Science.gov

Sample records for agency continued superfund

  1. Superfund policy fight continues

    SciTech Connect

    Kirschner, E.

    1992-07-29

    Superfund continues to be embroiled in controversy, as companies contend with cleanup costs and Senate amendments seek to cut back municipality and lender liability. The Environmental Protection Agency announced earlier this month that it is suing seven companies for Superfund costs at the Bridgeport Rental and Oil Services waste oil recycling and disposal facility in Logan Township, NJ. EPA says the companies -- Monsanto, DuPont, Allied Signal, Rohm and Haas, Rollings Environmental Services, International Flavors Fragrances, and Atlantic City Electric Power -- as waste generators, should foot the $29 million-plus cleanup bill. At issue is whether the government should be named a potentially responsible party (PRP). Ten PRPs, including four of the firms named in the EPA case, filed a suit in March seeking government involvement in negotiations. DuPont attorney Bernard Reilly says a study of the site shows that 50 million-70 million gal is military waste oil, pegging only 5 million gal as industry's share.

  2. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION - US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY SUPERFUND PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation outlines the Superfund program approach to site cleanup, then provides information from actual insitu and exsitu solidification/stabilization remediations to illustrate technology, equipment, field implementation, performance evaluation, cleanup specifications, ...

  3. Superfund handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This book discusses the law, politics, and practical problems of the U.S. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA - commonly known as Superfund) implementation. It surveys environmental and legal requirements that govern contaminated locations designated as Superfund sites by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and includes information on EPA policies and actions, cleanup standards, health and safety, corporate liability, and assessment of risks associated with human exposure to toxic materials. It notes the exclusion of petroleum from the definition of hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant, and lists possible exclusions from federal spill reporting requirements.

  4. Radioactive Water Treatment at a United States Environmental Protection Agency Superfund Site - 12322

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, John C.

    2012-07-01

    A water treatment system at a United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Superfund site impacted by radiological contaminants is used to treat water entering the site. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is actively managing the remedial action for the USEPA using contracts to support the multiple activities on site. The site is where former gas mantle production facilities operated around the turn of the century. The manufacturing facilities used thorium ores to develop the mantles and disposed of off-specification mantles and ore residuals in the surrounding areas. During Site remedial actions, both groundwater and surface water comes into contact with contaminated soils and must be collected and treated at an on-site treatment facility. The radionuclides thorium and radium with associated progeny are the main concern for treatment. Suspended solids, volatile organic compounds, and select metals are also monitored during water treatment. The water treatment process begins were water is pumped to a collection tank where debris and grit settle out. Stored water is pumped to a coagulant tank containing poly-aluminum chloride to collect dissolved solids. The water passes into a reaction tube where aspirated air is added or reagent added to remove Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC'S) by mass transfer and convert dissolved iron to a solid. The water enters the flocculent polymer tank to drop solids out. The flocculated water overflows to a fluidized bed contact chamber to increase precipitation. Flocculation is where colloids of material drop out of suspension and settle. The settled solids are periodically removed and disposed of as radioactive waste. The water is passed through filters and an ion exchange process to extract the radionuclides. Several million liters of water are processed each year from two water treatment plants servicing different areas of the remediation site. Ion exchange resin and filter material are periodically replaced

  5. Federal Agency Liability under the Superfund Act: It Goes Beyond Federal Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond Takashi Swenson

    2004-02-01

    While many readers of the Federal Facilities Environmental Journal are involved with the performance of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup on Department of Defense and Department of Energy facilities, many may be unfamiliar with the much broader CERCLA liability of federal agencies under other circumstances. This article places the various kinds of federal agency CERCLA liability into that wider context and serves as a lessons learned for environmental managers who want to avoid creating new CERCLA liability for their agencies.

  6. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION OF PNEUMATIC FRACTURING EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in cooperation with Accutech Remedial Systems (ARS) and the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) performed a field demonstration of Pneumatic Fracturing Extraction (PFE) for the removal of chlorinated volatile organics (VOCS) f...

  7. 77 FR 8255 - Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site, Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site, Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Constitution Road Drum Superfund...

  8. 78 FR 57852 - Warrior Rosin Spill Superfund Site, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama ; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Warrior Rosin Spill Superfund Site, Holt, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama ; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... costs concerning the Warrior Rosin Spill Superfund Site located in Holt, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama....

  9. SUPERFUND SOILS DATA MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the Superfund Soil Data Management System (DMS), a PC-based data system being developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in its effort to manage and evaluate treatment and performance data for contaminated soil, sludge, and debris. his system...

  10. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM: ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS FY 1994

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates innovative technologies for the remediation of contaminated Superfund and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) corrective actions sites. Historically t...

  11. Continuing Professional Education Programs of Voluntary Health Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL.

    Organizational objectives and professional continuing education programs of ten voluntary health agencies--Allergy Foundation of America, American Cancer Society, American Heart Association, Arthritis Foundation, National Association for Mental Health, National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, National Society for the Prevention of Blindness,…

  12. EPA ensures oversight of worker safety and health at Superfund incinerator sites. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    In response to increasing concern over the safety and health of hazardous waste workers at Superfund incinerator sites, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently established a joint EPA-Labor Superfund Health and Safety Task Force to coordinate activities designed to ensure vigorous oversight of occupationl safety and health at these sites. As a result of EPA/Labor Task Force-sponsored inspections, operators of the inspected incinerators have agreed to address the team's findings and to improve their safety and health programs. The EPA/Labor Task Force also has developed a draft 'Protocol for Safety and Health Inspections at Superfund Sites' to be used for inspections of all types of Superfund sites. In 1993, the EPA/Labor Task Force will continue to conduct additional Superfund incinerator site inspections. EPA believes that the initiaties launched with the EPA/Labor Task Force will ensure that the safety and health of workers engaged in hazardous waste cleanup activities is a top priority at these sites.

  13. 75 FR 53694 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-01

    ... AGENCY Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement... costs concerning the Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site located in Davie, Broward County... Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site by one of the following methods: http://www.regulations.gov :...

  14. 77 FR 9652 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Lake Linden Superfund Site in Lake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Lake Linden Superfund Site in Lake Linden... administrative settlement for recovery of past response costs concerning the Lake Linden Superfund Site in Lake..., Chicago, Illinois, C-14J, 60604, (312) 886-6609. Comments should reference the Lake Linden Superfund...

  15. Superfund list adds Pantex

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-13

    While Congress crafts Superfund reauthorization to see that more money is spent on cleanups instead of legal fees, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency added 24 federal facilities to the National Priorities List of the worst pollution problems. Three Department of Energy sites were added on May 31, despite objections from state and other officials about how sites were selected. The Pantex nuclear weapon plant in Amarillo, Texas, was included despite protests by state officials, while environmentalists claim that {open_quotes}political gamesmanship{close_quotes} kept a Portsmouth, Ohio, uranium enrichment plant off the list. Other DOE sites listed were the Paducah (Kentucky) Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Laboratory for Energy Related Health Research in Davis, California.

  16. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM - ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS 1993

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA.) established the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program in 1986, following passage of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). The SITE Program, now in its eighth year, is an integral part of EPA's ...

  17. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) Indoor-Air Quality Implementation Plan. A report to Congress under Title IV of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986: radon gas and indoor air-quality research. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The EPA Indoor Air Quality Implementation Plan provides information on the direction of EPA's indoor air program, including the Agency's policy on indoor air and priorities for research and information dissemination over the next two years. EPA submitted the report to Congress on July 2, 1987 as required by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. There are five appendices to the report: Appendix A--Preliminary Indoor Air Pollution Information Assessment; Appendix B--FY 87 Indoor Air Research Program; Appendix C--EPA Radon Program; Appendix D--Indoor Air Resource History (Published with Appendix C); Appendix E--Indoor Air Reference Data Base.

  18. 78 FR 47317 - Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement... Superfund Site located in Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina. The settlement addresses...

  19. 40 CFR 300.170 - Federal agency participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Federal agency participation. 300.170 Section 300.170 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... discharges of oil, as required in 40 CFR part 110, from facilities or vessels under their jurisdiction...

  20. 40 CFR 300.170 - Federal agency participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Federal agency participation. 300.170 Section 300.170 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... discharges of oil, as required in 40 CFR part 110, from facilities or vessels under their jurisdiction...

  1. 40 CFR 300.170 - Federal agency participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Federal agency participation. 300.170 Section 300.170 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... discharges of oil, as required in 40 CFR part 110, from facilities or vessels under their jurisdiction...

  2. 40 CFR 300.170 - Federal agency participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal agency participation. 300.170 Section 300.170 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... discharges of oil, as required in 40 CFR part 110, from facilities or vessels under their jurisdiction...

  3. 78 FR 14543 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... AGENCY Ward Transformer Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Agency has entered into a settlement at the Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake... EPA Region 4 contact Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Ward...

  4. 75 FR 68788 - Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Jefferson, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... AGENCY Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Jefferson, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement for reimbursement of past response costs concerning the Ore..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-0893 or Site name Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site by one of...

  5. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) PROGRAM SPRING UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its fifth year, serves several purposes, including (1) the development and implementation of innovative treatment technologies for hazardous waste remediation and (2) the...

  6. Reinventing Superfund means de-inventing'' superfund

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, C.J. )

    1994-03-01

    The White House claims there are some things the federal government does that it could do better and other things it should not do at all. It is in this light that the federal government should delegate responsibility for Superfund to the states. Various factors that drove the federalization of many environmental programs in the 1970s and 1980s no longer apply for Superfund. Air and water pollution programs were federalized partly because states feared businesses would relocate to friendlier'', less environmentally stringent areas. States would not impose sufficiently stringent environmental controls, because pursuing tougher standards meant committing economic suicide. Thus, uniform air and water pollution standards were implemented on a federal level to eliminate business flight. Superfund, by contrast, imposes costs based wholly on past activities. One state's determination to rededicate its waste sites quickly and more stringently than another state has little effect on a business's location decisions. Relocating a plant does not change where the waste previously was disposed.

  7. 76 FR 44912 - Callaway and Son Drum Service Superfund Site; Lake Alfred, Polk County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... AGENCY Callaway and Son Drum Service Superfund Site; Lake Alfred, Polk County, FL; Notice of Settlement... costs concerning the Callaway and son Drum Service Superfund Site located in Lake Alfred, Polk County.... Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Callaway and Son Drum Service Superfund Site by one of...

  8. Environmental justice and the Superfund program

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, G.J.; Dunn, S.; Epstein, F.; Gosling, R.

    1994-12-31

    Environmental justice is an issue of national importance; the President, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Agency`s Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response have all made it a priority. The Agency is beginning to incorporate environmental justice concerns into all aspects of operations. Areas specifically targeted for improvement include community relations, and outreach and economic redevelopment of contaminated inner-city properties. In addition to incorporating environmental justice concerns into existing programs, opportunities exist to expand environmental justice activities through the Superfund reform process, and many such proposals are being considered during Superfund reauthorization. Although there has been progress in addressing environmental justice issues, much still needs to be done.

  9. SUPERFUND REMOTE SENSING SUPPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This task provides remote sensing technical support to the Superfund program. Support includes the collection, processing, and analysis of remote sensing data to characterize hazardous waste disposal sites and their history. Image analysis reports, aerial photographs, and assoc...

  10. SUPERFUND TECHNICAL SUPPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under this task, technical support is provided to Regional Remedial Project Managers (RPMs)/On-Scene Coordinators (OSCs) at Superfund, RCRA, and Brownfields sites contaminated with hazardous materials by the Technical Support Center (TSC) for Monitoring and Site Characterization....

  11. 77 FR 13603 - Anniston PCB Superfund Site; Anniston, Calhoun County, AL; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... published on February 27, 2012, 77 FR 11533 (FRL-9637-7), EPA posted a Notice of Amended Settlement concerning the Anniston PCB Superfund Site located in Anniston. The settlement is not an amendment, but a new... AGENCY Anniston PCB Superfund Site; Anniston, Calhoun County, AL; Correction AGENCY:...

  12. 77 FR 11533 - Anniston PCB Superfund Site, Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama; Notice of Amended Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... AGENCY Anniston PCB Superfund Site, Anniston, Calhoun County, Alabama; Notice of Amended Settlement... Agency has entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Anniston PCB Superfund Site... available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Anniston PCB by one of the...

  13. 75 FR 81269 - Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... AGENCY Ward Transformer Superfund Site Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of Settlements AGENCY... Ward Transformer Superfund Site located in Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina for publication. DATES... your comments, identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-1053 or Site name Ward...

  14. Feasibility study for the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoff, A.H.; Costan, G.P.; Montgomery, M.S.; White, P.J.

    1994-07-01

    The United Heckathom Superfund Site in Richmond, California, was used to formulate pesticides from approximately 1947 to 1966. Soils at the site and sediments in the harbor were contaminated with various chlorinated pesticides, primarily DDT, as a result of these activities. The US Environmental Protection Agency listed the site on the Superfund National Priorities List in 1990. This document is part of the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study phase of the Superfund response, which will provide the basis for selection of a final remedy that will protect human health and the environment and achieve compliance with federal and state envirorunental laws.

  15. Technology evaluation report: SITE (Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation) program demonstration test. The American Combustion Pyretron Thermal Destruction System at the US EPA's (Environmental Protection Agency's) combustion research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Waterland, L.; Lee, J.W.

    1989-04-01

    A series of demonstration tests of the American Combustion, Inc., Thermal Destruction System was performed under the SITE program. This oxygen-enhanced combustion system was retrofit to the rotary-kiln incinerator at EPA's Combustion Research Facility. The system's performance was tested firing contaminated soil from the Stringfellow Superfund Site, both alone and mixed with a coal tar waste (KO87). Comparative performance with conventional incinerator operation was also tested. Compliance with the incinerator performance standards of 99.99% principal organic hazardous constituents (POHC) destruction and removal efficiency and particulate emissions of less than 180 mg/dscm at 7% O2 was measured for all tests. The Pyretron system was capable of in-compliance performance at double the mixed waste feedrate and at a 60% increase in batch waste charge mass than possible with conventional incineration. Scrubber blowdown and kiln ash contained no detectable levels of any of the POHCs chosen.

  16. SUPERFUND PUBLIC HEALTH EVALUATION MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Public Health Evaluation Manual has been developed for use by a diverse audience, including EPA regional staff, state Superfund program staff, federal and state remedial contractors, and potentially responsible parties. Individuals having different levels of scienti...

  17. 40 CFR 300.175 - Federal agencies: additional responsibilities and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Federal agencies: additional responsibilities and assistance. 300.175 Section 300.175 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY...

  18. 40 CFR 300.175 - Federal agencies: additional responsibilities and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Federal agencies: additional responsibilities and assistance. 300.175 Section 300.175 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY...

  19. 40 CFR 300.175 - Federal agencies: additional responsibilities and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Federal agencies: additional responsibilities and assistance. 300.175 Section 300.175 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY...

  20. 40 CFR 300.175 - Federal agencies: additional responsibilities and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal agencies: additional responsibilities and assistance. 300.175 Section 300.175 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY...

  1. 40 CFR 300.175 - Federal agencies: additional responsibilities and assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Federal agencies: additional responsibilities and assistance. 300.175 Section 300.175 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES POLLUTION CONTINGENCY...

  2. SUPERFUND GROUNDWATER ISSUE - FACILITATED TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Regional Superfund Ground Water Forum is a group of ground-water scientists representing EPA's Regional Superfund Offices, organized to exchange up to date information related to ground-water remediation at Superfund sites. Facilitated transport is an issue identified by the ...

  3. 15 CFR 930.84 - Continuing State agency objections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND COASTAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT FEDERAL CONSISTENCY WITH APPROVED COASTAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS Consistency for...

  4. 76 FR 72405 - San Fernando Valley Area 2 Superfund Site; Notice of Proposed Prospective Purchaser Agreement Re...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY San Fernando Valley Area 2 Superfund Site; Notice of Proposed Prospective Purchaser Agreement Re: 4057 and 4059 Goodwin Avenue, Los Angeles, CA AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)....

  5. Summary report on OSHA inspections conducted at Superfund incinerator sites

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-30

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR) recently entered into an interagency agreement to participate jointly in activities that will ensure vigorous occupational safety and health oversight of Superfund Thermal Destruction Facilities (TDFs).

  6. 40 CFR 35.4040 - How many groups can receive a TAG at one Superfund site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... one Superfund site? 35.4040 Section 35.4040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Eligible? § 35.4040 How many groups can receive a TAG at one Superfund site? (a) Only one TAG may be awarded for a site at any one time. However, the recipient of the grant can be changed when: (1) EPA...

  7. 40 CFR 35.4040 - How many groups can receive a TAG at one Superfund site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... one Superfund site? 35.4040 Section 35.4040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Eligible? § 35.4040 How many groups can receive a TAG at one Superfund site? (a) Only one TAG may be awarded for a site at any one time. However, the recipient of the grant can be changed when: (1) EPA...

  8. 40 CFR 35.4040 - How many groups can receive a TAG at one Superfund site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... one Superfund site? 35.4040 Section 35.4040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Eligible? § 35.4040 How many groups can receive a TAG at one Superfund site? (a) Only one TAG may be awarded for a site at any one time. However, the recipient of the grant can be changed when: (1) EPA...

  9. 40 CFR 35.4040 - How many groups can receive a TAG at one Superfund site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... one Superfund site? 35.4040 Section 35.4040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Eligible? § 35.4040 How many groups can receive a TAG at one Superfund site? (a) Only one TAG may be awarded for a site at any one time. However, the recipient of the grant can be changed when: (1) EPA...

  10. 78 FR 36560 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Distribution of Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset to Affected Domestic Producers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... of Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset to Affected Domestic Producers (CDSOA). This request for... concerning the following information collection: Title: Distribution of Continued Dumping and Subsidy...

  11. 78 FR 55280 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Distribution of Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ... Register (78 FR 36560) on June 18, 2013, allowing for a 60-day comment period. This notice allows for an... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Distribution of Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset to Affected Domestic Producers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and...

  12. Slipcovering a superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Gascoyne, S.

    1993-09-01

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal is both a Superfund cleanup site (one of the most contaminated in the United States) and a recently named provisional wildlife refuge. In this article, the history of the Rocky Mountain arsenal is reviewed. The decontamination program for the arsenal and the probable effects of cleanup on the ecology of the site are described. Some of the diverse responses to the program are included in the discussion.

  13. 40 CFR 310.9 - If more than one local agency or government is involved, can each receive up to $25,000?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false If more than one local agency or government is involved, can each receive up to $25,000? 310.9 Section 310.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW...

  14. 40 CFR 310.7 - Can more than one local agency or government be reimbursed for response to the same incident?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Can more than one local agency or government be reimbursed for response to the same incident? 310.7 Section 310.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW...

  15. 40 CFR 310.7 - Can more than one local agency or government be reimbursed for response to the same incident?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... government be reimbursed for response to the same incident? 310.7 Section 310.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS... Reimbursed? § 310.7 Can more than one local agency or government be reimbursed for response to the...

  16. 40 CFR 310.7 - Can more than one local agency or government be reimbursed for response to the same incident?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... government be reimbursed for response to the same incident? 310.7 Section 310.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS... Reimbursed? § 310.7 Can more than one local agency or government be reimbursed for response to the...

  17. 40 CFR 310.7 - Can more than one local agency or government be reimbursed for response to the same incident?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Can more than one local agency or government be reimbursed for response to the same incident? 310.7 Section 310.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW...

  18. 40 CFR 310.9 - If more than one local agency or government is involved, can each receive up to $25,000?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false If more than one local agency or government is involved, can each receive up to $25,000? 310.9 Section 310.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW...

  19. 40 CFR 310.7 - Can more than one local agency or government be reimbursed for response to the same incident?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Can more than one local agency or government be reimbursed for response to the same incident? 310.7 Section 310.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW...

  20. Superfund: Evaluating the Impact of Executive Order 12898

    PubMed Central

    O’Neil, Sandra George

    2007-01-01

    Background The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) addresses uncontrolled and abandoned hazardous waste sites throughout the country. Sites that are perceived to be a significant threat to both surrounding populations and the environment can be placed on the U.S. EPA Superfund list and qualify for federal cleanup funds. The equitability of the Superfund program has been questioned; the representation of minority and low-income populations in this cleanup program is lower than would be expected. Thus, minorities and low-income populations may not be benefiting proportionately from this environmental cleanup program. In 1994 President Clinton signed Executive Order 12898 requiring that the U.S. EPA and other federal agencies implement environmental justice policies. These policies were to specifically address the disproportionate environmental effects of federal programs and policies on minority and low-income populations. Objective and Methods I use event history analysis to evaluate the impact of Executive Order 12898 on the equitability of the Superfund program. Discussion Findings suggest that despite environmental justice legislation, Superfund site listings in minority and poor areas are even less likely for sites discovered since the 1994 Executive Order. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that Executive Order 12898 for environmental justice has not increased the equitability of the Superfund program. PMID:17637927

  1. 1994 UPDATE OF U.S. EPA'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE), Emerging Technology Partnership (ETP) has initiated actions since 1987 that support the Clinton Administration's policy to foster and accelerate the research and development of inn...

  2. 75 FR 36106 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Distribution of Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-24

    ... Federal Register (75 FR 16493) on April 1, 2010, allowing for a 60-day comment period. One comment was... Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset to Affected Domestic Producers (CDSOA) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border...: Distribution of Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset to Affected Domestic Procedures. This is a...

  3. 75 FR 16493 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Distribution of Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset to Affected Domestic Producers (CDSOA) AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border... Dumping and Subsidy Offset to Affected Domestic Procedures. This request for comment is being made... Continued Dumping and Subsidy Offset to Affected Domestic Producers (CDSOA). OMB Number: 1651-0086....

  4. 40 CFR 35.6800 - Superfund State Contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Superfund State Contract. 35.6800 Section 35.6800 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... for a remedial action at a site within the State and before EPA or a political subdivision can...

  5. Results of a monitoring program of continuous water levels and physical water properties at the Operable Unit 1 area of the Savage Municipal Well Superfund site, Milford, New Hampshire, water years 2000-03

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2005-01-01

    The Milford-Souhegan glacial-drift (MSGD) aquifer, in south-central New Hampshire, is an important source of industrial, commercial, and domestic water. The MSGD aquifer was also an important source of drinking water for the town of Milford until it was found to contain high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Savage and Keyes municipal-supply wells in the early 1980s. A VOC plume was found to cover part of the southwestern half of the MSGD aquifer. In September 1984, the site was designated a Superfund site, called the Savage Municipal Well Superfund site. The primary source area of contaminants was a former tool manufacturing facility (called the OK Tool facility, and now called the Operable Unit 1 (OU1) area) that disposed of solvents at the surface and in the subsurface. The facility was closed in 1987 and removed in 1998. A low-permeability containment barrier wall was constructed and installed in the overburden (MSGD aquifer) in 1998 to encapsulate the highest concentrations of VOCs, and a pump-and-treat remediation facility was also added. Remedial operations of extraction and injection wells started in May 1999. A network of water-level monitoring sites was implemented in water year 2000 (October 1, 1999, through September 30, 2000) in the OU1 area to help assess the effectiveness of remedial operations to mitigate the VOC plume, and to evaluate the effect of the barrier wall and remedial operations on the hydraulic connections across the barrier and between the overburden and underlying bedrock. Remedial extraction and injections wells inside and outside the barrier help isolate ground-water flow inside the barrier and the further spreading of VOCs. This report summarizes both continuous and selected periodic manual measurements of water level and physical water properties (specific conductance and water temperature) for 10 monitoring locations during water years 2000-03. Additional periodic manual measurements of water levels were

  6. Revisions to US EPA Superfund Risk and Dose Assessment Models and Guidance - 13403

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Stuart A.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program's six Preliminary Remediation Goal (PRG) and Dose Compliance Concentration (DCC) internet based calculators for risk and dose assessment at Superfund sites are being revised to reflect better science, revisions to existing exposure scenarios and new scenarios, and changes to match up more closely with the EPA chemical regional screening level calculator. A revised version of the 1999 guidance document that provides an overview for the Superfund risk assessment process at radioactively contaminated sites, 'Radiation Risk Assessment At CERCLA Sites: Q and A', is being completed that will reflect Superfund recommended guidance and other technical documents issued over the past 13 years. EPA is also issuing a series of fact sheets in the document 'Superfund Radiation Risk Assessment: A Community Tool-kit'. This presentation would go over those changes that are expected to be finished by this spring. (authors)

  7. Partnering at Superfund sites -- a win-win situation

    SciTech Connect

    Neumann, M.G.; Ohlinger, B.

    1994-12-31

    Combining today`s litigious society with shrinking profit margins for Superfund contractors results in adversarial relationships among all parties involved in Superfund site remediation, such as regulatory agencies, designers, contractors, suppliers and owners. These negative relationships have a detrimental effect on the project at hand. Partnering is an available solution to the problem and creates a win-win situation for everyone. This presentation defines partnering, describes the process and gives real-world examples from two Superfund Sites, citing successes and giving tips on how to make partnering work for you. Partnering is working at the Bofors-Nobel Superfund Site in Muskegon, Michigan. Located six miles east of downtown Muskegon, the 85-acre Bofors site includes an active chemical production facility, an unused landfill, and abandoned sludge lagoons. Used for chemical manufacturing since the early 1960s, soil and groundwater at Bofors-Nobel are contaminated with pesticides, dye intermediates, aromatic hydrocarbons, and chlorinated organic compounds. Within 13 miles of the Bofors site is the Ott/Story/Cordova Superfund site. The 1.35 mgd groundwater treatment facility under construction there will surpass the capacity of the Bofors plant by nearly a quarter-million gallons per day. The 20-acre Ott/Story/Cordova site sits on more than 1 billion gallons of groundwater contaminated with chlorides, phenols, volatile organic compounds, and heavy metals which have percolated through the sandy soil of wastewater lagoons.

  8. Watershed Council as Polymorph: The Changing Nature of Expertise and Expert-Public Communication in Deliberations about Superfund Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper investigates the navigation of expert and public credibility in the remediation of a New England Superfund site. In 1999, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) named Rhode Island’s Centredale Manor an official Superfund site, prompting remediation effort...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1336 - Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. 165.1336 Section... Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. (a... the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and others in the Pacific Sound Resources and...

  10. 33 CFR 165.1336 - Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. 165.1336 Section... Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. (a... the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and others in the Pacific Sound Resources and...

  11. Relationships of Academia, Professions and Agencies. Continuing Education in Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    These guidelines for relationships of academia, professions, and agencies in mental health were developed for persons responsible for conducting professional continuing education programs in mental health. Following a brief introduction and definitions of terms, content is presented in six sections covering the following areas, respectively: (1)…

  12. 77 FR 2981 - Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site; Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Constitution Road Drum Superfund Site; Atlanta, Dekalb County, GA; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement for past response costs concerning the Constitution Road...

  13. HISTORY AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF THE US EPA'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) MONITORING AND MEASUREMENT (MMT) PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript presents the history and evolution of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Monitoring and Measurement Technology (MMT) Program. This includes a discussion of how the fundamental concepts of a performanc...

  14. Defending Superfund and RCRA imminent hazard cases

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Legal defenses by the government under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (Superfund) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act include common defenses in which there is (1) no imminent or substantial endangerment, (2) inappropriate remedy, (3) action not in accord with the National Contingency Plan that governs Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) remedial actions, (4) not credible or sufficient evidence, (5) not credible scientific conclusion, or (6) government action precluding the relief. Defenses to Superfund reimbursement claims include cases (1) when defendant is not among the class of liable partners, (2) of joint and several liability and the right of contribution, (3) involving releases by an act of God, war, or third party. Defenses to abatement actions include cases in which (1) there is no irreparable harm and adequate remedy at law is available and (2) emergency provisions are not retrospective. Also relevant to EPA enforcement efforts are political pressures and the government's intentions. The author discusses basic defense strategies and implementation tactics. 67 references.

  15. 41 CFR 102-85.205 - What happens if a customer agency continues occupancy after the expiration of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... assignments. However, provisions are necessary to cover the GSA and customer relationship if an OA expires... customer agency continues occupancy after the expiration of an OA? 102-85.205 Section 102-85.205 Public..., Relocation and Forced Moves § 102-85.205 What happens if a customer agency continues occupancy after...

  16. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Anchor Chemicals Superfund Site, Town of Oyster Bay, Nassau County, NY, September 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    This Record of Decision (ROD) documents the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) selection of the remedial action for the Anchor Chemical Superfund Site (the `Site`). EPA, in consultation with the State of New York, has determined that the Achor Chemical Superfund Site does not pose a significant threat to human health or the environment and, therefore, further remediation is not appropriate. This determination is based on the findings of the Remedial Investigation and the baseline Risk Assessment. The risks posed by the Site are within EPA`s acceptable risk range and therefore do not pose a threat to human health or the environment.

  17. 78 FR 44119 - Circle Environmental #1 Superfund Site; Dawson, Terrell County, Georgia; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ...Under 122(h) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the United States Environmental Protection Agency has entered into a settlement with Walter G. Mercer, Jr. concerning the Circle Environmental 1 Superfund Site located in Dawson, Terrell County, Georgia. The settlement addresses cost incurred by the agency in conducting a fund lead......

  18. POINT-OF-ENTRY DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS FOR SUPERFUND APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection AGency (EPA) and State Superfund agencies need a technical assistance manualto assist their personnel in the selection of an effective drinking water treatment system for aindividualhouseholds in areas whre the drinking water has been adversely a...

  19. Computer-aided analysis of a Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Qualheim, B.J. )

    1990-05-01

    The groundwater investigation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was initiated in 1983 after perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) were detected in the groundwater. Since that time, more than 300 monitor wells have been completed, logged, sampled, and hydraulically tested. In 1987, the Livermore site was placed on the Environmental Protection Agency's National Priority List (Superfund). The Livermore valley is relatively flat, underlain by a complex alluvial sedimentary basin drained by two intermittent streams. The subsurface consists of unconsolidated sand, gravel, silt, and clay with multiple water-bearing zones of relatively high permeability. The hydrogeologic system is characterized as leaky, with horizontal hydraulic communication of up to 800 ft and vertical communication between aquifers of up to 50 ft. Computer-based analysis of the site stratigraphy was used to analyze and characterize the subsurface. The authors used a computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) system to create two-dimensional slices of the subsurface. The slice program takes a subsurface slice at any specified depositional gradient and at any slice thickness. A slice displays the lithology type, unit thickness, depth of slice, and chemical analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The lateral continuity of subsurface channels was mapped for each depth slice. By stacking these maps, the authors interpreted a pseudo-three-dimensional representation of probably pathways for VOC movement in the subsurface. An enhanced computer graphics system was also used to map the movement of VOCs in the subsurface.

  20. Evaluating public participation in environmental decision-making: EPA's superfund community involvement program.

    PubMed

    Charnley, Susan; Engelbert, Bruce

    2005-11-01

    This article discusses an 8-year, ongoing project that evaluates the Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund community involvement program. The project originated as a response to the Government Performance and Results Act, which requires federal agencies to articulate program goals, and evaluate and report their progress in meeting those goals. The evaluation project assesses how effective the Superfund community involvement program is in promoting public participation in decisions about how to clean up hazardous wastes at Superfund sites. We do three things in the article: (1) share our experience with evaluating an Agency public participation program, including lessons learned about methods of evaluation; (2) report evaluation results; and (3) address a number of issues pertaining to the evaluation of public participation in environmental decision-making. Our goal is to encourage more environmental managers to incorporate evaluation into their public participation programs as a tool for improving them. We found that written mail surveys were an effective and economical tool for obtaining feedback on EPA's community involvement program at Superfund sites. The evaluation focused on four criteria: citizen satisfaction with EPA information about the Superfund site, citizen understanding of environmental and human health risks associated with the site, citizen satisfaction with opportunities provided by EPA for community input, and citizen satisfaction with EPA's response to community input. While the evaluation results were mixed, in general, community members who were most informed about and involved in the cleanup process at Superfund sites generally were also the most satisfied with the community involvement process, and the job that EPA was doing cleaning up the site. We conclude that systematic evaluation provides meaningful and useful information that agencies can use to improve their public participation programs. However, there need to be

  1. Scaled-down program for expanding Superfund urged

    SciTech Connect

    Ember, L.

    1984-09-24

    In a statement to several Senators, an Office of Technology Assessment analyst says the Superfund program to clean up abandoned hazardous waste sites is likely to be a multidecade effort, encompassing at least 10,000 sites, and costing $50 billion to $100 billion. But throwing vast sums of money at the Environmental Protection Agency now would be throwing money down a black hole, says OTA senior associate Joel S. Hirschhorn. He says this is the first time OTA, the research arm of Congress, has put a price tag on the cost of cleaning up the disposal mistakes of the past. But he is quick to add that OTA's staggering estimate of total cleanup costs should in no way influence funding levels in pending bills to reauthorize Superfund. Hirschhorn says EPA is not now capable of spending efficiently more than $1 billion per year. And by so saying, he reaffirmed what EPA has been declaring all year to House and Senate committees working on legislation to reauthorize Superfund before the November elections and one year before it expires in 1985.

  2. Spatial disparity in the distribution of superfund sites in South Carolina: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background According to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Superfund is a federal government program implemented to clean up uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. Twenty-six sites in South Carolina (SC) have been included on the National Priorities List (NPL), which has serious human health and environmental implications. The purpose of this study was to assess spatial disparities in the distribution of Superfund sites in SC. Methods The 2000 US census tract and block level data were used to generate population characteristics, which included race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), education, home ownership, and home built before 1950. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) were used to map Superfund facilities and develop choropleth maps based on the aforementioned sociodemographic variables. Spatial methods, including mean and median distance analysis, buffer analysis, and spatial approximation were employed to characterize burden disparities. Regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the number of Superfund facilities and population characteristics. Results Spatial coincidence results showed that of the 29.5% of Blacks living in SC, 55.9% live in Superfund host census tracts. Among all populations in SC living below poverty (14.2%), 57.2% were located in Superfund host census tracts. Buffer analyses results (0.5mi, 1.0mi, 5.0mi, 0.5km, 1.0km, and 5.0km) showed a higher percentage of Whites compared to Blacks hosting a Superfund facility. Conversely, a slightly higher percentage of Blacks hosted (30.2%) a Superfund facility than those not hosting (28.8%) while their White counterparts had more equivalent values (66.7% and 67.8%, respectively). Regression analyses in the reduced model (Adj. R2 = 0.038) only explained a small percentage of the variance. In addition, the mean distance for percent of Blacks in the 90th percentile for Superfund facilities was 0.48mi. Conclusion Burden disparities exist in the distribution of

  3. PILOT-SCALE INCINERATION OF CONTAMINATED SOIL FROM THE PURITY OIL SALES AND MCCOLL SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An incineration test program was conducted at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the potential of incineration as an option to treat contaminated soils at the Purity Oil Sales superfund site in Fresno, California, and the McColl ...

  4. DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS UNDER THE U.S. EPA SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is engaged in an initiative called the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. his program offers a mechanism for conducting joint technology demonstration/evaluation projects between the private sector and EPA. he...

  5. 75 FR 30831 - Cooksey Brothers Landfill Fire Superfund Site; Ashland, Boyd County, KY; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ...Under Section 122(h)(1) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), the United States Environmental Protection Agency has entered into a settlement for reimbursement of past response costs concerning the Cooksey Brothers Landfill Fire Superfund Site located in Ashland, Boyd County, Kentucky for...

  6. 77 FR 16548 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ...] Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlements AGENCY... entered into four (4) settlements for past response costs concerning the Florida Petroleum Reprocessors... settlement are available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida...

  7. 40 CFR 35.4040 - How many groups can receive a TAG at one Superfund site?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How many groups can receive a TAG at one Superfund site? 35.4040 Section 35.4040 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Technical Assistance Who Is Eligible? § 35.4040 How many groups can...

  8. R9 SUPERFUND/RCRA BIOLOGICAL TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE (WORK) GROUP (BTAG)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work group is an ad hoc body of regulatory and trustee biologists from State and Federal agencies in Region 9 who work on hazardous waste sites. It is chaired by the Superfund BTAG coordinator. The BTAG meets bimonthly to exchange and discuss technical information on ecolo...

  9. POST-REMEDIAL USE OF SUPERFUND SITES: SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the report is to study the social and economic issues involved in cleaning up Superfund sites. EPA usually avoids making land use an explicit consideration when the Agency chooses a cleanup strategy. Yet post-remediation land use assumptions are part of the risk as...

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Western Pacific Railroad Company, Oroville, CA, September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This Record of Decision (ROD) presents the selected final remedial action at the Western Pacific Railroad Superfund Site (the Site) in Oroville, California. The remedy the Environmental Protection Agency has selected for soil includes excavation of approximately 2,000 tons of soil in the area with the highest levels of contamination.

  11. Superfund Public Information System (SPIS), June 1998 (on CD-ROM). Data file

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Superfund Public Information System (SPIS) on CD-ROM contains Superfund data for the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The Superfund data is a collection of four databases, CERCLIS, Archive (NFRAP), RODS, and NPL Sites. Descriptions of these databases and CD contents are listed below. The FolioViews browse and retrieval engine is used as a graphical interface to the data. Users can access simple queries and can do complex searching on key words or fields. In addition, context sensitive help, a Superfund process overview, and an integrated data dictionary are available. RODS is the Records Of Decision System. RODS is used to track site clean-ups under the Superfund program to justify the type of treatment chosen at each site. RODS contains information on technology justification, site history, community participation, enforcement activities, site characteristics, scope and role of response action, and remedy. Explanation of Significant Differences (ESDs) are also available on the CD. CERCLIS is the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Information System. It is the official repository for all Superfund site and incident data. It contains comprehensive information on hazardous waste sites, site inspections, preliminary assessments, and remedial status. The system is sponsored by the EPA`s Office of Emergency and Remedial Response, Information Management Center. Archive (NFRAP) consists of hazardous waste sites that have no further remedial action planned; only basic identifying information is provided for archive sites. The sites found in the Archive database were originally in the CERCLIS database, but were removed beginning in the fall of 1995. NPL sites (available online) are fact sheets that describe the location and history of Superfund sites. Included are descriptions of the most recent activities and past actions at the sites that have contributed to the contamination. Population estimates, land usages, and nearby

  12. 20 CFR 411.375 - Does a State VR agency continue to provide services under the requirements of the State plan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Does a State VR agency continue to provide... Rehabilitation Agencies' Participation Participation in the Ticket to Work Program § 411.375 Does a State VR.... The State VR agency must continue to provide services under the requirements of the State...

  13. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This techn...

  14. Point-of-entry drinking-water treatment systems for Superfund applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, C.D.; Janszen, T.A.

    1989-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and State Superfund agencies need a technical manual to assist their personnel in the selection of an effective drinking-water treatment system for individual households in areas where the drinking water has been adversely affected by Superfund site contaminants and no other alternative water supply is available or feasible. Commercially available water treatment systems for individual households are of two basic types: point-of-use (POU) and point-of-entry (POE). A POU device consists of equipment applied to selected water taps to reduce contaminants at each tap. A POE device consists of equipment to reduce the contaminants in the water distributed throughout the entire structure of a house. The study was initiated to collect monitoring, operation and maintenance, performance, and design data on existing Superfund POE water-treatment systems. Evaluation of the collected data showed that the existing data are not sufficient for the preparation of a technical assistance document to meet the objectives of EPA and State Superfund personnel.

  15. Bolivian Teachers' Agency: Soldiers of Liberation or Guards of Coloniality and Continuation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopes Cardozo, Mieke T. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the problems and promises of teachers' agency associated with Bolivia's current "decolonising" education reform. The Avelino Siñani Elizardo Pérez (ASEP) education reform is part of a counter-hegemonic and anti-neoliberal policy that aims to advance the political project of the government of Evo Morales,…

  16. 40 CFR 300.505 - EPA/State Superfund Memorandum of Agreement (SMOA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) of CERCLA shall be developed in accordance with 40 CFR part 35, subpart O. The SMOA shall not... (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS NATIONAL OIL AND HAZARDOUS... relationship for removal, pre-remedial, remedial, and enforcement response, including a description of...

  17. Superfund cost recovery through national contingency plan compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Mundell, J.A.; Wightman, A.

    1994-12-31

    The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (``NCP``), codified at 40 C.F.R. pt. 300, was first promulgated by the US EPA on July 16, 1982 (the ``1982 NCP``). Required by section 105 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, or CERCLA, and by section 311 of the Clean Water Act (CWA), the NCP ``establish[es] procedures and standards for responding to releases of hazardous substances`` at Superfund sites. The purpose of the NCP ``is to give some consistency and cohesiveness to response planning and actions``. The primary goal of the NCP is to mitigate damage to the environment and protect the public health at the least possible expense. Within this framework, the NCP allows for the evaluation and clean-up activities at a Superfund site to be led directly by the US EPA, the designated state regulatory agency or, under monitoring, by private parties who are potentially responsible for the site contamination. This paper addresses NCP consistency review from both a technical and legal standpoint. The authors will first address the regulatory standards and process for evaluating private party NCP compliance, and then review common legal attacks on NCP compliance that bar the recovery of clean-up costs.

  18. 76 FR 25331 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... throughout the Superfund process. Title: National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP... of 1980 as amended (CERCLA) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Oil...

  19. Superfund Reform Legislation - implications for California

    SciTech Connect

    Trumbull, T.A.

    1995-09-01

    This is a tale of two Congresses. Until October, it seemed certain that the 103d Congress would pass relatively minor amendments to the nations`s laws to clean up contaminated properties, commonly referred to by the public as Superfund. There seemed to be widespread agreement on the changes, and a delay due to politics just before the November 1994 elections did not seem to interfere with approval of the amendments in early 1995. However, the Republican Contract with America changed the timing of the adoption of Superfund Amendments, and more significantly, a Republican Congress means a complete evaluation of the basic Superfund Program. As a result, many potential responsible parties (PRPs) are questioning their need to even pay to clean up properties contaminated by their operation. At a minimum, the 104th Congress has created an uncertainty that discourages cleanup of properties during 1995.

  20. 75 FR 34117 - Proposed CERCLA Section 122(h) Cost Recovery Settlement for the H.M. Quackenbush, Inc. Superfund...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Section 122(h) Cost Recovery Settlement for the H.M. Quackenbush, Inc. Superfund... recovery settlement agreement pursuant to Section 122(h) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9622(h), regarding the H.M... requires Frederick H. Hagar (``Settling Party''), CEO, Chairman and majority shareholder of...

  1. 76 FR 20287 - Superfund Site, New Bedford Harbor, New Bedford, MA: Anchorage Ground and Regulated Navigation Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ...The Coast Guard proposes to amend an existing anchorage ground which currently overlaps a pilot underwater cap (``pilot cap'') in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site in New Bedford, MA. The Coast Guard also proposes to establish a regulated navigation area (RNA) prohibiting activities that disturb the seabed around the site. The proposed RNA would......

  2. Superfund issues facing municipalities. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Superfund, Ocean, and Water Protection of the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 29, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Members of Congress, representatives from the Environmental Protection Agency, as well as city officials were among those testifying at a hearing on unfair private party lawsuits against cities and towns. These lawsuits seriously threaten to undermine the Superfund program. This bill focuses on blocking opportunistic and costly lawsuits by large corporate polluters against innocent cities and towns. The problem is caused by cities and towns hauling their garbage to landfills, where industry brings millions of gallons of liquid hazardous waste. These old landfills have now become Superfund sites because industrial hazardous wastes were deliberately disposed with the garbage.

  3. 41 CFR 102-85.200 - Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA? 102-85.200 Section 102-85.200 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Continued Occupancy, Relocation and Forced Moves § 102-85.200 Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must...

  4. 41 CFR 102-85.200 - Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA? 102-85.200 Section 102-85.200 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Continued Occupancy, Relocation and Forced Moves § 102-85.200 Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must...

  5. 41 CFR 102-85.200 - Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA? 102-85.200 Section 102-85.200 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 85-PRICING POLICY FOR OCCUPANCY IN GSA SPACE Continued Occupancy, Relocation and Forced Moves § 102-85.200 Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must...

  6. U.S. EPA Superfund Program's Policy for Risk and Dose Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Stuart

    2008-01-15

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) has primary responsibility for implementing the long-term (non-emergency) portion of a key U.S. law regulating cleanup: the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, CERCLA, nicknamed 'Superfund'. The purpose of the Superfund program is to protect human health and the environment over the long term from releases or potential releases of hazardous substances from abandoned or uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. The focus of this paper is on risk and dose assessment policies and tools for addressing radioactively contaminated sites by the Superfund program. EPA has almost completed two risk assessment tools that are particularly relevant to decommissioning activities conducted under CERCLA authority. These are the: 1. Building Preliminary Remediation Goals for Radionuclides (BPRG) electronic calculator, and 2. Radionuclide Outdoor Surfaces Preliminary Remediation Goals (SPRG) electronic calculator. EPA developed the BPRG calculator to help standardize the evaluation and cleanup of radiologically contaminated buildings at which risk is being assessed for occupancy. BPRGs are radionuclide concentrations in dust, air and building materials that correspond to a specified level of human cancer risk. The intent of SPRG calculator is to address hard outside surfaces such as building slabs, outside building walls, sidewalks and roads. SPRGs are radionuclide concentrations in dust and hard outside surface materials. EPA is also developing the 'Radionuclide Ecological Benchmark' calculator. This calculator provides biota concentration guides (BCGs), also known as ecological screening benchmarks, for use in ecological risk assessments at CERCLA sites. This calculator is intended to develop ecological benchmarks as part of the EPA guidance 'Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for Designing and Conducting Ecological Risk

  7. Two Superfund environmental justice case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, J.S.

    1997-12-31

    One of the environmental contributions of the Clinton Administration was Executive Order No. 12898 on Environmental Justice issued in 1994. Environmental justice has received considerable attention in EPA`s Superfund program. Many Superfund sites are located in or close by residential areas composed populated by ethnic minorities and people of the lowest economic status. Over the years, minority communities have often asserted that they have been treated more unfairly than predominantly white, middle class communities, with respect to the quality of environmental cleanups and the relocation of residents. The environmental justice claim is also that these communities have been intentionally placed in harm`s way because of historical racial prejudice and injustice, meaning that either polluting industrial facilities were intentionally placed in minority neighborhoods or that residential areas for minority workers were built close to industrial facilities. This paper presents discussions of two Superfund sites where environmental justice issues have been very important, and it analyzes how specific parts of the Executive Order have been complied with in EPA`s Superfund program.

  8. THERMAL ENCAPSULATION OF METALS IN SUPERFUND SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Superfund sites frequently contain both heavy metals and organic hazardous waste. If not properly controlled, the metals may be changed to a more leachable form and may also be emitted to the atmosphere via the exhaust stack. This paper documents a batch kiln R&D test program to ...

  9. SUPERFUND: FOCUSING ON THE NATION AT LARGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1986 Congress enacted sweeping amendments to the nation's law to cleanup abandoned hazardous waste sites. Two years later Administrator Reilly set a course for the Superfund program designed to improve the program's performance and to increase the role of the private sector in...

  10. CONTROL OF AIR EMISSIONS FROM SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook is an easy-to-use tool for decision makers to evaluate emission control devices for use with Superfund remediation actions. t will assist in the selection of cost-effective control options. t is intended for use by engineers and scientists involved in preparing reme...

  11. THERMAL ENCAPSULATION OF METALS IN SUPERFUND SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Superfund sites frequently contain both heavy metals and organic hazardous waste. f not properly controlled, the metals may be changed to a more leachable form and may also be emitted to the atmosphere via the exhaust stack. his paper documents a batch kiln R& D test program to s...

  12. ASYMMETRIC LOSS FUNCTION FOR SUPERFUND REMEDIATION DECISIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    At a Superfund remediation site the decision is a classification problem, discriminating between polluted blocks to be remediated and background blocks to be left untreated. he concentration of the pollutant in a block is estimated from sampling. he more samples taken the better ...

  13. Site action, environmental justice and an urban community: A unique approach at a Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Seppi, P.K.; Richman, L.R.; Wireman, J.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) project at the Diamond Alkali Superfund Site is an example of how technical, environmental justice, and community relations issues all affect actions at a Superfund Site. The Diamond Alkali Superfund Site is divided into two operable units. The site consists of the former pesticides manufacturing facility at 80 and 120 Lister Avenue in Newark, New Jersey, and the adjoining six mile reach of the Passaic River known as the ``Passaic River Study Area``. EPA has negotiated Consent Orders with the Potentially Responsible Party (PRP) to design and construct the selected containment remedy at the land-based properties, and to conduct the Remedial Investigation (RI) of the river under EPA oversight. Pesticides, dioxin, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), metals and other hazardous substances have been found at the Site. Evidence indicates that the ecology of the Passaic River has been adversely impacted by the presence of these hazardous substances. The State of New Jersey issued a ban on the consumption of fish and crabs from affected sections of the Passaic River; yet reportedly, many residents still consume seafood from the river. Community relations at the Site had deteriorated because of the community`s lack of trust and loss of confidence in EPA. To address these issues, EPA has implemented an innovative public outreach program to improve how it communicates with racial minority and low-income communities living in the vicinity of the Site, and to involve them in the decision-making process.

  14. Recovering value from the Avtex Fibers Superfund site: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Blasko, M.J.; DeTemple, M.I.

    1994-12-31

    The Avtex Superfund site is located in Front Royal, Virginia. Some recent activities at Avtex have followed an innovative path. This innovative path provides some hope that government regulators and entrepreneurs can coexist in mutually beneficial relationships at potentially valuable Superfund sites. Manufacturing operations at the Avtex site began in 1940. The site produced viscose rayon from wood pulp. Contaminants at the site include sodium hydroxide, carbon disulfide, viscose, sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, and zinc sulfate. Other contaminants identified at the site include asbestos, PCBs, and hydrogen sulfide. Recognizing the health and safety hazards at the site, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) developed and issued a Consent Order that governs asset removal activities at the site. The Consent Order requires individuals planning to remove assets to develop a Work Plan for asset removal, as well as cleanup.

  15. 41 CFR 102-85.200 - Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA? 102-85.200 Section 102-85.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY...

  16. 41 CFR 102-85.200 - Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Can customer agencies continue occupancy of space or must they relocate at the end of an OA? 102-85.200 Section 102-85.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY...

  17. Superfund and contamination of workers' homes.

    PubMed

    Zirschky, J; Gentry, B; Marcus, P

    1987-11-01

    Although originally conceived as a means to clean up abandoned hazardous waste sites, at least one state is now attempting to use the Superfund (CERCLA) legislation as a means to recover the costs of a home contamination incident. This case has not been litigated yet. If the state is successful, however, the Superfund program would be expanded not only to cover waste disposal practices but also industrial hygiene practices. Industries thus need to review the nature and disposition of their waste material and their industrial hygiene practices in order to assess their full potential exposure under Superfund. The small amounts of chemicals that may leave a factory on workers' clothing and shoes someday could develop into a costly home decontamination project. If a review of past and present industrial hygiene practices reveals that home contamination could have occurred, an industry should take an offensive (as opposed to defensive) role in correcting the problem. Not only can taking the initiative in remedying a problem help minimize damage to employee health, morale and public opinion, but clean-up costs can be reduced as well without sacrificing the quality of the remedial action. PMID:3425546

  18. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): Limestone Road Superfund Site, operable unit 2, Cumberland, MD, June 28, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This Record of Decision (`ROD`) presents the final remedial action selected for Operable Unit 2 (`OU2`) of the Limestone Road Superfund Site (`Site`), located in Cumberland, Allegany County, Maryland. The selected remedy for the Site consists of the installation of a waterline and ancillary equipment (a pumping station and fire hydrants) to service residents in the vicinity of the Site. Implementation of deed restrictions on the previously capped areas of the Site to prevent use of such areas in such a manner as would cause disturbance of the caps; Implementation of a ground water management program to prevent installation of drinking water wells in the vicinity of the Site; Continuation of the long term ground water, surface water, and sediment monitoring plans currently being implemented pursuant to OU1; and Abandonment of existing residential water supply well.

  19. On the brink of reform: Four bills vie for the Superfund reauthorization title

    SciTech Connect

    Zodrow, J.J.

    1995-12-01

    After months of hearings in the House of Representatives and the Senate, Congress is poised to reform the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980. Without CERCLA reauthorization, no federal tax dollars will be allocated to the Superfund for remediating contaminated industrial sites. Authorization to pay into the Superfund expired officially in 1994, and only $2.8 billion remains in the trust fund, enough to run the program through next September at its current annual budget of $1.4 billion. Critics state that Congress acted ambitiously in enacting CERCLA 15 years ago in response to a general belief that only dozens of contaminated sites existed and could be addressed within a few years. However, the Environmental Protection Agency since 1980 has named 1,300 sites to the National Priorities List. Many contend that the Superfund program was not designed to be a clearinghouse for a multitude of site cleanups. CERCLA`s complicated procedural requirements and taxing transactional costs, some say, were intended to apply to a few, highly toxic sites.

  20. RESEARCH STUDIES AT THE GILT EDGE MINE SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A collaborative effort is being implemented at the Gilt Edge Mine Superfund site near Lead, SD. The partnerships involves the Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) with the USEPA's NRMRL, Region VIII Superfund program, the DOE, MSE Technology Application, Inc (MSE) and CDM Federal...

  1. National superfund program priorities, fiscal year 1994. Directive

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-31

    The memorandum provides the FY 1994 National Superfund Program Priorities for Regions and Headquarters. There are nine major Superfund priorities: Accelerated Cleanup and Emergency Response; Enforcement First; Enforcement Fairness; Military Base Closure; NPL Construction Completions; Contracts Management; Environmental Justice and Meaningful Community Involvement; Enhancement of State Role and Development of Deferral Options; and Innovative Technologies.

  2. Superfund explanation of significant difference for the record of decision (EPA Region 4): Wrigley Charcoal Plant, Wrigley, TN, October 20, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is issuing this Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) for the Wrigley Charcoal Superfund site (``the Site``) in Wrigley, Hickman County, Tenn. The purpose of this fact sheet is to modify the Interim Action Record of Decision (IAROD) issued on September 30, 1991, and to inform the public of current site conditions and future actions.

  3. Ethanol-Fed Or Solid-Phase Organic Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors For The National Tunnel Drainage, Clear Creek/Central City Superfund Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is planning to treat mining influenced water (MIW) from the National Tunnel Adit that discharges to North Clear Creek near the City of Blackhawk, Colorado. North Clear Creek is part of the Clear Creek/Central City Superfund Site, an...

  4. Ethanol-Fed Or Solid-Phase Organic Sulfate Reducing Bioreactors For The National Tunnel Drainage, Clear Creek/Central City Superfund Site (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is planning to treat mining influenced water (MIW) from the National Tunnel Adit that discharges to North Clear Creek near the City of Blackhawk, Colorado. North Clear Creek is part of the Clear Creek/Central City Superfund Site, an...

  5. Research Implementation and Quality Assurance Project Plan: An Evaluation of Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Technologies for the Detection of Fugitive Contamination at Selected Superfund Hazardous Waste Sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Fisher, Gary B.

    2009-01-01

    This project is a research collaboration between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Inspector General (OIG) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC), for the purpose of evaluating the utility of hyperspectral remote sensing technology for post-closure monitoring of residual contamination at delisted and closed hazardous waste sites as defined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act [CERCLA (also known as 'Superfund')] of 1980 and the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986.

  6. Superfund awakes in state supreme courts

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, D.

    1998-01-01

    Superfund, often referred to as a sleeping giant, is waking up in state courts with rulings the insurance industry is on the hook for a large share of the nation`s environmental cleanup. While Congress has been quagmired in legislative reauthorization attempts, 40% of the state supreme courts (20 states) have passed laws favoring policyholders of comprehensive general liability insurance (CGL) to be compensated for their cleanup and litigation costs. These rulings vary in terms from state to state, but their collective action is giving the insurance industry grave concerns because of the increase in settlements with CGL policyholders.

  7. Superfund at work: Hazardous waste cleanup efforts nationwide, Spring 1993 (Powersville site profile, Peach County, Georgia)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) encountered much more than a municipal landfill at the Powersville site in Peach County, Georgia. Contamination from improperly dumped hazardous wastes and pesticides tainted an old quarry used for household garbage. Chemicals migrating into area ground water threatened local drinking water supplies. To address these issues, EPA's Superfund program designed a cleanup strategy that included: negotiating with the county and chemical companies to contain the hazardous wastes on site underneath a protective cover; investigating reports of drinking water contamination and extending municipal water lines to affected residents; and conducting a tailored community relations program to inform and educate residents about the site.

  8. Borehole Geophysical Data From Eastland Woolen Mill Superfund Site, Corinna, Maine, March 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansen, Bruce P.; Nichols, William J.; Dudley, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    Borehole-geophysical data were collected in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in seven bedrock wells at the Eastland Woolen Mill Superfund site, Penobscot County, Corinna, Maine, in March, 1999. The data were collected as part of a reconnaissance investigation to provide information needed to address concerns about the distribution and fate of contaminants in ground-water at the site. The borehole geophysical data were also needed to guide subsequent data collection associated with the development of a remediation workplan. The borehole geophysical logs collected included: natural gamma, caliper, fluid temperature, fluid conductivity, electromagnetic conductivity, electromagnetic resistivity, spontaneous potential, and single-point resistivity.

  9. Mining-related sediment and soil contamination in a large Superfund site: Characterization, habitat implications, and remediation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juracek, Kyle E.; Drake, K. D.

    2016-01-01

    Historical mining activity (1850–1970) in the now inactive Tri-State Mining District provided an ongoing source of lead and zinc to the environment including the US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site located in Cherokee County, southeast Kansas, USA. The resultant contamination adversely affected biota and caused human health problems and risks. Remediation in the Superfund site requires an understanding of the magnitude and extent of contamination. To provide some of the required information, a series of sediment and soil investigations were conducted in and near the Superfund site to characterize lead and zinc contamination in the aquatic and floodplain environments along the main-stem Spring River and its major tributaries. In the Superfund site, the most pronounced lead and zinc contamination, with concentrations that far exceed sediment quality guidelines associated with potential adverse biological effects, was measured for streambed sediments and floodplain soils located within or downstream from the most intensive mining-affected areas. Tributary streambeds and floodplains in affected areas are heavily contaminated with some sites having lead and zinc concentrations that are an order of magnitude (or more) greater than the sediment quality guidelines. For the main-stem Spring River, the streambed is contaminated but the floodplain is mostly uncontaminated. Measured lead and zinc concentrations in streambed sediments, lakebed sediments, and floodplain soils documented a persistence of the post-mining contamination on a decadal timescale. These results provide a basis for the prioritization, development, and implementation of plans to remediate contamination in the affected aquatic and floodplain environments within the Superfund site.

  10. Overview of proposed revisions to the superfund hazard ranking system.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, S; Ortiz, A

    1989-06-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 required the federal government to establish criteria for setting priorities among releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, and contaminants. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency responded by developing the Hazard Ranking System (HRS), which is a scoring system used to establish the National Priorities List (NPL). The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 required EPA to amend the HRS so it will more accurately assess relative risks and take into account certain specific elements of risk. On December 23, 1988, EPA published in the Federal Register the proposed rule to revise the HRS. EPA expects to issue the final rule in 1990 after reviewing public comments. This paper describes the proposed revisions and summarizes major technical findings that support the revisions. As a result of the HRS revisions, there may be some changes in the types of sites that score high enough to be placed on the NPL. A projection of those changes is discussed. PMID:2754440

  11. The toxicologic hazard of superfund hazardous-waste sites.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B L; DeRosa, C

    1997-01-01

    Uncontrolled hazardous-waste sites are a major environmental and public health concern in the United States and elsewhere. The remediation of and public health responses to these sites is mandated by the federal Superfund statute. Approximately 40,000 uncontrolled waste sites have been reported to U.S. federal agencies. About 1,300 of these sites constitute the current National Priorities List (NPL) of sites for remediation. Findings from a national database on NPL sites show approximately 40% present completed exposure pathways, although this figure rose to 80% in 1996. Data from 1992 through 1996 indicate that 46% of sites are a hazard to public health. Thirty substances are found at 6% or more of sites with completed pathways. Eighteen of the substances are known human carcinogens or reasonably anticipated to be carcinogenic. Many of the 30 substances also possess systemic toxicity. The high percentage of sites with completed exposure pathways and the toxicity potential of substances in these pathways show that uncontrolled hazardous-waste sites are a major environmental threat to human health. Findings from the United States' experience in responding to uncontrolled waste sites are relevant to other countries as they address similar environmental and public health concerns. PMID:9553998

  12. Integrated technologies to evaluate the impact of air emissions at a petroleum recovery Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Zarus, G.M.; Wagaman, S.A.; Trespalacios, M.J.; Turpin, R.D.; Forrester, T.; Wilder, L.; Meyer, J.; Hansen, M.

    1995-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Response Team (US EPA/ERT) was requested by US EPA Region 6 to verify or refute the presence of volatile organic air emissions at a petroleum recovery Superfund (PRS) site. Several environmental protection and public health organizations were involved with evaluating the air emissions at this PRS site, including: Region 6 of the US EPA, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and the US EPA/ERT. Each group brought a unique expertise which helped in identifying sources, determining their emission rates, evaluating their impact, and monitoring during remedial activities. This report describes the technologies used at the PRS site and some of the results obtained. The compounds of concern included: benzene, bis(2-chloroethyl)ether, 1,2-dichloroethene, methylene chloride, styrene, toluene, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and vinyl chloride.

  13. EVALUATION OF UNSATURATED/VADOSE ZONE MODELS FOR SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical models of water and chemical movement in soils are being used as decision aids for defining groundwater protection practices for Superfund sites. Numerous transport models exist for predicting movementand degradation of hazardous chemicals through soils. Many of thes...

  14. HANDBOOK: RECYCLING AND REUSE OF MATERIAL FOUND ON SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides assistance in identifying potential recycling technologies for a wide variety of contaminants and matrices. Personnel at Superfund and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Corrective Action sites face the challenge of selecting remedial options for...

  15. Environmental policy and equity: The case of Superfund

    SciTech Connect

    Hird, J.A. )

    1993-01-01

    This article analyzes the equity implications of the EPA's Superfund program by examining the geographic distribution of sites, who pays for cleanup, and cleanup pace. Although the [open quotes]polluter pays[close quotes] principle is used to justify Superfund policy, it is a goal that is not and indeed usually cannot be attained for past contamination. Further, the geographic distribution of Superfund sites suggests that the likely beneficiaries of program expenditures live in counties that are on average both wealthier and more highly educated than the rest, and also have lower rates of poverty. The pace of the EPA's cleanups, however, depends mostly on the sites potential hazard, and is not apparently motivated by the localities socioeconomic characteristics or political representation. The program is found in several respects to be both inefficient and inequitable, yet Superfund enjoys considerable support for reasons beyond these traditional public policy goals, including its political and symbolic appeal. 36 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. PERSONNEL PROTECTION THROUGH RECONNAISSANCE ROBOTICS AT SUPERFUND REMEDIAL SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation, mitigation, and clean-up of hazardous materials at Superfund sites normally require on-site workers to perform hazardous and sometimes potentially dangerous functions. uch functions include site surveys and the reconnaissance for airborne and buried toxic environme...

  17. CONTAMINATION OF PUBLIC GROUND WATER SUPPLIES BY SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multiple sources of contamination can affect ground water supplies, including municipal landfills, industrial operations, leaking underground storage tanks, septic tank systems, and prioritized uncontrolled hazardous waste sites known as “Superfund” sites. A review of Superfund R...

  18. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM - TECHNOLOGY PROFILES 4th Edition

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new and promising treatment technologies for cleanup of hazardous waste sites. The program was created to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment technologies. As a result, the SI...

  19. HANDBOOK: RECYCLING AND REUSE OF MATERIAL FOUND ON SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides assistance in identifying potential recycling technologies for a wide variety of contaminants and matrices. Personnel at Superfund and Resource Conservation and RecoveryAct (RCRA) Corrective Action sites face the challenge of selecting remedial options for...

  20. The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program SUMMARY AND CLOSURE REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program promoted the development, commercialization, and implementation of innovative hazardous waste treatment technologies for 20 years. SITE offered a mechanism for conducting joint technology demonstration and evaluation ...

  1. The SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION program - Technology Profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program was created to evaluate new and promising treatment technologies for cleanup at hazardous waste sites. The mission of the SITE program is to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment technologie...

  2. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM TECHNOLOGY PROFILES: SIXTH EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new and promising treatment and monitoring and measurement technologies for cleanup of hazardous waste sites. The program was created to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment techn...

  3. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM - TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - SEVENTH EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new and promising treatment and monitoring and measurement technologies for cleanup of hazardous waste sites. The program was created to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment techn...

  4. Superfund fact sheet: The removal program. Fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The fact sheet describes the Superfund Emergency Response Program, a program specifically designed to respond to multi-media hazardous materials accidents (e.g. illegal disposal or improper handling of materials, transportation accidents, chemical fires) that endanger people and/or the environment. Explanations of how the removal program works and how the affected communities are involved are given. The fact sheet is one in a series providing reference information about Superfund issues and is intended for readers with no scientific training.

  5. Superfund record of decision amendment (EPA Region 9): J. H. Baxter and Company, Weed, CA, March 27, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    This decision document presents the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) revised selected remedial actions for certain contaminated soils and groundwater at the J.H. Baxter Superfund Site in Weed, California. EPA concluded that it is not possible to achieve the 1990 ROD (PB91-921489) cleanup standards for groundwater within the DNAPL zone. The remedy consists of the 1990 ROD components plus enhancements, modifications, and additional containment measures as described in this amendment. Actions have also been selected to modify other aspects of the soils remedy previously selected for the site in the 1990 ROD.

  6. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 3): H and H Burn Pit Superfund Site, Hanover County, VA, June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    This Record of Decision (ROD) presents the final remedial action selected for the HH Burn Pit Superfund Site, located in Hanover County, Virginia (Site). This remedy addresses contaminated soil, sediment, surface water, and ground water at the Site. The Site has been identified using different names in many of the documents in the Administrative Record and on the National Priorities List. This Record of Decision will refer to the Site as the `HH Burn Pit Superfund Site.`

  7. Year 6 Post-Remediation Biomonitoring and Phase II Source Investigation at the United Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Evans, Nathan R.

    2004-04-02

    The Heckathorn Superfund Site in Richmond, California, encompasses the property of the former United Heckathorn pesticide packaging plant and the adjacent waterway, Lauritzen Channel. The site was used from 1945 to 1966 by several operators to produce various agricultural chemicals. The site was placed on the National Priorities List of Superfund sites in 1990, which resulted in the removal of pesticide-contaminated soil from the upland portion of the site and dredging the marine portion of the site. Post-remediation marine monitoring and associated studies conducted through 2002 indicate that the contamination in the channel continues to pose a significant risk to biota and human health. This report documents continued marine monitoring and source investigation studies conducted in 2003.

  8. Capacity building in Developing Countries: a challenge ahead for the European Space Agency to continue its successful experience to date

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fea, M.

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has built a long tradition and a large experience in the domain of education, training and capacity building throughout its space programmes. As an example, the ESA Science Programme dedicates 1% of its budget to these activities. One of the key reasons for it is the need of closing the loop along the chain from the provider to the user, that is to say between the space and the users elements. In fact, besides the obvious need for technology development, there is actually not very much justification in the long term for a space programme if the user communities are not able to make good use of programme outputs and provide feedback and proper requirements to space agencies. The case of ESA Earth Observation programmes is described to illustrate these considerations, as a way to also implement the European Space Policy and UNISPACE III recommendations. Since its foundation in 1975 and the implementation of its EO programme with the launch of Meteosat-1 in 1977 and the birth of the Earthnet Programme Office in 1978, the European Space Agency is very active in the field of capacity building in developing countries. That is performed through both ESA's specific projects and international co-operation activities. In the latter domain, ESA enjoys a long-standing collaboration with many entities, such as the Committee of Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS), and organisations, such as WMO, UN and its specialised agencies (FAO, UNESCO, UNEP, and so on). In that respect, the Agency is an active member of the CEOS Working Group on Education (WGEdu) and of the World Summit for Sustainable Development Follow-Up (WSSD) Module 1 group dedicated to education, training and capacity building. The overall ESA strategy targets various citizen communities and takes into account the fact that today's young generations will become tomorrow's professionals and decision makers. ESA's activities in this domain are in particular based on an end-to-end concept

  9. 48 CFR 1426.7103 - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Minority Contractors Utilization Report). 1426.7103 Section 1426.7103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Minority Contractors...

  10. 48 CFR 1426.7103 - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Minority Contractors Utilization Report). 1426.7103 Section 1426.7103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Minority Contractors...

  11. 48 CFR 1426.7103 - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Minority Contractors Utilization Report). 1426.7103 Section 1426.7103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Minority Contractors...

  12. 48 CFR 1426.7103 - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Minority Contractors Utilization Report). 1426.7103 Section 1426.7103 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Minority Contractors...

  13. 48 CFR 1426.7103 - The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Minority Contractors Utilization... Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) (Superfund Minority Contractors...

  14. 76 FR 38389 - Caraleigh Phosphate and Fertlizer Works Superfund Site; Raleigh, Wake County, NC; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... response costs concerning the Caraleigh Phosphate and Fertilizer Works Superfund Site located in Raleigh...-0534 or Site name Caraleigh Phosphate and Fertilizer Works Superfund Site by one of the...

  15. 41 CFR 102-85.205 - What happens if a customer agency continues occupancy after the expiration of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... assignments. However, provisions are necessary to cover the GSA and customer relationship if an OA expires... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What happens if a... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued)...

  16. 41 CFR 102-85.205 - What happens if a customer agency continues occupancy after the expiration of an OA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... assignments. However, provisions are necessary to cover the GSA and customer relationship if an OA expires... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What happens if a... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued)...

  17. GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE (GAO) SURVEY FOR POSSIBLE LISTING ON SUPERFUND NPL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is an Arcinfo point coverage of Superfund sites developed by the Region 9 GIS Center for the Superfund Division's Site Assessment section. The points in this coverage represent sites monitored under EPA Superfund program offices. The geographic extent of this coverage ...

  18. 1993 UPDATE OF THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Emerging Technology Program (ETP), part of the U.S. EPA's Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, is continuing to create an environment where technical innovation can accelerate into field and commercial applications for treatment of hazardous waste sites....

  19. BioTrol completes SITE (Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation) program demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored the demonstration of two new innovative hazardous waste treatment technologies developed by BioTrol, Inc., Chaska, Minnesota. One of the technologies treated contaminated soils and the other technology treated contaminated groundwater, surface water and waste water. According to the company, this is the first time in the history of the SITE program that soil washing and bioremediation were demonstrated in the field. These demonstrations were conducted at a Superfund site in New Brighton, Minnesota, under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The BioTrol Aqueous Treatment System (BATS) is based on a fixed-film bioreactor that uses naturally occurring bacteria to degrade organic chemicals. The BioTrol Soils Treatment System (BSTS) uses water as the washing medium to scrub contaminants from contaminated soil, thereby isolating the contaminants for subsequent detoxification. The contaminated wash water is recovered for recycle to the washing step using BATS technology. The soil washing process is based on mineral processing technology similar to that used in the mining industry in northern Minnesota.

  20. Limited-use chemical protective clothing for EPA Superfund activities. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Sawicki, J.C.; Mond, C.; Schwope, A.D.; Watkins, S.

    1992-02-01

    Because contractor field personnel complained about the poor durability and fit of limited-use chemical protective clothing (CPC) most commonly used at hazardous waste site operations, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a study to: characterize use of CPC; determine problems, and communicate results in publications and procurement guidelines. Personnel at two Superfund hazardous waste sites were surveyed about CPC problems. Poor fit of coveralls and lack of fabric durability resulted in garment failures, especially in the seat, crotch, and underarms. Some fabrics were identified that provided improved performance. The commercial market was surveyed, and commercial fabrics for limited-use CPC were identified and obtained. Available standards and specifications describing size and fit parameters for limited-use CPC were identified and reviewed relative to EPA Superfund CPC needs. None of the standards were found to be fully acceptable. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard 101-1985, however, provided a satisfactory baseline for further standards development. Problems with CPC were analyzed and suggested changes to ANSI 101 were developed as a proposed procurement guideline. The information was presented to the Industrial Safety Equipment Association, which developed the ANSI standard.

  1. Alternating current electrocoagulation for superfund site remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Barkley, N.P.; Farrell, C.W.; Gardner-Clayson, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    The technical and economical feasibility of alternating current electrocoagulation (ACE) was evaluated for a 2-year period. ACE is an electrochemical technology where highly-charged aluminum polyhydroxide species are introduced into aqueous media for the removal of suspended solids, oil droplets, and soluble ionic pollutants. ACE can break stable aqueous colloidal suspensions of up to 10% total solids and stable emulsions containing up to 5% oil. Major operating parameters have been defined for different classes of effluents based on experimental results using complex synthetic soil slurries and metals. Test results indicate that ACE produces aqueous and solid separations comparable to those produced by chemical flocculent additions, but with reduced filtration times and sludge volumes. The technology has application where removal of soluble and suspended pollutants from effluents is required, and in the recovery of fine-grained products from process streams. The technology however, has not yet been demonstrated at full-scale for Superfund site remediation. Summarized are the principal results of the SITE research program and results of ACE treatment on some different classes of industrial effluents, not part of the SITE Program.

  2. Phase I Source Investigation, Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Evans, Nathan R.

    2002-12-18

    This report represents Phase I of a multi-phase approach to a source investigation of DDT at the Heckathorn Superfund Site, Richmond, California, the former site of a pesticide packaging plant, and the adjacent waterway, the Lauritzen Channel. Potential identified sources of contamination were from sloughed material from undredged areas (such as side banks) and from outfall pipes. Objectives of Phase I included the (1) evaluation of pesticide concentrations associated with discharge from outfalls, (2) identification of additional outfalls in the area, (3) identification of type, quantity, and distribution of sediment under the Levin pier, (4) quantification of pesticide concentrations in sediment under the pier, and (5) evaluation of sediment structure and slope stability under the pier. Field operations included the collection of sediment directly from inside the mouths of outfall pipes, when possible, or the deployment of specially designed particle traps where direct sampling was problematic. Passive water samplers were placed at the end of known outfall pipes and analyzed for DDT and other pesticides of concern. Underwater dive surveys were conducted beneath the Levin pier to document type, slope, and thickness of sediment. Samples were collected at locations of interest and analyzed for contaminants. Also sampled was soil from bank areas, which were suspected of potentially contributing to continued DDT contamination of the Lauritzen Channel through erosion and groundwater leaching. The Phase I Source Investigation was successful in identifying significant sources of DDT contamination to Lauritzen Channel sediment. Undredged sediment beneath the Levin pier that has been redistributed to the channel is a likely source. Two outfalls tested bear further investigation. Not as well-defined are the contributions of bank erosional material and groundwater leaching. Subsequent investigations will be based on the results of this first phase.

  3. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 8): Summitville Mine Superfund Site, Operable Unit 4, Summitville, CO, December 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This decision document presents the selected interim remedial action for reclamation of non-point sources at the Summitville Mine Superfund Site (Site) in Rio Grande County, Colorado. The interim remedy addresses the reduction or elimination of acid generation by minimizing the infiltration of surface water and oxygen into the sulfide mineral zones (including rock-filled areas) and the stabilization of surface areas on the Summitville Mine Superfund Site through reclamation practices. The interim remedy will address the principal threat posed by surface waters infiltrating areas that were not addressed in other operable units.

  4. EPN Continuous Cumulative Solution - Single Analysis Centers and Combination -,Heinz Habrich, Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy, Frankfurt M., Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habrich, H.

    2009-12-01

    -specific generation of CSs, which did not exist so far and may contribute to improve the EPN weekly combination. Other innovations are the continuous update of the CSs at every week and the usage of the FODITS tool. With FODITS not only linear trends but also periodic signals in coordinate time series will be modeled. The discussion of the coordinate reference epoch figured out to be an important aspect for coordinate comparison issues. Where the so-called “epoch of minimum variance” has been recommended for release of a single CS, it is not suitable for comparisons of solutions from various analysis centers, because it may be different for each analysis center. Such comparisons require synchronized reference epochs even in case of commonly applied a-priori information for station discontinuities during the processing. The results include an investigation of LAC-specific CSs and of residuals from direct comparisons as well as Helmert transformations between EPN, ITRF and other solutions. The impact of reference epoch selection on the compared coordinates will be shown. The demonstrated strategy for generating CSs and comparison of synchronized solution numbers is of general interest with respect to ongoing re-processing initiatives and future realizations of terrestrial reference frames.

  5. SUPERFUND ENGINEERING ISSUE: TREATMENT OF LEAD-CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document summarizes the contents of a seminar on treatment of lead-contaminated soils presented on August 28, 1990, to Region V Superfund and RCRA personnel by members of EPA's Engineering and Treatment Technology Support Center located in the Risk Reduction Engineering Labo...

  6. SUPERFUND GROUND WATER ISSUE: GROUND WATER SAMPLING FOR METALS ANALYSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Filtration of ground-water samples for metals analysis is an issue identified by the Forum as a concern of Superfund decision-makers. Inconsistency in EPA Syperfund cleanup pracices occurs where one EPA Region implements a remedial action based on unfiltered ground-water samples,...

  7. GUIDE TO TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTES AT SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past fewyears, it has become increasinsly evident that land disposal of hazardous wastes is at least only a temporary solution for much of the wastes present at Superfund sites. The need for more Iong-term, permanent "treatment solutions as alternatives to land disposal ...

  8. Risk assessment and remedial technology effectiveness at Superfund sites

    SciTech Connect

    Doty, C.B.; Travis, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    Although the protection of public health is one of the primary goals of the Superfund program, the program's success in achieving risk reduction has been difficult to determine thus far. However, evidence to date suggests that risk reduction is not being effectively integrated into the remedial action decision process in spite of the change of program philosophy since the passage of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) and the advances made in the field of risk assessment in recent years. Defining risk, using risk assessment as a priority-setting tool, and defining risk reduction within the confines of both the current state of technology and the resources available with which to address risk are essential components of the decision process. Although risk assessments are conducted at Superfund sites, risk assessment has not been used effectively as a priority-setting tool. Many decisions to remediate are made where no current exposure exists and potential risk is not well-defined. At the same time, the majority of remedial alternatives are selected without evidence of their effectiveness in meeting health-based cleanup goals, even at sites which pose a threat to human health. Recent analyses of the effectiveness of treatment remedies suggest that treating contaminated media to health-based cleanup goals is considerably more difficult than originally expected. Thus, Superfund policy-making should focus on determining when health-based cleanup goals are necessary and when attaining such standards is feasible. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. CHEMICAL MIXTURES AND HEALTH EFFECTS AT SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Between 1991 and 1993, EPA's Office of Research and Development conducted a small health effects research program dedicated to the problem of chemical mixtures at Superfund sites. This paper summarizes key findings from the program. The studies covered a wide range of endpoints, ...

  10. DECISION ANALYSIS OF INCINERATION COSTS IN SUPERFUND SITE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study examines the decision-making process of the remedial design (RD) phase of on-site incineration projects conducted at Superfund sites. Decisions made during RD affect the cost and schedule of remedial action (RA). Decision analysis techniques are used to determine the...

  11. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION: TECHNOLOGY PROFILES, NINTH EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its eleventh year, is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine use o...

  12. SUPERFUND GROUND WATER ISSUE - ACCURACY OF DEPTH TO WATER MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accuracy of depth to water measurements is an issue identified by the Forum as a concern of Superfund decision-makers as they attempt to determine directions of ground-water flow, areas of recharge of discharge, the hydraulic characteristics of aquifers, or the effects of manmade...

  13. Great lakes research--important human health findings and their impact on ATSDR's Superfund research program.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Heraline E; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2002-03-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) was created by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, commonly known as Superfund. ATSDR is the principal United States federal public health agency involved with issues of public health and applied science concerning the human health impact of living in the vicinity of a hazardous waste site, or emergencies resulting from unplanned releases of hazardous substances into community environments. In pursuing these mandates, ATSDR's mission is to prevent exposure and adverse human health effects and diminished quality of life associated with exposure to hazardous substances from waste sites, unplanned releases, and other sources of pollution present in the environment. There are more than 2,000 toxic substances found at hazardous waste sites in the United States. ATSDR has developed a prioritized list of 275 substances that pose the greatest hazard to human health. In conducting its work ATSDR has identified data gaps in knowledge about the toxicity of various hazardous substances as well as gaps in human exposure characterization. As part of its mandate, ATSDR initiated a Substance-Specific Applied Research Program (SSARP) to address these data gaps. The ATSDR Great Lakes Human Health Effects Research Program (GLHHERP) is a congressionally-mandated research program that characterizes exposure to persistent toxic substances and investigates the potential for adverse health outcome in at-risk populations. The research findings from this program in the areas of exposure, sociodemographic data, and health effects have significant public health implications for ATSDR's Superfund research activities. PMID:12018016

  14. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 8): Summitville Mine Superfund Site, Operable Unit 0, Summitville, CO, December 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The decision document presents the selected interim remedial action for point source water treatment at the Summitville Mine Superfund Site (Site) in Summitville, Colorado. The interim remedy addresses the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) and water containing cyanide from the Summitville Site. The water originates from sources altered or disturbed during mining activities at the Site.

  15. An evaluation of traditional and emerging remote sensing technologies for the detection of fugitive contamination at selected Superfund hazardous waste sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Fisher, Gary B.

    2011-01-01

    This report represents a remote sensing research effort conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the EPA Office of Inspector General. The objective of this investigation was to explore the efficacy of remote sensing as a technology for postclosure monitoring of hazardous waste sites as defined under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-510, 42 U.S.C. §9601 et seq.), also known as \\"Superfund.\\" Five delisted Superfund sites in Maryland and Virginia were imaged with a hyperspectral sensor and visited for collection of soil, water, and spectral samples and inspection of general site conditions. This report evaluates traditional and hyperspectral imagery and field spectroscopic measurement techniques in the characterization and analysis of fugitive (anthropogenic, uncontrolled) contamination at previously remediated hazardous waste disposal sites.

  16. Superfund oversight. Hearing before the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, April 8, 1983. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Part 2 of the hearing record covers the testimony of Lee Thomas, Acting Deputy Administrator, and others from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Although the focus was on implementation of the Superfund, the committee also sought information on the implementation of environmental laws concerning toxic substances, insecticides, etc.; the status of environmental research and development programs; and efforts to ease the burden of environmental regulations on polluting industries. Of concern to the committee was the Agency's loss of effectiveness because of poor leadership and poor judgment in the area of toxic wastes. (DCK)

  17. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: COMPOSITING OF EXPLOSIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This treatability study was conducted by Atlantic Research Corporation for the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Material Agency. The objective of this bench-scale study was to determine the extent to which TNT and RDX concentrations were reduced by composting for a six week peri...

  18. 20 CFR 411.582 - Can a State VR agency receive payment under the cost reimbursement payment system if a continuous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...? Yes. If a State VR agency provides services to a beneficiary under 34 CFR part 361, and elects payment... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Can a State VR agency receive payment under... Systems § 411.582 Can a State VR agency receive payment under the cost reimbursement payment system if...

  19. 20 CFR 411.582 - Can a State VR agency receive payment under the cost reimbursement payment system if a continuous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...? Yes. If a State VR agency provides services to a beneficiary under 34 CFR part 361, and elects payment... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Can a State VR agency receive payment under... Systems § 411.582 Can a State VR agency receive payment under the cost reimbursement payment system if...

  20. 20 CFR 411.582 - Can a State VR agency receive payment under the cost reimbursement payment system if a continuous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...? Yes. If a State VR agency provides services to a beneficiary under 34 CFR part 361, and elects payment... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Can a State VR agency receive payment under... Systems § 411.582 Can a State VR agency receive payment under the cost reimbursement payment system if...

  1. 20 CFR 411.582 - Can a State VR agency receive payment under the cost reimbursement payment system if a continuous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...? Yes. If a State VR agency provides services to a beneficiary under 34 CFR part 361, and elects payment... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Can a State VR agency receive payment under... Systems § 411.582 Can a State VR agency receive payment under the cost reimbursement payment system if...

  2. Ten years of progress in the Superfund Program

    SciTech Connect

    Clay, D.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Superfund celebrated its tenth anniversary in December 1990. The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) - popularly known as Superfund - was passed into law in December 1980 in the wake of such incidents as Love Canal and the Valley of the Drums. The program was designed to clean up uncontrolled hazardous waste sites and, during the past ten years, thousands of actions have been taken to protect human health and the environment from the hazards posed by those sites. EPA believes that goal is best met by its strategy: make sites safer - control immediate threats; enforce aggressively; make sites cleaner - worst problems at worst sites first; bring new technology to bear on the problem.

  3. Superfund, Hedonics, and the Scales of Environmental Justice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noonan, Douglas S.; Turaga, Rama Mohana R.; Baden, Brett M.

    2009-11-01

    Environmental justice (EJ) is prominent in environmental policy, yet EJ research is plagued by debates over methodological procedures. A well-established economic approach, the hedonic price method, can offer guidance on one contentious aspect of EJ research: the choice of the spatial unit of analysis. Environmental managers charged with preventing or remedying inequities grapple with these framing problems. This article reviews the theoretical and empirical literature on unit choice in EJ, as well as research employing hedonic pricing to assess the spatial extent of hazardous waste site impacts. The insights from hedonics are demonstrated in a series of EJ analyses for a national inventory of Superfund sites. First, as evidence of injustice exhibits substantial sensitivity to the choice of spatial unit, hedonics suggests some units conform better to Superfund impacts than others. Second, hedonic estimates for a particular site can inform the design of appropriate tests of environmental inequity for that site. Implications for policymakers and practitioners of EJ analyses are discussed.

  4. Annotated Bibliography of Selected References on PCB and the Kalamazoo River Superfund Site, Michigan, 1982-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simard, Andreanne

    2003-01-01

    Fifty six publications pertaining to the Kalamazoo River Superfund Site Publications stored in the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality Environmental Response Division site files are summarized. Publications are presented chronologically within four categories: PCB releases, PCB remediation, PCB safety, and PCB testing and cleanup. The text consists of bibliographical information and brief summaries of various published documents pertaining to PCB contamination of the Kalamazoo River. Numerous investigators such as the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Georgia Pacific, and various contractors have demonstrated that multiple and at times continuous releases and re-releases of PCBs have occurred as a result of operations at papermill facilities owned and operated by the 'Potential Responsible Parties'.

  5. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Beaunit Circular Knit and Dyeing, Greenville County, Fountain Inn, SC, September 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Beaunit Circular Knit and Dying Superfund Site (the Site) in Fountain Inn, South Carolina. The major components of the selected remedy include: containment of soils and sediments contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metals by capping of the lagoon area; and additional monitoring of groundwater and soils on a regular schedule to determine effects of construction of lagoon cap, and to insure effectiveness of cap after construction. Modifications to the frequency or termination of continued monitoring will be determined during the Remedial Action and the Five Year Review.

  6. Superfund flop, new Congress fail to faze environmental execs

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.

    1995-01-01

    Congressional failure to pass a Superfund reauthorization bill this fall disappointed environmental consulting and engineering companies, environmentalists and parties liable for site cleanups. The Clinton administration's reform bill was introduced in the House Feb. 3, six months overdue, only seven months before Congress' annual summer break and less than a year before mid-term elections. The House bill was revised in August, but reauthorization was declared a lost cause in October, when supporters faced the harsh political fact that Republicans would hold the line against passing a new law until after the November elections. Of the three major environmental laws overdue for reauthorization--the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Clean Water Act and Superfund (officially, the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act)--the Superfund law appears to have the best chance of making it through the 104 Congress successfully. The latest version of the administration-sponsored bill received wide-spread support from environmentalists, industry and environmental business groups as being more reasonable and fair than the existing law.

  7. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 8): Summitville Mine Superfund Site, Operable Unit 2, Summitville, CO, December 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The decision document presents the selected interim remedial action, for reducing or eliminating acid mine drainage from the Cropsy Waste Pile (CWP), Summitville Dam Impoundment (SDI), Beaver Mud Dump (BMD), and Mine Pits at the Summitville Mine Superfund Site (Site) in Rio Grande County, Colorado. The interim remedy addresses the reduction or elimination of acid mine drainage (AMD) from the CWP, SDI, and BMD, and the Mine Pits. The AMD originates from sources altered or disturbed during mining activities at the Site.

  8. OVERVIEW AND UPDATE OF THE SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program is now in its sixth year of demonstrating technologies applicable to Superfund sites, and 56 projects are now part of the Program. nder the SITE Demonstration Program, the developer and EPA participate in a joint ventu...

  9. SHIRCO PILOT-SCALE INFRARED INCINERATION SYSTEM AT THE ROSE TOWNSHIP DEMODE ROAD SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation or SITE Program, an evaluation was made of the Shirco Pilot-Scale Infrared Incineration System during 17 separate test runs under varying operating conditions. The tests were conducted at the Demode Road Superfund site in Ros...

  10. APPLICATION ANALYSIS REPORT - DEMONSTRATION OF A TRIAL EXCAVATION AT THE MCCOLL SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In June 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Region IX Superfund Program, in cooperation with EPA’s Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL), and EPA’s Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program performed a trial excavation of approximatel...

  11. The NIEHS Superfund Research Program: 25 Years of Translational Research for Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Robert O.; Cordero, Jose F.; Eaton, David L.; Goldstein, Bernard D.; Hennig, Bernhard; Maier, Raina M.; Ozonoff, David M.; Smith, Martyn T.; Tukey, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Superfund Research Program (SRP) is an academically based, multidisciplinary, translational research program that for 25 years has sought scientific solutions to health and environmental problems associated with hazardous waste sites. SRP is coordinated by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS). It supports multi-project grants, undergraduate and postdoctoral training programs, individual research grants, and Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Technology Transfer Research (STTR) grants. Results SRP has had many successes: discovery of arsenic’s toxicity to the developing human central nervous system; documentation of benzene toxicity to hematologic progenitor cells in human bone marrow; development of novel analytic techniques such as the luciferase expression assay and laser fragmentation fluorescence spectroscopy; demonstration that PCBs can cause developmental neurotoxicity at low levels and alter the genomic characteristics of sentinel animals; elucidation of the neurodevelopmental toxicity of organophosphate insecticides; documentation of links between antimicrobial agents and alterations in hormone response; discovery of biological mechanisms through which environmental chemicals may contribute to obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer; tracking the health and environmental effects of the attacks on the World Trade Center and Hurricane Katrina; and development of novel biological and engineering techniques to facilitate more efficient and lower-cost remediation of hazardous waste sites. Conclusion SRP must continue to address the legacy of hazardous waste in the United States, respond to new issues caused by rapid advances in technology, and train the next generation of leaders in environmental health science while recognizing that most of the world’s worst toxic hot spots are now located in low- and middle-income countries. Citation Landrigan PJ, Wright RO, Cordero JF, Eaton DL, Goldstein BD

  12. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Standard Chlorine of Delaware Superfund Site in Delaware City, Delaware. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Standard Chlorine of Delaware site in Delaware City, Delaware, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  13. 40 CFR 374.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND... Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund... the United States (including the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency and...

  14. 20 CFR 411.375 - Does a State VR agency continue to provide services under the requirements of the State plan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies' Participation Participation in the Ticket to Work Program § 411.375 Does a State...

  15. 20 CFR 411.375 - Does a State VR agency continue to provide services under the requirements of the State plan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies' Participation Participation in the Ticket to Work Program § 411.375 Does a State...

  16. 20 CFR 411.375 - Does a State VR agency continue to provide services under the requirements of the State plan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies' Participation Participation in the Ticket to Work Program § 411.375 Does a State...

  17. 20 CFR 411.582 - Can a State VR agency receive payment under the cost reimbursement payment system if a continuous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Network Payment...? Yes. If a State VR agency provides services to a beneficiary under 34 CFR part 361, and elects...

  18. 20 CFR 411.375 - Does a State VR agency continue to provide services under the requirements of the State plan...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies' Participation Participation in the Ticket to Work Program § 411.375 Does a State...

  19. Reverse osmosis reverses conventional wisdom with Superfund cleanup success

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M. ); Miller, K. )

    1994-09-01

    Although widely recognized as the most efficient means of water purification, reverse osmosis has not been considered effective for remediating hazardous wastewater. Scaling and fouling, which can cause overruns and downtime, and require membrane replacement, have inhibited success in high-volume wastewater applications. Despite this background, a reverse osmosis technology developed in Europe recently was used successfully to treat large volumes of contaminated water at a major Superfund site in Texas. The technology's success there may increase the chances for reverse osmosis to find wider use in future cleanups and other waste treatment applications.

  20. 1990 UPDATE OF THE US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA) directed the U.S. Environmental Protection AGency (EPA) to establish an Alternative/Innovative Treatment Technology Research and Demonstration Program. The EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response and the ...

  1. EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) INCINERATION OF AN INDUSTRIAL REFINERY. LAGOON SLUDGE USING INFRARED FURNACE TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report briefly presents a case study of a recent field-scale incineration test supported by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as one of over twenty projects under EPA's Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The purpose of these programs is to...

  2. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 8): Summitville Mine Superfund Site, Operable Unit 1, Summitville, CO, December 15, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    The decision document presents the selected interim remedial action for reducing or eliminating acid mine drainage (AMD) and cyanide contaminated waters from the Heap Leach Pad (HLP) at the Summitville Mine Superfund Site in Rio Grande County, Colorado. The interim remedial action for the HLP addresses the reduction or elimination of acid mine drainage and cyanide contaminated waters from the Heap Leach Pad. The purpose of this interim remedial action is to control the transport of cyanide and toxic metals from the Heap Leach Pad (HLP) into Cropsy Creek and Wightman Fork.

  3. Geophysical logging and geologic mapping data in the vicinity of the GMH Electronics Superfund site near Roxboro, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Melinda J.; Clark, Timothy W.; Williams, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Geologic mapping, the collection of borehole geophysical logs and images, and passive diffusion bag sampling were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey North Carolina Water Science Center in the vicinity of the GMH Electronics Superfund site near Roxboro, North Carolina, during March through October 2011. The study purpose was to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the development of a conceptual groundwater model for the assessment of current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants. Data compilation efforts included geologic mapping of more than 250 features, including rock type and secondary joints, delineation of more than 1,300 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations) in 15 open borehole wells, and the collection of passive diffusion-bag samples from 42 fracture zones at various depths in the 15 wells.

  4. Evaluation of borehole geophysical logs at the Sharon Steel Farrell Works Superfund site, Mercer County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAuley, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    On April 14?15, 2003, geophysical logging was conducted in five open-borehole wells in and adjacent to the Sharon Steel Farrell Works Superfund Site, Mercer County, Pa. Geophysical-logging tools used included caliper, natural gamma, single-point resistance, fluid temperature, and heatpulse flowmeter. The logs were used to determine casing depth, locate subsurface fractures, identify water-bearing fractures, and identify and measure direction and rate of vertical flow within the borehole. The results of the geophysical logging were used to determine the placement of borehole screens, which allows monitoring of water levels and sampling of water-bearing zones so that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency can conduct an investigation of contaminant movement in the fractured bedrock. Water-bearing zones were identified in three of five boreholes at depths ranging from 46 to 119 feet below land surface. Borehole MR-3310 (MW03D) showed upward vertical flow from 71 to 74 feet below land surface to a receiving zone at 63-68 feet below land surface, permitting potential movement of ground water, and possibly contaminants, from deep to shallow zones. No vertical flow was measured in the other four boreholes.

  5. Brown Superfund Basic research Program: a multistakeholder partnership addresses real-world problems in contaminated communities.

    PubMed

    Senier, Laura; Hudson, Benjamin; Fort, Sarah; Hoover, Elizabeth; Tillson, Rebecca; Brown, Phil

    2008-07-01

    The NIEHS funds several basic and applied research programs, many of which also require research translation or outreach. This paper reports on a project by the Brown University Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP), in which outreach and research translation teams collaborated with state regulatory agency personnel and community activists on a legislative initiative to mitigate the financial impacts of living in a contaminated community. The Environmentally Compromised Home Ownership (ECHO) program makes home equity loans of up to $25,000 available to qualified applicants. This collaboration provides a case study in community engagement and demonstrates how research translation and outreach activities that are clearly differentiated yet well-integrated can improve a suite of basic and applied research. Although engaging diverse constituencies can be difficult community-engaged translation and outreach have the potential to make research findings more useful to communities, address some of the social impacts of contamination, and empower stakeholders to pursue their individual and collectively held goals for remediation. The NIEHS has recently renewed its commitment to community-engaged research and advocacy, making this an optimal time to reflect on how basic research programs that engage stakeholders through research translation and outreach can add value to the overall research enterprise. PMID:18677987

  6. Hydrogeologic reconnaissance of the swope oil superfund site and vicinity, Camden and Burlington Counties, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, G.J.; Krebs, M.

    1990-01-01

    Groundwater beneath a former chemical reclamation facility in New Jersey is contaminated with metals and organic compounds. The off-site migration of these compounds has not been studied; however, a nearby public-supply well is contaminated, and a public-supply well 1,400 ft downgradient from the site may be threatened. The study is underlain by alluvial deposits composed of gravel, sand, silt, and clay. These deposits comprise the water table aquifer, the confining units, and the confined aquifer throughout the study area. The water table beneath the Swope Oil Superfund site is approximately 17 ft below sea level and groundwater levels throughout the study area are below the stage of the Delaware River. The aquifer system is recharged by precipitation, leakage of water through confining units, and the water induced from the Delaware River. Five public supply-well fields, primarily adjacent to the Delaware River, and four waste disposal sites with observation well networks are located in the study area. Both the water table and confined aquifers are contaminated in several locations. The concentration of metals and/or purgeable organic compounds in more than 20 wells exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking-water standard and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection recommended drinking water criteria. Selected data from wells and test borings are presented, including well construction details; drillers', geologists', and geophysical logs; water levels; specific-capacity and slug test data; and chemical analysis of groundwater samples. 35 refs., 5 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. Pilot study of dredging and disposal alternatives for the New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Otis, M.J.

    1992-03-01

    Bottom sediments in New Bedford Harbor are contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and heavy metals to the extent that the site is considered one of the Nation's worst hazardous waste sites and is being studied by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Federal Superfund program. At the request of EPA, the Corps of Engineers has evaluated the feasibility of dredging and disposal alternatives for the upper estuary of New Bedford, an area where PCB concentrations in the percent levels have been detected in the sediments. Between May 1988 and February 1989 a pilot study was performed as part of this effort. This study involved the evaluation of three hydraulic pipeline dredges with the contaminated sediments being placed in a confined disposal facility and a contained aquatic disposal cell. This paper provides a comprehensive discussion of our approach and the results of this $6.5 million effort. The study provided for a site-specific technical evaluation of the methods used which has allowed the Corps of Engineers to make recommendations to EPA which will be critical in their final evaluation of remedial alternatives for the site.

  8. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS FY 1996

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program has been successfully promoting the development, commercialization and implementation of innovative hazardous waste treatment technologies for more than 10 years. SITE offers a mechanism for conducting joint technology...

  9. THE SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS FY1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program has successfully promoted the development, commercialization and implementation of innovative hazardous waste treatment technologies for more than 14 years. SITE offers a mechanism for conducting joint technology demon...

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF REMEDIAL DREDGING AT THE NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, MA, SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    New Bedford Harbor (NBH), MA, is a Superfund site due to high sediment polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations. An initial remedial dredging operation removed the most contaminated sediments from the upper harbor ("Hot Spot"). During remediation, a monitoring program assess...

  11. SUPERFUND INNOVTIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS FY 1997

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program has successfully promoted the development, commercialization and implementation of innovative hazardous waste treatment technologies for more than 12 years. SITE offers a mechanism for conducting joint technology demon...

  12. Assessing Risks to Populations at Superfund and Rcra Sites: Characterizing Effects on Populations (Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ecological Risk Assessment Support Center (ERASC) announced the release of the final document titled, Assessing Risks to Populations at Superfund and RCRA Sites: Characterizing Effects on Populations.

  13. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS FY 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report details the Fiscal Year 2002 activities of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The Program focused on the remediation needs of the hazardous waste remediation community through demonstration and evaluation of innovative technologies for reme...

  14. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS FY2000

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program promotes the development, commercialization, and implementation of innovative hazardous waste treatment technologies. SITE offers a mechanism for conducting joint demonstration and evaluation projects at hazardous waste site...

  15. 1992 UPDATE OF U.S. EPA'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Emerging Technology Program (ETP) has encouraged and financially supported further development of bench- and pilot-scale testing and evaluation of innovative technologies suitable for use at hazardous waste sites for five year...

  16. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS FY 1995

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program was established more than nine years ago to encourage the development and implementation of innovative treatment technologies for hazardous waste site remediation. Development of this program was in direct response to ...

  17. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS 2003

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program has successfully promoted the development, commercialization and implementation of innovative hazardous waste treatment technologies for 17 years. SITE offers a mechanism for conducting joint technology demonstration a...

  18. How information resources are used by federal agencies in risk assessment application: Rapporteur summary

    SciTech Connect

    Fenner-Crisp, P.

    1990-12-31

    The application of information available for risk assessment from the federal perspective is described. Different federal agencies conduct varying degrees of hazard evaluation, and some also generate empirical data. The role of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in hazard assessments of potential public health impacts of Superfund sites includes identification of the 275 most significant substances. ATSDR is responsible for preparing toxicological profiles. ATSDR also identifies data gaps and needs critical to adequately assessing human health impacts.

  19. Assistance to Oil and Gas State Agencies and Industry through Continuation of Environmental and Production Data Management and a Water Regulatory Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Grunewald, Ben; Arthur, Dan; Langhus, Bruce; Gillespie, Tom; Binder, Ben; Warner, Don; Roberts, Jim; Cox, D.O.

    2002-05-31

    This grant project was a major step toward completion of the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) project. Additionally the project addresses the needs identified during the projects initial phases. By implementing this project, the following outcomes were sought: (1) State regulatory agencies implemented more formalized environmental risk management practices as they pertain to the production of oil and gas, and injection via Class II wells. (2) Enhancement of oil and gas production by implementing a management system supporting the saving of abandoned or idle wells located in areas with a relatively low environmental risk of endangering underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) in a particular state. (3) Verification that protection of USDWs is adequate and additional restrictions of requirements are not necessary in areas with a relatively low environmental risk. (4) Standardization of data and information maintained by state regulatory agencies and decrease the regulatory cost burden on producers operating in multiple states, and (5) Development of a system for electronic data transfer among operators and state regulatory agencies and reduction of overall operator reporting burdens.

  20. Delegating Superfund responsibilities: Implementation strategies and political ramifications of a state-wide lead model

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.

    1991-11-25

    Federal officials manage the great majority of Superfund program work. States have assisted in the process on a site-by-site basis. This contrasts with other EPA programs in which states take responsibility for all work within their boundaries. The paper presents a model for an increased delegation of Superfund responsibilities to qualified states and tribes. Guidelines for implementing the policy shift are addressed as well as political ramifications for various stakeholders.

  1. Value engineering, community relations speed Superfund site cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R.E.; Thomson, P.; Yunaska, M.

    1996-11-01

    Value engineering provides contractors an opportunity to modify a project`s design to lower costs while maintaining the desired design function. The project thus benefits from the contractor`s expertise, and all parties benefit financially by sharing in the savings. Applying value engineering principles to cleanup of offsite areas at the former Lipari industrial waste landfill reduced costs and also accelerated remediation time. Containment of the landfill (once listed as the nation`s No. 1 Superfund site) and cleanup of offsite locations enabled Alcyon lake in Pitman, NJ, to regain its status as the town`s principal recreation center. An ecologically significant marsh and the adjoining Chestnut Branch, a stream flowing behind homes in the scenic and historic town, also were restored.

  2. ANALYSIS OF EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) PROTOCOL GASES USED FOR CALIBRATION AND AUDITS OF CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING SYSTEMS AND AMBIENT AIR ANALYZERS - RESULTS OF AUDIT 6

    EPA Science Inventory

    A performance audit was conducted on EPA Protocol Gases used for calibration and audits of continuous emission monitoring systems and ambient air analyzers. Fifty gaseous pollutant calibraton standards were purchased from eleven specialty gas producers. These standards contained ...

  3. 10 CFR 607.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Federal agency or agency. 607.645 Section 607.645 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 607.645 Federal agency or agency. Department of Energy means the...

  4. Solutions Network Formulation Report. Landsat Data Continuity Mission Simulated Data Products for Bureau of Land Management and Environmental Protection Agency Abandoned Mine Lands Decision Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, Leland

    2007-01-01

    Presently, the BLM (Bureau of Land Management) has identified a multitude of abandoned mine sites in primarily Western states for cleanup. These sites are prioritized and appropriate cleanup has been called in to reclaim the sites. The task is great in needing considerable amounts of agency resources. For instance, in Colorado alone there exists an estimated 23,000 abandoned mines. The problem is not limited to Colorado or to the United States. Cooperation for reclamation is sought at local, state, and federal agency level to aid in identification, inventory, and cleanup efforts. Dangers posed by abandoned mines are recognized widely and will tend to increase with time because some of these areas are increasingly used for recreation and, in some cases, have been or are in the process of development. In some cases, mines are often vandalized once they are closed. The perpetrators leave them open, so others can then access the mines without realizing the danger posed. Abandoned mine workings often fill with water or oxygen-deficient air and dangerous gases following mining. If the workings are accidentally entered into, water or bad air can prove fatal to those underground. Moreover, mine residue drainage negatively impacts the local watershed ecology. Some of the major hazards that might be monitored by higher-resolution satellites include acid mine drainage, clogged streams, impoundments, slides, piles, embankments, hazardous equipment or facilities, surface burning, smoke from underground fires, and mine openings.

  5. Influence of a chlor-alkali superfund site on mercury bioaccumulation in periphyton and low-trophic level fauna.

    PubMed

    Buckman, Kate L; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Taylor, Vivien F; Chalmers, Ann; Broadley, Hannah J; Agee, Jennifer; Jackson, Brian P; Chen, Celia Y

    2015-07-01

    In Berlin, New Hampshire, USA, the Androscoggin River flows adjacent to a former chlor-alkali facility that is a US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site and source of mercury (Hg) to the river. The present study was conducted to determine the fate and bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) to lower trophic-level taxa in the river. Surface sediment directly adjacent to the source showed significantly elevated MeHg (10-40× increase, mean ± standard deviation [SD]: 20.1 ± 24.8 ng g(-1) dry wt) and total mercury (THg; 10-30× increase, mean ± SD: 2045 ± 2669 ng g(-1) dry wt) compared with all other reaches, with sediment THg and MeHg from downstream reaches elevated (3-7× on average) relative to the reference (THg mean ± SD: 33.5 ± 9.33 ng g(-1) dry wt; MeHg mean ± SD: 0.52 ± 0.21 ng g(-1) dry wt). Water column THg concentrations adjacent to the point source for both particulate (0.23 ng L(-1)) and dissolved (0.76 ng L(-1)) fractions were 5-fold higher than at the reference sites, and 2-fold to 5-fold higher than downstream. Methylmercury production potential of periphyton material was highest (2-9 ng g(-1) d(-1) dry wt) adjacent to the Superfund site; other reaches were close to or below reporting limits (0. 1 ng g(-1) d(-1) dry wt). Total Hg and MeHg bioaccumulation in fauna was variable across sites and taxa, with no clear spatial patterns downstream of the contamination source. Crayfish, mayflies, and shiners showed a weak positive relationship with porewater MeHg concentration. PMID:25732794

  6. Assessment of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals in Soils and Sediments from Three Superfund Sites

    PubMed Central

    dela Cruz, Albert Leo N.; Cook, Robert L.; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M.; Donnelly, Kirby C.; Kelley, Matthew A.; Cosgriff, David

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported the presence of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) in pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated soils at a closed wood treatment facility site in Georgia. The reported EPFRs were pentachlorophenoxyl radicals formed on soils under ambient conditions via electron transfer from PCP to electron acceptors in the soil. In this study, we present results for soil and sediment samples from additional Superfund sites in Montana and Washington. Paramagnetic centers associated with different chemical environments were characterized by distinct g-factors and line widths (ΔHp-p). EPFR concentrations in contaminated samples were ~30x, ~12x, and ~2x higher than background samples at the Georgia, Montana, and Washington sites, respectively. EPR signals in the Montana contaminated soils were very similar to those previously observed for pentachlorophenol contaminated soils at the Georgia site, i.e., g = 2.00300 and ΔHp-p = 6.0 G, whereas signals in the Washington sediment samples were similar to those previously observed for other PAH contaminated soils, i.e., g = 2.00270 and ΔHp-p = 9.0G. Total carbon content measurements exhibited direct correlation with EPFR concentration. The presence of radicals in sites contaminated a decade to a century ago suggests continuous formation of EPFRs from molecular contaminants in the soil and sediment. PMID:24244947

  7. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Prestolite Battery, Vincennes, IN, August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Prestolite Battery Superfund Site in Vincennes, Knox County, Indiana, which was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), 42 U.S.C. Section 9601 et seq., and is consistent with the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), 40 CFR Part 300 to the extent practicable. The decision is based upon the contents of the Administrative Record for the site. The actual or threatened releases of hazardous substances from this site, if not addressed by implementing the response action in this Record of Decision (ROD), may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health, selfare, or the environment. The remedy selected for ground water contamination includes continued monitoring of the shallow and intermediate aquifers at the site as well as monitoring of surface water and sediments. The selected remedy also incorporates institutional controls on the placement of drinking water wells and natural attenuation of shallow contaminated ground water.

  8. Assessment of environmentally persistent free radicals in soils and sediments from three Superfund sites.

    PubMed

    dela Cruz, Albert Leo N; Cook, Robert L; Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir M; Donnelly, Kirby C; Kelley, Matthew A; Cosgriff, David

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported the presence of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) in pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated soils at a closed wood treatment facility site in Georgia. The reported EPFRs were pentachlorophenoxyl radicals formed on soils under ambient conditions via electron transfer from PCP to electron acceptors in the soil. In this study, we present results for soil and sediment samples from additional Superfund sites in Montana and Washington. Paramagnetic centers associated with different chemical environments were characterized by distinct g-factors and line widths (ΔHp-p). EPFR concentrations in contaminated samples were ~30×, ~12×, and ~2× higher than background samples at the Georgia, Montana, and Washington sites, respectively. EPR signals in the Montana contaminated soils were very similar to those previously observed for pentachlorophenol contaminated soils at the Georgia site, i.e., g = 2.00300 and ΔHp-p = 6.0 G, whereas signals in the Washington sediment samples were similar to those previously observed for other PAH contaminated soils, i.e., g = 2.00270 and ΔHp-p = 9.0 G. Total carbon content measurements exhibited direct correlation with EPFR concentration. The presence of radicals in sites contaminated a decade to a century ago suggests continuous formation of EPFRs from molecular contaminants in the soil and sediment. PMID:24244947

  9. Superfund Technology Evaluation Report: SITE Program Demonstration Test Shirco Pilot-Scale Infrared Incineration System at the Rose Township Demode Road Superfund Site Volume I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Shirco Pilot-Scale Infrared Incineration System was evaluated during a series of seventeen test runs under varied operating conditions at the Demode Road Superfund Site located in Rose Township, Michigan. The tests sought to demonstrate the effectiveness of the unit and the t...

  10. RISKS TO CHILDREN FROM EXPPOSURE TO LEAD IN AIR DURING REMEDIAL OR REMOVAL ACTIVITIES AT SUPERFUND SITES: A CASE STUDY OF THE RSR LEAD SMELTER SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study explored modeling approaches for assessing potential risks to children from air lead emisions from the RSR Superfund site in Dallas, TX. The EPA Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic model and the International Radiologic Protection lead model were used to simulate blo...

  11. 1993 UPDATE OF THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S SITE EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Emerging Technology Program (ETP), part of the U.S. EPA`s Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, is continuing to create an environment where technical innovation can accelerate into field and commercial applications for treatment of hazardous waste sites....

  12. The control of acid mine drainage at the Summitville Mine Superfund Site

    SciTech Connect

    Ketellapper, V.L.; Williams, L.O.

    1996-11-01

    The Summitville Mine Superfund Site is located about 25 miles south of Del Norte, Colorado, in Rio Grande County. Occurring at an average elevation of 11,500 feet in the San Juan Mountain Range, the mine site is located two miles east of the Continental Divide. Mining at Summitville has occurred since 1870. The mine was most recently operated by Summitville Consolidated Mining Company, Inc. (SCMCI) as an open pit gold mine with extraction by means of a cyanide leaching process. In December of 1992, SCMCI declared bankruptcy and vacated the mine site. At that time, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) took over operations of the water treatment facilities to prevent a catastrophic release of cyanide and metal-laden water from the mine site. Due to high operational costs of water treatment (approximately $50,000 per day), EPA established a goal to minimize active water treatment by reducing or eliminating acid mine drainage (AMD). All of the sources of AMD generation on the mine site were evaluated and prioritized. Of the twelve areas identified as sources of AMD, the Cropsy Waste Pile, the Summitville Dam Impoundment, the Beaver Mud Dump, the Reynolds and Chandler adits, and the Mine Pits were consider to be the most significant contributors to the generation of metal-laden acidic (low pH) water. A two part plan was developed to control AMD from the most significant sources. The first part was initiated immediately to control AMD being released from the Site. This part focused on improving the efficiency of the water treatment facilities and controlling the AMD discharges from the mine drainage adits. The second part of the plan was aimed at reducing the AMD generated in groundwater and surface water runoff from the mine wastes. A lined and capped repository located in the mine pits for acid generating mining waste and water treatment plant sludge was found to be the most feasible alternative.

  13. Geology, hydrology, and ground-water quality at the Byron Superfund site near Byron, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kay, Robert T.; Yeskis, Douglas J.; Bolen, William J.; Rauman, James R.; Prinos, Scott T.

    1997-01-01

    A study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to define the geohydrology and contaminant distribution at a Superfund site near Byron, Illinois. Geologic units of interest beneath the site are the St. Peter Sandstone; the shale, dolomite and sandstone of the Glenwood Formation; the dolomite of the Platteville and Galena Groups; and sands, gravels, tills and loess of Quaternary age. The hydrologic units of interest are the unconsolidated aquifer, Galena-Platteville aquifer, Harmony Hill Shale semiconfining unit, and the St. Peter aquifer. Ground-water flow generally is from the upland areas northwest and southwest toward the Rock River. Water levels indicate the potential for downward ground-water flow in most of the area except near the Rock River. The Galena-Platteville aquifer can be subdivided into four zones characterized by differing water-table altitudes, hydraulic gradients, and vertical and horizontal permeabilities. Geophysical, hydraulic, and aquifer-test data indicate that lithology, stratigraphy, and tectonic structures affect the distribution of primary and secondary porosity of dolomite in the Galena and Platteville Groups, which affects the permeability distribution in the Galena-Platteville aquifer. The distribution of cyanide, chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons, and aromatic hydrocarbons in ground water indicates that these contaminants are derived from multiple sources in the study area. Contaminants in the northern part of this area migrate northwest to the Rock River. Contaminants in the central and southern parts of this area appear to migrate to the southwest in the general direction of the Rock River.

  14. Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Selected Species of Mercury, Carson River Superfund Site, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thodal, C.; Morway, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Carson River Mercury Site in western Nevada was added to the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) "Superfund" List in 1990 due to contamination from mercury used to amalgamate silver and gold from Comstock Lode ores milled during the late 1800s. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has monitored concentrations of suspended sediment (SS), total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) as well as streamflow upstream and downstream of Lahontan Reservoir since 1997 in support of USEPA Remedial Investigations. Differences between inflow and outflow concentrations indicate that nearly 90 percent of SS and unfiltered THg, and at least 50 percent of unfiltered MeHg and filtered (<0.45 μm) THg and MeHg is retained in the reservoir. However, outflow MeHg concentrations exceeded mean inflow concentration (2.9 nanograms per liter; ng/L) in 10 of 135 samples, indicating augmented mercury methylation. During August 2010 and June-September 2011, limnological profiles were measured and water samples collected from discrete depths in each of the reservoir's 3 sub-basins, the inflow delta and 2 shallow and rarely inundated overflow basins to investigate mercury distribution and methylation. In most samples, MeHg concentrations were less than 5 ng/L and increased by less than 1 ng/L in deeper samples. After temperature, oxygen, and Eh profiles indicated thermal stratification in the deep (~25 m) lower basin, samples from the top 1 m still had less than 2 ng/L MeHg but samples collected from 2 m above the sediment-water interface yielded concentrations as high as 220 ng/L in filtered water samples, accounting for 100 percent of filtered and 65 percent of unfiltered THg concentrations in concurrently-sampled water. We hypothesize that anoxic conditions and decomposition of mercury-contaminated plankton and sulfate-reduction in the hypolimnion provide carbon and mercury necessary for mercury methylation that exceeds diffusion from bottom sediment.

  15. Hydrogeologic reconnaissance of the Swope Oil Superfund site and vicinity, Camden and Burlington counties, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, G.J.; Krebs, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    Groundwater beneath a former chemical reclamation facility in New Jersey is contaminated with metals and organic compounds. The off-site migration of these compounds has not been studied; however, a nearby public-supply well is contaminated, and a public-supply well 1,400 ft downgradient from the site may be threatened. The study area, in the New Jersey part of the Atlantic Coastal Plain, is underlain by alluvial deposits composed of gravel, sand, silt, and clay. These deposits comprise the water table aquifer, the confining units, and the confined aquifer throughout the study area. The water table beneath the Swope Oil Superfund site is approximately 17 ft below sea level and groundwater levels throughout the study area are below the stage of the Delaware River. The aquifer system is recharged by precipitation, leakage of water through confining units, and the water induced from the Delaware River. Five public supply-well fields, primarily adjacent to the Delaware River, and four waste disposal sites with observation well networks are located in the study area. Both the water table and confined aquifers are contaminated in several locations. The concentration of metals and/or purgeable organic compounds in more than 20 wells exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking-water standard and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection recommended drinking water criteria. Selected data from wells and test borings are presented, including well construction details; drillers ', geologists ', and geophysical logs; water levels; specific-capacity and slug test data; and chemical analysis of groundwater samples. (USGS)

  16. ANCHOR HILL PIT LAKE IN SITU TREATMENT, GILT EDGE MINE SUPERFUND SITE, S. DAKOTA, USA - A RETROSPECTIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Region VII Superfund office and the EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP)have been conducting a field scale technology demonstration of an in situ treatment of the Anchor Hill Pit Lake at the Gilt Edge Mine Superfund...

  17. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: BDAT INCINERATION OF CERCLA SARMS AT THE JOHN ZINK COMPANY TEST FACILITY (FINAL PROJECT REPORT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of a treatability study of rotary kiln incineration of a synthetic "Superfund soil" bearing a wide range of chemical contaminants typically occurring at Superfund sites. This surrogate soil is referred to as a synthetic analytical reference ...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1336 - Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA. 165.1336 Section... Area; Pacific Sound Resources and LockheedShipyard Superfund Sites, Elliott Bay, Seattle, WA....

  19. Intrinsic bioremediation modeling to support Superfund site closure

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard, A.H.; Day, M.J.; Johnson, R.H.; Ritter, K.J.; Stancel, S.G.; Thomson, J.A.M.

    1997-09-01

    Closure of the groundwater component of a major Superfund site has been accomplished by a combination of source control, engineered in-situ bioremediation, and subsequent long-term intrinsic bioremediation. Engineered bioremediation outside the source control area resulted in very significant contaminant mass removal. This allowed intrinsic bioremediation to be considered as a passive remedial management method of achieving cleanup objectives after active remediation needed. Modeling demonstrated that intrinsic bioremediation would achieve cleanup objectives (for this site, Federal drinking water standards) within ten years of shutdown of the active bioremediation system. Modeling showed that residual electron acceptors and nutrients distributed in the aquifer during engineered bioremediation greatly enhance the intrinsic bioremediation process. The results of the modeling effort led to the active system being shut down a year ahead of schedule, allowing the project to move into a low-maintenance intrinsic bioremediation and long-term monitoring phase. The modeling demonstration coupled Visual MODFLOW{copyright} and BioTrans{copyright} to simulate groundwater flow, solute transport, and oxygen-limited, multi-species biodegradation. Regional flow evaluation, detailed model sensitivity analyses, and subarea modeling were employed to provide support to model predictions. Predictions will be tested by subsequent progress and compliance monitoring. Site closure began in early 1996.

  20. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Stauffer Chemical, AL, September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This decision document (Record of Decision), presents the selected remedial action for Cold Creek Swamp (OU3) for the Stauffer Chemical (LeMoyne Plant) Superfund Site and the Stauffer Chemical (Cole Creek Plant) Superfund Site, Mobile County, Alabama. This operable unit is the third of four at the Stauffer Sites. Operable unit one was enumerated by a Record of Decision that was signed by EPA on September 27, 1989. Operable unit two addressed the migration of contaminants present in the surficial aquifer at the Site. Operable unit three, which is enumerated by this Record of Decision, addresses contamination at the Site in Cold Creek Swamp.

  1. 32 CFR 148.6 - Agency review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agency review. 148.6 Section 148.6 National... Inspections of Facilities § 148.6 Agency review. Agencies will continue to review and assess the potential... government. As this review continues, agencies creating or modifying facilities databases will do so in...

  2. Fate and Transport of Perchlorate at California's Stringfellow Superfund Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenoyer, G. J.; Nuttall, H. E.; Paulson, R.; Wolfenden, A.; Aldern, J.

    2007-12-01

    Geologic conditions exert primary control over the fate and transport of perchlorate at the Stringfellow Superfund site. A buried valley filled with alluvium has been defined that extends from Pyrite Canyon, location of the former Stringfellow acid pits, down to near the Santa Ana River. The buried valley is cut into the underlying granitic bedrock, and appears to be a paleo-channel of the ancestral Pyrite Creek. The groundwater hydraulic gradient aligns closely with the buried valley, as does the perchlorate plume. The buried valley appears to be a preferential pathway for contaminant migration. Perchlorate concentrations in the downgradient portion of the plume have been slowly decreasing over time, suggesting that the groundwater extraction wells are effective at cutting off the source. Perchlorate degradation, however, appears to be minimal over most of the sandy aerobic aquifer, as concentrations of perchlorate persist over a 5-mile long plume. Scattered concentrations of perchlorate in the 1 to 12 ug/L range are widespread over a broad area adjacent to the plume and appear to be unrelated to the plume. Hydrogeologic analysis and perchlorate isotope analysis are being used to investigate whether these outlying concentrations may be related to the historic use of perchlorate- bearing mineral nitrate fertilizer. At the distal end of the plume, a marked change in the fate of perchlorate occurs beneath the Santa Ana River. Sampling of mini-piezometers installed into the river sediments shows that the perchlorate and nitrate concentrations fall to below detection as the aquifer environment changes from oxidizing to reducing conditions. In this local environment, it appears that anaerobic biodegradation reduces the perchlorate and nitrate. As a result of degradation of perchlorate, and possibly mixing of infiltrating river water beneath the losing portions of the river, perchlorate concentrations decrease to below 6 ug/L downgradient of the river. This presentation

  3. Concentration of 1,4-Dioxane in Wells Sampled During 2002-2009 in the Vicinity of the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund Site, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillman, Fred D

    2010-01-01

    Extensive groundwater contamination resulting from industrial activities led to the listing of the Tucson International Airport Area as a Superfund Site in 1983. Early investigations revealed elevated levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including the chlorinated solvents trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) in wells in the area. Several responsible parties were identified and cleanup activities were begun in the late 1980s using technology designed for removal of VOCs. In 2002, the compound 1,4-dioxane was discovered in wells in the Tucson Airport Remediation Project (TARP) area. Since then, 1,4-dioxane has been detected throughout the TARP area, in some cases exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) drinking water advisory level of 3 ?g/L.

  4. Treatability Study of In Situ Technologies for Remediation of Hexavalent Chromium in Groundwater at the Puchack Well Field Superfund Site, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeul, Vince R.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Truex, Michael J.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Girvin, Donald C.; Phillips, Jerry L.; Devary, Brooks J.; Fischer, Ashley E.; Li, Shu-Mei W.

    2006-11-13

    This treatability study was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), at the request of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 2, to evaluate the feasibility of using in situ treatment technologies for chromate reduction and immobilization at the Puchack Well Field Superfund Site in Pennsauken Township, New Jersey. In addition to in situ reductive treatments, which included the evaluation of both abiotic and biotic reduction of Puchack aquifer sediments, natural attenuation mechanisms were evaluated (i.e., chromate adsorption and reduction). Chromate exhibited typical anionic adsorption behavior, with greater adsorption at lower pH, at lower chromate concentration, and at lower concentrations of other competing anions. In particular, sulfate (at 50 mg/L) suppressed chromate adsorption by up to 50%. Chromate adsorption was not influenced by inorganic colloids.

  5. Selected Water- and Sediment-Quality, Aquatic Biology, and Mine-Waste Data from the Ely Copper Mine Superfund Site, Vershire, VT, 1998-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Argue, Denise M.; Kiah, Richard G.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Hathaway, Edward; Coles, James F.

    2008-01-01

    The data contained in this report are a compilation of selected water- and sediment-quality, aquatic biology, and mine-waste data collected at the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site in Vershire, VT, from August 1998 through May 2007. The Ely Copper Mine Superfund site is in eastern, central Vermont (fig. 1) within the Vermont Copper Belt (Hammarstrom and others, 2001). The Ely Copper Mine site was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List in 2001. Previous investigations conducted at the site documented that the mine is contributing metals and highly acidic waters to local streams (Hammarstrom and others, 2001; Holmes and others, 2002; Piatak and others, 2003, 2004, and 2006). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the USEPA, compiled selected data from previous investigations into uniform datasets that will be used to help characterize the extent of contamination at the mine. The data may be used to determine the magnitude of biological impacts from the contamination and in the development of remediation activities. This report contains analytical data for samples collected from 98 stream locations, 6 pond locations, 21 surface-water seeps, and 29 mine-waste locations. The 98 stream locations are within 3 streams and their tributaries. Ely Brook flows directly through the Ely Copper Mine then into Schoolhouse Brook (fig. 2), which joins the Ompompanoosuc River (fig. 1). The six pond locations are along Ely Brook Tributary 2 (fig. 2). The surface-water seeps and mine-waste locations are near the headwaters of Ely Brook (fig. 2 and fig. 3). The datasets 'Site_Directory' and 'Coordinates' contain specific information about each of the sample locations including stream name, number of meters from the mouth of stream, geographic coordinates, types of samples collected (matrix of sample), and the figure on which the sample location is depicted. Data have been collected at the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site by the

  6. PILOT-SCALE INCINERABILITY EVALUATION OF ARSENIC- AND LEAD-CONTAMINATED SOILS FROM TWO SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two incineration test programs were conducted at EPA's Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the suitability of incineration as an option to treat-contaminated Superfund site soils. he soils from the Purity Oil Sales site in Region 9 are contaminated with lead, up to several...

  7. INTEGRATIVE ASSESSMENT OF BENTHIC EFFECTS FROM REMEDIAL ACTIVITIES AT SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, the Superfund program must decide whether to leave the site alone or select a remedial option. These decisions are based in part on the relative risks to the environment and health posed by each alternative. Whatever decision is made at a site, the...

  8. ADDENDUM TO SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM TECHNOLOGY PROFILES, TENTH EDITION, VOLUME 1 - DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, now in its thirteenth year, is an integral part of EPA's research into alternative cleanup methods for hazardous waste sites around the nation. The SITE Program was created to encourage the development and routine us...

  9. REMEDIAL INVESTIGATIONS (RI) OF REGION 4 SUPERFUND HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES: AUGUST 2007 – SEPTEMBER 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD) conducts and/or provides technical assistance to Remedial Investigation (RI) projects of Region 4 Superfund sites. These RI projects require developing and implementing RI Work Plans which include a Project Operations Pla...

  10. REMEDIAL INVESTIGATIONS (RI) OF REGION 4 SUPERFUND HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES: OCTOBER 2006 – JULY 2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Region 4 Science and Ecosystem Support Division (SESD) conducts and/or provides technical assistance to Remedial Investigation (RI) projects of Region 4 Superfund sites. These RI projects require developing and implementing RI Work Plans which include a Project Operations Pla...

  11. HOW TO EVALUATE BENTHIC RECOVERY FROM REMEDIAL ACTIVITIES AT CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, the Superfund program usually must decide whether to leave the site alone, cap it, or dredge it. This decision is based in part upon the relative risk to the environment and human health posed by each alternative. Whatever decision is made at a s...

  12. PILOT-SCALE INCINERATION OF CONTAMINATED SLUDGES FROM THE BOFORS-NOBEL SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed test program was performed at the U.S. EPA Incineration Research Facility to help determine the effectiveness of incineration in treating two contaminated lagoon sludges from the Bofors-Nobel Superfund site in Muskegon, MI. he sludges tested were contaminated with vari...

  13. The New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site Long Term Monitoring Program (1993-2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    New Bedford Harbor (NBH), located in southeastern Massachusetts, was designated as a marine Superfund site in 1983 due to sediment contamination by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Based on risks to human health and the environment, the first two phases of the site cleanup invo...

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING OF REMEDIAL DREDGING AT THE NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, MA, SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    New Bedford Harbor (NBH), MA, is a Superfund site because of high polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in the sediment. From April 1994 to September 1995, a remedial dredging operation (termed the 'Hot Spot') removed the most contaminated sediments (PCB concentrations gr...

  15. USE OF A FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETER AS A REMOTE SENSOR AT SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Fourier transform infrared remote sensor (FTIR-RS) was used to measure chemical emissions at the Shaver's Park Superfund site in northwestern Georgia. he system was bistatic with a source/receiver at one end of a 250 path and a retroreflector at the other end. he source/receive...

  16. A General Chemistry Assignment Analyzing Environmental Contamination for the Depue, IL, National Superfund Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saslow Gomez, Sarah A.; Faurie-Wisniewski, Danielle; Parsa, Arlen; Spitz, Jeff; Spitz, Jennifer Amdur; Loeb, Nancy C.; Geiger, Franz M.

    2015-01-01

    The classroom exercise outlined here is a self-directed assignment that connects students to the environmental contamination problem surrounding the DePue Superfund site. By connecting chemistry knowledge gained in the classroom with a real-world problem, students are encouraged to personally connect with the problem while simultaneously…

  17. Medical costs and lost productivity from health conditions at volatile organic compound-contaminated Superfund sites

    SciTech Connect

    Lybarger, J.A.; Spengler, R.F.; Brown, D.R.; Lee, R.; Vogt, D.P. |; Perhac, R.M. Jr. |

    1998-10-01

    This paper estimates the health costs at Superfund sites for conditions associated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water. Health conditions were identified from published literature and registry information as occurring at excess rates in VOC-exposed populations. These health conditions were: (1) some categories of birth defects, (2) urinary tract disorders, (3) diabetes, (4) eczema and skin conditions, (5) anemia, (6) speech and hearing impairments in children under 10 years of age, and (7) stroke. Excess rates were used to estimate the excess number of cases occurring among the total population living within one-half mile of 258 Superfund sites. These sites had evidence of completed human exposure pathways for VOCs in drinking water. For each type of medical condition, an individual`s expected medical costs, long-term care costs, and lost work time due to illness or premature mortality were estimated. Costs were calculated to be approximately $330 million per year, in the absence of any remediation or public health intervention programs. The results indicate the general magnitude of the economic burden associated with a limited number of contaminants at a portion of all Superfund sites, thus suggesting that the burden would be greater than that estimated in this study if all contaminants at all Superfund sites could be taken into account.

  18. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: RECLAMATION OF LEAD FROM SUPERFUND WASTE MATERIAL USING SECONDARY LEAD SMELTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This process involves incorporating lead-contaminated Superfund waste with the regular feed to a secondary lead smelter. Since secondary lead smelters already recover lead from recycled automobile batteries, it seems likely that this technology could be used to treat waste from ...

  19. Guidelines for Using Passive Samplers to Monitor Organic Contaminants at Superfund Sediment Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Passive samplers are monitoring tools that can provide faster, cheaper, and scientifically-sound information about the water column and interstitial water concentrations of contaminants of concern (COC) at Superfund sites. Often, the use of passive samplers is more effective tha...

  20. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: TRIAL BURN TEST REPORT, PART 1 - DATA SUMMARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This treatability study summary reports on the results of a trial burn of pesticide-contaminated soil from the Aberdeen, NC Superfund site. The trial burn using the Vesta mobile rotary kiln incinerator was designed to demonstrate that this system can destroy the pestici...

  1. Superfund: Focusing on the nation at large. A decade of progress at National Priorities List sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The publication summarizes the progress made in hazardous site clean-up of sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). It also provides a state-by-state summary of 422 improved sites. 'Superfund: Focusing on the Nation at Large' is supplemented by individual State books which contain detailed information on all 1,236 NPL sites.

  2. 76 FR 45738 - Regulated Navigation Area; Pacific Sound Resources and Lockheed Shipyard EPA Superfund Cleanup...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... navigation area (RNA) on a portion of Elliott Bay in Seattle, Washington. The RNA would protect the seabed in... Resources (PSR) and Lockheed Shipyard superfund cleanup remediation efforts. This RNA would...

  3. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: CERCLA BDAT SARM PREPARATION AND RESULTS OF PHYSICAL SOILS WASHING EXPERIMENTS (FINAL REPORT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reports on the results of work preparing 30,000 Ibs of SARM or synthetic analytical reference matrix, a surrogate Superfund soil containing a vide range of contaminants. It also reports the results ©f bench scale treatability experiments designed to simulate the EP...

  4. Technology Demonstration Summary Shirco Electric Infrared Incineration At The Peak Oil Superfund Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the auspices of the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation or SITE Program, a critical assessment is made of the performance of the transportable Shirco Infrared Thermal Destruction System during three separate test runs at an operating feed rate of 100 tons per day. Th...

  5. PILOT-SCALE INCINERATION OF CONTAMINATED SLUDGES FROM THE BOFORS-NOBEL SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A detailed test program was performed at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Incineration Research Facility (IRF) to help determine the effectiveness of incineration in treating two contaminated lagoon sludges from the Bofors-Nobel Superfund site in Mus...

  6. SEDIMENT RESUSPENSION: RESEARCH TO EVALUATE RELEASE AND BIOAVAILABILITY OF CONTAMINANTS AT SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, the Superfund program usually must decide whether to leave the site alone, cap it, or dredge it. This decision is based in part upon the relative risk to the environment and human health posed by each option. Resuspension of contaminants from the...

  7. Application of passive sampling for measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants in the water column at three marine superfund sites.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Robert M; Lohmann, Rainer; Schubauer-Berigan, Joseph P; Reitsma, Pamela; Perron, Monique M; Lefkovitz, Lisa; Cantwell, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Currently, there is an effort under way to encourage remedial project managers at contaminated sites to use passive sampling to collect freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree ) of hydrophobic organic contaminants to improve site assessments. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the use of passive sampling for measuring water column Cfree for several hydrophobic organic contaminants at 3 US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund sites. Sites investigated included New Bedford Harbor (New Bedford, MA, USA), Palos Verdes Shelf (Los Angeles, CA, USA), and Naval Station Newport (Newport, RI, USA); and the passive samplers evaluated were polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane-coated solid-phase microextraction fibers, semipermeable membrane devices, and polyoxymethylene. In general, the different passive samplers demonstrated good agreement, with Cfree values varying by a factor of 2 to 3. Further, at New Bedford Harbor, where conventional water sample concentrations were also measured (i.e., grab samples), passive sampler-based Cfree values agreed within a factor of 2. These findings suggest that all of the samplers were experiencing and measuring similar Cfree during their respective deployments. Also, at New Bedford Harbor, a strong log-linear, correlative, and predictive relationship was found between polyethylene passive sampler accumulation and lipid-normalized blue mussel bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (r(2)  = 0.92, p < 0.05). The present study demonstrates the utility of passive sampling for generating scientifically accurate water column Cfree values, which is critical for making informed environmental management decisions at contaminated sediment sites. PMID:26039657

  8. The Brown Superfund Basic Research Program: A Multistakeholder Partnership Addresses Real-World Problems in Contaminated Communities

    PubMed Central

    Senier, Laura; Hudson, Benjamin; Fort, Sarah; Hoover, Elizabeth; Tillson, Rebecca; Brown, Phil

    2008-01-01

    The NIEHS funds several basic and applied research programs, many of which also require research translation or outreach. This paper reports on a project by the Brown University Superfund Basic Research Program (SBRP), in which outreach and research translation teams collaborated with state regulatory agency personnel and community activists on a legislative initiative to mitigate the financial impacts of living in a contaminated community. The Environmentally Compromised Home Ownership (ECHO) program makes home equity loans of up to $25,000 available to qualified applicants. This collaboration provides a case study in community engagement and demonstrates how research translation and outreach activities that are clearly differentiated yet well integrated can improve a suite of basic and applied research. Although engaging diverse constituencies can be difficult, community-engaged translation and outreach have the potential to make research findings more useful to communities, address some of the social impacts of contamination, and empower stakeholders to pursue their individual and collectively-held goals for remediation. The NIEHS has recently renewed its commitment to community-engaged research and advocacy, making this an optimal time to reflect on how basic research programs that engage stakeholders through research translation and outreach can add value to the overall research enterprise. PMID:18677987

  9. Influence of a chlor-alkali superfund site on mercury bioaccumulation in periphyton and low-trophic level fauna

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckman, Kate L.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Taylor, Vivien F.; Chalmers, Ann T.; Broadley, Hannah J.; Agee, Jennifer L.; Jackson, Brian P.; Chen, Celia Y.

    2015-01-01

    In Berlin, New Hampshire, USA, the Androscoggin River flows adjacent to a former chlor-alkali facility that is a US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site and source of mercury (Hg) to the river. The present study was conducted to determine the fate and bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) to lower trophic-level taxa in the river. Surface sediment directly adjacent to the source showed significantly elevated MeHg (10–40× increase, mean ± standard deviation [SD]: 20.1 ± 24.8 ng g–1 dry wt) and total mercury (THg; 10–30× increase, mean ± SD: 2045 ± 2669 ng g–1 dry wt) compared with all other reaches, with sediment THg and MeHg from downstream reaches elevated (3–7× on average) relative to the reference (THg mean ± SD: 33.5 ± 9.33 ng g–1 dry wt; MeHg mean ± SD: 0.52 ± 0.21 ng g–1 dry wt). Water column THg concentrations adjacent to the point source for both particulate (0.23 ng L–1) and dissolved (0.76 ng L–1) fractions were 5-fold higher than at the reference sites, and 2-fold to 5-fold higher than downstream. Methylmercury production potential of periphyton material was highest (2–9 ng g–1 d–1 dry wt) adjacent to the Superfund site; other reaches were close to or below reporting limits (0. 1 ng g–1 d–1 dry wt). Total Hg and MeHg bioaccumulation in fauna was variable across sites and taxa, with no clear spatial patterns downstream of the contamination source. Crayfish, mayflies, and shiners showed a weak positive relationship with porewater MeHg concentration.

  10. Soil ingestion estimates for children residing on a superfund site.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, E J; Stanek, E J; Pekow, P; Barnes, R M

    1997-04-01

    Soil ingestion estimates were obtained from a stratified, simple random sample of 64 children aged 1-4 years residing on a superfund site in Montana. The study was conducted during the month of September for 7 consecutive days. The study utilized a mass-balance methodology in which eight naturally occurring soil tracers (Al, Si, Ti, Ce, Nd, La, Y, and Zr) believed to be poorly absorbed by the gastrointestinal tract were employed to provide soil ingestion estimates. Food and fecal samples were analyzed on a daily basis. Soil/dust samples representative of where the children played during the study period were obtained. Very high compliance among the participants was maintained throughout the study. The identical methodology employed in the childrens' study was used in an adult study of tracer recovery in 10 subjects over 28 days of observation to provide validation that soil ingestion over the range of 20 to 500 mg/day could be detected. Soil ingestion was estimated by each soil tracer via traditional methods as well as by an improved approach using five trace elements (Al, Si, Ti, Y, and Zr), called the Best Tracer Method (BTM), which substantially corrects for error due to misalignment of tracer input and output as well as error occurring from ingestion of tracers from nonfood, nonsoil sources, while being insensitive to the particle size of the soil/dust ingested. According to the BTM, the median soil ingestion was less than 1 mg/day while the upper 95% was 160 mg/day. No significant age (1 year vs 2, vs 3) or sex-related differences in soil ingestion were observed. These estimates are lower than estimates observed in another study in Massachusetts during September and October. Significant methodological improvements in this study as compared to previously conducted soil ingestion studies include the selection of a representative sample of children, longer study duration, inclusion of dietary recommendations to reduce food tracer input and variability, use of the

  11. Analysis of geophysical logs, at North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site, Lansdale, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, Randall W.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), as part of technical assistance to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), collected borehole geophysical log data in 34 industrial, commercial, and public supply wells and 28 monitor wells at the North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site, in Lansdale, Pa., from August 22, 1995, through August 29, 1997. The wells range in depth from 50 to 1,027 feet below land surface and are drilled in Triassic-age shales and siltstones of the Brunswick Group and Lockatong Formation. The geophysical log data were collected to help describe the hydrogeologic framework in the area and to provide guidance in the reconstruction of the 28 monitor wells drilled during summer 1997. At the time of logging, all wells had open-hole construction. The geophysical logs, caliper, fluid-resistivity, and fluid-temperature, and borehole video logs were used to determine the vertical distribution of water-bearing fractures. Heatpulse-flowmeter measurements were used to determine vertical borehole flow under pumping and nonpumping conditions. The most productive fractures generally could be determined from heatpulse-flowmeter measurements under pumping conditions. Vertical borehole flow was measured under nonpumping conditions in most wells that had more than one water-bearing fracture. Upward flow was measured in 35 wells and probably is a result of natural head differences between fractures in the local ground-water-flow system. Downward flow was measured in 11 wells and commonly indicated differences in hydraulic heads of the fractures caused by nearby pumping. Both upward and downward flow was measured in three wells. No flow was detected in eight wells. Natural-gamma-ray logs were used to estimate the attitude of bedding. Thin shale marker beds, shown as spikes of elevated radioactivity in the natural-gamma logs of some wells throughout the area, enable the determination of bedding-plane orientation from three-point correlations. Generally, the marker beds in

  12. Nanotoxicology and nanotechnology: new findings from the NIEHS and Superfund Research Program scientific community.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Danielle J

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are characterized by their small size (i.e., nanometer scale) and can be engineered from nearly any chemical substance, creating materials that differ in composition, particle size, shape, and surface coatings. These materials are often seen as a "double-edged sword" by having properties that make them potentially beneficial in product development, drug delivery, and remediation of hazardous substances, but these same properties may result in interaction with biological systems and potential effects in the environment. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is interested in both the potential risks associated with exposure to these materials, while harnessing the power of engineered nanomaterials to improve public health. This presentation will consist of discussion of nanoparticle studies by NIEHS researchers and the extramural community and its efforts to develop cross-agency initiatives to solve the many vexing issues associated with nanomaterials. For example, researchers from the NIEHS National Toxicology Program (NTP) are evaluating a number of nanomaterial classes in comprehensive toxicology studies. NIEHS also has an extensive extramural research grant portfolio consisting of the Nano Grand Opportunities (Nano GO) Program and NIEHS Centers for Nanotechnology Health Implications Research (NCNHIR) Consortium consisting of U19 and U01 Cooperative Centers. Furthermore, the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP), which supports a network of university (P42, R01), small business (SBIR/STTR), and training grants (R25), provides funding to grantees evaluating the toxicology of nanomaterials, developing new or improved nanotechnologies to monitor and remediate hazardous substances, and training professionals in the use of these of materials. The NIEHS's Worker Education Branch also offers educational materials for training workers on risks of nanotechnology in laboratories, manufacturing facilities, at hazardous waste cleanup

  13. POLYCHLORINATED BYPHENOLS AND P,P'-DDE IN TREE SWALLOW EGGS AND NESTLINGS FROM A SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study assessed biologically available contaminant concentrations in tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs and nestlings from a marine Superfund site. Tree swallows are used widely to assess and monitor aquatic contamination due to their preference for nesting near water an...

  14. Application of passive sampling for measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants in the water column at three marine superfund sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). However, historically a...

  15. SITE EVALUATION OF INNOVATIVE SEMI-PASSIVE ACID MINE DRAINAGE TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES AT THE SUMMITVILLE SUPERFUND SITE, COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA SITE Program is conducting a detailed sampling and evaluation of two innovative passive mine drainage treatment technologies at the Summitville Superfund Mining site in Southern Colorado. The technologies evaluated include the Aquafix automatic hydraulic lime dispensing s...

  16. 29 CFR 1614.102 - Agency program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency program. 1614.102 Section 1614.102 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION FEDERAL SECTOR EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Agency Program To Promote Equal Employment Opportunity § 1614.102 Agency program. (a) Each agency shall maintain a...

  17. Strengthening Career Human Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Charles P.

    2006-01-01

    Rooted in A. Bandura's (1982, 2001b) social cognitive theory, the notion of human agency has received considerable attention in vocational and career psychology for the last 2 decades, especially with the recent emergence of social constructivist thinking in the field. This article continues in the same direction. In reviewing the notion of human…

  18. Geophysical bed sediment characterization of the Androscoggin River from the former Chlor-Alkali Facility Superfund Site, Berlin, New Hampshire, to the state border with Maine, August 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Degnan, James R.; Teeple, Andrew P.; Johnston, Craig M.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Luce, Darryl

    2011-01-01

    The former Chlor-Alkali Facility in Berlin, New Hampshire, was listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Priorities List in 2005 as a Superfund site. The Chlor-Alkali Facility lies on the east bank of the Androscoggin River. Elemental mercury currently discharges from that bank into the Androscoggin River. The nature, extent, and the speciation of mercury and the production of methyl mercury contamination in the adjacent Androscoggin River is the subject of continuing investigations. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Region I of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, used geophysical methods to determine the distribution, thickness, and physical properties of sediments in the Androscoggin River channel at a small area of an upstream reference reach and downstream from the site to the New Hampshire–Maine State border. Separate reaches of the Androscoggin River in the study area were surveyed with surface geophysical methods including ground-penetrating radar and step-frequency electromagnetics. Results were processed to assess sediment characteristics including grain size, electrical conductivity, and pore-water specific conductance. Specific conductance measured during surface- and pore-water sampling was used to help interpret the results of the geophysical surveys. The electrical resistivity of sediment samples was measured in the laboratory with intact pore water for comparison with survey results. In some instances, anthropogenic features and land uses, such as roads and power lines affected the detection of riverbed properties using geophysical methods; when this occurred, the data were removed. Through combining results, detailed riverbed sediment characterizations were made. Results from ground-penetrating radar surveys were used to image and measure the depth to the riverbed, depth to buried riverbeds, riverbed thickness and to interpret material-type variations in terms of relative grain size. Fifty two percent of the

  19. 5 CFR 720.204 - Agency programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agency programs. 720.204 Section 720.204 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) AFFIRMATIVE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program § 720.204 Agency programs. (a) Each Executive agency...

  20. 5 CFR 831.1004 - Agency contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agency contributions. 831.1004 Section 831.1004 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT CSRS Offset § 831.1004 Agency contributions. The employing agency, the Secretary...

  1. 5 CFR 831.1004 - Agency contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agency contributions. 831.1004 Section 831.1004 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT CSRS Offset § 831.1004 Agency contributions. The employing agency, the Secretary of the Senate, and the Clerk of the House...

  2. 5 CFR 831.1004 - Agency contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agency contributions. 831.1004 Section 831.1004 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT CSRS Offset § 831.1004 Agency contributions. The employing agency, the Secretary...

  3. 5 CFR 831.1004 - Agency contributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agency contributions. 831.1004 Section 831.1004 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT CSRS Offset § 831.1004 Agency contributions. The employing agency, the Secretary of the Senate, and the Clerk of the House...

  4. 5 CFR 919.910 - Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agency. 919.910 Section 919.910 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.910 Agency. Agency means any United States executive department,...

  5. LIMITED-USE CHEMICAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING FOR EPA SUPERFUND ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because contractor field personnel complained about the poor durability and fit of limited-use chemical protective clothing (CPC) most commonly used at hazardous waste site operations, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a study to characterize use of CPC; de...

  6. LIMITED-USE CHEMICAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING FOR EPA SUPERFUND ACTIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because contractor field personnel complained about the poor durability and fit of limited-use chemical protective clothing (CPC) most commonly used at hazardous waste site operations, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated a study to • characterize use of CPC...

  7. Mercury in tree swallow food, eggs, bodies, and feathers at Acadia National Park, Maine, and an EPA Superfund Site, Ayer, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longcore, J.; Haines, T.; Halteman, W.

    2007-01-01

    We monitored nest boxes during 1997-1999 at Acadia National Park, Mt. Desert Island, ME and at an old-field site in Orono, ME to determine mercury (Hg) uptake in tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs, tissues, and food boluses. Also, in 1998-1999 we monitored nest boxes at Grove Pond and Plow Shop Pond at a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Superfund site in Ayer, MA. We recorded breeding success at all locations. On average among locations, total mercury (THg) biomagnified 2 to 4-fold from food to eggs and 9 to 18-fold from food to feathers. These are minimum values because the proportion of transferable methyl mercury (MeHg) of the THg in insects varies (i.e., 35%-95% of THg) in food boluses. THg was highest in food boluses at Aunt Betty Pond at Acadia, whereas THg in eggs was highest at the Superfund site. A few eggs from nests at each of these locations exceeded the threshold (i.e., 800-1,000 ng/g, wet wt.) of embryotoxicity established for Hg. Hatching success was 88.9% to 100% among locations, but five eggs failed to hatch from 4 of the 11 clutches in which an egg exceeded this threshold. MeHg in feathers was highest in tree swallows at Aunt Betty Pond and the concentration of THg in bodies was related to the concentration in feathers. Transfer of an average of 80%-92% of the Hg in bodies to feathers may have enhanced nestling survival. Residues of Hg in tissues of tree swallows in the Northeast seem higher than those of the Midwest.

  8. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Asbestos Dump, Operable Unit 3, Millington, NJ, September 8, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This Record of Decision (ROD) has been prepared for Operable Unit 3 (OU-3) of the Asbestos Dump Superfund Site, located at the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge (GSNWR) in Morris County, New Jersey. The major components of the selected remedy, including those partially or totally addressed by interim removal actions in 1997 and early 1998, include: Removal and off-site disposal of buried drums (this work was undertaken and completed in September 1997); Removal and off-site disposal of lead impacted soils (completed in Spring, 1998); Consolidation (partially addressed in Spring 1998) and Capping of ACM; Short-term Dewatering and Water Diversion, and Long-term Drainage Improvements (partially conducted in Summer 1997); Assessment of Wetland Impacts and Wetlands Restoration; Implementation of institutional controls to ensure the continued integrity of the drainage improvements and capping activities (e.g. limiting visitor access to daylight hours, prohibiting other than passive uses such as bird watching, hiking and photography); and, Appropriate environmental monitoring to confirm the effectiveness of the remedy (e.g. surface water, groundwater and biota monitoring and sampling).

  9. Operation of a solar photocatalytic water treatment system at a Superfund Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, J. E.; Mehos, M.; Turchi, C.; Link, H.

    A solar photocatalytic process has been under development at both Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute). This process uses solar ultraviolet light to activate a titanium dioxide catalyst which oxidizes organic contaminants in water. In the summer of 1991, a solar photocatalytic detoxification of water system was installed and tested at a California Superfund Site located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The site was designated a Superfund Site because of widespread groundwater contamination which resulted from the release of chlorinated solvents, principally trichloroethylene, when the site was a Naval Air Station in the early 1940s. The objectives of these experiments were to measure the effects of process variables and the process efficiency in an actual remediation setting, to collect experimental data and operating experience in photocatalytic oxidation of organic contaminants, to develop accurate models of the system operation, and to develop control strategies.

  10. Secondary Education Through Health -- environmental health curriculum: A Superfund science literacy outreach project

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, L.R.

    1996-12-31

    Inner-city high school students are disproportionately affected by health problems that stem from environmental conditions. Also, they are not adequately prepared in Science -- especially in the concepts, methods, and procedures of environmental-health science research -- and are generally unaware of the career opportunities in this field. A Superfund program was developed to increase Science literacy and expand career knowledge in environmental health among a cohort of minority high school students from New York City. The year-round program features lectures, laboratory tours, seminars, investigations, and research taught by faculty and Superfund investigators at Mount Sinai`s Environmental Health Sciences Center. The students made remarkable progress in terms of gaining environmental health knowledge, laboratory and scientific research skills, and awareness of environmental health careers.

  11. Superfund Explanation of Significant Difference for the Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Refuse Hideaway Landfill, Middleton, WI, September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-03-01

    This Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) is for the Refuse Hideaway Landfill Superfund site in Middleton, Wisconsin. The June 28, 1995 ROD required groundwater extraction and treatment of the most highly contaminated groundwater (greater than 200 ppb total volatile organic compounds (VOCs)), treatment of groundwater to discharge standards and injection of the treated water into the aquifer upgradient of the landfill to stimulate in-situ biodegradation of the degradable components of the contamination. This ESD documents that US EPA, in consultation with WDNR, has determined, based on the 1998 groundwater data, that it is not necessary to implement the groundwater extraction and treatment component of the selected remedy. The significant decrease of total VOCs in groundwater over a short period of time indicates that groundwater should meet the remedial action objective of NR 140 PALs within a reasonable period of time if source control measures continue to be operated and maintained.

  12. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 9): San Gabriel Valley (Area 4), Puente Valley Operable Unit, La Puente, CA, September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This Interim Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the contamination at the Puente Valley Operable Unit (PVOU) located within the San Gabriel Valley Superfund Site in Los Angeles County, California. This ROD addresses ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The selected remedy is containment of ground water contaminated with VOCs in the shallow and intermediate zones at the mouth of Puente Valley to prevent further migration of existing ground-water contamination. This remedy includes performance criteria that will require extraction and treatment of contaminated ground water at certain locations along the downgradient edge of the contamination and will require continued monitoring and evaluation at other locations. Treated ground water will be provided to local water purveyors or discharged to Puente Creek, immediately upstream of San Jose Creek. In addition, this remedy includes monitoring in the shallow, intermediate, and deep ground-water zones at mid-valley and at the mouth of the valley.

  13. 78 FR 35296 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Federal Emergency Management Agency, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent...

  14. 45 CFR 1173.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal agency or agency. 1173.645 Section 1173.645 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR...

  15. 45 CFR 1155.645 - Federal agency or agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal agency or agency. 1155.645 Section 1155.645 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE...

  16. Spatial and temporal variation of freely dissolved PAHs in an urban river undergoing Superfund remediation

    PubMed Central

    Sower, GJ; Anderson, K.A.

    2014-01-01

    Urban rivers with a history of industrial use can exhibit spatial and temporal variations in contaminant concentrations that may significantly affect risk evaluations and even the assessment of remediation efforts. Concentrations of 15 biologically available priority pollutant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured over five years along 18.5 miles of the lower Willamette River using passive sampling devices and HPLC. The study area includes the Portland Harbor Superfund megasite with several PAH sources including remediation operations for coal tar at RM 6.3 west and an additional Superfund site, McCormick and Baxter, at RM 7 east consisting largely of creosote contamination. Study results show that organoclay capping at the McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site reduced PAHs from a pre-cap average of 440 ± 422 ng/L to 8 ± 3 ng/L post-capping. Results also reveal that dredging of submerged coal tar nearly tripled nearby freely dissolved PAH concentrations. For apportioning sources, fluoranthene/ pyrene and phenanthrene/anthracene diagnostic ratios from passive sampling devices were established for creosote and coal tar contamination and compared to published sediment values. PMID:19174872

  17. Electrochemical peroxidation of PCBs and VOCs in superfund site water and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Scrudato, R.J.; Chiarenzelli, J.R.

    1996-12-31

    An electrochemical peroxidation (ECP) process has been developed and used to degrade polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and volatile organic compounds (VOC)-contaminated water, sludge, and sediments at a New York State Federal and State Superfund Site. The process involves passing an oscillating low-amperage (<10 amps) current through steel electrodes immersed in an acidified water or sediment slurry into which hydrogen peroxide (<1,000 ppm) is added. The generated free radicals attack organic compounds, including organo-metallic complexes and refractory compounds including PCBs. PCB degradation ranged from about 30% to 80% in experiments involving Federal Superfund Site sediments; total PCBs were reduced by {approximately}97% to 68%, respectively, in water and slurry collected from a State Superfund subsurface storage tank. VOC bench-scale experiments involved chloroethane, 1,1-dichloroethane, dichloromethane, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and acetone and after a 3-min ECP treatment, degradation ranged from >94% to about 99.9%. Results indicate the ECP is a viable process to degrade organic contaminants in water and sediment suspensions. Because the treated water suspensions are acidified, select trace metal sorbed to the particulates is solubilized and therefore can be segregated from the particulates, offering a process that simultaneously degrades organic contaminants and separates trace metals. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Temporal Chemical Data for Sediment, Water, and Biological Samples from the Lava Cap Mine Superfund Site, Nevada County, California-2006-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, Andrea L.; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Tufano, Kate; White, Richard III

    2010-01-01

    The Lava Cap Mine is located about 6 km east of the city of Grass Valley, Nevada County, California, at an elevation of about 900 m. Gold was hosted in quartz-carbonate veins typical of the Sierran Gold Belt, but the gold grain size was smaller and the abundance of sulfide minerals higher than in typical deposits. The vein system was discovered in 1860, but production was sporadic until the 1930s when two smaller operations on the site were consolidated, a flotation mill was built, and a 100-foot deep adit was driven to facilitate drainage and removal of water from the mine workings, which extended to 366 m. Peak production at the Lava Cap occurred between 1934 and 1943, when about 90,000 tons of ore per year were processed. To facilitate removal of the gold and accessory sulfide minerals, the ore was crushed to a very fine sand or silt grain size for processing. Mining operations at Lava Cap ceased in June 1943 due to War Production Board Order L-208 and did not resume after the end of World War II. Two tailings retention structures were built at the Lava Cap Mine. The first was a log dam located about 0.4 km below the flotation mill on Little Clipper Creek, and the second, built in 1938, was a larger earth fill and rip-rap structure constructed about 2 km downstream, which formed the water body now called Lost Lake. The log dam failed during a storm that began on December 31, 1996, and continued into January 1997; an estimated 8,000-10,000 m3 of tailings were released into Little Clipper Creek during this event. Most of the fine tailings were deposited in Lost Lake, dramatically increasing its turbidity and resulting in a temporary 1-1.5 m rise in lake level due to debris blocking the dam spillway. When the blockage was cleared, the lake level quickly lowered, leaving a ?bathtub ring? of very fine tailings deposited substantially above the water line. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) initiated emergency action in late 1997 at the mine site to reduce

  19. 29 CFR 2703.2 - Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. 2703.2 Section 2703.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL... agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. The Chairman shall appoint...

  20. 29 CFR 2703.2 - Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. 2703.2 Section 2703.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL... agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. The Chairman shall appoint...

  1. 29 CFR 2703.2 - Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. 2703.2 Section 2703.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL... agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. The Chairman shall appoint...

  2. 29 CFR 2703.2 - Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. 2703.2 Section 2703.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL... agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. The Chairman shall appoint...

  3. 29 CFR 2703.2 - Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Designated agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. 2703.2 Section 2703.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL... agency ethics official and alternate designated agency ethics official. The Chairman shall appoint...

  4. 40 CFR 707.65 - Submission to agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 707.65 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL... (7407M), Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200..., Environmental Protection Agency, 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Washington, DC (Attention: TSCA Section...

  5. 40 CFR 707.65 - Submission to agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 707.65 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL... (7407M), Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200..., Environmental Protection Agency, 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Washington, DC (Attention: TSCA Section...

  6. 40 CFR 707.65 - Submission to agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 707.65 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL... (7407M), Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200..., Environmental Protection Agency, 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Washington, DC (Attention: TSCA Section...

  7. 40 CFR 707.65 - Submission to agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 707.65 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL... (7407M), Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200..., Environmental Protection Agency, 1201 Constitution Ave., NW., Washington, DC (Attention: TSCA Section...

  8. 5 CFR 841.504 - Agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... certification in an internal automated system of records. (e) An agency must maintain payroll systems and... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Employee Deductions and...

  9. 5 CFR 841.504 - Agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... certification in an internal automated system of records. (e) An agency must maintain payroll systems and... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Employee Deductions and...

  10. 5 CFR 841.504 - Agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... certification in an internal automated system of records. (e) An agency must maintain payroll systems and... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Employee Deductions and...

  11. 5 CFR 841.504 - Agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... certification in an internal automated system of records. (e) An agency must maintain payroll systems and... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Employee Deductions and...

  12. 5 CFR 841.504 - Agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certification in an internal automated system of records. (e) An agency must maintain payroll systems and... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES RETIREMENT SYSTEM-GENERAL ADMINISTRATION Employee Deductions and...

  13. Denver Radium Site -- Operable Unit X closeout report for the US Environmental Protection Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Denver Radium Site consists of properties in the Denver area having radioactive contamination left from radium processing in the early 1900s. The properties are divided into 11 groups or operable units'' to facilitate remedial action management of the Site. Under the provisions of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is authorized to respond to a release of a hazardous substance or to a substantial threat of such a release into the environment. EPA or the state conducts a site inspection and uses the Hazard Ranking System to determine placement on the EPA National Priorities List (NPL). In 1983, EPA placed the Denver Radium Site on the NPL, making it eligible for cleanup under the EPA Superfund Program. Through a series of interagency agreements,EPA has enlisted the support of the US Department of Energy Grand junction Projects Office and Chem-Nuclear Geotech, Inc., for remedial design and remedial action activities at the Denver Radium Superfund Site.The US Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) is managing the waste transportation and disposal contract.

  14. Denver Radium Site -- Operable Unit X closeout report for the US Environmental Protection Agency

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Denver Radium Site consists of properties in the Denver area having radioactive contamination left from radium processing in the early 1900s. The properties are divided into 11 groups or ``operable units`` to facilitate remedial action management of the Site. Under the provisions of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is authorized to respond to a release of a hazardous substance or to a substantial threat of such a release into the environment. EPA or the state conducts a site inspection and uses the Hazard Ranking System to determine placement on the EPA National Priorities List (NPL). In 1983, EPA placed the Denver Radium Site on the NPL, making it eligible for cleanup under the EPA Superfund Program. Through a series of interagency agreements,EPA has enlisted the support of the US Department of Energy Grand junction Projects Office and Chem-Nuclear Geotech, Inc., for remedial design and remedial action activities at the Denver Radium Superfund Site.The US Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) is managing the waste transportation and disposal contract.

  15. Geophysical Logs, Aquifer Tests, and Water Levels in Wells in and Near the North Penn Area 7 Superfund Site, Upper Gwynedd Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 2002-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Conger, Randall W.; Bird, Philip H.

    2008-01-01

    Ground water in the vicinity of several industrial facilities in Upper Gwynedd Township and Lansdale Borough, Montgomery County, Pa., is contaminated with several volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The 2-square-mile area was placed on the National Priorities List as the North Penn Area 7 Superfund Site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1989. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical logging, aquifer testing, water-level monitoring, and streamflow measurements in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 from October 2002 through December 2006. This followed work that began in 2000 to assist the USEPA in developing an understanding of the hydrogeologic framework in the area as part of the USEPA Remedial Investigation. The study area is underlain by Triassic- and Jurassic-age sandstones, siltstones, and shales of the Lockatong Formation and the Brunswick Group. Regionally, these rocks strike northeast and dip to the northwest. The sequence of rocks form fractured-rock aquifers that act as a set of confined to semi-confined layered aquifers of differing permeabilities. The aquifers are recharged by precipitation and discharge to streams and wells. The Wissahickon Creek headwaters are less than 1 mile northeast of the study area. This stream flows southwest approximately parallel to strike and bisects North Penn Area 7. Ground water is pumped in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 for industrial use and public supply. The USGS collected geophysical logs for 42 wells that ranged in depth from 40 to 477 ft. Aquifer-interval-isolation testing was done in 17 of the 42 wells, for a total of 122 zones tested. A multiple-well aquifer test was conducted by monitoring the response of 14 wells to pumping and shutdown of a 600-ft deep production well in November-December 2004. In addition, water levels were monitored continuously in four wells in the area from October 2002 through September 2006, and streamflow was measured quarterly at two sites on

  16. 40 CFR 300.2 - Authority and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... publication for notice and comment. This includes coordination with the Federal Emergency Management Agency... Section 300.2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY... in the emergency planning responsibilities of those agencies. The NCP is applicable to...

  17. Federal Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyle, George M.

    1976-01-01

    The status of two of life's necessities, air and water, is of crucial importance to the future of American parks and recreation programs, and continued cooperation among federal, state, local and private sectors is necessary to preserve them. (JD)

  18. 1992 update of US EPA's Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Emerging Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, N.M.; Barkley, N.P.; Williams, T. )

    1992-12-01

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Emerging Technology Program (ETP) has financially supported further development of bench- and pilot-scale testing and evaluation of innovative technologies for use at hazardous waste sites for five years. The ETP was established under the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The ETP complies with the goal of the SITE Program to promote, accelerate and make commercially available the development of alternative/innovative treatment technologies for use at Superfund sites. Technologies are submitted to the ETP through yearly solicitations for Preproposals. Applicants are asked to submit a detailed project proposal and a cooperative agreement application that requires Developer/EPA cost sharing. EPA co-funds selected Developers for one to two years. Second-year funding requires documentation of significant progress during the first year. Facilities, equipment, data collection, performance and development are monitored throughout the project. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Air Force (USAF) are participants in the ETP. DOE has co-funded ETP projects since 1990 and the USAF since 1991. A goal of the ETP is to move developed technologies to the field-demonstration stage. A developer may be considered for participation in the SITE Demonstration Program if performance in the ETP indicates the technology is field-ready for evaluation. Six technology categories: biological, chemical, materials handling, physical, solidification/stabilization and thermal, are presently in the ETP. Technologies of primary interest to EPA are those that can treat complex mixtures of hazardous organic and inorganic contaminants and provide improved solids handling and/or pretreatment. An account of the background and progress of the ETP's first five years is presented in this paper. Technologies currently in the ETP are noted, and developers and EPA Project Managers, are listed. 4 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Continual improvement plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    NASA's approach to continual improvement (CI) is a systems-oriented, agency-wide approach that builds on the past accomplishments of NASA Headquarters and its field installations and helps achieve NASA's vision, mission, and values. The NASA of the future will fully use the principles of continual improvement in every aspect of its operations. This NASA CI plan defines a systematic approach and a model for continual improvement throughout NASA, stressing systems integration and optimization. It demonstrates NASA's constancy of purpose for improvement - a consistent vision of NASA as a worldwide leader in top-quality science, technology, and management practices. The CI plan provides the rationale, structures, methods, and steps, and it defines NASA's short term (1-year) objectives for improvement. The CI plan presents the deployment strategies necessary for cascading the goals and objectives throughout the agency. It also provides guidance on implementing continual improvement with participation from top leadership and all levels of employees.

  20. Documented performance of a slurry wall at a Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Zamojski, L.D.; Reinknecht, D.F.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents data on the performance of a soil-bentonite slurry wall installed at the FLR Landfill site. The wall was approximately 1,600 meters or 5,250 lineal ft in length, and varied in depth for 6 m (20 ft) to 13 m (43 ft). Pre-construction laboratory testing was performed and identified a mix of 4 percent bentonite by dry weight as being required to provide the necessary hydraulic conductivity of 1{times}10E-7 cm/sec. Because of limited space near the trench, the construction contractor was required to use a central mixing plant (pugmill). The pugmill provided computerized weight documentation of the mix proportions to insure a homogeneous backfill mix. It also gave permanent records of the amount of materials used. The hydraulic conductivity of the installed, slurry wall was determined by post-construction testing. With the use of a central mixing plant, a consistent good quality soil-bentonite wall was obtained together with the necessary documentation for the regulatory agencies. The main source of environmental concern at FLR was the reported deposition of approximately 86 metric tons of hazardous chemicals at the site which included phthalates, heavy metals and vinyl chloride monomers. Landfill gas emissions containing methane, hydrogen sulfide and volatile organic compounds were also observed.

  1. 29 CFR 1614.104 - Agency processing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency processing. 1614.104 Section 1614.104 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION FEDERAL SECTOR EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Agency Program To Promote Equal Employment Opportunity § 1614.104 Agency...

  2. 34 CFR 303.22 - Lead agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lead agency. 303.22 Section 303.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.22 Lead agency. Lead agency means the...

  3. 34 CFR 303.22 - Lead agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Lead agency. 303.22 Section 303.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.22 Lead agency. Lead agency means the...

  4. 34 CFR 303.22 - Lead agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lead agency. 303.22 Section 303.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.22 Lead agency. Lead agency means the...

  5. 40 CFR 166.25 - Agency review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Agency review. 166.25 Section 166.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS EXEMPTION OF FEDERAL AND STATE AGENCIES FOR USE OF PESTICIDES UNDER EMERGENCY CONDITIONS Specific, Quarantine, and...

  6. 40 CFR 166.25 - Agency review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency review. 166.25 Section 166.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS EXEMPTION OF FEDERAL AND STATE AGENCIES FOR USE OF PESTICIDES UNDER EMERGENCY CONDITIONS Specific, Quarantine, and...

  7. 40 CFR 166.25 - Agency review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agency review. 166.25 Section 166.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS EXEMPTION OF FEDERAL AND STATE AGENCIES FOR USE OF PESTICIDES UNDER EMERGENCY CONDITIONS Specific, Quarantine, and...

  8. Continuing Education Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, K. A.; Fenwick, P. R.

    In 1978, a national survey was conducted in New Zealand to determine the extent of participation in continuing education and the level of unmet need for these activities. A questionnaire was developed dealing with respondent characteristics, spare time and interests, agency-directed learning activities (ADLAS), and unmet needs, and administered to…

  9. 5 CFR 720.204 - Agency programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agency programs. 720.204 Section 720.204 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) AFFIRMATIVE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program § 720.204 Agency programs....

  10. 5 CFR 720.303 - Agency programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agency programs. 720.303 Section 720.303 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) AFFIRMATIVE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS Disabled Veterans Affirmative Action Program § 720.303 Agency programs....

  11. 5 CFR 720.204 - Agency programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agency programs. 720.204 Section 720.204 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) AFFIRMATIVE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS Federal Equal Opportunity Recruitment Program § 720.204 Agency programs....

  12. Toward Identifying the Next Generation of Superfund and Hazardous Waste Site Contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Ela, Wendell P.; Sedlak, David L.; Barlaz, Morton A.; Henry, Heather F.; Muir, Derek C.G.; Swackhamer, Deborah L.; Weber, Eric J.; Arnold, Robert G.; Ferguson, P. Lee; Field, Jennifer A.; Furlong, Edward T.; Giesy, John P.; Halden, Rolf U.; Henry, Tala; Hites, Ronald A.; Hornbuckle, Keri C.; Howard, Philip H.; Luthy, Richard G.; Meyer, Anita K.; Sáez, A. Eduardo; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Vulpe, Chris D.; Wiesner, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Background This commentary evolved from a workshop sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences titled “Superfund Contaminants: The Next Generation” held in Tucson, Arizona, in August 2009. All the authors were workshop participants. Objectives Our aim was to initiate a dynamic, adaptable process for identifying contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) that are likely to be found in future hazardous waste sites, and to identify the gaps in primary research that cause uncertainty in determining future hazardous waste site contaminants. Discussion Superfund-relevant CECs can be characterized by specific attributes: They are persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic, occur in large quantities, and have localized accumulation with a likelihood of exposure. Although still under development and incompletely applied, methods to quantify these attributes can assist in winnowing down the list of candidates from the universe of potential CECs. Unfortunately, significant research gaps exist in detection and quantification, environmental fate and transport, health and risk assessment, and site exploration and remediation for CECs. Addressing these gaps is prerequisite to a preventive approach to generating and managing hazardous waste sites. Conclusions A need exists for a carefully considered and orchestrated expansion of programmatic and research efforts to identify, evaluate, and manage CECs of hazardous waste site relevance, including developing an evolving list of priority CECs, intensifying the identification and monitoring of likely sites of present or future accumulation of CECs, and implementing efforts that focus on a holistic approach to prevention. PMID:21205582

  13. Environmental Asbestos Assessment Manual Superfund Method for the Determination of Asbestos in Ambient Air Part 2: Technical Background Document

    EPA Science Inventory

    A sampling and analysis method for the determination of asbestos in air is presented in Part 1 of this report, under separate cover. This method is designed specifically to provide results suitable for supporting risk assessments at Superfund sites, although it is applicable t...

  14. LEAD (Pb) IN BIOTA AND PERCEPTIONS OF Pb EXPOSURE AT A RECENTLY DESIGNATED SUPERFUND BEACH SITE IN NEW JERSEY

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn

    2014-01-01

    The Raritan Bay Slag Site (New Jersey) was designated a Superfund site in 2009 because the seawall, jetties, and sediment contained lead (Pb). Our objective was to compare Pb and mercury (Hg) levels in biota and public perceptions of exposure at the Superfund and reference sites. Samples (algae, invertebrates, fish) were collected from the Raritan Bay Slag Site and reference sites and analyzed for Pb and Hg. Waterfront users were interviewed using a standard questionnaire. Levels of Pb in aquatic organisms were compared to ecological and human health safety standards. Lead levels were related to location, trophic level, and mobility. Lead levels in biota were highest at the western side of the West Jetty. Mean Pb levels were highest for algae (Fucus = 53,600 ± 6990 ng/g = ppb [wet weight], Ulva = 23,900 ± 2430 ppb), intermediate for grass shrimp (7270 ± 1300 ppb, 11,600 ± 3340 ppb), and lowest for fish (Atlantic silversides 218 ± 44 ppb). Within species, Pb levels varied significantly across the sampling sites. Lead levels in algae, sometimes ingested by individuals, were sufficiently high to exceed human safety levels. Mercury levels did not differ between the Superfund and reference sites. Despite the fence and warnings, people (1) used the Superfund and reference sites similarly, (2) had similar fish consumption rates, and (3) were not concerned about Pb, although most individuals knew the metal was present. The fish sampled posed no apparent risk for human consumers, but the algae did. PMID:22409490

  15. Use of Polyethylene Passive Samplers to Estimate Dissolved Phase PCBs in the Water Column of the Palos Verdes Superfund Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Palos Verdes Superfund site is located in over 50 meters of water on the continental shelf and slope off the coast of southern California (USA). The site includes 27 km2 of seabed contaminated over several decades by municipal treatment plant effluent discharged via outfall ...

  16. PILOT-SCALE INCINERATION OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS FROM THE HOT SPOT OF THE NEW BEDFORD HARBOR SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing was performed at the EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) to determine the incinerability of contaminated marine sediment from the Hot Spot in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site. he contaminants at this site were PCBs, at concentration up to >200,000 mg/kb, and m...

  17. PILOT-SCALE INCINERATION OF PCB-CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS FROM THE NEW BEDFORD HARBOR HOT SPOT SUPERFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Testing was performed at the EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) to determine the incinerability of contaminated marine sediment from the Hot Spot in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site. he contaminants at this site were PCBs, at concentrations up to >200,000 mg/kg, and ...

  18. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT, SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION TEST: SHIRCO PILOT-SCALE INFRARED INCINERATION SYSTEM ROSE TOWNSHIP DEMODE ROAD SUPERFUND

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of the Shirco pilot-scale infrared thermal destruction system has been evaluated at the Rose Township, Demode Road Superfund Site and is presented in the report. he waste tested consisted of solvents, organics and heavy metals in an illegal dump site. olume I give...

  19. ASSESSMENT OF VAPOR INTRUSION IN HOMES NEAR THE RAYMARK SUPERFUND SITE USING BASEMENT AND SUB-SLAB AIR SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the results of an investigation conducted to assist EPA’s New England Regional Office in evaluating vapor intrusion at 15 homes and one commercial building near the Raymark Superfund Site in Stratford, Connecticut. Methods were developed to sample sub-slab ...

  20. Hydrologic data for the Eastland Woolen Mill Superfund Site, Penobscot County, Corinna, Maine, March through June 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Martha G.; Dudley, Robert W.; Parrish, Camille S.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrologic data were collected at the Eastland Woolen Mill Superfund Site, Corinna, Maine, from March 19, 1999 through June 11, 1999 as part of a study to formulate a geologic characterization and conceptual model of this study area. Data-collection consisted of measurements of water-surface elevations at 7 surface-water sites and 20 wells.

  1. TAR CREEK SUPERFUND SITE REMEDIATION: COMBINED ROLES FOR BIOMASS, POULTRY LITTER, FLY ASH AND FLU GAS DESULFURIZATION RESIDUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tar Creek Superfund site in Northeastern Oklahoma is a large area contaminated from 100 years of lead and zinc mining. In this proposal we focus on developing surface coverage and remediation methods for the 45 million cubic yards of mine tailings, known as chat. The chat h...

  2. Evaluation of Polyethylene Passive Samplers to Estimate Deep Water PCB Concentrations at the Palos Verdes Shelf Superfund Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Palos Verdes Superfund site is located in over 50 meters of water on the continental shelf and slope off the coast of southern California (USA). The site includes 27 km2 of seabed contaminated over several decades by municipal treatment plant effluent discharged via outfall ...

  3. SITE PROGRAM APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS ASSESSMENT OF SUPERFUND APPLICATIONS FOR THE AMERICAN COMBUSTION INC. PYRETRON OXYGEN ENHANCED BURNER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incineration is widely used to clean up Superfund sites. Modifications which improve the efficiency with which waste can be incinerated are therefore of interest to EPA. Oxygen/air burners are of interest because their installation on conventional incinerators can allow for signi...

  4. Arsenic Fate, Transport And Stability Study: Groundwater, Surface Water, Soil And Sediment Investigation At Fort Devens Superfund Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field investigation was conducted to examine the distribution of arsenic in groundwater, surface water, and sediments at the Fort Devens Superfund Site. The study area encompassed a portion of plow Shop Pond (Red Cove), which receives groundwater discharge from the aquifer und...

  5. Lead (Pb) in biota and perceptions of Pb exposure at a recently designated Superfund beach site in New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn

    2012-01-01

    The Raritan Bay Slag Site (New Jersey) was designated a Superfund site in 2009 because the seawall, jetties, and sediment contained lead (Pb). Our objective was to compare Pb and mercury (Hg) levels in biota and public perceptions of exposure at the Superfund and reference sites. Samples (algae, invertebrates, fish) were collected from the Raritan Bay Slag Site and reference sites and analyzed for Pb and Hg. Waterfront users were interviewed using a standard questionnaire. Levels of Pb in aquatic organisms were compared to ecological and human health safety standards. Lead levels were related to location, trophic level, and mobility. Lead levels in biota were highest at the western side of the West Jetty. Mean Pb levels were highest for algae (Fucus = 53,600 ± 6990 ng/g = ppb [wet weight], Ulva = 23,900 ± 2430 ppb), intermediate for grass shrimp (7270 ± 1300 ppb, 11,600 ± 3340 ppb), and lowest for fish (Atlantic silversides 218 ± 44 ppb). Within species, Pb levels varied significantly across the sampling sites. Lead levels in algae, sometimes ingested by individuals, were sufficiently high to exceed human safety levels. Mercury levels did not differ between the Superfund and reference sites. Despite the fence and warnings, people (1) used the Superfund and reference sites similarly, (2) had similar fish consumption rates, and (3) were not concerned about Pb, although most individuals knew the metal was present. The fish sampled posed no apparent risk for human consumers, but the algae did. PMID:22409490

  6. 75 FR 30753 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... ] Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA'' in the Federal Register (73 FR 162, Aug. 20, 2008... approximately 30 acres of sediment in the waterway. Discussion of Comments and Change During the comment...

  7. 75 FR 76280 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA in the Federal Register (75 FR 105). We... August 20, 2008, we published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM; 73 FR 162) to establish a regulated... activities common to a working waterfront, covering approximately 30 acres of sediment in the waterway....

  8. Identification of potential water-bearing zones by the use of borehole geophysics in the vicinity of Keystone Sanitation Superfund Site, Adams County, Pennsylvania and Carroll County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conger, Randall W.

    1997-01-01

    Between April 23, 1996, and June 21, 1996, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency contracted Haliburton-NUS, Inc., to drill four clusters of three monitoring wells near the Keystone Sanitation Superfund Site. The purpose of the wells is to allow monitoring and sampling of shallow, intermediate, and deep waterbearing zones for the purpose of determining the horizontal and vertical distribution of any contaminated ground water migrating from the Keystone Site. Twelve monitoring wells, ranging in depth from 50 to 397.9 feet below land surface, were drilled in the vicinity of the Keystone Site. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted borehole-geophysical logging and determined, with geophysical logs and other available data, the ideal intervals to be screened in each well. Geophysical logs were run on four intermediate and four deep wells, and a caliper log only was run on shallow well CL-AD-173 (HN-1S). Interpretation of geophysical logs and existing data determined the placement of screens within each borehole.

  9. Geophysical Logs, Specific Capacity, and Water Quality of Four Wells at Rogers Mechanical (former Tate Andale) Property, North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site, Lansdale, Pennsylvania, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Bird, Philip H.

    2010-01-01

    As part of technical assistance to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in the remediation of properties on the North Penn Area 6 Superfund Site in Lansdale, Pa., the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2006-07 collected data in four monitor wells at the Rogers Mechanical (former Tate Andale) property. During this period, USGS collected and analyzed borehole geophysical and video logs of three new monitor wells (Rogers 4, Rogers 5, and Rogers 6) ranging in depth from 80 to 180 feet, a borehole video log and additional heatpulse-flowmeter measurements (to quantify vertical borehole flow) in one existing 100-foot deep well (Rogers 3S), and water-level data during development of two wells (Rogers 5 and Rogers 6) to determine specific capacity. USGS also summarized results of passive-diffusion bag sampling for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the four wells. These data were intended to help understand the groundwater system and the distribution of VOC contaminants in groundwater at the property.

  10. Risks to children from exposure to lead in air during remedial or removal activities at Superfund sites: a case study of the RSR lead smelter Superfund site.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Ghassan A; Diamond, Gary L

    2003-01-01

    Superfund sites that are contaminated with lead and undergoing remedial action generate lead-enriched dust that can be released into the air. Activities that can emit lead-enriched dust include demolition of lead smelter buildings, stacks, and baghouses; on-site traffic of heavy construction vehicles; and excavation of soil. Typically, air monitoring stations are placed around the perimeter of a site of an ongoing remediation to monitor air lead concentrations that might result from site emissions. The National Ambient Air Quality (NAAQ) standard, established in 1978 to be a quarterly average of 1.5 microg/m(3), is often used as a trigger level for corrective action to reduce emissions. This study explored modeling approaches for assessing potential risks to children from air lead emissions from the RSR Superfund site in West Dallas, TX, during demolition and removal of a smelter facility. The EPA Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model and the International Commission of Radiologic Protection (ICRP) lead model were used to simulate blood lead concentrations in children, based on monitored air lead concentrations. Although air lead concentrations at monitoring stations located in the downwind community intermittently exceeded the NAAQ standard, both models indicated that exposures to children in the community areas did not pose a significant long-term or acute risk. Long-term risk was defined as greater than 5% probability of a child having a long-term blood lead concentration that exceeded 10 microg/dl, which is the CDC and the EPA blood lead concern level. Short-term or acute risk was defined as greater than 5% probability of a child having a blood lead concentration on any given day that exceeded 20 microg/dl, which is the CDC trigger level for medical evaluation (this is not intended to imply that 20 microg/dl is a threshold for health effects in children exposed acutely to airborne lead). The estimated potential long-term and short-term exposures

  11. Estimating Children’s Soil/Dust Ingestion Rates through Retrospective Analyses of Blood Lead Biomonitoring from the Bunker Hill Superfund Site in Idaho

    PubMed Central

    von Lindern, Ian; Spalinger, Susan; Stifelman, Marc L.; Stanek, Lindsay Wichers; Bartrem, Casey

    2016-01-01

    Background: Soil/dust ingestion rates are important variables in assessing children’s health risks in contaminated environments. Current estimates are based largely on soil tracer methodology, which is limited by analytical uncertainty, small sample size, and short study duration. Objectives: The objective was to estimate site-specific soil/dust ingestion rates through reevaluation of the lead absorption dose–response relationship using new bioavailability data from the Bunker Hill Mining and Metallurgical Complex Superfund Site (BHSS) in Idaho, USA. Methods: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in vitro bioavailability methodology was applied to archived BHSS soil and dust samples. Using age-specific biokinetic slope factors, we related bioavailable lead from these sources to children’s blood lead levels (BLLs) monitored during cleanup from 1988 through 2002. Quantitative regression analyses and exposure assessment guidance were used to develop candidate soil/dust source partition scenarios estimating lead intake, allowing estimation of age-specific soil/dust ingestion rates. These ingestion rate and bioavailability estimates were simultaneously applied to the U.S. EPA Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic Model for Lead in Children to determine those combinations best approximating observed BLLs. Results: Absolute soil and house dust bioavailability averaged 33% (SD ± 4%) and 28% (SD ± 6%), respectively. Estimated BHSS age-specific soil/dust ingestion rates are 86–94 mg/day for 6-month- to 2-year-old children and 51–67 mg/day for 2- to 9-year-old children. Conclusions: Soil/dust ingestion rate estimates for 1- to 9-year-old children at the BHSS are lower than those commonly used in human health risk assessment. A substantial component of children’s exposure comes from sources beyond the immediate home environment. Citation: von Lindern I, Spalinger S, Stifelman ML, Stanek LW, Bartrem C. 2016. Estimating children’s soil/dust ingestion

  12. Hydrogeology and water quality of the Galena-Platteville aquifer at the Parson's Casket Hardware Superfund site, Belvidere, Illinois, 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mills, P.C.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, investigated the hydrogeology of the Galena-Platteville aquifer and its relation to contaminant migration at the Parson's Casket Hardware Superfund site in Belvidere, Ill. This report presents the results of the second phase of the investigation, which lasted from March through October 1991. The uppermost bedrock units beneath the study site are the Galena and Platteville Groups1; these bedrock units immediately underlie a glacial drift aquifer. The Galena and Platteville Groups, which consist predominantly of dolomite, compose the Galena-Platteville aquifer, and extend from about 40 to 320 feet below land surface. The unconfined Galena-Platteville aquifer is partitioned into five hydrogeologic units. The uppermost unit, the weathered surface of the bedrock, has a horizontal hydraulic conductivity that ranges from about 1 to 200 feet per day. The four underlying units have hydraulic conductivities that range from about 0.01 to 1 foot per day. Vertical hydraulic gradients in the aquifer are typically downward. Horizontal groundwater flow generally is southward to southeastward from the site toward the Kishwaukee River. Three notable bedding-plane solution fissures and three fractures that crosscut the bedding planes are identified within the dolomite bedrock. The inclined fractures are assumed to function as conduits that connect high conductivity horizontal fissures, thus allowing more rapid vertical movement of ground water and contaminants than would be expected in the generally low conductivity dolomite matrix. A multiple-well, constant-discharge aquifer test confirms the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the dolomite aquifer. The hydraulic characteristics of the uppermost part of the bedrock aquifer are somewhat different than the characteristics of the deeper part(s) of the aquifer. This is because the principal conduits for water movement are in the deeper part(s) of the

  13. Aquatic assessment of the Pike Hill Copper Mine Superfund site, Corinth, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Argue, Denise M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Kiah, Richard G.; Besser, John M.; Coles, James F.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Levitan, Denise M.; Deacon, Jeffrey R.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    The Pike Hill Copper Mine Superfund site in Corinth, Orange County, Vermont, includes the Eureka, Union, and Smith mines along with areas of downstream aquatic ecosystem impairment. The site was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List in 2004. The mines, which operated from about 1847 to 1919, contain underground workings, foundations from historical structures, several waste-rock piles, and some flotation tailings. The mine site is drained to the northeast by Pike Hill Brook, which includes several wetland areas, and to the southeast by an unnamed tributary that flows to the south and enters Cookville Brook. Both brooks eventually drain into the Waits River, which flows into the Connecticut River. The aquatic ecosystem at the site was assessed using a variety of approaches that investigated surface-water quality, sediment quality, and various ecological indicators of stream-ecosystem health. The degradation of surface-water quality is caused by elevated concentrations of copper, and to a lesser extent cadmium, with localized effects caused by aluminum, iron, and zinc. Copper concentrations in surface waters reached or exceeded the USEPA national recommended chronic water-quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life in all of the Pike Hill Brook sampling locations except for the location farthest downstream, in half of the locations sampled in the tributary to Cookville Brook, and in about half of the locations in one wetland area located in Pike Hill Brook. Most of these same locations also contained concentrations of cadmium that exceeded the chronic water-quality criteria. In contrast, surface waters at background sampling locations were below these criteria for copper and cadmium. Comparison of hardness-based and Biotic Ligand Model (BLM)-based criteria for copper yields similar results with respect to the extent or number of stations impaired for surface waters in the affected area. However, the BLM

  14. Application of Passive Sampling for Measuring Dissolved Concentrations of Organic Contaminants in the Water Column at Three U.S. EPA Marine Superfund Sites.

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). Historically, acquiring...

  15. Application of Passive Sampling for Measuring Dissolved Concentrations of Organic Contaminants in the Water Column at Three U.S. EPA Marine Superfund Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    At contaminated sediment sites, including U.S. EPA Superfund sites, it is critical to measure water column concentrations of freely dissolved contaminants to understand the complete exposure of aquatic organisms to hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). Historically acquiring ...

  16. 7 CFR 247.35 - Local agency appeals of State agency actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Local agency appeals of State agency actions. 247.35 Section 247.35 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.35 Local agency appeals of State...

  17. Northern Idaho house dust and soil lead levels compared to the Bunker Hill Superfund Site.

    PubMed

    Spalinger, Susan M; von Braun, Margrit C; Petrosyan, Varduhi; von Lindern, Ian H

    2007-07-01

    House dust has been identified as a major exposure medium for lead (Pb) in children. High levels of Pb in soil and house dust have been recorded at the Bunker Hill Superfund Site (BHSS) in northern Idaho, an historic mining and smelting district. Soil and dust remediation at the site was required; however, regional background soil and dust Pb levels had not been well characterized. The objective of this survey was to determine background house dust Pb levels and to compare those levels with concentrations, and dust and Pb loading rates measured at the BHSS. Soil and house dust samples were collected in five towns demographically similar to the BHSS but unaffected by the mining industry. The background concentrations and loading rates were significantly lower than those observed at the site. House age was a significant factor affecting background soil and house dust Pb concentrations and loading rates. PMID:17171279

  18. Raman spectroscopy of efflorescent sulfate salts from Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sobron, Pablo; Alpers, Charles N.

    2013-01-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site near Redding, California, is a massive sulfide ore deposit that was mined for iron, silver, gold, copper, zinc, and pyrite intermittently for nearly 100 years. As a result, both water and air reached the sulfide deposits deep within the mountain, producing acid mine drainage consisting of sulfuric acid and heavy metals from the ore. Particularly, the drainage water from the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain is among the most acidic waters naturally found on Earth. The mineralogy at Iron Mountain can serve as a proxy for understanding sulfate formation on Mars. Selected sulfate efflorescent salts from Iron Mountain, formed from extremely acidic waters via drainage from sulfide mining, have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy. Gypsum, ferricopiapite, copiapite, melanterite, coquimbite, and voltaite are found within the samples. This work has implications for Mars mineralogical and geochemical investigations as well as for terrestrial environmental investigations related to acid mine drainage contamination.

  19. Ecotoxicity of nitroaromatics to aquatic and terrestrial species at Army Superfund sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hovatter, P.S.; Talmage, S.S.; Opresko, D.M.; Ross, R.H.

    1997-09-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds, including 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, RDX, HMX, tetryl, and associated degradation products, are released into the environment during the manufacturing, loading, packing, and assembling of munitions at US Army Ammunition Plants. With the exception of 2A46DNT, nitroaromatic compounds are more toxic to freshwater fishes than to freshwater invertebrates. Rainbow trout are the most sensitive test species with LC{sub 50} values ranging from 0.43 to 6.4 mg/L for TNT, RDX, and HMX. These compounds produce negative effects on reproductive endpoints in terrestrial mammals at doses >1 mg/kg/day. Limited data indicate that nitroaromatics are not toxic to terrestrial plants and soil invertebrates. Additional studies need to be undertaken to completely characterize the toxicity of these compounds; however, the criteria and screening benchmarks presented in this paper can be used to assess the risks to indigenous flora and fauna at Army Superfund sites.

  20. Geophysical Logs of Selected Test Wells at the Diaz Chemical Superfund Site in Holley, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckhardt, David A.V.; Anderson, J. Alton

    2007-01-01

    In June and July 2006, geophysical logs were collected and analyzed along with rock-core samples to define the bedrock stratigraphy and flow zones penetrated by four test wells at the Diaz Chemical Superfund site at Holley in eastern Orleans County, New York. The work was completed as a preliminary part of the investigation of contamination by organic compounds in the shale, mudstone, and sandstone bedrock. The geophysical logs included natural-gamma, caliper, borehole image, fluid properties, and flowmeter data. The orientation of fractures in the boreholes was inferred from the log data and summarized in stereo and tadpole plots; the transmissivity and hydraulic head was also determined for fracture zones that were observed to be hydraulically active through the flowmeter logs. The data are intended in part for use in the remediation of the site.

  1. Field Sampling Plan for the Distler Brickyard Superfund Site, Hardin County, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    J. P. Martin; L. N. Peterson; C. J. Taylor

    1999-08-01

    This plan describes the field and analytical activities to be conducted at the Distler Brickyard Superfund Site, Hardin County, Kentucky, in order to evaluate natural attenuation processes within the aquifer system. Sampling will consist of a single round to take place in October 1999. Analytes will consist of the contaminants of concern (chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons), electron donors (non-chlorinated organic compounds), oxidation-reduction indicators, and water quality parameters. These activities are conducted in order to evaluate the water quality parameters. These activities are conducted in order to evaluate the extent to which natural attenuation processes, in the form of anaerobic reductive dechlorination, may be taking place in the aquifer system. These data will then be used to select the appropriate remediation technology for this site.

  2. Sediment quality assessment and Toxicity Identification Evaluation studies in Lavaca Bay, Texas -- An estuarine Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.; Hooten, R.; May, L.; Teas, T.

    1995-12-31

    A sediment quality assessment survey was conducted in the Lavaca Bay system which has been designated a Superfund site because of elevated concentrations of mercury and other contaminants (e.g., PAHs) in the sediments. Twenty-four stations were sampled in the initial survey. Sediment pore water was extracted pneumatically and the toxicity of the pore water determined using the sea urchin fertilization and embryological development assays. Based on the results of the toxicity tests, aliquots of the toxic sediments were analyzed for metals, PAHs, and pesticides. Based on these results, several of the most toxic sites were resampled and a preliminary Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) was performed with the pore water using the sea urchin fertilization test. Preliminary results indicated that the toxic components were removed by adsorption on a C-18 column but were not affected by EDTA additions and, therefore, the primary toxicants are hydrophobic in nature.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of efflorescent sulfate salts from Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site, California.

    PubMed

    Sobron, Pablo; Alpers, Charles N

    2013-03-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund Site near Redding, California, is a massive sulfide ore deposit that was mined for iron, silver, gold, copper, zinc, and pyrite intermittently for nearly 100 years. As a result, both water and air reached the sulfide deposits deep within the mountain, producing acid mine drainage consisting of sulfuric acid and heavy metals from the ore. Particularly, the drainage water from the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain is among the most acidic waters naturally found on Earth. The mineralogy at Iron Mountain can serve as a proxy for understanding sulfate formation on Mars. Selected sulfate efflorescent salts from Iron Mountain, formed from extremely acidic waters via drainage from sulfide mining, have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy. Gypsum, ferricopiapite, copiapite, melanterite, coquimbite, and voltaite are found within the samples. This work has implications for Mars mineralogical and geochemical investigations as well as for terrestrial environmental investigations related to acid mine drainage contamination. PMID:23464669

  4. Arsenic and metals in soils in the vicinity of the Imperial Oil Company Superfund Site, Marlboro Township, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Water-resources investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Barringer, J.L.; Szabo, Z.; Barringer, T.H.

    1998-09-01

    Concentrations of arsenic exceed the New Jersey State Cleanup Criterion of 20 parts per million in sandy and clay-rich soils of two residential areas in the vicinity of the Imperial Oil Company Superfund site in Marlboro Township, Monmouth County, New Jersey. In order to determine the source of the arsenic and metals in soils in the two residential areas, soil samples were collected from (1) long-term forested areas, to determine background geologic and regional atmospheric inputs of arsenic and metals; (2) former and current orchards, to assess the range of concentrations of arsenic and metals that could be contributed by past use of pesticides; (3) the Imperial Oil Company Superfund site, to characterize the chemical composition of contamination from activities at the site; (4) a wooded area adjacent to the Superfund site, to determine whether arsenic and metals from the Superfund site were evident; and (5) the two residential areas, to compare soil chemistry in these areas with the chemistry of soils from forests, orchards, and the Superfund site. The soil samples were divided by soil horizon and were analyzed for 23 metals and metalloids, total organic carbon, and total sulfur. Additionally, air-flow models were used to determine whether roasting of arsenic at the Imperial Oil Company Superfund site was a possible source of arsenic in the soils.

  5. In Situ Oxalic Acid Injection to Accelerate Arsenic Remediation at a Superfund Site in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Wovkulich, Karen; Stute, Martin; Mailloux, Brian J.; Keimowitz, Alison R.; Ross, James; Bostick, Benjamin; Sun, Jing; Chillrud, Steven N.

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a prevalent contaminant at a large number of US Superfund sites; establishing techniques that accelerate As remediation could benefit many sites. Hundreds of tons of As were released into the environment by the Vineland Chemical Co. in southern New Jersey during its manufacturing lifetime (1949–1994), resulting in extensive contamination of surface and subsurface soils and sediments, groundwater, and the downstream watershed. Despite substantial intervention at this Superfund site, sufficient aquifer cleanup could require many decades if based on traditional pump and treat technologies only. Laboratory column experiments have suggested that oxalic acid addition to contaminated aquifer solids could promote significant As release from the solid phase. To evaluate the potential of chemical additions to increase As release in situ and boost treatment efficiency, a forced gradient pilot scale study was conducted on the Vineland site. During spring/summer 2009, oxalic acid and bromide tracer were injected into a small portion (~50 m2) of the site for 3 months. Groundwater samples indicate that introduction of oxalic acid led to increased As release. Between 2.9 and 3.6 kg of As were removed from the sampled wells as a result of the oxalic acid treatment during the 3-month injection. A comparison of As concentrations on sediment cores collected before and after treatment and analyzed using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy suggested reduction in As concentrations of ~36% (median difference) to 48% (mean difference). While further study is necessary, the addition of oxalic acid shows potential for accelerating treatment of a highly contaminated site and decreasing the As remediation time-scale. PMID:25598701

  6. Perspectives: The Continuous Improvement Trap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Accrediting agencies, legislators, pundits, and even higher educational professionals have become enamored with applying the language of continuous improvement to learning outcomes. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges specifically uses the term "continuing improvement" in Core Standard 2.5, one of its…

  7. 29 CFR 1601.74 - Designated and notice agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Designated and notice agencies. 1601.74 Section 1601.74 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS FEP Agency Designation Procedures § 1601.74 Designated and notice agencies. (a) The designated FEP agencies are: Alaska Commission for...

  8. 29 CFR 1601.74 - Designated and notice agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Designated and notice agencies. 1601.74 Section 1601.74 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS FEP Agency Designation Procedures § 1601.74 Designated and notice agencies. (a) The designated FEP agencies are: Alaska Commission for...

  9. 29 CFR 1601.80 - Certified designated FEP agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certified designated FEP agencies. 1601.80 Section 1601.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS FEP Agency Designation Procedures § 1601.80 Certified designated FEP agencies. The designated FEP agencies receiving certification by...

  10. 29 CFR 1601.80 - Certified designated FEP agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certified designated FEP agencies. 1601.80 Section 1601.80 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS FEP Agency Designation Procedures § 1601.80 Certified designated FEP agencies. The designated FEP agencies receiving certification by...

  11. 5 CFR 731.205 - Debarment by agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Debarment by agencies. 731.205 Section... (CONTINUED) SUITABILITY Suitability Determinations and Actions § 731.205 Debarment by agencies. (a) Subject... specific covered, positions within that agency. (b) The agency may impose an additional period of...

  12. 5 CFR 731.205 - Debarment by agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Debarment by agencies. 731.205 Section... (CONTINUED) SUITABILITY Suitability Determinations and Actions § 731.205 Debarment by agencies. (a) Subject... specific covered, positions within that agency. (b) The agency may impose an additional period of...

  13. 40 CFR 93.154 - Federal agency conformity responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Federal agency conformity responsibility. 93.154 Section 93.154 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... agency conformity responsibility. Any department, agency, or instrumentality of the Federal...

  14. 40 CFR 93.154 - Federal agency conformity responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Federal agency conformity responsibility. 93.154 Section 93.154 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... agency conformity responsibility. Any department, agency, or instrumentality of the Federal...

  15. 40 CFR 93.154 - Federal agency conformity responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Federal agency conformity responsibility. 93.154 Section 93.154 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... agency conformity responsibility. Any department, agency, or instrumentality of the Federal...

  16. 40 CFR 93.154 - Federal agency conformity responsibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Federal agency conformity responsibility. 93.154 Section 93.154 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... agency conformity responsibility. Any department, agency, or instrumentality of the Federal...

  17. 40 CFR 56.7 - State agency performance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false State agency performance audits. 56.7 Section 56.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGIONAL CONSISTENCY § 56.7 State agency performance audits. (a) EPA will utilize the provisions of...

  18. 40 CFR 56.7 - State agency performance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false State agency performance audits. 56.7 Section 56.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGIONAL CONSISTENCY § 56.7 State agency performance audits. (a) EPA will utilize the provisions of...

  19. 40 CFR 791.85 - Availability of final Agency order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Availability of final Agency order. 791.85 Section 791.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Final Order § 791.85 Availability of final Agency...

  20. 40 CFR 791.85 - Availablity of final Agency order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Availablity of final Agency order. 791.85 Section 791.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Final Order § 791.85 Availablity of final Agency...

  1. 40 CFR 56.7 - State agency performance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false State agency performance audits. 56.7 Section 56.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGIONAL CONSISTENCY § 56.7 State agency performance audits. (a) EPA will utilize the provisions of...

  2. 40 CFR 791.85 - Availablity of final Agency order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Availablity of final Agency order. 791.85 Section 791.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Final Order § 791.85 Availablity of final Agency...

  3. 40 CFR 56.7 - State agency performance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false State agency performance audits. 56.7 Section 56.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGIONAL CONSISTENCY § 56.7 State agency performance audits. (a) EPA will utilize the provisions of...

  4. 40 CFR 56.7 - State agency performance audits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false State agency performance audits. 56.7 Section 56.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGIONAL CONSISTENCY § 56.7 State agency performance audits. (a) EPA will utilize the provisions of...

  5. 40 CFR 791.85 - Availability of final Agency order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Availability of final Agency order. 791.85 Section 791.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Final Order § 791.85 Availability of final Agency...

  6. 40 CFR 791.85 - Availability of final Agency order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Availability of final Agency order. 791.85 Section 791.85 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Final Order § 791.85 Availability of final Agency...

  7. Continuous Problem of Function Continuity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jayakody, Gaya; Zazkis, Rina

    2015-01-01

    We examine different definitions presented in textbooks and other mathematical sources for "continuity of a function at a point" and "continuous function" in the context of introductory level Calculus. We then identify problematic issues related to definitions of continuity and discontinuity: inconsistency and absence of…

  8. 28 CFR 81.4 - Referral of reports where the designated agency is not a law enforcement agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CHILD ABUSE AND CHILD PORNOGRAPHY REPORTING DESIGNATIONS AND PROCEDURES § 81.4 Referral of reports where the designated agency is not a law enforcement agency. Where a report of child abuse received by a designated agency that is not a law enforcement agency involves allegations of sexual...

  9. 28 CFR 81.4 - Referral of reports where the designated agency is not a law enforcement agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CHILD ABUSE AND CHILD PORNOGRAPHY REPORTING DESIGNATIONS AND PROCEDURES § 81.4 Referral of reports where the designated agency is not a law enforcement agency. Where a report of child abuse received by a designated agency that is not a law enforcement agency involves allegations of sexual...

  10. 28 CFR 81.4 - Referral of reports where the designated agency is not a law enforcement agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CHILD ABUSE AND CHILD PORNOGRAPHY REPORTING DESIGNATIONS AND PROCEDURES § 81.4 Referral of reports where the designated agency is not a law enforcement agency. Where a report of child abuse received by a designated agency that is not a law enforcement agency involves allegations of sexual...

  11. Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act Section 120(e)(5). Annual report to Congress for Fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to conducting its operations in a safe and environmentally sound manner. High priorities for the Department are identifying and correcting environmental problems at DOE facilities that resulted from past operations, and preventing environmental problems from occurring during present and future operations. In this regard, the Department is committed to clean up the 1989 inventory of sites in the Environmental Restoration Program by the year 2019. DOE has issued an Order and guidance establishing policy and procedures for activities conducted under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and has developed a Five-Year Plan, updated annually, that integrates planning for corrective activities, environmental restoration and waste management operations at its facilities. DOE also continues to conduct assessments (e.g., Management Audits, Environmental Safety and Health (ES & H) Progress Assessments, Internal Self Assessments) at its operating facilities to provide the Secretary of Energy with information on current environmental compliance status and follow-up on findings.

  12. An evaluation of the impact of recent flooding on the operation of a groundwater extraction and treatment system at a Superfund Site

    SciTech Connect

    Gavett, K.L.; Fiore, M.J.; Meyer, E.J.

    1994-12-31

    A groundwater extraction and treatment system was installed in 1987 at the Des Moines TCE Superfund Site. The purpose of the system is to prevent groundwater contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from migrating toward an infiltration gallery system which supplies drinking water to the City of Des Moines, Iowa. The extraction system was not operating for a three week period in July and August when the system was flooded by the nearby Raccoon collected as part of a monitoring program have been s the affect of flooding on the operation of the system. Records indicate that the flood did not have a long-term impact on the Performance of the system. An examination of groundwater levels show that groundwater elevations receded quickly after the flood, similar to patterns observed after other periods of heavy precipitation. In fact, data collected nine weeks after the extraction system was returned to service indicate that the system continues to meet its containment objective. Water quality records indicate that the affect of the 1993 flood was similar to trends Observed after earlier periods of heavy precipitation. Trichloroethene concentrations in the treatment system influent and in wells located in the vicinity of suspected source areas increased as a result of rising groundwater levels, and infiltration through residual contamination in the unsaturated zone. Groundwater quality in areas beyond suspected source areas does not appear to have been affected by the 1993 flood.

  13. Zenon Environmental, Inc.: ZenoGem{trademark} biological and ultrafiltration technology. Innovative technology evaluation report; Superfund innovative technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    Zenon Environmental Inc. (Zenon), of Burlington, Ontario, Canada had developed an innovative wastewater treatment technology called the ZenoGem{trademark} technology. The ZenoGem{trademark} technology integrates biological treatment with membrane-based ultrafiltration to treat wastewater with high concentrations of organic contaminants that cause elevated concentrations of chemical oxygen demand (COD). The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) demonstration occurred between September and December 1994 at the Nascolite Superfund site (Nascolite) in Millville, Cumberland County, New Jersey. During the SITE demonstration, critical and noncritical measurements were evaluated. Critical measurements consisted of sample analyses and process measurements that directly impacted meeting the project`s primary technical objective. Critical measurements included collection of liquid and air samples for MMA and VOC analyses; liquid samples to evaluate COD; and flow rate measurements of the influent and effluent liquid streams. Noncritical, or system condition measurements, provided information on operating ranges, reliability, variability, cost-effectiveness, and full-scale remediation potential of the technology.

  14. Control technologies for remediation of contaminated soil and waste deposits at Superfund lead-battery recycling sites

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, M.D.; Selvakumar, A.; Gaire, R.

    1992-01-01

    The paper primarily addresses remediation of contaminated soils and waste deposits at defunct lead-acid battery recycling sites (LBRS) via immobilization and separation processes. Metallic lead and lead compounds are generally the principal contaminants of concern in soils and waste deposits. Other metals (e.g., cadmium, copper, arsenic, antimony, and selenium) are often present at LBRS. The article is primarily based on experience gained from: (1) Superfund site investigation, removal, and remedial actions, and (2) development and demonstration of control technologies under the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The primary remedial options for lead contaminated soils and waste deposits include: (1) no action, (2) off-site disposal, (3) containment, (4) immobilization, (5) separation with resource recovery, and (6) separation without resource recovery.

  15. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Carroll and Dubies Sewage Disposal, Port Jervis, NY, March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Carroll and Dubies Superfund Site (the Site). This operable unit (OU1) represents the first of two operable units planned for the Site. This operable unit addresses the source areas (lagoons and surrounding impacted soils) at the Site and actions needed to ensure that the source areas do not pose a threat to human health or the environment, including any potential cross media impacts to groundwater.

  16. Hydrogeologic framework, arsenic distribution, and groundwater geochemistry of the glacial-sediment aquifer at the Auburn Road landfill superfund site, Londonderry, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Degnan, James R.; Harte, Philip T.

    2013-01-01

    Leachate continues to be generated from landfills at the Auburn Road Landfill Superfund Site in Londonderry, New Hampshire. Impermeable caps on the three landfills at the site inhibit direct infiltration of precipitation; however, high water-table conditions allow groundwater to interact with landfill materials from below, creating leachate and ultimately reducing conditions in downgradient groundwater. Reducing conditions can facilitate arsenic transport by allowing it to stay in solution or by liberating arsenic adsorbed to surfaces and from geologic sources, such as glacial sediments and bedrock. The site occupies a 180-acre parcel of land containing streams, ponds, wetlands, and former gravel pits located in glacial sediment. Four areas, totaling 14 acres, including three landfills and one septage lagoon, were used for waste disposal. The site was closed in 1980 after volatile organic compounds associated with industrial waste dumping were detected. The site was added to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency National Priority List in 1982, and the landfills were capped in 1996. Although volatile organic compound concentrations in groundwater have declined substantially, some measurable concentrations remain. Temporally variable and persistent elevated arsenic concentrations have been measured in groundwater affected by the landfill leachate. Microbial consumption of carbon found in leachate is a driver of reducing conditions that liberate arsenic at the site. In addition to sources of carbon in landfill leachate, wetland areas throughout the site also could contribute carbon to groundwater, but it is currently unknown if any of the wetland areas have downward or reversing gradients that could allow the infiltration of surface water to groundwater. Red-stained sediments and water indicate iron-rich groundwater discharge to surface water and are also associated with elevated concentrations of arsenic in sediment and groundwater. Ironrich groundwater seeps have

  17. 77 FR 76077 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION...)), and as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and respondent burden, the National...

  18. 7 CFR 1794.43 - Agency finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agency finding. 1794.43 Section 1794.43 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Procedure for Environmental Assessments § 1794.43 Agency... quality of the human environment, RUS will prepare a FONSI. Upon authorization of RUS, the applicant...

  19. 34 CFR 303.30 - Public agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Public agency. 303.30 Section 303.30 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.30 Public agency. As used in this part, public...

  20. 7 CFR 247.3 - Administering agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administering agencies. 247.3 Section 247.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.3 Administering agencies....

  1. 5 CFR 720.303 - Agency programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) AFFIRMATIVE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS Disabled Veterans Affirmative Action Program § 720.303 Agency programs. (a.... Postal Service and the Postal Rate Commission, shall conduct a continuing affirmative program for the... then be translated into action items....

  2. Coordinating activities between NOAA and other agencies.

    PubMed

    Fritz, A T; Buchman, M F

    1997-11-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) mandate protection of public health, welfare, and the environment at Superfund hazardous waste sites. The NCP requires lead response agenciesto integrate baseline risk assessments into the remedial process that "assess threats to the environment." EPA policy statements direct regional offices to perform thorough, consistent ecological risk assessments, and stress the importance of coordination and technical consultation with the natural resource trustees. As a Federal natural trustee, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) role and responsibilities within the CERCLA process also are defined and mandated by Federal law. NOAA is responsible for identifying sites in the coastal zone that may affect natural resources, evaluating injury to trust resources, and providing technical advice on assessments and remedial and restoration alternatives. Statutes require lead cleanup agencies and trustee agencies to notify and coordinate with each other during CERCLA response. Over the past ten years, NOAA has gained valuable experience and technical expertise in environmental assessments and in evaluating contaminated aquatic environments. NOAA fulfills its responsibilities through an effective network of Coastal Resource Coordinators (CRCs) who can rapidly respond to local technical requirements and priorities, and coordinate effectively with technical and trustee representatives. In addition to CRCs, an interdisciplinary support group provides technical expertise in the scientific disciplines required to respond to the needs of regional activities. NOAA provides CRCs to coastal EPA regional offices for technical support, and to act as liaisons with Federal and state natural resource trustee agencies. The CRCs help EPA and other lead response agencies identify and assess risks to coastal resources

  3. 40 CFR 63.7121 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations standard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous...

  4. 40 CFR 63.7121 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations standard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous...

  5. 40 CFR 63.7121 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations standard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous...

  6. 40 CFR 63.7121 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations standard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous...

  7. 40 CFR 63.7121 - How do I demonstrate continuous compliance with the emission limitations standard?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous...

  8. 40 CFR 63.6635 - How do I monitor and collect data to demonstrate continuous compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for...

  9. 40 CFR 63.7120 - How do I monitor and collect data to demonstrate continuous compliance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for...

  10. 78 FR 5801 - Operating Industries, Inc. Superfund Site, Monterey Park, CA; Notice of Proposed CERCLA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... Administrative De Minimis Settlement AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice; request for... proposed administrative settlement with 47 de minimis settling parties for recovery of response costs... Grinding Co., V-M Enterprises, Inc., Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, Valley Proteins (DE),...

  11. 78 FR 729 - Ellman Battery Superfund Site; Orlando, Orange County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ...: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of settlement. SUMMARY: Under 122(h)(1) of the.... Environmental Protection Agency, 61 Forsyth Street SW., Atlanta, Georgia 30303. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL...

  12. 40 CFR 300.505 - EPA/State Superfund Memorandum of Agreement (SMOA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... support agency interaction regarding the review of key documents and/or decision points in removal, pre... documents when each is serving as the support agency shall be equivalent to the extent practicable. Review... state agree that the lead and support agency roles and responsibilities have changed, or...

  13. 40 CFR 300.505 - EPA/State Superfund Memorandum of Agreement (SMOA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... support agency interaction regarding the review of key documents and/or decision points in removal, pre... documents when each is serving as the support agency shall be equivalent to the extent practicable. Review... state agree that the lead and support agency roles and responsibilities have changed, or...

  14. 15 CFR 1180.8 - Appointment of Agency Liaison Officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION TO THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE § 1180.8 Appointment...

  15. 15 CFR 1180.8 - Appointment of Agency Liaison Officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION TO THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE § 1180.8 Appointment...

  16. 15 CFR 1180.8 - Appointment of Agency Liaison Officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION TO THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE § 1180.8 Appointment...

  17. 15 CFR 1180.8 - Appointment of Agency Liaison Officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE TRANSFER BY FEDERAL AGENCIES OF SCIENTIFIC, TECHNICAL AND ENGINEERING INFORMATION TO THE NATIONAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION SERVICE § 1180.8 Appointment...

  18. 38 CFR 21.7200 - State approving agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION All Volunteer Force Educational Assistance Program... activities; and (f) Section 21.4155—Evaluation of State approving agency performance. (Authority: 38...

  19. 38 CFR 21.7200 - State approving agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION All Volunteer Force Educational Assistance Program... activities; and (f) Section 21.4155—Evaluation of State approving agency performance. (Authority: 38...

  20. Possible environmental contaminant effects in neotropical migrants nesting at a Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Arenal, C.; Halbrook, R.

    1995-12-31

    Forest fragmentation, insularization, and tropical deforestation have been named as significant factors in the decline of many neotropical migrant bird species, however, contamination of breeding grounds also may be of concern. Additionally, neotropical migrants may serve as a route of transport of contaminants from breeding grounds in North America to wintering grounds in the tropics. Accumulation and effects of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) and heavy metal concentrations in avian species were evaluated at a Superfund site (Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge, Illinois) using the European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) as a model. Starlings were monitored at 12 nest boxes constructed at each of 3 study and 2 reference sites. Behavior of adult starlings was observed in the field to assess possible contaminant effects on nest attentiveness and reproductive success was recorded as the number of chicks surviving to 15 days post-hatch. Effects included a significant reduction in nest attentiveness behavior and increased chick mortality between PCB and reference sites. There were no significant differences among study and reference sites in number of eggs laid and percent of eggs hatched. Because Crab Orchard NWR serves as breeding ground for approximately 80 neotropical migrant species, the results suggest that species with feeding habits similar to starlings also may have greater body burdens of metals and PCBs and may suffer similar reductions in nesting success. The potential exists for transport and incorporation of environmental contaminants into the food chain at sites along the migration route.

  1. Fishing a superfund site: Dissonance and risk perception of environmental hazards by fishermen in Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.; Gochfeld, M. )

    1991-06-01

    Risk perception studies show that individuals tend to underestimate significant risks, overestimate negligible ones, and distrust authorities. They also rely on a variety of strategies or heuristics to reach decisions regarding their risk-taking behavior. The authors report on a survey of fishermen and crabbers engaged in recreational and substance fishing in a Puerto Rican estuary (near Humacao), which has been declared a Superfund site because of suspected contamination by mercury, and at ecologically similar control sites. Nearly everyone interviewed at the Humacao site was aware of the mercury contamination, but either denied its importance, believed the contamination was restricted to a distant part of the estuary, or assumed that the estuary would be closed by the authorities if the threat was real. All site-users consumed the fish and crabs they caught. At Humacao, the average catch was 7 fish per fishermen (mostly tilapia, Tilapia mossambica, and tarpon, Megalops atlantica) and 13 crabs per crabber (all blue crabs, Callinectes sapidus). On average, the site-users returned to the lagoons about 3-4 times per month. At control sites, fewer fish were eaten. The worst case consumption of tarpon, a species which concentrated mercury at Eastern Puerto Rico, provided an exposure exceeding the EPA reference dose, whereas consumption of one tarpon per week did not entail excess exposure. Fortunately, few individuals caught tarpon exclusively. Unlike counterparts in the northeastern United States, they trusted authorities and indicated that they would have heeded warnings of mercury contamination posted where they fished.

  2. A risk-based screening approach for prioritizing contaminants and exposure pathways at Superfund sites.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, F O; Blaylock, B G; Frank, M L; Thiessen, K M

    1993-12-01

    Contamination at Superfund sites can involve mixtures of chemicals and radionuclides in a variety of environmental media. Determining priorities for evaluation and remediation of various contaminants is an important part of the initial phases of any site investigation. An effective screening analysis at the beginning of the project can help by identifying both those situations in need of immediate remedial attention and those which require further sampling and evaluation. The screening approach discussed here is made up of two sets of calculations designed to provide upper- and lower-bound estimates of health risk to individuals likely to receive the highest exposures. This approach allows rapid identification of contaminants which pose a negligible risk and can be assigned a low priority for remedial attention or which pose a substantial risk and should be given the highest priority for appropriate remediation efforts. Contaminants designated as neither high- nor low-priority should be investigated in more detail prior to making decisions regarding the need for or method of remediation. The utility of this approach has already been demonstrated in the evaluation of contamination in the Clinch and Tennessee River systems originating from historical operations of atomic weapons and energy research facilities near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. PMID:24221185

  3. Assessment, approval, design and construction of a facility on a Superfund site in 36 months

    SciTech Connect

    Drag, D.J.; Webb, C.K.; Luenenborg, G.W.

    1996-11-01

    The Union Pacific Resources Corporation (UPRC) owned and operated a 600-acre crude oil production field in Wilmington, California. UPRC granted a lease to the TCL Corporation in 1951 for the disposal of oil and gas drilling field wastes. In the 1950s and 1960s, waste materials consisting of oil-free rotary mud, as well as rotary mud containing oil and crude oil tank bottoms were accepted at the site. Site testing and record investigations have shown that some other wastes, inconsistent with those permitted by the agreement between UPRC and TCL, were also disposed of at the site. Soil samples collected from the site in 1981 showed moderately high levels of metals in the soils at the site. In 1983, the site was included on the California State Superfund list of hazardous waste contaminated sites. In 1988, UPRC signed a Consent order Agreement with the Department of Toxic Substance Control (DTSC) whereby UPRC agreed to investigate a 31-acre area of the Study Area and develop a Remedial Action Plan (RAP) with DTSC oversight. The Port of Long Beach (POLB) is assuming the responsibility for implementing subsequent investigative and remedial activities at the portions of the site which they have since purchased from UPRC. The overall project objective was to investigate a 31-acre parcel within the Study Area (TCL site), develop a RAP, remediate the oil sump soils, and develop the parcel as an automobile distribution facility to be used by Toyota Motor Sales (TMS).

  4. Elevated incidence of childhood leukemia in Woburn, Massachusetts: NIEHS Superfund Basic Research Program searches for causes.

    PubMed Central

    Durant, J L; Chen, J; Hemond, H F; Thilly, W G

    1995-01-01

    Between 1966 and 1986, the childhood leukemia rate in Woburn, Massachusetts, was 4-fold higher than the national average. A multidisciplinary research team from MIT, which is being supported by the NIEHS Superfund Basic Research Program, has explored the possible importance of a temporal correlation between the period of elevated leukemia and a previously unrecognized mobilization of toxic metals from a waste disposal site in north Woburn. Residents of Woburn may have been exposed to arsenic (70 micrograms/l) and chromium (240 micrograms/l) at levels in excess of federal drinking water standards (50 micrograms/l for each metal) by consuming municipal groundwater contaminated with these metals. Research is currently underway a) to elucidate the mechanisms and the pathways by which these metals were transported from the waste disposal site to the drinking water supply; b) to determine the identity of the principal human cell mutagens in samples of aquifer materials collected from the site of the municipal supply wells; and c) to measure the extent of exposure and genetic change in residents who consumed the contaminated well water. Images Figure 8. PMID:8549500

  5. Long-term monitoring at the New Bedford Harbor marine Superfund site: Phase 4 -- Data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, W.G.; Bergen, B.J.; Morrison, G.; Copeland, J.

    1995-12-31

    New Bedford Harbor (NBH), MA, is a marine Superfund site due to severely PCB-contaminated sediments. Recently, the first phase of remediation was completed; dredging of a five acre ``Hot Spot``. Prior to remediation, a comprehensive 30 year long-term monitoring program was developed and implemented at this site that incorporated a systematic, probabilistic, hexagonal grid sampling design, and an information management system similar to that used by the EPA`s Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program. Pre-remedial baseline sediment sampling consisted of quantifying a suite of exposure indicators (PCBs, metals, sediment toxicity), habitat indicators (TOC, AVS, grain size) and ecological indicators (benthic community indices) at each of 72 stations along a gradient from the severely contaminated upper estuary to Buzzards Bay. Analyses of these data, presented in GIS format, focused on the relationships between total and bioavailable contaminant concentrations (PCBs and metals), bioavailable contaminants and sediment toxicity, bioavailable contaminants and benthic community structure, and a comparison between standard short-term sediment toxicity (10-day test) and longer-term benthic community structure. Results of these and subsequent analyses will be used to modify the sampling efforts during the course of the 30 year long-term monitoring plan.

  6. Review of ecological-based risk management approaches used at five Army Superfund sites.

    PubMed

    Poucher, Sherri L; Tracey, Gregory A; Johnson, Mark S; Haines, Laurie B

    2012-04-01

    Factors used in environmental remedial decision making concerning ecological risk are not well understood or necessarily consistent. Recent Records of Decision (RODs) for Army CERCLA sites were reviewed to select case studies where remedial management occurred in response to ecological risks. Thirty-four Army RODs were evaluated representing decisions promulgated between 1996 and 2004. Five were selected based on assessments that remedial actions were clearly linked to concern for ecological receptors. The Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) approach and the subsequent risk management process were reviewed for each site. The case studies demonstrated that the ERA findings, as well as critical management decisions regarding interpretation of identified ecological risks, were determinants of remedial action objectives. Decisions regarding the selection of remedial alternatives were based on a set of criteria prescribed by Superfund requirements and guidance. Remedial alternative evaluations require protection of human health and the environment, but protective conditions were determined using different methods at each site. Examining the remedial management process for the 5 case study sites revealed that uncertainty in the risk assessment and decisions regarding appropriate spatial scales for both risk assessment and remediation were important factors influencing remedial action decisions. The case reviews also revealed that levels of documentation were variable from site to site. In the future, more detailed documentation of decision criteria and the development of criteria that consider the resilience of the site will result in more technically defensible ecological risk management. PMID:22025287

  7. Superfund dredging restoration results in widespread regional reduction in cadmium in blue crabs.

    PubMed

    Levinton, Jeffrey S; Pochron, Sharon T; Kane, Michael W

    2006-12-15

    A nickel-cadmium battery factory released about 53 tons of mostly cadmium and nickel hydroxide suspended solid waste between 1953 and 1979 into Foundry Cove, which is tidally connected to the Hudson River estuary. A major Superfund dredging cleanup in 1994-1995 removed most of the cadmium from the sediment from within Foundry Cove. Here, we demonstrate that the cleanup reduced cadmium tissue concentrations (hepatopancreas and leg muscle) in an important fishery species, the blue crab Callinectes sapidus near Foundry Cove, but also across a broad reach of the Hudson River. Before the cleanup, cadmium concentrations in crabs were 4-5 times higher on average than after the cleanup and geographic variation in crab cadmium concentration along the Hudson River estuary was strongly reduced after the cleanup. The factor of reduction in crab tissue concentrations was far less than the factor of reduction of export of cadmium from Foundry Cove into the Hudson or the factor of reduction of cadmium sediment concentrations within the cove following the cleanup. This unique study demonstrates the efficacy of a major dredging cleanup and quantifies the spatial and temporal impact of the cleanup. It demonstrates that cleanup of a point source can have dramatic effects over large spatial scales. PMID:17256500

  8. Resistance to chemical stressors in embryo-larval fish from a marine Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Nacci, D.; Coiro, L.; Kuhn-Hines, A.; Munns, W.R. Jr.; Cooper, K.

    1995-12-31

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that estuarine fish chronically exposed to polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (PHAHs) are resistant to effects of those contaminants, as measured both by induction of detoxification enzymes and toxicity. A study was undertaken to examine the phenomenon of resistance to chemical toxicity in F. heteroclitus inhabiting the New Bedford (NBH) Superfund Site which exhibit some of the highest levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the world. This portion of that study was designed to examine: (a) whether embryo-larvae of NBH are resistant to PHAHs; (b) whether this resistance is restricted to site-related contaminants; and (c) whether this resistance is correlated with reduced responsiveness to cytochrome P450 induction. To investigate the correlation between cytochrome P450 induction and toxic effects in embryo-larval fish, a novel, nondestructive in ovo fluorescence assay for ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) activity was developed. Embryo-larval tests were conducted using whole sediment and aqueous exposures to samples such as PCB and PAH mixtures and single compounds, organic sediment extracts, and methylmercury as a reference toxicant.

  9. Groundwater Fate and Transport Modeling for Texarkana Wood Preserving Company Superfund Site, Texarkana, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Arnett, Ronald Chester

    1999-08-01

    Fate and transport model results are presented for the Texarkana Wood Preserving Company (TWPC)superfund site. The conceptual model assumes two sources of contamination, specifically, the areas around the old and new process areas. Recent data show the presence of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) in the aquifer that are also sources of dissolved contamination in the aquifer. A flow model was constructed and calibrated against measured hydraulic heads at permanent monitoring wells. Good matches were obtained between model simulated heads and most measured heads. An unexplained exception occurs at monitoring well MW-13 down gradient of the site beyond the measured contaminant plume where the model predicts heads that are more than 2 ft. lower than reported field measurements. Adjusting hydraulic parameters in the model could not account for this anomaly and still preserve the head matches at other wells. There is likely a moderate deficiency in the conceptual model or perhaps a data error. Other information such as substantial amounts of infiltrating surface water in the area or a correction in surveyed elevation would improve the flow model. A particle tracking model calculated a travel time from the new process area to the Day’s Creek discharge location on the order of 40 years. Travel times from the old process area to Day’s Creek were calculated to be on the order of 80 years. While these calculations are subject to some uncertainty, travel times of decades are indicated.

  10. Phytoextraction of Pb and Cd from a superfund soil: effects of amendments and croppings.

    PubMed

    Bricker, T J; Pichtel, J; Brown, H J; Simmons, M

    2001-01-01

    In a growth chamber, maize (Zea mays) and Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) were grown over two croppings in soil from a Superfund site (PbTotal = 65,200 mg/kg and CdTotal = 52mg/kg). Soil treatments consisted of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, sodium citrate and composted sewage sludge, each at two rates (EDTA .05%, EDTA .2%, citrate .05%, citrate .2%, CSS 5% and CSS 10%, respectively). In most cases, the EDTA and citrate treatments were superior in terms of solubilizing soil Pb for root uptake and translocation into above-ground biomass. In the first maize crop, the EDTA .2% treatment resulted in 2,435 and 9,389mg/kg Pb in shoot and root tissues, respectively. The CSS treatments typically resulted in lowest Pb and Cd removal efficiencies. Lead remaining in the soil after two croppings was mainly associated with the carbonate, organic, and residual fractions, which represent the less bioavailable forms. Soil Cd was generally more mobile for plant uptake than soil Pb. The EDTA .2% and citrate treatments were most successful in promoting Cd uptake by both maize and mustard. Although Pb concentrations (mg/kg tissue) were lower for maize than mustard, the former removed more total Pb (0.2 mg per pot, mean over all treatments), compared to mustard (0.03 mg), by virtue of its higher biomass production. PMID:11688677

  11. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Burnt Fly Bog, Marlboro Township, NJ, September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for the Westerly Wetlands, Northerly Wetlands, and Tar Patch Area at the Burnt Fly Bog Superfund Site. It addresses contaminated soil present on the three remaining contaminated areas on the Site, including the Westerly Wetlands, Northerly Wetlands, and Tar Patch Area. The major components of the selected remedy include: Excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil from the Northerly Wetlands; Excavation and off-site disposal of contaminated soil from the Tar Patch Area; Backfilling the excavated area in the Northerly Wetland and reestablishing wetlands; Backfilling the excavated area in the Tar Patch Area and creating wetlands; Provision of additional security fencing around the Westerly Wetlands, and the recording of a Deed Notice for the Westerly Wetlands, Northerly Wetlands, and Tar Patch Area; Monitoring of surface water and sediment in the Westerly Wetlands, surface water and sediment in the existing sedimentation basin located in the Downstream Area, and surface water, sediment and, if necessary, biota in Burnt Fly Brook; and Biological sampling in the Westerly Wetlands.

  12. SARA (Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act), Title III: implications for emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Leonard, R B; Calabro, J J; Noji, E K; Leviton, R H

    1989-11-01

    Practically every community has one or more industries that use or produce hazardous chemicals. The release of these chemicals into that community's environment has the potential of causing serious health problems. Previously, physicians have not had information about what hazardous chemicals were in their community or a warning that release of a hazardous chemical had occurred. The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, known as Title III of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), now mandates that every facility using, storing, or manufacturing hazardous chemicals make public its inventory and report every release of a hazardous chemical to public officials and health personnel. Every facility also must cooperate with physicians who are treating victims of exposure. Emergency physicians, both in their role in their community's emergency medical services system and as physicians in emergency departments, will soon be involved in many aspects of SARA's numerous ramifications. This report is intended to familiarize the emergency physician with the basic components of Title III of SARA. PMID:2817565

  13. Efficient analysis using custom interactive visualization tools at a Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.; Durham, L.

    1992-12-01

    Custom visualization analysis programs were developed and used to analyze contaminant transport calculations from a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model developed for a Department of Energy Superfund site. The site hydrogeology, which is highly heterogenous, includes both fractured limestone and dolomite and alluvium deposits. Three-dimensional interactive visualization techniques were used to understand and analyze the three-dimensional, double-porosity modeling results. A graphical object oriented programming environment was applied to efficiently develop custom visualization programs in a coarse-grained data structure language. Comparisons were made, using the results from the three-dimensional, finite-difference model, between traditional two-dimensional analyses (contour and vector plots) and interactive three-dimensional techniques. Subjective comparison areas include the accuracy of analysis, the ability to understand the results of three-dimensional contaminant transport simulation, and the capability to transmit the results of the analysis to the project management. In addition, a quantitative comparison was made on the time required to develop a thorough analysis of the modeling results. The conclusions from the comparative study showed that the visualization analysis provided an increased awareness of the contaminant transport mechanisms, provided new insights into contaminant migration, and resulted in a significant time savings.

  14. Efficient analysis using custom interactive visualization tools at a Superfund site

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. ); Durham, L. )

    1992-01-01

    Custom visualization analysis programs were developed and used to analyze contaminant transport calculations from a three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model developed for a Department of Energy Superfund site. The site hydrogeology, which is highly heterogenous, includes both fractured limestone and dolomite and alluvium deposits. Three-dimensional interactive visualization techniques were used to understand and analyze the three-dimensional, double-porosity modeling results. A graphical object oriented programming environment was applied to efficiently develop custom visualization programs in a coarse-grained data structure language. Comparisons were made, using the results from the three-dimensional, finite-difference model, between traditional two-dimensional analyses (contour and vector plots) and interactive three-dimensional techniques. Subjective comparison areas include the accuracy of analysis, the ability to understand the results of three-dimensional contaminant transport simulation, and the capability to transmit the results of the analysis to the project management. In addition, a quantitative comparison was made on the time required to develop a thorough analysis of the modeling results. The conclusions from the comparative study showed that the visualization analysis provided an increased awareness of the contaminant transport mechanisms, provided new insights into contaminant migration, and resulted in a significant time savings.

  15. Integration of Data Systems and Technology Improves Research and Collaboration for a Superfund Research Center

    PubMed Central

    Hobbie, Kevin A.; Peterson, Elena S.; Barton, Michael L.; Waters, Katrina M.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    Large collaborative centers are a common model for accomplishing integrated environmental health research. These centers often include various types of scientific domains (e.g. chemistry, biology, bioinformatics) that are integrated to solve some of the nation’s key economic or public health concerns. The Superfund Research Center (SRP) at Oregon State University (OSU) is one such center established in 2008 to study the emerging health risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons while utilizing new technologies both in the field and laboratory. With outside collaboration at remote institutions, success for the center as a whole depends on the ability to effectively integrate data across all research projects and support cores. Therefore, the OSU SRP center developed a system that integrates environmental monitoring data with analytical chemistry data and downstream bioinformatics and statistics to enable complete ‘source to outcome’ data modeling and information management. This article describes the development of this integrated information management system that includes commercial software for operational laboratory management and sample management in addition to open source custom built software for bioinformatics and experimental data management. PMID:22651935

  16. Interpretation of geophysical logs, aquifer tests, and water levels in wells in and near the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site, Upper Gwynedd Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 2000-02

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, Lisa A.; Cinotto, Peter J.; Conger, Randall W.; Bird, Philip H.; Pracht, Karl A.

    2005-01-01

    Ground water in the vicinity of various industrial facilities in Upper Gwynedd Township and Lansdale Borough, Montgomery County, Pa., is contaminated with various volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The 2-square-mile area was placed on the National Priorities List as the North Penn Area 7 Superfund site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1989. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical logging, aquifer testing, water-level monitoring, and streamflow measurements in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 beginning autumn 2000 to assist the USEPA in developing an understanding of the hydrogeologic framework in the area as part of the USEPA Remedial Investigation. The study area is underlain by Triassic and Jurassic-age sandstones, siltstones, and shales of the Lockatong Formation and the Brunswick Group. Regionally, these rocks strike northeast and dip to the northwest. The sequence of rocks form a fractured-sedimentary-rock aquifer that acts as a set of confined to partially confined layered aquifers of differing permeabilities. The aquifers are recharged by precipitation and discharge to streams and wells. The Wissahickon Creek headwaters are less than 1 mile northeast of the study area, and this stream flows southwest to bisect North Penn Area 7. Ground water is pumped in the vicinity of North Penn Area 7 for industrial use and public supply. The USGS collected geophysical logs for 16 wells that ranged in depth from 50 to 623 feet. Aquifer-interval-isolation testing was done in 9 of the 16 wells, for a total of 30 zones tested. A multiple-well aquifer test was conducted by monitoring the response of 14 wells to pumping a 600-ft deep production well in February and March 2002. In addition, water levels were monitored continuously in three wells in the area and streamflow was measured quarterly at two sites on Wissahickon Creek from December 2000 through September 2002. Geophysical logging identified water-bearing zones associated with

  17. Hydrostratigraphy, soil/sediment chemistry, and water quality, Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system, Puchack Well Field Superfund site and vicinity, Pennsauken Township, Camden County, New Jersey, 1997-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barringer, Julia L.; Walker, Richard L.; Jacobsen, Eric; Jankowski, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Drinking-water supplies from the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system at the Puchack well field in Pennsauken Township, Camden County, New Jersey, have been contaminated by hexavalent chromium-the most toxic and mobile form-at concentrations exceeding the New Jersey maximum contaminant level of 100 micrograms per liter. Also, scattered but widespread instances of volatile organic compounds (primarily trichloroethylene) at concentrations that exceed their respective maximum contaminant levels in the area's ground water have been reported. Because inorganic and organic contaminants are present in the ground water underlying the Puchack well field, no water from there has been withdrawn for public supply since 1998, when the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) added the area that contains the Puchack well field to the National Priorities List. As part of the USEPA's investigation of the Puchack Well Field Superfund site, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a study during 1997-2001 to (1) refine previous interpretations of the hydrostratigraphic framework, hydraulic gradients, and local directions of ground-water flow; (2) describe the chemistry of soils and saturated aquifer sediments; and (3) document the quality of ground water in the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system in the area. The four major water-bearing units of the Potomac-Raritan-Magothy aquifer system-the Upper aquifer (mostly unsaturated in the study area), the Middle aquifer, the Intermediate Sand (a local but important unit), and the Lower aquifer-are separated by confining units. The confining units contain areas of cut and fill, resulting in permeable zones that permit water to pass through them. Pumping from the Puchack well field during the past 3 decades resulted in downward hydraulic gradients that moved contaminants into the Lower aquifer, in which the production wells are finished, and caused ground water to flow northeast, locally. A comparison of current (1997

  18. Supplemental risk-assessment guidance for the Superfund program. Part 1. Guidance for Public-Health Risk Assessments. Part 2. Guidance for ecological Risk Assessments. Draft report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    This guidance manual was developed to address the practical aspects and issues pertaining to the Superfund risk-assessment process for both public health and environment concerns. Part 1, Guidance for Public Health Risk Assessments, supplements the Superfund Public Health Evaluation Manual and Superfund Exposure Assessment Manual and the Endangerment Assessment Handbook. Explicit guidance on technical matters which should be followed in developing public health risk assessments for EPA Region 1. The guidance addresses hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, risk characterization, and uncertainty/limitations. Part 2 of the manual, Guidance for Ecological Risk Assessments, addresses the collection of site-specific data needed to support an ecological risk assessment, describes a framework for conducting the assessments, and provides several specific approaches for assessing risks to systems exposed to chemical contamination in different media.

  19. Contaminated sites from the past: experience of the US Environmental Protection Agency.

    PubMed

    Boyd, M A

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the experience of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in cleaning up radioactively contaminated sites. In the USA, EPA regulates the radiological clean-up of uranium mill tailings sites, some Department of Energy legacy sites within the US nuclear weapons complex, and Superfund National Priorities List sites. The approach to site remediation decisions, including the determination of clean-up levels, varies according to the enabling legislation granting EPA these authorities. Past practices that gave rise to many of the existing exposure situations at legacy sites were permissible before the advent of environmental clean-up legislation. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 authorised EPA to set applicable radioactivity concentration standards for soil clean-up at inactive uranium mill sites and vicinity properties. For the other categories of sites mentioned above, remediation goals are typically based on not exceeding a target excess cancer risk range established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (also known as 'Superfund'). EPA's regulations for cleaning up various contaminated sites in existing exposure situations often result in residual doses that are typical of optimised doses in planned exposure situations. Although the clean-up levels selected may differ from those adopted in other countries, recommendations from the International Commission on Radiological Protection are reflected in the exposure assessment methodologies used in their establishment. PMID:27012843

  20. 5 CFR 792.105 - Agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Agency responsibilities. 792.105 Section 792.105 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' HEALTH, COUNSELING, AND WORK/LIFE PROGRAMS Alcoholism and Drug Abuse...

  1. 5 CFR 792.105 - Agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agency responsibilities. 792.105 Section 792.105 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' HEALTH, COUNSELING, AND WORK/LIFE PROGRAMS Alcoholism and Drug Abuse...

  2. 5 CFR 792.105 - Agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agency responsibilities. 792.105 Section 792.105 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' HEALTH AND COUNSELING PROGRAMS Regulatory Requirements for Alcoholism and...

  3. 5 CFR 792.105 - Agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agency responsibilities. 792.105 Section 792.105 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' HEALTH AND COUNSELING PROGRAMS Regulatory Requirements for Alcoholism and...

  4. 5 CFR 724.103 - Agency obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agency obligations. 724.103 Section 724.103 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) IMPLEMENTATION OF TITLE II OF THE NOTIFICATION AND FEDERAL EMPLOYEE ANTIDISCRIMINATION...

  5. 5 CFR 724.103 - Agency obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agency obligations. 724.103 Section 724.103 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) IMPLEMENTATION OF TITLE II OF THE NOTIFICATION AND FEDERAL EMPLOYEE ANTIDISCRIMINATION...

  6. 5 CFR 720.304 - Agency plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED... upon request. The Office of Personnel Management will review a selection of agency plans each fiscal... of the action plan. (3) An assessment of the current status of disabled veteran employment within...

  7. 76 FR 24479 - In the Matter of the Taylor Lumber and Treating Superfund Site, Sheridan, Oregon, Amendment to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Agreement and Covenant Not To Sue, Pacific Wood Preserving of Oregon AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency.... Environmental Protection Agency (``EPA'') and Pacific Wood Preserving of Oregon (``PWPO''). In accordance...

  8. 32 CFR 318.10 - Appeal of initial adverse Agency determination for access, correction or amendment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE THREAT REDUCTION AGENCY... Threat Reduction Agency, 45045 Aviation Drive, Dulles, VA 20166-7517. (c) The requester shall provide...

  9. Graphic products used in the evaluation of traditional and emerging remote sensing technologies for the detection of fugitive contamination at selected superfund hazardous waste sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, E. Terrence; Fisher, Gary B.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the overhead imagery and field sampling results used to prepare U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2011-1050, 'Evaluation of Traditional and Emerging Remote Sensing Technologies for the Detection of Fugitive Contamination at Selected Superfund Hazardous Waste Sites'. These graphic products were used in the evaluation of remote sensing technology in postclosure monitoring of hazardous waste sites and represent an ongoing research effort. Soil sampling results presented here were accomplished with field portable x-ray fluoresence (XRF) technology and are used as screening tools only representing the current conditions of metals and other contaminants at selected Superfund hazardous waste sites.

  10. Geochemical Characteristics of TP3 Mine Wastes at the Elizabeth Copper Mine Superfund Site, Orange County, Vermont

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Briggs, Paul H.; Meier, Allen L.; Muzik, Timothy L.

    2003-01-01

    Remediation of the Elizabeth mine Superfund site in the Vermont copper belt poses challenges for balancing environmental restoration goals with issues of historic preservation while adopting cost-effective strategies for site cleanup and long-term maintenance. The waste-rock pile known as TP3, at the headwaters of Copperas Brook, is especially noteworthy in this regard because it is the worst source of surface- and ground-water contamination identified to date, while also being the area of greatest historical significance. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a study of the historic mine-waste piles known as TP3 at the Elizabeth mine Superfund site near South Strafford, Orange County, VT. TP3 is a 12.3-acre (49,780 m2) subarea of the Elizabeth mine site. It is a focus area for historic preservation because it encompasses an early 19th century copperas works as well as waste from late 19th- and 20th century copper mining (Kierstead, 2001). Surface runoff and seeps from TP3 form the headwaters of Copperas Brook. The stream flows down a valley onto flotation tailings from 20th century copper mining operations and enters the West Branch of the Ompompanoosuc River approximately 1 kilometer downstream from the mine site. Shallow drinking water wells down gradient from TP3 exceed drinking water standards for copper and cadmium (Hathaway and others, 2001). The Elizabeth mine was listed as a Superfund site in 2001, mainly because of impacts of acid-mine drainage on the Ompompanoosuc River.

  11. 75 FR 52942 - Two Proposed CERCLA Section 122(g) Administrative Agreements for De Minimis Settlements for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-30

    ... Mercury Refining Superfund Site, Towns of Guilderland and Colonie, Albany County, NY AGENCY: Environmental...-OxyChem Settlement.'' Both settlements pertain to the Mercury Refining Superfund Site (``Site... Substance Superfund Mercury Refining Superfund Site Special Account. Each settling party's...

  12. 40 CFR 40.165 - Continuation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuation grants. 40.165 Section 40.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION GRANTS § 40.165 Continuation grants. To be eligible for a continuation...

  13. 40 CFR 40.165 - Continuation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Continuation grants. 40.165 Section 40.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION GRANTS § 40.165 Continuation grants. To be eligible for a continuation...

  14. 40 CFR 40.165 - Continuation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuation grants. 40.165 Section 40.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION GRANTS § 40.165 Continuation grants. To be eligible for a continuation...

  15. 40 CFR 40.165 - Continuation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuation grants. 40.165 Section 40.165 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION GRANTS § 40.165 Continuation grants. To be eligible for a continuation...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.150 - Continuous sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Continuous sampling. 1065.150 Section 1065.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.150 Continuous sampling. You may use...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.150 - Continuous sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuous sampling. 1065.150 Section 1065.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.150 Continuous sampling. You may use...

  18. 40 CFR 1065.150 - Continuous sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Continuous sampling. 1065.150 Section 1065.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.150 Continuous sampling. You may use...

  19. 40 CFR 1065.150 - Continuous sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Continuous sampling. 1065.150 Section 1065.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.150 Continuous sampling. You may use...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.150 - Continuous sampling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Continuous sampling. 1065.150 Section 1065.150 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.150 Continuous sampling. You may use...

  1. 40 CFR 45.155 - Continuation assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Continuation assistance. 45.155 Section 45.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE TRAINING ASSISTANCE § 45.155 Continuation assistance. To be eligible for continuation assistance,...

  2. 42 CFR 488.11 - State survey agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State survey agency functions. 488.11 Section 488... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES General Provisions § 488.11 State survey agency functions. State and local agencies that have agreements under section...

  3. 42 CFR 488.11 - State survey agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State survey agency functions. 488.11 Section 488... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES General Provisions § 488.11 State survey agency functions. State and local agencies that have agreements under section...

  4. 42 CFR 488.11 - State survey agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State survey agency functions. 488.11 Section 488... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES General Provisions § 488.11 State survey agency functions. State and local agencies that have agreements under section...

  5. 42 CFR 488.11 - State survey agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false State survey agency functions. 488.11 Section 488... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES General Provisions § 488.11 State survey agency functions. State and local agencies that have agreements under section...

  6. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  7. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  8. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  9. 32 CFR 728.58 - Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. 728.58 Section 728.58 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL... Federal Agencies § 728.58 Federal Aviation Agency (FAA) beneficiaries. (a) Beneficiaries. Air...

  10. 12 CFR 261b.3 - Conduct of agency business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Conduct of agency business. 261b.3 Section 261b... SYSTEM (CONTINUED) RULES REGARDING PUBLIC OBSERVATION OF MEETINGS § 261b.3 Conduct of agency business. Members shall not jointly conduct or dispose of official agency business other than in accordance...

  11. 14 CFR 73.19 - Reports by using agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reports by using agency. 73.19 Section 73.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE Restricted Areas § 73.19 Reports by using agency. (a) Each using agency shall prepare a report on the use of...

  12. 45 CFR 1302.32 - Alternative agency-prohibition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alternative agency-prohibition. 1302.32 Section 1302.32 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT... Alternative agency—prohibition. (a) No agency will be designated as the alternative agency pursuant to...

  13. 45 CFR 1302.32 - Alternative agency-prohibition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alternative agency-prohibition. 1302.32 Section 1302.32 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT... Alternative agency—prohibition. (a) No agency will be designated as the alternative agency pursuant to...

  14. 45 CFR 1302.31 - Requirements of alternative agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements of alternative agency. 1302.31 Section 1302.31 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN....31 Requirements of alternative agency. The agency identified by the Indian tribe must establish...

  15. 45 CFR 1302.31 - Requirements of alternative agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements of alternative agency. 1302.31 Section 1302.31 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN....31 Requirements of alternative agency. The agency identified by the Indian tribe must establish...

  16. 45 CFR 1302.31 - Requirements of alternative agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements of alternative agency. 1302.31 Section 1302.31 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN....31 Requirements of alternative agency. The agency identified by the Indian tribe must establish...

  17. 45 CFR 1302.32 - Alternative agency-prohibition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alternative agency-prohibition. 1302.32 Section 1302.32 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT... Alternative agency—prohibition. (a) No agency will be designated as the alternative agency pursuant to...

  18. 7 CFR 276.2 - State agency liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State agency liabilities. 276.2 Section 276.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM STATE AGENCY LIABILITIES AND FEDERAL SANCTIONS § 276.2 State agency liabilities. (a)...

  19. 7 CFR 1216.8 - Farm Service Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Farm Service Agency or FSA means the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Farm Service Agency. ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Farm Service Agency. 1216.8 Section 1216.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE...

  20. 7 CFR 1216.8 - Farm Service Agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Farm Service Agency or FSA means the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Farm Service Agency. ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farm Service Agency. 1216.8 Section 1216.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE...

  1. 34 CFR 303.142 - Designation of lead agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Designation of lead agency. 303.142 Section 303.142 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION....142 Designation of lead agency. Each application must include a designation of the lead agency in...

  2. 5 CFR 831.1307 - Use of consumer reporting agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of consumer reporting agencies. 831... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Collection of Debts § 831.1307 Use of consumer reporting agencies. (a... report the debtor to a consumer reporting agency. In addition, a debtor's failure to make...

  3. 5 CFR 831.1307 - Use of consumer reporting agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of consumer reporting agencies. 831... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Collection of Debts § 831.1307 Use of consumer reporting agencies. (a... report the debtor to a consumer reporting agency. In addition, a debtor's failure to make...

  4. 5 CFR 831.1307 - Use of consumer reporting agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of consumer reporting agencies. 831... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Collection of Debts § 831.1307 Use of consumer reporting agencies. (a... report the debtor to a consumer reporting agency. In addition, a debtor's failure to make...

  5. 5 CFR 831.1307 - Use of consumer reporting agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of consumer reporting agencies. 831... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Collection of Debts § 831.1307 Use of consumer reporting agencies. (a... report the debtor to a consumer reporting agency. In addition, a debtor's failure to make...

  6. 7 CFR 4279.115 - Prohibition under Agency programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Prohibition under Agency programs. 4279.115 Section 4279.115 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS... Industry Loans § 4279.115 Prohibition under Agency programs. No B&I loans guaranteed by the Agency will...

  7. 7 CFR 4279.115 - Prohibition under Agency programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Prohibition under Agency programs. 4279.115 Section 4279.115 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS... Industry Loans § 4279.115 Prohibition under Agency programs. No B&I loans guaranteed by the Agency will...

  8. 7 CFR 276.2 - State agency liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false State agency liabilities. 276.2 Section 276.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM STATE AGENCY LIABILITIES AND FEDERAL SANCTIONS § 276.2 State agency liabilities. Link to...

  9. 75 FR 22184 - Proposed Agency Information Collection Renewal; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-27

    ... order to inspect and photocopy comments. Board: You may submit comments, which should refer to ``FR TA-1... OTS (collectively, the Banking Agencies or Agencies), as part of their continuing effort to reduce... Reduction Act of 1995. The Banking Agencies may not conduct or sponsor, and the respondent is not...

  10. 38 CFR 45.200 - Agency and legislative liaison.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency and legislative... (CONTINUED) NEW RESTRICTIONS ON LOBBYING Activities by Own Employees § 45.200 Agency and legislative liaison... Federal contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement if the payment is for agency and...

  11. 34 CFR 303.201 - Designation of lead agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Designation of lead agency. 303.201 Section 303.201 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION... of lead agency. Each application must include the name of the State lead agency, as designated...

  12. 34 CFR 303.201 - Designation of lead agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Designation of lead agency. 303.201 Section 303.201 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION... of lead agency. Each application must include the name of the State lead agency, as designated...

  13. 34 CFR 303.201 - Designation of lead agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Designation of lead agency. 303.201 Section 303.201 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION... of lead agency. Each application must include the name of the State lead agency, as designated...

  14. 34 CFR 303.142 - Designation of lead agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Designation of lead agency. 303.142 Section 303.142 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION....142 Designation of lead agency. Each application must include a designation of the lead agency in...

  15. 40 CFR 166.30 - Notice of Agency decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Notice of Agency decision. 166.30 Section 166.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS EXEMPTION OF FEDERAL AND STATE AGENCIES FOR USE OF PESTICIDES UNDER EMERGENCY CONDITIONS...

  16. 40 CFR 51.162 - Identification of responsible agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Identification of responsible agency. 51.162 Section 51.162 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Sources and Modifications § 51.162 Identification of responsible agency. Each plan must identify the...

  17. 40 CFR 255.11 - Criteria for identifying agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria for identifying agencies. 255.11 Section 255.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Criteria for Identifying Regions and...

  18. 40 CFR 255.23 - Joint identification of agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Joint identification of agencies. 255.23 Section 255.23 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES IDENTIFICATION OF REGIONS AND AGENCIES FOR SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT Procedures for Identifying Regions and...

  19. 40 CFR 51.162 - Identification of responsible agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification of responsible agency. 51.162 Section 51.162 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Sources and Modifications § 51.162 Identification of responsible agency. Each plan must identify the...

  20. 40 CFR 763.84 - General local education agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false General local education agency responsibilities. 763.84 Section 763.84 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC... Transportation and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (h) Consider whether any conflict of interest...