turbine siting in wind farms and improving the power performance and lifetime of individual machines. In particular, Doppler wind Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) can be used to remotely measure the wind characteristics (speed, direction and turbulence intensity) approaching a rotor. This information can be utilised to improve turbine lifetime (advanced detection of incoming wind shear, wind veer and extreme wind conditions, such as gusts) and optimise power production (improved yaw, pitch and speed control). LiDAR can also make detailed measurements of the disturbed wind profile in the wake, which can damage surrounding turbines and reduce efficiency. These observational techniques can help engineers better understand and model wakes to optimize turbine spacing in large wind farms, improving efficiency and reducing the cost of energy. NEL is currently undertaking research to measure the disturbed wind profile in the wake of a 950 kW wind turbine using a ZephIR Dual Mode LiDAR at its Myres Hill wind turbine test site located near Glasgow, Scotland. Myres Hill is moderately complex terrain comprising deep peat, low lying grass and heathers, localised slopes and nearby forest, approximately 2 km away. Measurements have been obtained by vertically scanning at 10 recorded heights across and above the rotor plane to determine the wind speed, wind direction and turbulence intensity profiles. Measurement stations located at various rotor diameters downstream of the turbine were selected in an attempt to capture the development of the wake and its recovery towards free stream conditions. Results of the measurement campaign will also highlight how the wake behaves as a result of sudden gusts

  5. Time-domain solver in curvilinear coordinates for outdoor sound propagation over complex terrain.

    PubMed

    Dragna, Didier; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Poisson, Franck

    2013-06-01

    The current work aims at developing a linearized Euler equations solver in curvilinear coordinates to account for the effects of topography on sound propagation. In applications for transportation noise, the propagation environment as well as the description of acoustic sources is complex, and time-domain methods have proved their capability to deal with both atmospheric and ground effects. First, equations in curvilinear coordinates are examined. Then time-domain boundary conditions initially proposed for a Cartesian coordinate system are implemented in the curvilinear solver. Two test cases dealing with acoustic scattering by an impedance cylinder in a two-dimensional geometry and by an impedance sphere in a three-dimensional geometry are considered to validate the boundary conditions. Accurate solutions are obtained for both rigid and impedance surfaces. Finally, the solver is used to examine a typical outdoor sound propagation problem. It is shown that it is well-suited to study coupled effects of topography, mixed impedance ground and meteorological conditions.

  6. Feasibility of Estimating Snow Depth in Complex Terrain Using Satellite Lidar Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael F.; Stoll, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Satellite retrievals of snow depth and water equivalent (SWE) are critical for monitoring watershed scale processes around the world. However, the problem is especially challenging in mountainous regions where complex heterogeneities limit the utility of low resolution satellite sensors. The Geoscience Laser Altimeter Sensor (GLAS) aboard the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) collected surface elevation data along near-repeat reference transects over land areas from 2003-2009. Although intended for monitoring ice caps and sea ice, the seven year global GLAS data base has provided unprecedented opportunity to test the capability of satellite lidar technology for estimating snow depth over land. GLAS single track and low repeat frequency does not provide data sufficient for operational estimates. However, its comparatively small footprint size of -65 m and its database of seasonal repeat observations during both snow and no-snow conditions have been sufficient to evaluate the potential of spacebased lidar altimetry for estimating snow depth. Recent analysis of ICESat elevations in the Uinta Mountains in NE Utah provide encouraging results for watershed scale estimates of snow depth. Research reported here focuses on the sensitivity of several versions of an ICESat snow depth algorithm to a range of landscape types defined by vegetation cover, slope and roughness. Results are compared to available SNOTEL data.

  7. Use of Geostationary Satellite Imagery to Estimate Convective Precipitation Over Complex Terrain in the Western United States.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    imagery when terrain influences were included. This technique may be useful for real-time estimates of convective precipitation amounts and has potential for application to flash flood forecasting in the western United States.

  8. Multicriteria design of rain gauge networks for flash flood prediction in semiarid catchments with complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmann, Till H. M.; Lyon, Steve W.; Gupta, Hoshin V.; Troch, Peter A.

    2010-11-01

    Despite the availability of weather radar data at high spatial (1 km2) and temporal (5-15 min) resolution, ground-based rain gauges continue to be necessary for accurate estimation of storm rainfall input to catchments during flash flood events, especially in mountainous catchments. Given economical considerations, a long-standing problem in catchment hydrology is to establish optimal placement of a small number of rain gauges to acquire data on both rainfall depth and spatiotemporal variability of intensity during extreme storm events. Using weather radar observations and a dense network of 40 tipping bucket rain gauges, this study examines whether it is possible to determine a reliable "best" set of rain gauge locations for the Sabino Canyon catchment near Tucson, Arizona, USA, given its complex topography and dominant storm track pattern. High-quality rainfall data are used to evaluate all possible configurations of a "practical" network having from one to four rain gauges. A multicriteria design strategy is used to guide rain gauge placement, by simultaneously minimizing the residual percent bias and maximizing the coefficient of correlation between the estimated and true mean areal rainfall and minimizing the normalized spatial mean squared error between the estimated and true spatiotemporal rainfall distribution. The performance of the optimized rain gauge network was then compared against randomly designed network ensembles by evaluating the quality of streamflows predicted using the Kinematic Runoff and Erosion (KINEROS2) event-based rainfall-runoff model. Our results indicate that the multicriteria strategy provided a robust design by which a sparse but accurate network of rain gauges could be implemented for semiarid basins such as the one studied.

  9. Downscaling 20th century flooding events in complex terrain (Switzerland) using the WRF regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkilä, Ulla; Gómez Navarro, Juan Jose; Franke, Jörg; Brönnimann, Stefan; Cattin, Réne

    2016-04-01

    Switzerland has experienced a number of severe precipitation events during the last few decades, such as during the 14-16 November of 2002 or during the 21-22 August of 2005. Both events, and subsequent extreme floods, caused fatalities and severe financial losses, and have been well studied both in terms of atmospheric conditions leading to extreme precipitation, and their consequences [e.g. Hohenegger et al., 2008, Stucki et al., 2012]. These examples highlight the need to better characterise the frequency and severity of flooding in the Alpine area. In a larger framework we will ultimately produce a high-resolution data set covering the entire 20th century to be used for detailed hydrological studies including all atmospheric parameters relevant for flooding events. In a first step, we downscale the aforementioned two events of 2002 and 2005 to assess the model performance regarding precipitation extremes. The complexity of the topography in the Alpine area demands high resolution datasets. To achieve a sufficient detail in resolution we employ the Weather Research and Forecasting regional climate model (WRF). A set of 4 nested domains is used with a 2-km resolution horizontal resolution over Switzerland. The NCAR 20th century reanalysis (20CR) with a horizontal resolution of 2.5° serves as boundary condition [Compo et al., 2011]. First results of the downscaling the 2002 and 2005 extreme precipitation events show that, compared to station observations provided by the Swiss Meteorological Office MeteoSwiss, the model strongly underestimates the strength of these events. This is mainly due to the coarse resolution of the 20CR data, which underestimates the moisture fluxes during these events. We tested driving WRF with the higher-resolved NCEP reanalysis and found a significant improvement in the amount of precipitation of the 2005 event. In a next step we will downscale the precipitation and wind fields during a 6-year period 2002-2007 to investigate and

  10. Periglacial complexes in Utopia Planitia: rimless, tiered depressions, (clastically) sorted and unsorted polygonised terrain and an ice-rich mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soare, Richard; Conway, Susan; Gallagher, Colman; Dohm, James; Clifford, Stephen M.; Williams, Jean-pierre

    2016-10-01

    We report the spatial and possible genetic-relationship at the mid-latitudes of Utopia Planitia (45-500N 115-1200E), Mars, of: (a) metre to decametre deep, rimless, tiered depressions; terrain that exhibits (b) (clastically) sorted and (c) unsorted (small-sized) polygons; and, (d) a very youthful, ice-rich mantle. We show that these individual landscape features are separated stratigraphically, this being presented to the Mars community for the first time, and suggest that the stratigraphical separation of these features could be the result of boundary conditions and formation processes that have varied much more widely than has been thought hitherto. In cold-climate and non-glacial regions such as the Yamal Peninsula of eastern Russia and the Tuktoyaktuk Coastlands of northern Canada, landscape assemblages comprised of similar features are referenced as "ice complexes" and are indicative of periglacialism on two fronts: first, the presence of "ice-rich" permafrost or permafrost comprised of "excess ice", i.e. "permafrost" whose pore space is exceeded by the "water ice" within that body of sediment; and, second, antecedently or currently active freeze-thaw cycling, minimally, to the full depth of the "ice-complex" depressions. In the Dry Valleys of the Antarctic, where the atmospheric aridity and cold-temperatures approach those of Mars, ice-vapour diffusion and adsorption cycles are cited as the means by which the near-surface, permafrost, i.e. ≤1m deep, has become ice-cemented. However, the metre to decametre depths of the "ice-complex" depressions on Earth and the morphologically-similar ones on Mars lie beyond the vertical reach of the Antarctic diffusion and adsorption cycles, both empirically and theoretically. By deduction, this points to the freeze-thaw cycling of water to depth, fostered either by exogenic or endogenic means, perhaps playing a more important role in the formation of the possible Martian "ice complexes" than might be expected were

  11. Methodological approach in determination of small spatial units in a highly complex terrain in atmospheric pollution research: the case of Zasavje region in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Kukec, Andreja; Boznar, Marija Z; Mlakar, Primoz; Grasic, Bostjan; Herakovic, Andrej; Zadnik, Vesna; Zaletel-Kragelj, Lijana; Farkas, Jerneja; Erzen, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    The study of atmospheric air pollution research in complex terrains is challenged by the lack of appropriate methodology supporting the analysis of the spatial relationship between phenomena affected by a multitude of factors. The key is optimal design of a meaningful approach based on small spatial units of observation. The Zasavje region, Slovenia, was chosen as study area with the main objective to investigate in practice the role of such units in a test environment. The process consisted of three steps: modelling of pollution in the atmosphere with dispersion models, transfer of the results to geographical information system software, and then moving on to final determination of the function of small spatial units. A methodology capable of designing useful units for atmospheric air pollution research in highly complex terrains was created, and the results were deemed useful in offering starting points for further research in the field of geospatial health.

  12. Amazon Rainforest Exchange of Carbon and Subcanopy Air Flow: Manaus LBA Site—A Complex Terrain Condition

    PubMed Central

    Tóta, Julio; Roy Fitzjarrald, David; da Silva Dias, Maria A. F.

    2012-01-01

    On the moderately complex terrain covered by dense tropical Amazon Rainforest (Reserva Biologica do Cuieiras—ZF2—02°36′17.1′′ S, 60°12′24.4′′ W), subcanopy horizontal and vertical gradients of the air temperature, CO2 concentration and wind field were measured for the dry and wet periods in 2006. We tested the hypothesis that horizontal drainage flow over this study area is significant and can affect the interpretation of the high carbon uptake rates reported by previous works at this site. A similar experimental design as the one by Tóta et al. (2008) was used with a network of wind, air temperature, and CO2 sensors above and below the forest canopy. A persistent and systematic subcanopy nighttime upslope (positive buoyancy) and daytime downslope (negative buoyancy) flow pattern on a moderately inclined slope (12%) was observed. The microcirculations observed above the canopy (38 m) over the sloping area during nighttime presents a downward motion indicating vertical convergence and correspondent horizontal divergence toward the valley area. During the daytime an inverse pattern was observed. The micro-circulations above the canopy were driven mainly by buoyancy balancing the pressure gradient forces. In the subcanopy space the microcirculations were also driven by the same physical mechanisms but probably with the stress forcing contribution. The results also indicated that the horizontal and vertical scalar gradients (e.g., CO2) were modulated by these micro-circulations above and below the canopy, suggesting that estimates of advection using previous experimental approaches are not appropriate due to the tridimensional nature of the vertical and horizontal transport locally. This work also indicates that carbon budget from tower-based measurement is not enough to close the system, and one needs to include horizontal and vertical advection transport of CO2 into those estimates. PMID:22619608

  13. Saturation sampling for spatial variation in multiple air pollutants across an inversion-prone metropolitan area of complex terrain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Characterizing intra-urban variation in air quality is important for epidemiological investigation of health outcomes and disparities. To date, however, few studies have been designed to capture spatial variation during select hours of the day, or to examine the roles of meteorology and complex terrain in shaping intra-urban exposure gradients. Methods We designed a spatial saturation monitoring study to target local air pollution sources, and to understand the role of topography and temperature inversions on fine-scale pollution variation by systematically allocating sampling locations across gradients in key local emissions sources (vehicle traffic, industrial facilities) and topography (elevation) in the Pittsburgh area. Street-level integrated samples of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and ozone (O3) were collected during morning rush and probable inversion hours (6-11 AM), during summer and winter. We hypothesized that pollution concentrations would be: 1) higher under inversion conditions, 2) exacerbated in lower-elevation areas, and 3) vary by season. Results During July - August 2011 and January - March 2012, we observed wide spatial and seasonal variability in pollution concentrations, exceeding the range measured at regulatory monitors. We identified elevated concentrations of multiple pollutants at lower-elevation sites, and a positive association between inversion frequency and NO2 concentration. We examined temporal adjustment methods for deriving seasonal concentration estimates, and found that the appropriate reference temporal trend differs between pollutants. Conclusions Our time-stratified spatial saturation approach found some evidence for modification of inversion-concentration relationships by topography, and provided useful insights for refining and interpreting GIS-based pollution source indicators for Land Use Regression modeling. PMID:24735818

  14. Modeling SF{sub 6} plume dispersion in complex terrain and meteorology with a limited data set

    SciTech Connect

    Schalk, W.W. III

    1996-10-01

    Early actions of emergency responders during hazardous material releases are intended to assess contamination and potential public exposure. As measurements are collected, an integration of model calculations and measurements can assist to better understand the situation. This study applied a high resolution version of the operational 3-D numerical models used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to a limited meteorological and tracer data set to assist in the interpretation of the dispersion pattern on a 140 km scale. The data set was collected from a tracer release during the morning surface inversion and transition period in the complex terrain of the Snake River Plain near Idaho Falls, Idaho in November 1993 by the United States Air Force. Sensitivity studies were conducted to determine model input parameters that best represented the study environment. These studies showed that mixing and boundary layer heights, atmospheric stability, and rawinsonde data are the most important model input parameters affecting wind field generation and tracer dispersion. Numerical models and limited measurement data were used to interpret dispersion patterns through the use of data analysis, model input determination, and sensitivity studies. Comparison of the best-estimate calculation to measurement data showed that model results compared well with the aircraft data, but had moderate success with the few surface measurements taken. The moderate success of the surface measurement comparison, may be due to limited downward mixing of the tracer as a result of the model resolution determined by the domain size selected to study the overall plume dispersion. 8 refs., 40 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Amazon rainforest exchange of carbon and subcanopy air flow: Manaus LBA site--a complex terrain condition.

    PubMed

    Tóta, Julio; Fitzjarrald, David Roy; da Silva Dias, Maria A F

    2012-01-01

    On the moderately complex terrain covered by dense tropical Amazon Rainforest (Reserva Biologica do Cuieiras--ZF2--02°36'17.1'' S, 60°12'24.4'' W), subcanopy horizontal and vertical gradients of the air temperature, CO(2) concentration and wind field were measured for the dry and wet periods in 2006. We tested the hypothesis that horizontal drainage flow over this study area is significant and can affect the interpretation of the high carbon uptake rates reported by previous works at this site. A similar experimental design as the one by Tóta et al. (2008) was used with a network of wind, air temperature, and CO(2) sensors above and below the forest canopy. A persistent and systematic subcanopy nighttime upslope (positive buoyancy) and daytime downslope (negative buoyancy) flow pattern on a moderately inclined slope (12%) was observed. The microcirculations observed above the canopy (38 m) over the sloping area during nighttime presents a downward motion indicating vertical convergence and correspondent horizontal divergence toward the valley area. During the daytime an inverse pattern was observed. The micro-circulations above the canopy were driven mainly by buoyancy balancing the pressure gradient forces. In the subcanopy space the microcirculations were also driven by the same physical mechanisms but probably with the stress forcing contribution. The results also indicated that the horizontal and vertical scalar gradients (e.g., CO(2)) were modulated by these micro-circulations above and below the canopy, suggesting that estimates of advection using previous experimental approaches are not appropriate due to the tridimensional nature of the vertical and horizontal transport locally. This work also indicates that carbon budget from tower-based measurement is not enough to close the system, and one needs to include horizontal and vertical advection transport of CO(2) into those estimates.

  16. An Overview of MADONA: A Multinational Field Study of High-Resolution Meteorology and Diffusion over Complex Terrain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cionco, R. M.; Byers, J. H.; Aufm Kampe, W.; van Raden, H.; Weber, H.; Biltoft, C.; Collins, C. G.; Higgs, T. J.; Jones, C. D.; Ride, D. J.; Robson, R.; Hin, A. R. T.; Johansson, P.-E.; Nyrén, K.; Jørgensen, H. E.; Mikkelsen, T.; Santabarbara, J. M.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Kimber, J. F.; Streicher, J.

    1999-01-01

    The multination, high-resolution field study of Meteorology And Diffusion Over Non-Uniform Areas (MADONA) was conducted by scientists from the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark, Sweden, and the Netherlands at Porton Down, Salisbury, Wiltshire, United Kingdom, during September and October 1992. The host of the field study was the Chemical and Biological Defence Establishment (CBDE, now part of Defence Evaluation and Research Agency) at Porton Down. MADONA was designed and conducted for high-resolution meteorological data collection and diffusion experiments using smoke, sulphurhexaflouride (SF6), and propylene gas during unstable, neutral, and stable atmospheric conditions in an effort to obtain terrain-influenced meteorological fields, dispersion, and concentration fluctuation measurements using specialized sensors and tracer generators. Thirty-one days of meteorological data were collected during the period 7 September-7 October and 27 diffusion experiments were conducted from 14 to 23 September 1992. Puffs and plumes of smoke and SF6 were released simultaneously for most of the experiments to gauge the resultant diffusion and concentration behavior. Some 44 meteorological and aerosol sensors and four source generators were used during each day of the field study. This array of sensors included 14 towers of wind cups and vanes, 10 sonic anemometer/thermometers, one boundary layer sonde, two lidar, one ion sensor, the CBDE Weather Station, and several one-of-a-kind sensors. Simulations of airflow and diffusion over the MADONA topography (a 9 km by 7.5 km area) were made with a variety of models. Wind fields and wind-related parameters were simulated with several high-resolution (microalpha scale) wind flow models. A tally of the various data-gathering activities indicates that the execution of MADONA was highly successful. Preliminary use of the datasets shows the high quality and depth of the MADONA database. This well-documented database is

  17. Terrain Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A highlight of the IMAX film, Blue Planet, is a 100-second computer- generated animation of a flight and earthquake simulation along California's San Andreas Fault. Created by the VESA group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the sequence required the development of a technique to make possible terrain rendering of very large digital images. An image mosaic of California constructed from Landsat data made this possible. An advanced pyramidal terrain rendering technique was developed, significantly reducing the necessary time involved in transferring the Landsat data to film. The new technique has also enabled NASA to develop new perspective rendering technologies in order to cope with anticipated increased remote sensor data.

  18. How does complex terrain influence responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, B. J.; Peterson, K.; McKane, R.; Lajtha, K.; Quandt, D. J.; Allen, S. T.; Sell, S.; Daly, C.; Harmon, M. E.; Johnson, S. L.; Spies, T.; Sollins, P.; Abdelnour, A. G.; Stieglitz, M.

    2010-12-01

    We are pursuing the ambitious goal of understanding how complex terrain influences the responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change. Our studies take place in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, an LTER (Long Term Ecological Research) site situated in Oregon’s central-western Cascade Range. Decades of long-term measurements and intensive research have revealed influences of topography on vegetation patterns, disturbance history, and hydrology. More recent research has shown surprising interactions between microclimates and synoptic weather patterns due to cold air drainage and pooling in mountain valleys. Using these data and insights, in addition to a recent LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) reconnaissance and a small sensor network, we are employing process-based models, including “SPA” (Soil-Plant-Atmosphere, developed by Mathew Williams of the University of Edinburgh), and “VELMA” (Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Alternatives, developed by Marc Stieglitz and colleagues of the Georgia Institute of Technology) to focus on two important features of mountainous landscapes: heterogeneity (both spatial and temporal) and connectivity (atmosphere-canopy-hillslope-stream). Our research questions include: 1) Do fine-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneity result in emergent properties at the basin scale, and if so, what are they? 2) How does connectivity across ecosystem components affect system responses to climate variability and change? Initial results show that for environmental drivers that elicit non-linear ecosystem responses on the plot scale, such as solar radiation, soil depth and soil water content, fine-scale spatial heterogeneity may produce unexpected emergent properties at larger scales. The results from such modeling experiments are necessarily a function of the supporting algorithms. However, comparisons based on models such as SPA and VELMA that operate at much different spatial scales

  19. Polar Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03577 Polar Terrains

    The region surrounding the South Polar Cap contains many different terrain types. This image shows both etched terrain and a region of 'mounds'.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 75S, Longitude 286.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Vegetation-hydrology dynamics in complex terrain of semiarid areas: 2. Energy-water controls of vegetation spatiotemporal dynamics and topographic niches of favorability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Valeriy Y.; Bras, Rafael L.; Vivoni, Enrique R.

    2008-03-01

    Ecosystems of dry climates are a particularly interesting subject for ecohydrological studies, as water is generally considered to be the key limiting resource. This work focuses on vegetation-water-energy dynamics occurring on the complex terrain of a semiarid area characteristic of central New Mexico. The study employs a mechanistic model of coupled interactions to construct a set of numerical experiments carried out for two small-scale synthetic domains that exhibit particular hillslope curvatures. The linkages between terrain attributes and patterns of C4 grass productivity and water balance components are examined for three generic soil types. It is argued that in conditions of negligible moisture exchange, aspect and slope are the key determinants of both the hydrologic behavior and the degree of site "favorability" to vegetation. Certain topographic locations are more favorable to vegetation, as compared to a flat horizontal surface not influenced by lateral effects. These locations are associated with sites of northerly aspect with surface slopes within a narrow range of magnitudes. Contributions from both rainfall and radiation forcings are discussed to explain the existence of these topographic niches. The sensitivity of results is investigated by modifying the dominant mechanism of lateral water transfer. Two additional controlling topographic features are explored, corresponding to the contiguous and global terrain convergence levels. It is argued that their effects on vegetation-hydrology dynamics at a given location are characteristically superimposed with the impact of site-specific terrain attributes. Furthermore, the results lead to a conceptual relationship linking vegetation-hydrology quantities at different landscape locations.

  1. Factors associated with collaboration among agencies serving children with complex chronic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nageswaran, Savithri; Golden, Shannon L; Easterling, Douglas; O'Shea, T Michael; Hansen, William B; Ip, Edward H

    2013-11-01

    Our objective was to identify agency-level factors that increase collaborative relationships between agencies that serve children with complex chronic conditions (CCC). We hypothesized that an agency will collaborate with more partners in the network if the agency had a coordinator and participated in a community coalition. We surveyed representatives of 63 agencies that serve children with CCC in Forsyth County, North Carolina about their agencies' collaborations with other agencies. We used social network analytical methods and exponential random graph analysis to identify factors associated with collaboration among agencies. The unit of analysis was the collaborative tie (n = 3,658) between agencies in the network. Agencies participating in a community coalition were 1.5 times more likely to report collaboration than agencies that did not participate in a coalition. Presence of a coordinator in an agency was not associated with the number of collaborative relationships. Agencies in existence for a longer duration (≥11 vs. ≤10 years; adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.1) and those with a higher proportion of CCC clientele (aOR: 2.1 and 1.6 for 11-30 % and ≥31 % compared to ≤10 %) had greater collaboration. Care coordination agencies and pediatric practices reported more collaborative relationships than subspecialty clinics, home-health agencies, durable medical equipment companies, educational programs and family-support services. Collaborative relationships between agencies that serve children with CCC are increased by coalition participation, longer existence and higher CCC clientele. Future studies should evaluate whether interventions to improve collaborations among agencies will improve clinical outcomes of children with CCC.

  2. An examination of the relationships between selected ground properties and Landsat MSS data in an area of complex terrain in southern Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, C. O.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with the method and results of a study which involved an examination of the statistical relationships between selected ground properties and Landsat MSS data, and whose aim was to assess the applicability of Landsat data to surface cover mapping in areas characterized by high-frequency spatial variations of surface cover type over small areas. The results indicate that by systematic ground data collection it is possible to understand the basic relationships between ground properties and Landsat sensor data in areas of complex surface cover and terrain, and to classify the cover types.

  3. Improving ozone modeling in complex terrain at a fine grid resolution: Part I - examination of analysis nudging and all PBL schemes associated with LSMs in meteorological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunhee; Fu, Joshua S.; Miller, Terry L.

    2010-02-01

    Meteorological variables such as temperature, wind speed, wind directions, and Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have critical implications for air quality simulations. Sensitivity simulations with five different PBL schemes associated with three different Land Surface Models (LSMs) were conducted to examine the impact of meteorological variables on the predicted ozone concentrations using the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) version 4.5 with local perspective. Additionally, the nudging analysis for winds was adopted with three different coefficients to improve the wind fields in the complex terrain at 4-km grid resolution. The simulations focus on complex terrain having valley and mountain areas at 4-km grid resolution. The ETA M-Y (Mellor-Yamada) and G-S (Gayno-Seaman) PBL schemes are identified as favorite options and promote O 3 formation causing the higher temperature, slower winds, and lower mixing height among sensitivity simulations in the area of study. It is found that PX (Pleim-Xiu) simulation does not always give optimal meteorological model performance. We also note that the PBL scheme plays a more important role in predicting daily maximum 8-h O 3 than land surface models. The results of nudging analysis for winds with three different increased coefficients' values (2.5, 4.5, and 6.0 × 10 -4 s -1) over seven sensitivity simulations show that the meteorological model performance was enhanced due to improved wind fields, indicating the FDDA nudging analysis can improve model performance considerably at 4-km grid resolution. Specifically, the sensitivity simulations with the coefficient value (6.0 × 10 -4) yielded more substantial improvements than with the other values (2.5 and 4.5 × 10 -4). Hence, choosing the nudging coefficient of 6.0 × 10 -4 s -1 for winds in MM5 may be the best choice to improve wind fields as an input, as well as, better model performance of CMAQ in the complex terrain area. As a result, a finer grid resolution is

  4. Short-term emergency response planning and risk assessment via an integrated modeling system for nuclear power plants in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ni-Bin; Weng, Yu-Chi

    2013-03-01

    Short-term predictions of potential impacts from accidental release of various radionuclides at nuclear power plants are acutely needed, especially after the Fukushima accident in Japan. An integrated modeling system that provides expert services to assess the consequences of accidental or intentional releases of radioactive materials to the atmosphere has received wide attention. These scenarios can be initiated either by accident due to human, software, or mechanical failures, or from intentional acts such as sabotage and radiological dispersal devices. Stringent action might be required just minutes after the occurrence of accidental or intentional release. To fulfill the basic functions of emergency preparedness and response systems, previous studies seldom consider the suitability of air pollutant dispersion models or the connectivity between source term, dispersion, and exposure assessment models in a holistic context for decision support. Therefore, the Gaussian plume and puff models, which are only suitable for illustrating neutral air pollutants in flat terrain conditional to limited meteorological situations, are frequently used to predict the impact from accidental release of industrial sources. In situations with complex terrain or special meteorological conditions, the proposing emergency response actions might be questionable and even intractable to decisionmakers responsible for maintaining public health and environmental quality. This study is a preliminary effort to integrate the source term, dispersion, and exposure assessment models into a Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) to tackle the complex issues for short-term emergency response planning and risk assessment at nuclear power plants. Through a series model screening procedures, we found that the diagnostic (objective) wind field model with the aid of sufficient on-site meteorological monitoring data was the most applicable model to promptly address the trend of local wind field patterns

  5. Impact of resolution on regional climate modeling in the source region of Yellow River with complex terrain using RegCM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Pinhong; Tang, Jianping; Wang, Shuyu; Wu, Jian; Niu, Xiaorui; Kang, Yue

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents results from a 20-year (1990-2009) simulation by RegCM3 with both 45- and 15-km horizontal resolutions. The research focuses on the source region of Yellow River and its surrounding area, which is located on the northeast edge of the Tibetan Plateau with its very complex topography. Driven by the ECMWF ERA-interim reanalysis data, RegCM3 displays reasonable ability to reproduce the spatial patterns, annual cycles, and the interannual variabilities of regional surface climate, though the model shows wet and cold bias. The model's performance is more close to observation for the source region of Yellow River than the other part of the analysis region, and the application of high resolution of 15 km demonstrates better skill with less bias for mean climate and larger correlation coefficients for interannual variability at most stations. However, the high-resolution simulation shows little advantage for reproducing the variations of precipitation and surface air temperature with altitude. The RegCM3 model also generally reproduces the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of surface climate and, consequently, the occurrence of climatic extremes and extreme indices. The simulation with high resolution again proves to be more reliable to generate climatic extremes over complex terrain of the source region of the Yellow River, related to its better representation of complex terrain and local processes.

  6. An Analysis of Unique Aerial Photographs of Atmospheric Eddies in Marine Stratocumulus Clouds Downwind of Complex Terrain Along the California Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, B. M.; Herbster, C. G.; Mosher, F. R.

    2013-12-01

    Unique aerial photographs of atmospheric eddies in marine stratocumulus clouds downwind of complex terrain along the California coast are presented and analyzed. While satellite imagery of similar eddies have appeared in the scientific literature since the 1960's, it is believed that these are the first close-up photographs of such eddies, taken from an airplane, to appear in publication. Two photographs by a commercial pilot, flying California coastal routes, are presented: one from July 16, 2006 downwind of Santa Cruz Island, a 740 m peak bordering the Santa Barbara Channel off the California coast; and one from September 12, 2006 near Grover Beach, California, downwind of a headland containing the San Luis Range, a region of complex terrain near San Luis Obispo, California, with ridges ranging approximately from 240 to 550 m elevation. Both eddies occurred in the lee of inversion-penetrating terrain, and were marked by a cyclonic vortex in the clouds with a striking cloud-free 'eye' feature roughly 3 km in diameter. The Santa Cruz Island eddy was 25 km in length and 9-10 km in width, while the Grover Beach eddy was 17 km in length and had a width of 9 km, placing it in the meso-gamma scale of atmospheric features. GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) imagery for both cases was obtained and help to define the lifecycle and motions of the eddies captured in the snapshots. Relevant meteorological observations for the Santa Cruz Island eddy were not located, but in-situ observations from the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) pier, and the San Luis Obispo County Air Pollution Control District, made possible a more detailed examination of the Grover Beach eddy and its structure. Additionally, we offer speculation on an eddy formation mechanism consistent with the satellite and in-situ observations described in this presentation, and hypotheses from the literature on low Froude number, continuously

  7. Miranda's Geologic History (variety of terrain)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Miranda reveals a complex geologic history in this view, acquired by Voyager 2 on Jan. 24, 1986, around its close approach to the Uranian moon. At least three terrain types of different age and geologic style are evident at this resolution of about 700 meters (2,300 feet). Visible in this clear-filter, narrow-angle image are, from left: (1) an apparently ancient, cratered terrain consisting of rolling, subdued hills and degraded medium-sized craters (2) a grooved terrain with linear valleys and ridges developed at the expense of, or replacing, the first terrain type: and (3) a complex terrain seen along the terminator, in which intersecting curvilinear ridges and troughs are abruptly truncated by the linear, grooved terrain. Voyager scientists believe this third terrain type is intermediate in age between the first two. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  8. Influence of the diagnostic wind field model on the results of calculation of the microscale atmospheric dispersion in moderately complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalets, Ivan V.; Korolevych, Vladimir Y.; Khalchenkov, Alexander V.; Ievdin, Ievgen A.; Zheleznyak, Mark J.; Andronopoulos, Spyros

    2013-11-01

    The impact of diagnostic wind field model on the results of calculation of microscale atmospheric dispersion in moderately complex terrain conditions was investigated. The extensive radiological and meteorological data set collected at the site of the research reactor of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) in Canada had been compared with the results of calculations of the Local Scale Model Chain of the EU nuclear emergency response system JRODOS. The diagnostic wind field model based on divergence minimizing procedure and the atmospheric dispersion model RIMPUFF were used in calculations. Taking into account complex topography features with the use of diagnostic wind field model improved the results of calculations. For certain months, the level of improvement of the normalized mean squared error reached the factor of 2. For the whole simulation period (January-July, 2007) the level of improvement by taking into account terrain features with the diagnostic wind field model was about 9%. The use of diagnostic wind field model also significantly improved the fractional bias of the calculated results. Physical analysis of the selected cases of atmospheric dispersion at the CRL site had been performed.

  9. Simulation of detailed wind flow over a high complex terrain using a computational fluid dynamics model, CFD_NIMR_SNU, for the support of micrositing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Jean; Koo, Hae-Jung; Cho, Kyoungmi; Rang Kim, Kyu; Byon, Jaeyoung; Seo, Beom-Keun

    2010-05-01

    In order to encourage wind energy industry in Korea, it is required to develop accurate and detailed wind information. Although 1 km- high resolution wind maps over the Korean Peninsula had been developed, the determination of the wind conditions at the intended site of the wind turbines remains an important task that cannot be solved by means of the available large-scale wind maps alone. Especially, wind has a large spatial variability over highly complex terrain. To quantify mean wind and turbulence characteristics in any planning area for the installation of wind turbines, a CFD model can be used. We used CFD_NIMR_SNU, which has developed by National Institute of Meteorological Research and Seoul National University since 2004. It has a capability of calculating thermodynamic equations for the support of locally driven wind fields. In this study, the characteristics of spatial wind and turbulent flow ware analyzed using the CFD_NIMR_SNU in a complex terrain area, which has a plan for installing wind power plants. Results from this study, the topographic effects were shown well on mean wind fields. Especially, the maximum wind speed was observed over the mountain area, and turbulent kinetic energy is more uniform at higher altitude. In the future, to improve the boundary conditions and to validate to CFD model, coupling of CFD with meso- scale numerical models such as WRF will be explored.

  10. 77 FR 12197 - Standard for All-Terrain Vehicles

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 1420 Standard for All-Terrain Vehicles AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission... consumer product safety standard, the American National Standard for Four-Wheel All-Terrain Vehicles... National Standard for Four Wheel All-Terrain Vehicles Equipment Configuration, and Performance...

  11. Numerical Prediction of Cold Season Fog Events over Complex Terrain: the Performance of the WRF Model During MATERHORN-Fog and Early Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Zhaoxia; Chachere, Catherine N.; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Pardyjak, Eric; Gultepe, Ismail

    2016-09-01

    A field campaign to study cold season fog in complex terrain was conducted as a component of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program from 07 January to 01 February 2015 in Salt Lake City and Heber City, Utah, United States. To support the field campaign, an advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used to produce real-time forecasts and model evaluation. This paper summarizes the model performance and preliminary evaluation of the model against the observations. Results indicate that accurately forecasting fog is challenging for the WRF model, which produces large errors in the near-surface variables, such as relative humidity, temperature, and wind fields in the model forecasts. Specifically, compared with observations, the WRF model overpredicted fog events with extended duration in Salt Lake City because it produced higher moisture, lower wind speeds, and colder temperatures near the surface. In contrast, the WRF model missed all fog events in Heber City, as it reproduced lower moisture, higher wind speeds, and warmer temperatures against observations at the near-surface level. The inability of the model to produce proper levels of near-surface atmospheric conditions under fog conditions reflects uncertainties in model physical parameterizations, such as the surface layer, boundary layer, and microphysical schemes.

  12. Evaluation of the TMPA-3B42 precipitation product using a high-density rain gauge network over complex terrain in northeastern Iberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kenawy, Ahmed M.; Lopez-Moreno, Juan I.; McCabe, Matthew F.; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA)-3B42 version 7 product is assessed over north-eastern Iberia, a region with considerable topographical gradients and complexity. Precipitation characteristics from a dense network of 656 rain gauges, spanning the period from 1998 to 2009, are used to evaluate TMPA-3B42 estimates on a daily scale. A set of accuracy estimators, including the relative bias, mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE) and Spearman coefficient was used to evaluate the results. The assessment indicates that TMPA-3B42 product is capable of describing the seasonal characteristics of the observed precipitation over most of the study domain. In particular, TMPA-3B42 precipitation agrees well with in situ measurements, with MAE less than 2.5 mm.day- 1, RMSE of 6.4 mm.day- 1 and Spearman correlation coefficients generally above 0.6. TMPA-3B42 provides improved accuracies in winter and summer, whereas it performs much worse in spring and autumn. Spatially, the retrieval errors show a consistent trend, with a general overestimation in regions of low altitude and underestimation in regions of heterogeneous terrain. TMPA-3B42 generally performs well over inland areas, while showing less skill in the coastal regions. A set of skill metrics, including a false alarm ratio [FAR], frequency bias index [FBI], the probability of detection [POD] and threat score [TS], is also used to evaluate TMPA performance under different precipitation thresholds (1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 mm.day- 1). The results suggest that TMPA-3B42 retrievals perform well in specifying moderate rain events (5-25 mm.day- 1), but show noticeably less skill in producing both light (< 1 mm.day- 1) and heavy rainfall thresholds (more than 50 mm.day- 1). Given the complexity of the terrain and the associated high spatial variability of precipitation in north-eastern Iberia, the results reveal that TMPA-3B42 data provide

  13. Agency Collaboration in the Care of Children with Complex Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nageswaran, Savithri; Ip, Edward H.; Golden, Shannon L.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Easterling, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the network of collaboration among agencies that serve children with complex chronic conditions (CCC) and identify gaps in the network. Methods We surveyed representatives from agencies that serve children with CCC in Forsyth County, North Carolina about their agencies’ existing and desired collaborations with other agencies in the network. We used Social Network Analytical methods to describe gaps in the network. Mean out- and in-degree centrality (number of collaborative ties extending from or directed towards an agency) and density (ratio of extant ties to all possible ties) were measured. Results In this network with 3,658 possible collaborative ties, care-coordination agencies and pediatric practices reported the highest existing collaborations with other agencies (out-degree centrality: 32 and 30 respectively). Pediatric practices reported strong ties with subspecialty clinics (density: 73%), but weak ties with family support services (density: 3%). Pediatric practices and subspecialty clinics (in-degree: 26) received the highest collaborative ties from other agencies. Support services and durable medical equipment companies reported low ties with other agencies (out-degree: 7 and 10 respectively). Nursing agencies reported the highest desired collaborations (out-degree: 18). Support services, pediatric practices and care-coordination programs had the highest in-degree centrality (7, 6 and 6 respectively) for desired collaborations. Nursing agencies and support services had the greatest gaps in collaboration. Conclusions Although collaboration exists among agencies serving children with CCC, there are many gaps in the network. Future studies should explore barriers and facilitators to inter-agency collaborations and whether increased collaboration in the network improves patient-level outcomes. PMID:22583632

  14. Landfills in karst terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, T.H. ); Memon, B.A.; LaMoreaux, P.E. )

    1994-06-01

    State and Federal regulations have established restrictions for location of hazardous waste and municipal, solid waste landfills. Regulations require owners/operators to demonstrate that the hydrogeology has been completely characterized at proposed landfills, and that locations for monitoring wells have been properly selected. Owners/operators are also required to demonstrate that engineering measures have been incorporated in the design of the municipal solid waste landfills, so that the site is not subject to destabilizing events, as a result of location in unstable areas, such as karst terrains. Karst terrains are typically underlain by limestone or dolomite, and may contain a broad continuum of karst features and karst activity. Preliminary investigation of candidate sites will allow ranking of the sites, rejection of some unsuitable sites, and selection of a few sites for additional studies. The complexity of hydrogeologic systems, in karst terrains, mandates thorough hydrogeologic studies to determine whether a specific site is, or can be rendered, suitable for a land disposal facility. Important components of hydrogeologic studies are: field mapping of structural and stratigraphic units; interpretation of sequential aerial photographs; test drilling and geophysical analyses; fracture analyses; seasonal variation in water-levels; spatial variation of hydraulic characteristics of the aquifer and aquiclude; velocity and direction of movement of ground water within aquifers; determination of control for recharge, discharge, and local base level; and evaluation of the effects of man's activities, such as pumping, dewatering and construction.

  15. Dalmatian Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 1 July 2003

    An example of dalmatian terrain near the south pole. The bright material is polar ice and the dark spots dark sands that are appearing in depressions where the ice has defrosted to reveal underlying material. Interestingly, there is an almost continuous dark band around the edges of many of the depressions. This could be a clue to the nature of the sand deposits in polar regions. The sand forms dunes in a range of sizes and shapes. Near the top of the image the dunes shrink until they are smaller than the 18 m pixels of the THEMIS camera and seem to disappear into the surrounding ice.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -66.6, Longitude 36 East (324 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Assessment of the ARW-WRF model over complex terrain: the case of the Stellenbosch Wine of Origin district of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanzadeh, Iman; Bonnardot, Valérie; Sturman, Andrew; Quénol, Hervé; Zawar-Reza, Peyman

    2016-07-01

    Global warming has implications for thermal stress for grapevines during ripening, so that wine producers need to adapt their viticultural practices to ensure optimum physiological response to environmental conditions in order to maintain wine quality. The aim of this paper is to assess the ability of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to accurately represent atmospheric processes at high resolution (500 m) during two events during the grapevine ripening period in the Stellenbosch Wine of Origin district of South Africa. Two case studies were selected to identify areas of potentially high daytime heat stress when grapevine photosynthesis and grape composition were expected to be affected. The results of high-resolution atmospheric model simulations were compared to observations obtained from an automatic weather station (AWS) network in the vineyard region. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the ability of the WRF model to reproduce spatial and temporal variations of meteorological parameters at 500-m resolution. The model represented the spatial and temporal variation of meteorological variables very well, with an average model air temperature bias of 0.1 °C, while that for relative humidity was -5.0 % and that for wind speed 0.6 m s-1. Variation in model performance varied between AWS and with time of day, as WRF was not always able to accurately represent effects of nocturnal cooling within the complex terrain. Variations in performance between the two case studies resulted from effects of atmospheric boundary layer processes in complex terrain under the influence of the different synoptic conditions prevailing during the two periods.

  17. Coupling fast all-season soil strength land surface model with weather research and forecasting model to assess low-level icing in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sines, Taleena R.

    Icing poses as a severe hazard to aircraft safety with financial resources and even human lives hanging in the balance when the decision to ground a flight must be made. When analyzing the effects of ice on aviation, a chief cause for danger is the disruption of smooth airflow, which increases the drag force on the aircraft therefore decreasing its ability to create lift. The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Advanced Research WRF (WRF-ARW) is a collaboratively created, flexible model designed to run on distributed computing systems for a variety of applications including forecasting research, parameterization research, and real-time numerical weather prediction. Land-surface models, one of the physics options available in the WRF-ARW, output surface heat and moisture flux given radiation, precipitation, and surface properties such as soil type. The Fast All-Season Soil STrength (FASST) land-surface model was developed by the U.S. Army ERDC-CRREL in Hanover, New Hampshire. Designed to use both meteorological and terrain data, the model calculates heat and moisture within the surface layer as well as the exchange of these parameters between the soil, surface elements (such as snow and vegetation), and atmosphere. Focusing on the Presidential Mountain Range of New Hampshire under the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) Icing Assessments in Cold and Alpine Environments project, one of the main goals is to create a customized, high resolution model to predict and assess ice accretion in complex terrain. The purpose of this research is to couple the FASST land-surface model with the WRF to improve icing forecasts in complex terrain. Coupling FASST with the WRF-ARW may improve icing forecasts because of its sophisticated approach to handling processes such as meltwater, freezing, thawing, and others that would affect the water and energy budget and in turn affect icing forecasts. Several transformations had to take place in order

  18. Using Data Assimilation and State Augmentation to Update a Numerical Weather Prediction Model Parameter in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. A.; Hacker, J.

    2013-12-01

    A major source of model error in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models is uncertainty in empirical parameters. In certain surface layer parameterization schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (and other NWP models), there is one such parameter, the Zilitinkevich constant Czil, which governs the strength of the thermal coupling between the land surface and the surface layer. This constant has a direct effect of the heat and moisture fluxes through the surface layer, and a secondary effect on the momentum flux. It thus has a large effect on the growth and structure of the atmospheric boundary layer. There are no known methods to directly measure the correct value of Czil, so its value must be estimated. It has been common practice to treat Czil as a global constant in WRF, but recent research suggests it should not be a constant in space or in time. To develop an estimate of Czil that varies both in space and in time, we couple a WRF ensemble with the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART). In this WRF-DART ensemble prediction system we use an ensemble adjustment Kalman filter to assimilate surface and upper-air observations and update the WRF state vector of temperature, wind, and moisture variables. Using a process called state augmentation, we also append Czil to the state vector and allow DART to update Czil as well. We demonstrate the benefit of estimating a variable Czil on low-level temperature and wind forecasts. To do this we compare the performance of a constant-Czil and a variable-Czil ensemble from late September to mid-October 2012, to coincide with high-resolution meteorological observations made during the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations Program (MATERHORN) in western Utah.

  19. Evaluating Wind Fields from a Diagnostic Model Over Complex Terrain in the Phoenix Region and Implications to Dispersion Calculations for Regional Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weiguo; Shaw, William J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper compares the wind field from a diagnostic model (CALMET) over complex terrain in the Phoenix region in the USA with observations that are gridded by a state-of-the-art Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (FDDA) system. The wind difference between the CALMET and FDDA wind fields is larger at night than in the day. The magnitude of the wind difference can be smaller than 5% of the mean wind speed at low levels in areas with dense observational stations, while it can be larger than 80% in areas without observational stations or at high altitudes. The vector-mean wind direction difference over the domain is 15 deg on the surface level and 25 deg between 10 and 1500 m. To evaluate the effects of the wind difference on dispersion calculations, dispersion of a hypothetical passive tracer released from surface point sources is simulated by the second-order closure integrated puff (SCIPUFF) model driven by the CALMET and FDDA wind fields, respectively. Differences in the two simulated tracer concentration fields increase with time due to accumulation of effects of the wind differences both near the surface and at higher altitudes. Even for the release in the area with the densest distribution of surface stations, the relative difference in the peak surface concentration from CALMET-SCIPUFF and from FDDA-SCIPUFF is less than 10% only within 0.5 hr after the release in the afternoon, and increases to 70% at 1.5 hr; this is because of large differences in wind above the surface. For the release in the area with few stations, the difference can be larger than 100% or even larger after 1.5 hr from the release. To improve dispersion simulations driven by the CALMET wind in the region, observations at upper-air stations are needed and the current surface observation network needs to be reorganized or more stations are needed to account for the influence of terrain.

  20. Validation of high-resolution WRF-ARW model runs against airborne measurements over complex terrain in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, Federico; Gioli, Beniamino; Toscano, Piero; Gualtieri, Giovanni; Miglietta, Franco; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2015-04-01

    An intensive aerial campaign was flown in the context of the CARBIUS project (Maselli et al., 2010) between July 2004 and December 2005. The flights covered, over more than 240 Km, a target area in central Italy (between the regions of Lazio and Tuscany) characterized by various land uses and topography, ranging from coastal zones to mountainous landscapes (Colline Metallifere, Tuscany). The aerial vector (Sky Arrow 650 ERA) was equipped for high frequency (50 Hz) measurements of the three components of mean wind and turbulence, as well as air temperature, CO2 and H2O concentrations. While the aim of the CARBIUS campaign was focused on GHG fluxes, the dataset is used in the present work as a benchmark to assess the capability of mesoscale models to correctly simulate transport fields. A first assessment has been done by comparing the dataset to a coupled WRF-NMM-CALMET system (Gioli et al., 2014), but the aim of the present work is to expand on those foundations by comparing the data to higher resolution WRF-ARW simulations. WRF-ARW outputs are, in fact, frequently used as inputs to multiple dispersion models and any misrepresentation of the "real" situation is therefore propagated through the modelling chain. Our aim is to assess these potential errors keeping into account different topographic situations and seasons thanks to the existent aerial dataset. Moreover the sensitivity of the WRF-ARW model to different initial and boundary conditions (ECMWF vs. CFSR) is explored, since also the initial forcing may influence the representation of the transport field. Results show that the model is generally capable of reproducing the main features of the mean wind field independently from the choice of the initial forcing. Terrain features still show an impact on the model outputs (especially on wind directions), moreover the performance of the model is also influenced by seasonal effects. Gioli B., Gualtieri G., Busillo C., Calastrini F., Gozzini B., Miglietta F. (2014

  1. Scoping a field experiment: error diagnostics of TRMM precipitation radar estimates in complex terrain as a basis for IPHEx2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Y.; Wilson, A. M.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-10-01

    , though this behavior is strongly conditioned by the coarse spatial resolution (5 km) of the terrain topography mask used to remove ground clutter effects. Precipitation associated with small-scale systems (< 25 km2) and isolated deep convection tends to be underestimated, which we attribute to non-uniform beam-filling effects due to spatial averaging of reflectivity at the PR resolution. Mixed precipitation events (i.e., cold fronts and snow showers) fall into OVR or FA categories, but these are also the types of events for which observations from standard ground-based raingauge networks are more likely subject to measurement uncertainty, that is raingauge underestimation errors due to under-catch and precipitation phase. Overall, the space-time structure of the errors shows strong links among precipitation, envelope orography, landform (ridge-valley contrasts), and local hydrometeorological regime that is strongly modulated by the diurnal cycle, pointing to three major error causes that are inter-related: (1) representation of concurrent vertically and horizontally varying microphysics; (2) non uniform beam filling (NUBF) effects and ambiguity in the detection of bright band position; and (3) spatial resolution and ground clutter correction.

  2. New tool for CO2 flux partitioning with soil chamber flux implementation as a solution for site in topographically complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šigut, Ladislav; Mammarella, Ivan; Kolari, Pasi; Dařenová, Eva; Novosadová, Kateřina; Pietras, Justina; Pokorný, Radek; Sedlák, Pavel; Mauder, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Eddy covariance method (EC) is one of the most accurate and direct approaches for measurements of fluxes of matter and energy on the level of an entire ecosystem. CO2 flux data acquired using the global network of EC flux towers help us to better understand the impacts of natural and anthropogenic phenomena on the global carbon balance. Comparisons among different sites are usually performed on annual sums of net ecosystem exchange (annual sums of NEE). Nowadays, EC is also used in complex terrain on the edge of its applicability (e.g. hills, cities) such as the mountain forest site at Bílý Kříž, Beskydy Mountains, Czech Republic. This requires revisiting of generally applied algorithms for computation of annual sums of NEE. The first aim of this study is the assessment of the performance and correctness of a newly developed tool for CO2 flux separation in comparison with standard algorithms. Simple models describing response of NEE to temperature and photosynthetic active radiation will be used for flux partitioning and a new approach to remove seasonality from datasets will be demonstrated. The second aim of this study will be to evaluate whether it is possible to estimate defensible annual sums of NEE for complex terrain site Bílý Kříž with the help of auxiliary biomass inventory and soil chamber measurements. Here the up-scaling of soil respiration to ecosystem respiration will be attempted and the resulting sums of NEE will be compared to independent biomass inventory estimates of net primary productivity. The importance of this research lies in extending the boundaries of EC application, thus contributing to better understanding of carbon balance in mountainous regions ecosystems which are not well represented within networks of EC flux towers. Acknowledgement This work was supported by CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0073, CZ.1.07/2.4.00/31.0056, OU SGS20/PřF/2014 grants and MICMoR graduate programme.

  3. Urban Terrain Zone Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    function . An example of the interaction of some of these can result in an exposed surface of decorative brick veneer on a framed stracture . Or, a...Classification System for HOUT Studies . . . . . . . . .- ..- . . . . . . 14 2. Urban Terrain Zones Function /Morphology Relationship...By Function --All Cities Aggregated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 6. Building Types: Major Terrain Zones . . . . ...... 103 7. Urban Terrain

  4. Locally induced surface air confluence by complex terrain and its effects on air pollution in the valley of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazcilevich, Aron D.; García, Agustín R.; Caetano, Ernesto

    Using a meteorological computational model it is shown how, in the Valley of Mexico, a high pressure system together with the complex orography of the region induce the formation of a local confluence line. With the aid of a prognostic air quality model it is shown that the maximum pollutant mixing ratios are placed on and follow the confluence line which crosses over the most populated areas of Mexico City. This phenomenon provides an explanation of why and when pollutants assume its geographical distribution in the valley during high mixing ratio episodes.

  5. Digital terrain tapes: user guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1980-01-01

    DMATC's digital terrain tapes are a by-product of the agency's efforts to streamline the production of raised-relief maps. In the early 1960's DMATC developed the Digital Graphics Recorder (DGR) system that introduced new digitizing techniques and processing methods into the field of three-dimensional mapping. The DGR system consisted of an automatic digitizing table and a computer system that recorded a grid of terrain elevations from traces of the contour lines on standard topographic maps. A sequence of computer accuracy checks was performed and then the elevations of grid points not intersected by contour lines were interpolated. The DGR system produced computer magnetic tapes which controlled the carving of plaster forms used to mold raised-relief maps. It was realized almost immediately that this relatively simple tool for carving plaster molds had enormous potential for storing, manipulating, and selectively displaying (either graphically or numerically) a vast number of terrain elevations. As the demand for the digital terrain tapes increased, DMATC began developing increasingly advanced digitizing systems and now operates the Digital Topographic Data Collection System (DTDCS). With DTDCS, two types of data elevations as contour lines and points, and stream and ridge lines are sorted, matched, and resorted to obtain a grid of elevation values for every 0.01 inch on each map (approximately 200 feet on the ground). Undefined points on the grid are found by either linear or or planar interpolation.

  6. Interactions between complicated flow-dispersion patterns and boundary layer evolution in a mountainous complex terrain during elevated SO2 concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaios, Vasileios N.; Triantafyllou, Athanassios G.; Garas, Stylianos; Krestou, Athina; Leivaditou, Elena

    2016-11-01

    The dispersion of air pollutants from multiple industrial stacks located in complex topography is an interesting subject. An attractive case is that of the wider region of Western Macedonia in NW Greece, where the greater amount of electric power of Greece is being produced by lignite power plant stations (LPPS). Considerable amounts of atmospheric pollutants are emitted by those LPPS into the atmosphere due to the quantities of coal burned. The variability of the topographic features and the terrain complexity of the area may lead to the formation of local atmospheric circulations of various types, which affect pollutant's transport and dispersion. In the present work, the dispersion conditions that favor the pollutants accumulation in the area are investigated. For this purpose, 1 year's hourly SO2 concentrations, surface wind measurements and a mesoscale meteorological and air pollution model (The Air Pollution Model, TAPM) were used. The SO2 and wind measurements were collected in situ from monitoring stations located nearby and at a greater distance from the power plants. Yearly and daily variations of SO2 concentrations are analyzed and discussed, and the period with the highest concentrations is selected. During this period, the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the area as well as the pollutants dispersion is examined. Statistical measures between modeled and observed meteorological data were in good agreement and a good correlation coefficient 0.68 and 0.98 was found in the SO2 variations. The analysis of the wind fields indicated better ventilation in the center of the area due to topographic venturi effects, while the dispersion mechanism which resulted in the relatively high ground level concentrations was fumigation. Finally, the evolution of the ABL was affected by the complex interactions between topography and mesoscale flows as it was found by the turbulent kinetic energy cross sections.

  7. Statutory complexity disguises agency capture in Citizens Coal Council v. EPA

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, R.

    2007-07-01

    In Citizens Coal Council v. EPA, an en banc panel for the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals considered a challenge to EPA regulations promulgated pursuant to the Clean Water Act (CWA). The EPA promulgated the regulations in an attempt to incentivize coal companies to remine once abandoned mine sites. Petitioners, two nonprofit environmental organizations, claimed that the regulations violated the Clean Water Act and Administrative Procedure Act by allowing coal companies to remine without adhering to any enforceable pollution limitations. The EPA countered that more remining would improve water quality at abandoned sites. The Sixth Circuit rejected Petitioners' claims, finding that the EPA's regulations were reasonably consistent with the CWA's goal of restoring the integrity of the nation's waters. In so holding, the court struggled to understand the meaning of the CWA's complex procedural and technical language, and allowed the EPA to justify the rule based on the CWA's broad statement of purpose. Such superficial judicial review sets a dangerous precedent in environmental law, because it exacerbates the risk of agency capture. A captured agency promulgates regulations that benefit-industry, not the environment. Without the judiciary acting as a meaningful check against agency capture, the public loses a valuable tool in the fight against major-industrial polluters like the domestic coal industry. Citizens Coal Council therefore stands as a cautionary tale, a warning sign that the judiciary may be unable to identify agency capture where the regulations at issue are promulgated pursuant to a complex statute like the Clean Water Act.

  8. Evaluation of WRF-Predicted Near-Hub-Height Winds and Ramp Events over a Pacific Northwest Site with Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qing; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail; Fast, Jerome D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Stoelinga, Mark; Finley, Catherine

    2013-08-01

    The WRF model version 3.3 is used to simulate near hub-height winds and power ramps utilizing three commonly used planetary boundary-layer (PBL) schemes: Mellor-Yamada-Janjic (MYJ), University of Washington (UW), and Yonsei University (YSU). The predicted winds have small mean biases compared with observations. Power ramps and step changes (changes within an hour) consistently show that the UW scheme performed better in predicting up ramps under stable conditions with higher prediction accuracy and capture rates. Both YSU and UW scheme show good performance predicting up- and down- ramps under unstable conditions with YSU being slightly better for ramp durations longer than an hour. MYJ is the most successful simulating down-ramps under stable conditions. The high wind speed and large shear associated with low-level jets are frequently associated with power ramps, and the biases in predicted low-level jet explain some of the shown differences in ramp predictions among different PBL schemes. Low-level jets were observed as low as ~200 m in altitude over the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES) site, located in an area of complex terrain. The shear, low-level peak wind speeds, as well as the height of maximum wind speed are not well predicted. Model simulations with 3 PBL schemes show the largest variability among them under stable conditions.

  9. On the variability of the surface environment response to synoptic forcing over complex terrain: a multivariate data analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halios, Christos H.; Helmis, Costas G.; Flocas, Helena A.; Nyeki, Stephan; Assimakopoulos, Dimosthenis N.

    2012-11-01

    Synoptic climatology relates the atmospheric circulation with the surface environment. The aim of this study is to examine the variability of the surface meteorological patterns, which are developing under different synoptic scale categories over a suburban area with complex topography. Multivariate Data Analysis techniques were performed to a data set with surface meteorological elements. Three principal components related to the thermodynamic status of the surface environment and the two components of the wind speed were found. The variability of the surface flows was related with atmospheric circulation categories by applying Correspondence Analysis. Similar surface thermodynamic fields develop under cyclonic categories, which are contrasted with the anti-cyclonic category. A strong, steady wind flow characterized by high shear values develops under the cyclonic Closed Low and the anticyclonic H-L categories, in contrast to the variable weak flow under the anticyclonic Open Anticyclone category.

  10. Semi-automatic methods for landslide features and channel network extraction in a complex mountainous terrain: new opportunities but also challenges from high resolution topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarolli, Paolo; Sofia, Giulia; Pirotti, Francesco; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo

    2010-05-01

    In recent years, remotely sensed technologies such as airborne and terrestrial laser scanner have improved the detail of analysis providing high-resolution and high-quality topographic data over large areas better than other technologies. A new generation of high resolution (~ 1m) Digital Terrain Models (DTMs) are now available for different landscapes. These data call for the development of the new generation of methodologies for objective extraction of geomorphic features, such as channel heads, channel networks, bank geometry, landslide scars, service roads, etc. The most important benefit of a high resolution DTM is the detailed recognition of surface features. It is possible to recognize in detail divergent-convex landforms, associated with the dominance of hillslope processes, and convergent-concave landforms, associated with fluvial-dominated erosion. In this work, we test the performance of new methodologies for objective extraction of geomorphic features related to landsliding and channelized processes in order to provide a semi-automatic method for channel network and landslide features recognition in a complex mountainous terrain. The methodologies are based on the detection of thresholds derived by statistical analysis of variability of surface curvature. We considered a study area located in the eastern Italian Alps where a high-quality set of LiDAR data is available and where channel heads, related channel network, and landslides have been mapped in the field by DGPS. In the analysis we derived 1 m DTMs from bare ground LiDAR points, and we used different smoothing factors for the curvature calculation in order to set the more suitable curvature maps for the recognition of selected features. Our analyses suggest that: i) the scale for curvature calculations has to be a function of the scale of the features to be detected, (ii) rougher curvature maps are not optimal as they do not explore a sufficient range at which features occur, while smoother

  11. Smoke Dispersion Modeling Over Complex Terrain Using High-Resolution Meteorological Data and Satellite Observations: The FireHub Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomos, S.; Amiridis, V.; Zanis, P.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Sofiou, F. I.; Herekakis, T.; Brioude, J.; Stohl, A.; Kahn, R. A.; Kontoes, C.

    2015-01-01

    A total number of 20,212 fire hot spots were recorded by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite instrument over Greece during the period 2002e2013. The Fire Radiative Power (FRP) of these events ranged from 10 up to 6000 MW at 1 km resolution, and many of these fire episodes resulted in long-range transport of smoke over distances up to several hundred kilometers. Three different smoke episodes over Greece are analyzed here using real time hot-spot observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) satellite instrument as well as from MODIS hot-spots. Simulations of smoke dispersion are performed with the FLEXPART-WRF model and particulate matter emissions are calculated directly from the observed FRP. The modeled smoke plumes are compared with smoke stereo-heights from the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument and the sensitivities to atmospheric and modeling parameters are examined. Driving the simulations with high resolution meteorology (4 4 km) and using geostationary satellite data to identify the hot spots allows the description of local scale features that govern smoke dispersion. The long-range transport of smoke is found to be favored over the complex coastline environment of Greece due to the abrupt changes between land and marine planetary boundary layers (PBL) and the decoupling of smoke layers from the surface.

  12. Smoke dispersion modeling over complex terrain using high resolution meteorological data and satellite observations - The FireHub platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomos, S.; Amiridis, V.; Zanis, P.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Sofiou, F. I.; Herekakis, T.; Brioude, J.; Stohl, A.; Kahn, R. A.; Kontoes, C.

    2015-10-01

    A total number of 20,212 fire hot spots were recorded by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite instrument over Greece during the period 2002-2013. The Fire Radiative Power (FRP) of these events ranged from 10 up to 6000 MW at 1 km resolution, and many of these fire episodes resulted in long-range transport of smoke over distances up to several hundred kilometers. Three different smoke episodes over Greece are analyzed here using real time hot-spot observations from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) satellite instrument as well as from MODIS hot-spots. Simulations of smoke dispersion are performed with the FLEXPART-WRF model and particulate matter emissions are calculated directly from the observed FRP. The modeled smoke plumes are compared with smoke stereo-heights from the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) instrument and the sensitivities to atmospheric and modeling parameters are examined. Driving the simulations with high resolution meteorology (4 × 4 km) and using geostationary satellite data to identify the hot spots allows the description of local scale features that govern smoke dispersion. The long-range transport of smoke is found to be favored over the complex coastline environment of Greece due to the abrupt changes between land and marine planetary boundary layers (PBL) and the decoupling of smoke layers from the surface.

  13. Modeling Feasibility of a Proposed Renewable Energy System with Wind and Solar Resources and Hydro Storage in Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Koracin, D.; Hamilton, R.; Hagen, D.; King, K. C.

    2012-04-01

    High temporal and spatial variability in wind and solar power brings difficulties in integrating these resources into an electricity grid. These difficulties are even more emphasized in areas with complex topography due to complicated flow patterns and cloudiness evolution. This study investigates the feasibility and efficiency of a proposed renewable energy system with wind and solar resources and hydro storages in western Nevada, U.S.A. The state-of-the-art Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was used for the prediction of wind fields and incoming solar radiation at the ground surface. Forecast winds and solar radiation were evaluated with observational data from four wind masts and four meteorological towers in two months, July 2007 and January 2010. Based on a hypothetical wind farm and an assumed neighboring solar power plant both located near the hydro storage facility, as well as considering local power demand, the efficiency of the renewable energy system is projected. One of the main questions was how to optimize a schedule of activating pump storages according to the characteristics of several available hydro pumps, and wind and/or solar power predictions. The results show that segmentation of the pump-storage channel provides improved efficiency of the entire system. This modeled renewable energy system shows promise for possible applications and grid integration.

  14. The strength of contributions from topography mismatch and measurement filtering to simulated net ecosystem exchange in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, B.; Desai, A. R.; Stephens, B. B.; Jacobson, A. R.

    2011-12-01

    Global scale carbon cycle inverse models provide invaluable information for the construction of empirically based carbon budgets based on in situ measurements. In landscapes of predominantly smooth topography inverse carbon cycle models are useful for diagnosing the magnitude and climate sensitivity of different regional carbon sinks. However, in landscapes of predominately complex topography inversion model results come with strong caveats for two reasons: 1) Coarse gridding of model topography can lead the model to sample observations at elevations far above the model surface, and 2) Transport wind fields over smoothed model representations of mountain regions are not always sufficiently resolved to inform the model about the source region for assimilated measurements. The uncertainty contributed by incorrect winds and topography mismatches (e.g., differences between the actual measurement elevation and model surface on the order of 1,000 m) is thought to be smaller for higher resolution regional inversion models (e.g., Gockede et al., 2010; Schuh et al. 2010), but these uncertainties are not well constrained for larger scale inversion systems (e.g., Peters et al., 2010), which are one of few ways for determining the relative priority of regional sinks. In this work we examine the effects on net ecosystem exchange (NEE) for a global scale inversion system when 1) topography mismatches are ameliorated, and 2) subset observations consistent with model resolution are used rather than observation-based subsets. Our focus is to use an example inversion model system, CarbonTracker (Peters et al., 2007; 2010), driven by CO2 mixing ratio measurements, including the RACCOON Network in the United States Mountain West (raccoon.ucar.edu), to quantify and compare the contribution to NEE from tower elevation mismatches and filtering strategies across biomes and and in terms of forecast skill (model data mismatch). We further compare our results to the differences in NEE over

  15. Automatic remote sensing detection of the convective boundary layer structure over flat and complex terrain using the novel PathfinderTURB algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poltera, Yann; Martucci, Giovanni; Hervo, Maxime; Haefele, Alexander; Emmenegger, Lukas; Brunner, Dominik; Henne, stephan

    2016-04-01

    We have developed, applied and validated a novel algorithm called PathfinderTURB for the automatic and real-time detection of the vertical structure of the planetary boundary layer. The algorithm has been applied to a year of data measured by the automatic LIDAR CHM15K at two sites in Switzerland: the rural site of Payerne (MeteoSwiss station, 491 m, asl), and the alpine site of Kleine Scheidegg (KSE, 2061 m, asl). PathfinderTURB is a gradient-based layer detection algorithm, which in addition makes use of the atmospheric variability to detect the turbulent transition zone that separates two low-turbulence regions, one characterized by homogeneous mixing (convective layer) and one above characterized by free tropospheric conditions. The PathfinderTURB retrieval of the vertical structure of the Local (5-10 km, horizontal scale) Convective Boundary Layer (LCBL) has been validated at Payerne using two established reference methods. The first reference consists of four independent human-expert manual detections of the LCBL height over the year 2014. The second reference consists of the values of LCBL height calculated using the bulk Richardson number method based on co-located radio sounding data for the same year 2014. Based on the excellent agreement with the two reference methods at Payerne, we decided to apply PathfinderTURB to the complex-terrain conditions at KSE during 2014. The LCBL height retrievals are obtained by tilting the CHM15K at an angle of 19 degrees with respect to the horizontal and aiming directly at the Sphinx Observatory (3580 m, asl) on the Jungfraujoch. This setup of the CHM15K and the processing of the data done by the PathfinderTURB allows to disentangle the long-transport from the local origin of gases and particles measured by the in-situ instrumentation at the Sphinx Observatory. The KSE measurements showed that the relation amongst the LCBL height, the aerosol layers above the LCBL top and the gas + particle concentration is all but

  16. [Financial capital versus medical-industrial complex: challenges for the regulatory agencies].

    PubMed

    Iriart, Celia

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the structural processes that consolidated under the hegemony of the financial capital in the 90s; the dispute between the financial capital operating in the health sector and the medical-industrial complex; the strategies used by the medical-industrial complex for regaining positions; and the challenges all these processes pose for the regulatory agencies. The problems the regulatory agencies are facing lie in two central processes: 1) the hegemony the financial capital reached in the 90s in the health sector through reforms aimed at deregulating the sector in order to facilitate its entrance; and 2) the repositioning of the medical-industrial complex since the mid 90s by radicalizing medicalization. This article is based on several studies conducted by the author using qualitative methods and quantitative secondary data for understanding the historical-situational context. The theoretical approach was based on Marx, Gramsci, Benasayag, Badiou, Testa and Merhy. The analyses of the most recent reforms induced by the medical-industrial complex were the result of a bibliographic and document review.

  17. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of NOX over complex terrain region of Ranchi with FLEXPART-WRF by incorporation of improved turbulence intensity relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madala, Srikanth; Satyanarayana, A. N. V.; Srinivas, C. V.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate representation of air pollutant dispersion is essential for environmental management and planning purposes. In this study, semi-empirical relationships of turbulence intensity (σu/u*, σv/u* and σw/u*) as a function of surface layer scaling and local stability are developed following boundary layer similarity concepts at Ranchi, a complex terrain in Jharkhand, Eastern India for various seasons. The impact of the new turbulence parameterization for air pollution dispersion simulation is studied by incorporating the same in the Hanna scheme of FLEXPART-WRF Lagrangian Particle dispersion model over study region. The model is used to estimate the ground level concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx) due to industrial and vehicular sources in study region. The meteorological parameters needed in air-quality simulation are simulated using the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) mesoscale model at high resolution (3 km). Three turbulence schemes (YSU, MYNN2 and ACM2) in ARW are alternatively tested in dispersion simulation and comparisons are made with available air quality data for eight days in different seasons (winter, pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon). Simulations with FLEXPART revealed distinct seasonal variation of dispersion patterns. It has been found that the new turbulence intensity relationships in FLEXPART improved the NOx concentration estimates by reducing the negative bias seen with default Hanna scheme. Further, the ARW simulated meteorological parameters using ACM2 and MYNN2 significantly reduced the bias in modeled pollutant concentrations. The study demonstrates the utility of high quality seasonal turbulence measurements in pollution dispersion model for better diffusion parameterization needed in air quality modeling.

  18. Evaluation of a Sub-Grid Topographic Drag Parameterizations for Modeling Surface Wind Speed During Storms Over Complex Terrain in the Northeast U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frediani, M. E.; Hacker, J.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Hopson, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    This study aims at improving regional simulation of 10-meter wind speed by verifying PBL schemes for storms at different scales, including convective storms, blizzards, tropical storms and nor'easters over complex terrain in the northeast U.S. We verify a recently proposed sub-grid topographic drag scheme in stormy conditions and compare it with two PBL schemes (Mellor-Yamada and Yonsei University) from WRF-ARW over a region in the Northeast U.S. The scheme was designed to adjust the surface drag over regions with high subgrid-scale topographic variability. The schemes are compared using spatial, temporal, and pattern criteria against surface observations. The spatial and temporal criteria are defined by season, diurnal cycle, and topography; the pattern, is based on clusters derived using clustering analysis. Results show that the drag scheme reduces the positive bias of low wind speeds, but over-corrects the high wind speeds producing a magnitude-increasing negative bias with increasing speed. Both other schemes underestimate the most frequent low-speed mode and overestimate the high-speeds. Error characteristics of all schemes respond to seasonal and diurnal cycle changes. The Topo-wind experiment shows the best agreement with the observation quantiles in summer and fall, the best representation of the diurnal cycle in these seasons, and reduces the bias of all surface stations near the coast. In more stable conditions the Topo-wind scheme shows a larger negative bias. The cluster analysis reveals a correlation between bias and mean speed from the Mellor-Yamada and Yonsei University schemes that is not present when the drag scheme is used. When the drag scheme is used the bias correlates with wind direction; the bias increases when the meridional wind component is negative. This pattern corresponds to trajectories with more land interaction with the highest biases found in northwest circulation clusters.

  19. Turbulence regimes and the validity of similarity theory in the stable boundary layer over complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiening; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Ying; Cao, Xianjie; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Hongbin; Zhang, Beidou

    2014-05-01

    To gain an insight into the characteristics of turbulence in a stable boundary layer over the complex terrain of the Loess Plateau, data from the Semi-Arid Climate and Environment Observatory of Lanzhou University are analyzed. We propose a method to identify and efficiently isolate nonstationary motions from turbulence series, and then we examine the characteristics of nonstationary motions (nonstationary motions refer to gusty events on a greater scale than local shear-generated turbulence). The occurrence frequency of nonstationary motions is found to depend on the mean flow, being more frequent in weak wind conditions and vanishing when the wind speed, U, is greater than 3.0 m s-1. When U exceeds the threshold value of 1.0 m s-1 for the gradient Richardson number Ri ≤ 0.3 and 1.5 m s-1 for Ri > 0.3, local shear-generated turbulence on timescales of less than 4 min depends systematically on U with an average rate of 0.05 U. However, for the weak wind condition, neither the mean wind speed nor the stability is an important factor for local turbulence. Then turbulence is categorized into three regimes based on the behaviors of nonstationary motions and local turbulence. Regime 1 considers stationary turbulence with a wind speed greater than 3.0 m s-1, and the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) can be used to calculate the turbulence momentum flux. Regime 2 examines intermittent turbulence where the MOST is competent to evaluate the local turbulence momentum flux but not nonstationary motions. Regime 3 involves wind speed that is less than the threshold value, where nonstationary motions are dominant, local turbulence is independent of the mean flow, and where the MOST may well be invalid.

  20. 77 FR 51731 - All-Terrain Vehicle Safety Summit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... COMMISSION 16 CFR Chapter II All-Terrain Vehicle Safety Summit AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission... announcing its intent to hold a Summit on all-terrain vehicle (ATV) safety. The Summit will be held at the... information at the Summit should register by September 14, 2012; all other individuals who wish to attend...

  1. DIORAMA Earth Terrain Model

    SciTech Connect

    Werley, Kenneth Alan

    2015-03-10

    When simulating near-surface nuclear detonations, the terrain of the Earth can have an effect on the observed outputs. The critical parameter is called the “height of burst”. In order to model the effect of terrain on the simulations we have incorporated data from multiple sources to give 9 km resolution data with global coverage.

  2. Terrain Software Conversion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-29

    iv~ 1. Background. In 1979, CASAA (now TRAC-FLVN) contracted BDM Corporation to produce a terrain data base for the Corps Battle Game (predecessor to...vie% and mod-fv terrain Gata used by several of TRAO-FLVN’s war - si-,ulatiors was comnatible only with Tektronix 4027 hardware. TAB-GT was -,e- tc

  3. 75 FR 5767 - All Terrain Vehicle Chinese Language Webinar; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION All Terrain Vehicle Chinese Language Webinar; Meeting AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is announcing the following meeting:...

  4. In search of the mechanisms behind soil carbon metabolism of a Douglas fir forest in complex terrain using naturally abundant 13C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayler, Z. E.; Sulzman, E. W.; Barnard, H. R.; Kennedy, A.; Phillips, C.; Mix, A.; Bond, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Soil is well known for being highly variable, spatially and temporally, in moisture, texture, nutrients, carbon content and organisms. The magnitude of variation in soil characteristics represented in a study is, in part, determined by the choice in site location. Choosing sites that are topographically flat reduces variability due to environmental gradients, variability that is amplified in sites of complex terrain. We measured soil respiration, an integrative measure of ecosystem biological and physical processes, and its isotopic signature (δ13CR-s) to accomplish two goals: 1. Explore how gradients in temperature and moisture within a steeply sloped watershed affect the flux and isotopic signature of soil CO2 2. Deconvolve the isotopic signature of soil respiration into autotrophic and heterotrophic sources using a multi-source mixing model constrained by samples of soil organic matter and water soluble extracts of leaf foliage. Our site is located in a steep catchment within the central Cascades of Oregon (HJ Andrews LTER) where we made respiration measurements in plots established along side a sensor transect that continuously measures soil moisture and temperature; air relative humidity and temperature; and tree transpiration. There was a distinct difference in soil metabolism between the south and north aspects in the watershed. Temperature-corrected basal respiration of the south facing slope was 1 μmol m-2s-1 greater than the north facing slope. There was also a difference in isotopic signature between the two slopes that could be as great as 2 per mil depending on the period within the growing season. The strength of the correlation between environmental variables and soil carbon flux was non-uniform across the catchment. There was, however, a strong positive correlation between soil flux with recent transpiration rates (0 to 3 days prior) as well as with transpiration rates that occurred up to 9 days previously. This pattern was especially prevalent

  5. LOLA: Defining Lunar Terrain

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument on board NASA's LRO spacecraft builds the highest detail topography currently available of the lunar terrain. In this video David Smith, LOLA's P...

  6. Sampling in rugged terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, D.K.; Ralph, C. John; Scott, J. Michael

    1981-01-01

    Work in rugged terrain poses some unique problems that should be considered before research is initiated. Besides the obvious physical difficulties of crossing uneven terrain, topography can influence the bird species? composition of a forest and the observer's ability to detect birds and estimate distances. Census results can also be affected by the slower rate of travel on rugged terrain. Density figures may be higher than results obtained from censuses in similar habitat on level terrain because of the greater likelihood of double-recording of individuals and of recording species that sing infrequently. In selecting a census technique, the researcher should weigh the efficiency and applicability of a technique for the objectives of his study in light of the added difficulties posed by rugged terrain. The variable circular-plot method is probably the most effective technique for estimating bird numbers. Bird counts and distance estimates are facilitated because the observer is stationary, and calculations of species? densities take into account differences in effective area covered amongst stations due to variability in terrain or vegetation structure. Institution of precautions that minimize the risk of injury to field personnel can often enhance the observer?s ability to detect birds.

  7. Perception for rugged terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kweon, In SO; Hebert, Martial; Kanade, Takeo

    1989-01-01

    A three-dimensional perception system for building a geometrical description of rugged terrain environments from range image data is presented with reference to the exploration of the rugged terrain of Mars. An intermediate representation consisting of an elevation map that includes an explicit representation of uncertainty and labeling of the occluded regions is proposed. The locus method used to convert range image to an elevation map is introduced, along with an uncertainty model based on this algorithm. Both the elevation map and the locus method are the basis of a terrain matching algorithm which does not assume any correspondences between range images. The two-stage algorithm consists of a feature-based matching algorithm to compute an initial transform and an iconic terrain matching algorithm to merge multiple range images into a uniform representation. Terrain modeling results on real range images of rugged terrain are presented. The algorithms considered are a fundamental part of the perception system for the Ambler, a legged locomotor.

  8. Evaluation of a spatial rainfall generator and an interpolation methods for the creation of future gridded data sets over complex terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, Corrado; Bruggeman, Adriana; Hadjinicolaou, Panos; Michaelides, Silas; Lange, Manfred A.

    2015-04-01

    Space-time variability of precipitation plays a key role as a driver of many processes in different environmental fields like hydrology, ecology, biology, agriculture, and natural hazards. The objective of this study was to compare two approaches for statistical downscaling of precipitation from climate models. The study was applied to the island of Cyprus, an orographically complex terrain. The first approach makes use of a spatial temporal Neyman-Scott Rectangular Pulses (NSRP) model and a previously tested interpolation scheme (Camera et al., 2014). The second approach is based on the use of the single site NSRP model and a simplified gridded scheme based on scaling coefficients obtained from past observations. The rainfall generators were evaluated on the period 1980-2010. Both approaches were subsequently used to downscale three RCMs from the EU ENSEMBLE project to calculate climate projections (2020-2050). The main advantage of the spatial-temporal approach is that it allows creating spatially consistent daily maps of precipitation. On the other hand, due to the assumptions made using a stochastic generator based on homogeneous Poisson processes, it shows a smoothing out of all the rainfall statistics (except mean and variance) all over the study area. This leads to high errors when analyzing indices related to extremes. Examples are the number of days with rainfall over 50 mm (R50 - mean error 65%), the 95th percentile value of rainy days (RT95 - mean error 19%), and the mean annual rainfall recorded on days with rainfall above the 95th percentile (RA95 - mean error 22%). The single site approach excludes the possibility of using the created gridded data sets for case studies involving spatial connection between grid cells (e.g. hydrologic modelling), but it leads to a better reproduction of rainfall statistics and properties. The errors for the extreme indices are in fact much lower: 17% for R50, 4% for RT95, and 2% for RA95. Future projections show a

  9. DspaceOgreTerrain 3D Terrain Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myint, Steven; Jain, Abhinandan; Pomerantz, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    DspaceOgreTerrain is an extension to the DspaceOgre 3D visualization tool that supports real-time visualization of various terrain types, including digital elevation maps, planets, and meshes. DspaceOgreTerrain supports creating 3D representations of terrains and placing them in a scene graph. The 3D representations allow for a continuous level of detail, GPU-based rendering, and overlaying graphics like wheel tracks and shadows. It supports reading data from the SimScape terrain- modeling library. DspaceOgreTerrain solves the problem of displaying the results of simulations that involve very large terrains. In the past, it has been used to visualize simulations of vehicle traverses on Lunar and Martian terrains. These terrains were made up of billions of vertices and would not have been renderable in real-time without using a continuous level of detail rendering technique.

  10. Sakhalin Island terrain intelligence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1943-01-01

    This folio of maps and explanatory tables outlines the principal terrain features of Sakhalin Island. Each map and table is devoted to a specialized set of problems; together they cover the subjects of terrain appreciation, climate, rivers, water supply, construction materials, suitability for roads, suitability for airfields, fuels and other mineral resources, and geology. In most cases, the map of the island is divided into two parts: N. of latitude 50° N., Russian Sakhalin, and south of latitude 50° N., Japanese Sakhalin or Karafuto. These maps and data were compiled by the United States Geological Survey during the period from March to September, 1943.

  11. Vegetation and terrain mapping in Alaska using Landsat MSS and digital terrain data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shasby, Mark; Carneggie, David M.

    1986-01-01

    During the past 5 years, the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center Field Office in Anchorage, Alaska has worked cooperatively with Federal and State resource management agencies to produce land-cover and terrain maps for 245 million acres of Alaska. The need for current land-cover information in Alaska comes principally from the mandates of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA), December 1980, which requires major land management agencies to prepare comprehensive management plans. The land-cover mapping projects integrate digital Landsat data, terrain data, aerial photographs, and field data. The resultant land-cover and terrain maps and associated data bases are used for resource assessment, management, and planning by many Alaskan agencies including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Alaska Department of Natural Resources. Applications addressed through use of the digital land-cover and terrain data bases range from comprehensive refuge planning to multiphased sampling procedures designed to inventory vegetation statewide. The land-cover mapping programs in Alaska demonstrate the operational utility of digital Landsat data and have resulted in a new land-cover mapping program by the USGS National Mapping Division to compile 1:250,000-scale land-cover maps in Alaska using a common statewide land-cover map legend.

  12. Resolving Extreme Rainfall from Space: A New Class of Algorithms for Precipitation Retrieval and Data Fusion/Assimilation with Emphasis on Extremes over Complex Terrain and Coastal Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Ebtehaj, A.

    2015-12-01

    The increasing availability of precipitation observations from the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) Mission, has fueled renewed interest in developing frameworks for accurate estimation of precipitation extremes especially over ungauged mountainous terrains and coastal regions to improve hydro-geological hazard prediction and control. Our recent research has shown that treating precipitation retrieval and data fusion/assimilation as inverse problems and using a regularized variational approach with the regularization term(s) selected to impose desired smoothness in the solution, leads to improved representation of extremes. Here we present some new theoretical and computational developments which extend the ideas to a model-agnostic framework of retrieval via a regularized search within properly constructed data bases. We test the framework in several tropical storms over the Ganges-Brahmaputra delta region and over the Himalayas and compare the results with the standard retrieval algorithms currently used for operational purposes.

  13. Managing Cooperation and Complexity in Education: The Case of Educational Service Agencies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Janet A.; And Others

    Educational Service Agencies (ESA's) are public education agencies that provide specialized programs and services to a group of school districts in a specified geographical region and to the state department of education. Most states have encouraged the development of ESA's that have either evolved out of county districts or have been created to…

  14. Skyline based terrain matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, Lance A.

    1990-01-01

    Skyline-based terrain matching, a new method for locating the vantage point of stereo camera or laser range-finding measurements on a global map previously prepared by satellite or aerial mapping is described. The orientation of the vantage is assumed known, but its translational parameters are determined by the algorithm. Skylines, or occluding contours, can be extracted from the sensory measurements taken by an autonomous vehicle. They can also be modeled from the global map, given a vantage estimate from which to start. The two sets of skylines, represented in cylindrical coordinates about either the true or the estimated vantage, are employed as 'features' or reference objects common to both sources of information. The terrain matching problem is formulated in terms of finding a translation between the respective representations of the skylines, by approximating the two sets of skylines as identical features (curves) on the actual terrain. The search for this translation is based on selecting the longest of the minimum-distance vectors between corresponding curves from the two sets of skylines. In successive iterations of the algorithm, the approximation that the two sets of curves are identical becomes more accurate, and the vantage estimate continues to improve. The algorithm was implemented and evaluated on a simulated terrain. Illustrations and examples are included.

  15. 75 FR 76708 - Extension of the Date by Which Youth All-Terrain Vehicles Must Be Tested and Certified

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... COMMISSION Extension of the Date by Which Youth All-Terrain Vehicles Must Be Tested and Certified AGENCY... youth all-terrain vehicles. SUMMARY: The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (``CPSC'' or... (including importers) of youth all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) must submit sufficient samples of such products...

  16. 77 FR 29749 - Twelfth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217, Joint with EUROCAE WG-44, Terrain and Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... Committee 217, Joint with EUROCAE WG-44, Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases AGENCY: Federal Aviation... 217, Joint with EUROCAE WG-44, Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this..., Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases. DATES: The meeting will be held June 18-22, 2012, from 9:00...

  17. 76 FR 27744 - Eighth Meeting-RTCA Special Committee 217: Joint With EUROCAE WG-44 Terrain and Airport Mapping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 217: Joint with EUROCAE WG-44 Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases...: Joint with EUROCAE WG-44 Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases. DATES: The meeting will be held June...

  18. 76 FR 54527 - Ninth Meeting-RTCA Special Committee 217: Joint With EUROCAE WG-44 Terrain and Airport Mapping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 217: Joint with EUROCAE WG-44 Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases...: Joint with EUROCAE WG-44 Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases. DATES: The meeting will be...

  19. Conclusion: Agency in the face of complexity and the future of assumption-aware evaluation practice.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Nathan; Nkwake, Apollo M

    2016-12-01

    This final chapter in the volume pulls together common themes from the diverse set of articles by a group of eight authors in this issue, and presents some reflections on the next steps for improving the ways in which evaluators work with assumptions. Collectively, the authors provide a broad overview of existing and emerging approaches to the articulation and use of assumptions in evaluation theory and practice. The authors reiterate the rationale and key terminology as a common basis for working with assumption in program design and evaluation. They highlight some useful concepts and categorizations to promote more rigorous treatment of assumptions in evaluation. A three-tier framework for fostering agency for assumption-aware evaluation practice is proposed-agency for themselves (evaluators); agency for others (stakeholders); and agency for standards and principles.

  20. PROGRAM-ORIENTED INFORMATION--A MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS COMPLEX FOR STATE EDUCATION AGENCIES. PART II, MANUAL OF ACCOUNTING AND RELATED FINANCIAL PROCEDURES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FRIEDMAN, BURTON DEAN; AND OTHERS

    THIS DOCUMENT IS THE SECOND PART OF A REPORT, PROGRAM-ORIENTED INFORMATION--A MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS COMPLEX FOR STATE EDUCATION AGENCIES. PART 1, EA 001 170, SUBTITLED "ANALYSIS AND PROPOSALS," CONTAINS AN OUTLINE OF THE NEED FOR A MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS COMPLEX WITHIN EACH STATE EDUCATION AGENCY. THIS DOCUMENT IS A MANUAL PRESENTING THE…

  1. Fretted Terrain Valleys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    30 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows shallow tributary valleys in the Ismenius Lacus fretted terrain region of northern Arabia Terra. These valleys exhibit a variety of typical fretted terrain valley wall and floor textures, including a lineated, pitted material somewhat reminiscent of the surface of a brain. Origins for these features are still being debated within the Mars science community; there are no clear analogs to these landforms on Earth. This image is located near 39.9oN, 332.1oW. The picture covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  2. Spatial patterning in PM2.5 constituents under an inversion-focused sampling design across an urban area of complex terrain

    PubMed Central

    Tunno, Brett J; Dalton, Rebecca; Michanowicz, Drew R; Shmool, Jessie L C; Kinnee, Ellen; Tripathy, Sheila; Cambal, Leah; Clougherty, Jane E

    2016-01-01

    Health effects of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) vary by chemical composition, and composition can help to identify key PM2.5 sources across urban areas. Further, this intra-urban spatial variation in concentrations and composition may vary with meteorological conditions (e.g., mixing height). Accordingly, we hypothesized that spatial sampling during atmospheric inversions would help to better identify localized source effects, and reveal more distinct spatial patterns in key constituents. We designed a 2-year monitoring campaign to capture fine-scale intra-urban variability in PM2.5 composition across Pittsburgh, PA, and compared both spatial patterns and source effects during “frequent inversion” hours vs 24-h weeklong averages. Using spatially distributed programmable monitors, and a geographic information systems (GIS)-based design, we collected PM2.5 samples across 37 sampling locations per year to capture variation in local pollution sources (e.g., proximity to industry, traffic density) and terrain (e.g., elevation). We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to determine elemental composition, and unconstrained factor analysis to identify source suites by sampling scheme and season. We examined spatial patterning in source factors using land use regression (LUR), wherein GIS-based source indicators served to corroborate factor interpretations. Under both summer sampling regimes, and for winter inversion-focused sampling, we identified six source factors, characterized by tracers associated with brake and tire wear, steel-making, soil and road dust, coal, diesel exhaust, and vehicular emissions. For winter 24-h samples, four factors suggested traffic/fuel oil, traffic emissions, coal/industry, and steel-making sources. In LURs, as hypothesized, GIS-based source terms better explained spatial variability in inversion-focused samples, including a greater contribution from roadway, steel, and coal-related sources. Factor analysis

  3. Statistical Modeling of Robotic Random Walks on Different Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naylor, Austin; Kinnaman, Laura

    Issues of public safety, especially with crowd dynamics and pedestrian movement, have been modeled by physicists using methods from statistical mechanics over the last few years. Complex decision making of humans moving on different terrains can be modeled using random walks (RW) and correlated random walks (CRW). The effect of different terrains, such as a constant increasing slope, on RW and CRW was explored. LEGO robots were programmed to make RW and CRW with uniform step sizes. Level ground tests demonstrated that the robots had the expected step size distribution and correlation angles (for CRW). The mean square displacement was calculated for each RW and CRW on different terrains and matched expected trends. The step size distribution was determined to change based on the terrain; theoretical predictions for the step size distribution were made for various simple terrains. It's Dr. Laura Kinnaman, not sure where to put the Prefix.

  4. On the Complexity of Digital Video Cameras in/as Research: Perspectives and Agencements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bangou, Francis

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to consider the potential for digital video cameras to produce as part of a research agencement. Our reflection will be guided by the current literature on the use of video recordings in research, as well as by the rhizoanalysis of two vignettes. The first of these vignettes is associated with a short video clip shot by…

  5. Holographic Terrain Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    Panatomic-X Negative Print 18 6 AGFA Negative Print 19 7 Resolution Test 20 8 Terrain Resolution Test 21 9 Resolution Target with Incoherent Light...negatives by using AGFA 10E75 35mm film. This film is used for holography and has a relatively high resolution and high contrast when com- pared to...Figures 5 and 6 show projection prints of a typical Panatomic-X negative and a typical AGFA 10E75 negative. Resolution measurements were made by

  6. Information measures for terrain visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaventura, Xavier; Sima, Aleksandra A.; Feixas, Miquel; Buckley, Simon J.; Sbert, Mateu; Howell, John A.

    2017-02-01

    Many quantitative and qualitative studies in geoscience research are based on digital elevation models (DEMs) and 3D surfaces to aid understanding of natural and anthropogenically-influenced topography. As well as their quantitative uses, the visual representation of DEMs can add valuable information for identifying and interpreting topographic features. However, choice of viewpoints and rendering styles may not always be intuitive, especially when terrain data are augmented with digital image texture. In this paper, an information-theoretic framework for object understanding is applied to terrain visualization and terrain view selection. From a visibility channel between a set of viewpoints and the component polygons of a 3D terrain model, we obtain three polygonal information measures. These measures are used to visualize the information associated with each polygon of the terrain model. In order to enhance the perception of the terrain's shape, we explore the effect of combining the calculated information measures with the supplementary digital image texture. From polygonal information, we also introduce a method to select a set of representative views of the terrain model. Finally, we evaluate the behaviour of the proposed techniques using example datasets. A publicly available framework for both the visualization and the view selection of a terrain has been created in order to provide the possibility to analyse any terrain model.

  7. 76 FR 44289 - Amendment to Standard for All-Terrain Vehicles; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... COMMISSION 16 CFR PART 1420 Amendment to Standard for All-Terrain Vehicles; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking... National Standard for Four-Wheel All-Terrain Vehicles Equipment Configuration, and Performance Requirements... 20814; telephone (301) 504-7923. Instructions: All submissions received must include the agency name...

  8. Eastern Siberia terrain intelligence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1942-01-01

    The following folio of terrain intelligence maps, charts and explanatory tables represent an attempt to bring together available data on natural physical conditions such as will affect military operations in Eastern Siberia. The area covered is the easternmost section of the U.S.S.R.; that is the area east of the Yenisei River. Each map and accompanying table is devoted· to a specialized set of problems; together they cover such subjects as geology, construction materials, mineral fuels, terrain, water supply, rivers and climate. The data is somewhat generalized due to the scale of treatment as well as to the scarcity of basic data. Each of the maps are rated as to reliability according to the reliability scale on the following page. Considerable of the data shown is of an interpretative nature, although precise data from literature was used wherever possible. The maps and tables were compiled  by a special group from the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the Intelligence Branch of the Office, Chief of Engineers, War Department.

  9. Scannerless terrain mapper

    SciTech Connect

    Sackos, J.; Bradley, B.; Diegert, C.; Ma, P.; Gary, C.

    1996-09-01

    NASA-Ames Research Center, in collaboration with Sandia National Laboratories, is developing a Scannerless Terrain Mapper (STM) for autonomous vehicle guidance through the use of virtual reality. The STM sensor is based on an innovative imaging optical radar technology that is being developed by Sandia National Laboratories. The sensor uses active flood-light scene illumination and an image intensified CCD camera receiver to rapidly produce and record very high quality range imagery of observed scenes. The STM is an all solid-state device (containing no moving parts) and offers significant size, performance, reliability, simplicity, and affordability advantages over other types of 3-D sensor technologies, such as scanned laser radar, stereo vision, and structured lighting. The sensor is based on low cost, commercially available hardware, and is very well suited for affordable application to a wide variety of military and commercial uses, including: munition guidance, target recognition, robotic vision, automated inspection, driver enhanced vision, collision avoidance, site security and monitoring, and facility surveying. This paper reviews the sensor technology, discusses NASA`s terrain mapping applications, and presents results from the initial testing of the sensor at NASA`s planetary landscape simulator.

  10. Parkview opens a new hospital. Fort Wayne, Ind., hospital works with agency in complex compaign.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2003-01-01

    Parkview Health, Forth Wayne, Ind., recently opened its new primary care hospital, Parkview North, an expansion of the services of its flagship Parkview Hospital. But the grand opening event was only one focus of the integrated advertising campaign, which also included a component to recruit staff. In view of the nationwide shortage of nurses, marketers faced the need for 200 nurses to staff the new facility. With its agency, Ten Adams, of Evansville, Ind., Parkview succeeded in opening its new hospital with a full complement of nurses.

  11. Prediction of a Flash Flood in Complex Terrain. Part I: A Comparison of Rainfall Estimates from Radar, and Very Short Range Rainfall Simulations from a Dynamic Model and an Automated Algorithmic System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Thomas T.; Brandes, Edward A.; Sun, Juanzhen; Yates, David N.; Mueller, Cynthia K.

    2000-06-01

    Operational prediction of flash floods caused by convective rainfall in mountainous areas requires accurate estimates or predictions of the rainfall distribution in space and time. The details of the spatial distribution are especially critical in complex terrain because the watersheds generally are small in size, and position errors in the placement of the rainfall can distribute the rain over the wrong watershed. In addition to the need for good rainfall estimates, accurate flood prediction requires a surface-hydrologic model that is capable of predicting stream or river discharge based on the rainfall-rate input data. In part 1 of this study, different techniques for the estimation and prediction of convective rainfall are applied to the Buffalo Creek, Colorado, flash flood of July 1996, during which over 75 mm of rain from a thunderstorm fell on the watershed in less than 1 h. The hydrologic impact of the rainfall was exacerbated by the fact that a considerable fraction of the watershed experienced a wildfire approximately two months prior to the rain event.Precipitation estimates from the National Weather Service Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler and the National Center for Atmospheric Research S-band, dual-polarization radar, collocated east of Denver, Colorado, were compared. Very short range simulations from a convection-resolving dynamic model that was initialized variationally using the radar reflectivity and Doppler winds were compared with simulations from an automated algorithmic forecast system that also employs the radar data. The radar estimates of rain rate and the two forecasting systems that employ the radar data have degraded accuracy by virtue of the fact that they are applied in complex terrain. Nevertheless, the dynamic model and automated algorithms both produce simulations that could be useful operationally for input to surface-hydrologic models employed for flood warning. Part 2 of this study, reported in a companion paper, describes

  12. Improving ozone modeling in complex terrain at a fine grid resolution - Part II: Influence of schemes in MM5 on daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations and RRFs (Relative Reduction Factors) for SIPs in the non-attainment areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunhee; Fu, Joshua S.; Miller, Terry L.

    2010-06-01

    Part II presents a comprehensive evaluation of CMAQ for August of 2002 on twenty-one sensitivity simulations (detailed in Part I) in MM5 to investigate the model performance for O 3 SIPs (State Implementation Plans) in the complex terrain. CMAQ performance was quite consistent with the results of MM5, meaning that accurate meteorological fields predicted in MM5 as an input resulted in good model performance of CMAQ. In this study, PBL scheme plays a more important role than its land surface models (LSMs) for the model performance of CMAQ. Our results have shown that the outputs of CMAQ on eighteen sensitivity simulations using two different nudging coefficients for winds (2.5 and 4.5 × 10 -4 s -1, respectively) tend to under predict daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations at valley areas except the TKE PBL sensitivity simulations (ETA M-Y PBL scheme with Noah LSMs and 5-layer soil model and Gayno-Seaman PBL) using 6.0 × 10 -4 s -1 with positive MB (Mean Bias). At mountain areas, none of the sensitivity simulations has presented over predictions for 8-h O 3, due to relatively poor meteorological model performance. When comparing 12-km and 4-km grid resolutions for the PX simulation in CMAQ statistics analysis, the CMAQ results at 12-km grid resolution consistently show under predictions of 8-h O 3 at both of valley and mountain areas and particularly, it shows relatively poor model performance with a 15.1% of NMB (Normalized Mean Bias). Based on our sensitivity simulations, the TKE PBL sensitivity simulations using a maximum value (6 × 10 -4) among other sensitivity simulations yielded better model performance of CMAQ at all areas in the complex terrain. As a result, the sensitivity of RRFs to the PBL scheme may be considerably significant with about 1-3 ppb in difference in determining whether the attainment test is passed or failed. Furthermore, we found that the result of CMAQ model performance depending on meteorological variations is affected on estimating

  13. Terrain analysis from visibility metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richbourg, Robert F.; Ray, Clark; Campbell, Larry L.

    1995-07-01

    Terrain analysis in support of planned military training or operations in a task which requires considerably training, skill, and experience. Military planners must synthesize knowledge of both their own and their expected adversary's tactics, weapons systems, and probable courses of action to determine key terrain, those portions of the terrain surface which have the most impact on the conduct of tactical operations. Many attributes of the actual terrain influence terrain analyses. These include elevation, intervisibility, vegetation cover, transportation networks, waterways, trafficability, soil types, and others. In some important areas of the world, the large set of attributes that influence terrain analysis is greatly reduced. Desert areas comprise one such areal class. As an example, a high resolution digital elevation model is sufficient to support most terrain analysis efforts for platoon and company operations in the US Marine Corps' dismounted infantry training area at 29 Palms, California. The digital elevation model allows an analysis to characterize each point in the model according to an approximate relative-visibility metric. Determination of key terrain, siting of probable defensive positions, and identification of highly concealed avenues of approach flow from examination of the resulting visibility model. These tactically significant areas can be used to conduct operations planning, perform DEM resolution studies, or help determine selective fidelity parameters for TIN modeling purposes.

  14. Mars Terrain Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deen, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    A suite of programs for the generation of disparity maps from stereo image pairs via correlation, and conversion of those disparity maps to XYZ maps, has been updated. This suite implements an automated method of deriving terrain from stereo images for use in the ground data system for in-situ (lander and rover) cameras. This differs from onboard correlation by concentrating more on accuracy than speed, since near-real-time is not a requirement on the ground. The final result is an XYZ value for every point in the image that passes several quality checks. A priori geometric camera calibration information is required for this suite to operate. The suite is very flexible, enabling its use in many special situations, such as non-linearized images required for applications like the Phoenix arm camera, or long-baseline stereo, where the rover moves between left and right images.

  15. From digital elevation model data to terrain depiction data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmetag, Arnd; Smietanski, Guillaume; Baumgart, Michael; Kubbat, Wolfgang

    1999-07-01

    The analysis of accidents focused our work on the avoidance of 'Controlled Flight Into Terrain' caused by insufficient situation awareness. Analysis of safety concepts led us to the design of the proposed synthetic vision system that will be described. Since most information on these 3D-Displays is shown in a graphical way, it can intuitively be seized by the pilot. One key element of SVS is terrain depiction, that is the topic of this paper. Real time terrain depiction has to face two requirements. On the one hand spatial awareness requires recognition of synthetic environment demanding characteristics. On the other hand the number of rendered polygons has to be minimized due to limitations of real time image generation performance. Visual quality can significantly be enhanced if equidistant data like Digital Elevation Model data (DEM) are vectorized. One method of data vectorization will be explained in detail and advantages will be mentioned. In Virtual Reality (VR) applications, conventional decimation software degrades the visual quality of geometry that is compensated by complex textures and lighting. Since terrain decimated with those tools looses its characteristics, and textures are not acceptable for several reasons, a terrain specific decimation has to be performed. How can a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) be decimated without decreasing the visualization value? In this paper, extraction of terrain characteristics and adapted decimation will be proposed. Steps from DEM to Terrain Depiction Data (TDD) are discussed in detail.

  16. Environmental impacts of forest road construction on mountainous terrain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Forest roads are the base infrastructure foundation of forestry operations. These roads entail a complex engineering effort because they can cause substantial environmental damage to forests and include a high-cost construction. This study was carried out in four sample sites of Giresun, Trabzon(2) and Artvin Forest Directorate, which is in the Black Sea region of Turkey. The areas have both steep terrain (30-50% gradient) and very steep terrain (51-80% gradient). Bulldozers and hydraulic excavators were determined to be the main machines for forest road construction, causing environmental damage and cross sections in mountainous areas. As a result of this study, the percent damage to forests was determined as follows: on steep terrain, 21% of trees were damaged by excavators and 33% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction, and on very steep terrain, 27% of trees were damaged by excavators and 44% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction. It was also determined that on steep terrain, when excavators were used, 12.23% less forest area was destroyed compared with when bulldozers were used and 16.13% less area was destroyed by excavators on very steep terrain. In order to reduce the environmental damage on the forest ecosystem, especially in steep terrains, hydraulic excavators should replace bulldozers in forest road construction activities. PMID:23497078

  17. Environmental impacts of forest road construction on mountainous terrain.

    PubMed

    Caliskan, Erhan

    2013-03-15

    Forest roads are the base infrastructure foundation of forestry operations. These roads entail a complex engineering effort because they can cause substantial environmental damage to forests and include a high-cost construction. This study was carried out in four sample sites of Giresun, Trabzon(2) and Artvin Forest Directorate, which is in the Black Sea region of Turkey. The areas have both steep terrain (30-50% gradient) and very steep terrain (51-80% gradient). Bulldozers and hydraulic excavators were determined to be the main machines for forest road construction, causing environmental damage and cross sections in mountainous areas.As a result of this study, the percent damage to forests was determined as follows: on steep terrain, 21% of trees were damaged by excavators and 33% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction, and on very steep terrain, 27% of trees were damaged by excavators and 44% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction. It was also determined that on steep terrain, when excavators were used, 12.23% less forest area was destroyed compared with when bulldozers were used and 16.13% less area was destroyed by excavators on very steep terrain. In order to reduce the environmental damage on the forest ecosystem, especially in steep terrains, hydraulic excavators should replace bulldozers in forest road construction activities.

  18. The Relevance of Surface Roughness Data Qualities in Diagnostic Modeling of Wind Velocity in Complex Terrain: A Case Study from the Śnieżnik Massif (SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jancewicz, Kacper; Szymanowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Numerical modeling of wind velocity above complex terrain has become a subject of numerous contemporary studies. Regardless of the methodical approach (dynamic or diagnostic), it can be observed that information about surface roughness is indispensable to achieve realistic results. In this context, the current state of GIS and remote sensing development allows access to a number of datasets providing information about various properties of land coverage in a broad spectrum of spatial resolution. Hence, the quality of roughness information may vary depending on the properties of primary land coverage data. As a consequence, the results of the wind velocity modeling are affected by the accuracy and spatial resolution of roughness data. This paper describes further attempts to model wind velocity using the following sources of roughness information: LiDAR data (Digital Surface Model and Digital Terrain Model), database of topographical objects (BDOT10k) and both raster and vector versions of Corine Land Cover 2006 (CLC). The modeling was conducted in WindStation 4.0.2 software which is based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) diagnostic solver Canyon. Presented experiment concerns three episodes of relatively strong and constant synoptic forcing: 26 November 2011, 25 May 2012 and 26 May 2012. The modeling was performed in the spatial resolution of 50 and 100 m. Input anemological data were collected during field measurements while the atmosphere boundary layer parameters were derived from the meteorological stations closest to the study area. The model's performance was verified using leave-one-out cross-validation and calculation of error indices such as bias error, root mean square error and index of wind speed. Thus, it was possible to compare results of using roughness datasets of different type and resolution. The study demonstrates that the use of LiDAR-based roughness data may result in an improvement of the model's performance in 100 and 50 m resolution

  19. The Relevance of Surface Roughness Data Qualities in Diagnostic Modeling of Wind Velocity in Complex Terrain: A Case Study from the Śnieżnik Massif (SW Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jancewicz, Kacper; Szymanowski, Mariusz

    2017-02-01

    Numerical modeling of wind velocity above complex terrain has become a subject of numerous contemporary studies. Regardless of the methodical approach (dynamic or diagnostic), it can be observed that information about surface roughness is indispensable to achieve realistic results. In this context, the current state of GIS and remote sensing development allows access to a number of datasets providing information about various properties of land coverage in a broad spectrum of spatial resolution. Hence, the quality of roughness information may vary depending on the properties of primary land coverage data. As a consequence, the results of the wind velocity modeling are affected by the accuracy and spatial resolution of roughness data. This paper describes further attempts to model wind velocity using the following sources of roughness information: LiDAR data (Digital Surface Model and Digital Terrain Model), database of topographical objects (BDOT10k) and both raster and vector versions of Corine Land Cover 2006 (CLC). The modeling was conducted in WindStation 4.0.2 software which is based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) diagnostic solver Canyon. Presented experiment concerns three episodes of relatively strong and constant synoptic forcing: 26 November 2011, 25 May 2012 and 26 May 2012. The modeling was performed in the spatial resolution of 50 and 100 m. Input anemological data were collected during field measurements while the atmosphere boundary layer parameters were derived from the meteorological stations closest to the study area. The model's performance was verified using leave-one-out cross-validation and calculation of error indices such as bias error, root mean square error and index of wind speed. Thus, it was possible to compare results of using roughness datasets of different type and resolution. The study demonstrates that the use of LiDAR-based roughness data may result in an improvement of the model's performance in 100 and 50 m resolution

  20. Northern Arabia Etched Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 23 May 2002) The Science Many places on Mars display scabby, eroded landscapes that commonly are referred to as etched terrain. These places have a ragged, tortured look that reveals a geologic history of intense deposition and erosion. This THEMIS image shows such a place. Here a 10 km diameter crater is superposed on the floor of a 40 km diameter crater, most of which is outside of the image but apparent in the MOLA context image. The rugged crater rim material intermingles with low, flat-topped mesas and layers with irregular outlines along with dune-like ridges on many of the flat surfaces. The horizontal layers that occur throughout the scene at different elevations are evidence of repeated episodes of deposition. The apparent ease with which these deposits have been eroded, most likely by wind, suggests that they are composed of poorly consolidated material. Air-fall sediments are the likely candidate for this material rather than lava flows. The dune-like ridges are probably inactive granule ripples produced from the interaction of wind and erosional debris. The large interior crater displays features that are the result of deposition and subsequent erosion. Its raised rim is barely discernable due to burial while piles and blocks of slumped material along the interior circumference attest to the action of erosion. Some of the blocks retain the same texture as the surrounding undisrupted surface. It appears as if the crater had been buried long enough for the overlying material to be eroded into the texture seen today. Then at some point this overburden foundered and collapsed into the crater. Continuing erosion has caused the upper layer to retreat back from what was probably the original rim of the crater, producing the noncircular appearance seen today. The length of time represented by this sequence of events as well as the conditions necessary to produce them are unknown. The Story Have you ever seen an ink etching, where the artistic cross

  1. Robot Would Climb Steep Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Brett; Ganino, Anthony; Aghazarian, Hrand; Hogg, Robert; McHerny, Michael; Garrett, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This brief describes the steep terrain access robot (STAR) -- a walking robot that has been proposed for exploring steep terrain on remote planets. The STAR would be able to climb up or down on slopes as steep as vertical, and even beyond vertical to overhangs. Its system of walking mechanisms and controls would be to react forces and maintain stability. To enable the STAR to anchor itself in the terrain on steep slopes to maintain stability and react forces, it would be necessary to equip the tips of the walking legs with new ultrasonic/ sonic drill corers (USDCs) and to develop sensors and control algorithms to enable robust utilization of the USDCs.

  2. Forecasting urban PM10 and PM2.5 pollution episodes in very stable nocturnal conditions and complex terrain using WRF-Chem CO tracer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saide, Pablo E.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Spak, Scott N.; Gallardo, Laura; Osses, Axel E.; Mena-Carrasco, Marcelo A.; Pagowski, Mariusz

    2011-05-01

    This study presents a system to predict high pollution events that develop in connection with enhanced subsidence due to coastal lows, particularly in winter over Santiago de Chile. An accurate forecast of these episodes is of interest since the local government is entitled by law to take actions in advance to prevent public exposure to PM10 concentrations in excess of 150 μg m -3 (24 h running averages). The forecasting system is based on accurately simulating carbon monoxide (CO) as a PM10/PM2.5 surrogate, since during episodes and within the city there is a high correlation (over 0.95) among these pollutants. Thus, by accurately forecasting CO, which behaves closely to a tracer on this scale, a PM estimate can be made without involving aerosol-chemistry modeling. Nevertheless, the very stable nocturnal conditions over steep topography associated with maxima in concentrations are hard to represent in models. Here we propose a forecast system based on the WRF-Chem model with optimum settings, determined through extensive testing, that best describe both meteorological and air quality available measurements. Some of the important configurations choices involve the boundary layer (PBL) scheme, model grid resolution (both vertical and horizontal), meteorological initial and boundary conditions and spatial and temporal distribution of the emissions. A forecast for the 2008 winter is performed showing that this forecasting system is able to perform similarly to the authority decision for PM10 and better than persistence when forecasting PM10 and PM2.5 high pollution episodes. Problems regarding false alarm predictions could be related to different uncertainties in the model such as day to day emission variability, inability of the model to completely resolve the complex topography and inaccuracy in meteorological initial and boundary conditions. Finally, according to our simulations, emissions from previous days dominate episode concentrations, which highlights the

  3. Mars digital terrain model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Sherman S. C.; Howington, Annie-Elpis

    1987-01-01

    The Mars Digital Terrain Model (DTM) is the result of a new project to: (1) digitize the series of 1:2,000,000-scale topographic maps of Mars, which are being derived photogrammetically under a separate project, and (2) reformat the digital contour information into rasters of elevation that can be readily registered with the Digital Image Model (DIM) of Mars. Derivation of DTM's involves interpolation of elevation values into 1/64-degree resolution and transformation of them to a sinusoidal equal-area projection. Digital data are produced in blocks corresponding with the coordinates of the original 1:2,000,000-scale maps, i.e., the dimensions of each block in the equatorial belt are 22.5 deg of longitude and 15 deg of latitude. This DTM is not only compatible with the DIM, but it can also be registered with other data such as geologic units or gravity. It will be the most comprehensive record of topographic information yet compiled for the Martian surface. Once the DTM's are established, any enhancement of Mars topographic information made with updated data, such as data from the planned Mars Observer Mission, will be by mathematical transformation of the DTM's, eliminating the need for recompilation.

  4. Martian terrain - 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An area of rocky terrain near the landing site of the Sagan Memorial Station can be seen in this image, taken in stereo by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. 3D glasses are necessary to identify surface detail. This image is part of a 3D 'monster' panorama of the area surrounding the landing site.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    Click below to see the left and right views individually. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right

  5. Modeling of thermotopographic flows in forested terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froelich, Norma Jeanne

    contributions are concerned with the radiative and thermal complexities that occur in forests in sloping terrain. Firstly, fully three-dimensional simulations of the radiation transfer through a forest in sloping terrain are computationally intensive; however, neglecting the heterogeneity of the terrain removes spatial variability in cooling and flow. To address this, the concept of view factor was used to adjust radiative fluxes obtained through computationally-efficient calculations, which assume horizontal homogeneity, to account for the heterogeneous terrain in which slope flows develop. Secondly, it was recognized that accurate simulation of cooling of air within a canopy can not be done without consideration of the differences in cooling rates of canopy elements and air. A parameterization was developed that implicitly accounts for radiative cooling of the canopy elements, heat storage in the canopy elements, and heat transfer between the canopy elements and the air. Limitations of these parameterizations and future developments are discussed. The model was used to investigate the impact of a range of slope angles and vegetation densities on thermotopographic flows. Simulated rates of cooling and resulting flows were unsteady or pulsing in nature, particularly within a more dense canopy. In thinner canopies, as expected, cooling was more rapid, resulting in stronger temperature inversions and faster downslope flows. Flows also were more rapid on steeper slopes, due to a greater along-slope component of the driving buoyancy force. These results demonstrate the future potential of modeling thermotopographic flows in forested terrain.

  6. Alternative Terrain Following System Concepts,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    inertial altitude rate command in response to errors in terrain clearance altitude. This command is limited and summed with the actual rate of change of...altitude rate command in response to errors in the clearance altitude. This command is limited and summed with the rate of change of clearance...altitude. The normal acceleration command is generated in response to errors in the rate of change of terrain clearance. System Concept B describes a

  7. Remote sensing of Earth terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, Jin AU; Shin, Robert T.; Nghiem, Son V.; Yueh, Herng-Aung; Han, Hsiu C.; Lim, Harold H.; Arnold, David V.

    1990-01-01

    Remote sensing of earth terrain is examined. The layered random medium model is used to investigate the fully polarimetric scattering of electromagnetic waves from vegetation. The model is used to interpret the measured data for vegetation fields such as rice, wheat, or soybean over water or soil. Accurate calibration of polarimetric radar systems is essential for the polarimetric remote sensing of earth terrain. A polarimetric calibration algorithm using three arbitrary in-scene reflectors is developed. In the interpretation of active and passive microwave remote sensing data from the earth terrain, the random medium model was shown to be quite successful. A multivariate K-distribution is proposed to model the statistics of fully polarimetric radar returns from earth terrain. In the terrain cover classification using the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, the applications of the K-distribution model will provide better performance than the conventional Gaussian classifiers. The layered random medium model is used to study the polarimetric response of sea ice. Supervised and unsupervised classification procedures are also developed and applied to synthetic aperture radar polarimetric images in order to identify their various earth terrain components for more than two classes. These classification procedures were applied to San Francisco Bay and Traverse City SAR images.

  8. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow over complex topography

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundar...

  9. Dry Ice Etches Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    Every year seasonal carbon dioxide ice, known to us as 'dry ice,' covers the poles of Mars. In the south polar region this ice is translucent, allowing sunlight to pass through and warm the surface below. The ice then sublimes (evaporates) from the bottom of the ice layer, and carves channels in the surface.

    The channels take on many forms. In the subimage shown here (figure 1) the gas from the dry ice has etched wide shallow channels. This region is relatively flat, which may be the reason these channels have a different morphology than the 'spiders' seen in more hummocky terrain.

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003364_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 15-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 251.5 km (157.2 miles). At this distance the image scale is 25.2 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects 75 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:57 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 75 degrees, thus the sun was about 15 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 219.6 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  10. Cryptic Terrain on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    There is an enigmatic region near the south pole of Mars known as the 'cryptic' terrain. It stays cold in the spring, even as its albedo darkens and the sun rises in the sky.

    This region is covered by a layer of translucent seasonal carbon dioxide ice that warms and evaporates from below. As carbon dioxide gas escapes from below the slab of seasonal ice it scours dust from the surface. The gas vents to the surface, where the dust is carried downwind by the prevailing wind.

    The channels carved by the escaping gas are often radially organized and are known informally as 'spiders' (figure 1).

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_003179_0945 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 01-Apr-2007. The complete image is centered at -85.4 degrees latitude, 104.0 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 245.9 km (153.7 miles). At this distance the image scale is 49.2 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 148 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 06:19 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 78 degrees, thus the sun was about 12 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 210.8 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  11. Prediction of a Flash Flood in Complex Terrain. Part II: A Comparison of Flood Discharge Simulations Using Rainfall Input from Radar, a Dynamic Model, and an Automated Algorithmic System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, David N.; Warner, Thomas T.; Leavesley, George H.

    2000-06-01

    Three techniques were employed for the estimation and prediction of precipitation from a thunderstorm that produced a flash flood in the Buffalo Creek watershed located in the mountainous Front Range near Denver, Colorado, on 12 July 1996. The techniques included 1) quantitative precipitation estimation using the National Weather Service's Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler and the National Center for Atmospheric Research's S-band, dual-polarization radars, 2) quantitative precipitation forecasting utilizing a dynamic model, and 3) quantitative precipitation forecasting using an automated algorithmic system for tracking thunderstorms. Rainfall data provided by these various techniques at short timescales (6 min) and at fine spatial resolutions (150 m to 2 km) served as input to a distributed-parameter hydrologic model for analysis of the flash flood. The quantitative precipitation estimates from the weather radar demonstrated their ability to aid in simulating a watershed's response to precipitation forcing from small-scale, convective weather in complex terrain. That is, with the radar-based quantitative precipitation estimates employed as input, the simulated peak discharge was similar to that estimated. The dynamic model showed the most promise in providing a significant forecast lead time for this flash-flood event. The algorithmic system did not show as much skill in comparison with the dynamic model in providing precipitation forcing to the hydrologic model. The discharge forecasts based on the dynamic-model and algorithmic-system inputs point to the need to improve the ability to forecast convective storms, especially if models such as these eventually are to be used in operational flood forecasting.

  12. Laboratory simulations of the atmospheric mixed-layer in flow over complex topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Steven G.; Snyder, William H.

    2017-02-01

    A laboratory study of the influence of complex terrain on the interface between a well-mixed boundary layer and an elevated stratified layer was conducted in the towing-tank facility of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The height of the mixed layer in the daytime boundary layer can have a strong influence on the concentration of pollutants within this layer. Deflections of streamlines at the height of the interface are primarily a function of hill Froude number (Fr), the ratio of mixed-layer height (zi) to terrain height (h), and the crosswind dimension of the terrain. The magnitude of the deflections increases as Fr increases and zi/h decreases. For mixing-height streamlines that are initially below the terrain top, the response is linear with Fr; for those initially above the terrain feature the response to Fr is more complex. Once Fr exceeds about 2, the terrain-related response of the mixed layer interface decreases somewhat with increasing Fr (toward more neutral flow). Deflections are also shown to increase as the crosswind dimensions of the terrain increase. Comparisons with numerical modeling, limited field data, and other laboratory measurements reported in the literature are favorable. Additionally, visual observations of dye streamers suggest that the flow structure exhibited for our elevated inversions passing over three dimensional hills is similar to that reported in the literature for continuously stratified flow over two-dimensional hills.

  13. Trace Gas Transport Over Complex Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Burns, S. P.; Delany, A. C.; Oncley, S. P.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Stephens, B. B.; Monson, R. K.; Anderson, D. E.

    2005-12-01

    Carbon dioxide transport at the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site was investigated in both gravity and streamline coordinates during a pilot experiment. We found that the nighttime drainage flow and the daytime upslope flow played important roles in the trace gas budget, such as CO2 and water vapor, at this about 6% sloped forest site. Most of time, the canopy flow was decoupled from the air above; the air within the canopy was dominated by drainage and upslope flows while the air above was dominated by prevailing westerlies. At night the flow was stably stratified everywhere but less stable within than above the canopy; while during the day, the air was mostly stable within the canopy layer, especially near the bottom of the canopy, and the layer above was unstable. Protected by the overlying canopy, the drainage flow was responsible for transporting CO2 at night while the stable layer above the canopy prevented upward CO2 transport. In the early morning, the upslope flow transported the nighttime accumulation of moist and CO2-enhanced air up the slope. The reduction of the CO2 concentration in the early morning was associated with photosynthesis, upslope flow, and flux venting. The daytime stable boundary layer within the canopy prevented CO2 venting and provided favorable conditions for CO2 uptake, where the CO2 concentration was relatively high from both local and remote respiration, and both direct and diffused solar radiation were available for photosynthesis. Therefore, both the CO2 respiration at night and the CO2 uptake during the day are underestimated if the horizontal transport of CO2 is not monitored; and the two components may not cancel out.

  14. CO2 transport over complex terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Burns, Sean P.; Delany, A.C.; Oncley, S.P.; Turnipseed, A.A.; Stephens, B.B.; Lenschow, D.H.; LeMone, M.A.; Monson, Russell K.; Anderson, D.E.

    2007-01-01

    CO2 transport processes relevant for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) at the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site in the front range of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado, USA, were investigated during a pilot experiment. We found that cold, moist, and CO2-rich air was transported downslope at night and upslope in the early morning at this forest site situated on a ???5% east-facing slope. We found that CO2 advection dominated the total CO2 transport in the NEE estimate at night although there are large uncertainties because of partial cancellation of horizontal and vertical advection. The horizontal CO2 advection captured not only the CO2 loss at night, but also the CO2 uptake during daytime. We found that horizontal CO2 advection was significant even during daytime especially when turbulent mixing was not significant, such as in early morning and evening transition periods and within the canopy. Similar processes can occur anywhere regardless of whether flow is generated by orography, synoptic pressure gradients, or surface heterogeneity as long as CO2 concentration is not well mixed by turbulence. The long-term net effect of all the CO2 budget terms on estimates of NEE needs to be investigated. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Complete Scene Recovery and Terrain Classification in Textured Terrain Meshes

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Cho, Kyungeun; Um, Kyhyun; Won, Chee Sun; Sim, Sungdae

    2012-01-01

    Terrain classification allows a mobile robot to create an annotated map of its local environment from the three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) datasets collected by its array of sensors, including a GPS receiver, gyroscope, video camera, and range sensor. However, parts of objects that are outside the measurement range of the range sensor will not be detected. To overcome this problem, this paper describes an edge estimation method for complete scene recovery and complete terrain reconstruction. Here, the Gibbs-Markov random field is used to segment the ground from 2D videos and 3D point clouds. Further, a masking method is proposed to classify buildings and trees in a terrain mesh. PMID:23112653

  16. Simulation evaluation of helicopter Terrain Following/Terrain Avoidance concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, Herry N.; Hardy, Gordon H.; Morris, Pat M.

    1988-01-01

    A helicopter Terrain-Following/Terrain-Avoidance (TF/TA) system was developed and evaluated using a real-time piloted simulation. The TF/TA system included a guidance algorithm based upon dynamic programming and a head-up display (HUD) concept which incorporates a pathway in the sky, a phantom aircraft, and flightpath vector/predictor symbology. The simulation was conducted at the NASA Ames Research Center Interchangeable Cab (ICAB) Laboratory using NASA test pilots. The pilots performed the TF/TA task by manually tracking the HUD symbology. The pilots were able to satisfactorily perform the TF/TA tasks with an acceptable level of pilot workload.

  17. 76 FR 6179 - Eighth Meeting-RTCA Special Committee 217: Joint With EUROCAE WG-44 Terrain and Airport Mapping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... Meeting--RTCA Special Committee 217: Joint With EUROCAE WG-44 Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases AGENCY... EUROCAE WG-44 Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases. SUMMARY: The FAA is issuing this notice to advise the... Databases. DATES: The meeting will be held February 28-March 4, 2011, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ADDRESSES:...

  18. 76 FR 70531 - Tenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 217/EUROCAE WG-44: Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Airport Mapping Databases AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation... RTCA Special Committee 217/EUROCAE WG-44: Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases: For the tenth meeting... meeting of RTCA Special Committee 217/EUROCAE WG-44: Terrain and Airport Mapping Databases. The...

  19. Terrain profiling from Seasat altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    To determine their applicability for terrain profiling, Seasat altimeter measurements were analyzed for the following geographic areas: (1) Andean salars of southern Bolivia; (2) Alaska; (3) south-central Arizona; (4) imperial Valley of California; (5) Yuma Valley of Arizona; and (6) Great Salt Lake Desert. Analysis of the data over all of these geographic areas shows that the satellite altimeter servo did not respond quickly enough to changing terrain features. However, it is demonstrated that retracking of the archived surface return waveforms yields surface elevations over smooth terrain accurate to + or - 1 m when correlated with large scale maps. The retracking algorithm used and its verification over the salars of southern Bolivia are described. Results are presented for each of the six geographic areas.

  20. Appraisal of digital terrain elevation data for low-altitude flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelenka, Richard E.; Swenson, Harry N.

    1992-01-01

    The use of terrain elevation databases in advanced guidance and navigation systems has greatly expanded. However, the limitations and accuracies of these databases must be considered and established prior to safe system flight evaluation. A simple approach to quantify reasonable flight limits is presented and evaluated for a helicopter guidance system dependent on a terrain database. The flight test evaluated involved a helicopter equipped with a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver and radar altimeter, and a ground station GPS receiver which provided improved helicopter positioning. The precision navigation and radar altimeter data was acquired while flying low-altitude missions in south-central Pennsylvania. The aircraft-determined terrain elevations were compared with the terrain predicted by the Defense Mapping Agency (DMA) Level 1 terrain elevation data for the same area. The results suggest a safe set clearance altitude of 220 ft for flight testing of a DMA-based guidance avionic in the same area.

  1. Iapetus Bright and Dark Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Saturn's outermost large moon, Iapetus, has a bright, heavily cratered icy terrain and a dark terrain, as shown in this Voyager 2 image taken on August 22, 1981. Amazingly, the dark material covers precisely the side of Iapetus that leads in the direction of orbital motion around Saturn (except for the poles), whereas the bright material occurs on the trailing hemisphere and at the poles. The bright terrain is made of dirty ice, and the dark terrain is surfaced by carbonaceous molecules, according to measurements made with Earth-based telescopes. Iapetus' dark hemisphere has been likened to tar or asphalt and is so dark that no details within this terrain were visible to Voyager 2. The bright icy hemisphere, likened to dirty snow, shows many large impact craters. The closest approach by Voyager 2 to Iapetus was a relatively distant 600,000 miles, so that our best images, such as this, have a resolution of about 12 miles. The dark material is made of organic substances, probably including poisonous cyano compounds such as frozen hydrogen cyanide polymers. Though we know a little about the dark terrain's chemical nature, we do not understand its origin. Two theories have been developed, but neither is fully satisfactory--(1) the dark material may be organic dust knocked off the small neighboring satellite Phoebe and 'painted' onto the leading side of Iapetus as the dust spirals toward Saturn and Iapetus hurtles through the tenuous dust cloud, or (2) the dark material may be made of icy-cold carbonaceous 'cryovolcanic' lavas that were erupted from Iapetus' interior and then blackened by solar radiation, charged particles, and cosmic rays. A determination of the actual cause, as well as discovery of any other geologic features smaller than 12 miles across, awaits the Cassini Saturn orbiter to arrive in 2004.

  2. Equal Pay: The Emerging Terrain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Kent M.

    1985-01-01

    Colleges and universities can employ several statutory defenses to alleged pay disparities and demonstrate that there are legitimate reasons for pay differentials. Several preventive strategies in response to the emerging legal terrain of equal pay litigation are suggested. (Author/MLW)

  3. Remote sensing of earth terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, Jin AU; Yueh, Herng-Aung; Shin, Robert T.

    1991-01-01

    Abstracts from 46 refereed journal and conference papers are presented for research on remote sensing of earth terrain. The topics covered related to remote sensing include the following: mathematical models, vegetation cover, sea ice, finite difference theory, electromagnetic waves, polarimetry, neural networks, random media, synthetic aperture radar, electromagnetic bias, and others.

  4. Concurrent algorithms for autonomous robot navigation in an unexplored terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.V.N.; Iyengar, S.S.; Jorgensen, C.C.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Navigation planning is one of the vital aspects of any autonomous mobile robot. In this paper, we present concurrent algorithms for an autonomous robot navigation system that does not require a pre-learned obstacle terrain model. The terrain model is gradually built by integrating the information from multiple journeys. The available information is used to the maximum extent in navigation planning, and global optimality is gradually achieved. It is shown that these concurrent algorithms are free from deadlocks and starvation. The performance of the concurrent algorithms is analyzed in terms of the planning time, travel time, scanning time, and update time. A modified adjacency list is proposed as the data structure for the spatial graph that represents an obstacle terrain. The time complexities of various algorithms that access, maintain, and update the spatial graph are estimated, and the effectiveness of the implementation is illustrated.

  5. An automated system for terrain database construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L. F.; Fretz, R. K.; Logan, T. L.; Bryant, N. A.

    1987-01-01

    An automated Terrain Database Preparation System (TDPS) for the construction and editing of terrain databases used in computerized wargaming simulation exercises has been developed. The TDPS system operates under the TAE executive, and it integrates VICAR/IBIS image processing and Geographic Information System software with CAD/CAM data capture and editing capabilities. The terrain database includes such features as roads, rivers, vegetation, and terrain roughness.

  6. Evaluating terrain based criteria for snow avalanche exposure ratings using GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delparte, Donna; Jamieson, Bruce; Waters, Nigel

    2010-05-01

    Snow avalanche terrain in backcountry regions of Canada is increasingly being assessed based upon the Avalanche Terrain Exposure Scale (ATES). ATES is a terrain based classification introduced in 2004 by Parks Canada to identify "simple", "challenging" and "complex" backcountry areas. The ATES rating system has been applied to well over 200 backcountry routes, has been used in guidebooks, trailhead signs and maps and is part of the trip planning component of the AVALUATOR™, a simple decision-support tool for backcountry users. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) offers a means to model and visualize terrain based criteria through the use of digital elevation model (DEM) and land cover data. Primary topographic variables such as slope, aspect and curvature are easily derived from a DEM and are compatible with the equivalent evaluation criteria in ATES. Other components of the ATES classification are difficult to extract from a DEM as they are not strictly terrain based. An overview is provided of the terrain variables that can be generated from DEM and land cover data; criteria from ATES which are not clearly terrain based are identified for further study or revision. The second component of this investigation was the development of an algorithm for inputting suitable ATES criteria into a GIS, thereby mimicking the process avalanche experts use when applying the ATES classification to snow avalanche terrain. GIS based classifications were compared to existing expert assessments for validity. The advantage of automating the ATES classification process through GIS is to assist avalanche experts with categorizing and mapping remote backcountry terrain.

  7. Geological terrains and crater frequencies on Ariel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plescia, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The southern hemisphere of Ariel, a satellite of Uranus, can be divided into several terrain types. Data on the size-frequency distribution of craters for those different terrain types indicate that these terrains formed over a relatively short period of time. Much information on Ariel's geological history can be gained from these data. ?? 1987 Nature Publishing Group.

  8. Revolutionary High Mobility Rovers for Rugged Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Rilee, M. L.; Cheung, C. Y.; Wesenberg, R. P.; Dorband, J. E.; Lunsford, A. W.

    2006-05-01

    Reconfigurable architecture is essential in exploration because reaching features of the great potential interest, whether searching for life in volcanic terrain or water in at the bottom of craters, will require crossing a wide range of terrains. Such areas of interest are largely inaccessible to permanently appendaged vehicles. For example, morphology and geochemistry of interior basins, walls, and ejecta blankets of volcanic or impact structures must all be studied to understand the nature of a geological event. One surface might be relatively flat and navigable, while another could be rough, variably sloping, broken, or dominated by unconsolidated debris. To be totally functional, structures must form pseudo-appendages varying in size, rate, and manner of deployment (gait). We have already prototyped a simple robotic walker from a single reconfigurable tetrahedron (with struts as sides and nodes as apices) capable of tumbling and are simulating and building a prototype of the more evolved 12Tetrahedral Walker (Autonomous Moon or Mars Investigator) which has interior nodes for payload, more continuous motion, and is commandable through a user friendly interface. We are currently developing a more differentiated architecture to form detachable, reconfigurable, reshapable linearly extendable bodies to act as manual assistant subsystems on rovers, with extensions terminating in a wider range of sensors. We are now simulating gaits for and will be building a prototype rover arm. Ultimately, complex continuous n-tetrahedral structures will have deployable outer skin, and even higher degrees of freedom. Tetrahedral rover advantages over traditional wheeled or tread robots are being demonstrated and include abilities to: 1) traverse terrain more rugged in terms of slope, roughness, and obstacle size; 2) precisely place and lower instruments into hard-to-reach crevices; 3) sample more locations per unit time; 4) conform to virtually any terrain; 5) avoid falling down or

  9. Wind resource assessment in heterogeneous terrain.

    PubMed

    Vanderwel, C; Placidi, M; Ganapathisubramani, B

    2017-04-13

    the placement of the turbines within such heterogeneous terrain. Overall, these results indicate the importance of accounting for heterogeneous terrain when siting individual turbines and wind farms.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  10. The topography of impact craters in 'softened' terrain on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankowski, David G.; Squyres, Steven W.

    1992-01-01

    The technique of photoclinometry is applied here to Viking orbiter images of Mars in order to derive topographic profiles across Martian craters on both softened and unsoftened terrain. The results demonstrate that craters on the two kinds of terrain are in fact topographically distinct. Both simple and complex softened craters are characterized by more convex-upward crater walls than are unsoftened craters, and both simple and complex softened craters have rounder crater rims. Softened complex craters have modestly smaller crater depths than unsoftened complex craters. Both the rim heights and bowl depths are reduced, with the rim heights reduced more. Softened simple craters have much smaller crater depths than unsoftened simple craters. Both the rim heights and bowl depths are reduced, with the bowl depths reduced more.

  11. Urban Operations, Untrained on Terrain.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-05

    MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE by ■’ PAULS. BURTON, MAX USA ^ .B.S., Arizona State University, 1985 Fort Leavenworth, Kansas Tt998 Approved for public...Command and General Staff College in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree MASTER OF MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE by PAUL S...MILITARY ART AND SCIENCE THESIS APPROVAL PAGE Name of Candidate: MAJ Paul S. Burton Thesis Title: Urban Operations: Untrained on Terrain Approved

  12. Terrain commander UGS operational trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steadman, Robert L.

    2004-09-01

    Operational trials of Textron Systems" Terrain Commander unattended ground sensor (UGS) system are described. Terrain Commander is a powerful new concept in surveillance and remote situational awareness. It leverages a diverse suite of sophisticated unattended ground sensors, day/night electro-optics, satellite data communications, and an advanced Windows based graphic user interface. Terrain Commander OASIS (Optical Acoustic SATCOM Integrated Sensor) provides next generation target detection, classification, and tracking through smart sensor fusion of beam-forming acoustic, seismic, passive infrared, and magnetic sensors. With its fully integrated SATCOM system using internet protocols, virtually any site in the world can be monitored from almost any other location. Multiple remote sites such as airfields, landing zones, base perimeters, road junctions, flanks, and border crossings are monitored with ease from a central location. Intruding personnel or vehicles are automatically detected, classified, and imaged. Results from early operational trials in the outback of Australia and in various locations in the US are described. Probability of detection and recognition against a wide variety of targets including personnel, military and civilian vehicles, in-shore watercraft, and low altitude aircraft are discussed. Environments include snow cover, tropical savannah, rainforest, and woodlands. Experience with alternative SATCOM systems during the trials is also touched upon.

  13. Automatic Computer Mapping of Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedes, H. W.

    1971-01-01

    Computer processing of 17 wavelength bands of visible, reflective infrared, and thermal infrared scanner spectrometer data, and of three wavelength bands derived from color aerial film has resulted in successful automatic computer mapping of eight or more terrain classes in a Yellowstone National Park test site. The tests involved: (1) supervised and non-supervised computer programs; (2) special preprocessing of the scanner data to reduce computer processing time and cost, and improve the accuracy; and (3) studies of the effectiveness of the proposed Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) data channels in the automatic mapping of the same terrain, based on simulations, using the same set of scanner data. The following terrain classes have been mapped with greater than 80 percent accuracy in a 12-square-mile area with 1,800 feet of relief; (1) bedrock exposures, (2) vegetated rock rubble, (3) talus, (4) glacial kame meadow, (5) glacial till meadow, (6) forest, (7) bog, and (8) water. In addition, shadows of clouds and cliffs are depicted, but were greatly reduced by using preprocessing techniques.

  14. Simulated liquid water and visibility in stratiform boundary-layer clouds over sloping terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Tjernstroem, M. )

    1993-04-01

    The amount of liquid water in stratus clouds or fog is discussed from the point of view of estimating visibility variations in areas with complex terrain. The average vertical profile of liquid water from numerical simulations with a higher-order closure mesoscale model is examined, and runs with the model for moderately complex terrain are utilized to estimate the of low-level liquid water content variability and thus, indirectly, the variations in horizontal visibility along a slope. 37 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Overview of Venus geology: Preliminary description of terrain units for Venus global geological mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, R. Stephen; Stofan, Ellen R.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Michaels, Gregory A.

    1992-01-01

    Venus terrain units can be categorized on the basis of morphology, reflectivity, backscatter, roughness, and emissivity. Morphology can be inferred from Magellan left-looking nominal incidence angle image mosaics, right-looking coverage, and more limited left-looking stereo. The typical resolution is about 300 m down to about 120 m near periapsis in the cycle one nominal coverage. The scale of geologic mapping governs definition of mappable terrain units. Initial global mapping is being compiled at a scale of 1:50 million. At this scale, the smallest individual features that can be mapped are about 125 km. The categories of terrain types are plains, complex ridge terrain, features with morphology suggesting volcanic or volcano-tectonic origin, features interpreted to be tectonic in origin, crater units, and surficial units such as splotches and streaks. Brief descriptions of terrain units are provided.

  16. Terrain Portrayal for Synthetic Vision Systems Head-Down Displays Evaluation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Monica F.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2007-01-01

    A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. At the time of this study, the relationship between the complexity of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and pilot performance had been largely undefined. The terrain portrayal for SVS head-down displays (TP-HDD) simulation examined the effects of two primary elements of terrain portrayal on the primary flight display (PFD): variations of digital elevation model (DEM) resolution and terrain texturing. Variations in DEM resolution ranged from sparsely spaced (30 arc-sec) to very closely spaced data (1 arc-sec). Variations in texture involved three primary methods: constant color, elevation-based generic, and photo-realistic, along with a secondary depth cue enhancer in the form of a fishnet grid overlay.

  17. Groundwater flood hazards in lowland karst terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naughton, Owen; McCormack, Ted

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal complexity of flooding in karst terrains pose unique flood risk management challenges. Lowland karst landscapes can be particularly susceptible to groundwater flooding due to a combination of limited drainage capacity, shallow depth to groundwater and a high level of groundwater-surface water interactions. Historically the worst groundwater flooding to have occurred in the Rep. of Ireland has been centred on the Gort Lowlands, a karst catchment on the western coast of Ireland. Numerous notable flood events have been recorded throughout the 20th century, but flooding during the winters of 2009 and 2015 were the most severe on record, inundating an area in excess of 20km2 and causing widespread and prolonged disruption and damage to property and infrastructure. Effective flood risk management requires an understanding of the recharge, storage and transport mechanisms during flood conditions, but is often hampered by a lack of adequate data. Using information gathered from the 2009 and 2015 events, the main hydrological and geomorphological factors which influence flooding in this complex lowland karst groundwater system under are elucidated. Observed flood mechanisms included backwater flooding of sinks, overland flow caused by the overtopping of sink depressions, high water levels in turlough basins, and surface ponding in local epikarst watersheds. While targeted small-scale flood measures can locally reduce the flood risk associated with some mechanisms, they also have the potential to exacerbate flooding down-catchment and must be assessed in the context of overall catchment hydrology. This study addresses the need to improve our understanding of groundwater flooding in karst terrains, in order to ensure efficient flood prevention and mitigation in future and thus help achieve the aims of the EU Floods Directive.

  18. Parallel path planning in unknown terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prassler, Erwin A.; Milios, Evangelos E.

    1991-03-01

    We present a parallel processing approach to path planning in unknown terrains which combines map-based and sensor-based techniques into a real-time capable navigation system. The method is based on massively parallel computations in a grid of simple processing elements denoted as cells. In the course of a relaxation process a potential distribution is created in the grid which exhibits a monotonous slope from a start cell to the cell corresponding to the robot''s goal position. A shortest path is determined by means of a gradient descent criterion which settles on the steepest descent in the potential distribution. Like high-level path planning algorithms our approach is capable of planning shortest paths through an arbitrarily cluttered large-scale terrain on the basis of its current internal map. Sequentially implemented its complexity is in the order of efficient classical path planning algorithms. Unlike these algorithms however the method is also highly responsive to new obstacles encountered in the terrain. By continuing the planning process during the robot''s locomotion information about previously unknown obstacles immediately affects further path planning without a need to interrupt the ongoing planning process. New obstacles cause distortions of the potential distribution which let the robot find proper detours. By ensuring a monotonous slope in the overall distribution we avoid local minimum effects which may trap a robot in the proximity of an obstacle configuration before it has reached its goal. 1 Until the recent past research on path planning in the presence of obstacles can be assigned to two major categories: map-based high-level planning approaches and sensor-based low-level conLrol approaches. In work such as 12 path planning is treated as a high-level planning task. Assuming that an (accnrae) precompiled map of the terrain is available high-level path planners provide paths which guarantee a collision-free locomotion through an arbitrary

  19. Artillery Terrain Walk Gettysburg Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-27

    early in the afternoon. Hazlett and Gibbs arrived later in the afternoon just about the time the DEVIL’S DEN position was being overrun. LITTLE ROUND...battery kept up a continuous fire until dark .... Battery L, First Ohio Artillery, Capt. F.C. Gibbs , moved up to the field in rear of the Second... Gibbs placed a section on the north slope of this hill. The terrain was such that the section was rolled up by hand. If you are adventurous, you can

  20. Tactical Night Terrain Flight Navigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    an reverse aide It necesarmy and identify by block unmber) Terrain flight Night flight Surface nav’igation 20,. AW4~ACT ( C ~venoUa sov ero " eom a maa...were used on each test flight. The helicopter used for the low-level flights were equipped initially with a commercial radar altimeter with a single...indicator, which was later changed to a military AN/APN-209 radar altimeter with dual indicators. The second helicopter was used for command and

  1. Sculpting Mountains: Interactive Terrain Modeling Based on Subsurface Geology.

    PubMed

    Cordonnier, Guillaume; Cani, Marie-Paule; Benes, Bedrich; Braun, Jean; Galin, Eric

    2017-03-29

    Most mountain ranges are formed by the compression and folding of colliding tectonic plates. Subduction of one plate causes large-scale asymmetry while their layered composition (or stratigraphy) explains the multi-scale folded strata observed on real terrains. We introduce a novel interactive modeling technique to generate visually plausible, large scale terrains that capture these phenomena. Our method draws on both geological knowledge for consistency and on sculpting systems for user interaction. The user is provided hands-on control on the shape and motion of tectonic plates, represented using a new geologically-inspired model for the Earth crust. The model captures their volume preserving and complex folding behaviors under collision, causing mountains to grow. It generates a volumetric uplift map representing the growth rate of subsurface layers. Erosion and uplift movement are jointly simulated to generate the terrain. The stratigraphy allows us to render folded strata on eroded cliffs. We validated the usability of our sculpting interface through a user study, and compare the visual consistency of the earth crust model with geological simulation results and real terrains.

  2. Remote sensing of earth terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    Two monographs and 85 journal and conference papers on remote sensing of earth terrain have been published, sponsored by NASA Contract NAG5-270. A multivariate K-distribution is proposed to model the statistics of fully polarimetric data from earth terrain with polarizations HH, HV, VH, and VV. In this approach, correlated polarizations of radar signals, as characterized by a covariance matrix, are treated as the sum of N n-dimensional random vectors; N obeys the negative binomial distribution with a parameter alpha and mean bar N. Subsequently, and n-dimensional K-distribution, with either zero or non-zero mean, is developed in the limit of infinite bar N or illuminated area. The probability density function (PDF) of the K-distributed vector normalized by its Euclidean norm is independent of the parameter alpha and is the same as that derived from a zero-mean Gaussian-distributed random vector. The above model is well supported by experimental data provided by MIT Lincoln Laboratory and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in the form of polarimetric measurements.

  3. Evaluating planetary digital terrain models-The HRSC DTM test

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heipke, C.; Oberst, J.; Albertz, J.; Attwenger, M.; Dorninger, P.; Dorrer, E.; Ewe, M.; Gehrke, S.; Gwinner, K.; Hirschmuller, H.; Kim, J.R.; Kirk, R.L.; Mayer, H.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Rengarajan, R.; Rentsch, M.; Schmidt, R.; Scholten, F.; Shan, J.; Spiegel, M.; Wahlisch, M.; Neukum, G.

    2007-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) has been orbiting the planet Mars since January 2004 onboard the European Space Agency (ESA) Mars Express mission and delivers imagery which is being used for topographic mapping of the planet. The HRSC team has conducted a systematic inter-comparison of different alternatives for the production of high resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) from the multi look HRSC push broom imagery. Based on carefully chosen test sites the test participants have produced DTMs which have been subsequently analysed in a quantitative and a qualitative manner. This paper reports on the results obtained in this test. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Topological Landscapes: A Terrain Metaphor for ScientificData

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Pascucci, Valerio

    2007-08-01

    Scientific visualization and illustration tools are designed to help people understand the structure and complexity of scientific data with images that are as informative and intuitive as possible. In this context, the use of metaphors plays an important role, since they make complex information easily accessible by using commonly known concepts. In this paper we propose a new metaphor, called 'Topological Landscapes', which facilitates understanding the topological structure of scalar functions. The basic idea is to construct a terrain with the same topology as a given dataset and to display the terrain as an easily understood representation of the actual input data. In this projection from an n-dimensional scalar function to a two-dimensional (2D) model we preserve function values of critical points, the persistence (function span) of topological features, and one possible additional metric property (in our examples volume). By displaying this topologically equivalent landscape together with the original data we harness the natural human proficiency in understanding terrain topography and make complex topological information easily accessible.

  5. Incorporating scale into digital terrain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragut, L. D.; Eisank, C.; Strasser, T.

    2009-04-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and their derived terrain attributes are commonly used in soil-landscape modeling. Process-based terrain attributes meaningful to the soil properties of interest are sought to be produced through digital terrain analysis. Typically, the standard 3 X 3 window-based algorithms are used for this purpose, thus tying the scale of resulting layers to the spatial resolution of the available DEM. But this is likely to induce mismatches between scale domains of terrain information and soil properties of interest, which further propagate biases in soil-landscape modeling. We have started developing a procedure to incorporate scale into digital terrain analysis for terrain-based environmental modeling (Drăguţ et al., in press). The workflow was exemplified on crop yield data. Terrain information was generalized into successive scale levels with focal statistics on increasing neighborhood size. The degree of association between each terrain derivative and crop yield values was established iteratively for all scale levels through correlation analysis. The first peak of correlation indicated the scale level to be further retained. While in a standard 3 X 3 window-based analysis mean curvature was one of the poorest correlated terrain attribute, after generalization it turned into the best correlated variable. To illustrate the importance of scale, we compared the regression results of unfiltered and filtered mean curvature vs. crop yield. The comparison shows an improvement of R squared from a value of 0.01 when the curvature was not filtered, to 0.16 when the curvature was filtered within 55 X 55 m neighborhood size. This indicates the optimum size of curvature information (scale) that influences soil fertility. We further used these results in an object-based image analysis environment to create terrain objects containing aggregated values of both terrain derivatives and crop yield. Hence, we introduce terrain segmentation as an alternative

  6. Convective boundary layer heights over mountainous terrain - A review of concepts -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wekker, Stephan; Kossmann, Meinolf

    2015-12-01

    Mountainous terrain exerts an important influence on the Earth's atmosphere and affects atmospheric transport and mixing at a wide range of temporal and spatial scales. The vertical scale of this transport and mixing is determined by the height of the atmospheric boundary layer, which is therefore an important parameter in air pollution studies, weather forecasting, climate modeling, and many other applications. It is recognized that the spatio-temporal structure of the daytime convective boundary layer (CBL) height is strongly modified and more complex in hilly and mountainous terrain compared to flat terrain. While the CBL over flat terrain is mostly dominated by turbulent convection, advection from multi-scale thermally driven flows plays an important role for the CBL evolution over mountainous terrain. However, detailed observations of the CBL structure and understanding of the underlying processes are still limited. Characteristics of CBL heights in mountainous terrain are reviewed for dry, convective conditions. CBLs in valleys and basins, where hazardous accumulation of pollutants is of particular concern, are relatively well-understood compared to CBLs over slopes, ridges, or mountain peaks. Interests in the initiation of shallow and deep convection, and of budgets and long-range transport of air pollutants and trace gases, have triggered some recent studies on terrain induced exchange processes between the CBL and the overlying atmosphere. These studies have helped to gain more insight into CBL structure over complex mountainous terrain, but also show that the universal definition of CBL height over mountains remains an unresolved issue. The review summarizes the progress that has been made in documenting and understanding spatio-temporal behavior of CBL heights in mountainous terrain and concludes with a discussion of open research questions and opportunities for future research.

  7. Geomorphological Mapping of Sputnik Planum and Surrounding Terrain on Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, O. L.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Young, L. A.; Moore, J. M.; Cheng, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    The New Horizons flyby of Pluto in July 2015 has provided the first few close-up images of the Kuiper belt object, which reveal it to have a highly diverse range of terrains, implying a complex geological history. The highest resolution images that have yet been returned are seven lossy 400 m/pixel frames that cover the majority of the prominent Plutonian feature informally named Sputnik Planum (all feature names are currently informal), and its surroundings. This resolution is sufficient to allow detailed geomorphological mapping of this area to commence. Lossless versions of all 15 frames that make up the mosaic will be returned in September 2015, and the map presented at AGU will incorporate the total area covered by these frames. Sputnik Planum, with an area of ~650,000 km2, is notable for its smooth appearance and apparent total lack of impact craters at 400 m/pixel resolution. The Planum actually displays a wide variety of textures across its expanse, which includes smooth and pitted plains to the south, polygonal terrain at its center (the polygons can reach tens of kilometers in size and are bounded by troughs that sometimes feature central ridges), and, to the north, darker polygonal terrain displaying patterns indicative of glacial flow. Within these plains there exist several well-defined outcrops of a mottled, light/dark unit that reach from several to tens of kilometers across. Separating Sputnik Planum from the dark, cratered equatorial terrain of Cthulhu Regio on its south-western margin is a unit of chaotically arranged mountains; similar mountainous units exist on the south and western margins. The northern margin is bounded by rugged, hilly, cratered terrain into which ice of Sputnik Planum appears to be intruding in places. Terrain of similar relief exists to the east, but is much brighter than that to the north. The southernmost extent of the mosaic features a unit of rough, undulating terrain that displays very few impact craters at 400 m

  8. Geomorphological Mapping of Sputnik Planum and Surrounding Terrain on Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Oliver; Stern, Alan; Weaver, Hal; Olkin, Cathy; Ennico, Kimberly; Young, Leslie; Moore, Jeff

    2015-11-01

    The New Horizons flyby of Pluto in July 2015 has provided the first few close-up images of the Kuiper belt object, which reveal it to have a highly diverse range of terrains, implying a complex geological history. The highest resolution images that have yet been returned are seven lossy 400 m/pixel frames that cover the majority of the prominent Plutonian feature informally named Sputnik Planum (all feature names are currently informal), and its surroundings. This resolution is sufficient to allow detailed geomorphological mapping of this area to commence. Lossless versions of all 15 frames that make up the mosaic will be returned in September 2015, and the map presented at DPS will incorporate the total area covered by these frames.Sputnik Planum, with an area of ~650,000 km2, is notable for its smooth appearance and apparent total lack of impact craters at 400 m/pixel resolution. The Planum actually displays a wide variety of textures across its expanse, which includes smooth and pitted plains to the south, polygonal terrain at its center (the polygons can reach tens of kilometers in size and are bounded by troughs that sometimes feature central ridges), and, to the north, darker polygonal terrain displaying patterns indicative of glacial flow. Within these plains there exist several well-defined outcrops of a mottled, light/dark unit that reach from several to tens of kilometers across. Separating Sputnik Planum from the dark, cratered equatorial terrain of Cthulhu Regio on its south-western margin is a unit of chaotically arranged mountains (Hillary Montes); similar mountainous units exist on the south and western margins. The northern margin is bounded by rugged, hilly, cratered terrain (Cousteau Rupes) into which ice of Sputnik Planum appears to be intruding in places. Terrain of similar relief exists to the east, but is much brighter than that to the north. The southernmost extent of the mosaic features a unit of rough, undulating terrain (Pandemonium Dorsa

  9. Remote sensing of Earth terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Research findings are summarized for projects dealing with the following: application of theoretical models to active and passive remote sensing of saline ice; radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest; scattering of electromagnetic waves from a dense medium consisting of correlated Mie scatterers with size distribution and applications to dry snow; variance of phase fluctuations of waves propagating through a random medium; theoretical modeling for passive microwave remote sensing of earth terrain; polarimetric signatures of a canopy of dielectric cylinders based on first and second order vector radiative transfer theory; branching model for vegetation; polarimetric passive remote sensing of periodic surfaces; composite volume and surface scattering model; and radar image classification.

  10. Remote sensing of Earth terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Progress report on remote sensing of Earth terrain covering the period from Jan. to June 1993 is presented. Areas of research include: radiative transfer model for active and passive remote sensing of vegetation canopy; polarimetric thermal emission from rough ocean surfaces; polarimetric passive remote sensing of ocean wind vectors; polarimetric thermal emission from periodic water surfaces; layer model with tandom spheriodal scatterers for remote sensing of vegetation canopy; application of theoretical models to active and passive remote sensing of saline ice; radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest; scattering of electromagnetic waves from a dense medium consisting of correlated mie scatterers with size distributions and applications to dry snow; variance of phase fluctuations of waves propagating through a random medium; polarimetric signatures of a canopy of dielectric cylinders based on first and second order vector radiative transfer theory; branching model for vegetation; polarimetric passive remote sensing of periodic surfaces; composite volume and surface scattering model; and radar image classification.

  11. Photometric Characteristics of Lunar Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Hapke, Bruce W.; Denevi, Brett W.; Robinson, Mark

    2016-10-01

    The photometric properties of the lunar depend on albedo, surface roughness, porosity, and the internal/external structure of particles. Hapke parameter maps derived using a bidirectional reflectance model [Hapke, 2012] from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) images demonstrated the spatial and spectral variation of the photometric properties of the Moon [Sato et al., 2014]. Using the same methodology, here we present the photometric characteristics of typical lunar terrains, which were not systematically analyzed in the previous study.We selected five representative terrain types: mare, highland, swirls, and two Copernican (fresh) crater ejecta (one mare and one highlands example). As for the datasets, we used ~39 months of WAC repeated observations, and for each image pixel, we computed latitude, longitude, incidence, emission, and phase angles using the WAC GLD100 stereo DTM [Scholten et al., 2012]. To obtain similar phase and incidence angle ranges, all sampling sites are near the equator and in the vicinity of Reiner Gamma. Three free Hapke parameters (single scattering albedo: w, HG2 phase function parameter: c, and angular width of SHOE: hs) were then calculated for the seven bands (321-689 nm). The remaining parameters were fixed by simplifying the model [Sato et al., 2014].The highlands, highland ejecta, and swirl (Reiner Gamma) showed clearly higher w than the mare and mare ejecta. The derived c values were lower (less backscattering) for the swirl and higher (more backscattering) for the highlands (and ejecta) relative to the other sites. Forward scattering materials such as unconsolidated transparent crystalline materials might be relatively enriched in the swirl. In the highlands, anorthositic agglutinates with dense internal scattering could be responsible for the strong backscattering. The mare and mare ejecta showed continuously decreasing c from UV to visible wavelengths. This might be caused by the FeO-rich pyroxene

  12. Validating an Agency-based Tool for Measuring Women’s Empowerment in a Complex Public Health Trial in Rural Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Gram, Lu; Morrison, Joanna; Sharma, Neha; Shrestha, Bhim; Manandhar, Dharma; Costello, Anthony; Saville, Naomi; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Despite the rising popularity of indicators of women’s empowerment in global development programmes, little work has been done on the validity of existing measures of such a complex concept. We present a mixed methods validation of the use of the Relative Autonomy Index for measuring Amartya Sen’s notion of agency freedom in rural Nepal. Analysis of think-aloud interviews (n = 7) indicated adequate respondent understanding of questionnaire items, but multiple problems of interpretation including difficulties with the four-point Likert scale, questionnaire item ambiguity and difficulties with translation. Exploratory Factor Analysis of a calibration sample (n = 511) suggested two positively correlated factors (r = 0.64) loading on internally and externally motivated behaviour. Both factors increased with decreasing education and decision-making power on large expenditures and food preparation. Confirmatory Factor Analysis on a validation sample (n = 509) revealed good fit (Root Mean Square Error of Approximation 0.05–0.08, Comparative Fit Index 0.91–0.99). In conclusion, we caution against uncritical use of agency-based quantification of women’s empowerment. While qualitative and quantitative analysis revealed overall satisfactory construct and content validity, the positive correlation between external and internal motivations suggests the existence of adaptive preferences. High scores on internally motivated behaviour may reflect internalized oppression rather than agency freedom. PMID:28303173

  13. Axel Robotic Platform for Crater and Extreme Terrain Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesnas, Issa A.; Matthews, Jaret B.; Edlund, Jeffrey A.; Burdick, Joel W.; Abad-Manterola, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    To be able to conduct science investigations on highly sloped and challenging terrains, it is necessary to deploy science payloads to such locations and collect and process in situ samples. A tethered robotic platform has been developed that is capable of exploring very challenging terrain. The Axel rover is a symmetrical rover that is minimally actuated, can traverse arbitrary paths, and operate upside-down or right-side up. It can be deployed from a larger platform (rover, lander, or aerobot) or from a dual Axel configuration. Axel carries and manages its own tether, reducing damage to the tether during operations. Fundamentally, Axel is a two-wheeled rover with a symmetric body and a trailing link. Because the primary goal is minimal complexity, this version of the Axel rover uses only four primary actuators to control its wheels, tether, and a trailing link. A fifth actuator is used for level winding of tether onto Axel s spool.

  14. Towards terrain interaction prediction for bioinspired planetary exploration rovers.

    PubMed

    Yeomans, Brian; Saaj, Chakravathini M

    2014-03-01

    Deployment of a small legged vehicle to extend the reach of future planetary exploration missions is an attractive possibility but little is known about the behaviour of a walking rover on deformable planetary terrain. This paper applies ideas from the developing study of granular materials together with a detailed characterization of the sinkage process to propose and validate a combined model of terrain interaction based on an understanding of the physics and micro mechanics at the granular level. Whilst the model reflects the complexity of interactions expected from a walking rover, common themes emerge which enable the model to be streamlined to the extent that a simple mathematical representation is possible without resorting to numerical methods. Bespoke testing and analysis tools are described which reveal some unexpected conclusions and point the way towards intelligent control and foot geometry techniques to improve thrust generation.

  15. A comparison of the updated very high resolution model RegCM3_10km with the previous version RegCM3_25km over the complex terrain of Greece: present and future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolika, Konstantia; Anagnostopoulou, Christina; Velikou, Kondylia; Vagenas, Christos

    2016-11-01

    The ability of a fine resolution regional climate model (10 × 10 km) in simulating efficiently the climate characteristics (temperature, precipitation, and wind) over Greece, in comparison to the previous version of the model with a 25 × 25 km resolution, is examined and analyzed in the present study. Overall, the results showed that the finer resolution model presented a better skill in generating low winter temperatures at high altitudinal areas, the temperature difference between the islands and the surrounding sea, high rainfall totals over the mountainous areas, the thermal storms during summer, and the wind maxima over the Aegean Sea. Regarding the future projections, even though the two models agree on the climatic signal, differences are found mainly to the magnitude of change of the selected parameters. Finally, it was found that at higher pressure levels, the present day projections of the two models do not show significant differences since the topography and terrain does not play such an important role as the general atmospheric circulation.

  16. Terrain identification for RHex-type robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordonez, Camilo; Shill, Jacob; Johnson, Aaron; Clark, Jonathan; Collins, Emmanuel

    2013-05-01

    Terrain identification is a key enabling ability for generating terrain adaptive behaviors that assist both robot planning and motor control. This paper considers running legged robots from the RHex family) which the military plans to use in the field to assist troops in reconnaissance tasks. Important terrain adaptive behaviors include the selection of gaits) modulation of leg stiffness) and alteration of steering control laws that minimize slippage) maximize speed and/or reduce energy consumption. These terrain adaptive behaviors can be enabled by a terrain identification methodology that combines proprioceptive sensors already available in RHex-type robots. The proposed classification approach is based on the characteristic frequency signatures of data from leg observers) which combine current sensing with a dynamic model of the leg motion. The paper analyzes the classification accuracy obtained using both a single leg and groups of legs (through a voting scheme) on different terrains such as vinyl) asphalt) grass) and pebbles. Additionally) it presents a terrain classifier that works across various gait speeds and in fact almost as good as an overly specialized classifier.

  17. An ice-rich flow origin for the banded terrain in the Hellas basin, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diot, X.; El-Maarry, M. R.; Guallini, L.; Schlunegger, F.; Norton, K. P.; Thomas, N.; Sutton, S.; Grindrod, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The interior of Hellas Basin displays a complex landscape and a variety of geomorphological domains. One of these domains, the enigmatic banded terrain covers much of the northwestern part of the basin. We use high-resolution (Context Camera and High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment) Digital Terrain Models to show that most of the complex viscous flowing behavior exhibited by the banded terrain is controlled by topography and flow-like interactions between neighboring banded terrain. Furthermore, the interior of the basin hosts several landforms suggestive of the presence of near-surface ice, which include polygonal patterns with elongated pits, scalloped depressions, isolated mounds, and collapse structures. We suggest that thermal contraction cracking and sublimation of near-surface ice are responsible for the formation and the development of most of the ice-related landforms documented in Hellas. The relatively pristine form, lack of superposed craters, and strong association with the banded terrain, suggest an Amazonian (<3 Ga) age of formation for these landforms. Finally, relatively high surface pressures (above the triple point of water) expected in Hellas and summertime temperatures often exceeding the melting point of water ice suggest that the basin may have recorded relatively "temperate" climatic conditions compared to other places on Mars. Therefore, the potentially ice-rich banded terrain may have deformed with lower viscosity and stresses compared to other locations on Mars, which may account for its unique morphology.

  18. Terrain classification maps of Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, F. J.; Roller, N. E. G.

    1973-01-01

    A cooperative ERTS-1 investigation involving U. S. Geological Survey, National Park Service, and Environmental Research Institure of Michigan (ERIM) personnel has as its goal the preparation of terrain classification maps for the entire Yellowstone National Park. Excellent coverage of the park was obtained on 6 August 1972 (frame 1015-17404). Preliminary terrain classification maps have been prepared at ERIM by applying multispectral pattern recognition techniques to ERTS-MSS digital taped data. The color coded terrain maps are presented and discussed. The discussion includes qualitative and quantitative accuracy estimates and discussion of processing techniques.

  19. Karst on Mars? The thumbprint terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Martha W.

    1990-01-01

    The nature of the 'thumbprint' terrain noted by Guest et al. (1977) in high-resolution Viking Orbiter photographs of the northern plains of Mars is considered in light of plausible terrestrial analogs. At least some portion of such terrain may be due to differential solution of large carbonate deposits located in low-lying areas; comparative morphology may therefore indicate it to be an analog of the arid karst of Australia's Nullabor Plain, provided that groundwater flow was available during the terrain's formative period on Mars.

  20. Automated basin delineation from digital terrain data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, D.; Dozier, J.; Frew, J.

    1983-01-01

    While digital terrain grids are now in wide use, accurate delineation of drainage basins from these data is difficult to efficiently automate. A recursive order N solution to this problem is presented. The algorithm is fast because no point in the basin is checked more than once, and no points outside the basin are considered. Two applications for terrain analysis and one for remote sensing are given to illustrate the method, on a basin with high relief in the Sierra Nevada. This technique for automated basin delineation will enhance the utility of digital terrain analysis for hydrologic modeling and remote sensing.

  1. Biologic Analog Science Associated with Lava Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N. K.; Hamilton, J. C.; Veillet, A.; Muir, C.

    2016-05-01

    The goal of BASALT is to use Hawaiian volcanic terrain to constrain the upper limits of biomass that could have been supported on Mars and how those upper bounds inform future detection requirements for manned missions.

  2. Terrain Adaptive Navigation for Mars Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthies, Larry H.; Helmick, Daniel M.; Angelova, Anelia; Livianu, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    A navigation system for Mars rovers in very rough terrain has been designed, implemented, and tested on a research rover in Mars analog terrain. This navigation system consists of several technologies that are integrated to increase the capabilities compared to current rover navigation algorithms. These technologies include: goodness maps and terrain triage, terrain classification, remote slip prediction, path planning, high-fidelity traversability analysis (HFTA), and slip-compensated path following. The focus of this paper is not on the component technologies, but rather on the integration of these components. Results from the onboard integration of several of the key technologies described here are shown. Additionally, the results from independent demonstrations of several of these technologies are shown. Future work will include the demonstration of the entire integrated system described here.

  3. Sequential learning for robot vision terrain classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witus, Gary; Karlsen, Robert; Hunt, Shawn

    2009-05-01

    Terrains have widely varying visual appearance depending on the type of foliage, season, current weather conditions, recent precipitation, time of day, relative direction of lighting, presence of man-made structures and artifacts, landscaping, etc. It is difficult, if not impossible, to specify in advance the appearance of the different terrains that will be encountered while operating a robot in urban or rural environments. Yet people, having accumulated wide-ranging experience, have little trouble recognizing familiar terrain types and learning to recognize new, previously unfamiliar, terrains. Robots typically accumulate experience in "chunks" and do not have the luxury of years of training. This paper presents recent results in sequential learning methods applied to robot terrain recognition. In this paper we explore different sequential learning problem formulations and alternative machine learning algorithms. The investigations are based on the same data set. We report on the initial development of an incremental fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm capable of learning new information. We report on an approach to convert regression tree modeling, normally a batch learning method, to batch-incremental learning. We investigate issues in formulating the sequential learning problem and the performance of these algorithms. We also compare performance to four incremental learning classifiers. All investigations were conducted using the same set of image features, extracted from on-board video from a small robot traversing different terrains.

  4. Terrain coverage of an unknown room by an autonomous mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    VanderHeide, J.R.

    1995-12-05

    Terrain coverage problems are nearly as old as mankind: they were necessary early in our history for basic activities such as finding food and other necessities. As our societies and their associated machineries have grown more complex, we have not outgrown the need for this primitive skill. It is still used on a small scale for cleaning tasks and on a large scale for {open_quotes}search and report{close_quotes} missions of various kinds. The motivation for automating this process may not lie in the novelty of anything we might gain as an end product, but in freedom from something which we as humans find tedious, time-consuming and sometimes dangerous. Here we consider autonomous coverage of a terrain, typically indoor rooms, by a mobile robot that has no a priori model of the terrain. In evaluating its surroundings, the robot employs only inexpensive and commercially available ultrasonic and infrared sensors. The proposed solution is a basic step - a proof of principle - that can contribute to robots capable of autonomously performing tasks such as vacuum cleaning, mopping, radiation scanning, etc. The area of automatic terrain coverage and the closely related problem of terrain model acquisition have been studied both analytically and experimentally. Compared to the existing works, the following are three major distinguishing aspects of our study: (1) the theory is actually applied to an existing robot, (2) the robot has no a priori knowledge of the terrain, and (3) the robot can be realized relatively inexpensively.

  5. The topography of chaos terrain on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, G.; Prockter, L. M.; Schenk, P.

    2010-12-01

    Chaos terrain and lenticulae are commonly observed surface features unique to the Galilean satellite Europa. Chaos terrain occurs as discrete regions of the satellite’s surface 10s to 100s of km in size that are disrupted into isolated plates surrounded by hummocky matrix material. Lenticulae occur as positive- or negative-relief domes km to 10s of km in diameter that can disrupt the original surface in a manner similar to chaos terrain. Evidence suggests that they each form via an endogenic process involving the interaction of a mobile substrate with the brittle surface and it has been proposed that ice shell thinning or surface yielding coupled with brine production represents the most plausible mechanism for the formation of these features. These similarities in morphology and formation mechanism indicate they may represent a continuum process. We explore whether larger chaos terrain represent the coalescence of smaller lenticulae by examining topography within chaos to determine whether it contains domes on length scales similar to lenticulae. Schenk and Pappalardo (2004) alluded to the presence of several prominent domes within Conamara Chaos and we have previously shown that at least 4 and as many as 9 domes with length scales similar to lenticulae are present within and along the margins of the feature. This was accomplished by using Fourier analysis to decompose the topographic signature of Conamara Chaos and the surrounding terrain into discrete wavelength components. A low-pass filter was then used to strip away shorter wavelength components of the topography associated with the region and determine if longer wavelength features were present within the terrain. Here we present new work identifying the presence, size, and distribution of domes within the boundaries of other chaos terrains across the surface of Europa and discuss implications for chaos formation.

  6. Interactive mapping on 3-D terrain models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardin, T.; Cowgill, E.; Gold, R.; Hamann, B.; Kreylos, O.; Schmitt, A.

    2006-10-01

    We present an interactive, real-time mapping system for use with digital elevation models and remotely sensed multispectral imagery that aids geoscientists in the creation and interpretation of geologic/neotectonic maps at length scales of 10 m to 1000 km. Our system provides a terrain visualization of the surface of the Earth or other terrestrial planets by displaying a virtual terrain model generated from a digital elevation model overlain by a color texture generated from orthophotos or satellite imagery. We use a quadtree-based, multiresolution display method to render in real time high-resolution virtual terrain models that span large spatial regions. The system allows users to measure the orientations of geologic surfaces and record their observations by drawing lines directly on the virtual terrain model. In addition, interpretive surfaces can be generated from these drawings and displayed to facilitate understanding of the three-dimensional geometry of geologic surfaces. The main strength of our system is the combination of real-time rendering and interactive mapping performed directly on the virtual terrain model with the ability to navigate the scene while changing viewpoints arbitrarily during mapping. User studies and comparisons with commercially available mapping software show that our system improves mapping accuracy and efficiency and also yields observations that cannot be made with existing systems.

  7. Gravity measurements and terrain corrections using a digital terrain model in the NW Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Paramesh

    1998-12-01

    Areas recently gravity surveyed in the NW Himalaya are characterized by high-elevation and high-amplitude topographic undulations. A new method of applying combined Bouguer and terrain corrections using a digital terrain model is highly accurate and offers advantages over conventional techniques by saving efforts and being more flexible. Partitioning parameters for station-dependent inner-zone compartments and station-independent outer zones can be optimally selected for the desired accuracy requirements. A digital terrain database is used to obtain the outer-zone corrections. In the situation of the NW Himalaya surveys, a 1.2 km inner zone is divided into 112 compartments for each station and a digital terrain database containing nearly 16 000 data points for 30″×30″ compartments was applied using the computer program EFFECT.FOR, to compute combined Bouguer and terrain corrections for a 20 km range. The terrain corrections between 20 and 170 km were computed using National Geophysical Data Centre (NGDC) 5'×5' gridded global elevation database. The magnitude of the terrain correction varies between 3 and 50 mGal. The effects of the 20 km range terrain correction are more pronounced on short-medium wavelength anomalies. The Swarghat gravity high is further enhanced while several high-frequency pseudo-anomalies disappear after applying the terrain corrections. The refined Bouguer anomaly varies from -160 mGal at the southern end of the section, to -310 mGal at the northern end, suggesting a Moho depth variation from 45 to nearly 60 km. The steepness of the northward negative gravity gradient, typical for the Himalaya, is considerably reduced after applying a terrain correction for the 170 km range.

  8. The Surface Roughness of Terrains on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deal, K. S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Neumann, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    The RMS roughness measurements produced by Neumann et al. from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data provide unique information about surface height variations at an effective length scale of < 75 m. Roughness at this scale is important not only for landing site safety considerations, but also for assessment of landscape evolution, which depends on emplacement mechanisms and erosional/depositional processes. Here we present an examination of the global surface roughness map with discussion of terrain types and potential formation and/or alteration mechanisms. Spatially coherent terrain types were identified based on inspection of the roughness map. These terrains were further characterized through analysis of morphology and geology using MOLA topography, MOC wide-angle, and MOC narrow-angle images as well as the geologic maps produced by Scott & Tanaka and Greeley & Guest. All of these data were used to explore potential formation and modification processes.

  9. High performance robotic traverse of desert terrain.

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, William

    2004-09-01

    This report presents tentative innovations to enable unmanned vehicle guidance for a class of off-road traverse at sustained speeds greater than 30 miles per hour. Analyses and field trials suggest that even greater navigation speeds might be achieved. The performance calls for innovation in mapping, perception, planning and inertial-referenced stabilization of components, hosted aboard capable locomotion. The innovations are motivated by the challenge of autonomous ground vehicle traverse of 250 miles of desert terrain in less than 10 hours, averaging 30 miles per hour. GPS coverage is assumed to be available with localized blackouts. Terrain and vegetation are assumed to be akin to that of the Mojave Desert. This terrain is interlaced with networks of unimproved roads and trails, which are a key to achieving the high performance mapping, planning and navigation that is presented here.

  10. Large Terrain Modeling and Visualization for Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myint, Steven; Jain, Abhinandan; Cameron, Jonathan; Lim, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Physics-based simulations are actively used in the design, testing, and operations phases of surface and near-surface planetary space missions. One of the challenges in realtime simulations is the ability to handle large multi-resolution terrain data sets within models as well as for visualization. In this paper, we describe special techniques that we have developed for visualization, paging, and data storage for dealing with these large data sets. The visualization technique uses a real-time GPU-based continuous level-of-detail technique that delivers multiple frames a second performance even for planetary scale terrain model sizes.

  11. Rough and Steep Terrain Lunar Surface Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian

    2005-01-01

    In the summer of 2004, the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate conducted an open call for projects relevant to human and robotic exploration of the Earth-Moon and Mars systems. A project entitled 'Rough and Steep Terrain Lunar Surface Mobility' was submitted by JPL and accepted by NASA. The principal investigator of this project describes the robotic vehicle being developed for this effort, which includes six 'wheels-on-legs' so that it can roll efficiently on relatively smooth terrain but walk (using locked wheels as footpads) when "the going gets rough".

  12. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  13. Terrain Models in Field Geology Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittecar, G. Richard

    1984-01-01

    Describes a terrain model for geologic mapping which, when combined with exercises in rock description, Brunton compass manipulation, orienteering, and geologic report writing, allows students to refine skills needed for summer field camp. Advantages and limitations of the model and its use in a field course are also discussed. (BC)

  14. Processes Modifying Cratered Terrains on Pluto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The July encounter with Pluto by the New Horizons spacecraft permitted imaging of its cratered terrains with scales as high as approximately 100 m/pixel, and in stereo. In the initial download of images, acquired at 2.2 km/pixel, widely distributed impact craters up to 260 km diameter are seen in the near-encounter hemisphere. Many of the craters appear to be significantly degraded or infilled. Some craters appear partially destroyed, perhaps by erosion such as associated with the retreat of scarps. Bright ice-rich deposits highlight some crater rims and/or floors. While the cratered terrains identified in the initial downloaded images are generally seen on high-to-intermediate albedo surfaces, the dark equatorial terrain informally known as Cthulhu Regio is also densely cratered. We will explore the range of possible processes that might have operated (or still be operating) to modify the landscape from that of an ancient pristinely cratered state to the present terrains revealed in New Horizons images. The sequence, intensity, and type of processes that have modified ancient landscapes are, among other things, the record of climate and volatile evolution throughout much of the Pluto's existence. The deciphering of this record will be discussed. This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  15. Hand-arm vibration and terrain vehicles.

    PubMed

    Anttonen, H; Virokannas, H; Niskanen, J

    1995-01-01

    Hand-arm vibration was measured on the handlebars of terrain vehicles (N = 36) and a postal inquiry was made among N = 2705 reindeer herders (snowmobile drivers). Since many subjects had also used other vibrating tools the snowmobile group proper (N = 334) was established. In the whole group 19% of the subjects reported having experienced white finger attacks and 48% numbness of the hands. The frequency-weighted acceleration of snowmobile vibration was 3.5 m/s2, and risk evaluation using the ISO 5349 standard predicted the prevalence of white finger well in the snowmobile group proper. The vibration levels were 1.6-7.9 m/s2 on snowmobiles, 5.5-11.8 m/s2 on all-terrain vehicles and 6.9-12.7 m/s2 on terrain motorcycles. The most critical points for damping the vibration were the motor mounting and resonance in the steering yoke. There is need for health care, technical improvements, and other protection means to reduce the symptoms of vibration in driving terrain vehicles.

  16. Visualization of Large Terrains Made Easy

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, P; Pascucci, V

    2001-08-07

    We present an elegant and simple to implement framework for performing out-of-core visualization and view-dependent refinement of large terrain surfaces. Contrary to the recent trend of increasingly elaborate algorithms for large-scale terrain visualization, our algorithms and data structures have been designed with the primary goal of simplicity and efficiency of implementation. Our approach to managing large terrain data also departs from more conventional strategies based on data tiling. Rather than emphasizing how to segment and efficiently bring data in and out of memory, we focus on the manner in which the data is laid out to achieve good memory coherency for data accesses made in a top-down (coarse-to-fine) refinement of the terrain. We present and compare the results of using several different data indexing schemes, and propose a simple to compute index that yields substantial improvements in locality and speed over more commonly used data layouts. Our second contribution is a new and simple, yet easy to generalize method for view-dependent refinement. Similar to several published methods in this area, we use longest edge bisection in a top-down traversal of the mesh hierarchy to produce a continuous surface with subdivision connectivity. In tandem with the refinement, we perform view frustum culling and triangle stripping. These three components are done together in a single pass over the mesh. We show how this framework supports virtually any error metric, while still being highly memory and compute efficient.

  17. Modeling and Simulation Terrain Database Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    data for use in combat modeling. The SVDR is still under development by the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) in conjunction with...DOD organization for comunication between Unmanned Systems. But they have not worked on how to communicate terrain between systems. Hope this helps

  18. Tessera terrain: Characteristics and models of origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, D. L.; Head, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Tessera terrain consists of complexly deformed regions characterized by sets of ridges and valleys that intersect at angles ranging from orthogonal to oblique, and were first viewed in Venera 15/16 SAR data. Tesserae cover more area (approx. 15 percent of the area north of 30 deg N) than any of the other tectonic units mapped from the Venera data and are strongly concentrated in the region between longitudes 0 deg E and 150 deg E. Tessera terrain is concentrated between a proposed center of crustal extension and divergence in Aphrodite and a region of intense deformation, crustal convergence, and orogenesis in western Ishtar Terra. Thus, the tectonic processes responsible for tesserae are an important part of Venus tectonics. As part of an effort to understand the formation and evolution of this unusual terrain type, the basic characteristics of the tesserae were compared to the predictions made by a number of tectonic models. The basic characteristics of tessera terrain are described and the models and some of their basic predictions are briefly discussed.

  19. Scaling Terrain Attributes By Fractal Methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Terrain attributes derived from grid digital elevation models (DEMs) are commonly used in distributed hydrologic models. However, many attribute estimations are biased by DEM grid cell size. For example, land surface slopes estimated from 30-m DEMs are, on average, less than slopes estimated from ...

  20. Terrain Measurement with SAR/InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deren; Liao, Mingsheng; Balz, Timo; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Tianliang

    2016-08-01

    Terrain measurement and surface motion estimation are the most important applications for commercial and scientific SAR missions. In Dragon-3, we worked on these applications, especially regarding DEM generation, surface motion estimation with SAR time- series for urban subsidence monitoring and landslide motion estimation, as well as developing tomographic SAR processing methods in urban areas.

  1. Reconfigurable robots for all terrain exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenker, P. S.; Pirjanian, P.; Balaram, B.; Ali, K. S.; Trebi-Ollennu, A.; Huntsberger, T. L.; Aghazarian, H.; Kennedy, B. A.; Baumgartner, E. T.; Iagnemma, K.; Rzepniewski, A.; Dubowsky, S.; Leger, P. C.; McKee, G. T.

    2001-01-01

    While significant recent progress has been made in development of mobile robots for planetary suface exploration,there remain major challenges. These include increased autonomy of operation, traverse of challenging terrain, and fault-tolerance under long, unattended periods of use.

  2. Photometric diversity of terrains on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Lee, P.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager disk-resolved images of Triton in the violet (0.41 micrometers) and green (0.56 micrometer wavelengths have been analyzed to derive the photometric characteristics of terrains on Triton. Similar conclusions are found using two distinct but related definitions of photometric units, one based on color ratio and albedo properties (A. S. McEwen, 1990), the other on albedo and brightness ratios at different phase angles (P. Lee et al., 1992). A significant diversity of photometric behavior, much broader than that discovered so far on any other icy satellite, occurs among Triton's terrains. Remarkably, differences in photometric behavior do not correlate well with geologic terrain boundaries defined on the basis of surface morphology. This suggests that in most cases photometric properties on Triton are controlled by thin deposits superposed on underlying geologic units. Single scattering albedos are 0.98 or higher and asymmetry factors range from -0.35 to -0.45 for most units. The most distinct scattering behavior is exhibited by the reddish northern units already identified as the Anomalously Scattering Region (ASR), which scatters light almost isotropically with g = -0.04. In part due to the effects of Triton's clouds and haze, it is difficult to constrain the value of bar-theta, Hapke's macroscopic roughness parameter, precisely for Triton or to map differences in bar-theta among the different photometric terrains. However, our study shows that Triton must be relatively smooth, with bar-theta less than 15-20 degs and suggests that a value of 14 degs is appropriate. The differences in photometric characteristics lead to significantly different phase angle behavior for the various terrains. For example, a terrain (e.g., the ASR) that appears dark relative to another at low phase angles will reverse its contrast (become relatively brighter) at larger phase angles. The photometric parameters have been used to calculate hemispherical albedos for the units and to

  3. AirMSPI SEAC4RS Terrain Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-03-16

    ... AirMSPI SEAC4RS Terrain-projected Georegistered Radiance Data AirMSPI Terrain-Projected Georegistered Radiance Product ... Polarized Radiance DOLP AOLP Order Data:  Earthdata Search:  Earthdata Search Read ...

  4. Representations and Metrics for Time-Varying Terrain Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-06

    12 4.1 Development of the Surface Probability Function ( SPF ) Octree...15 5.2 SPF Terrain Model...terrain model and <….>. ..................................... 11 Figure 8: Visualization of our SPF Octree data structure using a sphere test surface

  5. Tessera terrain on Venus: Global characterization from Magellan data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, Mikhail; Head, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Tessera terrain is characterized by relatively high elevations and complex tectonic patterns; analysis of Venera 15/16 data showed that large (up to thousands of km across) and small (up to hundreds of km across) occurrences of tesserae are widespread and non-randomly distributed and make up about 10-15 percent of the surface of Venus north of approximately 30 deg N. In a previous analysis, we used the Magellan Cycle 1 and 2 data to map the global distribution of tesserae on the basis of the following: (1) complex deformational patterns (two or more trends); (2) relatively high radar backscatter; and (3) relatively high elevation. Here we report on the quantitative aspects of tesserae areal, size, and shape distribution and on the characteristics and distribution of tesserae boundaries. Experiments on volcanic flooding of tessera and implications for tessera presence beneath the plains and analysis of the distribution of impact craters on tesserae and the plains are reported elsewhere.

  6. Comparison of dry deposition estimates of AERMOD and CALPUFF from area sources in flat terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, Dmitry; Stern, Eli; Broday, David M.

    2016-10-01

    The dry deposition algorithms of AERMOD and CALPUFF were compared, studying emissions from hypothetical area and point sources in flat terrain. The deposited fractions calculated by AERMOD and CALPUFF are different for the C, D and F stability classes. In all the studied scenarios the differences between the deposited fractions calculated by AERMOD and CALPUFF are much smaller than those calculated previously in complex terrain. Yet, the detected differences in the deposited fractions may affect the ambient concentrations calculated by AERMOD and CALPUFF in the receptor points as a part of an environmental impact assessment and lead to different conclusions on the residents' exposure. The distinct account of AERMOD and CALPUFF to certain wind speeds and stability classes, and their different algorithms for calculating the dispersion coefficients, is the only explanation for the different estimates of deposited fractions between AERMOD and CALPUFF over absolutely flat terrain.

  7. Rolling ball algorithm as a multitask filter for terrain conductivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashed, Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Portable frequency domain electromagnetic devices, commonly known as terrain conductivity meters, have become increasingly popular in recent years, especially in locating underground utilities. Data collected using these devices, however, usually suffer from major problems such as complexity and interference of apparent conductivity anomalies, near edge local spikes, and fading of conductivity contrast between a utility and the surrounding soil. This study presents the experience of adopting the rolling ball algorithm, originally designed to remove background from medical images, to treat these major problems in terrain conductivity measurements. Applying the proposed procedure to data collected using different terrain conductivity meters at different locations and conditions proves the capability of the rolling ball algorithm to treat these data both efficiently and quickly.

  8. EFFECTS OF ROUGH TERRAIN ON DRAG-SENSITIVE TARGETS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    jeeps were exposed on Shot Smoky. Vehicles were placed on three blast lines: a control line of essentially flat terrain, a line of rolling terrain...and a line of steeply sloping terrain with scattered gullies and washes. Earth revetments were constructed to examine the protection they would provide

  9. 14 CFR 135.154 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (TSO)-C151. The airplane must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (2) No... terrain situational awareness display. (2) No person may operate a turbine-powered airplane configured... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system....

  10. 14 CFR 135.154 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (TSO)-C151. The airplane must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (2) No... terrain situational awareness display. (2) No person may operate a turbine-powered airplane configured... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system....

  11. 14 CFR 121.354 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (TSO)-C151. The airplane must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (b... must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (Approved by the Office of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system....

  12. 14 CFR 135.154 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (TSO)-C151. The airplane must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (2) No... terrain situational awareness display. (2) No person may operate a turbine-powered airplane configured... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system....

  13. 14 CFR 135.154 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (TSO)-C151. The airplane must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (2) No... terrain situational awareness display. (2) No person may operate a turbine-powered airplane configured... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system....

  14. 14 CFR 135.154 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (TSO)-C151. The airplane must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (2) No... terrain situational awareness display. (2) No person may operate a turbine-powered airplane configured... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system....

  15. 14 CFR 121.354 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (TSO)-C151. The airplane must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (b... must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (Approved by the Office of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system....

  16. 14 CFR 121.354 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (TSO)-C151. The airplane must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (b... must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (Approved by the Office of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system....

  17. 14 CFR 121.354 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... (TSO)-C151. The airplane must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (b... must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (Approved by the Office of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system....

  18. 14 CFR 121.354 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (TSO)-C151. The airplane must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (b... must also include an approved terrain situational awareness display. (Approved by the Office of... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system....

  19. 14 CFR 91.223 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system. 91..., and Certificate Requirements § 91.223 Terrain awareness and warning system. (a) Airplanes manufactured... seat, unless that airplane is equipped with an approved terrain awareness and warning system that as...

  20. 14 CFR 91.223 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system. 91..., and Certificate Requirements § 91.223 Terrain awareness and warning system. (a) Airplanes manufactured... seat, unless that airplane is equipped with an approved terrain awareness and warning system that as...

  1. 14 CFR 91.223 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system. 91..., and Certificate Requirements § 91.223 Terrain awareness and warning system. (a) Airplanes manufactured... seat, unless that airplane is equipped with an approved terrain awareness and warning system that as...

  2. 14 CFR 91.223 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system. 91..., and Certificate Requirements § 91.223 Terrain awareness and warning system. (a) Airplanes manufactured... seat, unless that airplane is equipped with an approved terrain awareness and warning system that as...

  3. 14 CFR 91.223 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Terrain awareness and warning system. 91..., and Certificate Requirements § 91.223 Terrain awareness and warning system. (a) Airplanes manufactured... seat, unless that airplane is equipped with an approved terrain awareness and warning system that as...

  4. 41 CFR 101-45.004 - All terrain vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true All terrain vehicles. 101-45.004 Section 101-45.004 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.004 All terrain vehicles. (a) Three-wheeled all terrain...

  5. 41 CFR 101-45.004 - All terrain vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false All terrain vehicles. 101-45.004 Section 101-45.004 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.004 All terrain vehicles. (a) Three-wheeled all terrain...

  6. 41 CFR 101-45.004 - All terrain vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true All terrain vehicles. 101-45.004 Section 101-45.004 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management... DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.004 All terrain vehicles. (a) Three-wheeled all terrain...

  7. Microwave and millimeter-wave interaction with terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yang

    To develop better understanding of the scattering mechanisms underlying microwave and millimeter wave (MMW) interaction with terrain, it is imperative to construct an extensive database of microwave and MMW measurements, and to develop analytical or empirical models to explain the observed features, with a fine balance between modeling rigorousness and flexibility as well as consistency. This thesis contributes to both aspects through several specific contributions. In the case of database construction and enhancement, the contribution entailed a first-of kind extensive experimental characterization of MMW snow backscatter at grazing incidence, as well as the characterization of the forward scattered signal off of terrain surface at MMW. The modeling contributions involved the development of analytical models for several important interactions of microwave and MMW with terrain. Specifically, first, the sensitivity to soil moisture for both active and passive sensors at, L band was evaluated, which showed that the radar and radiometric sensitivities exhibited comparable reductions due to vegetation cover, hence brought to a conclusion a long disputed issue. Second, this study showed that a simple first-order radiative transfer (RT) model, when coupled with high fidelity characterization of scattering parameters as functions of physical parameters, can capture the scattering mechanism for a complex setting such as a soybean-covered rough surface and provide very good prediction results. Third, we showed that mixed conventional RT (CRT) and dense media RT (DMRT) technique can be used to model the angular behavior of dry snow, provided that the disparity inherent in quasi-crystalline-approximation (QCA) for the extinction coefficient and in conventional determination of the phase matrix. To this purpose we proposed an albedo-matching technique and demonstrated its effectiveness. Forth, for MMW backscatter at wet snow, we showed that the underlying thermodynamic process

  8. A model for the origin of Martian polygonal terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgill, G. E.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive areas of the Martian northern plains in Utopia and Acidalia Planitiae are characterized by 'polygonal terrain.' Polygonal terrain consists of material cut by complex troughs defining a pattern resembling mudcracks, columnar joints, or frost-wedge polygons on the Earth. However, the Martian polygons are orders of magnitude larger than these potential Earth analogs, leading to severe mechanical difficulties for genetic models based on simple analogy arguments. Stratigraphic studies show that the polygonally fractured material in Utopia Planitia was deposited on a land surface with significant topography, including scattered knobs and mesas, fragments of ancient crater rims, and fresh younger craters. Sediments or volcanics deposited over topographically irregular surfaces can experience differential compaction producing drape folds. Bending stresses due to these drape folds would be superposed on the pervasive tensile stresses due to desiccation or cooling, such that the probability of fracturing is enhanced above buried topographic highs and suppressed above buried topographic lows. Thus it was proposed that the scale of the Martian polygons is controlled by the spacing of topographic highs on the buried surface rather than by the physics of the shrinkage process.

  9. Global multi-resolution terrain elevation data 2010 (GMTED2010)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Gesch, Dean B.

    2011-01-01

    In 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a global topographic elevation model designated as GTOPO30 at a horizontal resolution of 30 arc-seconds for the entire Earth. Because no single source of topographic information covered the entire land surface, GTOPO30 was derived from eight raster and vector sources that included a substantial amount of U.S. Defense Mapping Agency data. The quality of the elevation data in GTOPO30 varies widely; there are no spatially-referenced metadata, and the major topographic features such as ridgelines and valleys are not well represented. Despite its coarse resolution and limited attributes, GTOPO30 has been widely used for a variety of hydrological, climatological, and geomorphological applications as well as military applications, where a regional, continental, or global scale topographic model is required. These applications have ranged from delineating drainage networks and watersheds to using digital elevation data for the extraction of topographic structure and three-dimensional (3D) visualization exercises (Jenson and Domingue, 1988; Verdin and Greenlee, 1996; Lehner and others, 2008). Many of the fundamental geophysical processes active at the Earth's surface are controlled or strongly influenced by topography, thus the critical need for high-quality terrain data (Gesch, 1994). U.S. Department of Defense requirements for mission planning, geographic registration of remotely sensed imagery, terrain visualization, and map production are similarly dependent on global topographic data. Since the time GTOPO30 was completed, the availability of higher-quality elevation data over large geographic areas has improved markedly. New data sources include global Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTEDRegistered) from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), Canadian elevation data, and data from the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat). Given the widespread use of GTOPO30 and the equivalent 30-arc

  10. Mars Global Surveyor observations of Martian fretted terrain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.

    2001-01-01

    The Martian fretted terrain between latitudes 30?? and 50?? N and between 315?? and 360?? W has been reexamined in light of new Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) and Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data from Mars Global Surveyor. Much of the terrain in the 30??-50?? latitude belt in both hemispheres has a characteristic stippled or pitted texture at MOC (1.5 m) scale. The texture appears to result from partial removal of a formerly smooth, thin deposit as a result of sublimation and deflation. A complex history of deposition and exhumation is indicated by remnants of a former, thicker cover of layered deposits. In some hollows and on some slopes, particularly those facing the pole, are smooth textured deposits outlined by an outward facing escarpment. Throughout the study area are numerous escarpments with debris flows at their base. The escarpments typically have slopes in the 20??-30?? range. At the base of the escarpment is commonly a deposit with striae oriented at right angles to the escarpment. Outside this deposit is the main debris apron with a surface that typically slopes 2??-3?? and complex surface textures suggestive of compression, sublimation, and deflation. The presence of undeformed impact craters indicates that the debris flows are no longer forming. Fretted valleys contain lineated fill and are poorly graded. They likely form from fluvial valleys that were initially like those elsewhere on the planet but were subsequently widened and filled by the same mass-wasting processes that formed the debris aprons. Slope reversals indicate that downvalley flow of the lineated fill is minor. The ubiquitous presence of breaks in slope formed by mass wasting and the complex surface textures that result from mass wasting, deflation, and sublimation decreases the recognizability of the shorelines formerly proposed for this area.

  11. Large Terrain Continuous Level of Detail 3D Visualization Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myint, Steven; Jain, Abhinandan

    2012-01-01

    This software solved the problem of displaying terrains that are usually too large to be displayed on standard workstations in real time. The software can visualize terrain data sets composed of billions of vertices, and can display these data sets at greater than 30 frames per second. The Large Terrain Continuous Level of Detail 3D Visualization Tool allows large terrains, which can be composed of billions of vertices, to be visualized in real time. It utilizes a continuous level of detail technique called clipmapping to support this. It offloads much of the work involved in breaking up the terrain into levels of details onto the GPU (graphics processing unit) for faster processing.

  12. Microwave emission and scattering from vegetated terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibley, T. G.

    1973-01-01

    Models are developed for the apparent temperature and backscattering coefficient of vegetated terrain to illustrate the effects of vegetation on the sensitivity of these parameters to variations of soil moisture. Three types of terrain are simulated for both the passive and the active case: a uniform canopy over a smooth surface, plant rows on a smooth surface, and plant rows on a rough surface. In each case the canopy is defined by its overall dimensions and by its electric permittivity, which is determined from Weiner model for dielectric mixture. Emission and scattering from both the soil and the canopy are considered, but atmospheric effects are neglected. Calculated data indicate that the sensitivity of the apparent temperature and backscattering coefficient to variations of soil moisture, decreases as the amount of vegetation increases. It is shown that the same effect results from increasing signal frequency or angle of incidence.

  13. Chronology of heavily cratered terrains on Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, S.; Chapman, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Imaging of Mercury by Mariner 10 revealed a planet with more extensive plains units than on the Moon. Even in heavily cratered terrain, there is a lack of craters <40 km in diameter, relative to the size-frequency distribution on the Moon, a result attributed to resurfacing by the formation of widespread "intercrater plains". MESSENGER imaging has revealed that the more recent smooth plains are generally the result of widespread volcanism (rather than fluidized impact basin ejecta) and that at least localized volcanism may have persisted until comparatively recent times, despite the crustal contraction evidenced by the numerous lobate scarps. The older intercrater plains may also be volcanic. Here we address the ages of the oldest, most heavily cratered regions on Mercury that may predate most of the visible intercrater plains. We scale to Mercury the lunar crater chronology recently developed by Morbidelli et al., [1] in order to interpret new crater counts on these terrains. We find that these craters are probably not saturated but may have been in equilibrium with a rapid resurfacing process, presumably volcanism that formed the earliest recognized intercrater plains. The crater retention age for this terrain, which contains the oldest large craters on Mercury, is surprisingly young, perhaps hundreds of millions of years younger than the heavily cratered pre-Nectarian terrains on the Moon [2]. These results are important for understanding the early geological and geophysical evolution of Mercury. References: [1] Morbidelli A., Marchi S., Bottke W.F., and Kring D.A. 2012. A sawtooth timeline for the first billion years of the lunar bombardment. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, in press. [2] Marchi S., Bottke W.F., Kring D.A., and Morbidelli A. 2012. The onset of the lunar cataclysm as recorded in its ancient crater populations. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 325, 27-38.

  14. The identification of chaotic terrain on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neish, C.; Prockter, L.; Patterson, G. W.

    2011-10-01

    Chaos is one of the dominant terrain types on Jupiter's moon Europa. However, the determination of its total areal extent has been hindered by the lack of global images of Europa at suitable resolutions and incidence angles. In this work, we determine that high incidence angle (> 75°), not high resolution, is the primary observational requirement for observing chaos in spacecraft imaging data. These recommendations will guide observational strategies for future missions to Europa and other icy bodies, such as Triton and Pluto.

  15. Advanced Terrain Displays for Transport Category Aircraft.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    Map Displays, Terrain Displays, DOCUMENT IS AVAILABLE TO THE PUBLIC THROUGH Pilo t Performance, THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE , Cockp •t...DOT/FAA/RD-9214 Advanced Terran Wigays DOT-VNTSC-FAA-92-4 frTaaotCta Research and Development Servic fo rasor atgr Washington, DC 20591 Aircraft...U.S. Department of Transportation Final Report Federal Aviation Administration January 1991-Sept. 1991 Research and Development Service Washington, DC

  16. Classification Of Terrain In Polarimetric SAR Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Kong, Jin A.; Shin, Robert T.; Lim, Harold; Swartz, Albert; Yueh, Simon H.

    1993-01-01

    Two algorithms processing polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar data found effective in assigning various parts of SAR images to classes representing different types of terrain. Partially automate interpretation of SAR imagery, reducing amount of photointerpretation needed and putting whole interpretation process on more quantitative and systematic basis. First algorithm implements Bayesian classification scheme "supervised" by use of training data. Second algorithm implements classification procedure unsupervised.

  17. High-resolution terrain map from multiple sensor data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kweon, In S.; Kanade, Takeo

    1992-01-01

    The authors present 3-D vision techniques for incrementally building an accurate 3-D representation of rugged terrain using multiple sensors. They have developed the locus method to model the rugged terrain. The locus method exploits sensor geometry to efficiently build a terrain representation from multiple sensor data. The locus method is used to estimate the vehicle position in the digital elevation map (DEM) by matching a sequence of range images with the DEM. Experimental results from large-scale real and synthetic terrains demonstrate the feasibility and power of the 3-D mapping techniques for rugged terrain. In real world experiments, a composite terrain map was built by merging 125 real range images. Using synthetic range images, a composite map of 150 m was produced from 159 images. With the proposed system, mobile robots operating in rugged environments can build accurate terrain models from multiple sensor data.

  18. Fusing terrain and goals: agent control in urban environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptan, Varol; Gelenbe, Erol

    2006-04-01

    The changing face of contemporary military conflicts has forced a major shift of focus in tactical planning and evaluation from the classical Cold War battlefield to an asymmetric guerrilla-type warfare in densely populated urban areas. The new arena of conflict presents unique operational difficulties due to factors like complex mobility restrictions and the necessity to preserve civilian lives and infrastructure. In this paper we present a novel method for autonomous agent control in an urban environment. Our approach is based on fusing terrain information and agent goals for the purpose of transforming the problem of navigation in a complex environment with many obstacles into the easier problem of navigation in a virtual obstacle-free space. The main advantage of our approach is its ability to act as an adapter layer for a number of efficient agent control techniques which normally show poor performance when applied to an environment with many complex obstacles. Because of the very low computational and space complexity at runtime, our method is also particularly well suited for simulation or control of a huge number of agents (military as well as civilian) in a complex urban environment where traditional path-planning may be too expensive or where a just-in-time decision with hard real-time constraints is required.

  19. Remote sensing of earth terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Herng-Aung; Kong, Jin AU

    1991-01-01

    In remote sensing, the encountered geophysical media such as agricultural canopy, forest, snow, or ice are inhomogeneous and contain scatters in a random manner. Furthermore, weather conditions such as fog, mist, or snow cover can intervene the electromagnetic observation of the remotely sensed media. In the modelling of such media accounting for the weather effects, a multi-layer random medium model has been developed. The scattering effects of the random media are described by three-dimensional correlation functions with variances and correlation lengths corresponding to the fluctuation strengths and the physical geometry of the inhomogeneities, respectively. With proper consideration of the dyadic Green's function and its singularities, the strong fluctuation theory is used to calculate the effective permittivities which account for the modification of the wave speed and attenuation in the presence of the scatters. The distorted Born approximation is then applied to obtain the correlations of the scattered fields. From the correlation of the scattered field, calculated is the complete set of scattering coefficients for polarimetric radar observation or brightness temperature in passive radiometer applications. In the remote sensing of terrestrial ecosystems, the development of microwave remote sensing technology and the potential of SAR to measure vegetation structure and biomass have increased effort to conduct experimental and theoretical researches on the interactions between microwave and vegetation canopies. The overall objective is to develop inversion algorithms to retrieve biophysical parameters from radar data. In this perspective, theoretical models and experimental data are methodically interconnected in the following manner: Due to the complexity of the interactions involved, all theoretical models have limited domains of validity; the proposed solution is to use theoretical models, which is validated by experiments, to establish the region in which

  20. Mobility versus terrain: a game theoretic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarz, David; Muench, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Mobility and terrain are two sides of the same coin. You cannot describe mobility unless you describe the terrain. For example, if my world is trench warfare, the tank may be the ideal vehicle. If my world is urban warfare, clearing buildings and such, the tank may not be an ideal vehicle, perhaps an anthropomorphic robot would be better. We seek a general framework for mobility that captures the relative value of different mobility strategies. Game theory is positively the right way to analyze the interactions of rational players who behave strategically. In this paper, we will describe the interactions between a mobility player, who is trying to make it from point A to point B with one chance to refuel, and a terrain player who is trying to minimize that probability by placing an obstacle somewhere along the path from A to B. In previous work [1], we used Monte Carlo methods to analyze this mobility game, and found optimal strategies for a discretized version of the game. Here we show the relationship of this game to a classic game of timing [2], and use solution methods from that literature to solve for optimal strategies in a continuous version of this mobility game.

  1. Cooperative terrain model acquisition by two point-robots in planar polygonal terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, N.S.V.; Protopopescu, V.

    1994-11-29

    We address the model acquisition problem for an unknown terrain by a team of two robots. The terrain may be cluttered by a finite number of polygonal obstacles with unknown shapes and positions. The robots are point-sized and equipped with visual sensors which acquire all visible parts of the terrain by scanning from their locations. The robots communicate with each other via wireless connection. The performance is measured by the number of the sensor (scan) operations which are assumed to be the most time-consuming/expensive of all the robot operations. We employ the restricted visibility graph methods in a hierarchiacal setup. For terrains with convex obstacles, the sensing time can be halved compared to a single robot implementation. For terrains with concave corners, the performance of the algorithm depends on the number of concave regions and their depths. A hierarchical decomposition of the restricted visibility graph into 2-connected components and trees is considered. Performance for the 2-robot team is expressed in terms of sizes of 2-connected components, and the sizes and diameters of the trees. The proposed algorithm and analysis can be applied to the methods based on Voronoi diagram and trapezoidal decomposition.

  2. Dense-Gas Dispersion in Complex Terrain (PREPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    public release; distribution unlimited. A dense-gas version of the ADPIC Lagrangian particle, advection-diffusion model has been developed to...of momentum principles along with the ideal gas law equation of state for a mixture of gases. ADPIC , which is generally run in conjunction with a...versatility of coupling the new dense-gas ADPIC with alternative wind flow models. The new dense-gas ADPIC has been used to simulate the atmospheric

  3. Challenges to Autonomous Navigation in Complex Urban Terrain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-23

    a, Robert E. Karlsen a, Chip DiBerardino b, Edward Mottern b, & N. Joseph Kott, III a aU.S. Army Tank-Automotive Research, Development & Engineering...Gray; Robert Karlsen; Chip DiBerardino; Edward Mottern; N. Joseph Kott, III 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...There are a variety of sensors that a UGV can use to provide information about its environment, including active systems such as RADAR, LIDAR and

  4. A Model of Airflow and Diffusion in Complex Terrain (MADICT).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    REOR ARE§~ NO x TO, w~ BE(:T COSRELSA FICA EATETO THE~~ ARMY. POIINULSS9 ESGAE BYOHRAUHRZD OUET 1J~j7.Aq9FT~nMASTER C OPY AD FOR REPRODUCTION URPOSES...Research Office Unclassified P . 0. Box 12211 15a. OECL ASSIFICATION/ DOWNGRADING Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 SHDL . IS. 0ISTRIBUTION STATEMENT...invoking a "virtual" source above ,’,. , the reflecting surface. If the height above ground of the mixing layer is H .... ’ p

  5. Technical development to improve satellite sounding over radiatively complex terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    High resolution topography was acquired and applied on the McIDAS system. A technique for finding the surface skin temperature in the presence of cloud and reflected sunlight was implemented in the ALPEX retrieval software and the variability of surface emissivity at microwave wavelength was examined. Data containing raw radiances for all HIRS and MSU channels for NOAA-6 and 7 were used. METEOSAT data were used to derive cloud drift and water vapor winds over the Alpine region.

  6. Government Agencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    manufacturers. The Navy has a major in- house design capability for ships; the government does not possess such a capability for aircraft or other weapon systems...the Coast Guard, government agencies acquire a wide variety of ships, ranging from sophisticated submarines and nuclear aircraft carriers to much...the initial phase a review was made of written material relating to government procedures in U.S. Government agencies for acquiring vessels, aircraft

  7. Pitted terrains on Vesta: Thermophysical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capria, M.; Tosi, F.; De Sanctis, M.; Turrini, D.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Fonte, S.; Frigeri, A.; Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; Zambon, F.; Schroeder, S.; Denevi, B.; Williams, D.; Scully, J.; Russell, C.; Raymond, C.

    2014-07-01

    Launched in 2007, the Dawn spacecraft, after one year spent orbiting Vesta, is now on its way to Ceres. In the science payload, the Visible and Infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) is devoted to the study of the mineralogical composition and thermophysical properties of Vesta's surface [1]. Disk-resolved surface temperatures of Vesta have been determined from the infrared spectra measured by VIR [2]. The observed temperatures, together with a thermophysical model, have been used to constrain the thermal properties of a large part of the surface of the asteroid [3]. The average thermal inertia of the surface is quite low, consistent with a widespread presence of a dust layer. While the global thermal inertia is low, the characterization of its surface in terms of regions showing peculiar thermophysical properties gives us the possibility to identify specific areas with different thermal and structural characteristics. These variations can be linked to strong albedo variations that have been observed, or to other physical and structural characteristics of the first few centimeters of the soil. The highest values of thermal inertia have been determined on areas coinciding with locations where pitted terrains have been found [4]. Pitted terrains, first identified on Mars, have been found in association with 4 craters on Vesta: Marcia, Cornelia, Licinia, and Numisia. The Marcia area is characterized by high hydrogen and OH content [5]. By analogy with Mars, the formation of these terrains is thought to be due to the rapid release of volatiles, triggered by heating from an impact event. A question arises on the origin of volatiles: hydrated minerals, or ground, buried ice? In order to discuss the second hypothesis, we have to assume that a comet impact delivers ice that gets buried under a layer of regolith. Successively, another impact on the same area would give origin to the pitted terrain. The buried ice has obviously to survive for the time between the two impacts

  8. Tessera terrain, Venus: Characterization and models for origin and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bindschadler, D.L.; Head, J.W. )

    1991-04-10

    Tessera terrain is the dominant tectonic landform in the northern high latitudes of Venus mapped by the Venera 15 and 16 orbiters and is concentrated in the region between the mountain ranges of western Ishtar Terra and Aphrodite Terra. Tesserae are characterized by regionally high topography, a high degree of small scale surface roughness, and sets of intersecting tectonic features. Available Pioneer Venus line of sight gravity data suggest that tessera terrain is compensated at shallow depths relative to many topographic highs on Venus and may be supported by crustal thickness variations. Three types of tessera terrain can be defined on the basis of structural patterns: subparallel ridged terrains (T{sub sr}), trough and ridge terrain (T{sub tr}), and disrupted terrain (T{sub ds}). Observed characteristics of tessera terrain are compared to predictions of models in order to begin to address the question of its origin and evolution. Formational models, in which high topography is created along with surface deformation, include (1) horizontal convergence, (2) mantle upwelling, (3) crustal underplating, and (4) a seafloor spreading analogy. Modification models, in which deformation occurs as a response to the presence of elevated regions, consist of (1) gravity sliding and (2) gravitational relaxation. The authors find that horizontal convergence and late stage gravitational relaxation are the most consistent with basic observations for subparallel ridged terrain and disrupted terrain. Understanding of the basic structural characteristics of trough and ridge terrain is more tentative, and models involving a spreading process or convergence and relaxation merit further study.

  9. Geomorphology and sedimentology of hummocky terrain, south-central Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro-Stasiuk, Mandy J.

    The landscape in south-central Alberta, Canada, is dominated by a suite of landforms that formed beneath the Laurentide Ice Sheet. This thesis explores the origins of those landforms, specifically hummocky terrain. Sediments in the hummocks, hummock form, and associations with other landforms are examined to determine hummock genesis. Sediment was examined from over one hundred exposures through the "Buffalo Lake Moraine" at Travers Reservoir, McGregor Reservoir, and the Little Bow River. This belt of hummocky terrain (like most hummocky terrain regions) is traditionally interpreted as forming at, or near, the stagnating margins of the Laurentide Ice Sheet by supraglacial letdown. However, hummocks in south-central Alberta contain a complex variety of sediments and materials atypical of supraglacial letdown: in situ bedrock, thrust bedrock, lodgement till, melt-out till, sorted sand and gravel, rippled sand, rhythmically-bedded sand, silt, and clay, and pervasively sheared beds. All sediment types and deformation structures were deposited, or formed, subglacially. Also, the deposits make up in situ stratigraphies that record the history of initial Laurentide Ice Sheet advance into the area (lodgment till and thrust bedrock), the extensive accumulation of water at the bed (glaciolacustrine beds), and ice stagnation (melt-out till). Regardless of the genesis of sediments in hummocks, sedimentary units and structures are abruptly truncated by the surface that represents the hummock and trough morphology, demonstrating that the hummocks are erosional forms and that they represent a landscape unconformity. Subglacial sediments predating the erosion and subglacial eskers overlying the erosion surface strongly suggest that hummock erosion was subglacial. Also, hummock morphology, lithostratigraphy correlated from hummock to hummock, abrupt truncation at the land surface, and widespread boulder lags support meltwater erosion for hummocky terrain in the region. Well

  10. Integrating Terrain Maps Into a Reactive Navigation Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Ayanna; Werger, Barry; Seraji, Homayoun

    2006-01-01

    An improved method of processing information for autonomous navigation of a robotic vehicle across rough terrain involves the integration of terrain maps into a reactive navigation strategy. Somewhat more precisely, the method involves the incorporation, into navigation logic, of data equivalent to regional traversability maps. The terrain characteristic is mapped using a fuzzy-logic representation of the difficulty of traversing the terrain. The method is robust in that it integrates a global path-planning strategy with sensor-based regional and local navigation strategies to ensure a high probability of success in reaching a destination and avoiding obstacles along the way. The sensor-based strategies use cameras aboard the vehicle to observe the regional terrain, defined as the area of the terrain that covers the immediate vicinity near the vehicle to a specified distance a few meters away.

  11. False Color Terrain Model of Phoenix Workspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is a terrain model of Phoenix's Robotic Arm workspace. It has been color coded by depth with a lander model for context. The model has been derived using images from the depth perception feature from Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI). Red indicates low-lying areas that appear to be troughs. Blue indicates higher areas that appear to be polygons.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Integrating remote sensing and terrain data in forest fire modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medler, Michael Johns

    Forest fire policies are changing. Managers now face conflicting imperatives to re-establish pre-suppression fire regimes, while simultaneously preventing resource destruction. They must, therefore, understand the spatial patterns of fires. Geographers can facilitate this understanding by developing new techniques for mapping fire behavior. This dissertation develops such techniques for mapping recent fires and using these maps to calibrate models of potential fire hazards. In so doing, it features techniques that strive to address the inherent complexity of modeling the combinations of variables found in most ecological systems. Image processing techniques were used to stratify the elements of terrain, slope, elevation, and aspect. These stratification images were used to assure sample placement considered the role of terrain in fire behavior. Examination of multiple stratification images indicated samples were placed representatively across a controlled range of scales. The incorporation of terrain data also improved preliminary fire hazard classification accuracy by 40%, compared with remotely sensed data alone. A Kauth-Thomas transformation (KT) of pre-fire and post-fire Thematic Mapper (TM) remotely sensed data produced brightness, greenness, and wetness images. Image subtraction indicated fire induced change in brightness, greenness, and wetness. Field data guided a fuzzy classification of these change images. Because fuzzy classification can characterize a continuum of a phenomena where discrete classification may produce artificial borders, fuzzy classification was found to offer a range of fire severity information unavailable with discrete classification. These mapped fire patterns were used to calibrate a model of fire hazards for the entire mountain range. Pre-fire TM, and a digital elevation model produced a set of co-registered images. Training statistics were developed from 30 polygons associated with the previously mapped fire severity. Fuzzy

  13. Biomechanics and energetics of running on uneven terrain.

    PubMed

    Voloshina, Alexandra S; Ferris, Daniel P

    2015-03-01

    In the natural world, legged animals regularly run across uneven terrain with remarkable ease. To gain understanding of how running on uneven terrain affects the biomechanics and energetics of locomotion, we studied human subjects (N=12) running at 2.3 m s(-1) on an uneven terrain treadmill, with up to a 2.5 cm height variation. We hypothesized that running on uneven terrain would show increased energy expenditure, step parameter variability and leg stiffness compared with running on smooth terrain. Subject energy expenditure increased by 5% (0.68 W kg(-1); P<0.05) when running on uneven terrain compared with smooth terrain. Step width and length variability also increased by 27% and 26%, respectively (P<0.05). Positive and negative ankle work decreased on uneven terrain by 22% (0.413 J kg(-1)) and 18% (0.147 J kg(-1)), respectively (P=0.0001 and P=0.0008). Mean muscle activity increased on uneven terrain for three muscles in the thigh (P<0.05). Leg stiffness also increased by 20% (P<0.05) during running on uneven terrain compared with smooth terrain. Calculations of gravitational potential energy fluctuations suggest that about half of the energetic increases can be explained by additional positive and negative mechanical work for up and down steps on the uneven surface. This is consistent between walking and running, as the absolute increases in energetic cost for walking and running on uneven terrain were similar: 0.68 and 0.48 W kg(-1), respectively. These results provide insight into how surface smoothness can affect locomotion biomechanics and energetics in the real world.

  14. Photo-realistic Terrain Modeling and Visualization for Mars Exploration Rover Science Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Laurence; Sims, Michael; Kunz, Clayton; Lees, David; Bowman, Judd

    2005-01-01

    Modern NASA planetary exploration missions employ complex systems of hardware and software managed by large teams of. engineers and scientists in order to study remote environments. The most complex and successful of these recent projects is the Mars Exploration Rover mission. The Computational Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center delivered a 30 visualization program, Viz, to the MER mission that provides an immersive, interactive environment for science analysis of the remote planetary surface. In addition, Ames provided the Athena Science Team with high-quality terrain reconstructions generated with the Ames Stereo-pipeline. The on-site support team for these software systems responded to unanticipated opportunities to generate 30 terrain models during the primary MER mission. This paper describes Viz, the Stereo-pipeline, and the experiences of the on-site team supporting the scientists at JPL during the primary MER mission.

  15. "I Could Have Done Everything and Why Not?": Young Women's Complex Constructions of Sexual Agency in the Context of Sexualities Education in Life Orientation in South African Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruger, Lou-Marie; Shefer, Tamara; Oakes, Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    Progressive policies protecting women's rights to make reproductive decisions and the recent increase in literature exploring female sexual agency do not appear to have impacted on more equitable sexual relations in all contexts. In South Africa, gender power inequalities, intersecting with other forms of inequality in society, pose a challenge…

  16. Government-Based Training Agencies and the Professional Development of Indonesian Teachers of English for Young Learners: Perspectives from Complexity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zein, Mochamad Subhan

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify suggestions to improve PD programmes held by government-based training agencies to help enhance Indonesian EYL teachers' instructional practice. For the purpose of the study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 51 participants. The findings suggest the theorisation of a PD model that involves complex…

  17. Terrain Traversing Device Having a Wheel with Microhooks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron (Inventor); McKenzie, Clifford F. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A terrain traversing device includes an annular rotor element with a plurality of co-planar microspine hooks arranged on the periphery of the annular rotor element. Each microspine hook has an independently flexible suspension configuration that permits the microspine hook to initially engage an irregularity in a terrain surface at a preset initial engagement angle and subsequently engage the irregularity with a continuously varying engagement angle when the annular rotor element is rotated for urging the terrain traversing device to traverse a terrain surface.

  18. Terrain Traversing Device Having a Wheel with Microhooks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron (Inventor); Carpenter, Kalind C. (Inventor); Wiltsie, Nicholas (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A terrain traversing device is described. The device includes an annular rotor element with a plurality of co-planar microspine hooks arranged on the periphery of the annular rotor element. Each microspine hook has an independently flexible suspension configuration that permits the microspine hook to initially engage an irregularity in a terrain surface at a preset initial engagement angle and subsequently engage the irregularity with a continuously varying engagement angle when the annular rotor element is rotated for urging the terrain traversing device to traverse a terrain surface. Improvements related to the design, fabrication and use of the microspine hooks in the device are also described.

  19. Estimating Slopes In Images Of Terrain By Use Of BRDF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, Marija S.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed method of estimating slopes of terrain features based on use of bidirectional reflectivity distribution function (BRDF) in analyzing aerial photographs, satellite video images, or other images produced by remote sensors. Estimated slopes integrated along horizontal coordinates to obtain estimated heights; generating three-dimensional terrain maps. Method does not require coregistration of terrain features in pairs of images acquired from slightly different perspectives nor requires Sun or other source of illumination to be low in sky over terrain of interest. On contrary, best when Sun is high. Works at almost all combinations of illumination and viewing angles.

  20. Grooved Terrain on Ganymede: A Galileo-based Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, Robert T.; Collins, Geoffrey C.; Head, James W.; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Schenk, Paul M.

    2003-01-01

    Swaths of bright "grooved terrain" (sulci) on Ganymede are 10s to 100s of kilometers wide and cross-cut the older dark terrain, forming an intricate patchwork across 2/3 of Ganymede's surface. The view of grooved terrain developed from Voyager images is that bright cells are broad graben infilled by extrusion of relatively clean (silicate-poor) liquid water, warm ice, or icy slush, and then extended and faulted. Galileo imaging has greatly improved understanding of the emplacement history and geological implications of grooved terrain, supporting a rift-like model for its formation.

  1. Terrain modelling and motion planning for an autonomous exploration rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, F.; Benoliel, S.; Faugeras, O.; Grandjean, P.; Hayard, M.; Simeon, T.

    1994-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of planetary exploration missions using rovers, the French national agency CNES, with a consortium of European laboratories and industrial concerns, has initiated the Eureka project, 'Illustration of an Autonomous Robot for the Exploration of Space' (IARES). IARES is a demonstrator composed of a rover and a ground station, linked by telemetry and telecommand. It is aimed at verifying, on earth, robotic concepts developed by the RISP group of French laboratories (LAAS, INRIA, CERT, LETI) to perform scientific missions such as autonomous terrain sample collecting over large areas. To cope with the actual needs of planet exploration, IARES suitability is assessed through constraints on limited bandwidth, time delay and on-board resources. This autonomy relies heavily on robust onboard trajectory generation capabilities. This paper presents the main functions of the IARES navigation sub-system and shows how they are combined to allow movement in Mars-like environments. Section 2 gives an overall description of the IARES system. Section 3 details the functions of the Navigation sub-system, and finally, section 4 illustrates with a simple example the use of these functions.

  2. Performances of terrain partitioning methods in shallow landslide modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulli, M.; Santini, M.

    2008-12-01

    The realistic representation of flow through complex terrain is a major issue to address in developing spatially distributed hydro-geomorphologic modelling. An attempt to evaluate the role of terrain partitioning method in shallow landslide triggering models is here investigated. Shallow landslide susceptibility is determined by using the same spatially distributed model (Rosso et al., 2006) starting from both contour-based and grid-based topographic surface representation. Hillslope hydrology is modelled by coupling the conservation of mass of soil water with the Darcy's law used to describe seepage flow. Soil mechanics is investigated by infinite slope stability analysis. This yields a simple analytical model capable of accounting for the transient effects of precipitation in triggering shallow landslides. Model performances in detecting instability are evaluated by using the Rosso-Rulli-Vannucchi indexes (Rosso et al., 2006) in comparing observed landslide vs. simulated scenarios. Hereafter model based on contour will be addressed as RRV-Contour and the grid based model as RRV-Grid. Models application by considering different durations of a precipitation episode are shown for the Mettman Ridge study area in Oregon, USA. For the study area, the available data set includes high resolution digital elevation data acquired through Airoborne Laser Scanner (ALS), field tests for hydrologic and geomechanic parameterization of soil, observations of hydrologic variables and highly reliable field surveys for shallow landslide mapping. The results show that the two types of topographic discretization have different performances, with hillslope elements based on the flow tube approach better describing the shallow landslides initiation.

  3. Snowcover influence on backscattering from terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Abdelrazik, M.; Stiles, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of snowcover on the microwave backscattering from terrain in the 8-35 GHz region are examined through the analysis of experimental data and by application of a semiempirical model. The model accounts for surface backscattering contributions by the snow-air and snow-soil interfaces, and for volume backscattering contributions by the snow layer. Through comparisons of backscattering data for different terrain surfaces measured both with and without snowcover, the masking effects of snow are evaluated as a function of snow water equivalent and liquid water content. The results indicate that with dry snowcover it is not possible to discriminate between different types of ground surface (concrete, asphalt, grass, and bare ground) if the snow water equivalent is greater than about 20 cm (or a depth greater than 60 cm for a snow density of 0.3 g/cu cm). For the same density, however, if the snow is wet, a depth of 10 cm is sufficient to mask the underlying surface.

  4. Terrain-based routing of distribution cables

    SciTech Connect

    West, N.A.; Dwolatzky, B.; Meyer, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Specifying the actual layout of all overhead lines and underground cables is one of the key tasks to be carried out in the design of electrical distribution networks. Voltage drop and other network calculations can be performed only after the length of each cable segment is determined. Although automatic cable routers are currently available, they are mainly for formally planned urban areas. These routers are not always appropriate for use in designing rural distribution networks, because they fail to account for some of the special circumstances found in rural areas. A more practical approach bases automatic cable routing on the terrain of a given area rather than on the layout of roads. The automatic Distribution Network Router (DNR) finds the least-cost path (not merely the shortest one) connecting two nodes. This article briefly discusses methods currently used to determine cable routes for distribution networks, the unsuitability of these methods for routing cables in rural and informal urban areas, the proposed approach that relies on dividing the terrain into cost regions, and the benefits gained in its application. Emphasis is on the practical application of the new approach.

  5. Implications of terrain movements in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Mohamed M.

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the causes of localized terrain movements in Egypt. The motivation behind this research has been the vast progress in constructing huge engineering structures (dams, bridge,, tall buildings, etc.) as well as extending the urban activities in many new cities. These must be properly studied to ensure their safety versus their cost and other economic factors. In addition, the recent tendency is towards building nuclear power stations whose locations must be carefully investigated against the hazard and danger of inevitable atomic leakage, especially in the case of seismically active regions. Also the discovery of new oil wells and mines and the effects of future depletion require considerable attention from qualified investigators. The relative tectonic movements of North Africa and Southern Europe, the seismic activities around the Alexandria region, the presence of faults related to the region of the High Dam and its reservoir in Aswan, the erosion of the banks of the River Nile and its islands as well as coastal lines along the Mediterranean and the Red Sea, and the deformation and damage to large buildings in the Cairo area are examined here as a few examples of the implications of the earth's deformations within Egyptian territory. Strong recommendations are made concerning the necessity of studying and monitoring the terrain movements in the areas where new cities, large engineering constructions and power plants are planned to be erected.

  6. Tool for Viewing Faults Under Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Herbert, L.; Li, P. Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Multi Surface Light Table (MSLT) is an interactive software tool that was developed in support of the QuakeSim project, which has created an earthquake- fault database and a set of earthquake- simulation software tools. MSLT visualizes the three-dimensional geometries of faults embedded below the terrain and animates time-varying simulations of stress and slip. The fault segments, represented as rectangular surfaces at dip angles, are organized into collections, that is, faults. An interface built into MSLT queries and retrieves fault definitions from the QuakeSim fault database. MSLT also reads time-varying output from one of the QuakeSim simulation tools, called "Virtual California." Stress intensity is represented by variations in color. Slips are represented by directional indicators on the fault segments. The magnitudes of the slips are represented by the duration of the directional indicators in time. The interactive controls in MSLT provide a virtual track-ball, pan and zoom, translucency adjustment, simulation playback, and simulation movie capture. In addition, geographical information on the fault segments and faults is displayed on text windows. Because of the extensive viewing controls, faults can be seen in relation to one another, and to the terrain. These relations can be realized in simulations. Correlated slips in parallel faults are visible in the playback of Virtual California simulations.

  7. Correction of satellite imagery over mountainous terrain.

    PubMed

    Richter, R

    1998-06-20

    A method for the radiometric correction of satellite imagery over mountainous terrain has been developed to remove atmospheric and topographic effects. The algorithm accounts for horizontally varying atmospheric conditions and also includes the height dependence of the atmospheric radiance and transmittance functions to simulate the simplified properties of a three-dimensional atmosphere. A database has been compiled that contains the results of radiative transfer calculations (atmospheric transmittance, path radiance, direct and diffuse solar flux) for a wide range of weather conditions. A digital elevation model is used to obtain information about surface elevation, slope, and orientation. Based on the Lambertian assumption the surface reflectance in rugged terrain is calculated for the specified atmospheric conditions. Regions with extreme illumination geometries sensitive to BRDF effects can be optionally processed separately. The method is restricted to high spatial resolution satellite sensors with a small swath angle such as the Landsat thematic mapper and Systeme pour l'Observation de la Terre high resolution visible, since some simplifying assumptions were made to reduce the required image processing time.

  8. Correction of Satellite Imagery Over Mountainous Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Rudolf

    1998-06-01

    A method for the radiometric correction of satellite imagery over mountainous terrain has been developed to remove atmospheric and topographic effects. The algorithm accounts for horizontally varying atmospheric conditions and also includes the height dependence of the atmospheric radiance and transmittance functions to simulate the simplified properties of a three-dimensional atmosphere. A database has been compiled that contains the results of radiative transfer calculations (atmospheric transmittance, path radiance, direct and diffuse solar flux) for a wide range of weather conditions. A digital elevation model is used to obtain information about surface elevation, slope, and orientation. Based on the Lambertian assumption the surface reflectance in rugged terrain is calculated for the specified atmospheric conditions. Regions with extreme illumination geometries sensitive to BRDF effects can be optionally processed separately. The method is restricted to high spatial resolution satellite sensors with a small swath angle such as the Landsat thematic mapper and Systeme pour l Observation de la Terre high resolution visible, since some simplifying assumptions were made to reduce the required image processing time.

  9. Single-Frame Terrain Mapping Software for Robotic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rankin, Arturo L.

    2011-01-01

    This software is a component in an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) perception system that builds compact, single-frame terrain maps for distribution to other systems, such as a world model or an operator control unit, over a local area network (LAN). Each cell in the map encodes an elevation value, terrain classification, object classification, terrain traversability, terrain roughness, and a confidence value into four bytes of memory. The input to this software component is a range image (from a lidar or stereo vision system), and optionally a terrain classification image and an object classification image, both registered to the range image. The single-frame terrain map generates estimates of the support surface elevation, ground cover elevation, and minimum canopy elevation; generates terrain traversability cost; detects low overhangs and high-density obstacles; and can perform geometry-based terrain classification (ground, ground cover, unknown). A new origin is automatically selected for each single-frame terrain map in global coordinates such that it coincides with the corner of a world map cell. That way, single-frame terrain maps correctly line up with the world map, facilitating the merging of map data into the world map. Instead of using 32 bits to store the floating-point elevation for a map cell, the vehicle elevation is assigned to the map origin elevation and reports the change in elevation (from the origin elevation) in terms of the number of discrete steps. The single-frame terrain map elevation resolution is 2 cm. At that resolution, terrain elevation from 20.5 to 20.5 m (with respect to the vehicle's elevation) is encoded into 11 bits. For each four-byte map cell, bits are assigned to encode elevation, terrain roughness, terrain classification, object classification, terrain traversability cost, and a confidence value. The vehicle s current position and orientation, the map origin, and the map cell resolution are all included in a header for each

  10. What Influences Youth to Operate All-Terrain Vehicles Safely?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grummon, A. H.; Heaney, C. A.; Dellinger, W. A.; Wilkins, J. R., III

    2014-01-01

    The operation of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) by youth has contributed to the incidence of serious and fatal injuries among children. This study explored factors related to the frequency with which youth wore a helmet and refrained from engaging in three risky driving behaviors (driving at risky speeds, on paved roads and on unfamiliar terrain)…

  11. 14 CFR 93.311 - Minimum terrain clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum terrain clearance. 93.311 Section 93.311 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... of Grand Canyon National Park, AZ § 93.311 Minimum terrain clearance. Except in an emergency,...

  12. ATRAN Terrain Sensing Guidance-The Grand-Daddy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Richard F.; Evans, Donald C.

    1980-12-01

    ATRAN was the pioneer terrain sensing guidance system developed in the 1950 era and deployed in Europe on the Air Force's mobile, ground launched TM-76A MACE cruise missile in the late 1950's and early 1960's. The background, principles and technology are described for this system which was the forerunner of todays modern autonomous standoff terrain sensing guided weapons.

  13. Potassium fertility and terrain attributes in a Fragiudalf drainage Catena

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Site-specific management of soil fertility has been based on soil sampling in grid patterns or within soil mapping units without taking full advantage of terrain/soil relationships, often thought to pertain to pedology as a separate discipline. The topographic wetness index (TWI), a terrain attribut...

  14. IFSAR for the Rapid Terrain Visualization Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    BURNS,BRYAN L.; EICHEL,PAUL H.; HENSLEY JR.,WILLIAM H.; KIM,THEODORE J.

    2000-10-31

    The Rapid Terrain Visualization Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration (RTV-ACTD) is designed to demonstrate the technologies and infrastructure to meet the Army requirement for rapid generation of digital topographic data to support emerging crisis or contingencies. The primary sensor for this mission is an interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) designed at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper will outline the design of the system and its performance, and show some recent flight test results. The RTV IFSAR will meet DTED level III and IV specifications by using a multiple-baseline design and high-accuracy differential and carrier-phase GPS navigation. It includes innovative near-real-time DEM production on-board the aircraft. The system is being flown on a deHavilland DHC-7 Army aircraft.

  15. Mottled terrain - A continuing Martian enigma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, D. H.; Underwood, J. R., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The mottled plains material found in the northern Martian lowlands is discussed in terms of Mariner and Viking images as well as geologic mapping based on Viking images. The mottling in Mariner 9 images of this area was associated with albedo contrasts between bright crater-ejecta blankets and dark intercrater material, and dark-crested knobs. The interpretation of the plains material based on the Mariner images is compared to an interpretation of the higher-quality Viking images. Based on the newer images, the mottled terrain is theorized to be comprised of the four constituent members of the Vastitas Borealis formation of Late Hesperian age. Fluvial, aeolian, and glaciotectonic processes are responsible for the extensive modifications of the apparently volcanic formations. The northern plains are not completely understood in spite of the Viking images, and the varied geology in those plains requires more sampling to confirm the theories.

  16. Meso-beta scale numerical simulation studies of terrain-induced jet streak mass/momentum perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Kaplan, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    Work performed during the report period is summarized. The first numerical experiment which was performed on the North Carolina Supercomputer Center's CRAY-YMP machine during the second half of FY92 involved a 36 hour simulation of the CCOPE case study. This first coarse-mesh simulation employed the GMASS model with a 178 x 108 x 32 matrix of grid points spaced approximately 24 km apart. The initial data was comprised of the global 2.5 x 2.5 degree analyses as well as all available North American rawinsonde data valid at 0000 UTC 11 July 1981. Highly-smoothed LFM-derived terrain data were utilized so as to determine the mesoscale response of the three-dimensional atmosphere to weak terrain forcing prior to including the observed highly complex terrain of the northern Rocky Mountain region. It was felt that the model should be run with a spectrum of terrain geometries, ranging from observed complex terrain to no terrain at all, to determine how crucial the terrain was in forcing the mesoscale phenomena. Both convection and stratiform (stable) precipitation were not allowed in this simulation so that their relative importance could be determined by inclusion in forth-coming simulations. A full suite of planetary boundary layer forcing was allowed in the simulation, including surface sensible and latent heat fluxes employing the Blakadar PBL formulation. The details of this simulation, which in many ways could be considered the control simulation, including the important synoptic-scale, meso-alpha scale, and meso-beta scale circulations is described. These results are compared to the observations diagnosed by Koch and his colleagues as well as hypotheses set forth in the project proposal for terrain-influences upon the jet stream and their role in the generation of mesoscale wave phenomenon. The fundamental goal of the analyses being the discrimination among background geostrophic adjustment, terrain influences, and shearing instability in the initiation and

  17. The transition from an Archean granite-greenstone terrain into a charnockite terrain in southern India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condie, K. C.; Allen, P.

    1983-01-01

    In southern India, it is possible to study the transition from an Archean granite-greenstone terrain (the Karnataka province) into high grade charnockites. The transition occurs over an outcrop width of 20-35 km and appears to represent burial depths ranging from 15 to 20 km. Field and geochemical studies indicate that the charnockites developed at the expense of tonalites, granites, and greenstones. South of the transition zone, geobarometer studies indicate burial depths of 7-9 kb.

  18. Terrain Commander: a next-generation remote surveillance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneral, Henry J.

    2003-09-01

    Terrain Commander is a fully automated forward observation post that provides the most advanced capability in surveillance and remote situational awareness. The Terrain Commander system was selected by the Australian Government for its NINOX Phase IIB Unattended Ground Sensor Program with the first systems delivered in August of 2002. Terrain Commander offers next generation target detection using multi-spectral peripheral sensors coupled with autonomous day/night image capture and processing. Subsequent intelligence is sent back through satellite communications with unlimited range to a highly sophisticated central monitoring station. The system can "stakeout" remote locations clandestinely for 24 hours a day for months at a time. With its fully integrated SATCOM system, almost any site in the world can be monitored from virtually any other location in the world. Terrain Commander automatically detects and discriminates intruders by precisely cueing its advanced EO subsystem. The system provides target detection capabilities with minimal nuisance alarms combined with the positive visual identification that authorities demand before committing a response. Terrain Commander uses an advanced beamforming acoustic sensor and a distributed array of seismic, magnetic and passive infrared sensors to detect, capture images and accurately track vehicles and personnel. Terrain Commander has a number of emerging military and non-military applications including border control, physical security, homeland defense, force protection and intelligence gathering. This paper reviews the development, capabilities and mission applications of the Terrain Commander system.

  19. Format for Interchange and Display of 3D Terrain Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul; Powell, Mark; Vona, Marsette; Norris, Jeffrey; Morrison, Jack

    2004-01-01

    Visible Scalable Terrain (ViSTa) is a software format for production, interchange, and display of three-dimensional (3D) terrain data acquired by stereoscopic cameras of robotic vision systems. ViSTa is designed to support scalability of data, accuracy of displayed terrain images, and optimal utilization of computational resources. In a ViSTa file, an area of terrain is represented, at one or more levels of detail, by coordinates of isolated points and/or vertices of triangles derived from a texture map that, in turn, is derived from original terrain images. Unlike prior terrain-image software formats, ViSTa includes provisions to ensure accuracy of texture coordinates. Whereas many such formats are based on 2.5-dimensional terrain models and impose additional regularity constraints on data, ViSTa is based on a 3D model without regularity constraints. Whereas many prior formats require external data for specifying image-data coordinate systems, ViSTa provides for the inclusion of coordinate-system data within data files. ViSTa admits highspeed loading and display within a Java program. ViSTa is designed to minimize file sizes and maximize compressibility and to support straightforward reduction of resolution to reduce file size for Internet-based distribution.

  20. Terrain aided navigation for autonomous underwater vehicles with coarse maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ling; Cheng, Xianghong; Zhu, Yixian

    2016-09-01

    Terrain aided navigation (TAN) is a form of geophysical localization technique for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) operating in GPS-denied environments. TAN performance on sensor-rich AUVs has been evaluated in sea trials. However, many challenges remain before TAN can be successfully implemented on sensor-limited AUVs, especially with coarse maps. To improve TAN performance over coarse maps, a Gaussian process (GP) is proposed for the modeling of bathymetric terrain and integrated into the particle filter (GP-PF). GP is applied to provide not only the bathymetric value prediction through learning a set of bathymetric data from coarse maps but also the variance of the prediction. As a measurement update, calculated on bathymetric deviation is performed through the PF to obtain absolute and bounded positioning accuracy. Through the analysis of TAN performance on experimental data for two different terrains with map resolutions of 10-50 m, both the ability of the proposed model to represent the actual bathymetric terrain with accuracy and the effect of the GP-PF for TAN on sensor-limited systems in suited terrain are demonstrated. The experiment results further verify that there is an inverse relationship between the coarseness of the map and the overall TAN accuracy in rough terrains, but there is hardly any relationship between them in relatively flat terrains.

  1. Self-Supervised Learning of Terrain Traversability from Proprioceptive Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bajracharya, Max; Howard, Andrew B.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Robust and reliable autonomous navigation in unstructured, off-road terrain is a critical element in making unmanned ground vehicles a reality. Existing approaches tend to rely on evaluating the traversability of terrain based on fixed parameters obtained via testing in specific environments. This results in a system that handles the terrain well that it trained in, but is unable to process terrain outside its test parameters. An adaptive system does not take the place of training, but supplements it. Whereas training imprints certain environments, an adaptive system would imprint terrain elements and the interactions amongst them, and allow the vehicle to build a map of local elements using proprioceptive sensors. Such sensors can include velocity, wheel slippage, bumper hits, and accelerometers. Data obtained by the sensors can be compared to observations from ranging sensors such as cameras and LADAR (laser detection and ranging) in order to adapt to any kind of terrain. In this way, it could sample its surroundings not only to create a map of clear space, but also of what kind of space it is and its composition. By having a set of building blocks consisting of terrain features, a vehicle can adapt to terrain that it has never seen before, and thus be robust to a changing environment. New observations could be added to its library, enabling it to infer terrain types that it wasn't trained on. This would be very useful in alien environments, where many of the physical features are known, but some are not. For example, a seemingly flat, hard plain could actually be soft sand, and the vehicle would sense the sand and avoid it automatically.

  2. Venusian impact basins and cratered terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Warren B.

    1992-01-01

    The consensus regarding interpretation of Magellan radar imagery assigns Venus a young volcanic surface subjected in many areas to moderate crustal shortening. I infer that, on the contrary, ancient densely cratered terrain and large impact basins may be preserved over more than half the planet and that crustal shortening has been much overestimated. I see wind erosion and deposition as far more effective in modifying old structures. Integration with lunar chronology suggests that most of the surface of Venus may be older than 3.0 Ga and much may be older than 3.8 Ga. Broad volcanos, hug volcanic domes, plains preserving lobate flow patterns, and numerous lesser volcanic features, pocked sparsely by impact craters, are indeed obvious on Magellan imagery. Some of these postvolcanic impact craters have been slightly extended, but only a small portion has been flooded by still younger lavas. Relative ages of the young craters are indicated by the varying eolian removal of their forms and ejecta blankets and flow lobes, and the oldest are much subdued. If these young impact craters, maximum diameter 275 km, include all preserved impact structures, then their quantity and distribution indicate that Venus was largely resurfaced by volcanism approx. 0.5 Ga, subsequent eruptions having been at a much reduced rate. Away from the approx. 0.5 Ga volcanic features, much of Venus is, however, dominated by circular and subcircular features, 50-2000 km in diameter, many of them multiring, that may be mostly older impact and impact-melt structures substantially modified by wind action. Eolian erosion scoured to bedrock old ridges and uplands, including those that may be cratered terrains and the rims and outer-ring depressions of large impact basins, and removed all surficial deposits to the limits of resolution of the imagery. The complementary eolian deposits form not only dunes, wind streaks, and small plains, but also broad radar-dark plains, commonly assumed to be volcanic

  3. New Vocabulary: Araneiform and Lace Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2

    The south polar terrain on Mars contains landforms unlike any that we see on Earth, so much that a new vocabulary is required to describe them. The word 'araneiform' means 'spider-like.' There are radially organized channels on Mars that look spider-like, but we don't want to confuse anyone by talking about 'spiders' when we really mean 'channels,' not 'bugs.'

    The first subimage (figure 1) shows an example of 'connected araneiform topography,' terrain that is filled with spider-like channels whose arms branch and connect to each other. Gas flows through these channels until it encounters a vent, where is escapes out to the atmosphere, carrying dust along with it. The dark dust is blown around by the prevailing wind.

    The second subimage (figure 2) shows a different region of the same image where the channels are not radially organized. In this region they form a dense tangled network of tortuous strands. We refer to this as 'lace.'

    Observation Geometry Image PSP_002651_0930 was taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter spacecraft on 18-Feb-2007. The complete image is centered at -86.9 degrees latitude, 97.2 degrees East longitude. The range to the target site was 268.7 km (167.9 miles). At this distance the image scale is 53.8 cm/pixel (with 2 x 2 binning) so objects 161 cm across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 50 cm/pixel . The image was taken at a local Mars time of 04:56 PM and the scene is illuminated from the west with a solar incidence angle of 86 degrees, thus the sun was about 4 degrees above the horizon. At a solar longitude of 186.4 degrees, the season on Mars is Northern Autumn.

  4. MRO CTX-based Digital Terrain Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumke, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    In planetary surface sciences, digital terrain models (DTM) are paramount when it comes to understanding and quantifying processes. In this contribution an approach for the derivation of digital terrain models from stereo images of the NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Context Camera (CTX) are described. CTX consists of a 350 mm focal length telescope and 5000 CCD sensor elements and is operated as pushbroom camera. It acquires images with ~6 m/px over a swath width of ~30 km of the Mars surface [1]. Today, several approaches for the derivation of CTX DTMs exist [e. g. 2, 3, 4]. The discussed approach here is based on established software and combines them with proprietary software as described below. The main processing task for the derivation of CTX stereo DTMs is based on six steps: (1) First, CTX images are radiometrically corrected using the ISIS software package [5]. (2) For selected CTX stereo images, exterior orientation data from reconstructed NAIF SPICE data are extracted [6]. (3) In the next step High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) DTMs [7, 8, 9] are used for the rectification of CTX stereo images to reduce the search area during the image matching. Here, HRSC DTMs are used due to their higher spatial resolution when compared to MOLA DTMs. (4) The determination of coordinates of homologous points between stereo images, i.e. the stereo image matching process, consists of two steps: first, a cross-correlation to obtain approximate values and secondly, their use in a least-square matching (LSM) process in order to obtain subpixel positions. (5) The stereo matching results are then used to generate object points from forward ray intersections. (6) As a last step, the DTM-raster generation is performed using software developed at the German Aerospace Center, Berlin. Whereby only object points are used that have a smaller error than a threshold value. References: [1] Malin, M. C. et al., 2007, JGR 112, doi:10.1029/2006JE002808 [2] Broxton, M. J. et al

  5. Perception, planning, and control for walking on rugged terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, Reid; Krotkov, Eric

    1991-01-01

    The CMU Planetary Rover project is developing a six-legged walking robot capable of autonomously navigating, exploring, and acquiring samples in rugged, unknown environments. To gain experience with the problems involved in walking on rugged terrain, a full-scale prototype leg was built and mounted on a carriage that rolls along overhead rails. Issues addressed in developing the software system to autonomously walk the leg through rugged terrain are described. In particular, the insights gained into perceiving and modeling rugged terrain, controlling the legged mechanism, interacting with the ground, choosing safe yet effective footfalls, and planning efficient leg moves through space are described.

  6. Targeting a Hematite-rich Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows the abundance and location of the mineral grey hematite at the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, Mars. Opportunity is targeted to land somewhere inside the oval, approximately 71 kilometers (45 miles) long, on January 24, 2004 Pacific Standard Time. The background surface image of Meridiani Planum is a mosaic of daytime infrared images acquired by the thermal emission imaging system instrument on NASA's Mars Odyssey Orbiter. Superimposed on this image mosaic is a rainbow-colored map showing the abundance and location of grey hematite, as mapped by the thermal emission spectrometer on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter. Red and yellow indicates higher concentrations, whereas green and blue areas denote lower levels. On Earth, grey hematite is an iron oxide mineral that typically forms in the presence of liquid water. The rover Opportunity will study the martian terrain to determine whether liquid water was present in the past when rocks were being formed, and ultimately will address whether that past environment was favorable for life.

  7. All-terrain self-leveling wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Andrew; Barrett, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Limited mobility is something that affects approximately 6.8 million Americans. Approximately 1.7 million are using wheelchairs or scooters of some kind to enhance mobility. Everyday obstacles present a challenge to those in a wheelchair. Also, outdoor environments such as campsites, lakes, or even grass fields provide additional challenges for those with limited mobility. This project provides a solution to some of the limitations faced by those in wheelchairs. The wheels and tires of the wheelchair allow navigation through most terrains such as grass, gravel, and sand. Furthermore, as a wheelchair climbs or descends a hill it becomes unstable and the user risks tipping the wheelchair causing injury or even death. The self-leveling wheelchair uses an accelerometer to determine its angle of inclination and depending on user interface choices will display the angle or raise the seat with linear actuators to keep the seat level. This will keep the center of gravity towards the front of the chair when going up a hill and towards the back of the chair when going down a hill. This enhanced stability will give the user the confidence and ability to go places where most traditional wheelchairs can not. The chair has the ability to self-level at up to 45 degree and can provide a manual lift of 6 inches. The design presented in this report is patent pending.

  8. Pneumatic tyres interacting with deformable terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekakos, C. A.; Papazafeiropoulos, G.; O'Boy, D. J.; Prins, J.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a numerical model of a deformable tyre interacting with a deformable road has been developed with the use of the finite element code ABAQUS (v. 6.13). Two tyre models with different widths, not necessarily identical to any real industry tyres, have been created purely for research use. The behaviour of these tyres under various vertical loads and different inflation pressures is studied, initially in contact with a rigid surface and then with a deformable terrain. After ensuring that the tyre model gives realistic results in terms of the interaction with a rigid surface, the rolling process of the tyre on a deformable road was studied. The effects of friction coefficient, inflation pressure, rebar orientation and vertical load on the overall performance are reported. Regarding the modelling procedure, a sequence of models were analysed, using the coupling implicit - explicit method. The numerical results reveal that not only there is significant dependence of the final tyre response on the various initial driving parameters, but also special conditions emerge, where the desired response of the tyre results from specific optimum combination of these parameters.

  9. Inversion of topography in Martian highland terrains

    SciTech Connect

    De Hon, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Ring furrows are flat-floored trenches, circulate in plan view, forming rings 7 to 50 km in diameter. Typically, ring furrows, which are 0.5 km deep and 2 to 10 km wide, surround a central, flat-topped, circular mesa or plateau. The central plateau is about the same elevation or lower than the plain outside the ring. Ring furrows are unique features of the dissected martian uplands. Related landforms range from ring furrows with fractured central plateaus to circular mesas without encircling moats. Ring furrows are superposed on many types of materials, but they are most common cratered plateau-type materials that are interpreted as volcanic flow material overlying ancient cratered terrain. The ring shape and size suggest that they are related to craters partially buried by lava flows. Ring furrows were formed by preferential removal of exposed rims of partially buried craters. Evidence of overland flow of water is lacking except within the channels. Ground ice decay and sapping followed by fluvial erosion are responsible for removal of the less resistant rim materials. Thus, differential erosion has caused a reversal of topography in which the originally elevated rim is reduced to negative relief.

  10. Cratering and Grooved Terrain on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This color picture as acquired by Voyager 1 during its approach to Ganymede on Monday afternoon (the 5th of March). At ranges between about 230 to 250 thousand km. The image shows detail on the surface with a resolution of four and a half km. This picture is just south of PIA001515 (P21161) and shows more craters. It also shows the two distinctive types of terrain found by Voyager, the darker ungrooved regions and the lighter areas which show the grooves or fractures in abundance. The most striking features are the bright ray craters which havE a distinctly 'bluer' color appearing white against the redder background. Ganymede's surface is known to contain large amounts of surface ice and it appears that these relatively young craters have spread bright fresh ice materials over the surface. Likewise, the lighter color and reflectivity of the grooved areas suggests that here too, there is cleaner ice. We see ray craters with all sizes of ray patterns, ranging from extensive systems of the crater in the northern part of this picture, which has rays at least 300-500 kilometers long, down to craters which have only faint remnants of bright ejecta patterns. This variation suggests that, as on the Moon, there are processes which act to darken ray material, probably 'gardening' by micrometeoroid impact. JPL manages and controls the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  11. Risk terrain modeling predicts child maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Daley, Dyann; Bachmann, Michael; Bachmann, Brittany A; Pedigo, Christian; Bui, Minh-Thuy; Coffman, Jamye

    2016-12-01

    As indicated by research on the long-term effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), maltreatment has far-reaching consequences for affected children. Effective prevention measures have been elusive, partly due to difficulty in identifying vulnerable children before they are harmed. This study employs Risk Terrain Modeling (RTM), an analysis of the cumulative effect of environmental factors thought to be conducive for child maltreatment, to create a highly accurate prediction model for future substantiated child maltreatment cases in the City of Fort Worth, Texas. The model is superior to commonly used hotspot predictions and more beneficial in aiding prevention efforts in a number of ways: 1) it identifies the highest risk areas for future instances of child maltreatment with improved precision and accuracy; 2) it aids the prioritization of risk-mitigating efforts by informing about the relative importance of the most significant contributing risk factors; 3) since predictions are modeled as a function of easily obtainable data, practitioners do not have to undergo the difficult process of obtaining official child maltreatment data to apply it; 4) the inclusion of a multitude of environmental risk factors creates a more robust model with higher predictive validity; and, 5) the model does not rely on a retrospective examination of past instances of child maltreatment, but adapts predictions to changing environmental conditions. The present study introduces and examines the predictive power of this new tool to aid prevention efforts seeking to improve the safety, health, and wellbeing of vulnerable children.

  12. Analysis of radar images by means of digital terrain models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domik, G.; Leberl, F.; Kobrick, M.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that the importance of digital terrain models in the processing, analysis, and interpretation of remote sensing data is increasing. In investigations related to the study of radar images, digital terrain models can have a particular significance, because radar reflection is a function of the terrain characteristics. A procedure for the analysis and interpretation of radar images is discussed. The procedure is based on a utilization of computer simulation which makes it possible to produce simulated radar images on the basis of a digital terrain model. The simulated radar images are used for the geometric and radiometric rectification of real radar images. A description of the employed procedures is provided, and the obtained results are discussed, taking into account a test area in Northern California.

  13. AirMSPI PODEX BigSur Terrain Images

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-12-13

    ... Browse Images from the PODEX 2013 Campaign   Big Sur target (Big Sur, California) 02/03/2013 Terrain-projected   Select ...   Version number   For more information, see the Data Product Specifications (DPS)   ...

  14. Weather in Mountainous Terrain (Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-15

    Weather in Mountainous Terrain (Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support) Fiesta Resort & Conference Center Tempe, AZ February 1...Meteorology Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support Fiesta Resort & Conference Center Tempe, AZ February 1 & 2, 2010 Hosted by University

  15. Lunar terrain mapping and relative-roughness analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C.; Mccauley, J. F.; Holm, E. A.

    1971-01-01

    Terrain maps of the equatorial zone were prepared at scales of 1:2,000,000 and 1:1,000,000 to classify lunar terrain with respect to roughness and to provide a basis for selecting sites for Surveyor and Apollo landings, as well as for Ranger and Lunar Orbiter photographs. Lunar terrain was described by qualitative and quantitative methods and divided into four fundamental classes: maria, terrae, craters, and linear features. Some 35 subdivisions were defined and mapped throughout the equatorial zone, and, in addition, most of the map units were illustrated by photographs. The terrain types were analyzed quantitatively to characterize and order their relative roughness characteristics. For some morphologically homogeneous mare areas, relative roughness can be extrapolated to the large scales from measurements at small scales.

  16. Terrain-analysis procedures for modeling radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Berlin, G. L.; Pike, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Procedures developed to obtain both raw measured and surface roughness statistics for radar backscatter modeling are described. A comprehensive and highly flexible software package for terrain analysis is introduced.

  17. 12. VIEW OF ROAD ACROSS RELATIVELY FLAT TERRAIN (SECTION E), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF ROAD ACROSS RELATIVELY FLAT TERRAIN (SECTION E), RECENTLY CLEARED OF SMALL TREES AND BRUSH BY THE KOOTENAI NATIONAL FOREST - Troy-Libby Highway, Between Troy & Libby, Troy, Lincoln County, MT

  18. Remote Sensing Applications for the Martian Fretted Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, B. C.; King, D. T.; Marzen, L. J.

    2010-03-01

    The fretted terrain is located along the global escarpment. ArcGIS 9.x and MOLA was used to geoprocess and overlay images along with personal geodatabases to organization thousands of features to access the blocks present orientation/location.

  19. Uncertainty Quantification for atmospheric flows: natural terrain and urban area applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Sánchez, Clara; Gorlé, Catherine

    2016-11-01

    Modeling Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) flows is an important concern for a wide range of applications, including the assessment of air quality and wind energy resources. The complexity of these ABL flows, whether in urban areas or over natural terrain, still poses a challenge for Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models. In the present research, the effect of uncertainties in the inflow boundary conditions on the prediction of the flow patterns is investigated, considering two test cases for which field measurements are available: the Askervein Hill experiment (natural terrain) and the Joint Urban 2003 campaign (urban environment). The uncertainty in the inflow boundary conditions is represented by three uncertain parameters, and a non-intrusive polynomial chaos method is used to propagate these uncertainties to the quantities of interest, namely the prediction of the velocity at the locations of the different measurement stations. The results highlight some differences between ABL flows over natural terrain and those in an urban environment, in particular regarding the influence of the different uncertain parameters on the prediction of the velocity field. The implications for evaluating the effect of inflow uncertainties in these different types of ABL flows will be discussed.

  20. Strike-Slip Faulting Processes on Ganymede: Global Morphological Mapping and Structural Interpretation of Grooved and Transitional Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhard, L. M.; Cameron, M. E.; Smith-Konter, B. R.; Seifert, F.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Collins, G. C.

    2015-12-01

    Ganymede's fractured surface reveals many large-scale, morphologically distinct regions of inferred distributed shear and strike-slip faulting that may be important to the structural development of its surface and in the transition from dark to light (grooved) materials. To better understand the role of strike-slip tectonism in shaping Ganymede's complex icy surface, we perform a detailed mapping of key examples of strike-slip morphologies (i.e., en echelon structures, strike-slip duplexes, laterally offset pre-existing features, and possible strained craters) from Galileo and Voyager images. We focus on complex structures associated with grooved terrain (e.g. Nun Sulcus, Dardanus Sulcus, Tiamat Sulcus, and Arbela Sulcus) and terrains transitional from dark to light terrain (e.g. the boundary between Nippur Sulcus and Marius Regio, including Byblus Sulcus and Philus Sulcus). Detailed structural interpretations suggest strong evidence of strike-slip faulting in some regions (i.e., Nun and Dardanus Sulcus); however, further investigation of additional strike-slip structures is required of less convincing regions (i.e., Byblus Sulcus). Where applicable, these results are synthesized into a global database representing an inferred sense of shear for many of Ganymede's fractures. Moreover, when combined with existing observations of extensional features, these results help to narrow down the range of possible principal stress directions that could have acted at the regional or global scale to produce grooved terrain on Ganymede.

  1. A Community Terrain-Following Ocean Modeling System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    ways to incorporate wetting and drying effects. 4. A new NPZD biological model have been added using the formulation proposed by Powell et al. (2006...A Community Terrain-Following Ocean Modeling System Hernan G. Arango Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences Rutgers University 71 Dudley Road...generation primitive equation, Terrain-following Ocean Modeling System (TOMS) for high-resolution scientific and operational applications. This

  2. Investigation of Terrain Analysis and Classification Methods for Ground Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-27

    interest such as craters, ravines, and cliffs present dangers to landing, planetary rovers must land at safe locations and travel long distances to...hazard avoidance. While planetary scientists have long employed exteroceptive sensors, such as cameras or LIDAR sensors, for terrain sensing (e.g...terrains, he provided no guarantees about the error of any single prediction. For planetary exploration applications, overly optimistic predictions

  3. Projected technological requirements for remote sensing of terrain variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, C. F.

    1982-01-01

    Contributions of remote sensing to hydrogeomorphology and terrain analysis are reviewed in order to identify characteristics that should receive support in system and sensor configuration planning. Fluvial morphological studies, peak discharge modeling, and hydrogeomorphic floodplain mapping using large scale (1:12,000) to small scale (1:750,000) orbital photography are discussed as well as quantitative assessment of terrain variables for specific applications.

  4. Health-Terrain: Visualizing Large Scale Health Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0020 TITLE: Health-Terrain: Visualizing Large Scale Health Data PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ph.D. Fang, Shiaofen...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE April 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 7 MAR 2014 – 6 MAR 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Health-Terrain: Visualizing ...1) creating a concept space data model, which represents a schema tailored to support diverse visualizations and provides a uniform ontology that

  5. Use of the Atmospheric Electric Field for Terrain Avoidance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-04-01

    realistic enough to yield results applicable in the real world? And if the po- tential gradients are found to be as predicted b,,r Poisson’s equation...electric field is believed to be realistic "since the application of the atmospheric electric field for stabilization or terrain avoidance will be...phenomena) that causes the fluctuations in atmospheric potential (or potential gradient) that makes terrain avoidance or any other application of the

  6. Terrain intelligence Chita Oblast (U.S.S.R.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1943-01-01

    The following folio of maps and explanatory tables outlines the principal terrain features of the Chita Oblast.  Each map and table is devoted to a specialized set of problems; together they cover such subjects as terrain appreciations, rivers, surface-water and ground-water supplies, construction materials, fuels, suitability for temporary roads and airfields, mineral resources, and geology.  These maps and data were complied by the United States Geological Survey.

  7. The Effects of Terrain on a System of Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    TERRAIN ON A SYSTEM OF SYSTEMS by Cher Howe Ong December 2008 Thesis Advisor: Thomas W. Lucas Second Reader: Chwee Seng...DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Effects of Terrain on a System of Systems 6. AUTHOR(S) Cher Howe Ong 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7...maximum 200 words) Modern combat operations are predominantly joint or combined arms, in which different forces and weapon systems come together to

  8. Application of the Deformation Information System for automated analysis and mapping of mining terrain deformations - case study from SW Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowski, Jan; Grzempowski, Piotr; Milczarek, Wojciech; Nowacka, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring, mapping and modelling of mining induced terrain deformations are important tasks for quantifying and minimising threats that arise from underground extraction of useful minerals and affect surface infrastructure, human safety, the environment and security of the mining operation itself. The number of methods and techniques used for monitoring and analysis of mining terrain deformations is wide and expanding with the progress in geographical information technologies. These include for example: terrestrial geodetic measurements, Global Navigation Satellite Systems, remote sensing, GIS based modelling and spatial statistics, finite element method modelling, geological modelling, empirical modelling using e.g. the Knothe theory, artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic calculations and other. The presentation shows the results of numerical modelling and mapping of mining terrain deformations for two cases of underground mining sites in SW Poland, hard coal one (abandoned) and copper ore (active) using the functionalities of the Deformation Information System (DIS) (Blachowski et al, 2014 @ http://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EGU2014/EGU2014-7949.pdf). The functionalities of the spatial data modelling module of DIS have been presented and its applications in modelling, mapping and visualising mining terrain deformations based on processing of measurement data (geodetic and GNSS) for these two cases have been characterised and compared. These include, self-developed and implemented in DIS, automation procedures for calculating mining terrain subsidence with different interpolation techniques, calculation of other mining deformation parameters (i.e. tilt, horizontal displacement, horizontal strain and curvature), as well as mapping mining terrain categories based on classification of the values of these parameters as used in Poland. Acknowledgments. This work has been financed from the National Science Centre Project "Development of a numerical method of

  9. Airborne laser scanning of forested landslides characterization: Terrain model quality and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razak, K. A.; Straatsma, M. W.; van Westen, C. J.; Malet, J.-P.; de Jong, S. M.

    2011-03-01

    Mapping complex landslides under forested terrain requires an appropriate quality of digital terrain models (DTMs), which preserve small diagnostic features for landslide classification such as primary and secondary scarps, cracks, and displacement structures (flow-type and rigid-type). Optical satellite imagery, aerial photographs and synthetic aperture radar images are less effective to create reliable DTMs under tree coverage. Here, we utilized a very high density airborne laser scanning (ALS) data, with a point density of 140 points m - 2 for generating a high quality DTM for mapping landslides in forested terrain in the Barcelonnette region, the Southern French Alps. We quantitatively evaluated the preservation of morphological features and qualitatively assessed the visualization of ALS-derived DTMs. We presented a filter parameterization method suitable for landslide mapping and compared it with two default filters from the hierarchical robust interpolation (HRI) and one default filter from the progressive TIN densification (PTD) method. The results indicate that the vertical accuracy of the DTM derived from the landslide filter is about 0.04 m less accurate than that from the PTD filter. However, the landslide filter yields a better quality of the image for the recognition of small diagnostic features as depicted by expert image interpreters. Several DTM visualization techniques were compared for visual interpretation. The openness map visualized in a stereoscopic model reveals more morphologically relevant features for landslide mapping than the other filter products. We also analyzed the minimal point density in ALS data for landslide mapping and found that a point density of more than 6 points m - 2 is considered suitable for a detailed analysis of morphological features. This study illustrates the suitability of high density ALS data with an appropriate parameterization for the bare-earth extraction used for landslide identification and characterization

  10. Stratigraphy of the layered terrain in Valles Marineris, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komatsu, G.; Strom, Roger G.

    1991-01-01

    The layered terrain in Valles Marineris provides information about its origin and the geologic history of this canyon system. Whether the terrain is sedimentary material deposited in a dry or lacustrine environment, or volcanic material related to the tectonics of the canyon is still controversial. However, recent studies of Gangis Layered Terrain suggests a cyclic sequence of deposition and erosion under episodic lacustrine conditions. The stratigraphic studies are extended to four other occurrences of layered terrains in Valles Marineris in an attempt to correlate and distinguish between depositional environments. The Juvantae Chasma, Hebes Chasma, Ophir and Candor Chasmata, Melas Chasma, and Gangis Layered Terrain were examined. Although there are broad similarities among the layered terrains, no two deposits are exactly alike. This suggests that there was no synchronized regional depositional processes to form all the layered deposits. However, the similar erosional style of the lower massive weakly bedded unit in Hebes, Gangis, and Ophir-Candor suggests it may have been deposited under similar circumstances.

  11. Learned navigation in unknown terrains: A retraction method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Nageswara S. V.; Stoltzfus, N.; Iyengar, S. Sitharama

    1989-01-01

    The problem of learned navigation of a circular robot R, of radius delta (is greater than or equal to 0), through a terrain whose model is not a-priori known is considered. Two-dimensional finite-sized terrains populated by an unknown (but, finite) number of simple polygonal obstacles are also considered. The number and locations of the vertices of each obstacle are unknown to R. R is equipped with a sensor system that detects all vertices and edges that are visible from its present location. In this context two problems are covered. In the visit problem, the robot is required to visit a sequence of destination points, and in the terrain model acquisition problem, the robot is required to acquire the complete model of the terrain. An algorithmic framework is presented for solving these two problems using a retraction of the freespace onto the Voronoi diagram of the terrain. Algorithms are then presented to solve the visit problem and the terrain model acquisition problem.

  12. Vegetation-terrain feature relationships in southeast Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrumpf, B. J. (Principal Investigator); Mouat, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Studies of relationships of vegetation distribution to geomorphic characteristics of the landscape and of plant phenological patterns to vegetation identification of satellite imagery indicate that there exists positive relationships between certain plant species and certain terrain features. Not all species were found to exhibit positive relationships with all terrain feature variables, but enough positive relationships seem to exist to indicate that terrain feature variable-vegetation relationship studies have a definite place in plant ecological investigations. Even more importantly, the vegetation groups examined appeared to be successfully discriminated by the terrain feature variables. This would seem to indicate that spatial interpretations of vegetation groups may be possible. While vegetational distributions aren't determined by terrain feature differences, terrain features do mirror factors which directly influence vegetational response and hence distribution. As a result, those environmental features which can be readily and rapidly ascertained on relatively small-scale imagery may prove to be valuable indicators of vegetation distribution.

  13. Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication, Environmental Protection Agency Number ID4890008952

    SciTech Connect

    Holzemer, Michael J.; Hart, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication for the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Partial Permit, PER-116. This Permit Reapplication is required by the PER-116 Permit Conditions I.G. and I.H., and must be submitted to the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality in accordance with IDAPA 58.01.05.012 [40 CFR §§ 270.10 and 270.13 through 270.29].

  14. Terrain on Europa under Changing Lighting Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These images obtained by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft show the same region of Europa under different lighting conditions. The upper image was obtained on June 28th, 1996 during Galileo's first orbit around Jupiter under 'high-sun' conditions -- the equivalent of taking a picture from a high altitude at noon (with the sun directly overhead). Note that albedo (light/dark) features are emphasized. Compare this to the lower image containing a higher-resolution inset. This (inset) image was taken on November 6th, 1996 during the spacecraft's third orbit under 'low-sun' illumination -- the equivalent of taking a picture from a high altitude at sunrise or sunset. Note that in this image the albedo features are not readily apparent. Instead, the topography of the terrain is emphasized. Planetary geologists use information from images acquired under a variety of lighting conditions to identify different types of structures and interpret how they formed. Note that the bright linear features in the upper image are seen to be ridges in the lower image. The circular feature on the right side of both images, Cilix, is approximately 25 kilometers (15 miles) across.

    The area seen in the upper image is 312 kilometers (187 miles) by 570 kilometers (342 miles) across; the area covered by the inset is 36 kilometers (22 miles) by 315 kilometers (190 miles) across. Both of these images are centered near 2 South latitude, 185 West longitude. North is to the top of the frames.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  15. Mars South Polar Cap 'Fingerprint' Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This picture is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

    Some portions of the martian south polar residual cap have long, somewhat curved troughs instead of circular pits. These appear to form in a layer of material that may be different than that in which 'swiss cheese' circles and pits form, and none of these features has any analog in the north polar cap or elsewhere on Mars. This picture shows the 'fingerprint' terrain as a series of long, narrow depressions considered to have formed by collapse and widening by sublimation of ice. Unlike the north polar cap, the south polar region stays cold enough in summer to retain frozen carbon dioxide. Viking Orbiter observations during the late 1970s showed that very little water vapor comes off the south polar cap during summer, indicating that any frozen water that might be there remains solid throughout the year.

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image was obtained in early southern spring on August 4, 1999. It shows an area 3 x 5 kilometers (1.9 x 3.1 miles) at a resolution of about 7.3 meters (24 ft) per pixel. Located near 86.0oS, 53.9oW.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  16. Simulating Sand Behavior through Terrain Subdivision and Particle Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clothier, M.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in computer graphics, GPUs, and parallel processing hardware have provided researchers with new methods to visualize scientific data. In fact, these advances have spurred new research opportunities between computer graphics and other disciplines, such as Earth sciences. Through collaboration, Earth and planetary scientists have benefited by using these advances in hardware technology to process large amounts of data for visualization and analysis. At Oregon State University, we are collaborating with the Oregon Space Grant and IGERT Ecosystem Informatics programs to investigate techniques for simulating the behavior of sand. In addition, we have also been collaborating with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's DARTS Lab to exchange ideas on our research. The DARTS Lab specializes in the simulation of planetary vehicles, such as the Mars rovers. One aspect of their work is testing these vehicles in a virtual "sand box" to test their performance in different environments. Our research builds upon this idea to create a sand simulation framework to allow for more complex and diverse environments. As a basis for our framework, we have focused on planetary environments, such as the harsh, sandy regions on Mars. To evaluate our framework, we have used simulated planetary vehicles, such as a rover, to gain insight into the performance and interaction between the surface sand and the vehicle. Unfortunately, simulating the vast number of individual sand particles and their interaction with each other has been a computationally complex problem in the past. However, through the use of high-performance computing, we have developed a technique to subdivide physically active terrain regions across a large landscape. To achieve this, we only subdivide terrain regions where sand particles are actively participating with another object or force, such as a rover wheel. This is similar to a Level of Detail (LOD) technique, except that the density of subdivisions are determined by

  17. Terrain Analysis for Human-Robot Interaction (TAH-RI): Enabling Terrain Understanding to Improve Tactical Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Contractor Report 2005-04 Terrain Analysis for Human-Robot Interaction (TAH-RI): Enabling Terrain Understanding to Improve Tactical Behavior Jim...Hicinbothom, Dawn Riddle, Ken Graves CHI Systems, Inc. Robin Murphy University of South Florida This report is published to meet legal and contractual...for the Behavioral and Social Sciences Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 1. REPORT DATE (dd-mm-yy) 2

  18. Integrated terrain mapping with digital Landsat images in Queensland, Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinove, Charles Joseph

    1979-01-01

    Mapping with Landsat images usually is done by selecting single types of features, such as soils, vegetation, or rocks, and creating visually interpreted or digitally classified maps of each feature. Individual maps can then be overlaid on or combined with other maps to characterize the terrain. Integrated terrain mapping combines several terrain features into each map unit which, in many cases, is more directly related to uses of the land and to methods of land management than the single features alone. Terrain brightness, as measured by the multispectral scanners in Landsat 1 and 2, represents an integration of reflectance from the terrain features within the scanner's instantaneous field of view and is therefore more correlatable with integrated terrain units than with differentiated ones, such as rocks, soils, and vegetation. A test of the feasibilty of the technique of mapping integrated terrain units was conducted in a part of southwestern Queensland, Australia, in cooperation with scientists of the Queensland Department of Primary Industries. The primary purpose was to test the use of digital classification techniques to create a 'land systems map' usable for grazing land management. A recently published map of 'land systems' in the area (made by aerial photograph interpretation and ground surveys), which are integrated terrain units composed of vegetation, soil, topography, and geomorphic features, was used as a basis for comparison with digitally classified Landsat multispectral images. The land systems, in turn, each have a specific grazing capacity for cattle (expressed in beasts per km 2 ) which is estimated following analysis of both research results and property carrying capacities. Landsat images, in computer-compatible tape form, were first contrast-stretched to increase their visual interpretability, and digitally classified by the parallelepiped method into distinct spectral classes to determine their correspondence to the land systems classes and

  19. Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Monica F.; Takallu, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    The General Aviation Element of the Aviation Safety Program's Synthetic Vision Systems (SVS) Project is developing technology to eliminate low visibility induced General Aviation (GA) accidents. SVS displays present computer generated 3-dimensional imagery of the surrounding terrain on the Primary Flight Display (PFD) to greatly enhance pilot's situation awareness (SA), reducing or eliminating Controlled Flight into Terrain, as well as Low-Visibility Loss of Control accidents. SVS-conducted research is facilitating development of display concepts that provide the pilot with an unobstructed view of the outside terrain, regardless of weather conditions and time of day. A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. An experimental study has been conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to explore and quantify the relationship between the realism of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and pilot performance. Composed of complementary simulation and flight test efforts, Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays (TP-HDD) experiments will help researchers evaluate critical terrain portrayal concepts. The experimental effort is to provide data to enable design trades that optimize SVS applications, as well as develop requirements and recommendations to facilitate the certification process. This paper focuses on the experimental set-up and preliminary qualitative results of the TP-HDD simulation experiment. In this experiment a fixed based flight simulator was equipped with various types of Head Down flight displays, ranging from conventional round dials (typical of most GA aircraft) to glass cockpit style PFD's. The variations of the PFD included an assortment of texturing and Digital Elevation Model (DEM) resolution combinations. A test matrix of 10 terrain display configurations (in addition to the baseline displays) were evaluated by 27 pilots of various backgrounds and experience levels

  20. An Efficient Ray-Tracing Method for Determining Terrain Intercepts in EDL Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shidner, Jeremy D.

    2016-01-01

    The calculation of a ray's intercept from an arbitrary point in space to a prescribed surface is a common task in computer simulations. The arbitrary point often represents an object that is moving according to the simulation, while the prescribed surface is fixed in a defined frame. For detailed simulations, this surface becomes complex, taking the form of real-world objects such as mountains, craters or valleys which require more advanced methods to accurately calculate a ray's intercept location. Incorporation of these complex surfaces has commonly been implemented in graphics systems that utilize highly optimized graphics processing units to analyze such features. This paper proposes a simplified method that does not require computationally intensive graphics solutions, but rather an optimized ray-tracing method for an assumed terrain dataset. This approach was developed for the Mars Science Laboratory mission which landed on the complex terrain of Gale Crater. First, this paper begins with a discussion of the simulation used to implement the model and the applicability of finding surface intercepts with respect to atmosphere modeling, altitude determination, radar modeling, and contact forces influencing vehicle dynamics. Next, the derivation and assumptions of the intercept finding method are presented. Key assumptions are noted making the routines specific to only certain types of surface data sets that are equidistantly spaced in longitude and latitude. The derivation of the method relies on ray-tracing, requiring discussion on the formulation of the ray with respect to the terrain datasets. Further discussion includes techniques for ray initialization in order to optimize the intercept search. Then, the model implementation for various new applications in the simulation are demonstrated. Finally, a validation of the accuracy is presented along with the corresponding data sets used in the validation. A performance summary of the method will be shown using

  1. Biomechanics and energetics of walking on uneven terrain

    PubMed Central

    Voloshina, Alexandra S.; Kuo, Arthur D.; Daley, Monica A.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Walking on uneven terrain is more energetically costly than walking on smooth ground, but the biomechanical factors that contribute to this increase are unknown. To identify possible factors, we constructed an uneven terrain treadmill that allowed us to record biomechanical, electromyographic and metabolic energetics data from human subjects. We hypothesized that walking on uneven terrain would increase step width and length variability, joint mechanical work and muscle co-activation compared with walking on smooth terrain. We tested healthy subjects (N=11) walking at 1.0 m s−1, and found that, when walking on uneven terrain with up to 2.5 cm variation, subjects decreased their step length by 4% and did not significantly change their step width, while both step length and width variability increased significantly (22 and 36%, respectively; P<0.05). Uneven terrain walking caused a 28 and 62% increase in positive knee and hip work, respectively, and a 26% greater magnitude of negative knee work (0.0106, 0.1078 and 0.0425 J kg−1, respectively; P<0.05). Mean muscle activity increased in seven muscles in the lower leg and thigh (P<0.05). These changes caused overall net metabolic energy expenditure to increase by 0.73 W kg−1 (28%; P<0.0001). Much of that increase could be explained by the increased mechanical work observed at the knee and hip. Greater muscle co-activation could also contribute to increased energetic cost but to unknown degree. The findings provide insight into how lower limb muscles are used differently for natural terrain compared with laboratory conditions. PMID:23913951

  2. Biomechanics and energetics of walking on uneven terrain.

    PubMed

    Voloshina, Alexandra S; Kuo, Arthur D; Daley, Monica A; Ferris, Daniel P

    2013-11-01

    Walking on uneven terrain is more energetically costly than walking on smooth ground, but the biomechanical factors that contribute to this increase are unknown. To identify possible factors, we constructed an uneven terrain treadmill that allowed us to record biomechanical, electromyographic and metabolic energetics data from human subjects. We hypothesized that walking on uneven terrain would increase step width and length variability, joint mechanical work and muscle co-activation compared with walking on smooth terrain. We tested healthy subjects (N=11) walking at 1.0 m s(-1), and found that, when walking on uneven terrain with up to 2.5 cm variation, subjects decreased their step length by 4% and did not significantly change their step width, while both step length and width variability increased significantly (22 and 36%, respectively; P<0.05). Uneven terrain walking caused a 28 and 62% increase in positive knee and hip work, respectively, and a 26% greater magnitude of negative knee work (0.0106, 0.1078 and 0.0425 J kg(-1), respectively; P<0.05). Mean muscle activity increased in seven muscles in the lower leg and thigh (P<0.05). These changes caused overall net metabolic energy expenditure to increase by 0.73 W kg(-1) (28%; P<0.0001). Much of that increase could be explained by the increased mechanical work observed at the knee and hip. Greater muscle co-activation could also contribute to increased energetic cost but to unknown degree. The findings provide insight into how lower limb muscles are used differently for natural terrain compared with laboratory conditions.

  3. Planning and design considerations in karst terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, J. A.; Greene, R. W.; Ottoson, R. S.; Graham, T. C.

    1988-10-01

    This article discusses the various steps that the authors feel are necessary to the successful progression of an engineered project sited in karst terrain. The procedures require a multidisciplined approach with liaison and cooperation among the various parties to the project. Initially, the prospective owner must have sufficient understanding of the potential engineering problems to incorporate the engineering geologist into the early stages of any planned acquisition. The first step in an investigation should include a review of the available geologic information, aerial photo interpretation, consultation with the State Geological Survey, and a geologic reconnaissance of the prospective site and surrounding area. A go-no-go decision as to purchase can often been made at an early time. Although, in some instances, more study is needed for a particularly intriguing property. The second stage should consider the various planning alternatives that are feasible based upon the limited available information. At this stage planning/purchase decisions can be made as to purchasing options, value of the property, design constraints, and the possible economic penalties that could be associated with the potential site construction. Various planning and construction alternatives should be considered in this phase of the work. The third stage should include a site investigation program of moderate size, consisting of test pits and/or exploratory borings. The borings should be drilled using water as the drilling fluid, with an experienced crew and qualified technical inspection. The authors find the use of geophysical techniques can be extremely misleading unless used in conjunction with exploratory drilling. Successful evaluations using geophysical procedures occur only under ideal conditions. The geotechnical viability of the plan and preliminary design should be investigated in the fourth phase. Additionally, the physical parameters required for the design of structures

  4. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar and the Data Collection System Digital Terrain Elevation Demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidelbach, Robert; Bolus, R.; Chadwick, J.

    1994-08-01

    Digital Terrain Elevations (DTE) that can be rapidly generated, and that have better fidelity and accuracy than Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) Levels 1 or 2, would be extremely beneficial to Department of Defense (DOD) military operations, civil works programs, and various commercial applications. As a result, the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), along with the U.S. Army Topographic Engineering Center (TEC), are developing an Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) elevation mapping capability. This system, the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar for Digital Radar Elevations (IFSARE), is capable of collecting and providing data in all weather (reasonable), in day or night scenarios, and where obscurants are present. The IFSARE, which is currently undergoing Integration and Test, will allow for rapid on-line automatic processing of the collected digital radar data into DTE and high quality imagery. The prime contractor is the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM). This paper addresses the proof of concept for civil works applications by analyzing a data set taken by the Wright Labs/ERIM Data Collection System (DCS). The objective was to demonstrate the capability of an IFSAR system to provide high fidelity, fine resolution DTE that can be employed in hydraulic models of the Mississippi River watershed. The demonstration was sponsored by ARPA and TEC.

  5. Spectrophotometric Properties of Thermally Anomalous Terrain on Mimas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Helfenstein, Paul; Howett, Carly; Annex, Andrew; Schenk, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Cassini’s Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) maps of thermal emission from Mimas reveal a V-shaped boundary, centered at 0° N and 180° W, which divides relatively warm daytime temperatures from an anomalously cooler region at low to mid-latitudes on the moon’s leading hemisphere (Howett et al. 2011, Icarus 216, 221-226). This cooler region is also warmer at night, indicating that it has high thermal inertia, and also coincides in shape and location with that of high-energy electron deposition from Saturn’s magnetosphere (Roussos et al. 2007, JGRA 112, A06214; Schenk et al. 2011, Icarus 211, 740-757). Global IR/UV color ratio maps assembled from Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images show a lens-shaped region of relatively blue terrain also centered on Mimas’ leading hemisphere (Schenk et al. 2011), coinciding in shape and location with the region of high thermal inertia. We present results of our analysis of Cassini ISS CL1 UV3 and IR3 filter (centered at 338 and 930 nm, respectively) images using the Hapke (2008, Icarus 195, 918-926) photometric model. We investigate whether the photometric properties of surface particles are consistent with the conclusion by Howett et al. (2011) that their high thermal inertia is produced by sintering processes due to bombardment by high energy electrons. The non-thermally anomalous surface on Mimas' trailing hemisphere exhibits a strong opposition effect, consistent with the presence of a more complex microtexture due to preferential bombardment by E ring particles. This work is supported by the NASA Cassini Data Analysis and Participating Scientists Program.

  6. Aspects of conducting site investigations in glacial terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, K.E. )

    1993-03-01

    Much of northern US is mantled by Pleistocene glacial drift consisting of heterogeneous deposits of fine to coarse-textured sediments. Hazardous waste site investigations in glacial settings can often present unique design and implementation considerations. Complex glacial stratigraphy encountered during drilling activities demands flexibility built into work plans to allow for field decisions based on field conditions. Continuous cores should be collected from boreholes on a routine basis for stratigraphic purposes with particular importance assigned to field identification of relative permeabilities of stratigraphic units. Selection of appropriate field screening methodology should be based on site conditions. Utilization of open borehole groundwater sampling is recommended for fine-textured glacial settings where soil gas and well point sampling are ineffective. Installation of boreholes allows for collection of stratigraphic information and enables more surface area exposed beneath the water table for groundwater recharge and sampling. Water level determinations can be made on open boreholes for an initial assessment of the horizontal direction of groundwater flow. Placement of screens for monitoring wells should be based on field determination of likely groundwater flow paths. Nested wells are necessary to define the vertical groundwater flow system at most sites. Evaluation of the vertical flow system can often dominate site investigations in fine-textured glacial terrain. Two case studies from Iowa illustrate the usefulness of incorporating the above considerations in planning and implementing in fine-textured glacial sediments. Field investigations utilizing open borehole groundwater sampling successfully delineated site glacial geology and hydrogeology for determination of the nature and extent of groundwater contamination and better located the horizontal and vertical placement of monitoring wells.

  7. Terrain Portrayal for Head-Down Displays Flight Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Monica F.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2003-01-01

    The Synthetic Vision Systems General Aviation (SVS-GA) element of NASA's Aviation Safety Program is developing technology to eliminate low visibility induced General Aviation (GA) accidents through the application of synthetic vision techniques. SVS displays present computer generated 3-dimensional imagery of the surrounding terrain to greatly enhance pilot's situation awareness (SA), reducing or eliminating Controlled Flight into Terrain (CFIT), as well as Low-Visibility Loss of Control (LVLOC) accidents. In addition to substantial safety benefits, SVS displays have many potential operational benefits that can lead to flight in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) resembling those conducted in visual meteorological conditions (VMC). Potential benefits could include lower landing minimums, more approach options, reduced training time, etc. SVS conducted research will develop display concepts providing the pilot with an unobstructed view of the outside terrain, regardless of weather conditions and time of day. A critical component of SVS displays is the appropriate presentation of terrain to the pilot. The relationship between the realism of the terrain presentation and resulting enhancements of pilot SA and pilot performance has been largely undefined. Comprised of coordinated simulation and flight test efforts, the terrain portrayal for head-down displays (TP-HDD) test series examined the effects of two primary elements of terrain portrayal: variations of digital elevation model (DEM) resolution and terrain texturing. Variations in DEM resolution ranged from sparsely spaced (30 arc-sec/2,953ft) to very closely spaced data (1 arc-sec/98 ft). Variations in texture involved three primary methods: constant color, elevation-based generic, and photo-realistic, along with a secondary depth cue enhancer in the form of a fishnet grid overlay. The TP-HDD test series was designed to provide comprehensive data to enable design trades to optimize all SVS applications, as

  8. Generating color terrain images in an emergency response system

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.D.

    1985-08-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provides real-time assessments of the consequences resulting from an atmospheric release of radioactive material. In support of this operation, a system has been created which integrates numerical models, data acquisition systems, data analysis techniques, and professional staff. Of particular importance is the rapid generation of graphical images of the terrain surface in the vicinity of the accident site. A terrain data base and an associated acquisition system have been developed that provide the required terrain data. This data is then used as input to a collection of graphics programs which create and display realistic color images of the terrain. The graphics system currently has the capability of generating color shaded relief images from both overhead and perspective viewpoints within minutes. These images serve to quickly familiarize ARAC assessors with the terrain near the release location, and thus permit them to make better informed decisions in modeling the behavior of the released material. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Geomorphic Evolution of Sputnik Planum and Surrounding Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, A. D.; Moore, J. M.; White, O. L.; Umurhan, O. M.; Schenk, P.; Beyer, R. A.; McKinnon, W. B.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, A.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Ennico Smith, K.; Olkin, C.

    2015-12-01

    The informally-named Sputnik Planum is a vast expanse (about 835 km east-west and 1500 km north-south) of N2, CH4, and CO ices which appears craterless at current resolutions, but which gives evidence of both glacial and convective flow in the ices (Stern and the New Horizons Team, Science, 2015). This ice field is surrounded by uplands of varying morphology from hilly terrain to the northeast, plains of apparent ices interspersed with rough terrain to the east, and textured ice surrounding the mountainous terrain to the southwest. The morphology and composition of this bordering terrain will provide clues to the long-term evolution of Sputnik Planum as higher resolution visual and spectral imaging of this region are returned from the New Horizons spacecraft over the next few months. Interactions between Sputnik Planum and surrounding terrain may have involved glacial erosion and deposition. The geomorphic evolution of this region will be discussed in the context of newly-returned encounter data.

  10. On autonomous terrain model acquistion by a mobile robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, N. S. V.; Iyengar, S. S.; Weisbin, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    The following problem is considered: A point robot is placed in a terrain populated by an unknown number of polyhedral obstacles of varied sizes and locations in two/three dimensions. The robot is equipped with a sensor capable of detecting all the obstacle vertices and edges that are visible from the present location of the robot. The robot is required to autonomously navigate and build the complete terrain model using the sensor information. It is established that the necessary number of scanning operations needed for complete terrain model acquisition by any algorithm that is based on scan from vertices strategy is given by the summation of i = 1 (sup n) N(O sub i)-n and summation of i = 1 (sup n) N(O sub i)-2n in two- and three-dimensional terrains respectively, where O = (O sub 1, O sub 2,....O sub n) set of the obstacles in the terrain, and N(O sub i) is the number of vertices of the obstacle O sub i.

  11. Assessment of antipodal-impact terrains on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David A.; Greeley, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    The regions anitpodal to Mars' three largest impact basins, Hellas, Isidis, and Argyre, were assessed for evidence of impact-induced disrupted terrains. Photogeology and computer modeling using the Simplified Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (SALE) finite element code suggest that such terrains could have been found by the Hellas impact. Maximum antipodal pressures are 1100 MPa for Hellas, 520 MPa for Isidis, and 150 MPa for Argyre. The results suggest that if antipodal fracturing were associated with later volcanism, then Alba Patera may be related to the Hellas event, as proposed by Peterson (1978). Alba Patera is a unique volcano in the solar system, being a shield volcano which emitted large volume lava flows. This volcanism could be the result of the focusing of seismic energy which created a fractured region that served as a volcanic conduit for the future release of large volumes of magma. No disrupted terrain features are observed antipodal to the Isidis or Argyre basins, although some of the old fractures in Noctis Labyrinthus could have originated in response to the Isidis impact, and later have been reactivated by the Tharsis tectonics assumed to have produced Noctis. If the lower calculated antipodal pressures for Argyre were capable of producing disrupted terrains, then the terrains have been covered subsequently by volcanic or aeolian material, or modified beyond recognition.

  12. Geomorphic and Spectral Mapping of Meridiani Planum Eastern Etched Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffes, J. L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Bibring, J.; Poulet, F.

    2004-12-01

    Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS), and Mars Express (OMEGA) data were compiled and coregistered for analysis of exposures of etched terrain materials in the eastern portion of Meridiani Planum (latitude: -2.5° to 5° N, longitude: 0° to 8° E). The etched terrain in this region is a useful analog to the terrain underlying the hematite-bearing deposits at the Opportunity landing site. Etched materials in the study area are exposed in a NE-SW trending basin approximately 400 meters deep, 185 kilometers wide, and 315 kilometers long. We have mapped a stack (200 meters thick) of layered deposits which unconformably overlie the Noachian dissected cratered terrain. The surfaces range morphologically from smooth plains, patterned ground, and plains cut by interconnected ridges. Further, the units have distinct spectral signatures in OMEGA hyperspectral data (0.35 to 5.1 μ m) acquired on orbit 485. Detailed morphologic and mineralogic maps for the eastern etched terrain will be presented and discussed.

  13. Thermokarst terrain: pan-Arctic distribution and soil carbon vulnerability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olefeldt, D.; Goswami, S.; Grosse, G.; Hayes, D. J.; Hugelius, G.; Kuhry, P.; McGuire, A. D.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Sannel, B.; Schuur, E.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Development of thermokarst landforms through the thawing of ice-rich permafrost soils is expected to accelerate in the northern hemisphere due to ongoing climate change. This can damage infrastructure but also drastically impact landscape soil carbon storage and greenhouse gas emissions. Here we present a first circumpolar assessment of the spatial extent and distribution of thermokarst terrain, defined as landscapes where thermokarst landforms either have developed or potentially can develop. We differentiate between wetland, lake and hillslope thermokarst terrain types, and assess regional coverage of each type using geographical information of landscape characteristics, including ground ice content, soil type, topography, biome, and permafrost zone. Each thermokarst terrain type is estimated to occupy 5 to 8% of the northern boreal and tundra permafrost region, but otherwise differ markedly in their spatial distribution and projected exposure to climate change. With high soil organic carbon content, thermokarst terrain is estimated to store a disproportionate 30% of the total permafrost region soil organic carbon stock in the upper 3 meters of soil, and potentially more than half when accounting for deeper carbon stores. This first-order estimate of the distribution of northern thermokarst terrain is an essential step for assessing soil carbon vulnerability to thaw and the magnitude of the permafrost carbon feedback.

  14. On autonomous terrain model acquisition by a mobile robot

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, N.S.V.; Iyengar, S.S.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1987-01-20

    The following problem is considered: A point robot is placed in a terrain populated by unknown number of polyhedral obstacles of varied sizes and locations in two/three dimensions. The robot is equipped with a sensor capable of detecting all the obstacle vertices and edges that are visible from the present location of the robot. The robot is required to autonomously navigate and build the complete terrain model using the sensor information. It is established that the necessary number of scanning operations needed for complete terrain model acquisition by any algorithm that is based on 'scan from vertices' strategy is given by ..sigma../sub i = 1/sup n/N(O/sub i/) - n and ..sigma../sub i = 1/sup n/N(O/sub i/) - 2n in two and three dimensional terrains respectively, where O = )O/sub 1/,O/sub 2/,...,O/sub n/) set of the obstacles in the terrain, and N(O/sub i/) is the number of vertices of the obstacle O/sub i/.

  15. Flexible formation configuration for terrain following flight: Formation keeping constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latyshev, Simon

    This work suggests a control method for the terrain-following formation motion of a group of communicating autonomous agents. The presented approach centers on defining a suitable set of constraints for formation keeping task that shall be fulfilled while agents are negotiating an unknown terrain toward the predefined goal location. It allows agents to maintain a general geometric formation shape, while allowing each individual formation member freedom of maneuver, required for terrain collision free motion. Formation structure is defined with the use of virtual leader. Formation keeping constraints are defined with plane surfaces, specified relative to position and navigation vector of the virtual leader. Formation navigation and guidance constraints are defined using navigation vectors of formation members and the virtual leader. Alternative designs for the constraints derived with parabolic, cone, and cylindrical surfaces are considered. Formation control is derived using the Udwadia-Kalaba equation, following corresponding approach to the development of control methods for constraint based dynamical systems, including leader-follower systems defined using geometric constraints. Approach to terrain following motion requiring agents to stay within bounds of cylindrical corridor volumes built around their respective navigation vectors is assumed. Individual formation primitives and multi-level, hierarchical, formation structures are considered. Simulations, based on three degrees of freedom nonlinear model of an agent, performed using Mathematica and specifically developed combined Maya-Mathematica modeling and simulation system, demonstrate that a flexible terrain following formation motion is achieved with the presented sets of constraints.

  16. Geomorphological characteristics of Yedoma terrains in the northern part of Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, E.; Dillon, M.; Fortier, D.; Jorgenson, T.; Kanevskiy, M. Z.; Shur, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Yedoma (Ice Complex) is a Late Pleistocene periglacial formation of syngenetic permafrost with large ice wedges. These extremely ice-rich stratigraphic sequences have been widely observed and studied in northern Siberia. However, very few studies have focused on Yedoma terrain in Northern America. Occurrence of Yedoma landscape has a great significance for paleoenvironmental reconstructions because the regions where Yedoma can be observed remained unglaciated during the late Pleistocene. Understanding the dynamics of Yedoma landscape and the geotechnical properties of this permafrost unit is necessary for modeling the evolution of the periglacial landscape in the context of climate change. Degradation of Yedoma terrain triggers several geomorphological processes such as thaw settlement due to deepening of the active layer, development of thermokarst lakes, thermo-erosion gullies, and active layer detachment slides. Degradation of yedoma terrain also releases greenhouse gases (e.g. methane, CO2), water from melting ice, and various types of mineral and organic sediments which need to be accounted for in climate warming scenarios. Yedoma terrains in their contemporary state can be identified by the presence of typical geomorphological features such as erosional remnants with specific shape, baidjarakhs (ground mounds formed as a result of wedge-ice thawing), abundance of thermokarst lakes, drained lakes basins, low-gradient streams and erosion-thermokarst valleys (alas valleys) with occasional pingos. We have studied and characterized in the field the metrics of two Yedoma sites at the northern part of Seward Peninsula. Geomorphic sub-units such as drained lake basins and Yedoma remnants have been characterized in detail via optical leveling surveys. Bathymetry of thermokarst lakes was measured by lake-based sonar and GPS surveys. Drilling was conducted in several locations along the survey transects. The cores retrieved were described in the field in terms of

  17. Airflows and turbulent flux measurements in mountainous terrain: Part 1. Canopy and local effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, Andrew A.; Anderson, Dean E.; Blanken, Peter D.; Baugh, William M.; Monson, Russell K.

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the effects of local topography and canopy structure on turbulent flux measurements at a site located in mountainous terrain within a subalpine, coniferous forest. Our primary aim was to determine whether the complex terrain of the site affects the accuracy of eddy flux measurements from a practical perspective. We observed displacement heights, roughness lengths, spectral peaks, turbulent length scales, and profiles of turbulent intensities that were comparable in magnitude and pattern to those reported for forest canopies in simpler terrain. We conclude that in many of these statistical measures, the local canopy exerts considerably more influence than does topographical complexity. Lack of vertical flux divergence and modeling suggests that the flux footprints for the site are within the standards acceptable for the application of flux statistics. We investigated three different methods of coordinate rotation: double rotation (DR), triple rotation (TR), and planar-fit rotation (PF). Significant variability in rotation angles at low wind speeds was encountered with the commonly used DR and TR methods, as opposed to the PF method, causing some overestimation of the fluxes. However, these differences in fluxes were small when applied to large datasets involving sensible heat and CO2 fluxes. We observed evidence of frequent drainage flows near the ground during stable, stratified conditions at night. Concurrent with the appearance of these flows, we observed a positive bias in the mean vertical wind speed, presumably due to subtle topographic variations inducing a flow convergence below the measurement sensors. In the presence of such drainage flows, advection of scalars and non-zero bias in the mean vertical wind speed can complicate closure of the mass conservation budget at the site.

  18. A reactive system for open terrain navigation: Performance and limitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, D.; Rosenblatt, J.; Hebert, M.

    1994-01-01

    We describe a core system for autonomous navigation in outdoor natural terrain. The system consists of three parts: a perception module which processes range images to identify untraversable regions of the terrain, a local map management module which maintains a representation of the environment in the vicinity of the vehicle, and a planning module which issues commands to the vehicle controller. Our approach is to use the concept of 'early traversability evaluation', and on the use of reactive planning for generating commands to drive the vehicle. We argue that our approach leads to a robust and efficient navigation system. We illustrate our approach by an experiment in which a vehicle travelled autonomously for one kilometer through unmapped cross-country terrain.

  19. Mobility planning for omnidirectional vehicles in natural terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodsell, Thomas G.; Flann, Nicholas S.; Davidson, Morgan E.

    1999-07-01

    Planning paths for omni-directional vehicles (ODVs) can be computationally infeasible because of the large space of possible paths. This paper presents an approach that avoids this problem through the use of abstraction in characterizing the possible maneuvers of the ODV as a grammar of parameterized mobility behaviors and describing the terrain as a covering of object-oriented functional terrain features. The terrain features contain knowledge on how best to create mobility paths -- sequences of mobility behaviors -- through the object. Given an approximate map of the environment, the approach constructs a graph of mobility paths that link the location of the vehicle with the goals. The actual paths followed by the vehicle are determined by an A* search through the graph. The effectiveness of the strategy is demonstrated in actual tests with a real robotic vehicle.

  20. Terrain Classification From Body-Mounted Cameras During Human Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Anantrasirichai, Nantheera; Burn, Jeremy; Bull, David

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for terrain type classification based on monocular video captured from the viewpoint of human locomotion. A texture-based algorithm is developed to classify the path ahead into multiple groups that can be used to support terrain classification. Gait is taken into account in two ways. Firstly, for key frame selection, when regions with homogeneous texture characteristics are updated, the frequency variations of the textured surface are analyzed and used to adaptively define filter coefficients. Secondly, it is incorporated in the parameter estimation process where probabilities of path consistency are employed to improve terrain-type estimation. When tested with multiple classes that directly affect mobility-a hard surface, a soft surface, and an unwalkable area-our proposed method outperforms existing methods by up to 16%, and also provides improved robustness.

  1. Irregular Morphing for Real-Time Rendering of Large Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalem, Sid'Ali; Kourgli, Assia

    2016-06-01

    The following paper proposes an alternative approach to the real-time adaptive triangulation problem. A new region-based multi-resolution approach for terrain rendering is described which improves on-the-fly the distribution of the density of triangles inside the tile after selecting appropriate Level-Of-Detail by an adaptive sampling. This proposed approach organizes the heightmap into a QuadTree of tiles that are processed independently. This technique combines the benefits of both Triangular Irregular Network approach and region-based multi-resolution approach by improving the distribution of the density of triangles inside the tile. Our technique morphs the initial regular grid of the tile to deformed grid in order to minimize approximation error. The proposed technique strives to combine large tile size and real-time processing while guaranteeing an upper bound on the screen space error. Thus, this approach adapts terrain rendering process to local surface characteristics and enables on-the-fly handling of large amount of terrain data. Morphing is based-on the multi-resolution wavelet analysis. The use of the D2WT multi-resolution analysis of the terrain height-map speeds up processing and permits to satisfy an interactive terrain rendering. Tests and experiments demonstrate that Haar B-Spline wavelet, well known for its properties of localization and its compact support, is suitable for fast and accurate redistribution. Such technique could be exploited in client-server architecture for supporting interactive high-quality remote visualization of very large terrain.

  2. 45 CFR 630.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... or agency. Federal agency or agency means any United States executive department, military department... (including the Executive Office of the President), or any independent regulatory agency....

  3. 41 CFR 105-74.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ....645 Federal agency or agency. Federal agency or agency means any United States executive department... the executive branch (including the Executive Office of the President), or any independent...

  4. Digital terrain modelling and industrial surface metrology - Converging crafts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pike, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Quantitative characterisation of surface form, increasingly from digital 3-D height data, is cross-disciplinary and can be applied at any scale. Thus, separation of industrial-surface metrology from its Earth-science counterpart, (digital) terrain modelling, is artificial. Their growing convergence presents an opportunity to develop in surface morphometry a unified approach to surface representation. This paper introduces terrain modelling and compares it with metrology, noting their differences and similarities. Examples of potential redundancy among parameters illustrate one of the many issues common to both disciplines. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Landsat analysis of tropical forest succession employing a terrain model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barringer, T. H.; Robinson, V. B.; Coiner, J. C.; Bruce, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data have yielded a dual classification of rain forest and shadow in an analysis of a semi-deciduous forest on Mindonoro Island, Philippines. Both a spatial terrain model, using a fifth side polynomial trend surface analysis for quantitatively estimating the general spatial variation in the data set, and a spectral terrain model, based on the MSS data, have been set up. A discriminant analysis, using both sets of data, has suggested that shadowing effects may be due primarily to local variations in the spectral regions and can therefore be compensated for through the decomposition of the spatial variation in both elevation and MSS data.

  6. Terrain Modelling for Immersive Visualization for the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J.; Hartman, F.; Cooper, B.; Maxwell, S.; Yen, J.; Morrison, J.

    2004-01-01

    Immersive environments are being used to support mission operations at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This technology contributed to the Mars Pathfinder Mission in planning sorties for the Sojourner rover and is being used for the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) missions. The stereo imagery captured by the rovers is used to create 3D terrain models, which can be viewed from any angle, to provide a powerful and information rich immersive visualization experience. These technologies contributed heavily to both the mission success and the phenomenal level of public outreach achieved by Mars Pathfinder and MER. This paper will review the utilization of terrain modelling for immersive environments in support of MER.

  7. First results in terrain mapping for a roving planetary explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotkov, E.; Caillas, C.; Hebert, M.; Kweon, I. S.; Kanade, Takeo

    1989-01-01

    To perform planetary exploration without human supervision, a complete autonomous rover must be able to model its environment while exploring its surroundings. Researchers present a new algorithm to construct a geometric terrain representation from a single range image. The form of the representation is an elevation map that includes uncertainty, unknown areas, and local features. By virtue of working in spherical-polar space, the algorithm is independent of the desired map resolution and the orientation of the sensor, unlike other algorithms that work in Cartesian space. They also describe new methods to evaluate regions of the constructed elevation maps to support legged locomotion over rough terrain.

  8. Tectonized Terrains of Enceladus: The Same but Different

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, R. T.; Crow-Willard, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has now imaged Enceladus sufficiently well to recognize details of the satellite’s three distinct large-scale quasi-circular regions of tectonic deformation. In addition to the well-known “south polar terrain” (SPT), Enceladus also displays tectonically deformed terrains that we refer to as “trailing hemisphere terrain” (THT) and “leading hemisphere terrain” (LHT). Global geological mapping shows that each of the three terrains has a central region of tectonic deformation that is framed by units of curvilinear ridges and troughs, and all have comparable areal extent (the SPT being the smallest). Initial mapping by Porco et al. (Science 311, 1393, 2006) shows that the SPT has a central region which contains the distinctive subparallel “tiger stripes” and is wrapped by curvilinear terrain displaying outward-pointed Y-shaped zones of deformation that transition into radiating fracture zones. In its central region, the THT contains relatively old striated plains (Diyar and Sarandib Planitiae). These striated units are transected by ridged terrain, characterized by large ridges (the unusual “dorsa”), which are inferred to have formed by contraction and thrust faulting. The THT contains a unit consisting of smooth materials and long shallow troughs that is nearly identical to materials of the central SPT and with similar orientation. The LHT also contains a disorganized network of troughs similar to the central terrain of the SPT. The LHT contains polygons of sub-parallel troughs, suggestive of shearing. Neither the THT nor the LHT displays long individual and subparallel tectonic fractures that resemble the tiger stripes, and neither displays radiating fracture zones like those of the SPT. The gross similarities in shape and dimension of the tectonized terrains of Enceladus suggest similar formational processes, plausibly representing deformation above large-scale regions of warm ice. However, differences in morphological

  9. Applications of Microwaves to Remote Sensing of Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    A survey and study was conducted to define the role that microwaves may play in the measurement of a variety of terrain-related parameters. The survey consisted of discussions with many users and researchers in the field of remote sensing. In addition, a survey questionnaire was prepared and replies were solicited from these and other users and researchers. The results of the survey, and associated bibliography, were studied and conclusions were drawn as to the usefulness of radiometric systems for remote sensing of terrain.

  10. Robotic concepts for operation in barren terrain. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, K.

    1993-01-01

    We have performed a series of studies and configurations for robots that are capable of operating in rough barren terrains. The environments we are targeting are like those of the moon or other planets in the roughness and starkness of the terrains, the loose and hard materials that range from sandy slopes to boulder fields, and the extremes of temperature that are encountered in such places. We present a mission scenario, requirements and then present and evaluate a mechanism design. Additional subsystem issues of power, communication, sensing, and computing are all addressed with respect to these requirements.

  11. An advanced terrain modeler for an autonomous planetary rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, E. L.

    1980-01-01

    A roving vehicle capable of autonomously exploring the surface of an alien world is under development and an advanced terrain modeler to characterize the possible paths of the rover as hazardous or safe is presented. This advanced terrain modeler has several improvements over the Troiani modeler that include: a crosspath analysis, better determination of hazards on slopes, and methods for dealing with missing returns at the extremities of the sensor field. The results from a package of programs to simulate the roving vehicle are then examined and compared to results from the Troiani modeler.

  12. Terrain type recognition using ERTS-1 MSS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramenopoulos, N.

    1973-01-01

    For the automatic recognition of earth resources from ERTS-1 digital tapes, both multispectral and spatial pattern recognition techniques are important. Recognition of terrain types is based on spatial signatures that become evident by processing small portions of an image through selected algorithms. An investigation of spatial signatures that are applicable to ERTS-1 MSS images is described. Artifacts in the spatial signatures seem to be related to the multispectral scanner. A method for suppressing such artifacts is presented. Finally, results of terrain type recognition for one ERTS-1 image are presented.

  13. Adapting Tilt Corrections and the Governing Flow Equations for Steep, Fully Three-Dimensional, Mountainous Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldroyd, Holly J.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Huwald, Hendrik; Parlange, Marc B.

    2016-06-01

    In recent studies of atmospheric turbulent surface exchange in complex terrain, questions arise concerning velocity-sensor tilt corrections and the governing flow equations for coordinate systems aligned with steep slopes. The standard planar-fit method, a popular tilt-correction technique, must be modified when applied to complex mountainous terrain. The ramifications of these adaptations have not previously been fully explored. Here, we carefully evaluate the impacts of the selection of sector size (the range of flow angles admitted for analysis) and planar-fit averaging time. We offer a methodology for determining an optimized sector-wise planar fit (SPF), and evaluate the sensitivity of momentum fluxes to varying these SPF input parameters. Additionally, we clarify discrepancies in the governing flow equations for slope-aligned coordinate systems that arise in the buoyancy terms due to the gravitational vector no longer acting along a coordinate axis. New adaptions to the momentum equations and turbulence kinetic energy budget equation allow for the proper treatment of the buoyancy terms for purely upslope or downslope flows, and for slope flows having a cross-slope component. Field data show that new terms in the slope-aligned forms of the governing flow equations can be significant and should not be omitted. Since the optimized SPF and the proper alignment of buoyancy terms in the governing flow equations both affect turbulent fluxes, these results hold implications for similarity theory or budget analyses for which accurate flux estimates are important.

  14. Vorticity and turbulence observations during a wildland fire on sloped terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contezac, J.; Clements, C. B.; Hall, D.; Seto, D.; Davis, B.

    2013-12-01

    Fire-atmosphere interactions represent an atmospheric boundary-layer regime typically associated with complex circulations that interact with the fire front. In mountainous terrain, these interactions are compounded by terrain-driven circulations that often lead to extreme fire behavior. To better understand the role of complex terrain on fire behavior, a set of field experiments was conducted in June 2012 in the Coast Range of central California. The experiments were conducted on steep valley sidewalls to allow fires to spread upslope. Instrumentation used to measure fire-atmosphere interactions included three micrometeorological towers arranged along the slope and equipped with sonic anemometers, heat flux radiometers, and fine-wire thermocouples. In addition, a scanning Doppler lidar was used to measured winds within and above the valley, and airborne video imagery was collected to monitor fire behavior characteristics. The experimental site was located on the leeside of a ridge where terrain-induced flow and opposing mesoscale winds aloft interacted to create a zone of high wind shear. During the burn, the interaction between the fire and atmosphere caused the generation of several fire whirls that develop as a result of several environmental conditions including shear-generated vorticity and fire front geometry. Airborne video imagery indicated that upon ignition, the plume tilted in the opposite direction from the fire movement suggesting that higher horizontal momentum from aloft was brought to the surface, resulting in much slower fire spread rates due to opposing winds. However, after the fire front had passed the lowest tower located at the base of the slope, a shift in wind speed and direction caused a fire whirl to develop near an L-shaped kink in the fire front. Preliminary results indicate that at this time, winds at the bottom of the slope began to rotate with horizontal vorticity values of -0.2 s^-1. Increased heat flux values at this time indicated

  15. Sink detection on tilted terrain for automated identification of glacial cirques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasicek, Günther; Robl, Jörg; Lang, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Glacial cirques are morphologically distinct but complex landforms and represent a vital part of high mountain topography. Their distribution, elevation and relief are expected to hold information on (1) the extent of glacial occupation, (2) the mechanism of glacial cirque erosion, and (3) how glacial in concert with periglacial processes can limit peak altitude and mountain range height. While easily detectably for the expert's eye both in nature and on various representations of topography, their complicated nature makes them a nemesis for computer algorithms. Consequently, manual mapping of glacial cirques is commonplace in many mountain landscapes worldwide, but consistent datasets of cirque distribution and objectively mapped cirques and their morphometrical attributes are lacking. Among the biggest problems for algorithm development are the complexity in shape and the great variability of cirque size. For example, glacial cirques can be rather circular or longitudinal in extent, exist as individual and composite landforms, show prominent topographic depressions or can entirely be filled with water or sediment. For these reasons, attributes like circularity, size, drainage area and topology of landform elements (e.g. a flat floor surrounded by steep walls) have only a limited potential for automated cirque detection. Here we present a novel, geomorphometric method for automated identification of glacial cirques on digital elevation models that exploits their genetic bowl-like shape. First, we differentiate between glacial and fluvial terrain employing an algorithm based on a moving window approach and multi-scale curvature, which is also capable of fitting the analysis window to valley width. We then fit a plane to the valley stretch clipped by the analysis window and rotate the terrain around the center cell until the plane is level. Doing so, we produce sinks of considerable size if the clipped terrain represents a cirque, while no or only very small sinks

  16. The effects of experience and training in the use of a Terrain Enhanced Primary Flight Display for terrain avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Douglas Allen

    The prevention of Controlled Flight into Terrain (CFIT) is one of the five goals established by the Presidential commission on aviation safety. The present study examined the history of CFIT prevention and investigated the use of a new terrain awareness display called the Terrain Enhanced Primary Flight Display (TE-PFD). The TE-PFD replaces the representation of the ground in a traditional electronic attitude and direction indicator with a 3-D perspective display of actual terrain. This display format is intended to enhance terrain awareness by providing an ecological interface that depicts terrain in a conformal "out-the-window" view. The present study sought to explore the differences between levels of pilot experience through the manipulation of situational parameters and the application of Signal Detection Theory (SDT) to the identification and avoidance of potential terrain conflicts. In two experiments, the role of pilot experience and of display specific training were addressed. Experiment 1 compared low-time and high-time pilots with non-pilots over a variety of conditions. Experiment 2 investigated the potential for improving non-pilot performance through practice-only training and practice with performance training. Participants in both experiments responded to the flight scenario depicted on the TE-PFD by either selecting a change in heading and/or pitch or selecting a "maintain course" option. Performance was analyzed using SDT parameters and response latency. While there were no differences in sensitivity across levels of pilot experience, there were variations in both response strategies (i.e., bias) and response latencies. The results revealed that pilots (both high-time and low-time) adjusted response bias to compensate for decreased sensitivity. In addition, pilots also adjusted response bias as a function of the immediacy of the impending collision. While all pilots made this latter type of adjustment with respect to the distance between the

  17. Youth Risk Assessment in Complex Agency Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groner, Mark R.; Solomon, Jean

    2007-01-01

    Advancements in the delivery of community-based services and tight utilization management of high-cost treatment options result in youths with serious behavior problems receiving intervention in lower levels of care than was true ten or fifteen years ago. This shift in where services tend to be delivered necessitates enhancement of risk assessment…

  18. Genetic algorithms for terrain categorization of Landsat images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larch, David E.

    1994-07-01

    We have developed a method that uses genetic algorithms (GAs) to optimize rules for categorizing the terrain in Landsat data. A rule has two parts: a left side (the 'if' clause) and a right side (the 'then' clause). When the 'if' clause is true, the functions in the 'then' clause are executed to process the Landsat data. Examples of functions for processing the data include pixel by pixel threshold and a linear combination of six bands. Optimized rules are used to identify different terrain categories within Landsat data. Optimization is performed by comparing the results of the rules with ground truth using an objective function which minimizes the number of false positive and false negative pixel labels. Those rules that generate results close to the ground truth (those rules that return a small number of false positive and false negative pixel identifications) are highly rewarded and are used to create the next generation of rules. High altitude photographs were used as ground truth. The GA produced promising results for terrain categorization when compared with results from a maximum likelihood classifier. More work in the area of terrain categroization is planned to build on these promising results.

  19. A structural origin for the cantaloupe terrain of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Joseph M.

    1993-01-01

    Cantaloupe terrain is unique to Triton. It is Triton's oldest terrain and includes about 250,000 km sq. region displaying sparsely cratered, closely spaced, nearly circular dimples about 30-40 km across. This terrain is found on no other planet because, only on Triton the final major global thermal pulse (1) caused completed (or nearly) interior melting resulting in a cooling history where large thermal stresses shattered and contorted a thin, weak lithosphere, and (2) occurred after heavy bombardment so that the surface features were preserved. The cantaloupe terrain is composed of intersecting sets of structures (folds and/or faults) that have developed as a result of global compression generated by volumetric changes associated with cooling of Triton's interior. Further, it is proposed that these structures developed after the period of heavy bombardment, and resulted from the last major global thermal epoch in Triton's unique history (either caused by tidal or radio metric heating). Initially, as the body cooled and the structures formed, their surface topography was most likely modified by thermal relaxation of the warm surface ices. In other bodies like Mercury, thermal stresses generated from global cooling and contraction have resulted in widely spaced thrust faults, whereas on Triton, thermal stresses produced more closely-spaced folds and faults sets. This difference in structural style is probably due to differences in lithospheric properties (thickness, strength, etc.), the magnitude of stress (directly dependent on the thermal history), and when the structures formed, relative to the period of heavy bombardment.

  20. Distant Secondary Craters and Age Constraints on Young Martian Terrains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEwen, A.; Preblich, B.; Turtle, E.; Studer, D.; Artemieva, N.; Golombek, M.; Hurst, M.; Kirk, R.; Burr, D.

    2005-01-01

    Are small (less than approx. 1 km diameter) craters on Mars and the Moon dominated by primary impacts, by secondary impacts of much larger primary craters, or are both primaries and secondaries significant? This question is critical to age constraints for young terrains and for older terrains covering small areas, where only small craters are superimposed on the unit. If the martian rayed crater Zunil is representative of large impact events on Mars, then the density of secondaries should exceed the density of primaries at diameters a factor of 1000 smaller than that of the largest contributing primary crater. On the basis of morphology and depth/diameter measurements, most small craters on Mars could be secondaries. Two additional observations (discussed below) suggest that the production functions of Hartmann and Neukum predict too many primary craters smaller than a few hundred meters in diameter. Fewer small, high-velocity impacts may explain why there appears to be little impact regolith over Amazonian terrains. Martian terrains dated by small craters could be older than reported in recent publications.