Science.gov

Sample records for agency spacecraft impacted

  1. Meteoroid Impacts on Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foschini, Luigi

    In the space age, information about the near-Earth environment is becoming more and more important, because of the potential danger to human exploration and use of space. In recent years there have been a number of in situ space experiments, such as LDEF and EURECA, that have demonstrated the threaths to satellites, space station, and astronauts from high-kinetic-energy impacts of meteoroids and space debris. Post-flight analyses of data from these satellites have revealed that, the catastrophic impact to be a rare event; however, the main danger comes from the impact-generated plasma, which can produce several types of electromagnetic interferences that can disturb or even destroy on-board electronics.

  2. NASA's Deep Impact Spacecraft Images Comet ISON

    NASA Video Gallery

    This series of images of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) was taken by theMedium-Resolution Imager of NASA’s Deep Impact spacecraft over a 36-hourperiod on Jan. 17 and 18, 2013. At the time, the spacecra...

  3. Hazards by meteoroid Impacts onto operational spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landgraf, M.; Jehn, R.; Flury, W.

    Operational spacecraft in Earth orbit or on interplanetary trajectories are exposed to high-velocity particles that can cause damage to sensitive on-board instrumentation. In general there are two types of hazard: direct destruction of functional elements by impacts, and indirect disturbance of instruments by the generated impact plasma. The latter poses a threat especially for high-voltage instrumentation and electronics. While most meteoroids have sizes in the order of a few micrometre, and typical masses of 10-15 kg, the most dangerous population with sizes in the millimetre and masses in the milligramme range exhibits still substantial impact fluxes in the order of 2 × 10-11 m-2 s-1 . This level of activity can by significantly elevated during passages of the spacecraft through cometary trails, which on Earth cause events like the well-known Leonid and Perseid meteor streams. The total mass flux of micrometeoroids onto Earth is about 107 kg yr-1 , which is about one order of magnitude less than the estimated mass flux of large objects like comets and asteroids with individual masses above 105 kg. In order to protect spacecraft from the advert effects of meteoroid impacts, ESA performs safety operations on its spacecraft during meteor streams, supported by real-time measurements of the meteor activity. A summary of past and future activities is given.

  4. Determining the effects of space debris impacts on spacecraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedeschi, William J.; Connell, John C.; McKnight, Darren S.; Allahdadi, Firooz; Reinhardt, Al; Hunt, Ronald D.; Hogg, David M.

    1992-07-01

    A Spacecraft Breakup Modeling Program initiated by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) in support of the DoD/NASA/DOT Orbital Debris Research Plan is discussed. The program is aimed at improving the accuracy and usefulness of satellite breakup models, with an emphasis on collision-induced events. The program encompasses hypervelocity impact tests, developing predictive models based on the analysis of test result, transferring appropriate technology to avoid duplication of effort, and continually interacting with DNA customers to identify and refine their specific technology needs.

  5. Hypervelocity impact testing of spacecraft optical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Hypervelocity tests of spacecraft optical sensors were conducted to determine if the optical signature from an impact inside the optical sensor sunshade resembled signals that have been observed on-orbit. Impact tests were conducted in darkness and with the ejected debris illuminated. The tests were conducted at the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility. The projectile masses and velocities that may be obtained at the facility are most representative of the hypervelocity particles thought to be responsible for a group of anomalous optical sensors responses that have been observed on-orbit. The projectiles are a few micrograms, slightly more massive than the microgram particles thought to be responsible for the signal source. The test velocities were typically 7.3 km/s, which are somewhat slower than typical space particles.

  6. Dust impact signals on the wind spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Monson, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze waveforms recorded by the Time Domain Sampler of the WAVES experiment on Wind which are similar to impulsive waveforms observed by the S/WAVES experiment on STEREO. These have been interpreted as dust impacts by Meyer-Vernet et al. and M. L. Kaiser and K. Goetz and extensively analyzed by Zaslavsky et al. The mechanism for coupling the emission to the antennas to produce an electrical signal is still not well understood, however. One suggested mechanism for coupling of the impact to the antenna is that the spacecraft body changes potential with respect to the surrounding plasma but the antennas do not (the body mechanism). Another class of mechanisms, with several forms, is that the charge of the emitted cloud interacts with the antennas. The Wind data show that both are operating. The time domain shapes of the dust pulses are highly variable but we have little understanding of what provides these shapes. One feature of the STEREO data has been interpreted as impacts from high velocity nanoparticles entrained by the solar wind. We have not found evidence for fast nanodust in the Wind data. An appreciable fraction of the impacts observed on Wind is consistent with interstellar dust. The impact rates do not follow a Poisson distribution, expected for random independent events, and this is interpreted as bunching. We have not succeeded in relating this bunching to known meteor showers, and they do not repeat from 1 year to the next. The data suggest bunching by fields in the heliosphere.

  7. Impact sensor network for detection of hypervelocity impacts on spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Frank; Janovsky, Rolf

    2007-11-01

    With regard to hypervelocity impact detection, a sensor network that can be applied on typical spacecraft structures is under development at Fraunhofer EMI (Ernst-Mach-Institut), supported by OHB-System. For impact detection, acoustic transducers are used. The structure types investigated are a 2 mm thick plate from aluminium alloy and a 49 mm thick sandwich panel with aluminium face-sheets and aluminium honeycomb core. One impact test was performed on each of the panels, which were instrumented with 6 ultrasonic transducers. The signals recorded at the various sensor locations varied with regard to peak amplitude and elapse time of the signal. Using this information and combining it with a localization algorithm, the impact location could be successfully determined. A description of the impact sensor network and the mathematical model to determine the impact location is provided. The impact tests on the spacecraft structure, the response of the sensor network and the analysis performed to determine the impact location are described.

  8. Low power arcjet system spacecraft impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lichtin, D. A.; Palchefsky, J. W.; Bogorad, A. L.

    1993-06-01

    Application of electrothermal arcjets on communications satellites requires assessment of integration concerns identified by the user community. Perceived risks include plume contamination of spacecraft materials, induced arcing or electrostatic discharges between differentially charged spacecraft surfaces, and conducted and radiated electromagnetic interference (EMI) for both steady state and transient conditions. A Space Act agreement between Martin Marietta Astro Space, the Rocket Research Company, and NASA's Lewis Research Center was established to experimentally examine these issues. Spacecraft materials were exposed to an arcjet plume for 40 hours, representing 40 weeks of actual spacecraft life, and contamination was characterized by changes in surface properties. With the exception of the change in emittance of one sample, all measurable changes in surface properties resulted in acceptable end of life characteristics. Charged spacecraft samples were benignly and consistently reduced to ground potential during exposure to the powered arcjet plume, suggesting that the arcjet could act as a charge control device on spacecraft. Steady state EMI signatures obtained using two different power processing units were similar to emissions measured in a previous test. Emissions measured in UHF, S, C, Ku and Ka bands obtained a null result which verified previous work in the UHF, S, and C bands. Characteristics of conducted and radiated transient emissions appear within standard spacecraft susceptibility criteria.

  9. Low power arcjet system spacecraft impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pencil, Eric J.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Lichtin, D. A.; Palchefsky, J. W.; Bogorad, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    Application of electrothermal arcjets on communications satellites requires assessment of integration concerns identified by the user community. Perceived risks include plume contamination of spacecraft materials, induced arcing or electrostatic discharges between differentially charged spacecraft surfaces, and conducted and radiated electromagnetic interference (EMI) for both steady state and transient conditions. A Space Act agreement between Martin Marietta Astro Space, the Rocket Research Company, and NASA's Lewis Research Center was established to experimentally examine these issues. Spacecraft materials were exposed to an arcjet plume for 40 hours, representing 40 weeks of actual spacecraft life, and contamination was characterized by changes in surface properties. With the exception of the change in emittance of one sample, all measurable changes in surface properties resulted in acceptable end of life characteristics. Charged spacecraft samples were benignly and consistently reduced to ground potential during exposure to the powered arcjet plume, suggesting that the arcjet could act as a charge control device on spacecraft. Steady state EMI signatures obtained using two different power processing units were similar to emissions measured in a previous test. Emissions measured in UHF, S, C, Ku and Ka bands obtained a null result which verified previous work in the UHF, S, and C bands. Characteristics of conducted and radiated transient emissions appear within standard spacecraft susceptibility criteria.

  10. Low-Impact Mating System for Docking Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, James L.; Robertson, Brandan; Carroll, Monty B.; Le, Thang; Morales, Ray

    2008-01-01

    A document describes a low-impact mating system suitable for both docking (mating of two free-flying spacecraft) and berthing (in which a robot arm in one spacecraft positions an object for mating with either spacecraft). The low-impact mating system is fully androgynous: it mates with a copy of itself, i.e., all spacecraft and other objects to be mated are to be equipped with identical copies of the system. This aspect of the design helps to minimize the number of unique parts and to standardize and facilitate mating operations. The system includes a closed-loop feedback control subsystem that actively accommodates misalignments between mating spacecraft, thereby attenuating spacecraft dynamics and mitigating the need for precise advance positioning of the spacecraft. The operational characteristics of the mating system can be easily configured in software, during operation, to enable mating of spacecraft having various masses, center-of-gravity offsets, and closing velocities. The system design provides multi-fault tolerance for critical operations: for example, to ensure unmating at a critical time, a redundant unlatching mechanism and two independent pyrotechnic release subsystems are included.

  11. Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feoktistov, K. P.

    1974-01-01

    The task of building a spacecraft is compared to the construction of an artificial cybernetic system able to acquire and process information. Typical features for future spacecraft are outlined and the assignment of duties in spacecraft control between automatic devices and the crew is analyzed.

  12. Micrometeoroid impact charge yield for common spacecraft materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, A.; Grün, E.; Malaspina, D.; Sternovsky, Z.

    2014-08-01

    The impact ionization charge yield is experimentally measured from four common materials used in space and specifically on the two STEREO spacecraft (germanium-coated black Kapton, beryllium copper, multilayer insulation, and solar cells). Cosmic dust particle impacts on spacecraft have been detected by electric field and plasma and radio wave instruments. The accurate interpretation of these signals is complicated by many factors, including the details of the spacecraft antenna system, the local spacecraft plasma environment, and our understanding of the physics of the impact process. The most basic quantity, the amount of charge liberated upon impact, is generally considered poorly constrained and is suspected to depend on the target material. Here we show that for common materials used on spacecraft this variability is small for impacts around 10 km/s, and the impact charge yield can be approximated by 80 fC for a 1 pg projectile. At higher speeds (˜50 km/s), variation of up to a factor of 5 is observed. The measured yields in the 10-50 km/s range are compared to measurements and predictions from the literature and are found to be lower than predicted by at least a factor of 12 at 10 km/s and at least a factor of 1.7 at 50 km/s. Impact charge is also found to depend on angle of incidence; the data suggest a maximum at 45°.

  13. Probability Analysis for Accidental Impact on Mars by the Micro-Spacecraft Procyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funase, Ryu; Yano, Hajime; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro; Ozaki, Naoya; Nakajima, Shintaro; Shimizu, Yukio

    This paper analyzes the impact probability on Mars for the 50kg-class micro-spacecraft PROCYON (PRoximate Object Close flYby with Optical Navigation) in 50 years after its launch. PROCYON, which is mainly developed by the University of Tokyo and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), has two missions: the first is the technology demonstration of a micro-spacecraft bus system for deep space exploration and the second is proximity operation by Near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) as the closest flyby distance from a target asteroid is aimed around 30 kilometer. The spacecraft is scheduled to be launched together with Japan’s second asteroid sample return spacecraft "Hayabusa-2" at the end of 2014. Initially PROCYON will be inserted into an Earth resonant trajectory that allows the spacecraft to cruise back to the Earth by solar electric propulsion leveraging. The Earth gravity assist, which is scheduled at the end of 2015, will enable the spacecraft to expand a number of candidate NEAs for flyby operations. At the time of the writing, its candidate NEAs include "2000 DP107", "2010 LJ14" and "2002 AJ29". A miniature ion thruster is mounted on the spacecraft to provide 300muN of thrust with specific impulse of 1200 seconds for deep space maneuver before Earth gravity assist. Considering a small amount of its fuel (about 2 kg of Xenon propellant), PROCYON has no possibility to impact directly on Mars without Earth gravity assist. However, if PROCYON successfully obtains large enough delta-V by the Earth gravity assist at the end of 2015, a possibility of accidental impact on Mars cannot be neglected in order to comply the COSPAR planetary protection requirements for forward contamination. In this paper, we calculate the possibility of accidental impact on Mars after the Earth gravity assist. As the result we conclude that the possibility of Mars impact is negligible within 50 years after its launch.

  14. Debris area distribution of spacecraft under hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Sheng-wei; Liu, Sen; Li, Yi; Ke, Fa-wei; Huang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    Cross-sectional area is an important parameter for spacecraft breakup debris as it is the directly measured data in space observation. It is significant for observing and analysing the spacecraft breakup event to accurately modelling the area distribution of the breakup debris. In this paper, experimental study has been performed on debris area distribution characteristics of spacecraft under hypervelocity impact. The tests are carried out at the ballistic ranges of CARDC. Aluminium projectiles are launched to normally impact the simulated spacecrafts at about 3.0 km/s. The simulated spacecrafts are made up of aluminium plates, filled with some simulated electronics boxes, each of which was installed with a circuit board. "Soft-catch" devices are used to recover the breakup fragments. The test results show that: 1) the relationship between the cross-sectional area and the characteristic length of debris, which can be obtained in the logarithmic coordinates by linear fitting, represents the debris shape characteristic in a certain extent; 2) the area-to-mass ratios of fragments show normal distributions in the logarithmic coordinates; 3) debris made of different materials can be distinguished by different peaks on the distribution curves; 4) the area-to-mass ratio distributions can be expressed by a linear superimposition of several normal functions which represent the main materials of the spacecraft.

  15. Electromagnetic pulses generated by meteoroid impacts on spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, S.; Colestock, P.; Cox, L.; Kelley, M.; Lee, N.

    2010-12-01

    Meteoroid impacts on spacecraft are known to cause mechanical damage, but their electrical effect on spacecraft systems are not well characterized. Several reported spacecraft anomalies are suggestive of an electrical failure associated with meteoroid impact. We present a theory to explain plasma production and subsequent electric fields occurring when a meteoroid strikes a spacecraft, ionizing itself and part of the spacecraft. This plasma, with a charge separation commensurate with different specie mobilities, can produce a strong electromagnetic pulse (EMP) at broad frequency spectra, potentially causing catastrophic damage if the impact is relatively near an area with low shielding or an open umbilical. Anomalies such as gyrostability loss can be caused by an EMP without any detectable momentum transfer due to small (<1 μg) particle mass. Subsequent plasma oscillations can also emit significant power and may be responsible for many reported satellite anomalies. The presented theory discusses both a dust-free plasma expansion with coherent electron oscillation and a dusty plasma expansion with macroscopic charge separation.

  16. Laboratory investigation of antenna signals from dust impacts on spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternovsky, Zoltan; Collette, Andrew; Malaspina, David M.; Thayer, Frederick

    2016-04-01

    Electric field and plasma wave instruments act as dust detectors picking up voltage pulses induced by impacts of particulates on the spacecraft body. These signals enable the characterization of cosmic dust environments even with missions without dedicated dust instruments. For example, the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft performed the first detection of dust particles near Uranus, Neptune, and in the outer solar system [Gurnett et al., 1987, 1991, 1997]. The two STEREO spacecraft observed distinct signals at high rate that were interpreted as nano-sized particles originating from near the Sun and accelerated to high velocities by the solar wind [MeyerVernet et al, 2009a, Zaslavsky et al., 2012]. The MAVEN spacecraft is using the antennas onboard to characterize the dust environment of Mars [Andersson et al., 2014] and Solar Probe Plus will do the same in the inner heliosphere. The challenge, however, is the correct interpretation of the impact signals and calculating the mass of the dust particles. The uncertainties result from the incomplete understanding of the signal pickup mechanisms, and the variation of the signal amplitude with impact location, the ambient plasma environment, and impact speed. A comprehensive laboratory study of impact generated antenna signals has been performed recently using the IMPACT dust accelerator facility operated at the University of Colorado. Dust particles of micron and submicron sizes with velocities of tens of km/s are generated using a 3 MV electrostatic analyzer. A scaled down model spacecraft is exposed to the dust impacts and one or more antennas, connected to sensitive electronics, are used to detect the impact signals. The measurements showed that there are three clearly distinct signal pickup mechanisms due to spacecraft charging, antenna charging and antenna pickup sensing space charge from the expanding plasma cloud. All mechanisms vary with the spacecraft and antenna bias voltages and, furthermore, the latter two

  17. Deep Impact Spacecraft Collides With Comet Tempel 1-Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    After 172 days and 268 million miles of deep space travel, the NASA Deep Impact spacecraft successfully reached out and touched comet Tempel 1. The collision between the coffee table-sized space probe and city-sized comet occurred July 4, 2005 at 12:52 a.m. CDT. The objects met at 23,000 miles per hour. The heat produced by the impact was at least several thousand degrees Kelvin and at that extreme temperature, just about any material begins to glow. This movie, made up of images taken by the medium resolution camera aboard the spacecraft, from May 1 to July 2, shows the Deep Impact approach to comet Tempel 1. The spacecraft detected 3 outbursts during this time period, on June 14th, June 22nd, and July 2nd. The movie ends during the final outburst. Mission scientists expect Deep Impact to provide answers to basic questions about the formation of the solar system. Principal investigator, Dr. Michael A'Hearn of the University of Maryland in College Park, is responsible for the mission, and project management is handled by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The program office at Marshall Space Flight Center MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, assisted the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington with program management, technology planning, systems assessment, flight assurance and public outreach. The spacecraft was built for NASA by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation of Boulder, Colorado. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UMD)

  18. Hydrodynamic water impact. [Apollo spacecraft waterlanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kettleborough, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    The hydrodynamic impact of a falling body upon a viscous incompressible fluid was investigated by numerically solving the equations of motion. Initially the mathematical model simulated the axisymmetric impact of a rigid right circular cylinder upon the initially quiescent free surface of a fluid. A compressible air layer exists between the falling cylinder and the liquid free surface. The mathematical model was developed by applying the Navier-Stokes equations to the incompressible air layer and the incompressible fluid. Assuming the flow to be one dimensional within the air layer, the average velocity, pressure and density distributions were calculated. The liquid free surface was allowed to deform as the air pressure acting on it increases. For the liquid the normalized equations were expressed in two-dimensional cylindrical coordinates. The governing equations for the air layer and the liquid were expressed in finite difference form and solved numerically. For the liquid a modified version of the Marker-and-Cell method was used. The mathematical model has been reexamined and a new approach has recently been initiated. Essentially this consists of examining the impact of an inclined plate onto a quiesent water surface with the equations now formulated in cartesian coordinates.

  19. Deep Impact Spacecraft Collides With Comet Tempel 1 (Video)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    After 172 days and 268 million miles of deep space travel, the NASA Deep Impact spacecraft successfully reached out and touched comet Tempel 1. The collision between the coffee table-sized space probe and city-sized comet occurred July 4, 2005 at 12:52 a.m. CDT. Comprised of images taken by the targeting sensor aboard the impactor probe, this movie shows the spacecraft approaching the comet up to just seconds before impact. Mission scientists expect Deep Impact to provide answers to basic questions about the formation of the solar system. Principal investigator for Deep Impact, Dr. Michael A'Hearn of the University of Maryland in College Park, is responsible for the mission, and project management is handled by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. The program office at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama assisted the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington with program management, technology planning, systems assessment, flight assurance and public outreach. The spacecraft was built for NASA by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation of Boulder, Colorado. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UMD)

  20. Detection of meteoroid hypervelocity impacts on the Cluster spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaverka, Jakub; Mann, Ingrid; Kero, Johan; De Spiegeleer, Alexandre; Hamrin, Maria; Norberg, Carol; Pitkanen, Timo; Pellinen-Wannberg, Asta

    2016-07-01

    There are several methods to measure the cosmic dust entering the Earth's atmosphere such as space-born dust detectors, meteor and HPLA radars, and optical imaging. One complementary method could be to use electric field instruments initially designed to measure electric waves. A plasma cloud generated by a hypervelocity dust impact on a spacecraft body can be detected by the electric field instruments commonly operated on the spacecraft. Since Earth-orbiting missions are generally not equipped with conventional dust detectors, the electric field instruments offer an alternative method to measure the Earth's dust environment. We present the first detection of dust impacts on one of the Earth-orbiting Cluster satellites recorded by the Wide-Band Data (WBD) instrument. We describe the concept of dust impact detection focused on specifics of the Cluster spacecraft and the WBD instrument and their influence on dust impact detection. The detected pulses are compared with theoretical shape based on the model of the recollection of plasma clouds electrons. The estimation of the size and the velocity of the impinging dust grains from the amplitude of the Cluster voltage pulses shown that such impacts can be generated by grains of radius of r = 0.1 μm impacting with the velocity v ˜100 km/s or by grains of radius r = 1 μm impacting with the velocity v ˜10 km/s. We discuss the sensitivity of this method for dust grain detection showing that grains of radius r = 0.01 μm can be detected when impacting with velocity v ˜300 km/s and grains of radius r = 10 μm with velocity v ˜1 km/s if the WBD instrument operates in the high gain level (75 dB).

  1. Planetary Gravity Fields and Their Impact on a Spacecraft Trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinwurm, G.; Weber, R.

    2005-01-01

    The present work touches an interdisciplinary aspect of space exploration: the improvement of spacecraft navigation by means of enhanced planetary interior model derivation. The better the bodies in our solar system are known and modelled, the more accurately (and safely) a spacecraft can be navigated. In addition, the information about the internal structure of a planet, moon or any other planetary body can be used in arguments for different theories of solar system evolution. The focus of the work lies in a new approach for modelling the gravity field of small planetary bodies: the implementation of complex ellipsoidal coordinates (figure 1, [4]) for irregularly shaped bodies that cannot be represented well by a straightforward spheroidal approach. In order to carry out the required calculations the computer programme GRASP (Gravity Field of a Planetary Body and its Influence on a Spacecraft Trajectory) has been developed [5]. The programme furthermore allows deriving the impact of the body s gravity field on a spacecraft trajectory and thus permits predictions for future space mission flybys.

  2. Experimental Study of Spacecraft Material Ejected upon Hypervelocity Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesconi, A.; Giacomuzzo, C.; Barilaro, L.; Segato, E.; Sansone, F.

    2013-08-01

    Twenty-eight hypervelocity impact experiments were carried out at CISAS impact facility, with the aim of assessing the amount of ejecta from three different targets representative of spacecraft materials, i.e. simple aluminum-alloy plates, silicon solar cells and simple aluminum-alloy plates covered by MLI blankets. Projectiles having different size (1, 1.5 and 2.3 mm diameter) were launched at speed ranging from 4 to 5.5 km/s and impact angle from 0° to 80° (the impact angle dependence was evaluated for simple aluminium targets only). Experiments pointed out that the number of ejecta produced after HVI is significantly high (order of thousands). Moreover, it was shown that brittle materials produce more fragments than ductile ones, but the environment pollution and the damage potential of particles coming from metals are much more critical, since large and heavy fragments are prevalent in this case.

  3. Spacecraft outer thermal blankets as hypervelocity impact bumpers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cour-Palais, B. G.

    1996-05-01

    A thermal barrier consisting of a woven fabric outer layer followed by several layers of aluminized mylar insulation has been the primary impact protection against micrometeoroid and orbital impacts for many spacecraft currently in orbit. This paper examines its effectiveness as a hypervelocity "bumper" based on the performance of a NASA space suit. In this case, the thermal barrier consisted of a fabric layer followed by five layers of the aluminized mylar, which shielded either an aluminum rear wall or a rubberized pressure garment. The total areal density of the fabric and mylar layers was 0.052 g/cm2 and the fabric stand-off was 4 mm from the protected surfaces, with the aluminized mylar filling the space. Test results obtained with hypervelocity aluminum projectile impacts up to 8.5 km/s on the thermal barrier and aluminum wall are described, and a semi-empirical equation for this type of shielding is suggested.

  4. Fullerenes in an impact crater on the LDEF spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radicati di Brozolo, F.; Bunch, T. E.; Fleming, R. H.; Macklin, J.

    1994-01-01

    The fullerenes C60 and C70 have been found to occur naturally on Earth and have also been invoked to explain features in the absorption spectra of interstellar clouds. But no definitive spectroscopic evidence exists for fullerenes in space and attempts to find fullerenes in carbonaceous chondrites have been unsuccessful. Here we report the observation of fullerenes associated with carbonaceous impact residue in a crater on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) spacecraft. Laser ionization mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy indicate the presence of fullerenes in the crater and in adjacent ejecta. Man-made fullerenes survive experimental hypervelocity (approximately 6.1 km s-1) impacts into aluminium targets, suggesting that space fullerenes contained in a carbonaceous micrometeorite could have survived the LDEF impact at velocities towards the lower end of the natural particle encounter range (<13 km s-1). We also demonstrate that the fullerenes were unlikely to have formed as instrumental artefacts, nor are they present as contaminants. Although we cannot specify the origin of the fullerenes with certainty, the most plausible source is the chondritic impactor. If, alternatively, the impact produced the fullerenes in situ on LDEF, then this suggests a viable mechanism for fullerene production in space.

  5. Evaluation of Space Debris Impact on Spacecraft Structure Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashide, Masumi; Onose, Naomi; Hasegawa, Sunao

    Mission-critical components of unmanned spacecraft, such as electronic equipment, are often mounted on the interior surfaces of structure panels. This study investigated debris impact damage to structure panels to assess the degree to which they can protect components. If debris perforates a structure panel but is stopped by the equipment chassis, the impact will not affect the probability of mission success. The ballistic limit of the chassis therefore equals to the damage limit of the structure panel. To estimate this damage limit, hypervelocity impact experiments were conducted on sets of a honeycomb sandwich panel, simulating a structure panel, fixed directly to an aluminum alloy plate, simulating an equipment chassis, with no gap between the two. Debris environment models show that alumina debris particles smaller than 1 mm in diameter are dominant in low earth orbit, and the average impact velocity is over 10 km/sec. However, advanced techniques are required to accelerate small solid projectiles to such speeds, so steel projectiles at 6 km/sec were used to simulate the impact pressure caused by alumina impacting at 9 km/sec. The depths of the resulting impact craters on the chassis plates were measured with an optical microscope, and the damage limit equation of the structure panels was derived from the crater depths. The calculated damage limit equation was compared with the SRL ballistic limit equations. As a result, it was found that the equation obtained in this study showed safety results but was too robust. The stand-off distance between honeycomb sandwich panel and aluminum alloy plate was effective to decrease depths of craters in the plate.

  6. Spacecraft design impacts on the post-Newtonian parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Anja Katharina; et al.

    2015-08-01

    The ESA mission BepiColombo, reaching out to explore the elusive planet Mercury, features unprecedented tracking techniques. The highly precise orbit determination around Mercury is a compelling opportunity for a modern test of General Relativity (GR). Using the software tool GRETCHEN incorporating the Square Root Information Filter (SRIF), MPO's orbit is simulated and the post-Newtonian parameters (PNP) are estimated. In this work, the influence of a specific constraint of the Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE) on the achievable accuracy of the PNP estimates is investigated. The power system design of the spacecraft requires that ±35° around perihelion the Ka transponder needs to be switched off, thus radiometric data is only gathered via X band. This analysis shows the impact of this constraint on the achievable accuracy of PNP estimates. On a bigger scale, if GR shows some violation at a detectable level it inevitably leads to its invalidation.

  7. Spacecraft Impacts with Advanced Power and Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Oleson, Steven R.

    2000-01-01

    A study was performed to assess the benefits of advanced power and electric propulsion systems for various space missions. Advanced power technologies that were considered included multiband gap and thin-film solar arrays, lithium batteries, and flywheels. Electric propulsion options included Hall effect thrusters and Ion thrusters. Several mission case studies were selected as representative of future applications for advanced power and propulsion systems. These included a low altitude Earth science satellite, a LEO communications constellation, a GEO military surveillance satellite, and a Mercury planetary mission. The study process entailed identification of overall mission performance using state-of-the-art power and propulsion technology, enhancements made possible with either power or electric propulsion advances individually, and the collective benefits realized when advanced power and electric propulsion are combined. Impacts to the overall spacecraft included increased payload, longer operational life, expanded operations and launch vehicle class step-downs.

  8. Large Field Photogrammetry Techniques in Aircraft and Spacecraft Impact Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.

    2010-01-01

    The Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR) at NASA Langley Research Center is a 240 ft. high A-frame structure which is used for full-scale crash testing of aircraft and rotorcraft vehicles. Because the LandIR provides a unique capability to introduce impact velocities in the forward and vertical directions, it is also serving as the facility for landing tests on full-scale and sub-scale Orion spacecraft mass simulators. Recently, a three-dimensional photogrammetry system was acquired to assist with the gathering of vehicle flight data before, throughout and after the impact. This data provides the basis for the post-test analysis and data reduction. Experimental setups for pendulum swing tests on vehicles having both forward and vertical velocities can extend to 50 x 50 x 50 foot cubes, while weather, vehicle geometry, and other constraints make each experimental setup unique to each test. This paper will discuss the specific calibration techniques for large fields of views, camera and lens selection, data processing, as well as best practice techniques learned from using the large field of view photogrammetry on a multitude of crash and landing test scenarios unique to the LandIR.

  9. Impacts of Center of Mass Shifts on Messenger Spacecraft Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Shaughnessy, D. J.; Vaughan, R. M.; Chouinard, T. L., III; Jaekle, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    The MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) has successfully completed its first three years of flight operations following launch on August 3, 2004. As part of NASA s Discovery Program, MESSENGER will observe Mercury during flybys in 2008 and 2009, as well as from orbit beginning in March 2011. This paper discusses the impact that center of mass (CM) location changes have had on many mission activities, particularly angular momentum management and maneuver execution. Momentum trends were altered significantly following the first deep-space maneuver, and these changes were related to a change in the CM. The CM location also impacts maneuver execution, and uncertainties in its location led to the significant direction errors experienced at trajectory correction maneuver 11. Because of the spacecraft sensitivity to CM location, efforts to estimate its position are important to momentum and maneuver prediction. This paper summarizes efforts to estimate the CM from flight data, as well as the operational strategy to handle CM uncertainties and their impact on momentum trends and maneuver execution accuracy.

  10. The Impact of Autonomy Technology on Spacecraft Software Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, E. B., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Autonomy technology for high-level, closed-loop control of spacecraft offers considerable benefits to space-flight projects. Those benefits can enable whole new classes of missions; however, they are not without cost.

  11. Reading the meteoroid impact record of the Stardust and Genesis spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolensky, M.

    In 1990 a team of dedicated, hardworking scientists labored long and hard to document the micrometeorite and space debris impact record of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) (Zolensky M.E. et al., 1995, Advances in Space Research 16, (11) 53-65). The procedures hammered out and perfected for that spacecraft can now be applied to the next two missions to carry micrometeorite impacted hardware to Earth, the Genesis and Stardust spacecraft. Neither of these missions has as its central goal the collection of micrometeorite impact residues. However, both spacecraft were designed to permit the micrometeorite record to be read. The Genesis spacecraft is now collecting solar wind atoms, but it also carries numerous foil surfaces and polished materials that will serve to record the impact record of interplanetary dust particles and beta meteoroids. In fact, this spacecraft will permit our first look at the composition and mineralogy of the latter materials, whose existence was first established by an analysis of the LDEF impact record by Herb Zook. The Stardust spacecraft was designed to catch comet and interstellar dust grains 10 - 100 microns in diameter in silica aerogel. Smaller cometary dust and interplanetary dust particles will be very difficult to find and extract from the aerogel. Thus, polished aluminu m foil strips are exposed between the aerogel panes, which will better record the microparticle impact record. Plans are for the foils and polished surfaces on these spacecraft to be optically scanned soon after Earth return. The LDEF experience tells us to expect that on the order of 10% of the impact features on the Genesis and Stardust spacecraft should contain impactor residues in the form of vapor or melt deposits, and a few percent of the impact features will contain residues retaining mineralogic information. It will take some considerable time to locate and characterize these particular residues, but of course a principal value of returned samples is

  12. Modeling and Failure Control of Spacecraft Pressurized Structures Subject to Orbital Debris Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Frederick; Telichev, Igor

    2013-08-01

    Motivated by the dramatic worsening and uncertainty of orbital debris situation, the present paper is focused on the structural integrity of the spacecraft pressurized modules/pressure vessels. The objective is to develop a methodology of numerical simulation of the spacecraft pressurized structure behaviour under hypervelocity impact, including simulation of the following processes: a) formation of the impact damage of the pressure wall; b) loading and failure of structure. The analysis was performed by the method of singular integral equations.

  13. The composition and plasma signature of a large dust impact on the Giotto spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R.; Goldstein, B. E.; Balsiger, H.; Coates, A. J.; Curdt, W.

    1991-01-01

    At about 14,800 km from the Comet Halley nucleus, on the inbound leg, at least six of the sensors onboard the Giotto spacecraft observed an unusual, brief (about 30 to 500 ms) event: the ion-mass spectrometer data show a brief flow of energetic (up to several hundred electron volts) plasma consisting of protons, water group, and heavier ions. The Johnstone plasma analyzer data show a short burst of plasma, while the dust impact detector system data show an impact event in four of its detectors. The magnetometer signature of the event shows two brief dips in the field. The sudden change in the spacecraft attitude and spin rate observed by the camera at that same time has been interpreted as the result of a large (5 mg or more) dust-particle impact on the front bumper shield of the spacecraft. In addition, at about the same time the spacecraft star-tracker suffered damage. The report combines direct measurements of the composition and dynamics of a dust-impact plasma cloud, the dust particle mass, and the location of the impact on the spacecraft. Analysis of the data indicate that the impacting particle was water or ice-bearing, possibly loosely compared, and was composed of one or more of: carbon, nitrogen, and silicon.

  14. Modified solution for finding the optimal angle of spacecraft walls under orbital debris impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelides, Chris P.; Tzan, Shyh-Rong

    1993-06-01

    A modification to the procedure developed by Schonberg and Tullos (1991) to find the configuration and the parameters of a corrugated bumper that can reduce the potential for creation of ricochet debris, in the event of an on-orbit impact, is presented. It is shown that the optimal bumper rise angle depends on the ratio of ricochet debris velocity to spacecraft velocity, has an asymptotic value of 45 deg, and is independent of the spacecraft orientaion.

  15. Analysis of possible changes of the orbit of an asteroid approaching the Earth by impact of a spacecraft.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashkin, V. V.; Zajtsev, A. V.

    1999-08-01

    As a part of analysis of guarding against the Earth's collision with an approaching asteroid the authors investigate the influence of kinetic impact of a spacecraft on the orbit of this asteroid. For an orbit of the Toutatis asteroid the global analysis of asteroid deflections (caused by the spacecraft impact) is carried out in the Earth's picture plane, depending on the spacecraft flight time and the moment of a spacecraft arrival to the asteroid. Locally optimal (with respect to the asteroid deflection) spacecraft trajectories are determined. The influence of the spacecraft initial mass on the limiting size of an asteroid, which is deflected from the Earth to a safe distance, is examined. The principal possibility of employing modern rocket-space systems for the spacecraft impact to prevent the Earth from colliding with an asteroid of a medium size is demonstrated.

  16. Spacecraft wall design for increased protection against penetration by space debris impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Tullos, Randy J.

    1990-01-01

    All orbiting spacecraft are susceptible to impacts by meteoroids and pieces of orbital space debris. These impacts occur at extremely high speeds and can damage flight-critical systems, which can in turn lead to catastrophic failure of the spacecraft. The design of a spacecraft for a long-duration mission into the meteoroid and space debris environment must include adequate protection against perforation of pressurized components by such impacts. This paper presents the results of an investigation into the perforation resistance of dual-wall structural systems fabricated with monolithic bumper plates and with corrugated bumper plates of equal weight. A comparative analysis of the impact damage in dual-wall systems with corrugated bumper specimens and that in dual-wall specimens with monolithic bumpers of similar weight is performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of employing corrugated bumpers in structural wall systems for long-duration spacecraft. The analysis indicates that a significant increase in perforation protection can be achieved if a monolithic bumper is replaced by a corrugated bumper of equal weight. The parameters of the corrugations in the corrugated bumper plates are optimized in a manner that minimizes the potential for the creation of ricochet debris in the event of an oblique hypervelocity impact. Several design examples using the optimization scheme are presented and discussed.

  17. Space Weather Impacts on Spacecraft Design and Operations in Auroral Charging Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda N.

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft in low altitude, high inclination (including sun-synchronous) orbits are widely used for remote sensing of the Earth s land surface and oceans, monitoring weather and climate, communications, scientific studies of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere, and a variety of other scientific, commercial, and military applications. These systems are episodically exposed to environments characterized by a high flux of energetic (approx.1 to 10 s kilovolt) electrons in regions of very low background plasma density which is similar in some ways to the space weather conditions in geostationary orbit responsible for spacecraft charging to kilovolt levels. While it is well established that charging conditions in geostationary orbit are responsible for many anomalies and even spacecraft failures, to date there have been relatively few such reports due to charging in auroral environments. This presentation first reviews the physics of the space environment and its interactions with spacecraft materials that control auroral charging rates and the anticipated maximum potentials that should be observed on spacecraft surfaces during disturbed space weather conditions. We then describe how the theoretical values compare to the observational history of extreme charging in auroral environments and discuss how space weather impacts both spacecraft design and operations for vehicles on orbital trajectories that traverse auroral charging environments.

  18. Hypervelocity dust impacts on the Wind spacecraft: Correlations between Ulysses and Wind interstellar dust detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, S. R.; Malaspina, David M.; Andersson, Laila; Horanyi, Mihaly

    2015-09-01

    The Wind spacecraft is positioned just sunward of Earth at the first Lagrange point, while the Ulysses spacecraft orbits above and below the ecliptic plane crossing the ecliptic as far from the Sun as the orbit of Jupiter (˜5 AU). While Wind does not carry a dedicated dust detector, we demonstrate the ability of Wind electric field measurements to detect hypervelocity dust impacts through their impact plasma signatures. Interstellar dust (ISD) and interplanetary dust particles are differentiated based on a yearly modulation of the ISD flux. Measurements of ISD flux variation by Wind are found to be in good agreement with ISD flux variation measured by Ulysses. While measurements of the ISD flow direction through the Solar System determined by Wind could not be directly compared to those from Ulysses, strong variation in ISD flow direction was observed during similar time periods by both spacecraft.

  19. A Whale of a Tale: Creating Spacecraft Telemetry Data Analysis Products for the Deep Impact Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturdevant, Kathryn F.; Wright, Jesse J.; Lighty, Roger A.; Nakamura, Lori L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes some of the challenges and lessons learned from the Deep Impact (DI) Mission Ground Data System's (GDS) telemetry data processing and product generation tool, nicknamed 'Whale.' One of the challenges of any mission is to analyze testbed and operational telemetry data. Methods to retrieve this data to date have required spacecraft subsystem members to become experts in the use of a myriad of query and plot tools. As budgets shrink, and the GDS teams grow smaller, more of the burden to understand these tools falls on the users. The user base also varies from novice to expert, and requiring them to become GDS tool experts in addition to spacecraft domain experts is an undue burden. The "Whale" approach is to process all of the data for a given spacecraft test, and provide each subsystem with plots and data products 'automagically.'.

  20. Removal of spacecraft-surface particulate contaminants by simulated micrometeoroid impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goad, J. H., Jr.; Dibattista, J. D.; Robinson, D. M.; Chu, W. P.

    1974-01-01

    A series of hypervelocity impacts has been conducted in an exploding lithium-wire accelerator to examine with a far-field holographic system the removal of particulate contaminants from external spacecraft surfaces subjected to micrometeoroid bombardment. The impacting projectiles used to simulate the micrometeoroids were glass spheres nominally 37 microns in diameter, having velocities between 4 and 17 km/sec. The particulates were glass spheres nominally 25, 50, and 75 microns in diameter which were placed on aluminum targets. For these test, particulates detached had velocities that were log-normally distributed. The significance of the log-normal behavior of the ejected-particulate velocity distribution is that the geometric mean velocity and the geometric standard deviation are the only two parameters needed to model completely the process of particles removed or ejected from a spacecraft surface by a micrometeoroid impact.

  1. Modeling the oblique hypervelocity impact of orbital debris particles on spacecraft structures using elementary shock physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim, Ahmed Roushdy

    1998-11-01

    During their missions in space, spacecraft are subjected to high velocity impacts by orbital debris particles. Such impacts are expected to occur at non-normal angles of incidence and can cause severe damage to the spacecraft as well as its internal and external flight- critical systems. In order to ensure crew safety as well as the proper function of internal and external spacecraft systems, the characteristics of the debris clouds generated from orbital debris impacts must be determined. The effects of these debris clouds can then be considered in the design of spacecraft protective systems. In this dissertation, a new first principles- based analytical model is developed for the characterization of the penetration and ricochet debris clouds created by an oblique hypervelocity impact of a spherical projectile on a thin bumper plate. This model employs normal and oblique shock wave theories to characterize the penetration and ricochet processes. The model formulation consists of two mechanisms. The first predicts the leading edge velocities and trajectories of centers of mass of the normal and in-line debris clouds created in an oblique hypervelocity impact of a spherical projectile on a thin plate. The second predicts the leading edge velocity and trajectory of center of mass of ricochet debris cloud. In each of these two mechanisms, a new functional form of a reflected Hugoniot is developed to approximate the release of the bumper material. It was found that, unlike normal impact where there is only one reflected Hugoniot, the release of the bumper material in case of an oblique impact is approximated by a set of reflected Hugoniots that depends upon the impact obliquity angle. The methodology for characterizing the debris clouds created in an oblique hypervelocity impact uses the conservation equations that, governing the impact event, calculates the debris clouds' leading edge velocities and trajectories of debris cloud centers-of- mass using an elementary

  2. An Environmental Impact Assessment of Perfluorocarbon Thermal Working Fluid Use On Board Crewed Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Jay L.; Arnold, William a.

    2006-01-01

    The design and operation of crewed spacecraft requires identifying and evaluating chemical compounds that may present reactivity and compatibility risks with the environmental control and life support (ECLS) system. Such risks must be understood so that appropriate design and operational controls, including specifying containment levels, can be instituted or an appropriate substitute material selected. Operational experience acquired during the International Space Station (ISS) program has found that understanding ECLS system and environmental impact presented by thermal control system working fluids is imperative to safely operating any crewed space exploration vehicle. Perfluorocarbon fluids are used as working fluids in thermal control fluid loops on board the ISS. Also, payload hardware developers have identified perfluorocarbon fluids as preferred thermal control working fluids. Interest in using perfluorocarbon fluids as thermal control system working fluids for future crewed space vehicles and outposts is high. Potential hazards associated with perfluorocarbon fluids are discussed with specific attention given to engineering assessment of ECLS system compatibility, compatibility testing results, and spacecraft environmental impact. Considerations for perfluorocarbon fluid use on crewed spacecraft and outposts are summarized.

  3. Space Weather Impacts on Spacecraft Operations: Identifying and Establishing High-Priority Operational Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G.; Reid, S.; Tranquille, C.; Evans, H.

    2013-12-01

    Space Weather is a multi-disciplinary and cross-domain system defined as, 'The physical and phenomenological state of natural space environments. The associated discipline aims, through observation, monitoring, analysis and modelling, at understanding and predicting the state of the Sun, the interplanetary and planetary environments, and the solar and non-solar driven perturbations that affect them, and also at forecasting and nowcasting the potential impacts on biological and technological systems'. National and Agency-level efforts to provide services addressing the myriad problems, such as ESA's SSA programme are therefore typically complex and ambitious undertakings to introduce a comprehensive suite of services aimed at a large number and broad range of end users. We focus on some of the particular threats and risks that Space Weather events pose to the Spacecraft Operations community, and the resulting implications in terms of User Requirements. We describe some of the highest-priority service elements identified as being needed by the Operations community, and outline some service components that are presently available, or under development. The particular threats and risks often vary according to orbit, so the particular User Needs for Operators at LEO, MEO and GEO are elaborated. The inter-relationship between these needed service elements and existing service components within the broader Space Weather domain is explored. Some high-priority service elements and potential correlation with Space Weather drivers include: solar array degradation and energetic proton storms; single event upsets at GEO and solar proton events and galactic cosmic rays; surface charging and deep dielectric charging at MEO and radiation belt dynamics; SEUs at LEO and the South Atlantic Anomaly and its variability. We examine the current capability to provide operational services addressing such threats and identify some advances that the Operations community can expect to benefit

  4. Survivability to Hypervelocity Impacts of Electrodynamic Tape Tethers for Deorbiting Spacecraft in LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesconi, A.; Giacomuzzo, C.; Lorenzini, E. C.

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports the results of 16 hypervelocity impact experiments on a composite flat electrodynamic tether for LEO spacecraft end-of-life deorbiting. The system is being developed within the EU FP7 BETs program. Impact tests were carried out at CISAS impact facility, with the aim of deriving failure equations that include the impact angle dependence up to grazing incidence. Experiments were realised with 1.5 and 2.3 mm aluminium spheres, at velocities between 3 and 5 km/s and impact angle from 0° to 90° from the tape normal. After a preliminary post-impact inspection of the target, the damage extension on the tape was evaluated using an automatic image processing technique. Ballistic limit equations were developed in the experimental range using a procedure that allows to estimate the uncertainty in the failure predictions starting from the measurement of the damage area. Experiments showed that the impact damage is very close to the projectile size in case of normal impact, while it increases significantly at highly oblique impact angles.

  5. Characterization of Dust Particles Near Saturn By Dust-Spacecraft Impact Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.

    2014-12-01

    The dusty plasma environment around Enceladus and its orbit plays an important role in the dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere. The characteristics of the dust population, e.g. size distribution and density, are crucial to modeling the interaction between dusty plasma and the magnetosphere. During the Cassini Saturn orbit insertion and many E-ring crossings, the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument has demonstrated ability to measure dust particles in the Saturn system via voltage pulses induced by dust impacts on the spacecraft. In this study, we will show characteristics of dust particles derived from Cassini RPWS observations in Saturn's magnetosphere, especially during Enceladus flybys and E-ring crossings. We will present dust density profiles of the E-ring and Enceladus plume based on the impact rates measured by the RPWS wideband receiver. The electron density measurement based on plasma oscillations induced by dust impacts will also be shown. The RPWS dust detection complements the measurement of dusty plasma and neutral particles in the vicinity of Enceladus by various instruments aboard Cassini spacecraft, e.g. Cosmic Dust Analyzer, Cassini Plasma Spectrometer, Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer, and the RPWS Langmuir probe.

  6. Properties of dust particles near Saturn inferred from voltage pulses induced by dust impacts on Cassini spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, S.-Y.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kempf, S.; Hsu, H.-W.; Srama, R.; Grün, E.

    2014-08-01

    The Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument can detect dust particles when voltage pulses induced by the dust impacts are observed in the wideband receiver. The size of the voltage pulse is proportional to the mass of the impacting dust particle. For the first time, the dust impacts signals measured by dipole and monopole electric antennas are compared, from which the effective impact area of the spacecraft is estimated to be 4 m2. In the monopole mode, the polarity of the dust impact signal is determined by the spacecraft potential and the location of the impact (on the spacecraft body or the antenna), which can be used to statistically infer the charge state of the spacecraft. It is shown that the differential number density of the dust particles near Saturn can be characterized as a power law dn/dr ∝ rμ, where μ ~ - 4 and r is the particle size. No peak is observed in the size distribution, contrary to the narrow size distribution found by previous studies. The RPWS cumulative dust density is compared with the Cosmic Dust Analyzer High Rate Detector measurement. The differences between the two instruments are within the range of uncertainty estimated for RPWS measurement. The RPWS onboard dust recorder and counter data are used to map the dust density and spacecraft charging state within Saturn's magnetosphere.

  7. Spacecraft system study: A study to define the impact of laser communication systems on their host spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The mutual influence of a laser communication system and its host spacecraft and the degree to which the mutual influence limited acquisition, tracking and pointing processes were investigated. A laser klink between a low earth orbiting (LEO) satellite and a geosynchronous earth orbiting (GEO) satellite was used as a baseline. The laser link between satellites was a generic channel transferring 500 Mbps data from the LEO to GEO using the GaAlAs laser as the laser light source. Major aspects of pointing and tracking with a satelliteborne optical system were evaluated including: (1) orbital aspects such as spacecraft relative motions, point ahead, and Sun snd Moon optical noise; (2) burst errors introduced by the electronic and optical noise levels; (3) servo system design and configurations, and the noise sources such as, sensor noise, base motion disturbances, gimbal friction torque noise; (4) an evaluation of the tracking and beacon link and the type of sensors used; (5) the function of the acquisition procedure and an evaluation of the sensors employed; and (6) an estimate of the size, weight and power needed for the satellite system.

  8. GIADA - Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator - Onboard Rosetta spacecraft: Extended calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Corte, V.; Sordini, R.; Accolla, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Rotundi, A.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Fulle, M.; Mazzotta-Epifani, E.; Palumbo, P.; Colangeli, L.; Lopez-Moreno, J. J.; Rodriguez, J.; Morales, R.; Cosi, M.

    2016-09-01

    Despite a long tradition of dust instruments flown on-board space mission, the largest number of these can be considered unique as they used different detection techniques. GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator), is one of the dust instruments on-board the Rosetta spacecraft and is devoted to measure the dust dynamical parameters in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It couples two different techniques to measure the mass and speed of individual dust particles. We report here the results of an extended calibration activity carried-out, during the hibernation phase of the Rosetta mission, on the GIADA Proto Flight Model (PFM) operative in a clean room in our laboratory. The main aims of an additional calibration campaign are: to verify the algorithms and procedures for data calibration developed before Rosetta launch; to improve the comprehension of GIADA response after the increased knowledge on cometary dust, e.g. the composition of dust particles after Stardust mission. These calibration improvements implied a final step, which consisted in defining transfer functions to correlate the new calibration curves obtained for the GIADA PFM to those to be used for GIADA onboard the Rosetta spacecraft. The extended calibration activity allowed us to analyze GIADA data acquired in the 67P/C-G coma permitting to infer additional information on cometary dust particles, e.g. density and tensile strength.

  9. Archaea in artificial environments: Their presence in global spacecraft clean rooms and impact on planetary protection

    PubMed Central

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The presence and role of Archaea in artificial, human-controlled environments is still unclear. The search for Archaea has been focused on natural biotopes where they have been found in overwhelming numbers, and with amazing properties. However, they are considered as one of the major group of microorganisms that might be able to survive a space flight, or even to thrive on other planets. Although still concentrating on aerobic, bacterial spores as a proxy for spacecraft cleanliness, space agencies are beginning to consider Archaea as a possible contamination source that could affect future searches for life on other planets. This study reports on the discovery of archaeal 16S rRNA gene signatures not only in US American spacecraft assembly clean rooms but also in facilities in Europe and South America. Molecular methods revealed the presence of Crenarchaeota in all clean rooms sampled, while signatures derived from methanogens and a halophile appeared only sporadically. Although no Archaeon was successfully enriched in our multiassay cultivation approach thus far, samples from a European clean room revealed positive archaeal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) signals of rod-shaped microorganisms, representing the first visualization of Archaea in clean room environments. The molecular and visual detection of Archaea was supported by the first quantitative PCR studies of clean rooms, estimating the overall quantity of Archaea therein. The significant presence of Archaea in these extreme environments in distinct geographical locations suggests a larger role for these microorganisms not only in natural biotopes, but also in human controlled and rigorously cleaned environments. PMID:20703318

  10. Archaea in artificial environments: their presence in global spacecraft clean rooms and impact on planetary protection.

    PubMed

    Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2011-02-01

    The presence and role of Archaea in artificial, human-controlled environments is still unclear. The search for Archaea has been focused on natural biotopes where they have been found in overwhelming numbers, and with amazing properties. However, they are considered as one of the major group of microorganisms that might be able to survive a space flight, or even to thrive on other planets. Although still concentrating on aerobic, bacterial spores as a proxy for spacecraft cleanliness, space agencies are beginning to consider Archaea as a possible contamination source that could affect future searches for life on other planets. This study reports on the discovery of archaeal 16S rRNA gene signatures not only in US American spacecraft assembly clean rooms but also in facilities in Europe and South America. Molecular methods revealed the presence of Crenarchaeota in all clean rooms sampled, while signatures derived from methanogens and a halophile appeared only sporadically. Although no Archaeon was successfully enriched in our multiassay cultivation approach thus far, samples from a European clean room revealed positive archaeal fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) signals of rod-shaped microorganisms, representing the first visualization of Archaea in clean room environments. The molecular and visual detection of Archaea was supported by the first quantitative PCR studies of clean rooms, estimating the overall quantity of Archaea therein. The significant presence of Archaea in these extreme environments in distinct geographical locations suggests a larger role for these microorganisms not only in natural biotopes, but also in human controlled and rigorously cleaned environments. PMID:20703318

  11. Laboratory Simulation of Impacts upon Aluminum Foils of the Stardust Spacecraft: Calibration of Dust Particle Size from Comet Wild 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearsley, A. T.; Burchell, M. J.; Horz, F.; Cole, M. J.; Schwandt, C. S.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic aluminium alloy foils exposed on the forward, comet-facing surface of the aerogel tray on the Stardust spacecraft are likely to have been impacted by the same cometary particle population as the dedicated impact sensors and the aerogel collector. The ability of soft aluminium alloy to record hypervelocity impacts as bowl-shaped craters offers an opportunistic substrate for recognition of impacts by particles of a wide potential size range. In contrast to impact surveys conducted on samples from low Earth orbit, the simple encounter geometry for Stardust and Wild 2, with a known and constant spacecraft-particle relative velocity and effective surface-perpendicular impact trajectories, permits closely comparable simulation in laboratory experiments. For a detailed calibration programme we have selected a suite of spherical glass projectiles of uniform density and hardness characteristics, with well-documented particle size range from 10 microns to nearly 100 microns. Light gas gun buckshot firings of these particles at approximately 6km s)exp -1) onto samples of the same foil as employed on Stardust have yielded large numbers of craters. Scanning electron microscopy of both projectiles and impact features has allowed construction of a calibration plot, showing a linear relationship between impacting particle size and impact crater diameter. The close match between our experimental conditions and the Stardust mission encounter parameters should provide another opportunity to measure particle size distributions and fluxes close to the nucleus of Wild 2, independent of the active impact detector instruments aboard the Stardust spacecraft.

  12. Spacecraft attitude impacts on COLD-SAT non-vacuum jacketed LH2 supply tank thermal performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arif, Hugh

    1990-01-01

    The Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot - Storage, Acquisition and Transfer (COLD-SAT) spacecraft will be launched into low earth orbit to perform fluid management experiments on the behavior of subcritical liquid hydrogen (LH2). For determining the optimum on-orbit attitude for the COLD-SAT satellite, a comparative analytical study was performed to determine the thermal impacts of spacecraft attitude on the performance of the COLD-SAT non-vacuum jacketed LH2 supply tank. Tank thermal performance was quantified by total conductive and radiative heat leakage into the pressure vessel due to the absorbed solar, earth albedo and infra-red on-orbit fluxes, and also by the uniformity of the variation of this leakage on the vessel surface area. Geometric and thermal analysis math models were developed for the spacecraft and the tank as part of this analysis, based on their individual thermal/structural designs. Two quasi-inertial spacecraft attitudes were investigated and their effects on the tank performance compared. The results are one of the criteria by which the spacecraft orientation in orbit was selected for the in-house NASA Lewis Research Center design.

  13. Spacecraft attitude impacts on COLD-SAT non-vacuum jacketed LH2 supply tank thermal performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arif, Hugh

    1990-01-01

    The Cryogenic On-Orbit Liquid Depot - Storage, Acquisition and Transfer (COLD-SAT) spacecraft will be launched into low earth orbit to perform fluid management experiments on the behavior of subcritical liquid hydrogen (LH2). For determining the optimum on-orbit attitude for the COLD-SAT satellite, a comparative analytical study was performed to determine the thermal impacts of spacecraft attitude on the performance of the COLD-SAT non-vacuum jacketed LH2 supply tank. Tank thermal performance was quantitied by total conductive and radiative heat leakage into the pressure vessel due to the absorbed solar, earth albedo and infra-red on-orbit fluxes, and also by the uniformity of the variation of this leakage on the vessel surface area. Geometric and thermal analysis math models were developed for the spacecraft and the tank as part of this analysis, based on their individual thermal/structural designs. Two quasi-inertial spacecraft attitudes were investigated and their effects on the tank performance compared. The results are one of the criteria by which the spacecraft orientation in orbit was selected for the in-house NASA Lewis Research Center design.

  14. Protecting Earth-orbiting spacecraft against micro-meteoroid/orbital debris impact damage using composite structural systems and materials: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    2010-03-01

    Spacecraft that are launched to operate in Earth orbit are susceptible to impacts by meteoroids and pieces of orbital debris (MMOD). The effect of a MMOD particle impact on a spacecraft depends on where the impact occurs, the size, composition, and speed of the impacting object, the function of the impacted system. In order to perform a risk analysis for a particular spacecraft under a specific mission profile, it is important to know whether or not the impacting particle (or its remnants) will exit the rear of an impacted spacecraft wall. A variety of different ballistic limit equations (BLEs) have been developed for many different types of structural wall configurations. BLEs can be used to optimize the design of spacecraft wall parameters so that the resulting configuration is able to withstand the anticipated variety of on-orbit high-speed impact scenarios. While the level of effort exerted in studying the response of metallic multi-wall systems to high speed particle impact is quite substantial, the extent of the effort to study composite material and composite structural systems under similar impact conditions has been much more limited. This paper presents an overview of the activities performed to assess the resiliency of composite structures and materials under high speed projectile impact. The activities reviewed will be those that have been aimed at increasing the level of protection afforded to spacecraft operating in the MMOD environment, and more specifically, on those activities performed to mitigate the mechanical and structural effects of an MMOD impact.

  15. Design of Spacecraft Missions to Test Kinetic Impact for Asteroid Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Sonia; Barbee, Brent W.

    2011-01-01

    There are currently over 8,000 known near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), and more are being discovered on a continual basis. More than 1,200 of these are classified as Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) because their Minimum Orbit Intersection Distance (MOID) with Earth's orbit is <= 0.05 AU and their estimated diameters are >= 150 m. To date, 178 Earth impact structures have been discovered, indicating that our planet has previously been struck with devastating force by NEAs and will be struck again. Such collisions are aperiodic events and can occur at any time. A variety of techniques have been proposed to defend our planet from NEA impacts by deflecting the incoming asteroid. However, none of these techniques have been tested. Unless rigorous testing is conducted to produce reliable asteroid deflection systems, we will be forced to deploy completely untested -- and therefore unreliable -- deflection missions when a sizable asteroid on a collision course with Earth is discovered. Such missions will have a high probability of failure. We propose to address this problem with a campaign of deflection technology test missions deployed to harmless NEAs. The objective of these missions is to safely evaluate and refine the mission concepts and asteroid deflection system designs. Our current research focuses on the kinetic impactor, one of the simplest proposed asteroid deflection techniques in which a spacecraft is sent to collide with an asteroid at high relative velocity. By deploying test missions in the near future, we can characterize the performance of this deflection technique and resolve any problems inherent to its execution before needing to rely upon it during a true emergency. In this paper we present the methodology and results of our survey, including lists of NEAs for which safe and effective kinetic impactor test missions may be conducted within the next decade. Full mission designs are also presented for the NEAs which offer the best mission opportunities.

  16. Propulsive effect of spacecraft propellant tank rupture following hypervelocity impact by a micrometeoroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jan, Darrell L.; Aaron, Kim M.

    1990-01-01

    The impulse due to propellant tank micrometeroid damage is estimated for the Galileo spacecraft. The modes of tank failure considered are tank burst, or rupture, and puncture, which results in a hole through which propellant escapes. Other factors relevant to this calculation include spacecraft geometry, propellant volume and properties, and available heat sources. Tank burst was found to result in a spacecraft Delta V of less than 5 m/s, while the net impulse due to puncture is less than 10,000 Newton-seconds.

  17. A Study of Learning Curve Impact on Three Identical Small Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Guangming; McLennan, Douglas D.

    2003-01-01

    With an eye to the future strategic needs of NASA, the New Millennium Program is funding the Space Technology 5 (ST-5) project to address the future needs in the area of small satellites in constellation missions. The ST-5 project, being developed at Goddard Space Flight Center, involves the development and simultaneous launch of three small, 20-kilogram-class spacecraft. ST-5 is only a test drive and future NASA science missions may call for fleets of spacecraft containing tens of smart and capable satellites in an intelligent constellation. The objective of ST-5 project is to develop three such pioneering small spacecraft for flight validation of several critical new technologies. The ST-5 project team at Goddard Space Flight Center has completed the spacecraft design, is now building and testing the three flight units. The launch readiness date (LRD) is in December 2005. A critical part of ST-5 mission is to prove that it is possible to build these small but capable spacecraft with recurring cost low enough to make future NASA s multi- spacecraft constellation missions viable from a cost standpoint.

  18. Imaging Comets ISON and Garradd With the Deep Impact Flyby Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnham, Tony; Bodewits, D.; Feaga, L. M.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Sunshine, J. M.; Wellnitz, D. D.; Klaasen, K. P.; Himes, T. W.

    2013-10-01

    The Deep Impact flyby spacecraft (DI) is currently operating as a remote observatory, studying bright comets from a different perspective than can be achieved from Earth. Images are obtained with the Medium Resolution Imager (MRI) using a broadband CLEAR filter to capture the continuum, and narrowband filters to capture OH, CN and C2 gas bands (Farnham et al., Icarus 147, 180, 2000). Sequences consist of continuum images sampled every 15 minutes, interspersed with gas-band images that are sampled at least every hour. These sequences continue for up to 6 days, providing a continuous baseline of high-frequency observations. Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) is a dynamically new comet in a sungrazing orbit (perihelion less than 3 solar radii) that was discovered at > 6 AU from the Sun. These circumstances offer a unique opportunity to characterize the physical properties and progression of activity of this comet on its first passage into the solar system, which can be done over a wide range of heliocentric distances up to and including its close approach to the Sun. DI observed ISON in January 2013, when the comet was at a heliocentric distance of 5 AU. A second window of opportunity occurs between July and September 2013, as the comet crosses the ice line from 3 to 2 AU. This window also covers a segment of the orbit where the comet is not easily observable from Earth. Comet Garradd (C/2009 P1) is a long-period comet that was observed by DI between February 20 and April 9 2012, while the comet moved from 1.7 to 2.1 AU from the Sun. Among other results, the DI observations show rotational variability and coma morphology at levels undetected from the Earth (Farnham et al. 2013, in prep). We will present results from the analysis of the ISON and Garradd observations, including cometary variability, coma morphology, and production rates, and will discuss how the analysis fits in to the broader context for understanding the comet's development and evolution.

  19. Impact of Spacecraft Shielding on Direct Ionization Soft Error Rates for sub-130 nm Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Xapsos, Michael A.; Stauffer, Craig A.; Jordan, Michael M.; Sanders, Anthony B.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Oldham, Timothy R.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    We use ray tracing software to model various levels of spacecraft shielding complexity and energy deposition pulse height analysis to study how it affects the direct ionization soft error rate of microelectronic components in space. The analysis incorporates the galactic cosmic ray background, trapped proton, and solar heavy ion environments as well as the October 1989 and July 2000 solar particle events.

  20. Material Damage from Impacts of Lunar Soil Particles Ejected by the Rocket Exhaust of Landing Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wittbrodt, Audelia C.; Metzger, Philip T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper details the experimentation of lunar stimulant sandblasting. This was done to understand the damage that landing spacecraft on the moon will have to a permanent lunar outpost. The sandblasting was done with JSC-1A onto glass coupons. Correlations between the velocity and the damage done to the glass were not found. Reasons for this and future analyses are discussed.

  1. Spacecraft Thermal and Optical Modeling Impacts on Estimation of the GRAIL Lunar Gravity Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahnestock, Eugene G.; Park, Ryan S.; Yuan, Dah-Ning; Konopliv, Alex S.

    2012-01-01

    We summarize work performed involving thermo-optical modeling of the two Gravity Recovery And Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft. We derived several reconciled spacecraft thermo-optical models having varying detail. We used the simplest in calculating SRP acceleration, and used the most detailed to calculate acceleration due to thermal re-radiation. For the latter, we used both the output of pre-launch finite-element-based thermal simulations and downlinked temperature sensor telemetry. The estimation process to recover the lunar gravity field utilizes both a nominal thermal re-radiation accleration history and an apriori error model derived from that plus an off-nominal history, which bounds parameter uncertainties as informed by sensitivity studies.

  2. Spacecraft Images Comet Target's Jets

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Deep Impact spacecraft's High- and Medium-Resolution Imagers (HRI and MRI) have captured multiple jets turning on and off while the spacecraft is 8 million kilometers (5 million miles) away fro...

  3. BUMPERII - DESIGN ANALYSIS CODE FOR OPTIMIZING SPACECRAFT SHIELDING AND WALL CONFIGURATION FOR ORBITAL DEBRIS AND METEOROID IMPACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    BUMPERII is a modular program package employing a numerical solution technique to calculate a spacecraft's probability of no penetration (PNP) from man-made orbital debris or meteoroid impacts. The solution equation used to calculate the PNP is based on the Poisson distribution model for similar analysis of smaller craft, but reflects the more rigorous mathematical modeling of spacecraft geometry, orientation, and impact characteristics necessary for treatment of larger structures such as space station components. The technique considers the spacecraft surface in terms of a series of flat plate elements. It divides the threat environment into a number of finite cases, then evaluates each element of each threat. The code allows for impact shielding (shadowing) of one element by another in various configurations over the spacecraft exterior, and also allows for the effects of changing spacecraft flight orientation and attitude. Four main modules comprise the overall BUMPERII package: GEOMETRY, RESPONSE, SHIELD, and CONTOUR. The GEOMETRY module accepts user-generated finite element model (FEM) representations of the spacecraft geometry and creates geometry databases for both meteoroid and debris analysis. The GEOMETRY module expects input to be in either SUPERTAB Universal File Format or PATRAN Neutral File Format. The RESPONSE module creates wall penetration response databases, one for meteoroid analysis and one for debris analysis, for up to 100 unique wall configurations. This module also creates a file containing critical diameter as a function of impact velocity and impact angle for each wall configuration. The SHIELD module calculates the PNP for the modeled structure given exposure time, operating altitude, element ID ranges, and the data from the RESPONSE and GEOMETRY databases. The results appear in a summary file. SHIELD will also determine the effective area of the components and the overall model, and it can produce a data file containing the probability

  4. 78 FR 57135 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Impact Aid Program Application for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Impact Aid Program Application for Section... the Department assess the impact of its information collection requirements and minimize the public's... respondents, including through the use of information technology. Please note that written comments...

  5. 78 FR 2379 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Impact Evaluation of Math Professional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Impact Evaluation of Math Professional... of Collection: Impact Evaluation of Math Professional Development. OMB Control Number: 1850-NEW. Type..., and teachers for a study of math professional development. The study will provide...

  6. Technology for small spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report gives the results of a study by the National Research Council's Panel on Small Spacecraft Technology that reviewed NASA's technology development program for small spacecraft and assessed technology within the U.S. government and industry that is applicable to small spacecraft. The panel found that there is a considerable body of advanced technology currently available for application by NASA and the small spacecraft industry that could provide substantial improvement in capability and cost over those technologies used for current NASA small spacecraft. These technologies are the result of developments by commercial companies, Department of Defense agencies, and to a lesser degree NASA. The panel also found that additional technologies are being developed by these same entities that could provide additional substantial improvement if development is successfully completed. Recommendations for future technology development efforts by NASA across a broad technological spectrum are made.

  7. Impact craters of Venus - A continuation of the analysis of data from the Venera 15 and 16 Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevskii, A. T.; Burba, G. A.; Chernaia, I. M.; Kriuchkov, V. P.; Ivanov, B. A.

    1987-11-01

    This paper describes and interprets data on about 150 impact craters on the northern quarter of the Venusian surface, approximately 115,000,000 sq km, which was surveyed by the Venera 15/16 spacecraft. The craters were found to display the size-dependent variations in morphology which are well known from other planets. Assuming a crater production rate based on estimates by Hartmann et al. (1981), their areal density indicates an age for the total population of approximately 1 billion yr. The analysis of areal and size frequency distribution of a number of circular features of unclear origin has indicated that some of them may be highly degraded impact craters corresponding to a population of about 3 billion years of age. A table listing the craters, their positions, diameters, class, and the terrain is presented.

  8. Multiple Spacecraft Study of the Impact of Turbulence on Reconnection Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendel, Deirdre; Goldstein, Melvyn; Figueroa-Vinas, Adolfo; Adrian, Mark; Sahraoui, Fouad

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic turbulence and secondary island formation have reemerged as possible explanations for fast reconnection. Recent three-dimensional simulations reveal the formation of secondary islands that serve to shorten the current sheet and increase the accelerating electric field, while both simulations and observations witness electron holes whose collapse energizes electrons. However, few data studies have explicitly investigated the effect of turbulence and islands on the reconnection rate. We present a more comprehensive analysis of the effect of turbulence and islands on reconnection rates observed in space. Our approach takes advantage of multiple spacecraft to find the location of the spacecraft relative to the inflow and the outflow, to estimate the reconnection electric field, to indicate the presence and size of islands, and to determine wave vectors indicating turbulence. A superposed epoch analysis provides independent estimates of spatial scales and a reconnection electric field. We apply k-filtering and a new method adopted from seismological analyses to identify the wavevectors. From several case studies of reconnection events, we obtain preliminary estimates of the spectral scaling law, identify wave modes, and present a method for finding the reconnection electric field associated with the wave modes.

  9. The Evolution of Software and Its Impact on Complex System Design in Robotic Spacecraft Embedded Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Roy

    2013-01-01

    The growth in computer hardware performance, coupled with reduced energy requirements, has led to a rapid expansion of the resources available to software systems, driving them towards greater logical abstraction, flexibility, and complexity. This shift in focus from compacting functionality into a limited field towards developing layered, multi-state architectures in a grand field has both driven and been driven by the history of embedded processor design in the robotic spacecraft industry.The combinatorial growth of interprocess conditions is accompanied by benefits (concurrent development, situational autonomy, and evolution of goals) and drawbacks (late integration, non-deterministic interactions, and multifaceted anomalies) in achieving mission success, as illustrated by the case of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Approaches to optimizing the benefits while mitigating the drawbacks have taken the form of the formalization of requirements, modular design practices, extensive system simulation, and spacecraft data trend analysis. The growth of hardware capability and software complexity can be expected to continue, with future directions including stackable commodity subsystems, computer-generated algorithms, runtime reconfigurable processors, and greater autonomy.

  10. Auroral-polar cap environment and its impact on spacecraft plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    The high density of the plasma at shuttle altitude is likely to increase greatly the possibility of arcing and shorting of exposed high voltage surfaces. For military missions over the polar caps and through the auoroal zones, the added hazards of high energy auroral particle fluxes or solar flares will further increase the hazard to shuttle, its crew, and its mission. A review of the role that the auroral and polar cap environment play in causing these interactions was conducted. A simple, though comprehensive attempt at modelling the shuttle environment at 400 km will be described that can be used to evaluate the importance of the interactions. The results of this evaluation are then used to define areas where adequate environmental measurements will be necessary if a true spacecraft interactions technology is to be developed for the shuttle.

  11. The impact of customer-contractor interactions on spacecraft innovation: Insights from communication satellite history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajnfarber, Zoe; Stringfellow, Margaret V.; Weigel, Annalisa L.

    2010-11-01

    This paper captures a first detailed attempt to quantitatively analyze the innovation history of the space sector. Building on a communication satellite innovation metric and a spacecraft innovation framework developed as part of an ongoing project, this paper presents a preliminary model of global communication satellite innovation. In addition to innovation being a function of the rate of performance normalized by price, innovation was found to be strongly influenced by characteristics of the customer-contractor contractual relationship. Specifically, Department of Defense contracts tend to result in a lower level of innovation on average as compared to other customers. Also, particular customer-contractor pairs perform differently and exhibit a second order relationship in time.

  12. Probabilities of Ground Impact Conditions of the New Horizons Spacecraft and RTG for Near Launch Pad Accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Brian E.; Frostbutter, Dave A.; Chang, Yale

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Pluto New Horizons mission's safety effort, assessment of accidental ground impacts of the spacecraft (SC) and its components, including the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG), near the launch pad are of particular interest as they determine the severity of the mechanical insult to the hardware. Two configurations are studied: the SC with RTG joined to the third stage STAR™ 48B solid rocket motor [Launch Vehicle (LV) payload], and the RTG joined to the RTG mounting fixture but separated from the SC after an at-altitude destruct action. The objective of the analyses conducted is to determine the probabilities of impact orientation and average impact velocity of these configurations for a near launch pad accident These are of interest because of the possibility that the STAR 48B solid rocket motor could impact on top of the RTG, and because the RTG/RTG mounting fixture impact orientations probabilities and velocities directly affect the mechanical response of the internal GPHS modules. The probabilities of impact orientation and impact velocity of the LV payload as a function of mission elapsed time at thrust termination are determined using a six degree of freedom motion simulation computer program coupled with a Monte Carlo method. The motion simulation accounts for the LV payload aerodynamic properties, mass properties, and the initial flight conditions (αt, γ, V, q and r). Baseline conditions for position, direction, velocity and angular rates, are obtained from the mission timeline information for the Atlas V 551 launch vehicle. The results from this new and unique approach contributed information to safety assessments for the launch approval process. As the environments associated with the RTG/RTG mounting fixture impact orientations probabilities and velocities were less severe than earlier assumptions, this contributed to a reduction in the estimated risk for the Pluto mission.

  13. Impact of assembly, testing and launch operations on the airborne bacterial diversity within a spacecraft assembly facility clean-room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newcombe, David A.; La Duc, Myron T.; Vaishampayan, Parag; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2008-10-01

    In an effort to minimize the probability of forward contamination of pristine extraterrestrial environments, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration requires that all US robotic spacecraft undergo assembly, testing and launch operations (ATLO) in controlled clean-room environments. This study examines the impact of ATLO activity on the microbial diversity and overall bioburden contained within the air of the clean-room facility in which the Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) underwent final preparations for launch. Air samples were collected from several facility locations and traditional culture-based and molecular methodologies were used to measure microbial burden and diversity. Surprisingly, the greatest estimates of airborne bioburden, as derived from ATP content and cultivation assays, were observed prior to the commencement of MER ATLO activities. Furthermore, airborne microbial diversity gradually declined from the initiation of ATLO on through to launch. Proteobacterial sequences were common in 16S rDNA clone libraries. Conspicuously absent were members of the Firmicutes phylum, which includes the genus Bacillus. In previous studies, species of this genus were repeatedly isolated from the surfaces of spacecraft and clean-room assembly facilities. Increased cleaning and maintenance initiated immediately prior to the start of ATLO activity could explain the observed declines in both airborne bioburden and microbial diversity.

  14. Assessing the Risk of Disc Heniation Related to Landing Impact Following Long-duration Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, J. T.; Newby, N..; Wells, J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that crewmembers returning on the Space Shuttle have an increased incidence of herniated nucleus pulposus after spaceflight. This increased risk is thought to be related to disc volume expansion due to unloading and prolonged exposure to microgravity. Although there is an increased risk of disc herniation in Space Shuttle astronauts, it is unknown if dynamic landing loads further contribute to the risk of herniation. To determine if dynamic loads increase the risk of incidence, data from crewmembers (excluding cosmonauts) returning on the Soyuz spacecraft will be compared to Space Shuttle astronauts. These data will be obtained from the Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) Project at NASA. Severity and incidence after spaceflight will be mined from the data, and statistical analyses will be used to determine if Soyuz crewmembers have a higher incidence of disc herniation than Space Shuttle crewmembers. The results are expected to show no difference between Space Shuttle and Soyuz crewmembers, indicating that higher dynamic loads on landing and long-duration spaceflight do not significantly increase the risk of disc herniation. If no difference is shown between the two crewmember populations, then disc volume expansion due to microgravity does not significantly increase the risk of injury due to dynamic loads for deconditioned crewmembers. Any risk associated with deconditioning would be primarily due to bone structure changes and resulting bone strength changes. This study is an important first step in determining whether the spinal disc plays a role in injury due to dynamic loads.

  15. Docking system for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A mechanism is disclosed for the docking of a spacecraft to a space station where a connection for transfer of personnel and equipment is desired. The invention comprises an active docking structure on a spacecraft and a passive docking structure on the station. The passive structure includes a docking ring mounted on a tunnel structure fixed to the space station. The active structure includes a docking ring carried by an actuator-attenuator devices, each attached at one end to the ring and at its other end in the spacecraft payload bay. The devices respond to command signals for moving the docking ring between a stowed position in the spacecraft to a deployed position suitable for engagement with the docking ring. The devices comprise means responsive to signals of sensed loadings to absorb impact energy and retraction means for drawing the coupled spacecraft and station into final docked configuration and moving the tunnel structure to a berthed position in the spacecraft. Latches couple the spacecraft and space station upon contact of the docking rings and latches establish a structural tie between the spacecraft when retracted.

  16. Design of Spacecraft Missions to Test Kinetic Impact for Asteroid Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbee, Brent W.; Hernandez, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Earth has previously been struck with devastating force by near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) and will be struck again. Telescopic search programs aim to provide advance warning of such an impact, but no techniques or systems have yet been tested for deflecting an incoming NEA. To begin addressing this problem, we have analyzed the more than 8000 currently known NEAs to identify those that offer opportunities for safe and meaningful near-term tests of the proposed kinetic impact asteroid deflection technique. In this paper we present our methodology and results, including complete mission designs for the best kinetic impactor test mission opportunities.

  17. Spacecraft 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the Workshop was to focus on the key technology area for 21st century spacecraft and the programs needed to facilitate technology development and validation. Topics addressed include: spacecraft systems; system development; structures and materials; thermal control; electrical power; telemetry, tracking, and control; data management; propulsion; and attitude control.

  18. 49 CFR Attachment 4 - State and Local Agency Review of Impact Statements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State and Local Agency Review of Impact Statements 4 Attachment 4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURES FOR CONSIDERING ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Procedures Comments on...

  19. 49 CFR Attachment 4 to Part 520 - State and Local Agency Review of Impact Statements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State and Local Agency Review of Impact Statements 4 Attachment 4 to Part 520 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURES FOR CONSIDERING ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Pt. 520, Attach....

  20. 49 CFR Attachment 4 - State and Local Agency Review of Impact Statements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State and Local Agency Review of Impact Statements 4 Attachment 4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROCEDURES FOR CONSIDERING ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS Procedures Comments on...

  1. 78 FR 15929 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request-Impact of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... Request--Impact of Implementation of the Affordable Care Act on SNAP Operations and Participation AGENCY...) on the operations of, and participation in, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP... INFORMATION: Title: Impact of Implementation of the Affordable Care Act on SNAP Operations and...

  2. A Whale of a Tale: Creating Spacecraft Telemetry Data Analysis Products for the Deep Impact Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturdevant, Kathryn

    2006-01-01

    A description of the Whale product generation utility and its means of analyzing project data for Deep Impact Missions is presented. The topics include: 1) Whale Definition; 2) Whale Overview; 3) Whale Challenges; 4) Network Configuration; 5) Network Diagram; 6) Whale Data Flow: Design Decisions; 7) Whale Data Flow Diagram; 8) Whale Data Flow; 9) Whale Team and Users; 10) Creeping Requirements; 11) Whale Competition; 12) Statistics: Processing Time; 13) CPU and Disk Usage; 14) The Ripple Effect of More Data; and 15) Data Validation and the Automation Challenge.

  3. Pulsed Plasma Thruster Plume Study: Symmetry and Impact on Spacecraft Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, Lynn A.; Marrese, Colleen M.; Blandino, John J.

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-four witness plates were positioned on perpendicular arrays near a breadboard Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) to collect plume constituents for analysis. Over one million shots were fired during the experiment at 43 J using fluorocarbon polymer propellant. The asymmetry of the film deposition on the witness plates was investigated with mass and thickness measurements and correlated with off-axis thrust vector measurements. The composition of the films was determined. The transmittance and reflectance of the films were measured and the absorption coefficients were calculated in the wavelength range from 350 to 1200 mn. These data were applied to calculate the loss in signal intensity through the films, which will impact the visibility of spaceborne interferometer systems positioned by these thrusters.

  4. International funding agencies: potential leaders of impact evaluation in protected areas?

    PubMed

    Craigie, Ian D; Barnes, Megan D; Geldmann, Jonas; Woodley, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Globally, protected areas are the most commonly used tools to halt biodiversity loss. Yet, some are failing to adequately conserve the biodiversity they contain. There is an urgent need for knowledge on how to make them function more effectively. Impact evaluation methods provide a set of tools that could yield this knowledge. However, rigorous outcome-focused impact evaluation is not yet used as extensively as it could be in protected area management. We examine the role of international protected area funding agencies in facilitating the use of impact evaluation. These agencies are influential stakeholders as they allocate hundreds of millions of dollars annually to support protected areas, creating a unique opportunity to shape how the conservation funds are spent globally. We identify key barriers to the use of impact evaluation, detail how large funders are uniquely placed to overcome many of these, and highlight the potential benefits if impact evaluation is used more extensively. PMID:26460135

  5. Development of orbital debris spacecraft breakup models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tedeschi, William J.; Connell, John C.; McKnight, Darren S.

    1991-08-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency has initiated an Orbital Debris Spacecraft Breakup Modeling Program to improve the accuracy and usefulness of satellite breakup models with an emphasis on collision-induced events. Empirical, semianalytic, and complex approaches are used in the modeling. Current results from the modeling effort are presented and discussed along with data from associated hypervelocity impact test programs. It is shown that major improvements in modeling have been made but that milestones must be achieved before the models will routinely provide accurate predictions for a wide range of collision scenarios.

  6. Cassini Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Research Lab (JPL) workers use a borescope to verify the pressure relief device bellow's integrity on a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that has been installed on the Cassini spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The activity is part of the mechanical and electrical verification testing of RTGs during prelaunch processing. RTGs use heat from the natural decay of plutonium to generate electrical power. The three RTGs on Cassini will enable the spacecraft to operate far from the Sun where solar power systems are not feasible. They will provide electrical power to Cassini on it seven year trip to the Saturnian system and during its four year mission at Saturn.

  7. Spacecraft sterilization.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalfayan, S. H.

    1972-01-01

    Spacecraft sterilization is a vital factor in projects for the successful biological exploration of other planets. The microorganisms of major concern are the fungi and bacteria. Sterilization procedures are oriented toward the destruction of bacterial spores. Gaseous sterilants are examined, giving attention to formaldehyde, beta-propiolactone, ethylene oxide, and the chemistry of the bactericidal action of sterilants. Radiation has been seriously considered as another method for spacecraft sterilization. Dry heat sterilization is discussed together with the effects of ethylene oxide decontamination and dry heat sterilization on materials.

  8. Impact Evaluation from Quality Assurance Agencies' Perspectives: Methodological Approaches, Experiences and Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajaste, Matti; Prades, Anna; Scheuthle, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Starting from the main objective of external quality assurance (EQA) procedures to assure and improve the quality of higher education institutions and its provisions, the paper examines expected impacts of EQA procedures on institutions from the perspectives of three European quality assurance agencies. First, the paper examines the expected…

  9. Spacecraft architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zefeld, V. V.

    1986-01-01

    Three requirements for a spacecraft interior are considered. Adequate motor activity in the anatomical-physiological sense results from attention to the anthropometric characteristics of humans. Analysis of work requirements is a prerequisite for the planning of adequate performance space. The requirements for cognitive activity are also elucidated. The importance of a well-designed interior during a long space flight is discussed.

  10. Toward a new spacecraft optimal design lifetime? Impact of marginal cost of durability and reduced launch price

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snelgrove, Kailah B.; Saleh, Joseph Homer

    2016-10-01

    The average design lifetime of satellites continues to increase, in part due to the expectation that the satellite cost per operational day decreases monotonically with increased design lifetime. In this work, we challenge this expectation by revisiting the durability choice problem for spacecraft in the face of reduced launch price and under various cost of durability models. We first provide a brief overview of the economic thought on durability and highlight its limitations as they pertain to our problem (e.g., the assumption of zero marginal cost of durability). We then investigate the merging influence of spacecraft cost of durability and launch price, and we identify conditions that give rise cost-optimal design lifetimes that are shorter than the longest lifetime technically achievable. For example, we find that high costs of durability favor short design lifetimes, and that under these conditions the optimal choice is relatively robust to reduction in launch prices. By contrast, lower costs of durability favor longer design lifetimes, and the optimal choice is highly sensitive to reduction in launch price. In both cases, reduction in launch prices translates into reduction of the optimal design lifetime. Our results identify a number of situations for which satellite operators would be better served by spacecraft with shorter design lifetimes. Beyond cost issues and repeat purchases, other implications of long design lifetime include the increased risk of technological slowdown given the lower frequency of purchases and technology refresh, and the increased risk for satellite operators that the spacecraft will be technologically obsolete before the end of its life (with the corollary of loss of value and competitive advantage). We conclude with the recommendation that, should pressure to extend spacecraft design lifetime continue, satellite manufacturers should explore opportunities to lease their spacecraft to operators, or to take a stake in the ownership

  11. Transferring Files Between the Deep Impact Spacecrafts and the Ground Data System Using the CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP): A Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Felicia A.; Jones, Grailing, Jr.; Levesque, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The CCSDS File Delivery Protocol (CFDP) Standard could reshape ground support architectures by enabling applications to communicate over the space link using reliable-symmetric transport services. JPL utilized the CFDP standard to support the Deep Impact Mission. The architecture was based on layering the CFDP applications on top of the CCSDS Space Link Extension Services for data transport from the mission control centers to the ground stations. On July 4, 2005 at 1:52 A.M. EDT, the Deep Impact impactor successfully collided with comet Tempel 1. During the final 48 hours prior to impact, over 300 files were uplinked to the spacecraft, while over 6 thousand files were downlinked from the spacecraft using the CFDP. This paper uses the Deep Impact Mission as a case study in a discussion of the CFDP architecture, Deep Impact Mission requirements, and design for integrating the CFDP into the JPL deep space support services. Issues and recommendations for future missions using CFDP are also provided.

  12. Docking mechanism for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Gregory A. (Inventor); Mcmanamen, John P. (Inventor); Schliesing, John A. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A system is presented for docking a space vehicle to a space station where a connecting tunnel for in-flight transfer of personnel is required. Cooperable coupling mechanisms include docking rings on the space vehicle and space station. The space station is provided with a tunnel structure, a retraction mechanism, and a docking ring. The vehicle coupling mechanism is designed to capture the station coupling mechanism, arrest relative spacecraft motions while limiting loads to acceptable levels, and then realign the spacecraft for final docking and tunnel interconnection. The docking ring of the space vehicle coupling mechanism is supported by linear attentuator actuator devices, each of which is controlled by a control system which receives loading information signals and attenuator stroke information signals from each device and supplies output signals for controlling its linear actuation to attenuate impact loading or to realign the spacecraft for final docking and tunnel interconnection. The retraction mechanism is used to draw the spacecraft together after initial contact and coupling. Tunnel trunnions, cooperative with the latches on the space vehicle constitute the primary structural tie between the spacecraft in final docked configuration.

  13. Aluminum 2219-T87 and 5456-H116 - A comparative study of spacecraft wall materials in dual-wall structures under hypervelocity impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1992-01-01

    All earth-orbiting spacecraft are susceptible to high-speed impacts by pieces of orbital debris. To prevent mission failure and possibly loss of life, protection against perforation by high-speed orbital debris particles must be included in the spacecraft design. Although any number of materials can be used to manufacture perforation-resistant structures, aluminum is often used in such systems because of its relatively high strength-to-weight ratio. This paper presents the results of a study in which the high speed impact response characteristics of dual-wall structures made from two different aluminum alloys were analyzed to determine which alloy would be more suitable for use in a perforation-resistant dual-wall structural system that is to be exposed to the orbital debris environment. Impact response characteristics were obtained numerically and experimentally. At impact speeds below 7 km/s, it was found that the two aluminum alloys considered contributed similar levels of perforation resistance; at speeds in excess of 7 km/s, aluminum 2219-T87 was superior to aluminum 5546-H116 in preventing perforation of dual-wall structural systems.

  14. Aluminum 2219-T87 and 5456-H116 - A comparative study of spacecraft wall materials in dual-wall structures under hypervelocity impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonberg, William P.

    1992-11-01

    All earth-orbiting spacecraft are susceptible to high-speed impacts by pieces of orbital debris. To prevent mission failure and possibly loss of life, protection against perforation by high-speed orbital debris particles must be included in the spacecraft design. Although any number of materials can be used to manufacture perforation-resistant structures, aluminum is often used in such systems because of its relatively high strength-to-weight ratio. This paper presents the results of a study in which the high speed impact response characteristics of dual-wall structures made from two different aluminum alloys were analyzed to determine which alloy would be more suitable for use in a perforation-resistant dual-wall structural system that is to be exposed to the orbital debris environment. Impact response characteristics were obtained numerically and experimentally. At impact speeds below 7 km/s, it was found that the two aluminum alloys considered contributed similar levels of perforation resistance; at speeds in excess of 7 km/s, aluminum 2219-T87 was superior to aluminum 5546-H116 in preventing perforation of dual-wall structural systems.

  15. Spacecraft Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurlbert, Kathryn Miller

    2009-01-01

    In the 21st century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Russian Federal Space Agency, the National Space Agency of Ukraine, the China National Space Administration, and many other organizations representing spacefaring nations shall continue or newly implement robust space programs. Additionally, business corporations are pursuing commercialization of space for enabling space tourism and capital business ventures. Future space missions are likely to include orbiting satellites, orbiting platforms, space stations, interplanetary vehicles, planetary surface missions, and planetary research probes. Many of these missions will include humans to conduct research for scientific and terrestrial benefits and for space tourism, and this century will therefore establish a permanent human presence beyond Earth s confines. Other missions will not include humans, but will be autonomous (e.g., satellites, robotic exploration), and will also serve to support the goals of exploring space and providing benefits to Earth s populace. This section focuses on thermal management systems for human space exploration, although the guiding principles can be applied to unmanned space vehicles as well. All spacecraft require a thermal management system to maintain a tolerable thermal environment for the spacecraft crew and/or equipment. The requirements for human rating and the specified controlled temperature range (approximately 275 K - 310 K) for crewed spacecraft are unique, and key design criteria stem from overall vehicle and operational/programatic considerations. These criteria include high reliability, low mass, minimal power requirements, low development and operational costs, and high confidence for mission success and safety. This section describes the four major subsystems for crewed spacecraft thermal management systems, and design considerations for each. Additionally, some examples of specialized or advanced thermal system technologies are presented

  16. Spacecraft Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamnejad, Vahraz; Manshadi, Farzin; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya; Cramer, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Some of the various categories of issues that must be considered in the selection and design of spacecraft antennas for a Personal Access Satellite System (PASS) are addressed, and parametric studies for some of the antenna concepts to help the system designer in making the most appropriate antenna choice with regards to weight, size, and complexity, etc. are provided. The question of appropriate polarization for the spacecraft as well as for the User Terminal Antenna required particular attention and was studied in some depth. Circular polarization seems to be the favored outcome of this study. Another problem that has generally been a complicating factor in designing the multiple beam reflector antennas, is the type of feeds (single vs. multiple element and overlapping vs. non-overlapping clusters) needed for generating the beams. This choice is dependent on certain system design factors, such as the required frequency reuse, acceptable interbeam isolation, antenna efficiency, number of beams scanned, and beam-forming network (BFN) complexity. This issue is partially addressed, but is not completely resolved. Indications are that it may be possible to use relatively simple non-overlapping clusters of only a few elements, unless a large frequency reuse and very stringent isolation levels are required.

  17. Microbial contamination of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft and space habitats supporting human exploration contain a diverse population of microorganisms. Microorganisms may threaten human habitation in many ways that directly or indirectly impact the health, safety, or performance of astronauts. The ability to produce and maintain spacecraft and space stations with environments suitable for human habitation has been established over 40 years of human space flight. An extensive database of environmental microbiological parameters has been provided for short-term (< 20 days) space flight by more than 100 missions aboard the Space Shuttle. The NASA Mir Program provided similar data for long-duration missions. Interestingly, the major bacterial and fungal species found in the Space Shuttle are similar to those encountered in the nearly 15-year-old Mir. Lessons learned from both the US and Russian space programs have been incorporated into the habitability plan for the International Space Station. The focus is on preventive measures developed for spacecraft, cargo, and crews. On-orbit regular housekeeping practices complete with visual inspections are essential, along with microbiological monitoring. Risks associated with extended stays on the Moon or a Mars exploration mission will be much greater than previous experiences because of additional unknown variables. The current knowledge base is insufficient for exploration missions, and research is essential to understand the effects of space flight on biological functions and population dynamics of microorganisms in spacecraft. Equally important is a better understanding of the immune response and of human-microorganism-environment interactions during long-term space habitation.

  18. Microbial contamination of spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Pierson, D L

    2001-06-01

    Spacecraft and space habitats supporting human exploration contain a diverse population of microorganisms. Microorganisms may threaten human habitation in many ways that directly or indirectly impact the health, safety, or performance of astronauts. The ability to produce and maintain spacecraft and space stations with environments suitable for human habitation has been established over 40 years of human space flight. An extensive database of environmental microbiological parameters has been provided for short-term (< 20 days) space flight by more than 100 missions aboard the Space Shuttle. The NASA Mir Program provided similar data for long-duration missions. Interestingly, the major bacterial and fungal species found in the Space Shuttle are similar to those encountered in the nearly 15-year-old Mir. Lessons learned from both the US and Russian space programs have been incorporated into the habitability plan for the International Space Station. The focus is on preventive measures developed for spacecraft, cargo, and crews. On-orbit regular housekeeping practices complete with visual inspections are essential, along with microbiological monitoring. Risks associated with extended stays on the Moon or a Mars exploration mission will be much greater than previous experiences because of additional unknown variables. The current knowledge base is insufficient for exploration missions, and research is essential to understand the effects of space flight on biological functions and population dynamics of microorganisms in spacecraft. Equally important is a better understanding of the immune response and of human-microorganism-environment interactions during long-term space habitation. PMID:11865864

  19. Gaia Spacecraft Mechanical Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebranchu, C.; Blender, F.; Touzeau, S.; Escolar, D.

    2012-07-01

    Gaia is the European Space Agency's cornerstone mission for global space astrometry. Its goal is to make the largest, most precise three-dimensional map of our Galaxy by surveying an unprecedented number of stars. This paper gives an overview of the mechanical system engineering and verification of the spacecraft. This development includes several technical challenges. First of all, the very high stability performance as required for the mission is a key driver for the design; which incurs a high degree of stability. This is achieved through decoupling between payload and service module, and the use of high-performance engineering tools and of Silicon Carbide (Boostec® SiC) for the Payload. Compliance of spacecraft mass and volume with launcher capability is another key challenge, as well as the development of the 10.3 meter diameter deployable sunshield. The spacecraft mechanical verification follows an innovative approach, with direct testing on the flight model, without dedicated structural model. Gaia mechanical development is the fruit of a successful international cooperation.

  20. NASA Team Captures Hayabusa Spacecraft Reentry

    NASA Video Gallery

    A group of astronomers from NASA, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and other organizations had a front row seat to observe the Hayabusa spacecraft's fiery plunge into Earth's atmospher...

  1. Communications spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordyce, Samuel W.

    Progress in the designs and performance capabilities of communications satellites is traced from the Echo 1 Al-coated mylar balloon in 1960 to systems planned for the 1990s and beyond. The services allowed with the passive balloon concept were too limited and led to Telstar spacecraft, with 600 voice channels, being placed in elliptical orbits. Geosynchronous communications began in 1963 with the Syncom satellite, which also carried television signals. The evolution of subsequent Intelsat and ANIK satellites is described, as are features of the Marisat, Marecs, and the DBS systems. The near-term capabilities for DBS, advanced communications satellites using TDMA techniques, and mobile communications systems are summarized, along with the NASA ACTS and MSAT-X satellites for exploring the necessary technologies. The roles the Space Station and unmanned GEO platforms will play in future satellite communications are discussed.

  2. The Impact of NAFTA on Training and Development in Mexico: The Perspective of Mexican Senior Government Agency Officials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Carlos Enrique

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of Mexican senior government agency officials with regard to the impact of NAFTA on training and development practices in Mexico. This study was conducted using a phenomenological tradition within qualitative research. The major findings of the study indicate that Mexican senior government agency officials…

  3. The Distribution of Interplanetary Dust between 0.96 and 1.04 au as Inferred from Impacts on the STEREO Spacecraft Observed by the Heliospheric Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, C. J.; Davis, J. A.; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Crothers, S.; Lintott, C.; Smith, A.; Bamford, S.; Baeten, E. M. L.; SaintCyr, O. C.; Campbell-Brown, M.; Skelt, A.; Kaiser, M.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of dust in the ecliptic plane between 0.96 and 1.04 au has been inferred from impacts on the two Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft through observation of secondary particle trails and unexpected off-points in the heliospheric imager (HI) cameras. This study made use of analysis carried out by members of a distributed webbased citizen science project Solar Stormwatch. A comparison between observations of the brightest particle trails and a survey of fainter trails shows consistent distributions. While there is no obvious correlation between this distribution and the occurrence of individual meteor streams at Earth, there are some broad longitudinal features in these distributions that are also observed in sources of the sporadic meteor population. The different position of the HI instrument on the two STEREO spacecraft leads to each sampling different populations of dust particles. The asymmetry in the number of trails seen by each spacecraft and the fact that there are many more unexpected off-points in the HI-B than in HI-A indicates that the majority of impacts are coming from the apex direction. For impacts causing off-points in the HI-B camera, these dust particles are estimated to have masses in excess of 10 (exp-17) kg with radii exceeding 0.1 µm. For off-points observed in the HI-A images, which can only have been caused by particles travelling from the anti-apex direction, the distribution is consistent with that of secondary 'storm' trails observed by HI-B, providing evidence that these trails also result from impacts with primary particles from an anti-apex source. Investigating the mass distribution for the off-points of both HI-A and HI-B, it is apparent that the differential mass index of particles from the apex direction (causing off-points in HI-B) is consistently above 2. This indicates that the majority of the mass is within the smaller particles of this population. In contrast, the differential mass

  4. Spacecraft Charging Technology, 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The third Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference proceedings contain 66 papers on the geosynchronous plasma environment, spacecraft modeling, charged particle environment interactions with spacecraft, spacecraft materials characterization, and satellite design and testing. The proceedings is a compilation of the state of the art of spacecraft charging and environmental interaction phenomena.

  5. Xenia Spacecraft Study Addendum: Spacecraft Cost Estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Spencer; Hopkins, Randall

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Xenia spacecraft cost estimates as an addendum for the Xenia Spacecraft study. The NASA/Air Force Cost model (NAFCPOM) was used to derive the cost estimates that are expressed in 2009 dollars.

  6. Nonlinear spacecraft`s gyromoment attitude control

    SciTech Connect

    Somov, Y.I.

    1994-12-31

    Nonlinear methods of attitude control for spacecraft`s spatial rotation maneuvers through the use of gyrodynes - single gimbal control moment gyroscopes - are developed. We present new results on optimizing and dynamic synthesis of the nonlinear gyromoment attitude control system for a fast-manoeuvring spacecraft with a minimum-excessive scheme of gyrodynes.

  7. An Analysis of the Impact of the Federal Budgetary Cycle Upon the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center Research and Development Budget Formulation Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Ronald Keith

    1966-01-01

    The subsequent dissertation represents an analysis of the impact of the Federal Budgetary Cycle upon the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Research and Development (R&D) budget formulation process. The author's objectives may therefore be seen as the following: (1) to analyze the Federal Budgetary Cycle; (2) to analyze MSC R&D estimates and growth trends in relation to their implications on the Federal Cycle; (3) to identify relevant problems; and, (4) to-recommend solutions which display promise and feasibility. Any research involving the Federal Budgetary Cycle can well be characterized as of almost infinite scope and enormous complexity. For such reasons one must meticulously delineate all operational parameters and there-afore maintain their integrity. To do otherwise is to invite intellectual dilution and hazard a paltry effort.

  8. Spacecraft ceramic protective shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larriva, Rene F. (Inventor); Nelson, Anne (M.); Czechanski, James G. (Inventor); Poff, Ray E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A low areal density protective shield apparatus, and method for making same, for protecting spacecraft structures from impact with hypervelocity objects, including a bumper member comprising a bumper ceramic layer, a bumper shock attenuator layer, and a bumper confining layer. The bumper ceramic layer can be SiC or B.sub.4 C; the bumper shock attenuator layer can be zirconia felt; and the bumper confining layer can be aluminum. A base armor member can be spaced from the bumper member and a ceramic fiber-based curtain can be positioned between the bumper and base armor members.

  9. The 1975 report on active and planned spacecraft and experiments. [index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, R. (Editor); Davis, L. R. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Information is presented on current and planned spacecraft activity for various disciplines: astronomy, earth sciences, meteorology, planetary sciences, aeronomy, solar physics, and life sciences. For active orbiting spacecraft, the epoch date, orbit type, orbit period, apoasis, periapsis, and inclination are given along with the spacecraft weight, launch date, launch site, launch vehicle, and sponsoring agency. For each planned orbiting spacecraft, the orbit parameters, planned launch date, launch site, launch vehicle, spacecraft weight, and sponsoring agency are given.

  10. Comparing the quality of draft environmental impact statements by agencies in the United States since 1998 to 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Tzoumis, Kelly . E-mail: KellyTzoumis@Ameritech.net

    2007-01-15

    Since the creation of the National Environmental Policy Act in 1970, the United States has required the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to rate draft environmental statements (DEISs) for both information adequacy and the impact of the preferred alternative on the environment. In a previous study by Tzoumis and Finegold (2000), these ratings were found to be declining from 1970 to 1997. This current study investigates if that trend continued from 1998 to 2004. In addition, the top producing agencies (the Forest Service, the Federal Highway Administration, Army Corp of Engineers, and the Bureau of Land Management) are compared for the achievement of DEIS ratings. The results show that when the ratings are disaggregated for these agencies, the results indicate that there continues to be weak performance. The DEISs continue to have insufficient and sometimes inadequate information. Agencies continue to propose projects that have environmental concerns and sometimes objections. The agencies have some similarities in not being able to achieve the highest ratings on a consistent basis over time. However, more disturbing is the profile of agencies that have episodic peaks of achieving the lowest ratings. Conclusions and recommendations are focused on the agencies who submit that DEISs and EPA. One major conclusion is to better track the ratings and make them collectively available for the public. Agencies are encouraged to develop a best management practice in preparing DEISs to promote agency learning.

  11. Environmental impact assessment and control of pharmaceuticals: the role of environmental agencies.

    PubMed

    Adler, N E; Koschorreck, J; Rechenberg, B

    2008-01-01

    In 2005, the new legislation for pharmaceuticals came into effect. Since then environmental risk assessments are required for all new marketing authorisation applications. The German Federal Environment Agency has been assessing the environmental impact of 136 veterinary and 134 human pharmaceuticals. The authorisation of pharmaceuticals has shown that the authorisation of some groups of substances have to be combined with risk mitigation measures. Environmental risks may also arise from those pharmaceuticals which were authorised before the environmental risk assessment was added to the requirements of authorisation. Four examples of "existing" pharmaceuticals, i.e. diclofenac, ethinyl estradiol, ivermectin, and florfenicol are highlighted in this article. Risk management options for veterinary and human pharmaceuticals are discussed. PMID:18192745

  12. Spacecraft radiator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Grant A. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A spacecraft radiator system designed to provide structural support to the spacecraft. Structural support is provided by the geometric "crescent" form of the panels of the spacecraft radiator. This integration of radiator and structural support provides spacecraft with a semi-monocoque design.

  13. Comparison of self-healing ionomer to aluminium-alloy bumpers for protecting spacecraft equipment from space debris impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesconi, A.; Giacomuzzo, C.; Grande, A. M.; Mudric, T.; Zaccariotto, M.; Etemadi, E.; Di Landro, L.; Galvanetto, U.

    2013-03-01

    This paper discusses the impact behavior of a self-healing ionomeric polymer and compares its protection capability against space debris impacts to that of simple aluminium-alloy bumpers. To this end, 14 impact experiments on both ionomer and Al-7075-T6 thin plates with similar surface density were made with 1.5 mm aluminium spheres at velocity between 1 and 4 km/s.First, the perforation extent in both materials was evaluated vis-à-vis the prediction of well known hole-size equations; then, attention was given to the damage potential of the cloud of fragments ejected from the rear side of the target by analysing the craters pattern and the momentum transferred to witness plates mounted on a ballistic pendulum behind the bumpers.Self-healing was completely successful in all but one ionomer samples and the primary damage on ionomeric polymers was found to be significantly lower than that on aluminium. On the other hand, aluminium plates exhibited slightly better debris fragmentation abilities, even though the protecting performance of ionomers seemed to improve at increasing impact speed.

  14. Evaluation of spacecraft technology programs (effects on communication satellite business ventures), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenburg, J. S.; Gaelick, C.; Kaplan, M.; Fishman, J.; Hopkins, C.

    1985-01-01

    Commercial organizations as well as government agencies invest in spacecraft (S/C) technology programs that are aimed at increasing the performance of communications satellites. The value of these programs must be measured in terms of their impacts on the financial performane of the business ventures that may ultimately utilize the communications satellites. An economic evaluation and planning capability was developed and used to assess the impact of NASA on-orbit propulsion and space power programs on typical fixed satellite service (FSS) and direct broadcast service (DBS) communications satellite business ventures. Typical FSS and DBS spin and three-axis stabilized spacecraft were configured in the absence of NASA technology programs. These spacecraft were reconfigured taking into account the anticipated results of NASA specified on-orbit propulsion and space power programs. In general, the NASA technology programs resulted in spacecraft with increased capability. The developed methodology for assessing the value of spacecraft technology programs in terms of their impact on the financial performance of communication satellite business ventures is described. Results of the assessment of NASA specified on-orbit propulsion and space power technology programs are presented for typical FSS and DBS business ventures.

  15. Job satisfaction and retention of social workers in public agencies, non-profit agencies, and private practice: the impact of workplace conditions and motivators.

    PubMed

    Vinokur-Kaplan, D; Jayaratne, S; Chess, W A

    1994-01-01

    The authors examine a selected array of agency-influenced work and employment conditions and assess their impact upon social workers' job satisfaction, motivation, and intention to seek new employment. The study makes correlations with past empirical studies on job satisfaction and retention, with staff development concerns as stated in social work administration textbooks, and with conditions subject to administrators' influence. Some specified motivational issues included are salary, fringe benefits, job security, physical surroundings, and safety. The analysis demonstrates the contribution of certain contextual and motivational factors to a prediction of job satisfaction or of intent to leave the organization. PMID:10138941

  16. Computer simulation of spacecraft/environment interaction.

    PubMed

    Krupnikov, K K; Makletsov, A A; Mileev, V N; Novikov, L S; Sinolits, V V

    1999-10-01

    This report presents some examples of a computer simulation of spacecraft interaction with space environment. We analysed a set data on electron and ion fluxes measured in 1991 1994 on geostationary satellite GORIZONT-35. The influence of spacecraft eclipse and device eclipse by solar-cell panel on spacecraft charging was investigated. A simple method was developed for an estimation of spacecraft potentials in LEO. Effects of various particle flux impact and spacecraft orientation are discussed. A computer engineering model for a calculation of space radiation is presented. This model is used as a client/server model with WWW interface, including spacecraft model description and results representation based on the virtual reality markup language. PMID:11542669

  17. Standard user data services for spacecraft applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. F.; Hwang, C.; Fowell, S.; Plummer, C.

    2003-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems is an international organization of national space agencies that is branching out to provide new standards to enhanced reuse of spacecraft equiptment and software. These Spacecraft Onboard Interface (SOIF) standards will be based on the well-known Internet protocols. this paper will review the SOIF standards by looking at the services that are being proposed for SOIF.

  18. Evaluating the Impact of Training: A Collection of Federal Agency Evaluation Practices. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinger, Ruth; Roberts, Cynthia

    The purpose of this publication on agency training evaluation practices is to share approaches used by federal agencies to assess needs and measure training effectiveness. Emphasis is placed on the process of evaluation. Names of the agencies and highlights of the examples used by each follow: (1) Plant Protection and Quarantine (Department of…

  19. The Impact of NAFTA on Training and Development in Mexico: The Perspective of Mexican Senior Government Agency Officials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Carlos E.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of Mexican senior government agency officials with regard to the impact of NAFTA on training and development practices in Mexico. This study was conducted using a qualitative research design. Based on the participants' perceptions, NAFTA motivated the creation and development of national programs for training…

  20. Orbital Spacecraft Consumables Resupply System (OSCRS): Monopropellant application to space station and OMV automatic refueling impacts of an ELV launch, volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The use of orbital spacecraft consumables resupply system (OSCRS) at the Space Station is investigated, its use with the orbital maneuvering vehicle, and launch of the OSCRS on an expendable launch vehicles. A system requirements evaluation was performed initially to identify any unique requirements that would impact the design of OSCRS when used at the Space Station. Space Station documents were reviewed to establish requirements and to identify interfaces between the OSCRS, Shuttle, and Space Station, especially the Servicing Facility. The interfaces between OSCRS and the Shuttle consists of an avionics interface for command and control and a structural interface for launch support and for grappling with the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. For use of the OSCRS at the Space Station, three configurations were evaluated using the results of the interface definition to increase the efficiency of OSCRS and to decrease the launch weight by Station-basing specific OSCRS subsystems. A modular OSCRS was developed in which the major subsystems were Station-based where possible. The configuration of an OSCRS was defined for transport of water to the Space Station.

  1. Modeling of spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, E. C., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of modeling of spacecraft charging are discussed: statistical models, parametric models, and physical models. Local time dependence of circuit upset for DoD and communication satellites, and electron current to a sphere with an assumed Debye potential distribution are presented. Four regions were involved in spacecraft charging: (1) undisturbed plasma, (2) plasma sheath region, (3) spacecraft surface, and (4) spacecraft equivalent circuit.

  2. NASA's Orion Spacecraft Undergoes Water Landing Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    On August 25, 2016, the Orion spacecraft underwent a water drop test at the Hydro Impact Basin at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Join host Eric Gillard, of NASA Langley, and g...

  3. Spacecraft Charging Technology, 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of the aerospace environment with spacecraft surfaces and onboard, high voltage spacecraft systems operating over a wide range of altitudes from low Earth orbit to geosynchronous orbit is considered. Emphasis is placed on control of spacecraft electric potential. Electron and ion beams, plasma neutralizers material selection, and magnetic shielding are among the topics discussed.

  4. The Impact of Space Commercialization on Space Agencies: the Case of NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervos, Vasilis

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the hypothesis that commercialisation of space results in inefficient contracting policies by the space agencies, using the US NASA as a case study. Though commercialisation is seen by many as a way to reduce costs in space programmes, as the space industry is seen as a decreasing costs industry, this is not a problem-free process. Commercialisation of space has affected the US and European space industries and policies in two major ways. The first is that the public sector actively encourages mergers and acquisitions of major contractors, confined, however, within the geographical borders of the US and Europe. This follows largely from the perceived benefits of economies of size when competing in global commercial markets. The second is the formation of an increasing number of public-private partnerships (PPPs) in space programmes and a more `cosy' relationship between the two within a public-assistance strategic trade theoretic framework. As ESA's contracting policy of `juste retour' is marked by limited competition, the paper focuses on the case of NASA, which is expected to be more pro- competitive, to examine the impact of commercialisation. With the use of quantitative methods based on time series econometric analysis, the paper shows that NASA's contracting policy, results in increasingly less competition and more rent-favouring contracting. This is attributed to the decreasing number of major contractors in conjunction with the preferential treatment of the domestic space industry (`Buy American'). The results of the paper verify that the support of the domestic space industry in commercial and public space markets results in inefficient contracting policies, with NASA facing the conflicting tasks of a stated policy of enhancing competition and efficiency in contracting, as well as, supporting the competitiveness of the domestic space industry. The paper concludes with an analysis and assessment of solutions to this

  5. A Participatory Outcome Evaluation on the Impact of BSW Interns on Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallory, Drew; Cox, Shirley Elizabeth; Panos, Patrick T.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the findings of an exploratory study investigating the perceived benefits and costs of BSW interns for host agencies. The qualitative study included surveys from over 100 agency student supervisors, colleagues, and administrative personnel assessing the perceived effects students had on a range of categories. It also included…

  6. Interactions between spacecraft and their environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1993-01-01

    Spacecraft inevitably interact with their environments. Besides the interactions one immediately thinks of in space (zero-g, solar heating, atmospheric drag, expansion into vacuum conditions, etc.) other interactions are also important. Those of interest to spacecraft designers so far may be grouped under several headings; plasma interactions and spacecraft charging, impact of debris and micrometeoroids, chemical reactions with neutral species, radiation degradation, etc. Researchers have made great progress in defining and evaluating the interactions of spacecraft with their expected ambient environments near Earth and in interplanetary space. Some of these interactions are discussed with an eye toward expanding our knowledge into new environments, such as may be found at the moon and Mars, that will interact in new and different ways with exploring spacecraft and spacefarers.

  7. Microbial Contamination in the Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft and space habitats supporting human exploration contain a diverse population of microorganisms. Microorganisms may threaten human habitation in many ways that directly or indirectly impact the health, safety, or performance of astronauts. The ability to produce and maintain spacecraft and space stations with environments suitable for human habitation has been established over 40 years of human spaceflight. An extensive database of environmental microbiological parameters has been provided for short-term (< 20 days) spaceflight by more than 100 missions aboard the Space Shuttle. The NASA Mir Program provided similar data for long-duration missions. Interestingly, the major bacterial and fungal species found in the Space Shuttle are similar to those encountered in the nearly 15-year-old Mir. Lessons learned from both the US and Russian space programs have been incorporated into the habitability plan for the International Space Station. The focus is on preventive measures developed for spacecraft, cargo, and crews. On-orbit regular housekeeping practices complete with visual inspections are essential, along with microbiological monitoring. Risks associated with extended stays on the Moon or a Mars exploration mission will be much greater than previous experiences because of additional unknown variables. The current knowledge base is insufficient for exploration missions, and research is essential to understand the effects of spaceflight on biological functions and population dynamics of microorganisms in spacecraft.

  8. Implicit Spacecraft Gyro Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Richard; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an implicit algorithm for spacecraft onboard instrument calibration, particularly to onboard gyro calibration. This work is an extension of previous work that was done where an explicit gyro calibration algorithm was applied to the AQUA spacecraft gyros. The algorithm presented in this paper was tested using simulated data and real data that were downloaded from the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) spacecraft. The calibration tests gave very good results. A comparison between the use of the implicit calibration algorithm used here with the explicit algorithm used for AQUA spacecraft indicates that both provide an excellent estimation of the gyro calibration parameters with similar accuracies.

  9. Spacecraft camera image registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamel, Ahmed A. (Inventor); Graul, Donald W. (Inventor); Chan, Fred N. T. (Inventor); Gamble, Donald W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A system for achieving spacecraft camera (1, 2) image registration comprises a portion external to the spacecraft and an image motion compensation system (IMCS) portion onboard the spacecraft. Within the IMCS, a computer (38) calculates an image registration compensation signal (60) which is sent to the scan control loops (84, 88, 94, 98) of the onboard cameras (1, 2). At the location external to the spacecraft, the long-term orbital and attitude perturbations on the spacecraft are modeled. Coefficients (K, A) from this model are periodically sent to the onboard computer (38) by means of a command unit (39). The coefficients (K, A) take into account observations of stars and landmarks made by the spacecraft cameras (1, 2) themselves. The computer (38) takes as inputs the updated coefficients (K, A) plus synchronization information indicating the mirror position (AZ, EL) of each of the spacecraft cameras (1, 2), operating mode, and starting and stopping status of the scan lines generated by these cameras (1, 2), and generates in response thereto the image registration compensation signal (60). The sources of periodic thermal errors on the spacecraft are discussed. The system is checked by calculating measurement residuals, the difference between the landmark and star locations predicted at the external location and the landmark and star locations as measured by the spacecraft cameras (1, 2).

  10. Reactor power system/spacecraft integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elms, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The new national initiative in space reactor technology evaluation and development is strongly tied to mission applications and to spacecraft and space transportation system (STS) compatibility. This paper discusses the power system integration interfaces with potential using spacecraft and the STS, and the impact of these requirements on the design. The integration areas of interest are mechanical, thermal, electrical, attitude control, and mission environments. The mission environments include space vacuum, solar input, heat sink, space radiation, weapons effects, and reactor power system radiation environments. The natural, reactor, and weapons effects radiation must be evaluated and combined to define the design requirements for spacecraft electronic equipment.

  11. Discussion meeting on Gossamer spacecraft (ultralightweight spacecraft)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brereton, R. G. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Concepts, technology, and application of ultralightweight structures in space are examined. Gossamer spacecraft represented a generic class of space vehicles or structures characterized by a low mass per unit area (approximately 50g/m2). Gossamer concepts include the solar sail, the space tether, and various two and three dimensional large lightweight structures that were deployed or assembled in space. The Gossamer Spacecraft had a high potential for use as a transportation device (solar sail), as a science instrument (reflecting or occulting antenna), or as a large structural component for an enclosure, manned platform, or other human habitats. Inflatable structures were one possible building element for large ultralightweight structures in space.

  12. Spacecraft radiators for advanced mission requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Design requirements for spacecraft heat rejection systems are identified, and their impact on the construction of conventional pumped fluid and hybrid heat pipe/pumped fluid radiators is evaluated. Heat rejection systems to improve the performance or reduce the cost of the spacecraft are proposed. Heat rejection requirements which are large compared to those of existing systems and mission durations which are relatively long, are discussed.

  13. Small Spacecraft Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shope, R.

    1995-01-01

    Aerospace designers are aggressively pursuing new ideas in advanced technology for smaller spacecraft. NASA's 'faster, better, cheaper' philosophy is the driving force to accomplish higher level scientific exploration more efficiently. More memory and higher performance is packed into computer hardware that takes up a fraction of the space of earlier generation spacecraft. Current technology is described.

  14. Toxicology of spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, E. S.

    1971-01-01

    The procedures for determining the toxicity of products outgassed from spacecraft structures are discussed. The test equipment involved in the tests and the criteria for acceptability are described. The use of animals as the final step in determining toxicity of a spacecraft environment is explained.

  15. Spacecraft thermal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Guidance for the assessment and control of spacecraft temperatures is provided with emphasis on unmanned spacecraft in the space environment. The heat balance, elements of thermal design, and thermal control are discussed along with thermal testing, design criteria, and recommended practices.

  16. The electrification of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akishin, A. I.; Novikov, L. S.

    1985-01-01

    Physical and applied aspects of the electrification of space vehicles and natural celestial objects are discussed, the factors resulting in electrification of spacecraft are analyzed, and methods of investigating various phenomena associated with this electrification and ways of protecting spacecraft against the influence of static electricity are described. The booklet is intended for the general reader interested in present day questions of space technology.

  17. Spacecraft Thermal Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, Gajanana C.; Siebes, Georg; Swanson, Theodore D.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thermal control of the spacecraft is typically achieved by removing heat from the spacecraft parts that tend to overheat and adding heat to the parts that tend get too cold. The equipment on the spacecraft can get very hot if it is exposed to the sun or have internal heat generation. The pans also can get very cold if they are exposed to the cold of deep space. The spacecraft and instruments must be designed to achieve proper thermal balance. The combination of the spacecraft's external thermal environment, its internal heat generation (i.e., waste heat from the operation of electrical equipment), and radiative heat rejection will determine this thermal balance. It should also be noted that this is seldom a static situation, external environmental influences and internal heat generation are normally dynamic variables which change with time. Topics discussed include thermal control system components, spacecraft mission categories, spacecraft thermal requirements, space thermal environments, thermal control hardware, launch and flight operations, advanced technologies for future spacecraft,

  18. Miniature Robotic Spacecraft for Inspecting Other Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, Steven; Abbott, Larry; Duran, Steve; Goode, Robert; Howard, Nathan; Jochim, David; Rickman, Steve; Straube, Tim; Studak, Bill; Wagenknecht, Jennifer; Lemke, Matthew; Wade, Randall; Wheeler, Scott; Baggerman, Clinton

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses the Miniature Autonomous Extravehicular Robotic Camera (Mini AERCam)-- a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. The Mini AERCam is a successor to the AERCam Sprint -- a prior miniature robotic inspection spacecraft that was demonstrated in a space-shuttle flight experiment in 1997. The prototype of the Mini AERCam is a demonstration unit having approximately the form and function of a flight system. The Mini AERCam is approximately spherical with a diameter of about 7.5 in. (.19 cm) and a weight of about 10 lb (.4.5 kg), yet it has significant additional capabilities, relative to the 14-in. (36-cm), 35-lb (16-kg) AERCam Sprint. The Mini AERCam includes miniaturized avionics, instrumentation, communications, navigation, imaging, power, and propulsion subsystems, including two digital video cameras and a high-resolution still camera. The Mini AERCam is designed for either remote piloting or supervised autonomous operations, including station keeping and point-to-point maneuvering. The prototype has been tested on an air-bearing table and in a hardware-in-the-loop orbital simulation of the dynamics of maneuvering in proximity to the International Space Station.

  19. Assessing the Impact of Local Agency Traffic Safety Training Using Ethnographic Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colling, Timothy K.

    2010-01-01

    Traffic crashes are a significant source of loss of life, personal injury and financial expense in the United States. In 2008 there were 37,261 people killed and an estimated 2,346,000 people injured nationwide in motor vehicle traffic crashes. State and federal agencies are beginning to focus traffic safety improvement effort on local agency…

  20. Web 2.0 Impact on Business Value at a Federal Government Housing Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Anthony L.

    2013-01-01

    The idea of Open Government is an extension of the Electronic Government Act of 2002 which addresses the accessibility, usability, and preservation of government information. The concept of Open Government has evolved into the open government directive that mandates Executive Departments and Agencies to become more open and transparent while…

  1. Evaluating the Impact of Training: A Collection of Federal Agency Evaluation Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinger, Ruth; Bartlett, Joan

    The purpose of this document is to share various approaches used by federal agencies to assess needs and measure training effectiveness. The emphasis in the descriptions is on the evaluation process rather than on the results. One program was evaluated by employing return-on-investment (ROI) data and using volunteer line personnel who conducted…

  2. The Impact of the European Standards and Guidelines in Agency Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stensaker, Bjorn; Harvey, Lee; Huisman, Jeroen; Langfeldt, Liv; Westerheijden, Don F.

    2010-01-01

    The emergence of the European Standards and Guidelines (ESG) for Quality Assurance has been seen as an important step towards realising the European Higher Education Area by creating more transparency and accountability in the area of quality assurance. The ESG also include standards as to how quality assurance agencies should be reviewed. In a…

  3. Fostering Social Agency in Multimedia Learning: Examining the Impact of an Animated Agent's Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Robert K.; Mayer, Richard E.; Merrill, Mary Margaret

    2005-01-01

    Consistent with social agency theory, we hypothesized that learners who studied a set of worked-out examples involving proportional reasoning narrated by an animated agent with a human voice would perform better on near and far transfer tests and rate the speaker more positively compared to learners who studied the same set of examples narrated by…

  4. Assessing Cumulative Impact and Risk - Approaches at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has a mission and regulatory mandate to protect human health and the environment. EPA’s primary role is to implement environmental laws by developing and enforcing national regulation. Cogent to the goals of this workshop, key envi...

  5. Response of Federal Land Management Agencies to ozone impacts on vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Musselman, R.C.; Fisher, R.W.

    1999-07-01

    The FLAG (Federal Land Manager's AQRV WorkGroup) Ozone Subgroup was organized to compile information known about response of vegetation to ozone in federally managed parks, forests, and wildlife refuges; to document areas of agreement among federal agencies regarding identification of ozone sensitive Air Quality Related Values (AQRVs); and standardize agency responses to New Source Review (NSR) permit applications. Subgroup members included air resource managers and ozone effects scientists from several agencies that manage federal lands. The subgroup identified sensitive AQRV receptors, determined information needed to evaluate permit applications under the NSR process, determined the form of an ozone parameter to use to relate plant response to ambient ozone, and agreed on specific definitions for vegetation injury and damage from ozone. The subgroup developed specific protocols for federal agencies to follow in response to NSR permit applications. These protocols were based on (1) ambient levels of ozone as measured by the W126 ozone metric and the number of peak ozone concentrations $100 ppb (N100), and (2) the presence or absence of ozone sensitive plant species and ozone-induced damage to vegetation.

  6. Impacts of Psychological Science on National Security Agencies Post-9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Psychologists have been an integral part of national security agencies since World War I, when psychological science helped in personnel selection. A robust infrastructure supporting wider applications of psychology to military and intelligence problems developed further during World War II and the years following, primarily in the areas of…

  7. Surviving Atmospheric Spacecraft Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; Conley, Catharine A.

    2003-01-01

    In essence, to survival a spacecraft breakup an animal must not experience a lethal event. Much as with surviving aircraft breakup, dissipation of lethal forces via breakup of the craft around the organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. As spacecraft can travel higher and faster than aircraft, it is often assumed that spacecraft breakup is not a survivable event. Similarly, the belief that aircraft breakup or crashes are not survivable events is still prevalent in the general population. As those of us involved in search and rescue know, it is possible to survive both aircraft breakup and crashes. Here we make the first report of an animal, C. elegans, surviving atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications implied for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  8. Current LISA Spacecraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkowitz, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission, a space based gravitational wave detector, uses laser metrology to measure distance fluctuations between proof masses aboard three spacecraft. LISA is unique from a mission design perspective in that three spacecraft and their associated operations form one distributed science instrument, unlike more conventional missions where an instrument is a component of an individual spacecraft. The design of the LiSA spacecraft is also tightly coupled to the design and requirements of the scientific payload; for this reason it is often referred to as a "sciencecraft." A detailed discussion will be presented that describes the current spacecraft design and mission architecture needed to meet the LISA science requirements.

  9. Current LISA Spacecraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkowitz, S. M.; Castellucci, K. E.; Depalo, S. V.; Generie, J. A.; Maghami, P. G.; Peabody, H. L.

    2009-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. a space based gravitational wave detector. uses laser metrology to measure distance fluctuations between proof masses aboard three spacecraft. LISA is unique from a mission design perspective in that the three spacecraft and their associated operations form one distributed science instrument. unlike more conventional missions where an instrument is a component of an individual spacecraft. The design of the LISA spacecraft is also tightly coupled to the design and requirements of the scientific payload; for this reason it is often referred to as a "sciencecraft." Here we describe some of the unique features of the LISA spacecraft design that help create the quiet environment necessary for gravitational wave observations.

  10. Influence of Natural Environments in Spacecraft Design, Development, and Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Spacecraft are growing in complexity and sensitivity to environmental effects. The spacecraft engineer must understand and take these effects into account in building reliable, survivable, and affordable spacecraft. Too much protections, however, means unnecessary expense while too little will potentially lead to early mission loss. The ability to balance cost and risk necessitates an understanding of how the environment impacts the spacecraft and is a critical factor in its design. This presentation is intended to address both the space environment and its effects with the intent of introducing the influence of the environment on spacecraft performance.

  11. Influence of Natural Environments in Spacecraft Design, Development, and Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft are growing in complexity and sensitivity to environmental effects. The spacecraft engineer must understand and take these effects into account in building reliable, survivable, and affordable spacecraft. Too much protections, however, means unnecessary expense while too little will potentially lead to early mission loss. The ability to balance cost and risk necessitates an understanding of how the environment impacts the spacecraft and is a critical factor in its design. This presentation is intended to address both the space environment and its effects with the intent of introducing the influence of the environment on spacecraft performance.

  12. Foam Core Shielding for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A foam core shield (FCS) system is now being developed to supplant multilayer insulation (MLI) systems heretofore installed on spacecraft for thermal management and protection against meteoroid impacts. A typical FCS system consists of a core sandwiched between a face sheet and a back sheet. The core can consist of any of a variety of low-to-medium-density polymeric or inorganic foams chosen to satisfy application-specific requirements regarding heat transfer and temperature. The face sheet serves to shock and thereby shatter incident meteoroids, and is coated on its outer surface to optimize its absorptance and emittance for regulation of temperature. The back sheet can be dimpled to minimize undesired thermal contact with the underlying spacecraft component and can be metallized on the surface facing the component to optimize its absorptance and emittance. The FCS systems can perform better than do MLI systems, at lower mass and lower cost and with greater volumetric efficiency.

  13. Docking system for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Jon B. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A mechanism for the docking of a space vehicle to a space station where a connection for transfer of personnel and equipment is desired. The invention comprises an active docking structure on a space vehicle 10 and a passive docking structure on a station 11. The passive structure includes a docking ring 50 mounted on a tunnel structure 35 fixed to the space station. The active structure including a docking ring 18 carried by actuator-attenuator devices 20, each attached at one end to the ring 18 and at its other end in the vehicle's payload bay 12. The devices 20 respond to command signals for moving the docking ring 18 between a stowed position in the space vehicle to a deployed position suitable for engagement with the docking ring 50. The devices 20 comprise means responsive to signals of sensed loadings to absorb impact energy and retraction means for drawing the coupled space vehicle and station into final docked configuration and moving the tunnel structure to a berthed position in the space vehicle 10. Latches 60 couple the space vehicle and space station upon contact of docking rings 18 and 50 and latches 41-48 establish a structural tie between the spacecraft when retracted.

  14. 76 FR 68219 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 27363). Interested parties are encouraged to send comments to the OMB, Office of...; Impact Evaluation of the YouthBuild Program ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Labor (DOL) is... collection titled, ``Impact Evaluation of the YouthBuild Program,'' to the Office of Management and...

  15. Spacecraft Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghofranian, Siamak (Inventor); Chuang, Li-Ping Christopher (Inventor); Motaghedi, Pejmun (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and apparatus for docking a spacecraft. The apparatus comprises elongate members, movement systems, and force management systems. The elongate members are associated with a docking structure for a spacecraft. The movement systems are configured to move the elongate members axially such that the docking structure for the spacecraft moves. Each of the elongate members is configured to move independently. The force management systems connect the movement systems to the elongate members and are configured to limit a force applied by the each of the elongate members to a desired threshold during movement of the elongate members.

  16. Spacecraft dielectric material properties and spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Wall, J. A.; Cotts, D. B.; Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    The physics of spacecraft charging is reviewed, and criteria for selecting and testing semiinsulating polymers (SIPs) to avoid charging are discussed and illustrated. Chapters are devoted to the required properties of dielectric materials, the charging process, discharge-pulse phenomena, design for minimum pulse size, design to prevent pulses, conduction in polymers, evaluation of SIPs that might prevent spacecraft charging, and the general response of dielectrics to space radiation. SIPs characterized include polyimides, fluorocarbons, thermoplastic polyesters, poly(alkanes), vinyl polymers and acrylates, polymers containing phthalocyanine, polyacene quinones, coordination polymers containing metal ions, conjugated-backbone polymers, and 'metallic' conducting polymers. Tables summarizing the results of SIP radiation tests (such as those performed for the NASA Galileo Project) are included.

  17. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    extend the underwater endurance to 2-3 weeks. These propulsion engineering changes also reduce periodic ventilation of the submarine's interior and thus put a greater burden on the various maintenance systems. We note that the spaceflight community has similar issues; their energy production mechanisms are essentially air independent in that they rely almost entirely on photovoltaic arrays for electricity generation, with only emergency back-up power from alcohol fuel cells. In response to prolonged underwater submarine AIP operations, months-long spaceflight operations onboard the ISS and planning for future years-long missions to Mars, there has been an increasing awareness that bio-monitoring is an important factor for assessing the health and awareness states of the crewmembers. SAMAP researchers have been proposing various air and bio-monitoring instruments and methods in response to these needs. One of the most promising new methodologies is the non-invasive monitoring of exhaled breath. So, what do the IABR and SAMAP communities have in common? Inhalation toxicology. We are both concerned with contamination from the environment, either as a direct health threat or as a confounder for diagnostic assessments. For example, the exhaled breath from subjects in a contaminated and enclosed artificial environment (submarine or spacecraft) can serve as a model system and a source of contamination for their peers in a cleaner environment. In a similar way, exhaled anaesthetics can serve as a source of contamination in hospital/clinical settings, or exhalation of occupational exposures to tetrachloroethylene can impact family members at home. Instrumentation development. Both communities have similar needs for better, more specific and more sensitive instruments. Certainly, the analytical instruments to be used onboard submarines and spacecraft have severe restrictions on energy use, physical size and ease of operation. The medical and clinical communities have similar long

  18. Only an integrated approach across academia, enterprise, governments, and global agencies can tackle the public health impact of climate change

    PubMed Central

    Stordalen, Gunhild A.; Rocklöv, Joacim; Nilsson, Maria; Byass, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite considerable global attention to the issues of climate change, relatively little priority has been given to the likely effects on human health of current and future changes in the global climate. We identify three major societal determinants that influence the impact of climate change on human health, namely the application of scholarship and knowledge; economic and commercial considerations; and actions of governments and global agencies. Discussion The three major areas are each discussed in terms of the ways in which they facilitate and frustrate attempts to protect human health from the effects of climate change. Academia still pays very little attention to the effects of climate on health in poorer countries. Enterprise is starting to recognise that healthy commerce depends on healthy people, and so climate change presents long-term threats if it compromises health. Governments and international agencies are very active, but often face immovable vested interests in other sectors. Overall, there tends to be too little interaction between the three areas, and this means that potential synergies and co-benefits are not always realised. Conclusion More attention from academia, enterprise, and international agencies needs to be given to the potential threats the climate change presents to human health. However, there needs to also be much closer collaboration between all three areas in order to capitalise on possible synergies that can be achieved between them. PMID:23653920

  19. 49 CFR Attachment 4 to Part 520 - State and Local Agency Review of Impact Statements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... again on the basis of the draft impact statement is a matter to be left to the discretion of the... statements because the clearinghouses may be unwilling or unable to handle this phase of the process. In...

  20. 49 CFR Attachment 4 to Part 520 - State and Local Agency Review of Impact Statements

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... again on the basis of the draft impact statement is a matter to be left to the discretion of the... statements because the clearinghouses may be unwilling or unable to handle this phase of the process. In...

  1. Unusual spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Jonathan V.

    1990-01-01

    For particularly innovative space exploration missions, unusual requirements are levied on the structural components of the spacecraft. In many cases, the preferred solution is the utilization of unusual materials. This trend is forecast to continue. Several hypothetic examples are discussed.

  2. Surviving atmospheric spacecraft breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szewczyk, Nathaniel J.; McLamb, William

    2005-01-01

    Spacecraft travel higher and faster than aircraft, making breakup potentially less survivable. As with aircraft breakup, the dissipation of lethal forces via spacecraft breakup around an organism is likely to greatly increase the odds of survival. By employing a knowledge of space and aviation physiology, comparative physiology, and search-and-rescue techniques, we were able to correctly predict and execute the recovery of live animals following the breakup of the space shuttle Columbia. In this study, we make what is, to our knowledge, the first report of an animal, Caenorhabditis elegans, surviving the atmospheric breakup of the spacecraft that was supporting it and discuss both the lethal events these animals had to escape and the implications for search and rescue following spacecraft breakup.

  3. Quick spacecraft charging primer

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Brian Arthur

    2014-03-12

    This is a presentation in PDF format which is a quick spacecraft charging primer, meant to be used for program training. It goes into detail about charging physics, RBSP examples, and how to identify charging.

  4. Spacecraft Fire Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margle, Janice M. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Fire detection, fire standards and testing, fire extinguishment, inerting and atmospheres, fire-related medical science, aircraft fire safety, Space Station safety concerns, microgravity combustion, spacecraft material flammability testing, and metal combustion are among the topics considered.

  5. Internet Access to Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Jackson, Chris; Price, Harold; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project at NASA's Goddard Space flight Center (GSFC), is demonstrating the use of standard Internet protocols for spacecraft communication systems. This year, demonstrations of Internet access to a flying spacecraft have been performed with the UoSAT-12 spacecraft owned and operated by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL). Previously, demonstrations were performed using a ground satellite simulator and NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). These activities are part of NASA's Space Operations Management Office (SOMO) Technology Program, The work is focused on defining the communication architecture for future NASA missions to support both NASA's "faster, better, cheaper" concept and to enable new types of collaborative science. The use of standard Internet communication technology for spacecraft simplifies design, supports initial integration and test across an IP based network, and enables direct communication between scientists and instruments as well as between different spacecraft, The most recent demonstrations consisted of uploading an Internet Protocol (IP) software stack to the UoSAT- 12 spacecraft, simple modifications to the SSTL ground station, and a series of tests to measure performance of various Internet applications. The spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 3 months. The tests included basic network connectivity (PING), automated clock synchronization (NTP), and reliable file transfers (FTP). Future tests are planned to include additional protocols such as Mobile IP, e-mail, and virtual private networks (VPN) to enable automated, operational spacecraft communication networks. The work performed and results of the initial phase of tests are summarized in this paper. This work is funded and directed by NASA/GSFC with technical leadership by CSC in arrangement with SSTL, and Vytek Wireless.

  6. Viking lander spacecraft battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    The Viking Lander was the first spacecraft to fly a sterilized nickel-cadmium battery on a mission to explore the surface of a planet. The significant results of the battery development program from its inception through the design, manufacture, and test of the flight batteries which were flown on the two Lander spacecraft are documented. The flight performance during the early phase of the mission is also presented.

  7. NASA spacecraft propulsion activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Tyburski, Timothy E.; Sankovic, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.; Reed, Brian D.; Schneider, Steven J.; Hamley, John A.; Patterson, Michael J.; Sovey, James S.

    1997-01-01

    The NASA's activities in the development of spacecraft propulsion systems are reviewed, with emphasis on program directions and recent progress made in this domain. The recent trends towards the use of smaller spacecraft and launch vehicles call for new onboard propulsion systems. The NASA's efforts are conducted within the framework of the onboard propulsion program. The research and development work carried out in relation to the different propulsion system technologies are considered: electromagnetic systems; electrostatic systems; electrothermal systems; bipropellant systems; and monopropellant systems.

  8. 8th Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, J. L. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The 8th Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference was held in Huntsville, Alabama, October 20-24, 2003. Hosted by NASA s Space Environments and Effects (SEE) Program and co-sponsored by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and the European Space Agency (ESA), the 2003 conference saw attendance from eleven countries with over 65 oral papers and 18 poster papers. Presentation topics highlighted the latest in spacecraft charging mitigation techniques and on-orbit investigations, including: Plasma Propulsion and Tethers; Ground Testing Techniques; Interactions of Spacecraft and Systems With the Natural and Induced Plasma Environment; Materials Characterizations; Models and Computer Simulations; Environment Specifications; Current Collection and Plasma Probes in Space Plasmas; On-Orbit Investigations. A round-table discussion of international standards regarding electrostatic discharge (ESD) testing was also held with the promise of continued discussions in the off years and an official continuation at the next conference.

  9. Orbital spacecraft resupply technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Tracey, T. R.; Bailey, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    The resupplying of orbital spacecraft using the Space Shuttle, Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle, Orbital Transfer Vehicle or a depot supply at a Space Station is studied. The governing factor in fluid resupply designs is the system size with respect to fluid resupply quantities. Spacecraft propellant management for tankage via diaphragm or surface tension configurations is examined. The capabilities, operation, and application of adiabatic ullage compression, ullage exchange, vent/fill/repressurize, and drain/vent/no-vent fill/repressurize, which are proposed transfer methods for spacecraft utilizing tankage configurations, are described. Selection of the appropriate resupply method is dependent on the spacecraft design features. Hydrazine adiabatic compression/detonation, liquid-free vapor venting to prevent freezing, and a method for no-vent liquid filling are analyzed. Various procedures for accurate measurements of propellant mass in low gravity are evaluated; a system of flowmeters with a PVT system was selected as the pressurant solubility and quantity gaging technique. Monopropellant and bipropellant orbital spacecraft consumable resupply system tanks which resupply 3000 lb of hydrazine and 7000 lb of MMH/NTO to spacecraft on orbit are presented.

  10. Urban storm-induced discharge impacts: US Environmental Protection Agency research program review

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.; Pitt, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    Fecal coliform bacteria (and pathogens), high flow rates, sediment, toxic heavy metals, and organic pollutants are most commonly associated with urban receiving-water problems. Most beneficial uses have been shown to be adversely affected by urban runoff, including shell-fish harvesting, fish and aquatic-life propagation, drinking-water supplies, aesthetics and recreation. Most of the problems occur over long periods of time and are not associated with individual runoff events, making cause-and-effect relationships difficult to study. The storm and Combined Sewer Program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has sponsored several long-term research projects to investigate these problems, along with data reviews to identify urban-runoff problems from available information. Current research efforts are stressing sources and controls for toxicants in urban runoff.

  11. Assessing the Impact of a Multi-Agency Project on Afghan Basic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Yijie; McNerney, Frank

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of activities done in the basic education sub-sector by a consortium of four non-government organizations in four provinces in Afghanistan from January 2004 to June 2005. The evaluation uses the project objectives and components as the evaluation framework, and data collected through survey questionnaires,…

  12. Benefits and risks of using electrodynamic tethers to de-orbit spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardini, Carmen; Hanada, Toshiya; Krisko, Paula H.

    2009-03-01

    By using electrodynamic drag to greatly increase the orbital decay rate, an electrodynamic space tether can remove spent or dysfunctional spacecraft from low Earth orbit (LEO) rapidly and safely. Moreover, the low mass requirements of such tether devices make them highly advantageous compared to conventional rocket-based de-orbit systems. However, a tether system is much more vulnerable to space debris impacts than a typical spacecraft and its design must be proved to be safe up to a certain confidence level before being adopted for potential applications. To assess space debris related concerns, in March 2001 a new task (Action Item 19.1) on the "Potential Benefits and Risks of Using Electrodynamic Tethers for End-of-life De-orbit of LEO Spacecraft" was defined by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC). Two tests were proposed to compute the fatal impact rate of meteoroids and orbital debris on space tethers in circular orbits, at different altitudes and inclinations, as a function of the tether diameter to assess the survival probability of an electrodynamic tether system during typical de-orbiting missions. IADC members from three agencies, the Italian Space Agency (ASI), the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), participated in the study and different computational approaches were specifically developed within the framework of the IADC task. This paper summarizes the content of the IADC AI 19.1 Final Report. In particular, it introduces the potential benefits and risks of using tethers in space, it describes the assumptions made in the study plan, it compares and discusses the results obtained by ASI, JAXA and NASA for the two tests proposed. Some general conclusions and recommendations are finally extrapolated from this massive and intensive piece of research.

  13. The New Horizons Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fountain, Glen H.; Kusnierkiewicz, David Y.; Hersman, Christopher B.; Herder, Timothy S.; Coughlin, Thomas B.; Gibson, William C.; Clancy, Deborah A.; Deboy, Christopher C.; Hill, T. Adrian; Kinnison, James D.; Mehoke, Douglas S.; Ottman, Geffrey K.; Rogers, Gabe D.; Stern, S. Alan; Stratton, James M.; Vernon, Steven R.; Williams, Stephen P.

    2008-10-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft was launched on 19 January 2006. The spacecraft was designed to provide a platform for seven instruments designated by the science team to collect and return data from Pluto in 2015. The design meets the requirements established by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Announcement of Opportunity AO-OSS-01. The design drew on heritage from previous missions developed at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and other missions such as Ulysses. The trajectory design imposed constraints on mass and structural strength to meet the high launch acceleration consistent with meeting the AO requirement of returning data prior to the year 2020. The spacecraft subsystems were designed to meet tight resource allocations (mass and power) yet provide the necessary control and data handling finesse to support data collection and return when the one-way light time during the Pluto fly-by is 4.5 hours. Missions to the outer regions of the solar system (where the solar irradiance is 1/1000 of the level near the Earth) require a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) to supply electrical power. One RTG was available for use by New Horizons. To accommodate this constraint, the spacecraft electronics were designed to operate on approximately 200 W. The travel time to Pluto put additional demands on system reliability. Only after a flight time of approximately 10 years would the desired data be collected and returned to Earth. This represents the longest flight duration prior to the return of primary science data for any mission by NASA. The spacecraft system architecture provides sufficient redundancy to meet this requirement with a probability of mission success of greater than 0.85. The spacecraft is now on its way to Pluto, with an arrival date of 14 July 2015. Initial in-flight tests have verified that the spacecraft will meet the design requirements.

  14. In-Situ Dust Detection by Spacecraft Antennas: Laboratory Characterization of Particle Energies and Geometrical Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, J. R. R.; Collette, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Malaspina, D.; Thayer, F.

    2015-12-01

    We describe direct laboratory investigation of signals generated by hypervelocity dust impacts on spacecraft. Although the majority of spacecraft do not carry dedicated dust detectors, those with antenna-based instruments routinely observe impulsive signals from dust impacts on the spacecraft and antennas. Recent analysis of signals from the STEREO spacecraft WAVES electric field sensors, and unexpected high-altitude observations at Mars by MAVEN's LPW instrument, highlight the opportunity for in-situ dust detection by such spacecraft. However, quantitative interpretation of the spacecraft data currently suffers from large uncertainties, including the quantity and energy distribution of charged particles released, the effect of the spacecraft configuration and impact location, and the near-spacecraft electric fields and plasma environment. We report a series of experiments conducted at the IMPACT hypervelocity dust accelerator facility at the University of Colorado Boulder, to investigate (1) the effects of spacecraft and antenna potential on charge recollection and consequent signals, (2) the energy distribution of charged particles produced by dust impacts on realistic spacecraft materials at various speeds, and (3) the influence of spacecraft geometry, using impacts distributed across a high-fidelity model of the STEREO spacecraft. Implications for future spacecraft observations are also discussed.

  15. LDEF Materials Results for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F. (Compiler); Gregory, John (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    These proceedings describe the application of LDEF data to spacecraft and payload design, and emphasize where space environmental effects on materials research and development is needed as defined by LDEF data. The LDEF six years of exposure of materials has proven to be by far the most comprehensive source of information ever obtained on the long-term performance of materials in the space environment. The conference provided a forum for materials scientists and engineers to review and critically assess the LDEF results from the standpoint of their relevance, significance, and impact on spacecraft design practice. The impact of the LDEF findings on materials selection and qualification, and the needs and plans for further study, were addressed from several perspectives. Many timely and needed changes and modifications in external spacecraft materials selection have occurred as a result of LDEF investigations.

  16. Internet Technology on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, James; Parise, Ron; Hogie, Keith; Criscuolo, Ed; Langston, Jim; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Operating Missions as Nodes on the Internet (OMNI) project has shown that Internet technology works in space missions through a demonstration using the UoSAT-12 spacecraft. An Internet Protocol (IP) stack was installed on the orbiting UoSAT-12 spacecraft and tests were run to demonstrate Internet connectivity and measure performance. This also forms the basis for demonstrating subsequent scenarios. This approach provides capabilities heretofore either too expensive or simply not feasible such as reconfiguration on orbit. The OMNI project recognized the need to reduce the risk perceived by mission managers and did this with a multi-phase strategy. In the initial phase, the concepts were implemented in a prototype system that includes space similar components communicating over the TDRS (space network) and the terrestrial Internet. The demonstration system includes a simulated spacecraft with sample instruments. Over 25 demonstrations have been given to mission and project managers, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Department of Defense (DoD), contractor technologists and other decisions makers, This initial phase reached a high point with an OMNI demonstration given from a booth at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Inspection Day 99 exhibition. The proof to mission managers is provided during this second phase with year 2000 accomplishments: testing the use of Internet technologies onboard an actual spacecraft. This was done with a series of tests performed using the UoSAT-12 spacecraft. This spacecraft was reconfigured on orbit at very low cost. The total period between concept and the first tests was only 6 months! On board software was modified to add an IP stack to support basic IP communications. Also added was support for ping, traceroute and network timing protocol (NTP) tests. These tests show that basic Internet functionality can be used onboard spacecraft. The performance of data was measured to show no degradation from current

  17. Spacecraft Environment Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.; Jun, Insoo

    2011-01-01

    As electronic components have grown smaller in size and power and have increased in complexity, their enhanced sensitivity to the space radiation environment and its effects has become a major source of concern for the spacecraft engineer. As a result, the description of the sources of space radiation, the determination of how that radiation propagates through material, and, ultimately, how radiation affects specific circuit components are primary considerations in the design of modern spacecraft. The objective of this paper will be to address the first 2 aspects of the radiation problem. This will be accomplished by first reviewing the natural and man-made space radiation environments. These environments include both the particulate and, where applicable, the electromagnetic (i.e., photon) environment. As the "ambient" environment is typically only relevant to the outer surface of a space vehicle, it will be necessary to treat the propagation of the external environment through the complex surrounding structures to the point inside the spacecraft where knowledge of the internal radiation environment is required. While it will not be possible to treat in detail all aspects of the problem of the radiation environment within a spacecraft, by dividing the problem into these parts-external environment, propagation, and internal environment-a basis for understanding the practical process of protecting a spacecraft from radiation will be established. The consequences of this environment will be discussed by the other presenters at this seminar.

  18. Thermal balance testing of the MSAT spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, Serge; Choueiry, Elie; Pang, Kenneth

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports on the recently completed thermal balance/thermal vacuum testing of an MSAT satellite, the first satellite to provide mobile communications service for all of continental North America. MSAT is a two-spacecraft program, using a three-axis-stabilized HUGHES HS-601 series bus as the vehicle for the Canadian-designed payload. The thermal tests performed at the Canadian Space Agency's David Florida Laboratory in Ottawa, Canada, lasted approximately 32 days.

  19. Light pollution modelling the UK Highways Agency new environmental policy, inc. astronomical impact of blue-rich LED luminaires.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddiley, Christopher James

    2015-08-01

    The Highways Agency are replacing their policy of full cut off class G6 road lighting specification on motorways (originally based on the author’s work), and are adopting a categorised environmental impact based point system that can accommodate technical advances, such as LED lighting. The Skyglow component of this will be based on the modelling of skyglow versus cut-off angle, developed for determining the relative light pollution environmental impact of different streetlight designs, by the author. Further modelling has been done concerning the effect of LED lighting, which potentially, has highly directional properties. But increasingly used blue rich colour temperatures may increase skyglow by 5 fold, compared to traditional lighting. This is due to enhanced reflection of vegetation and greatly increased atmospheric molecular Rayleigh scattering; a potential astronomical environmental disaster.Prior to this, the author carried out a dark sky survey of the Malvern Hills area of outstanding natural beauty (AONB), relating it to the same light pollution model. The results confirm the general predictions of the model and also clearly illustrate the relative significance of different designs of light sources at different distances, to the dark sky environment.The paper also briefly describes the results from the same model adapted to study the night-time environmental impact of a proposed very large sea based wind farm project in the English Channel, as a part of the planning process.

  20. Degradation of Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dever, Joyce; Banks, Bruce; deGroh, Kim; Miller, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    This chapter includes descriptions of specific space environmental threats to exterior spacecraft materials. The scope will be confined to effects on exterior spacecraft surfaces, and will not, therefore, address environmental effects on interior spacecraft systems, such as electronics. Space exposure studies and laboratory simulations of individual and combined space environemntal threats will be summarized. A significant emphasis is placed on effects of Earth orbit environments, because the majority of space missions have been flown in Earth orbits which have provided a significant amount of data on materials effects. Issues associated with interpreting materials degradation results will be discussed, and deficiencies of ground testing will be identified. Recommendations are provided on reducing or preventing space environmental degradation through appropriate materials selection.

  1. Spacecraft servicing demonstration plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergonz, F. H.; Bulboaca, M. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A preliminary spacecraft servicing demonstration plan is prepared which leads to a fully verified operational on-orbit servicing system based on the module exchange, refueling, and resupply technologies. The resulting system can be applied at the space station, in low Earth orbit with an orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV), or be carried with an OMV to geosynchronous orbit by an orbital transfer vehicle. The three phase plan includes ground demonstrations, cargo bay demonstrations, and free flight verifications. The plan emphasizes the exchange of multimission modular spacecraft (MMS) modules which involves space repairable satellites. Three servicer mechanism configurations are the engineering test unit, a protoflight quality unit, and two fully operational units that have been qualified and documented for use in free flight verification activity. The plan balances costs and risks by overlapping study phases, utilizing existing equipment for ground demonstrations, maximizing use of existing MMS equipment, and rental of a spacecraft bus.

  2. Multipurpose hardened spacecraft insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steimer, Carlos H.

    1990-01-01

    A Multipurpose Hardened Spacecraft Multilayer Insulation (MLI) system was developed and implemented to meet diverse survivability and performance requirements. Within the definition and confines of a MLI assembly (blanket), the design: (1) provides environmental protection from natural and induced nuclear, thermal, and electromagnetic radiation; (2) provides adequate electrostatic discharge protection for a geosynchronous satellite; (3) provides adequate shielding to meet radiated emission needs; and (4) will survive ascent differential pressure loads between enclosed volume and space. The MLI design is described which meets these requirements and design evolution and verification is discussed. The application is for MLI blankets which closeout the area between the laser crosslink subsystem (LCS) equipment and the DSP spacecraft cabin. Ancillary needs were implemented to ease installation at launch facility and to survive ascent acoustic and vibration loads. Directional venting accommodations were also incorporated to avoid contamination of LCS telescope, spacecraft sensors, and second surface mirrors (SSMs).

  3. The Impact of Educational Interventions on Organizational Culture at an Urban Federal Agency. Ph.D. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Janet Myrick

    1994-01-01

    This study on the impact of educational interventions on organizational culture is an evaluation of a major educational initiative undertaken by an urban federal agency, namely the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC). The design of this educational evaluation captures the essence of NASA-LaRC's efforts to continue its distinguished and international stature in the aeronautical research community following the Challenger tragedy. More specifically, this study is an evaluation of the educational initiative designed to ameliorate organizational culture via educational interventions, with emphasis on communications, rewards and recognition, and career development. After completing a review of the related literature, chronicling the educational initiative, interviewing senior managers and employees, and critically examining thousands of free responses on employee perceptions of organizational culture, it is found that previous definitions of organizational culture are more accurately classified as manifestations of organizational culture. This research has endeared to redefine 'organizational culture' by offering a more accurate and diagnostic perspective.

  4. Spacecraft Attitude Determination Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This document is presentation in viewgraph form, which outlines the methods of determining spacecraft attitude. The presentation reviews several parameterizations relating to spacecraft attitude, such as Euler's Theorem, Rodriques parameters, and Euler-Rodriques parameters or Quaternion. Onboard attitude determination is the norm, using either single frame or filtering methods. The presentation reviews several mathematical representations of attitude. The mechanisms for determining attitude on board the Hubble Space Telescope, the Tropical Rainfall and Measuring Mission and the Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer are reviewed. Wahba's problem, Procrustes Problem, and some solutions are also summarized.

  5. Revamping Spacecraft Operational Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The EPOXI flight mission has been testing a new commercial system, Splunk, which employs data mining techniques to organize and present spacecraft telemetry data in a high-level manner. By abstracting away data-source specific details, Splunk unifies arbitrary data formats into one uniform system. This not only reduces the time and effort for retrieving relevant data, but it also increases operational visibility by allowing a spacecraft team to correlate data across many different sources. Splunk's scalable architecture coupled with its graphing modules also provide a solid toolset for generating data visualizations and building real-time applications such as browser-based telemetry displays.

  6. Spacecraft Radiation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The radiation interface in spacecrafts using radioisotope thermoelectric generators is studied. A Monte Carlo analysis of the radiation field that includes scattered radiation effects, produced neutron and gamma photon isoflux contours as functions of distance from the RTG center line. It is shown that the photon flux is significantly depressed in the RTG axial direction because of selfshielding. Total flux values are determined by converting the uncollided flux values into an equivalent RTG surface source and then performing a Monte Carlo analysis for each specific dose point. Energy distributions of the particle spectra completely define the radiation interface for a spacecraft model.

  7. Comet explorer spacecraft design project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The small, chemically primitive objects of the solar system, comets and asteroids, are one of the most important frontiers remaining for future planetary exploration. So stated the Solar System Exploration Committee of the NASA Advisory Council in its 1986 report 'Planetary Exploration Through the Year 2000.' The Halley's comet flyby missions completed last spring raised more questions than were answered about the nature of comets. The next mission to a comet must be able to explore some of these questions. In the late 1990's, a spacecraft might be built to explore the hazardous area surrounding a comet nucleus. Rigorous pointing requirements for remote sensing instruments will place a considerable burden on their attendant control systems. To meet these requirements we have pursued the initial design and analysis of a multi-bodied comet explorer spacecraft. Sized so as to be built on-orbit after the space station is operational, the spacecraft is comprised of Orbit Replaceable Unit (ORU) subsystems, packaged into two major components: a three-axis controlled instrument platform and a spinning, detached comet dust shield. Such a configuration decouples the dynamics of dust impaction from the stringent pointing out requirements of the imaging experiments. At the same time, it offers an abundance of simple analysis problems that may be carried out by undergraduates. These problems include the following: Selection of subsystem components, sizing trade studies, investigation of three-axis and simple spin dynamics, design of simple control systems, orbit determination, and intercept trajectory generation. Additionally, such topics as proposal writing project management, human interfacing, and costing have been covered. A new approach to design teaching has been taken, whereby students will 'learn by teaching.' They are asked to decompose trade options into a set of 'if-then' rules, which then 'instruct' the Mechanically Intelligent Designer (MIND) expert design system

  8. Analysis of spacecraft data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Support was provided for the maintenance and modifications of software for the production and detailed analysis of data from the DE-A spacecraft and new software developed for this end. Software for the analysis of the data from the Spacelab Experimental Particle Accelerator (SEPAC) was also developed.

  9. Multifunctional Tanks for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David H.; Lewis, Joseph C.; MacNeal, Paul D.

    2006-01-01

    A document discusses multifunctional tanks as means to integrate additional structural and functional efficiencies into designs of spacecraft. Whereas spacecraft tanks are traditionally designed primarily to store fluids and only secondarily to provide other benefits, multifunctional tanks are designed to simultaneously provide multiple primary benefits. In addition to one or more chamber(s) for storage of fluids, a multifunctional tank could provide any or all of the following: a) Passageways for transferring the fluids; b) Part or all of the primary structure of a spacecraft; c) All or part of an enclosure; d) Mechanical interfaces to components, subsystems, and/or systems; e) Paths and surfaces for transferring heat; f)Shielding against space radiation; j) Shielding against electromagnetic interference; h) Electrically conductive paths and surfaces; and i) Shades and baffles to protect against sunlight and/or other undesired light. Many different multifunctional-tank designs are conceivable. The design of a particular tank can be tailored to the requirements for the spacecraft in which the tank is to be installed. For example, the walls of the tank can be flat or curved or have more complicated shapes, and the tank can include an internal structure for strengthening the tank and/or other uses.

  10. Unmanned spacecraft for research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    The applications of unmanned spacecraft for research purposes are discussed. Specific applications of the Communication and Navigation satellites and the Earth Observations satellites are described. Diagrams of communications on world-wide basis using synchronous satellites are developed. Photographs of earth resources and geology obtained from space vehicles are included.

  11. Neonicotinoids impact bumblebee colony fitness in the field; a reanalysis of the UK's Food & Environment Research Agency 2012 experiment.

    PubMed

    Goulson, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The causes of bee declines remain hotly debated, particularly the contribution of neonicotinoid insecticides. In 2013 the UK's Food & Environment Research Agency made public a study of the impacts of exposure of bumblebee colonies to neonicotinoids. The study concluded that there was no clear relationship between colony performance and pesticide exposure, and the study was subsequently cited by the UK government in a policy paper in support of their vote against a proposed moratorium on some uses of neonicotinoids. Here I present a simple re-analysis of this data set. It demonstrates that these data in fact do show a negative relationship between both colony growth and queen production and the levels of neonicotinoids in the food stores collected by the bees. Indeed, this is the first study describing substantial negative impacts of neonicotinoids on colony performance of any bee species with free-flying bees in a field realistic situation where pesticide exposure is provided only as part of normal farming practices. It strongly suggests that wild bumblebee colonies in farmland can be expected to be adversely affected by exposure to neonicotinoids. PMID:25825679

  12. NASA Now: EPOXI Flyby Spacecraft

    NASA Video Gallery

    Close Encounters of the Comet Kind: In this installment of NASA Now, you’ll meet spacecraft pilot and engineer Steven Wissler, who talks about the challenges of flying a spacecraft remotely from ...

  13. Method for deploying multiple spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharer, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method for deploying multiple spacecraft is disclosed. The method can be used in a situation where a first celestial body is being orbited by a second celestial body. The spacecraft are loaded onto a single spaceship that contains the multiple spacecraft and the spacecraft is launched from the second celestial body towards a third celestial body. The spacecraft are separated from each other while in route to the third celestial body. Each of the spacecraft is then subjected to the gravitational field of the third celestial body and each of the spacecraft assumes a different, independent orbit about the first celestial body. In those situations where the spacecraft are launched from Earth, the Sun can act as the first celestial body, the Earth can act as the second celestial body and the Moon can act as the third celestial body.

  14. Evaluating the Impact of the Healthy Beverage Executive Order for City Agencies in Boston, Massachusetts, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Erica L.; McHugh, Anne; Conley, Lisa; Mozaffarian, Rebecca S.; Reiner, Jennifer F.; Gortmaker, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is associated with negative health effects. Access to healthy beverages may be promoted by policies such as the Healthy Beverage Executive Order (HBEO) established by former Boston mayor Thomas M. Menino, which directed city departments to eliminate the sale of SSBs on city property. Implementation consisted of “traffic-light signage” and educational materials at point of purchase. This study evaluates the impact of the HBEO on changes in beverage availability. Methods Researchers collected data on price, brand, and size of beverages for sale in spring 2011 (899 beverage slots) and for sale in spring 2013, two years after HBEO implementation (836 beverage slots) at access points (n = 31) at city agency locations in Boston. Nutrient data, including calories and sugar content, from manufacturer websites were used to determine HBEO beverage traffic-light classification category. We used paired t tests to examine change in average calories and sugar content of beverages and the proportion of beverages by traffic-light classification at access points before and after HBEO implementation. Results Average beverage sugar grams and calories at access points decreased (sugar, −13.1 g; calories, −48.6 kcal; p<.001) following the implementation of the HBEO. The average proportion of high-sugar (“red”) beverages available per access point declined (−27.8%, p<.001). Beverage prices did not change over time. City agencies were significantly more likely to sell only low-sugar beverages after the HBEO was implemented (OR = 4.88; 95% CI, 1.49–16.0). Discussion Policies such as the HBEO can promote community-wide changes that make healthier beverage options more accessible on city-owned properties. PMID:26355828

  15. FSD- FLEXIBLE SPACECRAFT DYNAMICS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    The Flexible Spacecraft Dynamics and Control program (FSD) was developed to aid in the simulation of a large class of flexible and rigid spacecraft. FSD is extremely versatile and can be used in attitude dynamics and control analysis as well as in-orbit support of deployment and control of spacecraft. FSD has been used to analyze the in-orbit attitude performance and antenna deployment of the RAE and IMP class satellites, and the HAWKEYE, SCATHA, EXOS-B, and Dynamics Explorer flight programs. FSD is applicable to inertially-oriented spinning, earth oriented, or gravity gradient stabilized spacecraft. The spacecraft flexibility is treated in a continuous manner (instead of finite element) by employing a series of shape functions for the flexible elements. Torsion, bending, and three flexible modes can be simulated for every flexible element. FSD can handle up to ten tubular elements in an arbitrary orientation. FSD is appropriate for studies involving the active control of pointed instruments, with options for digital PID (proportional, integral, derivative) error feedback controllers and control actuators such as thrusters and momentum wheels. The input to FSD is in four parts: 1) Orbit Construction FSD calculates a Keplerian orbit with environmental effects such as drag, magnetic torque, solar pressure, thermal effects, and thruster adjustments; or the user can supply a GTDS format orbit tape for a particular satellite/time-span; 2) Control words - for options such as gravity gradient effects, control torques, and integration ranges; 3) Mathematical descriptions of spacecraft, appendages, and control systems- including element geometry, properties, attitudes, libration damping, tip mass inertia, thermal expansion, magnetic tracking, and gimbal simulation options; and 4) Desired state variables to output, i.e., geometries, bending moments, fast Fourier transform plots, gimbal rotation, filter vectors, etc. All FSD input is of free format, namelist construction. FSD

  16. Effects of Knowledge Reuse on the Spacecraft Development Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutton, Esther S.

    1997-01-01

    The experimental objective was to assess the impact of knowledge reuse on spacecraft development time. A Secondary objective was to produce a comprehensive, flexible model other DNP teams could use to test their methodologies.

  17. Effects of arcing due to spacecraft charging on spacecraft survival

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, A.; Sanders, N. L.; Ellen, J. M., Jr.; Inouye, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    A quantitative assessment of the hazard associated with spacecraft charging and arcing on spacecraft systems is presented. A literature survey on arc discharge thresholds and characteristics was done and gaps in the data and requirements for additional experiments were identified. Calculations of coupling of arc discharges into typical spacecraft systems were made and the susceptibility of typical spacecraft to disruption by arc discharges was investigated. Design guidelines and recommended practices to reduce or eliminate the threat of malfunction and failures due to spacecraft charging/arcing were summarized.

  18. Habitability design for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, G. C.

    1978-01-01

    Habitability is understood to mean those spacecraft design elements that involve a degree of comfort, quality or necessities to support man in space. These elements are environment, architecture, mobility, clothing, housekeeping, food and drink, personal hygiene, off-duty activities, each of which plays a substantial part in the success of a mission. Habitability design for past space flights is discussed relative to the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab spacecraft, with special emphasis on an examination of the Shuttle Orbiter cabin design from a habitability standpoint. Future projects must consider the duration and mission objectives to meet their habitability requirements. Larger ward rooms, improved sleeping quarters and more complete hygiene facilities must be provided for future prolonged space flights

  19. LEO Spacecraft Charging Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillard, G. B.; Ferguson, D. C.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past decade, Low Earth Orbiting (LEO) spacecraft have gradually required ever-increasing power levels. As a rule, this has been accomplished through the use of high voltage systems. Recent failures and anomalies on such spacecraft have been traced to various design practices and materials choices related to the high voltage solar arrays. NASA Glenn has studied these anomalies including plasma chamber testing on arrays similar to those that experienced difficulties on orbit. Many others in the community have been involved in a comprehensive effort to understand the problems and to develop practices to avoid them. The NASA Space Environments and Effects program, recognizing the timeliness of this effort, has commissioned and funded a design guidelines document intended to capture the current state of understanding. We present here an overview of this document, which is now nearing completion.

  20. Flexible spacecraft simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Verification of control algorithms for flexible spacecraft can be done only through simulation and test; these are necessary to understand control/structure interaction (C/SI) sufficiently to design robust controllers for future spacecraft. The objective persued is to develop a low-cost facility which simulates the fundamental problem of C/SI; and to provide accessibility for designs so that experience can be gained in applying various multivariable control design methods to an actual structure. A test facility is being constructed with test elements that provide 3 rigid body and 6 flexible modes, all in the horizontal plane, with frequencies below 2.5 Hz. The control force actuator are on/off air jets with sensing by optical displacement sensors. Loop closure is provided by a digital computer with control algorithms designed using the IAC and MATRIX-X.

  1. Radiation Environment Inside Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Patrick O'Neill, NASA Johnson Space Center, will present a detailed description of the radiation environment inside spacecraft. The free space (outside) solar and galactic cosmic ray and trapped Van Allen belt proton spectra are significantly modified as these ions propagate through various thicknesses of spacecraft structure and shielding material. In addition to energy loss, secondary ions are created as the ions interact with the structure materials. Nuclear interaction codes (FLUKA, GEANT4, HZTRAN, MCNPX, CEM03, and PHITS) transport free space spectra through different thicknesses of various materials. These "inside" energy spectra are then converted to Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra and dose rate - that's what's needed by electronics systems designers. Model predictions are compared to radiation measurements made by instruments such as the Intra-Vehicular Charged Particle Directional Spectrometer (IV-CPDS) used inside the Space Station, Orion, and Space Shuttle.

  2. Spacecraft drag modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostaza Prieto, David; Graziano, Benjamin P.; Roberts, Peter C. E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews currently available methods to calculate drag coefficients of spacecraft traveling in low Earth orbits (LEO). Aerodynamic analysis of satellites is necessary to predict the drag force perturbation to their orbital trajectory, which for LEO orbits is the second in magnitude after the gravitational disturbance due to the Earth's oblateness. Historically, accurate determination of the spacecraft drag coefficient (CD) was rarely required. This fact was justified by the low fidelity of upper atmospheric models together with the lack of experimental validation of the theory. Therefore, the calculation effort was a priori not justified. However, advances on the field, such as new atmospheric models of improved precision, have allowed for a better characterization of the drag force. They have also addressed the importance of using physically consistent drag coefficients when performing aerodynamic calculations to improve analysis and validate theories. We review the most common approaches to predict these coefficients.

  3. Spacecraft transmitter reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A workshop on spacecraft transmitter reliability was held at the NASA Lewis Research Center on September 25 and 26, 1979, to discuss present knowledge and to plan future research areas. Since formal papers were not submitted, this synopsis was derived from audio tapes of the workshop. The following subjects were covered: users' experience with space transmitters; cathodes; power supplies and interfaces; and specifications and quality assurance. A panel discussion ended the workshop.

  4. Very Small Interstellar Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Mason A.

    2007-02-01

    This paper considers lower limits of length scale in spacecraft: interstellar vehicles consisting of little more material than found in a typical integrated-circuit chip. Some fundamental scaling principles are introduced to show how the dynamics of the very small can be used to realize interstellar travel with minimal advancements in technology. Our recent study for the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts provides an example: the use of the Lorentz force that acts on electrically charged spacecraft traveling through planetary and stellar magnetospheres. Schaffer and Burns, among others, have used Cassini and Voyager imagery to show that this interaction is responsible for some of the resonances in the orbital dynamics of dust in Jupiter's and Saturn's rings. The Lorentz force turns out to vary in inverse proportion to the square of this characteristic length scale, making it a more effective means of propelling tiny spacecraft than solar sailing. Performance estimates, some insight into plasma interactions, and some hardware concepts are offered. The mission architectures considered here involve the use of these propellantless propulsion techniques for acceleration within our solar system and deceleration near the destination. Performance estimates, some insight into plasma interactions, and some hardware concepts are offered. The mission architectures considered here involve the use of these propellantless propulsion techniques for acceleration within our solar system and deceleration near the destination. We might envision a large number of such satellites with intermittent, bursty communications set up as a one-dimensional network to relay signals across great distances using only the power likely from such small spacecraft. Conveying imagery in this fashion may require a long time because of limited power, but the prospect of imaging another star system close-up ought to be worth the wait.

  5. Spacecraft sanitation agent development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of an effective sanitizing agent that is compatible with the spacecraft environment and the human occupant is discussed. Experimental results show that two sanitation agents must be used to satisfy mission requirements: one agent for personal hygiene and one for equipment maintenance. It was also recommended that a water rinse be used with the agents for best results, and that consideration be given to using the agents pressure packed or in aerosol formulations.

  6. On the Role of Impact Evaluation of Quality Assurance from the Strategic Perspective of Quality Assurance Agencies in the European Higher Education Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damian, Radu; Grifoll, Josep; Rigbers, Anke

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the current national legislations, the quality assurance approaches and the activities of impact analysis of three quality assurance agencies from Romania, Spain and Germany are described from a strategic perspective. The analysis shows that the general methodologies (comprising, for example, self-evaluation reports, peer reviews,…

  7. The Impact of Child-Care Subsidies on Child Development: Evidence from Geographic Variation in the Distance to Social Service Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, Chris M.; Tekin, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the impact of U.S. child-care subsidies on the cognitive and behavioral development of children in low-income female-headed families. We identify the effect of subsidy receipt by exploiting geographic variation in the distance that families must travel from home to reach the nearest social service agency that administers…

  8. Solar array/spacecraft biasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Biasing techniques and their application to the control of spacecraft potential is discussed. Normally when a spacecraft is operated with ion thrusters, the spacecraft will be 10-20 volts negative of the surrounding plasma. This will affect scientific measurements and will allow ions from the charge-exchange plasma to bombard the spacecraft surfaces with a few tens of volts of energy. This condition may not be tolerable. A proper bias system is described that can bring the spacecraft to or near the potential of the surrounding plasma.

  9. Upsets related to spacecraft charging

    SciTech Connect

    Frederickson, A.R.

    1996-04-01

    The charging of spacecraft components by high energy radiation can result in spontaneous pulsed discharges. The pulses can interrupt normal operations of spacecraft electronics. The 20-year history of ground studies and spacecraft studies of this phenomenon are reviewed. The data from space are not sufficient to unambiguously point to a few specific solutions. The ground based data continue to find more problem areas the longer one looks. As spacecraft become more complex and carry less radiation shielding, the charging and discharging of insulators is becoming a more critical problem area. Ground experiments indicate that solutions for spacecraft are multiple and diverse, and many technical details are reviewed or introduced here.

  10. Operational Philosophy Concerning Manned Spacecraft Cabin Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSimpelaere, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The last thirty years have seen the Space Shuttle as the prime United States spacecraft for manned spaceflight missions. Many lessons have been learned about spacecraft design and operation throughout these years. Over the next few decades, a large increase of manned spaceflight in the commercial sector is expected. This will result in the exposure of commercial crews and passengers to many of the same risks crews of the Space Shuttle have encountered. One of the more dire situations that can be encountered is the loss of pressure in the habitable volume of the spacecraft during on orbit operations. This is referred to as a cabin leak. This paper seeks to establish a general cabin leak response philosophy with the intent of educating future spacecraft designers and operators. After establishing a relative definition for a cabin leak, the paper covers general descriptions of detection equipment, detection methods, and general operational methods for management of a cabin leak. Subsequently, all these items are addressed from the perspective of the Space Shuttle Program, as this will be of the most value to future spacecraft due to similar operating profiles. Emphasis here is placed upon why and how these methods and philosophies have evolved to meet the Space Shuttle s needs. This includes the core ideas of: considerations of maintaining higher cabin pressures vs. lower cabin pressures, the pros and cons of a system designed to feed the leak with gas from pressurized tanks vs. using pressure suits to protect against lower cabin pressures, timeline and consumables constraints, re-entry considerations with leaks of unknown origin, and the impact the International Space Station (ISS) has had to the standard Space Shuttle cabin leak response philosophy. This last item in itself includes: procedural management differences, hardware considerations, additional capabilities due to the presence of the ISS and its resource, and ISS docking/undocking considerations with a

  11. Proceedings of the Spacecraft Charging Technology Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, C. P. (Editor); Lovell, R. R. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Over 50 papers from the spacecraft charging conference are included on subjects such as: (1) geosynchronous plasma environment, (2) spacecraft modeling, (3) spacecraft materials characterization, (4) spacecraft materials development, and (5) satellite design and test.

  12. Spacecraft Modularity for Serviceable Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossetti, Dino; Keer, Beth; Panek, John; Ritter, Bob; Reed, Benjamin; Cepollina, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft modularity has been a topic of interest at NASA since the 1970s, when the Multi-­-Mission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) was developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Since then, modular concepts have been employed for a variety of spacecraft and, as in the case of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the International Space Station (ISS), have been critical to the success of on-­- orbit servicing. Modularity is even more important for future robotic servicing. Robotic satellite servicing technologies under development by NASA can extend mission life and reduce lifecycle cost and risk. These are optimized when the target spacecraft is designed for servicing, including advanced modularity. This paper will explore how spacecraft design, as demonstrated by the Reconfigurable Operational spacecraft for Science and Exploration (ROSE) spacecraft architecture, and servicing technologies can be developed in parallel to fully take advantage of the promise of both.

  13. Spacecraft Modularity for Serviceable Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Benjamin B.; Rossetti, Dino; Keer, Beth; Panek, John; Cepollina, Frank; Ritter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft modularity has been a topic of interest at NASA since the 1970s, when the Multi-Mission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) was developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Since then, modular concepts have been employed for a variety of spacecraft and, as in the case of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the International Space Station (ISS), have been critical to the success of on-orbit servicing. Modularity is even more important for future robotic servicing. Robotic satellite servicing technologies under development by NASA can extend mission life and reduce life-cycle cost and risk. These are optimized when the target spacecraft is designed for servicing, including advanced modularity. This paper will explore how spacecraft design, as demonstrated by the Reconfigurable Operational spacecraft for Science and Exploration (ROSE) spacecraft architecture, and servicing technologies can be developed in parallel to fully take advantage of the promise of both.

  14. Demonstration of Spacecraft Fire Safety Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David L.

    2012-01-01

    During the Constellation Program, the development of spacecraft fire safety technologies were focused on the immediate questions related to the atmosphere of the habitable volume and implementation of fire detection, suppression, and postfire clean-up systems into the vehicle architectures. One of the difficulties encountered during the trade studies for these systems was the frequent lack of data regarding the performance of a technology, such as a water mist fire suppression system or an optically-based combustion product monitor. Even though a spacecraft fire safety technology development project was being funded, there was insufficient time and funding to address all the issues as they were identified. At the conclusion of the Constellation Program, these knowledge gaps formed the basis for a project proposed to the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program. This project, subsequently funded by the AES Program and in operation since October 2011, has as its cornerstone the development of an experiment to be conducted on an ISS resupply vehicle, such as the European Space Agency (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) or Orbital Science s Cygnus vehicle after it leaves the ISS and before it enters the atmosphere. The technology development efforts being conducted in this project include continued quantification of low- and partial-gravity maximum oxygen concentrations of spacecraft-relevant materials, development and verification of sensors for fire detection and post-fire monitoring, development of standards for sizing and selecting spacecraft fire suppression systems, and demonstration of post-fire cleanup strategies. The major technology development efforts are identified in this paper but its primary purpose is to describe the spacecraft fire safety demonstration being planned for the reentry vehicle.

  15. An Assessment of Environmental Health Needs for Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental health fundamentally addresses the physical, chemical, and biological risks external to the human body that can impact the health of a person by assessing and controlling these risks in order to generate and maintain a health-supportive environment. Environmental monitoring coupled with other measures including active and passive controls and the implementation of environmental standards (SMACs, SWEGs, microbial and acoustics limits) are used to ensure environmental health in manned spacecraft. NASA scientists and engineers consider environmental monitoring a vital component to an environmental health management strategy for maintaining a healthy crew and achieving mission success. Environmental monitoring data confirms the health of ECLS systems, in addition to contributing to the management of the health of human systems. Crew health risks associated with the environment were reviewed by agency experts with the goal of determining risk-based environmental monitoring needs for future NASA manned missions. Once determined, gaps in knowledge and technology, required to address those risks, were identified for various types of Exploration missions. This agency-wide assessment of environmental health needs will help guide the activities/hardware development efforts to close those gaps and advance the knowledge required to meet NASA manned space exploration objectives. Details of this assessment and findings are presented in this paper.

  16. Spacecraft formation flight at Sun-Earth/Moon libration points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolbert, Douglas Robert

    2009-10-01

    Formations of spacecraft, positioned near the libration points of the Sun-Earth/Moon system, have recently received an increase in interest in response to a variety of mission needs. Specifically, missions such as the Micro Arcsecond X-Ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), Terrestrial Pathfinder (TPF), Stellar Imager (SI) and the European Space Agency's DARWIN all baseline formations of spacecraft to satisfy mission requirements. Replacing the traditional single spacecraft mission with multiple small spacecraft flying in formation is advantageous for these missions, especially when establishing a virtual aperture. These types of formations allow for higher resolution observations than with a single, conventional aperture. The de-emphasis on a single monolithic spacecraft approach to spacecraft mission design also reduces the chance of catastrophic failure of the mission if a single spacecraft can no longer perform its duty. The present study focuses on the relative dynamics of spacecraft within a formation orbiting near a libration point, such as L2 as examined in this study. A method for finding, understanding, and then exploiting the natural dynamics near a libration point for formation flight is sought. Various formation types (relative halo orbit, fixed-position, and paraboloid) are examined to determine the feasibility of natural formations for various applications. A method for determining possible DeltaV magnitudes and time between DeltaV maneuvers is also sought to gain an understanding of possible controlled formations that simultaneously exploit the natural dynamics while also controlling the spacecraft in the formation. One approach was identified that uses impulsive maneuvering at specified times to control the spacecraft in the formation desired.

  17. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  18. Evaluation of spacecraft technology programs (effects on communication satellite business ventures), volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenburg, J. S.; Kaplan, M.; Fishman, J.; Hopkins, C.

    1985-01-01

    The computational procedures used in the evaluation of spacecraft technology programs that impact upon commercial communication satellite operations are discussed. Computer programs and data bases are described.

  19. Xenia Spacecraft Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Randy

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed design for the Xenia mission spacecraft. The goal of this study is to perform a mission concept study for the mission. Included in this study are: the overall ground rules and assumptions (GR&A), a mission analysis, the configuration, the mass properties, the guidance, Navigation and control, the proposed avionics, the power system, the thermal protection system, the propulsion system, and the proposed structures. Conclusions from the study indicate that the observatory fits within the Falcon 9 mass and volume envelope for launching from Omelek, the pointing, slow slewing, and fast slewing requirements and the thermal requirements are met.

  20. Gimballing Spacecraft Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickens, Tim; Bossard, John

    2010-01-01

    A gimballing spacecraft reaction-control-system thruster was developed that consists of a small hydrogen/oxygen-burning rocket engine integrated with a Canfield joint. (Named after its inventor, a Canfield joint is a special gimbal mount that is strong and stable yet allows a wide range of motion.) One especially notable aspect of the design of this thruster is integration, into both the stationary legs and the moving arms of the Canfield joint, of the passages through which the hydrogen and oxygen flow to the engine. The thruster was assembled and subjected to tests in which the engine was successfully fired both with and without motion in the Canfield joint.

  1. Toward autonomous spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogel, L. J.; Calabrese, P. G.; Walsh, M. J.; Owens, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    Ways in which autonomous behavior of spacecraft can be extended to treat situations wherein a closed loop control by a human may not be appropriate or even possible are explored. Predictive models that minimize mean least squared error and arbitrary cost functions are discussed. A methodology for extracting cyclic components for an arbitrary environment with respect to usual and arbitrary criteria is developed. An approach to prediction and control based on evolutionary programming is outlined. A computer program capable of predicting time series is presented. A design of a control system for a robotic dense with partially unknown physical properties is presented.

  2. Furlable spacecraft antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, R. E.; Wilson, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    The development of large furlable spacecraft antennas using conical main reflectors is described. Two basic antenna configurations which utilize conical main reflectors have been conceived and are under development. In the conical-Gregorian configuration each ray experiences two reflections in traveling from the feed center to the aperture plane. In the Quadreflex (four reflection) configuration, each ray experiences four reflections, one at each of two subreflector surfaces and two at the main conical reflector surface. The RF gain measurements obtained from 6-ft and 30-in. models of the conical-Gregorian and Quadreflex concepts respectively were sufficiently encouraging to warrant further development of the concepts.

  3. Analysis of spacecraft anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C. E.; Graham, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    The anomalies from 316 spacecraft covering the entire U.S. space program were analyzed to determine if there were any experimental or technological programs which could be implemented to remove the anomalies from future space activity. Thirty specific categories of anomalies were found to cover nearly 85 percent of all observed anomalies. Thirteen experiments were defined to deal with 17 of these categories; nine additional experiments were identified to deal with other classes of observed and anticipated anomalies. Preliminary analyses indicate that all 22 experimental programs are both technically feasible and economically viable.

  4. Cluster Inter-Spacecraft Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    2008-01-01

    A document describes a radio communication system being developed for exchanging data and sharing data-processing capabilities among spacecraft flying in formation. The system would establish a high-speed, low-latency, deterministic loop communication path connecting all the spacecraft in a cluster. The system would be a wireless version of a ring bus that complies with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standard 1393 (which pertains to a spaceborne fiber-optic data bus enhancement to the IEEE standard developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Every spacecraft in the cluster would be equipped with a ring-bus radio transceiver. The identity of a spacecraft would be established upon connection into the ring bus, and the spacecraft could be at any location in the ring communication sequence. In the event of failure of a spacecraft, the ring bus would reconfigure itself, bypassing a failed spacecraft. Similarly, the ring bus would reconfigure itself to accommodate a spacecraft newly added to the cluster or newly enabled or re-enabled. Thus, the ring bus would be scalable and robust. Reliability could be increased by launching, into the cluster, spare spacecraft to be activated in the event of failure of other spacecraft.

  5. Space Weather Effects on Spacecraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2003-01-01

    Space-based systems are developing into critical infrastructure required to support the quality of life on Earth. Hence, spacecraft reliability is a serious issue that is complicated by exposure to the space environment. Complex mission designs along with rapidly evolving technologies have outpaced efforts to accommodate detrimental space environment impacts on systems. Hazardous space environments, the effects on systems, and the accommodation of the effects are described with a focus on the need to predict space environments.

  6. Soyuz Spacecraft Transported to Launch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Soyuz TMA-3 spacecraft and its booster rocket (rear view) is shown on a rail car for transport to the launch pad where it was raised to a vertical launch position at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on October 16, 2003. Liftoff occurred on October 18th, transporting a three man crew to the International Space Station (ISS). Aboard were Michael Foale, Expedition-8 Commander and NASA science officer; Alexander Kaleri, Soyuz Commander and flight engineer, both members of the Expedition-8 crew; and European Space agency (ESA) Astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain. Photo Credit: 'NASA/Bill Ingalls'

  7. Soyuz Spacecraft Transported to Launch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Soyuz TMA-3 spacecraft and its booster rocket (front view) is shown on a rail car for transport to the launch pad where it was raised to a vertical launch position at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on October 16, 2003. Liftoff occurred on October 18th, transporting a three man crew to the International Space Station (ISS). Aboard were Michael Foale, Expedition-8 Commander and NASA science officer; Alexander Kaleri, Soyuz Commander and flight engineer, both members of the Expedition-8 crew; and European Space agency (ESA) Astronaut Pedro Duque of Spain. Photo Credit: 'NASA/Bill Ingalls'

  8. Embedded Computer System on the Rosetta Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksa, A.; Balázs, A.; Pálos, Z.; Szalai, S.; Várhalmi, L.

    The KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physycs is participating in the Rosetta mission of the European Space Agency and contributes to the project by providing the on-board computer system of the Rosetta Lander. The Rosetta Spacecraft will rendezvous with a comet called Churyumov-Gerasimenko beyond the orbit of the Mars and it has the Lander to descend down to its surface. The life-time of the Lander on the surface of the comet should be at least four days while it will be powered by non-chargeable primary batteries Afterwards solar panels may provide power even for several months.

  9. Methodology for conceptual remote sensing spacecraft technology: insertion analysis balancing performance, cost, and risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bearden, David A.; Duclos, Donald P.; Barrera, Mark J.; Mosher, Todd J.; Lao, Norman Y.

    1997-12-01

    Emerging technologies and micro-instrumentation are changing the way remote sensing spacecraft missions are developed and implemented. Government agencies responsible for procuring space systems are increasingly requesting analyses to estimate cost, performance and design impacts of advanced technology insertion for both state-of-the-art systems as well as systems to be built 5 to 10 years in the future. Numerous spacecraft technology development programs are being sponsored by Department of Defense (DoD) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) agencies with the goal of enhancing spacecraft performance, reducing mass, and reducing cost. However, it is often the case that technology studies, in the interest of maximizing subsystem-level performance and/or mass reduction, do not anticipate synergistic system-level effects. Furthermore, even though technical risks are often identified as one of the largest cost drivers for space systems, many cost/design processes and models ignore effects of cost risk in the interest of quick estimates. To address these issues, the Aerospace Corporation developed a concept analysis methodology and associated software tools. These tools, collectively referred to as the concept analysis and design evaluation toolkit (CADET), facilitate system architecture studies and space system conceptual designs focusing on design heritage, technology selection, and associated effects on cost, risk and performance at the system and subsystem level. CADET allows: (1) quick response to technical design and cost questions; (2) assessment of the cost and performance impacts of existing and new designs/technologies; and (3) estimation of cost uncertainties and risks. These capabilities aid mission designers in determining the configuration of remote sensing missions that meet essential requirements in a cost- effective manner. This paper discuses the development of CADET modules and their application to several remote sensing satellite

  10. Electromagnetic propulsion for spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1993-09-01

    Three electromagnetic propulsion technologies, solid propellant pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and pulsed inductive thrusters (PIT), were developed for application to auxiliary and primary spacecraft propulsion. Both the PPT and MPD thrusters were flown in space, though only PPT's were used on operational satellites. The performance of operational PPT's is quite poor, providing only approximately 8 percent efficiency at approximately 1000 s specific impulse. However, laboratory PPT's yielding 34 percent efficiency at 2000 s specific impulse were extensively tested, and peak performance levels of 53 percent efficiency at 5170 s specific impulse were demonstrated. MPD thrusters were flown as experiments on the Japanese MS-T4 spacecraft and the Space Shuttle and were qualified for a flight in 1994. The flight MPD thrusters were pulsed, with a peak performance of 22 percent efficiency at 2500 s specific impulse using ammonia propellant. Laboratory MPD thrusters were demonstrated with up to 70 percent efficiency and 700 s specific impulse using lithium propellant. While the PIT thruster has never been flown, recent performance measurements using ammonia and hydrazine propellants are extremely encouraging, reaching 50 percent efficiency for specific impulses between 4000 to 8000 s. The fundamental operating principles, performance measurements, and system level design for the three types of electromagnetic thrusters are reviewed, and available data on flight tests are discussed for the PPT and MPD thrusters.

  11. Electromagnetic propulsion for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1993-01-01

    Three electromagnetic propulsion technologies, solid propellant pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and pulsed inductive thrusters (PIT), were developed for application to auxiliary and primary spacecraft propulsion. Both the PPT and MPD thrusters were flown in space, though only PPT's were used on operational satellites. The performance of operational PPT's is quite poor, providing only approximately 8 percent efficiency at approximately 1000 s specific impulse. However, laboratory PPT's yielding 34 percent efficiency at 2000 s specific impulse were extensively tested, and peak performance levels of 53 percent efficiency at 5170 s specific impulse were demonstrated. MPD thrusters were flown as experiments on the Japanese MS-T4 spacecraft and the Space Shuttle and were qualified for a flight in 1994. The flight MPD thrusters were pulsed, with a peak performance of 22 percent efficiency at 2500 s specific impulse using ammonia propellant. Laboratory MPD thrusters were demonstrated with up to 70 percent efficiency and 700 s specific impulse using lithium propellant. While the PIT thruster has never been flown, recent performance measurements using ammonia and hydrazine propellants are extremely encouraging, reaching 50 percent efficiency for specific impulses between 4000 to 8000 s. The fundamental operating principles, performance measurements, and system level design for the three types of electromagnetic thrusters are reviewed, and available data on flight tests are discussed for the PPT and MPD thrusters.

  12. Spacecraft Compartment Venting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.

    1998-01-01

    At various time concerns have been expressed that rapid decompressions of compartments of gas pockets and thermal blankets during spacecraft launches may have caused pressure differentials across their walls sufficient to cause minor structural failures, separations of adhesively-joined parts, ballooning, and flapping of blankets. This paper presents a close form equation expressing the expected pressure differentials across the walls of a compartment as a function of the external to the volume pressure drops, the pressure at which the rates occur and the vent capability of the compartment. The pressure profiles measured inside the shrouds of several spacecraft propelled by several vehicles and some profiles obtained from ground vacuum systems have been included. The equation can be used to design the appropriate vent, which will preclude excessive pressure differentials. Precautions and needed approaches for the evaluations of the expected pressures have been indicated. Methods to make a rapid assessment of the response of the compartment to rapid external pressure drops have been discussed. These are based on the evaluation of the compartment vent flow conductance, the volume and the length of time during which the rapid pressure drop occurs.

  13. NASA's spacecraft data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cudmore, Alan; Flanegan, Mark

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Small Explorer Data System (SEDS), a space flight data system developed to support the Small Explorer (SMEX) project, is addressed. The system was flown on the Solar Anomalous Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) SMEX mission, and with reconfiguration for different requirements will fly on the X-ray Timing Explorer (XTE) and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). SEDS is also foreseen for the Hubble repair mission. Its name was changed to Spacecraft Data System (SDS) in view of expansions. Objectives, SDS hardware, and software are described. Each SDS box contains two computers, data storage memory, uplink (command) reception circuitry, downlink (telemetry) encoding circuitry, Instrument Telemetry Controller (ITC), and spacecraft timing circuitry. The SDS communicates with other subsystems over the MIL-STD-1773 data bus. The SDS software uses a real time Operating System (OS) and the C language. The OS layer, communications and scheduling layer, application task layer, and diagnostic software, are described. Decisions on the use of advanced technologies, such as ASIC's (Application Specific Integrated Circuits) and fiber optics, led to technical improvements, such as lower power and weight, without increasing the risk associated with the data system. The result was a successful SAMPEX development, integration and test, and mission using SEDS, and the upgrading of that system to SDS for TRMM and XTE.

  14. Spacecraft Charging Sensitivity to Material Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Edwards, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating spacecraft charging behavior of a vehicle in the space environment requires knowledge of the material properties relevant to the charging process. Implementing surface and internal charging models requires a user to specify a number of material electrical properties including electrical resistivity parameters (dark and radiation induced), dielectric constant, secondary electron yields, photoemission yields, and breakdown strength in order to correctly evaluate the electric discharge threat posed by the increasing electric fields generated by the accumulating charge density. In addition, bulk material mass density and/or chemical composition must be known in order to analyze radiation shielding properties when evaluating internal charging. We will first describe the physics of spacecraft charging and show how uncertainties in material properties propagate through spacecraft charging algorithms to impact the results obtained from charging models. We then provide examples using spacecraft charging codes to demonstrate their sensitivity to material properties. The goal of this presentation is to emphasize the importance in having good information on relevant material properties in order to best characterize on orbit charging threats.

  15. Simulating Descent and Landing of a Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaram, J.; Jain, Abhinandan; Martin, Bryan; Lim, Christopher; Henriquez, David; McMahon, Elihu; Sohl, Garrett; Banerjee, Pranab; Steele, Robert; Bentley, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    The Dynamics Simulator for Entry, Descent, and Surface landing (DSENDS) software performs high-fidelity simulation of the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) of a spacecraft into the atmosphere and onto the surface of a planet or a smaller body. DSENDS is an extension of the DShell and DARTS programs, which afford capabilities for mathematical modeling of the dynamics of a spacecraft as a whole and of its instruments, actuators, and other subsystems. DSENDS enables the modeling (including real-time simulation) of flight-train elements and all spacecraft responses during various phases of EDL. DSENDS provides high-fidelity models of the aerodynamics of entry bodies and parachutes plus supporting models of atmospheres. Terrain and real-time responses of terrain-imaging radar and lidar instruments can also be modeled. The program includes modules for simulation of guidance, navigation, hypersonic steering, and powered descent. Automated state-machine-driven model switching is used to represent spacecraft separations and reconfigurations. Models for computing landing contact and impact forces are expected to be added. DSENDS can be used as a stand-alone program or incorporated into a larger program that simulates operations in real time.

  16. Self-contamination and environment of an orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The flux of molecules emitted by a spacecraft and subsequently reflected to its surface was investigated. The reflection occurs upon collision of the outgassed molecules with ambient molecules. Evaluation of the flux was based on a knowledge of the spacecraft outgassing rate, the spacecraft dimensions, and the orbit parameters. Condensation rates and adsorption layers on critical surfaces were calculated from the knowledge of this flux and the nature and temperature of the gas and the surface. Based on estimated and measured emission rates, calculation of these parameters was performed for a number of spacecraft. The relationships and graphs developed allow an estimate of several important parameters for an orbiting spacecraft to be made. The pressures and densities at various distances from the spacecraft, as produced by the surrounding ambient molecules and by the spacecraft's own outgassing, are presented. The pressure and density produced by the outgassing can be obtained as a function of time if the behavior of the outgassing with time is known. The number of desorbed molecules ionized by impact with ambient charged particles and the effect of the spacecraft's electric field on polarized desorbed molecules were considered.

  17. Exterior spacecraft subsystem protective shielding analysis and design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Taylor, Roy A.

    1990-01-01

    All spacecraft are susceptible to impacts by meteoroids and pieces of orbiting space debris. An effective mechanism is developed to protect external spacecraft subsystems against damage by ricochet particles formed during such impacts. Equations and design procedures for protective shield panels are developed based on observed ricochet phenomena and calculated ricochet particle sizes and speeds. It is found that the diameter of the most damaging ricochet debris particle can be as large as 40 percent of the original project tile diameter, and can travel at speeds between 24 and 36 percent of the original projectile impact velocity. Panel dimensions are shown to be strongly dependent on their inclination to the impact velocity vector and on their distribution around a spacecraft module. It is concluded that obliquity effects of high-speed impacts must be considered in the design of any structure exposed to the meteoroid and space debris environment.

  18. Launch vehicle system requirements and restraints for the ERTS-A spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The technical requirements and restraints imposed by the ERTS spacecraft upon the Delta launch vehicle, shroud system, associated launch complex, and range are presented for technical coordination among various agencies involved in the launch vehicle and launch operations. The payload and spacecraft systems are described, and the mission, design, test, and launch base data are outlined.

  19. Research-Based Monitoring, Prediction, and Analysis Tools of the Spacecraft Charging Environment for Spacecraft Users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Pulkkinen, Antti A.; Maddox, Marlo M.; Mays, Mona Leila

    2015-01-01

    The Space Weather Research Center (http://swrc. gsfc.nasa.gov) at NASA Goddard, part of the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (http://ccmc.gsfc.nasa.gov), is committed to providing research-based forecasts and notifications to address NASA's space weather needs, in addition to its critical role in space weather education. It provides a host of services including spacecraft anomaly resolution, historical impact analysis, real-time monitoring and forecasting, tailored space weather alerts and products, and weekly summaries and reports. In this paper, we focus on how (near) real-time data (both in space and on ground), in combination with modeling capabilities and an innovative dissemination system called the integrated Space Weather Analysis system (http://iswa.gsfc.nasa.gov), enable monitoring, analyzing, and predicting the spacecraft charging environment for spacecraft users. Relevant tools and resources are discussed.

  20. Graphical Planning Of Spacecraft Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeletic, J. F.; Ruley, L. T.

    1991-01-01

    Mission Planning Graphical Tool (MPGT) computer program provides analysts with graphical representations of spacecraft and environmental data used in planning missions. Designed to be generic software tool configured to analyze any specified Earth-orbiting spacecraft mission. Data presented as series of overlays on top of two-dimensional or three-dimensional projection of Earth. Includes spacecraft-orbit tracks, ground-station-antenna masks, solar and lunar ephemerides, and coverage by Tracking Data and Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). From graphical representations, analyst determines such spacecraft-related constraints as communication coverage, infringement upon zones of interference, availability of sunlight, and visibility of targets to instruments.

  1. Spacecraft telecommunications system mass estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, J. H.; Sakamoto, L. L.

    1988-01-01

    Mass is the most important limiting parameter for present-day planetary spacecraft design, In fact, the entire design can be characterized by mass. The more efficient the design of the spacecraft, the less mass will be required. The communications system is an essential and integral part of planetary spacecraft. A study is presented of the mass attributable to the communications system for spacecraft designs used in recent missions in an attempt to help guide future design considerations and research and development efforts. The basic approach is to examine the spacecraft by subsystem and allocate a portion of each subsystem to telecommunications. Conceptually, this is to divide the spacecraft into two parts, telecommunications and nontelecommunications. In this way, it is clear what the mass attributable to the communications system is. The percentage of mass is calculated using the actual masses of the spacecraft parts, except in the case of CRAF. In that case, estimated masses are used since the spacecraft was not yet built. The results show that the portion of the spacecraft attributable to telecommunications is substantial. The mass fraction for Voyager, Galileo, and CRAF (Mariner Mark 2) is 34, 19, and 18 percent, respectively. The large reduction of telecommunications mass from Voyager to Galileo is mainly due to the use of a deployable antenna instead of the solid antenna on Voyager.

  2. Spacecraft and launch systems for TACSAT applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, Chris; Rye, Gilbert D.; Meurer, Robert H.

    1993-02-01

    The ability of a tactical communication satellite (TACSAT) space system to fulfill its mission application with the desired capability, responsiveness, reliability, and survivability, while at the same time achieving low cost objectives, is a tremendous challenge that can only be met if all of the system segments - launch, space, and ground - contribute to meeting mission unique requirements. The emerging concepts for the development, deployment, and operation of cost-effective TACSAT space systems are especially dependent on the flexibility and operability of their launch vehicle and spacecraft bus systems. Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC) has privately developed two flexible yet cost-effective space launch vehicles--Pegasus (TM) and Taurus (TM)--with significant and unique operational capabilities that enable TACSAT space systems to meet these challenges. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has sponsored the first launch of both systems, with follow-on launches scheduled in support of U.S. Air Force, NASA, SDIO, and commercial programs. In addition, OSC has developed a flexible, cost-effective, spacecraft bus--PegaStar (TM)--that makes common use of the Pegasus or Taurus final stage avionics and structure in an integrated systems approach, thereby optimizing the mass and volume available for payload sensors. PegaStar spacecraft for the Air Force and NASA are now in engineering and production.

  3. Delamination Assessment Tool for Spacecraft Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portela, Pedro; Preller, Fabian; Wittke, Henrik; Sinnema, Gerben; Camanho, Pedro; Turon, Albert

    2012-07-01

    Fortunately only few cases are known where failure of spacecraft structures due to undetected damage has resulted in a loss of spacecraft and launcher mission. However, several problems related to damage tolerance and in particular delamination of composite materials have been encountered during structure development of various ESA projects and qualification testing. To avoid such costly failures during development, launch or service of spacecraft, launcher and reusable launch vehicles structures a comprehensive damage tolerance verification approach is needed. In 2009, the European Space Agency (ESA) initiated an activity called “Delamination Assessment Tool” which is led by the Portuguese company HPS Lda and includes academic and industrial partners. The goal of this study is the development of a comprehensive damage tolerance verification approach for launcher and reusable launch vehicles (RLV) structures, addressing analytical and numerical methodologies, material-, subcomponent- and component testing, as well as non-destructive inspection. The study includes a comprehensive review of current industrial damage tolerance practice resulting from ECSS and NASA standards, the development of new Best Practice Guidelines for analysis, test and inspection methods and the validation of these with a real industrial case study. The paper describes the main findings of this activity so far and presents a first iteration of a Damage Tolerance Verification Approach, which includes the introduction of novel analytical and numerical tools at an industrial level. This new approach is being put to the test using real industrial case studies provided by the industrial partners, MT Aerospace, RUAG Space and INVENT GmbH

  4. N° 28-1998: SOHO spacecraft contacted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contact has been re-established with the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) following six weeks of silence. Signals sent yesterday through the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) station at Canberra, Australia, were answered at 22:51 GMT in the form of bursts of signal lasting from 2 to 10 seconds. These signals were recorded both by the NASA DSN station and the ESA Perth station. Contact is being maintained through the NASA DSN stations at Goldstone (California), Canberra and Madrid (Spain). Although the signals are intermittent and do not contain any data information, they show that the spacecraft is still capable of receiving and responding to ground commands. The slow process of regaining control of the spacecraft and restoring it to an operational attitude will commence immediately, with attempts to initiate data transmissions in order to perform an initial assessment of the spacecraft on-board conditions. Radio contact with SOHO, a joint mission of the European Space Agency and NASA, was interrupted on 25 June (see ESA press releases N°24,25 and 26-98). More information on SOHO, including mission status reports is available on the Internet at http://sohowww.estec.esa.nl or via the new ESA science website: http://sci.esa.int

  5. The Health Deviation of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema: Symptom Assessment and Impact on Self-Care Agency.

    PubMed

    Armer, Jane M; Henggeler, Mary H; Brooks, Constance W; Zagar, Eris A; Homan, Sherri; Stewart, Bob R

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among women world-wide, affecting 1 of 8 women during their lifetimes. In the US alone, some 2 million breast cancer survivors comprise 20% of all cancer survivors. Conservatively, it is estimated that some 20-40% of all breast cancer survivors will develop the health deviation of lymphedema or treatment-related limb swelling over their lifetimes. This chronic accumulation of protein-rich fluid predisposes to infection, leads to difficulties in fitting clothing and carrying out activities of daily living, and impacts self-esteem, self-concept, and quality of life. Lymphedema is associated with self-care deficits (SCD) and negatively impacts self-care agency (SCA) and physiological and psychosocial well-being. Objectives of this report are two-fold: (1) to explore four approaches of assessing and diagnosing breast cancer lymphedema, including self-report of symptoms and the impact of health deviations on SCA; and (2) to propose the development of a clinical research program for lymphedema based on the concepts of Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (SCDNT). Anthropometric and symptom data from a National-Institutes-of-Health-funded prospective longitudinal study were examined using survival analysis to compare four definitions of lymphedema over 24 months post-breast cancer surgery among 140 of 300 participants (all who had passed the 24-month measurement). The four definitions included differences of 200 ml, 10% volume, and 2 cm circumference between pre-op baseline and/or contralateral limbs, and symptom self-report of limb heaviness and swelling. Symptoms, SCA, and SCD were assessed by interviews using a validated tool. Estimates of lymphedema occurrence varied by definition and time since surgery. The 2 cm girth change provided the highest estimation of lymphedema (82% at 24 months), followed by 200 ml volume change (57% at 24 months). The 10% limb volume change converged with symptom report of heaviness and swelling at 24 months

  6. The Health Deviation of Post-Breast Cancer Lymphedema: Symptom Assessment and Impact on Self-Care Agency

    PubMed Central

    Armer, Jane M.; Henggeler, Mary H; Brooks, Constance W.; Zagar, Eris A.; Homan, Sherri; Stewart, Bob R.

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cancer among women world-wide, affecting 1 of 8 women during their lifetimes. In the US alone, some 2 million breast cancer survivors comprise 20% of all cancer survivors. Conservatively, it is estimated that some 20-40% of all breast cancer survivors will develop the health deviation of lymphedema or treatment-related limb swelling over their lifetimes. This chronic accumulation of protein-rich fluid predisposes to infection, leads to difficulties in fitting clothing and carrying out activities of daily living, and impacts self-esteem, self-concept, and quality of life. Lymphedema is associated with self-care deficits (SCD) and negatively impacts self-care agency (SCA) and physiological and psychosocial well-being. Objectives of this report are two-fold: (1) to explore four approaches of assessing and diagnosing breast cancer lymphedema, including self-report of symptoms and the impact of health deviations on SCA; and (2) to propose the development of a clinical research program for lymphedema based on the concepts of Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory (SCDNT). Anthropometric and symptom data from a National-Institutes-of-Health-funded prospective longitudinal study were examined using survival analysis to compare four definitions of lymphedema over 24 months post-breast cancer surgery among 140 of 300 participants (all who had passed the 24-month measurement). The four definitions included differences of 200 ml, 10% volume, and 2 cm circumference between pre-op baseline and/or contralateral limbs, and symptom self-report of limb heaviness and swelling. Symptoms, SCA, and SCD were assessed by interviews using a validated tool. Estimates of lymphedema occurrence varied by definition and time since surgery. The 2 cm girth change provided the highest estimation of lymphedema (82% at 24 months), followed by 200 ml volume change (57% at 24 months). The 10% limb volume change converged with symptom report of heaviness and swelling at 24 months

  7. Electromagnetic propulsion for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Roger M.

    1993-01-01

    Three electromagnetic propulsion technologies, solid propellant pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT), magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, and pulsed inductive thrusters (PIT) have been developed for application to auxiliary and primary spacecraft propulsion. Both the PPT and MPD thrusters have been flown in space, though only PPTs have been used on operational satellites. The performance of operational PPTs is quite poor, providing only about 8 percent efficiency at about 1000 sec specific impulse. Laboratory PPTs yielding 34 percent efficiency at 5170 sec specific impulse have been demonstrated. Laboratory MPD thrusters have been demonstrated with up to 70 percent efficiency and 7000 sec specific impulse. Recent PIT performance measurements using ammonia and hydrazine propellants are extremely encouraging, reaching 50 percent efficiency for specific impulses between 4000 and 8000 sec.

  8. Spacecraft Attitude Representations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    1999-01-01

    The direction cosine matrix or attitude matrix is the most fundamental representation of the attitude, but it is very inefficient: It has six redundant parameters, it is difficult to enforce the six (orthogonality) constraints. the four-component quaternion representation is very convenient: it has only one redundant parameter, it is easy to enforce the normalization constraint, the attitude matrix is a homogeneous quadratic function of q, quaternion kinematics are bilinear in q and m. Euler angles are extensively used: they often have a physical interpretation, they provide a natural description of some spacecraft motions (COBE, MAP), but kinematics and attitude matrix involve trigonometric functions, "gimbal lock" for certain values of the angles. Other minimum (three-parameter) representations: Gibbs vector is infinite for 180 deg rotations, but useful for analysis, Modified Rodrigues Parameters are nonsingular, no trig functions, Rotation vector phi is nonsingular, but requires trig functions.

  9. Spacecraft stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    1992-01-01

    The Earth's first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1, slowly tumbled in orbit. The first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1, also tumbled out of control. Today, satellite stability and control has become a higher priority. For a satellite design that is to have a life expectancy of 14 years, appropriate spacecraft flight control systems will be reviewed, stability requirements investigated, and an appropriate flight control system recommended in order to see the design process. Disturbance torques, including aerodynamic, magnetic, gravity gradient, solar, micrometeorite, debris, collision, and internal torques, will be assessed to quantify the disturbance environment so that the required compensating torques can be determined. The control torques, including passive versus active, momentum control, bias momentum, spin stabilization, dual spin, gravity gradient, magnetic, reaction wheels, control moment gyros, inertia augmentation techniques, three-axis control, and reaction control systems (RCSs), will be considered. Conditions for stability will also be considered.

  10. The ISO Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ximenez de Ferrin, S.

    1995-11-01

    ESA's Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) consists of two modules: the Payload module, which includes the telescope and the scientific instruments, and the Service Module, which houses the instruments electronics, the hydrazine propellant tank and all other classical spacecraft subsystems. To ensure that the telescope is kept near absolute zero and thus is the least disturbed by the effects of the infrared emissions from other elements of the system, the telescope is enclosed in a helium-cooled cryostat. The cryostat in turn is shaded by a Sun-shield to protect it from the heat of the direct Sun. The shield has a covering of solar cells that provide the electrical power needed for the mission.

  11. Magnetic bearings for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have been successfully applied to motorized rotor systems in the multi-kilogram range, at speeds up to 1200 radians per second. These engineering models also indicated the need for continued development in specific areas to make them feasible for spacecraft applications. Significant power reductions have recently been attained. A unique magnetic circuit, combining permanent magnets with electromagnetic control, has a bidirectional forcing capability with improved current sensitivity. The multi-dimensional nature of contact-free rotor support is discussed. Stable continuous radial suspension is provided by a rotationally symmetric permanent magnet circuit. Two bearings, on a common shaft, counteract the normal instability perpendicular to the rotational axis. The axial direction is servoed to prevent contact. A new bearing technology and a new field of application for magnetics is foreseen.

  12. Microbiological Contamination of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, D. L.; Bruce, R. J.; Groves, T. O.; Novikova, N. D.; Viktorov, A. N.

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Phase1 Program resulted in seven US astronauts residing aboard the Russian Space Station Mir between March 1995 and May 1998. Collaboration between U.S. and Russian scientists consisted of collection and analyses of samples from the crewmembers and the Mir and Shuttle environments before, during, and after missions that lasted from 75 to 209 days in duration. The effects of long-duration space flight on the microbial characteristics of closed life support systems and the interactions of microbes with the spacecraft environment and crewmembers were investigated. Air samples were collected using a Russian or U.S.-supplied sampler (SAS, RCS, or Burkard,) while surface samples were collected using contact slides (Hycon) or swabs. Mir recycled condensate and stored potable water sources were analyzed using the U.S.-supplied Water Experiment Kit. In-flight analysis consisted of enumeration of levels of bacteria and fungi. Amounts of microorganisms seen in the air and on surfaces were mostly within acceptability lin1its; observed temporal fluctuations in levels of microbes probably reflect changes in environmental conditions (e.g., humidity). All Mir galley hot water samples were within the standards set for Mir and the ISS. Microbial isolates were returned to Earth for identification of bacterial and fungal isolates. Crew samples (nose, throat, skin, urine, and feces) were analyzed using methods approved for the medical evaluations of Shuttle flight crews. No significant changes in crew microbiota were found during space flight or upon return relative to preflight results. Dissemination of microbes between the crew and environment was demonstrated by D A fingerprinting. Some biodegradation of spacecraft materials was observed. Accumulation of condensate allowed for the recovery of a wide range of bacteria and fungi as well as some protozoa and dust mites.

  13. Estimating the Reliability of a Crewed Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutomski, M. G.; Garza, J.

    2012-01-01

    Now that the Space Shuttle Program has been retired, the Russian Soyuz Launcher and Soyuz Spacecraft are the only means for crew transportation to and from the International Space Station (ISS). Are the astronauts and cosmonauts safer on the Soyuz than the Space Shuttle system? How do you estimate the reliability of such a crewed spacecraft? The recent loss of the 44 Progress resupply flight to the ISS has put these questions front and center. The Soyuz launcher has been in operation for over 40 years. There have been only two Loss of Crew (LOC) incidents and two Loss of Mission (LOM) incidents involving crew missions. Given that the most recent crewed Soyuz launcher incident took place in 1983, how do we determine current reliability of such a system? How do all of the failures of unmanned Soyuz family launchers such as the 44P impact the reliability of the currently operational crewed launcher? Does the Soyuz exhibit characteristics that demonstrate reliability growth and how would that be reflected in future estimates of success? In addition NASA has begun development of the Orion or Multi-Purpose Crewed Vehicle as well as started an initiative to purchase Commercial Crew services from private firms. The reliability targets are currently several times higher than the last Shuttle reliability estimate. Can these targets be compared to the reliability of the Soyuz arguably the highest reliable crewed spacecraft and launcher in the world to determine whether they are realistic and achievable? To help answer these questions this paper will explore how to estimate the reliability of the Soyuz launcher/spacecraft system over its mission to give a benchmark for other human spaceflight vehicles and their missions. Specifically this paper will look at estimating the Loss of Mission (LOM) and Loss of Crew (LOC) probability for an ISS crewed Soyuz launcher/spacecraft mission using historical data, reliability growth, and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) techniques.

  14. Cassini Spacecraft in a JPL Assembly Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    On October of 1997, a two-story-tall robotic spacecraft will begin a journey of many years to reach and explore the exciting realm of Saturn, the most distant planet that can easily be seen by the unaided human eye. In addition to Saturn's interesting atmosphere and interior, its vast system contains the most spectacular of the four planetary ring systems, numerous icy satellites with a variety of unique surface features. A huge magnetosphere teeming with particles that interact with the rings and moons, and the intriguing moon Titan, which is slightly larger than the planet Mercury, and whose hazy atmosphere is denser than that of Earth, make Saturn a fascinating planet to study.

    The Cassini mission is an international venture involving NASA, the European Space Agency (ESA), the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and several separate European academic and industrial partners. The mission is managed for NASA by JPL. The spacecraft will carry a sophisticated complement of scientific sensors to support 27 different investigations to probe the mysteries of the Saturn system. The large spacecraft will consist of an orbiter and ESA's Huygens Titan probe. The orbiter mass at launch will be nearly 5300 kg, over half of which is propellant for trajectory control. The mass of the Titan probe (2.7 m diameter) is roughly 350 kg.

    The mission is named in honor of the seventeenth-century, French-Italian astronomer Jean Dominique Cassini, who discovered the prominent gap in Saturn's main rings, as well as the icy moons Iapetus, Rhea, Dione, and Tethys. The ESA Titan probe is named in honor of the exceptional Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens, who discovered Titan in 1655, followed in 1659 by his announcement that the strange Saturn 'moons' seen by Galileo in 1610 were actually a ring system surrounding the planet. Huygens was also famous for his invention of the pendulum clock, the first accurate timekeeping device.

  15. Solving a Spacecraft Design Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. K.

    1998-01-01

    We have probably all been amazed at the ingenuity of spacecraft engineers when we see some of the solutions they invent for such problems as landing a roving vehicle on Mars-as engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory did for NASA's Mars Pathfinder project-without using retro-rockets or even putting a spacecraft in orbit first.

  16. The Galeleo spacecraft magnetometer boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, D. T.; Benton, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft utilizes a deployable lattice boom to position three science instruments at remote distances from the spacecraft body. An improved structure and mechanism to precisely control deployment of the boom, and the unique deployment of an outer protective cover are described.

  17. Spacecraft detumbling through energy dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitz-Coy, Norman; Chatterjee, Anindya

    1993-01-01

    The attitude motion of a tumbling, rigid, axisymmetric spacecraft is considered. A methodology for detumbling the spacecraft through energy dissipation is presented. The differential equations governing this motion are stiff, and therefore an approximate solution, based on the variation of constants method, is developed and utilized in the analysis of the detumbling strategy. Stability of the detumbling process is also addressed.

  18. Active Spacecraft Potential Control Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Tajmar, M.; Scharlemann, C.; Jeszenszky, H.; Laky, G.; Fremuth, G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Svenes, K.

    2016-03-01

    In tenuous plasma the floating potential of sunlit spacecraft reaches tens of volts, positive. The corresponding field disturbs measurements of the ambient plasma by electron and ion sensors and can reduce micro-channel plate lifetime in electron detectors owing to large fluxes of attracted photoelectrons. Also the accuracy of electric field measurements may suffer from a high spacecraft potential. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positive charge produced by indium ion emitters. The method has been successfully applied on other spacecraft such as Cluster and Double Star. Two ASPOC units are present on each spacecraft. Each unit contains four ion emitters, whereby one emitter per instrument is operated at a time. ASPOC for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission includes new developments in the design of the emitters and the electronics. New features include the use of capillaries instead of needles, new materials for the emitters and their internal thermal insulators, an extended voltage and current range of the electronics, both for ion emission and heating purposes, and a more capable control software. This enables lower spacecraft potentials, higher reliability, and a more uniform potential structure in the spacecraft's sheath compared to previous missions. Results from on-ground testing demonstrate compliance with requirements. Model calculations confirm the findings from previous applications that the plasma measurements will not be affected by the beam's space charge. Finally, the various operating modes to adapt to changing boundary conditions are described along with the main data products.

  19. On-orbit spacecraft reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomquist, C.; Demars, D.; Graham, W.; Henmi, P.

    1978-01-01

    Operational and historic data for 350 spacecraft from 52 U.S. space programs were analyzed for on-orbit reliability. Failure rates estimates are made for on-orbit operation of spacecraft subsystems, components, and piece parts, as well as estimates of failure probability for the same elements during launch. Confidence intervals for both parameters are also given. The results indicate that: (1) the success of spacecraft operation is only slightly affected by most reported incidents of anomalous behavior; (2) the occurrence of the majority of anomalous incidents could have been prevented piror to launch; (3) no detrimental effect of spacecraft dormancy is evident; (4) cycled components in general are not demonstrably less reliable than uncycled components; and (5) application of product assurance elements is conductive to spacecraft success.

  20. Evaluation of Ultrafiltration for Spacecraft Water Reuse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Karen D.; Wiesner, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Ultrafiltration is examined for use as the first stage of a primary treatment process for spacecraft wastewater. It is hypothesized that ultrafiltration can effectively serve as pretreatment for a reverse osmosis system, removing the majority of organic material in a spacecraft wastewater. However, it is believed that the interaction between the membrane material and the surfactant found in the wastewater will have a significant impact on the fouling of the ultrafiltration membrane. In this study, five different ultrafiltration membrane materials are examined for the filtration of wastewater typical of that expected to be produced onboard the International Space Station. Membranes are used in an unstirred batch cell. Flux, organic carbon rejection, and recovery from fouling are measured. The results of this evaluation will be used to select the most promising membranes for further study.

  1. Meteoroids and Orbital Debris: Effects on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belk, Cynthia A.; Robinson, Jennifer H.; Alexander, Margaret B.; Cooke, William J.; Pavelitz, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    The natural space environment is characterized by many complex and subtle phenomena hostile to spacecraft. The effects of these phenomena impact spacecraft design, development, and operations. Space systems become increasingly susceptible to the space environment as use of composite materials and smaller, faster electronics increases. This trend makes an understanding of the natural space environment essential to accomplish overall mission objectives, especially in the current climate of better/cheaper/faster. Meteoroids are naturally occurring phenomena in the natural space environment. Orbital debris is manmade space litter accumulated in Earth orbit from the exploration of space. Descriptions are presented of orbital debris source, distribution, size, lifetime, and mitigation measures. This primer is one in a series of NASA Reference Publications currently being developed by the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch, Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory, Marshall Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  2. Fault tolerant control of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard

    Autonomous multiple spacecraft formation flying space missions demand the development of reliable control systems to ensure rapid, accurate, and effective response to various attitude and formation reconfiguration commands. Keeping in mind the complexities involved in the technology development to enable spacecraft formation flying, this thesis presents the development and validation of a fault tolerant control algorithm that augments the AOCS on-board a spacecraft to ensure that these challenging formation flying missions will fly successfully. Taking inspiration from the existing theory of nonlinear control, a fault-tolerant control system for the RyePicoSat missions is designed to cope with actuator faults whilst maintaining the desirable degree of overall stability and performance. Autonomous fault tolerant adaptive control scheme for spacecraft equipped with redundant actuators and robust control of spacecraft in underactuated configuration, represent the two central themes of this thesis. The developed algorithms are validated using a hardware-in-the-loop simulation. A reaction wheel testbed is used to validate the proposed fault tolerant attitude control scheme. A spacecraft formation flying experimental testbed is used to verify the performance of the proposed robust control scheme for underactuated spacecraft configurations. The proposed underactuated formation flying concept leads to more than 60% savings in fuel consumption when compared to a fully actuated spacecraft formation configuration. We also developed a novel attitude control methodology that requires only a single thruster to stabilize three axis attitude and angular velocity components of a spacecraft. Numerical simulations and hardware-in-the-loop experimental results along with rigorous analytical stability analysis shows that the proposed methodology will greatly enhance the reliability of the spacecraft, while allowing for potentially significant overall mission cost reduction.

  3. GLAS Spacecraft Pointing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Born, George H.; Gold, Kenn; Ondrey, Michael; Kubitschek, Dan; Axelrad, Penina; Komjathy, Attila

    1998-01-01

    Science requirements for the GLAS mission demand that the laser altimeter be pointed to within 50 m of the location of the previous repeat ground track. The satellite will be flown in a repeat orbit of 182 days. Operationally, the required pointing information will be determined on the ground using the nominal ground track, to which pointing is desired, and the current propagated orbit of the satellite as inputs to the roll computation algorithm developed by CCAR. The roll profile will be used to generate a set of fit coefficients which can be uploaded on a daily basis and used by the on-board attitude control system. In addition, an algorithm has been developed for computation of the associated command quaternions which will be necessary when pointing at targets of opportunity. It may be desirable in the future to perform the roll calculation in an autonomous real-time mode on-board the spacecraft. GPS can provide near real-time tracking of the satellite, and the nominal ground track can be stored in the on-board computer. It will be necessary to choose the spacing of this nominal ground track to meet storage requirements in the on-board environment. Several methods for generating the roll profile from a sparse reference ground track are presented.

  4. Hydrazine monitoring in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, J. H.; Beck, S. W.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrazine (HZ) and monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) are highly toxic compounds used as fuels in the Space Shuttle Orbiter Main Engines and in its maneuvering and reaction control system. Satellite refueling during a mission may also result in release of hydrazines. During extravehicular activities, the potential exists for hydrazines to contaminate the suit and to be brought into the internal atmosphere inadvertantly. Because of the high toxicity of hydrazines, a very sensitive, reliable, interference-free, and real-time method of measurement is required. A portable ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has exhibited a low ppb detection limit for hydrazines suggesting a promising technology for the detection of hydrazines in spacecraft air. The Hydrazine Monitor is a modified airborne vapor monitor (AVM) with a custom-built datalogger. This off-the-shelf IMS was developed for the detection of chemical warfare agents on the battlefield. After early evaluations of the AVM for hydrazine measurements showed a serious interference from ammonia, the AVM was modified to measure HZ and MMH in the ppb concentration range without interference from ammonia in the low ppm range. A description of the Hydrazine Monitor and how it functions is presented.

  5. Spacecraft Escape Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Edward A.; Charles, Dingell W.; Bufkin, Ann L.; Rodriggs, Liana M.; Peterson, Wayne; Cuthbert, Peter; Lee, David E.; Westhelle, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses the Gumdrop capsule a conceptual spacecraft that would enable the crew to escape safely in the event of a major equipment failure at any time from launch through atmospheric re-entry. The scaleable Gumdrop capsule would comprise a command module (CM), a service module (SM), and a crew escape system (CES). The CM would contain a pressurized crew environment that would include avionic, life-support, thermal control, propulsive attitude control, and recovery systems. The SM would provide the primary propulsion and would also supply electrical power, life-support resources, and active thermal control to the CM. The CES would include a solid rocket motor, embedded within the SM, for pushing the CM away from the SM in the event of a critical thermal-protection-system failure or loss of control. The CM and SM would normally remain integrated with each other from launch through recovery, but could be separated using the CES, if necessary, to enable the safe recovery of the crew in the CM. The crew escape motor could be used, alternatively, as a redundant means of de-orbit propulsion for the CM in the event of a major system failure in the SM.

  6. Spectra and spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, V. I.

    2001-02-01

    In June 1999, Dr. Regis Courtin, Associate Editor of PSS, suggested that I write an article for the new section of this journal: "Planetary Pioneers". I hesitated , but decided to try. One of the reasons for my doubts was my primitive English, so I owe the reader an apology for this in advance. Writing took me much more time than I supposed initially, I have stopped and again returned to manuscript many times. My professional life may be divided into three main phases: pioneering work in ground-based IR astronomy with an emphasis on planetary spectroscopy (1955-1970), studies of the planets with spacecraft (1970-1989), and attempts to proceed with this work in difficult times. I moved ahead using the known method of trials and errors as most of us do. In fact, only a small percentage of efforts led to some important results, a sort of dry residue. I will try to describe below how has it been in my case: what may be estimated as the most important, how I came to this, what was around, etc.

  7. Analyzing Spacecraft Telecommunication Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kordon, Mark; Hanks, David; Gladden, Roy; Wood, Eric

    2004-01-01

    Multi-Mission Telecom Analysis Tool (MMTAT) is a C-language computer program for analyzing proposed spacecraft telecommunication systems. MMTAT utilizes parameterized input and computational models that can be run on standard desktop computers to perform fast and accurate analyses of telecommunication links. MMTAT is easy to use and can easily be integrated with other software applications and run as part of almost any computational simulation. It is distributed as either a stand-alone application program with a graphical user interface or a linkable library with a well-defined set of application programming interface (API) calls. As a stand-alone program, MMTAT provides both textual and graphical output. The graphs make it possible to understand, quickly and easily, how telecommunication performance varies with variations in input parameters. A delimited text file that can be read by any spreadsheet program is generated at the end of each run. The API in the linkable-library form of MMTAT enables the user to control simulation software and to change parameters during a simulation run. Results can be retrieved either at the end of a run or by use of a function call at any time step.

  8. Empirical models for spacecraft damage from orbital debris penetration and effects on spacecraft survivability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamsen, Joel; Schonberg, William

    1997-01-01

    Semi-empirical models of hole diameter and tip-to-tip crack length for different multi-wall shielding systems currently under development for the International Space Station are presented. These equations were developed using light gas gun test data at impact velocities of 6.5 km/s and inhibited shaped charge test data for an impact velocity of 11.3 km/s. These models are incorporated into a survivability analysis using the manned spacecraft crew survivability computer code to determine whether or not module unzipping or crew incapacitation would occur under a specific set of impact conditions.

  9. Safety aspects of spacecraft commanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peccia, N.

    1994-01-01

    The commanding of spacecraft is a potentially hazardous activity for the safety of the spacecraft. Present day control systems contain safety features in their commanding subsystem and in addition, strict procedures are also followed by operations staff. However, problems have occurred on a number of missions as a result of erroneous commanding leading in some cases to spacecraft contingencies and even to near loss of the spacecraft. The problems of checking commands in advance are increased by the tendency in modern spacecraft to use blocked/time-tagged commands and the increased usage of on-board computers, for which commands changing on-board software tables can radically change spacecraft or subsystem behavior. This paper reports on an on-going study. The study aims to improve the approach to safety of spacecraft commanding. It will show how ensuring 'safe' commanding can be carried out more efficiently, and with greater reliability, with the help of knowledge based systems and/or fast simulators. The whole concept will be developed based on the Object-Oriented approach.

  10. TTEthernet for Integrated Spacecraft Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loveless, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Aerospace projects have traditionally employed federated avionics architectures, in which each computer system is designed to perform one specific function (e.g. navigation). There are obvious downsides to this approach, including excessive weight (from so much computing hardware), and inefficient processor utilization (since modern processors are capable of performing multiple tasks). There has therefore been a push for integrated modular avionics (IMA), in which common computing platforms can be leveraged for different purposes. This consolidation of multiple vehicle functions to shared computing platforms can significantly reduce spacecraft cost, weight, and design complexity. However, the application of IMA principles introduces significant challenges, as the data network must accommodate traffic of mixed criticality and performance levels - potentially all related to the same shared computer hardware. Because individual network technologies are rarely so competent, the development of truly integrated network architectures often proves unreasonable. Several different types of networks are utilized - each suited to support a specific vehicle function. Critical functions are typically driven by precise timing loops, requiring networks with strict guarantees regarding message latency (i.e. determinism) and fault-tolerance. Alternatively, non-critical systems generally employ data networks prioritizing flexibility and high performance over reliable operation. Switched Ethernet has seen widespread success filling this role in terrestrial applications. Its high speed, flexibility, and the availability of inexpensive commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components make it desirable for inclusion in spacecraft platforms. Basic Ethernet configurations have been incorporated into several preexisting aerospace projects, including both the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS). However, classical switched Ethernet cannot provide the high level of network

  11. Spacecraft power system architecture to mitigate spacecraft charging effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manner, David B. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A power system architecture for a spacecraft and a method of a power supply for a spacecraft are presented which take advantage of the reduced plasma interaction associated with positive ground high voltage photovoltaic arrays and provide a negative ground power supply for electrical loads of the spacecraft. They efficiently convert and regulate power to the load bus and reduce power system mass and complexity. The system and method ground the positive terminal of the solar arrays to the spacecraft hull, and using a power converter to invert the electric sign, permit a negative ground for the electrical distribution bus and electrical components. A number of variations including a load management system and a battery management system having charging and recharging devices are presented.

  12. Automated techniques for spacecraft monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segnar, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of implementing automated spacecraft monitoring depends on four factors: sufficient computer resources, suitable monitoring function definitions, adequate spacecraft data, and effective and economical test systems. The advantages of automated monitoring lie in the decision-making speed of the computer and the continuous monitoring coverage provided by an automated monitoring program. Use of these advantages introduces a new concept of spacecraft monitoring in which system specialists, ground based or onboard, freed from routine and tedious monitoring, could devote their expertise to unprogrammed or contingency situations.

  13. Spacecraft cryogenic gas storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rysavy, G.

    1971-01-01

    Cryogenic gas storage systems were developed for the liquid storage of oxygen, hydrogen, nitrogen, and helium. Cryogenic storage is attractive because of the high liquid density and low storage pressure of cryogens. This situation results in smaller container sizes, reduced container-strength levels, and lower tankage weights. The Gemini and Apollo spacecraft used cryogenic gas storage systems as standard spacecraft equipment. In addition to the Gemini and Apollo cryogenic gas storage systems, other systems were developed and tested in the course of advancing the state of the art. All of the cryogenic storage systems used, developed, and tested to date for manned-spacecraft applications are described.

  14. The Impact of Welfare State Regimes on Barriers to Participation in Adult Education: A Bounded Agency Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenson, Kjell; Desjardins, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative findings on barriers to participation in adult education are reviewed and some of the defining parameters that may explain observed national differences are considered. A theoretical perspective based on bounded agency is put forth to take account of the interaction between structurally and individually based barriers…

  15. Investing in Volunteerism: Recommendations Emerging from the Study of the Impact of Volunteers in Texas State Agencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehnborg, Sarah Jane; DeSpain, Meredith

    2003-01-01

    Responses from 20 of 22 Texas state government agencies using volunteers resulted in recommendations for volunteer management: standardize data collection, provide liability coverage, expand recognition programs, hire competent managers, support adequate infrastructure, replicate best practices, share best practices, encourage participation in…

  16. Development of electrical test procedures for qualification of spacecraft against EID. Volume 2: Review and specification of test procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkenfeld, J. M.; Harlacher, B. L.; Mathews, D.

    1982-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical program to develop system electrical test procedures for the qualification of spacecraft against damage produced by space-electron-induced discharges (EID) occurring on spacecraft dielectric outer surfaces is described. A review and critical evaluation of possible approaches to qualify spacecraft against space electron-induced discharges (EID) is presented. A variety of possible schemes to simulate EID electromagnetic effects produced in spacecraft was studied. These techniques form the principal element of a provisional, recommended set of test procedures for the EID qualification spacecraft. Significant gaps in our knowledge about EID which impact the final specification of an electrical test to qualify spacecraft against EID are also identified.

  17. Space Environments and Spacecraft Effects Organization Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Burns, Howard D.; Miller, Sharon K.; Porter, Ron; Schneider, Todd A.; Spann, James F.; Xapsos, Michael

    2012-01-01

    government agencies, and the commercial sector to ensure that communications are well established and the needs of the programs are being met. The programmatic support function also includes working in coordination with the program in anomaly resolution and generation of lessons learned documentation. The goal of this space environment and spacecraft effects organization is to develop decision-making tools and engineering products to support all mission phases from mission concept through operations by focusing on transitioning research to application. Products generated by this space environments and effects application are suitable for use in anomaly investigations. This paper will describe the scope of the TWGs and their relationship to the functional areas, and discuss an organizational structure for this space environments and spacecraft effects organization.

  18. Navigation of the EPOXI Spacecraft to Comet Hartley 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaskaran, Shyam; Abrahamson, Matt; Chesley, Steven; Chung, Min-Kun; Halsell, Allen; Haw, Robert; Helfrich, Cliff; Jefferson, David; Kennedy, Brian; McElrath, Tim; Owen, William; Rush, Brian; Smith, Jonathon; Wang, Tseng-Chan; Yen, Chen-Wan

    2011-01-01

    On November 4, 2010, the EPOXI spacecraft flew by the comet Hartley 2, marking the fourth time that a NASA spacecraft successfully captured high resolution images of a cometary nucleus. EPOXI is the extended mission of the Deep Impact mission, which delivered an impactor on comet Tempel-1 on July 4, 2005. EPOXI officially started in September 2007 and eventually took over 3 years of flight time and had 3 Earth gravity assists to achieve the proper encounter conditions. In the process, the mission was redesigned to accommodate a new comet as the target and changes in the trajectory to achieve better imaging conditions at encounter. Challenges in navigation of the spacecraft included precision targeting of several Earth flybys and the comet encounter, uncertainties in determining the ephemeris of the comet relative to the spacecraft, and the high accuracy trajectory knowledge needed to image the comet during the encounter. This paper presents an overview of the navigation process used for the mission.

  19. Applying Contamination Modelling to Spacecraft Propulsion Systems Designs and Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Philip T.; Thomson, Shaun; Woronowicz, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular and particulate contaminants generated from the operations of a propulsion system may impinge on spacecraft critical surfaces. Plume depositions or clouds may hinder the spacecraft and instruments from performing normal operations. Firing thrusters will generate both molecular and particulate contaminants. How to minimize the contamination impact from the plume becomes very critical for a successful mission. The resulting effect from either molecular or particulate contamination of the thruster firing is very distinct. This paper will discuss the interconnection between the functions of spacecraft contamination modeling and propulsion system implementation. The paper will address an innovative contamination engineering approach implemented from the spacecraft concept design, manufacturing, integration and test (I&T), launch, to on- orbit operations. This paper will also summarize the implementation on several successful missions. Despite other contamination sources, only molecular contamination will be considered here.

  20. The Multimission Modular Spacecraft for the 80's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, R. O.; Cepollina, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    The challenge to NASA is to prepare for the missions of tomorrow with manpower and funding constraints of today. The Goddard Space Flight Center has met this challenge with the Multimission Modular Spacecraft (MMS). This spacecraft design has evolved over the past six years while studying various potential missions. The key to the concept of the MMS is modularity and flexibility to accept mission unique hardware with minimum impact on the basic spacecraft bus. Beyond this, it was imperative that this multiple mission bus be cost effective even though it would not be of an optimum design for many missions having minimum performance requirements. The MMS performance and cost will capture 34 of the 43 potential spacecraft missions which have been initially studied. Gamma Ray Explorer (GRE) will be the first mission to utilize the MMS.

  1. Spacecraft Charging and the Microwave Anisotropy Probe Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, VanSant J.; Neergaard, Linda F.

    1998-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP), a MIDEX mission built in partnership between Princeton University and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), will study the cosmic microwave background. It will be inserted into a highly elliptical earth orbit for several weeks and then use a lunar gravity assist to orbit around the second Lagrangian point (L2), 1.5 million kilometers, anti-sunward from the earth. The charging environment for the phasing loops and at L2 was evaluated. There is a limited set of data for L2; the GEOTAIL spacecraft measured relatively low spacecraft potentials (approx. 50 V maximum) near L2. The main area of concern for charging on the MAP spacecraft is the well-established threat posed by the "geosynchronous region" between 6-10 Re. The launch in the autumn of 2000 will coincide with the falling of the solar maximum, a period when the likelihood of a substorm is higher than usual. The likelihood of a substorm at that time has been roughly estimated to be on the order of 20% for a typical MAP mission profile. Because of the possibility of spacecraft charging, a requirement for conductive spacecraft surfaces was established early in the program. Subsequent NASCAP/GEO analyses for the MAP spacecraft demonstrated that a significant portion of the sunlit surface (solar cell cover glass and sunshade) could have nonconductive surfaces without significantly raising differential charging. The need for conductive materials on surfaces continually in eclipse has also been reinforced by NASCAP analyses.

  2. Flexible Shields for Protecting Spacecraft Against Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Crews, Jeanne Lee

    2004-01-01

    A report presents the concept of Flexshield a class of versatile, lightweight, flexible shields for protecting spacecraft against impacts by small meteors and orbiting debris. The Flexshield concept incorporates elements of, but goes beyond, prior spacecraft-shielding concepts, including those of Whipple shields and, more recently, multi-shock shields and multi-shock blankets. A shield of the Flexshield type includes multiple outer layers (called bumpers in the art) made, variously, of advanced ceramic and/or polymeric fibers spaced apart from each other by a lightweight foam. As in prior such shields, the bumpers serve to shock an impinging hypervelocity particle, causing it to disintegrate vaporize, and spread out over a larger area so that it can be stopped by an innermost layer (back sheet). The flexibility of the fabric layers and compressibility of the foam make it possible to compress and fold the shield for transport, then deploy the shield for use. The shield can be attached to a spacecraft by use of snaps, hook-and-pile patches, or other devices. The shield can also contain multilayer insulation material, so that it provides some thermal protection in addition to mechanical protection.

  3. Science Goal Driven Observing and Spacecraft Autonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koratkar, Amuradha; Grosvenor, Sandy; Jones, Jeremy; Wolf, Karl

    2002-01-01

    Spacecraft autonomy will be an integral part of mission operations in the coming decade. While recent missions have made great strides in the ability to autonomously monitor and react to changing health and physical status of spacecraft, little progress has been made in responding quickly to science driven events. For observations of inherently variable targets and targets of opportunity, the ability to recognize early if an observation will meet the science goals of a program, and react accordingly, can have a major positive impact on the overall scientific returns of an observatory and on its operational costs. If the onboard software can reprioritize the schedule to focus on alternate targets, discard uninteresting observations prior to downloading, or download a subset of observations at a reduced resolution, the spacecraft's overall efficiency will be dramatically increased. The science goal monitoring (SGM) system is a proof-of-concept effort to address the above challenge. The SGM will have an interface to help capture higher level science goals from the scientists and translate them into a flexible observing strategy that SGM can execute and monitor. We are developing an interactive distributed system that will use on-board processing and storage combined with event-driven interfaces with ground-based processing and operations, to enable fast re-prioritization of observing schedules, and to minimize time spent on non-optimized observations.

  4. Gravity Probe B spacecraft description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Norman R.; Burns, Kevin; Katz, Russell; Kirschenbaum, Jon; Mason, Gary; Shehata, Shawky

    2015-11-01

    The Gravity Probe B spacecraft, developed, integrated, and tested by Lockheed Missiles & Space Company and later Lockheed Martin Corporation, consisted of structures, mechanisms, command and data handling, attitude and translation control, electrical power, thermal control, flight software, and communications. When integrated with the payload elements, the integrated system became the space vehicle. Key requirements shaping the design of the spacecraft were: (1) the tight mission timeline (17 months, 9 days of on-orbit operation), (2) precise attitude and translational control, (3) thermal protection of science hardware, (4) minimizing aerodynamic, magnetic, and eddy current effects, and (5) the need to provide a robust, low risk spacecraft. The spacecraft met all mission requirements, as demonstrated by dewar lifetime meeting specification, positive power and thermal margins, precision attitude control and drag-free performance, reliable communications, and the collection of more than 97% of the available science data.

  5. Gemini 9 spacecraft recovery operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The Gemini 9-A spacecraft, with Astronauts Thomas Stafford and Eugene Cernan still inside, in water as the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp, the recovery ship, comes alongside to recover the astronauts and their spaceship.

  6. ISS Update: Dream Chaser Spacecraft

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Michael Curie talks with Cheryl McPhillips, Commercial Crew Program Partner Manager for the Sierra Nevada Corporation, the company developing the Dream Chaser spacecraft...

  7. Thermoelectric Outer Planets Spacecraft (TOPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The research and advanced development work is reported on a ballistic-mode, outer planet spacecraft using radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) power. The Thermoelectric Outer Planet Spacecraft (TOPS) project was established to provide the advanced systems technology that would allow the realistic estimates of performance, cost, reliability, and scheduling that are required for an actual flight mission. A system design of the complete RTG-powered outer planet spacecraft was made; major technical innovations of certain hardware elements were designed, developed, and tested; and reliability and quality assurance concepts were developed for long-life requirements. At the conclusion of its active phase, the TOPS Project reached its principal objectives: a development and experience base was established for project definition, and for estimating cost, performance, and reliability; an understanding of system and subsystem capabilities for successful outer planets missions was achieved. The system design answered long-life requirements with massive redundancy, controlled by on-board analysis of spacecraft performance data.

  8. Autonomous spacecraft maintenance study group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, M. H.; Low, G. D.

    1981-01-01

    A plan to incorporate autonomous spacecraft maintenance (ASM) capabilities into Air Force spacecraft by 1989 is outlined. It includes the successful operation of the spacecraft without ground operator intervention for extended periods of time. Mechanisms, along with a fault tolerant data processing system (including a nonvolatile backup memory) and an autonomous navigation capability, are needed to replace the routine servicing that is presently performed by the ground system. The state of the art fault handling capabilities of various spacecraft and computers are described, and a set conceptual design requirements needed to achieve ASM is established. Implementations for near term technology development needed for an ASM proof of concept demonstration by 1985, and a research agenda addressing long range academic research for an advanced ASM system for 1990s are established.

  9. Spacecraft Environmental Interactions Technology, 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    State of the art of environment interactions dealing with low-Earth-orbit plasmas; high-voltage systems; spacecraft charging; materials effects; and direction of future programs are contained in over 50 papers.

  10. Designing a Better Spacecraft: Assessing Flight Operability of Human Rated Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    The design of a human rated spacecraft is a complex and costly process requiring the integrated assessment of many individual criteria. Historically, it has been difficult to include in that integrated assessment the design s full impact on the flight operations community and its costs. The unique "operability requirements" have not been well understood, nor has there been a well-defined set of criteria for assessing operability. As a result, flight operations organizations and program managers are often faced with difficult and costly operations phase implementations. In response, the Mission Operations Directorate at NASA s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center has established a formal technique to evaluate and communicate the operational characteristics of spacecraft system designs for the Constellation Program. This process is not intended to replace or replicate other critical assessments such as risk, reliability and safety assessments. Instead, this new technique adds to the assessment toolset a means to address the concerns and potential cost drivers that are unique to the operational phase of a program and the flight operations community. This paper describes the implementation and application of this "Spacecraft Flight Operability Assessment Scale" in supporting vehicle design efforts. The six key factors of flight operability are defined, with guiding principles and goals stated for each factor. A standardized rating technique provides feedback that is useful to both the operations and program management communities. Sample assessments of legacy spacecraft, including the Space Shuttle and International Space Station systems, are provided to provide real world examples of this technique s application.

  11. Artist's drawing of Viking spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing an unmanned spacecraft called Viking to continue the exploration of Mars in the mid-1970s. Two Viking spacecraft, each including an orbiter and a lander will be launched by TitanIII/Centaur launch vehicles in August and September 1975 from Cape Kennedy to reach Mars in mid-1976. They will perform scientific investigations both from orbit and on the surface of Mars, including a search for life form on the planet.

  12. Spacecraft Thermal Control Coatings References

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauder, Lonny

    2005-01-01

    The successful thermal design of spacecraft depends in part on a knowledge of the solar absorption and hemispherical emittance of the thermal control coatings used in and on the spacecraft. Goddard Space Flight Center has had since its beginning a group whose mission has been to provide thermal/optical properties data of thermal control coatings to thermal engineers. This handbook represents a summary of the data and knowledge accumulated over many years at GSFC.

  13. Small Spacecraft for Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, John; Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Bousquet, Pierre-W.; Vane, Gregg; Komarek, Tomas; Klesh, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    As planetary science continues to explore new and remote regions of the Solar system with comprehensive and more sophisticated payloads, small spacecraft offer the possibility for focused and more affordable science investigations. These small spacecraft or micro spacecraft (< 100 kg) can be used in a variety of architectures consisting of orbiters, landers, rovers, atmospheric probes, and penetrators. A few such vehicles have been flown in the past as technology demonstrations. However, technologies such as new miniaturized science-grade sensors and electronics, advanced manufacturing for lightweight structures, and innovative propulsion are making it possible to fly much more capable micro spacecraft for planetary exploration. While micro spacecraft, such as CubeSats, offer significant cost reductions with added capability from advancing technologies, the technical challenges for deep space missions are very different than for missions conducted in low Earth orbit. Micro spacecraft must be able to sustain a broad range of planetary environments (i.e., radiations, temperatures, limited power generation) and offer long-range telecommunication performance on a par with science needs. Other capabilities needed for planetary missions, such as fine attitude control and determination, capable computer and data handling, and navigation are being met by technologies currently under development to be flown on CubeSats within the next five years. This paper will discuss how micro spacecraft offer an attractive alternative to accomplish specific science and technology goals and what relevant technologies are needed for these these types of spacecraft. Acknowledgements: Part of this work is being carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract to NASA. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  14. The Atmosphere Explorer spacecraft system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, N. W.; Brace, L. H.; Grimes, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Brief description of the design goals, spacecraft, data system, and data analysis concept for the Atmosphere Explorer (AE) mission. The AE mission is shown to have been conceived and to be implemented for making possible a variety of studies of the lower thermosphere. The spacecraft support system, including an onboard propulsion system, will enable investigations to be carried out deep in the thermosphere and at all points of aeronomic significance about the earth.

  15. Spacecraft external molecular contamination analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, H. K. F.

    1990-01-01

    Control of contamination on and around spacecraft is required to avoid adverse effects on the performance of instruments and spacecraft systems. Recent work in this area is reviewed and discussed. Specific issues and limitations to be considered as part of the effort to predict contamination effects using modeling techniques are addressed. Significant results of Space Shuttle missions in the field of molecule/surface interactions as well as their implications for space station design and operation are reviewed.

  16. Spacecraft design applications of QUICK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, David L.

    1992-01-01

    The interactive space mission trajectory design environment software QUICK, which is currently available on 14 different machine architectures, furnishes a programmable FORTRAN-like interface for a wide range of both built-in and user-defined functions. Since its inception at JPL in 1971, QUICK has evolved from a specialized calculator into a general-purpose engineering tool which also facilitates spacecraft conceptual design by treating spacecraft as collections of data records describing individual components of instruments.

  17. Estimating the Loss of Crew and Loss of Mission for Crew Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutomski, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Once the US Space Shuttle retires in 2011, the Russian Soyuz Launcher and Soyuz Spacecraft will comprise the only means for crew transportation to and from the International Space Station (ISS). The U.S. Government and NASA have contracted for crew transportation services to the ISS with Russia. The resulting implications for the US space program including issues such as astronaut safety must be carefully considered. Are the astronauts and cosmonauts safer on the Soyuz than the Space Shuttle system? Is the Soyuz launch system more robust than the Space Shuttle? The Soyuz launcher has been in operation for over 40 years. There have been only two loss of life incidents and two loss of mission incidents. Given that the most recent incident took place in 1983, how do we determine current reliability of the system? Do failures of unmanned Soyuz rockets impact the reliability of the currently operational man-rated launcher? Does the Soyuz exhibit characteristics that demonstrate reliability growth and how would that be reflected in future estimates of success? NASA s next manned rocket and spacecraft development project will have to meet the Agency Threshold requirements set forth by NASA. The reliability targets are currently several times higher than the Shuttle and possibly even the Soyuz. Can these targets be compared to the reliability of the Soyuz to determine whether they are realistic and achievable? To help answer these questions this paper will explore how to estimate the reliability of the Soyuz Launcher/Spacecraft system, compare it to the Space Shuttle, and its potential impacts for the future of manned spaceflight. Specifically it will look at estimating the Loss of Crew (LOC) and Loss of Mission (LOM) probability using historical data, reliability growth, and Probabilistic Risk Assessment techniques used to generate these numbers.

  18. Software for Autonomous Spacecraft Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bristow, John; Folta, Dave; Hawkins, Al; Dell, Greg

    2004-01-01

    The AutoCon computer programs facilitate and accelerate the planning and execution of orbital control maneuvers of spacecraft while analyzing and resolving mission constraints. AutoCon-F is executed aboard spacecraft, enabling the spacecraft to plan and execute maneuvers autonomously; AutoCon-G is designed for use on the ground. The AutoCon programs utilize advanced techniques of artificial intelligence, including those of fuzzy logic and natural-language scripting, to resolve multiple conflicting constraints and automatically plan maneuvers. These programs can be used to satisfy requirements for missions that involve orbits around the Earth, the Moon, or any planet, and are especially useful for missions in which there are requirements for frequent maneuvers and for resolution of complex conflicting constraints. During operations, the software targets new trajectories, places and sizes maneuvers, and controls spacecraft burns. AutoCon-G provides a userfriendly graphical interface, and can be used effectively by an analyst with minimal training. AutoCon-F reduces latency and supports multiple-spacecraft and formation-flying missions. The AutoCon architecture supports distributive processing, which can be critical for formation- control missions. AutoCon is completely object-oriented and can easily be enhanced by adding new objects and events. AutoCon-F was flight demonstrated onboard GSFC's EO-1 spacecraft flying in formation with Landsat-7.

  19. Integrated Geologic, Hydrologic, and Geophysical Investigations of the Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure, Virginia, USA: A Multi-Agency Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gohn, G. S.; Bruce, T. S.; Catchings, R. D.; Emry, S. R.; Johnson, G. H.; Levine, J. S.; McFarland, E. R.; Poag, C. W.; Powars, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay impact structure is the focus of an ongoing federal-state-local research program. Recent core drilling and geophysical surveys address the formative processes and hydrogeologic properties of this major "wet-target" impact. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Intelligent spacecraft module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oungrinis, Konstantinos-Alketas; Liapi, Marianthi; Kelesidi, Anna; Gargalis, Leonidas; Telo, Marinela; Ntzoufras, Sotiris; Paschidi, Mariana

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the development of an on-going research project that focuses on a human-centered design approach to habitable spacecraft modules. It focuses on the technical requirements and proposes approaches on how to achieve a spatial arrangement of the interior that addresses sufficiently the functional, physiological and psychosocial needs of the people living and working in such confined spaces that entail long-term environmental threats to human health and performance. Since the research perspective examines the issue from a qualitative point of view, it is based on establishing specific relationships between the built environment and its users, targeting people's bodily and psychological comfort as a measure toward a successful mission. This research has two basic branches, one examining the context of the system's operation and behavior and the other in the direction of identifying, experimenting and formulating the environment that successfully performs according to the desired context. The latter aspect is researched upon the construction of a scaled-model on which we run series of tests to identify the materiality, the geometry and the electronic infrastructure required. Guided by the principles of sensponsive architecture, the ISM research project explores the application of the necessary spatial arrangement and behavior for a user-centered, functional interior where the appropriate intelligent systems are based upon the existing mechanical and chemical support ones featured on space today, and especially on the ISS. The problem is set according to the characteristics presented at the Mars500 project, regarding the living quarters of six crew-members, along with their hygiene, leisure and eating areas. Transformable design techniques introduce spatial economy, adjustable zoning and increased efficiency within the interior, securing at the same time precise spatial orientation and character at any given time. The sensponsive configuration is

  1. Effect of orbital debris shape on lightweight spacecraft shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, J.

    The risk posed by meteoroid and orbital debris (M/OD) impacts on low earth orbiting spacecraft is a critical design consideration. For years researchers have evaluated the M/OD environment and impact effects on spacecraft materials. Nearly all of these studies and risk assessment strategies have considered M/OD to have a spherical shape. Impact tests and hydrocode simulations have shown that impactors with length to diameter (L/D) ratios other than 1 can in fact affect more damage to spacecraft than equal mass spheres. With this concern in mind, the present work documents test results and simulations which demonstrate this shape effect. In particular, recent tests conducted at 3-7 km/s on representative spacecraft shields are reported. Furthermore, testing on these shields near 11 km/s are documented. These data are compared to existing ballistic limit equations which yield modified equations taking into account the shape effect. To demonstrate the significance of these analyses, risk assessments are modified to incorporate M/OD shape. The increased risk to spacecraft due to impactor shape is estimated based on assumptions in the M/OD population's shape.

  2. Influence on spacecraft control systems of evolving O/B technology and standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, Richard

    1990-10-01

    Analysis of the operation requirements of future spacecraft show that past approaches are not sufficient. The use of on board (O/B) technology and the development of the specific standards are proposed in order to meet those increasing requirements. The increase in on board decision making capability in spacecraft is discussed. Standardization of spacecraft operations and the impact on present and future ESA standards by this trend are considered.

  3. The Hayabusa Spacecraft Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    The Hayabusa (originally known as MUSES-C) engineering spacecraft was launched by the 5th Mu V launch vehicle on May 9, 2003 by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). It was designed to acquire samples from the surface of near-Earth asteroid 25143 Itokawa (1998 SF36) and return them to Earth. The main objectives of the mission were to demonstrate the performance of various technologies such as ion engine performance, autonomous navigation and control, asteroid surface sampling, and recovery of the return capsule after high speed re-entry. Hayabusa successfully returned a small capsule to Earth in June 2010 with a parachute assisted landing in Woomera, Australia. Details of the Hayabusa mission and the recovery operation will be presented for discussion.

  4. Maximizing the Impact of the NASA Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) Project: Building a Community of Project Evaluators, Collaborating Across Agencies & Evaluating a 71-Project Portfolio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. M.; Chambers, L. H.; Pippin, M. R.; Spruill, K.

    2012-12-01

    and efforts. Further work is underway to coordinate a common evaluation framework across the tri-agency portfolio. The tri-agency partnership has also focused on responding to calls for cross-agency interaction and common evaluation (e.g., the recommendations of the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) Committee on STEM Education). This integrated, collaborative approach to the project and its evaluation aims to increase the impact of the NICE initiative while also creating pathways to and resources for measuring that impact. In this poster, we will outline the NICE project and its portfolio of funded projects, along with our approach to building collaborations and relationships to build and support a community of practice among climate change educators and evaluators. We will describe how the activities of the NICE team and participation in the tri-agency collaboration contribute to NICE's goals, and will share how we leverage these elements for use in evaluation of the portfolio. This poster will have particular relevance to educators and evaluators on Federally-funded STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education projects, and will provide insights to the evaluation landscape on the project level at one Federal agency.

  5. Extreme Spacecraft Charging in Polar Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, Andrew D.; Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, L. Neergaard

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft in low altitude, high inclination (including sun -synchronous) orbits are widely used for remote sensing of the Earth fs land surface and oceans, monitoring weather and climate, communications, scientific studies of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere, and a variety of other scientific, commercial, and military applications. These systems episodically charge to frame potentials in the kilovolt range when exposed to space weather environments characterized by a high flux of energetic (approx.10 fs kilovolt) electrons in regions of low background plasma density. Auroral charging conditions are similar in some ways to the space weather conditions in geostationary orbit responsible for spacecraft charging to kilovolt levels. We first review the physics of space environment interactions with spacecraft materials that control auroral charging rates and the anticipated maximum potentials that should be observed on spacecraft surfaces during disturbed space weather conditions. We then describe how the theoretical values compare to the observational history of extreme charging in auroral environments. Finally, a set of extreme DMSP charging events are described varying in maximum negative frame potential from approx.0.6 kV to approx.2 kV, focusing on the characteristics of the charging events that are of importance both to the space system designer and to spacecraft operators. The goal of the presentation is to bridge the gap between scientific studies of auroral charging and the need for engineering teams to understand how space weather impacts both spacecraft design and operations for vehicles on orbital trajectories that traverse auroral charging environments.

  6. A global spacecraft control network for spacecraft autonomy research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitts, Christopher A.

    1996-01-01

    The development and implementation of the Automated Space System Experimental Testbed (ASSET) space operations and control network, is reported on. This network will serve as a command and control architecture for spacecraft operations and will offer a real testbed for the application and validation of advanced autonomous spacecraft operations strategies. The proposed network will initially consist of globally distributed amateur radio ground stations at locations throughout North America and Europe. These stations will be linked via Internet to various control centers. The Stanford (CA) control center will be capable of human and computer based decision making for the coordination of user experiments, resource scheduling and fault management. The project's system architecture is described together with its proposed use as a command and control system, its value as a testbed for spacecraft autonomy research, and its current implementation.

  7. Investigation on Improvements in Lightning Retest Criteria for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terseck, Alex; Trout, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Spacecraft are generally protected from a direct strike by launch the vehicle and ground structures, but protocols to evaluate the impact of nearby strikes are not consistent. Often spacecraft rely on the launch vehicle constraints to trigger a retest, but launch vehicles can typically evaluate the impact of a strike within minutes while spacecraft evaluation times can be on the order of hours or even days. For launches at the Kennedy Space Center where lightning activity is among the highest in the United States, this evaluation related delay could be costly with the possibility of missing the launch window altogether. This paper evaluated available data from local lightning measurements systems and computer simulations to predict the coupled effect from various nearby strikes onto a typical payload umbilical. Recommendations are provided to reduce the typical trigger criteria and costly delays.

  8. Space environmental interactions with spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    Environmental interactions are defined as the response of spacecraft surfaces to the charged-particle environment. These interactions are divided into two broad categories: spacecraft passive, in which the environment acts on the surfaces and spacecraft active, in which the spacecraft or a system on the spacecraft causes the interaction. The principal spacecraft passive interaction of concern is the spacecraft charging phenomenon. The spacecraft active category introduces the concept of interactions with the thermal plasma environment and Earth's magnetic fields, which are important at all altitudes and must be considered the designs of proposed large space structures and space power systems. The status of the spacecraft charging investigations is reviewed along with the spacecraft active interactions.

  9. Soft Landing of Spacecraft on Energy-Absorbing Self-Deployable Cushions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold

    2003-01-01

    A report proposes the use of cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) foam structures to cushion impacts of small (1 to 50 kg) exploratory spacecraft on remote planets. Airbags, which are used on larger (800 to 1,000 kg) spacecraft have been found to (1) be too complex for smaller spacecraft; (2) provide insufficient thermal insulation between spacecraft and ground; (3) bounce on impact, thereby making it difficult to land spacecraft in precisely designated positions; and (4) be too unstable to serve as platforms for scientific observations. A CHEM foam pad according to the proposal would have a glass-transition temperature (Tg) well above ambient temperature. It would be compacted, at a temperature above Tg, to about a tenth or less of its original volume, then cooled below Tg, then installed on a spacecraft without compacting restraints. Upon entry of the spacecraft into a planetary atmosphere, the temperature would rise above Tg, causing the pad to expand to its original volume and shape. As the spacecraft decelerated and cooled, the temperature would fall below Tg, rigidifying the foam structure. The structure would absorb kinetic energy during ground impact by inelastic crushing, thus protecting the payload from damaging shocks. Thereafter, this pad would serve as a mechanically stable, thermally insulating platform for the landed spacecraft.

  10. Simulating Flexible-Spacecraft Dynamics and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fedor, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    Versatile program applies to many types of spacecraft and dynamical problems. Flexible Spacecraft Dynamics and Control program (FSD) developed to aid in simulation of large class of flexible and rigid spacecraft. Extremely versatile and used in attitude dynamics and control analysis as well as in-orbit support of deployment and control of spacecraft. Applicable to inertially oriented spinning, Earth-oriented, or gravity-gradient-stabilized spacecraft. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  11. Lean spacecraft avionics trade study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Main, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft design is generally an exercise in design trade-offs: fuel vs. weight, power vs. solar cell area, radiation exposure vs. shield weight, etc. Proper analysis of these trades is critical in the development of lightweight, efficient, 'lean' satellites. The modification of the launch plans for the Magnetosphere Imager (MI) to a Taurus launcher from the much more powerful Delta has forced a reduction in spacecraft weight availability into the mission orbit from 1300 kg to less than 500 kg. With weight now a driving factor it is imperative that the satellite design be extremely efficient and lean. The accuracy of engineering trades now takes on an added importance. An understanding of spacecraft subsystem interactions is critical in the development of a good spacecraft design, yet it is a challenge to define these interactions while the design is immature. This is currently an issue in the development of the preliminary design of the MI. The interaction and interfaces between this spacecraft and the instruments it carries are currently unclear since the mission instruments are still under development. It is imperative, however, to define these interfaces so that avionics requirements ideally suited to the mission's needs can be determined.

  12. Magnetic shielding for interplanetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; Merrill, B.J.

    1991-12-01

    The protection of spacecraft crews from the radiation produced by high energy electrons, protons and heavier ions in the space environment is a major health concern on long duration missions. Conventional approaches to radiation shielding in space have relied on thicker spacecraft walls to stop the high energy charged particles and to absorb the resulting gamma and bremsstrahlung photons. The shielding concept described here uses superconducting magnets to deflect charged particles before they collide with the spacecraft, thus avoiding the production of secondary particles. A number of spacecraft configurations and sizes have been analyzed, ranging from a small ``storm cellar`` for use during solar flares to continuous shielding for space stations having a crew of 15--25. The effectiveness of the magnetic shielding has been analyzed using a Monte Carlo program with incident proton energies from 0.5 to 1000 MeV. Typically the shield deflects 35--99 percent of the incident particles, depending, of course on particle energy and magnetic field strength. Further evaluation studies have been performed to assess weight comparisons between magnetic and conventional shielding; to determine magnet current distributions which minimize the magnetic field within the spacecraft itself; and to assess the potential role of ceramic superconductors. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Magnetic shielding for interplanetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; Merrill, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    The protection of spacecraft crews from the radiation produced by high energy electrons, protons and heavier ions in the space environment is a major health concern on long duration missions. Conventional approaches to radiation shielding in space have relied on thicker spacecraft walls to stop the high energy charged particles and to absorb the resulting gamma and bremsstrahlung photons. The shielding concept described here uses superconducting magnets to deflect charged particles before they collide with the spacecraft, thus avoiding the production of secondary particles. A number of spacecraft configurations and sizes have been analyzed, ranging from a small storm cellar'' for use during solar flares to continuous shielding for space stations having a crew of 15--25. The effectiveness of the magnetic shielding has been analyzed using a Monte Carlo program with incident proton energies from 0.5 to 1000 MeV. Typically the shield deflects 35--99 percent of the incident particles, depending, of course on particle energy and magnetic field strength. Further evaluation studies have been performed to assess weight comparisons between magnetic and conventional shielding; to determine magnet current distributions which minimize the magnetic field within the spacecraft itself; and to assess the potential role of ceramic superconductors. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  14. Message Mode Operations for Spacecraft: A Proposal for Operating Spacecraft During Cruise and Mitigating the Network Loading Crunch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Ed; MacMedan, Marv; Kazz, Greg; Kallemeyn, Pieter

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) is a world-class spacecraft tracking facility with stations located in Spain, Australia and USA, servicing Deep Space Missions of many space agencies. The current system of scheduling spacecraft during cruise for multiple 8 hour tracking sessions per week currently leads to an overcommitted DSN. Studies indicate that future projected mission demands upon the Network will only make the loading problem worse. Therefore, a more efficient scheduling of DSN resources is necessary in order to support the additional network loading envisioned in the next few years: The number of missions is projected to increase from 25 in 1998 to 34 by 2001. In fact given the challenge of the NASA administrator, Dan Goldin, of launching 12 spacecraft per year, the DSN would be tracking approximately 90 spacecraft by 2010. Currently a large amount of antenna time and network resources are subscribed by a project in order to have their mission supported during the cruise phase. The recently completed Mars Pathfinder mission was tracked 3 times a week (8 hours/day) during the majority of its cruise to Mars. This paper proposes an innovative approach called Message Mode Operations (MMO) for mitigating the Network loading problem while continuing to meet the tracking, reporting, time management, and scheduling requirements of these missions during Cruise while occupying very short tracking times. MMO satisfies these requirements by providing the following services: Spacecraft Health and Welfare Monitoring Service Command Delivery Service Adaptive Spacecraft Scheduling Service Orbit Determination Service Time Calibration Service Utilizing more efficient engineering telemetry summarization and filtering techniques on-board the spacecraft and collapsing the navigation requirements for Doppler and Range into shorter tracks, we believe spacecraft can be adequately serviced using short 10 to 30 minute tracking sessions. This claim assumes that certain changes would

  15. Spacecraft Crew Cabin Condensation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrillo, Laurie Y.; Rickman, Steven L.; Ungar, Eugene K.

    2013-01-01

    A report discusses a new technique to prevent condensation on the cabin walls of manned spacecraft exposed to the cold environment of space, as such condensation could lead to free water in the cabin. This could facilitate the growth of mold and bacteria, and could lead to oxidation and weakening of the cabin wall. This condensation control technique employs a passive method that uses spacecraft waste heat as the primary wallheating mechanism. A network of heat pipes is bonded to the crew cabin pressure vessel, as well as the pipes to each other, in order to provide for efficient heat transfer to the cabin walls and from one heat pipe to another. When properly sized, the heat-pipe network can maintain the crew cabin walls at a nearly uniform temperature. It can also accept and distribute spacecraft waste heat to maintain the pressure vessel above dew point.

  16. Electromagnetic braking for Mars spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, A. C.

    1986-01-01

    Aerobraking concepts are being studied to improve performance and cost effectiveness of propulsion systems for Mars landers and Mars interplanetary spacecraft. Access to megawatt power levels (nuclear power coupled to high-storage inductive or capacitive devices) on a manned Mars interplanetary spacecraft may make feasible electromagnetic braking and lift modulation techniques which were previously impractical. Using pulsed microwave and magnetic field technology, potential plasmadynamic braking and hydromagnetic lift modulation techniques have been identified. Entry corridor modulation to reduce loads and heating, to reduce vertical descent rates, and to expand horizontal and lateral landing ranges are possible benefits. In-depth studies are needed to identify specific design concepts for feasibility assessments. Standing wave/plasma sheath interaction techniques appear to be promising. The techniques may require some tailoring of spacecraft external structures and materials. In addition, rapid response guidance and control systems may require the use of structurally embedded sensors coupled to expert systems or to artificial intelligence systems.

  17. Swarms: Optimum aggregations of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    Swarms are aggregations of spacecraft or elements of a space system which are cooperative in function, but physically isolated or only loosely connected. For some missions the swarm configuration may be optimum compared to a group of completely independent spacecraft or a complex rigidly integrated spacecraft or space platform. General features of swarms are induced by considering an ensemble of 26 swarms, examples ranging from Earth centered swarms for commercial application to swarms for exploring minor planets. A concept for a low altitude swarm as a substitute for a space platform is proposed and a preliminary design studied. The salient design feature is the web of tethers holding the 30 km swarm in a rigid two dimensional array in the orbital plane. A mathematical discussion and tutorial in tether technology and in some aspects of the distribution of services (mass, energy, and information to swarm elements) are included.

  18. Conductive spacecraft materials development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehn, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to provide design criteria, techniques, materials, and test methods to ensure control of absolute and differential charging of spacecraft surfaces. The control of absolute and differential charging of spacecraft cannot be effected without the development of new and improved or modified materials or techniques that will provide electrical continuity over the surface of the spacecraft. The materials' photoemission, secondary emission, thermooptical, physical, and electrical properties in the space vacuum environment both in the presence and absence of electrical stress and ultraviolet, electron, and particulate radiation, are important to the achievement of charge control. The materials must be stable or have predictable response to exposure to the space environment for long periods of time. The materials of interest include conductive polymers, paints, transparent films and coatings as well as fabric coating interweaves.

  19. Fire safety applications for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Olson, Sandra L.

    1989-01-01

    Fire safety for spacecraft is reviewed by first describing current practices, many of which are adapted directly from aircraft. Then, current analyses and experimental knowledge in low-gravity combustion, with implications for fire safety are discussed. In orbiting spacecraft, the detection and suppression of flames are strongly affected by the large reduction in buoyant flows under low gravity. Generally, combustion intensity is reduced in low gravity. There are some notable exceptions, however, one example being the strong enhancement of flames by low-velocity ventilation flows in space. Finally, the future requirements in fire safety, particularly the needs of long-duration space stations in fire prevention, detection, extinguishment, and atmospheric control are examined. The goal of spacecraft fire-safety investigations is the establishment of trade-offs that promote maximum safety without hampering the useful human and scientific activities in space.

  20. Universal Controller for Spacecraft Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levanas, Greg; McCarthy, Thomas; Hunter, Don; Buchanan, Christine; Johnson, Michael; Cozy, Raymond; Morgan, Albert; Tran, Hung

    2006-01-01

    An electronic control unit has been fabricated and tested that can be replicated as a universal interface between the electronic infrastructure of a spacecraft and a brushless-motor (or other electromechanical actuator) driven mechanism that performs a specific mechanical function within the overall spacecraft system. The unit includes interfaces to a variety of spacecraft sensors, power outputs, and has selectable actuator control parameters making the assembly a mechanism controller. Several control topologies are selectable and reconfigurable at any time. This allows the same actuator to perform different functions during the mission life of the spacecraft. The unit includes complementary metal oxide/semiconductor electronic components on a circuit board of a type called rigid flex (signifying flexible printed wiring along with a rigid substrate). The rigid flex board is folded to make the unit fit into a housing on the back of a motor. The assembly has redundant critical interfaces, allowing the controller to perform time-critical operations when no human interface with the hardware is possible. The controller is designed to function over a wide temperature range without the need for thermal control, including withstanding significant thermal cycling, making it usable in nearly all environments that spacecraft or landers will endure. A prototype has withstood 1,500 thermal cycles between 120 and +85 C without significant deterioration of its packaging or electronic function. Because there is no need for thermal control and the unit is addressed through a serial bus interface, the cabling and other system hardware are substantially reduced in quantity and complexity, with corresponding reductions in overall spacecraft mass and cost.

  1. Human factors in spacecraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Albert A.; Connors, Mary M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes some of the salient implications of evolving mission parameters for spacecraft design. Among the requirements for future spacecraft are new, higher standards of living, increased support of human productivity, and greater accommodation of physical and cultural variability. Design issues include volumetric allowances, architecture and layouts, closed life support systems, health maintenance systems, recreational facilities, automation, privacy, and decor. An understanding of behavioral responses to design elements is a precondition for critical design decisions. Human factors research results must be taken into account early in the course of the design process.

  2. Tools Automate Spacecraft Testing, Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    "NASA began the Small Explorer (SMEX) program to develop spacecraft to advance astrophysics and space physics. As one of the entities supporting software development at Goddard Space Flight Center, the Hammers Company Inc. (tHC Inc.), of Greenbelt, Maryland, developed the Integrated Test and Operations System to support SMEX. Later, the company received additional Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding from Goddard for a tool to facilitate the development of flight software called VirtualSat. NASA uses the tools to support 15 satellites, and the aerospace industry is using them to develop science instruments, spacecraft computer systems, and navigation and control software."

  3. Human factors in spacecraft design.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A A; Connors, M M

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes some of the salient implications of evolving mission parameters for spacecraft design. Among the requirements for future spacecraft are new, higher standards of living, increased support of human productivity, and greater accommodation of physical and cultural variability. Design issues include volumetric allowances, architecture and layouts, closed life support systems, health maintenance systems, recreational facilities, automation, privacy, and decor. An understanding of behavioral responses to design elements is a precondition for critical design decisions. Human factors research results must be taken into account early in the course of the design process. PMID:11537619

  4. Advanced spacecraft fuel cell systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    The development and characteristics of advanced spacecraft fuel cell systems are discussed. The system is designed to operate on low pressure, propulsion grade hydrogen and oxygen. The specific goals are 10,000 hours of operation with refurbishment, 20 pounds per kilowatt at a sustained power of 7 KW, and 21 KW peaking capability for durations of two hours. The system rejects waste heat to the spacecraft cooling system at power levels up to 7 KW. At higher powers, the system automatically transfers to open cycle operation with overboard steam venting.

  5. The Plume Chaser mission: Two-spacecraft search for organics on the dwarf planet Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Michael; Mauro, David; Stupl, Jan; Aziz, Jonathan; Colaprete, Anthony; Dono-Perez, Andres; Frost, Chad; Jonsson, Jonas; McKay, Chris; Sears, Derek; Soulage, Michael; Swenson, Jason; Yang, Fan Yang

    2016-03-01

    We present a mission concept designed at NASA Ames Research Center for a two-probe mission to the dwarf planet Ceres, utilizing a set of small low-cost spacecraft. The primary spacecraft will carry both a mass and an infrared spectrometer to characterize water vapor detected to be emanating from Ceres. Shortly after its arrival a second identical spacecraft will impact Ceres to create an ejecta "plume" timed to enable a rendezvous and sampling by the primary spacecraft. This enables additional subsurface chemistry, volatile content and material characterization, and new science complementary to the Dawn spacecraft, the first to arrive at Ceres. Science requirements, candidate instruments, rendezvous trajectories, spacecraft design and comparison with Dawn science are detailed.

  6. 76 FR 19766 - Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities OMB Responses AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... 1808.06; Environmental Impact Assessment of Nongovernmental Activities in Antarctica (Renewal); 40...

  7. Impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) actions on radiation protection of patients in many countries.

    PubMed

    Rehani, Madan M; Tsapaki, Virginia

    2011-09-01

    In the 1990s, there was a lack of information on patient doses in most developing countries. In 2004, the International Atomic Energy Agency initiated projects aimed at assessing 'how safe are patients in radiological procedures and how to make them safer'. The major obstacle was a lack of medical physicists with patient dosimetry skills and a lack of dosimetry facilities. Actions taken were such as to yield results within a short span of time and a number of publications with interesting findings. Results showed that while patient doses in radiography are largely within diagnostic reference levels (DRLs), poor image quality is rampant. In mammography, CT and interventional procedures, doses higher than DRLs were observed. Dose management actions were implemented and significant improvements emerged. Utilising existing manpower (physicists, regulators, radiographers, radiologists), preparing detailed guidelines and data collection forms, focussing training on acquiring dosimetry skills, a system of periodic reports with mentoring and motivating collaborations within each country are some of the reasons for the success of the project. PMID:21725082

  8. Science Goal Driven Observing and Spacecraft Autonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jeremy; Grosvenor, Sandy; Korathkar, Anuradha; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Wolf, Karl; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Spacecraft autonomy will be an integral part of mission operations in the coming decade. While recent missions have made great strides in the ability to autonomously monitor and react to changing health and physical status of spacecraft, little progress has been made in responding quickly to science driven events. For observations of inherently variable targets and targets of opportunity, the ability to recognize early if an observation will meet the science goals of a program, and react accordingly, can have a major positive impact on the overall scientific returns of an observatory and on its operational costs. If the onboard software can reprioritize the schedule to focus on alternate targets, discard uninteresting observations prior to downloading, or download a subset of observations at a reduced resolution, the spacecraft's overall efficiency will be dramatically increased. The science goal monitoring (SGM) system is a proof- of-concept effort to address the above challenge. The SGM will have an interface to help capture higher-level science goals from the scientists and translate them into a flexible observing strategy that SGM can execute and monitor. We are developing an interactive distributed system that will use on-board processing and storage combined with event-driven interfaces with ground-based processing and operations, to enable fast re-prioritization of observing schedules, and to minimize time spent on non-optimized observations. This paper will focus on our strategy for developing SGM and the technical challenges that we have encountered. We will discuss the SGM architecture as it applies to the proposed MIDEX-class mission Kronos. However, the architecture and interfaces will also be designed for easy adaptability to other observing platforms, including ground-based systems and to work with different scheduling and pipeline processing systems.

  9. Software Architecture for Autonomous Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Jimmy S.

    1997-01-01

    The thesis objective is to design an autonomous spacecraft architecture to perform both deliberative and reactive behaviors. The Autonomous Small Planet In-Situ Reaction to Events (ASPIRE) project uses the architecture to integrate several autonomous technologies for a comet orbiter mission.

  10. Spacecraft materials HCl susceptibility assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C.-T.; Liu, De-Ling; Kim, Hyun; Alaan, Diana R.

    2014-09-01

    The susceptibility of spacecraft materials to HCl exposure was investigated in light of concerns to potential contamination during evolved expendable launch vehicle (EELV) overflight scenarios. Overflight refers to the circumstance where one spacecraft, resident on a launch pad, may be exposed to HCl generated from an earlier solid rocket launch at an adjacent pad. One aspect of the overflight risk assessments involves spacecraft materials susceptibility to HCl exposure. This study examined a wide range of spacecraft materials after being exposed to HCl vapor in a well-characterized facility. Sample thermal/optical and electrostatic dissipation properties, as well as surface chemical and morphological features, were characterized before and after the HCl exposure. All materials tested, except for indium tin oxide (ITO) coated Kapton film, showed no significant degradation after HCl exposure of up to 4800 ppb-hr. The ITO coated Kapton sample showed slight signs of degradation after being exposed to 500 ppb-hr HCl, as the surface resistance was increased by a factor of 5. However, the potential HCl dose inside the payload fairing (PLF) was estimated to be far below 500 ppb-hr in an EELV overflight event. These results, along with other relevant laboratory test data on the HCl removal efficiency of the filtration media used on the launch sites, provide the technical rationale that properly filtered air as the PLF purge should pose little risk in terms of HCl contamination under EELV overflight scenarios.

  11. Spacecraft Modularity for Serviceable Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossetti, Dino; Keer, Beth; Panek, John; Reed, Benjamin; Cepollina, Frank; Ritter, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Satellite servicing has been a proven capability of NASA since the first servicing missions in the 1980s with astronauts on the space shuttle. This capability enabled the on-orbit assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) and saved the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) mission following the discovery of the flawed primary mirror. The effectiveness and scope of servicing opportunities, especially using robotic servicers, is a function of how cooperative a spacecraft is. In this paper, modularity will be presented as a critical design aspect for a spacecraft that is cooperative from a servicing perspective. Different features of modularity are discussed using examples from HST and the Multimission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) program from the 1980s and 1990s. The benefits of modularity will be presented including those directly related to servicing and those outside of servicing including reduced costs and increased flexibility. The new Reconfigurable Operational spacecraft for Science and Exploration (ROSE) concept is introduced as an affordable implementation of modularity that provides cost savings and flexibility. Key aspects of the ROSE architecture are discussed such as the module design and the distributed avionics architecture. The ROSE concept builds on the experience from MMS and due to its modularity, would be highly suitable as a future client for on-orbit servicing.

  12. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  13. Voyager Spacecraft During Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Two Voyager spacecraft were launched in 1977 to explore the outer planets and some of their satellites. A prototype Voyager spacecraft is shown at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, as it successfully passed vibration tests which simulated the expected launch environment. The large parabolic antenna at the top is 3.7 meters in diameter and was used at both S-band and X-band radio frequencies for communicating with Earth over the great distances from the outer planets. The spacecraft received electrical power from three nuclear power sources (lower left). The shiny cylinder on the left side under the antenna contained a folded boom, which extended after launch to hold a magnetometer instrument thirteen meters away from the body of the spacecraft. The truss-like structure on the right side is the stowed instrument boom which supported three science instruments and a scan platform. The scan platform allowed the accurate pointing of two cameras and three other science instruments at Jupiter, Saturn, the rings of Saturn, Jupiter's moons, Saturn's moons, Uranus, moons of Uranus, and Neptune.

  14. Next Vital Step: Spacecraft Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter was delivered in two large containers from Lockheed Martin to Cape Canaveral on an Air Force C-17 cargo plane. Over the next several months, engineers and technicians will prepare the spacecraft for its scheduled launch in August.

  15. Spacecraft communications terminal breadboard components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The C-band translator, transmitter, and attenuator are described for the spacecraft communication terminal breadboard components. The block diagram is also included for the C-band receiver. The system performance data and the mechanical properties of the system are briefly considered.

  16. An Autonomous Spacecraft Agent Prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pell, Barney; Bernard, Douglas E.; Chien, Steve A.; Gat, Erann; Muscettola, Nicola; Nayak, P. Pandurang; Wagner, Michael D.; Williams, Brian C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the New Millennium Remote Agent (NMRA) architecture for autonomous spacecraft control systems. This architecture integrates traditional real-time monitoring and control with constraint-based planning and scheduling, robust multi-threaded execution, and model-based diagnosis and reconfiguration.

  17. Transparent electrically conducting thin films for spacecraft temperature control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, G.; Heaney, J. B.; Toft, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    Thin transparent films of In2O3 or In2O3 + SnO2 prepared by evaporation or sputtering have been tested for use as surface layers for spacecraft temperature control coatings. The films are intended to prevent nonuniform electric charge buildup on the spacecraft exterior. Film thicknesses of 300 to 500 A were found to be optimal in terms of durability and minimum impact on the solar absorptance and the thermal emissivity of the underlayers. As a verification of their suitability for long-duration space missions, the films were subjected to simulated solar UV plus proton irradiation in a vacuum.

  18. The physiology of spacecraft and space suit atmosphere selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waligora, J. M.; Horrigan, D. J.; Nicogossian, A.

    1991-01-01

    Factors which are considered in arriving at control values and control ranges of the parameters established for spacecraft and space suit environments include physiological, engineering, operational cost, and safety considerations. A number of physiological considerations are discussed, including hypoxia and hyperoxia, hypercapnia, temperature regulation, and decompression sickness. The impact of these considerations on space craft and space suit atmosphere selection is considered. The past experience in controlling these parameters in the U.S. and Soviet spacecraft and space suits and the associated physical responses are also reviewed. Physiological factors currently under investigation are discussed, including decompression sickness.

  19. Target Search & Selection for the DI/EPOXI Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebow, Daniel J.; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Chesley, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Upon completion of the Hartley 2 flyby in November 2010, the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft resided in a solar orbit without possibility for gravity assist with any large body. Conservative estimates of remaining fuel were enough to provide only an 18 m/s impulse on the spacecraft. We present our method and results of our systematic scan of potential small body encounters for DI, and our criteria to narrow the selection to the asteroid 2002 GT as the target flyby body. The mission profile has two deterministic maneuvers to achieve the encounter, the first of which executed on November 25, 2011.

  20. Target Search and Selection for the DI/EPOXI Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebow, Daniel J.; Bhaskaran, Shyam; Chesley, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Upon completion of the Hartley 2 flyby in November 2010, the Deep Impact (DI) spacecraft resided in a solar orbit without possibility for gravity assist with any large body. Conservative estimates of remaining fuel were enough to provide only an 18 m/s impulse on the spacecraft. We present our method and results of our systematic scan of potential small body encounters for DI, and our criteria to narrow the selection to the asteroid 2002 GT as the target flyby body. The mission profile has two deterministic maneuvers to achieve the encounter, the first of which executed on November 25, 2011.

  1. A review of the methods used by the US Environmental Protection Agency to assess the financial impacts of the repository regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pflum, C.G.; Mattson, S.R.; Matthusen, A.C.

    1994-02-16

    All Federal agencies must consider the financial impacts of their regulations. When costs significantly outweigh benefits, the Office of Management and Budget can recommend that Congress not provide the funds needed to implement the regulation. Without funds, the agency is forced to either revise or retract the regulation. This has happened previously with a regulation on uranium mill tailings proposed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and it could happen again with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations that govern the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The EPA (1985, 1992) claims that its regulation: ``Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Waste`` (40 CFR Part 191 or standards) does not increase costs above what the US Department of Energy (DOE) would spend anyway or, at most, what the DOE would spend to comply with 10 CFR Part 60: a regulation promulgated by the NRC. This report reviews and disputes the EPA claim. In Chapter 2 a summary of the basis for the EPA claim is presented and in Chapter 3 a critique of the basis of the claim is presented. This critique finds the EPA basis unrealistic, incomplete, and misleading. According to the EPA, a repository at Yucca Mountain would easily meet 40 CFR Part 191 even without the use of special engineered barriers. Because the NRC regulation (10 CFR Part 60) requires engineered barriers, the EPA places the onus for regulatory costs on the NRC. We disagree; the EPA standards drive regulatory costs as much as NRC regulations. The EPA has the higher responsibility for setting the overall standard for safety while the NRC can only implement this standard.

  2. Scheme of rendezvous mission to lunar orbital station by spacecraft launched from Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtazin, R. F.

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, great experience has been accumulated in manned flight astronautics for rendezvous in near-Earth orbit. During flights of Apollo spacecraft with crews that landed on the surface of the Moon, the problem of docking a landing module launched from the Moon's surface with the Apollo spacecraft's command module in a circumlunar orbit was successfully solved. A return to the Moon declared by leading space agencies requires a scheme for rendezvous of a spacecraft launched from an earth-based cosmodromee with a lunar orbital station. This paper considers some ballistic schemes making it possible to solve this problem with minimum fuel expenditures.

  3. A Low Cost Spacecraft Architecture for Robotic Lunar Exploration Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Lawrence G.; Gonzales, Andrew A.

    2006-01-01

    A program of frequent, capable, but affordable lunar robotic missions prior to return of humans to the moon can contribute to the Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) NASA is tasked to execute. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and its secondary payload are scheduled to orbit the moon, and impact it, respectively, in 2008. It is expected that the sequence of missions occurring for approximately the decade after 2008 will place an increasing emphasis on soft landed payloads. These missions are requited to explore intrinsic characteristics of the moon, such as hydrogen distribution in the regolith, and levitated dust, to demonstrate the ability to access and process in-situ resources, and to demonstrate functions critical to supporting human presence, such as automated precision navigation and landing. Additional factors governing the design of spacecraft to accomplish this diverse set of objectives are: operating within a relatively modest funding profile, the need tb visit multiple sites (both polar and equatorial) repeatedly, and to use the current generation of launch vehicles. In the US, this implies use of the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicles, or EELVs, although this design philosophy may be extended to launch vehicles of other nations, as well. Many of these factors are seemingly inconsistent with each other. For example, the cost of a spacecraft usually increases with mass; therefore the desire to fly frequent, modestly priced spacecraft seems to imply small spacecraft (< 1 Mt, injected mass). On the other hand, the smallest of the EELVs will inject approx. 3 Mt. on a Trans Lunar Injection (TLI) trajectory md would therefore be wasteful or launching a single, small spacecraft. Increasing the technical capability of a spacecraft (such as autonomous navigation and soft landing) also usually increases cost. A strategy for spacecraft design that meets these conflicting requirements is presented. Taken together, spacecraft structure and propulsion subsystems

  4. Amoco/Environmental Protection Agency Pollution Prevention Project, Yorktown, Virginia. Ecological impacts of the Yorktown Refinery on the York River estuarine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The volume includes the findings of a two-phase (laboratory and field) assessment of the potential use of biomarkers to evaluate the impact of the Refinery effluent on the York River. The study was jointly sponsored as a cooperative effort of Amoco Corporation and the United States Environmental Protection Agency. In the laboratory phase of the study, several of the biomarkers tested responded to various dilutions of process water effluent in an apparent dose-dependent manner. In the field study, however, there was little evidence that similar exposure is occurring in fish collected from the York River mainstream. The field data did suggest PAH exposure in fish collected from the stormwater settling pond and perhaps from the creek below the pond.

  5. The Predicted Growth of the Low Earth Orbit Space Debris Environment: An Assessment of Future Risk for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisko, Paula H.

    2007-01-01

    Space debris is a worldwide-recognized issue concerning the safety of commercial, military, and exploration spacecraft. The space debris environment includes both naturally occuring meteoroids and objects in Earth orbit that are generated by human activity, termed orbital debris. Space agencies around the world are addressing the dangers of debris collisions to both crewed and robotic spacecraft. In the United States, the Orbital Debris Program Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center leads the effort to categorize debris, predict its growth, and formulate mitigation policy for the environment from low Earth orbit (LEO) through geosynchronous orbit (GEO). This paper presents recent results derived from the NASA long-term debris environment model, LEGEND. It includes the revised NASA sodium potassium droplet model, newly corrected for a factor of two over-estimation of the droplet population. The study indicates a LEO environment that is already highly collisionally active among orbital debris larger than 1 cm in size. Most of the modeled collision events are non-catastrophic (i.e., They lead to a cratering of the target, but no large scale fragmentation.). But they are potentially mission-ending, and take place between impactors smaller than 10 cm and targets larger than 10 cm. Given the small size of the impactor these events would likely be undetectable by present-day measurement means. The activity continues into the future as would be expected. Impact rates of about four per year are predicted by the current study within the next 30 years, with the majority of targets being abandoned intacts (spent upper stages and spacecraft). Still, operational spacecraft do show a small collisional activity, one that increases over time as the small fragment population increases.

  6. The role of power integrated circuits in lightweight spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, John W.; Theisinger, Peter C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper will present definitions for smart power and power integrated circuits and show how, for a typical planetary spacecraft power system, a 37 percent reduction in mass, 89 percent reduction in parts and a 50 percent reduction in volume can be attained. Also discussed are the technology needs for isolation, monolithic current sensing, and high efficiency switching necessary to enable monolithic power structures, as well as various applications of power integrated circuits. A specific example will verify the projected reductions expected when power integrated circuits are implemented in future spacecraft designs. In conclusion, power-integrated circuits can impact the overall design of the spacecraft in all subsystems, not just the power sybsystem.

  7. Vibration Isolation and Stabilization System for Spacecraft Exercise Treadmill Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fialho, Ian; Tyer, Craig; Murphy, Bryan; Cotter, Paul; Thampi, Sreekumar

    2011-01-01

    A novel, passive system has been developed for isolating an exercise treadmill device from a spacecraft in a zero-G environment. The Treadmill 2 Vibration Isolation and Stabilization System (T2-VIS) mechanically isolates the exercise treadmill from the spacecraft/space station, thereby eliminating the detrimental effect that high impact loads generated during walking/running would have on the spacecraft structure and sensitive microgravity science experiments. This design uses a second stage spring, in series with the first stage, to achieve an order of magnitude higher exercise- frequency isolation than conventional systems have done, while maintaining desirable low-frequency stability performance. This novel isolator design, in conjunction with appropriately configured treadmill platform inertia properties, has been shown (by on-orbit zero-G testing onboard the International Space Station) to deliver exceedingly high levels of isolation/ stability performance.

  8. Risk-based Spacecraft Fire Safety Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostolakis, G.; Catton, I.; Issacci, F.; Paulos, T.; Jones, S.; Paxton, K.; Paul, M.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on risk-based spacecraft fire safety experiments are presented. Spacecraft fire risk can never be reduced to a zero probability. Probabilistic risk assessment is a tool to reduce risk to an acceptable level.

  9. Electrical Grounding Architecture for Unmanned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This handbook is approved for use by NASA Headquarters and all NASA Centers and is intended to provide a common framework for consistent practices across NASA programs. This handbook was developed to describe electrical grounding design architecture options for unmanned spacecraft. This handbook is written for spacecraft system engineers, power engineers, and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) engineers. Spacecraft grounding architecture is a system-level decision which must be established at the earliest point in spacecraft design. All other grounding design must be coordinated with and be consistent with the system-level architecture. This handbook assumes that there is no one single 'correct' design for spacecraft grounding architecture. There have been many successful satellite and spacecraft programs from NASA, using a variety of grounding architectures with different levels of complexity. However, some design principles learned over the years apply to all types of spacecraft development. This handbook summarizes those principles to help guide spacecraft grounding architecture design for NASA and others.

  10. Second Venus spacecraft set for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The launch phase of the Pioneer Venus Multiprobe spacecraft and cruise phases of both the Pioneer Venus Orbiter and the Multiprobe spacecraft are covered. Material pertinent to the Venus encounter is included.

  11. A Shaftless Magnetically Levitated Multifunctional Spacecraft Flywheel Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Ken; Thornton, Richard; Clark, Tracy; Beaman, Bob G.; Dennehy, Neil; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Presently many types of spacecraft use a Spacecraft Attitude Control System (ACS) with momentum wheels for steering and electrochemical batteries to provide electrical power for the eclipse period of the spacecraft orbit. Future spacecraft will use Flywheels for combined use in ACS and Energy Storage. This can be done by using multiple wheels and varying the differential speed for ACS and varying the average speed for energy storage and recovery. Technology in these areas has improved since the 1990s so it is now feasible for flywheel systems to emerge from the laboratory for spacecraft use. This paper describes a new flywheel system that can be used for both ACS and energy storage. Some of the possible advantages of a flywheel system are: lower total mass and volume, higher efficiency, less thermal impact, improved satellite integration schedule and complexity, simplified satellite orbital operations, longer life with lower risk, less pointing jitter, and greater capability for high-rate slews. In short, they have the potential to enable new types of missions and provide lower cost. Two basic types of flywheel configurations are the Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) and the Integrated Power and Attitude Control System (IPACS).

  12. Deep Space Networking Experiments on the EPOXI Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ross M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Space Communications & Navigation Program within the Space Operations Directorate is operating a program to develop and deploy Disruption Tolerant Networking [DTN] technology for a wide variety of mission types by the end of 2011. DTN is an enabling element of the Interplanetary Internet where terrestrial networking protocols are generally unsuitable because they rely on timely and continuous end-to-end delivery of data and acknowledgments. In fall of 2008 and 2009 and 2011 the Jet Propulsion Laboratory installed and tested essential elements of DTN technology on the Deep Impact spacecraft. These experiments, called Deep Impact Network Experiment (DINET 1) were performed in close cooperation with the EPOXI project which has responsibility for the spacecraft. The DINET 1 software was installed on the backup software partition on the backup flight computer for DINET 1. For DINET 1, the spacecraft was at a distance of about 15 million miles (24 million kilometers) from Earth. During DINET 1 300 images were transmitted from the JPL nodes to the spacecraft. Then, they were automatically forwarded from the spacecraft back to the JPL nodes, exercising DTN's bundle origination, transmission, acquisition, dynamic route computation, congestion control, prioritization, custody transfer, and automatic retransmission procedures, both on the spacecraft and on the ground, over a period of 27 days. The first DINET 1 experiment successfully validated many of the essential elements of the DTN protocols. DINET 2 demonstrated: 1) additional DTN functionality, 2) automated certain tasks which were manually implemented in DINET 1 and 3) installed the ION SW on nodes outside of JPL. DINET 3 plans to: 1) upgrade the LTP convergence-layer adapter to conform to the international LTP CL specification, 2) add convergence-layer "stewardship" procedures and 3) add the BSP security elements [PIB & PCB]. This paper describes the planning and execution of the flight experiment and the

  13. Improvement of the ephemerides of the Martian moons from the amelioration of the Martian spacecraft orbits: Investigating a data-arc splitting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashova, M.; Rosenblatt, P.; Lainey, V.; Le Maistre, S.; Marty, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Phobos and Deimos ephemerides have been recently improved, using numerical modeling of their motion and astrometric observations of their positions from images taken by both Earth-based telescopes and cameras onboard spacecraft. In order to compute moon ephemerides from the spacecraft images, the spacecraft position on the orbit has to be known as precisely as possible. We propose to investigate a data-arc splitting method, consisting of computing precise orbit of spacecraft using suitable data-arcs encompassing each astrometric observations instead of successive data-arcs disregarding the occurrence of these observations as usually done for spacecraft navigation orbits. In this study, we test our method on Phobos' photographic observations taken by the Mars Express (MEX) Super Resolution Camera (SRC). We especially investigate the impact of the data-arc length (2, 4 or 10 days) and of the position of photographic observations inside the data-arc (from near the starting epoch to near the ending epoch of the data-arc) on Phobos' positions. We first compute new MEX orbits from fitting a dynamical model of MEX motion to Doppler and ranging tracking data for these different data-arcs (using the GINS software developed by the French space agency CNES and further adapted at Royal Observatory of Belgium for planetary geodesy applications). Then, we compute the positions of Phobos as seen from our new MEX orbits and compare it with the positions obtained from astrometric observations in order to assess the improvement expected from our method. Once validated on the MEX data, we plan to apply our method to older spacecraft data (Mariner-9, Viking 1-2, …) in order to provide better spacecraft positions to derive better Phobos' positions. These new positions will then be used to re-compute a better Phobos' ephemeris. In fine, the goal of this new ephemeris is to improve the knowledge of several geophysical parameters of the Martian system (such as the secular acceleration

  14. Autonomy Architectures for a Constellation of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes three autonomy architectures for a system that continuously plans to control a fleet of spacecraft using collective mission goals instead of goals of command sequences for each spacecraft. A fleet of self-commanding spacecraft would autonomously coordinate itself to satisfy high level science and engineering goals in a changing partially-understood environment-making feasible the operation of tens of even a hundred spacecraft (such as for interferometer or magnetospheric constellation missions).

  15. SAS-A spacecraft magnetic tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, J. C.

    1970-01-01

    Magnetic tests were conducted on the spacecraft for: (1) alignment, compensation, calibration, and bias determination for the spacecraft three-axis vector magnetometer; (2) determination of permanent, induced, and stray magnetic moments of the spacecraft and compensation of permanent magnetic moments by permanent magnets; and (3) evaluation of the spin and attitude control system.

  16. Spacecraft and their Boosters. Aerospace Education I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coard, E. A.

    This book, one in the series on Aerospace Education I, provides a description of some of the discoveries that spacecraft have made possible and of the experience that American astronauts have had in piloting spacecraft. The basic principles behind the operation of spacecraft and their boosters are explained. Descriptions are also included on…

  17. Spacecraft instrument technology and cosmochemistry.

    PubMed

    McSween, Harry Y; McNutt, Ralph L; Prettyman, Thomas H

    2011-11-29

    Measurements by instruments on spacecraft have significantly advanced cosmochemistry. Spacecraft missions impose serious limitations on instrument volume, mass, and power, so adaptation of laboratory instruments drives technology. We describe three examples of flight instruments that collected cosmochemical data. Element analyses by Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers on the Mars Exploration Rovers have revealed the nature of volcanic rocks and sedimentary deposits on Mars. The Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the Lunar Prospector orbiter provided a global database of element abundances that resulted in a new understanding of the Moon's crust. The Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer on Cassini has analyzed the chemical compositions of the atmosphere of Titan and active plumes on Enceladus. PMID:21402932

  18. Spacecraft Tests of General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Current spacecraft tests of general relativity depend on coherent radio tracking referred to atomic frequency standards at the ground stations. This paper addresses the possibility of improved tests using essentially the current system, but with the added possibility of a space-borne atomic clock. Outside of the obvious measurement of the gravitational frequency shift of the spacecraft clock, a successor to the suborbital flight of a Scout D rocket in 1976 (GP-A Project), other metric tests would benefit most directly by a possible improved sensitivity for the reduced coherent data. For purposes of illustration, two possible missions are discussed. The first is a highly eccentric Earth orbiter, and the second a solar-conjunction experiment to measure the Shapiro time delay using coherent Doppler data instead of the conventional ranging modulation.

  19. Laser Diagnostics for Spacecraft Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald-Tenenbaum, Natalia

    2015-09-01

    Over the past several decades, a variety of laser diagnostic techniques have been developed and applied to diagnose spacecraft propulsion devices. Laser diagnostics are inherently non-intrusive, and provide the opportunity to probe properties such as temperature, concentration or number density of plume species, and plume velocities in the harsh environments of combustion and plasma discharges. This presentation provides an overview of laser diagnostic capabilities for spacecraft propulsion devices such as small monopropellant thrusters, arcjets, ion engines and Hall thrusters. Particular emphasis is placed on recent developments for time-resolved ion velocity measurements in Hall thruster plumes. Results are presented for one such diagnostic method, a time-synchronized CW-laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique based on a sample hold scheme. This method is capable of correlating measured fluorescence excitation lineshapes with high frequency current fluctuations in the plasma discharge of a Hall thruster and is tolerant of natural drifting in the current oscillation frequency.

  20. Solar power supply for spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, A.

    1981-12-15

    A solar power supply for a spacecraft comprises an array of semiconductor devices for photovoltaic conversion of sunlight into electrical energy. Each semiconductor device is secured by a substantially stress-free electrically conductive joint to a flexible dielectric substrate that can be folded into a compact stowage configuration or opened into an elongate operational configuration. The stress-free joint is formed by securing an electrical terminal of the semiconductor device to a stress-relieving electrical conductor that is affixed to the substrate. Preferably, the stress-relieving conductor is a metallic wire mesh, a peripheral portion of which is adhesively bonded to the substrate circumjacent an aperture in the substrate. A pattern of metallic traces formed on the substrate provides a circuit for connecting the wire mesh to connectors for coupling electrical power generated by the array of semiconductor devices to an electrical load on the spacecraft.

  1. Doppler tracking of planetary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    This article concerns the measurement of Doppler shift on microwave links that connect planetary spacecraft with the Deep Space Network. Such measurements are made by tracking the Doppler effect with phase-locked loop receivers. A description of equipment and techniques as well as a summary of the appropriate mathematical models are given. The two-way Doppler shift is measured by transmitting a highly-stable microwave (uplink) carrier from a ground station, having the spacecraft coherently transpond this carrier, and using a phase-locked loop receiver at the ground station to track the returned (downlink) carrier. The largest sources of measurement error are usually plasma noise and thermal noise. The plasma noise, which may originate in the ionosphere or the solar corona, is discussed; and a technique to partially calibrate its effect, involving the use of two simultaneous downlink carriers that are coherently related, is described. Range measurements employing Doppler rate-aiding are also described.

  2. Contingent plan structures for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, M.; Currie, K.; Tate, A.

    1987-01-01

    Most current AI planners build partially ordered plan structures which delay decisions on action ordering. Such structures cannot easily represent contingent actions. A representation which can is presented. The representation has some other useful features: it provides a good account of the causal structure of a plan, can be used to describe disjunctive actions, and it offers a planner the opportunity of even less commitment than the classical partial order on actions. The use of this representation is demonstrated in an on-board spacecraft activity sequencing problem. Contingent plan execution in a spacecraft context highlights the requirements for a fully disjunctive representation, since communication delays often prohibit extensive ground-based accounting for remotely sensed information and replanning on execution failure.

  3. Spacecraft environmental anomalies expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koons, H. C.; Gorney, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    A microcomputer-based expert system is being developed at the Aerospace Corporation Space Sciences Laboratory to assist in the diagnosis of satellite anomalies caused by the space environment. The expert system is designed to address anomalies caused by surface charging, bulk charging, single event effects and total radiation dose. These effects depend on the orbit of the satellite, the local environment (which is highly variable), the satellite exposure time and the hardness of the circuits and components of the satellite. The expert system is a rule-based system that uses the Texas Instruments Personal Consultant Plus expert system shell. The completed expert system knowledge base will include 150 to 200 rules, as well as a spacecraft attributes database, an historical spacecraft anomalies database, and a space environment database which is updated in near real-time. Currently, the expert system is undergoing development and testing within the Aerospace Corporation Space Sciences Laboratory.

  4. Spacecraft instrument technology and cosmochemistry

    PubMed Central

    McSween, Harry Y.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Prettyman, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements by instruments on spacecraft have significantly advanced cosmochemistry. Spacecraft missions impose serious limitations on instrument volume, mass, and power, so adaptation of laboratory instruments drives technology. We describe three examples of flight instruments that collected cosmochemical data. Element analyses by Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometers on the Mars Exploration Rovers have revealed the nature of volcanic rocks and sedimentary deposits on Mars. The Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the Lunar Prospector orbiter provided a global database of element abundances that resulted in a new understanding of the Moon’s crust. The Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer on Cassini has analyzed the chemical compositions of the atmosphere of Titan and active plumes on Enceladus. PMID:21402932

  5. Fire extinguishers for manned spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopylov, S.; Smirnov, N. V.; Tanklevsky, L. T.

    2015-04-01

    Based on an analysis of fires in the oxygen-enriched atmosphere conditions in spacecraft and other sealed chambers of various purposes, the most dangerous groups of fires are identified. For this purpose, groups were compiled to analyze dependences that describe the increase of fire hazard to a critical value. A criterion for determining timely and effective fire extinguishing was offered. Fire experiments in oxygen-enriched atmosphere conditions were conducted, and an array of experimental data on the mass burning rate of materials and their extinguishing by water mist was obtained. Relationships colligating an array of experimental data were offered. Experimental and analytical studies were taken as a basis for hand fire extinguisher implementation for manned spacecraft.

  6. Neonicotinoids impact bumblebee colony fitness in the field; a reanalysis of the UK’s Food & Environment Research Agency 2012 experiment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The causes of bee declines remain hotly debated, particularly the contribution of neonicotinoid insecticides. In 2013 the UK’s Food & Environment Research Agency made public a study of the impacts of exposure of bumblebee colonies to neonicotinoids. The study concluded that there was no clear relationship between colony performance and pesticide exposure, and the study was subsequently cited by the UK government in a policy paper in support of their vote against a proposed moratorium on some uses of neonicotinoids. Here I present a simple re-analysis of this data set. It demonstrates that these data in fact do show a negative relationship between both colony growth and queen production and the levels of neonicotinoids in the food stores collected by the bees. Indeed, this is the first study describing substantial negative impacts of neonicotinoids on colony performance of any bee species with free-flying bees in a field realistic situation where pesticide exposure is provided only as part of normal farming practices. It strongly suggests that wild bumblebee colonies in farmland can be expected to be adversely affected by exposure to neonicotinoids. PMID:25825679

  7. Teaching old spacecraft new tricks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farquhar, Robert; Dunham, David

    1988-01-01

    The technique of sending existing space probes on extended mission by altering their orbital paths with gravity-assist maneuvers and relatively brief rocket firings is examined. The use of the technique to convert the International Sun-Earth Explorer 3 mission into the International Cometary Explorer mission is discussed. Other examples are considered, including the extension of the Giotto mission and the retargeting of the Sakigake spacecraft. The original and altered trajectories of these three missions are illustrated.

  8. Radiation effects in spacecraft electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, James P.

    1989-01-01

    Effects on the internal spacecraft electronics due to exposure to the natural and enhanced space radiation environment will be reviewed. The emphasis will be placed on the description of the nature of both the exposure environment and failure mechanisms in semiconductors. Understanding both the system environment and device effects is critical in the use of laboratory simulation environments to obtain the data necessary to design and qualify components for successful application.

  9. Outgassing data for spacecraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. A., Jr.; Marriott, R. S.; Park, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    A system for determining the mass loss in vacuum and for collecting the outgassed compounds was developed. Outgassing data, derived from tests at 398 K (125 degrees C) for 24 hours in vacuum as per ASTM E 59577, are compiled for numerous materials for spacecraft use. The data presented are the total mass loss (TML) and the collected volatile condensable materials (CVCM). The various materials are compiled by likely usage and alphabetically.

  10. Autonomous spacecraft rendezvous and docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, J. C.; Almand, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A storyboard display is presented which summarizes work done recently in design and simulation of autonomous video rendezvous and docking systems for spacecraft. This display includes: photographs of the simulation hardware, plots of chase vehicle trajectories from simulations, pictures of the docking aid including image processing interpretations, and drawings of the control system strategy. Viewgraph-style sheets on the display bulletin board summarize the simulation objectives, benefits, special considerations, approach, and results.

  11. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  12. Effectiveness of spacecraft testing programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krausz, A.

    1980-01-01

    The need for testing under simulated mission operational conditions is discussed and the results of such tests are reviewed from the point of view of the user. A brief overview of the usal test sequences for high reliability long life spacecraft is presented and the effectiveness of the testing program is analyzed in terms of the defects which are discovered by such tests. The need for automation, innovative mechanical test procedures, and design for testability is discussed.

  13. Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative (SSTI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reppucci, George

    1995-01-01

    This is the second in a series of semi-annual reports that describe the technology areas being advanced under this contract and the progress achieved to date. The last technology report concentrated on the spacecraft. This report places greater emphasis on the payloads. White papers by several of the payload providers are attached. These are HSI, UCB, PRKE, and CAFE. This report covers the period from January 1995 through June 1995.

  14. Inhalation risk in low-gravity spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Paul; Sklar, Michael V.; Ramirez, W. Fred; Smith, Gerald J.; Morgenthaler, George W.; McKinnon, J. T.; Oberdörster, Günter; Schulz, Jon

    Inhalation risks on long-duration manned spaced flight include gasses chronically released by outgassing of materials, gasses released during spills, thermodegradation events (including fires) with their attendant particulates, and fire extinguishment. As an example, an event in which electronic insulation consisting of polytetrafluoroethylene undergoes thermodegradation on the Space Station Freedom was modeled experimentally and theoretically from the initial chemistry and convective transport through pulmonary deposition in humans. The low-gravity environment was found to impact various stages of event simulation. Critical unknowns were identified, and these include the extent of production of ultrafine particles and polymeric products at the source in low gravity, the transport of ultrafine particles in the spacecraft air quality control system, and the biological response of the lung, including alveolar macrophages, to this inhalation risk in low gravity.

  15. The drag coefficient of cylindrical spacecraft in orbit at altitudes greater than 150 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrero, F. A.

    1983-01-01

    The spacecraft of the Geopotential Research Mission (GRM) are cylindrical in form and designed to fly with their longitudinal axes parallel to their direction of flight. The ratio of length to diameter of these spacecraft is roughly equal to 5.0. Other spacecraft previously flown had corresponding ratios roughly equal to 1.0, and therefore the drag produced by impacts on the lateral surfaces of those spacecraft was not as large as it will be on the GRM spacecraft. Since the drag coefficient is essentially the drag force divided by the frontal area in flight, lateral impacts, when taken into account make the GRM drag coefficient significantly larger than the coefficients used before for shorter spacecraft. A simple formula is derived for the drag coefficient of a cylindrical body flying with its long axis along the direction of flight, and it is used to estimate the drag for the GRM. The formula shows that the drag due to lateral surface impacts depends on the ratio of length-to-diameter and on a coefficient C sub LS (lateral surface impact coefficient) which can be determined from previous cylindrical spacecraft flown with the same attitude, or can be obtained from laboratory measurements of momentum accommodation coefficients.

  16. Energy Storage Flywheels on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, Robert O.; Brown, Gary; Levinthal, Joel; Brodeur, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    With advances in carbon composite material, magnetic bearings, microprocessors, and high-speed power switching devices, work has begun on a space qualifiable Energy Momentum Wheel (EMW). An EMW is a device that can be used on a satellite to store energy, like a chemical battery, and manage angular momentum, like a reaction wheel. These combined functions are achieved by the simultaneous and balanced operation of two or more energy storage flywheels. An energy storage flywheel typically consists of a carbon composite rotor driven by a brushless DC motor/generator. Each rotor has a relatively large angular moment of inertia and is suspended on magnetic bearings to minimize energy loss. The use of flywheel batteries on spacecraft will increase system efficiencies (mass and power), while reducing design-production time and life-cycle cost. This paper will present a discussion of flywheel battery design considerations and a simulation of spacecraft system performance utilizing four flywheel batteries to combine energy storage and momentum management for a typical LEO satellite. A proposed set of control laws and an engineering animation will also be presented. Once flight qualified and demonstrated, space flywheel batteries may alter the architecture of most medium and high-powered spacecraft.

  17. Worldwide Spacecraft Crew Hatch History

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The JSC Flight Safety Office has developed this compilation of historical information on spacecraft crew hatches to assist the Safety Tech Authority in the evaluation and analysis of worldwide spacecraft crew hatch design and performance. The document is prepared by SAIC s Gary Johnson, former NASA JSC S&MA Associate Director for Technical. Mr. Johnson s previous experience brings expert knowledge to assess the relevancy of data presented. He has experience with six (6) of the NASA spacecraft programs that are covered in this document: Apollo; Skylab; Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP), Space Shuttle, ISS and the Shuttle/Mir Program. Mr. Johnson is also intimately familiar with the JSC Design and Procedures Standard, JPR 8080.5, having been one of its original developers. The observations and findings are presented first by country and organized within each country section by program in chronological order of emergence. A host of reference sources used to augment the personal observations and comments of the author are named within the text and/or listed in the reference section of this document. Careful attention to the selection and inclusion of photos, drawings and diagrams is used to give visual association and clarity to the topic areas examined.

  18. EVA dosimetry in manned spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Thomson, I

    1999-12-01

    Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) will become a large part of the astronaut's work on board the International Space Station (ISS). It is already well known that long duration space missions inside a spacecraft lead to radiation doses which are high enough to be a significant health risk to the crew. The doses received during EVA, however, have not been quantified to the same degree. This paper reviews the space radiation environment and the current dose limits to critical organs. Results of preliminary radiation dosimetry experiments on the external surface of the BION series of satellites indicate that EVA doses will vary considerably due to a number of factors such as EVA suit shielding, temporal fluctuations and spacecraft orbit and shielding. It is concluded that measurement of doses to crew members who engage in EVA should be done on board the spacecraft. An experiment is described which will lead the way to implementing this plan on the ISS. It is expected that results of this experiment will help future crew mitigate the risks of ionising radiation in space. PMID:10631334

  19. Lessons Learned in the Decommissioning of the Stardust Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Timothy W.

    2012-01-01

    The Stardust spacecraft completed its prime mission in 2006, returning samples from the coma of comet Wild 2 to earth in the sample return capsule. Still healthy, and in a heliocentric orbit, the Stardust spacecraft was repurposed for a new mission - Stardust NExT. This new mission would take the veteran spacecraft to a 2011 encounter with comet Tempel 1, providing a new look at the comet visited in 2005 by the Deep Impact mission. This extended mission for Stardust would push it to the limits of its fuel reserves, prompting several studies aimed at determining the actual remaining fuel on board. The results were used to plan mission events within the constraints of this dwindling resource. The team tracked fuel consumption and adjusted the mission plans to stay within the fuel budget. This effort intensified toward the end of the mission, when a final assessment showed even less remaining fuel than previously predicted, triggering a delay in the start of comet imaging during the approach phase. The flyby of comet Tempel 1 produced spectacular up close views of this comet, imaging previously seen areas as well as new territory, and providing clear views of the location of the 2005 impact. The spacecraft was decommissioned about a month after the flyby, revealing that the fuel tank was now empty after having flown successfully for 12 years, returned comet dust samples to earth, and flown by an asteroid and two comets.

  20. Uncertainty-based Optimization Algorithms in Designing Fractionated Spacecraft

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xin; Yuan, Jianping; Yue, Xiaokui

    2016-01-01

    A fractionated spacecraft is an innovative application of a distributive space system. To fully understand the impact of various uncertainties on its development, launch and in-orbit operation, we use the stochastic missioncycle cost to comprehensively evaluate the survivability, flexibility, reliability and economy of the ways of dividing the various modules of the different configurations of fractionated spacecraft. We systematically describe its concept and then analyze its evaluation and optimal design method that exists during recent years and propose the stochastic missioncycle cost for comprehensive evaluation. We also establish the models of the costs such as module development, launch and deployment and the impacts of their uncertainties respectively. Finally, we carry out the Monte Carlo simulation of the complete missioncycle costs of various configurations of the fractionated spacecraft under various uncertainties and give and compare the probability density distribution and statistical characteristics of its stochastic missioncycle cost, using the two strategies of timing module replacement and non-timing module replacement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the comprehensive evaluation method and show that our evaluation method can comprehensively evaluate the adaptability of the fractionated spacecraft under different technical and mission conditions. PMID:26964755

  1. Uncertainty-based Optimization Algorithms in Designing Fractionated Spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Ning, Xin; Yuan, Jianping; Yue, Xiaokui

    2016-01-01

    A fractionated spacecraft is an innovative application of a distributive space system. To fully understand the impact of various uncertainties on its development, launch and in-orbit operation, we use the stochastic missioncycle cost to comprehensively evaluate the survivability, flexibility, reliability and economy of the ways of dividing the various modules of the different configurations of fractionated spacecraft. We systematically describe its concept and then analyze its evaluation and optimal design method that exists during recent years and propose the stochastic missioncycle cost for comprehensive evaluation. We also establish the models of the costs such as module development, launch and deployment and the impacts of their uncertainties respectively. Finally, we carry out the Monte Carlo simulation of the complete missioncycle costs of various configurations of the fractionated spacecraft under various uncertainties and give and compare the probability density distribution and statistical characteristics of its stochastic missioncycle cost, using the two strategies of timing module replacement and non-timing module replacement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the comprehensive evaluation method and show that our evaluation method can comprehensively evaluate the adaptability of the fractionated spacecraft under different technical and mission conditions. PMID:26964755

  2. Uncertainty-based Optimization Algorithms in Designing Fractionated Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xin; Yuan, Jianping; Yue, Xiaokui

    2016-03-01

    A fractionated spacecraft is an innovative application of a distributive space system. To fully understand the impact of various uncertainties on its development, launch and in-orbit operation, we use the stochastic missioncycle cost to comprehensively evaluate the survivability, flexibility, reliability and economy of the ways of dividing the various modules of the different configurations of fractionated spacecraft. We systematically describe its concept and then analyze its evaluation and optimal design method that exists during recent years and propose the stochastic missioncycle cost for comprehensive evaluation. We also establish the models of the costs such as module development, launch and deployment and the impacts of their uncertainties respectively. Finally, we carry out the Monte Carlo simulation of the complete missioncycle costs of various configurations of the fractionated spacecraft under various uncertainties and give and compare the probability density distribution and statistical characteristics of its stochastic missioncycle cost, using the two strategies of timing module replacement and non-timing module replacement. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the comprehensive evaluation method and show that our evaluation method can comprehensively evaluate the adaptability of the fractionated spacecraft under different technical and mission conditions.

  3. The NASA Spacecraft Transponding Modem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, Jeff B.; Kayalar, Selahattin; Perret, Jonathan D.

    2000-01-01

    A new deep space transponder is being developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA. The Spacecraft Transponding Modem (STM) implements the standard transponder functions and the channel service functions that have previously resided in spacecraft Command/Data Subsystems. The STM uses custom ASICs, MMICs, and MCMs to reduce the active device parts count to 70, mass to I kg, and volume to 524 cc. The first STMs will be flown on missions launching in the 2003 time frame. The STM tracks an X-band uplink signal and provides both X-band and Ka-band downlinks, either coherent or non-coherent with the uplink. A NASA standard Command Detector Unit is integrated into the STM, along with a codeblock processor and a hardware command decoder. The decoded command codeblocks are output to the spacecraft command/data subsystem. Virtual Channel 0 (VC-0) (hardware) commands are processed and output as critical controller (CRC) commands. Downlink telemetry is received from the spacecraft data subsystem as telemetry frames. The STM provides the following downlink coding options: the standard CCSDS (7-1/2) convolutional coding, ReedSolomon coding with interleave depths one and five, (15-1/6) convolutional coding, and Turbo coding with rates 1/3 and 1/6. The downlink symbol rates can be linearly ramped to match the G/T curve of the receiving station, providing up to a 1 dB increase in data return. Data rates range from 5 bits per second (bps) to 24 Mbps, with three modulation modes provided: modulated subcarrier (3 different frequencies provided), biphase-L modulated direct on carrier, and Offset QPSK. Also, the capability to generate one of four non-harmonically related telemetry beacon tones is provided, to allow for a simple spacecraft status monitoring scheme for cruise phases of missions. Three ranging modes are provided: standard turn around ranging, regenerative pseudo-noise (PN) ranging, and Differential One-way Ranging (DOR) tones. The regenerative ranging provides the

  4. Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John F.; Haggerty, James J.; Woodburn, John H.

    1961-01-01

    In this twentieth century, we are privileged to witness the first steps toward realization of an age-old dream: the exploration of space. Already, in the first few years of the Space Age, man has been able to penetrate the layer of atmosphere which surrounds his planet and to venture briefly into space. Scores of man-made objects have been thrust into space, some of them to roam the solar system forever. Behind each space mission are years of patient research, thousands of man-hours of labor, and large sums of money. Because the sums involved are so enormous, the question is frequently asked, "Is it worth it?" Many people want to know what return this huge investment will bring to mankind. The return on the investment is knowledge. The accumulation of knowledge over the centuries has made possible our advanced way of life. As we unlock more and more of the secrets of the universe through space exploration, we add new volumes to the encyclopedia of man's knowledge. This will be applied to the benefit of mankind. For the practical-minded, there are concrete benefits to our way of life. Although we are still in the Stone Age of space exploration, a number of immediate applications of space technology are already apparent. For instance, imagine the benefits of an absolutely perfect system of predicting the weather. Or, going a step further, even changing the weather. And wouldn't it be fascinating to watch the next Olympic games, telecast from Tokyo, on your TV set? These are just a few of the practical benefits made possible by space technology.

  5. 40 CFR 1501.5 - Lead agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lead agencies. 1501.5 Section 1501.5 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY NEPA AND AGENCY PLANNING § 1501.5 Lead agencies. (a) A lead agency shall supervise the preparation of an environmental impact statement if more...

  6. 40 CFR 1501.5 - Lead agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lead agencies. 1501.5 Section 1501.5 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY NEPA AND AGENCY PLANNING § 1501.5 Lead agencies. (a) A lead agency shall supervise the preparation of an environmental impact statement if more...

  7. 40 CFR 1501.5 - Lead agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lead agencies. 1501.5 Section 1501.5 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY NEPA AND AGENCY PLANNING § 1501.5 Lead agencies. (a) A lead agency shall supervise the preparation of an environmental impact statement if more...

  8. 40 CFR 1501.5 - Lead agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lead agencies. 1501.5 Section 1501.5 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY NEPA AND AGENCY PLANNING § 1501.5 Lead agencies. (a) A lead agency shall supervise the preparation of an environmental impact statement if more...

  9. 40 CFR 1507.3 - Agency procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agency procedures. 1507.3 Section 1507.3 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AGENCY COMPLIANCE § 1507.3 Agency... environmental impact statements. (c) Agency procedures may include specific criteria for providing...

  10. 40 CFR 1507.3 - Agency procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Agency procedures. 1507.3 Section 1507.3 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AGENCY COMPLIANCE § 1507.3 Agency... environmental impact statements. (c) Agency procedures may include specific criteria for providing...

  11. 40 CFR 1507.3 - Agency procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Agency procedures. 1507.3 Section 1507.3 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AGENCY COMPLIANCE § 1507.3 Agency... environmental impact statements. (c) Agency procedures may include specific criteria for providing...

  12. 40 CFR 1501.5 - Lead agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lead agencies. 1501.5 Section 1501.5 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY NEPA AND AGENCY PLANNING § 1501.5 Lead agencies. (a) A lead agency shall supervise the preparation of an environmental impact statement if more...

  13. 40 CFR 1507.3 - Agency procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Agency procedures. 1507.3 Section 1507.3 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AGENCY COMPLIANCE § 1507.3 Agency... environmental impact statements. (c) Agency procedures may include specific criteria for providing...

  14. Maneuver analysis for spinning thrusting spacecraft and spinning tethered spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Kaela M.

    During axial thrusting of a spin-stabilized spacecraft undergoing orbital injections or control maneuvers, misalignments and center-of-mass offset create undesired body-fixed torques. The effects of the body-fixed torques, which in turn cause velocity pointing errors, can be reduced by ramping up (and then ramping down) the thruster. The first topic discussed in this thesis derives closed-form solutions for the angular velocity, Euler angles, inertial velocity, and inertial displacement solutions with nonzero initial conditions. Using the closed-form solutions, the effect of variations in the spin-axis moment of inertia and spin-rate on the spacecraft velocity pointing error are shown. The analytical solutions closely match numerical simulations. The next topic considers various ramp-up profiles (including parabolic, cosine, logarithmic, exponential, and cubic) to heuristically find a suboptimal solution to reduce the velocity pointing error. Some of the considered cosine, logarithmic, exponential, parabolic, and cubic profiles drive the velocity pointing error to nearly zero and hence qualify as effective solutions. The third topic examines a large tethered spacecraft that produces artificial gravity with the propulsion system on one end of the tether. Instead of thrusting through the center of mass, the offset thrust occurs at an angle to the tether which is held in the desired direction by changing the spin rate to compensate for decreasing propellant mass. The dynamics and control laws of the system are derived for constant, time-varying, planar, and non-planar thrust as well as spin-up maneuvers. The final topic discusses how the Bodewadt solution of a self-excited rigid body is unable to accurately predict the motion compared to a numerical integration of the equations of motion.

  15. Preventing Spacecraft Failures Due to Tribological Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    Many mechanical failures that occur on spacecraft are caused by tribological problems. This publication presents a study that was conducted by the author on various preventatives, analyses, controls and tests (PACTs) that could be used to prevent spacecraft mechanical system failure. A matrix is presented in the paper that plots tribology failure modes versus various PACTs that should be performed before a spacecraft is launched in order to insure success. A strawman matrix was constructed by the author and then was sent out to industry and government spacecraft designers, scientists and builders of spacecraft for their input. The final matrix is the result of their input. In addition to the matrix, this publication describes the various PACTs that can be performed and some fundamental knowledge on the correct usage of lubricants for spacecraft applications. Even though the work was done specifically to prevent spacecraft failures the basic methodology can be applied to other mechanical system areas.

  16. Optimization techniques applied to passive measures for in-orbit spacecraft survivability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mog, Robert A.; Price, D. Marvin

    1991-01-01

    Spacecraft designers have always been concerned about the effects of meteoroid impacts on mission safety. The engineering solution to this problem has generally been to erect a bumper or shield placed outboard from the spacecraft wall to disrupt/deflect the incoming projectiles. Spacecraft designers have a number of tools at their disposal to aid in the design process. These include hypervelocity impact testing, analytic impact predictors, and hydrodynamic codes. Analytic impact predictors generally provide the best quick-look estimate of design tradeoffs. The most complete way to determine the characteristics of an analytic impact predictor is through optimization of the protective structures design problem formulated with the predictor of interest. Space Station Freedom protective structures design insight is provided through the coupling of design/material requirements, hypervelocity impact phenomenology, meteoroid and space debris environment sensitivities, optimization techniques and operations research strategies, and mission scenarios. Major results are presented.

  17. Three spacecraft observe Jupiter's glowing polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-09-01

    again in 1994, when the fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 hit Jupiter in a spectacular series of events. The explosive impacts appeared to repress the auroral activity at the time, suggesting a remarkable effect of comet dust on the charged particles creating the aurorae in Jupiter's atmosphere. The new results on variability due to other causes will help astronomers to assess that effect more confidently. They will also compare the 1994 and 1996 IUE data to see how the atmosphere of Jupiter has recovered from the impacts. In Jupiter's vicinity IUE registered ultraviolet emissions from oxygen and sulphur atoms littering the orbit of Io, and probably released by volcanic emissions from that peculiar moon. This Io Torus is highly variable too. The record of its ultraviolet emissions, both within the 1996 campaign and in comparison with earlier observations, will help the astronomers to understand the reasons for the variations. A remarkable history The close scrutiny of Jupiter and its moons was the final astronomical task of IUE, before the termination of space operations on 30 September 1996. Over the past few months the IUE science team and collaborating astronomers in Europe have fulfilled a wish-list of important observations precluded by the intense demands on their ultraviolet space observatory throughout its life of nearly nineteen years. The observations in the final science programme confirmed and extended IUE's record, as the most reliable and productive astronomical satellite that ever flew. In March of this year the spacecraft was ailing, with only one of its six gyros still functioning, which severely limited the scope of its original mission. By skillful control and spacecraft engineering it went on harvesting new data, including prolonged observations of Comet Hyakutake. The concluding campaigns that began in April targeted the gamma-ray emitting "blazar" Markarian 421, various other active galaxies, and stellar winds, as well as Jupiter. "I am sad but

  18. Vulnerability of manned spacecraft to crew loss from orbital debris penetration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamsen, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    Orbital debris growth threatens the survival of spacecraft systems from impact-induced failures. Whereas the probability of debris impact and spacecraft penetration may currently be calculated, another parameter of great interest to safety engineers is the probability that debris penetration will cause actual spacecraft or crew loss. Quantifying the likelihood of crew loss following a penetration allows spacecraft designers to identify those design features and crew operational protocols that offer the highest improvement in crew safety for available resources. Within this study, a manned spacecraft crew survivability (MSCSurv) computer model is developed that quantifies the conditional probability of losing one or more crew members, P(sub loss/pen), following the remote likelihood of an orbital debris penetration into an eight module space station. Contributions to P(sub loss/pen) are quantified from three significant penetration-induced hazards: pressure wall rupture (explosive decompression), fragment-induced injury, and 'slow' depressurization. Sensitivity analyses are performed using alternate assumptions for hazard-generating functions, crew vulnerability thresholds, and selected spacecraft design and crew operations parameters. These results are then used to recommend modifications to the spacecraft design and expected crew operations that quantitatively increase crew safety from orbital debris impacts.

  19. Coffee-can-sized spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ross M.

    1988-01-01

    The current status and potential scientific applications of intelligent 1-5-kg projectiles being developed by SDIO and DARPA for military missions are discussed. The importance of advanced microelectronics for such small spacecraft is stressed, and it is pointed out that both chemical rockets and EM launchers are currently under consideration for these lightweight exoatmospheric projectiles (LEAPs). Long-duration power supply is identified as the primary technological change required if LEAPs are to be used for interplanetary scientific missions, and the design concept of a solar-powered space-based railgun to accelerate LEAPs on such missions is considered.

  20. Spacecraft transformer and inductor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    The conversion process in spacecraft power electronics requires the use of magnetic components which frequently are the heaviest and bulkiest items in the conversion circuit. This handbook pertains to magnetic material selection, transformer and inductor design tradeoffs, transformer design, iron core dc inductor design, toroidal power core inductor design, window utilization factors, regulation, and temperature rise. Relationships are given which simplify and standardize the design of transformers and the analysis of the circuits in which they are used. The interactions of the various design parameters are also presented in simplified form so that tradeoffs and optimizations may easily be made.

  1. Digital Doppler measurement with spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Hinedi, Sami M.; Labelle, Remi C.; Bevan, Roland P.; Del Castillo, Hector M.; Chong, Dwayne C.

    1991-01-01

    Digital and analog phase-locked loop (PLL) receivers were operated in parallel, each tracking the residual carrier from a spacecraft. The PLL tracked the downlink carrier and measured its instantaneous phase. This information, combined with a knowledge of the uplink carrier and the transponder ratio, permitted the computation of a Doppler observable. In this way, two separate Doppler measurements were obtained for one observation window. The two receivers agreed on the magnitude of the Doppler effect to within 1 mHz. There was less jitter on the data from the digital receiver. This was due to its smaller noise bandwidth. The demonstration and its results are described.

  2. Spacecraft platform cost estimating relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruhl, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The three main cost areas of unmanned satellite development are discussed. The areas are identified as: (1) the spacecraft platform (SCP), (2) the payload or experiments, and (3) the postlaunch ground equipment and operations. The SCP normally accounts for over half of the total project cost and accurate estimates of SCP costs are required early in project planning as a basis for determining total project budget requirements. The development of single formula SCP cost estimating relationships (CER) from readily available data by statistical linear regression analysis is described. The advantages of single formula CER are presented.

  3. Benefits of Spacecraft Level Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Scott; Kern, Dennis L.

    2015-01-01

    NASA-HDBK-7008 Spacecraft Level Dynamic Environments Testing discusses the approaches, benefits, dangers, and recommended practices for spacecraft level dynamic environments testing, including vibration testing. This paper discusses in additional detail the benefits and actual experiences of vibration testing spacecraft for NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) flight projects. JPL and GSFC have both similarities and differences in their spacecraft level vibration test approach: JPL uses a random vibration input and a frequency range usually starting at 5 Hz and extending to as high as 250 Hz. GSFC uses a sine sweep vibration input and a frequency range usually starting at 5 Hz and extending only to the limits of the coupled loads analysis (typically 50 to 60 Hz). However, both JPL and GSFC use force limiting to realistically notch spacecraft resonances and response (acceleration) limiting as necessary to protect spacecraft structure and hardware from exceeding design strength capabilities. Despite GSFC and JPL differences in spacecraft level vibration test approaches, both have uncovered a significant number of spacecraft design and workmanship anomalies in vibration tests. This paper will give an overview of JPL and GSFC spacecraft vibration testing approaches and provide a detailed description of spacecraft anomalies revealed.

  4. Three spacecraft observe Jupiter's glowing polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1996-09-01

    again in 1994, when the fragments of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 hit Jupiter in a spectacular series of events. The explosive impacts appeared to repress the auroral activity at the time, suggesting a remarkable effect of comet dust on the charged particles creating the aurorae in Jupiter's atmosphere. The new results on variability due to other causes will help astronomers to assess that effect more confidently. They will also compare the 1994 and 1996 IUE data to see how the atmosphere of Jupiter has recovered from the impacts. In Jupiter's vicinity IUE registered ultraviolet emissions from oxygen and sulphur atoms littering the orbit of Io, and probably released by volcanic emissions from that peculiar moon. This Io Torus is highly variable too. The record of its ultraviolet emissions, both within the 1996 campaign and in comparison with earlier observations, will help the astronomers to understand the reasons for the variations. A remarkable history The close scrutiny of Jupiter and its moons was the final astronomical task of IUE, before the termination of space operations on 30 September 1996. Over the past few months the IUE science team and collaborating astronomers in Europe have fulfilled a wish-list of important observations precluded by the intense demands on their ultraviolet space observatory throughout its life of nearly nineteen years. The observations in the final science programme confirmed and extended IUE's record, as the most reliable and productive astronomical satellite that ever flew. In March of this year the spacecraft was ailing, with only one of its six gyros still functioning, which severely limited the scope of its original mission. By skillful control and spacecraft engineering it went on harvesting new data, including prolonged observations of Comet Hyakutake. The concluding campaigns that began in April targeted the gamma-ray emitting "blazar" Markarian 421, various other active galaxies, and stellar winds, as well as Jupiter. "I am sad but

  5. 3D Direct Simulation Monte Carlo Modeling of the Spacecraft Environment of Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, A. M.; Tenishev, V.; Fougere, N.; Gombosi, T. I.; Hansen, K. C.; Combi, M. R.; Huang, Z.; Jia, X.; Toth, G.; Altwegg, K.; Wurz, P.; Jäckel, A.; Le Roy, L.; Gasc, S.; Calmonte, U.; Rubin, M.; Tzou, C. Y.; Hässig, M.; Fuselier, S.; De Keyser, J.; Berthelier, J. J.; Mall, U. A.; Rème, H.; Fiethe, B.; Balsiger, H.

    2014-12-01

    The European Space Agency's Rosetta mission is the first to escort a comet over an extended time as the comet makes its way through the inner solar system. The ROSINA instrument suite consisting of a double focusing mass spectrometer, a time of flight mass spectrometer and a pressure sensor, will provide temporally and spatially resolved data on the comet's volatile inventory. The effect of spacecraft outgassing is well known and has been measured with the ROSINA instruments onboard Rosetta throughout the cruise phase. The flux of released neutral gas originating from the spacecraft cannot be distinguished from the cometary signal by the mass spectrometers and varies significantly with solar illumination conditions. For accurate interpretation of the instrument data, a good understanding of spacecraft outgassing is necessary. In this talk we present results simulating the spacecraft environment with the Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (AMPS) code. AMPS is a direct simulation monte carlo code that includes multiple species in a 3D adaptive mesh to describe a full scale model of the spacecraft environment. We use the triangulated surface model of the spacecraft to implement realistic outgassing rates for different areas on the surface and take shadowing effects in consideration. The resulting particle fluxes are compared to the measurements of the ROSINA experiment and implications for ROSINA measurements and data analysis are discussed. Spacecraft outgassing has implications for future space missions to rarefied atmospheres as it imposes a limit on the detection of various species.

  6. Autonomy Architectures for a Constellation of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    Until the past few years, missions typically involved fairly large expensive spacecraft. Such missions have primarily favored using older proven technologies over more recently developed ones, and humans controlled spacecraft by manually generating detailed command sequences with low-level tools and then transmitting the sequences for subsequent execution on a spacecraft controller. This approach toward controlling a spacecraft has worked spectacularly on previous missions, but it has limitations deriving from communications restrictions - scheduling time to communicate with a particular spacecraft involves competing with other projects due to the limited number of deep space network antennae. This implies that a spacecraft can spend a long time just waiting whenever a command sequence fails. This is one reason why the New Millennium program has an objective to migrate parts of mission control tasks onboard a spacecraft to reduce wait time by making spacecraft more robust. The migrated software is called a "remote agent" and has 4 components: a mission manager to generate the high level goals, a planner/scheduler to turn goals into activities while reasoning about future expected situations, an executive/diagnostics engine to initiate and maintain activities while interpreting sensed events by reasoning about past and present situations, and a conventional real-time subsystem to interface with the spacecraft to implement an activity's primitive actions. In addition to needing remote planning and execution for isolated spacecraft, a trend toward multiple-spacecraft missions points to the need for remote distributed planning and execution. The past few years have seen missions with growing numbers of probes. Pathfinder has its rover (Sojourner), Cassini has its lander (Huygens), and the New Millenium Deep Space 3 (DS3) proposal involves a constellation of 3 spacecraft for interferometric mapping. This trend is expected to continue to progressively larger fleets. For

  7. Efficient Reorientation Maneuvers for Spacecraft with Multiple Articulated Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclamroch, N. Harris

    1993-01-01

    A final report is provided which describes the research program during the period 3 Mar. 1992 to 3 Jun. 1993. A summary of the technical research questions that were studied and of the main results that were obtained is given. The specific outcomes of the research program, including both educational impacts as well as research publications, are listed. The research is concerned with efficient reorientation maneuvers for spacecraft with multiple articulated payloads.

  8. Automated Spacecraft Conjunction Assessment at Mars and the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, David; Guinn, Joseph; Tarzi, Zahi; Demcak, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Conjunction assessment and collision avoidance are areas of current high interest in space operations. Most current conjunction assessment activity focuses on the Earth orbital environment. Several of the world's space agencies have satellites in orbit at Mars and the Moon, and avoiding collisions there is important too. Smaller number of assets than Earth, and smaller number of organizations involved, but consequences similar to Earth scenarios.This presentation will examine conjunction assessment processes implemented at JPL for spacecraft in orbit at Mars and the Moon.

  9. Electrolysis Propulsion for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim A.; Arrington, Lynn A.; McElroy, James F.; Mitlitsky, Fred; Weisberg, Andrew H.; Carter, Preston H., II; Myers, Blake; Reed, Brian D.

    1997-01-01

    Electrolysis propulsion has been recognized over the last several decades as a viable option to meet many satellite and spacecraft propulsion requirements. This technology, however, was never used for in-space missions. In the same time frame, water based fuel cells have flown in a number of missions. These systems have many components similar to electrolysis propulsion systems. Recent advances in component technology include: lightweight tankage, water vapor feed electrolysis, fuel cell technology, and thrust chamber materials for propulsion. Taken together, these developments make propulsion and/or power using electrolysis/fuel cell technology very attractive as separate or integrated systems. A water electrolysis propulsion testbed was constructed and tested in a joint NASA/Hamilton Standard/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories program to demonstrate these technology developments for propulsion. The results from these testbed experiments using a I-N thruster are presented. A concept to integrate a propulsion system and a fuel cell system into a unitized spacecraft propulsion and power system is outlined.

  10. Spacecraft nitrogen generation. [liquid hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, R. D.; Carlson, J. N.; Powell, J. D.; Kacholia, K. K.

    1974-01-01

    Two spacecraft nitrogen (N2) generation systems based on the catalytic dissociation of hydrazine (N2H4) were evaluated. In the first system, liquid N2H4 is catalytically dissociated to yield an N2 and hydrogen (H2) gas mixture. Separation of the N2/H2 gas mixture to yield N2 and a supply of H2 is accomplished using a polymer-electrochemical N2/H2 separator. In the second system, the N2/H2 gas mixture is separated in a two-stage palladium/silver (Pd/Ag) N2/H2 separator. The program culminated in the successful design, fabrication, and testing of a N2H4 catalytic dissociator, a polymer-electrochemical N2/H2 separator, and a two-stage Pd/Ag N2/H2 separator. The hardware developed was sized for an N2 delivery rate of 6.81 kg/d (15lb/day). Experimental results demonstrated that both spacecraft N2 generation systems are capable of producing 6.81 kg/d (15lb/day) of 99.9% pure N2 at a pressure greater than or equal to 1035 kN/m(2) (150 psia).

  11. Modeling Laser Effects on Imaging Spacecraft Using the SSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, P.; Smith, J.; Farmer, J.; Bonn, D.

    The Satellite Survivability Module (SSM) is an end-to-end, physics-based, performance prediction model for directed energy engagement of orbiting spacecraft. Two engagement types are currently supported: laser engagement of the focal plane array of an imaging spacecraft; and Radio Frequency (RF) engagement of spacecraft components. For laser engagements, the user creates a spacecraft, its optical system, any protection techniques used by the optical system, a laser threat, and an atmosphere through which the laser will pass. For RF engagements, the user creates a spacecraft (as a set of subsystem components), any protection techniques, and an RF source. SSM then models the engagement and its impact on the spacecraft using four impact levels: degradation, saturation, damage, and destruction. Protection techniques, if employed, will mitigate engagement effects. SSM currently supports several two laser and three RF protection techniques. SSM allows the user to create and implement a variety of "what if" scenarios. Satellites can be placed in a variety of orbits. Threats can be placed anywhere on the Earth. Satellites and threats can be mixed and matched to examine possibilities. Protection techniques for a particular spacecraft can be turned on or off individually; and can be arranged in any order to simulate more complicated protection schemes. Results can be displayed as 2-D or 3-D visualizations, or as textual reports. In order to test SSM capabilities, the Ball team used it to model engagement scenarios for a space experiment scheduled for the 2011 time frame. SSM was created by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. Systems Engineering Solutions in Albuquerque, New Mexico as an add-on module for the Satellite Tool Kit (STK). The current version of SSM (1.0) interfaces with STK through the Programmer's Library (STK/PL). Future versions of SSM will employ STK/Connect to provide the user access to STK functionality. The work is currently funded by the Air Force

  12. Terminal Guidance Navigation for an Asteroid Impactor Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaskaran, Shyam; Kennedy, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Near Earth Asteroids could potentially cause a great deal of devastation if one were to impact the Earth. If such an asteroid were found, the next step would be to mitigate the threat by one of several options, the most viable of which is to deflect the asteroids trajectory such that it misses the Earth by hitting it at a very high velocity with a spacecraft. The technology to perform such a deflection has been demonstrated by the Deep Impact (DI) mission, which successfully collided with comet Tempel 1 in July 2005 using an onboard autonomous navigation system, called AutoNav, for the terminal phase of the mission. In this paper, we evaluate the ability of AutoNav to impact a wide range of scenarios that an deflection mission could encounter, varying parameters such as the approach velocity, phase angle, size of the asteroid, and the determination of spacecraft attitude. Using realistic Monte Carlo simulations, we tabulated the probability of success of the deflection as a function of these parameters, and find the highest sensitivity to be due the spacecraft attitude determination mode. We conclude with some recommendations for future work.

  13. Closed Loop Terminal Guidance Navigation for a Kinetic Impactor Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhaskaran, Shyam; Kennedy, Brian

    2013-01-01

    A kinetic impactor spacecraft is a viable method to deflect an asteroid which poses a threat to the Earth. The technology to perform such a deflection has been demonstrated by the Deep Impact (DI) mission, which successfully collided with comet Tempel 1 in July 2005 using an onboard autonomous navigation system, called AutoNav, for the terminal phase of the mission. In this paper, we evaluate the ability of AutoNav to impact a wide range of scenarios that an deflection mission could encounter, varying parameters such as the approach velocity, phase angle, size of the asteroid, and the determination of spacecraft attitude. Using realistic Monte Carlo simulations, we tabulated the probability of success of the deflection as a function of these parameters, and the highest sensitivity to be due the spacecraft attitude determination mode. In addition, we also specifically analyzed the impact probability for a proposed mission which would send an impactor to the asteroid 1999RQ36. We conclude with some recommendations for future work.

  14. Active control of electric potential of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for controlling the potential of a spacecraft by means of devices which release appropriate charged particles from the spacecraft to the environment. Attention is given to electron emitters, ion emitters, a basic electron emitter arrangement, techniques for sensing electric field or potential, and flight experiments on active potential control. It is recommended to avoid differential charging on spacecraft surfaces because it can severely affect the efficacy of emitters. Discharging the frame of a spacecraft with dielectric surfaces involves the risk of stressing the dielectric material excessively. The spacecraft should, therefore, be provided with grounded conductive surfaces. It is pointed out that particles released by control systems can return to the spacecraft.

  15. Rapid Spacecraft Development: Results and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, William A.

    2002-01-01

    The Rapid Spacecraft Development Office (RSDO) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is responsible for the management and direction of a dynamic and versatile program for the definition, competition, and acquisition of multiple indefinite delivery and indefinite quantity contracts - resulting in a catalog of spacecraft buses. Five spacecraft delivery orders have been placed by the RSDO and one spacecraft has been launched. Numerous concept and design studies have been performed, most with the intent of leading to a future spacecraft acquisition. A collection of results and lessons learned is recorded to highlight management techniques, methods and processes employed in the conduct of spacecraft acquisition. Topics include working relationships under fixed price delivery orders, price and value, risk management, contingency reserves, and information restrictions.

  16. Pointing compensation system for spacecraft instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, Carl T. (Inventor); Gamble, Donald W. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A closed loop system reduces pointing errors in one or more spacecraft instruments. Associated with each instrument is a electronics package (3) for commanding motion in that instrument and a pointing control system (5) for imparting motion in that instrument in response to a command (4) from the commanding package (3). Spacecraft motion compensation logic (25) compensates for instrument pointing errors caused by instrument-motion-induced spacecraft motion. Any finite number of instruments can be so compensated, by providing each pointing control system (5) and each commanding package (3), for the instruments desired to be compensated, with a link to the spacecraft motion compensation logic (25). The spacecraft motion compensation logic (25) is an electronic manifestation of the algebraic negative of a model of the dynamics of motion of the spacecraft. An example of a suitable model, and computer-simulated results, are presented.

  17. Estimating Torque Imparted on Spacecraft Using Telemetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.; Macala, Glenn A.

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of missions with spacecraft flying by planetary moons with atmospheres; there will be future missions with similar flybys. When a spacecraft such as Cassini flies by a moon with an atmosphere, the spacecraft will experience an atmospheric torque. This torque could be used to determine the density of the atmosphere. This is because the relation between the atmospheric torque vector and the atmosphere density could be established analytically using the mass properties of the spacecraft, known drag coefficient of objects in free-molecular flow, and the spacecraft velocity relative to the moon. The density estimated in this way could be used to check results measured by science instruments. Since the proposed methodology could estimate disturbance torque as small as 0.02 N-m, it could also be used to estimate disturbance torque imparted on the spacecraft during high-altitude flybys.

  18. Spacecraft microbial burden reduction due to atmospheric entry heating: Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, C. C.; Jaworski, W.; Mcronald, A. S.; Hoffman, A. R.

    1973-01-01

    Planetary quarantine analyses performed for recent unmanned Mars and Venus missions assumed that the probability of contamination by a spacecraft given accidental impact was equivalent to one. However, in the case of the gaseous outer planets, the heat generated during the inadvertent entry of a spacecraft into the planetary atmosphere might be sufficient to cause significant microbial burden reduction. This could affect navigation strategy by reducing the necessity for biasing the aim point away from the planets. An effort has been underway to develop the tools necessary to predict temperature histories for a typical spacecraft during inadvertent entry. In order that the results have general applicability, parametric analyses were performed. The thermal response of the spacecraft components and debris resulting from disintegration was determined. The temperature histories of small particles and composite materials, such as thermal blankets and an antenna, were given special attention. Guidelines are given to indicate the types of components and debris most likely to contain viable organisms, which could contaminate the lower layers of the Jovian atmosphere (approximately one atmosphere of pressure).

  19. Best Practices for Reliable and Robust Spacecraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Patel, Naresh R.; Bonacuse, Peter J.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Gordon, S. A.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.; Daso, E. O.; Aggarwal, P.; Tillman, R. F.

    2007-01-01

    A study was undertaken to capture the best practices for the development of reliable and robust spacecraft structures for NASA s next generation cargo and crewed launch vehicles. In this study, the NASA heritage programs such as Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and the Space Shuttle program were examined. A series of lessons learned during the NASA and DoD heritage programs are captured. The processes that "make the right structural system" are examined along with the processes to "make the structural system right". The impact of technology advancements in materials and analysis and testing methods on reliability and robustness of spacecraft structures is studied. The best practices and lessons learned are extracted from these studies. Since the first human space flight, the best practices for reliable and robust spacecraft structures appear to be well established, understood, and articulated by each generation of designers and engineers. However, these best practices apparently have not always been followed. When the best practices are ignored or short cuts are taken, risks accumulate, and reliability suffers. Thus program managers need to be vigilant of circumstances and situations that tend to violate best practices. Adherence to the best practices may help develop spacecraft systems with high reliability and robustness against certain anomalies and unforeseen events.

  20. Hypervelocity impact physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, William P.; Bean, Alan J.; Darzi, Kent

    1991-01-01

    All large spacecraft are susceptible to impacts by meteoroids and orbiting space debris. These impacts occur at extremely high speed and can damage flight-critical systems, which can in turn lead to a catastrophic failure of the spacecraft. Therefore, the design of a spacecraft for a long-duration mission must take into account the possibility of such impacts and their effects on the spacecraft structure and on all of its exposed subsystems components. The work performed under the contract consisted of applied research on the effects of meteoroid/space debris impacts on candidate materials, design configurations, and support mechanisms of long term space vehicles. Hypervelocity impact mechanics was used to analyze the damage that occurs when a space vehicle is impacted by a micrometeoroid or a space debris particle. An impact analysis of over 500 test specimens was performed to generate by a hypervelocity impact damage database.

  1. EMI from Spacecraft Docking Systems Spacecraft Charging - Plasma Contact Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgard, John D.; Scully, Robert; Musselman, Randall

    2012-01-01

    The plasma contact potential of a visiting vehicle (VV), such as the Orion Service Module (SM), is determined while docking at the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Due to spacecraft charging effects on-orbit, the potential difference between the CEV and the VV can be large at docking, and an electrostatic discharge (ESD) could occur at capture, which could degrade, disrupt, damage, or destroy sensitive electronic equipment on the CEV and/or VV. Analytical and numerical models of the CEV are simulated to predict the worst-case potential difference between the CEV and the VV when the CEV is unbiased (solar panels unlit: eclipsed in the dark and inactive) or biased (solar panels sunlit: in the light and active).

  2. Fire suppression in human-crew spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Dietrich, Daniel L.

    1991-01-01

    Fire extinguishment agents range from water and foam in early-design spacecraft (Halon 1301 in the present Shuttle) to carbon dioxide proposed for the Space Station Freedom. The major challenge to spacecraft fire extinguishment design and operations is from the micro-gravity environment, which minimizes natural convection and profoundly influences combustion and extinguishing agent effectiveness, dispersal, and post-fire cleanup. Discussed here are extinguishment in microgravity, fire-suppression problems anticipated in future spacecraft, and research needs and opportunities.

  3. Timeline as Unifying Concept for Spacecraft Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinholtz, Kirk

    2012-01-01

    The notion of Timeline has been used informally in spacecraft operations software for some time, but it has not heretofore been formalized and unified either syntactically or semantically. We have formalized and unified the Timeline so that the commonality can be exploited to reduce the cost of developing and using spacecraft operations software. The Timeline can then be used as the common data structure for storage and communications between spacecraft planning and operations software elements.

  4. Spacecraft electronics design for radiation tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, R.D.

    1988-11-01

    Spacecraft electronics design for radiation tolerance is a complex subject, involving a detailed understanding of environment, component hardening, and design susceptibility. This paper describes current design practices and discusses future trends in spacecraft electronics which are likely to alter traditional approaches. A summary of radiation effects and radiation tolerance requirements typically levied on spacecraft designs is provided. Methods of dealing with radiation are then described, followed with testability issues.

  5. Neptune aerocapture mission and spacecraft design overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Robert W.; Hall, Jeff L.; Spliker, Tom R.; O'Kongo, Nora

    2004-01-01

    A detailed Neptune aerocapture systems analysis and spacecraft design study was performed as part of NASA's In-Space Propulsion Program. The primary objectives were to assess the feasibility of a spacecraft point design for a Neptune/Triton science mission. That uses aerocapture as the Neptune orbit insertion mechanism. This paper provides an overview of the science, mission and spacecraft design resulting from that study.

  6. Plasma Sterilization Technology for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, S. J.; Olson, R. L.; Leavens, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    The application of plasma gas technology to sterilization and decontamination of spacecraft components is considered. Areas investigated include: effective sterilizing ranges of four separate gases; lethal constituents of a plasma environment; effectiveness of plasma against a diverse group of microorganisms; penetrating efficiency of plasmas for sterilization; and compatibility of spacecraft materials with plasma environments. Results demonstrated that plasma gas, specifically helium plasma, is a highly effective sterilant and is compatible with spacecraft materials.

  7. 1997 Spacecraft Contamination and Coatings Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Philip T. (Compiler); Benner, Steve M. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains the presentation charts of talks given at the "1997 Spacecraft Contamination and Coatings Workshop," held July 9-10, 1997, in Annapolis, Maryland. The workshop was attended by representatives from NASA, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Department of Defense, industry, and universities concerned with the the spacecraft contamination engineering and thermal control coatings. The workshop provided a forum for exchanging new developments in spacecraft contamination and coatings.

  8. ISIS-B spacecraft magnetic tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Magnetic tests of the ISIS B spacecraft were conducted to determine the various magnetic moments of the spacecraft, evalute its spin and attitude control systems, and calibrate the six onboard magnetometer probes. Test procedures and equipment are described. Techniques for evaluting the data are discussed, and test results are presented. The spacecraft's magnetic characteristics were found to be satisfactory. Proper threshold values for gating the torquing coils were obtained. The onboard magnetometers were satisfactorily calibrated.

  9. Optimizing Spacecraft Placement for Liaison Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, C. Channing; Villac, Benjamin F.; Lo, Martin W.

    2011-01-01

    A navigation and communications network is proposed to support an anticipated need for infrastructure in the Earth-Moon system. Periodic orbits will host the constellations while a novel, autonomous navigation strategy will guide the spacecraft along their path strictly based on satellite-to-satellite telemetry. In particular, this paper investigates the second stage of a larger constellation optimization scheme for multi-spacecraft systems. That is, following an initial orbit down-selection process, this analysis provides insights into the ancillary problem of spacecraft placement. Two case studies are presented that consider configurations of up to four spacecraft for a halo orbit and a cycler trajectory.

  10. A spacecraft for the Earth observing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Raynor L.; Bordi, Francesco

    1995-04-01

    The space segment of NASA's Earth observing system (EOS) includes three series of intermediate-sized spacecraft, plus two smaller spacecraft. The EOS-AM spacecraft is the first of the intermediate-sized spacecraft. EOS-AM accommodates sensors that measure cloud and aerosol radiative properties, and that provide data to study the water and energy cycles. Scheduled for launch in the late 1990s, the EOS-AM spacecraft is designed for a 5-year mission. The spacecraft will be launched from the Western Space and Missile Center (California) into a polar, Sun-synchronous, low-Earth orbit with a 16-day repeat cycle. In its flight configuration, the spacecraft is almost 20 ft long (including instruments mounted at the fore end of the spacecraft) and 6 ft wide (in its widest dimension), has a mass of about 13,000 Ibs and uses about 3000 W of electrical power. The spacecraft is compatible with the Atlas IIAS launch vehicle. EOS-AM has on-board storage for at least two orbits of science data. These data will be transmitted to the ground via the tracking and data relay satellite system (using data structures and protocols in compliance with the recommendations of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems). A direct downlink system to support distributed users will also be available.

  11. Failures and anomalies attributed to spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, R. D.; Alexander, M. B. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The effects of spacecraft charging can be very detrimental to electronic systems utilized in space missions. Assuring that subsystems and systems are protected against charging is an important engineering function necessary to assure mission success. Spacecraft charging is expected to have a significant role in future space activities and programs. Objectives of this reference publication are to present a brief overview of spacecraft charging, to acquaint the reader with charging history, including illustrative cases of charging anomalies, and to introduce current spacecraft charging prevention activities of the Electromagnetics and Environments Branch, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  12. Whole-spacecraft shock isolation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Conor D.; Wilke, Paul S.

    2002-06-01

    Spacecraft are subjected to shock loads in the several thousands of g's level during their trip to orbit. These high shock loads usually result from some separation event, such as staging, spacecraft separation, and fairing separation. Shock loads are very detrimental to spacecraft components, instruments and electronics. A new type of shock isolation system is discussed. This shock system, referred to as the SoftRide ShockRing, is a whole-spacecraft isolation system, i.e., it shock isolates the complete spacecraft from the launch vehicle. Seven whole-spacecraft vibration isolation systems (SoftRide) have flown to date and flight data confirms large reductions of the dynamic loads on the spacecraft. The standard SoftRide system is a lower frequency isolation system than the ShockRing, vibration isolating the spacecraft starting in the approximately 25 Hz range. The ShockRing is targeted at shock loads and is set to isolate above approximately 75 Hz. Component tests have been performed on the ShockRing using a specially built pneumatic gun that can generate 10,000 g's on the test article. Results from these tests demonstrate substantial reductions of the shock being transmitted to the payload. Results from a system test consisting of a spacecraft simulator, payload attachment fittings, avionics section, and shock plate are discussed. In the system tests, pyrotechnic devices were used to obtain the high levels of shock for the tests.

  13. Outer planet spacecraft temperature testing and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, A. R.; Avila, A.

    2002-01-01

    Unmanned spacecraft flown on missions to the outer planets of the solar system have included flybys, planetary orbiters, and atmospheric probes during the last three decades. The thermal design, test, and analysis approach applied to these spacecraft evolved from the passive thermal designs applied to the earlier lunar and interplanetary spacecraft. The inflight temperature data from representative sets of engineering subsystems and science instruments from a subset of these spacecraft are compared to those obtained during the ground test programs and from the prelaunch predictions. Several lessons are presented with specific recommendations for considerations for new projects to aid in the planning of cost effective temperature design, test, and analysis programs.

  14. Ion thruster plume effects on spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Kuo, Y. S.

    1981-01-01

    A charge-exchange plasma, generated by an ion thruster, is capable of flowing upstream from the ion thruster and therefore represents a source of contamination to a spacecraft. An analytical model of the charge-exchange plasma density around a spacecraft was used to estimate the contamination which various spacecraft materials may be exposed to. Measurements of plasma density around an ion thruster were compared to this model. Results of experimental studied regarding the effects on various spacecraft materials' properties due to exposure to expected mercury contamination levels are presented.

  15. General Methodology for Designing Spacecraft Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gerald; Ocampo, Cesar; Mathur, Ravishankar; Morcos, Fady; Senent, Juan; Williams, Jacob; Davis, Elizabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    A methodology for designing spacecraft trajectories in any gravitational environment within the solar system has been developed. The methodology facilitates modeling and optimization for problems ranging from that of a single spacecraft orbiting a single celestial body to that of a mission involving multiple spacecraft and multiple propulsion systems operating in gravitational fields of multiple celestial bodies. The methodology consolidates almost all spacecraft trajectory design and optimization problems into a single conceptual framework requiring solution of either a system of nonlinear equations or a parameter-optimization problem with equality and/or inequality constraints.

  16. Ulysses spacecraft control and monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamer, P. A.; Snowden, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    The baseline Ulysses spacecraft control and monitoring system (SCMS) concepts and the converted SCMS, residing on a DEC/VAX 8350 hardware, are considered. The main functions of the system include monitoring and displaying spacecraft telemetry, preparing spacecraft commands, producing hard copies of experimental data, and archiving spacecraft telemetry. The SCMS system comprises over 20 subsystems ranging from low-level utility routines to the major monitoring and control software. These in total consist of approximately 55,000 lines of FORTRAN source code and 100 VMS command files. The SCMS major software facilities are described, including database files, telemetry processing, telecommanding, archiving of data, and display of telemetry.

  17. Galileo spacecraft system level environmental test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, A. R.; Schlue, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Project Galileo, the United States' next planetary mission, will be launched by the Shuttle/Centaur in May 1986. The Galileo spacecraft consists of both a planetary Orbiter and an atmospheric Probe. The spacecraft was environmentally tested as a system in the fall and winter of 1984/1985 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The protoflight qualification program consisted of vibration, acoustics, pyrotechnic shock, Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) and Solar Thermal Vacuum (STV) tests. This test program was accomplished on a large, complex, dual-spin spacecraft without the benefit of precursor spacecraft prototype tests. This paper discusses the objectives of these tests and the implementation, and summarizes the results.

  18. Formation Flying Spacecraft Concept for Heliophysics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Davila, Joseph; Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Shah, Neerav; Li, Steven X.

    2016-05-01

    A number of space-based heliophysics instruments would benefit from formation flying spacecraft. An occulter or a focusing optic such as a photon sieve could be mounted on a separate spacecraft rather than at the end of a boom. This would enable science measurements to be made on smaller, less expensive spacecraft. To accomplish this goal, the relative position of the spacecraft must be monitored and controlled to high precision. We describe two separate optical sensing systems that monitor relative position of the spacecraft to the level required for a photon sieve mission concept wherein the photon sieve is mounted on one spacecraft while the imaging detector is mounted on another. The first system employs a novel time of flight measurement of a laser beam that includes imbedded optical data packets. The contents of the returning data packet can be compared to the departing data packet to provide an extremely high resolution distance measurement. Employing three such systems allows measurement of pitch and yaw in addition to longitudinal separation. The second optical system monitors lateral motion. A mildy divergent laser beam is transmitted from one spacecraft to a sensor array on the second spacecraft. Monitoring the position of the brightest portion of the beam on the sensor array provides a direct measurement of lateral relative motion. Employing at least two such systems enables monitoring roll of the spacecraft as well as centration. We will also discuss low force thruster systems required for high precision station keeping.

  19. Evaluation of Sled Tests for Spacecraft Dynamic Environments using the Small Female and Large Male Hybrid III Anthropomorphic Test Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, Jessica A.; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Newby, Nathaniel J.; Putnam, Jacob F.; Currie-Gregg, Nancy J.; Lawrence, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Anthropomorphic test devices (ATD) are widely used for military and automotive applications. These ATDs have been correlated to certain types of human injuries largely involving automotive-type energetics and directions of impact. Spacecraft dynamic events involve very different impact characteristics and, in the case of landings, require lower levels of acceptable injury risk due to the certainty of impact occurrence. This test series evaluated the small female and large male Hybrid IIII ATDs for spacecraft dynamic events.

  20. Spacecraft Water Exposure Guidelines (SWEGs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    As the protection of crew health is a primary focus of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Space and Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) is vigilant in setting potable water limits for spaceflight that are health protective. Additional it is important that exposure limits not be set so stringently that water purification systems are unnecessarily over designed. With these considerations in mind, NASA has partnered with the National Research Council on Toxicology (NRCCOT) to develop spacecraft water exposure guidelines (SWEGs) for application in spaceflight systems. Based on documented guidance (NRC, 2000) NASA has established 28 SWEGs for chemical components that are particularly relevant to water systems on the International Space Station, the Shuttle and looking forward to Constellation.

  1. Rosetta spacecraft meets asteroid Steins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    Steins is Rosetta’s first nominal scientific target. The spacecraft will rendezvous with the asteroid in the course of its first incursion into the asteroid belt located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, while on its way to comet 67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The study of asteroids is extremely important as they represent a sample of Solar System material at different stages of evolution - key to understanding the origin of our own planet and of our planetary neighbourhood. The closest approach to Steins is due to take place on 5 September at 20:58 CEST (Central European Summer Time), from a distance of 800 km, during which the spacecraft will not be communicating with Earth. First ground contact with the spacecraft and announcement of successful fly-by will take place at 22:23 CEST. The first data and images collected by Rosetta will be sent to Earth throughout the night of 5 to 6 September and will undergo preliminary processing in the morning of 6 September. The first images will be made available for broadcasters via a special satellite feed on Saturday 6 September (details will be given on http://television.esa.int). To register for the events, please use the attached form. The press conference on 6 September will also be streamed on the ESA web: at http://www.esa.int/rosetta. Rosetta Steins Fly-By Doors open to the media 5 September 2008, 18:00, Building K ESA-ESOC Robert-Bosch Strasse 5, 64293 Darmstadt, Germany 18:00 - Doors open 18:00 - 19:00 Interview opportunities 19:00 - 20:15 Buffet dinner 20:15 - 20:30 The Steins Fly-By, Introduction by Paolo Ferri, Head of Solar and Planetary Missions Division (Mission Operations Dept.), ESA The crucial role of Flight Dynamics, by Trevor Morley, Rosetta Flight Dynamics Team, ESA 20:30 - 21:00 Live from Rosetta’s control room (loss of telemetry signal at 20:47) 22:23 - First telemetry on ground: signal of successful fly-by 23:00 - End of event Rosetta Steins Fly-By Press Conference 6 September 2008, 12

  2. Redundancy approaches in spacecraft computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonfeld, Chaim

    Twelve redundancy techniques for spacecraft computers are analyzed. The redundancy schemes include: a single unit; two active units; triple modular redundancy; NMR; a single unit with one and two spares; two units with one, two, and three spares; triple units with one and two spares; and a single unit with a spare per module; the basic properties of these schemes are described. The reliability of each scheme is evaluated as a function of the reliability of a single unit. The redundancy schemes are compared in terms of reliability, the number of failures the system can tolerate, coverage, recovery time, and mean time between failure improvement. The error detection and recovery systems and the random access memory redundancy of the schemes are examined. The data reveal that the single unit with a spare per module is the most effective redundancy approach; a description of the scheme is provided.

  3. Thermal insulating coating for spacecrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Raj K. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    To protect spacecraft and their contents from excessive heat thermal protection systems are essential. For such thermal protection, metal coatings, ceramic materials, ablative materials, and various matrix materials have all been tried, but none have been found entirely satisfactory. The basis for this thermal protection system is the fact that the heat required to melt a substance is 80 to 100 times larger than the heat required to raise its temperature one degree. This led to the use herein of solid-liquid phase change materials. Unlike conventional heat storage materials, when phase change materials reach the temperature at which they change phase they absorb large amounts of heat without getting hotter. By this invention, then, a coating composition is provided for application to substrates subjected to temperatures above 100? F. The coating composition includes a phase change material.

  4. Thermal Insulating Coating for Spacecrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Raj K. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    To protect spacecraft and their contents from excessive heat thermal protection system are essential. For such thermal protection, metal coatings, ceramic materials, ablative materials, and various matrix materials have all been tried, but none have been found entirely satisfactory. The basis for this thermal protection system is the fact that the heat required to melt a substance is 80 to 100 times larger than the heat required to raise its temperature one degree. This led to the use herein of solid-liquid phase change materials. Unlike conventional heat storage materials, when phase change materials reach the temperature at which they change phase they absorb large amounts of heat without getting hotter. By this invention, then, a coating composition is provided for application to substrates subjected to temperatures above 100 F. The coating composition includes a phase change material.

  5. Analysis of Reentry Survivability for UARS Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochelle, W.; Marichalar, J.; Johnson, N.

    The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), which was launched September 12, 1991 by the Space Shuttle STS-48, will be decommissioned in 2002-2003. It is currently planned to allow the spacecraft to reenter in an orbital decay mode. An analysis of reentry survivability of the UARS in this orbital decay mode was performed by Lockheed Martin Space Operations (LMSO), Houston, TX. The objective of this study was to use the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)/LMSO Object Reentry Survival Analysis Tool (ORSAT) to investigate reentry, breakup, demise, and impact of over 160 UARS components. The ORSAT code contains six general models of operation, including trajectory, atmosphere, aerodynamics, aeroheating, thermal, and debris casualty/ground impact risk. Objects are computed to demise in the code at the altitude at which the object's absorbed heat (defined as net heat rate integrated over time multiplied by surface area) becomes greater than the material heat of ablation. An updated version of ORSAT (Version 5.5) was used in this UARS analysis. This version enables objects to be evaluated in which parameters such as initial surface temperature, oxidation efficiency, mode of tumbling, breakup altitude, or other factors can be varied in a single object reentry simulation. The survivability factor (ratio of total absorbed heat on the object to its material heat of ablation) can be plotted as a function of some of these parameters. This information was used to make good engineering decisions of whether a borderline object (at the knee of the demise altitude/downrange plot) would demise or survive. This paper contains descriptions of the UARS spacecraft as modeled by ORSAT, method of approach (including assumptions), and results obtained. Plots showing such component reentry profiles as altitude, velocity, ballistic coefficient, heating rate, absorbed heat, surface temperature, and demise altitude are included. The analysis showed that

  6. Spacecraft Electrical Connector Selection and Application Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannello, Chris; Davis, Mitchell I; Kichak, Robert A.; Slenski, George

    2009-01-01

    This assessment was initiated by the NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) after a number of recent "high profile" connector problems, the most visible and publicized of these being the problem with the Space Shuttle's Engine Cut-Off System cryogenic feed-thru connector. The NESC commissioned a review of NASA's connector selection and application processes for space flight applications, including how lessons learned and past problem records are fed back into the processes to avoid recurring issues. Team members were primarily from the various NASA Centers and included connector and electrical parts specialists. The commissioned study was conducted on spacecraft connector selection and application processes at NASA Centers. The team also compared the NASA spacecraft connector selection and application process to the military process, identified recent high profile connector failures, and analyzed problem report data looking for trends and common occurrences. The team characterized NASA's connector problem experience into a list of top connector issues based on anecdotal evidence of a system's impact and commonality between Centers. These top issues are as follows, in no particular rank order: electrically shorted, bent and/or recessed contact pins, contact pin/socket contamination leading to electrically open or intermittencies, connector plating corrosion or corrosion of connector components, low or inadequate contact pin retention forces, contact crimp failures, unmated connectors and mis-wiring due to workmanship errors during installation or maintenance, loose connectors due to manufacturing defects such as wavy washer and worn bayonet retention, damaged connector elastomeric seals and cryogenic connector failure. A survey was also conducted of SAE Connector AE-8C1 committee members regarding their experience relative to the NASA concerns on connectors. The most common responses in order of occurrence were contact retention, plating issues, worn-out or damaged

  7. The THOR Project-Reducing the Impact of Thunderstorms on Aviation and the General Public Through a Multi-Agency Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephan B.; Pace, David; Goodman, Steven J.; Burgess, Donald W.; Smarsh, David; Roberts, Rita D.; Wolfson, Marilyn M.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Thunderstorms are high impact weather phenomena. They also pose an extremely challenging forecast problem. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA), and the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), have decided to pool technology and scientific expertise into an unprecedented effort to better observe, diagnose, and forecast thunderstorms. This paper describes plans for an operational field test called the THunderstorm Operational Research (THOR) Project beginning in 2002, the primary goals of which are to: 1) Reduce the number of Thunderstorm-related Air Traffic Delays with in the National Airspace System (NAS) and, 2) Improve severe thunderstorm, tornado and airport thunderstorm warning accuracy and lead time. Aviation field operations will be focused on the prime air traffic bottleneck in the NAS, the airspace bounded roughly by Chicago, New York City and Washington D.C., sometimes called the Northeast Corridor. A variety of new automated thunderstorm forecasting applications will be tested here that, when implemented into FAA-NWS operations, will allow for better tactical decision making and NAS management during thunderstorm days. Severe thunderstorm operations will be centered on Northern Alabama. NWS meteorologists from the forecast office in Birmingham will test the utility of experimental lightning, radar, and profiler data from a mesoscale observing network being established by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. In addition, new tornado detection and thunderstorm nowcasting algorithms will be examined for their potential for improving warning accuracy. The Alabama THOR site will also serve as a test bed for new gridded, digital thunderstorm and flash flood warning products.

  8. Impact of an Area Agency on Aging on the Quality of Life among Black and Whites in a Southern S.M.S.A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino-Richard, Terry; And Others

    The Area Agencies on Aging are the primary federally funded units charged with delivering basic services to older adults. A study of 145 older adults was conducted to determine the extent and effectiveness of services provided by a southern Area Agency on Aging (AAA) to an urban, black, elderly population in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Interview results…

  9. Elements of Terrorism Preparedness in Local Police Agencies, 2003-2007: Impact of Vulnerability, Organizational Characteristics, and Contagion in the Post-9/11 Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Aki; Roberts, John M., Jr.; Liedka, Raymond V.

    2012-01-01

    Different elements of local police agencies' terrorism preparedness may be associated with different organizational/environmental variables. We use 2003-2007 data (showing considerable adoption and desistance of practices) on medium-to-large-sized local agencies to examine relationships between contingency (vulnerability, organizational…

  10. Evaluation of Improved Spacecraft Models for GLONASS Orbit Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, J. P.; Sibthorpe, A.; Harvey, N.; Bar-Sever, Y.; Kuang, D.

    2010-12-01

    High-fidelity spacecraft models become more important as orbit determination strategies achieve greater levels of precision and accuracy. In this presentation, we assess the impacts of new solar radiation pressure and attitude models on precise orbit determination (POD) for GLONASS spacecraft within JPLs GIPSY-OASIS software. A new solar radiation pressure model is developed by empirically fitting a Fourier expansion to solar pressure forces acting on the spacecraft X, Y, Z components using one year of recent orbit data. Compared to a basic “box-wing” solar pressure model, the median 24-hour orbit prediction accuracy for one month of independent test data improves by 43%. We additionally implement an updated yaw attitude model during eclipse periods. We evaluate the impacts of both models on post-processed POD solutions spanning 6-months. We consider a number of metrics such as internal orbit and clock overlaps as well as comparisons to independent solutions. Improved yaw attitude modeling reduces the dependence of these metrics on the “solar elevation” angle. The updated solar pressure model improves orbit overlap statistics by several mm in the median sense and centimeters in the max sense (1D). Orbit differences relative to the IGS combined solution are at or below the 5 cm level (1D RMS).

  11. Coupled orbit-attitude dynamics and relative state estimation of spacecraft near small Solar System bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Gaurav; Izadi, Maziar; Sanyal, Amit; Scheeres, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The effects of dynamical coupling between the rotational (attitude) and translational (orbital) motion of spacecraft near small Solar System bodies is investigated. This coupling arises due to the weak gravity of these bodies, as well as solar radiation pressure. The traditional approach assumes a point-mass spacecraft model to describe the translational motion of the spacecraft, while the attitude motion is considered to be completely decoupled from the translational motion. The model used here to describe the rigid-body spacecraft dynamics includes the non-uniform rotating gravity field of the small body up to second degree and order along with the attitude dependent terms, solar tide, and solar radiation pressure. This model shows that the second degree and order gravity terms due to the small body affect the dynamics of the spacecraft to the same extent as the orbit-attitude coupling due to the primary gravity (zeroth order) term. Variational integrators are used to simulate the dynamics of both the rigid spacecraft and the point mass. The small bodies considered here are modeled after Near-Earth Objects (NEO) 101955 Bennu, and 25143 Itokawa, and are assumed to be triaxial ellipsoids with uniform density. Differences in the numerically obtained trajectories of a rigid spacecraft and a point mass are then compared, to illustrate the impact of the orbit-attitude coupling on spacecraft dynamics in proximity of small bodies. Possible implications on the performance of model-based spacecraft control and on the station-keeping budget, if the orbit-attitude coupling is not accounted for in the model of the dynamics, are also discussed. An almost globally asymptotically stable motion estimation scheme based solely on visual/optical feedback that estimates the relative motion of the asteroid with respect to the spacecraft is also obtained. This estimation scheme does not require a model of the dynamics of the asteroid, which makes it perfectly suited for asteroids whose

  12. Microbiological profiles of four Apollo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puleo, J. R.; Oxborrow, G. S.; Fields, N. D.; Herring, C. M.; Smith, L. S.

    1973-01-01

    The levels and types of microorganisms on various components of four Apollo spacecraft were determined and compared. Although the results showed that the majority of microorganisms isolated were those considered to be indigenous to humans, an increase in organisms associated with soil and dust was noted with each successive Apollo spacecraft.

  13. Recovery of Gemini 4 spacecraft and astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Recovery of Gemini 4 spacecraft and astronauts. Views include Astronaut James A. McDivitt, command pilot of the Gemini 4 space flight, sitting in life raft awaiting pickup by helicopter from the recovery ship, the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp (33490); Navy frogmen stand on the flotation collar of the Gemini 4 spacecraft during recovery operations (33491).

  14. Wet oxidation of a spacecraft model waste

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T.

    1985-01-01

    Wet oxidation was used to oxidize a spacecraft model waste under different oxidation conditions. The variables studied were pressure, temperature, duration of oxidation, and the use of one homogeneous and three heterogeneous catalysts. Emphasis is placed on the final oxidation state of carbon and nitrogen since these are the two major components of the spacecraft model waste and two important plant nutrients.

  15. The microwave radiometer spacecraft: A design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. L. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    A large passive microwave radiometer spacecraft with near all weather capability of monitoring soil moisture for global crop forecasting was designed. The design, emphasizing large space structures technology, characterized the mission hardware at the conceptual level in sufficient detail to identify enabling and pacing technologies. Mission and spacecraft requirements, design and structural concepts, electromagnetic concepts, and control concepts are addressed.

  16. Predicting Roll Angle Of A Spinning Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A.; Dyer, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Data for corrections of attitude derived on Earth from secondary measurements. Paper describes how attitude of Pioneer 10 spacecraft controlled since spacecraft lost signal from Sun-sensor signal. Roll calculations in paper yields insight into environment of solar system at great distances.

  17. MarcoPolo-R: Mission and Spacecraft Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacocke, L.; Kemble, S.; Chapuy, M.; Scheer, H.

    2013-09-01

    The MarcoPolo-R mission is a candidate for the European Space Agency's medium-class Cosmic Vision programme, with the aim to obtain a 100 g sample of asteroid surface material and return it safely to the Earth. Astrium is one of two industrial contractors currently studying the mission to Phase A level, and the team has been working on the mission and spacecraft design since January 2012. Asteroids are some of the most primitive bodies in our solar system and are key to understanding the formation of the Earth, Sun and other planetary bodies. A returned sample would allow extensive analyses in the large laboratory-sized instruments here on Earth that are not possible with in-situ instruments. This analysis would also increase our understanding of the composition and structure of asteroids, and aid in plans for asteroid deflection techniques. In addition, the mission would be a valuable precursor for missions such as Mars Sample Return, demonstrating a high speed Earth re-entry and hard landing of an entry capsule. Following extensive mission analysis of both the baseline asteroid target 1996 FG3 and alternatives, a particularly favourable trajectory was found to the asteroid 2008 EV5 resulting in a mission duration of 4.5 to 6 years. In October 2012, the MarcoPolo-R baseline target was changed to 2008 EV5 due to its extremely primitive nature, which may pre-date the Sun. This change has a number of advantages: reduced DeltaV requirements, an orbit with a more benign thermal environment, reduced communications distances, and a reduced complexity propulsion system - all of which simplify the spacecraft design significantly. The single spacecraft would launch between 2022 and 2024 on a Soyuz-Fregat launch vehicle from Kourou. Solar electric propulsion is necessary for the outward and return transfers due to the DeltaV requirements, to minimise propellant mass. Once rendezvous with the asteroid is achieved, an observation campaign will begin to characterise the

  18. Spacecraft Power Source Installation at Launch Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lytal, Paul; Hoffman, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    For certain space missions, an assembly must be integrated onto the spacecraft as late as possible in the launch vehicle processing flow. 12This late integration can be driven for a variety of reasons including thermal or hazardous materials constraints. This paper discusses the process of integrating an assembly onto a spacecraft as late as one week prior to the opening of the launch window. Consideration is given to achieving sufficient access for hardware integration, methods of remotely securing hardware to the spacecraft, maintaining spacecraft cleanliness throughout the integration process, and electrically integrating the component to the spacecraft. Specific examples are taken from the remote mechanical, electrical, and fluid cooling system integration of the power source onto the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover at the Atlas V Vertical Integration Facility (VIF) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

  19. Spacecraft command and control using expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, Scott; Grieser, William H.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a product called the Intelligent Mission Toolkit (IMT), which was created to meet the changing demands of the spacecraft command and control market. IMT is a command and control system built upon an expert system. Its primary functions are to send commands to the spacecraft and process telemetry data received from the spacecraft. It also controls the ground equipment used to support the system, such as encryption gear, and telemetry front-end equipment. Add-on modules allow IMT to control antennas and antenna interface equipment. The design philosophy for IMT is to utilize available commercial products wherever possible. IMT utilizes Gensym's G2 Real-time Expert System as the core of the system. G2 is responsible for overall system control, spacecraft commanding control, and spacecraft telemetry analysis and display. Other commercial products incorporated into IMT include the SYBASE relational database management system and Loral Test and Integration Systems' System 500 for telemetry front-end processing.

  20. Spacecraft Dynamics and Control Program at AFRPL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, A.; Slimak, L. K. S.; Schloegel, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    A number of future DOD and NASA spacecraft such as the space based radar will be not only an order of magnitude larger in dimension than the current spacecraft, but will exhibit extreme structural flexibility with very low structural vibration frequencies. Another class of spacecraft (such as the space defense platforms) will combine large physical size with extremely precise pointing requirement. Such problems require a total departure from the traditional methods of modeling and control system design of spacecraft where structural flexibility is treated as a secondary effect. With these problems in mind, the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) initiated research to develop dynamics and control technology so as to enable the future large space structures (LSS). AFRPL's effort in this area can be subdivided into the following three overlapping areas: (1) ground experiments, (2) spacecraft modeling and control, and (3) sensors and actuators. Both the in-house and contractual efforts of the AFRPL in LSS are summarized.

  1. Intelligent tutoring in the spacecraft command/control environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walter F.

    1988-01-01

    The spacecraft command/control environment is becoming increasingly complex. As we enter the era of Space Station and the era of more highly automated systems, it is evident that the critical roles played by operations personnel in supervising the many required control center system components is becoming more cognitively demanding. In addition, the changing and emerging roles in the operations picture have far-reaching effects on the achievement of mission objectives. Thus highly trained and competent operations personnel are mandatory for success. Keeping pace with these developments has been computer-aided instruction utilizing various artificial intelligence technologies. The impacts of this growing capability on the stringent requirements for efficient and effective control center operations personnel is an area of much concentrated study. Some of the research and development of automated tutoring systems for the spacecraft command/control environment is addressed.

  2. Implications of arcing due to spacecraft charging on spacecraft EMI margins of immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, G. T.

    1981-01-01

    Arcing due to spacecraft charging on spacecraft EMI margins of immunity was determined. The configuration of the P78-2 spacecraft of the SCATHA program was analyzed. A brushfire arc discharge model was developed, and a technique for initiating discharges with a spark plug trigger was for data configuration. A set of best estimate arc discharge parameters was defined. The effects of spacecraft potentials in limiting the discharge current blowout component are included. Arc discharge source models were incorporated into a SEMCAP EMI coupling analysis code for the DSP spacecraft. It is shown that with no mission critical circuits will be affected.

  3. Improving Spacecraft Data Visualization Using Splunk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conte, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    EPOXI, like all spacecraft missions, receives large volumes of telemetry data from its spacecraft, DIF. It is extremely important for this data to be updated quickly and presented in a readable manner so that the flight team can monitor the status of the spacecraft. Existing DMD pages for monitoring spacecraft telemetry, while functional, are limited and do not take advantage of modern search technology. For instance, they only display current data points from instruments on the spacecraft and have limited graphing capabilities, making it difficult to see historical data. The DMD pages have fixed refresh rates so the team must often wait several minutes to see the most recent data, even after it is received on the ground. The pages are also rigid and require an investment of time and money to update. To more easily organize and visualize spacecraft telemetry, the EPOXI team has begun experimenting with Splunk, a commercially-available data mining system. Splunk can take data received from the spacecraft's different data channels, often in different formats, and index all the data into a common format. Splunk allows flight team members to search through the different data formats from a single interface and to filter results by time range and data field to make finding specific spacecraft events quick and easy. Furthermore, Splunk provides functions to create custom interfaces which help team members visualize the data in charts and graphs to show how the health of the spacecraft has changed over time.One of the goals of my internship with my mentor, Victor Hwang, was to develop new Splunk interfaces to replace the DMD pages and give the spacecraft team access to historical data and visualizations that were previously unavailable. The specific requirements of these pages are discussed in the next section.

  4. Methodology for Developing a Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model of Spacecraft Rendezvous and Dockings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farnham, Steven J., II; Garza, Joel, Jr.; Castillo, Theresa M.; Lutomski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In 2007 NASA was preparing to send two new visiting vehicles carrying logistics and propellant to the International Space Station (ISS). These new vehicles were the European Space Agency s (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), the Jules Verne, and the Japanese Aerospace and Explorations Agency s (JAXA) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). The ISS Program wanted to quantify the increased risk to the ISS from these visiting vehicles. At the time, only the Shuttle, the Soyuz, and the Progress vehicles rendezvoused and docked to the ISS. The increased risk to the ISS was from an increase in vehicle traffic, thereby, increasing the potential catastrophic collision during the rendezvous and the docking or berthing of the spacecraft to the ISS. A universal method of evaluating the risk of rendezvous and docking or berthing was created by the ISS s Risk Team to accommodate the increasing number of rendezvous and docking or berthing operations due to the increasing number of different spacecraft, as well as the future arrival of commercial spacecraft. Before the first docking attempt of ESA's ATV and JAXA's HTV to the ISS, a probabilistic risk model was developed to quantitatively calculate the risk of collision of each spacecraft with the ISS. The 5 rendezvous and docking risk models (Soyuz, Progress, Shuttle, ATV, and HTV) have been used to build and refine the modeling methodology for rendezvous and docking of spacecrafts. This risk modeling methodology will be NASA s basis for evaluating the addition of future ISS visiting spacecrafts hazards, including SpaceX s Dragon, Orbital Science s Cygnus, and NASA s own Orion spacecraft. This paper will describe the methodology used for developing a visiting vehicle risk model.

  5. Improved Spacecraft Materials for Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Singleterry, R. C.; Tai, H.; Thibeault, S. A.; Simonsen, L. C.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Miller, J.

    1999-01-01

    In the execution of this proposal, we will first examine current and developing spacecraft materials and evaluate their ability to attenuate adverse biological mutational events in mammalian cell systems and reduce the rate of cancer induction in mice harderian glands as a measure of their protective qualities. The HZETRN code system will be used to generate a database on GCR attenuation in each material. If a third year of funding is granted, the most promising and mission-specific materials will be used to study the impact on mission cost for a typical Mars mission scenario as was planned in our original two year proposal at the original funding level. The most promising candidate materials will be further tested as to their transmission characteristics in Fe and Si ion beams to evaluate the accuracy of the HZETRN transmission factors. Materials deemed critical to mission success may also require testing as well as materials developed by industry for their radiation protective qualities (e.g., Physical Sciences Inc.) A study will be made of designing polymeric materials and composite materials with improved radiation shielding properties as well as the possible improvement of mission-specific materials.

  6. Imaging of Titan from the Cassini spacecraft.

    PubMed

    Porco, Carolyn C; Baker, Emily; Barbara, John; Beurle, Kevin; Brahic, Andre; Burns, Joseph A; Charnoz, Sebastien; Cooper, Nick; Dawson, Douglas D; Del Genio, Anthony D; Denk, Tilmann; Dones, Luke; Dyudina, Ulyana; Evans, Michael W; Fussner, Stephanie; Giese, Bernd; Grazier, Kevin; Helfenstein, Paul; Ingersoll, Andrew P; Jacobson, Robert A; Johnson, Torrence V; McEwen, Alfred; Murray, Carl D; Neukum, Gerhard; Owen, William M; Perry, Jason; Roatsch, Thomas; Spitale, Joseph; Squyres, Steven; Thomas, Peter; Tiscareno, Matthew; Turtle, Elizabeth P; Vasavada, Ashwin R; Veverka, Joseph; Wagner, Roland; West, Robert

    2005-03-10

    Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, is the only satellite in the Solar System with a substantial atmosphere. The atmosphere is poorly understood and obscures the surface, leading to intense speculation about Titan's nature. Here we present observations of Titan from the imaging science experiment onboard the Cassini spacecraft that address some of these issues. The images reveal intricate surface albedo features that suggest aeolian, tectonic and fluvial processes; they also show a few circular features that could be impact structures. These observations imply that substantial surface modification has occurred over Titan's history. We have not directly detected liquids on the surface to date. Convective clouds are found to be common near the south pole, and the motion of mid-latitude clouds consistently indicates eastward winds, from which we infer that the troposphere is rotating faster than the surface. A detached haze at an altitude of 500 km is 150-200 km higher than that observed by Voyager, and more tenuous haze layers are also resolved. PMID:15758990

  7. Analysis of reentry survivability of UARS spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochelle, W. C.; Marichalar, J. J.; Johnson, N. L.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis of reentry survivability of the NASA Goddard space flight center (GSFC) upper atmosphere research satellite (UARS) was performed by Lockheed Martin space operations (LMSO), Houston, TX. The objective of this study was to use the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson space center (JSC)/LMSO object reentry survival analysis tool (ORSAT) to investigate reentry, breakup, demise, and impact of approximately 160 specific components of the UARS. This paper contains descriptions of the UARS spacecraft as modeled by ORSAT, method of approach (including assumptions), and results obtained. The analysis showed that about 150 component types, including the parent body, will demise, and 12 types (26 counting multiple components) will survive. The components that survive produce a debris casualty area of 22 m 2, a surviving mass of 532 kg, a casualty risk of 1:2800, and a debris footprint length of nearly 800 km. The 22 m 2 debris casualty area reflects the results of a parametric assessment; otherwise the casualty area would have been larger.

  8. Orion spacecraft: crew radiation protection strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaza, Razvan; Cooper, Tim; Hussein, Hesham; Jarvis, Kandy; Mytyk, Anna; Patel, Chirag; Reddell, Brandon; Shelfer, Tad

    NASA's Project Constellation aims to return humans to the Moon by the year 2020, using a new generation of manned spacecraft. The Orion crew exploration vehicle (CEV) is the Constellation component inhabited by the crew during the trans-lunar transit and return trip. The ionizing radiation environment is significantly harsher in interplanetary space than in LEO, thus posing an increased risk for detrimental health effects. Minimizing crew radiation exposure on board Orion has been addressed by the prime contractor Lockheed Martin starting as early as the design phase of the vehicle. Radiation analysis of the CEV CAD models containing material and mass density information is used to assess the effective dose incurred by crew members. Ray-tracing is employed to reduce the 3D vehicle geometry and detailed anatomical models to sets of layered shielding configurations. Radiation transport is then modeled using 1-D analytical codes such as HZETRN. Shielding optimization is addressed iteratively, by evaluating the radiation exposure impacts of different protection strategies such as design changes (i.e., material selection), crew repositioning and cabin reconfiguration, and deploying individual shielding.

  9. NASA Spacecraft Fault Management Workshop Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, Marilyn; McDougal, John; Barley, Bryan; Fesq, Lorraine; Stephens, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Fault Management is a critical aspect of deep-space missions. For the purposes of this paper, fault management is defined as the ability of a system to detect, isolate, and mitigate events that impact, or have the potential to impact, nominal mission operations. The fault management capabilities are commonly distributed across flight and ground subsystems, impacting hardware, software, and mission operations designs. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Discovery & New Frontiers (D&NF) Program Office at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently studied cost overruns and schedule delays for 5 missions. The goal was to identify the underlying causes for the overruns and delays, and to develop practical mitigations to assist the D&NF projects in identifying potential risks and controlling the associated impacts to proposed mission costs and schedules. The study found that 4 out of the 5 missions studied had significant overruns due to underestimating the complexity and support requirements for fault management. As a result of this and other recent experiences, the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Planetary Science Division (PSD) commissioned a workshop to bring together invited participants across government, industry, academia to assess the state of the art in fault management practice and research, identify current and potential issues, and make recommendations for addressing these issues. The workshop was held in New Orleans in April of 2008. The workshop concluded that fault management is not being limited by technology, but rather by a lack of emphasis and discipline in both the engineering and programmatic dimensions. Some of the areas cited in the findings include different, conflicting, and changing institutional goals and risk postures; unclear ownership of end-to-end fault management engineering; inadequate understanding of the impact of mission-level requirements on fault management complexity; and practices, processes, and

  10. Prevention of Spacecraft Anomalies: The Role of Space Climate and Space Weather Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Janet L.

    2003-01-01

    Space-based systems are developing into critical infrastructure to support the quality of life on Earth. Mission requirements along with rapidly evolving technologies have outpaced efforts to accommodate detrimental space environment impacts on systems. This chapter describes approaches to accommodate space climate and space weather impacts on systems and notes areas where gaps in model development limit our ability to prevent spacecraft anomalies.

  11. Characterizing Secondary Debris Impact Ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonberg, W. P.

    1999-01-01

    All spacecraft in low-Earth orbit are subject to high-speed impacts by meteoroids and orbital debris particles. These impacts can damage flight-critical systems which can in turn lead to catastrophic failure of the spacecraft. Therefore, the design of a spacecraft for an Earth-orbiting mission must take into account the possibility of such impacts and their effects on the spacecraft structure and on all of its exposed subsystem components. In addition to threatening the operation of the spacecraft itself, on-orbit impacts also generate a significant amount of ricochet particles. These high-speed particles can destroy critical external spacecraft subsystem and also increase the contamination of the orbital environment. This report presents a summary of the work performed towards the development of an empirical model that characterizes the secondary ejecta created by a high-speed impacta on a typical aerospace structural surface.

  12. Characterizing Secondary Debris Impact Ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonberg, W. P.

    1999-08-01

    All spacecraft in low-Earth orbit are subject to high-speed impacts by meteoroids and orbital debris particles. These impacts can damage flight-critical systems which can in turn lead to catastrophic failure of the spacecraft. Therefore, the design of a spacecraft for an Earth-orbiting mission must take into account the possibility of such impacts and their effects on the spacecraft structure and on all of its exposed subsystem components. In addition to threatening the operation of the spacecraft itself, on-orbit impacts also generate a significant amount of ricochet particles. These high-speed particles can destroy critical external spacecraft subsystem and also increase the contamination of the orbital environment. This report presents a summary of the work performed towards the development of an empirical model that characterizes the secondary ejecta created by a high-speed impacta on a typical aerospace structural surface.

  13. Multidisciplinary studies of the social, economic and political impact resulting from recent advances in satellite meteorology. Volume 6: Executive summary. [technological forecasting spacecraft control/attitude (inclination) -classical mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An assessment of the technological impact of modern satellite weather forecasting for the United States is presented. Topics discussed are: (1) television broadcasting of weather; (2) agriculture (crop production); (3) water resources; (4) urban development; (5) recreation; and (6) transportation.

  14. Space Transportation System Cargo projects: inertial stage/spacecraft integration plan. Volume 1: Management plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Management System for the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) - spacecraft processing from KSC arrival through launch is described. The roles and responsibilities of the agencies and test team organizations involved in IUS-S/C processing at KSC for non-Department of Defense missions are described. Working relationships are defined with respect to documentation preparation, coordination and approval, schedule development and maintenance, test conduct and control, configuration management, quality control and safety. The policy regarding the use of spacecraft contractor test procedures, IUS contractor detailed operating procedures and KSC operations and maintenance instructions is defined. Review and approval requirements for each documentation system are described.

  15. Spacecraft capture and docking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, Kinyuen (Inventor); Rafeek, Shaheed (Inventor); Myrick, Thomas (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A system for capturing and docking an active craft to a passive craft has a first docking assembly on the active craft with a first contact member and a spike projecting outwardly, a second docking assembly on the passive craft having a second contact member and a flexible net deployed over a target area with an open mesh for capturing the end of the spike of the active craft, and a motorized net drive for reeling in the net and active craft to mate with the passive craft's docking assembly. The spike has extendable tabs to allow it to become engaged with the net. The net's center is coupled to a net spool for reeling in. An alignment funnel has inclined walls to guide the net and captured spike towards the net spool. The passive craft's docking assembly includes circumferentially spaced preload wedges which are driven to lock the wedges against the contact member of the active craft. The active craft's docking assembly includes a rotary table and drive for rotating it to a predetermined angular alignment position, and mating connectors are then engaged with each other. The system may be used for docking spacecraft in zero or low-gravity environments, as well as for docking underwater vehicles, docking of ancillary craft to a mother craft in subsonic flight, in-flight refueling systems, etc.

  16. Inertial energy storage for spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, G.E.

    1984-09-01

    The feasibility of inertial energy storage in a spacecraft power system is evaluated on the basis of a conceptual integrated design that encompasses a composite rotor, magnetic suspension and a permanent magnet (PM) motor/generator for a 3-kW orbital average payload at a bus distribution voltage of 250 volts dc. The conceptual design, is referred to as a Mechanical Capacitor. The baseline power system configuration selected is a series system employing peak-power-tracking for a Low Earth-Orbiting application. Power processing, required in the motor/generator, provides potential alternative that can only be achieved in systems with electrochemical energy storage by the addition of power processing components. One such alternative configuration provides for peak-power-tracking of the solar array and still maintains a regulated bus, without the expense of additional power processing components. Precise speed control of the two counterrotating wheels is required to reduce interaction with the attitude control system (ACS) or alternatively, used to perform attitude control functions.

  17. Inertial Energy Storage for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of inertial energy storage in a spacecraft power system is evaluated on the basis of a conceptual integrated design that encompasses a composite rotor, magnetic suspension and a permanent magnet (PM) motor/generator for a 3-kW orbital average payload at a bus distribution voltage of 250 volts dc. The conceptual design, is referred to as a Mechanical Capacitor. The baseline power system configuration selected is a series system employing peak-power-tracking for a Low Earth-Orbiting application. Power processing, required in the motor/generator, provides potential alternative that can only be achieved in systems with electrochemical energy storage by the addition of power processing components. One such alternative configuration provides for peak-power-tracking of the solar array and still maintains a regulated bus, without the expense of additional power processing components. Precise speed control of the two counterrotating wheels is required to reduce interaction with the attitude control system (ACS) or alternatively, used to perform attitude control functions.

  18. Micro Sun Sensor for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobasser, Sohrab; Liebe, Carl; Bae, Youngsam; Schroeder, Jeffrey; Wrigley, Chris

    2004-01-01

    A report describes the development of a compact micro Sun sensor for use as a part of the attitude determination subsystem aboard future miniature spacecraft and planetary robotic vehicles. The prototype unit has a mass of only 9 g, a volume of only 4.2 cm(sup 3), a power consumption of only 30 mW, and a 120 degree field of view. The unit has demonstrated an accuracy of 1 arcminute. The unit consists of a multiple pinhole camera: A micromachined mask containing a rectangular array of microscopic pinholes, machined utilizing the microectromechanical systems (MEMS), is mounted in front of an active-pixel sensor (APS) image detector. The APS consists of a 512 x 512-pixel array, on-chip 10-bit analog to digital converter (ADC), on-chip bias generation, and on-chip timing control for self-sequencing and easy programmability. The digitized output of the APS is processed to compute the centroids of the pinhole Sun images on the APS. The Sun angle, relative to a coordinate system fixed to the sensor unit, is then computed from the positions of the centroids.

  19. Novel Material for Future Spacecrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, Subbayu; Cothran, Ernestine

    2005-01-01

    Outside earth's protective magnetosphere crew members and sensitive equipment need to be protected against two primary radiation sources, namely Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEP). For planetary missions, this combination of radiation particles could result in doses that are higher than the allowable level currently permitted for low-earth orbit manned missions. This SBIR project aims to develop a multifunctional and lightweight composite material that not only provides sufficient radiation shielding but also provides sufficient structural integrity to be considered as a spacecraft material. This presentation will discuss the deep space radiation problem and the material based solutions being proposed by BAE SYS scientists to overcome this problem. The presentation will focus on the initiative taken by BAE SYS scientists to proactively engage and team with experts at NASA, small business, and other federal laboratories to develop and test a dual phase composite material. The presentation will also highlight the potential benefits to our customer, NASA and also to BAE SYS.

  20. Southern Impact Testing Alliance (SITA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbs, Whitney; Roebuck, Brian; Zwiener, Mark; Wells, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to form this Alliance began in 2008 to showcase the impact testing capabilities within the southern United States. Impact testing customers can utilize SITA partner capabilities to provide supporting data during all program phases-materials/component/ flight hardware design, development, and qualification. This approach would allow programs to reduce risk by providing low cost testing during early development to flush out possible problems before moving on to larger scale1 higher cost testing. Various SITA partners would participate in impact testing depending on program phase-materials characterization, component/subsystem characterization, full-scale system testing for qualification. SITA partners would collaborate with the customer to develop an integrated test approach during early program phases. Modeling and analysis validation can start with small-scale testing to ensure a level of confidence for the next step large or full-scale conclusive test shots. Impact Testing Facility (ITF) was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960's and played a malor role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As a result of return to flight testing after the loss of STS-107 (Columbia) MSFC ITF realized the need to expand their capabilities beyond meteoroid and space debris impact testing. MSFC partnered with the Department of Defense and academic institutions as collaborative efforts to gain and share knowledge that would benefit the Space Agency as well as the DoD. MSFC ITF current capabilities include: Hypervelocity impact testing, ballistic impact testing, and environmental impact testing.

  1. Environmental Impact Statement for the Cassini Mission. Supplement 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (FSEIS) to the 1995 Cassini mission Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) focuses on information recently made available from updated mission safety analyses. This information is pertinent to the consequence and risk analyses of potential accidents during the launch and cruise phases of the mission that were addressed in the EIS. The type of accidents evaluated are those which could potentially result in a release of plutonium dioxide from the three Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGS) and the up to 129 Radioisotope Heater Units (RHUS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. The RTGs use the heat of decay of plutonium dioxide to generate electric power for the spacecraft and instruments. The RHUs, each of which contains a small amount of plutonium dioxide, provide heat for controlling the thermal environment of the spacecraft and several of its instruments. The planned Cassini mission is an international cooperative effort of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Italian Space Agency (ASI) to conduct a 4-year scientific exploration of the planet Saturn, its atmosphere, moons, rings, and magnetosphere.

  2. Adaptive Deadband Synchronization for a Spacecraft Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Hadaegh, Fred; Kang, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    A paper discusses general problems in estimation and control of the states (positions, attitudes, and velocities) of spacecraft flying in formation, then addresses the particular formation-flying-control problem of synchronization of deadbands. The paper presents a deadband synchronization algorithm for the case in which the spacecraft are equipped with pulse-width-modulated thrusters for maintaining their required states. The algorithm synchronizes thruster-firing times across all six degrees of freedom of all the spacecraft. The algorithm is scalable, inherently adapts to disturbances, and does not require knowledge of spacecraft masses and disturbance forces. In this algorithm, one degree of freedom of one spacecraft is designated the leader, and all other degrees of freedom of all spacecraft as followers. The Cassini adaptive optimum deadband drift controller is the subalgorithm for control in each degree of freedom, and the adaptation is run until each spacecraft achieves a specified drift period. The adaptation is critical because a different disturbance affects each different degree of freedom. Then the leader communicates its thruster-firing starting times to the followers. Then, for each follower, a deadband-synchronization subalgorithm determines the shift needed to synchronize its drift period with that of the leader.

  3. Protecting Against Faults in JPL Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paula

    2007-01-01

    A paper discusses techniques for protecting against faults in spacecraft designed and operated by NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The paper addresses, more specifically, fault-protection requirements and techniques common to most JPL spacecraft (in contradistinction to unique, mission specific techniques), standard practices in the implementation of these techniques, and fault-protection software architectures. Common requirements include those to protect onboard command, data-processing, and control computers; protect against loss of Earth/spacecraft radio communication; maintain safe temperatures; and recover from power overloads. The paper describes fault-protection techniques as part of a fault-management strategy that also includes functional redundancy, redundant hardware, and autonomous monitoring of (1) the operational and health statuses of spacecraft components, (2) temperatures inside and outside the spacecraft, and (3) allocation of power. The strategy also provides for preprogrammed automated responses to anomalous conditions. In addition, the software running in almost every JPL spacecraft incorporates a general-purpose "Safe Mode" response algorithm that configures the spacecraft in a lower-power state that is safe and predictable, thereby facilitating diagnosis of more complex faults by a team of human experts on Earth.

  4. Remote agent prototype for spacecraft autonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pell, Barney; Bernard, Douglas E.; Chien, Steve; Gat, Erann; Muscettola, Nicola; Nayak, P. P.; Wagner, Michael D.; Williams, Brian C.

    1996-10-01

    NASA has recently announced the New Millennium Program (NMP) to develop 'faster, better, cheaper' spacecraft in order to establish a 'virtual presence' in space. A crucial element in achieving this vision is onboard spacecraft autonomy, requiring us to automate functions which have traditionally been achieved on ground by humans. These include planning activities, sequencing spacecraft actions, tracking spacecraft state, ensuring correct functioning, recovering in cases of failure and reconfiguring hardware. In response to these challenging requirements, we analyzed the spacecraft domain to determine its unique properties and developed an architecture which provided the required functionality. This architecture integrates traditional real-time monitoring and control with constraint-based planning and scheduling, robust multi-threaded execution, and model-based diagnosis and reconfiguration. In a five month effort we successfully demonstrated this implemented architecture in the context of an autonomous insertion of a simulated spacecraft into orbit around Saturn, trading off science and engineering goals, and achieving the mission goals in the face of any single point of hardware failure. This scenario turned out to be among the most complex handled by each of the component technologies. As a result of this success, the integrated architecture has been selected to control the first NMP flight, Deep Space One, in 1998. It will be the first AI system to autonomously control an actual spacecraft.

  5. Closed loop terminal guidance navigation for a kinetic impactor spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran, Shyam; Kennedy, Brian

    2014-10-01

    A kinetic impactor spacecraft is a viable method to deflect an asteroid which poses a threat to the Earth. The technology to perform such a deflection has been demonstrated by the Deep Impact (DI) mission, which successfully collided with comet Tempel 1 in July 2005 using an onboard autonomous navigation system, called AutoNav, for the terminal phase of the mission. In this paper, we evaluate the ability of AutoNav to impact a wider range of scenarios that a deflection mission could encounter, varying parameters such as the approach velocity, phase angle, size of the asteroid, and the attitude determination accuracy. In particular, we evaluated the capability of AutoNav to impact 100-300 m size asteroids at speeds between 7.5 and 20 km/s at various phase angles. Using realistic Monte Carlo simulations, we tabulated the probability of success of the deflection as a function of these parameters and find the highest sensitivity to be due to the spacecraft attitude determination error. In addition, we also specifically analyzed the impact probability for a proposed mission (called ISIS) which would send an impactor to the asteroid 1999RQ36. We conclude with some recommendations for future work.

  6. Meteoroid-Induced Anomalies on Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic meteoroid background is directional (not isotropic) and accounts for 90 percent of the meteoroid risk to a typical spacecraft. Meteor showers get all the press, but account for only approximately10 percent of spacecraft risk. Bias towards assigning meteoroid cause to anomalies during meteor showers. Vast majority of meteoroids come from comets and have a bulk density of approximately 1 gram per cubic centimeter (ice). High speed meteoroids (approximately 50 kilometers per second) can induce electrical anomalies in spacecraft through discharging of charged surfaces (also EMP (electromagnetic pulse?).

  7. The natural space environment: Effects on spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Bonnie F.; Norton, O. W. (Compiler); Alexander, Margaret B. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The effects of the natural space environments on spacecraft design, development, and operation are the topic of a series of NASA Reference Publications currently being developed by the Electromagnetics and Environments Branch, Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory, Marshall Space Flight Center. This primer provides an overview of the natural space environments and their effect on spacecraft design, development, and operations, and also highlights some of the new developments in science and technology for each space environment. It is hoped that a better understanding of the space environment and its effect on spacecraft will enable program management to more effectively minimize program risks and costs, optimize design quality, and successfully achieve mission objectives.

  8. Embedded spacecraft thermal control using ultrasonic consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Jared W.

    Research has been completed in order to rapidly manufacture spacecraft thermal control technologies embedded in spacecraft structural panels using ultrasonic consolidation. This rapid manufacturing process enables custom thermal control designs in the time frame necessary for responsive space. Successfully embedded components include temperature sensors, heaters, wire harnessing, pre-manufactured heat pipes, and custom integral heat pipes. High conductivity inserts and custom integral pulsating heat pipes were unsuccessfully attempted. This research shows the viability of rapid manufacturing of spacecraft structures with embedded thermal control using ultrasonic consolidation.

  9. Foot Pedals for Spacecraft Manual Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Morin, Lee M.; McCabe, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Fifty years ago, NASA decided that the cockpit controls in spacecraft should be like the ones in airplanes. But controls based on the stick and rudder may not be best way to manually control a vehicle in space. A different method is based on submersible vehicles controlled with foot pedals. A new pilot can learn the sub's control scheme in minutes and drive it hands-free. We are building a pair of foot pedals for spacecraft control, and will test them in a spacecraft flight simulator.

  10. Galileo spacecraft modeling for orbital operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaughlin, Bruce A.; Nilsen, Erik N.

    1994-01-01

    The Galileo Jupiter orbital mission using the Low Gain Antenna (LGA) requires a higher degree of spacecraft state knowledge than was originally anticipated. Key elements of the revised design include onboard buffering of science and engineering data and extensive processing of data prior to downlink. In order to prevent loss of data resulting from overflow of the buffers and to allow efficient use of the spacecraft resources, ground based models of the spacecraft processes will be implemented. These models will be integral tools in the development of satellite encounter sequences and the cruise/playback sequences where recorded data is retrieved.

  11. Autonomic Computing for Spacecraft Ground Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Zhenping; Savkli, Cetin; Jones, Lori

    2007-01-01

    Autonomic computing for spacecraft ground systems increases the system reliability and reduces the cost of spacecraft operations and software maintenance. In this paper, we present an autonomic computing solution for spacecraft ground systems at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), which consists of an open standard for a message oriented architecture referred to as the GMSEC architecture (Goddard Mission Services Evolution Center), and an autonomic computing tool, the Criteria Action Table (CAT). This solution has been used in many upgraded ground systems for NASA 's missions, and provides a framework for developing solutions with higher autonomic maturity.

  12. Design, construction and testing of the Communications Technology Satellite protection against spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, J. V.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed discussions are presented of the measures taken on the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS or Hermes) which provide protection against the effects of spacecraft charging. These measures include: a comprehensive grounding philosophy and implementation; provision of command and data line transmitters and receivers for transient noise immunity; and a fairly restrictive EMI specification. Ground tests were made on materials and the impact of these tests on the CTS spacecraft is described. Hermes, launched on 17 January 1976 on a 2914 Delta vehicle, has successfully completed 10 months of operations. Anomalies observed are being assessed in relation to spacecraft charging, but no definite correlations have yet been established. A list of conclusions with regard to the CTS experience is given and recommendations for future spacecraft are also listed.

  13. Applications of Advanced Nondestructive Measurement Techniques to Address Safety of Flight Issues on NASA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Advanced nondestructive measurement techniques are critical for ensuring the reliability and safety of NASA spacecraft. Techniques such as infrared thermography, THz imaging, X-ray computed tomography and backscatter X-ray are used to detect indications of damage in spacecraft components and structures. Additionally, sensor and measurement systems are integrated into spacecraft to provide structural health monitoring to detect damaging events that occur during flight such as debris impacts during launch and assent or from micrometeoroid and orbital debris, or excessive loading due to anomalous flight conditions. A number of examples will be provided of how these nondestructive measurement techniques have been applied to resolve safety critical inspection concerns for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and a variety of launch vehicles and unmanned spacecraft.

  14. Spacecraft System Failures and Anomalies Attributed to the Natural Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedingfield, Keith, L.; Leach, Richard D.; Alexander, Margaret B. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The natural space environment is characterized by many complex and subtle phenomena hostile to spacecraft. The effects of these phenomena impact spacecraft design, development, and operations. Space systems become increasingly susceptible to the space environment as use of composite materials and smaller, faster electronics increases. This trend makes an understanding of the natural space environment essential to accomplish overall mission objectives, especially in the current climate of better/cheaper/faster. This primer provides a brief overview of the natural space environment - definition, related programmatic issues, and effects on various spacecraft subsystems. The primary focus, however, is to catalog, through representative case histories, spacecraft failures and anomalies attributed to the natural space environment. This primer is one in a series of NASA Reference Publications currently being developed by the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch, Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  15. Autonomy Architectures for a Constellation of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    Until the past few years, missions typically involved fairly large expensive spacecraft. Such missions have primarily favored using older proven technologies over more recently developed ones, and humans controlled spacecraft by manually generating detailed command sequences with low-level tools and then transmitting the sequences for subsequent execution on a spacecraft controller. This approach toward controlling a spacecraft has worked spectacularly on previous missions, but it has limitations deriving from communications restrictions - scheduling time to communicate with a particular spacecraft involves competing with other projects due to the limited number of deep space network antennae. This implies that a spacecraft can spend a long time just waiting whenever a command sequence fails. This is one reason why the New Millennium program has an objective to migrate parts of mission control tasks onboard a spacecraft to reduce wait time by making spacecraft more robust. The migrated software is called a "remote agent" and has 4 components: a mission manager to generate the high level goals, a planner/scheduler to turn goals into activities while reasoning about future expected situations, an executive/diagnostics engine to initiate and maintain activities while interpreting sensed events by reasoning about past and present situations, and a conventional real-time subsystem to interface with the spacecraft to implement an activity's primitive actions. In addition to needing remote planning and execution for isolated spacecraft, a trend toward multiple-spacecraft missions points to the need for remote distributed planning and execution. The past few years have seen missions with growing numbers of probes. Pathfinder has its rover (Sojourner), Cassini has its lander (Huygens), and the New Millenium Deep Space 3 (DS3) proposal involves a constellation of 3 spacecraft for interferometric mapping. This trend is expected to continue to progressively larger fleets. For

  16. Making Human Spaceflight Practical and Affordable: Spacecraft Designs and their Degree of Operability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocker, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    As we push toward new and diverse space transportation capabilities, reduction in operations cost becomes increasingly important. Achieving affordable and safe human spaceflight capabilities will be the mark of success for new programs and new providers. The ability to perceive the operational implications of design decisions is crucial in developing safe yet cost competitive space transportation systems. Any human spaceflight program - government or commercial - must make countless decisions either to implement spacecraft system capabilities or adopt operational constraints or workarounds to account for the lack of such spacecraft capabilities. These decisions can benefit from the collective experience that NASA has accumulated in building and operating crewed spacecraft over the last five decades. This paper reviews NASA s history in developing and operating human rated spacecraft, reviewing the key aspects of spacecraft design and their resultant impacts on operations phase complexity and cost. Specific examples from current and past programs - including the Space Shuttle and International Space Station - are provided to illustrate design traits that either increase or increase cost and complexity associated with spacecraft operations. These examples address factors such as overall design performance margins, levels of redundancy, degree of automated failure response, type and quantity of command and telemetry interfaces, and the definition of reference scenarios for analysis and test. Each example - from early program requirements, design implementation and resulting real-time operations experience - to tell the end-to-end "story" Based on these experiences, specific techniques are recommended to enable earlier and more effective assessment of operations concerns during the design process. A formal method for the assessment of spacecraft operability is defined and results of such operability assessments for recent spacecraft designs are provided. Recent

  17. Orbital debris hazard insights from spacecraft anomalies studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, Darren S.

    2016-09-01

    Since the dawning of the space age space operators have been tallying spacecraft anomalies and failures then using these insights to improve the space systems and operations. As space systems improved and their lifetimes increased, the anomaly and failure modes have multiplied. Primary triggers for space anomalies and failures include design issues, space environmental effects, and satellite operations. Attempts to correlate anomalies to the orbital debris environment have started as early as the mid-1990's. Early attempts showed tens of anomalies correlated well to altitudes where the cataloged debris population was the highest. However, due to the complexity of tracing debris impacts to mission anomalies, these analyses were found to be insufficient to prove causation. After the fragmentation of the Chinese Feng-Yun satellite in 2007, it was hypothesized that the nontrackable fragments causing anomalies in LEO would have increased significantly from this event. As a result, debris-induced anomalies should have gone up measurably in the vicinity of this breakup. Again, the analysis provided some subtle evidence of debris-induced anomalies but it was not convincing. The continued difficulty in linking debris flux to satellite anomalies and failures prompted the creation of a series of spacecraft anomalies and failure workshops to investigate the identified shortfalls. These gatherings have produced insights into why this process is not straightforward. Summaries of these studies and workshops are presented and observations made about how to create solutions for anomaly attribution, especially as it relates to debris-induced spacecraft anomalies and failures.

  18. Gravity and Tide Parameters Determined from Satellite and Spacecraft Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Robert A.

    2015-05-01

    As part of our work on the development of the Jovian and Saturnian satellite ephemerides to support the Juno and Cassini missions, we determined a number of planetary system gravity parameters. This work did not take into account tidal forces. In fact, we saw no obvious observational evidence of tidal effects on the satellite or spacecraft orbits. However, Lainey et al. (2009 Nature 459, 957) and Lainey et. al (2012 Astrophys. J. 752, 14) have published investigations of tidal effects in the Jovian and Saturnian systems, respectively. Consequently, we have begun a re-examination of our ephemeris work that includes a model for tides raised on the planet by the satellites as well as tides raised on the satellites by the planet. In this paper we briefly review the observations used in our ephemeris production; they include astrometry from the late 1800s to 2014, mutual events, eclipses, occultatons, and data acquired by the Pioneer, Voyager, Ulysses, Cassini, Galileo, and New Horizons spacecraft. We summarize the gravity parameter values found from our original analyses. Next we discuss our tidal acceleration model and its impact on the gravity parameter determination. We conclude with preliminary results found when the reprocessing of the observations includes tidal forces acting on the satellites and spacecraft.

  19. Aerothermodynamics of the Mars Global Surveyor Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shane, Russell W.; Tolson, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    The aerothermodynamics characteristics of the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft are investigated and reported. These results have been used by the Mars Global Surveyor mission planners to design the aerobraking phase of the mission. Analytical and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo computer codes were used with a detailed, three dimensional model of the spacecraft to evaluate spacecraft aerobraking characteristics for flight in free molecular and transitional flow regimes. The spacecraft is found to be aerodynamically stable in aerobraking and planned contingency configurations. Aerodynamic forces, moments, and heating are found to be highly dependent on atmospheric density. Accommodation coefficient. is seen to strongly influence drag coefficient. Transitional flow effects are found to reduce overall solar panel heating. Attitude control thruster plumes are shown to interact with the freestream, diminishing the effectiveness of the attitude control system and even leading to thrust reversal. These plume-freestream interaction effects are found to be highly dependent on freestream density.

  20. Launch of the MR-2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    Launching of the Mercury-Redstone 2 (MR-3) spacecraft from Cape Canaveral on a suborbital mission. Onboard the craft was Ham, a 37-pound chimpanzee. Despite an over-acceleration factor, the flight was considered to be successful.