Science.gov

Sample records for agency surface transportation

  1. Mars surface transportation options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitner, Jeffrey M.; Alred, John W.

    1986-01-01

    As the number of scientific experiments for the surface of Mars grows, the need for effective surface transportation becomes critical. Because of the diversity of the experiments proposed, as well as the desire to explore Mars from the equator to the poles, the optimum surface vehicle configuration is not obvious. Five candidate vehicles are described, with an estimate of their size and performance. In order to maximize the success of a manned Mars mission, it appears that two vehicles should be designed for surface transportation: an advanced long-range rover, and a remotely-piloted airplane.

  2. 41 CFR 102-118.45 - How does a transportation service provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... transportation service provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and transportation services? 102-118.45... provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and transportation services? The manner in which your agency orders transportation and transportation services determines the manner in which a TSP bills...

  3. 41 CFR 102-118.45 - How does a transportation service provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... transportation service provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and transportation services? 102-118.45... provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and transportation services? The manner in which your agency orders transportation and transportation services determines the manner in which a TSP bills...

  4. 41 CFR 102-118.45 - How does a transportation service provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... transportation service provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and transportation services? 102-118.45... provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and transportation services? The manner in which your agency orders transportation and transportation services determines the manner in which a TSP bills...

  5. 41 CFR 102-118.45 - How does a transportation service provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... transportation service provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and transportation services? 102-118.45... provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and transportation services? The manner in which your agency orders transportation and transportation services determines the manner in which a TSP bills...

  6. 41 CFR 102-118.45 - How does a transportation service provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... transportation service provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and transportation services? 102-118.45... provider (TSP) bill my agency for transportation and transportation services? The manner in which your agency orders transportation and transportation services determines the manner in which a TSP bills...

  7. 41 CFR 102-118.40 - How does my agency order transportation and transportation services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does my agency order transportation and transportation services? 102-118.40 Section 102-118.40 Public Contracts and Property... TRANSPORTATION 118-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT Ordering and Paying for Transportation and...

  8. Transportation of the Handicapped: A Survey of State Education Agency Transportation Directors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluth, Linda, Ed.; Sweeney, Mary Kathleen, Ed.

    A survey of 45 State Education Agency Transportation Directors is reported concerning state transportation services for handicapped students. Summary data are given in both tabular and narrative form for the following areas: procedures used for transporting handicapped individuals, handicapped population transported by public and/or private…

  9. Supersonic transport. [using canard surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coe, P. L., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An aircraft of supersonic transport configuration is described, featuring thrust vectoring in conjunction with wing apex segments used as canard surfaces during takeoff, landing, and low-speed flight. The angle of incidence of the wing apex segments, when the segments were functioning as canard surfaces, was variable with respect to the aircraft angle of attack. The wing apex segments furthermore formed a portion of the main wing panel swept leading edge when not functioning as canard surfaces. The combination of thrust vectoring and deployable wing apex segments resulted in increased aircraft range and improved low speed longitudinal stability while providing acceptable takeoff length capabilities.

  10. 41 CFR 102-118.95 - What forms can my agency use to pay transportation bills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... use to pay transportation bills? 102-118.95 Section 102-118.95 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.95 What forms can my agency use to pay transportation bills? Your agency must use... agency, your agency may use the following Government forms to pay transportation bills: (a) Standard...

  11. 41 CFR 102-118.95 - What forms can my agency use to pay transportation bills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... use to pay transportation bills? 102-118.95 Section 102-118.95 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.95 What forms can my agency use to pay transportation bills? Your agency must use... agency, your agency may use the following Government forms to pay transportation bills: (a) Standard...

  12. 41 CFR 102-118.95 - What forms can my agency use to pay transportation bills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... use to pay transportation bills? 102-118.95 Section 102-118.95 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.95 What forms can my agency use to pay transportation bills? Your agency must use... agency, your agency may use the following Government forms to pay transportation bills: (a) Standard...

  13. 41 CFR 102-118.95 - What forms can my agency use to pay transportation bills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... use to pay transportation bills? 102-118.95 Section 102-118.95 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.95 What forms can my agency use to pay transportation bills? Your agency must use... agency, your agency may use the following Government forms to pay transportation bills: (a) Standard...

  14. 41 CFR 102-118.95 - What forms can my agency use to pay transportation bills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... use to pay transportation bills? 102-118.95 Section 102-118.95 Public Contracts and Property... Services § 102-118.95 What forms can my agency use to pay transportation bills? Your agency must use... agency, your agency may use the following Government forms to pay transportation bills: (a) Standard...

  15. Reactivation of cell surface transport in Reticulomyxa.

    PubMed

    Orokos, D D; Bowser, S S; Travis, J L

    1997-01-01

    Granuloreticulosean protists transport particles (e.g., bacteria, algae, and sand grains) along the outer surfaces of their pseudopodia. This cell surface transport plays a vital role in feeding, reproduction, shell construction, and locomotion and can be visualized by the movements of extracellularly adherent polystyrene microspheres (i.e., latex beads). Our videomicroscopic analyses of transport associated with the pseudopodia of Reticulomyxa filosa revealed two distinct types of both intracellular and cell surface transport: (1) saltatory, bidirectional transport of individual or clustered organelles and/or surface-attached particles, and (2) continuous, unidirectional bulk or "resolute" motion of aggregated organelles and/or surface-bound particles. Organelles and surface-attached polystyrene microspheres remained firmly attached to the microtubule cytoskeletons of detergent-extracted pseudopodia. Both saltatory and resolute organelle and surface transport reactivated upon the addition of 0.01-1.0 mM ATP. At 1 mM ATP, the velocities of reactivated saltatory transport were indistinguishable from those observed in vivo. The reactivated transport was microtubule-dependent and was not inhibited by incubation with Ca(2+)-gelsolin under conditions that abolish rhodamine-phalloidin detection of actin filaments. These findings provide further support that both intracellular organelle and membrane surface transport are mediated by a common mechanism, and establish Reticulomyxa as a unique model system to further study the mechanochemistry of cell surface transport in vitro.

  16. 41 CFR 102-118.160 - Who is liable if my agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill? 102-118.160 Section 102-118.160 Public Contracts... Transportation Services § 102-118.160 Who is liable if my agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill? If the agency conducts prepayment audits of its transportation bills, agency...

  17. 41 CFR 102-118.160 - Who is liable if my agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill? 102-118.160 Section 102-118.160 Public Contracts... Transportation Services § 102-118.160 Who is liable if my agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill? If the agency conducts prepayment audits of its transportation bills, agency...

  18. 41 CFR 102-118.160 - Who is liable if my agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill? 102-118.160 Section 102-118.160 Public Contracts... Transportation Services § 102-118.160 Who is liable if my agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill? If the agency conducts prepayment audits of its transportation bills, agency...

  19. 41 CFR 102-118.160 - Who is liable if my agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill? 102-118.160 Section 102-118.160 Public Contracts... Transportation Services § 102-118.160 Who is liable if my agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill? If the agency conducts prepayment audits of its transportation bills, agency...

  20. 41 CFR 102-118.160 - Who is liable if my agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill? 102-118.160 Section 102-118.160 Public Contracts... Transportation Services § 102-118.160 Who is liable if my agency makes an overpayment on a transportation bill? If the agency conducts prepayment audits of its transportation bills, agency...

  1. Surface transport in plasma-balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armas, Jay; Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy; Kundu, Nilay

    2016-06-01

    We study the surface transport properties of stationary localized configurations of relativistic fluids to the first two non-trivial orders in a derivative expansion. By demanding that these finite lumps of relativistic fluid are described by a thermal partition function with arbitrary stationary background metric and gauge fields, we are able to find several constraints among surface transport coefficients. At leading order, besides recovering the surface thermodynamics, we obtain a generalization of the Young-Laplace equation for relativistic fluid surfaces, by considering a temperature dependence in the surface tension, which is further generalized in the context of superfluids. At the next order, for uncharged fluids in 3+1 dimensions, we show that besides the 3 independent bulk transport coefficients previously known, a generic localized configuration is characterized by 3 additional surface transport coefficients, one of which may be identified with the surface modulus of rigidity. Finally, as an application, we study the effect of temperature dependence of surface tension on some explicit examples of localized fluid configurations, which are dual to certain non-trivial black hole solutions via the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  2. 41 CFR 301-31.4 - Must my agency pay transportation and subsistence expenses?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must my agency pay transportation and subsistence expenses? 301-31.4 Section 301-31.4 Public Contracts and Property Management...-THREATENED LAW ENFORCEMENT/INVESTIGATIVE EMPLOYEES § 301-31.4 Must my agency pay transportation...

  3. 41 CFR 301-31.8 - What transportation expenses may my agency pay?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What transportation expenses may my agency pay? 301-31.8 Section 301-31.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... LAW ENFORCEMENT/INVESTIGATIVE EMPLOYEES § 301-31.8 What transportation expenses may my agency...

  4. Exciton transport by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, J.; Hey, R.; Santos, P. V.

    2007-05-01

    Long-range acoustic transport of excitons in GaAs quantum wells (QWs) is demonstrated. The mobile strain field of a surface acoustic wave creates a dynamic lateral type I modulation of the conduction and valence bands in a double-quantum-well (DQW) structure. This mobile potential modulation transports long-living indirect excitons in the DQW over several hundreds of μm.

  5. Dust Charging and Transport on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Robertson, S.; Horanyi, M.

    2011-11-29

    In this paper, we review laboratory studies of dust transport on surfaces in plasmas, performed for a number of different mechanisms: 1) Dust particles were levitated in plasma sheaths by electrostatic forces balancing the gravitational force. 2) Dust was observed to spread over and lift off a surface that repels electrons in a plasma. 3) Dust was transported on surfaces having different secondary electron yields in plasma with an electron beam as a consequence of differential charging. 4) We also report a mechanism of dust transport by electric fields occurring at electron beam impact/shadow boundaries. These processes are candidates to explain the formation of dust ponds that were recently observed in craters on the asteroid Eros by the NEAR Shoemaker spacecraft.

  6. 41 CFR 102-118.430 - What information must be on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit? 102-118.430 Section 102-118... Transportation Audits § 102-118.430 What information must be on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit? Your agency must annotate all of its transportation bills submitted for postpayment...

  7. 41 CFR 102-118.430 - What information must be on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit? 102-118.430 Section 102-118... Transportation Audits § 102-118.430 What information must be on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit? Your agency must annotate all of its transportation bills submitted for postpayment...

  8. 41 CFR 102-118.430 - What information must be on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit? 102-118.430 Section 102-118... Transportation Audits § 102-118.430 What information must be on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit? Your agency must annotate all of its transportation bills submitted for postpayment...

  9. 41 CFR 102-118.430 - What information must be on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit? 102-118.430 Section 102-118... Transportation Audits § 102-118.430 What information must be on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit? Your agency must annotate all of its transportation bills submitted for postpayment...

  10. 41 CFR 102-118.80 - Who is responsible for keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records? 102-118.80 Section 102-118.80... Transportation and Transportation Services § 102-118.80 Who is responsible for keeping my agency's electronic commerce transportation billing records? Your agency's internal financial regulations will...

  11. Aspheric surface testing by irradiance transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shomali, Ramin; Darudi, Ahmad; Nasiri, Sadollah; Asgharsharghi Bonab, Armir

    2010-10-01

    In this paper a method for aspheric surface testing is presented. The method is based on solving the Irradiance Transport Equation (ITE).The accuracy of ITE normally depends on the amount of the pick to valley of the phase distribution. This subject is investigated by a simulation procedure.

  12. 77 FR 19680 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Rail Transportation Security

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... rail transit service on track that is part of the general railroad system of transportation and rail... OMB Review: Rail Transportation Security AGENCY: Transportation Security Administration, DHS. ACTION... period soliciting comments, of the following collection of information on January 13, 2012, 77 FR...

  13. Turbulent transport process in atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Awasaki, T.

    2012-04-01

    The organized motion or the coherent motion can be detected in wind tunnel and water channel experiments and those motions play an important role for the production of turbulent energy and transport of turbulent fluxes. Similar phenomena can be found in the atmospheric surface layer (Gao et al., 1989). The purpose of this study is to clarify the transport structure and process of turbulent fluxes, especially heat, water vapor and carbon dioxide. The organized motions are detected by using the wavelet transform analysis as well as the conventional statistical method such as Fourier spectral analysis. We consider the dependency of transport process by the organized motion to the atmospheric stability in the surface layer. The observation was carried out at the test field of Shionomisaki Wind Effect Laboratory, where two sets of the combination of sonic anemometer thermometer and open path H2O/CO2 analyzer were mounted at 2m and 20m height. The evident ramp and inverse ramp structures can be found in the time series of temperature, water vapor and CO2 in the unstable stability, using the Mexican hut wavelet transform analysis. The co-spectral density in wavelet analysis is considered as the flux at each time scale. The large amount of fluxes is transported at the sudden decrease in scalar ramp structure and the sudden increase in inverse ramp structure in several tens of seconds. The scalar and vertical wind velocity are completely either in phase or out of phase, which means that the turbulent transport by the organized motion occurs at time scales of several tens of seconds. The quadrant analysis of turbulent flux shows that the rate of the transport amount of scalar by ejection and sweep to the total transport flux increases according to the increase of the atmospheric stability. At 2m height, the transport by ejection is dominant in unstable condition, and that by sweep is larger in the stable condition. At 20m height, transport by ejection is larger than that by

  14. Electrical transport properties of silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Kwonjae

    The understanding and utilization of electronic transport phenomena in low-dimensional, quantum-confined structures is of enormous scientific and technological interest. We have studied the electrical transport properties of systems that are quantum confined in one dimension but periodic in the other two dimensions, namely surfaces and ultrathin film materials. The electrical conductance of atomically clean, reconstructed silicon surfaces and interfaces was measured as a function of temperature in ultrahigh vacuum using the classical four-point probe technique. We employed Silicon on Insulator (SOI) technology to enhance the surface sensitivity of the four-point probe measurements. High-quality ohmic contacts were fabricated using ion-implantation. The Si(100)2 x 1 surface reconstruction consists of a two-dimensional, anti-ferromagnetic c(4 x 2) array of buckled silicon dimers. The surface undergoes a c(4 x 2) → 2 x 1 order-disorder transition near T = 200 K. Above 200 K, dimers fluctuate rapidly and the long-range c(4 x 2) ordering is destroyed. The conductance of this two-dimensional system has a temperature-dependence that is characteristic of a metal. The surface conductance appears closely correlated with the order parameter of the low-temperature c(4 x 2) structure. Thermally activated flip-flop motion of the Si dimers thus appears to be the dominant scattering mechanism. Recent high-resolution photoemission experiments indicate that the Si(111)7 x 7 surface reconstruction is a two-dimensional, correlated metal. The surface electrical conductivity decreases with increasing temperature, thus confirming metallic transport. However, conductivity measurements on ultrathin SOI indicate insulating behavior. The origin of this discrepancy is not understood and requires further investigation of the sheet conductance as a function of the SOI layer thickness. The Ga/Si(112) interface consists of a self-assembled, mesoscopic array of atomic Ga wires on a high-index Si

  15. 78 FR 76152 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... and Manifest of Goods Subject to CBP Inspection and Permit AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection...: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to CBP Inspection and Permit. This is a proposed extension of... the public and affected agencies. This information collection was previously published in the...

  16. 75 FR 43997 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... and Manifest of Goods Subject to CBP Inspection and Permit AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... respondent burden, CBP invites the general public and other Federal agencies to comment on an information collection requirement concerning the: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to CBP...

  17. 75 FR 60772 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... and Manifest of Goods Subject to CBP Inspection and Permit AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection...: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to CBP Inspection and Permit (CBP Form 7512). This is a... comments from the public and affected agencies. This proposed information collection was...

  18. 78 FR 57405 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... and Manifest of Goods Subject to CBP Inspection and Permit AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... burden, CBP invites the general public and other Federal agencies to comment on an information collection requirement concerning the: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to CBP Inspection and...

  19. USING SUBSURFACE TRANSPORT RESEARCH TO ACHIEVE AGENCY OUTCOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gasoline leaks from underground storage tanks can cause ground water contamination because there are a number of organic chemicals in gasoline. These chemicals have varying properties that influence how far contamination extends from the release. Research on transport of these ...

  20. A Convective Transport Theory for Surface Fluxes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stull, Roland B.

    1994-01-01

    For a boundary layer in free convection where turbulent thermal structures communicate information between the surface and the interior of the mixed layer, it is hypothesized that the surface momentum flux can be parameterized by u(2 = bDwBMML, the heat flux by = bHwB(skinML), and the moisture flux by = bHwB(rskinrML). In these expressions u( is the friction velocity, M is mean wind speed, is potential temperature, r is mixing ratio, subscript ML denotes the interior of the mixed layer, and subscript skin denotes the characteristics of the underlying solid or liquid surface. A buoyancy velocity scale is defined by wB[(g/v)zi(vskinvML)] 1/2 , where zi is mixed-layer depth, v is virtual potential temperature, and g is gravitational acceleration.Using data from the BLX83 field experiment in Oklahoma (roughness length: 0.05 m, latitude: 35.03°N, vegetation: mixed pasture and crops, season: spring), the convective transport coefficients are empirically found to be bH = 5.0×104 for heat and moisture, and bD=1.83 × 103 for momentum. These parameters worked well when tested against independent data from the Australian Koorin field experiment (roughness length: 0.4 m, latitude: 16.27°S, vegetation: uniform sparse trees, season: winter). If these parameterizations and coefficient values are validated for other sites, then convective transport theory could be considered as a candidate to replace the resistance law similarity theory based on profile matching, for conditions of free convection

  1. 41 CFR 302-9.10 - For what transportation expenses will my agency pay?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false For what transportation expenses will my agency pay? 302-9.10 Section 302-9.10 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 9-ALLOWANCES...

  2. 77 FR 71430 - New Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Public Transportation Baseline...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ...: Public Transportation Baseline Assessment for Security Enhancement (BASE) Program AGENCY: Transportation... collection of information on May 30, 2012, 77 FR 31866. TSA received two comments unrelated to the ICR in... Enhancement (BASE) Program. Type of Request: New collection. OMB Control Number: Not yet assigned....

  3. 41 CFR 102-118.40 - How does my agency order transportation and transportation services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... orders: (a) Transportation of freight and household goods and related transportation services (e.g... equivalent), or a Government bill of lading for international shipments (including domestic...

  4. 41 CFR 102-118.40 - How does my agency order transportation and transportation services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... orders: (a) Transportation of freight and household goods and related transportation services (e.g... equivalent), or a Government bill of lading for international shipments (including domestic...

  5. 41 CFR 102-118.40 - How does my agency order transportation and transportation services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... orders: (a) Transportation of freight and household goods and related transportation services (e.g... equivalent), or a Government bill of lading for international shipments (including domestic...

  6. Coherent transport of topological insulator surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adroguer, Pierre; Carpentier, David; Orignac, Edmond; Cayssol, Jerome

    2012-02-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a new state of matter recently predicted theoreticallyootnotetextC. L. Kane and E. J. Mele, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 226801 (2005).^,ootnotetextX.-L. Qi, T. L. Hughes, and S.-C. Zhang, Phys. Rev. B 78,195424 (2008). and realized experimentally. In 3D they are characterized by the presence of gapless surface states which exhibit a linear dispersion, typical of Dirac fermions. Moreover, contrary to conventionnal materials, these Dirac cones occur in an odd number of Dirac fermions at the surface: ARPES experimentsootnotetextY. Xia, D. Qian, D. Hsieh, L. Wray, A. Pal, H. Lin, A. Bansil, D. Grauer, Y. S. Hor, R. J. Cava, and M. Z. Hasan, Nature Physics 5, 398 (2009).^,ootnotetextY. L. Chen, J. G. Analytis, J.-H. Chu, Z. K. Liu, S.-K. Mo, X.L.Qi,H.J.Zhang,D.H.Lu,X.Dai,Z.Fang,S.C. Zhang, I. R. Fisher, Z. Hussain, and Z.-X. Shen, Science 325, 178 (2009). have found a single Dirac cone at the surface of Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3. This work focuses on the electronic transport properties calculations in the diffusive limite of a single Dirac cone. Specificities of the TI surface states, like the hexagonal warping coupling are taken into account.

  7. 41 CFR 302-3.218 - Are there any special circumstances when my agency may authorize me travel and transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... circumstances when my agency may authorize me travel and transportation expenses for my tour renewal travel in... agency may authorize me travel and transportation expenses for my tour renewal travel in Alaska or Hawaii? Other than as specified in §§ 302-3.209 through 302-3.226, your agency head will only authorize...

  8. 41 CFR 302-3.218 - Are there any special circumstances when my agency may authorize me travel and transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... circumstances when my agency may authorize me travel and transportation expenses for my tour renewal travel in... agency may authorize me travel and transportation expenses for my tour renewal travel in Alaska or Hawaii? Other than as specified in §§ 302-3.209 through 302-3.226, your agency head will only authorize...

  9. 41 CFR 102-118.425 - Is my agency allowed to perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills? 102-118.425 Section 102-118.425 Public Contracts....425 Is my agency allowed to perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills? No, your agency must forward all transportation bills to GSA for a postpayment audit regardless of any waiver...

  10. 41 CFR 102-118.425 - Is my agency allowed to perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills? 102-118.425 Section 102-118.425 Public Contracts....425 Is my agency allowed to perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills? No, your agency must forward all transportation bills to GSA for a postpayment audit regardless of any waiver...

  11. 41 CFR 102-118.320 - What information must be on transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... on transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit? 102-118.320 Section 102-118... transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit? (a) The following information must be annotated on all transportation bills that have completed a prepayment audit: (1) The date received from...

  12. 41 CFR 102-118.320 - What information must be on transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... on transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit? 102-118.320 Section 102-118... transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit? (a) The following information must be annotated on all transportation bills that have completed a prepayment audit: (1) The date received from...

  13. 41 CFR 102-118.320 - What information must be on transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... on transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit? 102-118.320 Section 102-118... transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit? (a) The following information must be annotated on all transportation bills that have completed a prepayment audit: (1) The date received from...

  14. 41 CFR 102-118.320 - What information must be on transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... on transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit? 102-118.320 Section 102-118... transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit? (a) The following information must be annotated on all transportation bills that have completed a prepayment audit: (1) The date received from...

  15. 41 CFR 102-118.425 - Is my agency allowed to perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills? 102-118.425 Section 102-118.425 Public Contracts....425 Is my agency allowed to perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills? No, your agency must forward all transportation bills to GSA for a postpayment audit regardless of any waiver...

  16. 41 CFR 102-118.425 - Is my agency allowed to perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills? 102-118.425 Section 102-118.425 Public Contracts....425 Is my agency allowed to perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills? No, your agency must forward all transportation bills to GSA for a postpayment audit regardless of any waiver...

  17. 41 CFR 102-118.320 - What information must be on transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... on transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit? 102-118.320 Section 102-118... transportation bills that have completed my agency's prepayment audit? (a) The following information must be annotated on all transportation bills that have completed a prepayment audit: (1) The date received from...

  18. 41 CFR 102-118.425 - Is my agency allowed to perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills? 102-118.425 Section 102-118.425 Public Contracts....425 Is my agency allowed to perform a postpayment audit on our transportation bills? No, your agency must forward all transportation bills to GSA for a postpayment audit regardless of any waiver...

  19. 78 FR 58383 - Renewal of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Renewal of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Notice of intent to renew charter. SUMMARY: In accordance with... the Surface Transportation Board (Board) intends to renew the charter of the Rail...

  20. 41 CFR 102-118.450 - Can a TSP file a transportation claim against my agency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Can a TSP file a transportation claim against my agency? 102-118.450 Section 102-118.450 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION...

  1. General theory of Taylor dispersion phenomena. Part 3. Surface transport

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, L.H.; Brenner, H.

    1982-01-01

    An asymptotic theory of Brownian tracer particle transport phenomena within a bulk fluid, as augmented by surface transport, is presented in the context of generalized Taylor dispersion theory. The analysis expands upon prior work, which was limited to transport wholly within a continuous phase, so as to now include surface adsorption, diffusion, and convection of the tracer along a continuous surface bounding the continuous fluid phase.

  2. 41 CFR 102-118.65 - Can my agency receive electronic billing for payment of transportation services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... electronic billing for payment of transportation services? 102-118.65 Section 102-118.65 Public Contracts and... Transportation Services § 102-118.65 Can my agency receive electronic billing for payment of transportation... to use electronic billing for the procurement and billing of transportation services....

  3. 78 FR 61251 - The National Public Transportation Safety Plan, the Public Transportation Agency Safety Plan, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... April 11, 2000, at 65 FR 19477-8 or http://DocketsInfo.dot.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Safety... light of high profile rail transit accidents discussed in section IIIA, below. Modern safety management... red flag. Accordingly, any residual risk would be accepted and the agency would focus on those...

  4. 41 CFR 102-117.325 - May my agency appear on its own behalf before a transportation regulatory body proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... its own behalf before a transportation regulatory body proceeding? 102-117.325 Section 102-117.325... Regulatory Body Proceedings § 102-117.325 May my agency appear on its own behalf before a transportation regulatory body proceeding? Generally, no executive agency may appear on its own behalf in any...

  5. 41 CFR 102-117.325 - May my agency appear on its own behalf before a transportation regulatory body proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... its own behalf before a transportation regulatory body proceeding? 102-117.325 Section 102-117.325... Regulatory Body Proceedings § 102-117.325 May my agency appear on its own behalf before a transportation regulatory body proceeding? Generally, no executive agency may appear on its own behalf in any...

  6. 41 CFR 102-118.190 - When buying passenger transportation must my agency reference the applicable contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false When buying passenger... Request (gtr) (until Form Retirement) § 102-118.190 When buying passenger transportation must my agency reference the applicable contract? Yes, when buying passenger transportation, your agency must reference...

  7. 41 CFR 102-118.190 - When buying passenger transportation must my agency reference the applicable contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false When buying passenger... Request (gtr) (until Form Retirement) § 102-118.190 When buying passenger transportation must my agency reference the applicable contract? Yes, when buying passenger transportation, your agency must reference...

  8. 41 CFR 102-118.190 - When buying passenger transportation must my agency reference the applicable contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false When buying passenger... Request (gtr) (until Form Retirement) § 102-118.190 When buying passenger transportation must my agency reference the applicable contract? Yes, when buying passenger transportation, your agency must reference...

  9. 41 CFR 102-118.190 - When buying passenger transportation must my agency reference the applicable contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When buying passenger... Request (gtr) (until Form Retirement) § 102-118.190 When buying passenger transportation must my agency reference the applicable contract? Yes, when buying passenger transportation, your agency must reference...

  10. 41 CFR 102-118.190 - When buying passenger transportation must my agency reference the applicable contract?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When buying passenger... Request (gtr) (until Form Retirement) § 102-118.190 When buying passenger transportation must my agency reference the applicable contract? Yes, when buying passenger transportation, your agency must reference...

  11. Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2014

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Rockefeller, John D., IV [D-WV

    2014-09-08

    12/12/2014 By Senator Rockefeller from Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation filed written report. Report No. 113-321. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  12. 41 CFR 102-118.405 - Are my agency's prepayment audited transportation bills subject to periodic postpayment audit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... prepayment audited transportation bills subject to periodic postpayment audit oversight from the GSA Audit... § 102-118.405 Are my agency's prepayment audited transportation bills subject to periodic postpayment... prepayment audited transportation bills to periodic postpayment audit oversight rather than...

  13. 41 CFR 102-118.405 - Are my agency's prepayment audited transportation bills subject to periodic postpayment audit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prepayment audited transportation bills subject to periodic postpayment audit oversight from the GSA Audit... § 102-118.405 Are my agency's prepayment audited transportation bills subject to periodic postpayment... prepayment audited transportation bills to periodic postpayment audit oversight rather than...

  14. Oil droplet self-transportation on oleophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Qin, Qi Hang; Shah, Ali; Ras, Robin H A; Tian, Xuelin; Jokinen, Ville

    2016-06-01

    Directional liquid transportation is important for a variety of biological processes and technical applications. Although surface engineering through asymmetric chemical modification or geometrical patterning facilitates effective liquid manipulation and enables water droplet self-transportation on synthetic surfaces, self-transportation of oil droplets poses a major challenge because of their low surface tension. We report oil droplet self-transportation on oleophobic surfaces that are microtextured with radial arrays of undercut stripes. More significantly, we observe three modes of oil motion on various sample surfaces, namely, inward transportation, pinned, and outward spreading, which can be switched by the structure parameters, including stripe intersection angle and width. Accompanying theoretical modeling provides an in-depth mechanistic understanding of the structure-droplet motion relationship. Finally, we reveal how to optimize the texture parameters to maximize oil droplet self-transportation capability and demonstrate spontaneous droplet movement for liquids down to a surface tension of 22.4 mN/m. The surfaces presented here open up new avenues for power-free liquid transportation and oil contamination self-removal applications in various analytical and fluidic devices. PMID:27386574

  15. Oil droplet self-transportation on oleophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Qin, Qi Hang; Shah, Ali; Ras, Robin H A; Tian, Xuelin; Jokinen, Ville

    2016-06-01

    Directional liquid transportation is important for a variety of biological processes and technical applications. Although surface engineering through asymmetric chemical modification or geometrical patterning facilitates effective liquid manipulation and enables water droplet self-transportation on synthetic surfaces, self-transportation of oil droplets poses a major challenge because of their low surface tension. We report oil droplet self-transportation on oleophobic surfaces that are microtextured with radial arrays of undercut stripes. More significantly, we observe three modes of oil motion on various sample surfaces, namely, inward transportation, pinned, and outward spreading, which can be switched by the structure parameters, including stripe intersection angle and width. Accompanying theoretical modeling provides an in-depth mechanistic understanding of the structure-droplet motion relationship. Finally, we reveal how to optimize the texture parameters to maximize oil droplet self-transportation capability and demonstrate spontaneous droplet movement for liquids down to a surface tension of 22.4 mN/m. The surfaces presented here open up new avenues for power-free liquid transportation and oil contamination self-removal applications in various analytical and fluidic devices.

  16. Oil droplet self-transportation on oleophobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Qin, Qi Hang; Shah, Ali; Ras, Robin H. A.; Tian, Xuelin; Jokinen, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Directional liquid transportation is important for a variety of biological processes and technical applications. Although surface engineering through asymmetric chemical modification or geometrical patterning facilitates effective liquid manipulation and enables water droplet self-transportation on synthetic surfaces, self-transportation of oil droplets poses a major challenge because of their low surface tension. We report oil droplet self-transportation on oleophobic surfaces that are microtextured with radial arrays of undercut stripes. More significantly, we observe three modes of oil motion on various sample surfaces, namely, inward transportation, pinned, and outward spreading, which can be switched by the structure parameters, including stripe intersection angle and width. Accompanying theoretical modeling provides an in-depth mechanistic understanding of the structure–droplet motion relationship. Finally, we reveal how to optimize the texture parameters to maximize oil droplet self-transportation capability and demonstrate spontaneous droplet movement for liquids down to a surface tension of 22.4 mN/m. The surfaces presented here open up new avenues for power-free liquid transportation and oil contamination self-removal applications in various analytical and fluidic devices. PMID:27386574

  17. Surface atmospheric extremes (Launch and transportation areas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The effects of extreme values of surface and low altitude atmospheric parameters on space vehicle design, tests, and operations are discussed. Atmospheric extremes from the surface to 150 meters for geographic locations of interest to NASA are given. Thermal parameters (temperature and solar radiation), humidity, pressure, and atmospheric electricity (lighting and static) are presented. Weather charts and tables are included.

  18. Transport Powder and Liquid Samples by Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Louyeh, Sahar

    2009-01-01

    Sample transport is an important requirement for In-situ analysis of samples in NASA planetary exploration missions. Tests have shown that powders or liquid drops on a surface can be transported by surface acoustic waves (SAW) that are generated on the surface using interdigital transducers. The phenomena were investigated experimentally and to generate SAWs interdigital electrodes were deposited on wafers of 128 deg rotated Y-cut LiNbO?. Transporting capability of the SAW device was tested using particles of various sizes and drops of various viscosities liquids. Because of different interaction mechanisms with the SAWs, the powders and the liquid drops were observed to move in opposite directions. In the preliminary tests, a speed of 180 mm/s was achieved for powder transportation. The detailed experimental setup and results are presented in this paper. The transporting mechanism can potentially be applied to miniaturize sample analysis system or " lab-on-chip" devices.

  19. Surface modification of tribological components in transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.R.

    1992-11-01

    This paper reviews a number of programs funded through the Engineered Tribological Interfaces (ETI) Task area of the Tribology Program that utilize energetic beams of atoms to enhance the mechanical and microstructural properties of near-surface regions to improve the tribological performance of critical components. The processes used in these programs include techniques based on chemical vapor deposition, physical vapor deposition, and ion implantation. A common feature of these techniques is their ability to produce dense and adherent modified surfaces without need for subsequent grinding/polishing treatments. Another feature of these techniques is their ability to introduce a wide range of elements into near-surface regions.

  20. 29 CFR 1926.902 - Surface transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provisions of Department of Transportation regulations contained in 46 CFR parts 146-149, Water Carriers; 49 CFR parts 171-179, Highways and Railways; 49 CFR part 195, Pipelines; and 49 CFR parts 390-397, Motor... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface transportation of explosives. 1926.902 Section...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.902 - Surface transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provisions of Department of Transportation regulations contained in 46 CFR parts 146-149, Water Carriers; 49 CFR parts 171-179, Highways and Railways; 49 CFR part 195, Pipelines; and 49 CFR parts 390-397, Motor... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Surface transportation of explosives. 1926.902 Section...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.902 - Surface transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provisions of Department of Transportation regulations contained in 46 CFR parts 146-149, Water Carriers; 49 CFR parts 171-179, Highways and Railways; 49 CFR part 195, Pipelines; and 49 CFR parts 390-397, Motor... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Surface transportation of explosives. 1926.902 Section...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.902 - Surface transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provisions of Department of Transportation regulations contained in 46 CFR parts 146-149, Water Carriers; 49 CFR parts 171-179, Highways and Railways; 49 CFR part 195, Pipelines; and 49 CFR parts 390-397, Motor... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Surface transportation of explosives. 1926.902 Section...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.902 - Surface transportation of explosives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provisions of Department of Transportation regulations contained in 46 CFR parts 146-149, Water Carriers; 49 CFR parts 171-179, Highways and Railways; 49 CFR part 195, Pipelines; and 49 CFR parts 390-397, Motor... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Surface transportation of explosives. 1926.902 Section...

  5. Computer methodology for transportation agencies to screen technologies for hazardous waste remediation. Volume 3. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Grenney, W.J.; Penmetsa, R.K.

    1993-03-01

    When transportation agencies become involved in the remediation of hazardous waste on their sites, the common practice is to hire consultants and contractors for the clean up process. Because the field of hazardous waste site remediation is changing so rapidly, agency personnel evaluating the consultant's recommendations need to have access to the most recent regulatory and remediation information. Early stages of the remediation process typically involve site assessment, and the identification of feasible technologies for treatment. A user friendly computerized methodology was developed for screening out the most inappropriate treatment technologies for a specific waste at a specific site. The STEP model was developed for this purpose using knowledge-base expert system techniques. Object oriented programming was used to interface multiple rule-bases, databases, and a simulation model.

  6. Comparison of alternative concepts for lunar surface transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, Uwe

    The lunar surface transportation system is a key element in lunar development. The decision which means of conveyance should be preferred depends on a lot of influencing factors such as transportation requirements, physical boundary conditions and economics. Starting with a systematic approach to define and structure the problem, a model to compare alternative transportation systems has been built. From the pool of possible means of conveyance, chemical rockets, electric cars, maglev-trains and mass-drivers have been chosen as candidates for investigation. With these candidates five different surface transportation systems were defined. For a reference lunar development scenario the systems were compared on the basis of a cost-to-benefit ratio. Preliminary results indicate that under the assumption that LH2 could be produced on lunar surface, LOX/LH2 propulsed "Hoppers" seem very attractive up to medium transportation demands. For large amounts of bulk cargo, mass driver transportation seems to have advantages, and electric cars should be used for all transportation tasks if the transportation demand is high. Maglev-trains seem to be competitive only for very large transportation demand and long life cycles.

  7. Surface atmospheric extremes (launch and transportation areas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Criteria are provided on atmospheric extremes from the surface to 150 meters for geographical locations of interest to NASA. Thermal parameters (temperature and solar radiation), humidity, precipitation, pressure, and atmospheric electricity (lightning and static) are presented. Available data are also provided for the entire continental United States for use in future space programs.

  8. Controlled droplet transport on a gradient adhesion surface.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shile; Wang, Sijie; Liu, Chengcheng; Zheng, Yongmei; Hou, Yongping

    2015-04-01

    A surface with continuously changed adhesion from ultrahigh to ultralow is fabricated by an integrated method of anodic oxidation combined with octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) plasma. The control of droplet transport along the direction of the adhesion gradient in length is achieved, as the surface is submitted to either tilted angle or vibration frequency. PMID:25740352

  9. An Atomistic View on Fundamental Transport Processes on Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Giesen, Margret

    2007-06-14

    In this lecture I present an introduction to the time-resolved observation of atomic transport processes on metal surfaces using scanning tunneling microscopy video sequences. The experimental data is analyzed using scaling law concepts known from statistical thermodynamics. I will present studies from metal surfaces in vacuum as well as in electrolyte.

  10. Controlled droplet transport on a gradient adhesion surface.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shile; Wang, Sijie; Liu, Chengcheng; Zheng, Yongmei; Hou, Yongping

    2015-04-01

    A surface with continuously changed adhesion from ultrahigh to ultralow is fabricated by an integrated method of anodic oxidation combined with octafluorocyclobutane (C4F8) plasma. The control of droplet transport along the direction of the adhesion gradient in length is achieved, as the surface is submitted to either tilted angle or vibration frequency.

  11. Models of Fate and Transport of Pollutants in Surface Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okome, Gloria Eloho

    2013-01-01

    There is the need to answer very crucial questions of "what happens to pollutants in surface waters?" This question must be answered to determine the factors controlling fate and transport of chemicals and their evolutionary state in surface waters. Monitoring and experimental methods are used in establishing the environmental states.…

  12. 41 CFR 302-9.8 - Must my agency authorize transportation or emergency or temporary storage of my POV?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 9-ALLOWANCES FOR TRANSPORTATION AND EMERGENCY OR TEMPORARY STORAGE OF A PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE General Rules... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Must my agency...

  13. 41 CFR 102-118.185 - When buying freight transportation, must my agency reference the applicable contract or tender on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false When buying freight....185 When buying freight transportation, must my agency reference the applicable contract or tender on... tender when buying transportation on a bill of lading (including GBLs). However, the...

  14. 41 CFR 102-118.185 - When buying freight transportation, must my agency reference the applicable contract or tender on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false When buying freight....185 When buying freight transportation, must my agency reference the applicable contract or tender on... tender when buying transportation on a bill of lading (including GBLs). However, the...

  15. 41 CFR 102-118.185 - When buying freight transportation, must my agency reference the applicable contract or tender on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When buying freight....185 When buying freight transportation, must my agency reference the applicable contract or tender on... tender when buying transportation on a bill of lading (including GBLs). However, the...

  16. 41 CFR 102-118.185 - When buying freight transportation, must my agency reference the applicable contract or tender on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false When buying freight....185 When buying freight transportation, must my agency reference the applicable contract or tender on... tender when buying transportation on a bill of lading (including GBLs). However, the...

  17. 41 CFR 102-118.185 - When buying freight transportation, must my agency reference the applicable contract or tender on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When buying freight....185 When buying freight transportation, must my agency reference the applicable contract or tender on... tender when buying transportation on a bill of lading (including GBLs). However, the...

  18. Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    1981-04-01

    The study objective of "The Mathematical Simulation of Sediment and Radionuclide Transport in Surface Waters" is to synthesize and test radionuclide transport models capable of realistically assessing radionuclide transport in various types of surface water bodies by including the sediment-radionuclide interactions. These interactions include radionuclide adsorption by sediment; desorption from sediment into water; and transport, deposition, and resuspension of sorbed radionuclides controlled by the sediment movements. During FY-1979, the modification of sediment and contaminant (radionuclide) transport model, FETRA, was completed to make it applicable to coastal waters. The model is an unsteady, two-dimensional (longitudinal and lateral) model that consists of three submodels (for sediment, dissolved-contaminant, and particulate-contaminant transport), coupled to include the sediment-contaminant interactions. In estuaries, flow phenomena and consequent sediment and radionuclide migration are often three-dimensional in nature mainly because of nonuniform channel cross-sections, salinity intrusion, and lateral-flow circulation. Thus, an unsteady, three-dimensional radionuclide transport model for estuaries is also being synthesized by combining and modifying a PNL unsteady hydrothermal model and FETRA. These two radionuclide transport models for coastal waters and estuaries will be applied to actual sites to examine the validity of the codes.

  19. Thermoelectric transport of edge/surface states of topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Shuichi; Takahashi, Ryuji

    2011-03-01

    In my talk we theoretically study thermoelectric properties of topological insulators (TI), where novel properties of edge/surface states are expected to appear. As compared to the number of bulk states, the edge/surface states are very few; we therefore consider a narrow ribbon for 2D and a thin slab for 3D TI to make the edge/surface-state transport larger. By considering edge/surface and bulk transport together, we calculate the charge and heat conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient. We find that in 2D TI the bulk and edge transport compete each other in the thermoelectric transport. By lowering temperature, the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT has a minimum, corresponding to the bulk-to-edge crossover, and then increases again at low temperature where the edge state dominates. The crossover is estimated to be at around 5K-10K for 10nm-width ribbon. We also discuss surface state transport for 3D TI as well.

  20. Spectral Analysis of Surface Controlled Phonon Transport in Nanophononic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Sanghamitra; Donadio, Davide

    Phonon engineering in nanostructured semiconductors has shown promises to further advance the performance of energy applications beyond the state-of-the-art limit. In nanostructured materials, phonon transport is greatly affected by the surface nanoscale character. The concept of nanophononic metamaterial (NPM) was introduced recently to affect nanoscale thermal transport with the inclusion of local surface resonators. We carried out a systematic investigation of phonon transport in locally resonant silicon-based NPMs. We used classical equilibrium molecular dynamics and a Boltzmann transport equation approach with the relaxation time approximation to investigate the nature of phononic thermal transport in nanopatterned silicon membranes with thicknesses of the order of 10 nm and below. We find the presence of local surface resonators has a significant effect on the phonon dispersion and has a direct consequence of suppression of group velocities of phonons in the NPMs. We completed the investigation by relating nanoscale resonant character (geometry and material composition) with phonon scattering, and consequently, phonon transport in the locally resonant silicon membrane NPMs This project is funded by the program FP7-ENERGY-2012-1-2STAGE under Contract Number 309150.

  1. Respirable Particle Transport from Surfaces by Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truman, C. R.; Vorobieff, P.; Conroy, J.; Wayne, P.; White, R.; Anderson, M.; Kumar, S.

    2011-11-01

    Resuspension of particles from planar surfaces was studied in a shock tube. Respirable particles (aerodyn. diam. <=5 μm) and slightly larger non-respirable particles were tested on smooth and rough surfaces at Mach 1.2 to 2.0. Particles of specified size were deposited on substrates of prescribed roughness. Surface roughness and particle-surface adhesion forces were quantified by atomic force microscopy. Alkylthiol self assembled monolayers (SAMs) were applied to precisely control surface roughness and surface chemistry. The advection of particles initially at rest on the surface by the rapidly accelerated flow were measured by Mie scattering. An ultra-high-speed digital camera with pulsed laser sheet illumination enables time-resolved particle transport diagnostics. Although particles are initially swept off a smooth surface with greater ease, cloud propagation speed is higher for a rough surface. At late times the cloud height is greater for a rough surface so that particles end up in a faster region of the boundary layer. Because our respirable and non-respirable particle size distributions overlap, further study is required. Shear-driven Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices clearly visible in some images likely play a prominent role in particle transport. Supported by DTRA Threat Agent Science, Agent Characterization.

  2. Surface-Dominated Transport on a Bulk Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Philip; Barreto, Lucas; Kühnemund, Lisa; Edler, Frederik; Tegenkamp, Christoph; Mi, Jianli; Bremholm, Martin; Brummerstedt Iversen, Bo; Frydendahl, Christian; Bianchi, Marco

    2014-03-01

    Topological insulators are guaranteed to support metallic surface states on an insulating bulk, and one should thus expect that the electronic transport in these materials is dominated by the surfaces states. Alas, due to the high remaining bulk conductivity, surface contributions to transport have so-far only been singled out indirectly via quantum oscillation, or for devices based on gated and doped topological insulator thin films, a situation in which the surface carrier mobility could be limited by defect and interface scattering. Here we present a direct measurement of surface-dominated conduction on an atomically clean surface of Bi2Te2Se. Using nano-scale four point setups with variable contact distance, we show that the transport at 30 K is two-dimensional rather than three-dimensional and by combining these measurements with angle-resolved photoemission results from the same crystals, we find a surface state mobility of 390(30) cm2V-1s-1 at 30 K at a carrier concentration of 8.71(7) ×1012 cm-2.

  3. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-01-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field. PMID:24149467

  4. Water transport mechanism through open capillaries analyzed by direct surface modifications on biological surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Hiroko; Hirai, Yuji; Yabu, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Tsujii, Kaoru; Shimozawa, Tateo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2013-10-01

    Some small animals only use water transport mechanisms passively driven by surface energies. However, little is known about passive water transport mechanisms because it is difficult to measure the wettability of microstructures in small areas and determine the chemistry of biological surfaces. Herein, we developed to directly analyse the structural effects of wettability of chemically modified biological surfaces by using a nanoliter volume water droplet and a hi-speed video system. The wharf roach Ligia exotica transports water only by using open capillaries in its legs containing hair- and paddle-like microstructures. The structural effects of legs chemically modified with a self-assembled monolayer were analysed, so that the wharf roach has a smart water transport system passively driven by differences of wettability between the microstructures. We anticipate that this passive water transport mechanism may inspire novel biomimetic fluid manipulations with or without a gravitational field.

  5. Surface hall effect and nonlocal transport in SmB₆: evidence for surface conduction.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Thomas, S; Grant, T; Botimer, J; Fisk, Z; Xia, Jing

    2013-11-06

    A topological insulator (TI) is an unusual quantum state in which the insulating bulk is topologically distinct from vacuum, resulting in a unique metallic surface that is robust against time-reversal invariant perturbations. The surface transport, however, remains difficult to isolate from the bulk conduction in most existing TI crystals (particularly Bi₂Se₃, Bi₂Te₃ and Sb₂Te₃) due to impurity caused bulk conduction. We report in large crystals of topological Kondo insulator (TKI) candidate material SmB₆ the thickness-independent surface Hall effects and non-local transport, which persist after various surface perturbations. These results serve as proof that at low temperatures SmB₆ has a metallic surface that surrounds an insulating bulk, paving the way for transport studies of the surface state in this proposed TKI material.

  6. Surface flux evolution constraints for flux transport dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, R. H.; Schmitt, D.; Jiang, J.; Işık, E.

    2012-06-01

    The surface flux transport (SFT) model of solar magnetic fields involves empirically well-constrained velocity and magnetic fields. The basic evolution of the Sun's large-scale surface magnetic field is well described by this model. The azimuthally averaged evolution of the SFT model can be compared to the surface evolution of the flux transport dynamo (FTD), and the evolution of the SFT model can be used to constrain several near-surface properties of the FTD model. We compared the results of the FTD model with different upper boundary conditions and diffusivity profiles against the results of the SFT model. Among the ingredients of the FTD model, downward pumping of magnetic flux, related to a positive diffusivity gradient, has a significant effect in slowing down the diffusive radial transport of magnetic flux through the solar surface. Provided the pumping was strong enough to give rise to a downflow of a magnetic Reynolds number of 5 in the near-surface boundary layer, the FTD using a vertical boundary condition matches the SFT model based on the average velocities above the boundary layer. The FTD model with a potential field was unable to match the SFT results.

  7. Directional transport of impinging capillary jet on wettability engineered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Impingement of capillary jet on a surface is important for applications like heat transfer, or for liquid manipulation in bio-microfluidic devices. Using wettability engineered surfaces, we demonstrate pump-less and directional transport of capillary jet on a flat surface. Spatial contrast of surface energy and a wedge-shape geometry of the wettability confined track on the substrate facilitate formation of instantaneous spherical bulges upon jet impingement; these bulges are further transported along the superhydrophilic tracks due to Laplace pressure gradient. Critical condition warranted for formation of liquid bulge along the varying width of the superhydrophilic track is calculated analytically and verified experimentally. The work throws light on novel fluid phenomena of unidirectional jet impingement on wettability confined surfaces and provides a platform for innovative liquid manipulation technique for further application. By varying the geometry and wettability contrast on the surface, one can achieve volume flow rates of ~ O(100 μL/sec) and directionally guided transport of the jet liquid, pumplessly at speeds of ~ O(10cm/sec).

  8. Cholesterol Is Required for Surface Transport of Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Patrick; Simons, Kai

    1998-01-01

    Transport from the TGN to the basolateral surface involves a rab/N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive fusion protein (NSF)/soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP)/SNAP receptor (SNARE) mechanism. Apical transport instead is thought to be mediated by detergent-insoluble sphingolipid–cholesterol rafts. By reducing the cholesterol level of living cells by 60–70% with lovastatin and methyl-β-cyclodextrin, we show that the TGN-to-surface transport of the apical marker protein influenza virus hemagglutinin was slowed down, whereas the transport of the basolateral marker vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein as well as the ER-to-Golgi transport of both membrane proteins was not affected. Reduction of transport of hemagglutinin was accompanied by increased solubility in the detergent Triton X-100 and by significant missorting of hemagglutinin to the basolateral membrane. In addition, depletion of cellular cholesterol by lovastatin and methyl-β-cyclodextrin led to missorting of the apical secretory glycoprotein gp-80, suggesting that gp-80 uses a raft-dependent mechanism for apical sorting. Our data provide for the first time direct evidence for the functional significance of cholesterol in the sorting of apical membrane proteins as well as of apically secreted glycoproteins. PMID:9508769

  9. Excess surface area in bioelectrochemical systems causes ion transport limitations

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Davenport, Emily K.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: 1) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200 mM increased current linearly up to a total of +273% vs. 0 mM NaCl under advective conditions, 2) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200 mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and 3) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steady-state current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential at the electrode surface. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant. PMID:25421463

  10. Strong Surface Orientation Dependent Thermal Transport in Si Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanguang; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectrics, which convert waste heat to electricity, offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Research to date has focused on reducing the thermal conductivity relative to the bulk. Si nanowires (NWs) have received exceptional attention due to their low-dimensionality, abundance of availability, and high carrier mobility. From thermal transport point of view, the thermal conductivity of Si NWs strongly depends on the detailed surface structure, such as roughness and surface orientation. Here, direct molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical models are used to investigate the thermal transport in Si NWs with diverse surface orientations. Our results show that the thermal conductivity of Si NWs with different surface orientation can differ by as large as 2.7~4.2 times, which suggests a new route to boost the thermoelectric performance. Using the full spectrum theory, we find that the surface orientation, which alters the distribution of atoms on the surface and determines the degree of phonon coupling between the core and the surface, is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using spectral thermal conductivity, the remarkable difference in the thermal conductivity for different surface orientation is found to only stem from the phonons in the medium frequency range, with minor contribution from low and high frequency phonons. PMID:27113556

  11. Strong Surface Orientation Dependent Thermal Transport in Si Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanguang; Chen, Yuli; Hu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Thermoelectrics, which convert waste heat to electricity, offer an attractive pathway for addressing an important niche in the globally growing landscape of energy demand. Research to date has focused on reducing the thermal conductivity relative to the bulk. Si nanowires (NWs) have received exceptional attention due to their low-dimensionality, abundance of availability, and high carrier mobility. From thermal transport point of view, the thermal conductivity of Si NWs strongly depends on the detailed surface structure, such as roughness and surface orientation. Here, direct molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical models are used to investigate the thermal transport in Si NWs with diverse surface orientations. Our results show that the thermal conductivity of Si NWs with different surface orientation can differ by as large as 2.7~4.2 times, which suggests a new route to boost the thermoelectric performance. Using the full spectrum theory, we find that the surface orientation, which alters the distribution of atoms on the surface and determines the degree of phonon coupling between the core and the surface, is the dominant mechanism. Furthermore, using spectral thermal conductivity, the remarkable difference in the thermal conductivity for different surface orientation is found to only stem from the phonons in the medium frequency range, with minor contribution from low and high frequency phonons. PMID:27113556

  12. AMOC sensitivity to surface buoyancy fluxes: Stronger ocean meridional heat transport with a weaker volume transport?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sévellec, Florian; Fedorov, Alexey V.

    2016-09-01

    Oceanic northward heat transport is commonly assumed to be positively correlated with the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). For example, in numerical "water-hosing" experiments, imposing anomalous freshwater fluxes in the northern Atlantic leads to a slow-down of the AMOC and the corresponding reduction of oceanic northward heat transport. Here, we study the sensitivity of the ocean heat and volume transports to surface heat and freshwater fluxes using a generalized stability analysis. For the sensitivity to surface freshwater fluxes, we find that, while the direct relationship between the AMOC volume and heat transports holds on shorter time scales, it can reverse on timescales longer than 500 years or so. That is, depending on the model surface boundary conditions, reduction in the AMOC volume transport can potentially lead to a stronger heat transport on long timescales, resulting from the gradual increase in ocean thermal stratification. We discuss the implications of these results for the problem of steady state (statistical equilibrium) in ocean and climate GCM as well as paleoclimate problems including millennial climate variability.

  13. Excess Surface Area in Bioelectrochemical Systems Causes ion Transport Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Timothy D.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Davenport, Emily K.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-05-01

    We investigated ion transport limitations on 3D graphite felt electrodes by growing Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms with advection to eliminate external mass transfer limitations. We characterized ion transport limitations by: (i) showing that serially increasing NaCl concentration up to 200mM increased current linearly up to a total of þ273% vs. 0mM NaCl under advective conditions; (ii) growing the biofilm with a starting concentration of 200mM NaCl, which led to a maximum current increase of 400% vs. current generation without NaCl, and (iii) showing that un-colonized surface area remained even after steadystate current was reached. After accounting for iR effects, we confirmed that the excess surface area existed despite a non-zero overpotential. The fact that the biofilm was constrained from colonizing and producing further current under these conditions confirmed the biofilms under study here were ion transport-limited. Our work demonstrates that the use of high surface area electrodes may not increase current density when the system design allows ion transport limitations to become dominant.

  14. 78 FR 43261 - Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act (TIFIA) Program; Agency Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act... for the Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act (TIFIA) program to pay the subsidy....gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation...

  15. Robust surface state transport in thin bismuth nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Wei; Kong, Fengyu; Han, Yuyan; Du, Haifeng; Yang, Jiyong; Tian, Mingliang; Zhang, Yuheng

    2014-01-01

    While a two-dimensional (2D) metallic surface state in bismuth has been proposed, experimental 2D evidence of quantum transport, e.g., angular dependent Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations is still lacking. Here, we report the angular-dependent magnetoresistance measurements in single-crystal Bi nanoribbons, and found that both the low-field weak antilocalization behavior and the high-field angle-dependent SdH oscillations follow exactly the 2D character, indicative of the 2D metallic surface states which dominate the transport properties of thin Bi nanoribbons. Moreover, by controllable exposing the ribbons to ambient environment (1 atm and room temperature), the metallic surface states were found to be robust to the oxidation although the carrier density in the surface states are modified after the exposures. These results suggest that the metallic surface states in Bi nanoribbons should be topologically protected which can provide key information in understanding the surface properties of Bi in nanometer scale. PMID:25404036

  16. Aeolian sediment transport on a beach: Surface moisture, wind fetch, and mean transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, B. O.; Davidson-Arnott, R. G. D.; Hesp, P. A.; Namikas, S. L.; Ollerhead, J.; Walker, I. J.

    2009-04-01

    Temporal and spatial changes in wind speed, wind direction, and moisture content are ubiquitous across sandy coastal beaches. Often these factors interact in unknown ways to create complexity that confounds our ability to model sediment transport at any point across the beach as well as our capacity to predict sediment delivery into the adjacent foredunes. This study was designed to measure wind flow and sediment transport over a beach and foredune at Greenwich Dunes, Prince Edward Island National Park, with the express purpose of addressing these complex interactions. Detailed measurements are reported for one stormy day, October 11, 2004, during which meteorological conditions were highly variable. Wind speed ranged from 4 ms - 1 to over 20 ms - 1 , wind direction was highly oblique varying between 60° and 85° from shore perpendicular, and moisture content of the sand surface ranged from a minimum of about 3% (by mass) to complete saturation depending on precipitation, tidal excursion, and storm surge that progressively inundated the beach. The data indicate that short-term variations (i.e., minutes to hours) in sediment transport across this beach arise predominantly because of short-term changes in wind speed, as is expected, but also because of variations in wind direction, precipitation intensity, and tide level. Even slight increases in wind speed are capable of driving more intense saltation events, but this relationship is mediated by other factors on this characteristically narrow beach. As the angle of wind approach becomes more oblique, the fetch distance increases and allows greater opportunity for the saltation system to evolve toward an equilibrium transport state before reaching the foredunes. Whether the theoretically-predicted maximum rate of transport is ever achieved depends on the character of the sand surface (e.g., grain size, slope, roughness, vegetation, moisture content) and on various attributes of the wind field (e.g., average wind

  17. 41 CFR 301-10.3 - What methods of transportation may my agency authorize me to use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ALLOWABLE TRAVEL EXPENSES... me to use? Your agency may authorize: (a) Common carrier transportation (e.g., aircraft, train, bus, ship, or other transit system) under Subpart B; (b) Government vehicle under Subpart C; (c) POV...

  18. 41 CFR 301-10.3 - What methods of transportation may my agency authorize me to use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ALLOWABLE TRAVEL EXPENSES... me to use? Your agency may authorize: (a) Common carrier transportation (e.g., aircraft, train, bus, ship, or other transit system) under Subpart B; (b) Government vehicle under Subpart C; (c) POV...

  19. 41 CFR 301-10.3 - What methods of transportation may my agency authorize me to use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ALLOWABLE TRAVEL EXPENSES... me to use? Your agency may authorize: (a) Common carrier transportation (e.g., aircraft, train, bus, ship, or other transit system) under Subpart B; (b) Government vehicle under Subpart C; (c) POV...

  20. 49 CFR 1570.13 - False statements regarding security background checks by public transportation agency or railroad...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... regarding security background checks by public transportation agency or railroad carrier. (a) Scope. This... in section 20102 of title 49, United States Code. Security background check means reviewing the..., or guidance issued by the Secretary of Homeland Security related to security background...

  1. 49 CFR 1570.13 - False statements regarding security background checks by public transportation agency or railroad...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... regarding security background checks by public transportation agency or railroad carrier. (a) Scope. This... in section 20102 of title 49, United States Code. Security background check means reviewing the..., or guidance issued by the Secretary of Homeland Security related to security background...

  2. Neoclassical transport in toroidal plasmas with nonaxisymmetric flux surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.

    2015-05-01

    The capability to treat nonaxisymmetric flux surface geometry has been added to the drift-kinetic code NEO (Belli and Candy 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 095010). Geometric quantities (i.e. metric elements) are supplied by a recently-developed local 3D equilibrium solver, allowing neoclassical transport coefficients to be systematically computed while varying the 3D plasma shape in a simple and intuitive manner. Code verification is accomplished via detailed comparison with 3D Pfirsch-Schlüter theory. A discussion of the various collisionality regimes associated with 3D transport is given, with an emphasis on non-ambipolar particle flux, neoclassical toroidal viscosity, energy flux and bootstrap current. Finally, we compute the transport in the presence of ripple-type perturbations in a DIII-D-like H-mode edge plasma.

  3. Transport effects on the kinetics of protein-surface binding.

    PubMed Central

    Balgi, G; Leckband, D E; Nitsche, J M

    1995-01-01

    A detailed model is presented for protein binding to active surfaces, with application to the binding of avidin molecules to a biotin-functionalized fiber optic sensor in experiments reported by S. Zhao and W. M. Reichert (American Chemical Society Symposium Series 493, 1992). Kinetic data for binding in solution are used to assign an intrinsic catalytic rate coefficient k to the biotin-avidin pair, deconvoluted from transport and electrostatic factors via application of coagulation theory. This intrinsic chemical constant is built into a reaction-diffusion analysis of surface binding where activity is restricted to localized sites (representing immobilized biotin molecules). The analysis leads to an effective catalytic rate coefficient keff characterizing the active surface. Thereafter, solution of the transport problem describing absorption of avidin molecules by the macroscopic sensor surface leads to predictions of the avidin flux, which are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The analysis suggests the following conclusions. 1) Translational diffusion limitations are negligible for avidin-biotin binding in solution owing to the small (kinetically limiting) value k = 0.00045 m/s. 2) The sparse distribution of biotin molecules and the presence of a repulsive hydration force produce an effective surface-average catalytic rate coefficient keff of order 10(-7) m/s, much smaller than k. 3) Avidin binding to the fiber optic sensor occurs in an intermediate regime where the rate is influenced by both kinetics and diffusion. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 PMID:7647232

  4. Dynamic modeling of contaminant transport with surface runoff and sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Ashraf, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    Non-point source pollution in surface runoff due to agricultural activities presents one of the principal problems in the U.S. Solution to the problem of delivering pollutants is crucial to a non-point abatement program. Mathematical models can serve as tools to relate hydrologic conditions and soil properties to the processes of pollutant transport, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of best management practices in reducing non-point source pollutant load in surface waters. In this study, a dynamic model component is developed to simulate transport of non-point source pollutants, mostly agricultural chemicals, with surface runoff and sediment in agricultural watersheds. Algorithms are developed to route chemicals and infiltrating water through different soil increments assuming complete mixing until time of ponding or initiation of runoff. Once runoff starts, the runoff interacts with a mixing soil layer in a non-uniform fashion and exchange of chemicals takes place between runoff and the mixing soil layer. When runoff storage builds up, it is assumed that a relatively stagnant depth of runoff interacts with the mixing soil layer. This stagnant depth is obtained by applying boundary layer theory. Mass balance equations are used to route chemicals associated with runoff and sediment along the slope lengths for overland and channel flow. Model algorithms are coupled with the hydrologic and sediment transport model RUNOFF to simulate transport of contaminants with surface runoff and sediments in agricultural watersheds. The model performance is evaluated with data ranging from controlled laboratory experiments to watershed scale. The concept of non-uniform mixing is tested with a laboratory data set found in the literature. A total of fifteen runs are made, five for each of the chemicals, nitrate, phosphate, and cyanazine. The model results show good agreements with the observed yields of runoff, sediment, orthophosphate, and ammonium.

  5. Model for surface packing and aeolian transport on sand ripples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louge, M. Y.; Valance, A.; el-Moctar, A. Ould; Ahmedou, D. Ould; Dupont, P.

    2009-06-01

    Measurements indicate that the solid volume fraction on a sand ripple varies from random jammed packing at troughs to the minimum stable packing at crests. By relating variations of the solid volume fraction to those of the surface turbulent shear stress, a collisional model of reptation suggests a qualitative origin for these observations. Although the model overestimates the critical shear velocity at which reptation arises, it predicts the rate of aeolian transport on Earth and Mars.

  6. Transport equations for linear surface waves with random underlying flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, Guillaume; Chou, Tom

    1999-11-01

    We define the Wigner distribution and use it to develop equations for linear surface capillary-gravity wave propagation in the transport regime. The energy density a(r, k) contained in waves propagating with wavevector k at field point r is given by dota(r,k) + nabla_k[U_⊥(r,z=0) \\cdotk + Ω(k)]\\cdotnabla_ra [13pt] \\: hspace1in - (nabla_r\\cdotU_⊥)a - nabla_r(k\\cdotU_⊥)\\cdotnabla_ka = Σ(δU^2) where U_⊥(r, z=0) is a slowly varying surface current, and Ω(k) = √(k^3+k)tanh kh is the free capillary-gravity dispersion relation. Note that nabla_r\\cdotU_⊥(r,z=0) neq 0, and that the surface currents exchange energy density with the propagating waves. When an additional weak random current √\\varepsilon δU(r/\\varepsilon) varying on the scale of k-1 is included, we find an additional scattering term Σ(δU^2) as a function of correlations in δU. Our results can be applied to the study of surface wave energy transport over a turbulent ocean.

  7. A global assessment of accelerations in surface mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Heflin, Michael B.

    2015-08-01

    Water mass transport in the Earth's dynamic surface layer of atmosphere, cryosphere, and hydrosphere driven by various global change processes has complex spatiotemporal patterns. Here we determine global patterns and regional mean values of accelerations in surface mass variations during the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission's data span from 2002.2 to 2015.0. GRACE gravity data are supplemented by surface deformation from 607 Global Navigation Satellite System stations, an ocean bottom pressure model, satellite laser ranging, and loose a priori knowledge on mass variation regimes incorporating high-resolution geographic boundaries. While Greenland and West Antarctica have strong negative accelerations, Alaska and the Arctic Ocean show significant positive accelerations. In addition, the accelerations are not constant in time with some regions showing considerable variability due to irregular interannual changes. No evidence of significant nonsteric mean sea level acceleration has been found, but the uncertainty is quite large.

  8. Modifying Thermal Transport in Colloidal Nanocrystal Solids with Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minglu; Ma, Yuanyu; Wang, Robert Y

    2015-12-22

    We present a systematic study on the effect of surface chemistry on thermal transport in colloidal nanocrystal (NC) solids. Using PbS NCs as a model system, we vary ligand binding group (thiol, amine, and atomic halides), ligand length (ethanedithiol, butanedithiol, hexanedithiol, and octanedithiol), and NC diameter (3.3-8.2 nm). Our experiments reveal several findings: (i) The ligand choice can vary the NC solid thermal conductivity by up to a factor of 2.5. (ii) The ligand binding strength to the NC core does not significantly impact thermal conductivity. (iii) Reducing the ligand length can decrease the interparticle distance, which increases thermal conductivity. (iv) Increasing the NC diameter increases thermal conductivity. (v) The effect of surface chemistry can exceed the effect of NC diameter and becomes more pronounced as NC diameter decreases. By combining these trends, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of NC solids can be varied by an overall factor of 4, from ∼0.1-0.4 W/m-K. We complement these findings with effective medium approximation modeling and identify thermal transport in the ligand matrix as the rate-limiter for thermal transport. By combining these modeling results with our experimental observations, we conclude that future efforts to increase thermal conductivity in NC solids should focus on the ligand-ligand interface between neighboring NCs.

  9. Formation and transport of deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine in surface water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Meyer, M.T.; Mills, M.S.; Zimmerman, L.R.; Perry, C.A.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    Field disappearance studies and a regional study of nine rivers in the Midwest Corn Belt show that deethylatrazine (DEA; 2-amino-4-chloro-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and deisopropylatrazine (DIA; 2-amino-4-chloro-6-ethylaminos-triazine) occur frequently in surface water that has received runoff from two parent triazine herbicides, atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) and cyanazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-methylpropionitrileamino-s-triazine). The concentration of DEA and DIA in surface water varies with the hydrologic conditions of the basin and the timing of runoff, with maximum concentrations reaching 5 ??g/L (DEA + DIA). Early rainfall followed by a dry summer will result in an early peak concentration of metabolites in surface water. A wet summer will delay the maximum concentrations of metabolites and increase their runoff into surface water, occasionally resulting in a slight separation of the parent atrazine maximum concentrations from the metabolite maximum concentrations, giving a "second flush?? of triazine metabolites to surface water. Replicated field dissipation studies of atrazine and cyanazine indicate that DIA/DEA ratios will vary from 0.4 ?? 0.1 when atrazine is the major triazine present to 0.6 ?? 0.1 when significant amounts of cyanazine are present. A comparison of transport time of DEA and DIA from field plots to their appearance in surface water indicates that storage and dilution are occurring in the alluvial aquifers of the basin.

  10. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-04-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role.

  11. Nanoscale electron transport at the surface of a topological insulator

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Sebastian; Bobisch, Christian A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional topological insulators for disruptive technologies critically depends on the dissipationless transport of electrons at the surface, because of the suppression of backscattering at defects. However, in real devices, defects are unavoidable and scattering at angles other than 180° is allowed for such materials. Until now, this has been studied indirectly by bulk measurements and by the analysis of the local density of states in close vicinity to defect sites. Here, we directly measure the nanoscale voltage drop caused by the scattering at step edges, which occurs if a lateral current flows along a three-dimensional topological insulator. The experiments were performed using scanning tunnelling potentiometry for thin Bi2Se3 films. So far, the observed voltage drops are small because of large contributions of the bulk to the electronic transport. However, for the use of ideal topological insulating thin films in devices, these contributions would play a significant role. PMID:27098939

  12. 41 CFR 102-117.270 - What are agency performance measures for transportation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Increase the use of electronic commerce; (2) Adopt industry best practices and services to meet your agency... Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT...

  13. 77 FR 38709 - Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research...-LU) established the Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program... research on issues related to planning, environment, and realty will be included in future...

  14. 76 FR 50312 - Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research...-LU) established the Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program... research on issues related to planning, environment, and realty will be included in future...

  15. 75 FR 38605 - Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program (STEP)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research...-LU) established the Surface Transportation Environment and Planning Cooperative Research Program... research on issues related to planning, environment, and realty will be included in future...

  16. Solar energy conversion using surface plasmons for broadband energy transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    A new strategy for efficient solar energy conversion based on parallel processing with surface plasmons is introduced. The approach is unique in identifying: (1) a broadband carrier with suitable range for energy transport, and (2) a technique to extract more energy from the more energetic photons, without sequential losses or unique materials for each frequency band. The aim is to overcome the fundamental losses associated with the broad solar spectrum and to achieve a higher level of spectrum splitting than has been possible in semiconductor systems.

  17. 41 CFR 102-118.90 - If my agency orders transportation and/or transportation services with a Government contractor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... transportation and/or transportation services with a Government contractor issued charge card or charge account... contractor issued charge card or charge account citation, is this subject to prepayment audit? Generally, no... account citation can be prepayment audited because the bank or charge card contractor pays the...

  18. Electrostatic dust transport on the surfaces of airless bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Schwan, J.; Hsu, H. W.; Horanyi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The surfaces of airless bodies are charged due to the exposure to solar wind plasma and UV radiation. Dust particles on the regolith of these surfaces can become charged, and may move and even get lofted due to electrostatic force. Electrostatic dust transport has been a long-standing problem that may be related to many observed phenomena on the surfaces of airless planetary bodies, including the lunar horizon glow, the dust ponds on asteroid Eros, the spokes in Saturn's rings, and more recently, the collection of dust particles ejected off Comet 67P, observed by Rosetta. In order to resolve these puzzles, a handful of laboratory experiments have been performed in the past and demonstrated that dust indeed moves and lifts from surfaces exposed to plasma. However, the exact mechanisms for the mobilization of dust particles still remain a mystery. Current charging models, including the so-called "shared charge model" and the charge fluctuation theory, will be discussed. It is found that neither of these models can explain the results from either laboratory experiments or in-situ observations. Recently, single dust trajectories were captured with our new dust experiments, enabling novel micro-scale investigations. The particles' initial launch speeds and size distributions are analyzed, and a new so-called "patched charge model" is proposed to explain our findings. We identify the role of plasma micro-cavities that are formed in-between neighboring dust particles. The emitted secondary or photo- electrons are proposed to be absorbed inside the micro-cavities, resulting in significant charge accumulation on the exposed patches of the surfaces of neighboring particles. The resulting enhanced Coulomb force (repulsion) between particles is likely the dominant force to mobilize and lift them off the surface. The role of other properties, including surface morphology, cohesion and photoelectron charging, will also be discussed.

  19. Pumpless Transport of Low Surface Tension Liquids in Surface Tension Confined (STC) Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megaridis, Constantine; Schutzius, Thomas; Elsharkawy, Mohamed; Tiwari, Manish

    2012-11-01

    Surfaces with patterned wettability have potential applications in microfluidics, fog capture, pool boiling, etc. With recent fabrication advancements, surfaces with adjacent superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic regions are feasible at a reasonable cost; with properly designed patterns, one can produce microfluidic paths (a.k.a. surface tension confined or STC tracks) where a liquid is confined and transported by surface tension alone. The surface tension of water is relatively high (72 mN/m), as compared with oils (~25 mN/m) and organic solvents (~20 mN/m). This makes the design of STC channels for oils and organic solvents far more difficult. In this study, open STC tracks for pumpless transport of low-surface tension liquids (acetone, ethanol, and hexadecane) on microfluidic chips are fabricated using a large-area, wet-processing technique. Wettable, wax-based, submillimeter-wide tracks are applied by a fountain-pen procedure on superoleophobic, fluoroacrylic carbon nanofiber (CNF) composite coatings. The fabricated anisotropic wetting patterns confine the low-surface tension liquids onto the flow tracks, driving them with meniscus velocities exceeding 3 cm/s. Scaling arguments and Washburn's equation provide estimates of the liquid velocities measured in these tracks, which also act as rails for directional sliding control of mm-sized water droplets. The present facile patterned wettability approach can be extended to deposit micrometer-wide tracks.

  20. ABC transporters involved in export of cell surface glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Leslie; Kos, Veronica; Whitfield, Chris

    2010-09-01

    Complex glycoconjugates play critical roles in the biology of microorganisms. Despite the remarkable diversity in glycan structures and the bacteria that produce them, conserved themes are evident in the biosynthesis-export pathways. One of the primary pathways involves representatives of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. These proteins are responsible for the export of a wide variety of cell surface oligo- and polysaccharides in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Recent investigations of the structure and function of ABC transporters involved in the export of lipopolysaccharide O antigens have revealed two fundamentally different strategies for coupling glycan polymerization to export. These mechanisms are distinguished by the presence (or absence) of characteristic nonreducing terminal modifications on the export substrates, which serve as chain termination and/or export signals, and by the presence (or absence) of a discrete substrate-binding domain in the nucleotide-binding domain polypeptide of the ABC transporter. A bioinformatic survey examining ABC exporters from known oligo- and polysaccharide biosynthesis loci identifies conserved nucleotide-binding domain protein families that correlate well with themes in the structures and assembly of glycans. The familial relationships among the ABC exporters generate hypotheses concerning the biosynthesis of structurally diverse oligo- and polysaccharides, which play important roles in the biology of bacteria with different lifestyles.

  1. ABC Transporters Involved in Export of Cell Surface Glycoconjugates

    PubMed Central

    Cuthbertson, Leslie; Kos, Veronica; Whitfield, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Complex glycoconjugates play critical roles in the biology of microorganisms. Despite the remarkable diversity in glycan structures and the bacteria that produce them, conserved themes are evident in the biosynthesis-export pathways. One of the primary pathways involves representatives of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. These proteins are responsible for the export of a wide variety of cell surface oligo- and polysaccharides in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Recent investigations of the structure and function of ABC transporters involved in the export of lipopolysaccharide O antigens have revealed two fundamentally different strategies for coupling glycan polymerization to export. These mechanisms are distinguished by the presence (or absence) of characteristic nonreducing terminal modifications on the export substrates, which serve as chain termination and/or export signals, and by the presence (or absence) of a discrete substrate-binding domain in the nucleotide-binding domain polypeptide of the ABC transporter. A bioinformatic survey examining ABC exporters from known oligo- and polysaccharide biosynthesis loci identifies conserved nucleotide-binding domain protein families that correlate well with themes in the structures and assembly of glycans. The familial relationships among the ABC exporters generate hypotheses concerning the biosynthesis of structurally diverse oligo- and polysaccharides, which play important roles in the biology of bacteria with different lifestyles. PMID:20805402

  2. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Peter; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres.

  3. Aluminum in acidic surface waters: chemistry, transport, and effects.

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, C T

    1985-01-01

    Ecologically significant concentrations of Al have been reported in surface waters draining "acid-sensitive" watersheds that are receiving elevated inputs of acidic deposition. It has been hypothesized that mineral acids from atmospheric deposition have remobilized Al previously precipitated within the soil during soil development. This Al is then thought to be transported to adjacent surface waters. Dissolved mononuclear Al occurs as aquo Al, as well as OH-, F-, SO4(2-), and organic complexes. Although past investigations have often ignored non-hydroxide complexes of Al, it appears that organic and F complexes are the predominant forms of Al in dilute (low ionic strength) acidic surface waters. The concentration of inorganic forms of Al increases exponentially with decreases in solution pH. This response is similar to the theoretical pH dependent solubility of Al mineral phases. The concentration of organic forms of Al, however, is strongly correlated with variations in organic carbon concentration of surface waters rather than pH. Elevated concentrations of Al in dilute acidic waters are of interest because: Al is an important pH buffer; Al may influence the cycling of important elements like P, organic carbon, and trace metals; and Al is potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. An understanding of the aqueous speciation of Al is essential for an evaluation of these processes. PMID:3935428

  4. Aluminum in acidic surface waters: chemistry, transport, and effects.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, C T

    1985-11-01

    Ecologically significant concentrations of Al have been reported in surface waters draining "acid-sensitive" watersheds that are receiving elevated inputs of acidic deposition. It has been hypothesized that mineral acids from atmospheric deposition have remobilized Al previously precipitated within the soil during soil development. This Al is then thought to be transported to adjacent surface waters. Dissolved mononuclear Al occurs as aquo Al, as well as OH-, F-, SO4(2-), and organic complexes. Although past investigations have often ignored non-hydroxide complexes of Al, it appears that organic and F complexes are the predominant forms of Al in dilute (low ionic strength) acidic surface waters. The concentration of inorganic forms of Al increases exponentially with decreases in solution pH. This response is similar to the theoretical pH dependent solubility of Al mineral phases. The concentration of organic forms of Al, however, is strongly correlated with variations in organic carbon concentration of surface waters rather than pH. Elevated concentrations of Al in dilute acidic waters are of interest because: Al is an important pH buffer; Al may influence the cycling of important elements like P, organic carbon, and trace metals; and Al is potentially toxic to aquatic organisms. An understanding of the aqueous speciation of Al is essential for an evaluation of these processes.

  5. 78 FR 76187 - Transportation Infrastructure Financing and Innovation Act (TIFIA) Program; Agency Information...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ...-day Federal Register notice was published on September 27, 2013, 2013 (78 FR 59751). Since the...: State and local governments, transit agencies, railroad companies, special authorities, special... detailing other borrowed funds and revenue sources (including pledged repayment source). Finally, a...

  6. Transport through quantum wells and superlattices on topological insulator surfaces.

    PubMed

    Song, J-T; Li, Y-X; Sun, Q-F

    2014-05-01

    We investigate electron transmission coefficients through quantum wells and quantum superlattices on topological insulator surfaces. The quantum well or superlattice is not constituted by general electronic potential barriers but by Fermi velocity barriers which originate in the different topological insulator surfaces. It is found that electron resonant modes can be renormalized by quantum wells and more clearly by quantum superlattices. The depth and width of a quantum well and superlattice, the incident angle of an electron, and the Fermi energy can be used to effectively tune the electron resonant modes. In particular, the number N of periodic structures that constitute a superlattice can further strengthen these regulating effects. These results suggest that a device could be developed to select and regulate electron propagation modes on topological insulator surfaces. Finally, we also study the conductance and the Fano factor through quantum wells and quantum superlattices. In contrast to what has been reported before, the suppression factors of 0.4 in the conductance and 0.85 in the Fano factor are observed in a quantum well, while the transport for a quantum superlattice shows strong oscillating behavior at low energy and reaches the same saturated values as in the case of a quantum well at sufficiently large energies.

  7. Surface Complexation of Actinides with Iron Oxides: Implications for Radionuclide Transport in Near-Surface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerden, J. L.; Kropf, A. J.; Tsai, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The surface complexation of actinides with iron oxides plays a key role in actinide transport and retardation in geosphere-biosphere systems. The development of accurate actinide transport models therefore requires a mechanistic understanding of surface complexation reactions (i.e. knowledge of chemical speciation at mineral/fluid interfaces). Iron oxides are particularly important actinide sorbents due to their pH dependent surface charges, relatively high surface areas and ubiquity in oxic and suboxic near-surface systems. In this paper we present results from field and laboratory investigations that elucidate the mechanisms involved in binding uranium and neptunium to iron oxide mineral substrates in near neutral groundwaters. The field study involved sampling and characterizing uranium-bearing groundwaters and solids from a saprolite aquifer overlying an unmined uranium deposit in the Virginia Piedmont. The groundwaters were analyzed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and ion chromatography and the aquifer solids were analyzed by electron microprobe. The laboratory study involved a series of batch sorption tests in which U(VI) and Np(V) were reacted with goethite, hematite and magnetite in simulated groundwaters. The pH, ionic strength, aging time, and sorbent/sorbate ratios were varied in these experiments. The oxidation state and coordination environment of neptunium in solutions and sorbents from the batch tests were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Results from this work indicate that, in oxidizing near-surface aquifers, the dissolved concentration of uranium may be limited to less than 30 parts per billion due to uptake by iron oxide mineral coatings and the precipitation of sparingly soluble U(VI) phosphate minerals. Results from the batch adsorption tests showed that, in near neutral groundwaters, a significant fraction of the uranium and neptunium adsorbed as strongly

  8. SURFACE COMPLEXATION OF ACTINIDES WITH IRON OXIDES: IMPLICATIONS FOR RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT IN NEAR-SURFACE AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jerden Jr.; A.J. Kropf; Y. Tsai

    2005-08-25

    The surface complexation of actinides with iron oxides plays a key role in actinide transport and retardation in geosphere-biosphere systems. The development of accurate actinide transport models therefore requires a mechanistic understanding of surface complexation reactions (i.e. knowledge of chemical speciation at mineral/fluid interfaces). Iron oxides are particularly important actinide sorbents due to their pH dependent surface charges, relatively high surface areas and ubiquity in oxic and suboxic near-surface systems. In this paper we present results from field and laboratory investigations that elucidate the mechanisms involved in binding uranium and neptunium to iron oxide mineral substrates in near neutral groundwaters. The field study involved sampling and characterizing uranium-bearing groundwaters and solids from a saprolite aquifer overlying an unmined uranium deposit in the Virginia Piedmont. The groundwaters were analyzed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and ion chromatography and the aquifer solids were analyzed by electron microprobe. The laboratory study involved a series of batch sorption tests in which U(VI) and Np(V) were reacted with goethite, hematite and magnetite in simulated groundwaters. The pH, ionic strength, aging time, and sorbent/sorbate ratios were varied in these experiments. The oxidation state and coordination environment of neptunium in solutions and sorbents from the batch tests were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Results from this work indicate that, in oxidizing near-surface aquifers, the dissolved concentration of uranium may be limited to less than 30 parts per billion due to uptake by iron oxide mineral coatings and the precipitation of sparingly soluble U(VI) phosphate minerals. Results from the batch adsorption tests showed that, in near neutral groundwaters, a significant fraction of the uranium and neptunium adsorbed as strongly

  9. Ternary Complexation on Bacterial Surfaces: Implications for Subsurface Anion Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, L. C.; Higginbottom, C. M.; Fowle, D. A.

    2002-12-01

    The physical, chemical, and biological controls on contaminant mobilities in aquatic ecosystems must be determined to establish the threat that contamination poses to the environment. Quantitative models of contaminant mobilities are required as a prerequisite to guide remediation efforts and to prioritize the potential hazard to the ecosystem of each contaminated site. It is well established that mineral surface adsorption is an important control on contaminant mobilities, and many studies have utilized thermodynamics to quantify metal/organic adsorption in order to yield predictive models of contaminant transport. However, these models of contaminant transport may not be representative of the reactions which control contaminant mobilities as most mineral surfaces are coated with organic acids, bacteria, and extracellular polymers. Numerous laboratory studies have demonstrated that bacterial cell walls have a high affinity for binding metal cations, and field studies indicate that a significant proportion of bacteria cells and associated extracellular matrices are coated with small scale hydrous metal oxides. The small size of bacteria, and in many cases the nanoscale of their associated mineral phases, suggests these bacteria-mineral composites may represent a large proportion of surface area exposed to fluid flow. Therefore, due to the affinity of bacterial cell walls for cations and biominerals, bacteria may also have a significant impact on anionic contaminant mobility in many natural systems. The extent of metal-bacteria adsorption reactions varies drastically as a function of pH and solution chemistry. Current adsorption models have focused on the interactions of positively charged metal cations with bacterial surfaces, however in many oxidizing environments metals such as Cr exist as anions or anionic complexes. We have studied the ability of non-metabolizing cells of the bacterial species Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella putrifaciens to adsorb aqueous Cr

  10. Asphalt pavement surfaces and asphalt mixtures. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The papers in this volume, which deal with asphalt pavement surfaces and asphalt mixtures, should be of interest to state and local construction, design, materials, and research engineers as well as contractors and material producers. The papers in Part 1 include discussions of pavement smoothness specifications and skidding characteristics. The first four papers in Part 2 were submitted in response to a call for papers for a session at the 75th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board on low-temperature properties of hot-mix asphalt. The next eight are on the influence of volumetric and strength properties on the performance of hot-mix asphalt. In the following three papers, the topics covered are the complex modulus of asphalt concrete, cold in-place asphalt recycling, and polymer modification of asphalt pavements in Ontario. The last two papers were presented in a session on relationship of materials characterization to accelerated pavement performance testing.

  11. 76 FR 7560 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Transportation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... this action are metropolitan planning organizations, local transit agencies, state departments of... potential respondents: This ICR estimates that approximately 174 Metropolitan Planning Organizations will... Reduction Act (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.), this document announces that EPA is planning to submit...

  12. 76 FR 73020 - Agency Information Collection (Request for Transportation Expense Reimbursement): Activity Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ....Regulations.gov or to VA's OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch, New Executive Office... veterans born with spina bifida and receiving vocational training or seeking employment may request... unable to pursue training or employment without travel assistance. An agency may not conduct or...

  13. 41 CFR 302-9.170 - Under what specific conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty subsequent to the time of my assignment to that post? 302-9.170 Section 302-9.170 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... the Time of Assignment § 302-9.170 Under what specific conditions may my agency...

  14. 41 CFR 302-9.170 - Under what specific conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty subsequent to the time of my assignment to that post? 302-9.170 Section 302-9.170 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... the Time of Assignment § 302-9.170 Under what specific conditions may my agency...

  15. 41 CFR 302-9.170 - Under what specific conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty subsequent to the time of my assignment to that post? 302-9.170 Section 302-9.170 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... Subsequent to the Time of Assignment § 302-9.170 Under what specific conditions may my agency...

  16. 41 CFR 302-9.170 - Under what specific conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty subsequent to the time of my assignment to that post? 302-9.170 Section 302-9.170 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... Subsequent to the Time of Assignment § 302-9.170 Under what specific conditions may my agency...

  17. 41 CFR 302-9.170 - Under what specific conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty subsequent to the time of my assignment to that post? 302-9.170 Section 302-9.170 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... Subsequent to the Time of Assignment § 302-9.170 Under what specific conditions may my agency...

  18. Effects of Communication and Transportation on Utilization of Agency Services by Rural Poor People in South Carolina. South Carolina State College Research Bulletin No. 5, January 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howie, Marguerite Rogers; Hanna, Kathleen

    Use of five agencies offering adult education, vocational rehabilitation, food stamps, employment, and health services in Orangeburg County by rural poor people in Bowman, Elloree, and North was studied over a two-year period. The study examined whether communication, transportation, or both increased agency use. In Bowman, information about the…

  19. RESEARCH ACTIVITIES AT U.S. GOVERNMENT AGENCIES IN SUBSURFACE REACTIVE TRANSPORT MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fate of contaminants in the environment is controlled by both chemical reactions and transport phenomena in the subsurface. Our ability to understand the significance of these processes over time requires an accurate conceptual model that incorporates the various mechanisms ...

  20. ORNL results for Test Case 1 of the International Atomic Energy Agency`s research program on the safety assessment of Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, D.J.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Kocher, D.C.; Little, C.A.; Roemer, E.K.

    1993-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started the Coordinated Research Program entitled ```The Safety Assessment of Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities.`` The program is aimed at improving the confidence in the modeling results for safety assessments of waste disposal facilities. The program has been given the acronym NSARS (Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Safety Assessment Reliability Study) for ease of reference. The purpose of this report is to present the ORNL modeling results for the first test case (i.e., Test Case 1) of the IAEA NSARS program. Test Case 1 is based on near-surface disposal of radionuclides that are subsequently leached to a saturated-sand aquifer. Exposure to radionuclides results from use of a well screened in the aquifer and from intrusion into the repository. Two repository concepts were defined in Test Case 1: a simple earth trench and an engineered vault.

  1. Surface trap mediated electronic transport in biofunctionalized silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puppo, F.; Traversa, F. L.; Di Ventra, M.; De Micheli, G.; Carrara, S.

    2016-08-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), fabricated via a top-down approach and then functionalized with biological probes, are used for electrically-based sensing of breast tumor markers. The SiNWs, featuring memristive-like behavior in bare conditions, show, in the presence of biomarkers, modified hysteresis and, more importantly, a voltage memory component, namely a voltage gap. The voltage gap is demonstrated to be a novel and powerful parameter of detection thanks to its high-resolution dependence on charges in proximity of the wire. This unique approach of sensing has never been studied and adopted before. Here, we propose a physical model of the surface electronic transport in Schottky barrier SiNW biosensors, aiming at reproducing and understanding the voltage gap based behavior. The implemented model describes well the experimental I–V characteristics of the device. It also links the modification of the voltage gap to the changing concentration of antigens by showing the decrease of this parameter in response to increasing concentrations of the molecules that are detected with femtomolar resolution in real human samples. Both experiments and simulations highlight the predominant role of the dynamic recombination of the nanowire surface states, with the incoming external charges from bio-species, in the appearance and modification of the voltage gap. Finally, thanks to its compactness, and strict correlation with the physics of the nanodevice, this model can be used to describe and predict the I–V characteristics in other nanostructured devices, for different than antibody-based sensing as well as electronic applications.

  2. Surface trap mediated electronic transport in biofunctionalized silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Puppo, F; Traversa, F L; Ventra, M Di; Micheli, G De; Carrara, S

    2016-08-26

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), fabricated via a top-down approach and then functionalized with biological probes, are used for electrically-based sensing of breast tumor markers. The SiNWs, featuring memristive-like behavior in bare conditions, show, in the presence of biomarkers, modified hysteresis and, more importantly, a voltage memory component, namely a voltage gap. The voltage gap is demonstrated to be a novel and powerful parameter of detection thanks to its high-resolution dependence on charges in proximity of the wire. This unique approach of sensing has never been studied and adopted before. Here, we propose a physical model of the surface electronic transport in Schottky barrier SiNW biosensors, aiming at reproducing and understanding the voltage gap based behavior. The implemented model describes well the experimental I-V characteristics of the device. It also links the modification of the voltage gap to the changing concentration of antigens by showing the decrease of this parameter in response to increasing concentrations of the molecules that are detected with femtomolar resolution in real human samples. Both experiments and simulations highlight the predominant role of the dynamic recombination of the nanowire surface states, with the incoming external charges from bio-species, in the appearance and modification of the voltage gap. Finally, thanks to its compactness, and strict correlation with the physics of the nanodevice, this model can be used to describe and predict the I-V characteristics in other nanostructured devices, for different than antibody-based sensing as well as electronic applications.

  3. Surface trap mediated electronic transport in biofunctionalized silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puppo, F.; Traversa, F. L.; Di Ventra, M.; De Micheli, G.; Carrara, S.

    2016-08-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), fabricated via a top-down approach and then functionalized with biological probes, are used for electrically-based sensing of breast tumor markers. The SiNWs, featuring memristive-like behavior in bare conditions, show, in the presence of biomarkers, modified hysteresis and, more importantly, a voltage memory component, namely a voltage gap. The voltage gap is demonstrated to be a novel and powerful parameter of detection thanks to its high-resolution dependence on charges in proximity of the wire. This unique approach of sensing has never been studied and adopted before. Here, we propose a physical model of the surface electronic transport in Schottky barrier SiNW biosensors, aiming at reproducing and understanding the voltage gap based behavior. The implemented model describes well the experimental I-V characteristics of the device. It also links the modification of the voltage gap to the changing concentration of antigens by showing the decrease of this parameter in response to increasing concentrations of the molecules that are detected with femtomolar resolution in real human samples. Both experiments and simulations highlight the predominant role of the dynamic recombination of the nanowire surface states, with the incoming external charges from bio-species, in the appearance and modification of the voltage gap. Finally, thanks to its compactness, and strict correlation with the physics of the nanodevice, this model can be used to describe and predict the I-V characteristics in other nanostructured devices, for different than antibody-based sensing as well as electronic applications.

  4. Surface trap mediated electronic transport in biofunctionalized silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Puppo, F; Traversa, F L; Ventra, M Di; Micheli, G De; Carrara, S

    2016-08-26

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs), fabricated via a top-down approach and then functionalized with biological probes, are used for electrically-based sensing of breast tumor markers. The SiNWs, featuring memristive-like behavior in bare conditions, show, in the presence of biomarkers, modified hysteresis and, more importantly, a voltage memory component, namely a voltage gap. The voltage gap is demonstrated to be a novel and powerful parameter of detection thanks to its high-resolution dependence on charges in proximity of the wire. This unique approach of sensing has never been studied and adopted before. Here, we propose a physical model of the surface electronic transport in Schottky barrier SiNW biosensors, aiming at reproducing and understanding the voltage gap based behavior. The implemented model describes well the experimental I-V characteristics of the device. It also links the modification of the voltage gap to the changing concentration of antigens by showing the decrease of this parameter in response to increasing concentrations of the molecules that are detected with femtomolar resolution in real human samples. Both experiments and simulations highlight the predominant role of the dynamic recombination of the nanowire surface states, with the incoming external charges from bio-species, in the appearance and modification of the voltage gap. Finally, thanks to its compactness, and strict correlation with the physics of the nanodevice, this model can be used to describe and predict the I-V characteristics in other nanostructured devices, for different than antibody-based sensing as well as electronic applications. PMID:27418560

  5. 36 CFR 13.460 - Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... transportation in accordance with 43 CFR 36.11(c), (d), (e), and (g). ..., motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally employed by local rural... of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

  6. 36 CFR 13.460 - Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... transportation in accordance with 43 CFR 36.11(c), (d), (e), and (g). ..., motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally employed by local rural... of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

  7. 36 CFR 13.460 - Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... transportation in accordance with 43 CFR 36.11(c), (d), (e), and (g). ..., motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally employed by local rural... of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

  8. 36 CFR 13.460 - Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... transportation in accordance with 43 CFR 36.11(c), (d), (e), and (g). ..., motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally employed by local rural... of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

  9. Transport on the surface of a topological insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Vargiamidis, V.; Vasilopoulos, P.

    2014-08-14

    We study theoretically dc and ac transport on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator when its time-reversal symmetry is broken. Starting with a Kubo formula, we derive an explicit expression for the dc Hall conductivity, valid for finite temperatures. At zero temperature this expression gives the dc half-quantum Hall conductivity, provided the Fermi level lies in the gap. Corrections when the Fermi level is outside the gap and scattering by impurities are quantified. The longitudinal conductivity is also examined. At finite frequencies, we find a modified Drude term in σ{sub xx}(ω) and logarithmic, frequency-dependent corrections in σ{sub yx}(ω). The ac Hall conductivity exhibits a robust logarithmic singularity for excitation energies equal to the gapwidth. For these energies, we also find that the power spectrum, which is pertinent to optical experiments, exhibits drastic increase. The Hall conductivity remains almost unaffected for temperatures up to approximately 300 K.

  10. 41 CFR 302-9.101 - In what situations may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In what situations may... OWNED VEHICLE Transportation General § 302-9.101 In what situations may my agency...

  11. 77 FR 17565 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on Proposed Transportation Improvements in Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    .... Land: Section 4(f) of the Department of Transportation Act of 1966 ; 4. Wildlife: Endangered Species Act ; Migratory Bird Treaty Act ; 5. Historic and Cultural Resources: Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended ; 6. Social and Economic: Civil Rights Act of 1964......

  12. Laboratory studies of aeolian sediment transport processes on planetary surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Keld R.; Valance, Alexandre; Merrison, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    , but not all, older or recent wind tunnel observations. Similarly some measurements performed with uniform sand samples having grain diameters of the order of 0.25-0.40 mm indicate that ripple spacing depends on friction velocity in a similar way as particle jump length. The observations are thus in agreement with a recent ripple model that link the typical jump length to ripple spacing. A possible explanation for contradictory observations in some experiments may be that long observation sequences are required in order to assure that equilibrium exists between ripple geometry and wind flow. Quantitative understanding of saltation characteristics on Mars still lacks important elements. Based upon image analysis and numerical predictions, aeolian ripples have been thought to consist of relatively large grains (diameter > 0.6 mm) and that saltation occurs at high wind speeds (> 26 m/s) involving trajectories that are significantly longer than those on Earth (by a factor of 10-100). However, this is not supported by recent observations from the surface of Mars, which shows that active ripples in their geometry and composition have characteristics compatible with those of terrestrial ripples (Sullivan et al., 2008). Also the highest average wind speeds on Mars have been measured to be < 20 m/s, with even turbulent gusts not exceeding 25 m/s. Electrification is seen as a dominant factor in the transport dynamics of dust on Mars, affecting the structure, adhesive properties and detachment/entrainment mechanisms specifically through the formation of aggregates (Merrison et al., 2012). Conversely for terrestrial conditions electric fields typically observed are not intense enough to significantly affect sand transport rates while little is known in the case of extra-terrestrial environments.

  13. Air support facilities. [interface between air and surface transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Airports are discussed in terms of the interface between the ground and air for transportation systems. The classification systems, design, facilities, administration, and operations of airports are described.

  14. Organic nature of colloidal actinides transported in surface water environments.

    PubMed

    Santschi, Peter H; Roberts, Kimberly A; Guo, Laodong

    2002-09-01

    Elevated levels of (239,240)Pu and 241Am have been present in surficial soils of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), CO, since the 1960s, when soils were locally contaminated in the 1960s by leaking drums stored on the 903 Pad. Further dispersion of contaminated soil particles was by wind and water. From 1998 until 2001, we examined actinide ((239,240)Pu and 241Am) concentrations and phase speciation in the surface environment at RFETS through field studies and laboratory experiments. Measurements of total (239,240)Pu and 241Am concentrations in storm runoff and pond discharge samples, collected during spring and summer times in 1998-2000, demonstrate that most of the (239,240)Pu and 241Am transported from contaminated soils to streams occurred in the particulate (> or = 0.45 microm; 40-90%) and colloidal (approximately 2 nm or 3 kDa to 0.45 microm; 10-60%) phases. Controlled laboratory investigations of soil resuspension, which simulated storm and erosion events, confirmed that most of the Pu in the 0.45 microm filter-passing phase was in the colloidal phase (> or = 80%) and that remobilization of colloid-bound Pu during soil erosion events can be greatly enhanced by humic and fulvic acids present in these soils. Most importantly, isoelectric focusing experiments of radiolabeled colloidal matter extracted from RFETS soils revealed that colloidal Pu is in the four-valent state and is mostly associated with a negatively charged organic macromolecule with a pH(IEP) of 3.1 and a molecular weight of 10-15 kDa, rather than with the more abundant inorganic (iron oxide and clay) colloids. This finding has important ramifications for possible remediation, erosion controls, and land-management strategies. PMID:12322742

  15. 36 CFR 13.460 - Use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally employed by local rural... of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface transportation traditionally... this chapter, the use of snowmobiles, motorboats, dog teams, and other means of surface...

  16. Lunar surface transportation systems conceptual design lunar base systems study Task 5.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual designs for three categories of lunar surface transportation were described. The level of understanding for the capabilities and design approach varies between the vehicles representing these categories. A summary of the vehicle categories and current state of conceptual design is provided. Finally, a brief evaluation and discussion is provided for a systematic comparison of transportation categories and effectiveness in supporting transportation objectives.

  17. Intracellular transport and cell surface delivery of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM).

    PubMed

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) regulates differentiation and functioning of neurons by accumulating at the cell surface where it mediates the interactions of neurons with the extracellular environment. NCAM also induces a number of intracellular signaling cascades, which coordinate interactions at the cell surface with intracellular processes including changes in gene expression, transport and cytoskeleton remodeling. Since NCAM functions at the cell surface, its transport and delivery to the cell surface play a critical role. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the intracellular transport and cell surface delivery of NCAM. We also discuss the data suggesting a possibility of cross talk between activation of NCAM at the cell surface and the intracellular transport and cell surface delivery of NCAM.

  18. Transport of phenolic compounds from leaf surface of creosotebush and tarbush to soil surface by precipitation.

    PubMed

    Hyder, P W; Fredrickson, E L; Estell, R E; Lucero, M E

    2002-12-01

    During the last 100 years, many desert grasslands have been replaced by shrublands. One possible mechanism by which shrubs outcompete grasses is through the release of compounds that interfere with neighboring plants. Our objective was to examine the movement of secondary compounds from the leaf surface of creosotebush and tarbush to surrounding soil surfaces via precipitation. Units consisting of a funnel and bottle were used to collect stemflow, throughfall, and interspace precipitation samples from 20 creosotebush (two morphotypes) and 10 tarbush plants during three summer rainfall events in 1998. Precipitation samples were analyzed for total phenolics (both species) and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (creosotebush only). Phenolics were detected in throughfall and stemflow of both species with stemflow containing greater concentrations than throughfall (0.088 and 0.086 mg/ml for stemflow and 0.022 and 0.014 mg/ml for throughfall in creosotebush morphotypes U and V, respectively: 0.044 and 0.006 mg/ml for tarbush stemflow and throughfall, respectively). Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was not found in any precipitation collections. The results show that phenolic compounds produced by creosotebush and tarbush can be transported to the soil surface by precipitation, but whether concentrations are ecologically significant is uncertain. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid was not present in the runoff from creosotebush.

  19. Functional droplets that recognize, collect, and transport debris on surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ying; Chang, Chia-Chih; Choudhary, Umesh; Bolukbasi, Irem; Crosby, Alfred J.; Emrick, Todd

    2016-01-01

    We describe polymer-stabilized droplets capable of recognizing and picking up nanoparticles from substrates in experiments designed for transporting hydroxyapatite nanoparticles that represent the principal elemental composition of bone. Our experiments, which are inspired by cells that carry out materials transport in vivo, used oil-in-water droplets that traverse a nanoparticle-coated substrate driven by an imposed fluid flow. Nanoparticle capture is realized by interaction of the particles with chemical functionality embedded within the polymeric stabilizing layer on the droplets. Nanoparticle uptake efficiency is controlled by solution conditions and the extent of functionality available for contact with the nanoparticles. Moreover, in an elementary demonstration of nanoparticle transportation, particles retrieved initially from the substrate were later deposited “downstream,” illustrating a pickup and drop-off technique that represents a first step toward mimicking point-to-point transportation events conducted in living systems.

  20. Bioinspired Directional Surfaces for Adhesion, Wetting and Transport

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Matthew J.; Sekeroglu, Koray

    2013-01-01

    In Nature, directional surfaces on insect cuticle, animal fur, bird feathers, and plant leaves are comprised of dual micro-nanoscale features that tune roughness and surface energy. This feature article summarizes experimental and theoretical approaches for the design, synthesis and characterization of new bioinspired surfaces demonstrating unidirectional surface properties. The experimental approaches focus on bottom-up and top-down synthesis methods of unidirectional micro- and nanoscale films to explore and characterize their anomalous features. The theoretical component of the review focuses on computational tools to predict the physicochemical properties of unidirectional surfaces. PMID:23526120

  1. Radiative energy transport on the surface of an ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathles, Lawrence Maclagan, IV

    Both surface roughness and surface conditions of an ice sheet affect the exchange of energy between the atmosphere and an ice sheet. Potential feedbacks exist where the absorbed energy on the surface changes the surface in such a way that more energy is absorbed. One such feedback occurs when a supraglacial lake absorbs energy and sub-lake melting occurs, which deepens the lake, and reduces the albedo. While another feedback exists from topography which creates non-uniform absorption of sunlight, causing surface geometries to change as melting occurs, affecting how energy is absorbed on the surface. The influence of these feedbacks on the surface energy balance of ice sheet are not well understood, and motivate the work presented here. To assess the influences of surface conditions and surface topography on the radiative budget of an ice sheet, the two feedback cases were studied separately. The effect of the surface condition was determined using a two-stream radiative transfer model for a two layer system, where the top layer could be either ice, snow, or water, and the second layer was ice. An analytical solution for the albedo of a supraglacial lake as a function of water depth was derived, and showed that a supraglacial lake can reduce the albedo by fifty percent. Multispectral analysis is required for surfaces where liquid water is present, but little additional accuracy is gained beyond 18 spectral bands. Complex surface topography has a significant effect on the absorption of energy due to multiple reflections between the surface and its self. A numerical model was developed to determine the absorption of insolation on an arbitrary two-dimensional surface. The absorbed radiation forces an ice ablation model evolving the surface topography through an ablation season. Results from numerical simulations show that there is a strong latitudinal dependence on how surface features evolve through an ablation season. At high latitudes, the aspect ratio of surface

  2. Surface transport properties of reticulopodia: do intracellular and extracellular motility share a common mechanism?

    PubMed

    Bowser, S S; Israel, H A; McGee-Russell, S M; Rieder, C L

    1984-12-01

    The reticulopodial networks of the foraminiferan protozoans Allogromia sp., strain NF, and A. laticollaris display rapid (up to 11 microns/second) and bidirectional saltatory transport of membrane surface markers (polystyrene microspheres). Electron microscopy shows that microspheres adhere directly to the reticulopodial surface glycocalyx. A videomicroscopic analysis of this phenomenon reveals that microsphere movement is typically independent of pseudopod extension/withdrawal and that particles of different sizes and surface properties display similar motile characteristics. The motile properties of surface-associated microspheres appear identical to those of saltating intracellular organelles. Indeed, in some instances the surface-attached microspheres appear transiently linked in motion to these underlying organelles. Our observations suggest that, in reticulopodia, surface transport of microspheres and intracellular transport of organelles are driven by a common mechanism.

  3. SURFACE CHEMICAL EFFECTS ON COLLOID STABILITY AND TRANSPORT THROUGH NATURAL POROUS MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface chemical effects on colloidal stability and transport through porous media were investigated using laboratory column techniques. Approximately 100 nm diameter, spherical, iron oxide particles were synthesized as the mobile colloidal phase. The column packing material was ...

  4. E. coli transport through surface-connected biopores identified from smoke injection tests

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Macropores are the primary mechanism by which fecal bacteria from surface-applied manure can be transported into subsurface drains or shallow groundwater bypassing the soil matrix. Limited research has been performed investigating fecal bacteria transport through specific macropores identified in th...

  5. Fate and transport of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in surface waters of agricultural basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gregoire, Caroline; Capel, Paul D.; Coupe, Richard H.; Kalkhoff, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Glyphosate use in a watershed results in some occurrence in surface water; however, the watersheds most at risk for the offsite transport of glyphosate are those with high application rates, rainfall that results in overland runoff and a flow route that does not include transport through the soil.

  6. 75 FR 75532 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit... semiannual audits during each of the first 2 years of State participation. This notice announces and solicits comments on the fifth audit report for the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans)....

  7. Dissolved-Solids Transport in Surface Water of the Muddy Creek Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerner, Steven J.

    2008-01-01

    Muddy Creek is located in the southeastern part of central Utah and is a tributary of the Dirty Devil River, which, in turn, is a tributary of the Colorado River. Dissolved solids transported from the Muddy Creek Basin may be stored in the lower Dirty Devil River Basin, but are eventually discharged to the Colorado River and impact downstream water users. This study used selected dissolved-solids measurements made by various local, State, and Federal agencies from the 1970s through 2006, and additional dissolved-solids data that were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during April 2004 through November 2006, to compute dissolved-solids loads, determine the distribution of dissolved-solids concentrations, and identify trends in dissolved-solids concentration in surface water of the Muddy Creek Basin. The dissolved-solids concentration values measured in water samples collected from Muddy Creek during April 2004 through October 2006 ranged from 385 milligrams per liter (mg/L) to 5,950 mg/L. The highest dissolved-solids concentration values measured in the study area were in water samples collected at sites in South Salt Wash (27,000 mg/L) and Salt Wash (4,940 to 6,780 mg/L). The mean annual dissolved-solids load in Muddy Creek for the periods October 1976 to September 1980 and October 2005 to September 2006 was smallest at a site near the headwaters (9,670 tons per year [tons/yr]) and largest at a site at the mouth (68,700 tons/yr). For this period, the mean annual yield of dissolved solids from the Muddy Creek Basin was 44 tons per square mile. During October 2005 to September 2006, direct runoff transported as much as 45 percent of the annual dissolved-solids load at the mouth of Muddy Creek. A storm that occurred during October 5?7, 2006 resulted in a peak streamflow at the mouth of Muddy Creek of 7,150 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) and the transport of an estimated 35,000 tons of dissolved solids, which is about 51 percent of the average annual dissolved

  8. Surface transport in the Ria de Vigo - Transport barriers in a tidal estuary with a complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, F.; von Kameke, A.; Montero, P.; Allen-Perkins, S.; Venancio, A.; Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.

    2012-04-01

    We study the submesoscale surface transport in the Ria de Vigo, NW Spain, an estuary with tidal and wind-driven circulation, analyzing the output of the coastal model MOHID with state-of-the-art Lagrangian methods, and comparing the results to drifter experiments. We extract Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) as ridges in fields of the Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) that can be identified with transport barriers. The LCS reveal the fundamental structure of the modelled circulation in the estaury that is a superposition of the tidal inflow and outflow, the wind-driven currents and the long-term drift on the shelf. In the Ria de Vigo, LCS are attached to prominent coastal boundaries, as islands or capes, indicating that the geometry of the flow patterns is dominated by bathymetry. Although the vertical flow which is not represented in the horizontal surface flow can be important at the coast, the found transport patterns can be seen as the surface footprint of the 3D circulation in the estaury. Comparing the trajectories of real surface drifters from four deployments to the computed transport barriers in different typical meteorological sitiations, we find that the drifter trajectories are in agreement with the different coherent water masses predicted by the model. The knowledge of the global transport patterns of water masses in this highly populated coastal region is indispensable for the assessment of the fate of contaminations, like possible oil spills or released waste water, but also for biological studies that deal with the drift of eggs and larvae of fish and other marine species, or investigate plankton blooms.

  9. Simulating the fate and transport of nanomaterials in surface waters

    EPA Science Inventory

    The unique properties of nanomaterials have resulted in their increased production. However, it is unclear how nanomaterials will move and react once released to the environment One approach for addressing possible exposure of nanomaterials in surface waters is by using numerical...

  10. Coherent topological transport on the surface of Bi₂Se₃.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dohun; Syers, Paul; Butch, Nicholas P; Paglione, Johnpierre; Fuhrer, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    The two-dimensional surface of the three-dimensional topological insulator is in the symplectic universality class and should exhibit perfect weak antilocalization reflected in positive weak-field magneto-resistance. Previous studies in topological insulator thin films suffer from high level of bulk n-type doping making quantitative analysis of weak antilocalization difficult. Here we measure the magneto-resistance of bulk-insulating Bi2Se3 thin films as a function of film thickness and gate-tuned carrier density. For thick samples, the magnitude of weak antilocalization indicates two decoupled (top and bottom) symplectic surfaces. On reducing thickness, we observe first a crossover to a single symplectic channel, indicating coherent coupling of top and bottom surfaces via interlayer tunnelling, and second, a complete suppression of weak antilocalization. The first crossover is governed by the ratio of phase coherence time to the inter-surface tunnelling time, and the second crossover occurs when the hybridization gap becomes comparable to the disorder strength.

  11. Spatial Transport of Magnetic Flux Surfaces in Strongly Anisotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Servidio, S.; Wan, M.; Ruffolo, D. J.; Rappazzo, A. F.; Oughton, S.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic flux surfaces afford familiar descriptions of spatial structure, dynamics, and connectivity of magnetic fields, with particular relevance in contexts such as solar coronal flux tubes, magnetic field connectivity in the interplanetary and interstellar medium, as well as in laboratory plasmas and dynamo problems [1-4]. Typical models assume that field-lines are orderly, and flux tubes remain identifiable over macroscopic distances; however, a previous study has shown that flux tubes shred in the presence of fluctuations, typically losing identity after several correlation scales [5]. Here, the structure of magnetic flux surfaces is numerically investigated in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) model of homogeneous turbulence. Short and long-wavelength behavior is studied statistically by propagating magnetic surfaces along the mean field. At small scales magnetic surfaces become complex, experiencing an exponential thinning. At large scales, instead, the magnetic flux undergoes a diffusive behavior. The link between the diffusion of the coarse-grained flux and field-line random walk is established by means of a multiple scale analysis. Both large and small scales limits are controlled by the Kubo number. These results have consequences for understanding and interpreting processes such as magnetic reconnection and field-line diffusion in plasmas [6]. [1] E. N. Parker, Cosmical Magnetic Fields (Oxford Univ. Press, New York, 1979). [2] J. R. Jokipii and E. N. Parker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 21, 44 (1968). [3] R. Bruno et al., Planet. Space Sci. 49, 1201 (2001). [4] M. N. Rosenbluth et al., Nuclear Fusion 6, 297 (1966). [5] W. H. Matthaeus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2136 (1995). [6] S. Servidio et al., submitted (2013).

  12. 49 CFR Attachment 3 - Offices Within Federal Agencies and Federal-State Agencies for Information Regarding the Agencies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Attachment 3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC.... Attachment 3—Offices Within Federal Agencies and Federal-State Agencies for Information Regarding...

  13. Transport of Ice on the Surface of Iapetus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galuba, Götz G.

    2014-11-01

    The global black-and-white dichotomy as well as the dark floors and rims of equatorial craters on the Saturnian moon Iapetus can be explained by ice migration driven by a thermal feedback [1]. All icy moons in the Jovian and Saturnian systems are - with the exception of Titan - airless bodies. Yet it is unique, how these two types of surface features on Iapetus look. A physical model of the processes of absorption, sublimation and deposition was developed and a computational model that simulates ice migration of volatiles under these circumstances derived. The model tessellates the surfaces of an airless body into triangles of equal size that can each have different surface properties. These properties evolve while the model simulates a long-term development. A rate network of net migration is calculated from sublimation and redeposition under the assumptions ofa. a slowly rotating bodyb. undisturbed ballistic molecular trajectoriesc. isotropic emissiond. Maxwellian speed distributione. high sticking coefficients of the surfaces.The assumptions (b.) to (e.) are equally valid for all bigger outer solar system icy moons (except Titan). The very first assumption however is not equally valid throughout the moons of the outer solar system. Callisto being in many regards similar to Iapetus still has a five times higher rotation rate. So global effects depending on slow rotation are more profound on Iapetus. The computer model is complemented by a model for local ice migration from craters.First results show, that the global timescale of albedo change in our model is of the same order of magnitude as in the supporting material to [1] with a tendency towards slightly faster 2 Gyr instead of ~2.4 Gyr) darkening compared to the "Model B". The time rate of local crater darkening rates lies between the global darkening rate and rate of the opposing brightening effect as estimated in [2] to (τ between 10 and 100 MYr).[1] Formation of Iapetus’ Extreme Albedo Dichotomy by

  14. Comparison of subsurface and surface runoff phosphorus transport rates in alluvial floodplains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) loading to streams can occur by both surface runoff and subsurface transport. Although surface runoff is often considered the dominant pathway, groundwater P concentrations in alluvial aquifers can be significant, especially in preferential flow paths (PFPs). The objectives of this re...

  15. Modeling Fate and Transport of Rotavirus in Surface Flow by Integrating WEPP and a Pathogen Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, R.; Kalita, P. K.; Davidson, P. C.; Kuhlenschmidt, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    More than 3.5 million people die each year from a water related diseases in this world. Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a water-related illness. Even in a developed country like the United States, there have been at least 1870 outbreaks associated with drinking water during the period of 1920 to 2002, causing 883,806 illnesses. Most of these outbreaks are resulted due to the presence of microbial pathogens in drinking water. Rotavirus infection has been recognized as the most common cause of diarrhea in young children throughout the world. Laboratory experiments conducted at the University of Illinois have demonstrated that recovery of rotavirus has been significantly affected by climatic and soil-surface conditions like slope, soil types, and ground cover. The objective of this study is to simulate the fate and transport of Rotavirus in overland and near-surface flow using a process-based model. In order to capture the dynamics of sediment-bound pathogens, the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) is coupled with the pathogen transport model. Transport of pathogens in overland flow can be simulated mathematically by including terms for the concentration of the pathogens in the liquid phase (in suspension or free-floating) and the solid phase (adsorbed to the fine solid particles like clay and silt). Advection, adsorption, and decay processes are considered. The mass balance equations are solved using numerical technique to predict spatial and temporal changes in pathogen concentrations in two phases. Outputs from WEPP simulations (flow velocity, depth, saturated conductivity and the soil particle fraction exiting in flow) are transferred as input for the pathogen transport model. Three soil types and three different surface cover conditions have been used in the experimental investigations. Results from these conditions have been used in calibrating and validating the simulation results. Bare surface conditions have produced very good agreement between

  16. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: periplasmic transport and assembly into the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    May, Janine M; Sherman, David J; Simpson, Brent W; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane (OM) containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Proper assembly of the OM not only prevents certain antibiotics from entering the cell, but also allows others to be pumped out. To assemble this barrier, the seven-protein lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) system extracts LPS from the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), transports it across the periplasm and inserts it selectively into the outer leaflet of the OM. As LPS is important, if not essential, in most Gram-negative bacteria, the LPS biosynthesis and biogenesis pathways are attractive targets in the development of new classes of antibiotics. The accompanying paper (Simpson BW, May JM, Sherman DJ, Kahne D, Ruiz N. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150029. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0029)) reviewed the biosynthesis of LPS and its extraction from the IM. This paper will trace its journey across the periplasm and insertion into the OM.

  17. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: periplasmic transport and assembly into the outer membrane

    PubMed Central

    May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Simpson, Brent W.; Ruiz, Natividad; Kahne, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess an outer membrane (OM) containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Proper assembly of the OM not only prevents certain antibiotics from entering the cell, but also allows others to be pumped out. To assemble this barrier, the seven-protein lipopolysaccharide transport (Lpt) system extracts LPS from the outer leaflet of the inner membrane (IM), transports it across the periplasm and inserts it selectively into the outer leaflet of the OM. As LPS is important, if not essential, in most Gram-negative bacteria, the LPS biosynthesis and biogenesis pathways are attractive targets in the development of new classes of antibiotics. The accompanying paper (Simpson BW, May JM, Sherman DJ, Kahne D, Ruiz N. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150029. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0029)) reviewed the biosynthesis of LPS and its extraction from the IM. This paper will trace its journey across the periplasm and insertion into the OM. PMID:26370939

  18. The transport characteristics of passing fast ions produced by nonlocal overlapping of drift island surfaces and magnetic island surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jinjia; Gong, Xueyu; Xiang, Dong; Huang, Qianhong; Yu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The structure of the drift-island surface of passing fast ions (PFIs) is investigated in the presence of the resonant interaction with a magnetic island. Two overlapping regions of the drift-island surface and the magnetic island surface are found, one corresponding to local overlapping region and the other to non-local one. Here, the word "nonlocal" denotes that the resonances in the core plasma can have effects on the PFIs near the plasma boundary, while the "local" represents that the PFIs just near the resonant location are influenced. The nonlocal overlapping constructs a transport path along which the PFIs can become losses. There are three kinds of drift-island surfaces to join in forming the transport paths. A pitch angle region, which is called pitch angle gap, is found near the plasma boundary, where the drift-island surface cannot be formed and few PFIs are lost. The pitch-angle selective features of PFI losses are obtained by analyzing the three kinds of drift-island surfaces. The coupling between the crowd drift island surfaces and the collision can induce the prompt losses of PFIs and rapidly slowing down of PFI energy. The time of the prompt losses and the slowing down rate are calculated. Qualitatively, the theoretical results are in well agreement with the experimental observations in ASDEX Upgrade [M. García-Muñoz et al., Nucl. Fusion 47, L10 (2007)].

  19. Stability and Transport of Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles in Groundwater and Surface Water.

    PubMed

    Lanphere, Jacob D; Rogers, Brandon; Luth, Corey; Bolster, Carl H; Walker, Sharon L

    2014-07-01

    The effects of groundwater and surface water constituents (i.e., natural organic matter [NOM] and the presence of a complex assortment of ions) on graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) were investigated to provide additional insight into the factors contributing to fate and the mechanisms involved in their transport in soil, groundwater, and surface water environments. The stability and transport of GONPs was investigated using dynamic light scattering, electrokinetic characterization, and packed bed column experiments. Stability results showed that the hydrodynamic diameter of the GONPs at a similar ionic strength (2.1±1.1 mM) was 10 times greater in groundwater environments compared with surface water and NaCl and MgCl2 suspensions. Transport results confirmed that in groundwater, GONPs are less stable and are more likely to be removed during transport in porous media. In surface water and MgCl2 and NaCl suspensions, the relative recovery was 94%±3% indicating that GONPs will be very mobile in surface waters. Additional experiments were carried out in monovalent (KCl) and divalent (CaCl2) salts across an environmentally relevant concentration range (0.1-10 mg/L) of NOM using Suwannee River humic acid. Overall, the transport and stability of GONPs was increased in the presence of NOM. This study confirms that planar "carbonaceous-oxide" materials follow traditional theory for stability and transport, both due to their response to ionic strength, valence, and NOM presence and is the first to look at GONP transport across a wide range of representative conditions found in surface and groundwater environments. PMID:25053876

  20. Stability and Transport of Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles in Groundwater and Surface Water.

    PubMed

    Lanphere, Jacob D; Rogers, Brandon; Luth, Corey; Bolster, Carl H; Walker, Sharon L

    2014-07-01

    The effects of groundwater and surface water constituents (i.e., natural organic matter [NOM] and the presence of a complex assortment of ions) on graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) were investigated to provide additional insight into the factors contributing to fate and the mechanisms involved in their transport in soil, groundwater, and surface water environments. The stability and transport of GONPs was investigated using dynamic light scattering, electrokinetic characterization, and packed bed column experiments. Stability results showed that the hydrodynamic diameter of the GONPs at a similar ionic strength (2.1±1.1 mM) was 10 times greater in groundwater environments compared with surface water and NaCl and MgCl2 suspensions. Transport results confirmed that in groundwater, GONPs are less stable and are more likely to be removed during transport in porous media. In surface water and MgCl2 and NaCl suspensions, the relative recovery was 94%±3% indicating that GONPs will be very mobile in surface waters. Additional experiments were carried out in monovalent (KCl) and divalent (CaCl2) salts across an environmentally relevant concentration range (0.1-10 mg/L) of NOM using Suwannee River humic acid. Overall, the transport and stability of GONPs was increased in the presence of NOM. This study confirms that planar "carbonaceous-oxide" materials follow traditional theory for stability and transport, both due to their response to ionic strength, valence, and NOM presence and is the first to look at GONP transport across a wide range of representative conditions found in surface and groundwater environments.

  1. Stability and Transport of Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles in Groundwater and Surface Water

    PubMed Central

    Lanphere, Jacob D.; Rogers, Brandon; Luth, Corey; Bolster, Carl H.; Walker, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The effects of groundwater and surface water constituents (i.e., natural organic matter [NOM] and the presence of a complex assortment of ions) on graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) were investigated to provide additional insight into the factors contributing to fate and the mechanisms involved in their transport in soil, groundwater, and surface water environments. The stability and transport of GONPs was investigated using dynamic light scattering, electrokinetic characterization, and packed bed column experiments. Stability results showed that the hydrodynamic diameter of the GONPs at a similar ionic strength (2.1±1.1 mM) was 10 times greater in groundwater environments compared with surface water and NaCl and MgCl2 suspensions. Transport results confirmed that in groundwater, GONPs are less stable and are more likely to be removed during transport in porous media. In surface water and MgCl2 and NaCl suspensions, the relative recovery was 94%±3% indicating that GONPs will be very mobile in surface waters. Additional experiments were carried out in monovalent (KCl) and divalent (CaCl2) salts across an environmentally relevant concentration range (0.1–10 mg/L) of NOM using Suwannee River humic acid. Overall, the transport and stability of GONPs was increased in the presence of NOM. This study confirms that planar “carbonaceous-oxide” materials follow traditional theory for stability and transport, both due to their response to ionic strength, valence, and NOM presence and is the first to look at GONP transport across a wide range of representative conditions found in surface and groundwater environments. PMID:25053876

  2. Reactive solute transport in streams: A surface complexation approach for trace metal sorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Kimball, B.A.; McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    A model for trace metals that considers in-stream transport, metal oxide precipitation-dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption is presented. Linkage between a surface complexation submodel and the stream transport equations provides a framework for modeling sorption onto static and/or dynamic surfaces. A static surface (e.g., an iron-oxide-coated streambed) is defined as a surface with a temporally constant solid concentration. Limited contact between solutes in the water column and the static surface is considered using a pseudokinetic approach. A dynamic surface (e.g., freshly precipitated metal oxides) has a temporally variable solid concentration and is in equilibrium with the water column. Transport and deposition of solute mass sorbed to the dynamic surface is represented in the stream transport equations that include precipitate settling. The model is applied to a pH-modification experiment in an acid mine drainage stream. Dissolved copper concentrations were depressed for a 3 hour period in response to the experimentally elevated pH. After passage of the pH front, copper was desorbed, and dissolved concentrations returned to ambient levels. Copper sorption is modeled by considering sorption to aged hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) on the streambed (static surface) and freshly precipitated HFO in the water column (dynamic surface). Comparison of parameter estimates with reported values suggests that naturally formed iron oxides may be more effective in removing trace metals than synthetic oxides used in laboratory studies. The model's ability to simulate pH, metal oxide precipitation-dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption provides a means of evaluating the complex interactions between trace metal chemistry and hydrologic transport at the field scale.

  3. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  4. Applications of asymmetric nanotextured parylene surface using its wetting and transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekeroglu, Koray

    In this thesis, basic digital fluidics devices were introduced using polymeric nanorods (nano-PPX) inspired from nature. Natural inspiration ignited this research by observing butterfly wings, water strider legs, rye grass leaves, and their asymmetric functions. Nano-PPX rods, manufactured by an oblique angle polymerization (OAP) method, are asymmetrically aligned structures that have unidirectional wetting properties. Nano-PPX demonstrates similar functions to the directional textured surfaces of animals and plants in terms of wetting, adhesion, and transport. The water pin-release mechanism on the asymmetric nano-PPX surface with adhesion function provides a great transport property. How the asymmetry causes transport is discussed in terms of hysteresis and interface contact of water droplets. In this study, the transport property of nano-PPX rods is used to guide droplets as well as transporting cargo such as microgels. With the addition of tracks on the nano-PPX rods, the surfaces were transformed into basic digital fluidics devices. The track-assisted nano-PPX has been employed to applications (i.e. sorting, mixing, and carrying cargo particles). Thus, digital fluidics devices fabricated on nano-PPX surface is a promising pathway to assemble microgels in the field of bioengineering. The characterization of the nano textured surface was completed using methods such as Scanning Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Contact Angle Goniometry, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy. These methods helped to understand the physical and chemical properties of nano-PPX. Parameters such as advancing and receding contact angles, nanorod tilt angle, and critical drop volumes were utilized to investigate the anisotropic wetting properties of nano-PPX surface. This investigation explained the directional wetting behavior of the surface as well as approaching new design parameters for adjusting surface properties. The nanorod tilt angle was a key parameter

  5. Is Agency Skin Deep? Surface Attributes Influence Infants' Sensitivity to Goal-Directed Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guajardo, Jose J.; Woodward, Amanda L.

    2004-01-01

    Three studies investigated the role of surface attributes in infants' identification of agents, using a habituation paradigm designed to tap infants' interpretation of grasping as goal directed (Woodward, 1998). When they viewed a bare human hand grasping objects, 7- and 12-month-old infants focused on the relation between the hand and its goal.…

  6. Robust topological surface transport with weak localization bulk channels in polycrystalline Bi2Te3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. B.; Yao, J. D.; Shao, J. M.; Yang, G. W.

    2016-03-01

    Bi2Te3 polycrystalline topological insulator films have provided an attractive material platform to investigate topological insulator properties and created new opportunities for novel magneto-electronic device applications. In order to confirm that Bi2Te3 polycrystalline film has a robust topological surface state, and whether such surface Dirac fermions can be protected from localization in transport, we performed a systematic transport measurement and analysis based on a Sn-doped Bi2Te3 polycrystalline film with Hall configuration electrodes. We demonstrated that the electron-electron interaction effect is very strong, which can help realize an insulating ground state. The surface state of the film always exhibits stable weak anti-localization features despite the presence of many structural defects and non-magnetic doping, and the Hall resistance can present a significant nonlinear dependence on magnetic fields. These two characteristics provide significant experimental evidence that the polycrystalline film has a robust topological surface state, and that such surface electrons cannot be localized. Owing to the lack of topological protection, the weak anti-localization transport of bulk electrons cannot be guaranteed, and weak localization behavior may appear in the bulk channels. These results verify that robust topological surface transport in topological insulator polycrystalline films can be accompanied by weak localization bulk channels.

  7. Identifying key surface parameters for optical photon transport in GEANT4/GATE simulations.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Jenny; Cuplov, Vesna; Isaksson, Mats

    2015-09-01

    For a scintillator used for spectrometry, the generation, transport and detection of optical photons have a great impact on the energy spectrum resolution. A complete Monte Carlo model of a scintillator includes a coupled ionizing particle and optical photon transport, which can be simulated with the GEANT4 code. The GEANT4 surface parameters control the physics processes an optical photon undergoes when reaching the surface of a volume. In this work the impact of each surface parameter on the optical transport was studied by looking at the optical spectrum: the number of detected optical photons per ionizing source particle from a large plastic scintillator, i.e. the output signal. All simulations were performed using GATE v6.2 (GEANT4 Application for Tomographic Emission). The surface parameter finish (polished, ground, front-painted or back-painted) showed the greatest impact on the optical spectrum whereas the surface parameter σ(α), which controls the surface roughness, had a relatively small impact. It was also shown how the surface parameters reflectivity and reflectivity types (specular spike, specular lobe, Lambertian and backscatter) changed the optical spectrum depending on the probability for reflection and the combination of reflectivity types. A change in the optical spectrum will ultimately have an impact on a simulated energy spectrum. By studying the optical spectra presented in this work, a GEANT4 user can predict the shift in an optical spectrum caused be the alteration of a specific surface parameter.

  8. Magnetic-field-induced surface transport on laser-irradiated foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forslund, D. W.; Brackbill, J. U.

    1982-06-01

    Electrons heated by absorption of laser energy are shown to generate intense magnetic fields which rapidly spread from the edge of the laser spot along the target surface. The fields convectively transport hot electrons and confine a major fraction of the deposited laser energy in the corona. Eventually, this energy is lost to fast-ion blowoff or deposited at large distances from the spot. This model qualitatively explains many experimental observations of thermal-transport inhibition and fast-ion loss.

  9. Effects of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants on surface ozone concentrations over Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Emmons, Louisa K.; Walters, Stacy; Horowitz, Larry W.; Tao, Shu

    2014-11-01

    Due to a lack of industrialization in Western China, surface air there was, until recently, believed to be relatively unpolluted. However, recent measurements and modeling studies have found high levels of ozone (O3) there. Based on the state-of-the-science global chemical transport model MOZART-4, we identify the origin, pathway, and mechanism of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants to Western China in 2000. MOZART-4 generally simulates well the observed surface O3 over inland areas of China. Simulations find surface ozone concentrations over Western China on average to be about 10 ppbv higher than Eastern China. Using sensitivity studies, we find that anthropogenic emissions from all Eurasian regions except China contribute 10-15 ppbv surface O3 over Western China, superimposed upon a 35-40 ppbv natural background. Transport from European anthropogenic sources to Northwestern China results in 2-6 ppbv O3 enhancements in spring and summer. Indian anthropogenic sources strongly influence O3 over the Tibetan Plateau during the summer monsoon. Transport of O3 originating from emissions in the Middle East occasionally reach Western China and increase surface ozone there by about 1-4 ppbv. These influences are of similar magnitude as trans-Pacific and transatlantic transport of O3 and its precursors, indicating the significance of trans-Eurasian ozone transport in hemispheric transport of air pollution. Our study further indicates that mitigation of anthropogenic emissions from Europe, the Indian subcontinent, and the Middle East could benefit public health and agricultural productivity in Western China.

  10. Effects of trans-Eurasian transport of anthropogenic pollutants on surface ozone concentrations over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Li, X.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Emmons, L. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Guo, Y.; Tao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Due to a lack of industrialization in Western China, surface air there was, until recently, believed to be relatively unpolluted. However, recent measurements and modeling studies have found high levels of ozone (O3) there. Based on the state-of-the-science global chemical transport model MOZART-4, we identify the origin, pathway, and mechanism of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants to Western China in 2000. MOZART-4 generally simulates well the observed surface O3 over inland areas of China. Simulations find surface ozone concentrations over Western China on average to be about 10 ppbv higher than Eastern China. Using sensitivity studies as well as a fully-tagged approach, we find that anthropogenic emissions from all Eurasian regions except China contribute 10-15 ppbv surface O3 over Western China, superimposed upon a 35-40 ppbv natural background. Transport from European anthropogenic sources to Northwestern China results in 2-6 ppbv O3 enhancements in spring and summer. Indian anthropogenic sources strongly influence O3 over the Tibetan Plateau during the summer monsoon. Transport of O3 originating from emissions in the Middle East occasionally reach Western China and increase surface ozone there by about 1-4 ppbv. These influences are of similar magnitude as trans-Pacific and transatlantic transport of O3 and its precursors, indicating the significance of trans-Eurasian ozone transport in hemispheric transport of air pollution. Our study further indicates that mitigation of anthropogenic emissions from Europe, the Indian subcontinent, and the Middle East could benefit public health and agricultural productivity in Western China.

  11. Light-Driven Transport of a Liquid Marble with and against Surface Flows.

    PubMed

    Kavokine, Nikita; Anyfantakis, Manos; Morel, Mathieu; Rudiuk, Sergii; Bickel, Thomas; Baigl, Damien

    2016-09-01

    Liquid marbles, that is, liquid drops coated by a hydrophobic powder, do not wet any solid or liquid substrate, making their transport and manipulation both highly desirable and challenging. Herein, we describe the light-driven transport of floating liquid marbles and emphasize a surprising motion behavior. Liquid marbles are deposited on a water solution containing photosensitive surfactants. Irradiation of the solution generates photoreversible Marangoni flows that transport the liquid marbles toward UV light and away from blue light when the thickness of the liquid substrate is large enough (Marangoni regime). Below a critical thickness, the liquid marbles move in the opposite direction to that of the surface flow at a speed increasing with decreasing liquid thickness (anti-Marangoni). We demonstrate that the anti-Marangoni motion is driven by the free surface deformation, which propels the non-wetting marble against the surface flow. We call this behavior "slide effect". PMID:27381297

  12. Light-Driven Transport of a Liquid Marble with and against Surface Flows.

    PubMed

    Kavokine, Nikita; Anyfantakis, Manos; Morel, Mathieu; Rudiuk, Sergii; Bickel, Thomas; Baigl, Damien

    2016-09-01

    Liquid marbles, that is, liquid drops coated by a hydrophobic powder, do not wet any solid or liquid substrate, making their transport and manipulation both highly desirable and challenging. Herein, we describe the light-driven transport of floating liquid marbles and emphasize a surprising motion behavior. Liquid marbles are deposited on a water solution containing photosensitive surfactants. Irradiation of the solution generates photoreversible Marangoni flows that transport the liquid marbles toward UV light and away from blue light when the thickness of the liquid substrate is large enough (Marangoni regime). Below a critical thickness, the liquid marbles move in the opposite direction to that of the surface flow at a speed increasing with decreasing liquid thickness (anti-Marangoni). We demonstrate that the anti-Marangoni motion is driven by the free surface deformation, which propels the non-wetting marble against the surface flow. We call this behavior "slide effect".

  13. 78 FR 13156 - Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Surface Transportation Board Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, Transportation. ACTION: Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory... communications about this meeting may be announced through the Board's Web site at WWW.STB.DOT.GOV. This...

  14. Continuous directional water transport on the peristome surface of Nepenthes alata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Hongliang; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Deyuan; Han, Zhiwu; Jiang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Numerous natural systems contain surfaces or threads that enable directional water transport. This behaviour is usually ascribed to hierarchical structural features at the microscale and nanoscale, with gradients in surface energy and gradients in Laplace pressure thought to be the main driving forces. Here we study the prey-trapping pitcher organs of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata. We find that continuous, directional water transport occurs on the surface of the ‘peristome’—the rim of the pitcher—because of its multiscale structure, which optimizes and enhances capillary rise in the transport direction, and prevents backflow by pinning in place any water front that is moving in the reverse direction. This results not only in unidirectional flow despite the absence of any surface-energy gradient, but also in a transport speed that is much higher than previously thought. We anticipate that the basic ‘design’ principles underlying this behaviour could be used to develop artificial fluid-transport systems with practical applications.

  15. Continuous directional water transport on the peristome surface of Nepenthes alata.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Pengfei; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Hongliang; Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Deyuan; Han, Zhiwu; Jiang, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Numerous natural systems contain surfaces or threads that enable directional water transport. This behaviour is usually ascribed to hierarchical structural features at the microscale and nanoscale, with gradients in surface energy and gradients in Laplace pressure thought to be the main driving forces. Here we study the prey-trapping pitcher organs of the carnivorous plant Nepenthes alata. We find that continuous, directional water transport occurs on the surface of the 'peristome'--the rim of the pitcher--because of its multiscale structure, which optimizes and enhances capillary rise in the transport direction, and prevents backflow by pinning in place any water front that is moving in the reverse direction. This results not only in unidirectional flow despite the absence of any surface-energy gradient, but also in a transport speed that is much higher than previously thought. We anticipate that the basic 'design' principles underlying this behaviour could be used to develop artificial fluid-transport systems with practical applications. PMID:27078568

  16. Quantum Electronic Transport of Topological Surface States in β-Ag2Se Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihwan; Hwang, Ahreum; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Jhi, Seung-Hoon; Lee, Sunghun; Park, Yun Chang; Kim, Si-In; Kim, Hong-Seok; Doh, Yong-Joo; Kim, Jinhee; Kim, Bongsoo

    2016-04-26

    Single-crystalline β-Ag2Se nanostructures, a new class of 3D topological insulators (TIs), were synthesized using the chemical vapor transport method. The topological surface states were verified by measuring electronic transport properties including the weak antilocalization effect, Aharonov-Bohm oscillations, and Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations. First-principles band calculations revealed that the band inversion in β-Ag2Se is caused by strong spin-orbit coupling and Ag-Se bonding hybridization. These investigations provide evidence of nontrivial surface state about β-Ag2Se TIs that have anisotropic Dirac cones.

  17. Surface transport of nutrients from surface broadcast and subsurface-banded broiler litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broiler chicken litter is commonly used as a fertilizer on pastures and cropland in major broiler-producing states. However, phosphorus (P) loss from fields fertilized with broiler litter contributes to eutrophication and growth of toxic algae in surface waters. Recently, to reduce surface transpo...

  18. A simple approach to fabricate the rose petal-like hierarchical surfaces for droplet transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chao; Huang, Mengyu; Yu, Xingjian; Ma, Yupu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-11-01

    Precise transportation of liquid microdroplets is a great challenge in the microfluidic field. A sticky superhydrophobic surface with a high static contact angle (CA) and a large contact angle hysteresis (CAH) is recognized as the favorable tool to deal with the challenging job. Some approaches have been proposed to fabricate such surface, such as mimicing the dual-scale hierarchical structure of a natural material, like rose petal. However, the available approaches normally require multiple processing steps or are carried out with great expense. In this study, we report a straightforward and inexpensive method for fabricating the sticky superhydrophobic surfaces. The fabrication relies on electroless galvanic deposition to coat the copper substrates with a textured layer of silver. The whole fabrication process is carried out under ambient conditions by using conventional laboratory materials and equipments, and generally take less than 15 min. Despite the simplicity of this fabrication method, the rose petal-like hierarchical structures and the corresponding sticky superhydrophobic wetting properties were well achieved on the artificial surfaces. For instance, the surface with a deposition time of 10 s exhibits the superhydrophobity with a CA of 151.5°, and the effective stickiness with a CAH of 56.5°. The prepared sticky superhydrophobic surfaces are finally shown in the application of droplet transportation, in which the surface acts as a mechanical hand to grasp and transport the water droplet.

  19. Chondroitin Sulfate Accelerates Trans-Golgi-to-Surface Transport of Proteoglycan Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    PubMed

    Mihov, Deyan; Raja, Eva; Spiess, Martin

    2015-08-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a membrane protein implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. APP is a part-time proteoglycan, as splice variants lacking exon 15 are modified by a chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chain. Investigating the effect of the GAG chain on the trafficking of APP in non-polarized cells, we found it to increase the steady-state surface-to-intracellular distribution, to reduce the rate of endocytosis and to accelerate transport kinetics from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. Deletion of the cytosolic domain resulted in delayed surface arrival of GAG-free APP, but did not affect the rapid export kinetics of the proteoglycan form. Protein-free GAG chains showed the same TGN-to-cell surface transport kinetics as proteoglycan APP. Endosome ablation experiments were performed to distinguish between indirect endosomal and direct pathways to the cell surface. Surprisingly, TGN-to-cell surface transport of both GAG-free and proteoglycan APP was found to be indirect via transferrin-positive endosomes. Our results show that GAGs act as alternative sorting determinants in cellular APP transport that are dominant over cytoplasmic signals and involve distinct sorting mechanisms.

  20. Surface Charge- and Space-Dependent Transport of Proteins in Crowded Environments of Nanotailored Posts

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Chang Kyoung; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Retterer, Scott T; Siuti, Piro; Iyer, Sukanya; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    The reaction and diffusion of molecules across barriers and through crowded environments is integral to biological system function and to separation technologies. Ordered, microfabricated post arrays are a promising route to creating synthetic barriers with controlled chemical and physical characteristics. They can be used to create crowded environments, to mimic aspects of cellular membranes, and to serve as engineered replacements of polymer-based separation media. Here, the translational diffusion of fluorescein isothiocyante and various forms of green fluorescent protein (GFP), including 'supercharged' variants, are examined in a silicon-based post array environment. The technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is combined with analytical approximations and numerical simulations to assess the relative effects of reaction and diffusion on molecular transport, respectively. FRAP experiments were conducted for 64 different cases where the molecular species, the density of the posts, and the chemical surface charge of the posts were varied. In all cases, the dense packing of the posts hindered the diffusive transport of the fluorescent species. The supercharged GFPs strongly interacted with oppositely charged surfaces. With similar molecular and surface charges, transport is primarily limited by hindered diffusion. For conventional, enhanced GFP in a positively charged surface environment, transport was limited by the coupled action of hindered diffusion and surface interaction with the posts. Quantification of the size-, space-, time-, and charge-dependent translational diffusion in the post array environments can provide insight into natural processes and guide the design and development of selective membrane systems.

  1. Atomic interactions at the (100) diamond surface and the impact of surface and interface changes on the electronic transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deferme, Wim

    Centuries and centuries already, diamond is a material that speaks to ones imagination. Till the 18th century it was only mined in India, after it was also found in Brazil and South-Africa. But along the fascinating properties of diamond, it is also a very interesting material for industry. After the discovery at the end of the 18th century that diamond consists of carbon, it took until the 50's of the previous century before research groups from Russia, Japan and the USA were able to reproduce the growth process of diamond. In 1989 it was discovered that the surface of intrinsic, insulation diamond can be made conductive by hydrogenating the surface. It was clear that not only hydrogen at the surface but also the so called "adsorbates" were responsible for this conductivity. It was still not completely clear what was the influence of other species (like oxygen) on the mechanism of surface conductivity and therefore in this thesis the influence of oxygen on the electronic transport properties of atomically flat diamond are researched. Besides the growth of atomically flat diamond with the use of CVD (chemical vapour deposition) en the study of the grown surfaces with characterising techniques such as AFM (atomic force microscopy) and STM (scanning tunnelling microscopy), the study of the surface treatment with plasma techniques is the main topic of this thesis. The influence of oxygen on the surface conductivity is studied and with the ToF (Time-of-Flight) technique the transport properties of the freestanding diamond are examined. With a short laserflash, electrons and holes are created at the diamond/aluminium interface and due to an electric field (up to 500V) the charge carriers are translated to the back contact. In this way the influence of the surface and the changes at the aluminum contacts is studied leading to very interesting results.

  2. Quantification of chemical transport processes from the soil to surface runoff.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kun; Huang, Chi-Hua; Wang, Guang-Qian; Fu, Xu-Dong; Parker, Gary

    2013-01-01

    There is a good conceptual understanding of the processes that govern chemical transport from the soil to surface runoff, but few studies have actually quantified these processes separately. Thus, we designed a laboratory flow cell and experimental procedures to quantify the chemical transport from soil to runoff water in the following individual processes: (i) convection with a vertical hydraulic gradient, (ii) convection via surface flow or the Bernoulli effect, (iii) diffusion, and (iv) soil loss. We applied different vertical hydraulic gradients by setting the flow cell to generate different seepage or drainage conditions. Our data confirmed the general form of the convection-diffusion equation. However, we now have additional quantitative data that describe the contribution of each individual chemical loading process in different surface runoff and soil hydrological conditions. The results of this study will be useful for enhancing our understanding of different geochemical processes in the surface soil mixing zone. PMID:23673742

  3. Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qinggang; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Lucas, Ivan T.; Clark, Kyle; Weber, Adam Z.; Kostecki, Robert

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this effort was to correlate the local surface ionic conductance of a Nafion? 212 proton-exchange membrane with its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a function of water content. Both macroscopic and microscopic proton conductivities were investigated at different relative humidity levels, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current-sensing atomic force microscopy (CSAFM). We were able to identify small ion-conducting domains that grew with humidity at the surface of the membrane. Numerical analysis of the surface ionic conductance images recorded at various relative humidity levels helped determine the fractional area of ion-conducting active sites. A simple square-root relationship between the fractional conducting area and observed interfacial mass-transport resistance was established. Furthermore, the relationship between the bulk ionic conductivity and surface ionic conductance pattern of the Nafion? membrane was examined.

  4. Probing the electronic transport on the reconstructed Au/Ge(001) surface

    PubMed Central

    Krok, Franciszek; Kaspers, Mark R; Bernhart, Alexander M; Nikiel, Marek; Jany, Benedykt R; Indyka, Paulina; Wojtaszek, Mateusz; Möller, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Summary By using scanning tunnelling potentiometry we characterized the lateral variation of the electrochemical potential µec on the gold-induced Ge(001)-c(8 × 2)-Au surface reconstruction while a lateral current flows through the sample. On the reconstruction and across domain boundaries we find that µec shows a constant gradient as a function of the position between the contacts. In addition, nanoscale Au clusters on the surface do not show an electronic coupling to the gold-induced surface reconstruction. In combination with high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, we conclude that an additional transport channel buried about 2 nm underneath the surface represents a major transport channel for electrons. PMID:25247129

  5. PTV measurements of Lagrangian particle transport by surface gravity wave groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, Ton; Whittaker, Colin; Raby, Alison; Taylor, Paul

    2015-11-01

    We present detailed PTV (particle tracking velocimetry) measurements of the Lagrangian transport and trajectories of neutrally buoyant particles underneath two-dimensional surface gravity wave groups in a laboratory flume. By focussing our attention on wave groups of moderate steepness, we confirm the predictions of standard second-order multi-chromatic wave theory, in which the body of fluid satisfies the potential flow equations. Particles near the surface are transported forwards and their motion is dominated by Stokes drift. Particles at sufficient depth are transported backwards by the Eulerian return current that was first described by Longuet-Higgins & Stewart (1962) and forms an inseparable counterpart of Stokes drift for surface wave groups ensuring the (irrotational) mass balance holds. Finally, we provide experimental validation of a simple scaling relationship, derived based under the assumption of separation of scales, for the transition depth: the depth above which Lagrangian particles are transported forwards by the Stokes drift and below which such particles are transported backwards by the return current. We present results for a range of effective water depths.

  6. Patterned gradient surface for spontaneous droplet transportation and water collection: simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xianhua; Zhu, Yiying; Shi, Tielin; Tang, Zirong; Liao, Guanglan

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate spontaneous droplet transportation and water collection on wedge-shaped gradient surfaces consisting of alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. Droplets on the surfaces are modeled and simulated to analyze the Gibbs free energy and free energy gradient distributions. Big half-apex angle and great wettability difference result in considerable free energy gradient, corresponding to large driving force for spontaneous droplet transportation, thus causing the droplets to move towards the open end of the wedge-shaped hydrophilic regions, where the Gibbs free energy is low. Gradient surfaces are then fabricated and tested. Filmwise condensation begins on the hydrophilic regions, forming wedge-shaped tracks for water collection. Dropwise condensation occurs on the hydrophobic regions, where the droplet size distribution and departure diameters are controlled by the width of the regions. Condensate water from both the hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are collected directionally to the open end of the wedge-shaped hydrophilic regions, agreeing with the simulations. Directional droplet transport and controllable departure diameters make the branched gradient surfaces more efficient than smooth surfaces for water collection, which proves that gradient surfaces are potential in water collection, microfluidic devices, anti-fogging and self-cleaning.

  7. Relationship between cell surface properties and transport of bacteria through soil

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.T.; Manilal, V.B.; Alexander, M. )

    1991-01-01

    One means of bringing about the remediation of underground sites containing polluting chemicals is to inoculate the sites with bacteria able to metabolize those compounds. However, successful bioremediation of such sites requires the movement of the biodegradative bacteria through soil, aquifer solids, or groundwater. A study was conducted to relate the properties of Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Achromobacter, Flavobacterium, and Arthrobacter strains to their transport with water moving through soil. The bacteria differed markedly in their extent of transport; their hydrophobicity, as measured by adherence to n-octane and by hydrophobic-interaction chromatography; and their net surface electrostatic charge, as determined by electrostatic interaction chromatography and by measurements of the zeta potential. Transport of the 19 strains through Kendaia loam or their retention by this soil was not correlated with hydrophobicities or net surface charges of the cells or the presence of capsules. Among 10 strains tested, the presence of flagella was also not correlated with transport. Retention was statistically related to cell size, with bacteria shorter than 1.0 {mu}m usually showing higher percentages of cells being transported through the soil. We suggest that more than one characteristic of bacterial cells determines whether the organisms are transported through soil with moving water.

  8. Gate-tuned normal and superconducting transport at the surface of a topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Sacépé, Benjamin; Oostinga, Jeroen B; Li, Jian; Ubaldini, Alberto; Couto, Nuno J G; Giannini, Enrico; Morpurgo, Alberto F

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional topological insulators are characterized by the presence of a bandgap in their bulk and gapless Dirac fermions at their surfaces. New physical phenomena originating from the presence of the Dirac fermions are predicted to occur, and to be experimentally accessible via transport measurements in suitably designed electronic devices. Here we study transport through superconducting junctions fabricated on thin Bi(2)Se(3) single crystals, equipped with a gate electrode. In the presence of perpendicular magnetic field B, sweeping the gate voltage enables us to observe the filling of the Dirac fermion Landau levels, whose character evolves continuously from electron- to hole-like. When B=0, a supercurrent appears, whose magnitude can be gate tuned, and is minimum at the charge neutrality point determined from the Landau level filling. Our results demonstrate how gated nano-electronic devices give control over normal and superconducting transport of Dirac fermions at an individual surface of a three-dimensional topological insulators.

  9. Morphing Surfaces Enable Acoustophoretic Contactless Transport of Ultrahigh-Density Matter in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foresti, Daniele; Sambatakakis, Giorgio; Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-11-01

    The controlled contactless transport of heavy drops and particles in air is of fundamental interest and has significant application potential. Acoustic forces do not rely on special material properties, but their utility in transporting heavy matter in air has been restricted by low power and poor controllability. Here we present a new concept of acoustophoresis, based on the morphing of a deformable reflector, which exploits the low reaction forces and low relaxation time of a liquid with enhanced surface tension through the use of thin overlaid membrane. An acoustically induced, mobile deformation (dimple) on the reflector surface enhances the acoustic field emitted by a line of discretized emitters and enables the countinuos motion of heavy levitated samples. With such interplay of emitters and reflecting soft-structure, a 5 mm steel sphere (0.5 grams) was contactlessly transported in air solely by acoustophoresis.

  10. Surface excitations in the modelling of electron transport for electron-beam-induced deposition experiments

    PubMed Central

    Valentí, Roser; Werner, Wolfgang S

    2015-01-01

    Summary The aim of the present overview article is to raise awareness of an essential aspect that is usually not accounted for in the modelling of electron transport for focused-electron-beam-induced deposition (FEBID) of nanostructures: Surface excitations are on the one hand responsible for a sizeable fraction of the intensity in reflection-electron-energy-loss spectra for primary electron energies of up to a few kiloelectronvolts and, on the other hand, they play a key role in the emission of secondary electrons from solids, regardless of the primary energy. In this overview work we present a general perspective of recent works on the subject of surface excitations and on low-energy electron transport, highlighting the most relevant aspects for the modelling of electron transport in FEBID simulations. PMID:26171301

  11. Morphing Surfaces Enable Acoustophoretic Contactless Transport of Ultrahigh-Density Matter in Air

    PubMed Central

    Foresti, Daniele; Sambatakakis, Giorgio; Bottan, Simone; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-01-01

    The controlled contactless transport of heavy drops and particles in air is of fundamental interest and has significant application potential. Acoustic forces do not rely on special material properties, but their utility in transporting heavy matter in air has been restricted by low power and poor controllability. Here we present a new concept of acoustophoresis, based on the morphing of a deformable reflector, which exploits the low reaction forces and low relaxation time of a liquid with enhanced surface tension through the use of thin overlaid membrane. An acoustically induced, mobile deformation (dimple) on the reflector surface enhances the acoustic field emitted by a line of discretized emitters and enables the countinuos motion of heavy levitated samples. With such interplay of emitters and reflecting soft-structure, a 5 mm steel sphere (0.5 grams) was contactlessly transported in air solely by acoustophoresis. PMID:24212104

  12. 76 FR 5237 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... fifth audit report in a Federal Register Notice published on December 3, 2010, at 75 FR 75532. The FHWA... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit... compliance by each State participating in the Pilot Program, 23 U.S.C. 327(g) mandates semiannual...

  13. 77 FR 10599 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit... semiannual audits during each of the first 2 years of State participation and annual audits during each subsequent year of State participation. This notice announces and solicits comments on the sixth audit...

  14. 75 FR 9638 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... the fourth audit report in a Federal Register Notice published on December 23, 2009, at 74 FR 68308... the fourth audit report in a Federal Register Notice published December 22, 2009, at 74 FR 68308. The... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans...

  15. 77 FR 27273 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... 77 FR 10599. The FHWA received one comment from Caltrans. This notice provides the final draft of the... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit... compliance by each State participating in the Pilot Program, 23 U.S.C. 327(g) mandates semiannual...

  16. 77 FR 26355 - Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit Report

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... February 22, 2012, at 77 FR 10599. The FHWA received one comment from Caltrans. This notice provides the... Federal Highway Administration Surface Transportation Project Delivery Pilot Program; Caltrans Audit... compliance by each State participating in the Pilot Program, 23 U.S.C. 327(g) mandates semiannual...

  17. Investigation of the pathway of contaminated soil transported to plant surfaces by raindrop splash

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, M.; Hakonson, T.E.; Whicker, F.W.; White, G.C.

    1983-10-21

    The environmental transport pathway of soil-borne radioisotopes to vegetation surfaces via raindrop splash was studied. The data show that soil can significantly contribute to the contamination found on plants. Further detailed study is needed to calculate the rate constant for the raindrop splash and retention pathways. 8 references, 1 figure. (ACR)

  18. Aircraft surface coatings study: Energy efficient transport program. [sprayed and adhesive bonded coatings for drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Surface coating materials for application on transport type aircraft to reduce drag, were investigated. The investigation included two basic types of materials: spray on coatings and adhesively bonded films. A cost/benefits analysis was performed, and recommendations were made for future work toward the application of this technology.

  19. Fate and surface transport of urea in a coastal plain soil: a rainfall simulation study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The surface transport of urea has rarely been studied since it is assumed to undergo rapid hydrolysis to ammonia. However, studies have shown urea to exist in estuarine and coastal waters. Urea in small amounts can trigger the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia spp. to produce the toxin domoic acid, which is o...

  20. Quantum transport and two-parameter scaling at the surface of a weak topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Mong, Roger S K; Bardarson, Jens H; Moore, Joel E

    2012-02-17

    Weak topological insulators have an even number of Dirac cones in their surface spectrum and are thought to be unstable to disorder, which leads to an insulating surface. Here we argue that the presence of disorder alone will not localize the surface states; rather, the presence of a time-reversal symmetric mass term is required for localization. Through numerical simulations, we show that in the absence of the mass term the surface always flow to a stable metallic phase and the conductivity obeys a one-parameter scaling relation, just as in the case of a strong topological insulator surface. With the inclusion of the mass, the transport properties of the surface of a weak topological insulator follow a two-parameter scaling form.

  1. Trafficking of cell surface beta-amyloid precursor protein: retrograde and transcytotic transport in cultured neurons

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Amyloid beta-protein (A beta), the principal constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD), is derived by proteolysis from the beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta PP). The mechanism of A beta production in neurons, which are hypothesized to be a rich source of A beta in brain, remains to be defined. In this study, we describe a detailed localization of cell surface beta PP and its subsequent trafficking in primary cultured neurons. Full-length cell surface beta PP was present primarily on perikarya and axons, the latter with a characteristic discontinuous pattern. At growth cones, cell surface beta PP was inconsistently detected. By visualizing the distribution of beta PP monoclonal antibodies added to intact cultures, beta PP was shown to be internalized from distal axons or terminals and retrogradely transported back to perikarya in organelles which colocalized with fluid-phase endocytic markers. Retrograde transport of beta PP was shown in both hippocampal and peripheral sympathetic neurons, the latter using a compartment culture system that isolated cell bodies from distal axons and terminals. In addition, we demonstrated that beta PP from distal axons was transcytotically transported to the surface of perikarya from distal axons in sympathetic neurons. Indirect evidence of this transcytotic pathway was obtained in hippocampal neurons using antisense oligonucleotide to the kinesin heavy chain to inhibit anterograde beta PP transport. Taken together, these results demonstrate novel aspects of beta PP trafficking in neurons, including retrograde axonal transport and transcytosis. Moreover, the axonal predominance of cell surface beta PP is unexpected in view of the recent report of polarized sorting of beta PP to the basolateral domain of MDCK cells. PMID:7721945

  2. Quantum transport in the surface states of epitaxial Bi(111) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kai; Wu, Lin; Gong, Xinxin; Xiao, Shunhao; Jin, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Although bulk Bi is a prototypical semimetal with a topologically trivial electronic band structure, we show by various quantum transport measurements that epitaxial Bi(111) thin films have unexpected and nontrivial properties. Not only the top and the bottom but also the side surfaces of epitaxial Bi(111) thin films are always robustly metallic while the interior has already become insulating. We identify the coupling between the top and the bottom surface states that drives the two originally independent surface conducting channels into a single connected one. The properties of Bi(111) thin films realized could lead to promising applications in spintronics.

  3. Transport and distribution of TNT and DNT in the presence of surface vegetation with Fimbristylis cymosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sangchul; Padilla, Ingrid; Feliciano, Irimar; Falcon, Juan

    2009-05-01

    A small-scale field column experiment was set up to assess the impact of a native tropical grass (Fimbrystilis Cymosa) on the transport and distribution of high explosives (TNT and DNT). Explosives powders in a membrane were embedded as a point source below 2 inches from the column surface. Three different surfaces were layered on top of the explosives layer: one column with sand, two columns with Fimbrystilis Cymosa, and one column with a mixture of (sand+clay) soil. Hydraulic differences due to surface vegetation which would affect explosives transport were monitored by measuring the amount of infiltrated rain water. For the biogeochemical parameters, explosives concentrations in the infiltrated water were quantified. At the end of the experiment, each column was sacrificed by multiple layers and distribution of explosives concentrations, soil pH, and soil dehydrogenase concentration was quantified from the layers. Plants were also analyzed for explosives concentrations in their leaves and roots.

  4. Effect of irradiation by argon ions on hydrogen transport through the surface oxide layer of zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evsin, A. E.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Gumarov, A. I.; Kashapov, N. F.; Luchkin, A. G.; Vakhitov, I. R.; Yanilkin, I. V.; Tagirov, L. R.

    2016-09-01

    Effect of zirconium irradiation by 1 keV Ar+ ions on hydrogen transport through the surface oxide layer is studied. It is shown that deuterium trapping under subsequent irradiation of the Ar-treated sample by deuterium atoms of thermal energies in D2 + 30at.% O2 gas mixture is 2 times less than trapping in the untreated sample. Besides, irradiation of the untreated sample by D-atoms provokes desorption of ≈25% of hydrogen contained therein, whereas hydrogen desorption from the ion-treated zirconium surface does not occur. It is proposed that oxygen depletion of the surface oxide layer, caused by ion bombardment, is a reason of mitigation of the hydrogen transport through this layer in both directions.

  5. Transport numbers in the surface layers of asymmetric membranes from initial time measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Compan, V.; Lopez, M.L. ); Sorensen, T.S. ); Garrido, J. )

    1994-09-08

    The initial time asymmetry potentials of two ultra filtration membranes (cellulose acetate and polysulfone membranes) were measured in electrochemical cells using Ag/AgCl electrodes and NaCl solutions. The concentration in the two electrode chambers differed slightly by a fixed concentration difference. Either the membranes were brought to equilibrium with the left-hand solution and subsequently exposed to the right-hand solution at the right-hand face, or the procedure was reversed. From such measurements it is possible to evaluate the transport numbers corresponding to each of the two surface layers of the membrane under conditions such that the effects of autoprotolysis of water and of foreign ions may be neglected. These measurements permit a description of each of the surface layers of the membranes and make possible an electrochemical characterization of the asymmetry of ultrafiltration membranes. The asymmetry is given by the difference between surface layer transport numbers. 31 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. 41 CFR 102-118.25 - Does GSA still require my agency to submit its overall transportation policies for approval?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT General Introduction... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does GSA still...

  7. 41 CFR 302-9.7 - What POV transportation and emergency or temporary storage may my agency authorize at Government...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-9.7 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What POV transportation... PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE General Rules § 302-9.7 What POV transportation and emergency or temporary...

  8. 41 CFR 102-118.525 - What are my agency's responsibilities for verifying the correct amount of transportation charges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT Claims and Appeal Procedures... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are my...

  9. Thermal Transport across a Substrate-Thin-Film Interface: Effects of Film Thickness and Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhi; Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-08-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations and a model AlN-GaN interface, we demonstrate that the interfacial thermal resistance RK (Kapitza resistance) between a substrate and thin film depends on the thickness of the film and the film surface roughness when the phonon mean free path is larger than film thickness. In particular, when the film (external) surface is atomistically smooth, phonons transmitted from the substrate can travel ballistically in the thin film, be scattered specularly at the surface, and return to the substrate without energy transfer. If the external surface scatters phonons diffusely, which is characteristic of rough surfaces, RK is independent of film thickness and is the same as RK that characterizes smooth surfaces in the limit of large film thickness. At interfaces where phonon transmission coefficients are low, the thickness dependence is greatly diminished regardless of the nature of surface scattering. The film thickness dependence of RK is analogous to the well-known fact of lateral thermal conductivity thickness dependence in thin films. The difference is that phonon-boundary scattering lowers the in-plane thermal transport in thin films, but it facilitates thermal transport from the substrate to the thin film.

  10. Influence of enterococcal surface protein (esp) on the transport of Enterococcus faecium within saturated quartz sands.

    PubMed

    Johanson, Jennifer J; Feriancikova, Lucia; Xu, Shangping

    2012-02-01

    Enterococcus was selected by US EPA as a Gram-positive indicator microorganism for groundwater fecal contamination. It was recently reported that enterococcal surface protein (esp) was more prevalent in Enterococcus from human sources than in Enterococcus from nonhuman sources and esp could potentially be used as a source tracking tool for fecal contamination (Scott et al., 2005). In this research, we performed laboratory column transport experiments to investigate the transport of Enterococcus faecium within saturated quartz sands. Particularly, we used a wild type strain (E1162) and a mutant (E1162Δesp) to examine the influence of esp on the transport behavior of E. faecium. Our results showed that esp could significantly enhance the attachment of E. faecium cells onto the surface of silica sands and thus lower the mobility of E. faecium within sand packs. Cell surface properties (e.g., zeta potential) were determined and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (XDLVO) theory was applied to explain the effects of esp on the retention of E. faecium. Overall, our results suggested that E. faecium strains with esp could display lower mobility within saturated sand packs than E. faecium strains without esp. The disparity in the transport behavior of E. faecium with and without esp could limit the effectiveness of esp as a source tracking tool within the groundwater system.

  11. Inhibition of Nucleotide Sugar Transport in Trypanosoma brucei Alters Surface Glycosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Xu, Yu-Xin; Caradonna, Kacey L.; Kruzel, Emilia K.; Burleigh, Barbara A.; Bangs, James D.; Hirschberg, Carlos B.

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs) are indispensible for the biosynthesis of glycoproteins by providing the nucleotide sugars needed for glycosylation in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Mutations in NST genes cause human and cattle diseases and impaired cell walls of yeast and fungi. Information regarding their function in the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, a causative agent of African trypanosomiasis, is unknown. Here, we characterized the substrate specificities of four NSTs, TbNST1–4, which are expressed in both the insect procyclic form (PCF) and mammalian bloodstream form (BSF) stages. TbNST1/2 transports UDP-Gal/UDP-GlcNAc, TbNST3 transports GDP-Man, and TbNST4 transports UDP-GlcNAc, UDP-GalNAc, and GDP-Man. TbNST4 is the first NST shown to transport both pyrimidine and purine nucleotide sugars and is demonstrated here to be localized at the Golgi apparatus. RNAi-mediated silencing of TbNST4 in the procyclic form caused underglycosylated surface glycoprotein EP-procyclin. Similarly, defective glycosylation of the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG221) as well as the lysosomal membrane protein p67 was observed in Δtbnst4 BSF T. brucei. Relative infectivity analysis showed that defects in glycosylation of the surface coat resulting from tbnst4 deletion were insufficient to impact the ability of this parasite to infect mice. Notably, the fact that inactivation of a single NST gene results in measurable defects in surface glycoproteins in different life cycle stages of the parasite highlights the essential role of NST(s) in glycosylation of T. brucei. Thus, results presented in this study provide a framework for conducting functional analyses of other NSTs identified in T. brucei. PMID:23443657

  12. Inhibition of nucleotide sugar transport in Trypanosoma brucei alters surface glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Xu, Yu-Xin; Caradonna, Kacey L; Kruzel, Emilia K; Burleigh, Barbara A; Bangs, James D; Hirschberg, Carlos B

    2013-04-12

    Nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs) are indispensible for the biosynthesis of glycoproteins by providing the nucleotide sugars needed for glycosylation in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Mutations in NST genes cause human and cattle diseases and impaired cell walls of yeast and fungi. Information regarding their function in the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, a causative agent of African trypanosomiasis, is unknown. Here, we characterized the substrate specificities of four NSTs, TbNST1-4, which are expressed in both the insect procyclic form (PCF) and mammalian bloodstream form (BSF) stages. TbNST1/2 transports UDP-Gal/UDP-GlcNAc, TbNST3 transports GDP-Man, and TbNST4 transports UDP-GlcNAc, UDP-GalNAc, and GDP-Man. TbNST4 is the first NST shown to transport both pyrimidine and purine nucleotide sugars and is demonstrated here to be localized at the Golgi apparatus. RNAi-mediated silencing of TbNST4 in the procyclic form caused underglycosylated surface glycoprotein EP-procyclin. Similarly, defective glycosylation of the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG221) as well as the lysosomal membrane protein p67 was observed in Δtbnst4 BSF T. brucei. Relative infectivity analysis showed that defects in glycosylation of the surface coat resulting from tbnst4 deletion were insufficient to impact the ability of this parasite to infect mice. Notably, the fact that inactivation of a single NST gene results in measurable defects in surface glycoproteins in different life cycle stages of the parasite highlights the essential role of NST(s) in glycosylation of T. brucei. Thus, results presented in this study provide a framework for conducting functional analyses of other NSTs identified in T. brucei. PMID:23443657

  13. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the Earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-11-01

    Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids") on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of) form resistance - impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support fast advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope-independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, minerals, and economic goods. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain regional- and global-scale advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment) and air (dust). The appearance of a mechanism for sustained advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, simulating a continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities), and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The latter property

  14. Technology and human purpose: the problem of solids transport on the earth's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haff, P. K.

    2012-05-01

    Displacement of mass of limited deformability ("solids") on the Earth's surface is opposed by friction and (the analog of) form resistance - impediments relaxed by rotational motion, self-powering of mass units, and transport infrastructure. These features of solids transport first evolved in the biosphere prior to the emergence of technology, allowing slope-independent, diffusion-like motion of discrete objects as massive as several tons, as illustrated by animal foraging and movement along game trails. However, high-energy-consumption technology powered by fossil fuels required a mechanism that could support advective transport of solids, i.e., long-distance, high-volume, high-speed, unidirectional, slope independent transport across the land surface of materials like coal, containerized fluids, and minerals. Pre-technology nature was able to sustain large-scale, long-distance solids advection only in the limited form of piggybacking on geophysical flows of water (river sediment) and air (dust). The appearance of a generalized mechanism for advection of solids independent of fluid flows and gravity appeared only upon the emergence of human purpose. Purpose enables solids advection by, in effect, enabling a simulated continuous potential gradient, otherwise lacking, between discrete and widely separated fossil-fuel energy sources and sinks. Invoking purpose as a mechanism in solids advection is an example of the need to import anthropic principles and concepts into the language and methodology of modern Earth system dynamics. As part of the emergence of a generalized solids advection mechanism, several additional transport requirements necessary to the function of modern large-scale technological systems were also satisfied. These include spatially accurate delivery of advected payload, targetability to essentially arbitrarily located destinations (such as cities), and independence of structure of advected payload from transport mechanism. The latter property

  15. Magnetically Controlled Electronic Transport Properties of a Ferromagnetic Junction on the Surface of a Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Qin; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Deng, Ming-Xun; Hu, Liang-Bin

    2015-06-01

    We have investigated the transport properties of the Dirac fermions through a ferromagnetic barrier junction on the surface of a strong topological insulator. The current-voltage characteristic curve and the tunneling conductance are calculated theoretically. Two interesting transport features are predicted: observable negative differential conductances and linear conductances tunable from unit to nearly zero. These features can be magnetically manipulated simply by changing the spacial orientation of the magnetization. Our results may contribute to the development of high-speed switching and functional applications or electrically controlled magnetization switching. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11174088, 11175067, 11274124

  16. A controlled field pilot for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spangler, L.H.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.; Nehrir, A.; Humphries, S.; Keith, C.; Shaw, J.; Rouse, J.; Cunningham, A.; Benson, S.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Lewicki, J.L.; Wells, A.; Diehl, R.; Strazisar, B.; Fessenden, J.; Rahn, Thomas; Amonette, J.; Barr, J.; Pickles, W.; Jacobson, J.; Silver, E.; Male, E.; Rauch, H.; Gullickson, K.; Trautz, R.; Kharaka, Y.; Birkholzer, J.; Wielopolski, L.

    2009-01-01

    A field facility has been developed to allow controlled studies of near surface CO2 transport and detection technologies. The key component of the facility is a shallow, slotted horizontal well divided into six zones. The scale and fluxes were designed to address large scale CO2 storage projects and desired retention rates for those projects. A wide variety of detection techniques were deployed by collaborators from 6 national labs, 2 universities, EPRI, and the USGS. Additionally, modeling of CO2 transport and concentrations in the saturated soil and in the vadose zone was conducted. An overview of these results will be presented. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Understanding extraction and beam transport in the ISIS H{sup -} Penning surface plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Gabor, C.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.; Jolly, S.; Pozimski, J.; Savage, P.; Woods, M.

    2008-02-15

    The ISIS H{sup -} Penning surface plasma source has been developed to produce beam currents up to 70 mA and pulse lengths up to 1.5 ms at 50 Hz. This paper details the investigation into beam extraction and beam transport in an attempt to understand the beam emittance and to try to improve the emittance. A scintillator profile measurement technique has been developed to assess the performance of different plasma electrode apertures, extraction electrode geometries, and postextraction acceleration configurations. This work shows that the present extraction, beam transport, and postacceleration system are suboptimal and further work is required to improve it.

  18. Understanding extraction and beam transport in the ISIS H(-) Penning surface plasma ion source.

    PubMed

    Faircloth, D C; Letchford, A P; Gabor, C; Whitehead, M O; Wood, T; Jolly, S; Pozimski, J; Savage, P; Woods, M

    2008-02-01

    The ISIS H(-) Penning surface plasma source has been developed to produce beam currents up to 70 mA and pulse lengths up to 1.5 ms at 50 Hz. This paper details the investigation into beam extraction and beam transport in an attempt to understand the beam emittance and to try to improve the emittance. A scintillator profile measurement technique has been developed to assess the performance of different plasma electrode apertures, extraction electrode geometries, and postextraction acceleration configurations. This work shows that the present extraction, beam transport, and postacceleration system are suboptimal and further work is required to improve it.

  19. 41 CFR 302-3.218 - Are there any special circumstances when my agency may authorize me travel and transportation...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Are there any special... Alaska or Hawaii? 302-3.218 Section 302-3.218 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel...; or (b) Your agency is in need to recruit employees with special skills and knowledge and/or to...

  20. 41 CFR 102-118.430 - What information must be on my agency's transportation bills submitted for a postpayment audit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... with: (a) The date received from a TSP; (b) A TSP's bill number; (c) Your agency name; (d) A Document Reference Number; (e) The amount requested; (f) The amount paid; (g) The payment voucher number; (h... Regulation), item or section number; (i) The TSP's taxpayer identification number; and (j) The TSP's...

  1. 77 FR 69542 - V and S Railway, LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Colorado Department of Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... Surface Transportation Board V and S Railway, LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption-- Colorado Department of Transportation AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of exemption. SUMMARY: The... to Docket No. FD 35664, to: Surface Transportation Board, 395 E Street SW., Washington, DC...

  2. Effects of magnetic drift tangential to magnetic surfaces on neoclassical transport in non-axisymmetric plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Seikichi; Satake, Shinsuke; Kanno, Ryutaro; Sugama, Hideo

    2015-07-15

    In evaluating neoclassical transport by radially local simulations, the magnetic drift tangential to a flux surface is usually ignored in order to keep the phase-space volume conservation. In this paper, effect of the tangential magnetic drift on the local neoclassical transport is investigated. To retain the effect of the tangential magnetic drift in the local treatment of neoclassical transport, a new local formulation for the drift kinetic simulation is developed. The compressibility of the phase-space volume caused by the tangential magnetic drift is regarded as a source term for the drift kinetic equation, which is solved by using a two-weight δf Monte Carlo method for non-Hamiltonian system [G. Hu and J. A. Krommes, Phys. Plasmas 1, 863 (1994)]. It is demonstrated that the effect of the drift is negligible for the neoclassical transport in tokamaks. In non-axisymmetric systems, however, the tangential magnetic drift substantially changes the dependence of the neoclassical transport on the radial electric field E{sub r}. The peaked behavior of the neoclassical radial fluxes around E{sub r }={sub  }0 observed in conventional local neoclassical transport simulations is removed by taking the tangential magnetic drift into account.

  3. Quantum Transport of Spin-helical Dirac Fermion Topological Surface States in Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong P.

    Three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TI) are a novel class of electronic materials with topologically-nontrivial band structure such that the bulk is gapped and insulating yet the surface has topologically protected gapless conducting states. Such ``topological surface states'' (TSS) give helically spin polarized Dirac fermions, and offer a promising platform to realize various other novel physics such as topological magnetoelectric effects and Majorana fermions. However, it is often challenging to unambiguously access and study the transport properties of TSS in many practical TI materials due to non-negligible bulk conducting states. I will discuss our recent experiments on high-quality ``intrinsic'' TIs with insulating bulk and surface-dominated conduction that allow us to reveal a number of characteristic transport properties of spin-helical Dirac fermion topological surface states. We have observed, for example, a thickness-independent and surface-dominated conductance (even at room temperature) in exfoliated TI thin films and well-developed ``half-integer'' Dirac fermion quantum Hall effect (QHE) arising from TSS (observed up to 40K); fully-tunable ``two-species'' Dirac fermion QHE and other intriguing states in dual gated devices where both top and bottom surfaces can be independently controlled; current-induced helical spin-polarization detected by spin sensitive transport measurements using magnetic electrodes; and in TI nanoribbons, Shubnikov-de Hass (SdH) oscillations showing gate-tunable Berry phase and ultra-relativistic Dirac mass; and a ``half-integer'' Aharonov-Bohm effect (ABE) unique to the circumferentially quantized spin helical Dirac fermion surface state modes (sub-bands), with a gate-tunable conductance oscillation and alternation between the ``half-integer'' ABE and regular ABE periodic in fermi momentum. Such TIs and related devices may enable promising future applications in spintronics, thermoelectrics and various topological

  4. Predicting uncertainty in sediment transport and landscape evolution - the influence of initial surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, G. R.; Coulthard, T. J.; Lowry, J. B. C.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical landscape evolution models were initially developed to examine natural catchment hydrology and geomorphology and have become a common tool to examine geomorphic behaviour over a range of time and space scales. These models all use a digital elevation model (DEM) as a representation of the landscape surface and a significant issue is the quality and resolution of this surface. Here we focus on how subtle perturbations or roughness on the DEM surface can produce alternative model results. This study is carried out by randomly varying the elevations of the DEM surface and examining the effect on sediment transport rates and geomorphology for a proposed rehabilitation design for a post-mining landscape using multiple landscape realisations with increasing magnitudes of random changes. We show that an increasing magnitude of random surface variability does not appear to have any significant effect on sediment transport over millennial time scales. However, the random surface variability greatly changes the temporal pattern or delivery of sediment output. A significant finding is that all simulations at the end of the 10,000 year modelled period are geomorphologically similar and present a geomorphological equifinality. However, the individual patterns of erosion and deposition were different for repeat simulations with a different sequence of random perturbations. The alternative positions of random perturbations strongly influence local patterns of hillslope erosion and evolution together with the pattern and behaviour of deposition. The findings demonstrate the complex feedbacks that occur even within a simple modelled system.

  5. 19 CFR 18.9 - Examination by inspectors of trunk line associations or agents of the Surface Transportation Board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... associations or agents of the Surface Transportation Board. 18.9 Section 18.9 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... MERCHANDISE IN TRANSIT General Provisions § 18.9 Examination by inspectors of trunk line associations or... applicant to be a representative of the Trunk Line Association, the Surface Transportation Board, the...

  6. Atmosphere-surface exchange and long-range transport of persistent organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Pul, W.A.J. van; Jaarsveld, J.A. van; Jacobs, C.M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are compounds that are resistant to photolytic, biological and chemical degradation. Many POPs are semi-volatile at atmospheric conditions. Because of these characteristics POPs have a atmospheric lifetime of weeks or more and are subject to long-range atmospheric transport. During this transport POPs can be deposited as well as be re-emitted from soil and water bodies. In this study a model for the exchange of POP at the soil and sea surface is presented as well as its application in a long-range atmospheric transport model. The main goal of this study is to simulate the spatial distribution of POP deposition (accumulation) over Europe.

  7. Thermally driven transverse transports and magnetic dynamics on a topological surface capped with a ferromagnet strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ming-Xun; Zhong, Ming; Zheng, Shi-Han; Qiu, Jian-Ming; Yang, Mou; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically study thermally driven transport of the Dirac fermions on the surface of a topological insulator capped with a ferromagnet strip. The generation and manipulation of anomalous Hall and Nernst effects are analyzed, in which the in-plane magnetization of the ferromagnet film is found to take a decisive role. This scenario is distinct from that modulated by Berry phase where the in-plane magnetization is independent. We further discuss the thermal spin-transfer torque as a backaction of the thermoelectric transports on the magnetization and calculate the dynamics of the anomalous Hall and Nernst effects self-consistently. It is found that the magnitude of the long-time steady Hall and Nernst conductance is determined by competition between the magnetic anisotropy and current-induced effective anisotropy. These results open up a possibility of magnetically controlling the transverse thermoelectric transports or thermally manipulating the magnet switching.

  8. Plutonium-238 observations as a test of modeled transport and surface deposition of meteoric smoke particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, S. S.; Saunders, R. W.; Tian, W.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2013-08-01

    are large uncertainties in the transport and surface deposition of upper atmospheric particles used to construct climate proxies. Here we use a 3-D chemistry-climate model (CCM) to simulate the transport and deposition of plutonium-238 oxide nanoparticles formed after the ablation of a power unit in the upper stratosphere (~11°S) in 1964. The model reproduces both the observed hemispheric asymmetry and time scale of Pu-238 deposition. We then use the CCM to investigate the transport of meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) from the upper mesosphere. The strongest MSP deposition is predicted to occur at middle latitudes, providing a significant source of Fe fertilization to the Southern Ocean. The model also predicts substantially more deposition in Greenland than in Antarctica (by a factor of ~15, in agreement with ice core measurements), showing that climate proxy measurements from a limited number of sites must be interpreted with care.

  9. Surface trajectories of oil transport along the Northern Coastline of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, J. C.; Trahan, C. J.; Howard, M. T.; Fleming, J. G.; Weaver, R. J.; Tanaka, S.; Yu, L.; Luettich, R. A.; Dawson, C. N.; Westerink, J. J.; Wells, G.; Lu, A.; Vega, K.; Kubach, A.; Dresback, K. M.; Kolar, R. L.; Kaiser, C.; Twilley, R. R.

    2012-06-01

    After the destruction of the Deepwater Horizon drilling platform during the spring of 2010, the northern Gulf of Mexico was threatened by an oil spill from the Macondo well. Emergency responders were concerned about oil transport in the nearshore, where it threatened immediately the fishing waters and coastline from Louisiana to Florida. In this region, oil movement was influenced by a continental shelf with varying width, the protruding Mississippi River delta, the marshes and bayou of southern Louisiana, and the shallow sounds and barrier islands that protect the coastline. Transport forecasts require physics-based computational models and high-resolution meshes that represent the circulation in deep water, on the continental shelf, and within the complex nearshore environment. This work applies the coupled SWAN+ADCIRC model on a high-resolution computational mesh to simulate the current velocity field on the continental shelf, nearshore and marsh areas during the time that oil was visible on the surface of the Gulf. The SWAN+ADCIRC simulations account for the influence of tides, riverine discharge, winds and wind-driven waves. A highly efficient Lagrangian particle transport model is employed to simulate the surface trajectories of the oil. The transport model accounts for dispersion and advection by wind and currents. Transport is evaluated using 2-week long sequences of satellite images. During both periods, the SWAN+ADCIRC current fields alone appeared to be more successful moving the oil than when direct wind forcing was included. In addition, hypothetical oil transport is considered during two hurricane scenarios. Had a hurricane significantly impacted the northern Gulf while the spill was active, depending on the track of the storm relative to the spill location, oil would have moved farther into the marshes of southern Louisiana or farther along the shelf toward Texas than actually occurred during the spill.

  10. Taking advantage of reduced droplet-surface interaction to optimize transport of bioanalytes in digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Freire, Sergio L S; Thorne, Nathaniel; Wutkowski, Michael; Dao, Selina

    2014-01-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF), a technique for manipulation of droplets, is a promising alternative for the development of "lab-on-a-chip" platforms. Often, droplet motion relies on the wetting of a surface, directly associated with the application of an electric field; surface interactions, however, make motion dependent on droplet contents, limiting the breadth of applications of the technique. Some alternatives have been presented to minimize this dependence. However, they rely on the addition of extra chemical species to the droplet or its surroundings, which could potentially interact with droplet moieties. Addressing this challenge, our group recently developed Field-DW devices to allow the transport of cells and proteins in DMF, without extra additives. Here, the protocol for device fabrication and operation is provided, including the electronic interface for motion control. We also continue the studies with the devices, showing that multicellular, relatively large, model organisms can also be transported, arguably unaffected by the electric fields required for device operation. PMID:25407533

  11. Taking advantage of reduced droplet-surface interaction to optimize transport of bioanalytes in digital microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Freire, Sergio L S; Thorne, Nathaniel; Wutkowski, Michael; Dao, Selina

    2014-11-10

    Digital microfluidics (DMF), a technique for manipulation of droplets, is a promising alternative for the development of "lab-on-a-chip" platforms. Often, droplet motion relies on the wetting of a surface, directly associated with the application of an electric field; surface interactions, however, make motion dependent on droplet contents, limiting the breadth of applications of the technique. Some alternatives have been presented to minimize this dependence. However, they rely on the addition of extra chemical species to the droplet or its surroundings, which could potentially interact with droplet moieties. Addressing this challenge, our group recently developed Field-DW devices to allow the transport of cells and proteins in DMF, without extra additives. Here, the protocol for device fabrication and operation is provided, including the electronic interface for motion control. We also continue the studies with the devices, showing that multicellular, relatively large, model organisms can also be transported, arguably unaffected by the electric fields required for device operation.

  12. Transport and Attenuation of Particles of Different Density and Surface Charge: A Karst Aquifer Field Study.

    PubMed

    Schiperski, Ferry; Zirlewagen, Johannes; Scheytt, Traugott

    2016-08-01

    Although karst aquifers are far more susceptible to contamination than porous aquifers, with the transport of particulate matter being an important factor, little is known about the attenuation of solutes within karst aquifers and even less about the attenuation of particulate matter. These in situ investigations have therefore aimed to systematically identify the processes that influence the transport and attenuation of particles within a karst aquifer through multitracer testing, using four different types of 1 μm fluorescent particles and the fluorescent dye uranine. Each of the types of particles used were detected at the observed spring, which drains the investigated aquifer. However, the transport behavior varied significantly between the various particles and the uranine dye, with the breakthrough of particles occurring slightly earlier than that of uranine. Attenuation was determined from the tracer recovery and attributed to filtration processes. These processes were affected by the hydrophobicity and surface charge of the particles. Carboxylated polystyrene particles with a density and surface charge comparable to pathogenic microorganisms were found to be mobile in groundwater over a distance of about 3 km. No attenuation was observed for plain silica particles. Particles with these characteristics thus pose a major threat to karst spring water as they might occur as contaminants themselves or facilitate the transport of other contaminants.

  13. Transport and Attenuation of Particles of Different Density and Surface Charge: A Karst Aquifer Field Study.

    PubMed

    Schiperski, Ferry; Zirlewagen, Johannes; Scheytt, Traugott

    2016-08-01

    Although karst aquifers are far more susceptible to contamination than porous aquifers, with the transport of particulate matter being an important factor, little is known about the attenuation of solutes within karst aquifers and even less about the attenuation of particulate matter. These in situ investigations have therefore aimed to systematically identify the processes that influence the transport and attenuation of particles within a karst aquifer through multitracer testing, using four different types of 1 μm fluorescent particles and the fluorescent dye uranine. Each of the types of particles used were detected at the observed spring, which drains the investigated aquifer. However, the transport behavior varied significantly between the various particles and the uranine dye, with the breakthrough of particles occurring slightly earlier than that of uranine. Attenuation was determined from the tracer recovery and attributed to filtration processes. These processes were affected by the hydrophobicity and surface charge of the particles. Carboxylated polystyrene particles with a density and surface charge comparable to pathogenic microorganisms were found to be mobile in groundwater over a distance of about 3 km. No attenuation was observed for plain silica particles. Particles with these characteristics thus pose a major threat to karst spring water as they might occur as contaminants themselves or facilitate the transport of other contaminants. PMID:27348254

  14. Surface plasmon enhanced quantum transport in a hybrid metal nanoparticle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lin; Nan, Yali; Xu, Shang; Zhang, Sishi; Han, Min

    2014-07-01

    Hybrid Pd-Ag nanoparticle arrays composed of randomly distributed Pd nanoparticles in dense packing and a small number of dispersed Ag nanoparticles were fabricated with controlled coverage. Photo-enhanced conductance was observed in the nanoparticle arrays. Largest enhancement, which can be higher than 20 folds, was obtained with 450 nm light illumination. This wavelength was found to correlate with the surface plasmon resonance of the Ag nanoparticles. Electron transport measurements showed there were significant Coulomb blockade in the nanoparticle arrays and the blockade could be overcome with the surface plasmon enhanced local field of Ag nanoparticles induced by light illumination.

  15. Transportation-Driven Mars Surface Operations Supporting an Evolvable Mars Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toups, Larry; Brown, Kendall; Hoffman, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a study evaluating options for supporting a series of human missions to a single Mars surface destination. In this scenario the infrastructure emplaced during previous visits to this site is leveraged in following missions. The goal of this single site approach to Mars surface infrastructure is to enable "Steady State" operations by at least 4 crew for up to 500 sols at this site. These characteristics, along with the transportation system used to deliver crew and equipment to and from Mars, are collectively known as the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). Information in this paper is presented in the sequence in which it was accomplished. First, a logical buildup sequence of surface infrastructure was developed to achieve the desired "Steady State" operations on the Mars surface. This was based on a concept of operations that met objectives of the EMC. Second, infrastructure capabilities were identified to carry out this concept of operations. Third, systems (in the form of conceptual elements) were identified to provide these capabilities. This included top-level mass, power and volume estimates for these elements. Fourth, the results were then used in analyses to evaluate three options (18t, 27t, and 40t landed mass) of Mars Lander delivery capability to the surface. Finally, Mars arrival mass estimates were generated based upon the entry, descent, and landing requirements for inclusion in separate assessments of in-space transportation capabilities for the EMC.

  16. Coherent Topological Transport on the Surface of Bi2Se3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohun; Syers, Paul; Butch, Nicholas P.; Paglione, Johnpierre; Fuhrer, Michael S.

    2013-03-01

    We report weak anti-localization (WAL) measurements in gate-tuned, bulk insulating Bi2Se3 thin crystals with thicknesses varying between 5 and 17 nm. The gate-voltage dependent WAL behavior shows systematic variation as a function of crystal thickness. For the thickest samples, we observe two decoupled surfaces exhibiting perfect WAL as expected for the symplectic class. As the films are made thinner, we observe a gate-voltage tuned crossover from two decoupled surfaces to a single coherently coupled 2D system exhibiting WAL. The observed crossover is governed by competition between the phase coherence time and inter-surface tunneling time associated with the hybridization gap. In contrast to classical transport in which the signature of the hybridization gap appears only in the ultrathin limit (<= 3nm), phase coherent transport is extraordinarily sensitive to sub-meV coupling between top and bottom topological surfaces, and the surfaces of a TI film may be coherently coupled even for thicknesses as large as 12 nm. On further thinning, the WAL behavior is suppressed altogether at small carrier density, which we associate with the opening of a sizable gap on order the Fermi energy and destruction of topological protection. The authors acknowledge support from Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM).

  17. Stochastic model for photoinduced surface relief grating formation through molecular transport in polymer films.

    SciTech Connect

    Juan, M.; Plain, J.; Bachelot, R.; Royer, P.; Gray, S. K.; Wiederrecht, G. P.; Univ. de Technologie de Troyes

    2008-09-01

    We use a stochastic model to study photoinduced surface relief grating (SRG) formation due to molecular transport in azobenzene polymer films. The model is shown to reproduce the essential experimental features of SRG formation. In particular, it predicts SRG formation under both p and s polarizations, and the double peaked topographies that can occur at early times of the process. The evolving molecular positions and orientations during exposure are also followed, providing a useful mechanistic picture of SRG dynamics.

  18. Stochastic model for photoinduced surface relief grating formation through molecular transport in polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Juan, M. L.; Plain, J.; Bachelot, R.; Royer, P.; Gray, S. K.; Wiederrecht, G. P.

    2008-10-13

    We use a stochastic model to study photoinduced surface relief grating (SRG) formation due to molecular transport in azobenzene polymer films. The model is shown to reproduce the essential experimental features of SRG formation. In particular, it predicts SRG formation under both p and s polarizations, and the double peaked topographies that can occur at early times of the process. The evolving molecular positions and orientations during exposure are also followed, providing a useful mechanistic picture of SRG dynamics.

  19. System safety engineering in the development of advanced surface transportation vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnzen, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    Applications of system safety engineering to the development of advanced surface transportation vehicles are described. As a pertinent example, the paper describes a safety engineering efforts tailored to the particular design and test requirements of the Tracked Air Cushion Research Vehicle (TACRV). The test results obtained from this unique research vehicle provide significant design data directly applicable to the development of future tracked air cushion vehicles that will carry passengers in comfort and safety at speeds up to 300 miles per hour.

  20. Zeeman effect on surface electron transport in topological insulator Bi2Se3 nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Xian; Yan, Yuan; Zhang, Liang; Liao, Zhi-Min; Wu, Han-Chun; Yu, Da-Peng

    2015-10-01

    Topological insulators have exotic surface states that are massless Dirac fermions, manifesting special magnetotransport properties, such as the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, and weak antilocalization effects. In the surface Dirac cone, the band structures are typically closely related to the p-orbitals and possess helical orbital texture. Here we report on the tunability of the transport properties via the interaction between the magnetic field and the spin-orbital angular momentum of the surface states in individual Bi2Se3 nanoribbons. Because the surface states have a large Landé factor and helical spin-orbital texture, the in-plane magnetic field induced Zeeman energy will result in the deformation of the Dirac cone, which gives rise to spin polarization of the surface states. The spin-dependent scattering of the conducting electrons on the existing local magnetic moments produces a giant negative magnetoresistance. The negative magnetoresistance is robust with a ratio of -20% at 2 K and -0.5% at 300 K under 14 T. The results are valuable for possible orbital-electronics based on topological insulators.Topological insulators have exotic surface states that are massless Dirac fermions, manifesting special magnetotransport properties, such as the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, and weak antilocalization effects. In the surface Dirac cone, the band structures are typically closely related to the p-orbitals and possess helical orbital texture. Here we report on the tunability of the transport properties via the interaction between the magnetic field and the spin-orbital angular momentum of the surface states in individual Bi2Se3 nanoribbons. Because the surface states have a large Landé factor and helical spin-orbital texture, the in-plane magnetic field induced Zeeman energy will result in the deformation of the Dirac cone, which gives rise to spin polarization of the surface states. The spin-dependent scattering of

  1. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: biosynthesis and extraction from the inner membrane

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brent W.; May, Janine M.; Sherman, David J.; Kahne, Daniel; Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The network of charges and sugars provided by the dense packing of LPS molecules in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane interferes with the entry of hydrophobic compounds into the cell, including many antibiotics. In addition, LPS can be recognized by the immune system and plays a crucial role in many interactions between bacteria and their animal hosts. LPS is synthesized in the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, so it must be transported across their cell envelope to assemble at the cell surface. Over the past two decades, much of the research on LPS biogenesis has focused on the discovery and understanding of Lpt, a multi-protein complex that spans the cell envelope and functions to transport LPS from the inner membrane to the outer membrane. This paper focuses on the early steps of the transport of LPS by the Lpt machinery: the extraction of LPS from the inner membrane. The accompanying paper (May JM, Sherman DJ, Simpson BW, Ruiz N, Kahne D. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150027. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0027)) describes the subsequent steps as LPS travels through the periplasm and the outer membrane to its final destination at the cell surface. PMID:26370941

  2. Specific spacecraft evaluation: Special report. [charged particle transport from a mercury ion thruster to spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Charged and neutral particle transport from an 8 cm mercury ion thruster to the surfaces of the P 80-1 spacecraft and to the Teal Ruby sensor and the ECOM-501 sensor of that spacecraft were investigated. Laboratory measurements and analyses were used to examine line-of-sight and nonline-of sight particle transport modes. The recirculation of Hg(+) ions in the magnetic field of the earth was analyzed for spacecraft velocity and Earth magnetic field vector configurations which are expected to occur in near Earth, circular, high inclination orbits. For these magnetic field and orbit conditions and for expected ion release distribution functions, in both angles and energies, the recirculation/re-interception of ions on spacecraft surfaces was evaluated. The refraction of weakly energetic ions in the electric fields of the thruster plasma plume and in the electric fields between this plasma plume and the material boundaries of the thruster, the thruster sputter shield, and the various spacecraft surfaces were examined. The neutral particle transport modes of interest were identified as sputtered metal atoms from the thruster beam shield. Results, conclusions, and future considerations are presented.

  3. Modeling Fate and Transport of Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocysts in Overland and Near- surface Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, R.; Kalita, P.; Kuhlenschmidt, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a manure-borne protozoan parasite which is common in the environment. It has been recognized as an important microbial contaminant of water and can cause infection and diarrhea in many mammalian hosts, including humans. The laboratory experiments carried out have demonstrated that recovery of C. parvum oocysts was significantly affected by climatic and surface conditions like slope, rainfall and surface cover. The objective of this study is to develop a model for simulating transport of C. parvum oocysts in overland and near-surface flow. Modeling can help understanding oocysts transport pathways. Accordingly, best management practices (BMP) can be developed. Transport of oocysts in overland flow can be simulated mathematically by including terms for the concentration of the oocysts in the liquid phase (in suspension or free-floating) and the solid phase (adsorbed to the fine solid particles like clay). Oocysts adsorption, advection and decay processes are considered. These processes are solved using numerical technique to predict spatial and temporal changes in oocyst concentrations in solid and liquid phases. The model results are compared with experimental data to validate the model outcome. The model output reproduced observed recovery kinetics for 1.5% slope but not for higher slopes (3.0% and 4.5%).

  4. Lipopolysaccharide transport to the cell surface: biosynthesis and extraction from the inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Brent W; May, Janine M; Sherman, David J; Kahne, Daniel; Ruiz, Natividad

    2015-10-01

    The cell surface of most Gram-negative bacteria is covered with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The network of charges and sugars provided by the dense packing of LPS molecules in the outer leaflet of the outer membrane interferes with the entry of hydrophobic compounds into the cell, including many antibiotics. In addition, LPS can be recognized by the immune system and plays a crucial role in many interactions between bacteria and their animal hosts. LPS is synthesized in the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, so it must be transported across their cell envelope to assemble at the cell surface. Over the past two decades, much of the research on LPS biogenesis has focused on the discovery and understanding of Lpt, a multi-protein complex that spans the cell envelope and functions to transport LPS from the inner membrane to the outer membrane. This paper focuses on the early steps of the transport of LPS by the Lpt machinery: the extraction of LPS from the inner membrane. The accompanying paper (May JM, Sherman DJ, Simpson BW, Ruiz N, Kahne D. 2015 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 370, 20150027. (doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0027)) describes the subsequent steps as LPS travels through the periplasm and the outer membrane to its final destination at the cell surface.

  5. 76 FR 416 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Allegany County, Md.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board CSX Transportation, Inc.--Abandonment Exemption--in Allegany County, Md. AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Notice of exemption. SUMMARY: Under 49 U.S.C....

  6. 75 FR 53374 - Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Surface Transportation Board Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of Rail Energy Transportation Advisory Committee meeting... this meeting may be announced through the Board's Web site at www.stb.dot.gov . This action will...

  7. New York state high-speed surface transportation study: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    In 1990, New York State Governor Mario M. Cuomo created an interagency task force under the leadership of Lt. Governor Stan Lundine to investigate the potential of high speed ground transportation (HSGT) systems. Building on information from previous agency activities, including consultant efforts contracted by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York State Thruway Authority (NYSTA), and in-house analyses performed by New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT), the task force focused on the corridor between New York City and the Niagara Frontier. In December 1991, NYSERDA issued a contract for a study of high speed ground transportation options for New York State. The study`s objective was to assess potential rights-of-way, ridership, energy and environmental impacts, economic benefits, capital, operating, and maintenance costs, and financial viability of HSGT systems. This study builds upon and supplements previous and on-going HSGT activities conducted by the members of the interagency task force. These activities include: Maglev Technical and Economic Feasibility Study (NYSERDA); Maglev Demonstration Site Investigation (NYSTA); and New York/Massachusetts High Speed Ground Transportation Study (NYSDOT). This study is intended to verify and refine previous information and analyses and provide supplemental information and insights to be used in determining if additional investigation and activities involving HSGT are desirable for New York State. This study evaluates HSGT technologies capable of speeds significantly higher than those achieved with the present rail system. Three HSGT categories are used in this study: incremental rail improvement, very high-speed rail, and Maglev.

  8. A large-scale methane model by incorporating the surface water transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoliang; Zhuang, Qianlai; Liu, Yaling; Zhou, Yuyu; Aghakouchak, Amir

    2016-06-01

    The effect of surface water movement on methane emissions is not explicitly considered in most of the current methane models. In this study, a surface water routing was coupled into our previously developed large-scale methane model. The revised methane model was then used to simulate global methane emissions during 2006-2010. From our simulations, the global mean annual maximum inundation extent is 10.6 ± 1.9 km2 and the methane emission is 297 ± 11 Tg C/yr in the study period. In comparison to the currently used TOPMODEL-based approach, we found that the incorporation of surface water routing leads to 24.7% increase in the annual maximum inundation extent and 30.8% increase in the methane emissions at the global scale for the study period, respectively. The effect of surface water transport on methane emissions varies in different regions: (1) the largest difference occurs in flat and moist regions, such as Eastern China; (2) high-latitude regions, hot spots in methane emissions, show a small increase in both inundation extent and methane emissions with the consideration of surface water movement; and (3) in arid regions, the new model yields significantly larger maximum flooded areas and a relatively small increase in the methane emissions. Although surface water is a small component in the terrestrial water balance, it plays an important role in determining inundation extent and methane emissions, especially in flat regions. This study indicates that future quantification of methane emissions shall consider the effects of surface water transport.

  9. Arsenic transport between surface and groundwater in a moderately reducing zone: Geochemical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaska, Mahmoud; Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Verdoux, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic contamination represents a major risk to human health as one of the most prominent environmental causes of cancer mortality. Mining activities, particularly those involving arsenic rich ores have an impact on the environment and on human health that may persist for many decades after mine closure. The relationships between As released from alluvial aquifer in the vicinity of the sulfide-rich mine dumps was demonstrated with geochemical and isotopic tracers (major and traces elements, 87Sr/86Sr, 18O, 2H). Strontium isotopes were used to trace the transport of As downstream from a As rich tailing dam. Increasing As and Fe concentrations in surface water are explained by As release associated with alluvial groundwater discharge to the stream. This process occurs in a moderately reduced section of the stream downgradient from the sulfide-rich tailing dam. High As, total Fe and low Eh in groundwater confirm the discharge of alluvial groundwater and explain its impact on surface water. Transport of As between surface and groundwater can be described as follows: 1- Subsurface moderately reducing conditions prevail in groundwater downgradient from the tailing dams. This suggests a flux of reduced water from sulfide-rich tailing dams which is characterized by its high As and Fe content resulting from the reduction of Fe-sulfides. 2- Upon mixing with surface water, oxidizing conditions prevails and precipitate as Fe hydroxide on the stream bed. As and Sr subsequently adsorbed on the Fe -oxyhydroxide surface. This process contributes to the immobilization of As in surface water. Remaining dissolved As in surface water can be re-introduced in alluvial groundwater downstream of the reducing zone.

  10. Radioxenon Production and Transport from an Underground Nuclear Detonation to Ground Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yunwei; Carrigan, Charles R.; Hao, Yue

    2015-02-01

    Radioxenon isotopes are considered as possible indicators for detecting and discriminating underground nuclear explosions. To monitor and sample the release of radioxenon isotopes, both independent and chain-reaction yields need to be considered together with multiphase transport in geological systems from the detonation point to the ground surface. For the sake of simplicity, modeling of radioxenon isotopic radioactivities has typically been focused either on chain reactions in a batch reactor without considering multiphase transport or on radionuclide transport with simplified reactions. Although numerical methods are available for integrating coupled differential equations of complex decay networks, the stiffness of ordinary differential equations due to greatly differing decay rates may require substantial additional effort to obtain solutions for the fully coupled system. For this reason, closed-form solutions for sequential reactions and numerical solutions for multiparent converging and multidaughter branching reactions were previously developed and used to simulate xenon isotopic radioactivities in the batch reactor mode. In this paper, we develop a fully coupled numerical model, which involves tracking 24 components (i.e., 22 radionuclide components plus air and water) in two phases to enhance model predictability of simultaneously simulating xenon isotopic transport and fully coupled chain reactions. To validate the numerical model and verify the corresponding computer code, we derived closed-form solutions for first-order xenon reactions in a batch reactor mode and for single-gas phase transport coupled with the xenon reactions in a one-dimensional column. Finally, cylindrical 3-D simulations of two-phase flow within a dual permeability fracture-matrix medium, simulating the geohydrologic regime of an underground nuclear explosion, indicate the existence of both a strong temporal and spatial dependence of xenon isotopic ratios sampled at the surface. In

  11. Tuning thermal transport ultra-thin silicon membranes: Influence of surface nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Sanghamitra; Donadio, Davide

    2015-03-01

    A detailed understanding of the behaviour of phonons in low-dimensional and nanostructured systems provides opportunities for thermal management at the nanoscale, efficient conversion of waste heat into electricity, and exploration of new paradigms in information and communication technologies. We elucidate the interplay between nanoscale surface structures and thermal transport properties in free-standing silicon membranes with thicknesses down to 4 nm. We demonstrate that whereas dimensional reduction affects the phonon dispersion, the surface nanostructures provide the main channel for phonon scattering leading to the dramatic reduction of thermal conductivity in ultra-thin silicon membranes. The presence of surface nanostructures, by means of pattern formation and surface oxidation, leads to a 40-fold reduction in the in-plane thermal conductivity of the thinnest membrane. We also investigate the effect of chemical substitution and the geometry of the nanostructures in the thermal transport properties of the membranes. We show that local strain induced by nanostructuring enables tuning of the thermal conductivity of these nanophononic metamaterials. Acknowledgment: This project is funded by the program FP7-ENERGY-2012-1-2STAGE under Contract Number 309150.

  12. Transport of Cryptosporidium parvum in Surface Waters: Interplay of Hydrodynamic Processes, Sediments, and Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, K. E.; Packman, A. I.; Atwill, E. R.; Harter, T.

    2005-05-01

    Understanding the movement of pathogens in the environment is necessary to ensure the safety and protection of municipal water supply systems. Cryptosporidium parvum is a human pathogen of particular concern as it is common in surface waters of the United States, it can survive for long periods of time in the environment, and it is difficult to disinfect in water treatment plants. The transport of oocysts through watersheds can be mediated by interactions with the stream channel and suspended particles in the water column. For example, the association of C. parvum oocysts with suspended particles can alter the effective physical properties of the oocysts and increase their settling velocity. The hydrodynamic coupling of the overlying water with the pore water of the sediment bed can carry oocysts from the surface water into the sediment bed. Surface-attached communities of microorganisms, called biofilms, are ubiquitous in surface water systems and can capture C. parvum oocysts. Laboratory experiments were conducted at multiple scales (flowcell, batch, and flume) to determine the association of oocysts with sediments and biofilm communities and to assess the impact of this association on C. parvum transport. The effects of flow conditions, water chemistry, sediment composition, biofilm composition, and biofilm structure on these associations were all evaluated. The experimental results demonstrate that oocyst-sediment-biofilm interactions have significant implications for the propagation of C. parvum oocysts through watersheds and should generally be considered when predicting the fate of pathogens in the environment.

  13. Effect of dense vegetation on colloid transport and removal in surface runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Congrong; Gao, Bin; Muñoz-Carpena, Rafael

    2012-04-01

    SummaryWidely distributed in aquatic environment, colloids can pose risks to water quality, particularly when loaded in surface runoff, which can facilitate fast distribution of contaminants. It is unclear whether densely vegetated areas, which are known to be effective to reduce solutes and sediment from runoff, can be used to remove colloidal contaminants. In this paper, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate effects of dense vegetation on colloid transport and removal in surface runoff. First, batch experiments were conducted to obtain the sorption isotherms of colloids (fluorescent microspheres) onto different vegetation parts (grass leaf, stem, and root). Then, a laboratory rainfall/runoff system was used to compare the transport behaviors of a tracer (bromide) and colloids in overland and drainage flows during a simulated rainfall event (64 mm/h). The system was equipped with Bahia grass growing on sandy soil containers with one surface flow and four vertical drainage sampling outlets. We found that all grass parts can sorb aqueous colloids with the Langmuir maximum sorption capacity between 455.3 and 1188.3 mg kg-1. Runoff experimental results demonstrated that both the surface vegetation and the soil (including plant root) underneath can effectively remove colloids from surface and subsurface flows. Only about 33% of the applied colloids were recovered from the outflows, with about 29% and 4% from overland flow and drainages, respectively. Our results suggest that well designed and maintained areas of dense vegetation, like vegetative filter strips, can be used as an effective best management practice to reduce colloidal contaminants in surface runoff.

  14. The Association of Cryptosporidium parvum With Suspended Sediments: Implications for Transport in Surface Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, K. E.; Packman, A. I.; Atwill, E. R.; Harter, T.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding the transport and fate of microorganisms in surface waters is of vital concern in protecting the integrity and safety of municipal water supply systems. The human pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum is a particular public health interest, as it is ubiquitous in the surface waters of the United States, it can persist for long periods in the environment, and it is difficult to disinfect in water treatment plants. Due to its small size (5 um), low specific gravity (1.05 g/cm3), and negative surface charge, C. parvum oocysts are generally considered to move through watersheds from their source to drinking water reservoirs with little attenuation. However, the transport of the oocysts in surface waters may be mediated by interactions with suspended sediments. Batch experiments were conducted to determine the extent of C. parvum oocyst attachment to several inorganic and organic sediments under varying water chemical conditions, and settling column experiments were performed to demonstrate how these associations influence the effective settling velocity of C. parvum oocysts. Results from these experiments showed that C. parvum oocysts do associate with inorganic and organic sediments and often settle at the rate of the suspended sediment. The size and surface charge of the host suspended sediment influenced the extent of oocyst attachment as oocysts preferentially associated with particles greater than 3 um, and fewer oocysts associated with particles having a highly negative surface charge. Background water chemical conditions including ionic strength, ion composition, and pH did not have a significant effect on oocyst attachment to suspended sediments.

  15. Surface transport and band gap structure of exfoliated 2H-MoTe2 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez Lezama, Ignacio; Ubaldini, Alberto; Longobardi, Maria; Giannini, Enrico; Renner, Christoph; Kuzmenko, Alexey B.; Morpurgo, Alberto F.

    2014-09-01

    Semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have emerged as materials that can be used to realize two-dimensional (2D) crystals possessing rather unique transport and optical properties. Most research has so far focused on sulfur and selenium compounds, while tellurium-based materials have attracted little attention so far. As a first step in the investigation of Te-based semiconducting TMDs in this context, we have studied MoTe2 crystals with thicknesses above 4 nm, focusing on surface transport and a quantitative determination of the gap structure. Using ionic-liquid gated transistors, we show that ambipolar transport at the surface of the material is reproducibly achieved, with hole and electron mobility values between 10 and 30 cm2 V-1s-1 at room temperature. The gap structure is determined through three different techniques: ionic-liquid gated transistors and scanning tunneling spectroscopy, which allow the measurement of the indirect gap (Eind), and optical transmission spectroscopy on crystals of different thickness, which enables the determination of both the direct (Edir) and the indirect gap. We find that at room temperature Eind = 0.88 eV and Edir = 1.02 eV. Our results suggest that thin MoTe2 layers may exhibit a transition to a direct gap before mono-layer thickness. They should also drastically extend the range of direct gaps accessible in 2D semiconducting TMDs.

  16. Fate and transport of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid in surface waters of agricultural basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coupe, R.H.; Kalkhoff, S.J.; Capel, P.D.; Gregoire, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] is a herbicide used widely throughout the world in the production of many crops and is heavily used on soybeans, corn and cotton. Glyphosate is used in almost all agricultural areas of the United States, and the agricultural use of glyphosate has increased from less than 10 000 Mg in 1992 to more than 80 000 Mg in 2007. The greatest intensity of glyphosate use is in the midwestern United States, where applications are predominantly to genetically modified corn and soybeans. In spite of the increase in usage across the United States, the characterization of the transport of glyphosate and its degradate aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) on a watershed scale is lacking. Results: Glyphosate and AMPA were frequently detected in the surface waters of four agricultural basins. The frequency and magnitude of detections varied across basins, and the load, as a percentage of use, ranged from 0.009 to 0.86% and could be related to three general characteristics: source strength, rainfall runoff and flow route. Conclusions: Glyphosate use in a watershed results in some occurrence in surface water; however, the watersheds most at risk for the offsite transport of glyphosate are those with high application rates, rainfall that results in overland runoff and a flow route that does not include transport through the soil. ?? 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Vertical Transports by Plumes within the Moderately Convective Marine Atmospheric Surface Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Richard A.; Shirer, Hampton N.; Wells, Robert; Young, George S.

    2002-04-01

    Bursts in the kinematic vertical transports of heat and horizontal momentum in a moderately convective marine atmospheric surface layer are studied by applying the variable interval time averaging (VITA) detection method to principal components analysis (PCA)-decomposed datasets obtained from the Floating Instrumentation Platform (FLIP) moored vessel during the 1995 April-May Pacific Marine Boundary Layer (PMBL) experiment. For convective plumes, a well-defined dimensionless relationship is shown to exist between the vertical transports of heat and horizontal momentum; this relationship cannot be easily deduced if PCA and VITA are not both applied.PCA decomposes a dataset using correlations within that dataset instead of bandpass filtering it to retain energy in a predetermined range of scales; PCA thus respects all scales contributing to the phenomena retained in the dataset. Subsequent use of cross-spectral techniques to group the PCA-decomposed dataset into coherent structure types leads to, among other types of coherent structures, PCA-derived plumes. The VITA method is applied to a decomposed dataset in order to identify updrafts (bursts) and downdrafts (sweeps) in the time series of correlated variables by searching the signal for events that satisfy user-specified criteria. With proper use of PCA, surface-layer plumes can be reassembled in a way that yields the same transport relationships no matter which of the two different detecting variables is used.

  18. The Fate and Transport of Glyphosate and AMPA into Surface Waters of Agricultural Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupe, R.; Kalkhoff, S.; Capel, P.; Gregoire, C.

    2010-12-01

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] is a herbicide used widely throughout the world in the production of many crops, but is particularly heavily used on crops which are genetically modified to be glyphosate tolerant: predominately soybeans, corn, potatoes, and cotton. Glyphosate is used extensively in almost all agricultural areas of the United States, and annual application has increased from less than 10,000 Mg in 1992 to more than 80,000 Mg in 2007. The greatest areal use is in the Midwest where glyphosate is applied on genetically modified corn and soybeans. Although use is increasing, the characterization of glyphosate transport on the watershed scale is lacking. Glyphosate, and its degradate AMPA [aminomethylphosphoric acid], was frequently detected in the surface waters of four agricultural watersheds. The load as a percent of use of glyphosate ranged from 0.009 to 0.86 percent and can be related to three factors: source strength, hydrology, and flowpath. Glyphosate use within a watershed results in some occurrence in surface water at the part per billion level; however watersheds most at risk for the offsite transport of glyphosate are those with high application rates, rainfall that results in overland runoff, and a flowpath that does not include transport through the soil.

  19. Fabrication of self-supporting porous silicon membranes and tuning transport properties by surface functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velleman, Leonora; Shearer, Cameron James; Ellis, Amanda Vera; Losic, Dusan; Voelcker, Nicolas Hans; Shapter, Joseph George

    2010-09-01

    This study presents a simple approach to perform selective mass transport through freestanding porous silicon (pSi) membranes. pSi membranes were fabricated by the electrochemical etching of silicon to produce membranes with controlled structure and pore sizes close to molecular dimensions (~12 nm in diameter). While these membranes are capable of size-exclusion based separations, chemically specific filtration remains a great challenge especially in the biomedical field. Herein, we investigate the transport properties of chemically functionalized pSi membranes. The membranes were functionalized using silanes (heptadecafluoro-1,1,2,2-tetrahydrodecyl)dimethylchlorosilane (PFDS) and N-(triethoxysilylpropyl)-o-polyethylene oxide urethane (PEGS) to give membranes hydrophobic (PFDS) and hydrophilic (PEGS) properties. The transport of probe dyes tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(ii) hexahydrate (Rubpy) and Rose Bengal (RB) through these functionalized membranes was examined to determine the effect surface functionalization has on the selectivity and separation ability of pSi membranes. This study provides the basis for further investigation into more sophisticated surface functionalization and coupled with the biocompatibility of pSi will lead to new advances in membrane based bio-separations.

  20. Transport and dispersion of pollutants in surface impoundments: a finite element model

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.

    1980-07-01

    A surface impoundment model in finite element (SIMFE) is presented to enable the simulation of flow circulations and pollutant transport and dispersion in natural or artificial lakes, reservoirs or ponds with any number of islands. This surface impoundment model consists of two sub-models: hydrodynamic and pollutant transport models. Both submodels are simulated by the finite element method. While the hydrodynamic model is solved by the standard Galerkin finite element scheme, the pollutant transport model can be solved by any of the twelve optional finite element schemes built in the program. Theoretical approximations and the numerical algorithm of SIMFE are described. Detail instruction of the application are given and listing of FORTRAN IV source program are provided. Two sample problems are given. One is for an idealized system with a known solution to show the accuracy and partial validation of the models. The other is applied to Prairie Island for a set of hypothetical input data, typifying a class of problems to which SIMFE may be applied.

  1. A Poisson random field model of pathogen transport in surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghiazarian, L.; Samorodnitsky, G.; Montemagno, C. D.

    2009-11-01

    To address the uncertainty associated with microbial transport and surface water contamination events, we developed a new comprehensive stochastic framework that combines processes on the microscopic (single microorganism) and macroscopic (ensembles of microorganisms) scales. The spatial and temporal population behavior is modeled as a nonhomogeneous Poisson random field with Markovian field dynamics. The model parameters are based on the actual physical and biological characteristics of the Cryptosporidium parvum transport process and can be extended to cover a variety of other pathogens. Since soil particles have been shown to be a major vehicle in microbial transport, a U.S. Department of Agriculture approved erosion model (Water Erosion Prediction Project) is incorporated into the model. Risk assessment is an integral part of the stochastic model and is conducted using a set of simple calculations. Poisson intensity functions and correlations are computed. The results consistently indicate that surface water contamination events are transient, with traveling high peaks of microorganism concentrations. Correlations between microorganism populations at different points in time and space reach relatively significant levels even at large distances from one another. This information is aimed to assist water resources management teams in the decision-making process to identify the likely timing and locations of high-risk areas and thus to avoid collection of contaminated water.

  2. Strong suppression of near-surface thermal transport by metal-assisted chemical etching of Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feser, Joseph; Cahill, David

    2013-03-01

    Recently, we reported that the thermal conductivity of Si nanowire arrays roughened by metal-assisted chemical etching (MAC-etch) is strongly correlated to both the magnitude of the roughness and a broadening of the one-phonon Raman linewidth. We hypothesized that microstructural disorder induced by the etching chemistry leads to changes in the Raman linewidth and reduced thermal conductivity. Here, we simplify the study of such effects by chemically roughening Si wafers instead of nanowires. We have studied the effects of various roughening procedures on the near-surface thermal transport properties using time-domain thermoreflectance. We find that the thermal conductance of the near-surface region is systematically reduced by the MAC-etch process, despite the expectation that pristine roughened surfaces should have increased conductance due to enhanced surface area. In addition, highly roughened surfaces show strong picosecond acoustic echoes with reflection coefficient indicative of a soft interface. These features are consistent with the presence of strong disorder or nanoporosity in the near-surface region created by the MAC-etch process.

  3. Preliminary Assessment of Mercury Atmosphere-Surface Exchange Parameterizations for Incorporation into Chemical Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, T.; Agnan, Y.; Obrist, D.; Selin, N. E.; Urban, N. R.; Wu, S.; Perlinger, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Inadequate representation of process-based mechanisms of exchange behavior of elemental mercury (Hg0) and decoupled treatment of deposition and emission are two major limitations of parameterizations of atmosphere-surface exchange flux commonly incorporated into chemical transport models (CTMs). Of nineteen CTMs for Hg0 exchange we reviewed (ten global, nine regional), eight global and seven regional models have decoupled treatment of Hg0 deposition and emission, two global models include no parameterization to account for emission, and the remaining two regional models include coupled deposition and emission parameterizations (i.e., net atmosphere-surface exchange). The performance of atmosphere-surface exchange parameterizations in CTMs depends on parameterization uncertainty (in terms of both accuracy and precision) and feasibility of implementation. We provide a comparison of the performance of three available parameterizations of net atmosphere-surface exchange. To evaluate parameterization accuracy, we compare predicted exchange fluxes to field measurements conducted over a variety of surfaces compiled in a recently developed global database of terrestrial Hg0 surface-atmosphere exchange flux measurements. To assess precision, we estimate the sensitivity of predicted fluxes to the imprecision in parameter input values, and compare this sensitivity to that derived from analysis of the global Hg0 flux database. Feasibility of implementation is evaluated according to the availability of input parameters, computational requirements, and the adequacy of uncertainty representation. Based on this assessment, we provide suggestions for improved treatment of Hg0 net exchange processes in CTMs.

  4. Stretch-induced changes in geometry and ultrastructure of transporting surfaces of toad bladder.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, E; Walser, M

    1971-12-01

    Methods were developed for estimation of the area of the microscopic and ultramicroscopic surface of the toad bladder epithelium at various degrees of stretch. Bladder sacs fixed while containing 2.5, 5, 25 or 50 ml of mucosal fluid were studied. For a perfect, hollow elastic sphere, this range of volume corresponds to a sevenfold range of surface area. In the bladder, this increase could be achieved by unfolding of surface irregularities, with no change in surface area, or by stretching the epithelial membrane. The measured microscopic surface area increased threeinstead of sevenfold, but the ultramicroscopic surface remained constant. Thus the bladder stretches (1) by unfolding of the mucosal epithelium, and (2) by flattening of the microvilli. From measurements of the apparent thickness of the mucosal epithelium alone and of the entire bladder, we conclude that the former behaves like a flexible inelastic sheet, whereas the submucosa and serosa stretch elastically. Lateral intercellular spaces do not widen with stretch, but they do become more convoluted because of thinning of the epithelium. Thinning is unlikely to explain the increased sodium transport which follows stretching, because cytoplasmic resistance cannot approach total transepithelial resistance of this preparation. PMID:24174226

  5. Selective, Spontaneous One-Way Oil-Transport Fabrics and Their Novel Use for Gauging Liquid Surface Tension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Zhou, Hua; Yang, Weidong; Zhao, Yan; Fang, Jian; Lin, Tong

    2015-10-21

    Thin porous materials that can spontaneously transport oil fluids just in a single direction have great potential for making energy-saving functional membranes. However, there is little data for the preparation and functionalities of this smart material. Here, we report a novel method to prepare one-way oil-transport fabrics and their application in detecting liquid surface tension. This functional fabric was prepared by a two-step coating process to apply flowerlike ZnO nanorods, fluorinated decyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes, and hydrolyzed fluorinated alkylsilane on a fabric substrate. Upon one-sided UV irradiation, the coated fabric shows a one-way transport feature that allows oil fluid transport automatically from the unirradiated side to the UV-irradiated surface, but it stops fluid transport in the opposite direction. The fabric still maintains high superhydrophobicity after UV treatment. The one-way fluid transport takes place only for the oil fluids with a specific surface tension value, and the fluid selectivity is dependent on the UV treatment time. Changing the UV irradiation time from 6 to 30 h broadened the one-way transport for fluids with surface tension from around 22.3 mN/m to a range of 22.3-56.7 mN/m. We further proved that this selective one-way oil transport can be used to estimate the surface tension of a liquid simply by observing its transport feature on a series of fabrics with different one-way oil-transport selectivities. To our knowledge, this is the first example to use one-way fluid-transport materials for testing the liquid surface tension. It may open up further theoretical studies and the development of novel fluid sensors. PMID:26422530

  6. Selective, Spontaneous One-Way Oil-Transport Fabrics and Their Novel Use for Gauging Liquid Surface Tension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxia; Zhou, Hua; Yang, Weidong; Zhao, Yan; Fang, Jian; Lin, Tong

    2015-10-21

    Thin porous materials that can spontaneously transport oil fluids just in a single direction have great potential for making energy-saving functional membranes. However, there is little data for the preparation and functionalities of this smart material. Here, we report a novel method to prepare one-way oil-transport fabrics and their application in detecting liquid surface tension. This functional fabric was prepared by a two-step coating process to apply flowerlike ZnO nanorods, fluorinated decyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes, and hydrolyzed fluorinated alkylsilane on a fabric substrate. Upon one-sided UV irradiation, the coated fabric shows a one-way transport feature that allows oil fluid transport automatically from the unirradiated side to the UV-irradiated surface, but it stops fluid transport in the opposite direction. The fabric still maintains high superhydrophobicity after UV treatment. The one-way fluid transport takes place only for the oil fluids with a specific surface tension value, and the fluid selectivity is dependent on the UV treatment time. Changing the UV irradiation time from 6 to 30 h broadened the one-way transport for fluids with surface tension from around 22.3 mN/m to a range of 22.3-56.7 mN/m. We further proved that this selective one-way oil transport can be used to estimate the surface tension of a liquid simply by observing its transport feature on a series of fabrics with different one-way oil-transport selectivities. To our knowledge, this is the first example to use one-way fluid-transport materials for testing the liquid surface tension. It may open up further theoretical studies and the development of novel fluid sensors.

  7. A biophysical glance at the outer surface of the membrane transporter SGLT1.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Navneet K; Puntheeranurak, Theeraporn; Raja, Mobeen; Kumar, Azad; Wimmer, Barbara; Neundlinger, Isabel; Gruber, Hermann; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Kinne, Rolf K H

    2011-01-01

    Proteins mediating the transport of solutes across the cell membrane control the intracellular conditions in which life can occur. Because of the particular arrangement of spanning a lipid bilayer and the many conformations required for their function, transport proteins pose significant obstacles for the investigation of their structure-function relation. Crystallographic studies, if available, define the transmembrane segments in a "frozen" state and do not provide information on the dynamics of the extramembranous loops, which are similarly evolutionary conserved and thus as functionally important as the other parts of the protein. The current review presents biophysical methods that can shed light on the dynamics of transporters in the membrane. The techniques that are presented in some detail are single-molecule recognition atomic force microscopy and tryptophan scanning, which can report on the positioning of the loops and on conformational changes at the outer surface. Studies on a variety of symporters are discussed, which use gradients of sodium or protons as energy source to translocate (mainly organic) solutes against their concentration gradients into or out of the cells. Primarily, investigations of the sodium-glucose cotransporter SGLT1 are used as examples for this biophysical approach to understand transporter function. PMID:20692230

  8. The effects of surface aging on nanoparticle fate and transport in natural and engineered porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittelman, Anjuliee M.

    Nanomaterials will be subjected to various surface transformations in the environment and within water and wastewater treatment systems. A comprehensive understanding of the fate and transport behavior of "aged" nanomaterials in both natural and engineered porous media is required in order to accurately quantify ecological and human health risks. This research sought to (1) evaluate the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light aging on nanoparticle transport in water-saturated porous media; and (2) assess the effects of influent water quality on silver nanoparticle retention and dissolution in ceramic water filters. Additionally, the value of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) data in nanoparticle fate and transport studies was evaluated by comparing deposition behavior in complementary QCM-D and sand columns experiments. Silver (nAg) and iron oxide nanoparticles exposed to UV light were up to 50% more strongly retained in porous media compared with freshly prepared suspensions due to less negative surface charge and larger aggregate sizes. UV-aged nAg were more prone to dissolution in sand columns, resulting in effluent Ag+ concentrations as high as 1.2 mg/L. In ceramic water filters, dissolution and cation exchange processes controlled silver release into treated water. The use of acidic, high salinity, or high hardness water accelerated oxidative dissolution of the silver coating and resulted in effluent silver concentrations 5-10 times above international drinking water guidelines. Results support the recommendation for a regular filter replacement or silver re-application schedule to ensure ongoing efficacy. Taken in concert, these research findings suggest that oxidative aging of nanomaterial surfaces (either through exposure to UV light or aggressive water chemistries) will alter the fate of nanomaterials in the environment and may decrease the effective lifetime of devices which utilize nanotechnology. Corresponding QCM-D and column experiments revealed that

  9. The Influence of the Sensible Heat of Rain and Subsurface Heat Transport on the Energy Balance at the Land Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollet, S.; Cvijanovic, I.; Schüttemeyer, D.; Maxwell, R. M.; Moene, A. F.; Bayer, P.

    2009-04-01

    In land many surface models, which account for the energy balance at the land surface, subsurface heat transport is an important component that reciprocally influences ground, sensible and latent heat fluxes, and net radiation. The applied subsurface heat transport parameterizations are commonly simplified for computational efficiency. A major simplification is the disregard of the sensible heat of rain and convective subsurface heat flow, i.e. the transport of heat through moisture redistribution, which basically decouples heat transport from moisture transport at the land surface and in the subsurface. In the presented analysis, the influence of sensible heat of rain and convection on the energy balance is studied using a coupled model that integrates a subsurface moisture and energy transport model with a land surface model. It is shown that all components of the land surface energy balance depend on the sensible heat of rain. The strength of the dependence is related to the rain rate, and the temperature difference between the rain water and the soil surface. The rain water temperature is a parameter rarely measured in the field that introduces uncertainty in the calculations and is approximated using the either the air or wet bulb temperatures in different simulations. In addition it is shown that the lower boundary condition for closing the problem of subsurface heat transport has strong implications on the energy balance under dynamic equilibrium conditions. Comparison with measured data from the Meteostation Haarweg, Wageningen, The Netherlands, shows good agreement and suggests the usefulness of the proposed approach.

  10. Lagrangian transport for two-dimensional deep-water surface gravity wave groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bremer, T. S.; Taylor, P. H.

    2016-08-01

    The Lagrangian trajectories of neutrally buoyant particles underneath surface gravity wave groups are dictated by two physical phenomena: the Stokes drift results in a net displacement of particles in the direction of propagation of the group, whereas the Eulerian return flow, as described by the multi-chromatic wave theory of Longuet-Higgins & Stewart (1962 J. Fluid Mech. 13, 481-504. (doi:10.1017/S0022112062000877)), transports such particles in the opposite direction. By pursuing a separation of scales expansion, we develop simple closed-form expressions for the net Lagrangian displacement of particles. By comparing the results from the separation of scales expansion at different orders in bandwidth, we study the effect of frequency dispersion on the local Lagrangian transport, which we show can be ignored for realistic sea states.

  11. Reduced core transport in T-10 and TEXTOR discharges at rational surfaces with low magnetic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razumova, K. A.; Donné, A. J. H.; Andreev, V. F.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Bel'bas, I. S.; Borschegovskij, A. A.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Chistyakov, V. V.; Jaspers, R.; Kislov, A. Ya.; I'lin, V. I.; Krupin, D. A.; Krylov, S. V.; Kravtsov, D. E.; Liang, Y.; Lysenko, S. E.; Maslov, M. V.; Min, E.; Myalton, T. B.; Notkin, G. E.; Ossipenko, M. V.; Piterskij, V. V.; Petrov, D. P.; Roi, I. N.; Ryzhakov, D. V.; Shelukhin, D. A.; Sushkov, A. V.; Trukhin, V. M.; Vershkov, V. A.; Westerhof, E.; T-10 Team; TEXTOR Team

    2004-10-01

    It has been observed in the T-10 tokamak that immediately after off-axis electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) switch-off, the core electron temperature stays constant for some time, which can be as long as several tens of milliseconds, i.e. several energy confinement times (tgrE), before it starts to decrease. Whether or not the effect is observed depends critically on the local magnetic shear in the vicinity of the q = 1 rational surface, which should be close to zero. It is hypothesized that a small shear can induce the formation of an internal transport barrier. Measurements of density fluctuations in the transport barrier with a correlation reflectometer show immediately after the ECRH switch-off a clear reduction in the fluctuation level, corroborating the above results. The delayed temperature decrease has also been observed in similar discharges in the TEXTOR tokamak; however, the delay is restricted to ~ 1 × tgrE.

  12. Systematic study of transport via surface and bulk states in Bi2Te3 topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Castro, S.; Peres, M. L.; Chitta, V. A.; Gratens, X.; Soares, D. A. W.; Fornari, C. I.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Abramof, E.; Oliveira, N. F., Jr.

    2016-07-01

    We performed magnetoresistance measurements on Bi2Te3 thin film in the temperature range of T = 1.2-4.0 K and for magnetic fields up to 2 T. The curves exhibited anomalous behavior for temperatures below 4.0 K. Different temperature intervals revealed electrical transport through different conductive channels with clear signatures of weak antilocalization. The magnetoresistance curves were explained using the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka model and the 2D Dirac modified model. The comparison between the parameters obtained from the two models revealed the transport via topological surface states and bulk states. In addition, a superconductive like transition is observed for the lowest temperatures and we suggest that this effect can be originated from the misfit dislocations caused by strain, giving rise to a superconductive channel between the interface of the film and the substrate.

  13. Predicting the sun's polar magnetic fields with a surface flux transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H. E-mail: lar0009@uah.edu

    2014-01-01

    The Sun's polar magnetic fields are directly related to solar cycle variability. The strength of the polar fields at the start (minimum) of a cycle determine the subsequent amplitude of that cycle. In addition, the polar field reversals at cycle maximum alter the propagation of galactic cosmic rays throughout the heliosphere in fundamental ways. We describe a surface magnetic flux transport model that advects the magnetic flux emerging in active regions (sunspots) using detailed observations of the near-surface flows that transport the magnetic elements. These flows include the axisymmetric differential rotation and meridional flow and the non-axisymmetric cellular convective flows (supergranules), all of which vary in time in the model as indicated by direct observations. We use this model with data assimilated from full-disk magnetograms to produce full surface maps of the Sun's magnetic field at 15 minute intervals from 1996 May to 2013 July (all of sunspot cycle 23 and the rise to maximum of cycle 24). We tested the predictability of this model using these maps as initial conditions, but with daily sunspot area data used to give the sources of new magnetic flux. We find that the strength of the polar fields at cycle minimum and the polar field reversals at cycle maximum can be reliably predicted up to 3 yr in advance. We include a prediction for the cycle 24 polar field reversal.

  14. Rayleigh surface waves, phonon mode conversion, and thermal transport in nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Leon; Knezevic, Irena

    We study the effects of phonon mode conversion and Rayleigh (surface) waves on thermal transport in nanostructures. We present a technique to calculate thermal conductivity in the elastic-solid approximation: a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solution of the elastic or scalar wave equations combined with the Green-Kubo formula. The technique is similar to an equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, captures phonon wave behavior, and scales well to nanostructures that are too large to simulate with many other techniques. By imposing fixed or free boundary conditions, we can selectively turn off mode conversion and Rayleigh waves to study their effects. In the example case of graphenelike nanoribbons with rough edges, we find that mode conversion among bulk modes has little effect on thermal transport, but that conversion between bulk and Rayleigh waves can significantly reduce thermal conductivity. With increasing surface disorder, Rayleigh waves readily become trapped by the disorder and draw energy away from the propagating bulk modes, which lowers thermal conductivity. We discuss the implications on the accuracy of popular phonon-surface scattering models that stem from scalar wave equations and cannot capture mode conversion to Rayleigh waves.

  15. A propagating ATPase gradient drives transport of surface-confined cellular cargo

    PubMed Central

    Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.; Neuman, Keir C.; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The faithful segregation of duplicated genetic material into daughter cells is critical to all organisms. In many bacteria, the segregation of chromosomes involves transport of “centromere-like” loci over the main body of the chromosome, the nucleoid, mediated by a two-protein partition system: a nonspecific DNA-binding ATPase, ParA, and an ATPase stimulator, ParB, which binds to the centromere-like loci. These systems have previously been proposed to function through a filament-based mechanism, analogous to actin- or microtubule-based movement. Here, we reconstituted the F-plasmid partition system using a DNA-carpeted flow cell as an artificial nucleoid surface and magnetic beads coated with plasmid partition complexes as surface-confined cargo. This minimal system recapitulated directed cargo motion driven by a surface ATPase gradient that propagated with the cargo. The dynamics are consistent with a diffusion-ratchet model, whereby the cargo dynamically establishes, and interacts with, a concentration gradient of the ATPase. A chemophoresis force ensues as the cargo perpetually chases the ATPase gradient, allowing the cargo to essentially “surf” the nucleoid on a continuously traveling wave of the ATPase. Demonstration of this non–filament-based motility mechanism in a biological context establishes a distinct class of motor system used for the transport and positioning of large cellular cargo. PMID:24567408

  16. What Supergranule Flow Models Tell Us About the Sun's Surface Shear Layer and Magnetic Flux Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David

    2011-01-01

    Models of the photospheric flows due to supergranulation are generated using an evolving spectrum of vector spherical harmonics up to spherical harmonic wavenumber l1500. Doppler velocity data generated from these models are compared to direct Doppler observations from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI. The models are adjusted to match the observed spatial power spectrum as well as the wavenumber dependence of the cell lifetimes, differential rotation velocities, meridional flow velocities, and relative strength of radial vs. horizontal flows. The equatorial rotation rate as a function of wavelength matches the rotation rate as a function of depth as determined by global helioseismology. This leads to the conclusions that the cellular structures are anchored at depths equal to their widths, that the surface shear layer extends to at least 70 degrees latitude, and that the poleward meridional flow decreases in amplitude and reverses direction at the base of the surface shear layer (approx.35 Mm below the surface). Using the modeled flows to passively transport magnetic flux indicates that the observed differential rotation and meridional flow of the magnetic elements are directly related to the differential rotation and meridional flow of the convective pattern itself. The magnetic elements are transported by the evolving boundaries of the supergranule pattern (where the convective flows converge) and are unaffected by the weaker flows associated with the differential rotation or meridional flow of the photospheric plasma.

  17. Impact of microforms on nitrate transport at the groundwater-surface water interface in gaining streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haizhu; Binley, Andrew; Heppell, Catherine M.; Lansdown, Katrina; Mao, Xiaomin

    2014-11-01

    Small streambed structures (or microforms, 0.01-1 m in length) exist ubiquitously in riverbed systems. Small-scale topography is potentially important in controlling hyporheic exchange flow and transport of conservative and reactive solutes at the groundwater-surface water interface. The role of microforms on NO3- transfer in a riffle-scale (macroforms of >1 m length) hyporheic zone within a gaining river setting is investigated using a 2-D flow and transport model which accounts for both nitrification and denitrification. Results show that the short pathlines caused by microforms lead to more NO3- discharge to the river compared with a macroform-only condition due to shortened residence times of both surface water and groundwater in mixing zones. Short hyporheic exchange flow pathways caused by microforms could remain oxic along their entire length or switch from nitrate producing to nitrate consuming as oxygen concentrations decline. Microforms affect net NO3- flux by the combined effect of introducing more stream mass flux and reducing their residence time in mixing zones under different hydrological and biogeochemical conditions. Our findings underscore that ignoring microforms in river beds may underestimate NO3- load to the river and have practical implications for pore water sampling strategies in groundwater-surface water studies.

  18. Importance of 3D Processes Near the Ocean's Surface for Material Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    There are a number of practical problems that demand an accurate knowledge of ocean currents near the surface of the ocean. It is known that oceanic coherent features transport heat and carry out vertical exchange of biogeochemical tracers. Ocean currents can affect biological primary production, air-sea gas exchanges and global tracer budgets. Ocean currents are also important for the dispersion of substances that pose a danger to society, economy and human health. Examples of such events include algal blooms, the Fukushima nuclear plant incident in the Pacific Ocean in 2011, and repeated large oil spills in the Gulf of Mexico, namely the IXTOC in 1978 and the Deepwater Horizon event in 2010. Such incidents demand accurate answers to questions such as ``where will the pollutant go?", ``how fast will it get there?" and ``how much pollutant will arrive there?", and in some instances ``where did the pollutant come from?". The answers to these questions are critical to the allocation of limited response resources, and in determining the overall impact of the events. We will summarize the efforts by the Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE). One of the primary objectives of CARTHE is to improve predictive modeling capability for flows near the air-sea interface. In particular, two large experiments, Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD) and Surf-zone and Coastal Oil Pathways Experiment (SCOPE), coordinated with real-time modeling were instructive on processes influencing near-surface material transport. Findings on submesoscale flows as well as model deficiencies to capture processes relevant to transport will be discussed. Insight into future modeling and observational plans will be provided.

  19. The actions of the European Space Agency to prepare for future space transportation systems - The FESTIP programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Heinrich A.

    1992-12-01

    The Future European Space Transportation Investigations Program (FESTIP) has been entrusted with the conceptual development and evaluation of such techniques and technologies relevant to next-generation launch vehicle configurations as CFD for severe aerothermodynamics, refractory materials and structures, advanced rocket and airbreathing propulsion, and subsystem designs. The FESTIP reference configurational concepts encompass a two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) reusable rocket, a TSTO airbreathing/rocket hybrid, a reusable SSTO dual-cycle engined craft such as NASA's NASP, and a reusable SSTO rocket.

  20. A Modular, Reusable Latch and Decking System for Securing Payloads During Launch and Planetary Surface Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.; Dorsey, John T.; Jones, Thomas C.; King, Bruce D.; Mikulas, Martin M.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient handling of payloads destined for a planetary surface, such as the moon or Mars, requires robust systems to secure the payloads during transport on the ground, in-space and on the planetary surface. In addition, mechanisms to release the payloads need to be reliable to ensure successful transfer from one vehicle to another. An efficient payload handling strategy must also consider the devices available to support payload handling. Cranes used for overhead lifting are common to all phases of payload handling on Earth. Similarly, both recent and past studies have demonstrated that devices with comparable functionality will be needed to support lunar outpost operations. A first generation test-bed of a new high performance device that provides the capabilities of both a crane and a robotic manipulator, the Lunar Surface Manipulation System (LSMS), has been designed, built and field tested and is available for use in evaluating a system to secure payloads to transportation vehicles. National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton Va 23662 A payload handling approach must address all phases of payload management including: ground transportation, launch, planetary transfer and installation in the final system. In addition, storage may be required during any phase of operations. Each of these phases requires the payload to be lifted and secured to a vehicle, transported, released and lifted in preparation for the next transportation or storage phase. A critical component of a successful payload handling approach is a latch and associated carrier system. The latch and carrier system should minimize requirements on the: payload, carrier support structure and payload handling devices as well as be able to accommodate a wide range of payload sizes. In addition, the latch should; be small and lightweight, support a method to apply preload, be reusable, integrate into a minimal set of hard-points and have manual interfaces to actuate the latch should a problem occur. A

  1. A Modular, Reusable Latch and Decking System for Securing Payloads During Launch and Planetary Surface Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.; Dorsey, John T.; Jones, Thomas C.; King, Bruce D.; Mikulas, Martin M.

    2011-01-01

    Efficient handling of payloads destined for a planetary surface, such as the moon or mars, requires robust systems to secure the payloads during transport on the ground, in space and on the planetary surface. In addition, mechanisms to release the payloads need to be reliable to ensure successful transfer from one vehicle to another. An efficient payload handling strategy must also consider the devices available to support payload handling. Cranes used for overhead lifting are common to all phases of payload handling on Earth. Similarly, both recent and past studies have demonstrated that devices with comparable functionality will be needed to support lunar outpost operations. A first generation test-bed of a new high performance device that provides the capabilities of both a crane and a robotic manipulator, the Lunar Surface Manipulation System (LSMS), has been designed, built and field tested and is available for use in evaluating a system to secure payloads to transportation vehicles. A payload handling approach must address all phases of payload management including: ground transportation, launch, planetary transfer and installation in the final system. In addition, storage may be required during any phase of operations. Each of these phases requires the payload to be lifted and secured to a vehicle, transported, released and lifted in preparation for the next transportation or storage phase. A critical component of a successful payload handling approach is a latch and associated carrier system. The latch and carrier system should minimize requirements on the: payload, carrier support structure and payload handling devices as well as be able to accommodate a wide range of payload sizes. In addition, the latch should; be small and lightweight, support a method to apply preload, be reusable, integrate into a minimal set of hard-points and have manual interfaces to actuate the latch should a problem occur. A latching system which meets these requirements has been

  2. High-Speed Transport of Fluid Drops and Solid Particles via Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Lih, Shyh-shiuh

    2012-01-01

    A compact sampling tool mechanism that can operate at various temperatures, and transport and sieve particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains with no moving parts, has been created using traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs) that are emitted by an inter-digital transducer (IDT). The generated waves are driven at about 10 MHz, and it causes powder to move towards the IDT at high speed with different speeds for different sizes of particles, which enables these particles to be sieved. This design is based on the use of SAWs and their propelling effect on powder particles and fluids along the path of the waves. Generally, SAWs are elastic waves propagating in a shallow layer of about one wavelength beneath the surface of a solid substrate. To generate SAWs, a piezoelectric plate is used that is made of LiNbO3 crystal cut along the x-axis with rotation of 127.8 along the y-axis. On this plate are printed pairs of fingerlike electrodes in the form of a grating that are activated by subjecting the gap between the electrodes to electric field. This configuration of a surface wave transmitter is called IDT. The IDT that was used consists of 20 pairs of fingers with 0.4-mm spacing, a total length of 12.5 mm. The surface wave is produced by the nature of piezoelectric material to contract or expand when subjected to an electric field. Driving the IDT to generate wave at high amplitudes provides an actuation mechanism where the surface particles move elliptically, pulling powder particles on the surface toward the wavesource and pushing liquids in the opposite direction. This behavior allows the innovation to separate large particles and fluids that are mixed. Fluids are removed at speed (7.5 to 15 cm/s), enabling this innovation of acting as a bladeless wiper for raindrops. For the windshield design, the electrodes could be made transparent so that they do not disturb the driver or pilot. Multiple IDTs can be synchronized to transport water or powder over larger

  3. Rainfall intensity and phosphorus source effects on phosphorus transport in surface runoff from soil trays.

    PubMed

    Shigaki, Francirose; Sharpley, Andrew; Prochnow, Luis Ignacio

    2007-02-01

    Phosphorus runoff from agricultural fields amended with mineral fertilizers and manures has been linked to freshwater eutrophication. A rainfall simulation study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different rainfall intensities and P sources differing in water soluble P (WSP) concentration on P transport in runoff from soil trays packed with a Berks loam and grassed with annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.). Triple superphosphate (TSP; 79% WSP), low-grade super single phosphate (LGSSP; 50% WSP), North Carolina rock phosphate (NCRP; 0.5% WSP) and swine manure (SM; 70% WSP), were broadcast (100 kg total P ha-1) and rainfall applied at 25, 50 and 75 mm h-1 1, 7, 21, and 56 days after P source application. The concentration of dissolved reactive (DRP), particulate (PP), and total P (TP) was significantly (P<0.01) greater in runoff with a rainfall intensity of 75 than 25 mm h-1 for all P sources. Further, runoff DRP increased as P source WSP increased, with runoff from a 50 mm h-1 rain 1 day after source application having a DRP concentration of 0.25 mg L-1 for NCRP and 28.21 mg L-1 for TSP. In contrast, the proportion of runoff TP as PP was greater with low (39% PP for NCRP) than high WSP sources (4% PP for TSP) averaged for all rainfall intensities. The increased PP transport is attributed to the detachment and transport of undissolved P source particles during runoff. These results show that P source water solubility and rainfall intensity can influence P transport in runoff, which is important in evaluating the long-term risks of P source application on P transport in surface runoff.

  4. Zeeman effect on surface electron transport in topological insulator Bi2Se3 nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Xian; Yan, Yuan; Zhang, Liang; Liao, Zhi-Min; Wu, Han-Chun; Yu, Da-Peng

    2015-10-28

    Topological insulators have exotic surface states that are massless Dirac fermions, manifesting special magnetotransport properties, such as the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, and weak antilocalization effects. In the surface Dirac cone, the band structures are typically closely related to the p-orbitals and possess helical orbital texture. Here we report on the tunability of the transport properties via the interaction between the magnetic field and the spin-orbital angular momentum of the surface states in individual Bi2Se3 nanoribbons. Because the surface states have a large Landé factor and helical spin-orbital texture, the in-plane magnetic field induced Zeeman energy will result in the deformation of the Dirac cone, which gives rise to spin polarization of the surface states. The spin-dependent scattering of the conducting electrons on the existing local magnetic moments produces a giant negative magnetoresistance. The negative magnetoresistance is robust with a ratio of -20% at 2 K and -0.5% at 300 K under 14 T. The results are valuable for possible orbital-electronics based on topological insulators. PMID:26400635

  5. Transport processes induced by metastable boiling water under Martian surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massé, M.; Conway, S. J.; Gargani, J.; Patel, M. R.; Pasquon, K.; McEwen, A.; Carpy, S.; Chevrier, V.; Balme, M. R.; Ojha, L.; Vincendon, M.; Poulet, F.; Costard, F.; Jouannic, G.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid water may exist on the Martian surface today, albeit transiently and in a metastable state under the low atmospheric surface pressure. However, the identification of liquid water on Mars from observed morphological changes is hampered by our limited understanding of how metastable liquids interact with sediments. Here, we present lab experiments in which a block of ice melts and seeps into underlying sediment, and the resulting downslope fluid propagation and sediment transport are tracked. In experiments at Martian surface pressure, we find that pure water boils as it percolates into the sediment, inducing grain saltation and leading to wholesale slope destabilization: a hybrid flow mechanism involving both wet and dry processes. For metastable brines, which are more stable under Martian conditions than pure water, saltation intensity and geomorphological impact are reduced; however, we observed channel formation in some briny flow experiments that may be analogous to morphologies observed on Mars. In contrast, under terrestrial-like experimental conditions, there is little morphological impact of seeping water or brine, which are both stable. We propose that the hybrid flow mechanism operating in our experiments under Martian surface pressure could explain observed Martian surface changes that were originally interpreted as the products of either dry or wet processes.

  6. Zeeman effect on surface electron transport in topological insulator Bi2Se3 nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Xian; Yan, Yuan; Zhang, Liang; Liao, Zhi-Min; Wu, Han-Chun; Yu, Da-Peng

    2015-10-28

    Topological insulators have exotic surface states that are massless Dirac fermions, manifesting special magnetotransport properties, such as the Aharonov-Bohm effect, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations, and weak antilocalization effects. In the surface Dirac cone, the band structures are typically closely related to the p-orbitals and possess helical orbital texture. Here we report on the tunability of the transport properties via the interaction between the magnetic field and the spin-orbital angular momentum of the surface states in individual Bi2Se3 nanoribbons. Because the surface states have a large Landé factor and helical spin-orbital texture, the in-plane magnetic field induced Zeeman energy will result in the deformation of the Dirac cone, which gives rise to spin polarization of the surface states. The spin-dependent scattering of the conducting electrons on the existing local magnetic moments produces a giant negative magnetoresistance. The negative magnetoresistance is robust with a ratio of -20% at 2 K and -0.5% at 300 K under 14 T. The results are valuable for possible orbital-electronics based on topological insulators.

  7. Atmospheric transport and deposition, an additional input pathway for triazine herbicides to surface waters

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, D.C.G.; Rawn, D.F.

    1996-10-01

    Although surface runoff from treated fields is regarded as the major route of entry of triazine herbicides to surface waters, other pathways such as deposition via precipitation, gas absorption and dryfall may also be important. Triazine herbicides have been detected in precipitation but there has been only a very limited amount of work on gas phase and aerosols. To examine the importance of atmospheric inputs concentrations of atrazine, cyanazine and terbuthylazine in gas phase/aerosols, precipitation, and surface waters were determined (along with other herbicides) using selected ion GC-MS. Atrazine was detected at low ng/L concentrations in surface waters (<0.04-5.3 ng/L) and precipitation (0.1-53 ng/L), and at 0.02-0.1 ng/m{sup 3} in air. Cyanazine and terbuthylazine were detected in air and infrequently in water. Highest atrazine concentrations in air were found during June each year on both gas phase and particles. Concentrations of atrazine in surface waters at both locations increased during June, even in the absence of precipitation or overland flow, presumably due to inputs from dryfall and to gas areas and boreal forest lakes due to transport and deposition. Ecological risk assessment of triazines, especially for pristine aquatic environments should include consideration of this atmospheric pathway.

  8. Quasi-optical electron transport across a magnetically induced junction on a topological insulator surface

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Xiaopeng; Li, Xiaodong; Semenov, Yuriy G.; Kim, Ki Wook

    2014-12-14

    Quasi-optical Dirac electron transport is theoretically analyzed at the magnetic boundaries on a topological insulator (TI) surface. The electronic band mismatch induced by the spatially varying magnetization profile can form an effective junction akin to the electrostatic potential step. The transmission/reflection characteristics show a direct dependence on electron energy and incident angle with highly asymmetric patterns. The investigation also illustrates a nontrivial anomalous Hall current along the boundary which is further shown by a numerical simulation based on the finite-difference time-domain method. The results provide key design guidelines for prospective quasi-optical devices based on the TI-magnet heterostructures.

  9. Preliminary economic evaluation of the use of graphite composite materials in surface transportation, phase 1 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Composite materials are discussed with emphasis on the identification of the characteristics of those materials that make them attractive for use in surface transportation. Potential uses of graphite composites are given including automotive applications and the effects of materials substitution on vehicle characteristics and performance. Preliminary estimates of the economic effects of the use of graphite composite materials on vehicle manufacturers and consumers are included. The combined impact on the national economy of vehicle design changes to meet mandated fuel efficiency requirements and the extensive use of graphite composite materials in the automotive industry is considered.

  10. Accumulation and transport of Cd, Cu, and Pb in an estuarine salt marsh surface microlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Lion, L.W.; Leckie, J.O.

    1982-01-01

    Dissolved and particulate Cd, Cu, and Pb were measured in bulk solution and surface microlayer samples from an intertidal salt marsh in south San Francisco Bay. The phase distribution (dissolved vs. particulate) of metals was consistent with their calculated speciation in computer-simulated sea-salt matrices. Trace metal enrichment at the microlayer corresponded with physical events at the sample site. Advective exchange of Cd, Cu, and Pb between the estuary and marsh systems was dominated by transport of bulk suspended particulate metals, with an apparent net export from the marsh to the bay.

  11. Transport and distribution of bacteria and diatoms in the aqueous surface micro-layer of a salt marsh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, Ronald W.; Lion, Leonard W.; Young, Lily Y.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of tide and wind upon the distribution and transport of bacteria and diatoms in the aqueous surface microlayers of a Massachusetts and San Francisco Bay salt marsh were examined. The compression of the surface films by both tide and wind resulted in significant enrichments of bacterioneuston. At the San Francisco Bay site, significant numbers of diatoms were transported within the microlayer over a tidal cycle.

  12. Virtual laboratory for the study of transport processes in surface waterflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, C.; Egüen, M.; Contreras, E.; Polo, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    The equations involved in the study of transport processes depend on the spatial and temporal scale of the study and according to the required level of detail can become very difficult to solve analytically. Besides, experimentation of processes with any transport phenomena involved is complex due to their natural or forced occurrence in the environment (eg. Rainfall-runoff, sediment yield, controlled and uncontrolled pollutant loadings, etc.) and the great diversity of substances and components with an specific chemical behavior. However, due to the numerous fields of application of transport phenomena (basic and applied research, hydrology and associated fluxes, sediment transport, pollutant loadings to water flows, industrial processes, soil and water quality, atmospheric emissions, legislation, etc.), realistic studies of transport processes are required. In this context, case study application, an active methodology according to the structural implications of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA), with the aid of computer tools constitute an interactive, instantaneous and flexible method with a new interplay between students and lecturers. Case studies allow the lecturer to design significant activities that generate knowledge in the students and motivates them to look for information, discuss, and be autonomous. This work presents the development of a graphical interface for the solution of different case studies for the acquisition of capacities and abilities in the autonomous apprenticeship of courses related to transport processes in Environmental Hydraulics. The interactive tool helps to develop and improve abilities in mixing and transport in surface water related courses. Thus, students clarify theoretical concepts and visualize processes with negative effects for the environment and that therefore, can only be reproduced in the laboratory or in the field under very controlled conditions and commonly with tracers instead of the real substances. The

  13. Coupled heat and vapor transport: The thermostat effect of a freely evaporating land surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilagyi, Jozsef; Schepers, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Analytical solutions of the 2-D heat and vapor transport equations for a surface moisture jump are often based on a constant streamwise temperature (Tws) assumption over the wet vegetated surface. By analyzing 90 thermal infrared images taken over center-pivot irrigated areas in Nebraska, it has been demonstrated for the first time that such an assumption is realistic. Average temperature difference between the perimeter and core of the irrigated full or half circles stayed between -0.11 and 0.09°C (standard deviation of 0.25-0.41°C). It was further demonstrated that wet-bulb temperatures (a proxy of Tws) remain near constant during drying of the environment when net radiation and wind conditions stay largely unchanged, enabling estimation of Tws at any stage of drying, thus improving evaporation estimates of the Priestley-Taylor equation in arid and semiarid environments.

  14. A charge transport study in diamond, surface passivated by high-k dielectric oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kovi, Kiran Kumar Majdi, Saman; Gabrysch, Markus; Isberg, Jan

    2014-11-17

    The recent progress in the growth of high-quality single-crystalline diamond films has sparked interest in the realization of efficient diamond power electronic devices. However, finding a suitable passivation is essential to improve the reliability and electrical performance of devices. In the current work, high-k dielectric materials such as aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide were deposited by atomic layer deposition on intrinsic diamond as a surface passivation layer. The hole transport properties in the diamond films were evaluated and compared to unpassivated films using the lateral time-of-flight technique. An enhancement of the near surface hole mobility in diamond films of up to 27% is observed when using aluminum oxide passivation.

  15. Surface flux transport simulations. Inflows towards active regions and the modulation of the solar cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Belda, David; Cameron, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Aims. We investigate the way near-surface converging flows towards active regions affect the build-up of magnetic field at the Sun's polar caps. In the Babcock-Leighton dynamo framework, this modulation of the polar fields could explain the variability of the solar cycle. Methods. We develop a surface flux transport code incorporating a parametrized model of the inflows and run simulations spanning several cycles. We carry out a parameter study to test how the strength and extension of the inflows affect the amplitude of the polar fields. Results. Inflows are seen to play an important role in the build-up of the polar fields, and can act as the non-linearity feedback mechanism required to limit the strength of the solar cycles in the Babcock-Leighton dynamo framework.

  16. Surfactant control of gas transport and reactions at the surface of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Chan; Burden, Daniel K; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2009-02-17

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere are tiny chemical reactors that catalyze numerous reactions, including the conversion of benign gases into ozone-destroying ones. In the lower stratosphere, these particles are often supercooled mixtures of water and sulfuric acid. The different species present at the surface of these droplets (H(2)O, H(3)O(+), HSO(4)(-), H(2)SO(4), and SO(4)(2-)) stand at the "gas-liquid frontier"; as the first to be struck by impinging molecules, these species provide the initial environment for solvation and reaction. Furthermore, aerosol particles may contain a wide range of organic molecules, some of which migrate to the surface and coat the droplet. How do ambient gases dissolve in the droplet if it is coated with an organic layer? At one extreme, monolayer films of insoluble, long-chain alcohols can dramatically reduce gas transport, packing so tightly at the surface of water that they impede water evaporation by factors of 10,000 or more. Shorter chain surfactants are expected to pack less tightly, but we wondered whether these incomplete monolayers also block gas transport and whether this system could serve as a model for understanding the surfaces of atmospheric aerosol particles. To address these questions, our research focuses on small, soluble surfactants such as butanol and hexanol dissolved in supercooled sulfuric acid. These amphiphilic molecules spontaneously segregate to the surface and coat the acid but only to a degree. Gas-liquid scattering experiments reveal that these porous films behave in surprisingly diverse ways: they can impose a barrier (to N(2)O(5) hydrolysis), be "invisible" (to water evaporation), or even enhance gas uptake (of HCl). The transition from obstacle to catalyst can be traced to specific interactions between the surfactant and each gas. For example, the hydrolysis of N(2)O(5) may be impeded because of its large size and because alcohol molecules that straddle the interface limit contact between N(2)O(5

  17. Surfactant control of gas transport and reactions at the surface of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Chan; Burden, Daniel K; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2009-02-17

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere are tiny chemical reactors that catalyze numerous reactions, including the conversion of benign gases into ozone-destroying ones. In the lower stratosphere, these particles are often supercooled mixtures of water and sulfuric acid. The different species present at the surface of these droplets (H(2)O, H(3)O(+), HSO(4)(-), H(2)SO(4), and SO(4)(2-)) stand at the "gas-liquid frontier"; as the first to be struck by impinging molecules, these species provide the initial environment for solvation and reaction. Furthermore, aerosol particles may contain a wide range of organic molecules, some of which migrate to the surface and coat the droplet. How do ambient gases dissolve in the droplet if it is coated with an organic layer? At one extreme, monolayer films of insoluble, long-chain alcohols can dramatically reduce gas transport, packing so tightly at the surface of water that they impede water evaporation by factors of 10,000 or more. Shorter chain surfactants are expected to pack less tightly, but we wondered whether these incomplete monolayers also block gas transport and whether this system could serve as a model for understanding the surfaces of atmospheric aerosol particles. To address these questions, our research focuses on small, soluble surfactants such as butanol and hexanol dissolved in supercooled sulfuric acid. These amphiphilic molecules spontaneously segregate to the surface and coat the acid but only to a degree. Gas-liquid scattering experiments reveal that these porous films behave in surprisingly diverse ways: they can impose a barrier (to N(2)O(5) hydrolysis), be "invisible" (to water evaporation), or even enhance gas uptake (of HCl). The transition from obstacle to catalyst can be traced to specific interactions between the surfactant and each gas. For example, the hydrolysis of N(2)O(5) may be impeded because of its large size and because alcohol molecules that straddle the interface limit contact between N(2)O(5

  18. Rectification of nanopores in aprotic solvents - transport properties of nanopores with surface dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plett, Timothy; Shi, Wenqing; Zeng, Yuhan; Mann, William; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Baker, Lane A.; Siwy, Zuzanna S.

    2015-11-01

    Nanopores have become a model system to understand transport properties at the nanoscale. We report experiments and modeling of ionic current in aprotic solvents with different dipole moments through conically shaped nanopores in a polycarbonate film and through glass nanopipettes. We focus on solutions of the salt LiClO4, which is of great importance in modeling lithium based batteries. Results presented suggest ion current rectification observed results from two effects: (i) adsorption of Li+ ions to the pore walls, and (ii) a finite dipole moment rendered by adsorbed solvent molecules. Properties of surfaces in various solvents were probed by means of scanning ion conductance microscopy, which confirmed existence of an effectively positive surface potential in aprotic solvents with high dipole moments.Nanopores have become a model system to understand transport properties at the nanoscale. We report experiments and modeling of ionic current in aprotic solvents with different dipole moments through conically shaped nanopores in a polycarbonate film and through glass nanopipettes. We focus on solutions of the salt LiClO4, which is of great importance in modeling lithium based batteries. Results presented suggest ion current rectification observed results from two effects: (i) adsorption of Li+ ions to the pore walls, and (ii) a finite dipole moment rendered by adsorbed solvent molecules. Properties of surfaces in various solvents were probed by means of scanning ion conductance microscopy, which confirmed existence of an effectively positive surface potential in aprotic solvents with high dipole moments. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06340j

  19. Alluvial Fans on Titan Reveal Atmosphere and Surface Interactions and Material Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radebaugh, J.; Ventra, D.; Lorenz, R. D.; Farr, T. G.; Kirk, R. L.; Hayes, A.; Malaska, M. J.; Birch, S.; Liu, Z. Y. C.; Lunine, J. I.; Barnes, J. W.; Le Gall, A. A.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Stofan, E. R.; Wall, S. D.; Paillou, P.

    2015-12-01

    Alluvial fans, important depositional systems that record how sediment is stored and moved on planetary surfaces, are found on the surface of Titan, a body of significantly different materials and process rates than Earth. As seen by Cassini's Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images at 350 m resolution, fans on Titan are found globally and are variable in size, shape and relationship to adjacent landforms. Their morphologies and SAR characteristics, which reveal roughness, textural patterns and other material properties, show similarities with fans in Death Valley seen by SAR and indicate there are regions of high relative relief locally, in the Ganesa, Xanadu and equatorial mountain belt regions. The Leilah Fluctus fans near Ganesa are ~30 km x 15 km, similar to the largest Death Valley fans, and revealing mountainous topography adjacent to plains. Others have gentle slopes over hundreds of kilometers, as in the high southern latitude lakes regions or the Mezzoramia southern midlatitudes, where a fan system is 200 km x 150 km, similar to the Qarn Alam fan emerging into the Rub al Khali in Oman. Additionally, there is evidence for a range of particle sizes, from relatively coarse (~2 cm or more) to fine, revealing long-term duration and variability in erosion by methane rainfall and transport. Some features have morphologies consistent with proximality to high-relief source areas and highly ephemeral runoff, while others appear to draw larger catchment areas and are perhaps characterized by more prolonged episodes of flow. The presence of many fans indicates the longevity of rainfall and erosion in Titan's surface processes and reveals that sediment transport and the precipitation that drives it are strongly episodic. Alluvial fans join rivers, lakes, eroded mountains, sand dunes and dissolution features in the list of surface morphologies derived from atmospheric and fluvial processes similar to those on Earth, strengthening comparisons between the two planetary

  20. Mechanism of Nitrate-N Transport in Surface Water and Groundwater in a Missourian Claypan Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Lerch, R. N.; Yang, J.; Baffaut, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizer applications have resulted in widespread surface water and groundwater nitrate-N (NO3-N) contamination in the U.S. Corn Belt. However, the processes that control NO3-N concentrations in both surface water and groundwater were not well understood, particularly for claypan-dominated watersheds. The objective of this study was to understand the processes that control the transport of NO3-N in/from surface water and/to groundwater in Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed (GCEW), a claypan-dominated watershed in north-central Missouri. The mean nitrate-N concentration in groundwater determined from more than 2000 samples collected during 1991 - 2004 was approximately three times that in stream water at GCEW. Despite the low hydraulic conductivity of the claypan soils, considerable NO3-N contamination of the glacial till aquifer occurred, with 38% of the wells exceeding 10 mg l-1. Groundwater recharge by preferential pathways through the claypan appeared to be the primary mechanism for NO3-N movement to the aquifer. In comparison, only 19-23% of sampled wells in non-claypan agricultural watersheds over the continental U.S. exceeded 10 mg l-1, suggesting that groundwater in GCEW appears to be more susceptible to NO3-N contamination than non-claypan watersheds. Using endmember mixing analysis based on conservative tracers, stream flow during the relatively low flow periods was primarily from surface runoff, shallow subsurface water and groundwater, with an average contribution of 25%, 44% and 31% from 2011 to 2014, respectively. Stable isotopic values of nitrate (d15N, d18O and D17O) also demonstrated that groundwater exerted a major control on nitrate concentrations in stream water. This information greatly improves our understanding of the processes that control NO3-N transport to the groundwater system of claypan-dominated watersheds.

  1. Observed and modeled surface Lagrangian transport between coastal regions in the Adriatic Sea with implications for marine protected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Daniel F.; Griffa, Annalisa; Zambianchi, Enrico; Suaria, Giuseppe; Corgnati, Lorenzo; Magaldi, Marcello G.; Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Russo, Aniello; Bellomo, Lucio; Mantovani, Carlo; Celentano, Paolo; Molcard, Anne; Borghini, Mireno

    2016-04-01

    Surface drifters and virtual particles are used to investigate transport between seven coastal regions in the central and southern Adriatic Sea to estimate the degree to which these regions function as a network. Alongshore coastal currents and cyclonic gyres are the primary circulation features that connected regions in the Adriatic Sea. The historical drifter observations span 25 years and, thus, provide estimates of transport between regions realized by the mean surface circulation. The virtual particle trajectories and a dedicated drifter experiment show that southeasterly Sirocco winds can drive eastward cross-Adriatic transport from the Italian coast near the Gargano Promontory to the Dalmatian Islands in Croatia. Southeasterly winds disrupt alongshore transport on the west coast. Northwesterly Mistral winds enhanced east-to-west transport and resulted in stronger southeastward coastal currents in the western Adriatic current (WAC) and export to the northern Ionian Sea. The central Italian regions showed strong connections from north to south, likely realized by alongshore transport in the WAC. Alongshore, downstream transport was weaker on the east coast, likely due to the more complex topography introduced by the Dalmatian Islands of Croatia. Cross-Adriatic connection percentages were higher for east-to-west transport. Cross-Adriatic transport, in general, occurred via the cyclonic sub-gyres, with westward (eastward) transport observed in the northern (southern) arms of the central and southern gyres.

  2. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  3. Surface transport and stable trapping of particles and cells by an optical waveguide loop.

    PubMed

    Hellesø, Olav Gaute; Løvhaugen, Pål; Subramanian, Ananth Z; Wilkinson, James S; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh

    2012-09-21

    Waveguide trapping has emerged as a useful technique for parallel and planar transport of particles and biological cells and can be integrated with lab-on-a-chip applications. However, particles trapped on waveguides are continuously propelled forward along the surface of the waveguide. This limits the practical usability of the waveguide trapping technique with other functions (e.g. analysis, imaging) that require particles to be stationary during diagnosis. In this paper, an optical waveguide loop with an intentional gap at the centre is proposed to hold propelled particles and cells. The waveguide acts as a conveyor belt to transport and deliver the particles/cells towards the gap. At the gap, the diverging light fields hold the particles at a fixed position. The proposed waveguide design is numerically studied and experimentally implemented. The optical forces on the particle at the gap are calculated using the finite element method. Experimentally, the method is used to transport and trap micro-particles and red blood cells at the gap with varying separations. The waveguides are only 180 nm thick and thus could be integrated with other functions on the chip, e.g. microfluidics or optical detection, to make an on-chip system for single cell analysis and to study the interaction between cells. PMID:22814473

  4. Surface transport and stable trapping of particles and cells by an optical waveguide loop.

    PubMed

    Hellesø, Olav Gaute; Løvhaugen, Pål; Subramanian, Ananth Z; Wilkinson, James S; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh

    2012-09-21

    Waveguide trapping has emerged as a useful technique for parallel and planar transport of particles and biological cells and can be integrated with lab-on-a-chip applications. However, particles trapped on waveguides are continuously propelled forward along the surface of the waveguide. This limits the practical usability of the waveguide trapping technique with other functions (e.g. analysis, imaging) that require particles to be stationary during diagnosis. In this paper, an optical waveguide loop with an intentional gap at the centre is proposed to hold propelled particles and cells. The waveguide acts as a conveyor belt to transport and deliver the particles/cells towards the gap. At the gap, the diverging light fields hold the particles at a fixed position. The proposed waveguide design is numerically studied and experimentally implemented. The optical forces on the particle at the gap are calculated using the finite element method. Experimentally, the method is used to transport and trap micro-particles and red blood cells at the gap with varying separations. The waveguides are only 180 nm thick and thus could be integrated with other functions on the chip, e.g. microfluidics or optical detection, to make an on-chip system for single cell analysis and to study the interaction between cells.

  5. Methodologies for Removing/Desorbing and Transporting Particles from Surfaces to Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Carla J.; Cespedes, Ernesto R.

    2012-12-01

    Explosive trace detection (ETD) continues to be a key technology supporting the fight against terrorist bombing threats. Very selective and sensitive ETD instruments have been developed to detect explosive threats concealed on personnel, in vehicles, in luggage, and in cargo containers, as well as for forensic analysis (e.g. post blast inspection, bomb-maker identification, etc.) in a broad range of homeland security, law enforcement, and military applications. A number of recent studies have highlighted the fact that significant improvements in ETD systems' capabilities will be achieved, not by increasing the selectivity/sensitivity of the sensors, but by improved techniques for particle/vapor sampling, pre-concentration, and transport to the sensors. This review article represents a compilation of studies focused on characterizing the adhesive properties of explosive particles, the methodologies for removing/desorbing these particles from a range of surfaces, and approaches for transporting them to the instrument. The objectives of this review are to summarize fundamental work in explosive particle characterization, to describe experimental work performed in harvesting and transport of these particles, and to highlight those approaches that indicate high potential for improving ETD capabilities.

  6. A Global Assessment of Accelerations in Mass Transport of Surface Geophysical Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Heflin, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Mass transport in the Earth's surface geophysical fluid layer has complex spatiotemporal patterns. The GRACE gravity mission provides an unprecedented global capability to monitor this important process with high accuracy and resolution. Accurate assessments of global mass transport patterns and budget also depend critically on changes in degree-1 coefficients (geocenter motion) and in Earth's dynamic oblateness coefficient J2. We combine GRACE measurements, time series of GNSS data, JPL's ECCO ocean bottom pressure model, and high-resolution loose a priori models of mass variation regimes to derive complete spherical harmonic spectra of detrended mass variations up to degree and order 180. Mass accelerations are estimated along with linear, annual, semiannual, and the 161-day tidal aliasing components from coefficient time series. The appropriateness of a priori information and estimate uncertainties are further evaluated by variance component estimation and residual statistics of fitting the time series. During the GRACE data period of 2002.2-2015.0, accelerations in mass transport are geographically uneven with significant positive or negative accelerations in various parts of the world. While Greenland and West Antarctica show strong accelerated mass losses, Alaska and the Arctic Ocean have significant positive accelerations with reversals of earlier mass loss trends. No evidence of non-Arctic global mean sea level acceleration due to mass has been found. Depending on region, some estimated accelerations are also not steady over time due to large irregular and interannual variations.

  7. Effects of Surface and Subsurface Bed Material Composition on Gravel Transport and Flow Competence Relations—Possibilities for Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Abt, S. R.; Swingle, K. W.; Cenderelli, D. A.; Gaeuman, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Bedload transport and flow competence relations are difficult to predict in coarse-bedded steep streams where widely differing sediment supply, bed stability, and complex flow hydraulics greatly affect amounts and sizes of transported gravel particles. This study explains how properties of bed material surface and subsurface size distributions are directly related to gravel transport and may be used for prediction of gravel transport and flow competence relations. Gravel transport, flow competence, and bed material size were measured in step-pool and plane-bed streams. Power functions were fitted to gravel transport QB=aQb and flow competence Dmax=cQd relations; Q is water discharge. Frequency distributions of surface FDsurf and subsurface FDsub bed material were likewise described by power functions FDsurf=hD j and FDsub=kDm fitted over six 0.5-phi size classes within 4 to 22.4 mm. Those gravel sizes are typically mobile even in moderate floods. Study results show that steeper subsurface bed material size distributions lead to steeper gravel transport and flow competence relations, whereas larger amounts of sediment contained in those 6 size bedmaterial classes (larger h and k) flatten the relations. Similarly, steeper surface size distributions decrease the coefficients of the gravel transport and flow competence relations, whereas larger amounts of sediment within the six bed material classes increase the intercepts of gravel transport and flow competence relations. Those relations are likely causative in streams where bedload stems almost entirely from the channel bed as opposed to direct (unworked) contributions from hillslopes and tributaries. The exponent of the subsurface bed material distribution m predicted the gravel transport exponent b with r2 near 0.7 and flow competence exponent d with r2 near 0.5. The intercept of bed surface distributions h increased the intercept a of gravel transport and c of the flow competence relations with r2 near 0.6.

  8. Controllable Molecule Transport and Release by a Restorable Surface-tethered DNA nanodevice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoyin; Xu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Haiyan; Liu, Fengzhen; Ren, Zhenning; Wang, Zhaoxia

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report a novel surface-tethered DNA nanodevice that may present three states and undergo conformational changes under the operation of pH. Besides, convenient regulation on the electrode surface renders the construction and operation of this DNA nanodevice restorable. To make full use of this DNA nanodevice, ferrocene (Fc) has been further employed for the fabrication of the molecular device. On one hand, the state switches of the DNA nanodevice can be characterized conveniently and reliably by the obtained electrochemical signals from Fc. On the other hand, β-cyclodextrin-ferrocene (β-CD-Fc) host-guest system can be introduced by Fc, which functionalizes this molecular device. Based on different electrochemical behaviors of β-CD under different states, this DNA nanodevice can actualize directional loading, transporting and unloading of β-CD in nanoscale. Therefore, this DNA nanodevice bares promising applications in controllable molecular transport and release, which are of great value to molecular device design. PMID:27384943

  9. Oceanic transport of surface meltwater from the southern Greenland ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hao; Castelao, Renato M.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Tedesco, Marco; Bracco, Annalisa; Yager, Patricia L.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2016-07-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has undergone accelerating mass losses during recent decades. Freshwater runoff from ice melt can influence fjord circulation and dynamics and the delivery of bioavailable micronutrients to the ocean. It can also have climate implications, because stratification in the adjacent Labrador Sea may influence deep convection and the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Yet, the fate of the meltwater in the ocean remains unclear. Here, we use a high-resolution ocean model to show that only 1-15% of the surface meltwater runoff originating from southwest Greenland is transported westwards. In contrast, up to 50-60% of the meltwater runoff originating from southeast Greenland is transported westwards into the northern Labrador Sea, leading to significant salinity and stratification anomalies far from the coast. Doubling meltwater runoff, as predicted in future climate scenarios, results in a more-than-double increase in anomalies offshore that persists further into the winter. Interannual variability in offshore export of meltwater is tightly related to variability in wind forcing. The new insight that meltwaters originating from the west and east coasts have different fates indicates that future changes in mass loss rates and surface runoff will probably impact the ocean differently, depending on their Greenland origins.

  10. Oceanic Transport of Surface Meltwater from the Southern Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Hao; Castelao, Renato M.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Tedesco, Marco; Bracco, Annalisa; Yager, Patricia L.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has undergone accelerating mass losses during recent decades. Freshwater runoff from ice melt can influence fjord circulation and dynamic1 and the delivery of bioavailable micronutrients to the ocean. It can also have climate implications, because stratification in the adjacent Labrador Sea may influence deep convection and the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Yet, the fate of the meltwater in the ocean remains unclear. Here, we use a high-resolution ocean model to show that only 1-15% of the surface meltwater runoff originating from southwest Greenland is transported westwards. In contrast, up to 50-60% of the meltwater runoff originating from southeast Greenland is transported westwards into the northern Labrador Sea, leading to significant salinity and stratification anomalies far from the coast. Doubling meltwater runoff, as predicted in future climate scenarios, results in a more-than-double increase in anomalies offshore that persists further into the winter. Interannual variability in offshore export of meltwater is tightly related to variability in wind forcing. The new insight that meltwaters originating from the west and east coasts have different fates indicates that future changes in mass loss rates and surface runoff will probably impact the ocean differently, depending on their Greenland origins.

  11. A Transport Equation Approach to Modeling the Influence of Surface Roughness on Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langel, Christopher Michael

    A computational investigation has been performed to better understand the impact of surface roughness on the flow over a contaminated surface. This thesis highlights the implementation and development of the roughness amplification model in the flow solver OVERFLOW-2. The model, originally proposed by Dassler, Kozulovic, and Fiala, introduces an additional scalar field roughness amplification quantity. This value is explicitly set at rough wall boundaries using surface roughness parameters and local flow quantities. This additional transport equation allows non-local effects of surface roughness to be accounted for downstream of rough sections. This roughness amplification variable is coupled with the Langtry-Menter model and used to modify the criteria for transition. Results from flat plate test cases show good agreement with experimental transition behavior on the flow over varying sand grain roughness heights. Additional validation studies were performed on a NACA 0012 airfoil with leading edge roughness. The computationally predicted boundary layer development demonstrates good agreement with experimental results. New tests using varying roughness configurations are being carried out at the Texas A&M Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel to provide further calibration of the roughness amplification method. An overview and preliminary results are provided of this concurrent experimental investigation.

  12. Factors contributing to the off-target transport of pyrethroid insecticides from urban surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Brant C; Wissel-Tyson, Christopher; Young, Thomas M

    2012-08-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides used in urban and suburban contexts have been found in urban creek sediments and associated with toxicity in aquatic bioassays. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the main factors contributing to the off-target transport of pyrethroid insecticides from surfaces typical of residential landscapes. Controlled rainfall simulations over concrete, bare soil, and turf plots treated individually with pyrethroid insecticides in a suspension concentrate, an emulsifiable concentrate, or a granule formulation were conducted at different rainfall intensities and different product set-time intervals. Pyrethroid mass washoff varied by several orders of magnitude between experimental treatments. Suspension concentrate product application to concrete yielded significantly greater washoff than any other treatment; granule product application to turf yielded the least washoff. Fractional losses at 10 L of runoff ranged from 25.9 to 0.011% of pyrethroid mass applied, and 10 L nominal mass losses ranged from 3970 to 0.18 μg. Mass washoff depended principally on formulation and surface type combination and, to a lesser degree, on set-time interval and rainfall intensity. Treatment effects were analyzed by ANOVA on main factors of formulation, surface type, and set time. Factor effects were not purely additive; a significant interaction between formulation and surface type was noted.

  13. Effects of dietary K on cell-surface expression of renal ion channels and transporters.

    PubMed

    Frindt, Gustavo; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2010-10-01

    Changes in apical surface expression of ion channels and transporters in the superficial rat renal cortex were assessed using biotinylation and immunoblotting during alterations in dietary K intake. A high-K diet increased, and a low-K diet decreased, both the overall and surface abundance of the β- and γ-subunits of the epithelial Na channel (ENaC). In the case of γ-ENaC, the effect was specific for the 65-kDa cleaved form of the protein. The overall amount of α-ENAC was also increased with increasing K intake. The total expression of the secretory K(+) channels (ROMK) increased with a high-K diet and decreased with a low-K diet. The surface expression of ROMK increased with high K intake but was not significantly altered by a low-K diet. In contrast, the amounts of total and surface protein representing the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) decreased with increasing K intake. We conclude that modulation of K(+) secretion in response to changes in dietary K intake involves changes in apical K(+) permeability through regulation of K(+) channels and in driving force subsequent to alterations in both Na delivery to the distal nephron and Na(+) uptake across the apical membrane of the K(+) secretory cells. PMID:20702602

  14. Factors Contributing to the Off-Target Transport of Pyrethroid Insecticides From Urban Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Brant C.; Wissel-Tyson, Christopher; Young, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides used in an urban and suburban context have been found in urban creek sediments and associated with toxicity in aquatic bioassays. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the main factors contributing to the off-target transport of pyrethroid insecticides from surfaces typical of residential landscapes. Controlled rainfall simulations over concrete, bare soil, and turf plots treated individually with pyrethroid insecticides in a suspension concentrate, an emulsifiable concentrate, or a granule formulation were conducted at different rainfall intensities and different product set-time intervals. Pyrethroid mass washoff varied by several orders of magnitude between experimental treatments. Suspension concentrate product application to concrete yielded significantly greater washoff than any other treatment; granule product application to turf yielded the least washoff. Fractional losses at 10 L of runoff ranged from 25.9% to 0.011% of pyrethroid mass applied and 10 L nominal mass losses ranged from 3,970 to 0.18 μg. Mass washoff depended principally on formulation and surface type combination and to a lesser degree set-time interval and rainfall intensity. Treatment effects were analyzed by ANOVA on main factors of formulation, surface type, and set time. Factor effects were not purely additive; a significant interaction between formulation and surface type was noted. PMID:22784034

  15. Spin torques and charge transport on the surface of topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Akio; Kohno, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    We study various aspects of interplay between two-dimensional helical electrons, realized on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator, and the magnetization of a ferromagnet coupled to them. The magnetization is assumed to be perpendicular to the surface, with small transverse fluctuations u. In the first part of this paper, we calculate spin torques that the helical electrons exert on the magnetization. Up to first orders with respect to u, space/time derivative and electric current, we have determined all torques, which include Gilbert damping, spin renormalization, current-induced spin-orbit torques, and gradient corrections to them. Thanks to the identity between the velocity and spin in this model, these torques have exact interpretation in terms of transport phenomena, namely, diagonal conductivity, (anomalous) Hall conductivity, and corrections to them due to ordinary Hall effect on top of the anomalous one. These torque (and transport) coefficients are studied in detail with particular attention to the effects of vertex corrections and type of impurities (normal and magnetic). It is shown rigorously that the conventional current-induced torques, namely, spin-transfer torque and the so-called β term, are absent. An electromotive force generated by spin dynamics, which is the inverse to the current-induced spin-orbit torque, is also studied. In the second part, we study the feedback effects arising as combinations of current-induced spin-orbit torques and spin-dynamics-induced electromotive force. It is demonstrated that the Gilbert damping process in this system is completely understood as a feedback effect. Another feedback effect, which may be called "magnon-drag electrical conductivity," is shown to violate the exact correspondence between spin-torque and transport phenomena demonstrated in the first part.

  16. Single-File Transport of Classical Electrons on the Surface of Liquid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, David G.; Kono, Kimitoshi

    2014-07-01

    Electrons trapped on the surface of liquid helium form a model two-dimensional system. Because the electron density is low ( 109 cm-2) and the Coulomb interaction between the electrons is essentially unscreened, the system can be regarded as a classical analogue of the degenerate Fermi gas. Electrons on helium have therefore long been used to study many-body transport phenomena in two dimensions. Here we review recent experiments investigating the transport of electrons on helium through microscopic constrictions formed in microchannel devices. Two constriction geometries are studied; short saddle-point constrictions and long constrictions in which the length greatly exceeds the width. In both cases, the constriction width can be tuned electrostatically so that the electrons move in single file. As the width of the short constriction is increased, a periodic suppression of the electron current is observed due to pinning for commensurate states of the electron lattice. A related phenomenon is observed for the long constriction whereby the quasi-one-dimensional Wigner lattice exhibits reentrant melting as the number of electron chains increases. Our results demonstrate that electrons on helium are an ideal system in which to study many-body transport in the limit of single-file motion. Special Issue Comments: This article presents experimental results on the dynamics of classical electrons moving on the surface of liquid helium in narrow channels with constrictions, with a focus on the "quantum wire", i.e. single file, regime. This article is related to the Special Issue articles about advanced statistical properties in single file dynamics34 and the mathematical results on electron dynamics in liquid helium.35

  17. Transport of a nematicide in surface and groundwaters in a tropical volcanic catchment.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Jean-Baptiste; Cattan, Philippe; Voltz, Marc; Moussa, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to determine how the nematicide cadusafos [S,S-di-sec-butyl O-ethyl phosphorodithioate] contaminates water and soils at two scales, subcatchment and catchment. The study site was a small banana (Musa spp.)-growing catchment on the tropical volcanic island of Guadeloupe in the Caribbean. Two application campaigns were conducted, one in 2003 on 40% of the catchment and one in 2006 on 12%. The study involved monitoring for 100 d the surface water and groundwater flows and the cadusafos concentrations in the soil and in surface and groundwaters in a 2400 m(2) subcatchment and a 17.8 ha catchment. The results show that at the subcatchment scale the high retention in the A horizon of the soil limits the transport of cadusafos by runoff, whereas the lower retention of the molecule in the B horizon favors percolation toward the shallow groundwater. Comparing the losses of cadusafos at the subcatchment and at the catchment scales revealed that the nematicide re-infiltrated in the hydrographic network. Two successive phases of stream water contamination were observed, corresponding to two distinct contamination mechanisms: an event-dominated contamination phase (of <30 d) when transport was linked to overland flow during precipitation shortly after application, and a stabilized contamination phase when transport originated mainly from the drainage of the shallow aquifer. Lastly, comparing the losses of the two phases during 2003 and 2006 showed that shallow groundwater, which is promoted in such permeable soils under abundant tropical rainfalls, seems to be the main contributor to stream contamination.

  18. The Signature Sequence Region of the Human Drug Transporter Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1B1 Is Important for Protein Surface Expression.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Wells, Jennina; Meredith, David

    2014-01-01

    The organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs) encompass a family of membrane transport proteins responsible for the uptake of xenobiotic compounds. Human organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1) mediates the uptake of clinically relevant compounds such as statins and chemotherapeutic agents into hepatocytes, playing an important role in drug delivery and detoxification. The OATPs have a putative 12-transmembrane domain topology and a highly conserved signature sequence (human OATP1B1: DSRWVGAWWLNFL), spanning the extracellular loop 3/TM6 boundary. The presence of three conserved tryptophan residues at the TM interface suggests a structural role for the sequence. This was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of selected amino acids within the sequence D251E, W254F, W258/259F, and N261A. Transport was measured using the substrate estrone-3-sulfate and surface expression detected by luminometry and confocal microscopy, facilitated by an extracellular FLAG epitope. Uptake of estrone-3-sulfate and the surface expression of D251E, W254F, and W258/259F were both significantly reduced from the wild type OATP1B1-FLAG in transfected HEK293T cells. Confocal microscopy revealed that protein was produced but was retained intracellularly. The uptake and expression of N261A were not significantly different. The reduction in surface expression and intracellular protein retention indicates a structural and/or membrane localization role for these signature sequence residues in the human drug transporter OATP1B1.

  19. No-Loss Transportation of Water Droplets by Patterning a Desired Hydrophobic Path on a Superhydrophobic Surface.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haibao; Yu, Sixiao; Song, Dong

    2016-07-26

    The directional transportation of droplets on solid surfaces is essential in a wide range of engineering applications. It is convenient to guide liquid droplets in a given direction by utilizing the gradient of wettability, by which the binding forces can be produced. In contrast to the mass-loss transportation of a droplet moving along hydrophilic paths on a horizontal superhydrophobic surface, we present no-loss transportation by fabricating a hydrophobic path on the same surface under tangential wind. In experimental exploration and theoretical analysis, the conditions of no-loss transportation of a droplet are mainly considered. We demonstrate that the lower (or upper) critical wind velocity, under which the droplet starts on the path (or is derailed from the path), is determined by the width of the path, the length of the contact area in the direction parallel to the path, the drift angle between the path and the wind direction, and the surface wettability of the pattern. Meanwhile, the no-loss transportation of water droplets along the desired path zigzagging on a superhydrophobic surface can be achieved steadily under appropriate conditions. We anticipate that such robust no-loss transportation will find an extensive range of applications.

  20. Nanostructured materials for lithium-ion batteries: surface conductivity vs. bulk ion/electron transport.

    PubMed

    Ellis, B; Subramanya Herle, P; Rho, Y H; Nazar, L F; Dunlap, R; Perry, Laura K; Ryan, D H

    2007-01-01

    Lithium metal phosphates are amongst the most promising cathode materials for high capacity lithium-ion batteries. Owing to their inherently low electronic conductivity, it is essential to optimize their properties to minimize defect concentration and crystallite size (down to the submicron level), control morphology, and to decorate the crystallite surfaces with conductive nanostructures that act as conduits to deliver electrons to the bulk lattice. Here, we discuss factors relating to doping and defects in olivine phosphates LiMPO4 (M = Fe, Mn, Co, Ni) and describe methods by which in situ nanophase composites with conductivities ranging from 10(-4)-10(-2) S cm(-1) can be prepared. These utilize surface reactivity to produce intergranular nitrides, phosphides, and/or phosphocarbides at temperatures as low as 600 degrees C that maximize the accessibility of the bulk for Li de/insertion. Surface modification can only address the transport problem in part, however. A key issue in these materials is also to unravel the factors governing ion and electron transport within the lattice. Lithium de/insertion in the phosphates is accompanied by two-phase transitions owing to poor solubility of the single phase compositions, where low mobility of the phase boundary limits the rate characteristics. Here we discuss concerted mobility of the charge carriers. Using Mössbauer spectroscopy to pinpoint the temperature at which the solid solution forms, we directly probe small polaron hopping in the solid solution Li(x)FePO4 phases formed at elevated temperature, and give evidence for a strong correlation between electron and lithium delocalization events that suggests they are coupled.

  1. Transport and fate of nitrate at the ground-water/surface-water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puckett, L.J.; Zamora, C.; Essaid, H.; Wilson, J.T.; Johnson, H.M.; Brayton, M.J.; Vogel, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Although numerous studies of hyporheic exchange and denitrification have been conducted in pristine, high-gradient streams, few studies of this type have been conducted in nutrient-rich, low-gradient streams. This is a particularly important subject given the interest in nitrogen (N) inputs to the Gulf of Mexico and other eutrophic aquatic systems. A combination of hydrologic, mineralogical, chemical, dissolved gas, and isotopic data, were used to determine the processes controlling transport and fate of NO3- in streambeds at five sites across the USA. Water samples were collected from streambeds at depths ranging from 0.3 to 3 m at three to five points across the stream and in two to five separate transects. Residence times of water ranging from 0.28 to 34.7 d m-1 in the streambeds of N-rich watersheds played an important role in allowing denitrification to decrease NO3- concentrations. Where potential electron donors were limited and residence times were short, denitrification was limited. Consequently, in spite of reducing conditions at some sites, NO3- was transported into the stream. At two of the five study sites, NO3- in surface water infiltrated the streambeds and concentrations decreased, supporting current models that NO3- would be retained in N-rich streams. At the other three study sites, hydrogeologic controls limited or prevented infiltration of surface water into the streambed, and ground-water discharge contributed to NO 3- loads. Our results also show that in these low hydrologic-gradient systems, storm and other high-flow events can be important factors for increasing surface-water movement into streambeds. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  2. Coastal currents and mass transport of surface sediments over the shelf regions of Monterey Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, S.C.

    1970-01-01

    southward except near Monterey Canyon which acts as a physiographic barrier and the extreme southern end of the bay where currents are non persistent. Some sediments are also transported offshore by rip currents and other agencies and deposited in deeper, quieter waters. Supply of sediments to the canyon head results in over-filling and steepening with subsequent mass movement of sediments seaward followed by deposition in channels and on the broad deep sea fan. ?? 1970.

  3. Transport rectification in nanopores with outer membranes modified with surface charges and polyelectrolytes.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Rabin, Yitzhak; Szleifer, Igal

    2013-10-22

    This work reports a comprehensive theoretical study of the transport-rectification properties of cylindrical nanopores with neutral inner walls and chemically modified outer membrane. The chemical species on the two outer sides of the membrane have charges of opposite sign and can be either surface-confined species (i.e., surface charges) or polyelectrolyte brushes. The advantage of this design over other types of rectifying nanopores is that it requires controlling the composition of the outer walls of the pore (which are easy to access) rather than the inner walls, thus simplifying the fabrication process. Ion-current rectification in nanopores with charged outer walls is ascribed to applied-potential-induced changes in the ionic concentration within the pore. The rectification efficiency is studied as a function of pore length, radius, surface charge and bulk electrolyte concentration. An analytical model is derived for the case of surface-confined charges that predicts the current-potential curves in very good agreement with the numerical calculations. Neutral nanopores with polyelectrolyte-modified outer walls have two distinct advantages compared to surface-charged systems: (i) they exhibit higher rectification factors due to the large charge density immobilized by the polyelectrolyte brushes, and (ii) the applied potential deforms the polyelectrolyte chains toward the oppositely charged electrode. This deformation brings the polyelectrolyte brushes into the pore in the low conductivity state and expels them from the pore in the high conductivity regime. Calculations of the potentials of mean-force suggest that the applied-field-induced conformational changes can be used to control the translocation of cargoes larger than ions, such as proteins and nanoparticles.

  4. Measured transonic unsteady pressures on an energy efficient transport wing with oscillating control surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Watson, J. J.; Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Sandford, M. C.; Ricketts, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Highlight results are presented from subsonic and transonic pressure measurement studies conducted in the Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel on a supercritical wing model representative of an energy efficient transport design. Steady- and unsteady-pressure data were acquired on the upper and lower wing surface at an off-design Mach number of 0.60 and at the design Mach number of 0.78, for a Reynolds number of 2.2 x 10(6) (based on the wing average chord). The model configuration consisted of a sidewall-Mounted half-body fuselage and a semi-span wing with an aspect ratio of 10.76, a leading-edge sweepback angle of 28.8 degrees, and supercritical airfoil sections. The wing is instrumented with 252 static pressure orifices and 164 dynamic pressure gages. Model test variables included wing angle of attack, control-surface mean deflection angle, control-surface oscillating deflection angle and frequency, and phasing between oscillating leading-edge and trailing-edge controls when used together.

  5. Electronic transport properties of transition metal dichalcogenide field-effect devices: surface and interface effects.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hennrik; Giustiniano, Francesco; Eda, Goki

    2015-11-01

    Recent explosion of interest in two-dimensional (2D) materials research has led to extensive exploration of physical and chemical phenomena unique to this new class of materials and their technological potential. Atomically thin layers of group 6 transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) such as MoS2 and WSe2 are remarkably stable semiconductors that allow highly efficient electrostatic control due to their 2D nature. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on 2D TMDs are basic building blocks for novel electronic and chemical sensing applications. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of TMD-based FETs and summarize the current understanding of interface and surface effects that play a major role in these systems. We discuss how controlled doping is key to tailoring the electrical response of these materials and realizing high performance devices. The first part of this review focuses on some fundamental features of gate-modulated charge transport in 2D TMDs. We critically evaluate the role of surfaces and interfaces based on the data reported in the literature and explain the observed discrepancies between the experimental and theoretical values of carrier mobility. The second part introduces various non-covalent strategies for achieving desired doping in these systems. Gas sensors based on charge transfer doping and electrostatic stabilization are introduced to highlight progress in this direction. We conclude the review with an outlook on the realization of tailored TMD-based field-effect devices through surface and interface chemistry.

  6. Formulation effects and the off-target transport of pyrethroid insecticides from urban hard surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Brant C; Young, Thomas M

    2010-07-01

    Controlled rainfall experiments utilizing drop-forming rainfall simulators were conducted to study various factors contributing to off-target transport of off-the-shelf formulated pyrethroid insecticides from concrete surfaces. Factors evaluated included active ingredient, product formulation, time between application and rainfall (set time), and rainfall intensity. As much as 60% and as little as 0.8% of pyrethroid applied could be recovered in surface runoff depending primarily on product formulation, and to a lesser extent on product set time. Resulting wash-off profiles during one-hour storm simulations could be categorized based on formulation, with formulations utilizing emulsifying surfactants rather than organic solvents resulting in unique wash-off profiles with overall higher wash-off efficiency. These higher wash-off efficiency profiles were qualitatively replicated by applying formulation-free neat pyrethroid in the presence of independently applied linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) surfactant, suggesting that the surfactant component of some formulated products may be influential in pyrethroid wash-off from urban hard surfaces.

  7. Formulation Effects and the Off-target Transport of Pyrethroid Insecticides from Urban Hard Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Brant C.; Young, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Controlled rainfall experiments utilizing drop forming rainfall simulators were conducted to study various factors contributing to off-target transport of off-the-shelf formulated pyrethroid insecticides from concrete surfaces. Factors evaluated included active ingredient, product formulation, time between application and rainfall (set time), and rainfall intensity. As much as 60% and as little as 0.8% of pyrethroid applied could be recovered in surface runoff depending primarily on product formulation, and to a lesser extent on product set time. Resulting wash-off profiles during one-hour storm simulations could be categorized based on formulation, with formulations utilizing emulsifying surfactants rather than organic solvents resulting in unique wash-off profiles with overall higher wash-off efficiency. These higher wash-off efficiency profiles were qualitatively replicated by applying formulation-free neat pyrethroid in the presence of independently applied linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) surfactant, suggesting that the surfactant component of some formulated products may be influential in pyrethroid wash-off from urban hard surfaces. PMID:20524665

  8. A flexible numerical component to simulate surface runoff transport and biogeochemical processes through dense vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Carpena, R.; Perez-Ovilla, O.

    2012-12-01

    Methods to estimate surface runoff pollutant removal using dense vegetation buffers (i.e. vegetative filter strips) usually consider a limited number of factors (i.e. filter length, slope) and are in general based on empirical relationships. When an empirical approach is used, the application of the model is limited to those conditions of the data used for the regression equations. The objective of this work is to provide a flexible numerical mechanistic tool to simulate dynamics of a wide range of surface runoff pollutants through dense vegetation and their physical, chemical and biological interactions based on equations defined by the user as part of the model inputs. A flexible water quality model based on the Reaction Simulation Engine (RSE) modeling component is coupled to a transport module based on the traditional Bubnov -Galerkin finite element method to solve the advection-dispersion-reaction equation using the alternating split-operator technique. This coupled transport-reaction model is linked to the VFSMOD-W (http://abe.ufl.edu/carpena/vfsmod) program to mechanistically simulate mobile and stabile pollutants through dense vegetation based on user-defined conceptual models (differential equations written in XML language as input files). The key factors to consider in the creation of a conceptual model are the components in the buffer (i.e. vegetation, soil, sediments) and how the pollutant interacts with them. The biogeochemical reaction component was tested successfully with laboratory and field scale experiments. One of the major advantages when using this tool is that the pollutant transport and removal thought dense vegetation is related to physical and biogeochemical process occurring within the filter. This mechanistic approach increases the range of use of the model to a wide range of pollutants and conditions without modification of the core model. The strength of the model relies on the mechanistic approach used for simulating the removal of

  9. Determination of parameters of Cu surface mass transport on sapphire from morphological changes of beaded films caused by evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beszeda, I.; Beke, D. L.

    Basic parameters of surface mass transport - the surface diffusion length of adatoms, λs, the surface diffusion coefficient, Ds', and the surface reaction rate coefficient, βs', of Cu on alumina are determined in the temperature range 1048-1198 K. Measuring simultaneously the time dependence of the effective thickness, Heff(t), the lateral shift of the boundary, y(t) of beaded films (BF) and using vapour pressure data we concluded that the process is controlled by surface reaction at the perimeters of beads. Supposing Arrhenius-type temperature dependence for Ds', βs' and λs the activation energies and preexponential factors have been calculated.

  10. Accuracy of recent potential energy surfaces for the He -N2 interaction. I. Virial and bulk transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dham, Ashok K.; McCourt, Frederick R. W.; Dickinson, Alan S.

    2007-08-01

    A new exchange-Coulomb semiempirical model potential energy surface for the He -N2 interaction has been developed. Together with two recent high-level ab initio potential energy surfaces, it has been tested for the reliability of its predictions of second-virial coefficients and bulk transport phenomena in binary mixtures of He and N2. The agreement with the relevant available measurements is generally within experimental uncertainty for the exchange-Coulomb surface and the ab initio surface of Patel et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 119, 909 (2003)], but with slightly poorer agreement for the earlier ab initio surface of Hu and Thakkar [J. Chem. Phys. 104, 2541 (1996)].

  11. In situ investigation of titanium nitride surface dynamics: The role of surface and bulk mass transport processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bareno, Javier

    NaCl-structure TiN and related transition-metal (TM) nitrides are widely used as hard wear-resistant coatings on cutting tools, diffusion-barriers in microelectronic devices, corrosion-resistant layers on mechanical components, and abrasion-resistant thin films on optics and architectural glass. Since the elastic and physical properties of TiN are highly anisotropic, controlling the microstructural and surface morphological evolution of polycrystalline TM nitride films is important for all of the above applications. In this thesis, I used in-situ high-temperature low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to gain insight into film growth and microstructure development dynamics by studying mass-transport processes occurring during annealing of three dimensional (3D) structures on TiN surfaces. Additionally, in order to extend the current understanding of nanostructure development in binary nitride films to more complex ternary TM-nitride-based nanocomposites, I employed in-situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), as well as ab-initio modeling, to investigate the atomic structure of the SiNx/TiN heterointerfaces which control the properties of SiNx-TiN nanocomposites. The LEEM studies of mass transport on TiN(111) focus on two specific surface morphologies which are observed to be present during growth of TiN single-crystals. (1) I investigated the temperature-dependent coarsening/decay kinetics of three-dimensional TiN island mounds on large (>1000 A) atomically-flat terraces; showing that TiN(111) steps are highly permeable and exhibit strong repulsive temperature-dependent step-step interactions that vary from 0.03 eV-A at 1559 K to 0.76 eV-A at 1651 K. (2) I studied the nucleation and growth of spiral steps originating at surface-terminated screw dislocations; I developed a model of spiral growth relating the emission rate of point defects from the bulk to the temperature-dependent spiral rotation frequency o(T); and I

  12. River stage influences on uranium transport in a hydrologically dynamic groundwater-surface water transition zone

    DOE PAGES

    Zachara, John M.; Chen, Xingyuan; Murray, Chris; Hammond, Glenn

    2016-03-04

    In this study, a well-field within a uranium (U) plume in the groundwater-surface water transition zone was monitored for a 3 year period for water table elevation and dissolved solutes. The plume discharges to the Columbia River, which displays a dramatic spring stage surge resulting from snowmelt. Groundwater exhibits a low hydrologic gradient and chemical differences with river water. River water intrudes the site in spring. Specific aims were to assess the impacts of river intrusion on dissolved uranium (Uaq), specific conductance (SpC), and other solutes, and to discriminate between transport, geochemical, and source term heterogeneity effects. Time series trendsmore » for Uaq and SpC were complex and displayed large temporal and well-to-well variability as a result of water table elevation fluctuations, river water intrusion, and changes in groundwater flow directions. The wells were clustered into subsets exhibiting common behaviors resulting from the intrusion dynamics of river water and the location of source terms. Hot-spots in Uaq varied in location with increasing water table elevation through the combined effects of advection and source term location. Heuristic reactive transport modeling with PFLOTRAN demonstrated that mobilized Uaq was transported between wells and source terms in complex trajectories, and was diluted as river water entered and exited the groundwater system. While Uaq time-series concentration trends varied significantly from year-to-year as a result of climate-caused differences in the spring hydrograph, common and partly predictable response patterns were observed that were driven by water table elevation, and the extent and duration of river water intrusion.« less

  13. River stage influences on uranium transport in a hydrologically dynamic groundwater-surface water transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Chen, Xingyuan; Murray, Chris; Hammond, Glenn

    2016-03-01

    A well-field within a uranium (U) plume in the groundwater-surface water transition zone was monitored for a 3 year period for water table elevation and dissolved solutes. The plume discharges to the Columbia River, which displays a dramatic spring stage surge resulting from snowmelt. Groundwater exhibits a low hydrologic gradient and chemical differences with river water. River water intrudes the site in spring. Specific aims were to assess the impacts of river intrusion on dissolved uranium (Uaq), specific conductance (SpC), and other solutes, and to discriminate between transport, geochemical, and source term heterogeneity effects. Time series trends for Uaq and SpC were complex and displayed large temporal and well-to-well variability as a result of water table elevation fluctuations, river water intrusion, and changes in groundwater flow directions. The wells were clustered into subsets exhibiting common behaviors resulting from the intrusion dynamics of river water and the location of source terms. Hot-spots in Uaq varied in location with increasing water table elevation through the combined effects of advection and source term location. Heuristic reactive transport modeling with PFLOTRAN demonstrated that mobilized Uaq was transported between wells and source terms in complex trajectories, and was diluted as river water entered and exited the groundwater system. While Uaq time-series concentration trends varied significantly from year-to-year as a result of climate-caused differences in the spring hydrograph, common and partly predictable response patterns were observed that were driven by water table elevation, and the extent and duration of river water intrusion.

  14. River stage influences on uranium transport in a hydrologically dynamic groundwater-surface water transition zone

    DOE PAGES

    Zachara, John M.; Chen, Xingyuan; Murray, Chris; Hammond, Glenn

    2016-03-04

    A well-field within a uranium (U) plume in the groundwater-surface water transition zone was monitored for a 3 year period for water table elevation and dissolved solutes. The plume discharges to the Columbia River, which displays a dramatic spring stage surge resulting from snowmelt. Groundwater exhibits a low hydrologic gradient and chemical differences with river water. River water intrudes the site in spring. Specific aims were to assess the impacts of river intrusion on dissolved uranium (Uaq), specific conductance (SpC), and other solutes, and to discriminate between transport, geochemical, and source term heterogeneity effects. As a result of water tablemore » elevation fluctuations, river water intrusion, and changes in groundwater flow directions, time series trends for Uaq and SpC were found to be complex and displayed large temporal and well-to-well variability. The wells were clustered into subsets exhibiting common behaviors resulting from the intrusion dynamics of river water and the location of source terms. Hot-spots in Uaq varied in location with increasing water table elevation through the combined effects of advection and source term location. Heuristic reactive transport modeling with PFLOTRAN demonstrated that mobilized Uaq was transported between wells and source terms in complex trajectories, and was diluted as river water entered and exited the groundwater system. Moreover, while Uaq time-series concentration trends varied significantly from year-to-year as a result of climate-caused differences in the spring hydrograph, common and partly predictable response patterns were observed that were driven by water table elevation, and the extent and duration of river water intrusion.« less

  15. Inverse modeling of atmospheric mercury emissions using a global chemical transport model and surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S.; Selin, N. E.

    2012-12-01

    We use inverse modeling in combination with worldwide observational data to constrain atmospheric mercury fluxes and associated uncertainties from anthropogenic and natural sources. Though atmospheric transport is a critical pathway of global mercury transport, large uncertainties exist in estimating the magnitudes and temporal variabilities of mercury emissions to the atmosphere from both natural and anthropogenic processes. Previous estimations have primarily used a so-called "bottom-up" approach, which extrapolates the few direct measurements to larger regions or uses simplified process models to estimate fluxes. Here, we apply a "top-down" or inverse modeling approach. Worldwide surface observations of total gaseous mercury (TGM) and simulations from a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem version 9-01-02 with a 2 by 2.5 degree horizontal resolution) are combined to estimate mercury fluxes. Time-invariant anthropogenic emission and seasonally varying fluxes (e.g., ocean evasion, biomass burning, and soil volatilization) are optimally estimated by Kalman filter between 2005 and 2009 at a monthly time resolution. The reference source spatial distributions are shown in Figure 1. We collected data from 16 measurement sites with high precision and frequency, covering most active stations during our period of study. The observations and reference model outputs at 4 representative sites are compared in Figure 2. We test the inverse model by comparing model-measurement fits between the reference model and optimized emissions.igure 1. Mercury reference source spatial distributions. Annually averaged patterns are shown in log scale. igure 2. Comparison of TGM monthly mean observations between observations (black, shown with standard deviations) and reference model results (red) at 4 representative sites.

  16. Structure and assembly of hemagglutinin mutants of fowl plague virus with impaired surface transport.

    PubMed

    Garten, W; Will, C; Buckard, K; Kuroda, K; Ortmann, D; Munk, K; Scholtissek, C; Schnittler, H; Drenckhahn, D; Klenk, H D

    1992-03-01

    Five temperature-sensitive mutants of influenza virus A/FPV/Rostock/34 (H7N1), ts206, ts293, ts478, ts482, and ts651, displaying correct hemagglutinin (HA) insertion into the apical plasma membrane of MDCK cells at the permissive temperature but defective transport to the cell surface at the restrictive temperature, have been investigated. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the HA gene of the mutants and their revertants demonstrated that with each mutant a single amino acid change is responsible for the transport block. The amino acid substitutions were compared with those of mutants ts1 and ts227, which have been analyzed previously (W. Schuy, C. Will, K. Kuroda, C. Scholtissek, W. Garten, and H.-D. Klenk, EMBO J. 5:2831-2836, 1986). With the exception of ts206, the changed amino acids of all mutants and revertants accumulate in three distinct areas of the three-dimensional HA model: (i) at the tip of the 80-A (8-nm)-long alpha helix, (ii) at the connection between the globular region and stem, and (iii) in the basal domain of the stem. The concept that these areas are critical for HA assembly and hence for transport is supported by the finding that the mutants that are unable to leave the endoplasmic reticulum at the nonpermissive temperature do not correctly trimerize. Upon analysis by density gradient centrifugation, cross-linking, and digestion with trypsin and endoglucosaminidase H, two groups can be discriminated among these mutants: with ts1, ts227, and ts478, the HA forms large irreversible aggregates, whereas with ts206 and ts293, it is retained in the monomeric form in the endoplasmic reticulum. With a third group, comprising mutants ts482 and ts651 that enter the Golgi apparatus, trimerization was not impaired. PMID:1738202

  17. Structure and assembly of hemagglutinin mutants of fowl plague virus with impaired surface transport.

    PubMed Central

    Garten, W; Will, C; Buckard, K; Kuroda, K; Ortmann, D; Munk, K; Scholtissek, C; Schnittler, H; Drenckhahn, D; Klenk, H D

    1992-01-01

    Five temperature-sensitive mutants of influenza virus A/FPV/Rostock/34 (H7N1), ts206, ts293, ts478, ts482, and ts651, displaying correct hemagglutinin (HA) insertion into the apical plasma membrane of MDCK cells at the permissive temperature but defective transport to the cell surface at the restrictive temperature, have been investigated. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the HA gene of the mutants and their revertants demonstrated that with each mutant a single amino acid change is responsible for the transport block. The amino acid substitutions were compared with those of mutants ts1 and ts227, which have been analyzed previously (W. Schuy, C. Will, K. Kuroda, C. Scholtissek, W. Garten, and H.-D. Klenk, EMBO J. 5:2831-2836, 1986). With the exception of ts206, the changed amino acids of all mutants and revertants accumulate in three distinct areas of the three-dimensional HA model: (i) at the tip of the 80-A (8-nm)-long alpha helix, (ii) at the connection between the globular region and stem, and (iii) in the basal domain of the stem. The concept that these areas are critical for HA assembly and hence for transport is supported by the finding that the mutants that are unable to leave the endoplasmic reticulum at the nonpermissive temperature do not correctly trimerize. Upon analysis by density gradient centrifugation, cross-linking, and digestion with trypsin and endoglucosaminidase H, two groups can be discriminated among these mutants: with ts1, ts227, and ts478, the HA forms large irreversible aggregates, whereas with ts206 and ts293, it is retained in the monomeric form in the endoplasmic reticulum. With a third group, comprising mutants ts482 and ts651 that enter the Golgi apparatus, trimerization was not impaired. Images PMID:1738202

  18. Simulation of soluble waste transport and buildup in surface waters using tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.

    1993-01-01

    Soluble tracers can be used to simulate the transport and dispersion of soluble wastes that might have been introduced or are planned for introduction into surface waters. Measured tracer-response curves produced from the injection of a known quantity of soluble tracer can be used in conjunction with the superposition principle to simulate potential waste buildup in streams, lakes, and estuaries. Such information is particularly valuable to environmental and water-resource planners in determining the effects of proposed waste discharges. The theory, techniques, analysis, and presentation of results of tracer-waste simulation tests in rivers, lakes, and estuaries are described. This manual builds on other manuals dealing with dye tracing by emphasizing the expanded use of data from time-of-travel studies.

  19. Nanoscale transport of surface excitons at the interface between ZnO and a molecular monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friede, Sebastian; Kuehn, Sergei; Sadofev, Sergey; Blumstengel, Sylke; Henneberger, Fritz; Elsaesser, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Excitons play a key role for the optoelectronic properties of hybrid systems. We apply steady-state and time-resolved near-field scanning optical microscopy with a 100-nm spatial resolution to study the photoluminescence (PL) of surface excitons (SX) in a 20-nm-thick ZnO film capped with a monolayer of stearic acid molecules. The PL spectra exhibit emission from SX, donor-bound (DX), and—at sample temperatures T >20 K —free (FX) excitons. The 4 meV broad smooth envelope of SX emission at T <10 K points to an inhomogeneous distribution of SX transition energies and spectral diffusion caused by diffusive SX transport on a 50-nm scale with a diffusion coefficient of DSX(T <10 K ) =0.30 cm 2/s .

  20. Using Contaminant Transport Modeling to Determine Historical Discharges at the Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogwell, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    When it is determined that a contaminated site needs to be remediated, the issue of who is going to pay for that remediation is an immediate concern. This means that there needs to be a determination of who the responsible parties are for the existing contamination. Seldom is it the case that records have been made and kept of the surface contaminant discharges. In many cases it is possible to determine the relative amount of contaminant discharge at the surface of the various responsible parties by employing a careful analysis of the history of contaminant transport through the surface, through the vadose zone, and within the saturated zone. The process begins with the development of a dynamic conceptual site model that takes into account the important features of the transport of the contaminants through the vadose zone and in the groundwater. The parameters for this model can be derived from flow data available for the site. The resulting contaminant transport model is a composite of the vadose zone transport model, together with the saturated zone (groundwater) flow model. Any calibration of the model should be carefully employed in order to avoid using information about the conclusions of the relative discharge amounts of the responsible parties in determining the calibrated parameters. Determination of the leading edge of the plume is an important first step. It is associated with the first discharges from the surface of the site. If there were several discharging parties at the same time, then it is important to establish a chemical or isotopic signature of the chemicals that were discharged. The time duration of the first discharger needs to be determined as accurately as possible in order to establish the appropriate characterization of the leading portion of the resulting plume in the groundwater. The information about the first discharger and the resulting part of the plume associated with this discharger serves as a basis for the determination of the

  1. Decay characteristics of surface mounds with contrasting interlayer mass transport channels.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Wendelken, J F; Liu, B G; Wang, E G; Zhang, Z

    2001-03-12

    The decay characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) islands formed on surfaces are investigated theoretically considering two types of interlayer mass transport mechanisms. If an adatom on a given layer can easily descend from any site along the periphery of the layer, an optimal island slope and a constant terrace width will be selected during the decay. In contrast, if the adatom can descend primarily through selective (such as kinked) sites, the decay will be accompanied by a gradual increase in the island slope. These generic conclusions provide the basis for a microscopic understanding of the decay of nanostructures in fcc(111) and fcc(100) metal homoepitaxy and are applicable to other systems as well.

  2. Decay Characteristics of Surface Mounds with Contrasting Interlayer Mass Transport Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Maozhi; Wendelken, J. F.; Liu, Bang-Gui; Wang, E. G.; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2001-03-12

    The decay characteristics of three-dimensional (3D) islands formed on surfaces are investigated theoretically considering two types of interlayer mass transport mechanisms. If an adatom on a given layer can easily descend from any site along the periphery of the layer, an optimal island slope and a constant terrace width will be selected during the decay. In contrast, if the adatom can descend primarily through selective (such as kinked) sites, the decay will be accompanied by a gradual increase in the island slope. These generic conclusions provide the basis for a microscopic understanding of the decay of nanostructures in fcc(111) and fcc(100) metal homoepitaxy and are applicable to other systems as well.

  3. Vitamin A Transport Mechanism of the Multitransmembrane Cell-Surface Receptor STRA6

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Riki; Zhong, Ming; Kassai, Miki; Ter-Stepanian, Mariam; Sun, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin A has biological functions as diverse as sensing light for vision, regulating stem cell differentiation, maintaining epithelial integrity, promoting immune competency, regulating learning and memory, and acting as a key developmental morphogen. Vitamin A derivatives have also been used in treating human diseases. If vitamin A is considered a drug that everyone needs to take to survive, evolution has come up with a natural drug delivery system that combines sustained release with precise and controlled delivery to the cells or tissues that depend on it. This “drug delivery system” is mediated by plasma retinol binding protein (RBP), the principle and specific vitamin A carrier protein in the blood, and STRA6, the cell-surface receptor for RBP that mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. The mechanism by which the RBP receptor absorbs vitamin A from the blood is distinct from other known cellular uptake mechanisms. This review summarizes recent progress in elucidating the fundamental molecular mechanism mediated by the RBP receptor and multiple newly discovered catalytic activities of this receptor, and compares this transport system with retinoid transport independent of RBP/STRA6. How to target this new type of transmembrane receptor using small molecules in treating diseases is also discussed. PMID:26343735

  4. Surface Flux Transport and the Evolution of the Sun's Polar Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.-M.

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of the polar fields occupies a central place in flux transport (Babcock-Leighton) models of the solar cycle. We discuss the relationship between surface flux transport and polar field evolution, focusing on two main issues: the latitudinal profile of the meridional flow and the axial tilts of active regions. Recent helioseismic observations indicate that the poleward flow speed peaks at much lower latitudes than inferred from magnetic feature tracking, which includes the effect of supergranular diffusion and thus does not represent the actual bulk flow. Employing idealized simulations, we demonstrate that flow profiles that peak at mid latitudes give rise to overly strong and concentrated polar fields. We discuss the differences between magnetic and white-light measurements of tilt angles, noting the large uncertainties inherent in the sunspot group measurements and their tendency to underestimate the actual tilts. We find no clear evidence for systematic cycle-to-cycle variations in Joy's law during cycles 21-23. Finally, based on the observed evolution of the Sun's axial dipole component and polar fields up to the end of 2015, we predict that cycle 25 will be similar in amplitude to cycle 24.

  5. Transport and retention of phosphorus in surface water in an urban slum area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyenje, P. M.; Meijer, L. M. G.; Foppen, J. W.; Kulabako, R.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2013-08-01

    The transport of excessive phosphorus (P) discharged from unsewered informal settlements (slums) due to poor on-site sanitation is largely unknown. Hence, we investigated the processes governing P transport in a 28 km2 slum-dominated catchment in Kampala, Uganda. During high runoff events and a period of base flow, we collected hourly water samples (over 24 h) from a primary channel draining the catchment and from a small size tertiary channel draining one of the contributing slum areas (0.5 km2). Samples were analyzed for orthophosphate (PO4-P), particulate P (PP), total P (TP) and selected hydro-chemical parameters. Channel bed and suspended sediments were collected to determine their sorption potential, geo-available metals and dominant P forms. We found that P inputs in the catchment originated mainly from domestic wastewater as evidenced by high concentrations of Cl (36-144 mg L-1), HCO3 and other cations in the channels. Most P discharged during low flow conditions was particulate implying that much of it was retained in bed sediments. Retained P was mostly bound to Ca and Fe/Al oxides. Hence, we inferred that mineral precipitation and adsorption to Ca-minerals were the dominant P retention processes. Bed sediments were P-saturated and showed a tendency to release P to discharging waters. P released was likely due to Ca-bound P because of the strong correlation between Ca and total P in sediments (r2 = 0.9). High flows exhibited a strong flush of PP and SS implying that part of P retained was frequently flushed out of the catchment by surface erosion and resuspension of bed sediment. Our findings suggest that P accumulated in the channel bed during low flows and then was slowly released into surface water. Hence, it will likely take some time, even with improved wastewater management practices, before P loads to downstream areas can be significantly reduced.

  6. Cell Surface Receptors for Signal Transduction and Ligand Transport: A Design Principles Study

    PubMed Central

    Shankaran, Harish; Resat, Haluk; Wiley, H. Steven

    2007-01-01

    Receptors constitute the interface of cells to their external environment. These molecules bind specific ligands involved in multiple processes, such as signal transduction and nutrient transport. Although a variety of cell surface receptors undergo endocytosis, the systems-level design principles that govern the evolution of receptor trafficking dynamics are far from fully understood. We have constructed a generalized mathematical model of receptor–ligand binding and internalization to understand how receptor internalization dynamics encodes receptor function and regulation. A given signaling or transport receptor system represents a particular implementation of this module with a specific set of kinetic parameters. Parametric analysis of the response of receptor systems to ligand inputs reveals that receptor systems can be characterized as being: i) avidity-controlled where the response control depends primarily on the extracellular ligand capture efficiency, ii) consumption-controlled where the ability to internalize surface-bound ligand is the primary control parameter, and iii) dual-sensitivity where both the avidity and consumption parameters are important. We show that the transferrin and low-density lipoprotein receptors are avidity-controlled, the vitellogenin receptor is consumption-controlled, and the epidermal growth factor receptor is a dual-sensitivity receptor. Significantly, we show that ligand-induced endocytosis is a mechanism to enhance the accuracy of signaling receptors rather than merely serving to attenuate signaling. Our analysis reveals that the location of a receptor system in the avidity-consumption parameter space can be used to understand both its function and its regulation. PMID:17542642

  7. A theoretical study on the effect of surface roughness on mass transport and transformation in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Picioreanu, C; van Loosdrecht, M C; Heijnen, J J

    2000-05-20

    This modeling study evaluates the influence of biofilm geometrical characteristics on substrate mass transfer and conversion rates. A spatially two-dimensional model was used to compute laminar fluid flow, substrate mass transport, and conversion in irregularly shaped biofilms. The flow velocity above the biofilm surface was varied over 3 orders of magnitude. Numerical results show that increased biofilm roughness does not necessarily lead to an enhancement of either conversion rates or external mass transfer. The average mass transfer coefficient and Sherwood numbers were found to decrease almost linearly with biofilm area enlargement in the flow regime tested. The influence of flow, biofilm geometry and biofilm activity on external mass transfer could be quantified by Sh-Re correlations. The effect of biofilm surface roughness was incorporated in this correlation via area enlargement. Conversion rates could be best correlated to biofilm compactness. The more compact the biofilm, the higher the global conversion rate of substrate. Although an increase of bulk fluid velocity showed a large effect on mass transfer coefficients, the global substrate conversion rate per carrier area was less affected. If only diffusion occurs in pores and channels, then rough biofilms behave as if they were compact but having less biomass activity. In spite of the fact that the real biofilm area is increased due to roughness, the effective mass transfer area is actually decreased because only biofilm peaks receive substrate. This can be explained by the fact that in the absence of normal convection in the biofilm valleys, the substrate gradients are still largely perpendicular to the carrier. Even in the cases where convective transport dominates the external mass transfer process, roughness could lead to decreased conversion rates. The results of this study clearly indicate that only evaluation of overall conversion rates or mass fluxes can describe the correct biofilm conversion

  8. Transport toward earth of ions sputtered from the moon's surface by the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cladis, J. B.; Francis, W. E.; Vondrak, R. R.

    1994-01-01

    The transport of typical ions from the surface of the Moon to the vicinity of Earth was calculated using a test particle approach. It was assumed that the ions were sputtered from the surface by the solar wind, with fluxes in the range determined experimentally by Elphic et al. (1991), and were accelerated initially to 10 eV by the potential of the Moon on its sunlit side. Si(+) and Ca(+) ions were selected for this transport analysis because their masses are within two prominent ion mass groups that have high sputtering yields. In the solar wind the ion trajectories were traced in the following superimposed fields: (1) a steady magnetic field B0 at an angle of 45 deg to the solar wind velocity VSW, (2) the motional electric field Ezero = -V(sub SW x B0, and (3) turbulent magnetic and electric fields generated by hydromagnetic waves with a k-space power spectrum of absolute value of k-5/3 propagating along both directions of the magnetic field B0. Interactions with Earth's bow shock and magnetosphere were included. Case histories of the ions were recorded in the XGSM, YGSM plane and in various planes perpendicular to the E0 x B0 drift direction of the ions between the Moon and Earth. The number density, energy and angular distributions, and directional and omnidirectional fluxes of the ions were constructed from the case histories. It was found that the diffusion of the ions increases rapidly as the amplitude of the turbulence delta Brms increases beyond the value 0.04 B0. Recent measurements of lunar ions upstream of the bow shock by Hilchenbach et al. (1992) generally confirm the predicted behavior of the ions.

  9. The reactivity of chlorite surfaces: Microscopic alteration processes and the transport behaviour of uranium(VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosbach, D.; Brandt, F.; Arnold, T.; Krawczyk-Baersch, E.; Bernhard, G.

    2003-04-01

    The transport of U(VI) in phyllite rocks or on granitic fractures is significantly affected by the dissolution of chlorite and the re-precipitation of various secondary phases. However, in order to be able to predict the behaviour of radionuclides in these systems a sound understanding of the reaction kinetics of chlorite alteration/dissolution processes as well as the precipitation of secondary phases is required. We have studied the dissolution of chlorite with mixed-flow reactor experiments and in-situ AFM observations far from equilibrium over a broad pH range. Key parameters such as the reactive surface area as well as the stoichiometry and pH dependency of the dissolution reaction were determined. Speciation calculations indicate that no secondary phases have formed (except under neutral pH conditions). Under acidic conditions the brucite-like layer of the chlorite structure dissolves faster than the 2:1 TOT layer whereas above pH 8 a reverse dissolution behaviour was observed. Under acidic conditions (pH < 5) chlorite transforms to a vermiculite-like clay mineral, which has also been identified in field studies. In addition, static batch dissolution experiments with chlorite were performed in order to mimic more closely natural systems. In these experiments various secondary phases including hydrous ferrous oxides (HFO) were formed as coatings on chlorite surfaces and as colloids in solution. Batch adsorption experiments indicate that U(VI) has a strong affinity to HFO and that retardation of U(VI) occurs via adsorption to immobile HFO coatings on chlorite surfaces. Heterogeneous HFO formation seems to be favoured on {hk0} edge surfaces in the near neutral pH range. The formation mechanism of HFO coatings was studied systematically with titration experiments, in order to be able to quantify the homogeneous and heterogeneous formation of these secondary phases as a function of the geochemical conditions.

  10. Multiple Surface Regions on the Niemann-Pick C2 Protein Facilitate Intracellular Cholesterol Transport.

    PubMed

    McCauliff, Leslie A; Xu, Zhi; Li, Ran; Kodukula, Sarala; Ko, Dennis C; Scott, Matthew P; Kahn, Peter C; Storch, Judith

    2015-11-01

    The cholesterol storage disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is caused by defects in either of two late endosomal/lysosomal proteins, NPC1 and NPC2. NPC2 is a 16-kDa soluble protein that binds cholesterol in a 1:1 stoichiometry and can transfer cholesterol between membranes by a mechanism that involves protein-membrane interactions. To examine the structural basis of NPC2 function in cholesterol trafficking, a series of point mutations were generated across the surface of the protein. Several NPC2 mutants exhibited deficient sterol transport properties in a set of fluorescence-based assays. Notably, these mutants were also unable to promote egress of accumulated intracellular cholesterol from npc2(-/-) fibroblasts. The mutations mapped to several regions on the protein surface, suggesting that NPC2 can bind to more than one membrane simultaneously. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that WT NPC2 promotes vesicle-vesicle interactions. These interactions were abrogated, however, by mutations causing defective sterol transfer properties. Molecular modeling shows that NPC2 is highly plastic, with several intense positively charged regions across the surface that could interact favorably with negatively charged membrane phospholipids. The point mutations generated in this study caused changes in NPC2 surface charge distribution with minimal conformational changes. The plasticity, coupled with membrane flexibility, probably allows for multiple cholesterol transfer routes. Thus, we hypothesize that, in part, NPC2 rapidly traffics cholesterol between closely appositioned membranes within the multilamellar interior of late endosomal/lysosomal proteins, ultimately effecting cholesterol egress from this compartment.

  11. Multiple Surface Regions on the Niemann-Pick C2 Protein Facilitate Intracellular Cholesterol Transport.

    PubMed

    McCauliff, Leslie A; Xu, Zhi; Li, Ran; Kodukula, Sarala; Ko, Dennis C; Scott, Matthew P; Kahn, Peter C; Storch, Judith

    2015-11-01

    The cholesterol storage disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is caused by defects in either of two late endosomal/lysosomal proteins, NPC1 and NPC2. NPC2 is a 16-kDa soluble protein that binds cholesterol in a 1:1 stoichiometry and can transfer cholesterol between membranes by a mechanism that involves protein-membrane interactions. To examine the structural basis of NPC2 function in cholesterol trafficking, a series of point mutations were generated across the surface of the protein. Several NPC2 mutants exhibited deficient sterol transport properties in a set of fluorescence-based assays. Notably, these mutants were also unable to promote egress of accumulated intracellular cholesterol from npc2(-/-) fibroblasts. The mutations mapped to several regions on the protein surface, suggesting that NPC2 can bind to more than one membrane simultaneously. Indeed, we have previously demonstrated that WT NPC2 promotes vesicle-vesicle interactions. These interactions were abrogated, however, by mutations causing defective sterol transfer properties. Molecular modeling shows that NPC2 is highly plastic, with several intense positively charged regions across the surface that could interact favorably with negatively charged membrane phospholipids. The point mutations generated in this study caused changes in NPC2 surface charge distribution with minimal conformational changes. The plasticity, coupled with membrane flexibility, probably allows for multiple cholesterol transfer routes. Thus, we hypothesize that, in part, NPC2 rapidly traffics cholesterol between closely appositioned membranes within the multilamellar interior of late endosomal/lysosomal proteins, ultimately effecting cholesterol egress from this compartment. PMID:26296895

  12. Nitrogen Transport from Atmospheric Deposition and Contaminated Groundwater to Surface Waters on a Watershed Scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showers, W. J.; Demaster, D.

    2005-12-01

    Increasing nitrate contamination of surface water and groundwater is a problem in regions of intensive agriculture and near urban wastewater treatment facilities that land-apply biosolids. The 15N composition of groundwater nitrate has been used to assess potential sources of nitrogen contamination. But because of transformations of nitrogen within the hydrological system, contaminant source tracing with nitrogen isotopes has been complicated. We have used multiple isotope tracers of nitrate (15N, 17O, 18O) to distinguish between different N contamination sources, areas of extensive denitrification, and areas of atmospheric N deposition on the NC coastal plain and piedmont. Areas of extensive denitrification are often associated with hydric soils. The distribution of hydric soils on field and watershed scales correlates with surface and ground water quality degradation. The distribution of hydric soils may thus be an important element in prediction of environmental impacts of agriculture. Transport of atmospheric nitrogen into surface waters as indicated by the 17O of nitrate is event driven. Most surface waters in our study area have low concentrations of nitrate 17O, indicating that the importance of atmospheric N has been overestimated in riverine N flux from watersheds. However, when the atmospheric N flux is integrated over a discharge event, atmospheric N can approach 25 % of the total N riverine flux in urban areas. More work needs to be completed with multiple isotopic tracers and GIS analysis on watershed scales. Using a GIS / isotope approach, areas where the isotopic signature has been affected by denitrification can be predicted, and remediation efforts can be focused on potential areas of N contamination where extensive denitrification is unlikely to occur.

  13. Surface expression of sodium channels and transporters in rat kidney: effects of dietary sodium.

    PubMed

    Frindt, Gustavo; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2009-11-01

    The abundance of Na transport proteins in the luminal membrane of the rat kidney was assessed using in situ biotinylation and immunoblotting. When animals were fed an Na-deficient diet for 1 wk, the amounts of epithelial Na channel (ENaC) beta-subunit (beta-ENaC) and gamma-subunit (gamma-ENaC) and Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) protein in the surface fraction increased relative to controls by 1.9-, 3.5-, and 1.5-fold, respectively. The amounts of the luminal Na/H exchanger (NHE3) and the luminal Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) did not change significantly. The increases in ENaC subunits were mimicked by administration of aldosterone for 1 wk, but the increase in NCC was not. When the animals were fed a high-Na (5% NaCl) diet for 1 wk, the surface expression of beta-ENaC increased by 50%, whereas that of the other membrane proteins did not change, relative to controls. The biochemical parameter most strongly affected by dietary Na was the abundance of the 65-kDa cleaved form of gamma-ENaC at the surface. This increased by 8.5-fold with Na depletion and decreased by 40% with Na loading. The overall 14-fold change reflected regulation of the total abundance of the subunit as well as the fraction of the subunit protein in the cleaved form. We conclude that cleavage of gamma-ENaC and its expression at the apical surface play a major role in the regulation of renal Na reabsorption.

  14. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Glenn C.

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  15. Phonon-Enabled Carrier Transport of Localized States at Non-Polar Semiconductor Surfaces: A First-Principles-Based Prediction.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong; Bang, Junhyeok; Xie, Weiyu; Meunier, Vincent; Zhang, ShengBai

    2016-09-15

    Electron-phonon coupling can hamper carrier transport either by scattering or by the formation of mass-enhanced polarons. Here, we use time-dependent density functional theory-molecular dynamics simulations to show that phonons can also promote the transport of excited carriers. Using nonpolar InAs (110) surface as an example, we identify phonon-mediated coupling between electronic states close in energy as the origin for the enhanced transport. In particular, the coupling causes localized excitons in the resonant surface states to propagate into bulk with velocities as high as 10(6) cm/s. The theory also predicts temperature enhanced carrier transport, which may be observable in ultrathin nanostructures. PMID:27552528

  16. Theoretical investigation of the electronic structure and quantum transport in the graphene-C(111) diamond surface system.

    PubMed

    Selli, Daniele; Baburin, Igor; Leoni, Stefano; Zhu, Zhen; Tománek, David; Seifert, Gotthard

    2013-10-30

    We investigate the interaction of a graphene monolayer with the C(111) diamond surface using ab initio density functional theory. To accommodate the lattice mismatch between graphene and diamond, the overlayer deforms into a wavy structure that binds strongly to the diamond substrate. The detached ridges of the wavy graphene overlayer behave electronically as free-standing polyacetylene chains with delocalized π electrons, separated by regions containing only sp(3) carbon atoms covalently bonded to the (111) diamond surface. We performed quantum transport calculations for different geometries of the system to study how the buckling of the graphene layer and the associated bonding to the diamond substrate affect the transport properties. The system displays high carrier mobility along the ridges and a wide transport gap in the direction normal to the ridges. These intriguing, strongly anisotropic transport properties qualify the hybrid graphene-diamond system as a viable candidate for electronic nanodevices.

  17. General quantification of catchment-scale nutrient and pollutant transport through the subsurface to surface and coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Destouni, Georgia; Persson, Klas; Prieto, Carmen; Jarsjö, Jerker

    2010-03-15

    This study develops a general quantification framework for consistent intermodel and intercatchment comparison of the nutrient and pollutant mass loading from multiple sources in a catchment area to downstream surface and coastal waters. The framework accounts for the wide spectrum of different transport pathways and travel times through the subsurface (soil, groundwater, sediment) and the linked surface (streams, lakes, wetlands) water systems of a catchment. The account is based on key flow partitioning and mass delivery fractions, which can be quantified differently by different flow and transport and reaction models. The framework application is exemplified for two Swedish catchment cases with regard to the transport of phosphorus and of a generic attenuating solute. The results show essential differences in model quantifications of transport pathways and temporal spreading, with important implications for our understanding of cause and effect in the catchment-scale nutrient and pollutant loading to downstream waters. PMID:20158209

  18. Effect of strain, thickness, and local surface environment on electron transport properties of oxygen-terminated copper thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Soares, Alfonso; Jones, Sarah L. T.; Plombon, John J.; Kaushik, Ananth P.; Nagle, Roger E.; Clarke, James S.; Greer, James C.

    2016-10-01

    Electron transport is studied in surface oxidized single-crystal copper thin films with a thickness of up to 5.6 nm by applying density functional theory and density functional tight binding methods to determine electron transport properties within the ballistic regime. The variation of the electron transmission as a function of film thickness as well as the different contributions to the overall electron transmission as a function of depth into the the films is examined. Transmission at the oxidized copper film surfaces is found to be universally low. Films with thickness greater than 2.7 nm exhibit a similar behavior in local transmission per unit area with depth from the film surface; transmission per unit area initially increases rapidly and then plateaus at a depth of approximately 0.35-0.5 nm away from the surface, dependent on surface facet. Unstrained films tend to exhibit a higher transmission per unit area than corresponding films under tensile strain.

  19. Geochemical and magnetic characteristics of aeolian transported materials under different near-surface wind fields: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xunming; Lang, Lili; Hua, Ting; Zhang, Caixia; Xia, Dunsheng

    2015-06-01

    By combining field investigations, field sampling, wind-tunnel experiments, and laboratory measurements, the relationships between near-surface winds and the geochemical and magnetic characteristics of wind-transported materials were statistically analyzed. Our study was conducted using bulk surface samples from a major potential dust source area in Central Asia (the Ala Shan Plateau). Under near-surface wind velocities ranging from 8 to 22 m/s, the coefficients of variation ranged between 1.6% and 14.9% for χlf, 1.4% and 11.0% for χARM, and 0.7% and 12.3% for SIRM of the transported materials. For the 26 elements and oxides investigated, the coefficients of variation of Ti, Cr, As, Zr, Ce, Pb, and Cu in the samples were greater than 10%. No consistent patterns were found between magnetic characteristics and elemental and iron oxide concentrations as a function of variations in near-surface wind velocities. In potential dust source areas under near-surface wind velocities, there are variations in the relationships between magnetic and geochemical characteristics in the fine fractions of transported materials with different particle sizes. Given the wide variation in magnetic and geochemical characteristics of aeolian-transported materials under different near-surface winds, their use as proxies for past climate reconstruction must be carefully appraised.

  20. Neuronal activity mediated regulation of glutamate transporter GLT‐1 surface diffusion in rat astrocytes in dissociated and slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Al Awabdh, Sana; Gupta‐Agarwal, Swati; Sheehan, David F.; Muir, James; Norkett, Rosalind; Twelvetrees, Alison E.; Griffin, Lewis D.

    2016-01-01

    The astrocytic GLT‐1 (or EAAT2) is the major glutamate transporter for clearing synaptic glutamate. While the diffusion dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors at the neuronal surface are well understood, far less is known regarding the surface trafficking of transporters in subcellular domains of the astrocyte membrane. Here, we have used live‐cell imaging to study the mechanisms regulating GLT‐1 surface diffusion in astrocytes in dissociated and brain slice cultures. Using GFP‐time lapse imaging, we show that GLT‐1 forms stable clusters that are dispersed rapidly and reversibly upon glutamate treatment in a transporter activity‐dependent manner. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single particle tracking using quantum dots revealed that clustered GLT‐1 is more stable than diffuse GLT‐1 and that glutamate increases GLT‐1 surface diffusion in the astrocyte membrane. Interestingly, the two main GLT‐1 isoforms expressed in the brain, GLT‐1a and GLT‐1b, are both found to be stabilized opposed to synapses under basal conditions, with GLT‐1b more so. GLT‐1 surface mobility is increased in proximity to activated synapses and alterations of neuronal activity can bidirectionally modulate the dynamics of both GLT‐1 isoforms. Altogether, these data reveal that astrocytic GLT‐1 surface mobility, via its transport activity, is modulated during neuronal firing, which may be a key process for shaping glutamate clearance and glutamatergic synaptic transmission. GLIA 2016;64:1252–1264 PMID:27189737

  1. Surface Transportation Research and Development Act of 1997. House of Representatives, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    Mr. Sensenbrenner, from the Committee on Science, submitted this report together with additional views. The Committee on Science, to whom was referred the bill (H.R. 860) to authorize appropriations to the Department of Transportation for surface transportation research and development, and for other purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

  2. Bulk, surface, and gas-phase limited water transport in aerosol.

    PubMed

    Davies, James F; Haddrell, Allen E; Miles, Rachael E H; Bull, Craig R; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-11-15

    The influence of solute species on mass transfer to and from aqueous aerosol droplets is investigated using an electrodynamic balance coupled with light scattering techniques. In particular, we explore the limitations imposed on water evaporation by slow bulk phase diffusion and by the formation of surface organic films. Measurements of evaporation from ionic salt solutions, specifically sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate, are compared with predictions from an analytical model framework, highlighting the uncertainties associated with quantifying gas diffusional transport. The influence of low solubility organic acids on mass transfer is reported and compared to both model predictions and previous work. The limiting value of the evaporation coefficient that can be resolved by this approach, when uncertainties in key thermophysical quantities are accounted for, is estimated. The limitation of slow bulk phase diffusion on the evaporation rate is investigated for gel and glass states formed during the evaporation of magnesium sulfate and sucrose droplets, respectively. Finally, the effect of surfactants on evaporation has been probed, with soluble surfactants (such as sodium dodecyl sulfate) leading to little or no retardation of evaporation through slowing of surface layer kinetics. PMID:23095147

  3. Transport Properties of Thin Bismuth Films on InP (110) Surfaces by Scanning Tunneling Potentiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenstra, R. M.; Briner, B. G.; Chin, T. P.; Woodall, J. M.

    1996-03-01

    Charge transport in 20--30 Å thick Bi-films is studied by scanning tunneling potentiometry (STP) at room temperature. The Bi is deposited on cleaved InP(110) surfaces at temperatures near 140 K, yielding atomically flat films interspersed with 12 Å deep holes. The InP substrates contain conducting/insulating/conducting layers, which in cross-section are used to form contacts to the film, thus enabling lateral current densities as high as 8 × 10^6 A/cm^2 . Potential variations due to scattering of this lateral current is detected using STP, by locating the zero-crossing of current-voltage characteristics at each pixel in an image. Potential images reveal, on a coarse scale, a smooth ramp arising from the electric field due to phonon scattering in the film, from which an electron-phonon scattering length of >1000 Å is deduced. On a finer scale, potential steps 2--10 mV high are seen near surface holes and grain boundaries in the film. Detailed study of the ballistic scattering near the holes reveals a dipole shaped feature, which is identified as a residual resistivity dipole. *present address: Physics, Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh PA 15213 **now at: Fritz-Haber-Institut, 14195 Berlin, briner@fhi-berlin.mpg.de

  4. ON POLAR MAGNETIC FIELD REVERSAL AND SURFACE FLUX TRANSPORT DURING SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xudong; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2015-01-10

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33-2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in 2013 October; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60° latitude) reversed in 2012 November and 2014 March, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR tilt, higher total AR flux, or slower mid-latitude near-surface meridional flow, while exceptions occur during low magnetic activity. In particular, the AR flux and the mid-latitude poleward flow speed exhibit a clear anti-correlation. We discuss how these features can be explained in a surface flux transport process that includes a field-dependent converging flow toward the ARs, a characteristic that may contribute to solar cycle variability.

  5. Mechanisms of nanoparticle internalization and transport across an intestinal epithelial cell model: effect of size and surface charge.

    PubMed

    Bannunah, Azzah M; Vllasaliu, Driton; Lord, Jennie; Stolnik, Snjezana

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of nanoparticle size (50 and 100 nm) and surface charge on their interaction with Caco-2 monolayers as a model of the intestinal epithelium, including cell internalization pathways and the level of transepithelial transport. Initially, toxicity assays showed that cell viability and cell membrane integrity were dependent on the surface charge and applied mass, number, and total surface area of nanoparticles, as tested in two epithelial cell lines, colon carcinoma Caco-2 and airway Calu-3. This also identified suitable nanoparticle concentrations for subsequent cell uptake experiments. Nanoparticle application at doses below half maximal effective concentration (EC₅₀) revealed that the transport efficiency (ratio of transport to cell uptake) across Caco-2 cell monolayers is significantly higher for negatively charged nanoparticles compared to their positively charged counterparts (of similar size), despite the higher level of internalization of positively charged systems. Cell internalization pathways were hence probed using a panel of pharmacological inhibitors aiming to establish whether the discrepancy in transport efficiency is due to different uptake and transport pathways. Vesicular trans-monolayer transport for both positively and negatively charged nanoparticles was confirmed via inhibition of dynamin (by dynasore) and microtubule network (via nocodazole), which significantly reduced the transport of both nanoparticle systems. For positively charged nanoparticles a significant decrease in internalization and transport (46% and 37%, respectively) occurred in the presence of a clathrin pathway inhibitor (chlorpromazine), macropinocytosis inhibition (42%; achieved by 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyi)-amiloride), and under cholesterol depletion (38%; via methyl-β-cyclodextrin), but remained unaffected by the inhibition of lipid raft associated uptake (caveolae) by genistein. On the contrary, the most prominent reduction in

  6. Influence of surface charge on the transport characteristics of nanowire-field effect transistors in liquid environments

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Daijiro E-mail: research@nano.tu-dresden.de; Kunstmann, Jens; Zörgiebel, Felix; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-05-18

    One dimensional nanowire field effect transistors (NW-FETs) are a promising platform for sensor applications. The transport characteristics of NW-FETs are strongly modified in liquid environment due to the charging of surface functional groups accompanied with protonation or deprotonation. In order to investigate the influence of surface charges and ionic concentrations on the transport characteristics of Schottky-barrier NW-FETs, we have combined the modified Poisson-Boltzmann theory with the Landauer-Büttiker transport formalism. For a typical device, the model is able to capture the reduction of the sensitivity of NW-FETs in ionic solutions due to the screening from counter ions as well as a local gating from surface functional groups. Our approach allows to model, to investigate, and to optimize realistic Schottky-barrier NW-FET devices in liquid environment.

  7. Charge and spin transport in edge channels of a ν=0 quantum Hall system on the surface of topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Takahiro; Furusaki, Akira; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2015-04-10

    Three-dimensional topological insulators of finite thickness can show the quantum Hall effect (QHE) at the filling factor ν=0 under an external magnetic field if there is a finite potential difference between the top and bottom surfaces. We calculate energy spectra of surface Weyl fermions in the ν=0 QHE and find that gapped edge states with helical spin structure are formed from Weyl fermions on the side surfaces under certain conditions. These edge channels account for the nonlocal charge transport in the ν=0 QHE which is observed in a recent experiment on (Bi_{1-x}Sb_{x})_{2}Te_{3} films. The edge channels also support spin transport due to the spin-momentum locking. We propose an experimental setup to observe various spintronics functions such as spin transport and spin conversion.

  8. Surface-Water to Groundwater Transport of Pharmaceuticals in a Wastewater-Impacted Stream in the U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. M.; Barber, L. B.; Duris, J. W.; Foreman, W. T.; Furlong, E. T.; Hubbard, L. E.; Hutchinson, K. J.; Keefe, S. H.; Kolpin, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Wastewater pharmaceutical contamination of shallow groundwater is a substantial concern in effluent-dominated streams, due to aqueous mobility and designed bioactivity of pharmaceuticals and due to effluent-driven hydraulic gradients. Improved understanding of the environmental fate and transport of wastewater-derived pharmaceuticals is essential for effective protection of vital aquatic ecosystem services, environmental health, and drinking-water supplies. Substantial longitudinal (downstream) transport of pharmaceutical contaminants has been documented in effluent-impacted streams. The comparative lack of information on vertical and lateral transport (infiltration) of wastewater contaminants from surface-water to hyporheic and shallow groundwater compartments is a critical scientific data gap, given the potential for contamination of groundwater supplies in effluent-impacted systems. Growing dependencies on bank filtration and artificial recharge applications for release of wastewater to the environment and for pretreatment of poor-quality surface-water for drinking water emphasize the critical need to better understand the exchange of wastewater contaminants, like pharmaceuticals, between surface-water and groundwater compartments. The potential transport of effluent-derived pharmaceutical contaminants from surface-water to hyporheic-water and shallow groundwater compartments was examined in a wastewater-treatment-facility (WWTF) impacted stream in Ankeny, Iowa under effluent-dominated (71-99% of downstream flow) conditions. Strong hydraulic gradients and hydrologic connectivity were evident between surface-water and shallow-groundwater compartments in the vicinity of the WWTF outfall. Carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, and immunologically-related compounds were detected in groundwater 10-20 meters from the stream bank. Direct aqueous-injection HPLC-MS/MS revealed high percentage detections of pharmaceuticals (110 total analytes) in surface-water and groundwater

  9. Magnetic transport apparatus for the production of ultracold atomic gases in the vicinity of a dielectric surface

    SciTech Connect

    Haendel, S.; Marchant, A. L.; Wiles, T. P.; Hopkins, S. A.; Cornish, S. L.

    2012-01-15

    We present an apparatus designed for studies of atom-surface interactions using quantum degenerate gases of {sup 85}Rb and {sup 87}Rb in the vicinity of a room temperature dielectric surface. The surface to be investigated is a super-polished face of a glass Dove prism mounted in a glass cell under ultra-high vacuum. To maintain excellent optical access to the region surrounding the surface, magnetic transport is used to deliver ultracold atoms from a separate vacuum chamber housing the magneto-optical trap (MOT). We present a detailed description of the vacuum apparatus highlighting the novel design features; a low profile MOT chamber and the inclusion of an obstacle in the transport path. We report the characterization and optimization of the magnetic transport around the obstacle, achieving transport efficiencies of 70% with negligible heating. Finally, we demonstrate the loading of a hybrid optical-magnetic trap with {sup 87}Rb and the creation of Bose-Einstein condensates via forced evaporative cooling close to the dielectric surface.

  10. Convergence at the surface; divergence beneath: cross-agency working within a small-scale, schools-based project.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Mark

    2011-12-01

    In the UK school system social remits - requiring schools to work towards improved social as well as educational outcomes for children - have become significant over the last decade. This study focuses upon the inter-professional issues in the running of one small-scale intervention involving parents and their babies based in schools in an urban setting in the UK. The programme, run over the school year 2007/08, provided a professional framework in which parents from the local community surrounding a school brought their babies into classroom settings to talk about aspects of baby care and development. This professional framework included classroom teachers, one senior cross-school education manager, family health visitors and one senior children's health nurse. Despite agreement about the benefits of the programme there were also clear differences of priority. This paper describes the different perceptions that each of these two sets of professionals - from health and from education - had of the programme, and highlights some critical perspectives that tended to come more from health professionals. It also maps out potential solutions which draw upon recent literature that is similarly focused upon inter-professional and inter-agency service delivery. In so doing it offers valuable insights to professionals working in inter-agency collaborations in schools. PMID:21828171

  11. Influence of surface wettability on transport mechanisms governing water droplet evaporation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhenhai; Weibel, Justin A; Garimella, Suresh V

    2014-08-19

    Prediction and manipulation of the evaporation of small droplets is a fundamental problem with importance in a variety of microfluidic, microfabrication, and biomedical applications. A vapor-diffusion-based model has been widely employed to predict the interfacial evaporation rate; however, its scope of applicability is limited due to incorporation of a number of simplifying assumptions of the physical behavior. Two key transport mechanisms besides vapor diffusion-evaporative cooling and natural convection in the surrounding gas-are investigated here as a function of the substrate wettability using an augmented droplet evaporation model. Three regimes are distinguished by the instantaneous contact angle (CA). In Regime I (CA ≲ 60°), the flat droplet shape results in a small thermal resistance between the liquid-vapor interface and substrate, which mitigates the effect of evaporative cooling; upward gas-phase natural convection enhances evaporation. In Regime II (60 ≲ CA ≲ 90°), evaporative cooling at the interface suppresses evaporation with increasing contact angle and counterbalances the gas-phase convection enhancement. Because effects of the evaporative cooling and gas-phase convection mechanisms largely neutralize each other, the vapor-diffusion-based model can predict the overall evaporation rates in this regime. In Regime III (CA ≳ 90°), evaporative cooling suppresses the evaporation rate significantly and reverses entirely the direction of natural convection induced by vapor concentration gradients in the gas phase. Delineation of these counteracting mechanisms reconciles previous debate (founded on single-surface experiments or models that consider only a subset of the governing transport mechanisms) regarding the applicability of the classic vapor-diffusion model. The vapor diffusion-based model cannot predict the local evaporation flux along the interface for high contact angle (CA ≥ 90°) when evaporative cooling is strong and the

  12. Contributions of regional and intercontinental transport to surface ozone in Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitomi, M.; Wild, O.; Akimoto, H.

    2011-04-01

    Japan lies downwind of the Asian continent and for much of the year air quality is directly influenced by emissions of ozone precursors over these heavily-populated and rapidly-industrializing regions. This study examines the extent to which oxidant transport from regional and distant anthropogenic sources influences air quality in Japan in springtime, when these contributions are largest. We find that European and North American contributions to surface ozone over Japan in spring are persistent, averaging 3.5±1.1 ppb and 2.8±0.5 ppb respectively, and are greatest in cold continental outflow conditions following the passage of cold fronts. Contributions from China are larger, 4.0±2.8 ppb, and more variable, as expected for a closer source region, and are generally highest near cold fronts preceding the influence of more distant sources. The stratosphere provides a varying but ever-present background of ozone of about 11.2±2.5 ppb during spring. Local sources over Japan and Korea have a relatively small impact on mean ozone, 2.4±7.6 ppb, but this masks a strong diurnal signal, and local sources clearly dominate during episodes of high daytime ozone. By examining the meteorological mechanisms that favour transport from different source regions, we demonstrate that while maximum foreign influence generally does not occur at the same time as the greatest buildup of oxidants from local sources, it retains a significant influence under these conditions. It is thus clear that while meteorological boundaries provide some protection from foreign influence during oxidant outbreaks in Tokyo, these distant sources still make a substantial contribution to exceedance of the Japanese ozone air quality standard in springtime.

  13. Contributions of regional and intercontinental transport to surface ozone in the Tokyo area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitomi, M.; Wild, O.; Akimoto, H.

    2011-08-01

    Japan lies downwind of the Asian continent and for much of the year air quality is directly influenced by emissions of ozone precursors over these heavily-populated and rapidly-industrializing regions. This study examines the extent to which oxidant transport from regional and distant anthropogenic sources influences air quality in Japan in springtime, when these contributions are largest. We find that European and North American contributions to surface ozone over Japan in spring are persistent, averaging 3.5±1.1 ppb and 2.8±0.5 ppb respectively, and are greatest in cold continental outflow conditions following the passage of cold fronts. Contributions from China are larger, 4.0±2.8 ppb, and more variable, as expected for a closer source region, and are generally highest near cold fronts preceding the influence of more distant sources. The stratosphere provides a varying but ever-present background of ozone of about 11.2±2.5 ppb during spring. Local sources over Japan and Korea have a relatively small impact on mean ozone, 2.4±7.6 ppb, but this masks a strong diurnal signal, and local sources clearly dominate during episodes of high daytime ozone. By examining the meteorological mechanisms that favour transport from different source regions, we demonstrate that while maximum foreign influence generally does not occur at the same time as the greatest buildup of oxidants from local sources, it retains a significant influence under these conditions. It is thus clear that while meteorological boundaries provide some protection from foreign influence during oxidant outbreaks in Tokyo, these distant sources still make a substantial contribution to exceedance of the Japanese ozone air quality standard in springtime.

  14. 78 FR 64290 - Intermountain Power Agency v. Union Pacific Railroad Company-Oral Argument

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... rates established by Union Pacific Railroad Company (UP) for unit train coal transportation service from... affect either the quality of the human environment or the conservation of energy resources. It is ordered... Surface Transportation Board Intermountain Power Agency v. Union Pacific Railroad Company-- Oral...

  15. Transport and fate of hexachlorocyclohexanes in the oceanic air and surface seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Z.; Koch, B. P.; Möller, A.; Sturm, R.; Ebinghaus, R.

    2011-06-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) are ubiquitous organic pollutants derived from pesticide application. They are subject to long-range transport, persistent in the environment, and capable of accumulation in biota. Shipboard measurements of HCH isomers (α-, γ- and β-HCH) in surface seawater and boundary layer atmospheric samples were conducted in the Atlantic and the Southern Ocean in October to December of 2008. ΣHCHs concentrations (the sum of α-, γ- and β-HCH) in the lower atmosphere ranged from 11.8 to 36.9 pg m-3 (mean: 26.6 ± 11.0 pg m-3) in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), and from 1.5 to 4.0 pg m-3 (mean: 2.8 ± 1.1 pg m-3) in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), respectively. Water concentrations were: α-HCH 0.33-46.8 pg l-1, γ-HCH 0.02-33.2 pg l-1 and β-HCH 0.11-2 pg l-1. HCH concentrations decreased from the North Atlantic to the Southern Ocean, indicating historical use of HCHs in the NH. Spatial distribution showed increasing concentrations from the equator towards North and South latitudes illustrating the concept of cold condensation and less interhemispheric mixing process. In comparison to concentrations measured in 1987-1999/2000, gaseous HCHs were slightly lower, while dissolved HCHs decreased by factor of 2-3 orders of magnitude. Air-water exchange gradients suggested net deposition for α-HCH (mean: 3759 pg m-2 day-1) and γ-HCH (mean: 1987 pg m-2 day-1), whereas β-HCH varied between equilibrium (volatilization: <0-12 pg m-2 day-1) and net deposition (range: 6-687 pg m-2 day-1), indicating a multi-hopper transport behavior. Climate change may significantly accelerate the releasing process of "old" HCHs from continental storage (e.g. soil, vegetation and high mountains) and drive long-range transport from sources to deposition in the open oceans. Biological productivities may interfere with the air-water exchange process as well. Consequently, further investigation is necessary to elucidate the long term trends and the biogeochemical turnover of

  16. Mammalian target of rapamycin signalling modulates amino acid uptake by regulating transporter cell surface abundance in primary human trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    Abnormal fetal growth increases the risk for perinatal complications and predisposes for the development of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life. Emerging evidence suggests that changes in placental amino acid transport directly contribute to altered fetal growth. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating placental amino acid transport are largely unknown. Here we combined small interfering (si) RNA-mediated silencing approaches with protein expression/localization and functional studies in cultured primary human trophoblast cells to test the hypothesis that mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and 2 (mTORC2) regulate amino acid transporters by post-translational mechanisms. Silencing raptor (inhibits mTORC1) or rictor (inhibits mTORC2) markedly decreased basal System A and System L amino acid transport activity but had no effect on growth factor-stimulated amino acid uptake. Simultaneous inhibition of mTORC1 and 2 completely inhibited both basal and growth factor-stimulated amino acid transport activity. In contrast, mTOR inhibition had no effect on serotonin transport. mTORC1 or mTORC2 silencing markedly decreased the plasma membrane expression of specific System A (SNAT2, SLC38A2) and System L (LAT1, SLC7A5) transporter isoforms without affecting global protein expression. In conclusion, mTORC1 and mTORC2 regulate human trophoblast amino acid transporters by modulating the cell surface abundance of specific transporter isoforms. This is the first report showing regulation of amino acid transport by mTORC2. Because placental mTOR activity and amino acid transport are decreased in human intrauterine growth restriction our data are consistent with the possibility that dysregulation of placental mTOR plays an important role in the development of abnormal fetal growth.

  17. 41 CFR 302-9.140 - Under what specific conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of duty? 302-9.140 Section 302-9.140 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... TRANSPORTATION AND EMERGENCY STORAGE OF A PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE Transportation Pov Transportation at Time...

  18. 41 CFR 302-9.140 - Under what specific conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a POV to my post of duty...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of duty? 302-9.140 Section 302-9.140 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel... TRANSPORTATION AND EMERGENCY STORAGE OF A PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE Transportation Pov Transportation at Time...

  19. Application of divided convective-dispersive transport model to simulate conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Dittrich, Ernő; Klincsik, Mihály

    2015-11-01

    We have created a divided convective-dispersive transport (D-CDT) model that can be used to provide an accurate simulation of conservative transport processes in planted horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetlands filled with coarse gravel (HSFCW-C). This model makes a fitted response curve from the sum of two independent CDT curves, which show the contributions of the main and side streams. The analytical solutions of both CDT curves are inverse Gaussian distribution functions. We used Fréchet distribution to provide a fast optimization mathematical procedure. As a result of our detailed analysis, we concluded that the most important role in the fast upward part of the tracer response curve is played by the main stream, with high porous velocity and dispersion. This gives the first inverse Gaussian distribution function. The side stream shows slower transport processes in the micro-porous system, and this shows the impact of back-mixing and dead zones, too. The significance of this new model is that it can simulate transport processes in this kind of systems more accurately than the conventionally used convective-dispersive transport (CDT) model. The calculated velocity and dispersion coefficients with the D-CDT model gave differences of 24-54% (of velocity) and 22-308% (of dispersion coeff.) from the conventional CDT model, and were closer to actual hydraulic behaviour.

  20. 41 CFR 302-9.173 - How many replacement POV's may my agency authorize me to transport to my post of duty at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Section 302-9.173 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION... PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE Transportation Pov Transportation Subsequent to the Time of Assignment §...

  1. 41 CFR 302-9.173 - How many replacement POV's may my agency authorize me to transport to my post of duty at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 302-9.173 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION... PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE Transportation Pov Transportation Subsequent to the Time of Assignment §...

  2. 41 CFR 302-9.173 - How many replacement POV's may my agency authorize me to transport to my post of duty at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Section 302-9.173 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION... STORAGE OF A PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE Transportation Pov Transportation Subsequent to the Time...

  3. 41 CFR 302-9.172 - Under what conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a replacement POV to my post of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....172 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES... PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE Transportation Pov Transportation Subsequent to the Time of Assignment §...

  4. 41 CFR 302-9.173 - How many replacement POV's may my agency authorize me to transport to my post of duty at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Section 302-9.173 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION... STORAGE OF A PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE Transportation Pov Transportation Subsequent to the Time...

  5. 41 CFR 302-9.173 - How many replacement POV's may my agency authorize me to transport to my post of duty at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Section 302-9.173 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION... STORAGE OF A PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE Transportation Pov Transportation Subsequent to the Time...

  6. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CELL SURFACE PROPERTIES AND TRANSPORT OF BACTERIA THROUGH SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted to relate the properties of Enterobacter, Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Achromobacter, Flavobacterium, and Arthrobacter strains to their transport with water moving through soil. the bacteria differed markedly in their extent of transport; their hydrophobicity, as...

  7. Transport and Fate of Nitrate at the Ground Water-Surface Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckett, L. J.; Essaid, H. I.; Zamora, C.; Wilson, J. T.; Johnson, H. M.; Vogel, J. R.

    2006-05-01

    We investigated the transport and fate of nitrate within the ground water-surface water interface of 5 agriculturally dominated streams across the United States in Maryland, Indiana, Nebraska, California, and Washington. Water samples were collected from the streambed at depths ranging from 0.3 to 3 m, in 2-5 transects along the stream, and at 3-5 points across each transect. At 2 transects samples were collected on 3-4 occasions and analyzed for field parameters, major ions, nutrients, dissolved gases, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes, organic carbon, and CFC and SF6 age-dating tracers. Water levels were monitored continuously at each of the 5 sites in up to eight locations, and at one location temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, and specific conductance were monitored continuously. A smaller set of measurements were made at all sampling points and transects during one high-flow and one low-flow period; potentiometric heads were measured at all sampling points at the time samples were collected. Nitrate concentrations varied widely at most sites, ranging from below detection to greater than 2.5 mM/L. Ground water discharging to the ground water-surface water interface was totally denitrified at the Indiana site, partially denitrified at the California, Nebraska, and Washington sites, and not denitrified at the Maryland site. Redox state was highly variable within and among sites, with oxygen reduction, denitrification, and Fe and Mn oxide reduction indicated at most sites; Fe reduction was predominant at the Indiana site. Only minor amounts of electron donors such as pyrite were detected in sediment samples from the 5 sites, suggesting that organic carbon was the primary electron donor for denitrification. Mean velocities through the streambed ranged from 0 m per day in California to 1.9 m per day in Nebraska. These velocities translate into mean residence times of 0.5 to 29.7 days in the upper 1 m of the streambed. Sites having longer residence times provide greater

  8. Poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanotube array surfaces with tunable wetting and contact thermal energy transport.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew K; Singh, Virendra; Kalaitzidou, Kyriaki; Cola, Baratunde A

    2015-02-24

    Solution casting using a sacrificial template is a simple technique to fabricate vertical arrays of polymer nanotubes. However, because of their close proximity and high aspect ratios, large capillary forces cause nanotubes to cluster as the array dries; researchers often use special drying techniques to avoid this clustering. Here, we exploit the clustering of regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (rr-P3HT) nanotubes in a unique template etching process to create surfaces that exhibit tunable wetting and contact thermal energy transport. Vertical arrays of rr-P3HT nanotubes are cast from solution in nanoscale alumina templates, and a solution etching process is used to partially release the nanotubes from the template. The clustering of rr-P3HT nanotube tips upon template etching produces hierarchical surface structuring with a distinct pattern of interconnected ridges, and the spacing between the ridges increases with increased template etch times. These changes in morphology cause the water contact angle to increase from 141° to 168° as the etch time is increased from 4 to 12 min. When assembled into an interface, the morphological changes cause the thermal contact resistance of the vertical rr-P3HT nanotube arrays to increase linearly at a rate of approximately 6 mm(2)·K/W per 2 min etch interval (after 6 min of etching is surpassed). The effective thermal conductivity of the rr-P3HT nanotube arrays is 1 ± 0.2 W/mK independent of the etch time, which is approximately 5 times higher than the bulk rr-P3HT film value. PMID:25584684

  9. Material transport in a convective surface mixed layer under weak wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensa, Jean A.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Poje, Andrew C.; Imberger, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Flows in the upper ocean mixed layer are responsible for the transport and dispersion of biogeochemical tracers, phytoplankton and buoyant pollutants, such as hydrocarbons from an oil spill. Material dispersion in mixed layer flows subject to diurnal buoyancy forcing and weak winds (| u10 | = 5m s-1) are investigated using a non-hydrostatic model. Both purely buoyancy-forced and combined wind- and buoyancy-forced flows are sampled using passive tracers, as well as 2D and 3D particles to explore characteristics of horizontal and vertical dispersion. It is found that the surface tracer patterns are determined by the convergence zones created by convection cells within a time scale of just a few hours. For pure convection, the results displayed the classic signature of Rayleigh-Benard cells. When combined with a wind stress, the convective cells become anisotropic in that the along-wind length scale gets much larger than the cross-wind scale. Horizontal relative dispersion computed by sampling the flow fields using both 2D and 3D passive particles is found to be consistent with the Richardson regime. Relative dispersion is an order of magnitude higher and 2D surface releases transition to Richardson regime faster in the wind-forced case. We also show that the buoyancy-forced case results in significantly lower amplitudes of scale-dependent horizontal relative diffusivity, kD(ℓ), than those reported by Okubo (1970), while the wind- and buoyancy-forced case shows a good agreement with Okubo's diffusivity amplitude, and the scaling is consistent with Richardson's 4/3rd law, kD ∼ ℓ4/3. These modeling results provide a framework for measuring material dispersion by mixed layer flows in future observational programs.

  10. Modeling the Fate and Transport of Bacteriophage PRD-1 in a Large Surface Water System: The Grand River Watershed, Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanikumar, M. S.; Shen, C.; Fong, T. T.; Rose, J. B.

    2006-12-01

    Understanding the transport of biological agents that mimic the movement of pathogenic microorganisms in surface waters is important from the point of human health as well as risk assessment. In May 2006, we conducted a field experiment on the Grand River, Michigan using a conservative tracer (Rhodamine-WT) and the bacteriophage PRD-1, a surrogate for human viruses. Observed concentrations of the chemical and biological tracers were described using a transport model that included the effects of transient storage in addition to virus sorption and inactivation. Linkages between watershed-scale processes and in-stream processes were an important aspect of the modeling. Here we describe the similarities and differences between the two tracers (e.g., travel times and recovery factors) as well as environmental factors that influence virus transport and inactivation in the surface water system.

  11. Forward Modeling of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide in GEOS-5: Uncertainties Related to Surface Fluxes and Sub-Grid Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Ott, Lesley E.; Zhu, Zhengxin; Bowman, Kevin; Brix, Holger; Collatz, G. James; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Fisher, Joshua B.; Gregg, Watson W.; Hill, Chris; Menemenlis, DImiris; Potter, Christopher S.; Gunson, Michael R.; Jucks, Kenneth W.

    2011-01-01

    Forward GEOS-5 AGCM simulations of CO2, with transport constrained by analyzed meteorology for 2009-2010, are examined. The CO2 distributions are evaluated using AIRS upper tropospheric CO2 and ACOS-GOSAT total column CO2 observations. Different combinations of surface C02 fluxes are used to generate ensembles of runs that span some uncertainty in surface emissions and uptake. The fluxes are specified in GEOS-5 from different inventories (fossil and biofuel), different data-constrained estimates of land biological emissions, and different data-constrained ocean-biology estimates. One set of fluxes is based on the established "Transcom" database and others are constructed using contemporary satellite observations to constrain land and ocean process models. Likewise, different approximations to sub-grid transport are employed, to construct an ensemble of CO2 distributions related to transport variability. This work is part of NASA's "Carbon Monitoring System Flux Pilot Project,"

  12. Transport and interaction of cosmetic product material within the ocular surface: beauty and the beastly symptoms of toxic tears.

    PubMed

    Malik, Adeela; Claoué, Charles

    2012-12-01

    Eye cosmetics such as mascara, eye shadow and eyeliner are used extensively to highlight the eyes, and are normally applied external to the ocular surface. Adverse reactions of cosmetics within the ocular surface include mild discomfort, eyelid dermatitis, pre-corneal tear film instability, and keratitis. These are attributed mainly to the preservative (benzalkonium chloride (BAC)) constituent of cosmetic product material (CPM). Transport of CPM from an external environment to any location on the ocular surface, essentially precedes the adverse interactions occurring at the location, and the control of these transport modes is therefore of clinical relevance. The inter-transport of CPM across the TF occurs due to both diffusion and drift processes. Diffusion of neutral species is driven by concentration gradients, and the drift of cationic BAC is influenced by the inherent electric field; determined by the distribution of the various ions secreted into the aqueous layer, and the negative glycocalyx charge at the mucin layer. In the presence of mucin deficiency, the corneal epithelium is exposed to invasion by both incident BAC and lipophilic species. The transport of cationic BAC across the TF may be controlled by regulating the secretion of various electrolytes at the lacrimal gland. This is of clinical significance in reducing corneal epithelial adverse effects. However, the risks of adverse effects at the corneal surface due to invasion by the lipophilic species remain. Patients with mucin deficiency, and especially those on eye ointment/drops medication, should be discouraged from using cosmetics in a way likely to contaminate the TF.

  13. Estrogen transport in surface runoff from agricultural fields treated with two different application methods of dairy manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While the land-application of animal manure provides many benefits, concerns exist regarding the subsequent transport of hormones and potential effects on aquatic ecosystems. This study compares two methods of dairy manure application, surface broadcasting and shallow disk injection, on the fate and...

  14. Significance of wall structure, macromolecular composition, and surface polymers to the survival and transport of Cryptosporidium parvum Oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structure and composition of the oocyst wall are primary factors determining the survival of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts outside the host. An external polymer matrix (glycocalyx) may mediate interactions with environmental surfaces and, thus, affect the transport of oocysts in water, soil, an...

  15. 49 CFR 173.427 - Transport requirements for low specific activity (LSA) Class 7 (radioactive) material and surface...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... contamination control limits specified in § 173.443; (5) External radiation levels may not exceed those... (LSA) Class 7 (radioactive) material and surface contaminated objects (SCO). 173.427 Section 173.427... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials § 173.427 Transport requirements for low...

  16. Stratification, Sediment Transport, and the Early Wet Surface of Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotzinger, J. P.; Athena Science Team

    2004-12-01

    the spectral gap in the size distribution of eolian dunes and ripples. A further clue to the likely subaqueous origin for Eagle cross-laminae is provided by their festoon geometry which requires that the reconstructed ripples have three-dimensional geometry defined by highly sinuous crestlines. In terrestrial settings such bedforms are known only to develop in subaqueous, subcritical flows, with velocities of less than one meter per second. On Mars, the initiation of subaqueous sediment movement is expected to occur at velocities lower than on earth, by a factor of 1.34. With respect to length scales, such as bedform dimensions, the scaling factor turns out to have the opposite sense so that, given dynamically similar flows, ripples on Mars might be larger by a factor of 1.34. Neither of these rescaling effects influences the interpretation that cm-scale, festoon cross-lamination at Eagle crater most probably requires sediment transport in subaqueous, low-velocity flows across the Meridiani plains. The assemblage of primary facies recorded at Eagle crater is most consistent with an environment characterized by episodic inundation by surface water to shallow depths, followed by evaporation, and exposure and desiccation. Terrestrial analogs for such a suite of facies and surface processes include small interdune depressions, playa lakes, and sabkhas adjacent to marginal seaways. All rover observations indicate that the evaporite-bearing cross-bedded unit extends at least on the order of 1 km though MOC and THEMIS data suggest it extends much further.

  17. A Versatile Lifting Device for Lunar Surface Payload Handling, Inspection and Regolith Transport Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.; Dorsey, John T.; Collins, Timothy J.; King, Bruce D.; Mikulas, Martin M., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Devices for lifting and transporting payloads and material are critical for efficient Earth-based construction operations. Devices with similar functionality will be needed to support lunar-outpost construction, servicing, inspection, regolith excavation, grading and payload placement. Past studies have proposed that only a few carefully selected devices are required for a lunar outpost. One particular set of operations involves lifting and manipulating payloads in the 100 kg to 3,000 kg range, which are too large or massive to be handled by unassisted astronauts. This paper will review historical devices used for payload handling in space and on earth to derive a set of desirable features for a device that can be used on planetary surfaces. Next, an innovative concept for a lifting device is introduced, which includes many of the desirable features. The versatility of the device is discussed, including its application to lander unloading, servicing, inspection, regolith excavation and site preparation. Approximate rules, which can be used to size the device for specific payload mass and reach requirements, are provided. Finally, details of a test-bed implementation of the innovative concept, which will be used to validate the structural design and develop operational procedures, is provided.

  18. A Versatile Lifting Device for Lunar Surface Payload Handling, Inspection & Regolith Transport Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doggett, William; Dorsey, John; Collins, Tim; King, Bruce; Mikulas, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Devices for lifting and transporting payloads and material are critical for efficient Earth-based construction operations. Devices with similar functionality will be needed to support lunar-outpost construction, servicing, inspection, regolith excavation, grading and payload placement. Past studies have proposed that only a few carefully selected devices are required for a lunar outpost. One particular set of operations involves lifting and manipulating payloads in the 100 kg to 3,000 kg range, which are too large or massive to be handled by unassisted astronauts. This paper will review historical devices used for payload handling in space and on earth to derive a set of desirable features for a device that can be used on planetary surfaces. Next, an innovative concept for a lifting device is introduced, which includes many of the desirable features. The versatility of the device is discussed, including its application to lander unloading, servicing, inspection, regolith excavation and site preparation. Approximate rules, which can be used to size the device for specific payload mass and reach requirements, are provided. Finally, details of a test-bed implementation of the innovative concept, which will be used to validate the structural design and develop operational procedures, is provided.

  19. A Review of Removable Surface Contamination on Radioactive Materials Transportation Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Jr, W. E.; Watson, E. C.; Murphy, D. W.; Harrer, B. J.; Harty, R.; Aldrich, J. M.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the results of a study sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) of removable surface contamination on radioactive materials transportation containers. The purpose of the study is to provide information to the NRC during their review of existing regulations. Data was obtained from both industry and literature on three major topics: 1) radiation doses, 2) economic costs, and 3) contamination frequencies. Containers for four categories of radioactive materials are considered including radiopharmaceuticals, industrial sources, nuclear fuel cycle materials, and low-level radioactive waste. Assumptions made in this study use current information to obtain realistic yet conservative estimates of radiation dose and economic costs. Collective and individual radiation doses are presented for each container category on a per container basis. Total doses, to workers and the public, are also presented for spent fuel cask and low-level waste drum decontamination. Estimates of the additional economic costs incurred by lowering current limits by factors of 10 and 100 are presented. Current contamination levels for each category of container are estimated from the data collected. The information contained in this report is designed to be useful to the NRC in preparing their recommendations for new regulations.

  20. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massman, William

    2016-04-01

    The increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change requires an improved modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This study describes a new model of soil evaporation and transport of heat, soil moisture, and water vapor, for use during fires. The model is based on conservation equations of energy and mass and its performance is evaluated against dynamic soil temperature and moisture observations obtained during laboratory experiments on soil samples exposed to surface heat fluxes ranging between 10,000 and 50,000 Wm2. In general, the model simulates the observed temperature dynamics quite well, but is less precise (but still good) at capturing the moisture dynamics. The model emulates the observed increase in soil moisture ahead of the drying front and the hiatus in the soil temperature rise during the strongly evaporative stage of drying. It also captures the observed rapid evaporation of soil moisture that occurs at relatively low temperatures (50-90 C), and can provide quite accurate predictions of the total amount of soil moisture evaporated during the laboratory experiments. Overall, this new model provides a much more physically realistic simulation over all previous models developed for the same purpose.

  1. Effect of surface charge of immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell monolayer on transport of charged solutes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Li, Guanglei; Gil, Eun Seok; Lowe, Tao Lu; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-04-01

    Charge carried by the surface glycocalyx layer (SGL) of the cerebral endothelium has been shown to significantly modulate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to charged solutes in vivo. The cultured monolayer of bEnd3, an immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell line, is becoming a popular in vitro BBB model due to its easy growth and maintenance of many BBB characteristics over repeated passages. To test whether the SGL of bEnd3 monolayer carries similar charge as that in the intact BBB and quantify this charge, which can be characterized by the SGL thickness (L(f)) and charge density (C(mf)), we measured the solute permeability of bEnd3 monolayer to neutral solutes and to solutes with similar size but opposite charges: negatively charged alpha-lactalbumin (-11) and positively charged ribonuclease (+3). Combining the measured permeability data with a transport model across the cell monolayer, we predicted the L(f) and the C(mf) of bEnd3 monolayer, which is approximately 160 nm and approximately 25 mEq/L, respectively. We also investigated whether orosomucoid, a plasma glycoprotein modulating the charge of the intact BBB, alters the charge of bEnd3 monolayer. We found that 1 mg/mL orosomucoid would increase SGL charge density of bEnd3 monolayer to approximately 2-fold of its control value.

  2. Regulation of the cell surface expression of chloride transporters during epileptogenesis.

    PubMed

    González, Marco I

    2016-08-15

    The process is commonly known as epileptogenesis refers to the cascade of molecular and cellular changes that transform the brain to make it hyperexcitable and capable of generate recurrent spontaneous seizures. Unfortunately, our understanding of the molecular changes that affect the brain during epileptogenesis remains incomplete. Recent evidence suggests that dysfunction of cation-chloride transporters (CCCs) might be one of the factors that contribute to the deficits in inhibitory neurotransmission observed during epileptogenesis. This study analyzed the cell surface expression of CCCs during epileptogenesis and during chronic epilepsy to evaluate if a loss of CCCs from the plasma membrane might contribute to hyperexcitability. Alterations in the plasma membrane expression of CCCs were mostly detected during the early phase of the epileptogenic period, suggesting that dysfunction of CCCs might contribute to the alterations in the chloride gradient previously detected. Together, the findings presented here suggest that aberrant regulation of the plasma membrane levels of CCCs might contribute to the impartment of GABAergic neurotransmission and that CCCs dysfunction might be relevant for the initial appearance of spontaneous seizures. PMID:27345384

  3. Surface Ozone and Atmospheric Transport over the Gulf of Maine during ICARTT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintsa, E.; Twickler, M.; Talbot, R.; Rawlins, T.

    2005-12-01

    As part of the 2004 ICARTT summer campaign, we deployed a buoy with ozone and wind instruments about 20 km ESE of Appledore Island from late June through early September. Data from Thompson Farm, Appledore, and the buoy showed that on average, surface ozone levels over the Gulf of Maine increased with distance from the New Hampshire coast. Diurnally averaged ozone was highest at the buoy site, both in daytime and at night. The diurnal cycle at sea peaked several hours later than at Thompson Farm (3-6 PM EST vs. 1-3 PM). Trajectory and dispersion calculations showed that elevated ozone episodes were generally correlated with air masses from the New York-Boston corridor. The diurnal cycle in ozone at coastal and offshore sites at Martha's Vineyard (about 150 km to the south) was much smaller than in the Gulf of Maine (higher nighttime lows and lower daytime highs), reflecting a higher incidence of marine air at these stations. In summer 2004, the sea-breeze/land-breeze strongly influenced local transport and ozone levels at Appledore and the buoy. For onshore winds, the diurnal cycle in ozone was much smaller than for offshore winds but still present. A weekly cycle in ozone at the Gulf of Maine sites was also observed, with lowest daily ozone maxima on weekends.

  4. Effect of surface charge of immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell monolayer on transport of charged solutes.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei; Li, Guanglei; Gil, Eun Seok; Lowe, Tao Lu; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-04-01

    Charge carried by the surface glycocalyx layer (SGL) of the cerebral endothelium has been shown to significantly modulate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to charged solutes in vivo. The cultured monolayer of bEnd3, an immortalized mouse cerebral endothelial cell line, is becoming a popular in vitro BBB model due to its easy growth and maintenance of many BBB characteristics over repeated passages. To test whether the SGL of bEnd3 monolayer carries similar charge as that in the intact BBB and quantify this charge, which can be characterized by the SGL thickness (L(f)) and charge density (C(mf)), we measured the solute permeability of bEnd3 monolayer to neutral solutes and to solutes with similar size but opposite charges: negatively charged alpha-lactalbumin (-11) and positively charged ribonuclease (+3). Combining the measured permeability data with a transport model across the cell monolayer, we predicted the L(f) and the C(mf) of bEnd3 monolayer, which is approximately 160 nm and approximately 25 mEq/L, respectively. We also investigated whether orosomucoid, a plasma glycoprotein modulating the charge of the intact BBB, alters the charge of bEnd3 monolayer. We found that 1 mg/mL orosomucoid would increase SGL charge density of bEnd3 monolayer to approximately 2-fold of its control value. PMID:20087768

  5. Upscaling of the specific surface area for reactive transport modelling in fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    The impact of flow heterogeneity on chemical transport from single to multiple fractures, is investigated. The emphasis is on the dynamic nature of the specific surface area (SSA) due to heterogeneity of the flow, relative to a purely geometrical definition. It is shown how to account for SSA as a random variable in modelling multi-component reactions. The flow-dependent SSA is interpreted probabilistically, following inert tracer particles along individual fractures. Upscaling to a fracture network is proposed as a time-domain random walk based on the statistics of SSA for single fractures. Statistics of SSA are investigated for three correlation structures of transmissivity, one classical multi-gaussian, and two non-Gaussian. The coefficient of variation of single fracture SSA decreases monotonously with the distance over the fracture length; the CV of the upscaled SSA reduces further such that after ca 20 fractures it is under 0.1 for a disconnected field, and around 0.2 for connected and multi-gaussian fields. This implies that after 10-20 fractures, uncertainty in SSA is significantly reduced, justifying the use of an effective value. A conservative, lower bound for the dimensionless upscaled effective SSA was found to be 1, suitable for all heterogeneity structures, assuming the cubic hydraulic law applicable.

  6. Surface plasmon resonance assay of inhibition by pharmaceuticals for thyroxine hormone binging to transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Kinouchi, Hiroki; Matsuyama, Keigo; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kamimori, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay to estimate the competitive inhibition by pharmaceuticals for thyroxine (T4) binding to thyroid hormone transport proteins, transthyretin (TTR) and thyroxine binding globulin (TBG). In this SPR assay, the competitive inhibition of pharmaceuticals for introducing T4 into immobilized TTR or TBG on the sensor chip can be estimated using a running buffer containing pharmaceuticals. The SPR assay showed reproducible immobilization of TTR and TBG, and the kinetic binding parameters of T4 to TTR or TBG were estimated. The equilibrium dissociation constants of TTR or TBG measured by SPR did not clearly differ from data reported for other binding assays. To estimate the competitive inhibition of tetraiodothyroacetic acid, diclofenac, genistein, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, and furosemide, reported to be competitive or noncompetitive pharmaceuticals for T4 binding to TTR or TBG, their 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) (or 80% inhibition concentration, IC80) were calculated from the change of T4 responses in sensorgrams obtained with various concentrations of the pharmaceuticals. Our SPR method should be a useful tool for predicting the potential of thyroid toxicity of pharmaceuticals by evaluating the competitive inhibition of T4 binding to thyroid hormone binding proteins, TTR and TBG.

  7. Geocenter motion due to surface mass transport from GRACE satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, R. E. M.; van der Wal, W.; Lavallée, D. A.; Hashemi Farahani, H.; Ditmar, P.

    2012-04-01

    Measurements of mass redistribution from satellite gravimetry are insensitive to geocenter motions. However, geocenter motions can be constrained by satellite gravity data alone if we partition mass changes between land and oceans, under the assumption that the ocean is passive (i.e., in gravitational equilibrium with the land load and the solid earth). Here, we make use of 8 years (2003-2010) of optimally filtered monthly GRACE-based solutions produced at TU Delft to determine changes in the land load and the corresponding geocenter motion, through an iterative procedure. We pay particular attention to correcting for signal leakage caused by the limited spatial resolution of GRACE. We also investigate how the choice of a model of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) affects the estimated geocenter motion trend due to present-day surface mass transport. Finally, we separate the contribution of ice masses from that of land hydrology and show how they have a different sensitivity to the chosen GIA model and observational time-span.

  8. Understanding electric field-enhanced transport for the measurement of nanoparticles and their assembly on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, De-Hao

    The goal of this dissertation is to understand the synthesis, characterization, and integration of nanoparticles and nanoparticle-based devices by electric field-enhanced transport of nanoparticles. Chapter I describes the factors used for determining particle trajectories and found that electric fields provide the directional electrostatic force to overcome other non-directional influences on particle trajectories. This idea is widely applied in the nanoparticle classification, characterization, and assembly onto substrate surfaces as investigated in the following chapters. Chapter 2 presents a new assembly method to position metal nanoparticles delivered from the gas phase onto surfaces using the electrostatic force generated by biased p-n junction patterned substrates. Aligned deposition patterns of metal nanoparticles were observed, and the patterning selectivity quantified. A simple model accounting for the generated electric field, and the electrostatic, van der Waals, and image forces was used to explain the observed results. Chapter 2.2 describes a data set for particle size resolved deposition, from which a Brownian dynamics model for the process can be evaluated. Brownian motion and fluid convection of nanoparticles, as well as the interactions between the charged nanoparticles and the patterned substrate, including electrostatic force, image force and van der Waals force, are accounted for in the simulation. Using both experiment and simulation the effects of the particle size, electric field intensity, and the convective flow on coverage selectivity have been investigated. Coverage selectivity is most sensitive to electric field, which is controlled by the applied reverse bias voltage across the p-n junction. A non-dimensional analysis of the competition between the electrostatic and diffusion force is found to provide a means to collapse a wide range of process operating conditions and an effective indicator or process performance. Directed assembly of

  9. Intracellular transport of membrane glycoproteins: two closely related histocompatibility antigens differ in their rates of transit to the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The intracellular transport of two closely related membrane glycoproteins was studied in the murine B cell lymphoma line, AKTB-1b. Using pulse-chase radiolabeling, the kinetics of appearance of the class I histocompatibility antigens, H-2Kk and H-2Dk, at the cell surface were compared and found to be remarkably different. Newly synthesized H-2Kk is transported rapidly such that all radiolabeled molecules reach the surface within 1 h. In contrast, the H-2Dk antigen is transported slowly with a half-time of 4-5 h. The rates of surface appearance for the two antigens closely resemble the rates at which their Asn-linked oligosaccharides mature from endoglucosaminidase H (endo H)-sensitive to endo H-resistant forms, a process that occurs in the Golgi apparatus. This suggests that the rate-limiting step in the transport of H-2Dk to the cell surface occurs before the formation of endo H-resistant oligosaccharides in the Golgi apparatus. Subcellular fractionation experiments confirmed this conclusion by identifying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as the site where the H-2Dk antigen accumulates. The retention of this glycoprotein in the ER does not appear to be due to a lack of solubility or an inability of the H-2Dk heavy chain to associate with beta 2-microglobulin. Our data is inconsistent with a passive membrane flow mechanism for the intracellular transport of membrane glycoproteins. Rather, it suggests that one or more receptors localized to the ER membrane may mediate the selective transport of membrane glycoproteins out of the ER to the Golgi apparatus. The fact that H-2Kk and H-2Dk are highly homologous (greater than or equal to 80%) indicates that this process can be strongly influenced by limited alterations in protein structure. PMID:3928633

  10. Intracellular transport of membrane glycoproteins: two closely related histocompatibility antigens differ in their rates of transit to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Williams, D B; Swiedler, S J; Hart, G W

    1985-09-01

    The intracellular transport of two closely related membrane glycoproteins was studied in the murine B cell lymphoma line, AKTB-1b. Using pulse-chase radiolabeling, the kinetics of appearance of the class I histocompatibility antigens, H-2Kk and H-2Dk, at the cell surface were compared and found to be remarkably different. Newly synthesized H-2Kk is transported rapidly such that all radiolabeled molecules reach the surface within 1 h. In contrast, the H-2Dk antigen is transported slowly with a half-time of 4-5 h. The rates of surface appearance for the two antigens closely resemble the rates at which their Asn-linked oligosaccharides mature from endoglucosaminidase H (endo H)-sensitive to endo H-resistant forms, a process that occurs in the Golgi apparatus. This suggests that the rate-limiting step in the transport of H-2Dk to the cell surface occurs before the formation of endo H-resistant oligosaccharides in the Golgi apparatus. Subcellular fractionation experiments confirmed this conclusion by identifying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as the site where the H-2Dk antigen accumulates. The retention of this glycoprotein in the ER does not appear to be due to a lack of solubility or an inability of the H-2Dk heavy chain to associate with beta 2-microglobulin. Our data is inconsistent with a passive membrane flow mechanism for the intracellular transport of membrane glycoproteins. Rather, it suggests that one or more receptors localized to the ER membrane may mediate the selective transport of membrane glycoproteins out of the ER to the Golgi apparatus. The fact that H-2Kk and H-2Dk are highly homologous (greater than or equal to 80%) indicates that this process can be strongly influenced by limited alterations in protein structure. PMID:3928633

  11. Hazardous materials transportation. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Surface Transportation of the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, April 22, 24, and May 12, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    A series of three hearings on the reauthorization of the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act brought testimony from representatives of the railway, trucking, chemical, and other industries, environmental agencies, engineers, and safety experts. The goal of the legislation is to maximize public safety while meeting the need to transport chemical and nuclear waste materials. This entails developing the technologies for handling materials safely and establishing guidelines that will be consistent and coordinated. Witnesses urged increases in both funding and staffing for this purpose. A major point of concern was the right of local jurisdictions to impose more stringent regulations than those set by the federal government. Additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony.

  12. Trend of surface solar radiation over Asia simulated by aerosol transport-climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, T.; Ohmura, A.

    2009-12-01

    Long-term records of surface radiation measurements indicate a decrease in the solar radiation between the 1950s and 1980s (“global dimming”), then its recovery afterward (“global brightening”) at many locations all over the globe [Wild, 2009]. On the other hand, the global brightening is delayed over the Asian region [Ohmura, 2009]. It is suggested that these trends of the global dimming and brightening are strongly related with a change in aerosol loading in the atmosphere which affect the climate change through the direct, semi-direct, and indirect effects. In this study, causes of the trend of the surface solar radiation over Asia during last several decades are analyzed with an aerosol transport-climate model, SPRINTARS. SPRINTARS is coupled with MIROC which is a general circulation model (GCM) developed by Center for Climate System Research (CCSR)/University of Tokyo, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), and Frontier Research Center for Global Change (FRCGC) [Takemura et al., 2000, 2002, 2005, 2009]. The horizontal and vertical resolutions are T106 (approximately 1.1° by 1.1°) and 56 layers, respectively. SPRINTARS includes the transport, radiation, cloud, and precipitation processes of all main tropospheric aerosols (black and organic carbons, sulfate, soil dust, and sea salt). The model treats not only the aerosol mass mixing ratios but also the cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations as prognostic variables, and the nucleation processes of cloud droplets and ice crystals depend on the number concentrations of each aerosol species. Changes in the cloud droplet and ice crystal number concentrations affect the cloud radiation and precipitation processes in the model. Historical emissions, that is consumption of fossil fuel and biofuel, biomass burning, aircraft emissions, and volcanic eruptions are prescribed from database provided by the Aerosol Model Intercomparison Project (AeroCom) and the latest IPCC inventories

  13. Modeling Np and Pu transport with a surface complexation model and spatially variant sorption capacities: Implications for reactive transport modeling and performance assessments of nuclear waste disposal sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) geochemical transport modeling is used to demonstrate the effects of speciation and sorption reactions on the ground-water transport of Np and Pu, two redox-sensitive elements. Earlier 1D simulations (Reardon, 1981) considered the kinetically limited dissolution of calcite and its effect on ion-exchange reactions (involving 90Sr, Ca, Na, Mg and K), and documented the spatial variation of a 90Sr partition coefficient under both transient and steady-state chemical conditions. In contrast, the simulations presented here assume local equilibrium for all reactions, and consider sorption on constant potential, rather than constant charge, surfaces. Reardon's (1981) seminal findings on the spatial and temporal variability of partitioning (of 90Sr) are reexamined and found partially caused by his assumption of a kinetically limited reaction. In the present work, sorption is assumed the predominant retardation process controlling Pu and Np transport, and is simulated using a diffuse-double-layer-surface-complexation (DDLSC) model. Transport simulations consider the infiltration of Np- and Pu-contaminated waters into an initially uncontaminated environment, followed by the cleanup of the resultant contamination with uncontaminated water. Simulations are conducted using different spatial distributions of sorption capacities (with the same total potential sorption capacity, but with different variances and spatial correlation structures). Results obtained differ markedly from those that would be obtained in transport simulations using constant Kd, Langmuir or Freundlich sorption models. When possible, simulation results (breakthrough curves) are fitted to a constant K d advection-dispersion transport model and compared. Functional differences often are great enough that they prevent a meaningful fit of the simulation results with a constant K d (or even a Langmuir or Freundlich) model, even in the case of Np, a weakly sorbed radionuclide under the

  14. Model of the mass transport to the surface of animal cells cultured in a rotating bioreactor operated in micro gravity.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Solorio, Ivan; Kleis, Stanley J

    2006-06-20

    A mathematical model is used to investigate the transport of dissolved oxygen from the bulk fluid to the surface of aggregates of animal cells cultured in a rotating bioreactor. These aggregates move through different regions of the bioreactor with a local flow field and concentration distribution that vary with time. The time variation of the Sherwood number and the surface concentration for a range of parameters typical of a cell science experiment executed in the Rotating Wall Perfused Vessel (RWPV) bioreactor in space are investigated. The Reynolds numbers experienced by the aggregate are generally low (Re < 1) and the Peclet numbers range from O(1) to O(100). Comparison of the results from the numerical solution of the mathematical model with those from a quasi-steady model, using a steady-state correlation for mass transport on a sphere, indicate that the quasi-steady assumption is not a good model to compute the instantaneous Sherwood number. This indicates a significant history effect in the Sherwood number response to the variations of acceleration of the aggregates in the bioreactor. A high resistance to the mass transport from the bulk fluid to the surface of the aggregate exists for the bioreactor operated in micro gravity. The difference between the surface concentration and the free stream concentration was as high as 30% for aggregates larger than 3 mm. Diffusion reduces the variations of the free stream concentration resulting in a nearly constant value for the concentration at the surface of the aggregates.

  15. Transport and fate of hexachlorocyclohexanes in the oceanic air and surface seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Z.; Koch, B. P.; Möller, A.; Sturm, R.; Ebinghaus, R.

    2011-09-01

    Hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) are ubiquitous organic pollutants derived from pesticide application. They are subject to long-range transport, persistent in the environment, and capable of accumulation in biota. Shipboard measurements of HCH isomers (α-, γ- and β-HCH) in surface seawater and boundary layer atmospheric samples were conducted in the Atlantic and the Southern Ocean in October to December of 2008. ΣHCHs concentrations (the sum of α-, γ- and β-HCH) in the lower atmosphere ranged from 12 to 37 pg m-3 (mean: 27 ± 11 pg m-3) in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), and from 1.5 to 4.0 pg m-3 (mean: 2.8 ± 1.1 pg m-3) in the Southern Hemisphere (SH), respectively. Water concentrations were: α-HCH 0.33-47 pg l-1, γ-HCH 0.02-33 pg l-1 and β-HCH 0.11-9.5 pg l-1. Dissolved HCH concentrations decreased from the North Atlantic to the Southern Ocean, indicating historical use of HCHs in the NH. Spatial distribution showed increasing concentrations from the equator towards North and South latitudes illustrating the concept of cold trapping in high latitudes and less interhemispheric mixing process. In comparison to concentrations measured in 1987-1999/2000, gaseous HCHs were slightly lower, while dissolved HCHs decreased by factor of 2-3 orders of magnitude. Air-water exchange gradients suggested net deposition for α-HCH (mean: 3800 pg m-2 day-1) and γ-HCH (mean: 2000 pg m-2 day-1), whereas β-HCH varied between equilibrium (volatilization: <0-12 pg m-2 day-1) and net deposition (range: 6-690 pg m-2 day-1). Climate change may significantly accelerate the release of "old" HCHs from continental storage (e.g. soil, vegetation and high mountains) and drive long-range transport from sources to deposition in the open oceans. Biological productivities may interfere with the air-water exchange process as well. Consequently, further investigation is necessary to elucidate the long term trends and the biogeochemical turnover of HCHs in the oceanic environment.

  16. Mass transfer in fuel cells. [electron microscopy of components, thermal decomposition of Teflon, water transport, and surface tension of KOH solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Results of experiments on electron microscopy of fuel cell components, thermal decomposition of Teflon by thermogravimetry, surface area and pore size distribution measurements, water transport in fuel cells, and surface tension of KOH solutions are described.

  17. Particle transport and adjustments of the boundary layer over rough surfaces with an unrestricted, upwind supply of sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna Neuman, Cheryl

    1998-10-01

    Most natural surfaces containing non-erodible roughness elements are considerably more complex than those studied in modelling exercises and wind tunnel simulations. Unlike idealized roughness elements, which are uniform in size, shape (i.e., spheres or cylinders) and spacing, natural elements are challenging to measure in 3-dimensional space. Similarly, most deflation lag surfaces, such those as found on sandar and beaches, are spatially heterogeneous open systems in which sediment transport from an external supply is very likely. The development of irregular deflation lag surfaces, and the transport of sediment over these surfaces from an upwind source of sediment, was studied in a series of wind tunnel simulations. Surfaces prepared with crushed gravel and natural beach shingle respond conservatively in terms of the adjustment to the deflation and deposition of sediment. Deflation lag surfaces, prepared with no spacing between the roughness elements (i.e., close packed), demonstrate little to no change in coverage with the introduction of particles from an upwind source. Neither the element type nor the friction velocity affect this outcome. As the center-to-center element spacing increases to 60 mm, infilling of the lag surface eventually is observed, with the element coverage reduced by a factor between 2 and 4. For a given threshold ratio ( Rt), the roughness density ( λ) is smaller than observed in previous simulation studies based on idealized roughness elements.

  18. 49 CFR 6.35 - Agency review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Agency review. 6.35 Section 6.35 Transportation... PROCEEDINGS Procedures for Considering Applications § 6.35 Agency review. Where Department review of the underlying decision is permitted, either the applicant or agency counsel, may seek review of the...

  19. The different diffusive transport behaviours of some metals in layers of Peru Basin surface sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsche, Ulrich; Koschinsky, Andrea; Winkler, Andreas

    Diffusion experiments with a duration of 90 days were carried out with radio tracers in an oxic and a suboxic sediment layer from two deep-sea sediment cores. Diffusion coefficients, breakthrough and time-lag values were determined and the results checked by modelling. Only small differences of diffusive transport were observed for Na and Cs during the four experiments; Na behaved as a perfect conservative tracer, and the somewhat stronger uptake of Cs in one sample was caused by preferential absorption by illite that was enriched in this sample. The significant differences between the four experiments for the diffusion parameters of Mn, Zn, Co, and Cd correlate with the differing chemical compositions of the sediment layers; higher Mn oxide concentrations in the sample led to slower diffusion through the sediment sample and to significant sorption of the diffusing heavy metals. This result confirms the dominating role of Mn oxide phases in controlling the diffusive exchange of heavy metals between deep-sea sediment and bottom water. Sediment resuspension of the oxic surface layer, such as during potential ferromanganese nodule mining in the deep-sea, would be followed by increased diffusive flux of dissolved heavy metals, especially Mn, from suboxic sediment layers to the new disturbed sediment-bottom-water interface. According to our modelling, the Mn flux from the oxic sediment surface of 0.3 mg m -2 yr -1 in the undisturbed state would increase to up to several mg m -2 yr -1 within the first few weeks after disturbance. Depending on the time necessary until a stable oxic and Mn oxide rich layer is again re-established, a total Mn 2+ release of 54 mg m -2 was calculated if the original state is reached within 100 yr, in contrast to only 3.5 mg m -2 for 5 yr of re-establishment. The fluxes of the other heavy metals would be smaller, corresponding to their lower pore water concentrations in the suboxic layer compared to Mn.

  20. Transport and deposition of nitrogen oxides and ozone in the atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongxian

    Tropospheric ozone is an important photochemical air pollutant, which increases respiratory-related diseases, decreases crop yields, and causes other environmental problems. This research has focused on the measurement of soil biogenic emissions of nitric oxide (NO), one of the precursors for ozone formation, from intensively managed soils in the Southeast US, and examined the transport and deposition of NOx (NO + NO2) and ozone in the atmospheric surface layer, and the effects of NO emissions and its chemical reactions on ozone flux and deposition to the earth's surface. Emissions of nitric oxide were measured from an intensively managed agricultural soil, in the lower coastal plain of North Carolina (near Plymouth, NC), using a dynamic chamber technique. Measurements of soil NO emissions in several crop canopies were conducted at four different sites in North Carolina during late spring and summer of 1994-1996. The turbulent fluxes of NO2 and O3 at 5 m and 10 m above the ground were measured using the eddy-correlation technique near Plymouth, NC during late spring of 1995 and summer of 1996, concurrent with measurements of soil NO emissions using the dynamic chamber system. Soil NO emission from within the corn field was high averaging approximately 35 ng N/m2/s during the measurement period of 1995. In another study, vertical measurements of ozone were made on a 610 m tall tower located 15 km Southeast of Raleigh, NC during the summers of 1993-1997, as part of an effort by the State of North Carolina to develop a State Implementation Plan (SIP) for ozone control in the Raleigh Metropolitan Statistical Area. A strong correlation was observed between the nighttime and early morning ozone concentrations in the residual layer (CR) above the NBL and the maximum ground level concentration (C o max) the following afternoon. Based on this correlation, an empirical regression equation (Co max = 27.67*exp(0.016 CR)) was developed for predicting maximum ground level ozone

  1. Equations of the surface harmonics method for solving time-dependent neutron transport problems and their verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Kondrushin, A. E.; Fomichenko, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Time-dependent equations of the surface harmonics method (SHM) are obtained for planar one-dimensional geometry. The equations are verified by calculations of test problems from Benchmark Problem Book ANL-7416, and the capabilities and efficiency of applying the SHM for solving the time-dependent neutron transport equation in the diffusion approximation are demonstrated. The results of the work show that the implementation of the SHG for full-scale computations will make possible substantial progress in the efficient solution of time-dependent problems of neutron transport in nuclear reactors.

  2. Influence of surface water/groundwater interactions on stream and wetland water quality: analytical solutions for coupled contaminant transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melek Kazezyilmaz-Alhan, Cevza

    2014-05-01

    Wetlands are located in transitional zones between uplands and downstream flooded systems and surface water/groundwater interactions are frequently observed especially in riparian wetlands where the water level fluctuates frequently during the rainy season. Moreover, surface water/groundwater interactions also influence the characteristics of contaminant transport in pools and riffles, and in meandering type of streams. Therefore, it is important to investigate and solve these processes accurately to improve the prediction of downstream water quality. Although there are many experimental and numerical studies available in the literature which discuss and model the surface water/ground water interactions in streams and wetlands, very few analytical solutions have been conducted. Analytical solutions are helpful tools for verification of numerical solutions and they provide fast and accurate results for practical problems. Furthermore, they provide an understanding to the influence of each parameter in hydrological and contaminant transport models for streams and wetlands. In order to contribute to the research in understanding the behavior of water quality in streams and wetlands, analytical solutions are developed for the coupled contaminant transport equations of several transient storage and wetland models. Among these models are the wetland model WETland Solute TrANsport Dynamics (WETSAND) developed by Kazezyilmaz-Alhan et al. (2007), the transient storage models developed by Bencala and Walters (1983), and Kazezyilmaz-Alhan and Medina (2006). WETSAND is a general comprehensive wetland model, which has both surface flow and solute transport components. In this wetland model, water quality components are solved by advection-dispersion-reaction equations which incorporate surface water/groundwater interactions by including the incoming/outgoing mass due to the groundwater recharge/discharge. The transient storage model developed by Bencala and Walters (1983

  3. Non-Genomic Estrogen Regulation of Ion Transport and Airway Surface Liquid Dynamics in Cystic Fibrosis Bronchial Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Kim, Sung Hoon; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Harvey, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Male cystic fibrosis (CF) patients survive longer than females and lung exacerbations in CF females vary during the estrous cycle. Estrogen has been reported to reduce the height of the airway surface liquid (ASL) in female CF bronchial epithelium. Here we investigated the effect of 17β-estradiol on the airway surface liquid height and ion transport in normal (NuLi-1) and CF (CuFi-1) bronchial epithelial monolayers. Live cell imaging using confocal microscopy revealed that airway surface liquid height was significantly higher in the non-CF cells compared to the CF cells. 17β-estradiol (0.1–10 nM) reduced the airway surface liquid height in non-CF and CF cells after 30 min treatment. Treatment with the nuclear-impeded Estrogen Dendrimer Conjugate mimicked the effect of free estrogen by reducing significantly the airway surface liquid height in CF and non-CF cells. Inhibition of chloride transport or basolateral potassium recycling decreased the airway surface liquid height and 17β-estradiol had no additive effect in the presence of these ion transporter inhibitors. 17β-estradiol decreased bumetanide-sensitive transepithelial short-circuit current in non-CF cells and prevented the forskolin-induced increase in ASL height. 17β-estradiol stimulated an amiloride-sensitive transepithelial current and increased ouabain-sensitive basolateral short-circuit current in CF cells. 17β-estradiol increased PKCδ activity in CF and non-CF cells. These results demonstrate that estrogen dehydrates CF and non-CF ASL, and these responses to 17β-estradiol are non-genomic rather than involving the classical nuclear estrogen receptor pathway. 17β-estradiol acts on the airway surface liquid by inhibiting cAMP-mediated chloride secretion in non-CF cells and increasing sodium absorption via the stimulation of PKCδ, ENaC and the Na+/K+ATPase in CF cells. PMID:24223826

  4. Inhibition of beta-amino acid transport by diamide does not involve the brush border membrane surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chesney, R.W.; Gusowski, N.; Albright, P.

    1985-01-01

    Diamide (dicarboxylic acid bis-(N,N-dimethylamide) has been shown in previous studies to block the uptake of the beta-amino acid taurine at its high affinity transport site in rat renal cortex slices. Diamide may act by increasing the efflux of taurine from the slice. Studies performed in rat slices again indicate enhanced efflux over 8-12 minutes. The time course of reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion from renal cortex is similar, indicating a potential interaction between GSH depletion and inhibition of taurine accumulation. The effect of 9 mM diamide on the Na+ -dependent accumulation of taurine (10 and 250 microM) by brush border membrane vesicles was examined, and the taurine uptake value both initially and at equilibrium was the same in the presence and absence of diamide. Isolation of the brush border surface and subsequent transport studies of taurine are not influenced by diamide. Thus, diamide inhibition of taurine uptake does not involve physiochemical alteration of the membrane surface where active amino acid transport occurs, despite the thiol-oxidizing properties of this agent. Further, these studies suggest that diamide either acts at the basolateral surface, rather than the brush border surface of rat renal cortex or requires the presence of an intact tubule, capable of metabolism, prior to its inhibitory action.

  5. Dust transport over the eastern Mediterranean derived from Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, Aerosol Robotic Network, and surface measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, N.; Gerasopoulos, E.; Vrekoussis, M.; Kouvarakis, G.; Kubilay, N.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Vardavas, I.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2007-02-01

    Multiyear surface PM10 measurements performed on Crete Island, Greece, have been used in conjunction with satellite (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)) and ground-based remote sensing measurements (Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)) to enhance our understanding of the evolution of mineral dust events over the eastern Mediterranean. An analysis of southerly air masses at altitudes of 1000 and 3000 m over a 5 year period (2000-2005), showed that dust can potentially arrive over Crete, either simultaneously in the lower free troposphere and inside the boundary layer (vertical extended transport (VET)) or initially into the free troposphere with the heavier particles gradually being scavenged inside the boundary layer (free troposphere transport (FTT)). Both pathways present significant seasonal variations but on an annual basis contribute almost equally to the dust transport in the area. During VET the aerosol index (AI) derived from TOMS was significantly correlated with surface PM10, and in general AI was found to be adequate for the characterization of dust loadings over the eastern Mediterranean on a climatological basis. A significant covariance between PM10 and AOT was observed during VET as well, indicating that AOT levels from AERONET may be estimated by PM10 levels at the surface. Surface measurements are thus crucial for the validation of remote sensing measurements and hence are a powerful tool for the investigation of the impact of aerosols on climate.

  6. Maintaining high-volume, low-pressure surface-coating regulatory compliance using the U.s. Environmental Protection Agency's data quality objectives process.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Palmer, Glenn R; Peters, Scott; Olivas, Arthur C; Nelson, Tim M

    2005-03-01

    To effectively reduce the environmental compliance costs associated with meeting specific requirements under the Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Facility's National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants rule, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Data Quality Objective (DQO) process has been proposed as a suitable framework for developing a scientifically defensible surface compliance monitoring program. By estimating the variability associated with the air cap pressure of high- volume, low-pressure (HVLP) surface-coating spray equipment, the number of monitoring samples necessary for an affected facility to claim compliance with a desired statistical confidence level was established. Using data taken from the pilot test facility, the DQO process indicated that the mean of at least 21 HVLP air cap pressure samples taken over the compliance period must be < or = 10 pounds per square inch (psig) gauge for the facility to claim regulatory compliance with 99.99% statistical confidence. Fewer compliance samples could be taken, but that decision would lead to a commensurate reduction in the compliance confidence level. Implementation of the DQO-based compliance sampling plan eliminates the need for an affected facility to sample all regulated HVLP surface-coating processes while still maintaining a high level of compliance assurance.

  7. 41 CFR 102-118.210 - May my agency use bills of lading other than the GBL for a transportation shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT Use of Government Billing Documents Terms and Conditions Governing Acceptance and Use of A Government Bill of Lading (gbl) Or Government... conditions (also found in the “U.S. Government Freight Transportation Handbook”) contained in this part....

  8. 41 CFR 102-118.210 - May my agency use bills of lading other than the GBL for a transportation shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT Use of Government Billing Documents Terms and Conditions Governing Acceptance and Use of A Government Bill of Lading (gbl) Or Government... conditions (also found in the “U.S. Government Freight Transportation Handbook”) contained in this part....

  9. 41 CFR 102-118.210 - May my agency use bills of lading other than the GBL for a transportation shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT Use of Government Billing Documents Terms and Conditions Governing Acceptance and Use of A Government Bill of Lading (gbl) Or Government... conditions (also found in the “U.S. Government Freight Transportation Handbook”) contained in this part....

  10. 41 CFR 102-118.210 - May my agency use bills of lading other than the GBL for a transportation shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT Use of Government Billing Documents Terms and Conditions Governing Acceptance and Use of A Government Bill of Lading (gbl) Or Government... conditions (also found in the “U.S. Government Freight Transportation Handbook”) contained in this part....

  11. 41 CFR 102-118.210 - May my agency use bills of lading other than the GBL for a transportation shipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT Use of Government Billing Documents Terms and Conditions Governing Acceptance and Use of A Government Bill of Lading (gbl) Or Government... conditions (also found in the “U.S. Government Freight Transportation Handbook”) contained in this part....

  12. Idealised Simulations of Daytime Pollution Transport in a Steep Valley and its Sensitivity to Thermal Stratification and Surface Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehner, M.; Gohm, A.

    2010-02-01

    Numerical simulations of tracer transport in an idealised, east-west aligned valley are performed with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), both two-dimensional and three-dimensional. The results are qualitatively consistent with wintertime observations in the Austrian Inn Valley. The simulations show an asymmetry in wind circulation and tracer distribution between the valley sidewalls according to the orientation of the slope with respect to the sun. Two-dimensional sensitivity experiments are run to investigate the influence of vertical inhomogeneities in thermal stratification and vegetation coverage on the slope-wind circulation and therewith the tracer transport. It is shown that a transition to a layer of higher stability or to a region with higher surface albedo causes a reduction of the mass flux in the upslope-wind layer and due to mass continuity a quasi-horizontal transport out of the slope-wind layer.

  13. Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W J

    1996-05-01

    Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

  14. An experimental investigation on the surface water transport process over an airfoil by using a digital image projection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wei, Tian; Hu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, an experimental investigation was conducted to characterize the transient behavior of the surface water film and rivulet flows driven by boundary layer airflows over a NACA0012 airfoil in order to elucidate underlying physics of the important micro-physical processes pertinent to aircraft icing phenomena. A digital image projection (DIP) technique was developed to quantitatively measure the film thickness distribution of the surface water film/rivulet flows over the airfoil at different test conditions. The time-resolved DIP measurements reveal that micro-sized water droplets carried by the oncoming airflow impinged onto the airfoil surface, mainly in the region near the airfoil leading edge. After impingement, the water droplets formed thin water film that runs back over the airfoil surface, driven by the boundary layer airflow. As the water film advanced downstream, the contact line was found to bugle locally and developed into isolated water rivulets further downstream. The front lobes of the rivulets quickly advanced along the airfoil and then shed from the airfoil trailing edge, resulting in isolated water transport channels over the airfoil surface. The water channels were responsible for transporting the water mass impinging at the airfoil leading edge. Additionally, the transition location of the surface water transport process from film flows to rivulet flows was found to occur further upstream with increasing velocity of the oncoming airflow. The thickness of the water film/rivulet flows was found to increase monotonically with the increasing distance away from the airfoil leading edge. The runback velocity of the water rivulets was found to increase rapidly with the increasing airflow velocity, while the rivulet width and the gap between the neighboring rivulets decreased as the airflow velocity increased.

  15. On the Sensitivity of Atmospheric Model Implied Ocean Heat Transport to the Dominant Terms of the Surface Energy Balance

    SciTech Connect

    Gleckler, P J

    2004-11-03

    The oceanic meridional heat transport (T{sub o}) implied by an atmospheric General Circulation Model (GCM) can help evaluate a model's readiness for coupling with an ocean GCM. In this study we examine the T{sub o} from benchmark experiments of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project, and evaluate the sensitivity of T{sub o} to the dominant terms of the surface energy balance. The implied global ocean TO in the Southern Hemisphere of many models is equatorward, contrary to most observationally-based estimates. By constructing a hybrid (model corrected by observations) T{sub o}, an earlier study demonstrated that the implied heat transport is critically sensitive to the simulated shortwave cloud radiative effects, which have been argued to be principally responsible for the Southern Hemisphere problem. Systematic evaluation of one model in a later study suggested that the implied T{sub o} could be equally as sensitive to a model's ocean surface latent heat flux. In this study we revisit the problem with more recent simulations, making use of estimates of ocean surface fluxes to construct two additional hybrid calculations. The results of the present study demonstrate that indeed the implied T{sub o} of an atmospheric model is very sensitive to problems in not only the surface net shortwave, but the latent heat flux as well. Many models underestimate the shortwave radiation reaching the surface in the low latitudes, and overestimate the latent heat flux in the same region. The additional hybrid transport calculations introduced here could become useful model diagnostic tests as estimates of implied ocean surface fluxes are improved.

  16. The influence of subgrid surface-layer variability on vertical transport of a chemical species in a convective environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, G. M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Parker, D. J.; Petch, J. C.

    2006-08-01

    We use a 2-D cloud-resolving model over a 256 km domain to examine the influence of subgrid-scale processes on the concentration and vertical transport of a chemical species (dimethyl sulphide, or DMS) in a deep convective marine environment. Two issues are highlighted. Firstly, deriving fluxes using a spatially averaged surface wind representative of a global model reduces the domain-mean DMS concentration by approximately 50%. Emission of DMS from the surface is greater in the CRM because it resolves the localized intense winds embedded in the dynamical structure of convective systems. Secondly, we find that the spatial pattern of DMS concentration in the boundary layer is positively correlated with the pattern of convective updraughts. Using a mean concentration field reduces transport to the upper troposphere by more than 50%. The explanation is that secondary convection occurs preferentially on the edges of cold pools, where DMS concentrations are higher than the domain mean.

  17. In-situ surface debris inspection and removal system for upward-facing transport mirrors of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W H; Dzenitis, E; Martin, D; Listiyo, K; Sherman, G; Kent, W; Butlin, R; Stolz, C J; Pryatel, J

    2004-11-10

    We describe a system to inspect and remove surface debris in-situ from the surfaces of upward-facing mirrors that transport 1053 nm laser light to the target chamber of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Grazing angle (2-5{sup o}) illumination with a bar light highlights debris {approx}10 {micro}m in size and larger, which is then viewed through windows in the enclosures of selected mirrors. Debris is removed with 1-second bursts of high velocity (76 m/s) clean air delivered across the optic surfaces by a commercially available linear nozzle (''gas knife''). Experiments with aluminum, stainless steel, glass and polystyrene particles of various sizes >30 {micro}m show that particle removal efficiency is near 100% over most of the mirror surfaces for all sizes tested.

  18. Heavy surface state in a possible topological Kondo insulator: Magnetothermoelectric transport on the (011) plane of SmB6

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Yongkang; Chen, Hua; Dai, Jianhui; Xu, Zhu -an; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-02-25

    Motivated by the high sensitivity to Fermi surface topology and scattering mechanisms in magnetothermoelectric transport, we have measured the thermopower and Nernst effect on the (011) plane of the proposed topological Kondo insulator SmB6. These experiments, together with electrical resistivity and Hall effect measurements, suggest that the (011) plane also harbors a metallic surface with an effective mass on the order of 10–102 m0. The surface and bulk conductances are well distinguished in these measurements and are categorized into metallic and nondegenerate semiconducting regimes, respectively. As a result, electronic correlations play an important role in enhancing scattering and also contributemore » to the heavy surface state.« less

  19. Long-range transport and vertical structure of Asian dust from CALIPSO and surface measurements during PACDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianping; Minnis, Patrick; Chen, Bin; Huang, Zhongwei; Liu, Zhaoyan; Zhao, Qingyun; Yi, Yuhong; Ayers, J. Kirk

    2008-12-01

    Knowledge of long-range transport and vertical distribution of Asian dust aerosols in the free troposphere is important for estimating their impact on climate. Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), surface micropulse lidar (MPL), and standard surface measurements are used to directly observe the long-range transport and vertical distribution of Asian dust aerosols in the free troposphere during the Pacific Dust Experiment (PACDEX). The MPL measurements were made at the Loess Plateau (35.95°N, 104.1°E) near the major dust source regions of the Taklamakan and Gobi deserts. Dust events are more frequent in the Taklamakan, where floating dust dominates, while more intensive, less frequent dust storms are more common in the Gobi region. The vertical distribution of the CALIPSO backscattering/depolarization ratios indicate that nonspherically shaped dust aerosols floated from near the ground to an altitude of approximately 9 km around the source regions. This suggests the possible long-range transport of entrained dust aerosols via upper tropospheric westerly jets. A very distinct large depolarization layer was also identified between 8 and 10 km over eastern China and the western Pacific Ocean corresponding to dust aerosols transported from the Taklamakan and Gobi areas, as confirmed by back trajectory analyses. The combination of these dust sources results in a two-layer or multilayered dust structure over eastern China and the western Pacific Ocean.

  20. Transport of Ions and Particles Through Single Pores of Controlled Geometry and Surface Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevarnik, Matthew A.

    Synthetic nanopores are a powerful tool to control the transport of ions, molecules, and water at the molecular level, mimicking biological systems. In this research, polymer pores are prepared of different geometries, sizes, and surface chemistry to utilize features seen in naturally occurring systems. Specifically, it was one of the goals of this research to prepare and characterize single polymer pores that rectify the current due to a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, similar to naturally occurring ion channels. Prior to modification, aqueous electrolytic solutions are able to conduct readily through the single polymer pores, but after the chemisorption of hydrophobic chemical groups, the pore demonstrates open and closed states. This behavior is also observed to be voltage dependent. Increasing voltage increases the probability of the pore to be in the open states. There is also a voltage range where the pore does not conduct at all. The hydrophobic gating was studied as a function of pore diameter and charge of the residual groups and could be used for an on demand drug delivery system. Another technique that was utilized in this research is the resistive-pulse technique, which is a powerful approach to detect single molecules and particles. A single particle passing through a pore can be observed as a transient drop of the transmembrane current. This research focuses on resistive-pulse sensing experiments performed with track-etched polymer pores characterized by an undulating diameter along the pore length. The resistive pulses generated by spherical beads passing through these pores have a repeatable pattern of large variations corresponding to these diameter changes. We show that this pattern of variations enables the unambiguous resolution of multiple particles simultaneously in the pore, the detection of transient sticking of particles within the pore, and confirmation whether any individual particle completely translocates the

  1. 78 FR 19069 - Southfield Coinvest Holdings, LLC; Southfield Hallcon Investment Corp. and Hallcon Crew Transport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... Hallcon Crew Transport Inc., et al.--Acquisition of Control-- Renzenberger, Inc. AGENCY: Surface...), Hallcon Corp. (HC), Hallcon Crew Transport Inc. (Hallcon Canada), and Hallcon Crew Transport Inc. (Hallcon... industries. HC directly owns 100% of Hallcon Canada, which is incorporated under Canadian law...

  2. Accelerated particle-based target capture--the roles of volume transport and near-surface alignment.

    PubMed

    van Reenen, Alexander; de Jong, Arthur M; Prins, Menno W J

    2013-02-01

    The upcoming generations of high-sensitive and miniaturized biosensing systems need target capture methods that are as efficient and as rapid as possible, with targets ranging from molecules to cells. Capture of the targets can be achieved using particles coated with affinity molecules, but there are still fundamental questions as to the processes that limit the association rates. In this paper we quantify and compare the reaction rates of particle-based target capture with different types of actuation, namely (i) passive thermal transport, (ii) fluid agitation by vortex mixing, and (iii) actively rotating particles. In the experiments, we use fluorescent nanoparticles as targets which are biochemically captured by magnetic microparticles, and the capture efficiency is quantified using fluorescence microscopy with single target resolution. The data unravel the contributions of volume transport, near-surface alignment, and the chemical reaction to the overall rate constant of association. Vortex mixing versus passive transport gives an increase of the reaction rate constant by more than an order of magnitude, implying that the encounter frequency as well as the near-surface alignment probability are increased. The importance of near-surface alignment is underscored by the data of active particle rotation; the binding probability per encounter is 4-fold enhanced on rotating capture particles. We discuss the implications of our results for different biological systems and for the development of novel actuation methods in particle-based target capture. PMID:23297682

  3. Coupled Soil Water and Heat Transport Near the Land Surface in Arid and Semiarid Regions - Multi-Domain Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Binayak; Yang, Zhenlei

    2016-04-01

    Understanding and simulating coupled water and heat transfer appropriately in the shallow subsurface is of vital significance for accurate prediction of soil evaporation that would improve the coupling between land surface and atmosphere, which consequently could enhance the reliability of weather as well as climate forecast. The theory of Philip and de Vries (1957), accounting for water vapor diffusion only, was considered physically incomplete and consequently extended and improved by several researchers by explicitly taking water vapor convection, dispersion or air flow into account. It is generally believed that the soil moisture is usually low in the near surface layer under highly transient field conditions, particularly in arid and semiarid regions, and that accurate characterization of water vapor transport is critical when modeling simultaneous water and heat transport in the shallow field soils. The first objective of this study is thus mainly to test existing coupled water and heat transport theories and to develop reasonable and simplified numerical models using field experimental data collected under semi-arid and arid hydro-climatic conditions. In addition, more complex multi-domain models are developed for ubiquitous heterogeneous terrestrial surfaces such as horizontal textural contrasts or structured heterogeneity including macropores (fractures, cracks, root channels, etc.). This would make coupled water and heat transfer models applicable in such non-homogeneous soils more meaningful and enhance the skill of land-atmosphere interaction models at a larger context.

  4. Effects of bulk charged impurities on the bulk and surface transport in three-dimensional topological insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, B.; Chen, T.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2013-09-15

    In the three-dimensional topological insulator (TI), the physics of doped semiconductors exists literally side-by-side with the physics of ultrarelativistic Dirac fermions. This unusual pairing creates a novel playground for studying the interplay between disorder and electronic transport. In this mini-review, we focus on the disorder caused by the three-dimensionally distributed charged impurities that are ubiquitous in TIs, and we outline the effects it has on both the bulk and surface transport in TIs. We present self-consistent theories for Coulomb screening both in the bulk and at the surface, discuss the magnitude of the disorder potential in each case, and present results for the conductivity. In the bulk, where the band gap leads to thermally activated transport, we show how disorder leads to a smaller-than-expected activation energy that gives way to variable-range hopping at low temperatures. We confirm this enhanced conductivity with numerical simulations that also allow us to explore different degrees of impurity compensation. For the surface, where the TI has gapless Dirac modes, we present a theory of disorder and screening of deep impurities, and we calculate the corresponding zero-temperature conductivity. We also comment on the growth of the disorder potential in passing from the surface of the TI into the bulk. Finally, we discuss how the presence of a gap at the Dirac point, introduced by some source of time-reversal symmetry breaking, affects the disorder potential at the surface and the mid-gap density of states.

  5. Transport of trace metals in runoff from soil and pond ash feedlot surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, J.R.; Gilley, J.E.; Cottrell, G.L.; Woodbury, B.L.; Berry, E.D.; Eigenbert, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    The use of pond ash (fly ash that has been placed in evaporative ponds for storage and subsequently dewatered) for feedlot surfaces provides a drier environment for livestock and furnishes economic benefits. However, pond ash is known to have high concentrations of trace elements, and the runoff water-quality effects of feedlot surfaces amended with pond ash are not well defined. For this study, two experimental units (plots) were established in eight feedlot pens. Four of the pens contained unamended soil surfaces, and the remaining four pens had pond-ash amended surfaces. Before each test, unconsolidated surface material was removed from four of the plots for each of the amendment treatments, resulting in eight unamended plots and eight pond-ash amended plots. Concentrations for 23 trace elements were measured in cattle feedlot surface material and in the runoff water from three simulated rainfall events. Trace element concentrations in surface material and runoff did not differ between surface consolidation treatments. Amending the feedlot surface material with pond ash resulted in a significant increase in concentration for 14 of the 17 trace elements. Runoff concentrations for 21 trace elements were affected by pond-ash amendment. Sixteen of 21 trace element concentrations that differed significantly were greater in runoff from unamended soil surfaces. Concentrations in runoff were significantly correlated with concentrations in feedlot surface material for boron, manganese, molybdenum, selenium, and uranium.

  6. Transport signatures of surface potentials on three-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sthitadhi; Das, Sourin

    2016-02-01

    The spin-momentum-locked nature of the robust surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators (3D TIs) makes them promising candidates for spintronics applications. Surface potentials which respect time-reversal symmetry can exist at the surface between a 3D TI and the trivial vacuum. These potentials can distort the spin texture of the surface states while retaining their gapless nature. In this work, the effect of all such surface potentials on the spin textures is studied. Since a tunnel magnetoresistance signal carries the information of the spin texture, it is proposed that spin-polarized tunneling of electrons to a 3D TI surface can be used to uniquely identify the surface potentials and quantitatively characterize them.

  7. From Soil to Surface Water: a Meta-Analysis of Catchment-Scale Organic Matter Production and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, R. S.; Brooks, P. D.; Perdrial, J. N.

    2015-12-01

    Organic matter plays a fundamental role in the ecology and biogeochemistry of many ecosystems, from soils to headwater streams to oceans. In most catchments, the terrestrial environment is the dominant source of organic matter for the aquatic system, and thus DOM represents a fundamental linkage between soil and surface water. With trends of increasing DOC concentrations observed in many areas of the world, there is growing interest in identifying which factors drive DOM concentration and chemistry. Studies of systems ranging from tropical rainforests to boreal landscapes have identified many catchment characteristics that co-vary with DOM concentration and chemistry. These include climate elements such as solar radiation and precipitation patterns, chemical measurements such as sulfate or chloride concentration, and land use impacts such as percent agriculture. The question of which catchment characteristics actually control DOM can be broken down into two parts: which factors control the production of mobile DOM and what drives DOM transport from the terrestrial to the aquatic system. Here we review studies covering a range of ecosystems, scales, and measurement techniques, to categorize the major state factors that drive catchment controls of aquatic organic matter. Specifically, we identify three major transport vectors that vary both in their timing of DOM transport to surface water and the propensity for DOM originating from terrestrial source areas to be modified during transport. We use this three vector conceptual model of transport to group catchments and identify reproducible signatures of DOM export with varying levels of disturbance. By developing a generalized conceptual model of catchment-scale controls on aquatic organic matter, we can predict how dissolved organic matter will respond to environmental change. This knowledge can then help guide best management practices.

  8. Separation of bulk and surface electron transport in metamorphic InAs layers using quantitative mobility spectrum analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Arehart, A. R.; Carlin, A. M.; Ringel, S. A.

    2008-08-11

    Electron transport in low dislocation density, strain-relaxed InAs layers grown on metamorphic InAs{sub y}P{sub 1-y}/InP substrates by molecular beam epitaxy was characterized using quantitative mobility spectrum analysis (QMSA) of Hall effect measurements. QMSA applied to systematically varied metamorphic InAs samples reveals high bulk electron mobilities of {approx}20 000 cm{sup 2}/V s at 300 K at a Si doping concentration of 1x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}, simultaneously with a separate population of much slower electrons having an average mobility of {approx}2400 cm{sup 2}/V s due to parallel conduction within the InAs surface electron accumulation layer. Measurements made on higher doped samples reveal only a single electron population participating in transport due to lowered surface band bending that reduces surface accumulation of electrons in conjunction with the high conductivity of the high mobility metamorphic InAs bulk that overwhelms any remaining surface conductivity in the Hall effect measurements.

  9. Pseudospin-valve effect on transport in junctions of three-dimensional topological insulator surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sthitadhi; Roychowdhury, Krishanu; Das, Sourin

    2016-07-01

    We show that the surface states of pristine 3D topological insulators (TIs) are analogs of ferromagnetic half metals due to complete polarization of an emergent momentum independent pseudospin (SU(2)) degree of freedom on the surface. To put this claim on firm footing, we present results for TI surfaces perpendicular to the crystal growth axis, which clearly show that the tunneling conductance between two such TI surfaces of the same TI material is dominated by this half metallic behavior leading to physics reminiscent of a spin-valve. Further using the generalized tunnel magnetoresistance derived in this work we also study the tunneling current between arbitrary TI surfaces. We also perform a comprehensive study of the effect of all possible surface potentials allowed by time reversal symmetry on this spin-valve effect and show that it is robust against most of such potentials.

  10. Reversible modulation of electric transport properties by oxygen absorption and releasing on Nb:SrTiO{sub 3} surface

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Chen, Y. S. Wang, J.; Shen, B. G.; Sun, J. R.

    2014-11-07

    Pt Schottky contacts on (001)-orientated Nb-doped SrTiO{sub 3} (NSTO) in both ambient air and vacuum were investigated by the conductive atomic force microscope. The co-existed TiO{sub 2} and SrO termination layers were identified on the terrace-structured NSTO surface, where the former possessed a higher forward current than the latter. In ambient air, the barrier height of Pt/NSTO Schottky junction exhibited periodical variation with cyclic terrace plane and step sites, whereas it became homogeneous in ambient vacuum. We suggested that the oxygen absorption and releasing of surface dangling bonds were the origin for reversible changes in transport properties, which indicates a feasible approach for the surface modulation and band structure tailoring of NSTO based heterojunctions.

  11. Ab-initio calculations of the hydrogen-uranium system. Part I: Surface phenomena, absorption, transport and trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Christopher D; Lillard, R Scott

    2009-01-01

    Density functional theory was applied to the initial steps of uranium hydriding: surface phenomena, absorption, bulk transport and trapping. H adsorbs exothermically to the (0 0 1) surface, yet H absorption into the bulk is endothermic, with off-center octahedral absorption having the lowest absorption energy of 0.39 eV, relative to molecular H{sub 2}. H absorption in interstitial sites causes a local softening of the bulk modulus. Diffusion of H in unstrained {alpha}-U has a barrier of 0.6 eV. The energy of H absorption adjacent to the chemical impurities C, S, Si was lowered by an amount proportional to the size of the impurity atom, and the resulting lattice strain Si > S > C. Thus, impurities may promote hydriding by providing surfaces or prestrained zones for H uptake.

  12. 41 CFR 302-9.172 - Under what conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a replacement POV to my post of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Under what conditions...-9.172 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION... PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE Transportation Pov Transportation Subsequent to the Time of Assignment §...

  13. 41 CFR 302-9.172 - Under what conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a replacement POV to my post of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Under what conditions...-9.172 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION... PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE Transportation Pov Transportation Subsequent to the Time of Assignment §...

  14. 41 CFR 302-7.15 - Must I use the method selected by my agency for transporting my HHG, PBP&E and temporary storage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must I use the method... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 7-TRANSPORTATION AND TEMPORARY STORAGE OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND...

  15. 41 CFR 302-7.15 - Must I use the method selected by my agency for transporting my HHG, PBP&E and temporary storage?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Must I use the method... Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE OF PROPERTY 7-TRANSPORTATION AND TEMPORARY STORAGE OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS AND...

  16. 41 CFR 302-9.172 - Under what conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a replacement POV to my post of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Under what conditions...-9.172 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION... STORAGE OF A PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE Transportation Pov Transportation Subsequent to the Time...

  17. 41 CFR 302-9.172 - Under what conditions may my agency authorize transportation of a replacement POV to my post of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Under what conditions...-9.172 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION... STORAGE OF A PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE Transportation Pov Transportation Subsequent to the Time...

  18. 41 CFR 102-118.455 - What is the time limit for a TSP to file a transportation claim against my agency?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) FEDERAL MANAGEMENT REGULATION TRANSPORTATION 118-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT Claims and Appeal Procedures... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the time...

  19. 41 CFR 102-118.230 - What if my agency creates or eliminates a field office approved to prepare transportation documents?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Government Billing Documents Terms and Conditions Governing Acceptance and Use of A Government Bill of Lading (gbl) Or Government Transportation Request (gtr) (until Form Retirement) § 102-118.230 What if my... creates or eliminates a field office approved to prepare transportation documents? 102-118.230 Section...

  20. 41 CFR 102-118.230 - What if my agency creates or eliminates a field office approved to prepare transportation documents?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Government Billing Documents Terms and Conditions Governing Acceptance and Use of A Government Bill of Lading (gbl) Or Government Transportation Request (gtr) (until Form Retirement) § 102-118.230 What if my... creates or eliminates a field office approved to prepare transportation documents? 102-118.230 Section...