Science.gov

Sample records for agency usepa mid-atlantic

  1. COMPARISON OF USEPA FIELD SAMPLING METHODS FOR BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) macroinvertebrate sampling protocols were compared in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands region. The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) wadeable streams protocol results in a single composite sample from nine transects...

  2. COMPARING STRENGTHS OF GEOGRAPHIC AND NONGEOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATIONS OF STREAM BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) sampled - 500 wadeable streams in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands region of the US during the late spring of 1993 to 1995 for a variety of physical, chemical, and biological indicat...

  3. COMPARING THE STRENGTHS OF GEOGRAPHIC AND NON-GEOGRAPHIC CLASSIFICATIONS OF STREAM BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) sampled approximately 500 wadeable streams in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands region of the US during the late spring of 1993 to 1995 for a variety of physical, chemical and biologi...

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A MACROINVERTEBRATE BIOTIC INTEGRITY INDEX (MBII) FOR REGIONALLY ASSESSING MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The multimetric Macroinvertebrate Biotic Integrity Index (MBII) was developed from data collected at 574 wadeable stream reaches in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands region (MAHR) by the USEPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). Over 100 candidate metrics were eval...

  5. 77 FR 65363 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC298 Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Mid-Atlantic Fishery...

  6. 77 FR 51968 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC188 Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Mid-Atlantic Fishery...

  7. THE MID-ATLANTIC INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MAIA - ESTUARIES 1997-1998 SUMMARY REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the summers of 1997-98, a consortium of federal and state environmental agencies conducted the Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA) program to characterize the environmental condition of the four major estuaries in the the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. The...

  8. USEPA EPIC IMPERVIOUS SURFACE RESEARCH IN THE MID-ATLANTIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anthropogenic impervious surfaces have an important relationship with non-point source pollution (NPS) in urban watersheds. These human-created surfaces include such features as roads, parking lots, rooftops, sidewalks, and driveways. The amount of impervious surface area in a ...

  9. EFFECTIVENESS OF STREAM AND RIPARIAN RESTORATION IN THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA-ORD-GWERD has research projects in several locations in the Mid-Atlantic in progress to evaluate the effectiveness of stream and riparian restoration, including Mine Bank Run (Baltimore Co., MD), Susquehanna watershed (York and Lancaster Co., PA), and Leipsic watershed ...

  10. INTEGRATION OF COASTAL ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS FOR THE U.S. MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAlA) Project began in 1994 as a partnership between USEPA's Region III Office and Office of Research and Development. This multi-year initiative was envisioned to: (1) improve the quality of environmental science and promote the use of sou...

  11. 76 FR 68719 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... recently provided for both species by the Northeast Fisheries Science Center. Information about accessing... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA810 Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  12. Evaluation of stream chemistry and watershed characteristics in the mid-atlantic coastal plain

    SciTech Connect

    Janicki, A.; Morgan, M.; Lynch, J.

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to apply the stream classification model developed from Maryland Synoptic Stream Chemistry Study data base to assess the relative importance of acidic deposition and other anthropogenic disturbances on acidity in Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain streams. Data pertaining to Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain watershed geology, soils, land use type, and stream chemistry were obtained from USEPA National Stream Survey, USGS and County Soil Conservation Services from New Jersey to North Carolina. These data were used in a regression analysis to establish the relative importance of ions determining stream water acidity. The study results support the conclusion that acidic deposition has substantially altered the acid base chemistry of Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain Streams.

  13. MID-ATLANTIC LANDCOVER CHANGE DATA BROWSER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mid-Atlantic region is comprised of southern New York, southern and western New Jersey, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Virginia, northeastern North Carolina, Delaware, and Washington, DC. It is an ecosystem rich in streams, wetlands, forests, estuaries, breeding birds...

  14. MACROINVERTEBRATE METRICS AND WATER CHEMISTRY RELATIONSHIPS FROM NON-WADEABLE STREAMS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Macroinvertebrates were collected from non-wadeable streams during the summer of 1997 and 1998 for the USEPA Environmental Monitoring and Assessent Program (EMAP) Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA). In this study we examined macroinvertebrate metrics to identify those whi...

  15. STREAM BIOASSESSMENTS AND HOW TAXONOMIC RESOLUTION AFFECTS OUR VIEW OF THE WORLD: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    During late spring 1993-1995, the USEPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) sampled wadeable streams in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. for a variety of physical, chemical, and biological indicators of environmental condition. A representative set of abou...

  16. Ground-water vulnerability to nitrate contamination in the mid-atlantic region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, Earl A.; LaMotte, Andrew E.; Cullinan, Kerri-Ann; Smith, Elizabeth R.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s (USEPA) Regional Vulnerability Assessment (ReVA) Program has developed a set of statistical tools to support regional-scale, integrated ecological risk-assessment studies. One of these tools, developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), is used with available water-quality data obtained from USGS National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) and other studies in association with land cover, geology, soils, and other geographic data to develop logistic-regression equations that predict the vulnerability of ground water to nitrate concentrations exceeding specified thresholds in the Mid-Atlantic Region. The models were developed and applied to produce spatial probability maps showing the likelihood of elevated concentrations of nitrate in the region. These maps can be used to identify areas that currently are at risk and help identify areas where ground water has been affected by human activities. This information can be used by regional and local water managers to protect water supplies and identify land-use planning solutions and monitoring programs in these vulnerable areas.

  17. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to

  18. Forecasting fish biomasses, densities, productions, and bioaccumulation potentials of Mid-Atlantic wadeable streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional fishery conditions of Mid-Atlantic wadeable streams in the eastern United States are estimated using the BASS bioaccumulation and fish community model and data collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP)....

  19. MID-ATLANTIC INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT (MAIA) STATE OF THE FLOWING WATERS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This assessment serves the purpose of a report card on the state of streams and rivers in the Mid-Atlantic region. It combines data from two sample surveys of flowing waters conducted in the region by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency during the period 1993-98. Two unique...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDEX OF BIOTIC INTEGRITY FOR THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    From 1993 to 1996, fish assemblage data were collected from 309 wadeable streams in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Highlands region as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program. Stream sites were selected with a probabilistic sampl...

  1. INNOVATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CONTRIBUTES TO IMPROVED MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN THE MID-ATLANTIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA and other federal agencies have conducted considerable research in the Mid-Atlantic region. EPA's Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program funds academic scientists and engineers to conduct complementary research. Some of the research results are being used, but there is a...

  2. MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL STREAMS STUDY: STATISTICAL DESIGN FOR REGIONAL ASSESSMENT AND LANDSCAPE MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A network of stream-sampling sites was developed for the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (New Jersey through North Carolina) a collaborative study between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Geological Survey. A stratified random sampling with unequal weighting was u...

  3. MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL STREAMS STUDY: STATISTICAL DESIGN FOR REGIONAL ASSESSMENT AND LANDSCAPE MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A network of stream-sampling sites was developed for the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (New Jersey through North Carolina) as part of collaborative research between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Geological Survey. A stratified random sampling with unequal wei...

  4. EVALUATION OF MACROINVERTEBRATE TRENDS IN STREAMS VULNERABLE TO ACID DEPOSITION IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS REGION OF THE U.S.A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic macroinvertebrate and water chemistry samples were collected from wadeable stream sites in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands region of the U.S. during 1993-1995 and 2001 in support of USEPA's TIME (Temporally Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems) Progam. This study was designed ...

  5. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

    2012-05-31

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  6. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

    2012-06-29

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  7. ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF THE U.S. MID-ATLANTIC ESTUARIES: THE MID-ATLANTIC INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT (MAIA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA-Estuaries) evaluated ecological conditions in US Mid-Atlantic estuaries during the summers of 1997 and 1998. Over 800 probability-based stations were monitored in four main estuarine systems?Chesapeake Bay, the Delaware Estuary, Maryla...

  8. 78 FR 54644 - 2013 Fall Joint Meeting of the Ozone Transport Commission and the Mid-Atlantic Northeast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... AGENCY 2013 Fall Joint Meeting of the Ozone Transport Commission and the Mid-Atlantic Northeast... United States Environmental Protection Agency is announcing the joint 2013 Fall Meeting ] of the Ozone... will include topics regarding reducing ground-level ozone precursors and matters relative to...

  9. 77 FR 65380 - 2012 Fall Joint Meeting of the Ozone Transport Commission and the Mid-Atlantic Northeast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... AGENCY 2012 Fall Joint Meeting of the Ozone Transport Commission and the Mid-Atlantic Northeast... Environmental Protection Agency is announcing the joint 2012 Fall Meeting of the Ozone Transport Commission (OTC... regarding reducing ground- level ozone precursors and matters relative to Regional Haze and...

  10. BIOLOGICAL INTEGRITY IN MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAINS HEADWATER STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to assess the applicability of landscape metrics, in conjunction with stream water quality to estimate the biological integrity of headwater streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plains using multivariate techniques.

  11. Satellite Movie Sees Major Winter Storm Nearing Mid-Atlantic

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from Jan. 20 to 22 shows the movement of the system that is expected to bring a powerful winter storm to the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region. Credit: NASA...

  12. Black smokers on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rona, Peter A.

    Evidence for a variety of active hydrothermal venting phenomena, including black smokers, was discovered at a site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge by a research team of government and university scientists. The work was accomplished on a cruise of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship Researcher during July 1985 as part of the NOAA Vents Program. The site of the venting phenomena is the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) Hydrothermal Field on the east wall of the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 26°N. The TAG Hydrothermal Field was the first hydrothermal field to be found on an oceanic ridge; it was discovered 12 years ago in 1973. However, until the present cruise, only low-temperature hydrothermal activity had been documented, and the existence of higher-temperature hydrothermal activity along slow spreading oceanic ridges (half rate 2 cm/yr), such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, was in question.

  13. Biological integrity in mid-atlantic coastal plains headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Megan, Mehaffey H; Nash, Maliha S; Neale, Anne C; Pitchford, Ann M

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the applicability of using landscape variables in conjunction with water quality and benthic data to efficiently estimate stream condition of select headwater streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plains. Eighty-two streams with riffle sites were selected from eight-two independent watersheds across the region for sampling and analyses. Clustering of the watersheds by landscape resulted in three distinct groups (forest, crop, and urban) which coincided with watersheds dominant land cover or use. We used non-parametric analyses to test differences in benthos and water chemistry between groups, and used regression analyses to evaluate responses of benthic communities to water chemistry within each of the landscape groups. We found that typical water chemistry measures associated with urban runoff such as specific conductance and dissolved chloride were significantly higher in the urban group. In the crop group, we found variables commonly associated with farming such as nutrients and pesticides significantly greater than in the other two groups. Regression analyses demonstrated that the numbers of tolerant and facultative macroinvertebrates increased significantly in forested watersheds with small shifts in pollutants, while in human use dominated watersheds the intolerant macroinvertebrates were more sensitive to shifts in chemicals present at lower concentrations. The results from this study suggest that landscape based clustering can be used to link upstream landscape characteristics, water chemistry and biotic integrity in order to assess stream condition and likely cause of degradation without the use of reference sites. Notice: Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  14. INTERACTIVE HABITAT MODELS FOR MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLAND STREAM FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In most wadeable streams of the Mid-Atlantic Highland region of the eastern United States, habitat alteration resulting from development in the watershed is the primary stressor for fish. Models that predict the presence of stream fish species based on habitat characteristics ca...

  15. BIOLOGICAL INTEGRITY IN MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAINS HEADWATER STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to assess the applicability of using landscape variables in conjunction with water quality and benthic data to efficiently estimate stream condition of select headwater streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plains. Eighty-two streams with riffle sit...

  16. Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect

    Saracino-Brown, Jocelyn; Smith, Courtney; Gilman, Patrick

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. The workshop was planned by Federal agency, academic, and private partners to promote collaboration between ongoing offshore ecological survey efforts, and to promote the collaborative development of complementary predictive models and compatible databases. The meeting primarily focused on efforts to establish and predict marine mammal, seabird, and sea turtle abundance, density, and distributions extending from the shoreline to the edge of the Exclusive Economic Zone between Nantucket Sound, Massachusetts and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.

  17. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #17: PUBLICATION OF MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report, "Preparing for a Changing Climate: The Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change - Mid-Atlantic Overview", summarizes the findings of the first Mid-Atlantic Regional Assessment. The Mid-Atlantic Regional Assessment was led by a team from The Pennsylvani...

  18. Composition of basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engel, A.E.J.; Engel, C.G.

    1964-01-01

    Studies of volcanic rocks in dredge hauls from the submerged parts of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggest that it consists largely of tholeiitic basalt with low values of K, Ti, and P. In contrast, the volcanic islands which form the elevated caps on the Ridge are built of alkali basalt with high values of Ti, Fe3+, P, Na, and K. This distinct correlation between the form of the volcanic structures, elevation above the sea floor, and composition suggests that the islands of alkali basalt are derived from a parent tholeiitic magma by differentiation in shallow reservoirs. The volume of low-potassium tholeiites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and elsewhere in the oceans appears to be many times that of the alkali basalts exposed on oceanic islands. Tholeiitic basalts with about 0.2 K2O appear to be the primary and predominant magma erupted on the oceanic floor.

  19. Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force. Hearing before the Committee on the Judiciary. United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session on the Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Force in the Mid-Atlantic Region Which Would Coordinate Government Agencies, Including U.S. Attorneys, the FBI, DEA, Customs Service, BATF, and the IRS. Dover, Delaware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

    This document presents testimony and proceedings from the Congressional hearings on organized crime and drug enforcement in the Mid-Atlantic region, and government efforts to solve these problems. Opening statements are presented from Senators Strom Thurmond and Joseph Biden. Testimony is also presented from the United States attorneys for the…

  20. An introduction to mid-Atlantic seasonal pools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, L.J.; Jung, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Seasonal pools, also known as vernal ponds, provide important ecological services to the mid-Atlantic region. This publication serves as an introduction to seasonal pool ecology and management; it also provides tools for exploring seasonal pools, including a full-color field guide to wildlife. Seasonal pools are defined as having four distinctive features: surface water isolation, periodic drying, small size and shallow depth, and support of a characteristic biological community. Seasonal pools experience regular drying that excludes populations of predatory fish. Thus, pools in the mid-Atlantic region provide critical breeding habitat for amphibian and invertebrate species (e.g., spotted salamander (Ambystoma maculatum), wood frog (Rana sylvatica), and fairy shrimp (Order Anostraca)) that would be at increased risk of predation in more permanent waters. The distinctive features of seasonal pools also make them vulnerable to human disturbance. In the mid-Atlantic region, land-use changes pose the greatest challenges to seasonal pool conservation. Seasonal pools are threatened by direct loss (e.g., filling or draining of the pool) as well as by destruction and fragmentation of adjoining terrestrial habitat. Many of the species that depend on seasonal pools for breeding spend the majority of their lives in the surrounding lands that extend a radius of 1000 feet or more from the pools; these vital habitats are being transected by roads and converted to other land uses. Other threats to seasonal pools include biological introductions and removals, mosquito control practices, amphibian diseases, atmospheric deposition, and climate change. The authors recommend a three-pronged strategy for seasonal pool conservation and management in the mid-Atlantic region: education and research, inventory and monitoring of seasonal pools, and landscape-level planning and management.

  1. Forecasting fish biomasses, densities, productions, and bioaccumulation potentials of mid-atlantic wadeable streams.

    PubMed

    Barber, M Craig; Rashleigh, Brenda; Cyterski, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Regional fishery conditions of Mid-Atlantic wadeable streams in the eastern United States are estimated using the Bioaccumulation and Aquatic System Simulator (BASS) bioaccumulation and fish community model and data collected by the US Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). Average annual biomasses and population densities and annual productions are estimated for 352 randomly selected streams. Realized bioaccumulation factors (BAF) and biomagnification factors (BMF), which are dependent on these forecasted biomasses, population densities, and productions, are also estimated by assuming constant water exposures to methylmercury and tetra-, penta-, hexa-, and hepta-chlorinated biphenyls. Using observed biomasses, observed densities, and estimated annual productions of total fish from 3 regions assumed to support healthy fisheries as benchmarks (eastern Tennessee and Catskill Mountain trout streams and Ozark Mountains smallmouth bass streams), 58% of the region's wadeable streams are estimated to be in marginal or poor condition (i.e., not healthy). Using simulated BAFs and EMAP Hg fish concentrations, we also estimate that approximately 24% of the game fish and subsistence fishing species that are found in streams having detectable Hg concentrations would exceed an acceptable human consumption criterion of 0.185 μg/g wet wt. Importantly, such streams have been estimated to represent 78.2% to 84.4% of the Mid-Atlantic's wadeable stream lengths. Our results demonstrate how a dynamic simulation model can support regional assessment and trends analysis for fisheries. PMID:25858149

  2. Forecasting fish biomasses, densities, productions, and bioaccumulation potentials of mid-atlantic wadeable streams.

    PubMed

    Barber, M Craig; Rashleigh, Brenda; Cyterski, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Regional fishery conditions of Mid-Atlantic wadeable streams in the eastern United States are estimated using the Bioaccumulation and Aquatic System Simulator (BASS) bioaccumulation and fish community model and data collected by the US Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). Average annual biomasses and population densities and annual productions are estimated for 352 randomly selected streams. Realized bioaccumulation factors (BAF) and biomagnification factors (BMF), which are dependent on these forecasted biomasses, population densities, and productions, are also estimated by assuming constant water exposures to methylmercury and tetra-, penta-, hexa-, and hepta-chlorinated biphenyls. Using observed biomasses, observed densities, and estimated annual productions of total fish from 3 regions assumed to support healthy fisheries as benchmarks (eastern Tennessee and Catskill Mountain trout streams and Ozark Mountains smallmouth bass streams), 58% of the region's wadeable streams are estimated to be in marginal or poor condition (i.e., not healthy). Using simulated BAFs and EMAP Hg fish concentrations, we also estimate that approximately 24% of the game fish and subsistence fishing species that are found in streams having detectable Hg concentrations would exceed an acceptable human consumption criterion of 0.185 μg/g wet wt. Importantly, such streams have been estimated to represent 78.2% to 84.4% of the Mid-Atlantic's wadeable stream lengths. Our results demonstrate how a dynamic simulation model can support regional assessment and trends analysis for fisheries.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION AND PREDICTION OF NUTRIENTS AND PESTICIDES IN BASE FLOW CONDITIONS OF FIRST ORDER STREAMS IN THE MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN-A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Landscape Indicators for Pesticides Study in Mid-Atlantic Coastal Streams (LIPS-MACS) is a collaborative research effort between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development and the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment Pr...

  4. PREDICTING THE OCCURRENCE OF NUTRIENTS AND PESTICIDES DURING BASE FLOW IN STREAMS: STATUS OF MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN AND MIDWEST CORN BELT STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Random surveys of 174 headwater streams of the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (MACP) and 110 third-order streams in the Midwest Corn Belt (MCB) were conducted in 2000 and 2004, respectively in two cooperative research studies by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Geolo...

  5. Comparative visual ecophysiology of mid-Atlantic temperate reef fishes

    PubMed Central

    Horodysky, Andrij Z.; Brill, Richard W.; Crawford, Kendyl C.; Seagroves, Elizabeth S.; Johnson, Andrea K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The absolute light sensitivities, temporal properties, and spectral sensitivities of the visual systems of three mid-Atlantic temperate reef fishes (Atlantic spadefish [Ephippidae: Chaetodipterus faber], tautog [Labridae: Tautoga onitis], and black sea bass [Serranidae: Centropristis striata]) were studied via electroretinography (ERG). Pelagic Atlantic spadefish exhibited higher temporal resolution but a narrower dynamic range than the two more demersal foragers. The higher luminous sensitivities of tautog and black sea bass were similar to other benthic and demersal coastal mid-Atlantic fishes. Flicker fusion frequency experiments revealed significant interspecific differences at maximum intensities that correlated with lifestyle and habitat. Spectral responses of the three species spanned 400–610 nm, with high likelihood of cone dichromacy providing the basis for color and contrast discrimination. Significant day-night differences in spectral responses were evident in spadefish and black sea bass but not tautog, a labrid with characteristic structure-associated nocturnal torpor. Atlantic spadefish responded to a wider range of wavelengths than did deeper-dwelling tautog or black sea bass. Collectively, these results suggest that temperate reef-associated fishes are well-adapted to their gradient of brighter to dimmer photoclimates, representative of their unique ecologies and life histories. Continuing anthropogenic degradation of water quality in coastal environments, at a pace faster than the evolution of visual systems, may however impede visual foraging and reproductive signaling in temperate reef fishes. PMID:24285711

  6. Anomalous Cold Water Detected along Mid-Atlantic Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Donglian; Liu, Zhong; Chiu, Long; Yang, Ruixin; Singh, Ramesh P.; Kafatos, Menas

    2004-04-01

    In July 2003, anomalous cold water along the mid-Atlantic coast affected local tourism and fishing. The cold water interfered with tuna fishing, and for 2 to 3 weeks, rockfish generally found during the fall were present in the area. Satellite data, buoy observations, and weather maps were analyzed to investigate the cause of this cold water event. The results show that the increasing westerly and southerly winds that resulted from approaching cold fronts may have induced upwelling away from and along the mid-Atlantic coast. This, combined with the southward advection of cold sea water from the North Atlantic Ocean, might have caused the anomalous cold water along the coast. The sea surface temperature (SST) observations made by buoy 44014 (0.6 m below sea level) (http://www.ndbc.noaa.gov/) near Virginia Beach (36.61°N, 74.84° W) for the month of July 2003 show a 4°C decrease in SST from 3 to 5 July 2003. A smaller drop of 2-3°C is also found for 24-25 July 2003 (Figure 1a). The east-west (u) and south-north (v) wind components (Figure 1a) observed by buoy 44014 shows a relationship with the observed SST. In general, wind speeds during July 2003 were found to be stronger than those of July 2002.

  7. Comparative visual ecophysiology of mid-Atlantic temperate reef fishes.

    PubMed

    Horodysky, Andrij Z; Brill, Richard W; Crawford, Kendyl C; Seagroves, Elizabeth S; Johnson, Andrea K

    2013-01-01

    The absolute light sensitivities, temporal properties, and spectral sensitivities of the visual systems of three mid-Atlantic temperate reef fishes (Atlantic spadefish [Ephippidae: Chaetodipterus faber], tautog [Labridae: Tautoga onitis], and black sea bass [Serranidae: Centropristis striata]) were studied via electroretinography (ERG). Pelagic Atlantic spadefish exhibited higher temporal resolution but a narrower dynamic range than the two more demersal foragers. The higher luminous sensitivities of tautog and black sea bass were similar to other benthic and demersal coastal mid-Atlantic fishes. Flicker fusion frequency experiments revealed significant interspecific differences at maximum intensities that correlated with lifestyle and habitat. Spectral responses of the three species spanned 400-610 nm, with high likelihood of cone dichromacy providing the basis for color and contrast discrimination. Significant day-night differences in spectral responses were evident in spadefish and black sea bass but not tautog, a labrid with characteristic structure-associated nocturnal torpor. Atlantic spadefish responded to a wider range of wavelengths than did deeper-dwelling tautog or black sea bass. Collectively, these results suggest that temperate reef-associated fishes are well-adapted to their gradient of brighter to dimmer photoclimates, representative of their unique ecologies and life histories. Continuing anthropogenic degradation of water quality in coastal environments, at a pace faster than the evolution of visual systems, may however impede visual foraging and reproductive signaling in temperate reef fishes.

  8. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH, MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT IN THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Region 3 to implement a long-term research, monitoring, and assessment program in the Mid-Atlantic region - the Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA). The MAIA mission is to develop a broad-based partnership to integrate scientific knowledge into the decision-making proc...

  9. 76 FR 66041 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... Fishery Management Council's (Council) Ecosystem and Ocean Planning Committee will hold a public meeting... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA786 Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council... telephone: (410) 859- 3300. Council address: Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, 800 N. State...

  10. 75 FR 4348 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XU05 Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public hearings. SUMMARY: The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management... Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish (MSB) Fishery Management Plan (FMP). See SUPPLEMENTARY...

  11. WATERSHED RESTORATION AND FISHERIES MANAGEMENT IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is about watershed restoration and fisheries management in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands. The goal of the Canaan Valley Institue is to develop and implement solutions to restore damaged areas and protect aquatic systems in the Mid-Atlantic Highlands. A decision ana...

  12. Mid-Atlantic Consumer Purchasing Behavior and Knowledge of Locally Grown and Seasonal Produce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, Amy J.; Kelley, Kathleen M.; Hyde, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Mid-Atlantic urban consumers were surveyed on their fruit and vegetable purchasing behaviors and their knowledge of produce grown in the region. Consumers were generally unaware of what produce is grown in the mid-Atlantic and during what months they are harvested. Additionally, differences pertaining to number of produce items purchased were…

  13. EXCHANGING AND INTEGRATING DATA FOR REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTS IN THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    To answer questions posed by the Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAlA) regarding the health of estuaries in the coastal U.S. mid-Atlantic region, researchers need data from several databases, operated by different organizations in various formats for their own purposes. Analy...

  14. CLIMATE IMPACTS ON NUTRIENT FLUXES IN STREAM FLOW IN THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a national assessment process, researchers of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Assessment (MARA) are studying the impacts of climate variation and change on the natural and social systems of the Mid-Atlantic Region. This poster presents research investigating climate impacts ...

  15. Investigation of the Mid-Atlantic coast sudden cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D.; Kafatos, M.; Liu, Z.; Chiu, L.

    2003-12-01

    In the midsummer of this year, it was reported that there was a tremendous change in ocean temperature along the Mid-Atlantic coast, dropping as much as 10 degrees overnight. This sudden sea surface temperature drop affected local tourism and fishing, keep the tourists out of water at this vacation time, caused local tuna fishing hasn't been as good this year, but the cold water lured chill-loving striped bass close to shore, and has two to three weeks of great rockfish, which fishermen could normally get till fall. This article investigates this event by using satellite observations, numerical model outputs, and surface weather analysis. It is found that the North Atlantic cold current, combined with the coastal upwelling driven by the weather influence might cause this sudden cold SST event.

  16. Microbial ecology of deep-water mid-Atlantic canyons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellogg, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    The research described in this fact sheet will be conducted from 2012 to 2014 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's DISCOVRE (DIversity, Systematics, and COnnectivity of Vulnerable Reef Ecosystems) Program. This integrated, multidisciplinary effort will be investigating a variety of topics related to unique and fragile deep-sea ecosystems from the microscopic level to the ecosystem level. One goal is to improve understanding, at the microbiological scale, of the benthic communities (including corals) that reside in and around mid-Atlantic canyon habitats and their associated environments. Specific objectives include identifying and characterizing the microbial associates of deep-sea corals, characterizing the microbial biofilms on hard substrates to better determine their role in engineering the ecosystem, and adding a microbial dimension to benthic community structure and function assessments by characterizing micro-eukaryotes, bacteria, and archaea in deep-sea sediments.

  17. Lebensspuren of the Bathyal Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James B.; Jones, Daniel O. B.; Alt, Claudia H. S.

    2013-12-01

    The extent of megafaunal bioturbation was characterised at flat sedimented sites on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 2500 m depth. This study investigated the properties of and spatial variation in surficial bioturbation at the MAR. Lebensspuren assemblages were assessed at four superstations either side of the MAR and in two different surface productivity regimes, north and south of the sub-polar front. High-definition ROV videos from these superstations were used to quantify area and abundance of 58 lebensspuren types. Lebensspuren area was lowest at the SW with 4.12% lebensspuren coverage and the SE & NW had the greatest area coverage of lebensspuren (9.69% for both). All stations except the SW were dominated by epifaunal, particularly track-style, lebensspuren. Infaunal mounds were more significant in the southern superstations, particularly in the SW. In terms of lebensspuren assemblage composition, all superstations were significantly different from one another, which directly corresponded with the composition of lebensspuren-forming epifauna. Lebensspuren assemblages appeared to have been primarily influenced by local-scale environmental variation and were independent of detrital flux. This investigation presented a novel relationship between lebensspuren and faunal density that conflicted with the traditionally held view of inverse proportionality and suggests that, at the MAR, megafaunal reworking was not the only significant control on lebensspuren assemblages.

  18. 78 FR 20897 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    .... Moore Ph.D., Executive Director, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, 800 N. State Street, Suite 201... protocol will be used to monitor and regulate ITQ ownership and lease activity in these fisheries....

  19. 75 FR 20984 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... Council's (MAFMC) Ad Hoc Search Committee will hold a closed meeting. DATES: Monday, May 10, 2010 from 9 a... INFORMATION: The Mid-Atlantic Council is currently seeking a new Executive Director. The Ad Hoc...

  20. A STRATEGY FOR INTEGRATED ECOLOGICAL RESTORATION OF RIPARIAN BUFFERS IN THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased sediments, nutrients, and other contaminants in the Mid-Atlantic region contribute to environmental problems ranging from stream degradation to possibly Pfiesteria attacks in Chesapeake Bay. Restoring riparian areas - the filters between terrestrial watersheds and aquat...

  1. 77 FR 4013 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ...The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (Council) and its Surfclam, Ocean Quahog and Tilefish Committee, its Ecosystem and Ocean Planning Committee, and its Spiny Dogfish Committee will hold public...

  2. Diorites from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 45{degrees}N.

    PubMed

    Aumento, F

    1969-09-12

    Diorites, associated with basalts, basalt breccias, and serpentinized peridotites, occur in situ on the faulted scarps of two seamounts from the western High Fractured Plateau of the Mid-Atlantic Ridgeat 45 degrees N.

  3. 77 FR 12010 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meeting; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... the Federal Register on February 17, 2012 (77 FR 9628). The date of the meeting changed from March 6.... SUMMARY: The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council's (Council) Ad-Hoc Atlantic Sturgeon Committee...

  4. 76 FR 69706 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Fishery Management Council's (MAFMC) Summer Flounder Monitoring Committee, Scup Monitoring Committee, Black Sea Bass Monitoring Committee, and the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Council's and the Atlantic...

  5. Documenting nursing and health care history in the mid-Atlantic region.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, D M

    1993-01-01

    The records of health care institutions can be of great value to library patrons. Yet, librarians rarely provide these unique resources because records must be collected, arranged, and described before they can be useful to patrons. The University of Pennsylvania's Center for the Study of the History of Nursing conducted a survey of health care agencies in the mid-Atlantic region to locate records created by area health care institutions. The goals of this project were to develop a database of primary source materials, to place organizational records with enduring value at suitable repositories, and to assist in the development of in-house archival programs at agencies keeping records. In-house programs provide health care institutions with a systematic way to preserve their records for administrative, legal, fiscal, and research use. Such programs also facilitate access to information, reduce cost through records management, and promote an institution through preservation and use of its historical records. The survey demonstrated that record keeping is not coordinated in most institutions, and that institutional awareness of the organization or content of records is minimal.

  6. Mid-Atlantic Technology Applications Center. Quarters 1-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mid-atlantic Technology Application Center (MTAC) pursued a number of initiatives designed to enhance the strategic position of the Langley Research Center (LaRC) and NASA in industry. Among these was a closer association with the ISA, International Society for Measurement and Control. During 1997, MTAC placed articles regarding NASA-developed technologies in each In Tech magazine. The monthly magazine is sent to 46,000 sensors and instrumentation professionals. In addition, MTAC coordinated NASXs participation in the ISA Tech 97 Conference, securing $112,000 of free exhibit space, 1500 NASA sensors posters at no cost to NASA, and thousands of dollars of free publicity. MTAC was awarded a contract by ISA to operate its Technical Resource Center (TRC). The goal of this project is to determine what user needs are in order to identify opportunities for collaboration between NASA centers and companies. In addition, the TRC work will lay the groundwork for the Technology Development Consortium (TDC) proposed by MTAC. The purpose of the TDC is to: match current industry needs with NASA technologies available now, and to identify future needs of NASA and industry which may lead to dual use projects. The goal of these activities is twofold: to infuse NASA technologies into the sensors and instrumentation industry and to secure industry funds to support NASA technology development projects. The instrumentation and sensors industry is valued at $30 billion worldwide, with $12 billion in sales in the United States. The growth rate averages 13.5%, so that by the year 2000, the industry will produce products worth $49 billion. More than 80% of instruments, sensors and control systems are currently manufactured in the United States. NASA and the industry do not have a history of collaborative projects; MTAC's initiatives in this area are designed to foster working relationships between the two parties that will help maintain U.S. leadership in this field. Mid-atlantic Technology

  7. Phytoplankton Assemblage Patterns in the Southern Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makinen, Carla; Moisan, Tiffany A. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Wallops Coastal Oceans Observing Laboratory (Wa-COOL) Project, we sampled a time-series transect in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) biweekly. Our 2-year time-series data included physical parameters, nutrient concentrations, and chlorophyll a concentrations. A detailed phytoplankton assemblage structure was examined in the second year. During the 2-year study, chlorophyll a concentration (and ocean color satellite imagery) indicated that phytoplankton blooms occurred in January/February during mixing conditions and in early autumn under stratified conditions. The chlorophyll a concentrations ranged from 0.25 microgram 1(exp -1) to 15.49 microgram 1(exp -1) during the 2-year period. We were able to discriminate approximately 116 different species under phase contrast microscopy. Dominant phytoplankton included Skeletonema costatum, Rhizosolenia spp., and Pseudo-nitzschia pungens. In an attempt to determine phytoplankton species competition/succession within the assemblage, we calculated a Shannon Weaver diversity index for our diatom microscopy data. Diatom diversity was greatest during the winter and minimal during the spring. Diatom diversity was also greater at nearshore stations than at offshore stations. Individual genera appeared patchy, with surface and subsurface patches appearing abruptly and persisting for only 1-2 months at a time. The distribution of individual species differed significantly from bulk variables of the assemblage (chlorophyll a ) and total phytoplankton assemblage (cells), which indicates that phytoplankton species may be limited in growth in ways that differ from those of the total assemblage. Our study demonstrated a highly diverse phytoplankton assemblage throughout the year, with opportunistic species dominating during spring and fall in response to seasonal changes in temperature and nutrients in the southern MAB.

  8. Ground-water vulnerability to nitrate contamination at multiple thresholds in the mid-Atlantic region using spatial probability models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, Earl A.; LaMotte, Andrew E.; Cullinan, Kerri-Ann

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s Regional Vulnerability Assessment Program, has developed a set of statistical tools to support regional-scale, ground-water quality and vulnerability assessments. The Regional Vulnerability Assessment Program?s goals are to develop and demonstrate approaches to comprehensive, regional-scale assessments that effectively inform managers and decision-makers as to the magnitude, extent, distribution, and uncertainty of current and anticipated environmental risks. The U.S. Geological Survey is developing and exploring the use of statistical probability models to characterize the relation between ground-water quality and geographic factors in the Mid-Atlantic Region. Available water-quality data obtained from U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program studies conducted in the Mid-Atlantic Region were used in association with geographic data (land cover, geology, soils, and others) to develop logistic-regression equations that use explanatory variables to predict the presence of a selected water-quality parameter exceeding a specified management concentration threshold. The resulting logistic-regression equations were transformed to determine the probability, P(X), of a water-quality parameter exceeding a specified management threshold. Additional statistical procedures modified by the U.S. Geological Survey were used to compare the observed values to model-predicted values at each sample point. In addition, procedures to evaluate the confidence of the model predictions and estimate the uncertainty of the probability value were developed and applied. The resulting logistic-regression models were applied to the Mid-Atlantic Region to predict the spatial probability of nitrate concentrations exceeding specified management thresholds. These thresholds are usually set or established by regulators or managers at National or local levels. At management thresholds of

  9. Traumatic uveitis in the mid-Atlantic United States

    PubMed Central

    Engelhard, Stephanie B; Patrie, James; Prenshaw, John; Bajwa, Asima; Monahan, Rose; Reddy, Ashvini K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to conduct an in-depth analysis of traumatic uveitis in patients managed in a mid-Atlantic tertiary care center with the goal of better characterizing the clinical features and outcomes of this large and important subset of uveitis patients. Methods This was a retrospective, observational study comparing traumatic uveitis patients with nontraumatic uveitis patients seen at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA, from 1984 to 2014. Results Fifty-four traumatic uveitis patients (55 eyes) were identified. The patient population was 70.4% male, 57.4% Caucasian, and 37.0% African American. Mean age at diagnosis was 31.2 years; mean duration of follow-up was 5.4 years; and mean number of visits to the clinic was 4. The most common treatment modality was local steroids (77.8%). Glaucoma was medically managed in eight patients (14.8%). Cataract surgery was performed in five patients (9.3%). Mean best-corrected visual acuity at baseline for traumatic uveitis patients was 0.33 logMAR (SD 0.42) at the initial visit and 0.16 logMAR (SD 0.33) at the final visit. Mean baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) in the traumatic uveitis group was 15.5 mmHg (SD 7.4) at the initial visit and 14.6 mmHg (SD 4.0) at the final visit. Patients in the traumatic uveitis cohort tended to have better visual outcomes than those in the nontraumatic uveitis cohort. Conclusion In our series, traumatic uveitis patients tended to be young and male and present with unilateral disease, all findings consistent with other reports. Despite relatively good visual outcomes, the traumatic uveitis patients still experienced a high burden of disease, measured both in the number of clinic visits and duration of follow-up. Due to the young mean age of patients, these disease burdens and decreased quality of life are nontrivial, emphasizing the importance of careful management and prompt treatment of this subset of uveitis patients. PMID:26491249

  10. USEPA Drinking Water Laboratory Certification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Feige, M.A.; Madding, C.; Glick, E.M. )

    1993-09-01

    The Drinking Water Laboratory Certification Program has been in existence since 1943 and was adopted by the Drinking Water Program in 1978 under the authority given the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) by the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Both USEPA and the states are looking for ways to make the program efficient in the face of dwindling resources. Recent discussions concerning the certification program have included major new approaches. With impending reauthorization of the SDWA and the changing needs of the certification community, the program could be significantly modified.

  11. APPLICATION OF USEPA'S DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS TOWARDS RAINWATER CATCHMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rainwater harvesting is receiving increased attention worldwide as an alternative source of drinking water. Although federal agencies such as the USEPA acknowledge the existence of rainwater collection systems, the monitoring of this water source is still typically carried out b...

  12. 75 FR 48666 - Calpine Mid-Atlantic Marketing, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Calpine Mid-Atlantic Marketing, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market... supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding, of Calpine Mid-Atlantic Marketing, LLC's application... the FERC Online links at http://www.ferc.gov . To facilitate electronic service, persons with...

  13. Mid-Atlantic Regional Training Center for Residential Construction Trades. Final Program Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasdyke (R. G.) & Associates, Annapolis, MD.

    A group of partners headed by the Home Builders Institute (HBI) created the Mid-Atlantic Regional Training (MART) Center for Residential Construction, with a primary focus on providing education and training services related to the masonry and carpentry trades at existing institutions in the District of Columbia, Maryland, Virginia, and West…

  14. 78 FR 44539 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC777 Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council... Fishery Management Council (Council) and its Research Set-Aside Committee (RSA), and its Ecosystems and Ocean Planning Committee will hold public meetings. DATES: The meetings will be held Tuesday, August...

  15. ESTIMATING STREAMFLOW AND ASSOCIATED HYDRAULIC GEOMETRY, THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to estimate streamflow and channel hydraulic geometry were developed for ungaged streams in the Mid-Atlantic Region. Observed mean annual streamflow and associated hydraulic geometry data from 75 gaging stations located in the Appalachian Plateau, the Ridge and Valley, an...

  16. IMPACTS OF CLIMATE VARIATION AND CHANGE ON MID-ATLANTIC REGION HYDROLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study analyzes periodic variations in the climate of the mid-Atlantic Region over the last 100 years and uses general circulation models (GCMs) to project major climate trends for the next hundred years. Historical data include the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) for th...

  17. ASSESMENT OF THE CONDITION OF THE ECOLOGICAL RESOURCES OF THE MID-ATLANTIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    One objective of the Mid Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA) program is a series of "state of the resource" assessment reports describing the condition of important natural resources within the region. These will culminate in an integrated statement of the ecological condition ...

  18. ASSESSING THE HYDROGEOLOGIC CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM IN MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN STREAMS USING BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing classification systems that describe natural variation across regions is an important first step for developing indicators. We evaluated a hydrogeologic framework for first order streams in the mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain as part of the LIPS-MACS (Landscape Indicators f...

  19. 76 FR 3878 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-21

    ... Council's (MAFMC) Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC) will hold a webinar. DATES: The meeting will be held on Monday, February 7, 2011, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. ADDRESSES: The webinar will be held at.... The public may obtain information about accessing the webinar by visiting the Mid- Atlantic...

  20. A REGIONAL SCALE TOXICITY ASSESSMENT OF SEDIMENT IN THE MID-ATLANTIC AND SOUTHERN ROCKIES, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), sediment samples were collected to assess toxicity on a regional scale in streams and rivers in the Mid-Atlantic U.S. in 1994, 1997 and 1998, and in the Colorado Rocky Mountains in 1994 and 1995. Sample sites...

  1. DECISION TOOL FOR RIPARIAN ECOSYSTEM MANAGMENT IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Canaan Valley Highlands of the Mid-Atlantic, riparian zone restoration has been identified as a critical watershed management practice not only for the ecosystem services provided but also for the potential socioeconomic growth from environmental investment and job creatio...

  2. APPLICATION OF A MULTIPURPOSE UNEQUAL-PROBABILITY STREAM SURVEY IN THE MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A stratified random sample with unequal-probability selection was used to design a multipurpose survey of headwater streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. Objectives for data from the survey include unbiased estimates of regional stream conditions, and adequate coverage of un...

  3. THE POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper assesses the potential impacts of climate change on the mid-Atlantic coastal (MAC) region of the United States. In order of increasing uncertainty, it is projected that sea level, temperature and streamflow will increase in the MAC region in response to higher levels o...

  4. Trophic Structure Over the Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge: The Bathypelagic Zone Really Matters

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present preliminary results and ongoing efforts to characterize the trophic structure and energy flow of the pelagic ecosystems of the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), from Iceland to the Azores. This study is one component of the international CoML field project MAR-ECO (ww...

  5. SELF-ORGANIZING MAPS FOR INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A. new method was developed to perform an environmental assessment for the
    Mid-Atlantic Region (MAR). This was a combination of the self-organizing map (SOM) neural network and principal component analysis (PCA). The method is capable of clustering ecosystems in terms of envi...

  6. Characterization Methods for Small Estuarine Systems in the Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various statistical methods were applied to spatially discrete data from 14 intensively sampled small estuarine systems in the mid-Atlantic U.S. The number of sites per system ranged from 6 to 37. The surface area of the systems ranged from 1.9 to 193.4 km2. Parameters examined ...

  7. INDICATORS OF CHANGE IN MID-ATLANTIC WATERSHEDS, AND CONSEQUENCES IN UPPER CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of change of atmospheric temperature in the Northern Hemisphere in the past century relative to the preceding millennium strongly suggests that we are in a period of rapid global climate change. The mid-Atlantic region is quite sensitive to larger-scale climate variation...

  8. CHLORDANES IN THE MID-ATLANTIC ATMOSPHERE: NEW JERSEY 1997-1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    To characterize the atmospheric dynamics and behavior of chlordane compounds in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States, atmospheric concentrations were measured in 1997-1999 at three New Jersey locations as part of the New Jersey Atmospheric Deposition Network (NJADN) pro...

  9. Ecological Condition of Coastal Ocean Waters Along the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Bight: 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents the results of an assessment of ecological condition in coastal-ocean waters of the U.S. mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB), along the U.S. continental shelf from Cape Cod, MA and Nantucket Shoals to the northeast to Cape Hatteras to the south, based on sampling conduc...

  10. 78 FR 70017 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Mid-Atlantic... meet in a closed session to review the recommendations for the Ricks E Savage Award. The...

  11. PREDICTION OF FUNDAMENTAL ASSEMBLAGES OF MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLAND STREAM FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A statistical software tool, the Stream Fish Assemblage Predictor (SFAP), based on stream sampling data collected by the EPA in the mid-Atlantic Highlands, was developed to predict potential stream fish communities using characteristics of the stream and its watershed.
    Step o...

  12. STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR DETERMINATION AND PREDICTION OF FUNDAMENTAL FISH ASSEMBLAGES OF THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A statistical software tool, Stream Fish Community Predictor (SFCP), based on EMAP stream sampling in the mid-Atlantic Highlands, was developed to predict stream fish communities using stream and watershed characteristics. Step one in the tool development was a cluster analysis t...

  13. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #2: MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL ASSESSMENT (MARA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of this National Assessment effort mandated by the Global Change Research Act of 1990, EPA's Global Change Research Program is sponsoring the Mid-Atlantic Regional Assessment (MARA). With EPA sponsorship, a multi-disciplinary team of faculty members is leading the first a...

  14. VULNERABILITY OF ECOSYSTEMS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION, USA, TO CLIMATIC CHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in the distribution of vegetation in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States were explored for two climate-change scenarios. The equilibrium vegetation ecology (EVE) model was used to project the distribution of life forms and to combine these into biomes for a doubl...

  15. 76 FR 39074 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    .... Moore, Ph.D., Executive Director, Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, 800 North State Street, Suite... and acceptable biological catch (ABC) for bluefish, summer flounder, scup, and black sea bass for 2012; (2) review and comment on proposed 2012 quota specifications and management measures for...

  16. Mid-Atlantic Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center. Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottrell, Raymond S.; Carter, Robert

    The final report of the Mid-Atlantic Region Special Education Instructional Materials Center (MAR-SEIMC) describes field services, information services, library services, and research and evaluation activities conducted from 1967 to August 1974. It is explained that 39 affiliate centers were established throughout Pennsylvania, New Jersey,…

  17. ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK FOR MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN STREAMS USING BENTHIC MACRO INVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A collaborative study among 6 states along the mid-Atlantic seaboard of the USA developed a consistent approach for collecting and interpreting macroinvertebrate data for low-gradient streams of the coastal plain. The study had 3 objectives: 1) to evaluate the validity of aggrega...

  18. A SURVEY OF FISH CONTAMINATION IN SMALL WADEABLE STREAMS IN THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1993 and 1994, fish tissue samples were collected from first, second and third order streams in the Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States.The tissue samples were prepared from whole fish from prioritized lists of Small Target Species and Large Target Species. The two types ...

  19. Mid-Atlantic Region: A Report Identifying and Addressing the Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the deliberations of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Advisory Committee (RAC), one of 10 RACs established under the Educational Technical Assistance Act of 2002 (20 U.S.C. sections 9601 et. seq.) to assess the educational needs of the region. The committee's report outlines the educational needs across the District of Columbia and…

  20. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN NAO VARIBILITY AND U.S. MID-ATLANTIC REGION HYDROCLIMATOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Variability in the climate of the US Mid-Atlantic Region is associated with larger scale variability in the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Pacific North American (PNA) teleconnection pattern, and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Collectively, these three large-scal...

  1. INNOVATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CONTRIBUTES TO IMPROVED MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN THE MID-ATLANTIC

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA) and its partner, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a graduate-level course focused on successful application of science by decision-makers to address a particular problem. Students conduct a literature rev...

  2. 76 FR 68745 - DC Energy, LLC; DC Energy Mid-Atlantic, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission DC Energy, LLC; DC Energy Mid-Atlantic, LLC v. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206 (2011), DC Energy, LLC (DC Energy)...

  3. 77 FR 31332 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Organizational Reports, the New England Council Liaison Report, Executive Director's Report, Science Report... effects of climate on fisheries resources of the Mid-Atlantic region will be presented by Jon Hare of NMFS... Organizational Reports, the New England Council Liaison Report, the Executive Director's Report, Science...

  4. SPATIAL PATTERNS AND ECOLOGICAL DETERMINANTS OF BENTHIC ALGAL ASSEMBLAGES IN MID-ATLANTIC STREAMS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    We attempted to identify spatial patterns and determinants for benthic algal assemblages in Mid-Atlantic streams. Periphyton, water chemistry, stream physical habitat, riparian conditions, and land cover/use in watersheds were characterized at 89 randomly selected stream sites i...

  5. 76 FR 16617 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... overview of offshore wind energy, introduction to the Smart from the Start Energy Initiative, and an overview of the Proposed Mid-Atlantic Wind Energy Areas. Howard King will provide the Council with an... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Presentation from 10 a.m. until...

  6. IMPACT OF CLIMATE VARIATION AND CHANGE ON MID-ATLANTIC REGION HYDROLOGY AND WATER RESOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of hydrology and water resources to climate variation and climate change is assessed for the Mid-Atlantic Region (MAR) of the United States. Observed streamflow, groundwater, and water-quality data are shown to vary in association with climate variation. Projectio...

  7. 76 FR 70421 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... effectively with the recreational community to integrate their views into the management process. Special... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA816 Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council... Fishery Management Council Staff will hold a meeting of recreational fishermen to get input...

  8. 76 FR 72906 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... presentation on Fishery Management Councils: Decision-making, Communication, and Social Factors Associated with...: Decision-making, Communication, and Social Factors Associated with Ecosystem-based Fisheries Management... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA846 Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management...

  9. 77 FR 12814 - Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council (MAFMC); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Statistical Committee (SSC) and the Tilefish Monitoring Committee of the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management.... until 5 p.m. and Thursday, March 22, 2012 from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. The Tilefish Monitoring...

  10. Summary of the Mid-Atlantic Conference on Small-Scale Hydropower in the Mid-Atlantic states: Resolution of the barriers impeding its development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-05-01

    The workshop was conducted to bring together interested persons to examine and discuss the major problems associated with small scale hydroelectric dam development in the Mid-Atlantic region. The objectives and the materials available to conference participants were outlined. Two of the workshops discussed problems and policy responses raised by state and federal regulation. The other two workshops concerned economic issues confronting small scale hydro development and the operation and usefulness of the systems dynamics model under development by the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth. Various Federal and state programs designed to stimulate small scale hydro development were discussed. A plenary session completed the workshops.

  11. Mid-Atlantic CEAP wetland restoration – lessons learned

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the past several decades there has been considerable effort to protect and restore wetlands throughout the United States. The United States Department of Agriculture Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP) is a multi-agency effort to quantify the environmental benefits of conservation pr...

  12. USEPA/WSWRD MEMBRANE RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA has been very active in membrane research. The following areas are currently being investigated: in-house fouling research, Information Collection Rule (ICR) treatment studies, inorganic scaling modeling, Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program implementati...

  13. An oilspill risk analysis for the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard Allmon; Slack, James Richard; Davis, Robert K.

    1976-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine relative environmental impacts of developing oil in different regions of the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf lease area. The study analyzed probability of spills, likely path of pollutants from spills, and locations in space and time of recreational and biological resources likely to be vulnerable. These results are combined to yield estimates of the overall oilspill risk associated with development of the lease area. (Woodard-USGS)

  14. IPOD-USGS multichannel seismic reflection profile from Cape Hatteras to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grow, John A.; Markl, Rudi G.

    1977-01-01

    A 3,400-km-long multichannel seismic-reflection profile from Cape Hatteras to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge was acquired commercially under contract to the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Geological Survey. These data show evidence for massive erosion of the continental slope, diapirs at the base of the continental slope, and mantle reflections beneath the Hatteras Abyssal Plain.

  15. Pathways of fish invasions in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapointe, Nicolas W. R.; Fuller, Pam; Neilson, Matthew; Murphy, Brian R.; Angermeier, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-native fish introductions are a major threat to biodiversity and fisheries, and occur through numerous pathways that vary regionally in importance. A key strategy for managing invasions is to focus prevention efforts on pathways posing the greatest risk of future introductions. We identified high-risk pathways for fish establishment in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States based on estimates of probability of establishment and records of previous introductions, which were considered in the context of emerging socioeconomic trends. We used estimates of propagule pressure, species’ environmental tolerance, and size of species pool to assess the risk of establishment by pathway. Pathways varied considerably in historic importance and species composition, with the majority of species introduced intentionally via stocking (primarily for sport, forage, or biocontrol) or bait release. Bait release, private stocking, illegal introductions intended to establish reproducing populations (e.g., of sport fish), aquaculture, and the sale of live organisms all create risks for future invasions in the Mid-Atlantic region. Of these pathways, bait release probably poses the greatest risk of introductions for the Mid-Atlantic region because propagule pressure is moderate, most released species are tolerant of local environmental conditions, and the pool of species available for transplantation is large. Our findings differ considerably from studies in other regions (e.g., bait release is a dominant pathway in the Mid-Atlantic region, whereas illegal introduction of sport fish is dominant in the western US and aquarium releases are dominant in Florida), demonstrating the need for regional-scale assessments of, and management strategies for, introduction pathways.

  16. Quantitative relationships between watershed-scale stressors and estuarine condition for mid-Atlantic region

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.F.; Hale, S.S.; Comeleo, R.L.; Copeland, J.; August, P.V.

    1995-12-31

    A pilot project has been conducted that developed quantitative relationships between watershed-scale (landscape) stressors and sediment contamination for sub-estuaries within Chesapeake Bay. The landscape stressors, land use patterns (derived from classified, contemporary satellite imagery) and point source pollution, were spatially analyzed for each individual watershed of 25 sub-estuaries using a geographic information system. Sediment contamination data for the sub-estuaries, available from the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP), were statistically reduced to one principal component for the metals and organics. Non-parametric statistical techniques were used to develop empirical relationships between sediment contamination and developed land (positive), herbaceous land (negative) and point source loadings (positive). These analyses have been extended to (1) include approximately 80 subestuaries across the mid-Atlantic region for which EMAP data were available, and (2) relate landscape stressors with estuarine condition. The measure of estuarine condition was an index of benthic quality developed by EMAP. The only available land use data set for the entire mid-Atlantic region was from US Geological Survey Land Use Data Analysis database, which is of 1970s vintage. Because of the dramatic differences in spatial area of the sub-estuaries in the mid-Atlantic region, adjustments for differing hydrologic regimes had to be factored into the analysis. Results indicate that it is possible to develop relationships between watershed-scale stressors and estuarine condition across large geographic regions.

  17. Particulate Matter Pollution and its Regional Transport in the Mid-Atlantic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, H.; Goldberg, D. L.; Hembeck, L.; Canty, T. P.; Vinciguerra, T.; Ring, A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) causes negative effects on human health, impair visibility in scenic areas, and affect regional/global climate. PM can be formed through chemical changes of precursors, including biogenic VOCs and anthropogenic SO2 and NOx often from fossil fuel combustion. In the past decades, PM pollution in the US has improved substantially. However, some areas in the Mid-Atlantic States are still designated as 'moderate' nonattainment by EPA. We utilize datasets obtained during the NASA 2011 DISCOVER-AQ campaign to characterize the composition and distribution of summertime PM pollution in the Mid-Atlantic States. Aircraft measurements and OMI satellite retrieval of major anthropogenic precursors (NO2 and SO2) are analyzed to investigate the regional transport of PM precursors from upwind sources. We compare PM concentration and chemical composition observed during the field campaign to CMAQ simulations with the latest EPA emission inventory. Specifically, we focus on the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemistry in CMAQ simulations using various biogenic VOCs estimates from the MEGAN and BEIS models. Airborne PM observations including PILS measurements from DISCOVER-AQ campaign and OMI retrievals of HCHO are also used to validate and improve the representation of SOA chemistry and PM pollution within CMAQ. The comparison reveals the source and evolution of PM pollution in the Mid-Atlantic States.

  18. USEPA WATERSHED APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development has developed a well defined research plan to evaluate pollutants within watersheds. This plan is defined by long term goals and annual performance measures. The first goal is to provide the approache...

  19. Patterns and Rates of Historical Shoreline Change along the New England and Mid-Atlantic Coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratzmann, M. G.; Hapke, C. J.; Himmelstoss, E. A.; List, J. H.; Thieler, E. R.

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is analyzing historical shoreline changes along open-ocean shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii, Alaska and the Great Lakes to calculate trends and rates of shoreline movement. This accurate and detailed coastal change information is necessary as growing coastal communities and infrastructure are threatened by erosion. Repeatable analytical methods were developed for shoreline movement calculations to facilitate periodic updates of coastal change in a systematic and internally consistent manner. The U.S. New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts from Maine to Virginia are the most recent to be completed in the National Assessment of Shoreline Change project. Shorelines from the 1800s through 2007 were derived from historical maps, orthophotos, and airborne lidar (1997-2007). All shoreline change rates are calculated using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Long-term rates of change are calculated using linear regression through all available shorelines (n = 4 to 12) for the full period of record (100-150 years). Short-term rates of change are calculated for the most recent 25-30 years, using the end-point method. Shoreline change rates were calculated for 78% of the 1360 km of coast in the study area. Complete coverage is lacking due to data gaps, as well as locations (rocky coastlines, large embayments, and beaches) where robust data are unavailable. The average rates of shoreline change for New England and the Mid-Atlantic are erosional, with higher erosion rates observed in the long-term than in the short-term. The average rates of long- and short-term shoreline change in New England (Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island) are -0.4 m/yr ± 0.1 m/yr and -0.2 ± 0.09 m/yr, respectively. The average long-term rate in the Mid-Atlantic (New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia) is -0.6 ± 0.1 m/yr and the short-term rate of change is -0.3 ± 0.1 m

  20. Summary of the Mid-Atlantic conference on small-scale hydropower in the Mid-Atlantic states: resolution of the barriers impeding its development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The workshop was conducted to bring together interested persons to examine and discuss the major problems associated with small-scale hydroelectric dam development in the Mid-Atlantic region. The conference opened with an introductory panel which outlined the objectives and the materials available to conference participants. Two of the workshops discussed problems and policy responses raised by state and Federal regulation. The other two workshops concerned economic issues confronting small-scale hydro development and the operation and usefulness of the systems dynamics model under development by the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth. Various Federal and state programs designed to stimulate small-scale hydro development were discussed. A plenary session completed the workshops.

  1. Intense mixing of lower thermocline water on the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    St Laurent, Louis C; Thurnherr, Andreas M

    2007-08-01

    Buoyancy exchange between the deep and the upper ocean, which is essential for maintaining global ocean circulation, mainly occurs through turbulent mixing. This mixing is thought to result primarily from instability of the oceanic internal wave field, but internal waves tend to radiate energy away from the regions in which they are generated rather than dissipate it locally as turbulence and the resulting distribution of turbulent mixing remains unknown. Another, more direct, mixing mechanism involves the generation of turbulence as strong flows pass through narrow passages in topography, but the amount of turbulence generated at such locations remains poorly quantified owing to a lack of direct measurements. Here we present observations from the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the subtropical North Atlantic Ocean that suggest that passages in rift valleys and ridge-flank canyons provide the most energetic sites for oceanic turbulence. Our measurements show that diffusivities as large as 0.03 m2 s(-1) characterize the mixing downstream of a sill in a well-stratified boundary layer, with mixing levels remaining of the order of 10(-4) m2 s(-1) at the base of the main thermocline. These mixing rates are significantly higher than the diffusivities of the order of 10(-5) m2 s(-1) that characterize much of the global thermocline and the abyssal ocean. Our estimates suggest that overflows associated with narrow passages on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the North Atlantic Ocean produce as much buoyancy flux as has previously been estimated for the entire Romanche fracture zone, a large strait in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that connects the North and South Atlantic basins. This flux is equivalent to the interior mixing that occurs in the entire North Atlantic basin at the depth of the passages, suggesting that turbulence generated in narrow passages on mid-ocean ridges may be important for buoyancy flux at the global scale.

  2. Recycling of construction debris as aggregate in the Mid-Atlantic Region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, G.R.; Menzie, W.D.; Hyun, H.

    2004-01-01

    Reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and portland cement concrete (RPCC) are abundant and available substitutes for natural aggregate in many areas. This paper presents an overview of factors that affect recycled aggregate cost, availability, and engineering performance, and the results of a survey of business practices in the Mid-Atlantic region. For RAP, processing costs are less than those for virgin natural aggregate. Use of efficient asphalt pavement stripping technology, on-site reclamation, and linked two-way transport of asphalt debris and processed asphalt paving mix between asphalt mix plants and paving sites has led to extensive recycling of asphalt pavement in the Mid-Atlantic region of the US. Most of the sites that recycle asphalt pavement (RAP) are located in or near urban areas close to important transportation corridors. RPCC is a viable aggregate source in urban settings where unit costs for processed aggregate from RPCC and natural aggregate are comparable. Disposal fees charged at RPCC recycling sites help defray processing costs and the significantly lower tipping fees at recycling sites versus landfill disposal sites encourage recycling of construction debris as aggregate. Construction contractors and construction debris recycling centers, many of which have the ability to crush and process concrete debris at the job site, produce most RPCC. Production of RPCC aggregate from construction debris that is processed on site using portable equipment moved to the construction site eliminates transportation costs for aggregate and provides an economic incentive for RPCC use. Processing costs, quality and performance issues, and lack of large quantities where needed limit RPCC use. Most RPCC suppliers in the Mid-Atlantic area are located in counties with population densities greater than 400 people/km2 (1036 people/mile2) and that have high unit-value costs and limited local availability of natural aggregate. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Carlsberg Ridge and Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Comparison of slow spreading centre analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murton, Bramley J.; Rona, Peter A.

    2015-11-01

    Eighty per cent of all mid-ocean spreading centres are slow. Using a mixture of global bathymetry data and ship-board multibeam echosounder data, we explore the morphology of global mid-ocean ridges and compare two slow spreading analogues: the Carlsberg Ridge in the north-west Indian Ocean between 57°E and 60°E, and the Kane to Atlantis super-segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 21°N and 31°N. At a global scale, mid-ocean spreading centres show an inverse correlation between segment length and spreading rate with segmentation frequency. Within this context, both the Mid-Atlantic Ridge super-segment and Carlsberg Ridge are similar: spreading at 22 and 26 mm/yr full rates respectively, being devoid of major transform faults, and being segmented by dextral, non-transform, second-order discontinuities. For these and other slow spreading ridges, we show that segmentation frequency varies inversely with flank height and ridge axis depth. Segments on both the Mid-Atlantic Ridge super-segment and Carlsberg Ridge range in aspect ratio (ridge flank height/axis width), depth and symmetry. Segments with high aspect ratios and deeper axial floors often have asymmetric rift flanks and are associated with indicators of lower degrees of melt flux. Segments with low aspect ratios have shallower axial floors, symmetric rift flanks, and evidence of robust melt supply. The relationship between segmentation, spreading rate, ridge depth and morphology, at both a global and local scale, is evidence that rates of melting of the underlying mantle and melt delivery to the crust play a significant role in determining the structure and morphology of slow spreading mid-ocean ridges.

  4. A new species of Nidalia Gray, 1835 from Mid-Atlantic seamounts (Octocorallia, Alcyonacea, Nidaliidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-González, Pablo J.; Gili, Josep-Maria

    2008-12-01

    A new soft coral species of the genus Nidalia, from seamounts to the south of the Azores Archipelago is described. The main features of Nidalia aurantia n. sp. are as following: colony torch-like, a capitulum light orange in colour, not laterally flattened, dome-shaped and not distinctly projecting beyond the stalk, an introvert with sparse sclerites transversally placed, and an anthocodial crown with 13 17 sclerite rows. The new species is compared with its closest congeners. This is the first time that a species of Nidalia has been located in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean.

  5. Scrap tire management in the New York/Mid Atlantic region

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, M.

    1995-05-01

    The Scrap Tire Management Council (STMC) is a North American tire manufactures sponsored, advocacy organization, created to identify and promote environmentally and economically sound markets for scrap tires. The primary goal of the Council is to assist in the creation of demand for 100 percent of the annually generated scrap tires in the United States. Based on current market demand and projected market growth, we envision the primary goal to be met by the turn of the century. A national overview of the scrap tire situation is presented, and then the situations in New York/Mid Atlantic region are discussed.

  6. A survey of storm-water management water quality regulations in four Mid-Atlantic States.

    PubMed

    Balascio, Carmine C; Lucas, William C

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines and compares the management practices and regulatory approaches used by the Mid-Atlantic States of Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania for improving the quality of storm-water runoff. Such practices range from simple extended detention criteria in Pennsylvania through the BMP credit system used by Maryland, to the latest "green technology" methods promoted in Delaware and the recharge, quality and peak reduction approaches of New Jersey. All practices are designed to meet EPA requirements for total suspended solids (TSS) removal, but verification of performance is not required. More sophisticated methods of evaluating TSS removal that can be used for engineering design purposes are needed.

  7. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Mid-Atlantic Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.; Flores, F.; Zammit, D.; Kraemer, M.; Miles, J.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Mid-Atlantic region.

  8. Magnetic Anomalies over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 27{degrees}N.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J D

    1967-08-25

    Ten magnetic profiles across the mid-Atlantic ridge near 27 degrees N show trends that are parallel to the ridge axis and symmetrical about the ridge axis. The configuration of magnetic bodies that could account for the pattern supports the Vine and Matthews hypothesis for the origin of magnetic anomalies over oceanic ridges. A polarity-reversal time scale inferred from models for sea-floor spreading in the Pacific-Antarctic ridge and radiometrically dated reversals of the geomagnetic field indicates a spreading rate of 1.25 centimeters per year during the last 6 million years and a rate of 1.65 centimeters per year between 6 and 10 million years ago. A similar analysis of more limited data over the mid-Atlantic ridge near 22 degrees N also indicates a change in the spreading rate. Here a rate of 1.4 centimeters per year appears to have been in effect during the last 5 million years; between 5 and 9 million years ago, an increased rate of 1.7 centimeters per year is indicated. The time of occurrence and relative magnitude of these changes in the spreading rate, about 5 to 6 million years ago and 18 to 27 percent, respectively, accords with the spreading rate change implied for the Juan de Fuca ridge in the northeast Pacific.

  9. Vulnerability of Mid-Atlantic forested watersheds to timber harvest disturbance.

    PubMed

    Schaberg, Rex H; Abt, Robert C

    2004-06-01

    Forested watersheds of the Mid-Atlantic Region are an important economic resource. They are also critical for maintaining water quality, sustaining important ecological services, and providing habitat to many animal and plant species of conservation concern. These forests are vulnerable to disturbance and fragmentation from changing patterns of land use in the Mid-Atlantic Region, and from harvests of commercially mature and relatively inexpensive timber. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USDA-FS) Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) compiles data on forest condition by state and county. We have transformed these FIA data to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 6-digithdrologic unit code (HUC 6) watershed base, and projected trends in timber growth, inventory, and harvest to 2025 using a timber economics forecasting model (SRTS). We consider forest sustainability from the perspective of timber production, and from the perspective of landscape stability important to conservation values. Simulation data is combined with FIA planted pine acreage data to form a more complete picture of forest extent, composition, and silvicultural practice. Early recognition of prevailing economic trends which encourage the fragmentation of mature forests due to increasing timber harvests may provide managers and policy makers with a planning tool to mitigate undesirable impacts. PMID:15141449

  10. S-wave velocity, basalt chemistry and bathymetry along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu-Shen; Tanimoto, Toshiro; Stolper, Edward M.

    1994-07-01

    Major element chemistry of mid-ocean ridge basalt, S-wave velocity and bathymetry along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge are correlated on an intermediate length scale, and the large anomalies in these observations are associated with hotspot locations. The best correlations are for at depths of 100-200 km, and there is no correlation for depths of 300 km or deeper. S-Wave velocities are low directly under the Mid-Atlantic Ridge above 100 km, but the low-velocity regions shift away from the ridge at greater depth, and a sinuous strip of asthenospheric low velocity extends along the Atlantic hotspots from the Azores to Tristan da Cunha. These features suggest that common physical processes in the upper mantle produce these anomalies. An inspection of the history of the Atlantic Ocean suggests that the asthenospheric low-velocity strip may record earlier ridge position or possible upwelling in the mantle. Possible interaction between hotspots and the ridge blurs the distinction between passive and active upwellings.

  11. Satellite detection of phytoplankton export from the mid-Atlantic Bight during the 1979 spring bloom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, J. J.; Dieterle, D. A.; Esaias, W. E.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) imagery confirms shipboard and in situ moored fluorometer observations of resuspension of near-bottom chlorophyll within surface waters (1 to 10 m) by northwesterly wind events in the mid-Atlantic Bight. As much as 8 to 16 micrograms chl/l are found during these wind events from March to May, with a seasonal increase of algal biomass until onset of stratification of the water column. Rapid sinking or downwelling apparently occurs after subsequent wind events, however, such that the predominant surface chlorophyll pattern is approx. 0.5 to 1.5 micrograms/l over the continental shelf during most of the spring bloom. Perhaps half of the chlorophyll increase observed by satellite during a wind resuspension event represents in-situ production during the 4 to 5 day interval, with the remainder attributed to accumulation of algal biomass previously produced and temporarily stored within near-bottom water. Present calculations suggest that about 10% of the primary production of the spring bloom may be exported as ungrazed phytoplankton carbon from mid-Atlantic shelf waters to those of the continental slope.

  12. Magnetic Anomalies over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 27{degrees}N.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J D

    1967-08-25

    Ten magnetic profiles across the mid-Atlantic ridge near 27 degrees N show trends that are parallel to the ridge axis and symmetrical about the ridge axis. The configuration of magnetic bodies that could account for the pattern supports the Vine and Matthews hypothesis for the origin of magnetic anomalies over oceanic ridges. A polarity-reversal time scale inferred from models for sea-floor spreading in the Pacific-Antarctic ridge and radiometrically dated reversals of the geomagnetic field indicates a spreading rate of 1.25 centimeters per year during the last 6 million years and a rate of 1.65 centimeters per year between 6 and 10 million years ago. A similar analysis of more limited data over the mid-Atlantic ridge near 22 degrees N also indicates a change in the spreading rate. Here a rate of 1.4 centimeters per year appears to have been in effect during the last 5 million years; between 5 and 9 million years ago, an increased rate of 1.7 centimeters per year is indicated. The time of occurrence and relative magnitude of these changes in the spreading rate, about 5 to 6 million years ago and 18 to 27 percent, respectively, accords with the spreading rate change implied for the Juan de Fuca ridge in the northeast Pacific. PMID:17792827

  13. Water resources activities of the U.S. Geological Survey, Mid-Atlantic District, 1984-1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGreevy, L.J.; Hyatt, G.J.; Cockey, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Mid-Atlantic District of the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, includes the States of Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia and the District of Columbia. The water resources program of the Mid-Atlantic District is conducted from offices located at seven sites in the three states. The program consists of two elements: Collection of basic records concerning quantitative and qualitative data for streams, reservoirs, estuaries, and groundwater; and interpretative investigations based on the water facts collected in the basic data activities. The organization and activities of the Mid-Atlantic District are described. Projects that were active during 1984, 1985, or 1986 are summarized with a listing of reports of results of water resources studies in the District that were approved between January 1980 and June 1986. (USGS)

  14. Nematocarcinus Milne Edwards, 1881 (Crustacea, Decapoda) from Southwestern Atlantic, including the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge area.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Irene A; Burukovsky, Rudolf N

    2014-01-01

    The deep sea shrimp genus Nematocarcinus Milne Edwards, 1881 includes 47 species, ten of them have been recorded from the Atlantic Ocean. Herein, material sampled during three scientific projects (REVIZEE Central Fishery project; Campos Basin Deep Sea Environmental Project; Evaluation of Environmental Heterogeneity in the Campos Basin) made in the Southwestern Atlantic, off Brazil, is examined. In addition, material sampled from the South Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR-ECO Project) was also examined. Four species are recorded for the first time to the southwestern Atlantic Ocean including Mid Atlantic Ridge area: Nematocarcinus faxoni Burukovsky, 2001; N. gracilipes Filhol, 1884; N. rotundus Crosnier & Forest, 1973 and N. tenuipes Spence-Bate, 1888. PMID:25543942

  15. Nematocarcinus Milne Edwards, 1881 (Crustacea, Decapoda) from Southwestern Atlantic, including the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge area.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Irene A; Burukovsky, Rudolf N

    2014-01-01

    The deep sea shrimp genus Nematocarcinus Milne Edwards, 1881 includes 47 species, ten of them have been recorded from the Atlantic Ocean. Herein, material sampled during three scientific projects (REVIZEE Central Fishery project; Campos Basin Deep Sea Environmental Project; Evaluation of Environmental Heterogeneity in the Campos Basin) made in the Southwestern Atlantic, off Brazil, is examined. In addition, material sampled from the South Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR-ECO Project) was also examined. Four species are recorded for the first time to the southwestern Atlantic Ocean including Mid Atlantic Ridge area: Nematocarcinus faxoni Burukovsky, 2001; N. gracilipes Filhol, 1884; N. rotundus Crosnier & Forest, 1973 and N. tenuipes Spence-Bate, 1888.

  16. SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER WITHIN USEPA'S OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) was established in 1970 and currently employs over 17,000 personnel. Headquartered in Washington D.C., the USEPA has 10 regional offices (located in various cities throughout the USA) and 13 national laboratories that com...

  17. MEASURING BASE-FLOW CHEMISTRY AS AN INDICATOR OF REGIONAL GROUND-WATER QUALITY IN THE MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality in headwater (first-order) streams of the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain during base flow in the winter and spring is related to land use, hydrogeology, and other natural and human influences. A random survey of water quality in 174 headwater streams in the Mid-Atlantic...

  18. TESTING LANDSCAPE INDICATORS FOR STREAM CONDITION RELATED TO PESTICIDES AND NUTRIENTS: LANDSCAPE INDICATORS FOR PESTICIDES STUDY FOR MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL STREAMS (LIPS-MACS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research plan for the Landscape Indicators for Pesticides Study ? Mid-Atlantic Coastal Streams (LIPS-MACS) describes the rational and approach of developing a research project to evaluate statistical landscape indicator models for freshwater streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coas...

  19. The stratigraphic record of recent climate change in mid-Atlantic USA

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, G.S.; Hilgartner, W.B.; Khan, H. )

    1994-06-01

    The Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age recorded in sediments deposited in tributaries and marshes surrounding the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays in the mid-Atlantic region of USA, by changes in pollen and seeds of terrestrial and aquatic plants, and changes in influxes of charcoal, sediment, metals and nutrients. Fossil pollen and seeds portray a regional landscape characterized by conditions drier that present from about 1000 to 1200 AD. During the same period, high charcoal and sediment influxes indicate high fire frequency. This short dry interval was followed by an expansion of submerged aquatic plants, low marsh plants, and terrestrial plants that occupy wet habitats. Charcoal influxes are extremely low during the latter interval, which extended from about 1200 AD to 1500 AD. Plant macrofossil and pollen distributions indicate a second dry period extending from 1550 to 1650 AD, which appears similar to the earlier Medieval Warm interval.

  20. PaTH: towards a learning health system in the Mid-Atlantic region

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Waqas; Tsui, Fuchiang (Rich); Borromeo, Charles; Chuang, Cynthia H; Espino, Jeremy U; Ford, Daniel; Hwang, Wenke; Kapoor, Wishwa; Lehmann, Harold; Martich, G Daniel; Morton, Sally; Paranjape, Anuradha; Shirey, William; Sorensen, Aaron; Becich, Michael J; Hess, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    The PaTH (University of Pittsburgh/UPMC, Penn State College of Medicine, Temple University Hospital, and Johns Hopkins University) clinical data research network initiative is a collaborative effort among four academic health centers in the Mid-Atlantic region. PaTH will provide robust infrastructure to conduct research, explore clinical outcomes, link with biospecimens, and improve methods for sharing and analyzing data across our diverse populations. Our disease foci are idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, atrial fibrillation, and obesity. The four network sites have extensive experience in using data from electronic health records and have devised robust methods for patient outreach and recruitment. The network will adopt best practices by using the open-source data-sharing tool, Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2), at each site to enhance data sharing using centrally defined common data elements, and will use the Shared Health Research Information Network (SHRINE) for distributed queries across the network. PMID:24821745

  1. Rain rate duration statistics derived from the Mid-Atlantic coast rain gauge network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius

    1993-01-01

    A rain gauge network comprised of 10 tipping bucket rain gauges located in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States has been in continuous operation since June 1, 1986. Rain rate distributions and estimated slant path fade distributions at 20 GHz and 30 GHz covering the first five year period were derived from the gauge network measurements, and these results were described by Goldhirsh. In this effort, rain rate time duration statistics are presented. The rain duration statistics are of interest for better understanding the physical nature of precipitation and to present a data base which may be used by modelers to convert to slant path fade duration statistics. Such statistics are important for better assessing optimal coding procedures over defined bandwidths.

  2. The influence of surface waves on water circulation in a mid-Atlantic continental shelf region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Talay, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    The importance of wave-induced currents in different weather conditions and water depths (18.3 m and 36.6 m) is assessed in a mid-Atlantic continental-shelf region. A review of general circulation conditions is conducted. Factors which perturb the general circulation are examined using analytic techniques and limited experimental data. Actual wind and wave statistics for the region are examined. Relative magnitudes of the various currents are compared on a frequency of annual occurrence basis. Results indicated that wave-induced currents are often the same order of magnitude as other currents in the region and become more important at higher wind and wave conditions. Wind-wave and ocean-swell characteristics are among those parameters which must be monitored for the analytical computation of continental-shelf circulation.

  3. Carbonate dissolution and sedimentation on the mid-atlantic continental margin.

    PubMed

    Balsam, W L

    1982-09-01

    The calcium carbonate content was determined for core tops from two transects on the upper slope to lower rise on the mid-Atlantic continental margin. Carbonate content in the sediment increases from approximately 5 percent (by weight) on the upper slope to more than 30 percent on the upper rise. A zone of low-carbonate content extends from 3000 to 4400 meters. Below 4400 meters, the percent carbonate increases. An examination of dissolution indices in these core tops indicates that the low-carbonate zone is associated with intense dissolution. Below 4400 meters, dissolution decreases and carbonate is well preserved. The decrease in dissolution occurs where the high-velocity core of the Western Boundary Undercurrent is first encountered.

  4. Past permafrost on the Mid-Atlantic coastal plain, eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    French, H.; Demitroff, M.; Newell, W.L.

    2009-01-01

    Sand-wedge casts, soil wedges and other non-diastrophic, post-depositional sedimentary structures suggest that Late-Pleistocene permafrost and deep seasonal frost on the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain extended at least as far south as southern Delaware, the Eastern Shore and southern Maryland. Heterogeneous cold-climate slope deposits mantle lower valley-side slopes in central Maryland. A widespread pre-existing fragipan is congruent with the inferred palaeo-permafrost table. The high bulk density of the fragipan was probably enhanced by either thaw consolidation when icy permafrost degraded at the active layer-permafrost interface or by liquefaction and compaction when deep seasonal frost thawed. ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Carbon monoxide in the U.S. mid-Atlantic troposphere: Evidence for a decreasing trend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock-Waters, Kristen A.; Doddridge, Bruce G.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Spitzer, Shane; Ray, John D.

    Nearly continuous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) were made at Shenandoah National Park-Big Meadows in rural Virginia, a site considered representative of regional air quality, from December 1994 to November 1997. Similar observations were also made at this location from October 1988 to October 1989. These observations combine to indicate a decreasing trend in CO concentration over the U.S. mid-Atlantic region of about 5.0 ppbv yr-1, with greater than 95% confidence that the slope is significantly different from zero. The decrease suggests U.S. reductions in anthropogenic CO emissions have been effective in reducing pollutant levels. The observed trend is consistent with the U.S. EPA reported trend in emissions and the decrease in Northern Hemisphere tropospheric background CO mixing ratios observed by other researchers.

  6. Variation in physicochemical responses to urbanization in streams between two Mid-Atlantic physiographic regions.

    PubMed

    Utz, Ryan M; Eshleman, Keith N; Hilderbrand, Robert H

    2011-03-01

    Urban development substantially alters the physicochemistry of streams, resulting in biodiversity and ecosystem function loss. However, interregional comparisons of physicochemical impact in urban streams suggest that geoclimatic heterogeneity may influence the extent of degradation. In the Mid-Atlantic United States, the adjacent Coastal Plain and Piedmont physiographic provinces possess distinctly different hydrogeomorphic properties that may influence how stream ecosystems respond to urbanization. Recent bioassessments have demonstrated that biotic sensitivity to urbanization is relatively acute in the Piedmont, suggesting that physicochemical change as a consequence of urbanization may be greater in that province. We compared hydrologic, chemical, and thermal characteristics of Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain and Piedmont first- through fifth-order streams along gradients of impervious surface cover (ISC) at multiple spatial scales. Linear models were applied to test if conditions in rural streams and the degree of impact from ISC varied between provinces. Mean and maximum summer temperatures in Piedmont streams increased more per unit of ISC than in the Coastal Plain. Contrary to expectations, however, variables that quantified high-flow event frequency, magnitude and duration, exhibited significantly greater impact along the ISC gradient in the Coastal Plain. Most chemical changes associated with increasing ISC were similar in the two provinces, although the interregional chemical composition of rural streams differed substantially for most parameters. Our findings demonstrate consistent interregional heterogeneity in stream ecosystem responses to urbanization. Landscape-scale management decisions with stream ecosystem conservation, mitigation, or restoration as a goal must therefore carefully consider the geoclimatic context in order to maximize effectiveness.

  7. Carbon in Natural, Cultivated, and Restored Depressional Wetlands in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain.

    PubMed

    Fenstermacher, D E; Rabenhorst, M C; Lang, M W; McCarty, G W; Needelman, B A

    2016-03-01

    Aerial extent of wetland ecosystems has decreased dramatically since precolonial times due to the conversion of these areas for human use. Wetlands provide various ecosystem services, and conservation efforts are being made to restore wetlands and their functions, including soil carbon storage. This Mid-Atlantic Regional USDA Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project study was conducted to evaluate the effects and effectiveness of wetland conservation practices along the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. This study examined 48 wetland sites in Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina under natural, prior converted cropland, and 5- to 10-yr post wetland restoration states. The North Carolina sites mainly contained soils dominated by organic soil materials and therefore were analyzed separately from the rest of the sites, which primarily contained mineral soils. Soil samples were collected using the bulk density core method by horizon to a depth of 1 m and were analyzed for percent carbon. The natural wetlands were found to have significantly greater carbon stocks (21.5 ± 5.2 kg C m) than prior converted croplands (7.95 ± 1.93 kg C m; < 0.01) and restored wetlands (4.82 ± 1.13 kg C m; < 0.001). The restored and prior converted sites did not differ significantly, possibly the result of the methods used to restore the wetlands, and the relatively young age of the restored sites. Wetlands were either restored by plugging drainage structures, with minimal surface disturbance, or by scraping the surface (i.e., excavation) to increase hydroperiod. Sites restored with the scraping technique had significantly lower carbon stocks (2.70 ± 0.38 kg C m) than those restored by passive techniques (6.06 ± 1.50 kg C m; = 0.09). Therefore, techniques that involve excavation and scraping to restore hydrology appear to negatively affect C storage. PMID:27065423

  8. Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in the Mid-Atlantic States: Assessing Grower Perceptions, Economic Impact, and Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dellinger, Theresa A.; Day, Eric R.; Pfeiffer, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    Attendees at mid-Atlantic grower meetings were surveyed in 2012 and 2014 regarding their knowledge of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) and its impact. Responses to individual questions were paired and analyzed for independence between survey years. Despite a large-scale effort by Extension to inform growers and others about BMSB,…

  9. 75 FR 25291 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Mid-Atlantic Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 220

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Mid-Atlantic Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 220... May 17, 2010 (see 75 FR 16830). Pursuant to the regulations implementing the procedural provisions...

  10. Conservation program and practice effects on ecosystem services in the mid atlantic region of the U.S

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Mid-Atlantic Regional (MIAR) Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project (CEAP-Wetland) study area covers approximately ~58,000 km2 in the eastern United States, including areas of within five states (North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, and New...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A AGGREGATED INDEX OF ENVIRONMENTAL INTEGRITY FOR THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION OF THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of reports on the condition of resources for the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States is being produced. These reports focus on individual resources (e.g., estuaries, streams, forests, and landscapes), summarizing
    with an environmental report card for each resour...

  12. INDICATORS OF CHANGE IN THE MID-ATLANTIC WATERSHEDS AND CONSEQUENCES OF CLIMATE IN UPPER CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of change in Northern Hemisphere atmospheric temperature in the past century relative to the preceding millennium strongly suggests that we are in a period of rapid global climate change. The mid-Atlantic region is quite sensitive to larger scale climate variation, which...

  13. HISTORICAL CHANGES IN GLOBAL SCALE CIRCULATION PATTERNS, MID-ATLANTIC CLIMATE STREAM FLOW AND NUTRIENT FLUXES TO THE CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of change in Northern Hemisphere temperature in the past century strongly suggests that we are now in a period of rapid global climate change. Also, the climate in the mid-Atlantic is quite sensitive to larger scale climate variation, which affects the frequency and seve...

  14. Appendix A of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the first appendix to the report, the workshop agenda.

  15. COMPARISON OF MID-WESTERN AND MID-ATLANTIC REGIONS EXPOSURE CRITERIA FOR PETROLEUM AND COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional background levels of exposure to fish from petroleum and combustion by-products were determined for the state of Ohio (mid-Western) and the mid-Atlantic region. Exposures were measured using bile metabolites that fluoresce at 290/335 nm for naphthalene (NAPH)-type compou...

  16. DETERMINING BACKGROUND EXPOSURE TO PETROLEUM AND COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS: COMPARISON OF MID-WESTERN AND MID-ATLANTIC REGIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regional background levels of exposure to fish from petroleum and combustion by-products were determined for the state of Ohio and the mid-Atlantic region. Exposures were measured using bile metabolites that fluoresce at 290/335 nm for naphthalene(NAPH)-type compounds and at 380...

  17. Bathypelagic Food Web Structure of the Northern Atlantic Mid-Atlantic Ridge Based on Stable Isotope Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of our study was to characterize the trophic connections of the dominant fishes of the deep-pelagic region of the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) with respect to vertical distribution using carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stable isotope analysis. Our goals were to id...

  18. Spatial distribution of brown marmorated stink bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) injury at harvest in mid-Atlantic apple orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brown marmorated stink bug's, Halyomorpha halys (Stal), injury to late-season apple cultivars was measured at harvest in 2011 and 2012 in commercial orchards in four mid-Atlantic states. In each orchard block, a border zone (adjacent to woods), an interior zone (near orchard center), and an interme...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A MID-ATLANTIC LAND USE/ LAND COVER CHANGE DATA SET (1970S TO 1990S)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mid-Atlantic region (MAIA) is comprised of southern New York, southern and western New Jersey, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Virginia, northeastern North Carolina, Delaware, and Washington, D.C. in the lower-48 American States. It is an ecosystem rich in streams, wet...

  20. Sisterhood Surveyed. Proceedings of the Mid-Atlantic Women's Studies Association Conference (West Chester, Pennsylvania, October 1-2, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sessa, Anne Dzamba, Ed.

    Proceedings of the 1982 conference of the Mid-Atlantic Women's Studies Association are presented. Synopses of sessions include the following topics: iconography of sisterhood, matriarchy, ethnic and cultural critiques, political perspectives, and nontraditional women students. Conference papers and authors are as follows: "Friends for Half a…

  1. Educator Effectiveness Series: Assessing School Climate. Q&A with Jonathan Cohen, Ph.D. REL Mid-Atlantic Webinar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The REL Mid-Atlantic Webinar discussed the elements in a positive school climate and shared different methods for assessing school data, including the Comprehensive School Climate Inventory. The Q&A presented in this document address the questions participants had for Dr. Cohen following the webinar. The webinar recording and PowerPoint…

  2. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STREAM CHEMISTRY AND WATERSHED LAND COVER DATA IN THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION, U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to investigate the relationship between stream chemistry and watershed land cover at the regional scale, we analyzed data from 368 wadeable streams sampled in the mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. during spring 1993-1994. Study sites were selected using a probability sampl...

  3. Appendix E of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the fifth appendix to the report, the bibliography of references.

  4. Appendix C of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the third appendix to the report, the compendium of pre-workshop answers.

  5. SSOAP - A USEPA Toolbox for Sanitary Sewer Overflow Analysis and Control Planning - Presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has identified a need to use proven methodologies to develop computer tools that help communities properly characterize rainfall-derived infiltration and inflow (RDII) into sanitary sewer systems and develop sanitary sewer...

  6. USEPA BIOMONITORING AND BIOINDICATOR CONCEPTS NEEDED TO EVALUATE THE BIOLOGICAL INTEGRITY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter presents the current uses, concepts and anticipated future directions of biomonitoring and bioindicators in the regulatory and research programs of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The chapter provides a historical look on how biomonitoring...

  7. USEPA BIOMONITORING AND BIOINDICATORS CONCEPTS NEEDED TO EVALUATE THE BIOLOGICAL INTEGRITY OF AQUATIC SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter presents the current uses, concepts and anticipated future directions of biomonitoring and bioindicators in the regulatory and research programs of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The chapter provides a historical look on how biomonitoring ...

  8. Conceptual ecological model for management of breeding shrubland birds in the Mid-Atlantic Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterjohn, Bruce G.

    2006-01-01

    While grassland birds have become the focus of increased conservation activities, the status of birds occupying shrubland habitats has received relatively little attention (Hunter et al. 2001). Yet, in eastern North America, shrubland birds exhibited consistent population declines during the past 40 years, based on data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey (Pardieck and Sauer 2001). These population declines primarily reflect large-scale changes in land use patterns during the previous century (Lorimer 2001). Large areas of marginal farmland were abandoned and underwent secondary succession during the first half of the twentieth century, producing abundant successional habitats favored by shrubland birds. As these habitats matured, combined with strict fire-suppression policies (Hunter et al. 2001), shrublands succeeded into mature forests, and shrubland bird communities were replaced by woodland birds (Irland 1982; Askins 1993). For example, while nearly 29% of New England forests were classified as sapling stage in 1950, only 8% remained at that stage in the 1980s (Askins 1993). The trend towards forest maturation and loss of shrubland habitats continues, yet concerted conservation activities have not been directed to benefit declining shrubland bird populations. The National Park Service (NPS) could contribute to shrubland bird conservation in the Mid- Atlantic Region. The NPS maintains a number of historic sites and former battlefields managed for their cultural significance but also support wildlife populations. Many of these “cultural parks” maintain open landscapes, recreating land use patterns existing at the times of the historical events. While these open landscapes are frequently managed grasslands, some parks also support successional habitats that could be managed to benefit shrubland birds. In 2005, the NPS initiated a project exploring the potential of “cultural parks” to support significant breeding grassland and shrubland bird

  9. Conceptual ecological model for management of breeding grassland birds in the Mid-Atlantic Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterjohn, Bruce G.

    2006-01-01

    The status of grassland birds has become an increasingly important conservation issue. These species exhibit the most consistent population declines of any group of North American birds during the past 40 years. Anecdotal evidence suggests these declines have been occurring for nearly a century (Peterjohn and Sauer 1999). While the widespread conversion of grasslands into other habitats contributed to these declining populations, other factors such as habitat fragmentation and mowing regimes are also implicated (Vickery et al. 1999a). This plight of grassland birds has heightened awareness of the need for concerted conservation actions to reverse these seriously declining population trends. The National Park Service (NPS) is positioned to potentially contribute to grassland bird conservation in the Mid-Atlantic Region. The NPS maintains a number of historic sites and former battlefields that are managed for their cultural significance but also support wildlife populations. Many of these “cultural parks” maintain open landscapes to recreate land use patterns that existed at the times of the historical events. These open landscapes are primarily managed grasslands which could be maintained to benefit grassland birds. In 2005, the NPS initiated a project exploring the potential of “cultural parks” to support significant breeding grassland bird communities. This project involved parks within three NPS Inventory and Monitoring Program (I&M) networks, Mid-Atlantic, National Capital, and Eastern Rivers and Mountains. Five parks were selected for the initial focus of this study, all of which maintain open landscapes for interpretation of historic events. Most parks were selected because they represent the most extensive grassland habitats within their networks, with the rationale that if these parks cannot support significant breeding grassland bird communities, then parks with smaller acreages cannot support these communities either. The five parks included in

  10. A Surficial Hydrogeologic Framework for the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ator, Scott W.; Denver, Judith M.; Krantz, David E.; Newell, Wayne L.; Martucci, Sarah K.

    2005-01-01

    A surficial hydrogeologic framework was developed for the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain, from New Jersey through North Carolina. The framework includes seven distinct hydrogeologic subregions within which the primary natural physical factors affecting the flow and chemistry of shallow ground water and small streams are relatively consistent. Within most subregions, the transport of chemicals from the land surface to ground water and streams can be described by a fairly uniform set of natural processes; some subregions include mixed hydrogeologic settings that are indistinguishable at the regional scale. The hydrogeologic framework and accompanying physiographic and geologic delineations are presented in digital and printed format. The seven hydrogeologic subregions that constitute the framework were delineated primarily on the basis of physiography and the predominant texture (typical grain size) of surficial and (where surficial sediments are particularly thin) subcropping sediments. Physiography for the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain was constructed by standardizing and extrapolating previously published interpretations for the Coastal Plain of South Carolina and New Jersey, based on similar work in the other States. Surficial and subcropping geology were similarly compiled from previous publications by resolving inconsistencies in nomenclature, interpretation, and scale, and interpolating across unmapped areas. A bulk sediment texture was determined for each mapped geologic unit on the basis of published descriptions. Fundamental differences among the seven hydrogeologic subregions are described on the basis of hypotheses about surficial and shallow subsurface hydrology and water chemistry in each, as well as variable land use, soils, and topography. On the regional scale, the Coastal Lowlands (Subregion 1), the Middle Coastal Plain Fine Sediments (Subregion 3), the Middle Coastal Plain Sands with Overlying Gravels (Subregion 4), and the Inner Coastal Plain Upland

  11. Air Quality in the Mid-Atlantic/Northeast Region: An Aircraft Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marufu, L. T.; Doddridge, B.; Taubman, B.; Piety, C.

    2002-12-01

    Parts of the U.S. Mid-Atlantic and Northeast are frequently in violation of the 125 ppbv 1-hr national ambient air quality standard for ozone (O3). The frequency of occurrence and spatial coverage of these violations are expected to increase when/if new standards for fine particulate matter (PM) and ozone averaged over 8-hr come into effect. Online aircraft measurements provide a powerful tool for determining the levels and origins of both primary and secondary pollutants of interest. During the summer of 2002 the University of Maryland at College Park used a twin engine Piper Aztec-F PA-27-250 aircraft to; investigate pollution transport (ozone, haze, and gaseous precursors) over region, state, and class 1 area boundaries; characterize planetary boundary layer (PBL) height, dynamics and development; investigate cross-corridor (transport corridors, metropolitan/ industrial areas) differences in air quality aloft leading to downwind enhancements in pollutants; investigate mesoscale and sub-regional transport influences (e.g. bay and sea breezes, low-level jets, urban island effects) upon near surface air quality and visibility; acquire in situ data for initialization, constraint, and evaluation of ongoing and planned measurement analyses efforts and modeling studies within the region. A total of 54 research flights (192.5 hours), consisting of fixed-position vertical survey spirals and constant altitude transects, were made upwind, near and downwind of selected major cities/industrial areas, transport corridors and class 1 areas in the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic regions. Preliminary results from upwind, near and downwind data show that major cities/industrial areas (Richmond, Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York and Boston) and transport corridors are net sources of primary and secondary pollutants (gaseous precursors, ozone, and haze). Class 1 areas (Shenandoah national park VA, Lye Brook NY, Mt. Washington in New Hampshire NH and Acadia in ME), on the other

  12. A high resolution coccolithophore record of interglacial surface water variability from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Christian; Kinkel, Hanno; Weinelt, Mara; Repschläger, Janne; Blanz, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    The response of coccolithophores to changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) in the Azores Current system was investigated in detailed and well dated sediment cores from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) southwest of the Azores Islands (38°N/31°W). The observed changes in the coccolith assemblage may be either caused by shifts in the position and/or strength of the Azores Current regime, as also evidenced in pronounced SST, SSS and nutrient inventory fluctuations. Two cores recovered from a small basin at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (AMOCINT cruise MD 168, 2008), today situated underneath the transition zone between the oligotrophic Subtropical Gyre and the more productive North Atlantic Transitional Waters, provide early Holocene and deglacial sedimentation rates up to more than 70 cm/kyr. Today the site is characterized by relatively low surface productivity accordingly accumulation of biogenic material is only moderate. Substantial phytoplankton production takes place during early spring, when winter mixing relaxes and stratification sets in. An array of independent paleoproductivity proxies shows that productivity was considerably increased during cooler intervals (e.g.Younger Dryas) which enhanced the biogenic particle flux. This applies also to the short lived 8,2 kyr event as identified in the SST record. In general cold water species then (e.g. C. pelagicus, G. muellerae), today nearly absent from the site, occur significantly. Oppositely F. profunda, an indicator for low productivity, shows peak abundance during the late Holocene. The coccolith based paleoproductivity reconstructions are supported by geochemical proxies (e.g. XRF Ba/Ti and Si/Ca ratios) exhibiting pronounced peak maxima during cold fluctuations. Pronounced changes in the productivity and hydrographic regimes suggest that the Azores Current system is highly sensitive to AMOC variability. Changes in the Azores Current system appear to be precisely in phase with changes in

  13. COOL Observations on the Biogeochemistry of the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, O.; Cahill, B.; Castaleo, R.; Kohut, J.; Chant, R. M.; Gong, D.; Glenn, S. T.; Yi, X.

    2007-05-01

    The Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) has exhibited significant changes in the last decade; however the implications for the shelf biogeochemistry remain an open question. We are using an integrated ocean observatory to study the productivity and its associated transport on the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). We have constructed a shelf-wide ocean observatory, anchored by four enabling technologies, to characterize the physical forcing of continental shelf primary productivity in the New York Bight (NYB). An international constellation of ocean color satellites, multi- static high frequency long-range surface current radar, real-time telemetry moorings, and long duration autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) are all controlled through a centralized computer network dedicated to receiving, processing and visualizing the real-time data and then disseminating results to both field scientists and ocean forecasters working in the MAB. On an annual basis overall half of the primary productivity of the MAB is associated with winter and early spring productivity during the onset of shelf stratification. This is complemented by productivity associated with buoyant river plumes, dominated by the Hudson River, which provides 1/4 of the productivity largely during late spring and early summer. Close to 2/3s of the buoyant waters from the Hudson river flow out along the edge of the Hudson shelf valley which then flows south on the MAB along mid-shelf front. As the Hudson river contributes a significant fraction of the shelf productivity, the jet provides an efficient mechanism for transporting nearshore carbon and larval species to the shelf break/slope from the near shore waters. Transport onto the slope is mediated by offshore large warm rings. Transport across the Hudson canyon appears to be severely limited and is a defining feature for the biogeography of the shelf suggesting unique biotic provinces north and south of the Hudson canyon. Summer upwelling accounts for the remaining 25% of

  14. An index of biological integrity for northern Mid-Atlantic Slope drainages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, R.A.; Riva-Murray, K.; Halliwell, D.B.; Vana-Miller, D. L.; Bilger, M.D.

    2002-01-01

    An index of biological integrity (IBI) was developed for streams in the Hudson, Delaware, and Susquehanna River drainages in the northeastern United States based on fish assemblage data from the Mohawk River drainage of New York. The original IBI, developed for streams in the U.S. Midwest, was modified to reflect the assemblage composition and structure present in Mid-Atlantic Slope drainages. We replaced several of the Midwestern IBI metrics and criteria scores because fishes common to the Midwest are absent from or poorly represented in the Northeast and because stream fish assemblages in the Northeast are less rich than those in the Midwest. For all replacement metrics we followed the ecology-based rationale used in the development of each of the metrics of the Midwestern IBI so that the basic theoretical underpinnings of the IBI remained unchanged. The validity of this modified IBI is demonstrated by examining the quality of streams in the Hudson, Delaware, and lower Susquehanna River basins. The relationships between the IBI and other indicators of environmental quality are examined using data on assemblages of fish and benthic macroinvertebrates and on chemical and physical stream characteristics obtained during 1993-2000 by the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment Program in these three river basins. A principal components analysis (PCA) of chemical and physical variables from 27 sites resulted in an environmental quality gradient as the primary PCA axis (eigenvalue, 0.41 ). Principal components analysis site scores were significantly correlated with such benthic macroinvertebrate metrics as the percentage of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera taxa (Spearman R = -0.66, P < 0.001). Index of biological integrity scores for sites in these three river basins were significantly correlated with this environmental quality gradient (Spearman R = -0.78, P = 0.0001). The northern Mid-Atlantic Slope IBI appears to be sensitive to

  15. Metal Concentrations in Two Commercial Tuna Species from an Active Volcanic Region in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Torres, Paulo; Rodrigues, Armindo; Soares, Lília; Garcia, Patrícia

    2016-02-01

    Concentrations of cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead [Pb (µg g(-1) wet weight)] were determined in liver and muscle samples of 15 bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and 15 skipjack tunas (Katsuwonus pelamis) caught over an active volcanic region in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean (Azores, Portugal) and evaluated regarding consumption safety. None of the muscle samples (edible part) exceeded the European Union (EU) maximum limits (MLs) for Hg and Pb. Cd concentrations in muscle were much greater than EU MLs with 53 and 26 % of the bigeye tuna and skipjack tuna, respectively, in exceedance of the limits. Results obtained in this work, together with other studies in the same region, support the existence of an important volcanic source of Cd in waters of the Mid-Atlantic region, which should be carefully monitored given the importance of many commercial marine species for human consumption, mainly in Europe. PMID:26681184

  16. Metal Concentrations in Two Commercial Tuna Species from an Active Volcanic Region in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Torres, Paulo; Rodrigues, Armindo; Soares, Lília; Garcia, Patrícia

    2016-02-01

    Concentrations of cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead [Pb (µg g(-1) wet weight)] were determined in liver and muscle samples of 15 bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and 15 skipjack tunas (Katsuwonus pelamis) caught over an active volcanic region in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean (Azores, Portugal) and evaluated regarding consumption safety. None of the muscle samples (edible part) exceeded the European Union (EU) maximum limits (MLs) for Hg and Pb. Cd concentrations in muscle were much greater than EU MLs with 53 and 26 % of the bigeye tuna and skipjack tuna, respectively, in exceedance of the limits. Results obtained in this work, together with other studies in the same region, support the existence of an important volcanic source of Cd in waters of the Mid-Atlantic region, which should be carefully monitored given the importance of many commercial marine species for human consumption, mainly in Europe.

  17. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the North Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Matthew T; Mannino, Antonio; Kirchman, David L

    2006-01-01

    The abundance of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria, cyanobacteria, and heterotrophs was examined in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the central North Pacific Gyre using infrared fluorescence microscopy coupled with image analysis and flow cytometry. AAP bacteria comprised 5% to 16% of total prokaryotes in the Atlantic Ocean but only 5% or less in the Pacific Ocean. In the Atlantic, AAP bacterial abundance was as much as 2-fold higher than that of Prochlorococcus spp. and 10-fold higher than that of Synechococcus spp. In contrast, Prochlorococcus spp. outnumbered AAP bacteria 5- to 50-fold in the Pacific. In both oceans, subsurface abundance maxima occurred within the photic zone, and AAP bacteria were least abundant below the 1% light depth. The abundance of AAP bacteria rivaled some groups of strictly heterotrophic bacteria and was often higher than the abundance of known AAP bacterial genera (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter spp.). Concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) were low ( approximately 1%) compared to those of chlorophyll a in the North Atlantic. Although the BChl a content of AAP bacteria per cell was typically 20- to 250-fold lower than the divinyl-chlorophyll a content of Prochlorococcus, the pigment content of AAP bacteria approached that of Prochlorococcus in shelf break water. Our results suggest that AAP bacteria can be quite abundant in some oceanic regimes and that their distribution in the water column is consistent with phototrophy.

  18. Arsenic speciation in food chains from mid-Atlantic hydrothermal vents

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Vivien F.; Jackson, Brian P.; Siegfried, Matthew; Navratilova, Jana; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Kirshtein, Julie; Voytek, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic concentration and speciation were determined in benthic fauna collected from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents. The shrimp species, Rimicaris exoculata, the vent chimney-dwelling mussel, Bathymodiolus azoricus, Branchipolynoe seepensis, a commensal worm of B. azoricus, and the gastropod Peltospira smaragdina showed variations in As concentration and in stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) signature between species, suggesting different sources of As uptake. Arsenic speciation showed arsenobetaine to be the dominant species in R. exoculata, whereas in B. azoricus and B. seepensis arsenosugars were most abundant, although arsenobetaine, dimethylarsinate, and inorganic arsenic were also observed, along with several unidentified species. Scrape samples from outside the vent chimneys, covered with microbial mat, which is a presumed food source for many vent organisms, contained high levels of total As, but organic species were not detectable. The formation of arsenosugars in pelagic environments is typically attributed to marine algae, and the pathway to arsenobetaine is still unknown. The occurrence of arsenosugars and arsenobetaine in these deep sea organisms, where primary production is chemolithoautotrophic and stable isotope analyses indicate food sources are of vent origin, suggests that organic arsenicals can occur in a food web without algae or other photosynthetic life. PMID:23741175

  19. Arsenic speciation in food chains from mid-Atlantic hydrothermal vents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Vivien F.; Jackson, Brian P.; Siegfried, Matthew R.; Navratilova, Jana; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Kirshtein, Julie; Voytek, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic concentration and speciation were determined in benthic fauna collected from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents. The shrimp species, Rimicaris exoculata, the vent chimney-dwelling mussel, Bathymodiolus azoricus, Branchipolynoe seepensis, a commensal worm of B. azoricus and the gastropod Peltospira smaragdina showed variations in As concentration and in stable isotope (δ13C and δ15N) signature between species, suggesting different sources of As uptake. Arsenic speciation showed arsenobetaine to be the dominant species in R. exoculata, whereas in B. azoricus and B. seepensis arsenosugars were most abundant, although arsenobetaine, dimethylarsinate and inorganic arsenic were also observed, along with several unidentified species. Scrape samples from outside the vent chimneys covered with microbial mat, which is a presumed food source for many vent organisms, contained high levels of total As, but organic species were not detectable. The formation of arsenosugars in pelagic environments is typically attributed to marine algae, and the pathway to arsenobetaine is still unknown. The occurrence of arsenosugars and arsenobetaine in these deep sea organisms, where primary production is chemolithoautotrophic and stable isotope analyses indicate food sources are of vent origin, suggests that organic arsenicals can occur in a foodweb without algae or other photosynthetic life.

  20. Discovery of a magma chamber and faults beneath a Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal field.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satish C; Crawford, Wayne C; Carton, Hélène; Seher, Tim; Combier, Violaine; Cannat, Mathilde; Pablo Canales, Juan; Düsünür, Doga; Escartin, Javier; Miranda, J Miguel

    2006-08-31

    Crust at slow-spreading ridges is formed by a combination of magmatic and tectonic processes, with magmatic accretion possibly involving short-lived crustal magma chambers. The reflections of seismic waves from crustal magma chambers have been observed beneath intermediate and fast-spreading centres, but it has been difficult to image such magma chambers beneath slow-spreading centres, owing to rough seafloor topography and associated seafloor scattering. In the absence of any images of magma chambers or of subsurface near-axis faults, it has been difficult to characterize the interplay of magmatic and tectonic processes in crustal accretion and hydrothermal circulation at slow-spreading ridges. Here we report the presence of a crustal magma chamber beneath the slow-spreading Lucky Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The reflection from the top of the magma chamber, centred beneath the Lucky Strike volcano and hydrothermal field, is approximately 3 km beneath the sea floor, 3-4 km wide and extends up to 7 km along-axis. We suggest that this magma chamber provides the heat for the active hydrothermal vent field above it. We also observe axial valley bounding faults that seem to penetrate down to the magma chamber depth as well as a set of inward-dipping faults cutting through the volcanic edifice, suggesting continuous interactions between tectonic and magmatic processes.

  1. Tuberculosis control activities before and after Hurricane Sandy--northeast and mid-Atlantic states, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-03-22

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy struck the U.S. northeast and mid-Atlantic seaboard; the effects of the storm extended to southeastern and midwestern states and to eastern Canada. At the time, 1,899 residents in the most affected areas were undergoing treatment for tuberculosis (TB) disease or infection. To ascertain the operational abilities of state and local TB programs during and after the storm and to determine whether lessons learned from a previous hurricane were effective in ensuring continuity of TB patient care, CDC interviewed staff members at all of the affected state and city TB control programs, including those in areas with power outages and flooded streets, tunnels, and subway lines. The interviews determined that continuity of care for TB patients in programs affected by Hurricane Sandy was better preserved than it had been during and after Hurricane Katrina in August 2005. This improvement might be attributed to 1) preparedness measures learned from Hurricane Katrina (e.g., preparing line lists of patients, providing patients with as-needed medications, and making back-up copies of patient records in advance of the storm) and 2) less widespread displacement of persons after Hurricane Sandy than occurred after Hurricane Katrina. Maintaining readiness among clinicians and TB control programs to respond to natural disasters remains essential to protecting public health and preserving TB patients' continuity of care.

  2. Low-frequency whale and seismic airgun sounds recorded in the mid-Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Nieukirk, Sharon L; Stafford, Kathleen M; Mellinger, David K; Dziak, Robert P; Fox, Christopher G

    2004-04-01

    Beginning in February 1999, an array of six autonomous hydrophones was moored near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (35 degrees N-15 degrees N, 50 degrees W-33 degrees W). Two years of data were reviewed for whale vocalizations by visually examining spectrograms. Four distinct sounds were detected that are believed to be of biological origin: (1) a two-part low-frequency moan at roughly 18 Hz lasting 25 s which has previously been attributed to blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus); (2) series of short pulses approximately 18 s apart centered at 22 Hz, which are likely produced by fin whales (B. physalus); (3) series of short, pulsive sounds at 30 Hz and above and approximately 1 s apart that resemble sounds attributed to minke whales (B. acutorostrata); and (4) downswept, pulsive sounds above 30 Hz that are likely from baleen whales. Vocalizations were detected most often in the winter, and blue- and fin whale sounds were detected most often on the northern hydrophones. Sounds from seismic airguns were recorded frequently, particularly during summer, from locations over 3000 km from this array. Whales were detected by these hydrophones despite its location in a very remote part of the Atlantic Ocean that has traditionally been difficult to survey.

  3. Low-frequency whale and seismic airgun sounds recorded in the mid-Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieukirk, Sharon L.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Mellinger, David K.; Dziak, Robert P.; Fox, Christopher G.

    2004-04-01

    Beginning in February 1999, an array of six autonomous hydrophones was moored near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (35 °N-15 °N, 50 °W-33 °W). Two years of data were reviewed for whale vocalizations by visually examining spectrograms. Four distinct sounds were detected that are believed to be of biological origin: (1) a two-part low-frequency moan at roughly 18 Hz lasting 25 s which has previously been attributed to blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus); (2) series of short pulses approximately 18 s apart centered at 22 Hz, which are likely produced by fin whales (B. physalus); (3) series of short, pulsive sounds at 30 Hz and above and approximately 1 s apart that resemble sounds attributed to minke whales (B. acutorostrata); and (4) downswept, pulsive sounds above 30 Hz that are likely from baleen whales. Vocalizations were detected most often in the winter, and blue- and fin whale sounds were detected most often on the northern hydrophones. Sounds from seismic airguns were recorded frequently, particularly during summer, from locations over 3000 km from this array. Whales were detected by these hydrophones despite its location in a very remote part of the Atlantic Ocean that has traditionally been difficult to survey.

  4. Discovery of a magma chamber and faults beneath a Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal field.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satish C; Crawford, Wayne C; Carton, Hélène; Seher, Tim; Combier, Violaine; Cannat, Mathilde; Pablo Canales, Juan; Düsünür, Doga; Escartin, Javier; Miranda, J Miguel

    2006-08-31

    Crust at slow-spreading ridges is formed by a combination of magmatic and tectonic processes, with magmatic accretion possibly involving short-lived crustal magma chambers. The reflections of seismic waves from crustal magma chambers have been observed beneath intermediate and fast-spreading centres, but it has been difficult to image such magma chambers beneath slow-spreading centres, owing to rough seafloor topography and associated seafloor scattering. In the absence of any images of magma chambers or of subsurface near-axis faults, it has been difficult to characterize the interplay of magmatic and tectonic processes in crustal accretion and hydrothermal circulation at slow-spreading ridges. Here we report the presence of a crustal magma chamber beneath the slow-spreading Lucky Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The reflection from the top of the magma chamber, centred beneath the Lucky Strike volcano and hydrothermal field, is approximately 3 km beneath the sea floor, 3-4 km wide and extends up to 7 km along-axis. We suggest that this magma chamber provides the heat for the active hydrothermal vent field above it. We also observe axial valley bounding faults that seem to penetrate down to the magma chamber depth as well as a set of inward-dipping faults cutting through the volcanic edifice, suggesting continuous interactions between tectonic and magmatic processes. PMID:16943836

  5. A simulation analysis of the fate of phytoplankton within the mid-Atlantic bight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, J. J.; Dieterle, D. A.; Meyers, M. B.

    1986-01-01

    A time-dependent, three-dimensional simulation model of wind-induced changes of the circulation field, of light and nutrient regulation of photosynthesis, of vertical mixing as well as algal sinking, and of herbivore grazing stress, is used to analyze the seasonal production, consumption, and transport of the spring bloom within the mid-Atlantic Bight. The particular case (c) of a 58-day period in February-April 1979, simulated primary production, based on both nitrate and recycled nitrogen, with a mean of 0.62 g C sq m/day over the whole model domain, and an export at the shelf-break off Long Island of 2.60 g ch1 sq m/day within the lower third of the water column. About 57% of the carbon fixation was removed by herbivores, with 21% lost as export, either downshelf or offshore to slope waters, after the first 58 days of the spring bloom. Extension of the model for another 22 days of case (c) increased the mean export to 27%, while variation of the model's parameters in 8 other cases led to a range in export from 8% to 38% of the average primary production. Spatial and temporal variations of the simulated albal biomass, left behind in the shelf water column, reproduced chlorophyll fields sensed by satellite, shipboard, and in situ instruments.

  6. Delta-proteobacterial SAR324 group in hydrothermal plumes on the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huiluo; Dong, Chunming; Bougouffa, Salim; Li, Jiangtao; Zhang, Weipeng; Shao, Zongze; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In the dark ocean, the SAR324 group of Delta-proteobacteria has been associated with a chemolithotrophic lifestyle. However, their electron transport chain for energy generation and information system has not yet been well characterized. In the present study, four SAR324 draft genomes were extracted from metagenomes sampled from hydrothermal plumes in the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We describe novel electron transport chain components in the SAR324 group, particularly the alternative complex III, which is involved in energy generation. Moreover, we propose that the C-type cytochrome, for example the C553, may play a novel role in electron transfer, adding to our knowledge regarding the energy generation process in the SAR324 cluster. The central carbon metabolism in the described SAR324 genomes exhibits several new features other than methanotrophy e.g. aromatic compound degradation. This suggests that methane oxidation may not be the main central carbon metabolism component in SAR324 cluster bacteria. The reductive acetyl-CoA pathway may potentially be essential in carbon fixation due to the absence of components from the Calvin-Benson cycle. Our study provides insight into the role of recombination events in shaping the genome of the SAR324 group based on a larger number of repeat regions observed, which has been overlooked thus far. PMID:26953077

  7. Near seafloor bioluminescence, macrozooplankton and macroparticles at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Jessica; Youngbluth, Marsh; Jamieson, Alan J.; Priede, Imants G.

    2015-04-01

    The benthic boundary layer is a region often perceived to be high in faunal abundance and biomass. In this study, we investigated the distribution of near seafloor bioluminescent zooplankton (BL), macrozooplankton (>1 cm) and macroparticles (>430 μm) at the Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge at ca. 2500 m depth. At sites south of 52°N, the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone, BL density increased weakly towards the seafloor. This trend was driven by small bioluminescent crustaceans, comprising ca. 90% of the total BL density. Macroparticle density was coherent with BL density, exhibiting a small increase towards the seafloor. Appendicularians (animals as well as occupied and discarded houses) were the most abundant macrozooplankton, and the only group to show a significant increase in density towards the seafloor. The absence of pronounced increases in BL and macroparticle density, and no increase in macrozooplankton (except appendicularians), towards the seafloor do not support the conventional view of high concentrations of particulate organic matter and zooplankton biomass in the benthic boundary layer relative to overlying waters.

  8. Diet composition of Bathylagus euryops (Osmeriformes: Bathylagidae) along the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetman, C. J.; Sutton, T. T.; Vecchione, M.; Latour, R. J.

    2014-10-01

    The northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, from Iceland to the Azores (MAR), is the largest topographical feature in the Atlantic Ocean. Despite its size, few studies have described dietary patterns of pelagic fishes along the MAR. MAR-ECO, a Census of Marine Life field project, aimed to describe the food web structure of abundant fish species along the ridge through a series of research expeditions to the MAR. Among the midwater fishes sampled during the MAR-ECO project, Bathylagus euryops (Osmeriformes: Bathylagidae) was the biomass-dominant pelagic species and ranked third in total abundance. In this paper, we describe the dietary composition of B. euryops along the MAR. Overall, copepods represented the dominant prey group consumed by B. euryops. Multivariate analyses, including a cluster analysis and a canonical correspondence analysis, revealed that fish size significantly influenced the diet of B. euryops with ostracods representing the most important prey group at small sizes (<95 mm) and decapod shrimp and calanoid copepods becoming more important with increasing fish size. Due to the high abundance and biomass observed along the MAR combined with its role as a link for energy transfer between zooplankton and higher trophic level predators, B. euryops appears to be an ecologically important species in the oceanic food web of the North Atlantic Ocean.

  9. Tuberculosis control activities before and after Hurricane Sandy--northeast and mid-Atlantic states, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-03-22

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy struck the U.S. northeast and mid-Atlantic seaboard; the effects of the storm extended to southeastern and midwestern states and to eastern Canada. At the time, 1,899 residents in the most affected areas were undergoing treatment for tuberculosis (TB) disease or infection. To ascertain the operational abilities of state and local TB programs during and after the storm and to determine whether lessons learned from a previous hurricane were effective in ensuring continuity of TB patient care, CDC interviewed staff members at all of the affected state and city TB control programs, including those in areas with power outages and flooded streets, tunnels, and subway lines. The interviews determined that continuity of care for TB patients in programs affected by Hurricane Sandy was better preserved than it had been during and after Hurricane Katrina in August 2005. This improvement might be attributed to 1) preparedness measures learned from Hurricane Katrina (e.g., preparing line lists of patients, providing patients with as-needed medications, and making back-up copies of patient records in advance of the storm) and 2) less widespread displacement of persons after Hurricane Sandy than occurred after Hurricane Katrina. Maintaining readiness among clinicians and TB control programs to respond to natural disasters remains essential to protecting public health and preserving TB patients' continuity of care. PMID:23515057

  10. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the North Pacific Gyre. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottrell, Matthew T.; Mannino, Antonio; Kirchman, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The abundance of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AM) bacteria, cyanobacteria and heterotrophs was examined in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the central North Pacific gyre using infrared fluorescence microscopy coupled with image analysis and flow cytometry. AAP bacteria comprised 5% to 16% of total prokaryotes in the Atlantic but only 5% or less in the Pacific. In the Atlantic, AAP bacterial abundance was as much as 2-fold higher than Prochlorococcus and 10-folder higher than Synechococcus. In contrast, Prochlorococcus outnumbered AAP bacteria 5- to 50-fold in the Pacific. In both oceans, subsurface abundance maxima occurred within the photic zone, and AAP bacteria were least abundant below the 1% light depth. Concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) were low (approx.1%) compared to chlorophyll a. Although the BChl a content of AAP bacteria per cell was typically 20- to 250-fold lower than the divinyl-chlorophyll a content of Prochlorococcus, in shelf break water the pigment content of AAP bacteria approached that of Prochlorococcus. The abundance of AAP bacteria rivaled some groups of strictly heterotrophic bacteria and was often higher than the abundance of known AAP genera (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter spp.). The distribution of AAP bacteria in the water column, which was similar in the Atlantic and the Pacific, was consistent with phototrophy.

  11. Karst of the Mid-Atlantic region in Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doctor, Daniel H.; Weary, David J.; Brezinski, David K.; Orndorff, Randall C.; Spangler, Lawrence E.; Brezinski, David K.; Halka, Jeffrey; Ortt, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    The Mid-Atlantic region hosts some of the most mature karst landscapes in North America, developed in highly deformed rocks within the Piedmont and Valley and Ridge physiographic provinces. This guide describes a three-day excursion to examine karst development in various carbonate rocks by following Interstate 70 west from Baltimore across the eastern Piedmont, across the Frederick Valley, and into the Great Valley proper. The localities were chosen in order to examine the structural and lithological controls on karst feature development in marble, limestone, and dolostone rocks with an eye toward the implications for ancient landscape evolution, as well as for modern subsidence hazards. A number of caves will be visited, including two commercial caverns that reveal strikingly different histories of speleogenesis. Links between karst landscape development, hydrologic dynamics, and water resource sustainability will also be emphasized through visits to locally important springs. Recent work on quantitative dye tracing, spring water geochemistry, and groundwater modeling reveal the interaction between shallow and deep circulation of groundwater that has given rise to the modern karst landscape. Geologic and karst feature mapping conducted with the benefit of lidar data help reveal the strong bedrock structural controls on karst feature development, and illustrate the utility of geologic maps for assessment of sinkhole susceptibility.

  12. Monitoring stink bugs (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in mid-Atlantic apple and peach orchards.

    PubMed

    Leskey, T C; Hogmire, H W

    2005-02-01

    Pyramid traps coated with "industrial safety yellow" exterior latex gloss enamel paint and baited with Euschistus spp. aggregation pheromone, methyl (2E,4Z)-decadienoate captured more stink bugs than all other baited and unbaited trap types in both apple and peach orchards in 2002 and 2003. Commercial sources of dispensers of methyl (2E,4Z)-decadienoate deployed in association with pyramid traps had a significant impact on trap captures. Captures in pyramid traps were four-fold greater when baited with lures from IPM Technologies, Inc. (Portland, OR) than with lures from Suterra (Bend, OR). Variation in yellow pyramid trap color ("industrial safety yellow" and "standard coroplast yellow") and material (plywood, plastic, and masonite) did not affect trap captures. Brown stink bug was the predominant species captured (58%), followed by dusky stink bug, Euschistus tristigmus (Say) (20%); green stink bug, Acrosternum hilare (Say) (14%); and other stink bugs (Brochymena spp. and unidentified nymphs) (8%). Captures in baited pyramid traps were significantly correlated with tree beating samples in both managed and unmanaged apple orchards and with sweep netting samples in the unmanaged apple orchard. However, problems associated with trapping mechanisms of pyramid trap jar tops and jar traps likely resulted in reduced captures in baited traps. Improved trapping mechanisms must be established to develop an effective monitoring tool for stink bugs in mid-Atlantic orchards.

  13. Application of a multipurpose unequal probability stream survey in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ator, S.W.; Olsen, A.R.; Pitchford, A.M.; Denver, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    A stratified, spatially balanced sample with unequal probability selection was used to design a multipurpose survey of headwater streams in the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. Objectives for the survey include unbiased estimates of regional stream conditions, and adequate coverage of unusual but significant environmental settings to support empirical modeling of the factors affecting those conditions. The design and field application of the survey are discussed in light of these multiple objectives. A probability (random) sample of 175 first-order nontidal streams was selected for synoptic sampling of water chemistry and benthic and riparian ecology during late winter and spring 2000. Twenty-five streams were selected within each of seven hydrogeologic subregions (strata) that were delineated on the basis of physiography and surficial geology. In each subregion, unequal inclusion probabilities were used to provide an approximately even distribution of streams along a gradient of forested to developed (agricultural or urban) land in the contributing watershed. Alternate streams were also selected. Alternates were included in groups of five in each subregion when field reconnaissance demonstrated that primary streams were inaccessible or otherwise unusable. Despite the rejection and replacement of a considerable number of primary streams during reconnaissance (up to 40 percent in one subregion), the desired land use distribution was maintained within each hydrogeologic subregion without sacrificing the probabilistic design.

  14. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (mid-Atlantic): SPOT

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.M.; Huish, M.T.; Kerby, J.H.; Moran, D.P.

    1989-02-01

    Spot (Leiostomus xanthurus) is an important species to recreational fishermen and to the commercial fishing industry. Landings in Virginia are reported to be nearly 2 million pounds annually and in North Carolina 3 to 7 million pounds. Spot are distributed throughout the Mid-Atlantic area and their larvae are found up to 63 nautical miles from land. The larvae are reported to metamorphose to the juvenile phase near estuarine inlets and the juveniles appear in estuaries from about mid-December to mid-April where they remain until September or October. The juveniles may constitute 80%-90% of the total number of fish present in tidal creeks and seagrass meadows. Growth rates (weight) of juvenile spot vary but are reported as 3% per day. Lengths of young-of-year were reported by various authors to be about 80-181 mm; age-1, 122-230 mm; age-2, 215-290 mm; and age-3, 275 mm. Relatively few spot are over 3 years old. Their diet includes benthic fauna which varies with location. Spot may be eaten by a variety of predators, including striped bass. Spot occur at temperatures ranging from 8-31/degree/C and at salinities of 0--66 ppt. They were shown to increase their oxygen consumption with weight, swimming speed and activity. They appear to be more efficient consumers of oxygen than some major estuarine species, such as the striped bass and white perch. 69 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Myctophid feeding ecology and carbon transport along the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Jeanna M.; Steinberg, Deborah K.; Sutton, Tracey T.; Graves, John E.; Latour, Robert J.

    2014-11-01

    Myctophids are among the most abundant fishes in the world's ocean and occupy a key position in marine pelagic food webs. Through their significant diel vertical migrations and metabolism they also have the potential to be a significant contributor to carbon export. We investigated the feeding ecology and contribution to organic carbon export by three myctophid species, Benthosema glaciale, Protomyctophum arcticum, and Hygophum hygomii, from a structurally and ecologically unique ecosystem- the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Similar to the results of previous studies, the diet of these fishes was primarily copepods and euphausiids, however, gelatinous zooplankton was identified in the diet of B. glaciale for the first time. Ridge section and time of day were significant explanatory variables in the diet of B. glaciale as determined by canonical correspondence analysis, while depth was the only significant explanatory variable in the diet of P. arcticum. Daily consumption by MAR myctophids was less than 1% of dry body weight per day and resulted in the removal of less than 1% of zooplankton biomass daily. Although lower than previous estimates of carbon transport by myctophids and zooplankton in other areas, MAR myctophid active transport by diel vertical migration was equivalent to up to 8% of sinking particulate organic carbon in the North Atlantic. While highly abundant, myctophids do not impart significant predation pressure on MAR zooplankton, and play a modest role in the active transport of carbon from surface waters.

  16. Near-bottom currents over the continental slope in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Csanady, G.T.; Churchill, J.H.; Butman, B.

    1988-01-01

    From a set of 28 current meter records we have found that near-bottom currents faster than 0.2 m s-1 occur frequently over the outer continental shelf of the Mid-Atlantic Bight (bottom depth <210 m) but very rarely (<1% of the time) between bottom depths of 500 m and 2 km over the slope. The rarity of strong near-bottom flow over the middle and lower slope allows the accumulation of fine-grained sediment and organic carbon in this region. Fast near-bottom currents which do occur over the slope are invariably associated with topographic waves, although it is often superimposed inertial oscillations which increase current speed above the level of 0.2 m s-1. Episodes of intense inertial oscillations occur randomly and last typically for 10-20 days. Their energy source is unknown. Topographic wave energy exhibits a slight, but statistically significant, minimum over the mid-slope. These waves appear irregularly and vary both along isobaths and in time. The irregularity is presumably a consequence of random topographic wave generation by Gulf Stream instability. The current regime within sea-floor depressions in the slope (canyons and gullies) is distinctly different from that of the open slope; most notable is the near absence of topographic wave motion within depressions. ?? 1988.

  17. Autochthonous eukaryotic diversity in hydrothermal sediment and experimental microcolonizers at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    López-García, Purificación; Philippe, Hervé; Gail, Françoise; Moreira, David

    2003-01-21

    The diversity and mode of life of microbial eukaryotes in hydrothermal systems is very poorly known. We carried out a molecular survey based on 18S ribosomal RNA genes of eukaryotes present in different hydrothermal niches at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. These included metal-rich and rare-earth-element-rich hydrothermal sediments of the Rainbow site, fluid-seawater mixing regions, and colonization devices (microcolonizers) containing organic, iron-rich, and porous mineral substrates that were exposed for 15 days to a fluid source. We identified considerable phylogenetic diversity, both at kingdom level and within kinetoplastids and alveolates. None of our sequences affiliates to photosynthesizing lineages, suggesting that we are targeting only autochthonous deep-sea communities. Although sediment harbored most phylogenetic diversity, microcolonizers predominantly contained bodonids and ciliates, indicating that these protists pioneer the colonization process. Given the large variety of divergent lineages detected within the alveolates in deep-sea plankton, hydrothermal sediments, and vents, alveolates seem to dominate the deep ocean in terms of diversity. Compared with data from the Pacific Guaymas basin, some protist lineages seem ubiquitous in hydrothermal areas, whereas others, notably kinetoplastid lineages, very abundant and diverse in our samples, so far have been detected only in Atlantic systems. Unexpectedly, although alvinellid polychaetes are considered endemic of Pacific vents, we detected alvinellid-related sequences at the fluid-seawater interface and in microcolonizers. This finding can boost further studies on deep-sea vent animal biology and biogeography.

  18. Health and climate benefits of offshore wind facilities in the Mid-Atlantic United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Luckow, Patrick; Fisher, Jeremy; Kempton, Willett; Levy, Jonathan I.

    2016-07-01

    Electricity from fossil fuels contributes substantially to both climate change and the health burden of air pollution. Renewable energy sources are capable of displacing electricity from fossil fuels, but the quantity of health and climate benefits depend on site-specific attributes that are not often included in quantitative models. Here, we link an electrical grid simulation model to an air pollution health impact assessment model and US regulatory estimates of the impacts of carbon to estimate the health and climate benefits of offshore wind facilities of different sizes in two different locations. We find that offshore wind in the Mid-Atlantic is capable of producing health and climate benefits of between 54 and 120 per MWh of generation, with the largest simulated facility (3000 MW off the coast of New Jersey) producing approximately 690 million in benefits in 2017. The variability in benefits per unit generation is a function of differences in locations (Maryland versus New Jersey), simulated years (2012 versus 2017), and facility generation capacity, given complexities of the electrical grid and differences in which power plants are offset. This work demonstrates health and climate benefits of offshore wind, provides further evidence of the utility of geographically-refined modeling frameworks, and yields quantitative insights that would allow for inclusion of both climate and public health in benefits assessments of renewable energy.

  19. The Mid-Atlantic Region in Transition: Employment Trends, 1974-84. Rural Development Research Report Number 57.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Theodore E.

    A comparison of the Mid-Atlantic region (New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania) with the nation from 1974 to 1984 revealed that this region trailed New England and the nation in rate of employment growth between 1974-79 and 1979-84. The region had an above-average share of employment in the national fast-growth sectors (services, finance,…

  20. Wave climate model of the Mid-Atlantic shelf and shoreline (Virginian Sea): Model development, shelf geomorphology, and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, V.; Morris, W. D.; Byrne, R. J.; Whitlock, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    A computerized wave climate model is developed that applies linear wave theory and shelf depth information to predict wave behavior as they pass over the continental shelf as well as the resulting wave energy distributions along the coastline. Reviewed are also the geomorphology of the Mid-Atlantic Continental Shelf, wave computations resulting from 122 wave input conditions, and a preliminary analysis of these data.

  1. Wildlife Densities and Habitat Use Across Temporal and Spatial Scales on the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Final Report to the Department of Energy EERE Wind & Water Power Technologies Office

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Kathryn A.; Stenhouse, Iain J.; Johnson, Sarah M.; Connelly, Emily E.

    2015-10-01

    The Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies Project helped address environmental barriers to offshore wind energy development in the mid-Atlantic region by providing regulators, developers, and other stakeholders with comprehensive baseline ecological data and analyses. Project funders and collaborators from a range of academic institutions, non-governmental organizations, federal agencies, foundations, and private companies came together to study bird, sea turtle, and marine mammal distributions, densities, and movements on the mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf between 2012 and 2014. Specific project activities and goals included the following: (1) Conduct standardized surveys to quantify bird, sea turtle, and marine mammal densities seasonally and annually throughout the study region and identify important habitat use or aggregation areas. (2) Develop statistical models to help understand the drivers of wildlife distribution and abundance patterns. (3) Use individual tracking data for several focal bird species to provide information on population connectivity and individual movements that is complementary to survey data. (4) Identify species that are likely to be exposed to offshore wind energy development activities in the mid-Atlantic study area. (5) Develop U.S.-based technological resources and assessment methods for future monitoring efforts, including a comparison of high resolution digital video aerial surveys to boat-based surveys. (6) Help meet data needs associated with National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Marine Mammal Protection Act, and Endangered Species Act requirements, by contributing several years of data and analysis towards future Environmental Impact Statements. This report consists of six parts: Project overview (executive summary and Chapters 1-2); Examining wildlife distributions and relative abundance from a digital video aerial survey platform (Chapters 3-6); Examining wildlife distributions and abundance using boat-based surveys

  2. Impacts of interstate transport of pollutants on high ozone events over the Mid-Atlantic United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Kuo-Jen; Hou, Xiangting; Baker, Debra Ratterman

    2014-02-01

    The impacts of interstate transport of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions on peak ozone formation in four nonattainment areas (i.e., Baltimore, Philadelphia-Wilmington-Atlantic City, Pittsburgh-Beaver Valley and Washington, DC) in the Mid-Atlantic U.S. were quantified in this study. Regional air quality and sensitivities of ground-level ozone to emissions from four regions in the eastern U.S. were simulated for three summer months (June, July and August) in 2007 using the U.S. EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality model with the decoupled direct method 3D. The emissions inventory used in this study was the 2007 Mid-Atlantic Regional Air Management Association Level 2 inventory, developed for State Implementation Plan screening modeling for the Ozone Transport Commission region. The modeling results show that responses of peak ozone levels at specific locations to emissions from EGU (i.e., electric generating unit) and non-EGU sources could be different. Therefore, emissions from EGU and non-EGU sources should be considered as two different control categories when developing regional air pollution mitigation strategies. Based on the emission inventories used in this study, reductions in anthropogenic NOx emissions (including those from EGU and non-EGU sources) from the Great Lake region as well as northeastern and southeastern U.S. would be effective for decreasing area-mean peak ozone concentrations during the summer of 2007 in the Mid-Atlantic ozone air quality nonattainment areas. The results also show that reductions in anthropogenic VOC emissions from the northeastern U.S. would also be effective for decreasing area-mean peak ozone concentrations over the Mid-Atlantic U.S. In some cases, reductions in anthropogenic NOx emissions from the Great Lake and northeastern U.S. could slightly increase area-mean peak ozone concentrations at some ozone monitors in the Pittsburgh-Beaver Valley and Washington, DC areas

  3. Distribution of Seismicity and thermal structure at Lucky Strike Hydrothermal Segment of Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, A.; Singh, S. C.; Crawford, W. C.; Escartin, J.; Cannat, M.; Seher, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Lucky-strike segment (37.2 deg. N), located at the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) south of the Azores hot-spot, is characterized by a large hydrothermal field underlain by a 3-km deep magma chamber. To study the seismic activity in the Lucky-strike segment, four short-period and one broad-band ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs) were deployed in a diamond shape at an spacing of 4.5 km, and centered at the hydrothermal field. These five OBSs recorded two horizontal, one vertical and one pressure channels, over a period of 13 months (06/08-08/09) as a part of the BBMOMAR experiment. All the five equipments have recorded large number of micro-earthquakes, earthquake swarms and teleseismic earthquakes. Here, we present the preliminary analysis of distribution of micro-seismicity in and around the Lucky-strike segment. We have detected about 6000 earthquakes to date. Out of these, we have located about 800 earthquakes which have been recorded by at-least four equipments with clear P- and S- arrivals. The distribution of earthquakes show a concentration of events at both inside corners North and South of the Lucky Strike segment, reaching maximum depths of more than 10 km, and a relative low number of events at the segment center, below the central volcano, with maximum depths reaching only 6 km. We have also identified several swarm activity in the region. This study will be extended to include the new data of 8/08-9/09 time period, after recovery and redeployment of instruments during the BATHYLUCK09 cruise. These additional data will thus provide the best constraints to date on the thermal structure throughout the segment and around the magma chamber at its center, and intern on the links between hydrothermal activity and deformation of the oceanic lithosphere at this site.

  4. Genetic Connectivity between North and South Mid-Atlantic Ridge Chemosynthetic Bivalves and Their Symbionts

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Karina; Petersen, Jillian M.; Dubilier, Nicole; Borowski, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Transform faults are geological structures that interrupt the continuity of mid-ocean ridges and can act as dispersal barriers for hydrothermal vent organisms. In the equatorial Atlantic Ocean, it has been hypothesized that long transform faults impede gene flow between the northern and the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and disconnect a northern from a southern biogeographic province. To test if there is a barrier effect in the equatorial Atlantic, we examined phylogenetic relationships of chemosynthetic bivalves and their bacterial symbionts from the recently discovered southern MAR hydrothermal vents at 5°S and 9°S. We examined Bathymodiolus spp. mussels and Abyssogena southwardae clams using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene as a phylogenetic marker for the hosts and the bacterial 16S rRNA gene as a marker for the symbionts. Bathymodiolus spp. from the two southern sites were genetically divergent from the northern MAR species B. azoricus and B. puteoserpentis but all four host lineages form a monophyletic group indicating that they radiated after divergence from their northern Atlantic sister group, the B. boomerang species complex. This suggests dispersal of Bathymodiolus species from north to south across the equatorial belt. 16S rRNA genealogies of chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic symbionts of Bathymodiolus spp. were inconsistent and did not match the host COI genealogy indicating disconnected biogeography patterns. The vesicomyid clam Abyssogena southwardae from 5°S shared an identical COI haplotype with A. southwardae from the Logatchev vent field on the northern MAR and their symbionts shared identical 16S phylotypes, suggesting gene flow across the Equator. Our results indicate genetic connectivity between the northern and southern MAR and suggest that a strict dispersal barrier does not exist. PMID:22792208

  5. Chemosynthetic microbial activity at Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirsen, Carl O.; Jannasch, Holger W.; Molyneaux, Stephen J.

    1993-06-01

    Chemosynthetic production of microbial biomass, determined by 14CO2 fixation and enzymatic (RuBisCo) activity, at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) 23° and 26°N vent sites was found in various niches: warm water emissions, loosely rock-attached flocculent material, dense morphologically diverse bacterial mats covering the surfaces of polymetal sulfide deposits, and filamentous microbes on the carapaces of shrimp (Rimicaris exoculata). The bacterial mats on polymetal sulfide surfaces contained unicellular and filamentous bacteria which appeared to use as their chemolithotrophic electron or energy source either dissolved reduced minerals from vent emissions, mainly sulfur compounds, or solid metal sulfide deposits, mainly pyrite. Moderately thermophilic Chemosynthetic activity was observed in carbon dioxide fixation experiments and in enrichments, but no thermophilic aerobic sulfur oxidizers could be isolated. Both obligate and facultative chemoautotrophs growing at mesophilic temperatures were isolated from all chemosynthetically active surface scrapings. The obligate autotrophs could oxidize sterilized MAR natural sulfide deposits as well as technical pyrite at near neutral pH, in addition to dissolved reduced sulfur compounds. While the grazing by shrimp on the surface mats of MAR metal sulfide deposits was observed and deemed important, the animals' primary occurrence in dense swarms near vent emissions suggests that they were feeding at these sites, where conditions for Chemosynthetic growth of their filamentous microbial epiflora were optimal. The data show that the transformation of geothermal energy at the massive polymetal sulfide deposits of the MAR is based on the lithoautotrophic oxidation of soluble sulfides and pyrites into microbial biomass.

  6. Population genetic structure of the abyssal grenadier (Coryphaenoides armatus) around the mid-Atlantic ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, H.; Cousins, N. J.; Cregeen, S. J.; Piertney, S. B.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the factors that affect the levels and distribution of genetic diversity in oceanic and deep sea environments is a central focus in marine population genetics. Whilst it has been considered that the oceans represent a homogenous environment that would facilitate dispersal and minimise population structure, it is now clear that topographical features and current patterns can influence the extent of spatial gene flow and promote significant population genetic divergence even at local scales. Here we examine patterns of population genetic structure among N. Atlantic populations of the cosmopolitan abyssal grenadier Coryphaenoides armatus in relation to two hypothesised barriers to gene flow-the mid-Atlantic Ridge and the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone/Sub-Polar Front. A suite of microsatellite markers were developed to examine the spatial pattern of allelic variation among 210 individuals from ten sampling locations encompassing sites east and west of the MAR and north and south of the CGFZ, plus a geographically distinct sample of individuals from the Crozet Islands in the Indian Ocean. Considerable genetic diversity was detected among individuals (na=5-13 and HO=0.46-0.69 across populations) but with an overall lack of genetic divergence between populations. Pairwise estimates of divergence among NE Atlantic samples were small and non-significant (max FST=0.04) and Structure-based Bayesian analysis of genetic clusters returned no distinct population structure. The only indication of genetic structure was between the Atlantic and Indian Oceans, with FST estimates of ca. 0.05. Patterns of genetic diversity and divergence are discussed in relation to what has been resolved in Coryphaenoides congeners, and what is known about the life history and ecology of C. armatus.

  7. Discovery of free-living Fe-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, D.; Scott, J.; MacDonald, D.; Findlay, A.; Luther, G. W.

    2013-12-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria play an essential role in the iron cycle on the Earth. Thus far, the majority of marine Fe-oxidizers have been associated with a novel class, Zetaproteobacteria, within the phylum Proteobacteria. Fe-oxidizing communities have been found at volcanically-active seamounts, crustal spreading centers, and in coastal waters. One conspicuous absence is at hydrothermal systems associated with the slow-crustal spreading center along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). We used the DSV Jason to visit three well-known hydrothermal vents at the MAR: Rainbow, TAG, and Snakepit, to determine if Fe-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria were present. Small, diffuse flow venting areas with high Fe(II) concentrations, and rust-colored microbial mats were observed at all three sites proximal to black smoker chimneys. A novel, syringe-based precision sampler was used to collect multiple, individual microbial iron mats at all three sites. Morphologically, sheath-forming Fe-oxidizers were observed at all sites, although the degree of mineralization varied substantially between the samples. Tagged pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene from these samples revealed that Zetaproteobacteria were the most abundant class of any bacterial group in all the samples (5.1-92.0%; m=55.2%). Beta diversity estimates showed that there was as much variability between microbial mats at a specific vent site as there was between different vent fields. Principal component analysis revealed two distinct clusters of samples dominated by five different Zeta operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Single cell genome analysis of two representative samples was also dominated by Zetas, and confirmed the pyrosequencing results. We are in the process of associating community diversity data with in situ geochemical analysis to determine what geochemical factor(s) might be driving these patterns of diversity and community assembly. Together these data confirm that Fe-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria

  8. Time/depth distribution of Uvigerina Peregrina: lower continental slope, mid-Atlantic Bight

    SciTech Connect

    Balsam, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Uvigerina peregrina is one of the most intensely studied deep-see benthic foraminifera. In the mid-Atlantic Bight modern U. peregrina is found in ore tops from water depths of 700-3000m reaching its acme between 1300 and 1800m. During the glacial maximum (18,000 YBP) this species occupied depths from at least 2800m to 4350m. Beginning 16,000 YBP Uvigerina disappeared from both the shallow and deep parts of its range until the last remnants of this glacial age population disappeared 7600 YBP from a depth of 3600m. In order to examine the relationship between the modern population of Uvigerina peregrina and glacial age forms the authors analyzed three cores taken from depths of 1811m, 2186m, and 2375m. Stratigraphy in these cores is based on correlation of down core changes in weight percent carbonate to oxygen isotope records and radiocarbon dates. All cores go back at least 20,000 years. In the shallowest core Uvigerina is absent except for the last 4000 years. In the two deeper cores Uvigerina is sporadically present during late glacial time, disappears during latest glacial and early Holocene time and reappears 4000 YBP. This data indicates that 1) the modern population of Uvigerina has occupied depths below 1800m only during the last 4000 years and 2) there is no obvious continuity between modern and glacial age populations of this species. Further, this data suggests that water mass properties are a major control on the distribution of Uvigerina.

  9. Origin and fate of the North Atlantic Current at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breckenfelder, Tilia; Myers, Paul G.; Rhein, Monika; Pennelly, Clark; Hu, Xianmin

    2016-04-01

    Warm, salty tropical and subtropical water is brought into the subpolar gyre by the North Atlantic Current (NAC). The NAC is the northward extension of the Gulf Stream and is part of the upper branch of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. The warm, salty water is further transported into the Nordic Seas via the Rockall Trough, into the Denmark Strait and, finally into the Labrador Sea, where it plays an important role in the deep water formation process. On its way into the Labrador Sea the water mass increases its density by dissipating heat to the atmosphere and thereby influencing the local climate. To further understand the processes behind warm water transport towards higher latitudes, we start our investigation at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Here, the NAC flows from the western to eastern basin of the North Atlantic and crosses the MAR via the Charlie-Gibbs, Faraday and Maxwell Fracture Zones. The role of the subpolar and subtropical gyre on the different water masses, and their properties, originating or reaching the MAR is studied using the lagrangian tool ARIANE with the 3D velocity fields taken from a 1/12° AGRIF nest set in a regional NEMO configuration. One result of this investigation is that the majority of particles released at the MAR, distributed over the entire water column, recirculate. Most of the remaining particles make their way into the East Greenland Current or turn in the eastern basin towards the south. The influence of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) is investigated by studying the pathways of the NAC and their properties during different NAO phases.

  10. Seismogenic behavior of symmetric vs. detachment-dominated sections of the Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive, J. A. L.; Escartin, J.

    2015-12-01

    Normal faults are essential in shaping the seafloor formed at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges, and information on their behavior on short (seismic cycle) time scales is limited. Here we combine catalogs of hydro-acoustically recorded [Bohnenstiehl et al., 2000; 2002] and teleseismic earthquakes to analyze the modes of seismic moment release along the Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge between the Marathon (12ºN) and Oceanographer (35ºN) Fracture Zones. Along about 50% of the ridge axis, tectonic extension is taken up by steep, symmetric conjugate faults that bound a well-defined axial valley. By contrast, along the remaining 50% most of the tectonic strain is accommodated by large-offset detachment faults [Escartín et al., 2008]. Upon declustering the catalogs to remove major aftershock sequences, we estimate seismicity rates and infer seismic moment release along the ridge axis by converting hydro-acoustic source level to moment magnitude. The shape of the resulting cumulative moment release curves is then investigated at individual ridge sections defined by tectonic interpretation of seafloor morphology. Qualitatively, the seismogenic behavior of symmetric sections appears more stick slip-like (with large events separated by a few years of relative quiescence) than that of detachment-dominated sections, which feature more frequent, smaller events. We quantify these differences by measuring relevant parameters (e.g., background seismicity rates, b-values...) along different tectonic ridge sections, as well as along sliding windows with no prior knowledge of the seafloor morphology. Finally, we assess possible relations between the observed contrasted seismogenic behavior and the systematic variations in fault geometry and rheology (dip, offset, cross-axis and down-dip extent, presence of weak minerals in the fault zone) inferred from seafloor observations along slow-spreading ridges.

  11. Crystallization depth beneath an oceanic detachment fault (ODP Hole 923A, Mid-Atlantic Ridge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissenberg, C. Johan; Rioux, Matthew; MacLeod, Christopher J.; Bowring, Samuel A.; Shimizu, Nobumichi

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic detachment faults are increasingly recognized as playing an integral role in the seafloor spreading process at slow and ultraslow spreading mid-ocean ridges, with significant consequences for the architecture of the oceanic lithosphere. Although melt supply is considered to play a critical control on the formation and evolution of oceanic detachments, much less well understood is how melts and faults interact and influence each other. Few direct constraints on the locus and depth of melt emplacement in the vicinity of detachments are available. Gabbros drilled in ODP Hole 923A near the intersection of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the Kane transform fault (23°N; the MARK area) represent magmas emplaced into the footwall of such a detachment fault and unroofed by it. We here present U-Pb zircon dates for these gabbros and associated diorite veins which, when combined with a tectonic reconstruction of the area, allow us to calculate the depths at which the melts crystallized. Th-corrected single zircon U-Pb dates from three samples range from 1.138 ± 0.062 to 1.213 ± 0.021 Ma. We find a crystallization depth of 6.4 +1.7/-1.3 km, and estimate that the melts parental to the gabbros were initially emplaced up to 1.5 km deeper, at <8 km below the seafloor. The tectonic reconstruction implies that the detachment fault responsible for the exposure of the sampled sequence likely crossed the ridge axis at depth, suggesting that melt emplacement into the footwall of oceanic detachment faults is an important process. The deep emplacement depth we find associated with "detachment mode" spreading at ˜1.2 Ma appears to be significantly greater than the depth of magma reservoirs during the current "magmatic mode" of spreading in the area, suggesting that the northern MARK segment preserves a recent switch between two temporally distinct modes of spreading with fundamentally different lithospheric architecture.

  12. Genetic connectivity between north and south Mid-Atlantic Ridge chemosynthetic bivalves and their symbionts.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Karina; Petersen, Jillian M; Dubilier, Nicole; Borowski, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Transform faults are geological structures that interrupt the continuity of mid-ocean ridges and can act as dispersal barriers for hydrothermal vent organisms. In the equatorial Atlantic Ocean, it has been hypothesized that long transform faults impede gene flow between the northern and the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and disconnect a northern from a southern biogeographic province. To test if there is a barrier effect in the equatorial Atlantic, we examined phylogenetic relationships of chemosynthetic bivalves and their bacterial symbionts from the recently discovered southern MAR hydrothermal vents at 5°S and 9°S. We examined Bathymodiolus spp. mussels and Abyssogena southwardae clams using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene as a phylogenetic marker for the hosts and the bacterial 16S rRNA gene as a marker for the symbionts. Bathymodiolus spp. from the two southern sites were genetically divergent from the northern MAR species B. azoricus and B. puteoserpentis but all four host lineages form a monophyletic group indicating that they radiated after divergence from their northern Atlantic sister group, the B. boomerang species complex. This suggests dispersal of Bathymodiolus species from north to south across the equatorial belt. 16S rRNA genealogies of chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic symbionts of Bathymodiolus spp. were inconsistent and did not match the host COI genealogy indicating disconnected biogeography patterns. The vesicomyid clam Abyssogena southwardae from 5°S shared an identical COI haplotype with A. southwardae from the Logatchev vent field on the northern MAR and their symbionts shared identical 16S phylotypes, suggesting gene flow across the Equator. Our results indicate genetic connectivity between the northern and southern MAR and suggest that a strict dispersal barrier does not exist.

  13. Relative species richness and community completeness: avian communities and urbanization in the mid-Atlantic states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cam, E.; Nichols, J.D.; Sauer, J.R.; Hines, J.E.; Flather, C.H.

    2000-01-01

    The idea that local factors govern local richness has been dominant for years, but recent theoretical and empirical studies have stressed the influence of regional factors on local richness. Fewer species at a site could reflect not only the influence of local factors, but also a smaller regional pool. The possible dependency of local richness on the regional pool should be taken into account when addressing the influence of local factors on local richness. It is possible to account for this potential dependency by comparing relative species richness among sites, rather than species richness per se. We consider estimation of a metric permitting assessment of relative species richness in a typical situation in which not all species are detected during sampling sessions. In this situation, estimates of absolute or relative species richness need to account for variation in species detection probability if they are to be unbiased. We present a method to estimate relative species richness based on capture-recapture models. This approach involves definition of a species list from regional data, and estimation of the number of species in that list that are present at a site-year of interest. We use this approach to address the influence of urbanization on relative richness of avian communities in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. There is a negative relationship between relative richness and landscape variables describing the level of urban development. We believe that this metric should prove very useful for conservation and management purposes because it is based on an estimator of species richness that both accounts for potential variation in species detection probability and allows flexibility in the specification of a 'reference community.' This metric can be used to assess ecological integrity, the richness of the community of interest relative to that of the 'original' community, or to assess change since some previous time in a community.

  14. Temporal trends in nitrate and selected pesticides in mid-atlantic ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Debrewer, L.M.; Ator, S.W.; Denver, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Evaluating long-term temporal trends in regional ground-water quality is complicated by variable hydrogeologic conditions and typically slow flow, and such trends have rarely been directly measured. Ground-water samples were collected over near-decadal and annual intervals from unconfined aquifers in agricultural areas of the Mid-Atlantic region, including fractured carbonate rocks in the Great Valley, Potomac River Basin, and unconsolidated sediments on the Delmarva Peninsula. Concentrations of nitrate and selected pesticides and degradates were compared among sampling events and to apparent recharge dates. Observed temporal trends are related to changes in land use and chemical applications, and to hydrogeology and climate. Insignificant differences in nitrate concentrations in the Great Valley between 1993 and 2002 are consistent with relatively steady fertilizer application during respective recharge periods and are likely related to drought conditions in the later sampling period. Detecting trends in Great Valley ground water is complicated by long open boreholes characteristic of wells sampled in this setting which facilitate significant ground-water mixing. Decreasing atrazine and prometon concentrations, however, reflect reported changes in usage. On the Delmarva Peninsula between 1988 and 2001, median nitrate concentrations increased 2 mg per liter in aerobic ground water, reflecting increasing fertilizer applications. Correlations between selected pesticide compounds and apparent recharge date are similarly related to changing land use and chemical application. Observed trends in the two settings demonstrate the importance of considering hydrogeology and recharge date along with, changing land and chemical uses when interpreting trends in regional ground-water quality. Copyright ?? 2008 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  15. National Assessment of Shoreline Change; historical shoreline change along the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Kratzmann, Meredith G.; List, Jeffrey H.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2011-01-01

    Beach erosion is a chronic problem along many open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present trends and rates of shoreline movement. There is also a need for a comprehensive analysis of shoreline movement that is consistent from one coastal region to another. To meet these national needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along open-ocean sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii, Alaska, and the Great Lakes. One purpose of this work is to develop standard, repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic, systematic, internally consistent updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally. In the case of this study, the shoreline is the interpreted boundary between the ocean water surface and the sandy beach. This report on the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts is the fifth in a series of reports on historical shoreline change. Previous investigations include analyses and descriptive reports of the Gulf of Mexico, the Southeast Atlantic, and, for California, the sandy shoreline and the coastal cliffs. The rates of change presented in this report represent conditions up to the date of the most recent shoreline data and therefore are not intended for predicting future shoreline positions or rates of change. Because of the geomorphology of the New England and Mid-Atlantic (rocky coastlines, large embayments and beaches) as well as data gaps in some areas, this report presents beach erosion rates for 78 percent of the 1,360 kilometers of the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts. The New England and Mid-Atlantic shores were subdivided into a total of 10 analysis regions for the purpose of reporting regional trends in shoreline change rates. The average rate of long

  16. The Distribution and Abundance of Mercury Methylating Microorganisms in Mid-Atlantic Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillan, E. F. U.; Gilmour, C. C.; Schwartz, G.; Christensen, G. A.; King, A. J.; Elias, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery of the genes responsible for microbial methylmercury production, hgcAB, has led to the identification of novel Hg methylators with diverse metabolisms including Fe and SO42- reducing bacteria, syntrophs, and methanogens. We recently developed DNA probes for hgcA in each group of methylators: Deltaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Archaea [Christensen, 2015]. In this study, we use the probes to determine quantity and distribution of hgcA+ organisms in mid-Atlantic marshes and sediments, and in Hg-contaminated wetland soils. We also analyze hgcA distribution over a 28-day soil slurry experiment designed to evaluate the impact of activated carbon on Hg methylation and demethylation [Gilmour, 2015]. Initial soils show Deltaproteobacteria comprise most hgcA+ organisms. Methanogens encompass >45% of the remaining methylators. The addition of SO42- to induce SO42- reducing conditions in slurries caused the number of hgcA+ Deltaproteobacteria to increase and the number of hgcA+ methanogens to decrease to >32%. In soils and slurries, Firmicutes were below detection, suggesting our Firmicute primers are either unrepresentative in natural samples, or that hgcA+ Firmicutes are rare. This observation is interesting as Firmicutes include organisms with divergent metabolisms, and their role in environmental methylation is still unknown. Slurries also show no correlation between hgcA abundance and Hg concentrations. We now plan to explore how hgcA abundance relates to Hg-methylation and electron acceptor availability. Our results offer initial insights into the natural distribution of hgcA, supporting the idea that the distribution of different methylators is related to electron acceptors and redox chemistry. Christensen, G., Wymore, AM, King, A, Pdar, M, Hurt Jur, RA, Santillan, EFU, Gilmour, CC, Brandt, CC, Brown, SD, Palumbo, AV, Elias, DA (2015), A Study of Mercury Methylation Genetics: Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of hgcAB in Pure Culture, paper presented

  17. The geochemical controls on vent fluids from the Lucky Strike vent field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Damm, K. L.; Bray, A. M.; Buttermore, L. G.; Oosting, S. E.

    1998-08-01

    Hydrothermal vent fluids were collected from the Lucky Strike site at 37°17'N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in both 1993 and 1996. Seven vents were sampled with the DSV Alvin in 1993 and six vents were sampled in 1996 using the ROV Jason during the LUSTRE '96 Cruise. As three of the vents were sampled in both 1993 and in 1996, a time series of vent fluid chemistry is also reported. Measured temperatures ranged from 202 to 333°C at the 1618-1726 m depth of the vent field, which is located on Lucky Strike Seamount. These fluids are either equal to or less than the local bottom seawater in chlorinity. While the range in fluid compositions at Lucky Strike is generally within that observed elsewhere, the unusual aspects of the fluid chemistries are the relatively high pH and low Fe, Mn, Li and Zn. We attribute this, as well as an usually low Sr/Ca ratio, to reaction with a highly altered substrate. The high Si and Cu contents suggest a deep, as well as hot, source for these fluids. The fluid compositions therefore suggest formation by super-critical phase separation at a depth not less than 1300 m below the seafloor, and reaction with a relatively oxic, and previously altered, substrate. There is temporal variability in some of the vent fluid compositions as Li, K, Ca and Fe concentrations have increased in some of the vents, as has the Fe/Mn (molar) ratio, although the chlorinities have remained essentially constant from 1993 to 1996. While there is not a simple relationship between vent fluid compositions (or temperatures) and distance from the lava lake at the summit of the seamount, the vent fluids from many of the vents can be shown to be related to others, often at distances >200 m. The most southeasterly vents (Eiffel Tower and the Marker/Mounds vents) are distinct in chlorinity and other chemical parameters from the rest of the vents, although closely related to each other within the southeastern area. Similarly all of the vents not in this one area, appear

  18. Fluid evolution in submarine magna-hydrothermal systems at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Deborah S.; Gillis, Kathryn M.; Thompson, Geoff

    1993-11-01

    Fluid inclusion in a suite of gabbro, quartz-breccia, and metabasalt samples recovered from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge Kane Fracture Zone (MARK) area on the Mid-Atlanitc Ridge are the product of a complex hydrothermal history involving late stage magmatic fluids at temperatures greater than 700 C and penetration by modified seawater at 300-400 C. The evolution of volatiles during the early stage of solidification and cooling of magma bodies near the ridge-transform intersection is marked by exsolution of a CO2 fluid, entrapped within primary inclusions in fluorapatites. Attendant with progressive melt fractionation, residual evolved melts reached water saturation, and locally, supercritical CO2+H2O+NaCl+/-Fe brines (greater than 50 wt % NaCl) and cogenetic H2O+CO2-rich vapors (1-2 wt % NaCl) were exsolved as immiscible phases. Concomitant or subsequent fracturing, perhaps in response to volatile exsolution from the melts, allowed migration of these fluids along microfracture networks at greater than 700 C. Trondhjemitic-hosted inclusions, which homogenize by halite dissolution, indicate that the last fluids exsolved from the melts may have been 35-40 wt % brines. The transition from magmatic to seawater-dominated hydrothermal conditions in the gabbros is marked by initial penetration of lower salinity fluids (1-7 wt % NaCl) at temperatures in excess of 400 C, with the general cessation of fluid flow occurring at minimum temperatures of approximately = 250 C. The relative enrichment and depletion of NaCl with respect to seawater in these fluids may record supercitical phases separation of seawater or boiling of hydrothermal fluids enriched in NaCl. Migration along microfracture networks of Ch4-rich, 350 C fluids, may reflect deeper seated hydrothermal processes involving hydration of underlying mantle material in response to fluid flow along deeply penetrating fault systems. In shallow crustal rocks, circulation of seawater-derived fluids fluids occurred at temperatures

  19. Origin of major element chemical trends in DSDP Leg 37 basalts, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerly, G.R.; Wright, T.L.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the major element chemical variation for basalts from the Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 37 and relate it to stratigraphic position in each of five drilling sites. Least-squares techniques are successfully used to quantify the nature and extent of alteration in these basalts, and to correct the major element analysis back to a magmatic, or alteration-free, composition on the assumption that alteration takes place in two ways: (1) secondary minerals are introduced into veins and vesicles, and (2) CO2 and H2O react with components in the rock to form a simple alteration assemblage. A chemical stratigraphy is defined for these basalts by grouping lavas whose chemistries are related by low-pressure phenocryst-liquid differentiation as identified by least-squares calculation. Major chemical-stratigraphic units are as much as 200 m thick; correlations of these units can be made between the holes at site 332 (about 100 m apart), but not between the other sites. Compositions of parental magmas are calculated by extrapolating low-pressure variations to a constant value of 9% MgO. The differences in these extrapolated compositions reflect high-pressure processes, and suggest that clinopyroxene may be an important phase in either intermediate-level fractionation of basaltic liquids, or as a residual phase during the partial melting which produces these basaltic liquids. Several of the basaltic liquids calculated as parental to the Leg 37 basalts have CaO contents greater than 14% and indicate that the oceanic mantle is richer in CaO and Al2O3 than values used in pyrolite models for the upper mantle. A model for magma generation and eruption beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge embodies the following characteristics: 1. (1) Separate magma batches are generated in the mantle. 2. (2) Each of these may be erupted directly or stored at shallow depth where significant fractionation takes place. Common fractionation processes are inferred to be gravitative

  20. Methanethiol abundance in high-temperature hydrothermal fluids from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, E.; Seewald, J. S.; Saccocia, P.; van der Meer, M.

    2008-12-01

    The formation of aqueous organic sulfur compounds in hydrothermal systems remains poorly constrained, despite their potential significance in 'prebiotic' chemistry and the origin of life. The simplest - methanethiol (CH3SH) - has been implicated as a critical abiogenic precursor to the establishment of primitive microbial metabolism in early Earth hydrothermal settings. It also represents a readily-utilized substrate for microbial sulfate-reducing communities and a potential intermediate species in abiotic CH4 formation. To assess the abundance of CH3SH and factors regulating its stability under hydrothermal conditions we measured CH3SH concentrations in a suite of hydrothermal fluids collected from the Rainbow, Lucky Strike, TAG and Lost City hydrothermal sites located on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Fluids were collected using isobaric gas-tight samplers and analyzed for CH3SH by shipboard purge-and-trap gas chromatography. Measured concentrations at Rainbow (1.2 -- 223nM), Lucky Strike (1.1 -- 26nM), TAG (8.5 -- 11nM) and Lost City (1.6 -- 3.0nM) are all substantially lower than predicted for thermodynamic equilibrium with CO2, H2 and H2S at measured vent conditions. The highest concentrations (91 -- 223nM), however, were observed at Rainbow in intermediate temperature (128 -- 175°C) H2-rich fluids that may have undergone conductive cooling. Increased concentrations with decreasing temperature is consistent with the thermodynamic drive for the formation from CO2, suggesting a possible abiotic origin for CH3SH in some fluids. Substantially lower concentrations in the low temperature fluids at Lost City are consistent with the extremely low levels of CO2 and H2S in these fluids. Other possible sources of CH3SH to vent fluids must be considered, however, and include thermal alteration of biomass present in low-temperature environments and microbial consortia that produce CH3SH as a byproduct of anaerobic methane oxidation. Current models for the emergence of primordial

  1. Elevated relative risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage with colder weather in the mid-Atlantic region.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Lara, Lucia; Kowalski, Robert G; Schneider, Eric B; Tamargo, Rafael J; Nyquist, Paul

    2015-10-01

    We have previously reported an increase of 0.6% in the relative risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) in response to every 1°F decrease in the maximum daily temperature (Tmax) in colder seasons from patients presenting to our regional tertiary care center. We hypothesized that this relationship would also be observed in the warmer summer months with ambient temperatures greater than 70°F. From prospectively collected incidence data for aSAH patients, we investigated absolute Tmax, average daily temperatures, intraday temperature ranges, and the variation of daily Tmax relative to 70°F to assess associations with aSAH incidence for patients admitted to our institution between 1991 and 2009 during the hottest months and days on which Tmax>70°F. For all days treated as a group, the mean Tmax (± standard deviation) was lower when aSAH occurred than when it did not (64.4±18.2°F versus 65.8±18.3°F; p=0.016). During summer months, the odds ratio (OR) of aSAH incidence increased with lower mean Tmax (OR 1.019; 95% confidence interval 1.001-1.037; p=0.043). The proportion of days with aSAH admissions was lower on hotter days than the proportion of days with no aSAH (96% versus 98%; p=0.006). aSAH were more likely to occur during the summer and on days with a temperature fluctuation less than 10°F (8% versus 4%; p=0.002). During the hottest months of the year in the mid-Atlantic region, colder maximum daily temperatures, a smaller heat burden above 70°F, and smaller intraday temperature fluctuations are associated with increased aSAH admissions in a similar manner to colder months. These findings support the hypothesis that aSAH incidence is more likely with drops in temperature, even in the warmer months.

  2. Quality of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in watershed compartments for a forested mid-Atlantic watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S.; Inamdar, S. P.; Finger, N.; Mitchell, M. J.; Levia, D. F.; Scott, D.; Bais, H.

    2010-12-01

    Catchment exports of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in streamflow can be influenced by multiple sources, which, may vary with hydrologic conditions or seasons. Thus, understanding the concentrations and quality of DOM for potential watershed sources is critical to assessing the dynamics of DOM. We investigated the quality of DOM across various watershed sources in a 12 ha forested watershed located in the Piedmont region of the mid-Atlantic USA. Sampling was performed over a two-year time period (2008-2009) and included: rainfall, throughfall, litter-leachate, soil water, riparian and wetland waters, seeps, stream runoff, and shallow and deep groundwaters. DOM constituents were characterized using ultraviolet (UV) absorption and PARAFAC modeling of fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs). Specific indices that were used include: UV absorption coefficient at 254nm (a254), specific UV absorbance at 254nm (SUVA254), spectral slope ratio (SR), humification index (HIX), fluorescence index (FI), biological index (BIX), and percent humic-like and protein-like components. Our results indicated that of all the watershed DOM sources litter-leachate had the highest aromatic (high values of a254, SUVA, % C5) and humic (high HIX) content. Aromatic and humic content of DOM then decreased with soil depth with lowest values for deep groundwaters and seeps. In addition, the SR index indicated a decrease in molecular weight of DOM with soil depth. Taken together, these indices suggest that the aromatic and high molecular weight fractions of DOM were preferentially removed by sorption as runoff water percolated through the soil profile. While throughfall was less aromatic than litter-leachate, it was more aromatic than the other watershed compartments. The aromatic and humic content of soil and stream water was intermediate between litter-leachate and deep groundwaters. In contrast to the trend in aromatic DOM, the % of protein-like DOM component increased with soil depth

  3. Hydrothermal Activity and Volcanism on the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. M.; Scientific Party, M.

    2005-12-01

    In April 2005 four recently discovered different hydrothermal fields on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) south of the Equator were studied and sampled using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) during cruise METEOR 64/1. Three of these hydrothermally active fields (called Turtle Pits, Red Lion, and Wideawake) occur at about 3000 m water depth in the centre of a MAR segment at 4° 48'S which appears to be volcanically very active. The youngest lava flow partly covers the low-temperature, diffuse flow Wideawake mussel field and is thus probably only a few years old. The high-temperature Turtle Pits hydrothermal field with four active vent structures lies some 300 m west of the diffuse vent field and is characterized by boiling fluids with temperatures close to 400° C. The mineral assemblage recovered from inactive hydrothermal mounds includes massive magnetite+hematite+sulfate and differs from that of the presently active vents and indicates more oxidizing conditions during the earlier activity. The vent fluids at Turtle Pits contain relatively high contents of hydrogen which may have formed during iron oxidation processes when basaltic magmas crystallized. The high fluid temperatures, the change to more reducing conditions, and the relatively high hydrogen contents in the fluids are most likely due to the ascent of magmas from the mantle that fed the very recent eruption. The high-temperature Red Lion hydrothermal field lies some 2 km north of the Turtle Pits field and consists of at least four active black smokers surrounded by several inactive sulfide mounds. The composition of the Red Lion fluids differs significantly from the Turtle Pits fluids, possibly owing largely to a difference in the temperature of the two systems. The fourth hydrothermally active field on the southern MAR, the Liliput field, was discovered near 9° 33'S in a water depth of 1500 m and consists of several low-temperature vents. A shallow hydrothermal plume in the water column

  4. Sea-level in the U.S. mid-Atlantic coast during the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Timothy; García-Artola, Ane; Engelhart, Simon; Kemp, Andrew; Cahill, Niamh; Nikitina, Daria; Corbett, Reide; Brain, Matthew; Vane, Christopher; Walker, Jennifer; Pilarczyk, Jessica; Clear, Jennifer; Horton, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    Understanding of Common Era sea-level change is fragmentary compared to understanding of temperature variability, for which several global syntheses have been generated. This limitation prevents accurate assessment of the Common Era relationship between temperature and global mean sea level (GMSL), including the sea-level response to climate phases such as the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the Little Ice Age (LIA). Previous records of relative sea-level (RSL) change along the U.S. Atlantic coast during the Common Era have revealed spatial and temporal variability that reflects differences in the static-equilibrium effects of land ice changes and/or to ocean dynamic effects. Here we present two new RSL records spanning the Common Era from saltmarsh sites in the Delaware Bay and Chesapeake Bay. Motivation for this work stems from discrepancies in the timing and magnitude of sea-level changes for the mid-Atlantic coast. This region also experiences some of the highest rates of 20th century RSL change (up to ~5 mm/yr) along the U.S. Atlantic Coast. At Delaware Bay and Chesapeake Bay, extensive stratigraphic surveys revealed thick sequences of salt-marsh peat ideally suited to proxy-based RSL reconstructions utilizing foraminifera. Estimates of paleo marsh elevation were provided through contemporary training sets incorporating modern analogues from the full range of intertidal environments and subtracted from surveyed altitudes to provide RSL trends. Temporal constraints on sea-level changes were incorporated into a Bayesian framework using a composite chronology composed of AMS radiocarbon dating, short-lived radionuclides, regional pollution histories and pollen chronohorizons documenting land clearance events. The reconstructions showed a similar pre-instrumental RSL rise of ~1.1 - 1.6 mm/yr in Delaware Bay and Chesapeake Bay, respectively. The rate of RSL rise in both regions during the past ~130 years coincides with the increased rate observed in instrumental

  5. The seismicity of the equatorial Mid-Atlantic Ridge and its long-offset transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. K.; Dziak, R. P.; Palmiotto, C.; Parnell-Turner, R. E.; Zheleznov, A.

    2012-12-01

    An array of eight hydrophones is monitoring seismicity of the equatorial Atlantic between 20N and 10S. The array is obtaining a two-year, continuous record of seismicity, which will provide an important new view of the spatial and temporal patterns of seismicity at the slow-spreading equatorial Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and its long-offset transforms. The hydroacoustically-recorded seismicity, which will be in hand in 2014, can be used to address several key questions concerning the modes of spreading along the strongly offset equatorial MAR, the short-term earthquake predictability on some of the longest transform faults in the oceans, and the dynamics of the NA-SA-AF triple junction whose exact location is not known. In addition, seismic patterns of the entire South Atlantic will be obtained (at reduced location accuracy), and will aid in understanding the dynamics of the southern MAR, Walvis Ridge, Rio Grande Rise, and other prominent seafloor features. The hydroacoustic data will also allow characterization of cetacean populations in the region as well as an assessment of the ambient noise levels due to shipping and oil exploration. To provide additional information on the short-term earthquake predictability (retrospective) on oceanic transform faults, we are identifying all magnitude mb >5 earthquakes in our existing hydroacoustic databases and searching for systematic foreshock activity associated with these events. We have multi-year earthquake databases accumulated from past hydrophone experiments along the Central, Southwest and Southeast Indian Ridges, the Juan de Fuca Ridge system, and the northern MAR. Preliminary results are very promising, and there appear to be several examples of clear foreshocks preceding mainshocks by several hours. Also as part of this project, we are compiling a bathymetric map of the equatorial MAR and its transforms between 20N and 10S. There have been several international mapping efforts in this region and the integration of

  6. Spreading History of a Segment of the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, J. M.; Clayton, R. W.

    2001-12-01

    The Falkland-Agulhas fracture zone in the South Atlantic Ocean separates crust that records the entire Cenozoic history of South America-Africa spreading (on the north) from crust on the south that experienced a more complicated plate motion history including major ridge jumps, an additional plate (Malvinas), and plate reorganizations in early Cenozoic time. The Nathaniel B. Palmer cruise 01-02 in April 2001 measured gravity, magnetics, and swath bathymetry on a transit from Cape Town to Punta Arenas, including a survey line in Cenozoic crust on the north side of, and parallel to, the Falkland-Agulhas fracture zone. The objectives were to test previous models of Cenozoic plate motions for this region, and to examine the structure of the Falkland-Agulhas fracture zone by collection of limited single-channel seismic data. From 5° W to 3° W longitude, several seismic lines with accompanying SeaBeam data across the northern flank of the fracture zone reveal it to be a wide zone characterized by multiple parallel southward-facing fault scarps whose strike is 70-80° E of N. From chron 12 time to chron 6 time, the spreading history for this segment of the ridge was relatively simple, with slightly asymmetric spreading rates (more crust accreted to South America than to Africa), as has been previously noted for this part of the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Between chron 5c and chron 2a, the magnetic anomalies are complex and disrupted, suggesting possible small-scale ridge jumps and continued asymmetric spreading. The modern ridge axis is 40 km east of the topographic high ("ridge crest"). The zones of disrupted magnetic anomalies may be due to the effects of pseudofault traces in the same spreading corridor, visible in satellite gravity data in younger seafloor north of the transit. We recorded late Cretaceous and younger magnetic anomalies (chrons 34y to 18) on the Africa plate to improve the distribution of known magnetic anomaly locations in this part of the South

  7. Potential effects of climate change on freshwater ecosystems of the New England/Mid-Atlantic Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.V.; Pace, M.L.; Mather, J.R.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Howarth, R.W.; Folt, C.L.; Chen, C.-Y.; Hemond, Harold F.; Flebbe, P.A.; Driscoll, C.T.

    1997-01-01

    Numerous freshwater ecosystems, dense concentrations of humans along the eastern seaboard, extensive forests and a history of intensive land use distinguish the New England/Mid-Atlantic Region. Human population densities are forecast to increase in portions of the region at the same time that climate is expected to be changing. Consequently, the effects of humans and climatic change are likely to affect freshwater ecosystems within the region interactively. The general climate, at present, is humid continental, and the region receives abundant precipitation. Climatic projections for a 2 ??CO2 atmosphere, however, suggest warmer and drier conditions for much of this region. Annual temperature increases ranging from 3-5??C are projected, with the greatest increases occurring in autumn or winter. According to a water balance model, the projected increase in temperature will result in greater rates of evaporation and evapotranspiration. This could cause a 21 and 31% reduction in annual stream flow in the southern and northern sections of the region, respectively, with greatest reductions occurring in autumn and winter. The amount and duration of snow cover is also projected to decrease across the region, and summer convective thunderstorms are likely to decrease in frequency but increase in intensity. The dual effects of climate change and direct anthropogenic stress will most likely alter hydrological and biogeochemical processes, and, hence, the floral and faunal communities of the region's freshwater ecosystems. For example, the projected increase in evapotranspiration and evaporation could eliminate most bog ecosystems, and increases in water temperature may increase bioaccumulation, and possibly biomagnification, of organic and inorganic contaminants. Not all change may be adverse. For example, a decrease in runoff may reduce the intensity of ongoing estuarine eutrophication, and acidification of aquatic habitats during the spring snowmelt period may be

  8. Sociocultural dimensions of supply and demand for natural aggregate; examples from the Mid-Atlantic region, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson,, Gilpin R.; Brown, William M.

    2002-01-01

    The United States uses large quantities of natural aggregate to build and maintain a continuously expanding infrastructure. In recent years, per capita demand for aggregate in the United States has grown to about 9.7 metric tons (10.7 tons) per person per year. Over the next 25 years, the aggregate industry expects to mine quantities equivalent to all aggregate mined in the United States over the past 100 years. The issues surrounding supply and demand for aggregate in the mid-Atlantic states of Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia illustrate competing requirements for industrial minerals and many simultaneous social and environmental objectives.

  9. Simulation of the 1979 spring bloom in the Mid-Atlantic Bight - A coupled physical/biological/optical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Walsh, John J.

    1992-01-01

    A coupled physical/biological/optical model is developed for studies of phytoplankton variability in the spring 1979 Mid-Atlantic Bight, as observed by CZCS imagery. The model incorporates advection, mixing, sinking, growth as a function of light, temperature, nutrient availability, and death as a function of ingestion. It produced chlorophyll concentrations within the first attenuated depth within 1 standard deviation of CZCS imagery on large scale. The primary production estimates obtained using this model were within reasonable agreement with those measured in situ.

  10. Comparison of Nitrogen Cycling Between Old Growth Forests and Secondary Forests in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R. H.; Epstein, H. E.; McGarvey, J.; Thompson, J.; Mills, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    Throughout the eastern United States, forests are experiencing regrowth, and the sequestration of carbon (C) associated with this regrowth makes these forests a key component of greenhouse gas mitigation strategies (Albani et al., 2006). Through production and decomposition of plant biomass, the C and nitrogen (N) cycles are closely coupled, suggesting that N has a major impact on the cycling of C in N-limited Mid-Atlantic forest systems. The majority of C and N in a temperate forest system is located in the soil organic matter (Templer et al., 2012), so understanding soil N is important for estimating the potential for C sequestration in soils as Mid-Atlantic forests mature (Knicker, 2010). Due to the scarcity of old growth forest stands in the region, previous empirical studies of Mid-Atlantic forests in the old growth stage of succession are limited. I sampled soil C and N in twenty-five remnant old growth forests and matched secondary stands in the Mid-Atlantic to identify differences in soil organic C and N mass and concentrations of nitrate and ammonium. No significant differences were observed between the old growth and secondary growth concentrations of inorganic N species, N fraction, and C:N ratio. Rather, secondary growth values for these variables were found to have significant, positive linear relationships with old growth values, indicating that biotic and abiotic factors varying on a regional scale are driving variability seen in these N characteristics. Further, this suggests that as forest stands reach approximately 75 years in age, these N characteristics are largely established and not likely to change significantly as stands enter the old growth successional stage. Both N fraction and O-horizon depth were shown to have significant negative correlations with old growth stand age. These results indicate that old growth forest stands have a more efficient microbial decomposer community, which could have significant implications for both soil N and

  11. REMOVING ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS OF REGULATORY INTEREST WITH MEMBRANE PROCESSES: USEPA'S SCREENING STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act require the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to establish a list of unregulated microbiological and chemical contaminants to aid in priority-setting for the Agency's drinking water program. This list, known as the Cont...

  12. EPA Method 544: A Case Study in USEPA Drinking Water Method Develpment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act required the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to establish a Drinking Water Contaminant Candidate List (CCL) of chemicals and microbes that the Agency will consider for future regulation. One of the key pieces of info...

  13. Innovative environmental education contributes to improved management practices in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

    PubMed

    Bradley, M Patricia; Hanson, Royce; Walbeck, Eric S

    2004-06-01

    The Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA) and its partner, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a graduate-level course focused on successful application of science by decision-makers to address a particular problem. Students conduct a literature review, interview the decision-makers and scientists, and synthesize and document the management problem, the science that was applied to that problem, and other issues that might constrain or drive the solution (e.g., legalities, social pressures, expense, politics, personalities, etc.). Students also quantify the results, evaluate who the intended audience is and how they most appropriately target them, and determine if there are other management problems that could be addressed with the science. The final products are short publications geared towards other decision-makers who might have a similar problem and might be seeking successful innovative solutions. MAIA is distributing these short publications to decision-makers throughout the Mid-Atlantic Region. The publications have been very positively received by state and local governments and watershed groups.

  14. Widespread active detachment faulting and core complex formation near 13 degrees N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Smith, Deborah K; Cann, Johnson R; Escartín, Javier

    2006-07-27

    Oceanic core complexes are massifs in which lower-crustal and upper-mantle rocks are exposed at the sea floor. They form at mid-ocean ridges through slip on detachment faults rooted below the spreading axis. To date, most studies of core complexes have been based on isolated inactive massifs that have spread away from ridge axes. Here we present a survey of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 13 degrees N containing a segment in which a number of linked detachment faults extend for 75 km along one flank of the spreading axis. The detachment faults are apparently all currently active and at various stages of development. A field of extinct core complexes extends away from the axis for at least 100 km. Our observations reveal the topographic characteristics of actively forming core complexes and their evolution from initiation within the axial valley floor to maturity and eventual inactivity. Within the surrounding region there is a strong correlation between detachment fault morphology at the ridge axis and high rates of hydroacoustically recorded earthquake seismicity. Preliminary examination of seismicity and seafloor morphology farther north along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that active detachment faulting is occurring in many segments and that detachment faulting is more important in the generation of ocean crust at this slow-spreading ridge than previously suspected. PMID:16871215

  15. A watershed-based method for environmental vulnerability assessment with a case study of the Mid-Atlantic region

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Liem T.; O'Neill, Robert V.; Smith, Elizabeth R.

    2012-04-15

    The paper presents a method for environmental vulnerability assessment with a case study of the Mid-Atlantic region. The method is based on the concept of 'self-/peer-appraisal' of a watershed in term of vulnerability. The self-/peer-appraisal process is facilitated by two separate linear optimization programs. The analysis provided insights on the environmental conditions, in general, and the relative vulnerability pattern, in particular, of the Mid-Atlantic region. The suggested method offers a simple but effective and objective way to perform a regional environmental vulnerability assessment. Consequently the method can be used in various steps in environmental assessment and planning. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a method for regional environmental vulnerability assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is based on the self-/peer-appraisal concept in term of vulnerability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The analysis is facilitated by two separate linear optimization programs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method provides insights on the regional relative vulnerability pattern.

  16. Mantle thermal pulses below the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and temporal variations in the formation of oceanic lithosphere.

    PubMed

    Bonatti, Enrico; Ligi, Marco; Brunelli, Daniele; Cipriani, Anna; Fabretti, Paola; Ferrante, Valentina; Gasperini, Luca; Ottolini, Luisa

    2003-05-29

    A 20-Myr record of creation of oceanic lithosphere is exposed along a segment of the central Mid-Atlantic Ridge on an uplifted sliver of lithosphere. The degree of melting of the mantle that is upwelling below the ridge, estimated from the chemistry of the exposed mantle rocks, as well as crustal thickness inferred from gravity measurements, show oscillations of approximately 3-4 Myr superimposed on a longer-term steady increase with time. The time lag between oscillations of mantle melting and crustal thickness indicates that the mantle is upwelling at an average rate of approximately 25 mm x yr(-1), but this appears to vary through time. Slow-spreading lithosphere seems to form through dynamic pulses of mantle upwelling and melting, leading not only to along-axis segmentation but also to across-axis structural variability. Also, the central Mid-Atlantic Ridge appears to have become steadily hotter over the past 20 Myr, possibly owing to north-south mantle flow.

  17. Widespread active detachment faulting and core complex formation near 13 degrees N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Smith, Deborah K; Cann, Johnson R; Escartín, Javier

    2006-07-27

    Oceanic core complexes are massifs in which lower-crustal and upper-mantle rocks are exposed at the sea floor. They form at mid-ocean ridges through slip on detachment faults rooted below the spreading axis. To date, most studies of core complexes have been based on isolated inactive massifs that have spread away from ridge axes. Here we present a survey of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 13 degrees N containing a segment in which a number of linked detachment faults extend for 75 km along one flank of the spreading axis. The detachment faults are apparently all currently active and at various stages of development. A field of extinct core complexes extends away from the axis for at least 100 km. Our observations reveal the topographic characteristics of actively forming core complexes and their evolution from initiation within the axial valley floor to maturity and eventual inactivity. Within the surrounding region there is a strong correlation between detachment fault morphology at the ridge axis and high rates of hydroacoustically recorded earthquake seismicity. Preliminary examination of seismicity and seafloor morphology farther north along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge suggests that active detachment faulting is occurring in many segments and that detachment faulting is more important in the generation of ocean crust at this slow-spreading ridge than previously suspected.

  18. An off-axis hydrothermal vent field near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 30 degrees N.

    PubMed

    Kelley, D S; Karson, J A; Blackman, D K; Früh-Green, G L; Butterfield, D A; Lilley, M D; Olson, E J; Schrenk, M O; Roe, K K; Lebon, G T; Rivizzigno, P

    2001-07-12

    Evidence is growing that hydrothermal venting occurs not only along mid-ocean ridges but also on old regions of the oceanic crust away from spreading centres. Here we report the discovery of an extensive hydrothermal field at 30 degrees N near the eastern intersection of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the Atlantis fracture zone. The vent field--named 'Lost City'--is distinctly different from all other known sea-floor hydrothermal fields in that it is located on 1.5-Myr-old crust, nearly 15 km from the spreading axis, and may be driven by the heat of exothermic serpentinization reactions between sea water and mantle rocks. It is located on a dome-like massif and is dominated by steep-sided carbonate chimneys, rather than the sulphide structures typical of 'black smoker' hydrothermal fields. We found that vent fluids are relatively cool (40-75 degrees C) and alkaline (pH 9.0-9.8), supporting dense microbial communities that include anaerobic thermophiles. Because the geological characteristics of the Atlantis massif are similar to numerous areas of old crust along the Mid-Atlantic, Indian and Arctic ridges, these results indicate that a much larger portion of the oceanic crust may support hydrothermal activity and microbial life than previously thought.

  19. Dimension statistics of rain cell cores and associated rain rate isopleths derived from radar measurements in the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Musiani, Bert H.

    1992-01-01

    Employing a multi-year radar database of precipitation in a mid-Atlantic coast region, the authors have characterized rain cell size statistics. The measurements were made with a high resolution, high power radar in which equicircle diameter contours of resolutions of 1 km and greater were identified out to ranges of 100 km from the radar. The rain cell was constructed by its core intensity isopleth and a family of enveloping contours having defined rain rate intervals in the regions between them. The isopleth statistics were extracted from a culled database whose cores had intensities of RLN = 7 (18-24 mm/h) and greater. This implies a bias of the statistics toward various types of convective rains generally associated with thunderstorms in the mid-Atlantic coast. Since the radar measurements were made in the mid-Atlantic coast region, the isopleth statistics may not be directly applicable to other geographic regions (such as the tropics).

  20. Contrasted Origins For Gabbroic Cumulates Along The Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonnotte, P.; Benoit, M.; Ceuleneer, G.

    2005-12-01

    Gabbroic cumulates sampled along mid-ocean ridges are classically viewed as fractional crystallization products of primitive mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORB) in shallow axial magma chambers. Recent observations of deep horizons of the ocean crust have shown that, in slow spreading environments, crustal building proceeds by repeated injections of modest amounts of variously evolved melt batches. Such a discontinuous character of magma emplacement favors the development of complex petrogenetic evolutions triggered by the migration of various types of melts and fluids into formerly crystallized - or still crystallizing - gabbroic cumulates and into residual peridotite. In some occurrences, however, gabbros are clearly not issued from fractional crystallization of MORB-like melts. In order to better constrain the origin of various kinds of gabbronorites emplaced along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), we performed a geochemical study (trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes) of clinopyroxene (cpx) separates leached with a severe analytical protocol designed to remove the geochemical effects of post-crystallization water rock interaction. We focus on two sites: MAR off the FAMOUS area (DSDP Site 334) and MAR on both sides of the 15°20 N fracture zone (MODE98-Leg1 cruise). Cumulates sampled at DSDP Site 334 are orthopyroxene-rich gabbronorites which call for parent melts richer in SiO2, more "andesitic", than MORB at a given MgO content. They also show an extreme depletion in most incompatible major, minor and trace elements compared to MORB. We measured isotopic signatures to trace the source of the DSDP Site 334 cumulates. We find that Site 334 cpx depart from the global mantle correlation: normal MORB values for the 143Nd/144Nd ratio (0.51307-0.51315) are associated to highly radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr (0.7034-0.7067) ratios. These signatures show that the parent melts of Site 334 cumulates are issued from an ultra-depleted MORB source and that contamination with seawater occurred at

  1. Anatomy of an Axial Volcanic Ridge: The Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 45°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achenbach, K. L.; Searle, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    Study of a single axial volcanic ridge in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge median valley at 45°N has enabled us to construct a detailed volcano-stratigraphic model and thrown new light on the structure and development of AVRs. Data sets include 50 m resolution multibeam bathymetry, comprehensive 3 m resolution deep-towed sidescan sonar, a grid of twenty-two 1.4 km-spaced lines of deep-towed magnetic field measurements, continuous video observations and 270 rock samples from eleven ROV dives, and two approximately 8 km2 areas of very-high-resolution bathymetry and magnetics. A continuous topographic ridge extends ~35 km along the segment, and strikes 010°, ~5-10° CCW of the regional ridge trend. The northernmost 10 km appears older, as attested by lower topographic relief, acoustic backscatter and crustal magnetisation and greater degree of faulting. The rest, which we infer to be most recently constructed, is 25 km long, ~ 4 km wide and ~500 m high. It has a sharp crest, and lateral spurs trending NE that we attribute to tectonic control from the right-stepping MAR axis. The recent AVR is covered by approximately 3000 small (<450 m diameter, 200 m high) circular volcanoes ranging from steep-sided (45°) cones to more rounded domes. They tend to align in rows parallel to the AVR axis, to its NE-trending spurs, or, on its lower flanks, sub-normal to the AVR trend. These latter lineaments, which are spaced 1-2 km apart, comprise short (1-2 km) rows of single cones. We infer that their emplacement is controlled by down-flank magma transport. The AVR itself contains only one volcano >450 m diameter, though about ten, all flat-topped and up to 1.2 km diameter, occur elsewhere on the median valley floor. The high-resolution surveys show all cones >70 m high suffered significant flank collapse, often with near-vertical collapse scars. The active AVR is partly flanked by hummocky volcanic terrain similar to the AVR but of lower acoustic backscatter, which we infer to be older, and

  2. Shallow seismic structure of the Kane core complex, Mid-Atlantic Ridge 23°30'N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Canales, J.; Tucholke, B.; Dubois, D.

    2007-12-01

    We present high-resolution travel-time seismic tomography models obtained along and across the Kane core complex (KCC), a proposed IODP drilling target located off-axis on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) near 23°30'N south of the Kane Fracture Zone. Together with existing geological studies, our results characterize the lateral variability in structure and composition of this well developed oceanic core complex. The KCC is a large (~23 km by ~35 km in the dip and strike directions, respectively) megamullion formed by a long-lived detachment fault between ~3.3 and 2.1 Ma. The detachment is cut along-strike by a high- angle, west-dipping normal fault (East fault). Extensive ROV and dredge sampling indicates that the northern part of East fault is covered by in situ pillow basalts, but at the central dome the fault exposes the underlying lithosphere, which is dominated by highly altered harzburgites. In contrast, the northern dome to the east of East fault appears to consist largely of gabbros. We derived the two-dimensional, shallow P-wave velocity structure of the KCC along six ~20- to 40-km-long profiles, including three strike lines and three dip lines. The seismic data were acquired in 2001 using the 6-km- long hydrophone streamer and air-gun array of R/V Ewing (cruise EW0102). The dense sampling (shots spaced every 37.5 m, with receivers spaced every 12.5 m) and the shallow seafloor of the area (<3000 m) allows us to image lateral variations in velocity structure at scales of 1 km or less within the upper ~0.5-1.5 km of the lithosphere. Our results show significant lateral variations in velocity structure in both strike and dip directions, and these variations to first order correlate with sampled lithologies. The lowest observed velocities (~3.3 km/s at seafloor increasing to ~5.1 km/s at ~1 km depth) correlate with the zone of volcanics found along the northern part of East fault. Low velocities also occur beneath the volcanic terrain of the remnant hanging wall

  3. Hydrothermal Fluxes at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 5°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, C.; Walter, M.; Koehler, J.; Sueltenfuss, J.; Rhein, M.

    2011-12-01

    The growing number of known hydrothermal vent sites has lead to an increasing recognition of the quantitative importance of hydrothermally derived materials in the large scale ocean circulation due to their possible impact on the ocean carbon cycle. The basin wide spreading of primordial helium measured during the WOCE era revealed intense hydrothermal venting in the South Atlantic, but it was not until 2005 that the first vent fields were located after intense surveys along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Before these sur- veys no hydrothermal fields were known in the Atlantic between 12°N and the Southern Ocean, thus leaving a large gap in the biogeography of hydrothermal vent fauna. One of the newly discovered sites is located in a relatively short segment of the rift valley at 5°S. It consists of three known high temperature fields: Turtle Pits, Comfortless Cove, and Red Lion, as well as several areas were diffuse venting was found. Hydrographic measurements were carried out at the Turtle Pits vent site during three cruises: Meteor cruise 68/1 in May 2006, a cruise with the french vessel L'Atalante in January 2008, and Meteor cruise 78/2 in April/May 2009. The data collected during these cruises are vertical profiles and towed sections of temperature, salinity, and turbidity, direct velocity measurements with lowered acoustic Doppler current profilers, as well as water samples for Helium isotope analysis. The hydrography at the vent sites is largely determined by the location of the sites in relation to the surrounding rift valley. The vents are situated in the center of the valley at a topographic sill. The water column plumes of the vent fields are clearly visible by strong signals in turbidity and temperature anomalies, and show a maximum rise height of more than 200 m, which does not exceed the height of the side walls of the graben. The currents in the rift valley are predominantly northward; the difference in stratification between upstream and downstream

  4. COMPARISON OF BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT TOOLS AND BIOCRITERIA USED BY STATES IN THE NEW ENGLAND AND MID-ATLANTIC REGIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This poster is an overview of biological assessment programs for wadeable streams within states in USEPA Regions 1 (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont) and 3 (Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia). Specifically, we ...

  5. USEPA RESEARCH ON INFILTRATION/INFLOW CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    From the late 60's to early 80's, the USEPA conducted a series of research, development, and demonsration projects on the characterization, cause and consequence, and control of infiltation/inflow (I/I) in both sanitary and combined sewers. The research effort was driven by the n...

  6. USEPA RESEARCH ON INFILTRATION/INFLOW CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    From the late 60's to early 80's, the USEPA conducted a series of research, development, and demonstration projects on the characterization, cause and consequence, and control of infiltation/inflow (I/I) in both sanitary and combined sewers. The research effort was driven by the ...

  7. USEPA Santa Cruz River Public Survey Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA Office of Research and Development, Western Ecology Division is investigating how urban households value different possibilities for the Santa Cruz River in southern Arizona. A random sample of households in the Phoenix and Tucson areas are being asked to provide their ...

  8. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION - USEPA SUPERFUND PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA experience in using Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) Technology to remediate Superfund sites is reviewed. Included are several case studies for insitu and exsitu treatment and sites containing both metals and organics, both separately, and mixed on the same site. Co...

  9. 26 million years of mantle upwelling below a segment of the Mid Atlantic Ridge: The Vema Lithospheric Section revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriani, Anna; Bonatti, Enrico; Brunelli, Daniele; Ligi, Marco

    2009-07-01

    Temporal variations of temperature and composition of the mantle upwelling below a 80-km long segment of the Mid Atlantic Ridge were reconstructed from 20 to 4 Ma ago from peridotites sampled along a > 300-km long section of oceanic lithosphere (Vema Lithospheric Section or VLS) exposed south of the Vema transform at 11° N [Bonatti, E., Ligi, M., Brunelli, D., Cipriani, A., Fabretti, P., Ferrante, V., Gasperini, L., Ottolini, L., 2003. Mantle thermal pulses below the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and temporal variation in the formation of oceanic lithosphere, Nature, 423, 499-505]. We extended this time interval from 26 to 2 Ma by sampling mantle ultramafics at 18 new sites along the VLS. Peridotite orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene and spinel chemistry suggest a weak trend of decreasing extent of melting of the mantle from 26 to 18.5 Ma ago with superimposed short-wavelength (~ 4 Ma) oscillations followed by a steady increase of degree of melting from 18.5 to 2 Ma ago, with superimposed 3-4 Ma oscillations. Temporal variations of crustal thickness inferred from the Residual Mantle Bouguer Anomaly calculated from gravity data reveal similar trends. The older (26 to 18.5 Ma) and the younger (18.5 to 2 Ma) mantle suites differ in cpx Na 2O content and CaO/Al 2O 3 ratio, suggesting that not only the thermal regime, but also the composition of the mantle source might have been different in the two suites. The two trends are separated by a ~ 1.4 Ma-long stretch (from 18.2 to 16.8 Ma) where deformed ultramafic mylonites prevail, indicating probably an interval of nearly a-magmatic lithospheric emplacement at ridge axis, corresponding to a thermal minimum. Spatially offset correlation along the VLS of crustal thickness (i.e., quantity of basaltic melt released by the mantle) and mantle peridotite degree of melting led to an estimate of ~ 16.1 mm/a for the solid mantle average velocity of upwelling, a value close to the average half spreading rate for the 26 Ma interval covered by the

  10. A Comparison of Sulfur Dioxide Column Content Between Aircraft and Satellite Over the U.S. Mid-Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hains, J. C.; Dickerson, R. R.; Doddridge, B. G.; Burrows, J. P.; Richter, A.

    2002-12-01

    Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) is a major contributor to air pollution in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Sources of SO2 include coal fired power plants as well as diesel engines. Fine particulate sulfate (with diameter less than 2.5 mm) formed from SO2 can cause health problems as well as decreased visibility. Reliable measurements of SO2 within the lower troposphere are needed to determine sources, test emission inventories and to evaluate federal air quality standards. Monthly averages of SO2 lower-tropospheric column content for various points in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States have been calculated from episodic aircraft measurements during the summer months of 2000 and 2001 (http://www.meto.umd.edu/~umdair/rammpp01.html). A Thermo Environmental Instruments 4 3C SO2 analyzer was used to obtain data during aircraft spiral profiles, usually made from the near-surface to an altitude in the range of 2.3 to 3.1 km. From June to August 2000, 44 columns of SO2 were calculated from aircraft profiles over 11 different locations between North Carolina and Pennsylvania. Individual column concentrations of SO2 ranged from 0.10 to 2.31 Dobson Units (DU). Monthly averaged column concentrations were made for each location and the average concentrations for 2000 ranged from 0.02 to 1.18 DU. In 2001, 149 columns of SO2 were obtained from 36 different locations for the months of May through August. The individual column concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 3.40 DU and the monthly averaged columns ranged from 0.05 to 3.40 DU. UV-visible spectra collected by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) have been analyzed for SO2 by the research group at the University of Bremen in Germany (http://www.iup.physik.uni-bremen.de/gome/). The period of data collection by the University of Maryland team coincide with data collection by the University of Bremen. The monthly averages of SO2 determined from aircraft measurements are compared with measurements from the

  11. Panmixia in a Fragmented and Unstable Environment: The Hydrothermal Shrimp Rimicaris exoculata Disperses Extensively along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Sara; Serrão, Ester A.; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Dispersal plays a fundamental role in the evolution and persistence of species, and especially for species inhabiting extreme, ephemeral and highly fragmented habitats as hydrothermal vents. The Mid-Atlantic Ridge endemic shrimp species Rimicaris exoculata was studied using microsatellite markers to infer connectivity along the 7100-Km range encompassing the sampled sites. Astonishingly, no genetic differentiation was found between individuals from the different geographic origins, supporting a scenario of widespread large-scale dispersal despite the habitat distance and fragmentation. We hypothesize that delayed metamorphosis associated to temperature differences or even active directed migration dependent on physical and/or chemical stimuli could explain these results and warrant further studies on adaptation and dispersal mechanisms. PMID:22679511

  12. Dynamics of the direct intrusion of Gulf Stream ring water onto the Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weifeng G.; Gawarkiewicz, Glen G.

    2015-09-01

    Onshore intrusions of offshore waters onto the Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf can greatly affect shelf circulation, biogeochemistry, and fisheries. Previous studies have concentrated on onshore intrusions of slope water. Here we present a direct intrusion of Gulf Stream warm-core ring water onto the shelf representing a previously unknown exchange process at the shelfbreak. Impingement of warm-core rings at the shelfbreak generates along-isobath intrusions that grow like Pinocchio's nose, extending hundreds of kilometers to the southwest. By combining satellite and Ocean Observatory Initiative Pioneer Array data and idealized numerical simulations, we discover that the intrusion results from topographically induced vorticity variation of the ring water, rather than from entrainment of the shelfbreak frontal jet. This intrusion of the Gulf Stream ring water has important biogeochemical implications and could facilitate migration of marine species across the shelfbreak barrier and transport low-nutrient surface Gulf Stream ring water to the otherwise productive shelfbreak region.

  13. Symposium highlights and synopses of the scientific program: the Sixth Annual Mid-Atlantic Healthcare Informatics Symposium.

    PubMed

    Vito, D; Diltz, M; Porter, M; White, P; Luberti, A

    2014-01-01

    As the bar to actively participate in one's own health is consistently lowered through technology, patients are helping to evolve traditional workflows to make data more accessible at the point of care. This growing trend of patient engagement and personalized medicine was the focus of the 2013 Mid-Atlantic Healthcare Informatics Symposium in Philadelphia, PA on April 26, 2013. The conference, presented annually by the Center for Bio-medical Informatics (CBMi) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, featured plenary sessions, panel discussions, and paper presentations on a range of topics, including patient engagement and personalized medicine; using data and analytics to optimize patient care; nursing informatics; and the future of biomedical informatics.

  14. Drilling the Snake Pit hydrothermal sulfide deposit on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, lat 23/sup 0/22'N

    SciTech Connect

    Detrick, R.S.; Honnorez, J.; Adamson, A.C.; Brass, G.; Gillis, K.M.; Humphris, S.E.; Mevel, C.; Meyer, P.; Petersen, N.; Rautenschlein, M.; Shibata, T.; Staudigel, H.; Yamamoto, K.

    1986-12-01

    A major high-temperature hydrothermal area has been discovered in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge rift valley about 25 km south of the Kane Fracture Zone. The vent field consists of a wide area (> 40,000 m/sup 2/) of dark hydrothermal deposits, numerous sulfide chimneys and mounds, some up to 11 m high, and high-temperature black-smoker vents. Ten shallow holes, the first ever drilled in an active submarine hydrothermal area, recovered friable, unconsolidated Fe, Cu-Fe, and Zn sulfides and several large fragments of massive sulfide (mainly chalcopyrite) from the locally thick (> 13 m) hydrothermal deposits. The vents are also associated with an unusual biological community of smaller, more mobile organisms than reported from the East Pacific Rise.

  15. Potential for shoreline changes due to sea-level rise along the U.S. mid-Atlantic region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Thieler, E. Robert

    2007-01-01

    Sea-level rise over the next century is expected to contribute significantly to physical changes along open-ocean shorelines. Predicting the form and magnitude of coastal changes is important for understanding the impacts to humans and the environment. Presently, the ability to predict coastal changes is limited by the scientific understanding of the many variables and processes involved in coastal change, and the lack of consensus regarding the validity of existing conceptual, analytical, or numerical models. In order to assess potential future coastal changes in the mid-Atlantic U.S. for the U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP), a workshop was convened by the U.S. Geological Survey. Assessments of future coastal change were made by a committee of coastal scientists with extensive professional experience in the mid-Atlantic region. Thirteen scientists convened for a two-day meeting to exchange information and develop a consensus opinion on potential future coastal changes for the mid-Atlantic coast in response to sea-level rise. Using criteria defined in past work, the mid-Atlantic coast was divided into four geomorphic compartments: spits, headlands, wave-dominated barriers, and mixed-energy barriers. A range of potential coastal responses was identified for each compartment based on four sea-level rise scenarios. The four scenarios were based on the assumptions that: a) the long-term sea-level rise rate observed over the 20th century would persist over the 21st century, b) the 20th century rate would increase by 2 mm/yr, c) the 20th century rate would increase by 7 mm/yr, or d) sea-level would rise by 2 m over the next few hundred years. Potential responses to these sea-level rise scenarios depend on the landforms that occur within a region and include increased likelihood for erosion and shoreline retreat for all coastal types, increased likelihood for erosion, overwash and inlet breaching for barrier islands, as well as the possibility of a threshold

  16. Results of APL rain gauge network measurements in mid-Atlantic coast region and comparisons of distributions with CCIR models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Gebo, Norman; Rowland, John

    1988-01-01

    In this effort are described cumulative rain rate distributions for a network of nine tipping bucket rain gauge systems located in the mid-Atlantic coast region in the vicinity of the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, Virginia. The rain gauges are situated within a gridded region of dimensions of 47 km east-west by 70 km north-south. Distributions are presented for the individual site measurements and the network average for the year period June 1, 1986 through May 31, 1987. A previous six year average distribution derived from measurements at one of the site locations is also presented. Comparisons are given of the network average, the CCIR (International Radio Consultative Committee) climatic zone, and the CCIR functional model distributions, the latter of which approximates a log normal at the lower rain rate and a gamma function at the higher rates.

  17. Chirp seismic-reflection data from the Baltimore, Washington, and Norfolk Canyons, U.S. mid-Atlantic margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obelcz, Jeffrey B.; Brothers, Daniel S.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Chaytor, Jason D.; Worley, Charles R.; Moore, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    A large number of high-resolution geophysical surveys between Cape Hatteras and Georges Bank have been conducted by federal, state, and academic institutions since the turn of the century. A major goal of these surveys is providing a continuous view of bathymetry and shallow stratigraphy at the shelf edge in order to assess levels of geological activity during the current sea level highstand. In 2012, chirp seismic-reflection data was collected by the U.S. Geologial Survey aboard the motor vessel Tiki XIV near three United States mid-Atlantic margin submarine canyons. These data can be used to further our understanding of passive continental margin processes during the Holocene, as well as providing valuable information regarding potential submarine geohazards.

  18. Brownfields opportunity -- A product of a probusiness USEPA

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.E.

    1997-12-31

    Brownfields are former industrial facilities, office buildings or other properties that have been abandoned or are no longer in use. They may be returned as a beneficial asset of a company with prudent planning and by completing selected activities. The tangible economic impacts of a Brownfield property often result in lost taxes and lost jobs. In order to return a Brownfield property to beneficial use various activities are involved, which may include the services provided by many or all of the following: attorneys, financiers, insurance firms, business planners and operators, and environmental consultants. The melding of these diverse resources for a specific project must be determined on a case-by-case basis in a flexible manner. Consistent with the desire of much of the populace to return Brownfields to meaningful assets, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has now adopted a practical, profitable and reasonably low-risk program termed the Brownfields Incentive. Included in the Brownfields Incentive program are more reasonable, yet safe, cleanup levels. Additionally, this program provides specific protection for Brownfields participants from fines, sanctions and legal actions. Consistent with the USEPA`s program, approximately 40 states have also initiated or are planning to initiate Brownfields programs. It is obvious that programs exist at the Federal and State levels to enable the reasonable redevelopment of existing abandoned or vacant properties. The ability to form a team of professionals to redevelop a Brownfield property is required. A proper team of professionals, each performing activities required to return the property to a functioning status, will assure the success of a Brownfield project.

  19. Reinterpretation of the Franklin "Shore" in the Mid-Atlantic bight as a paleo-shelf edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John A.; Austin, James A.; Fulthorpe, Craig S.

    2013-06-01

    The presence of a scarp sub-parallel to, but landward of, the modern continental shelf edge is commonly used to infer a fossil shoreline preserved during the course of a sea level rise and shoreline transgression. Advances in geophysical imaging, including bathymetric data compilations and high-resolution acoustic reflection, merit a review of these scarps and their origins. We focus on the Mid-Atlantic Bight, east coast of the United States, where four siliciclastic fossil shorelines have previously been identified and are still cited as such in the literature. Two of the scarps are not in evidence in the newest compilation of bathymetry. A third, the Mid-Shelf Scarp, is of limited extent and, as established in previous studies, represents a seaward edge of delta lobes rather than a fossil shoreline. The fourth, the Franklin Scarp, is a major topographic feature that extends from Cape Hatteras to Cape Cod. However, morphologic and stratigraphic evidence leads us to conclude that, instead of a fossil shore, this scarp represents a paleo-shelf edge, likely formed during the MIS 4 lowstand (~65 ka). Both the modern shelf edge and the Franklin Scarp deepen to the north by ~50 m, while systematically maintaining a depth offset of ~40 m. This observation, which cannot be attributed to glacial isostatic processes, is enigmatic but suggests fundamental environmental controls on the depth of the clinoform rollover. Furthermore, all the major shelf-indenting canyons in the Mid-Atlantic Bight are bounded landward by the Franklin Scarp, which suggests that interfluve progradation may be a more significant mechanism for growth of these canyons than headward erosion.

  20. Anthropocene streams and base-level controls from historic dams in the unglaciated mid-Atlantic region, USA.

    PubMed

    Merritts, Dorothy; Walter, Robert; Rahnis, Michael; Hartranft, Jeff; Cox, Scott; Gellis, Allen; Potter, Noel; Hilgartner, William; Langland, Michael; Manion, Lauren; Lippincott, Caitlin; Siddiqui, Sauleh; Rehman, Zain; Scheid, Chris; Kratz, Laura; Shilling, Andrea; Jenschke, Matthew; Datin, Katherine; Cranmer, Elizabeth; Reed, Austin; Matuszewski, Derek; Voli, Mark; Ohlson, Erik; Neugebauer, Ali; Ahamed, Aakash; Neal, Conor; Winter, Allison; Becker, Steven

    2011-03-13

    Recently, widespread valley-bottom damming for water power was identified as a primary control on valley sedimentation in the mid-Atlantic US during the late seventeenth to early twentieth century. The timing of damming coincided with that of accelerated upland erosion during post-European settlement land-use change. In this paper, we examine the impact of local drops in base level on incision into historic reservoir sediment as thousands of ageing dams breach. Analysis of lidar and field data indicates that historic milldam building led to local base-level rises of 2-5 m (typical milldam height) and reduced valley slopes by half. Subsequent base-level fall with dam breaching led to an approximate doubling in slope, a significant base-level forcing. Case studies in forested, rural as well as agricultural and urban areas demonstrate that a breached dam can lead to stream incision, bank erosion and increased loads of suspended sediment, even with no change in land use. After dam breaching, key predictors of stream bank erosion include number of years since dam breach, proximity to a dam and dam height. One implication of this work is that conceptual models linking channel condition and sediment yield exclusively with modern upland land use are incomplete for valleys impacted by milldams. With no equivalent in the Holocene or late Pleistocene sedimentary record, modern incised stream-channel forms in the mid-Atlantic region represent a transient response to both base-level forcing and major changes in land use beginning centuries ago. Similar channel forms might also exist in other locales where historic milling was prevalent.

  1. Influences of temperature and nutrients on Synechococcus abundance and biomass in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisan, Tiffany A.; Blattner, Kristen L.; Makinen, Carla P.

    2010-07-01

    Synechococci are small (<1 μm) coccoid prokaryotes that play a significant ecological role in microbial food webs and are important contributors to carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical cycles. Under funding from NOAA and NASA, we developed a time series observatory to understand the seasonal variability of Synechococcus and other phytoplankton. Our goal is to understand the distribution and relative contribution of Synechococcus to the carbon cycle and how they relate to nutrients and temperature. Synechococcus in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight exhibited a clear seasonal abundance pattern in both inshore and offshore waters—peaking in abundance (11×10 4 cells ml -1) during warm periods of summer. Synechococci were numerically important during periods of stratification when waters were warm and macronutrients were low. Using a simple algorithm to convert cellular volume to cellular carbon using image analysis, we estimated that Synechococcus cellular carbon ranged from 0.1 to 1.5 pg C per cell and was most significant compared to total particulate carbon in the summer peaking at ˜25% of the total carbon available. No direct correlations were found between Synechococcus abundance and nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, phosphate, and silicate. However, inshore Synechococcus abundance peaked at 10 4 cells ml -1 when nitrogen concentrations were lowest. Our results suggest that Synechococcus is adapted to warm temperatures and are capable of demonstrating rapid growth during summer when macronutrients are limiting. The ability of Synechococcus to take advantage of high summer temperatures, low nutrient concentrations and low light levels allows them to maintain a picoplankton community during periods of low detritus and nanophytoplankton is nutrient limited. Temperature-dependence is important in altering the size spectrum of the phytoplankton community and affects the carbon cycle on the Mid Atlantic Bight.

  2. Watershed Scale Impacts of Stormwater Green Infrastructure on Hydrology and Nutrient Fluxes in the Mid-Atlantic Region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Pennino, M. J.; McDonald, R.

    2015-12-01

    Stormwater green infrastructure (SGI), including rain gardens, detention ponds, bioswales, and green roofs, is being implemented in cities across the globe to help reduce flooding, decrease combined sewer overflows, and lessen pollutant transport to streams and rivers. Despite the increasing use of urban SGI, there is much uncertainty regarding the cumulative effects of multiple SGI projects on hydrology and water quality at the watershed scale. To assess the cumulative effects of SGI, major cities across the mid-Atlantic were selected based on availability of SGI, water quality, and stream flow data. The impact of SGI was evaluated by comparing similar watersheds, with and without SGI or by assessing how long-term changes in SGI impact hydrologic and water quality metrics over time. Most mid-Atlantic cities have a goal of achieving 10-75% SGI by 2030. Of these cites, Washington D.C. currently has the highest density of SGI (15.5%), while Philadelphia, PA and New York, NY have the lowest (0.14% and 0.28%, respectively). When comparing watersheds of similar size and percent impervious surface cover, watersheds with lower amounts of SGI, on average, show up to 40% greater annual total nitrogen and 75% greater total phosphorus loads and show flashier hydrology (as indicated by 35% greater average peak discharge, 26% more peak discharge events per year, and 21% higher peak-to-volume ratio) compared to watersheds with higher amounts of SGI. However, for cities with combined sewer systems (e.g. Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia, PA), there was no relationship between the level of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and the amount of SGI, indicating the level of SGI may not yet be sufficient to reduce CSOs as intended. When comparing individual watersheds over time, increases in SGI show no significant effect on the long-term trends in nutrient loads or hydrologic variables, potentially being obscured by the larger effect of interannual variability.

  3. Anthropocene streams and base-level controls from historic dams in the unglaciated mid-Atlantic region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merritts, Dorothy; Walter, Robert; Rahnis, Michael; Hartranft, Jeff; Cox, Scott; Gellis, Allen; Potter, Noel; Hilgartner, William; Langland, Michael; Manion, Lauren; Lippincott, Caitlin; Siddiqui, Sauleh; Rehman, Zain; Scheid, Chris; Kratz, Laura; Shilling, Andrea; Jenschke, Matthew; Datin, Katherine; Cranmer, Elizabeth; Reed, Austin; Matuszewski, Derek; Voli, Mark; Ohlson, Erik; Neugebauer, Ali; Ahamed, Aakash; Neal, Conor; Winter, Allison; Becker, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Recently, widespread valley-bottom damming for water power was identified as a primary control on valley sedimentation in the mid-Atlantic US during the late seventeenth to early twentieth century. The timing of damming coincided with that of accelerated upland erosion during post-European settlement land-use change. In this paper, we examine the impact of local drops in base level on incision into historic reservoir sediment as thousands of ageing dams breach. Analysis of lidar and field data indicates that historic milldam building led to local base-level rises of 2-5 m (typical milldam height) and reduced valley slopes by half. Subsequent base-level fall with dam breaching led to an approximate doubling in slope, a significant base-level forcing. Case studies in forested, rural as well as agricultural and urban areas demonstrate that a breached dam can lead to stream incision, bank erosion and increased loads of suspended sediment, even with no change in land use. After dam breaching, key predictors of stream bank erosion include number of years since dam breach, proximity to a dam and dam height. One implication of this work is that conceptual models linking channel condition and sediment yield exclusively with modern upland land use are incomplete for valleys impacted by milldams. With no equivalent in the Holocene or late Pleistocene sedimentary record, modern incised stream-channel forms in the mid-Atlantic region represent a transient response to both base-level forcing and major changes in land use beginning centuries ago. Similar channel forms might also exist in other locales where historic milling was prevalent.

  4. Anthropocene streams and base-level controls from historic dams in the unglaciated mid-Atlantic region, USA.

    PubMed

    Merritts, Dorothy; Walter, Robert; Rahnis, Michael; Hartranft, Jeff; Cox, Scott; Gellis, Allen; Potter, Noel; Hilgartner, William; Langland, Michael; Manion, Lauren; Lippincott, Caitlin; Siddiqui, Sauleh; Rehman, Zain; Scheid, Chris; Kratz, Laura; Shilling, Andrea; Jenschke, Matthew; Datin, Katherine; Cranmer, Elizabeth; Reed, Austin; Matuszewski, Derek; Voli, Mark; Ohlson, Erik; Neugebauer, Ali; Ahamed, Aakash; Neal, Conor; Winter, Allison; Becker, Steven

    2011-03-13

    Recently, widespread valley-bottom damming for water power was identified as a primary control on valley sedimentation in the mid-Atlantic US during the late seventeenth to early twentieth century. The timing of damming coincided with that of accelerated upland erosion during post-European settlement land-use change. In this paper, we examine the impact of local drops in base level on incision into historic reservoir sediment as thousands of ageing dams breach. Analysis of lidar and field data indicates that historic milldam building led to local base-level rises of 2-5 m (typical milldam height) and reduced valley slopes by half. Subsequent base-level fall with dam breaching led to an approximate doubling in slope, a significant base-level forcing. Case studies in forested, rural as well as agricultural and urban areas demonstrate that a breached dam can lead to stream incision, bank erosion and increased loads of suspended sediment, even with no change in land use. After dam breaching, key predictors of stream bank erosion include number of years since dam breach, proximity to a dam and dam height. One implication of this work is that conceptual models linking channel condition and sediment yield exclusively with modern upland land use are incomplete for valleys impacted by milldams. With no equivalent in the Holocene or late Pleistocene sedimentary record, modern incised stream-channel forms in the mid-Atlantic region represent a transient response to both base-level forcing and major changes in land use beginning centuries ago. Similar channel forms might also exist in other locales where historic milling was prevalent. PMID:21282157

  5. Long-term observations of bottom current and bottom sediment movement on the mid-Atlantic continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Noble, Marlene A.; Folger, David W.

    1979-01-01

    Long-term in situ observations made at three locations on the mid-Atlantic continental shelf during 1975–1976 clearly show intermittent movement of bottom sediment caused by currents, waves, and other forcing mechanisms. In winter, storm-associated bottom currents greater than 30 cm s−1 resuspended and transported sediments. Net water particle excursions during storms were about 20–30 km longshelf and 5–10 km cross-shelf. Wave-induced bottom currents also resuspended sediments during periods of low mean flow. Sediment motion was observed in summer, although bottom conditions were generally tranquil. Significant changes in suspended matter concentration were observed that were only partially related to bottom currents. These changes may have been caused by biological activity or advection. Bottom currents on the mid-Atlantic region of the continental shelf were characterized by a coherent, primarily cross-shelf tidal flow of 5–10 cm s−1 and a low-frequency longshelf component of 5–20 cm s−1. The longshelf current was coherent over length scales of 100 km at tidal frequencies and for motions with periods greater than 50 hours. For these longer periods the longshelf flow was coherent with wind stress, which implies that winds were a major driving force of the longshelf current. The cross-shelf current was not coherent at stations separated by 100 km except at tidal frequencies. Packets of high-frequency internal waves were observed during stratified conditions in summer with bottom currents as large as 20 cm s−1.

  6. An oilspill risk analysis for the Mid-Atlantic (proposed sale 76) outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuels, W.B.; Hopkins, Dorothy

    1982-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted for the mid-Atlantic (proposed sale 76) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lease area. The analysis considered: the probability of spill occurrences based on historical trends; likely movement of oil slicks based on a climatological model; and locations of environmental resources which could be vulnerable to spilled oil. The times between spill occurrence and contact with resources were estimated to aid analysts in estimating slick characteristics. Critical assumptions made for this particular analysis were (1) that oil exists in the lease area, and (2) that 0.879 billion barrels of oil will be found and produced from tracts sold in sale 76. On the basis of this resource estimate, it was calculated that 3 to 4 oilspills of 1,000 barrels or greater will occur over the 30-year production life of the proposed sale 76 lease tracts. The results also depend upon the routes and methods chosen to transport oil from 0CS platforms to shore. Given the above assumptions, the estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than 30 days is 0.36; for spills 10,000 barrels or larger, the probability is 0.22. These probabilities also reflect the following assumptions: oilspills remain intact for up to 30 days, do not weather, and are not cleaned up. It is noteworthy that over 90 percent of the risk from proposed sale 76 is due to transportation rather than production of oil. In addition, the risks from proposed sale 76 are about 1/10 to 1/15 those of existing tanker transportation of crude oil imports and refined products in the mid-Atlantic area.

  7. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic). Surf Clam

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, C.W.; Neves, R.J.; Pardue, G.B.

    1983-10-01

    The surf clam (Spisula solidissima) is a dominant clam species in the mid-Atlantic region, and contributed 71.8% of all clam meats consumed in the United States between 1970 and 1974; total landings in 1981 were 20.9 thousand metric tons (46.1 million lb). Surf clams live in the coastal zone from the Gulf of Maine to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina; they are most common in the breaker zone, but occur to depths of 70 m (230 ft). They reach sexual maturity in 2 years and spawn in the mid-Atlantic region from mid-July through mid-October, often with two spawning peaks per year. Larval stages are planktonic; upon settlement, they metamorphose into juvenile clams. Adults live buried in sandy or gravel substrates, with siphons extended above the bottom for feeding and respiration. Surf clams may live up to 25 years and reach a size of 225 mm (8.9 inches). Larvae tolerate water temperatures of 14/sup 0/ to 30/sup 0/F (57/sup 0/) to 86/sup 0/F), and salinities as low as 16 ppt. Adults tolerate 0/sup 0/ to 28/sup 0/C (32/sup 0/ to 82/sup 0/F) and 12.5 ppt salinity or higher. Depletion of dissolved oxygen in ocean bottom waters was the major cause for large-scale surf clam mortalities off New York and New Jersey over the last two decades. Sewage, sludge, and heavy metals often cause accumulation of toxic materials in surf clam meats and force closure of beds to fishing to prevent human consumption of these toxic materials. 98 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Ozonesonde Climatology and Satellite Product Evaluation: Tropospheric Ozone in the Mid-Atlantic from 2005-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normile, C.; Thompson, A. M.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Schoeberl, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Geostationary satellite missions are proposed to remotely assess regional air quality over large swaths, although the precise capability of the current set of satellite instruments to accurately resolve urban scale pollution remains unverified. We use the Trajectory Enhanced Tropospheric Ozone Residual product derived from Aura's Ozone Monitoring Instrument/Microwave Limb Sounder satellite data to examine the regional climatology of ozone pollution in the mid-Atlantic, focusing on the Washington, D.C. area and downwind Delmarva. We use the North American Regional Reanalysis to determine the synoptic scale flow patterns in the lower troposphere. In addition, a set of proxies (OMI NO2, surface ozone, cloud cover, and air mass classification) are employed to understand TTOR performance and interacting meteorological and chemical effects in the region. We find that the TTOR product accuracy varies substantially both temporally and spatially, improving during summer months (0.22% error in May compared to 11% error in October) for example, and over urban areas more than rural ones (12% error versus 16% error). TTOR product accuracy is influenced by air mass effects on advection and on planetary boundary layer ozone concentrations. Conditions conducive to ozone production yield a higher near-surface proportion of the tropospheric column as measured by Wallops Island ozonesondes. We identify synoptic-scale flow regimes that strengthen correlations between urban tropospheric ozone density and column density off the coast of the mid-Atlantic. These results indicate that remotely sensed measurements may indeed be able to discriminate urban influences on regional ozone and their effects in more remote areas and have implications for air quality assessment and model validation.

  9. MULTI-RESOURCE ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTS ACROSS THE U.S. MID-ATLANTIC REGION: USE OF GIS AND THE ISSUE OF SCALE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA's Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment (MAIA) program is focusing on preparing State of the Region Reports. Individual resource reports have been prepared for landscapes, estuaries and streams. The program is ready to begin the integration of the information on the ind...

  10. Impact of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stal) in Mid-Atlantic tree fruit orchards in the United States: case studies of commercial management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four commercial orchards in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States were surveyed weekly in 2010 and 2011 for the presence of brown marmorated stink bug and the injury caused to both apple and peaches. Among tested sampling techniques, baited pyramid traps yielded the most brown marmorated sti...

  11. The Squishy and Stubborn Problem of Retention: A Study of a Mid Atlantic Historically Black Institution with a Land-Grant Mission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyirenda, Stanley M.; Gong, Tao

    2010-01-01

    This study of a Mid Atlantic Historically Black Institution (MAHBI) examines cognitive, social, and institutional factors to identify those that are most critical in contributing to the steady decline of the rate of student retention for this institution and others with similar characteristics. Secondary source data pertaining to three cohorts…

  12. Common Core State Standards and Teacher Effectiveness. Q&A with Ross Wiener, Ph.D. REL Mid-Atlantic Teacher Effectiveness Webinar Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In this REL Mid-Atlantic webinar, Dr. Ross Wiener, Vice President and Executive Director of the Education and Society Program, Aspen Institute, discussed strategies for integrating the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) into teacher effectiveness systems, including ways in which the CCSS can support professional growth and inform teacher…

  13. Prevailing Wage Laws and School Construction Costs: An Analysis of Public School Construction in Maryland and the Mid-Atlantic States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prus, Mark J.

    This document presents an analysis of the prevailing wage laws' impact on public school construction costs in Maryland. The document also provides a comparison of school construction costs of Mid-Atlantic states with prevailing wage laws as well as comparisons between Maryland jurisdictions with and without these laws. The discussion examines the…

  14. Appendix B of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data. Workshop to Establish Coordination and Communication

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the second appendix to the report, the workshop participants.

  15. Emergency Contraceptive Pills: A 10-Year Follow-up Survey of Use and Experiences at College Health Centers in the Mid-Atlantic United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laura McKeller; Sawyer, Robin G.

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a 10-year follow-up study using a telephone survey to investigate the availability of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) at college health centers in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. They also examined related issues, such as distribution procedure, existence of a written protocol, personnel involved,…

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of the Deep-Sea Ascomycetous Filamentous Fungus Cadophora malorum Mo12 from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge Reveals Its Biotechnological Potential

    PubMed Central

    Rédou, Vanessa; Kumar, Abhishek; Hainaut, Matthieu; Henrissat, Bernard; Record, Eric; Barbier, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Cadophora malorum Mo12 was isolated from the Rainbow hydrothermal site on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We present the draft genome sequence of this filamentous fungal strain, which has high biotechnological potentials as revealed by the presence of genes encoding biotechnologically important enzymes and genes involved in the synthesis of secondary metabolites. PMID:27389260

  17. Sampling techniques and detection methods for developing risk assessments for root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) on lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus) in the Mid-Atlantic region

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lima bean, Phaseolus lunatus, is a cornerstone crop in the Mid-Atlantic region and Meloidogyne incognita, the southern root knot nematode (RKN), causes significant yield loss. The RKN has become more pervasive as toxic nematicides have been removed from the market, and risk evaluation research is ne...

  18. PREDICTING THE OCCURRENCE OF NUTRIENTS AND PESTICIDES DURING BASE FLOW IN NONTIDAL HEADWATER STREAMS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC COASTAL PLAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality in nontidal headwater (first-order) streams of the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain (MACP) during base flow in the late winter and spring is related to land use, hydrogeology, and other natural or human influences in contributing watersheds.

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A MACROINVERTEBRATE BENTHOS INTEGRITY INDEX (SBII) FOR BIOASSESSMENT OF STREAMS IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multimetric macroinvertebrate index called the Stream Benthos Integrity Index (SBII) was developed for the Mid-Atlantic Highlands Region of the United States. The SBII was developed for assessing biological conditions of wadeable streams and was based on benthic macroinvertebr...

  20. Dropout Prevention Programs in Nine Mid-Atlantic Region School Districts: Additions to a Dropout Prevention Database. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 103

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burzichelli, Claudia; Mackey, Philip E.; Bausmith, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The current study replicates work of Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Northeast and Islands. It describes dropout prevention programs in nine Mid-Atlantic Region (Delaware, the District of Columbia, Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania) school districts serving communities with populations of 24,742-107,250 (as of July 2008). All nine…

  1. Appendix D of the Final Report of the Mid-Atlantic Marine Wildlife Surveys, Modeling, and Data. Workshop to Establish Coordination and Communication

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-01

    The Wind Program hosted a two-day workshop on July 24-25, 2012 with scientists and regulators engaged in marine ecological survey, modeling, and database efforts pertaining to the waters of the Mid-Atlantic region. This is the fourth appendix to the report, the presentations from the workshop.

  2. A plan for assessing the occurrence and distribution of methyl tert-butyl ether and other volatile organic compounds in drinking water and ambient ground water in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grady, Stephen J.; Casey, George D.

    1999-01-01

    A plan to assess the occurrence and distribution of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water and ambient ground water in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States was designed to meet two primary objectives. This study will provide the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency with information on potential human exposure to MTBE and other VOCs from drinking water. In addition, the study will further the goals of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) by providing additional information on the occurrence and distribution of VOCs in ambient ground water beneath a large, highly urbanized part of the Nation. The study will proceed in two phases-a drinking-water assessment (phase 1) and an ambient ground-water assessment (phase 2). The drinking-water assessment will involve compilation, review, and analysis of available water- quality and ancillary data for approximately 20 percent of the community water systems in 12 States in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic regions. This effort will summarize the occurrence and distribution of MTBE and other VOCs in drinking water supplied by 2,110 community water systems. The ambient ground-water assessment will involve compilation, review, and analysis of data on MTBE and other VOCs from previous USGS studies in the 12-State area, including regional water-quality assessments conducted for the USGS's NAWQA, plus other available State or local datasets. These data will be related, to the extent allowed by the completeness and quality of the data, to land-use patterns, population density, and other anthropogenic and natural factors using statistical tests. The occurrence and distribution of MTBE and other VOCs in ambient ground water and, to the extent possible, drinking water in relation to such factors, will be evaluated.

  3. The PETM in the mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain: A widespread record of unique climate signatures in shallow-shelf Marlboro Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powars, D. S.; Edwards, L. E.; Kopp, R. E.; Self-Trail, J.; Schultz, A.

    2009-12-01

    Abrupt sedimentary changes mark the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in the mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain. Across the tectonic downwarp known as the Salisbury Embayment (southeastern Virginia to central New Jersey), kaolinite-rich clay (the Marlboro Clay) abruptly replaces glauconite-rich quartz sand, silt, and illite-smectite clay of the late Paleocene. Dozens of cored boreholes obtained by the USGS and other Federal and State agencies, together with geophysical logs from more than 100 boreholes, allow us to document the widespread distribution and depositional, biostratigraphic, paleoecologic, taphonomic, and tectonic characteristics of the Marlboro Clay. In Maryland and Virginia, the Marlboro Clay is a silvery-gray to pale-red plastic clay and locally includes thin laminations and thicker beds of silt, concretions, pyrite nodules, and rare shell fragments (in downdip cores). The clay is unconformity bounded with highly burrowed contacts. The lower contact is locally so bioturbated that it has been reported as gradational. The upper contact in Virginia has glauconite-rich, sand-filled burrows from the overlying Nanjemoy Formation (lower Eocene) that penetrate as much as 8.5 m down into the Marlboro Clay (total thickness only 9 m). Biostratigraphically, the Marlboro Clay is placed in calcareous nannofossil Zone NP9 (and NP10 in downdip cores) and includes the PETM marker dinocyst species Apectodinium augustum (in downdip cores). In New Jersey, a similar clay deposit is described from the subsurface; and based on consistency in lithology, biostratigraphy, stratigraphic position, isotopic composition and its magnetic properties, we apply the name Marlboro Clay to this unique clay unit throughout the Salisbury Embayment. Structure-contour and isopach maps of the present configuration of the Marlboro Clay reveal a widespread deposit with localized truncation or thinning. Tectonic folding and faulting along the inner Coastal Plain and along the James River

  4. Ecosystem Services - An Emerging Direction for the U.S.EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Forty years ago the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S.EPA) was formed to “protect human health and the environment”. In those days the environment was being severely, and obviously, degraded by any number of pollution inputs, and it was clear that a healthy envi...

  5. USEPA'S APPROACH TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR EMERGING CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1996 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act require USEPA to perform Unregulated Contaminant Monitoring (UCM) for chemicals of interest to the Agency for possible future regulation. Many of these chemicals fall into the category of "emerging contaminants". An important e...

  6. USEPA'S SMALL DRINKING WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATIONS IN ECUADOR AND MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to support and help in the struggle to improve the quality of drinking water in the United States and abroad, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) conducts research studies for the demonstration and evaluation of alternative and innovative drinking w...

  7. IDENTIFICATION AND LOCATION OF FUNDAMENTAL FISH ASSEMBLAGES IN THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To predict fish community response to environmental restoration in the Highlands Region one must first have information on fish abundance and diversity. We used data collected by the US Environmental Protection Agency's EMAP (Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program) to i...

  8. THE EFFECTS OF ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION ON NITROGEN PROCESSING IN AN URBAN MID-ATLANTIC PIEDMONT STREAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated nitrate levels in streams and groundwater pose human and ecological threats. The US Environmental Protection Agency, US Geological Survey, Institute of Ecosystem Studies, and Baltimore County Dept. of Environmental Protection and Resource Management are collaborating on...

  9. Localized Deformation Beginning more than 15 km Beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 14 to 16 N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P.

    2003-12-01

    ODP Leg 209 drilled 19 holes at 8 sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from 14° 43 to 15° N. All sites were surveyed by submersible, and chosen to be < 200 m from peridotite or dunite exposed on the seafloor; outcrops of gabbroic rock were also close to some sites. One of our primary goals was to constrain the mechanism of mantle upwelling, corner flow and exhumation of shallow mantle rocks. Drilling at Sites 1268, 1270-72, 1274 and 1275 penetrated 1075 meters, and recovered 354 m of core. At Sites 1268 and 1270-72 we recovered 25% gabbroic rocks and 75% residual mantle peridotite. Core from Site 1274 was mainly residual peridotite, while core from Site 1275 was mainly gabbroic. Most of the residual peridotites have nearly undeformed, protogranular textures. Orthopyroxenes are interstitial to olivine or even poikilitic. Rare, isolated clinopyroxene grains are also interstitial. Skeletal spinel grains have mm-scale extensions in three dimensions, with no discernable shape fabric. These textures are clearly different from porphyroclastic textures typical in ophiolites and fracture zone dredges. As described elsewhere at this meeting, impregnated peridotites contain olivine, 2 pyroxenes, plagioclase and spinel, and equilibrated at 0.54 GPa (+/-0.14 GPa, 2σ ) and 1220° C (+/-16° C, 2σ ) [Kinzler & Grove, JGR 92]. Melts entered the thermal boundary layer beneath the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at about 20 km [e.g., Sleep, JGR 75; Reid & Jackson, MGR 82; Grove et al JGR 92; Cannat JGR 96; Michael & Chase CMP 97; Braun et al., EPSL 00], and began to crystallize within impregnated peridotites and as discrete plutons intruding peridotite. Gabbroic rocks and peridotites from most sites underwent large tectonic rotations since aquiring remanent magnetization. At some sites, rotations may have exceeded 60° around near-horizontal axes parallel to the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Such large rotations are unlikely to have been accomodated along a single fault, and instead blocks were

  10. Seismicity And Accretion Process Along The North Mid-Atlantic Ridge From The SIRENA Autonomous Hydrophone Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, J.; Goslin, J.; Dziak, R. P.; Haxel, J. H.; Maia, M. A.; Tisseau, C.; Royer, J.

    2009-12-01

    The seismicity of the North Atlantic Ocean was recorded by the SIRENA array of 6 autonomous underwater hydrophones (AUH) moored within the SOFAR channel on the flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The instruments were deployed north of the Azores Plateau between 40° and 50°N from June 2002 to September 2003. The low attenuation properties of the SOFAR channel for earthquake T-wave propagation result in a detection threshold reduction to a magnitude completeness level (Mc) of ~2.8, to be compared to a Mc~4.7 for MAR events recorded by land-based seismic networks. A spatio-temporal analysis was performed over the 1696 events localized inside the SIRENA array. For hydrophone-derived catalogs, the acoustic magnitude, or Source Level (SL), is used as a measure of earthquake size. The ''source level completeness'', above which the data set is complete, is SLc=208 dB. The SIRENA catalog was searched for swarms using the cluster software of the SEISAN distribution. A minimum SL of 210 dB was chosen to detect a possible mainshock, and all subsequent events within 40 days following the possible mainshock, located within a radius of 15 km from the mainshock were considered as events of the swarm. 15 km correspond to the maximum fault length in a slow-ridge context. 11 swarms with more than 15 events were detected along the MAR between 40°et 50°N during the SIRENA deployment. The maximum number of earthquakes in a swarm is 40 events. The SL vs. time distribution within each swarm allowed a first discrimination between the swarms occurring in a tectonic context and those which can be attributed to volcanic processes, the latter showing a more constant SL vs. time distribution. Moreover, the swarms occurring in a tectonic context show a "mainshock-afterschock" distribution of the cumulative number of events vs. time, fitting a Modified Omori Law. The location of tectonic and volcanic swarms correlates well with regions where a positive and negative Mantle Bouguer

  11. USEPA Waste Disposal Shareware: Purdue University and USEPA (1988-1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubleske, Joseph B.; Lindsey, Greg

    1997-01-01

    Describes and evaluates two USEPA shareware programs called Principles of On-Site Wastewater Treatment (ONSITE) and Residential Waste Treatment Evaluation (RWASTE). ONSITE, a tutorial, provides an overview of septic systems and their relationship to soils. RWASTE builds on ONSITE. Both are effective tools for persons interested in acquiring…

  12. Wind effects on coastal zone color scanner chlorophyll patterns in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Bight during spring 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eslinger, David L.; Iverson, Richard L.

    1986-01-01

    Coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) chlorophyll concentration increases in the Mid-Atlantic Bight were associated with high wind speeds in continental shelf waters during March and May 1979. Maximum spring CZCS chlorophyll concentrations occurred during April when the water column was not thermally stratified and were spatially and temporally associated with reductions in wind speed both in onshelf and in offshelf regions. Increased chlorophyll concentrations in offshelf waters were associated with high wind speeds during May when a deep chlorophyll maximum was present. Chlorophyll patchiness was observed on length scales typical of those controlled by biological processes during the April low-wind period but not during March or May when wind speeds were greater. The spring CZCS chlorophyll maximum in the southern portion of the Mid-Atlantic Bight occurred in response to a reduction in mixed layer depth caused by decreased wind speeds and not by increased water column stratification.

  13. Nitrogen Stimulates the Growth of Subsurface Basalt-associated Microorganisms at the Western Flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxu; Fang, Jing; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J; Orcutt, Beth N; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic crust constitutes the largest aquifer system on Earth, and microbial activity in this environment has been inferred from various geochemical analyses. However, empirical documentation of microbial activity from subsurface basalts is still lacking, particularly in the cool (<25°C) regions of the crust, where are assumed to harbor active iron-oxidizing microbial communities. To test this hypothesis, we report the enrichment and isolation of crust-associated microorganisms from North Pond, a site of relatively young and cold basaltic basement on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that was sampled during Expedition 336 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Enrichment experiments with different carbon (bicarbonate, acetate, methane) and nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium) sources revealed significant cell growth (one magnitude higher cell abundance), higher intracellular DNA content, and increased Fe(3+)/ΣFe ratios only when nitrogen substrates were added. Furthermore, a Marinobacter strain with neutrophilic iron-oxidizing capabilities was isolated from the basalt. This work reveals that basalt-associated microorganisms at North Pond had the potential for activity and that microbial growth could be stimulated by in vitro nitrogen addition. Furthermore, iron oxidation is supported as an important process for microbial communities in subsurface basalts from young and cool ridge flank basement. PMID:27199959

  14. Mantle control of a dynamically evolving spreading center: Mid-Atlantic Ridge 31-34 deg S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Peter J.; Forsyth, Donald W.; Blackman, Donna K.; Fox, Paul J.; Hanan, Barry B.; Harding, Alistair J.; MacDonald, Ken C.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Orcutt, John A.; Tolstoy, Maya

    1994-02-01

    A segment of the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 33 deg S changes dramatically as its center is approached. Towards the center of the segment, the axis shoals from 3900 to 2400 m and a deep median valley nearly disappears. There is a prominent bullseye gravity low centered over the shallow summit, indicating thicker crust or lower density mantle or both. Incompatible element and radiogenic isotope ratios in MORB increase, creating a 'spike high' centered on the summit of the segment. The basalts' enrichment is confined to this robust ridge sement alone and is geochemically unlike the nearby hotspots at Tristan da Cunha, Gough and Discovery Islands. The average extent of mantle melting for the entire segment, as determined from mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) major element chemistry, is slightly greater than for adjacent segments. The segment has lengthened to 100 km by ridge propagation at both ends during the past 3.5 m.y., and is presently the longest and shallowest segment in the region. Although the ridge crest anomalies of this ridge segment strongly resemble those caused by the interaction of mid-ocean ridges with mantle hotspots, the geochemical and geophysical evidence suggests that they may instead be related to interaction of the ridge with a passively embedded chemical heterogeneity in the mantle.

  15. An oilspill risk analysis of the Mid-Atlantic (Proposed Sale 49) outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, James Richard; Wyant, Timothy

    1978-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine the relative environmental hazards of developing oil in different regions of the mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf lease area. The study analyzed the probability of spill occurrence, likely paths of the spilled oil, and locations in space and time of recreational and biological resources that are likely to be vulnerable. These results are combined to yield estimates of the overall oilspill risk associated with development of the proposed lease area. The analysis implicitly includes estimates of weathering rates and slick dispersion and an indication of the possible mitigating effects of cleanups. Assuming that economically recoverable amounts of petroleum are found in the area, the leasing of the tracts proposed for sale 49 will increase the expected number of spills by about 20-25 percent over the number expected from the existing (sale 40) leases. The probability that an object such as land will be contacted by a spill is increased by at most five percentage points. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Hydrothermal vent meiobenthos associated with mytilid mussel aggregations from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekely, J.; Van Dover, C. L.; Nemeschkal, H. L.; Bright, M.

    2006-08-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents occur along the mid-ocean ridges and back-arc basins around the globe. There are very few community analyses of vent meiobenthos. The central objectives of this study were to identify and quantify for the first time the entire metazoan meiobenthic community associated with mussel aggregations of Bathymodiolus thermophilus Kenk and Wilson, 1985 from the EPR, 11°N and of Bathymodiolus puteoserpentis Cosel et al., 1994 from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), 23°N. Using a quantitative sampling method, abundance, biomass, sex ratio, species richness, diversity, evenness, and trophic structure were studied based on three samples from each site. Meiobenthic abundance in each sample was unexpectedly low, but similar between sites. The community was composed of nematodes, copepods, ostracods, and mites, with a total of 24 species at EPR vents, and 15 species at MAR vents. While most copepod species were vent endemics within the family Dirivultidae, nematodes and harpacticoid copepods belonged to generalist genera, which occur at a variety of habitats and are not restricted to hydrothermal vents or the deep sea. The meiobenthos of hydrothermal-vent mussel beds constitutes a unique community unlike those of other sulfidic habitats, including the thiobios of shallow-water sediments and the meiobenthos of deep-sea, cold-seep sediments. The trophic structure was dominated by primary consumers, mainly deposit feeders, followed by parasites. Predatory meiofaunal species were absent.

  17. Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, Gilberto E.; Campbell, James H.; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Meneghin, Jennifer; Podar, Mircea; Steinberg, Joshua I.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Tivey, Margaret Kingston; Voytek, Mary A.; Yang, Zamin K.; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37°17'N, 32°16.3'W, depth 1600-1750m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36°13'N, 33°54.1'W, depth 2270-2330m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

  18. Diversity and Metabolic Potentials of Subsurface Crustal Microorganisms from the Western Flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxu; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea oceanic crust constitutes the largest region of the earth’s surface. Accumulating evidence suggests that unique microbial communities are supported by iron cycling processes, particularly in the young (<10 million-year old), cool (<25°C) subsurface oceanic crust. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the microbial abundance, diversity, and metabolic potentials in the sediment-buried crust from “North Pond” on western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Three lithologic units along basement Hole U1383C were found, which typically hosted ∼104 cells cm-3 of basaltic rock, with higher cell densities occurring between 115 and 145 m below seafloor. Similar bacterial community structures, which are dominated by Gammaproteobacterial and Sphingobacterial species closely related to iron oxidizers, were detected regardless of variations in sampling depth. The metabolic potentials of the crust microbiota were assayed by metagenomic analysis of two basalt enrichments which showed similar bacterial structure with the original sample. Genes coding for energy metabolism involved in hydrocarbon degradation, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, denitrification and hydrogen oxidation were identified. Compared with other marine environments, the metagenomes from the basalt-hosted environments were enriched in pathways for Fe3+ uptake, siderophore synthesis and uptake, and Fe transport, suggesting that iron metabolism is an important energy production and conservation mechanism in this system. Overall, we provide evidence that the North Pond crustal biosphere is dominated by unique bacterial groups with the potential for iron-related biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27047476

  19. Carbon storage in old-growth forests of the Mid-Atlantic: toward better understanding the eastern forest carbon sink.

    PubMed

    McGarvey, Jennifer C; Thompson, Jonathan R; Epstein, Howard E; Shugart, Herman H

    2015-02-01

    Few old-growth stands remain in the matrix of secondary forests that dominates the eastern North American landscape. These remnant stands offer insight on the potential carbon (C) storage capacity of now-recovering secondary forests. We surveyed the remaining old-growth forests on sites characteristic of the general Mid-Atlantic United States and estimated the size of multiple components of forest C storage. Within and between old-growth stands, variability in C density is high and related to overstory tree species composition. The sites contain 219 ± 46 Mg C/ha (mean ± SD), including live and dead aboveground biomass, leaf litter, and the soil O horizon, with over 20% stored in downed wood and snags. Stands dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) store the most live biomass, while the mixed oak (Quercus spp.) stands overall store more dead wood. Total C density is 30% higher (154 Mg C/ha), and dead wood C density is 1800% higher (46 Mg C/ha) in the old-growth forests than in the surrounding younger forests (120 and 5 Mg C/ha, respectively). The high density of dead wood in old growth relative to secondary forests reflects a stark difference in historical land use and, possibly, the legacy of the local disturbance (e.g., disease) history. Our results demonstrate the potential for dead wood to maintain the sink capacity of secondary forests for many decades to come. PMID:26240851

  20. Mesophotic reef fish assemblages of the remote St. Peter and St. Paul's Archipelago, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, Marcos Rogerio; Alves, Aline Cristina; Medeiros, Diego Valverde; Coni, Ericka Oliveira Cavalcanti; Ferreira, Camilo Moitinho; Ferreira, Beatrice Padovani; de Souza Rosa, Ricardo; Amado-Filho, Gilberto Menezes; Pereira-Filho, Guilherme Henrique; de Moura, Rodrigo Leão; Thompson, Fabiano Lopes; Sumida, Paulo Yukio Gomes; Francini-Filho, Ronaldo Bastos

    2016-03-01

    Mesophotic reef fish assemblages (30-90 m depth) of the small and remote St. Peter and St. Paul's Archipelago (SPSPA), Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Brazil, were characterized using remotely operated vehicles. Ordination analyses identified distinct fish assemblages in the upper (30-50 m) and lower (50-90 m) mesophotic zones, the former characterized by high abundances of species that are also abundant at euphotic reefs ( Caranx lugubris, Melichthys niger, Stegastes sanctipauli and Chromis multilineata) and the latter dominated by two mesophotic specialists ( Prognathodes obliquus and Chromis enchrysura). Planktivores dominated fish assemblages, particularly in the upper mesophotic zone, possibly due to a greater availability of zooplankton coming from the colder Equatorial Undercurrent in mesophotic depths of the SPSPA. Turf algae, fleshy macroalgae and scleractinian corals dominated benthic assemblages between 30 and 40 m depth, while bryozoans, black corals and sponges dominated between 40 and 90 m depth. Canonical correspondence analysis explained 74 % of the relationship between environmental characteristics (depth, benthic cover and complexity) and structure of fish assemblages, with depth as the most important independent variable. Juveniles of Bodianus insularis and adults of P. obliquus and C. enchrysura were clearly associated with branching black corals ( Tanacetipathes spp.), suggesting that black corals play key ecological roles in lower mesophotic reefs of the SPSPA. Results from this study add to the global database about mesophotic reef ecosystems (MREs) and provide a baseline for future evaluations of possible anthropogenic and natural disturbances on MREs of the SPSPA.

  1. Managing Stormwater Runoff From Urban Areas in Consideration of Predicted Climate Change Impacts in the Mid-Atlantic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M.

    2014-12-01

    Mean annual temperature and precipitation in the Mid-Atlantic, USA, increased over the last century, and global climate models applied to this region generally project that these trends will continue throughout the year 2100. Higher temperatures and associated evapotranspiration may decrease total annual baseflow, even as stormflow events increase in magnitude and intensity, leading to more frequent and larger nutrient and sediment fluxes to receiving waters. Development will create more impervious surfaces, thereby increasing the ratio of stormflow to baseflow volumes. The possibility of increasing riverine flow associated with climate change this century necessitates an evaluation of various best management practices (BMPs) in urban areas to develop and utilize BMPs that optimize reductions in nutrient and sediment fluxes, as well as determine the extent to which these BMPs should be implemented. The headwaters of the Patuxent watershed are located in a highly developed urban corridor between Washington DC and Baltimore thus making it an ideal setting to explore potential climate change impacts in urban areas. Scenarios generated from a system of linked watershed and estuarine models were used to determine climate and land use change effects on Patuxent River runoff and estuarine water quality. The uncertainties of climate predictions and their implications regarding proactive mitigation approaches to manage pollutant fluxes from urban areas are discussed.

  2. Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Flores, Gilberto E; Campbell, James H; Kirshtein, Julie D; Meneghin, Jennifer; Podar, Mircea; Steinberg, Joshua I; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Tivey, Margaret Kingston; Voytek, Mary A; Yang, Zamin K; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37°17'N, 32°16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36°13'N, 33°54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

  3. Biogeographical distribution of Rimicaris exoculata resident gut epibiont communities along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent sites.

    PubMed

    Durand, Lucile; Roumagnac, Marie; Cueff-Gauchard, Valérie; Jan, Cyrielle; Guri, Mathieu; Tessier, Claire; Haond, Marine; Crassous, Philippe; Zbinden, Magali; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne

    2015-10-01

    Rimicaris exoculata is a deep-sea hydrothermal vent shrimp whose enlarged gill chamber houses a complex trophic epibiotic community. Its gut harbours an autochthonous and distinct microbial community. This species dominates hydrothermal ecosystem megafauna along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, regardless of contrasting geochemical conditions prevailing in them. Here, the resident gut epibiont community at four contrasted hydrothermal vent sites (Rainbow, TAG, Logatchev and Ashadze) was analysed and compiled with previous data to evaluate the possible influence of site location, using 16S rRNA surveys and microscopic observations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses). Filamentous epibionts inserted between the epithelial cell microvilli were observed on all examined samples. Results confirmed resident gut community affiliation to Deferribacteres, Mollicutes, Epsilonproteobacteria and to a lesser extent Gammaproteobacteria lineages. Still a single Deferribacteres phylotype was retrieved at all sites. Four Mollicutes-related operational taxonomic units were distinguished, one being only identified on Rainbow specimens. The topology of ribotype median-joining networks illustrated a community diversification possibly following demographic expansions, suggesting a more ancient evolutionary history and/or a larger effective population size at Rainbow. Finally, the gill chamber community distribution was also analysed through ribotype networks based on sequences from R. exoculata collected at the Rainbow, Snake Pit, TAG, Logatchev and Ashadze sites. Results allow the refining of hypotheses on the epibiont role and transmission pathways.

  4. Carbon storage in old-growth forests of the Mid-Atlantic: toward better understanding the eastern forest carbon sink.

    PubMed

    McGarvey, Jennifer C; Thompson, Jonathan R; Epstein, Howard E; Shugart, Herman H

    2015-02-01

    Few old-growth stands remain in the matrix of secondary forests that dominates the eastern North American landscape. These remnant stands offer insight on the potential carbon (C) storage capacity of now-recovering secondary forests. We surveyed the remaining old-growth forests on sites characteristic of the general Mid-Atlantic United States and estimated the size of multiple components of forest C storage. Within and between old-growth stands, variability in C density is high and related to overstory tree species composition. The sites contain 219 ± 46 Mg C/ha (mean ± SD), including live and dead aboveground biomass, leaf litter, and the soil O horizon, with over 20% stored in downed wood and snags. Stands dominated by tulip poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) store the most live biomass, while the mixed oak (Quercus spp.) stands overall store more dead wood. Total C density is 30% higher (154 Mg C/ha), and dead wood C density is 1800% higher (46 Mg C/ha) in the old-growth forests than in the surrounding younger forests (120 and 5 Mg C/ha, respectively). The high density of dead wood in old growth relative to secondary forests reflects a stark difference in historical land use and, possibly, the legacy of the local disturbance (e.g., disease) history. Our results demonstrate the potential for dead wood to maintain the sink capacity of secondary forests for many decades to come.

  5. Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, Gilberto E; Campbell, James H; Kirshtein, Julie D; Meneghin, Jennifer; Podar, Mircea; Steinberg, Joshua; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Tivey, Margaret Kingston; Voytek, Mary A; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Yang, Zamin Koo

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37 17'N, 32 16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36 13'N, 33 54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

  6. Cold-climate slope deposits and landscape modifications of the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain, Eastern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newell, W.L.; Dejong, B.D.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of Pleistocene cold-climate geomorphology are distributed across the weathered and eroded Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain uplands from the Wisconsinan terminal moraine south to Tidewater Virginia. Cold-climate deposits and landscape modifications are superimposed on antecedent landscapes of old, weathered Neogene upland gravels and Pleistocene marine terraces that had been built during warm periods and sea-level highstands. In New Jersey, sequences of surficial deposits define a long history of repeating climate change events. To the south across the Delmarva Peninsula and southern Maryland, most antecedent topography has been obscured by Late Pleistocene surficial deposits. These are spatially variable and are collectively described as a cold-climate alloformation. The cold-climate alloformation includes time-transgressive details of climate deterioration from at least marine isotope stage (MIS) 4 through the end of MIS 2. Some deposits and landforms within the alloformation may be as young as the Younger Dryas. Southwards along the trend of the Potomac River, these deposits and their climatic affinities become diffused. In Virginia, a continuum of erosion and surficial deposits appears to be the product of ‘normal’ temperate, climate-forced processes. The cold-climate alloformation and more temperate deposits in Virginia are being partly covered by Holocene alluvium and bay mud.

  7. Occurrence of deep-water corals on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge based on MAR-ECO data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, P. B.; Buhl-Mortensen, L.; Gebruk, A. V.; Krylova, E. M.

    2008-01-01

    Occurrence of deep-water corals on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between the southern part of the Reykjanes Ridge and the Azores has been examined based on video surveys using remotely operated vehicles (ROV) and bycatch from longline and bottom trawl. Eight sites were surveyed with ROVs, and the bycatch material came from 16 trawl hauls and nine longline sets. Corals were observed at all sites surveyed with ROVs at depths between 800 and 2400 m, but most commonly shallower than 1400 m. The species richness of corals was high, with a total of 40 taxa recorded. Octocorals dominated the coral fauna with 27 taxa. Lophelia pertusa was one of the most frequently observed corals, present at five of the eight surveyed sites. It occurred on basaltic outcrops on the seamounts but always as relatively small colonies (<0.5 m in diameter). Massive live reef structures were not observed. The deepest record of Lophelia was at 1340 m, south of the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone. Accumulations of dead debris of coral skeletons could indicate a presence of former large Lophelia reefs at several locations. The number of megafaunal taxa was 1.6 times higher in areas where corals were present compared to areas without corals. Typical taxa that co-occurred with Lophelia were crinoids, certain sponges, the bivalve Acesta excavata, and squat lobsters. Signs of destructive fishing and lost gillnets were observed at several locations. The impact of fishing on deep-sea corals is discussed.

  8. Source and delivery of nutrients to receiving waters in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Richard B.; Johnston, Criag M.; Smith, Richard A.; Milstead, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates nutrient sources and transport to receiving waters, in order to provide spatially detailed information to aid water-resources managers concerned with eutrophication and nutrient management strategies. SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) nutrient models were developed for the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic (NE US) regions of the United States to represent source conditions for the year 2002. The model developed to examine the source and delivery of nitrogen to the estuaries of nine large rivers along the NE US Seaboard indicated that agricultural sources contribute the largest percentage (37%) of the total nitrogen load delivered to the estuaries. Point sources account for 28% while atmospheric deposition accounts for 20%. A second SPARROW model was used to examine the sources and delivery of phosphorus to lakes and reservoirs throughout the NE US. The greatest attenuation of phosphorus occurred in lakes that were large relative to the size of their watershed. Model results show that, within the NE US, aquatic decay of nutrients is quite limited on an annual basis and that we especially cannot rely on natural attenuation to remove nutrients within the larger rivers nor within lakes with large watersheds relative to the size of the lake.

  9. Details of an Extinct Rift Embedded on the Western Flank of the Southernmost Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, K. M.; Tikku, A. A.; Stock, J. M.; Livermore, R. A.

    2002-05-01

    We have identified a possible extinct rift embedded on the western flank of the southernmost spreading corridors of the Mid-Atlantic ridge (MAR). This rift trends N10° W along 10° W longitude (between about 52° -55° S), northwest of the Bouvet Triple Junction. Elevated topography that slopes away from an axial valley, as well as magnetic anomalies 6b-8 that are symmetrically disposed about the axis, characterize this feature. We initially proposed magnetic anomalies 5a-5b were missing on the western flank of the MAR, and repeated on the eastern flank, which would suggest a second, more recent ridge jump. However detailed swath bathymetry (Ligi et al., JGR, 1999) in the region of the Bouvet Triple Junction reveals a sinistral offset of the MAR at about 2° W, 54.1° S that is consistent with displacement along a transform fault. The associated fracture zone can be traced westward where it crosses ship track a1076 at the location of the 5a-5b gap, thus accounting for the missing anomalies. Further, ship track jr09b shows magnetic anomalies 5a-5b are present on both the east and west MAR flanks. Our new magnetic anomaly interpretation suggests there was a single eastward ridge jump after Chron 6b resulting in anomalies 6b-8 being repeated on the western MAR ridge flank, and missing on the eastern flank. An additional, more recent ridge jump is not indicated.

  10. Nutritional relations of deep-sea hydrothermal fields at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: a stable isotope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colaço, A.; Dehairs, F.; Desbruyères, D.

    2002-02-01

    Nutritional relations among invertebrates from the hydrothermal vent fields at the Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR) were studied via the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope approach. A large number of specimens of different vent species from different MAR vent fields were analysed, providing a general picture of the community structure. The isotopic composition at each vent field presents the same general trend. There is an obvious dichotomy of the trophic structure, with the mussels being significantly depleted in 13C and shrimps being significantly enriched in 13C. MAR and Pacific vent fields present the same picture, despite a different species composition. Primary consumers are divided into main groups according to their δ13C signature: >-15 (shrimps) and <-20‰ (mussels). Vent predators are tightly linked to one or the other group, but a mixed diet cannot be excluded. Bathyal species are top predators, making incursions into the vent fields to profit from the large biomass. Taking into account the above associations, a descriptive trophic model was elaborated. At the base of the food chain the chemolithotrophic bacteria predominate. Four trophic levels were then distinguished: primary consumers, feeding only on bacteria; mixotrophs feeding on bacteria and small invertebrates; vent predators feeding only on small invertebrates; and finally top predators that are mainly constituted by deep-sea fauna.

  11. Diversity and Metabolic Potentials of Subsurface Crustal Microorganisms from the Western Flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxu; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea oceanic crust constitutes the largest region of the earth's surface. Accumulating evidence suggests that unique microbial communities are supported by iron cycling processes, particularly in the young (<10 million-year old), cool (<25°C) subsurface oceanic crust. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the microbial abundance, diversity, and metabolic potentials in the sediment-buried crust from "North Pond" on western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Three lithologic units along basement Hole U1383C were found, which typically hosted ∼10(4) cells cm(-3) of basaltic rock, with higher cell densities occurring between 115 and 145 m below seafloor. Similar bacterial community structures, which are dominated by Gammaproteobacterial and Sphingobacterial species closely related to iron oxidizers, were detected regardless of variations in sampling depth. The metabolic potentials of the crust microbiota were assayed by metagenomic analysis of two basalt enrichments which showed similar bacterial structure with the original sample. Genes coding for energy metabolism involved in hydrocarbon degradation, dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium, denitrification and hydrogen oxidation were identified. Compared with other marine environments, the metagenomes from the basalt-hosted environments were enriched in pathways for Fe(3+) uptake, siderophore synthesis and uptake, and Fe transport, suggesting that iron metabolism is an important energy production and conservation mechanism in this system. Overall, we provide evidence that the North Pond crustal biosphere is dominated by unique bacterial groups with the potential for iron-related biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27047476

  12. Free-living nematode species (Nematoda) dwelling in hydrothermal sites of the North Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchesunov, Alexei V.

    2015-12-01

    Morphological descriptions of seven free-living nematode species from hydrothermal sites of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge are presented. Four of them are new for science: Paracanthonchus olgae sp. n. (Chromadorida, Cyatholaimidae), Prochromadora helenae sp. n. (Chromadorida, Chromadoridae), Prochaetosoma ventriverruca sp. n. (Desmodorida, Draconematidae) and Leptolaimus hydrothermalis sp. n. (Plectida, Leptolaimidae). Two species have been previously recorded in hydrothermal habitats, and one species is recorded for the first time in such an environment. Oncholaimus scanicus (Enoplida, Oncholaimidae) was formerly known from only the type locality in non-hydrothermal shallow milieu of the Norway Sea. O. scanicus is a very abundant species in Menez Gwen, Lucky Strike and Lost City hydrothermal sites, and population of the last locality differs from other two in some morphometric characteristics. Desmodora marci (Desmodorida, Desmodoridae) was previously known from other remote deep-sea hydrothermal localities in south-western and north-eastern Pacific. Halomonhystera vandoverae (Monhysterida, Monhysteridae) was described and repeatedly found in mass in Snake Pit hydrothermal site. The whole hydrothermal nematode assemblages are featured by low diversity in comparison with either shelf or deep-sea non-hydrothermal communities. The nematode species list of the Atlantic hydrothermal vents consists of representatives of common shallow-water genera; the new species are also related to some shelf species. On the average, the hydrothermal species differ from those of slope and abyssal plains of comparable depths by larger sizes, diversity of buccal structures, presence of food content in the gut and ripe eggs in uteri.

  13. Nitrogen Stimulates the Growth of Subsurface Basalt-associated Microorganisms at the Western Flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxu; Fang, Jing; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J; Orcutt, Beth N; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic crust constitutes the largest aquifer system on Earth, and microbial activity in this environment has been inferred from various geochemical analyses. However, empirical documentation of microbial activity from subsurface basalts is still lacking, particularly in the cool (<25°C) regions of the crust, where are assumed to harbor active iron-oxidizing microbial communities. To test this hypothesis, we report the enrichment and isolation of crust-associated microorganisms from North Pond, a site of relatively young and cold basaltic basement on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that was sampled during Expedition 336 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Enrichment experiments with different carbon (bicarbonate, acetate, methane) and nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium) sources revealed significant cell growth (one magnitude higher cell abundance), higher intracellular DNA content, and increased Fe(3+)/ΣFe ratios only when nitrogen substrates were added. Furthermore, a Marinobacter strain with neutrophilic iron-oxidizing capabilities was isolated from the basalt. This work reveals that basalt-associated microorganisms at North Pond had the potential for activity and that microbial growth could be stimulated by in vitro nitrogen addition. Furthermore, iron oxidation is supported as an important process for microbial communities in subsurface basalts from young and cool ridge flank basement.

  14. Nitrogen Stimulates the Growth of Subsurface Basalt-associated Microorganisms at the Western Flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinxu; Fang, Jing; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.; Orcutt, Beth N.; Wang, Fengping

    2016-01-01

    Oceanic crust constitutes the largest aquifer system on Earth, and microbial activity in this environment has been inferred from various geochemical analyses. However, empirical documentation of microbial activity from subsurface basalts is still lacking, particularly in the cool (<25°C) regions of the crust, where are assumed to harbor active iron-oxidizing microbial communities. To test this hypothesis, we report the enrichment and isolation of crust-associated microorganisms from North Pond, a site of relatively young and cold basaltic basement on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that was sampled during Expedition 336 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Enrichment experiments with different carbon (bicarbonate, acetate, methane) and nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium) sources revealed significant cell growth (one magnitude higher cell abundance), higher intracellular DNA content, and increased Fe3+/ΣFe ratios only when nitrogen substrates were added. Furthermore, a Marinobacter strain with neutrophilic iron-oxidizing capabilities was isolated from the basalt. This work reveals that basalt-associated microorganisms at North Pond had the potential for activity and that microbial growth could be stimulated by in vitro nitrogen addition. Furthermore, iron oxidation is supported as an important process for microbial communities in subsurface basalts from young and cool ridge flank basement. PMID:27199959

  15. Spatial Distribution of Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) Injury at Harvest in Mid-Atlantic Apple Orchards.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Shimat V; Stallings, Jonathan W; Leskey, Tracy C; Krawczyk, Greg; Polk, Dean; Butler, Bryan; Bergh, J Christopher

    2014-10-01

    Brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål), injury to late-season apple cultivars was measured at harvest in 2011 and 2012 in commercial orchards in four mid-Atlantic states. In each orchard block, a border zone (adjacent to woods), an interior zone (near orchard center), and an intermediate zone (between border and interior zones) comprised 1-3 tree rows per zone, depending on block size. Just before commercial harvest, 10 fruit were sampled from the upper, middle, and lower third of the canopy from five trees in each zone. After 3-5 wk in cold storage, fruit were examined for external and internal injury, and severity of internal injury (number of injury sites per fruit) from H. halys. A zero-inflated negative binomial model accounted for significant variation among the orchards and showed that apples from the upper canopy of border zone trees had the highest probability of experiencing external and internal injury. A minor interaction was detected among the orchards and zones for injury prevalence and severity, but there was no evidence of an orchard showing less expected injury in the border zone compared with other zones. Adjusting for orchard-to-orchard variation, differences in injury distributions among the zones and canopies were primarily due to injury prevalence rather than expected injury severity. The implications of these results to scouting and managing H. halys in eastern apple orchards are discussed.

  16. Species profiles: Life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (North and Mid-Atlantic): Blue mussel

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, R.I.E.

    1989-06-01

    The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis L. is a widely distributed and locally abundant bivalve mollusc in the North and Mid-Atlantic Regions. It is a valuable commercial species; regional landings in 1986 were worth nearly $4 million. It is a semi-sessile species, anchored by byssus threads to firm surfaces in littoral and sub-littoral environments at salinities ranging from 5 to 35 ppt. It is a suspension feeder, ingesting phytoplankton and detrital particles in the size range of 3--30 /mu/m. The geographical range of the species is limited by lethal water temperatures above 27/degree/C in the south and by temperatures too low for growth and reproduction in the north. Animals from the northern end of the range are stressed by temperatures above 20/degree/C, whereas those near the southern distributional limit are not severely stressed by temperatures as high as 25/degree/C. The blue mussel is diecious and oviparous. The planktotrophic larvae take about 3 weeks to develop and metamorphose. The environmental tolerances of larvae are more restricted than those of adults. The juveniles grow to approximately 1.5 mm while attached to filamentous algae before being carried by water currents to reattach to a firm substrate, often close to adult mussels. Larval and adult blue mussels are important prey items for many animals, including crabs, fishes, and birds. 95 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. The production of methane, hydrogen, and organic compounds in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Konn, C; Charlou, J L; Holm, N G; Mousis, O

    2015-05-01

    Both hydrogen and methane are consistently discharged in large quantities in hydrothermal fluids issued from ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal fields discovered along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Considering the vast number of these fields discovered or inferred, hydrothermal fluxes represent a significant input of H2 and CH4 to the ocean. Although there are lines of evidence of their abiogenic formation from stable C and H isotope results, laboratory experiments, and thermodynamic data, neither their origin nor the reaction pathways generating these gases have been fully constrained yet. Organic compounds detected in the fluids may also be derived from abiotic reactions. Although thermodynamics are favorable and extensive experimental work has been done on Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, for instance, nothing is clear yet about their origin and formation mechanism from actual data. Since chemolithotrophic microbial communities commonly colonize hydrothermal vents, biogenic and thermogenic processes are likely to contribute to the production of H2, CH4, and other organic compounds. There seems to be a consensus toward a mixed origin (both sources and processes) that is consistent with the ambiguous nature of the isotopic data. But the question that remains is, to what proportions? More systematic experiments as well as integrated geochemical approaches are needed to disentangle hydrothermal geochemistry. This understanding is of prime importance considering the implications of hydrothermal H2, CH4, and organic compounds for the ocean global budget, global cycles, and the origin of life.

  18. Biogeographical distribution of Rimicaris exoculata resident gut epibiont communities along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vent sites.

    PubMed

    Durand, Lucile; Roumagnac, Marie; Cueff-Gauchard, Valérie; Jan, Cyrielle; Guri, Mathieu; Tessier, Claire; Haond, Marine; Crassous, Philippe; Zbinden, Magali; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Cambon-Bonavita, Marie-Anne

    2015-10-01

    Rimicaris exoculata is a deep-sea hydrothermal vent shrimp whose enlarged gill chamber houses a complex trophic epibiotic community. Its gut harbours an autochthonous and distinct microbial community. This species dominates hydrothermal ecosystem megafauna along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, regardless of contrasting geochemical conditions prevailing in them. Here, the resident gut epibiont community at four contrasted hydrothermal vent sites (Rainbow, TAG, Logatchev and Ashadze) was analysed and compiled with previous data to evaluate the possible influence of site location, using 16S rRNA surveys and microscopic observations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses). Filamentous epibionts inserted between the epithelial cell microvilli were observed on all examined samples. Results confirmed resident gut community affiliation to Deferribacteres, Mollicutes, Epsilonproteobacteria and to a lesser extent Gammaproteobacteria lineages. Still a single Deferribacteres phylotype was retrieved at all sites. Four Mollicutes-related operational taxonomic units were distinguished, one being only identified on Rainbow specimens. The topology of ribotype median-joining networks illustrated a community diversification possibly following demographic expansions, suggesting a more ancient evolutionary history and/or a larger effective population size at Rainbow. Finally, the gill chamber community distribution was also analysed through ribotype networks based on sequences from R. exoculata collected at the Rainbow, Snake Pit, TAG, Logatchev and Ashadze sites. Results allow the refining of hypotheses on the epibiont role and transmission pathways. PMID:26324855

  19. Simulation analysis of moored fluorometer time series from the Mid-Atlantic Bight during 1987--1990

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of the previous research during 1987-1990 within the DOE (Department of Energy) Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) program in the Mid-Atlantic Bight was to understand the physical and biogeochemical processes effecting the diffusive exchange of the proxies of energy-related, by-products associated with particulate matter between estuarine, shelf, and slope waters on this continental margin. As originally envisioned in the SEEP program plan, SEEP-III would take place at Cape Hatteras to study the advective exchange of materials by a major boundary current. One problem of continuing interest is the determination of the local assimilative capacity of slope waters and sediments off the eastern seaboard of the US to lengthen the pathway between potentially harmful energy by-products and man. At basin scales, realistic specification of the lateral transport by western boundary currents of particulate matter is a necessary input to global models of carbon/nitrogen cycling. Finally, at these global scales, the generic role of continental margins in cycling greenhouse gases, e.g. CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O, is now of equal interest. This continuing research of model construction and evaluation within the SEEP program focuses on all three questions at local, regional, and basin scales. Results from SEEP-I and II are discussed as well as plans for SEEP-III. 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Source and Delivery of Nutrients to Receiving Waters in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic Regions of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Johnston, C.M.; Smith, R.A.; Milstead, B.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates nutrient sources and transport to receiving waters, in order to provide spatially detailed information to aid water-resources managers concerned with eutrophication and nutrient management strategies. SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) nutrient models were developed for the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic (NE US) regions of the United States to represent source conditions for the year 2002. The model developed to examine the source and delivery of nitrogen to the estuaries of nine large rivers along the NE US Seaboard indicated that agricultural sources contribute the largest percentage (37%) of the total nitrogen load delivered to the estuaries. Point sources account for 28% while atmospheric deposition accounts for 20%. A second SPARROW model was used to examine the sources and delivery of phosphorus to lakes and reservoirs throughout the NE US. The greatest attenuation of phosphorus occurred in lakes that were large relative to the size of their watershed. Model results show that, within the NE US, aquatic decay of nutrients is quite limited on an annual basis and that we especially cannot rely on natural attenuation to remove nutrients within the larger rivers nor within lakes with large watersheds relative to the size of the lake. ?? 2011 American Water Resources Association. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Microearthquakes at the active Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) hydrothermal mound, Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 26°08'N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontbriand, C.; Reves-Sohn, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    A small 200 m aperture network of five ocean bottom seismometers around the periphery the active TAG hydrothermal mound on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (26°08’N) detected microearthquake events that may be associated with the subsurface hydraulics of the massive hydrothermal deposit. Seismic data were sampled at 100 Hz for a period of eight months spanning June, 2003 to February, 2004, during which time 24,191 locatable events were detected. Microearthquake hypocenters are concentrated within a 300 m radius of the sulfide mound in the top 250 m of crust, and exhibit a conical shape with the deepest events beneath the mound center. Event rates are steady at 180 events per day at the beginning of the study period and decline slightly to 116 events per day after whale calls elevate background noise levels about 2/3 of the way through the deployment. The mean local magnitude of events is -1.2 with a range of -2.9≦ML≦0.3. We suggest that events may be largely due to hydraulic fracturing of clogged flow conduits in the mineral deposit, which provides the possibility of using the microearthquake data to constrain subsurface flow parameters and the permeability structure of the active TAG deposit. Figure: A bathymetric map of the TAG area depicts a small aperture network of 5 ocean bottom seismometers (white triangles) around the periphery of the active TAG hydrothermal mound. High resolution bathymetry is from Roman and Singh, 2005.

  2. Effects of highway construction on stream water quality and macroinvertebrate condition in a mid-Atlantic highlands watershed, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart A.; Chen, Yushun; Viadero, Stuart C.; Wei, Xinchao; Hedrick, Lara B.; Anderson, James T.; Lin, Lian-Shin

    2009-01-01

    Refining best management practices (BMPs) for future highway construction depends on a comprehensive understanding of environmental impacts from current construction methods. Based on a before-after-control impact (BACI) experimental design, long-term stream monitoring (1997–2006) was conducted at upstream (as control, n = 3) and downstream (as impact, n = 6) sites in the Lost River watershed of the Mid-Atlantic Highlands region, West Virginia. Monitoring data were analyzed to assess impacts of during and after highway construction on 15 water quality parameters and macroinvertebrate condition using the West Virginia stream condition index (WVSCI). Principal components analysis (PCA) identified regional primary water quality variances, and paired t tests and time series analysis detected seven highway construction-impacted water quality parameters which were mainly associated with the second principal component. In particular, impacts on turbidity, total suspended solids, and total iron during construction, impacts on chloride and sulfate during and after construction, and impacts on acidity and nitrate after construction were observed at the downstream sites. The construction had statistically significant impacts on macroinvertebrate index scores (i.e., WVSCI) after construction, but did not change the overall good biological condition. Implementing BMPs that address those construction-impacted water quality parameters can be an effective mitigation strategy for future highway construction in this highlands region.

  3. Effects of highway construction on stream water quality and macroinvertebrate condition in a Mid-Atlantic Highlands watershed, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Y.; Viadero, R.C.; Wei, X.; Fortney, Ronald H.; Hedrick, Lara B.; Welsh, S.A.; Anderson, James T.; Lin, L.-S.

    2009-01-01

    Refining best management practices (BMPs) for future highway construction depends on a comprehensive understanding of environmental impacts from current construction methods. Based on a before-after-control impact (BACI) experimental design, long-term stream monitoring (1997-2006) was conducted at upstream (as control, n = 3) and downstream (as impact, n = 6) sites in the Lost River watershed of the Mid-Atlantic Highlands region, West Virginia. Monitoring data were analyzed to assess impacts of during and after highway construction on 15 water quality parameters and macroinvertebrate condition using the West Virginia stream condition index (WVSCI). Principal components analysis (PCA) identified regional primary water quality variances, and paired t tests and time series analysis detected seven highway construction-impacted water quality parameters which were mainly associated with the second principal component. In particular, impacts on turbidity, total suspended solids, and total iron during construction, impacts on chloride and sulfate during and after construction, and impacts on acidity and nitrate after construction were observed at the downstream sites. The construction had statistically significant impacts on macroinvertebrate index scores (i.e., WVSCI) after construction, but did not change the overall good biological condition. Implementing BMPs that address those construction-impacted water quality parameters can be an effective mitigation strategy for future highway construction in this highlands region. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  4. Tectonic evolution of 200 km of Mid-Atlantic Ridge over 10 million years: Interplay of volcanism and faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cann, Johnson R.; Smith, Deborah K.; Escartin, Javier; Schouten, Hans

    2015-07-01

    We reconstruct the history of the mode of accretion of an area of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge south of the Kane fracture zone using bathymetric morphology. The area includes 200 km of the spreading axis and reaches to 10 Ma on either side. We distinguish three tectonic styles: (1) volcanic construction with eruption and intrusion of magma coupled with minor faulting, (2) extended terrain with abundant large-offset faults, (3) detachment faulting marked by extension on single long-lived faults. Over 40% of the seafloor is made of extended terrain and detachment faults. The area includes products of seven spreading segments. The spreading axis has had detachment faulting or extended terrain on one or both sides for 70% of the last 10 Ma. In some parts of the area, regions of detachment faulting and extended terrain lie close to segment boundaries. Regions of detachment faulting initiated at 10 Ma close to the adjacent fracture zones to the north and south, and then expanded away from them. We discuss the complex evidence from gravity, seismic surveys, and bathymetry for the role of magma supply in generating tectonic style. Overall, we conclude that input of magma at the spreading axis has a general control on the development of detachment faulting, but the relationship is not strong. Other factors may include a positive feedback that stabilizes detachment faulting at the expense of volcanic extension, perhaps through the lubrication of active detachment faults by the formation of low friction materials (talc, serpentine) on detachment fault surfaces.

  5. Seasonal and spatial patterns of Penilia avirostris and three tunicate species in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambler, Julie W.; Kumar, Ajoy; Moisan, Tiffany A.; Aulenbach, Donielle L.; Day, Melissa C.; Dix, Stephanie A.; Winsor, Michele A.

    2013-10-01

    The cladoceran Penilia avirostris and three tunicate species, Oikopleura dioica, Dolioletta gegenbauri and Thalia democratica, form a mesozooplankton group which ingests a wide range of particles from pico- to micro- plankton, grows rapidly due to asexual reproduction, and thus can have major impacts on phytoplankton populations. These four zooplankton species were the most abundant tunicate and cladoceran species in a study where zooplankton were sampled biweekly at five stations across the inner continental shelf in the Mid-Atlantic Bight in 2005, 2006 and 2007. Vertical tows were taken at shallow stations and depth stratified vertical tows at stations >10 m. P. avirostris and O. dioica had highly predictable seasonal cycles with peak abundances in July and August. D. gegenbauri also was present during this time period if upwelling favorable winds were present, which implies cross shelf transport from source populations in slope waters and the Gulf Stream. T. democratica only appeared in pulses when southerly winds were increasing in strength. The co-occurrence P. avirostris and the tunicate species with abundant Synechococcus and heterotrophic nanoflagellates during highly stratified summer conditions provide potential connections to microbial food webs as well as grazing opportunities on event scale blooms of dinoflagellate and diatoms species present in the area.

  6. High paleointensities of the geomagnetic field from thermomagnetic studies on rift valley pillow basalts from the Mid- Atlantic Ridge.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.; Gromme, S.; Lecaille, A.

    1983-01-01

    Nineteen pillow basalts dredged within the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 36.8oN were studied by the Thellier stepwise heating method in order to determine the paleointensity of the geomagnetic field when they erupted on to the sea floor. Previously reported fission track ages are 2000-6000 yr for the youngest rocks (mainly olivine basalts) and 10 000-100 000 yr for the others (mainly plagioclase basalts and pyroxene basalts). All but three pillow basalts meet the conditions commonly considered as indicative of quite reliable paleointensity estimates; stability of the direction of NRM during its thermal demagnetization, constant ratio of NRM/TRM (natural remanent magnetization to thermoremanent magnetization) over 50% or more of the original NRM intensity (80 to 94% for 11 specimens), and reproducibility of low-temperature partial TRM(PTRM). However, strong field thermomagnetic measurements indicate that 11 of these 16 samples display a significant increase in Curie temperature (15 to 80oC) during the paleointensity experiments below 250oC, notwithstanding the linearity of the NRM-TRM plot in this temperature interval. This alteration, probably due to low-temperature oxidation of the specimens, seems typical of young pillow basalts and may result in paleointensity estimates which are too high.-from Authors

  7. Petrological and geochemical variations along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 46°S and 32°S: Influence of the Tristan da Cunha mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphris, Susan E.; Thompson, Geoffrey; Schilling, Jean-Guy; Kingsley, Richard H.

    1985-06-01

    Basalts from a section of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge close to the active volcanic island of Tristan da Cunha in the South Atlantic have been analysed to investigate the influence of the mantle plume on the geochemistry of basalts being erupted at the spreading center. Although petrographically the rocks show only limited variation, two basaltic types were determined to be erupting in this region based on their major, trace and REE compositions. One group shows depletion in the incompatible and LRE elements, and can be characterised as N-type mid-ocean ridge basalts. The second group shows "enriched" geochemical characteristics and is similar to T-type MORBs. Mixing hyperbolae for the incompatible element and REE ratios suggest that extensive mixing of an end-member, characteristic of a plume region with an end-member of normal depleted MORB, canaccount for the occurrence of the T-type MORBs in this region.Based on the nature and development of the Tristan da Cunha mantle plume over the past 100 Ma, a composite model of evolution is suggested,in which a ridge-centered hotspot progressed to a near ridge hotspot, and finally to a totally intraplate situation. The fact that Tristan da Cunha is highly alkalic now, but that an irregular geochemical anomalyis also present on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at this latitude would suggest an intermediate stage between the near-ridge and totally intraplate situation. This model leads to the conclusion that, as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge migrated away from the Tristan hotspot, a preferential sublithospheric flow towards the Ridge was established. This discontinuous feature can explain the geochemical variations seen along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge by providing a mechanism for mixing of a depleted N-type MORB component with an enriched component originating through processes active at the Tristan da Cunha mantle plume.

  8. Volcanic Glasses as Habitat for Microfossils: Evidence from the Early Paleoproterozoic Pillow Lavas of Karelia and their Modern Analogues in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adtafieva, M. M.; Rozanov, A. Yu; Sharkov, E. V.; Chistyakov, A. V.; Bogina, M. M.; Hoover, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial complexes were identified in the volcanic glasses from the ancient (2.4-Ga-old basaltic pillow-lavas of Karelia) and modern (pillow lavas of Mid-Atlantic ridge) volcanic rocks. It was shown that that their microbial colonization is likely to occur by the same mechanism. Thus, well preserved pillow lavas, which occupy a spacious fields in the Archean and Early Paleoproterozoic greenstone belts, are promising object for search of the earliest traces of life on Earth.

  9. Wave refraction diagrams for the Baltimore Canyon region of the mid-Atlantic continental shelf computed by using three bottom topography approximation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    The Langley Research Center and Virginia Institute of Marine Science wave refraction computer model was applied to the Baltimore Canyon region of the mid-Atlantic continental shelf. Wave refraction diagrams for a wide range of normally expected wave periods and directions were computed by using three bottom topography approximation techniques: quadratic least squares, cubic least squares, and constrained bicubic interpolation. Mathematical or physical interpretation of certain features appearing in the computed diagrams is discussed.

  10. The effects of macroinvertebrate taxonomic resolution in large landscape bioassessments: An example from the Mid-Atlantic Highlands, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, I.R.; Herlihy, A.T.; Larsen, D.P.; Urquhart, N.S.; Klemm, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    1. During late spring 1993-1995, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) sampled 490 wadeable streams in the mid-Atlantic Highlands (MAH) of the U.S. for a variety of physical, chemical and biological indicators of environmental condition. We used the resulting data set to evaluate the importance of differing levels of macroinvertebrate taxonomic resolution in bioassessments by comparing the ability of family versus genus to detect differences among sites classified by type and magnitude of human impact and by stream size. We divided the MAH into two physiographic regions: the Appalachian Plateau where mine drainage (MD) and acidic deposition are major stressors, and the Ridge and Valley where nutrient enrichment is a major stressor. Stream sites were classified into three or four impact classes based on water chemistry and habitat. We used stream order (first to third Strahler order) in each region as a measure of stream size. Ordination, 2 x 2 chi-square and biotic metrics were used to compare the ability of family and genus to detect differences among both stressor and size classes. 2. With one notable exception, there were only a small number of different genera per family (interquartile range = 1-4). Family Chironomidae, however, contained 123 different genera. As a result, significant information loss occurred when this group was only classified to family. The family Chironomidae did not discriminate among the predefined classes but many chironomid genera did: by chi-square analysis, 10 and 28 chironomid genera were significant in discriminating MD and nutrient impacts, respectively. 3. Family and genus data were similar in their ability to distinguish among the coarse impacts (e.g. most severe versus least severe impact classes) for all cases. Though genus data in many cases distinguished the subtler differences (e.g. mixed/moderate impacts versus high or low impacts) better than family, differences

  11. Biophysical and Population Genetic Models Predict the Presence of "Phantom" Stepping Stones Connecting Mid-Atlantic Ridge Vent Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Breusing, Corinna; Biastoch, Arne; Drews, Annika; Metaxas, Anna; Jollivet, Didier; Vrijenhoek, Robert C; Bayer, Till; Melzner, Frank; Sayavedra, Lizbeth; Petersen, Jillian M; Dubilier, Nicole; Schilhabel, Markus B; Rosenstiel, Philip; Reusch, Thorsten B H

    2016-09-12

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are patchily distributed ecosystems inhabited by specialized animal populations that are textbook meta-populations. Many vent-associated species have free-swimming, dispersive larvae that can establish connections between remote populations. However, connectivity patterns among hydrothermal vents are still poorly understood because the deep sea is undersampled, the molecular tools used to date are of limited resolution, and larval dispersal is difficult to measure directly. A better knowledge of connectivity is urgently needed to develop sound environmental management plans for deep-sea mining. Here, we investigated larval dispersal and contemporary connectivity of ecologically important vent mussels (Bathymodiolus spp.) from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge by using high-resolution ocean modeling and population genetic methods. Even when assuming a long pelagic larval duration, our physical model of larval drift suggested that arrival at localities more than 150 km from the source site is unlikely and that dispersal between populations requires intermediate habitats ("phantom" stepping stones). Dispersal patterns showed strong spatiotemporal variability, making predictions of population connectivity challenging. The assumption that mussel populations are only connected via additional stepping stones was supported by contemporary migration rates based on neutral genetic markers. Analyses of population structure confirmed the presence of two southern and two hybridizing northern mussel lineages that exhibited a substantial, though incomplete, genetic differentiation. Our study provides insights into how vent animals can disperse between widely separated vent habitats and shows that recolonization of perturbed vent sites will be subject to chance events, unless connectivity is explicitly considered in the selection of conservation areas. PMID:27476600

  12. Mid- Atlantic Gas Hydrate, Heat Flow, and Basin Analysis: Implications to Hydrocarbon Production in the Carolina Trough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phrampus, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    The new Mid- and South Atlantic Planning Areas for oil and gas leasing is proposed to open in 2021. This region lacks in contemporary geologic and geophysical petroleum data and has no conventional wells drilled within the proposed leasing area. As such, addressing the hydrocarbon potential of this region is particularly difficult. Here, we use new and legacy multi-channel seismic data with heat flow observations, ocean temperature measurements, and new seismic interpretations of gas hydrate deposits to determine basin-wide heat flow along the Mid- Atlantic. These data reveal a conductive heat flow regime along the continental margin with a lack of fluid flow that is consistent with sea floor spreading rates and cooling oceanic crust. We then use these observations in combination with basal heat flow models and sedimentation records to determine the thermal history of a cross section of the Carolina Trough. These models reveal varying depth of potential hydrocarbon production that begin at ~ 2000 mbsf and extend down to depths greater than 7000 mbsf across the Carolina Trough. These potentially productive depths correspond to varying stratal ages, but all models contain the Late Jurassic, which is a potential analog to the U.S. Gulf Coast's Smackover Formation. Additionally, the timing of hydrocarbon generation reveal that Early through Middle Jurassic evaporite deposits and Late Jurassic tight limestones should have been in place before the Early Jurassic source rocks reached a depth of burial sufficiently deep for the production of hydrocarbons. These potential seals may trap significant quantities of hydrocarbons with in the Jurassic layers, resulting in significant hydrocarbon potential within the Carolina Trough.

  13. Estimating population abundance and mapping distribution of wintering sea ducks in coastal waters of the mid-Atlantic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koneff, M.D.; Royle, J. Andrew; Forsell, D.J.; Wortham, J.S.; Boomer, G.S.; Perry, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Survey design for wintering scoters (Melanitta sp.) and other sea ducks that occur in offshore waters is challenging because these species have large ranges, are subject to distributional shifts among years and within a season, and can occur in aggregations. Interest in winter sea duck population abundance surveys has grown in recent years. This interest stems from concern over the population status of some sea ducks, limitations of extant breeding waterfowl survey programs in North America and logistical challenges and costs of conducting surveys in northern breeding regions, high winter area philopatry in some species and potential conservation implications, and increasing concern over offshore development and other threats to sea duck wintering habitats. The efficiency and practicality of statistically-rigorous monitoring strategies for mobile, aggregated wintering sea duck populations have not been sufficiently investigated. This study evaluated a 2-phase adaptive stratified strip transect sampling plan to estimate wintering population size of scoters, long-tailed ducks (Clangua hyemalis), and other sea ducks and provide information on distribution. The sampling plan results in an optimal allocation of a fixed sampling effort among offshore strata in the U.S. mid-Atlantic coast region. Phase I transect selection probabilities were based on historic distribution and abundance data, while Phase 2 selection probabilities were based on observations made during Phase 1 flights. Distance sampling methods were used to estimate detection rates. Environmental variables thought to affect detection rates were recorded during the survey and post-stratification and covariate modeling were investigated to reduce the effect of heterogeneity on detection estimation. We assessed cost-precision tradeoffs under a number of fixed-cost sampling scenarios using Monte Carlo simulation. We discuss advantages and limitations of this sampling design for estimating wintering sea duck

  14. Biophysical and Population Genetic Models Predict the Presence of "Phantom" Stepping Stones Connecting Mid-Atlantic Ridge Vent Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Breusing, Corinna; Biastoch, Arne; Drews, Annika; Metaxas, Anna; Jollivet, Didier; Vrijenhoek, Robert C; Bayer, Till; Melzner, Frank; Sayavedra, Lizbeth; Petersen, Jillian M; Dubilier, Nicole; Schilhabel, Markus B; Rosenstiel, Philip; Reusch, Thorsten B H

    2016-09-12

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are patchily distributed ecosystems inhabited by specialized animal populations that are textbook meta-populations. Many vent-associated species have free-swimming, dispersive larvae that can establish connections between remote populations. However, connectivity patterns among hydrothermal vents are still poorly understood because the deep sea is undersampled, the molecular tools used to date are of limited resolution, and larval dispersal is difficult to measure directly. A better knowledge of connectivity is urgently needed to develop sound environmental management plans for deep-sea mining. Here, we investigated larval dispersal and contemporary connectivity of ecologically important vent mussels (Bathymodiolus spp.) from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge by using high-resolution ocean modeling and population genetic methods. Even when assuming a long pelagic larval duration, our physical model of larval drift suggested that arrival at localities more than 150 km from the source site is unlikely and that dispersal between populations requires intermediate habitats ("phantom" stepping stones). Dispersal patterns showed strong spatiotemporal variability, making predictions of population connectivity challenging. The assumption that mussel populations are only connected via additional stepping stones was supported by contemporary migration rates based on neutral genetic markers. Analyses of population structure confirmed the presence of two southern and two hybridizing northern mussel lineages that exhibited a substantial, though incomplete, genetic differentiation. Our study provides insights into how vent animals can disperse between widely separated vent habitats and shows that recolonization of perturbed vent sites will be subject to chance events, unless connectivity is explicitly considered in the selection of conservation areas.

  15. Deep-sea surface-dwelling enteropneusts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Their ecology, distribution and mode of life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Daniel O. B.; Alt, Claudia H. S.; Priede, Imants G.; Reid, William D. K.; Wigham, Benjamin D.; Billett, David S. M.; Gebruk, Andrey V.; Rogacheva, Antonina; Gooday, Andrew J.

    2013-12-01

    The ecology, distribution and mode of life of three species of surface-dwelling enteropneusts is described, based on ROV observations and samples on the flanks of the Northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at comparative stations north and south of the Sub-Polar Front. Tergivelum cinnabarinum was most abundant in the north (mean=4.56 ind. 1000 m-2±3.50 s.d.) and occurred at low densities in the south (mean=1.19±1.68 s.d.). Yoda purpurata was dominant in the south (mean=17.00 ind. 1000 m-2±12.32 s.d.) but only one individual was found in the north. The within-station distribution of all enteropneust species encountered was generally random. T. cinnabarinum was larger (mean total length 142 mm) than Y. purpurata (mean total length 70 mm). Size distributions suggested smaller individuals of both species on the western side of the MAR. Size and density of enteropneusts were generally higher in areas with higher carbon flux to the seafloor. A single individual of Allapasus isidis was observed drifting and settling to the seafloor at the SW site. Traces on the seafloor made by T. cinnabarinum covered a much higher percentage of the total seabed area surveyed (mean=0.323%±0.155 s.d.) than those of Y. purpurata (mean=0.034%±0.037 s.d.). Stable isotope values for T. cinnabarinum suggested that it was a typical surficial deposit feeder. Enteropneusts appear to be abundant and an important bioturbator on the sedimented seafloor of the MAR at around 2500 m depth.

  16. Novel Bacterial and Archaeal Lineages from an In Situ Growth Chamber Deployed at a Mid-Atlantic Ridge Hydrothermal Vent

    PubMed Central

    Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Longnecker, Krista; Kirshtein, Julie

    2000-01-01

    The phylogenetic diversity was determined for a microbial community obtained from an in situ growth chamber placed on a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (23°22′ N, 44°57′ W). The chamber was deployed for 5 days, and the temperature within the chamber gradually decreased from 70 to 20°C. Upon retrieval of the chamber, the DNA was extracted and the small-subunit rRNA genes (16S rDNA) were amplified by PCR using primers specific for the Archaea or Bacteria domain and cloned. Unique rDNA sequences were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphisms, and 38 different archaeal and bacterial phylotypes were identified from the 85 clones screened. The majority of the archaeal sequences were affiliated with the Thermococcales (71%) and Archaeoglobales (22%) orders. A sequence belonging to the Thermoplasmales confirms that thermoacidophiles may have escaped enrichment culturing attempts of deep-sea hydrothermal vent samples. Additional sequences that represented deeply rooted lineages in the low-temperature eurarchaeal (marine group II) and crenarchaeal clades were obtained. The majority of the bacterial sequences obtained were restricted to the Aquificales (18%), the ɛ subclass of the Proteobacteria (ɛ-Proteobacteria) (40%), and the genus Desulfurobacterium (25%). Most of the clones (28%) were confined to a monophyletic clade within the ɛ-Proteobacteria with no known close relatives. The prevalence of clones related to thermophilic microbes that use hydrogen as an electron donor and sulfur compounds (S0, SO4, thiosulfate) indicates the importance of hydrogen oxidation and sulfur metabolism at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. The presence of sequences that are related to sequences from hyperthermophiles, moderate thermophiles, and mesophiles suggests that the diversity obtained from this analysis may reflect the microbial succession that occurred in response to the shift in temperature and possible associated changes in the chemistry of the

  17. New insights into serpentinization at Atlantis Massif, 30° N Mid-Atlantic Ridge, using wide-angle seismic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Collins, J. A.; Canales, J. P.; Tucholke, B. E.; Detrick, R. S.

    2004-12-01

    The Atlantis Massif is an ultramafic core complex that was formed in the last 1.5-2.0 Myr at the intersection of the Atlantis Fracture Zone and the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 30° N by tectonic extension along a long-lived oceanic detachment fault. The exhumation of deep crustal and upper mantle rocks in the footwall of the fault provides an excellent tectonic window into the oceanic lithosphere. The Atlantis Massif will be the subject of a deep-drilling investigation for upcoming IODP Legs 304 and 305 (November 2004 - February 2005). Near-offset seismic reflection data (offset up to 3 km) across the core complex imaged a reflection at 0.2-0.25 s below the seafloor, which has been interpreted as an older detachment fault [Canales et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 222, 543-560, 2004]. The application of a non-conventional multichannel seismic (MCS) imaging technique allows us to include wide-angle seismic reflection data (offset up to 6 km) in the imaging process. We find that this reflection is continuous along most of the profiles and is present beneath the exposed detachment surface over an area larger than previously estimated from the near-offset MCS sections. Complementary data from on-bottom shots and ocean bottom seismometers constrain both P and S-wave velocities down to 0.5-0.6 km below the seafloor, at approximately the depth of the widespread reflection. The combined seismic data suggest that the interval between the seafloor and the reflection contains serpentinized peridotite. We quantify the amount and distribution of alteration in this layer by using an effective medium theory, and we interpret the results to shed new light on serpentinization processes at Atlantis Massif. IODP drilling results this winter will allow us to compare our interpretation to ground-truth measurements.

  18. Active and relict sea-floor hydrothermal mineralization at the TAG hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A. . Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Labs.); Hannington, M.D. ); Raman, C.V. ); Thompson, G.; Tivey, M.K.; Humphris, S.E. ); Lalou, C. . Lab. CNRS-CEA); Petersen, S. Aachen Univ. of Technology )

    1993-12-01

    The TAG hydrothermal field is a site of major active and inactive volcanic-hosted hydrothermal mineralization in the rift valley of the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 26[degree]N. The axial high is the principal locus of present magmatic intrusions. The TAG field contains three main areas of present and past hydrothermal activity: (1) an actively venting high-temperature sulfide mound; (2) two former high-temperature vent areas; (3) a zone of low-temperature venting and precipitation of Fe and Mn oxide deposits. The volcanic centers occur at the intersections between ridge axis-parallel normal faults and projected axis-transverse transfer faults. The intersections of these active fault systems may act as conduits both for magmatic intrusions from sources beneath the axial high that build the volcanic centers and for hydrothermal upwelling that taps the heat sources. Radiometric dating of sulfide samples and manganese crusts in the hydrothermal zones and dating of sediments intercalated with pillow lava flows in the volcanic center adjacent to the active sulfide mound indicate multiple episodes of hydrothermal activity throughout the field driven by heat supplied by episodic intrusions over a period of at least 140 [times] 10[sup 3] yr. The sulfide deposits are built by juxtaposition and superposition during relatively long residence times near episodic axial heat sources counterbalanced by mass wasting in the tectonically active rift valley of the slow-spreading oceanic ridge. Hydrothermal reworking of a relict hydrothermal zone by high-temperature hydrothermal episodes has recrystallized sulfides and concentrated the first visible primary gold reported in a deposit at an oceanic ridge.

  19. The early Mesozoic Birdsboro central Atlantic margin basin in the Mid-Atlantic region, eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faill, R.T.

    2003-01-01

    The early Mesozoic Birdsboro basin (new name) was a single, elongate depositional trough in the present Mid-Atlantic area of the eastern United States, extending north-eastward from central Virginia across Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey into southern New York. What now remains after erosion comprises the Barboursville, Culpeper, Gettysburg, and Newark remnants. Some 7?? km of late Triassic and early Jurassic continental sediments of varying provenances entered and spread across in the Birdsboro basin in several depositional environments. The five resulting sedimentary lithosomes include feldspathic sandstone, quartzose sandstone, red silty mudstone, gray shale, and fanglomerate. The extensive interbedding, intertonguing, and lateral gradation among these lithosomes suggest that they were contemporary and closely interrelated. The feldspathic sandstone lithosome contains sediment with a southeastern provenance that accumulated in a bajada environment extending the length of the southeastern side of the basin. Sediment in the quartzose sandstone lithosome had a northwestern provenance-the coarse-grained fraction formed regional alluvial fans at the mouths of four major input centers. The finer-grained fraction was deposited in the distal reaches of these fans and in the playa environments in the interfan areas; this fraction formed the red silty mudstone lithosome. Gray/black shales and argillites of the gray shale lithosome accumulated in lacustrine environments in the interfan areas. The fanglomerate lithosome comprises numerous small, lobate deposits of poorly sorted sediment along both basin margins. The location and time of activity of the northwest input centers largely determined the distribution and areal extent of the various depositional environments and consequent lithosome along the length and across the width of the basin. The Birdsboro basin was deformed (tilted, faulted, and folded) sometime after the deposition of the youngest preserved rocks

  20. Characteristic length scales and time-averaged transport velocities of suspended sediment in the mid-Atlantic Region, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, James; Schenk, Edward R.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Gellis, Allen; Noe, Greg; Williamson, Elyse; Karwan, Diana L.; O'Neal, Michael; Marquard, Julia; Aalto, Rolf; Newbold, Denis

    2014-02-01

    Watershed Best Management Practices (BMPs) are often designed to reduce loading from particle-borne contaminants, but the temporal lag between BMP implementation and improvement in receiving water quality is difficult to assess because particles are only moved downstream episodically, resting for long periods in storage between transport events. A theory is developed that describes the downstream movement of suspended sediment particles accounting for the time particles spend in storage given sediment budget data (by grain size fraction) and information on particle transit times through storage reservoirs. The theory is used to define a suspended sediment transport length scale that describes how far particles are carried during transport events, and to estimate a downstream particle velocity that includes time spent in storage. At 5 upland watersheds of the mid-Atlantic region, transport length scales for silt-clay range from 4 to 60 km, while those for sand range from 0.4 to 113 km. Mean sediment velocities for silt-clay range from 0.0072 km/yr to 0.12 km/yr, while those for sand range from 0.0008 km/yr to 0.20 km/yr, 4-6 orders of magnitude slower than the velocity of water in the channel. These results suggest lag times of 100-1000 years between BMP implementation and effectiveness in receiving waters such as the Chesapeake Bay (where BMPs are located upstream of the characteristic transport length scale). Many particles likely travel much faster than these average values, so further research is needed to determine the complete distribution of suspended sediment velocities in real watersheds.

  1. Turbulence and finestructure in a deep ocean channel with sill overflow on the mid-Atlantic ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippenhauer, Sandra; Dengler, Marcus; Fischer, Tim; Kanzow, Torsten

    2015-05-01

    Diapycnal mixing in the deep ocean is known to be much stronger in the vicinity of rough topography of mid-ocean ridges than above abyssal plains. In this study a horizontally profiling microstructure probe attached to an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is used to infer the spatial distribution of the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (ε) in the central valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first successful realization of a horizontal, deep-ocean microstructure survey. More than 22 h of horizontal, near-bottom microstructure data from the Lucky Strike segment (37°N) are presented. The study focuses on a channel with unidirectional sill overflow. Density was found to decrease along the channel following the mean northward flow of 3 to 8 cm/s. The magnitude of the rate of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation was distributed asymmetrically relative to the position of the sill. Elevated dissipation rates were present in a segment 1-4 km downstream (north) of the sill with peak values of 1 ×10-7 W/kg. Large flow speeds and elevated density finestructure were observed within this segment. Lowered hydrographic measurements indicated unstable stratification in the same region. The data indicate that hydraulic control was established at least temporarily. Inside the channel at wavelengths between 1 m and 250 m the slopes of AUV-inferred horizontal temperature gradient spectra were found to be consistent with turbulence in the inertial-convective subrange. Integrated temperature gradient variance in this wavelength interval was consistent with an ε2/3 dependence. The results illustrate that deep-reaching AUVs are a useful tool to study deep ocean turbulence over complex terrain where free-falling and lowered turbulence measurements are inefficient and time-consuming.

  2. Geochemistry of vent fluid particles formed during initial hydrothermal fluid-seawater mixing along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klevenz, Verena; Bach, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Katja; Hentscher, Michael; Koschinsky, Andrea; Petersen, Sven

    2011-10-01

    We present geochemical data of black smoker particulates filtered from hydrothermal fluids with seawater-dilutions ranging from 0-99%. Results indicate the dominance of sulphide minerals (Fe, Cu, and Zn sulphides) in all samples taken at different hydrothermal sites on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Pronounced differences in the geochemistry of the particles between Logatchev I and 5°S hydrothermal fields could be attributed to differences in fluid chemistry. Lower metal/sulphur ratios (Me/H2S < 1) compared to Logatchev I result in a larger amount of particles precipitated per liter fluid and the occurrence of elemental sulphur at 5°S, while at Logatchev I Fe oxides occur in larger amounts. Systematic trends with dilution degree of the fluid include the precipitation of large amounts of Cu sulphides at a low dilution and a pronounced drop with increasing dilution. Moreover, Fe (sulphides or oxides) precipitation increases with dilution of the vent fluid by seawater. Geochemical reaction path modeling of hydrothermal fluid-seawater mixing and conductive cooling indicates that Cu sulphide formation at Logatchev I and 5°S mainly occurs at high temperatures and low dilution of the hydrothermal fluid by seawater. Iron precipitation is enhanced at higher fluid dilution, and the different amounts of minerals forming at 5°S and Logatchev I are thermodynamically controlled. Larger total amounts of minerals and larger amounts of sulphide precipitate during the mixing path when compared to the cooling path. Differences between model and field observations do occur and are attributable to closed system modeling, to kinetic influences and possibly to organic constituents of the hydrothermal fluids not accounted for by the model.

  3. OBS records of Whale vocalizations from Lucky-strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge during 2007-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, A.; Rai, A.; Singh, S. C.; Crawford, W. C.; Escartin, J.; Cannat, M.

    2009-12-01

    Passive seismic experiments to study seismicity require a long term deployment of ocean-bottom seismometers (OBSs). These instruments also record a large amount of non-seismogenic signals such as movement of large ships, air-gun shots, and marine mammal vocalizations. We report a bi-product of our passive seismic experiment (BBMOMAR) conducted around the Lucky-strike hydrothermal field of the slow-spreading mid-Atlantic ridge. Five multi-component ocean-bottom seismometers (recording two horizontal, one vertical and one pressure channel) were deployed during 2007-2008. During 13 months of deployment, abundant vocalizations of marine mammals have been recorded by all the five equipments. By analyzing the frequency content of data and their pattern of occurrence, we conclude that these low-frequency vocalizations (~20-40 Hz) typically corresponds to blue and fin-whales. These signals if not identified, could be mis-interpreted as underwater seismic/hydrothermal activity. Our data show an increase in the number of vocalizations recorded during the winter season relative to the summer. As part of the seismic monitoring of the Lucky-strike site, we anticipate to extend this study to the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 periods, after the recovery and deployment of the array during the BATHYLUCK09 cruise. Long-term and continuous records of calls of marine mammals provide valuable information that could be used to identify the species, study their seasonal behaviour and their migration paths. Our study suggestes that passive experiments such as ocean-bottom seismometers deployed at key locations, could provide useful secondary infromation about oceanic species besides recording seismicity, which is otherwise not possible without harming or interfering with their activity.

  4. Shewanella electrodiphila sp. nov., a psychrotolerant bacterium isolated from Mid-Atlantic Ridge deep-sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinwei; Burgess, J Grant

    2015-09-01

    Strains MAR441(T) and MAR445 were isolated from Mid-Atlantic Ridge sediments from a depth of 2734 m, and were found to belong to the genus Shewanella. The strains were rod-shaped, pigmented, non-motile and capable of anaerobic growth either by fermentation of carbohydrates or by anaerobic respiration. The strains utilized a variety of electron acceptors, including nitrate and ferric compounds, and could utilize peptone when grown anaerobically in a two-chambered microbial fuel cell, which used carbon cloth electrodes and delivered a stable power output of ,150-200 mW m(-2). The major fatty acids were typical of the genus Shewanella, with major components C13 : 0, iso-C13 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, C16 : 0, C16 : 1ω7c, C18 : 1ω7c and C20 : 5ω3 fatty acids. The DNA G+C content of strains MAR441(T) and MAR445 was 42.4 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that strains MAR441(T) and MAR445 were most closely related to Shewanella olleyana (sequence similarities 97.9% to the type strain). DNA-DNA hybridization demonstrated only 15.6-37.2% relatedness between strain MAR441(T) and the type strains of related species of the genus Shewanella. Phenotypic characteristics confirmed that these isolates constituted a novel species of the genus Shewanella, for which the name Shewanella electrodiphila sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is MAR441(T) (5ATCC BAA-2408(T) = DSM 24955(T)).

  5. Chemosynthetic communities and biogeochemical energy pathways along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: The case of Bathymodiolus azoricus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bris, N.; Duperron, S.

    Hydrothermal vents fields from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) are hosted in diverse geological contexts, resulting in contrasted end-member fluids. Despite this variability, the same animal species dominate the chemosynthetic fauna at almost all sites. Among these organisms, two Bathymodiolus mussel species occur. Both harbor similar sulfide- and methane-oxidizing endosymbionts in their gills. This dual symbiosis is thought to allow mussels to adapt to the different types of fluids encountered along the MAR. Distribution, abundances, and nutritional role of the two symbiont types tend to be correlated with end-member composition, but their variability cannot be fully explained without considering local influences. In this paper, the processes governing the environment of mussel aggregates in terms of available electron donors and energy sources are discussed. The properties of mixed fluids surrounding animals depart from those predicted from end-member conservative dilution. Both subsurface transformations and the influence of mussels on their own environment can significantly modify the relative availability of electron donors. Recent observations about mussel dual symbioses are summarized, leading to the assumption that flexible response of symbiont populations may be a key adaptation allowing mussels to colonize the diversified MAR vent habitats. As illustrated here, tools are becoming available to investigate both environment and symbiosis in detail. We advocate for a more integrative study of the biogeochemical couplings between fluids and chemosynthetic species at hydrothermal vents, using combined interdisciplinary approaches at the scale of organisms. Bathymodiolus azoricus from contrasted chemical environments appear as particularly relevant models for such studies.

  6. Landscape controls on the timing of spring, autumn, and growing season length in mid-Atlantic forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elmore, A.J.; Guinn, S.M.; Minsley, B.J.; Richardson, A.D.

    2012-01-01

    The timing of spring leaf development, trajectories of summer leaf area, and the timing of autumn senescence have profound impacts to the water, carbon, and energy balance of ecosystems, and are likely influenced by global climate change. Limited field-based and remote-sensing observations have suggested complex spatial patterns related to geographic features that influence climate. However, much of this variability occurs at spatial scales that inhibit a detailed understanding of even the dominant drivers. Recognizing these limitations, we used nonlinear inverse modeling of medium-resolution remote sensing data, organized by day of year, to explore the influence of climate-related landscape factors on the timing of spring and autumn leaf-area trajectories in mid-Atlantic, USA forests. We also examined the extent to which declining summer greenness (greendown) degrades the precision and accuracy of observations of autumn offset of greenness. Of the dominant drivers of landscape phenology, elevation was the strongest, explaining up to 70% of the spatial variation in the onset of greenness. Urban land cover was second in importance, influencing spring onset and autumn offset to a distance of 32 km from large cities. Distance to tidal water also influenced phenological timing, but only within ~5 km of shorelines. Additionally, we observed that (i) growing season length unexpectedly increases with increasing elevation at elevations below 275 m; (ii) along gradients in urban land cover, timing of autumn offset has a stronger effect on growing season length than does timing of spring onset; and (iii) summer greendown introduces bias and uncertainty into observations of the autumn offset of greenness. These results demonstrate the power of medium grain analyses of landscape-scale phenology for understanding environmental controls on growing season length, and predicting how these might be affected by climate change.

  7. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic). Striped Bass

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, C.W.; Neves, R.J.; Pardue, G.B.

    1983-10-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries on the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. The striped bass (Morone saxatilis) is a highly valued recreational and commercial fish species and is surpassed in total recreational catch (weight) only by bluefish and Atlantic mackerel on the Atlantic coast. Males mature at age 2 or 3, and females at age 4 or 5. Striped bass are anadromous, spawning in fresh or nearly fresh water, from April through June in the Mid-Atlantic region. Upper Chesapeake Bay, its major tributaries, and the Chesapeake-Delaware Canal are the most important spawning grounds on the Atlantic coast. Eggs are semibuoyant, and require a minimum current velocity of 30.5 cm/s during development to keep them from settling and smothering on the bottom. Environmental conditions during the larval stage are considered most crucial in terms of future year class strength. Juveniles remain in or near areas of origin for 2 or 3 years, at which time a portion of the juveniles may join coastal migratory stocks, moving north in spring and summer and south in fall and winter. Temperature, salinity, current velocity, and turbidity are important environmental factors for striped bass. Eggs require water temperatures between 14/sup 0/C and 23/sup 0/C, salinities between 0 and 10 ppt, water currents of at least 30.5 cm/s, and turbidities less than 1000 mg/l for successful development and hatching. Larvae require temperatures between 10/sup 0/C and 25/sup 0/C, salinities between 0 and 15 ppt, and turbidities less than 500 mg/1 for survival. Juvenile and adult tolerances are generally wider. 171 references, 4 figures, 9 tables.

  8. Species profiles: life histories and environmental requirements of coastal fishes and invertebrates (Mid-Atlantic). Atlantic silverside

    SciTech Connect

    Fay, C.W.; Neves, R.J.; Pardue, G.B.

    1983-10-01

    Species profiles are literature summaries of the taxonomy, morphology, range, life history, and environmental requirements of coastal aquatic species. They are prepared to assist in environmental impact assessment. The Atlantic silverside (Menidia menidia) is an important link in estuarine food webs as an opportunistic omnivore and as forage for large piscivores such as striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix). Many times the Atlantic silverside is the most abundant fish species encountered in estuaries and tributaries. They mature at age 1 and spawn in the intertidal zone of estuaries from March to June in the mid-Atlantic region. Few 2-year-old fish are ever encountered, so the Atlantic silverside is basically a short-lived species. Most spawning occurs at high tide during new or full moon phases. Eggs are adhesive and are found attached to submerged vegetation. Larvae, juveniles, and adults generally inhabit similar areas. Sex is determined in larval development 32 to 46 days after hatching, and is a function of parental genotype and water temperature regime during the critical period. Fisheries for this species are not documented. Eggs can tolerate water temperatures between 15/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/C, and larvae need temperatures above 15/sup 0/C for survival. Larvae tolerate relatively acute temperature increases. Upper lethal temperatures for juveniles and adults range from 30.5/sup 0/ to 33.8/sup 0/C, depending on acclimation temperature. Salinities of 20 ppt or lower significantly delay hatching and affect larval survival. Juveniles and adults tolerate the full range of naturally occurring salinities (i.e., freshwater to at least 37.8 ppt). 57 references, 2 figures.

  9. Distribution of the biomass-dominant pelagic fish, Bathylagus euryops (Argentiniformes: Microstomatidae), along the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweetman, C. J.; Sutton, T. T.; Vecchione, M.; Latour, R. J.

    2013-08-01

    The northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), from Iceland to the Azores, ranges in depth from 800-4500 m and extends over an area of 3.7 million km2. Despite its size, few studies have described the distribution of pelagic fishes along the MAR. Recent evidence from MAR-ECO, a Census of Marine Life field project, reported increased abundance and biomass of deep-pelagic fishes below 1000 m on the ridge, which stands in stark contrast to the traditional view that abundance and biomass decline exponentially with increasing depth in ‘typical’ open ocean ecosystems. Among the midwater fishes sampled during the MAR-ECO campaign, Bathylagus euryops (Argentiniformes: Microstomatidae) was the biomass-dominant pelagic species and ranked third in total abundance. In this paper, we characterize the distribution of B. euryops in relation to physical and biological variables along the MAR. Average catch of B. euryops over the MAR varied between 0.68 individuals/100,000 m3±0.70 individuals at the Azorean Zone and 5.82 individuals/100,000 m3±2.08 individuals at the Reykjanes Ridge. Generalized linear models applied to B. euryops catch data indicated that ridge section, depth zone, and prey abundance were important explanatory variables in structuring the distribution along the MAR. Analyses of vertical distribution patterns, relative to time of day and fish size, showed that larger fish were found deeper in the water column, likely due to an ontogenetic migration to depth. Mean fish size increased from 58.9 mm standard length in the epipelagic zone and continually increased to 155.7 mm standard length between 2300-3000 m. Due to the high abundance and biomass observed along the MAR, B. euryops appears to be an important species in the oceanic food web of the North Atlantic Ocean.

  10. Evaluation of two algorithms for a network of coastal HF radars in the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohut, Josh; Roarty, Hugh; Randall-Goodwin, Evan; Glenn, Scott; Lichtenwalner, C. Sage

    2012-06-01

    The National High Frequency (HF) Surface Current Mapping Radar Network is being developed as a backbone system within the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System. This paper focuses on the application of HF radar-derived surface current maps to U.S. Coast Guard Search and Rescue operations along the Mid-Atlantic coast of the USA. In that context, we evaluated two algorithms used to combine maps of radial currents into a single map of total vector currents. In situ data provided by seven drifter deployments and four bottom-mounted current meters were used to (1) evaluate the well-established unweighted least squares (UWLS) and the more recently adapted optimal interpolation (OI) algorithms and (2) quantify the sensitivity of the OI algorithm to varying decorrelation scales and error thresholds. Results with both algorithms were shown to depend on the location within the HF radar data footprint. The comparisons near the center of the HF radar coverage showed no significant difference between the two algorithms. The most significant distinction between the two was seen in the drifter trajectories. With these simulations, the weighting of radial velocities by distance in the OI implementation was very effective at reducing both the distance between the actual drifter and the cluster of simulated particles as well as the scale of the search area that encompasses them. In this study, the OI further reduced the already improved UWLS-based search areas by an additional factor of 2. The results also indicated that the OI output was relatively insensitive to the varying decorrelation scales and error thresholds tested.

  11. Occurrence and antibiotic resistance of multiple Salmonella serotypes recovered from water, sediment and soil on mid-Atlantic tomato farms.

    PubMed

    Micallef, Shirley A; Rosenberg Goldstein, Rachel E; George, Ashish; Kleinfelter, Lara; Boyer, Marc S; McLaughlin, Cristina R; Estrin, Andrew; Ewing, Laura; Jean-Gilles Beaubrun, Junia; Hanes, Darcy E; Kothary, Mahendra H; Tall, Ben D; Razeq, Jafar H; Joseph, Sam W; Sapkota, Amy R

    2012-04-01

    Salmonella outbreaks associated with the consumption of raw tomatoes have been prevalent in recent years. However, sources of Salmonella contamination of tomatoes remain poorly understood. The objectives of this study were to identify ecological reservoirs of Salmonella on tomato farms, and to test antimicrobial susceptibilities of recovered Salmonella isolates. Fourteen Mid-Atlantic tomato farms in the U.S. were sampled in 2009 and 2010. Groundwater, irrigation pond water, pond sediment, irrigation ditch water, rhizosphere and irrigation ditch soil, leaves, tomatoes, and swabs of harvest bins and worker sanitary facilities were analyzed for Salmonella using standard culture methods and/or a flow-through immunocapture method. All presumptive Salmonella isolates (n=63) were confirmed using PCR and the Vitek(®) 2 Compact System, and serotyped using the Premi(®)Test Salmonella and a conventional serotyping method. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out using the Sensititre™ microbroth dilution system. Four of the 14 farms (29%) and 12 out of 1,091 samples (1.1%) were found to harbor Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica. Salmonella was isolated by the immunocapture method from soil, while the culture method recovered isolates from irrigation pond water and sediment, and irrigation ditch water. No Salmonella was detected on leaves or tomatoes. Multiple serotypes were identified from soil and water, four of which-S. Braenderup, S. Javiana, S. Newport and S. Typhimurium-have been previously implicated in Salmonella outbreaks associated with tomato consumption. Resistance to sulfisoxazole was prevalent and some resistance to ampicillin, cefoxitin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and tetracycline was also observed. This study implicates irrigation water and soil as possible reservoirs of Salmonella on tomato farms and irrigation ditches as ephemeral habitats for Salmonella. The findings point to the potential for pre-harvest contamination of tomatoes from

  12. The Production of Methane, Hydrogen, and Organic Compounds in Ultramafic-Hosted Hydrothermal Vents of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Charlou, J.L.; Holm, N.G.; Mousis, O.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Both hydrogen and methane are consistently discharged in large quantities in hydrothermal fluids issued from ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal fields discovered along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Considering the vast number of these fields discovered or inferred, hydrothermal fluxes represent a significant input of H2 and CH4 to the ocean. Although there are lines of evidence of their abiogenic formation from stable C and H isotope results, laboratory experiments, and thermodynamic data, neither their origin nor the reaction pathways generating these gases have been fully constrained yet. Organic compounds detected in the fluids may also be derived from abiotic reactions. Although thermodynamics are favorable and extensive experimental work has been done on Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions, for instance, nothing is clear yet about their origin and formation mechanism from actual data. Since chemolithotrophic microbial communities commonly colonize hydrothermal vents, biogenic and thermogenic processes are likely to contribute to the production of H2, CH4, and other organic compounds. There seems to be a consensus toward a mixed origin (both sources and processes) that is consistent with the ambiguous nature of the isotopic data. But the question that remains is, to what proportions? More systematic experiments as well as integrated geochemical approaches are needed to disentangle hydrothermal geochemistry. This understanding is of prime importance considering the implications of hydrothermal H2, CH4, and organic compounds for the ocean global budget, global cycles, and the origin of life. Key Words: Hydrogen—Methane—Organics—MAR—Abiotic synthesis—Serpentinization—Ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal vents. Astrobiology 15, 381–399. PMID:25984920

  13. Comparing biosignatures from North Pond, Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the Louisville Seamount Chain, off New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türke, Andreas; Ménez, Bénédicte; Bach, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    The subseafloor ocean represents Earth's largest aquifer and the flow of seawater fluxed through these flanks is > 1016 L/yr, rivaling the rate of river discharge into the oceans. When volcanic basalt glass is exposed to oxygen-rich seawater, rims of palagonite form at the expense of glass. Within subseafloor basalt glass, a range of putative microbial biosignatures have been interpreted as traces of life in these basaltic aquifers, and these have been studied as a potential analogue for early life on Earth or extraterrestrial habitats for several years. However, little is known about the relationship of the physical and chemical nature of the habitat and the prevalent types of biosignatures. We report and compare biosignatures from two distinctly different study sites that vary strongly. We analyzed rock samples microscopically for their putative textural biosignatures and their associated organic molecules via Fourier transform infrared spectrometry. The biosignatures found in basalts from the North Pond Region, at the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge 23°N, which is young well-oxygenated crust, are characterized by a small textural diversity. However, the organic molecules associated, show evidence for the occurrence of complex molecules like proteins. In contrast, the biosignatures from the Louisville Seamount Chain, which are much older (50 - 80 Ma), are more diverse in terms of textures, while the organic molecules are more degraded and suggest an Archaeal origin. We propose that microbial communities change significantly during crustal evolution and that microbes associated with older and severely altered crust may not be related to the textures commonly found within subseafloor basalt glass and often interpreted as trace fossils.

  14. Geomorphic characterization of four shelf-sourced submarine canyons along the U.S. Mid-Atlantic continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obelcz, Jeffrey; Brothers, Daniel; Chaytor, Jason; Brink, Uri ten; Ross, Steve W.; Brooke, Sandra

    2014-06-01

    Shelf-sourced submarine canyons are common features of continental margins and are fundamental to deep-sea sedimentary systems. Despite their geomorphic and geologic significance, relatively few passive margin shelf-breaching canyons worldwide have been mapped using modern geophysical methods. Between 2007 and 2012 a series of geophysical surveys was conducted across four major canyons of the US Mid-Atlantic margin: Wilmington, Baltimore, Washington, and Norfolk canyons. More than 5700 km2 of high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and 890 line-km of sub-bottom CHIRP profiles were collected along the outer shelf and uppermost slope (depths of 80-1200 m). The data allowed us to compare and contrast the fine-scale morphology of each canyon system. The canyons have marked differences in the morphology and orientation of canyon heads, steepness and density of sidewall gullies, and the character of the continental shelf surrounding canyon rims. Down-canyon axial profiles for Washington, Baltimore and Wilmington canyons have linear shapes, and each canyon thalweg exhibits morphological evidence for recent, relatively small-scale sediment transport. For example, Washington Canyon displays extremely steep wall gradients and contains ~100 m wide, 5-10 m deep, v-shaped incisions down the canyon axis, suggesting modern or recent sediment transport. In contrast, the convex axial thalweg profile, the absence of thalweg incision, and evidence for sediment infilling at the canyon head, suggest that depositional processes strongly influence Norfolk Canyon during the current sea-level high-stand. The north walls of Wilmington, Washington and Norfolk canyons are steeper than the south walls due to differential erosion, though the underlying cause for this asymmetry is not clear. Furthermore, we speculate that most of the geomorphic features observed within the canyons (e.g., terraces, tributary canyons, gullies, and hanging valleys) were formed during the Pleistocene, and show only

  15. Geomorphic characterization of four shelf-sourced submarine canyons along the U.S. Mid-Atlantic continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obelcz, Jeffrey; Brothers, Daniel S.; Chaytor, Jason D.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Ross, Steve W.; Brooke, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Shelf-sourced submarine canyons are common features of continental margins and are fundamental to deep-sea sedimentary systems. Despite their geomorphic and geologic significance, relatively few passive margin shelf-breaching canyons worldwide have been mapped using modern geophysical methods. Between 2007 and 2012 a series of geophysical surveys was conducted across four major canyons of the US Mid-Atlantic margin: Wilmington, Baltimore, Washington, and Norfolk canyons. More than 5700 km2 of high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and 890 line-km of sub-bottom CHIRP profiles were collected along the outer shelf and uppermost slope (depths of 80-1200 m). The data allowed us to compare and contrast the fine-scale morphology of each canyon system. The canyons have marked differences in the morphology and orientation of canyon heads, steepness and density of sidewall gullies, and the character of the continental shelf surrounding canyon rims. Down-canyon axial profiles for Washington, Baltimore and Wilmington canyons have linear shapes, and each canyon thalweg exhibits morphological evidence for recent, relatively small-scale sediment transport. For example, Washington Canyon displays extremely steep wall gradients and contains ~100 m wide, 5–10 m deep, v-shaped incisions down the canyon axis, suggesting modern or recent sediment transport. In contrast, the convex axial thalweg profile, the absence of thalweg incision, and evidence for sediment infilling at the canyon head, suggest that depositional processes strongly influence Norfolk Canyon during the current sea-level high-stand. The north walls of Wilmington, Washington and Norfolk canyons are steeper than the south walls due to differential erosion, though the underlying cause for this asymmetry is not clear. Furthermore, we speculate that most of the geomorphic features observed within the canyons (e.g., terraces, tributary canyons, gullies, and hanging valleys) were formed during the Pleistocene, and show only

  16. Fish parasites in the bathyal zone: The halosaur Halosauropsis macrochir (Günther, 1878) from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimpel, S.; Palm, H. W.; Busch, M. W.; Kellermanns, E.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 42 Halosauropsis macrochir from a single position on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) were collected for studies on parasites and feeding ecology. A total of 9 different parasite species were found, with most of them belonging to the Digenea (4 species) and Nematoda (3). The host specific Degeneria halosauri, (Digenea) and Cystidicolidae indet. (Nematoda) were the predominant species, reaching a prevalence of 100.0% and 57.1% with intensities of infection of 1-12 and 1-10, respectively. Less host specific parasites such as Gonocerca phycidis (Digenea) and Tetraphyllidea indet. (Cestoda) occurred at low rates of infection. The parasite fauna of this bathyal fish can be described as predominantly adult and host specific, with larval and less host specific components. A total of 16 different food groups were identified, most of them of benthic origin or associated with the benthopelagial. The predominant prey organisms belonged to the Crustacea (e.g., Copepoda, Gammaridea, Amphipoda and Isopoda), which serve as main parasite vectors for H. macrochir. This deep-sea fish seems to follow a general pattern of fish parasites in the deep sea, with most isolated parasites belonging to the digeneans, nematodes and a cestode. The parasite composition is caused by the narrow depth range of the species and the restricted distribution of the fish family Halosauridae. The species richness was found to be lower than other demersal fish from the deep sea and shallow waters, however, higher than those from deep-sea fish living in the pelagial.

  17. Characteristic length scales and time-averaged transport velocities of suspended sediment in the mid-Atlantic Region, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pizzuto, James; Schenk, Edward R.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Gellis, Allen; Noe, Greg; Williamson, Elyse; Karwan, Diana L.; O'Neal, Michael; Marquard, Julia; Aalto, Rolf; Newbold, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Watershed Best Management Practices (BMPs) are often designed to reduce loading from particle-borne contaminants, but the temporal lag between BMP implementation and improvement in receiving water quality is difficult to assess because particles are only moved downstream episodically, resting for long periods in storage between transport events. A theory is developed that describes the downstream movement of suspended sediment particles accounting for the time particles spend in storage given sediment budget data (by grain size fraction) and information on particle transit times through storage reservoirs. The theory is used to define a suspended sediment transport length scale that describes how far particles are carried during transport events, and to estimate a downstream particle velocity that includes time spent in storage. At 5 upland watersheds of the mid-Atlantic region, transport length scales for silt-clay range from 4 to 60 km, while those for sand range from 0.4 to 113 km. Mean sediment velocities for silt-clay range from 0.0072 km/yr to 0.12 km/yr, while those for sand range from 0.0008 km/yr to 0.20 km/yr, 4–6 orders of magnitude slower than the velocity of water in the channel. These results suggest lag times of 100–1000 years between BMP implementation and effectiveness in receiving waters such as the Chesapeake Bay (where BMPs are located upstream of the characteristic transport length scale). Many particles likely travel much faster than these average values, so further research is needed to determine the complete distribution of suspended sediment velocities in real watersheds.

  18. End-Pleistocene Soil Constituents from Selected Sites on the Mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecompte, M. A.; Rock, B. N.; Demitroff, M.; Reid, M.; Lucas, L.; Hughes, D.; Hayden, L. B.

    2008-12-01

    Stratigraphic analyses of soil samples taken from dated and undated sites located along the mid-Atlantic Coastal Plain have yielded evidence of increased contemporary biomass burning, compared to under and overlying strata. Host strata ages are known or projected to bracket the onset of the Younger Dryas cooling episode at 12.9 cal ka. This ongoing investigation includes samples from: 1) a late-Pleistocene aged periglacial feature located within the Pine Barrens of southern New Jersey; 2) an artifact dated stratum (~ 12.9 ka) in an embankment on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland; and 3) an as yet undated (C14 test results pending) embankment of the Perquimans River in northeastern North Carolina projected to be age-appropriate. Sample analysis of scanning electron (SEM) micrographs from the Chesapeake Bay site revealed charred fragments of late-Wisconsinan Krummholz birch (Betula) and species of spruce (Picea) and fir (Abies), which are not extant on the modern-day, temperate Coastal Plain. In addition, organic faunal material is found in association with ancient charred boreal wood, including hollow hair and skin fragments that are as yet unidentified, perhaps from cold climate adapted animals as inferred from host sediment age. Charred wood fragments are found to be attracted to a neodymium magnet. Some aggregates of organic matter appear to contain magnetic spherule-like grains whose composition is awaiting geochemical analysis. Photomicrographs of all specimens and a stratigraphic breakdown in the relative amount of burned carbon associated with each site and strata will be presented, along with the results of various analyses that are currently underway.

  19. On the mass and salt budgets for a region of the continental shelf in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo Yin; Weatherly, Georges L.; Pietrafesa, Leonard J.

    2001-12-01

    Two field studies were conducted across and along the continental shelf, one from February to May 1996 (deployment 1) and the other from July to October 1996 (deployment 2), in part to determine the mass and salt budgets of shelf water from south of Cape Henry to north of Cape Hatteras, the southernmost portion of the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The temporal means of current meter records indicated that most of the water enters the region across its northern boundary near the shelf break as part of a southward, alongshore current and exits the southeast corner as a southeastward flowing current. Estimates of the volume transports indicated that not all the transport across the northern boundary was accounted for by transport across the southern boundary, and that the remainder occurred as a broad, diffusive flow across the eastern boundary at the shelf break. Time series of volume transport across northern and southern boundaries were very similar and associated with variations in the alongshore wind stress and sea level, indicative of a geostrophic balance. Examination of the individual current meter records indicated these fluctuations were very barotropic even during deployment 2, which included the stratified summer season. Time series of the volume transport across the eastern boundary at the shelf break strongly mirrored the volume transport across the northern boundary minus that across the southern boundary, suggesting that the inferred eastern boundary transport was real and accommodated whatever the southern boundary could not. The turbulent salt flux across each boundary contributes very little to the net respective mass fluxes because the salt fluxes are almost governed by current velocity fields. The instantaneous and mean salt fluxes across each boundary were very well approximated by the instantaneous and mean volume transports across the boundary times the deployment average salinity across that boundary, respectively. The Ocean Margins Program (OMP) moored

  20. Distribution and feeding ecology of dolphins along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between Iceland and the Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doksæter, L.; Olsen, E.; Nøttestad, L.; Fernö, A.

    2008-01-01

    During Leg 1 of the MAR-ECO expedition on the R.V. G.O. Sars in June 2004 four main species of dolphins were observed along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from Iceland to the Azores: pilot whale ( Globicephala melas) ( n=326), short-beaked common dolphin ( Delphinus delphis) ( n=273), white-sided dolphin ( Lagenorhynchus acutus) ( n=103), and striped dolphin ( Stenella coeruleoalba) ( n=86). Pilot whales and white-sided dolphins were found in cold (5-16 °C) and less-saline (34.6-35.8‰) water masses in the northern part of the study area, whereas common and striped dolphins inhabited warmer (12-22 °C) and more-saline (34.8-36.7‰) waters in the south. Dolphins tended to aggregate in areas of steep slopes, but actual bottom depth appeared to be less important. Based on spatial correlations between dolphin occurrence and candidate prey organisms recorded acoustically and by midwater trawling, mesopelagic fishes and squids were assumed to be important prey items, with Benthosema glaciale probably being the most important prey for pilot whales and white-sided dolphins, while Lampanyctus macdonaldi, Stomias boa ferox and Chauliodus sloani were probably of particular importance for common dolphins. Cephalopods, especially Gonatus sp. and Teuthowenia megalops were the most likely prey species of pilot whales and striped dolphins, respectively. The difference in physical habitat north and south of the Sub-polar Frontal Zone seemed to have important effects on prey distribution, in turn influencing dolphin distribution.

  1. Serpentinization of abyssal peridotites from the MARK area, Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Sulfur geochemistry and reaction modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2003-01-01

    The opaque mineralogy and the contents and isotope compositions of sulfur in serpentinized peridotites from the MARK (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Kane Fracture Zone) area were examined to understand the conditions of serpentinization and evaluate this process as a sink for seawater sulfur. The serpentinites contain a sulfur-rich secondary mineral assemblage and have high sulfur contents (up to 1 wt.%) and elevated ??34Ssulfide (3.7 to 12.7???). Geochemical reaction modeling indicates that seawater-peridotite interaction at 300 to 400??C alone cannot account for both the high sulfur contents and high ??34Ssulfide. These require a multistage reaction with leaching of sulfide from subjacent gabbro during higher temperature (???400??C) reactions with seawater and subsequent deposition of sulfide during serpentinization of peridotite at ???300??C. Serpentinization produces highly reducing conditions and significant amounts of H2 and results in the partial reduction of seawater carbonate to methane. The latter is documented by formation of carbonate veins enriched in 13C (up to 4.5???) at temperatures above 250??C. Although different processes produce variable sulfur isotope effects in other oceanic serpentinites, sulfur is consistently added to abyssal peridotites during serpentinization. Data for serpentinites drilled and dredged from oceanic crust and from ophiolites indicate that oceanic peridotites are a sink for up to 0.4 to 6.0 ?? 1012 g seawater S yr-1. This is comparable to sulfur exchange that occurs in hydrothermal systems in mafic oceanic crust at midocean ridges and on ridge flanks and amounts to 2 to 30% of the riverine sulfate source and sedimentary sulfide sink in the oceans. The high concentrations and modified isotope compositions of sulfur in serpentinites could be important for mantle metasomatism during subduction of crust generated at slow spreading rates. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. Mid-Atlantic

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... as a function of view angle are visible over both land and water. Scientists are using MISR data to monitor changes in clouds, Earth's surface, and pollution particles in the air, and to assess their impact on climate. MISR ...

  3. Styles of Detachment Faulting at the Kane Oceanic Core Complex, 23°N Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, L. N.; Cheadle, M. J.; John, B. E.; Swapp, S. M.; Dick, H. J.; Tucholke, B. E.; Tivey, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    In 2004, R/V Knorr Cruise 180-2 used ROV Jason II, the autonomous vehicle ABE, and dredges to collect samples and geophysical data from the Kane Oceanic Core Complex (OCC) on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 23°N. Examination of the deformed samples by hand-sample analysis, petrography, electron backscatter diffraction, and geothermometry in conjunction with the interpreted bathymetry suggests that the Kane OCC is bound by a detachment fault system that initiated at a moderate to high angle (45-60°), and rooted below the brittle-plastic transition. Constraints on the initial dip of the detachment fault come from the slopes of the ridge forming the breakaway (>23° to the west and >22° to the east). Assuming this ridge formed by flexural uplift, these slopes suggest the detachment fault formed with a dip >45°. Fault rocks, including peridotite mylonites and gabbro ultramylonites, reveal a history of deformation from granulite and amphibolite through sub-greenschist facies including brittle cataclasis. We present two cross sections through the detachment fault and footwall based on samples collected from secondary, high-angle normal faults that cut the detachment. One section, through Cain Dome in the central OCC, is dominated by peridotite and shows a ~450-m thick zone of discrete ductile shear zones with the uppermost portion overprinted by a 200-m zone of semi-brittle and brittle deformation. These are maximum shear zone thicknesses due to the possibility of down-scarp slumping/displacement. The other section, through Adam Dome on the southwest part of the OCC, is dominated by gabbroic rocks and shows little deformation. This section lies <4 km from the breakaway, and is therefore inferred to have undergone only brittle deformation in the shallow crust. A rheologic analysis, using LPO-deduced deformation mechanisms and geothermometry to construct deformation mechanism maps, suggests strain rates for the amphibole-bearing gabbros, the gabbronorites, and the

  4. New Pressure Results from the Expedition 336 CORKs at North Pond, Western Flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K.; Villinger, H. W.; Davis, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    We report results from a nearly two-year record of pressure data from three CORK hydrogeological observatories in the ~8x15 km "North Pond" sedimented basin in ~7 Ma crust west of the mid-Atlantic Ridge at 23°N. The new data were recovered during operations with the ROV Jason from the German R/V Maria S. Merian in April of 2014. Two of the CORKs (in Holes U1382A and U1383C) had been installed during IODP Expedition 336 in fall of 2011, with an initial installment of 6-7 months data recovered in spring 2012, also by Jason from R/V Merian. The third hole, U1383B, was instrumented during the 2012 cruise with a "CORK-Lite" deployed by the ROV. All three installations monitor formation pressures in basement beneath the sediment pond. The new data confirm results of the first half-year of data, which suggested a slight formation overpressure (~10 kPa) relative to hydrostatic in the two full CORK installations. This was somewhat surprising given (a) the long history of downhole flow in DSDP Hole 395A that also penetrated basement beneath the sediment pond, and (b) prior observations at more thickly-sedimented eastern Pacific ridge flanks of formation underpressures in sites drilled into basement lows. The new results show a small phase lag and attenuation of formation tidal signals relative to seafloor tides that is the same in all three holes, which confirms that the CORKs are properly sealed at the seafloor. The phase lag and attenuation are also the same among three separate basement intervals in Hole U1383C, which suggests either that the entire drilled section is hydrogeologically well connected or that downhole packers between the intervals do not seal completely. We explore potential models to explain the slight observed overpressures. One possibility is that the geometry of the isolated sediment pond results in higher formation temperatures and less dense formation fluids immediately below the relatively impermeable sediment pond, such that surrounding cooler

  5. Biodiversity patterns, environmental drivers and indicator species on a high-temperature hydrothermal edifice, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazin, Jozée; Legendre, Pierre; de Busserolles, Fanny; Fabri, Marie-Claire; Guilini, Katja; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N.; Morineaux, Marie; Vanreusel, Ann; Sarradin, Pierre-Marie

    2015-11-01

    Knowledge on quantitative faunal distribution patterns of hydrothermal communities in slow-spreading vent fields is particularly scarce, despite the importance of these ridges in the global mid-ocean system. This study assessed the composition, abundance and diversity of 12 benthic faunal assemblages from various locations on the Eiffel Tower edifice (Lucky Strike vent field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and investigated the role of key environmental conditions (temperature, total dissolved iron (TdFe), sulfide (TdS), copper (TdCu) and pH) on the distribution of macro- and meiofaunal species at small spatial scales (<1 m). There were differences in macro- and meiofaunal community structure between the different sampling locations, separating the hydrothermal community of the Eiffel Tower edifice into three types of microhabitats: (1) cold microhabitats characterized by low temperatures (<6 °C), high TdCu (up to 2.4±1.37 μmol l-1), high pH (up to 7.34±0.13) but low TdS concentrations (<6.98±5.01 μmol l-1); (2) warm microhabitats characterized by warmer temperatures (>6 °C), low pH (<6.5) and high TdS/TdFe concentrations (>12.8 μmol l-1/>1.1 μmol l-1 respectively); and (3) the third microhabitat characterized by intermediate abiotic conditions. Environmental conditions showed more variation in the warm microhabitats than in the cold microhabitats. In terms of fauna, the warm microhabitats had lower macro- and meiofaunal densities, and lower richness and Shannon diversity than the cold microhabitats. Six macrofaunal species (Branchipolynoe seepensis, Amathys lutzi, Bathymodiolus azoricus, Lepetodrilus fucensis, Protolira valvatoides and Chorocaris chacei) and three meiofaunal taxa (Paracanthonchus, Cephalochaetosoma and Microlaimus) were identified as being significant indicator species/taxa of particular microhabitats. Our results also highlight very specific niche separation for copepod juveniles among the different hydrothermal microhabitats. Some sampling units

  6. Mantle heterogeneity beneath the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge: trace element evidence for contamination of ambient asthenospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Roux, P. J.; le Roex, A. P.; Schilling, J.-G.; Shimizu, N.; Perkins, W. W.; Pearce, N. J. G.

    2002-10-01

    We report new trace element data for an extensive suite of quench basalt glasses dredged from the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) between 40°S and 52.5°S. Ratios between highly incompatible trace elements are strongly correlated and indicate a systematic distribution of incompatible element enriched mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) (E-type: Zr/Nb=5.9-19, Y/Nb=0.9-8.4, (La/Sm) n=1.0-2.9) and incompatible element depleted MORB (N-type: Zr/Nb=30-69, Y/Nb=11-29, (La/Sm) n=0.48-0.79) along this section of the southern MAR. A notable feature of N-type MORB from the region is the higher than usual Ba/Nb (4-9), La/Nb (1.2-2.4) and primitive mantle normalised K/Nb ratios (>1). Ba/Nb ratios in E-type MORB samples from 47.5 to 49°S are especially elevated (>10). The occurrence and geographic distribution of E-type MORB along this section of the southern MAR can be correlated with the ridge-centred Shona and off-axis Discovery mantle plumes. In conjunction with published isotope data for a subset of the same sample suite [Douglass et al., J. Geophys. Res. 104 (1999) 2941], a model is developed whereby prior to the breakup of Gondwana and the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean, the underlying asthenospheric mantle was locally contaminated by fluids/melts rising from the major Mesozoic subduction zone along the south-southwest boundary of Gondwana, leaving a subduction zone geochemical imprint (elevated (K/Nb) n and 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios, decreased 143Nd/ 144Nd ratios). Subsequent impingement of three major mantle plume heads (Tristan/Gough, Discovery, Shona) resulted in heating and thermal erosion of the lowermost subcontinental lithosphere and dispersal into the convecting asthenospheric mantle. With the opening of the ocean basin, continued plume upwelling led to plume-ridge interactions and mixing between geochemically enriched mantle derived from the Shona and Discovery mantle plumes, material derived from delamination of the subcontinental lithosphere, and mildly subduction

  7. Hydroacoustic seismicity along oceanic transform faults: Contrasts between the East Pacific Rise and Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, T.; Lin, J.; Zhong, Q.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the characteristics of seismicity of oceanic transform faults through analyzing hydroacoustic data recorded along the fast-spreading East Pacific Rise (EPR) and slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), respectively. The investigated region on the EPR is within 15°S-15°N from the Garrett to Clipperton Transform Fault during time period of June 1996 to September 2002. Meanwhile, the investigated region on the MAR is within 15°-37°N from the Fifteen-Twenty to Oceanographer Transform Fault during time period of February 1999 to August 2003. Using space-time correlation analysis, we matched hydroacoustic events with earthquakes from the Global Centroid Moment Tensor (GCMT) solutions for event magnitude greater than 4.8. Our analyses revealed systematic differences in the seismicity characteristics between the EPR and MAR: (1) Along the EPR, more than ninety percent of seismicity occurred within several kilometers from transform faults, a few percent occurred near over-lapping spreading centers, while the rest occurred along the ridge axis. Along the MAR, hydroacoustic seismicity is much more scattered near the ridge axis, transform faults, and non-transform offsets. (2) Near the EPR transform faults, the standard deviation of the separation distance of the hydroacoustic events from the morphologically-determined transform fault axis is s = 5.7 km. In contrast, the separation distance of hydroacoustic events to the transform faults is greater (s = 11.9 km), reflecting possibly more complex acoustic scattering due to complex MAR topography as well as more complex tectonic activity. (3) The mean hydroacoustic magnitude of the investigated EPR events is 3.3 (s = 0.6), while the mean hydroacoustic magnitude of the studied MAR events is 3.0 (s = 0.7). The mean hydroacoustic seismicity rate is 2.1 events per year per km of the EPR transform fault length, comparing to the mean seismicity rate of 0.5 events per year per km of the MAR transform fault length. (4

  8. Lipid Biomarkers and Carbon Isotopic Composition from Authigenic Carbonates and Seep Sediments from the US Mid-Atlantic Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P.; Prouty, N.; Demopoulos, A. W.; Roark, B.; Coykendall, K.

    2015-12-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by Archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria, is common in continental margin sediment and can result in authigenic carbonate precipitation. A lipid biomarker study was undertaken in Mid-Atlantic submarine canyons, focusing specifically on Baltimore and Norfolk canyons, to determine biomarker variability of carbonate rock and the associated sediment in cold seep communities dominated by chemosynthetic mussels, Bathymodiolus childressi. Preliminary 16S metagenomic results confirm the presence of free-living sulfur-reducing bacteria and methantrophic endosymbiotic bacteria in the mussels. Depleted d13C values in both the mussel tissue (-63 ‰) and authigenic carbonates (-48 ‰) support methanotrophy as the dominant nutritional pathway and AOM as the main driver of carbonate precipitation. In addition, paired 14C and 230Th dates are highly discordant, reflecting dilution of the 14C pool with fossil hydrocarbon derived carbon. Seep and canyon sediment, as well as authigenic carbonates, were collected and analyzed for a suite of biomarkers, including sterols, alcohols, alkanes and fatty acids, as well as δ13C values of select biomarkers, to elucidate pathways of organic matter cycling. A comparison of terrestrial biomarker signatures (e.g., n-alkane carbon preference index and C23 / (C23 + C29) values, HMW n-alkanes and C29 sterols) suggests that terrestrial inputs dominate the submarine canyon surface sediment, whereas seep sediment is predominantly marine autochthonous (i.e., cholesterol and 5α-cholestanol). Lipid biomarker profiles (e.g., n-alkanes in the C15 to C33 range) from authigenic carbonates mirror those found in the seep sediment, suggesting that the organisms mediating carbonate precipitation on the seafloor are characteristic of the assemblages present in the sediment at these sites. With widespread methane leakage recently discovered along the Atlantic Margin, the presence of AOM-mediated carbonate

  9. In Search for Diffuse Hydrothermal Venting at North Pond, Western Flank of the Mid-Atlantic-Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villinger, H. W.; Becker, K.; Hulme, S.; Kaul, N. E.; Müller, P.; Wheat, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from temperature measurements made with a ROV temperature lance in sediments deposited on the slopes of abyssal hills and small basins surrounding North Pond. North Pond is a ~8x15 km large sediment basin located on ~7 Ma year old crust west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 23°N. Data were collected with the ROV Jason II during cruise MSM37 on the German RV Maria S. Merian in April 2014. The temperature lance consists of a 60 cm long stainless steel tube (o.d. 12 mm) housing 8 thermistors with a spacing of 80 mm, resulting in an active length of 56 cm. Data are logged with an 8-channel data logger (XR-420-T8, RBR, Ottawa) and transmitted online to the control van of the ROV. Data reduction and temperature gradient calculation is done according to the HFRED algorithm (Villinger & Davis, 1987). 90 sites in total were visited, 88 gave good data for temperature gradient calculation. Calculated gradients are usually of good to very good quality. The gradients vary between less than 20 to more than 1000 mK/m reflecting the very heterogeneous distribution of geothermal heat flow. The expected conductive lithospheric heat flow for North Pond is ~190 mW/m2 (geothermal gradient of ~190 mK/m with a thermal conductivity of 1 W/Km). The highest temperature gradients are measured in places where temperature ~50 cm below the sediment-water boundary exceeds bottom water temperature by ~0.5 K . These high temperature gradients may reflect local hydrothermal circulation within the pillow lavas, however no focused discharge was detected. The analysis of temperature measurements made with the ROV-mounted CTD shows clearly detectable bottom water temperature anomalies. We infer that they are either caused by hydrothermal discharge through the thin sediment cover or through unsedimented pillow basalts nearby. Hydrothermal circulation in a North-Pond-like environment appears to be diffuse in nature, hence very difficult if not impossible to detect and to quantify.

  10. A magmatic robust segment propagating at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 21.5° N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannowski, A.; Grevemeyer, I.; Morgan, J. P.; Ranero, C. R.

    2009-12-01

    The Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 21.5° N shows the typical features of a propagating ridge segment in both bathymetric and satellite altimetry derived gravity data. However, the segment correlates with a gap in seismic activity. This active ridge system in a median valley environment started its propagation roughly five million years ago, after a transform fault boundary became unstable. At the southern segment end, a linear slightly asymmetric V-shaped wake has been formed by a propagation rate of approx. 16 mm/y with an average half-spreading rate of approx. 13 mm/y and hence a fast propagator for a slow spreading ridge. Three seismic refraction and wide-angle reflection profiles surveyed the crustal structure along and across the ridge crest and yielded the crustal structure at the segment centre as a function of melt supply. Results suggest that crust is with ~8 km thickest at the domed segment centre, decreasing towards segment ends. However, crust at the northern and southern segment boundaries is 4 km and 5.5 km, respectively. Thus, crust is thicker in the direction of ridge propagation, suggesting that melt is preferential transferred towards the southern ridge tip. While seismic layer 2 remains constant along axis layer 3 shows profound changes in thickness, governing variations in total crustal thickness. This features supports mantle upwelling in the segment centre, i.e., low viscosity basalts are distributed easily laterally, while high viscosity gabbroic crust tends to crystallise at the locus of rising melts. The entire segment correlates with gaps in seismic activity, suggesting that the lithosphere of the propagating ridge segment is thin. Increased seismicity in the transform zone connecting the propagating ridge tip with the doomed segment in the south and to the north indicates thicker lithosphere at segment boundaries. A strong anisotropy of the crust of up to 10% has been observed in the segment centre. While the upper crust shows spreading parallel

  11. Comparison of Five Hydrothermal Vent Fields at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Which Parameters Control the Differences in Fluid Geochemistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, K.; Koschinsky, A.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Seifert, R.

    2006-12-01

    Five different high-temperature hydrothermal vent sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge are investigated within a special priority program funded by the German Research Foundation (SPP 1144). The sites are all located at 3000 m water depth (near the critical point of seawater). Comparing the geochemical signature of the hydrothermal fluids with respect to the individual setting, it is possible to distinguish between the major controlling parameters as they are phase separation in the supercritical region of seawater, temperature, and host rock composition. Three of the vent sites were found at 4°49'S on the MAR in a young post-eruptive basaltic setting. Two of them are characterized by strong phase separation and the highest temperatures measured so far along the MAR (up to 407°C), assuming a very shallow heat source. It is assumed, that this hydrothermal system newly formed after a big eruption event in this region. The other one, although located at a distance of maximum 2 km from the other two, emanates somewhat cooler fluids (up to 349°C), with no indications for boiling and phase separation Despite their spatial proximity and the identical basaltic host rock in which these fields are situated, the vent fields show a clearly different fluid chemistry with depletion of alkali and earth alkali elements and some trace metals in the very hot, phase separated fluids. The Logatchev field at 14°45'N is located in an ultramafic setting with outcropping peridotitic and gabbroic rocks. The chlorinity of the fluids does not clearly indicate phase separation. Compared to the non-phase separated basaltic system at 4°49'S MAR the fluids are characterized by significantly higher concentrations of hydrogen and methane due to the serpentinization reactions, lower silica and lithium concentrations and a depletion of boron. A identical chemical signature characterizes a recently discovered system at 8°18'S, the Nibelungen field. Host rock composition with both mafic and

  12. Horizontal mapping of near-seafloor vertical mixing in the central valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tippenhauer, S.; Kanzow, T.

    2012-04-01

    In the open ocean, the largest vertical mixing rates are found in deep-ocean canyons of mid-oceanic ridge systems. It is currently unclear, which physical mechanisms control the intense turbulent dissipation in deep ocean canyons. Recent studies point to a potential role of hydraulic jumps, which have been observed in shallow water studies. To be able to resolve rapid horizontal transitions in mixing rates associated with hydraulic jumps, high-resolution horizontal fields of near-seafloor turbulent kinetic energy dissipation were obtained in August 2010 in the central valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 37°N, using a microstructure velocity shear sensor aboard the autonomous underwater vehicle AUV Abyss. The campaign was complemented by "classical" lowered and mooring-based density and velocity measurements. In the deep ocean above complex bathymetry AUV-based measurements are thought to be far more efficient in resolving spatial patterns of mixing than the commonly used free-falling or lowered turbulence probes. During several dives within the central valley the AUV made multiple crossings over a deep sill -characterized by unidirectional bottom-intensified flow - separating two basins below 1800 m. Here we present preliminary results of the measurement campaign. The raw velocity shear data shows a high degree of noise caused by high-frequency vibrations of the AUV. We demonstrate that much of the noise can be removed with established filter techniques relying on simultaneous velocity shear and acceleration measurements (Goodman et al. 2006). After noise-reduction, we are able to show that regions of elevated high-frequency shear signals largely coincide with high-freqeuncy temperature variations (the latter being insensitive to AUV vibrations). In such regions the temperature and shear spectra have similar characteristics. This suggests that the deep ocean AUV-based velocity shear measurements are indeed sensitive the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy

  13. Seismic airgun sounds recorded on moored hydrophones near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellinger, D. K.; Nieukirk, S. L.; Dziak, R. P.; Haxel, J. H.; Fox, C. G.

    2003-12-01

    Sounds of seismic airguns were detected in two years of data collected from large, remote areas near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and the East Pacific Rise (EPR). From February 1999-February 2001, six autonomous hydrophones were moored near the MAR between 15-35 N and 33-50 W, and six more were moored in the EPR between 8 N - 8 S and 95-110 W. Continuous acoustic data recovered from both arrays were examined for sounds associated with seismic airgun activity. This was done using an automatic detection algorithm designed to identify repetitive sounds in the 20-60 Hz band. Airgun impulses occurred every 10-20 s and were recorded frequently on all hydrophones. In the Atlantic, airgun activity peaked in the summer months, and airgun impulses were detected in nearly 100% of the hours examined; Pacific seasonal trends were less obvious. Because of the high source level of the airgun signals, it was possible to estimate the locations of ships conducting seismic surveys despite their great distance, often over 3,000 km from our array. In the Atlantic, we located seismic vessels, presumably commercial, working off the coast of Nova Scotia during summer, and off western Africa and northeast Brazil in spring, summer,and fall. During summer 1999, research airguns were recorded on the MAR near 26 N 50 W. In the eastern tropical Pacific, the predominant source of airgun sounds was seismic vessels in the nearshore waters of southern Ecuador and northern Peru. All of the areas in which intense airgun activity was detected include important habitat for marine mammals; one area included habitat of the critically endangered northern right whale. Sounds from airguns appear to be a major contributor to the sound field in the Atlantic and parts of the Pacific Ocean, and may be of concern given the recent interest in ocean noise and its effects on marine mammals. Acoustic pressure levels of earthquakes are also investigated, and received levels in some common marine mammal habitats are

  14. Selenium and tellurium systematics in MORBs from the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (47-50°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissner, M.; König, S.; Luguet, A.; le Roux, P. J.; Schuth, S.; Heuser, A.; le Roex, A. P.

    2014-11-01

    Selenium and tellurium concentrations along with sulfur and Highly Siderophile Element (HSE) contents as well as 187Os signatures were determined in 20 Mid-Ocean-Ridge Basalts (MORBs) from the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (SMAR; 47-50°S), ranging in composition from depleted N-MORBs to mantle plume-related E-MORBs. A comparison between glassy rims and crystalline pillow interiors reveal that secondary processes are only reflected in seawater-overprinted 187Os/188Os signatures and degassing-related low S contents of the crystalline pillow cores but did not affect the Se and Te abundances. In contrast, the segregation of sulfide liquids during MORB differentiation lowers the Se and Te concentrations (∼35% and 60%, respectively) and leads to higher Se/Te ratios. Recomputed primitive melt Se contents broadly overlap for both, N- and E-MORBs, while primitive E-MORB melts have systematically higher Te contents and lower Se/Te ratios compared to those of the N-MORBs (13-14 ppb Te and Se/Te ≈ 18 vs. 9-11 ppb Te and Se/Te ≈ 25). As suggested by lithophile trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic constraints, the Se-Te systematics of the E-MORB mantle source traces the involvement of a recycled component likely derived from the nearby Discovery mantle plume. Bulk mixing models suggests an addition of either 20% pyroxenitic melts, or only 10 ppm of metasomatic sulfides to account for the Te-richer E-MORB compositions. A conservative correction of our MORB data for sulfide segregation combined with a near fractional melting model predicts a Te-depleted MORB mantle reservoir with a non-chondritic Se/Te of 18-25, significantly higher than the primitive mantle Se/Te estimates (6.3-9.9). The existence of these different Se-Te signatures between the E-MORB mantle source, the N-MORB mantle source and the primitive mantle support an incompatible behavior of both Se and Te during partial melting, with Te being slightly more incompatible. More importantly, this stresses the necessity

  15. Predicting the timing of cherry blossoms in Washington, DC and Mid-Atlantic States in response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Chung, Uran; Mack, Liz; Yun, Jin I; Kim, Soo-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    Cherry blossoms, an icon of spring, are celebrated in many cultures of the temperate region. For its sensitivity to winter and early spring temperatures, the timing of cherry blossoms is an ideal indicator of the impacts of climate change on tree phenology. Here, we applied a process-based phenology model for temperate deciduous trees to predict peak bloom dates (PBD) of flowering cherry trees (Prunus×yedoensis 'Yoshino' and Prunus serrulata 'Kwanzan') in the Tidal Basin, Washington, DC and the surrounding Mid-Atlantic States in response to climate change. We parameterized the model with observed PBD data from 1991 to 2010. The calibrated model was tested against independent datasets of the past PBD data from 1951 to 1970 in the Tidal Basin and more recent PBD data from other locations (e.g., Seattle, WA). The model performance against these independent data was satisfactory (Yoshino: r(2) = 0.57, RMSE = 6.6 days, bias = 0.9 days and Kwanzan: r(2) = 0.76, RMSE = 5.5 days, bias = -2.0 days). We then applied the model to forecast future PBD for the region using downscaled climate projections based on IPCC's A1B and A2 emissions scenarios. Our results indicate that PBD at the Tidal Basin are likely to be accelerated by an average of five days by 2050 s and 10 days by 2080 s for these cultivars under a mid-range (A1B) emissions scenario projected by ECHAM5 general circulation model. The acceleration is likely to be much greater (13 days for 2050 s and 29 days for 2080s) under a higher (A2) emissions scenario projected by CGCM2 general circulation model. Our results demonstrate the potential impacts of climate change on the timing of cherry blossoms and illustrate the utility of a simple process-based phenology model for developing adaptation strategies to climate change in horticulture, conservation planning, restoration and other related disciplines. PMID:22087317

  16. Off-axis Submarine Massive Sulfide accumulation at the fault-controlled Logatchev 1 hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Christine; Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Hannington, Mark

    2016-04-01

    The largest Submarine Massive Sulfide (SMS) deposits in Mid-ocean ridge settings are found along slow-spreading ridges, where tectonic processes dominate and long-lived faults control the circulation of hydrothermal fluids through the oceanic crust. Here we combine results from 2D fluid flow simulations of the off-axis (8km), fault-controlled, high-T Logatchev 1 hydrothermal field (LHF1) at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge with data on vent fluid chemistry and the associated SMS deposit, which give insights about its accumulation history. Modeled high vent temperatures of 360°C, as measured at the active LHF1, result in a total integrated mass-flow rate through the seafloor of ~36 kg/sec scaled to 28 vent orifices of 10x10cm, located in the 7 known high-T sites at the LHF1. About 42% of the vent fluids are hotter than 350°C, the minimum temperature required for efficient metal transport, with a mass-flow rate of 13 kg/sec. This corresponds to ~400 kilotons of potentially SMS-forming hydrothermal fluids leaving the vent field per year. Combined with a total H2S-SiO2-metal (Zn+Cu+Fe) concentration of 732 ppm, measured in the LHF1 vent fluids, this makes a flux of ~300 t of hydrothermal precipitates per year. The SMS deposit at LHF1 has been dated to 58.200 years and has an estimated tonnage of 135 kilotons. Applying the above modeled annual discharge rate over the dated time period, results in an SMS accumulation efficiency of ~0.8% for the SMS deposit at the Logatchev 1 field, which fits the range of estimated global average for MORs between <0.3% and 3%. Our predicted depositional efficiency is based on numerical modeling, which simulates continuous and ideal venting. Realistically, venting at LHF1 might well have been fluctuating, including periods of low temperature discharge, where metal transport is insufficient or periods of inactivity, compensated by periods with a higher depositional efficiency than 0.8%. Such fluctuations could have been caused by variations in

  17. Spreading Rate versus Magma Supply in the Region of Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 16.5° N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmiotto, C.; Schouten, H.; Smith, D. K.; Cann, J. R.; Dick, H. J.; Parnell-Turner, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    The region of Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 16.5° N is a slow spreading center characterized by several detachment faults and oceanic core complexes. This area is ideal to study the relationship between the formation and the evolution of detachment faults, the role of magma supply during detachment faulting, and its effect on the magnetization of the crust at a slow-spreading center. In May-June 2013, during cruise KN210-05 on RV Knorr, we acquired multibeam bathymetry and sea surface magnetic anomaly data to understand the spreading history of a section of the MAR near 16.5° N. Multibeam data acquired using a SeaBeam 3012 system show that the ridge axis can be divided into a northern segment, characterized by a 4500-m deep axial valley, and a southern segment, which is characterized by a robust and continuous axial volcanic ridge which reaches to 3200 m water depth. Both segments are bordered to the west by active detachment faults. Magnetic data were acquired with a Marine Magnetics SeaSPY system, and inverted for crustal magnetization. The inversion assumes a constant thickness source layer of 0.5 km whose upper bound is bathymetry. Isochrons were identified from the magnetization map. We found that spreading rate is symmetric, and have calculated a total spreading rate in this area of ~24 km/Ma for the last 4 Ma. The central anomaly (Brunhes, 0-0.78 Ma) in the southern segment, however, has only half the predicted width of ~ 20 km and is located exclusively east of the axis. No Brunhes normal magnetization is recorded in the rift valley floor west of the axis, which is the hanging wall of the detachment. This observation confirms predictions from ';asymmetric' spreading at oceanic core complexes where slip along long-lived detachment faults take up extension on one (western) side and magmatic accretion occurs exclusively to the other (eastern) of the axis; the hanging wall, bounded by detachment fault and axis, should be as old as the core complex and its

  18. Feeding ecology of the Stomiiformes (Pisces) of the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. 1. The Sternoptychidae and Phosichthyidae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmo, Vanda; Sutton, Tracey; Menezes, Gui; Falkenhaug, Tone; Bergstad, Odd Aksel

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive trophic studies in the vast mid-oceanic regions are rare compared to coastal and fisheries-oriented investigations. Field sampling conducted by the multidisciplinary, international Census of Marine Life project MAR-ECO, namely the 2004 G.O. Sars cruise, has generated one of the largest open ocean deep-pelagic sample collections ever obtained. With the overall goal of understanding carbon flow processes within and through the deep-pelagic nekton associated with the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge system (N MAR), quantitative trophic analyses were conducted in order to identify the major intraspecific patterns in diet of characteristic members of the midwater fish community. Diets of five abundant species of zooplanktivorous fishes were examined in detail in terms of prey taxonomy and variability in space, ontogeny and diel cycle. Two major patterns of feeding were identified. Pattern 1 included three species preying primarily on copepods, Argyropelecus hemigymnus, Maurolicus muelleri and Vinciguerria attenuata, the former two of which revealed spatial differences in diet with latitude, mostly likely related to latitudinal prey distributions and densities. Maurolicus demonstrated ecological differences in diet that mirrored phenotypic variation North and South of the Subpolar Front, an 'oceanic species concept' question that warrants further research. Pattern 2 included two species feeding primarily on amphipods, Argyropelecus aculeatus and Sternoptyx diaphana, both of which showed ontogenetic variability in feeding primarily related to specific amphipod taxon sizes, rather than prey switching to other major prey taxa. This is the first study that highlights the importance of amphipods in the diets of these species. All fish species showed selectivity in prey choice, possibly related to competition with the other major nekton components along the N MAR, namely the Myctophidae and other zooplanktivorous Stomiiformes. Daily ration fell within the expected

  19. The physical oceanographic conditions along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge north of the Azores in June July 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Søiland, H.; Budgell, W. P.; Knutsen, Ø.

    2008-01-01

    During the MAR-ECO expedition in June and July 2004, 39 deep CTD stations were occupied with uneven spacing along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) between 41°N and 61°N. The CTD stations coincided with the biological sampling stations and thus gave a detailed vertical description of the water properties at these locations. Many different water masses were identified. However, using the predominant water mass in the upper 500 m, four different hydrographic regions were identified. Stations in the vicinity of the Reykjanes Ridge north of 57°N were dominated by Modified North Atlantic Water (MNAW). Stations south of 56°30'N and north of the Sub-Polar Front (SPF) were dominated by Sub-Arctic Intermediate Water (SAIW). CTD data combined with along-track continuous surface temperature and salinity measurements, satellite sea-level anomaly data and sea-surface temperature (SST) and along-track current data (ADCP data) showed that the position of the SPF was at about 52°N, at the southern edge of the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ). South of the SPF a Frontal Region with both North Atlantic Central Water (NACW) and SAIW present was observed, and south of about 50°N the predominant water mass in the upper 500 m was NACW. A ship-mounted RDI 75 kHz ADCP was operated during the cruise and yielded high quality data during the first leg. The currents showed large variations over short distances and were strongly affected by topography. The ADCP data was be used to describe the mesoscale eddy field along the MAR and to detect three jets in the North Atlantic Current (NAC). Data from a current meter mooring left for 10 months after the cruise at a seamount just to the south of CGFZ showed the dominance of the tidal currents in the area. Typical spring tidal currents were about 0.15 m s -1 and the mean flow an order of magnitude smaller, about 0.03 m s -1. A short-term mooring on a seamount farther south showed tidal currents of 0.3 m s -1. Binned 8-day, 4-km SST satellite

  20. Along-axis variability in crustal accretion at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Results from the OCEAN study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henstock, T.J.; White, Robert S.; McBride, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    The OCEAN experiment is an integrated geophysical study of a region of the Cape Verde abyssal plain that formed at 140 Ma. Deep seismic reflection and ocean bottom hydrophone (OBH) refraction data were acquired along lines parallel and perpendicular to the paleoridge axis trend identified from a detailed magnetic anomaly survey. The igneous basement is overlain by about 1.3 km of sediment which enables improved imaging of intracrustal structure beyond that possible near the Mid-Atlantic Ridge axis. We describe the results of a 150-km long profile oriented parallel to magnetic anomalies M15 and M16, along which deep seismic reflection data collected by the British Institutions Reflection Profiling Syndicate are complemented by refraction data constrained by four OBHs. The line spans an entire spreading segment between two fracture zones; the northern of which has an offset of 40 km and the other (central) has an offset of only 10 km. Away from the fracture zones, the mean igneous crustal thickness is 7.2 km; near both fracture zones, thinning of up to 4 km is observed, giving a mean igneous crustal thickness over the whole segment of approximately 6.5 km. Differences are seen between the two fracture zones in their seismic velocity structure, in the associated basement topography, and in the presence of a strong reflection extending into the mantle beneath the northern fracture zone. The boundary between oceanic layers 2 and 3 correlates with variably coherent normal incidence reflections and a change in the character of the reflectivity. A number of planar reflections up to 10 km in length are present within the middle and lower crust, dipping outward from beneath low-amplitude basement highs at ??? 15??; these appear to be present only within layer 3. The Moho has several expressions in the reflection data, including isolated reflection events, a local increase in reflected amplitudes, and a downward decrease in coherent reflections. At the center of the segment

  1. Observations of oceanic crust and mantle structures at a deep ocean seismic array in the Eastern Mid Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, Katrin; Krüger, Frank; Dahm, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    In 2011, twelve ocean bottom stations (OBS) were installed approximately 100 km North of the Gloria Fault during the DOCTAR project (Deep OCean Test ARray). This fault marks the plate boundary between the Eurasian and African plate in the North Eastern Mid Atlantic. The experiment took place in water depth of 4-6 km, 800 km West of the Portuguese coast. The stations were equipped with broad band seismometers which recorded for ten months. We employ P and S receiver functions (RF) to have a closer look at the structure of crust and mantle. The ocean is a quite noisy environment, therefore the number of usable events is low (around 20) compared to RF studies on land. We use several quality criteria (e.g. signal to noise ratio, relative spike position) to select proper processing parameters for the calculation of the RF and carefully reviewed all later on used RF. Despite the low number of events, the usage of an array of OBS with an aperture of 75 km allows us to investigate deeper discontinuities (e.g. in 410 and 660 km depth) compared to single station approaches which are usually employed for OBS. Furthermore, we increase the number of usable events by applying array methods. We use move out corrected and stacked RF to have a closer look at the mantle transition zone, and estimate average depth values for the Moho, the lithosphere asthenosphere boundary (LAB) and the base of the asthenosphere. The Moho lies at depth of 7 km, the LAB at approximately 50 km and the asthenosphere has an approximated thickness of 110 km. We observe a slight increase in the time difference of the mantle discontinuity conversion times compared to PREM. RF give just information regarding the impedance contrast at a discontinuity instead of velocities. We additionally use P wave polarization of teleseismic events to estimate absolute S velocities beneath the single stations. All in all, we use the information gained by the RF analysis, and the analysis of the P wave polarization to

  2. Effects of non-native earthworms on on below- and aboveground processes in the Mid-Atlantic region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlavecz, K. A.; McCormick, M. K.; Xia, L.; Pitz, S.; O'Neill, J.; Bernard, M.; Chang, C.; Whigham, D. F.

    2011-12-01

    Many biotic and abiotic disturbances have shaped the structure of the deciduous forests in the Mid-Atlantic region. One major anthropogenic factor is land use history. Agricultural practices in the past undoubtedly facilitated non-native earthworm colonization and establishment. Today most secondary forests are dominated by European lumbricid earthworms, although native species also occur in some habitats. To investigate how earthworm community composition and abundance affect belowground processes and tree seedling growth we set up a field manipulation experiment at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, MD. A total of 66 experimental plots were set up in successional (70 yrs) and mature (150 yrs) Tulip-poplar-Oak associations. We manipulated earthworm abundance and leaf litter input, and planted seedlings of Tulip poplar, Red maple, Red oak, and American beech. The experiment lasted for two years during which we regularly monitored density, biomass and species composition of earthworm assemblages and measured soil respiration. Soil moisture, temperature and air temperature were also continuously monitored using a wireless sensor network. At harvest, soil bulk density, pH, N pools, C:N ratio, potential N-mineralization rates, and enzyme activity were determined. We used quantitative PCR to assess the community composition of soil fungi. We also determined the extent of mycorrhizal colonization and biomass of roots, shoots and leaves. We conducted likelihood ratio tests for random and fixed effects based on mixed model analyses of variance. Differences between soil depths and among sites and plots accounted for a large portion of the variation in many soil properties. Litter quality affected soil pH and N mineralization. Earthworm densities affected bulk density, inorganic N content, and N mineralization. Both mycorrhizal groups were more abundant in mature than in successional forests. Both ectomycorrhizal (ECM) and arbuscular (AM) fungi were

  3. Predicting the Timing of Cherry Blossoms in Washington, DC and Mid-Atlantic States in Response to Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Uran; Mack, Liz; Yun, Jin I.; Kim, Soo-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    Cherry blossoms, an icon of spring, are celebrated in many cultures of the temperate region. For its sensitivity to winter and early spring temperatures, the timing of cherry blossoms is an ideal indicator of the impacts of climate change on tree phenology. Here, we applied a process-based phenology model for temperate deciduous trees to predict peak bloom dates (PBD) of flowering cherry trees (Prunus×yedoensis ‘Yoshino’ and Prunus serrulata ‘Kwanzan’) in the Tidal Basin, Washington, DC and the surrounding Mid-Atlantic States in response to climate change. We parameterized the model with observed PBD data from 1991 to 2010. The calibrated model was tested against independent datasets of the past PBD data from 1951 to 1970 in the Tidal Basin and more recent PBD data from other locations (e.g., Seattle, WA). The model performance against these independent data was satisfactory (Yoshino: r2 = 0.57, RMSE = 6.6 days, bias = 0.9 days and Kwanzan: r2 = 0.76, RMSE = 5.5 days, bias = −2.0 days). We then applied the model to forecast future PBD for the region using downscaled climate projections based on IPCC's A1B and A2 emissions scenarios. Our results indicate that PBD at the Tidal Basin are likely to be accelerated by an average of five days by 2050 s and 10 days by 2080 s for these cultivars under a mid-range (A1B) emissions scenario projected by ECHAM5 general circulation model. The acceleration is likely to be much greater (13 days for 2050 s and 29 days for 2080s ) under a higher (A2) emissions scenario projected by CGCM2 general circulation model. Our results demonstrate the potential impacts of climate change on the timing of cherry blossoms and illustrate the utility of a simple process-based phenology model for developing adaptation strategies to climate change in horticulture, conservation planning, restoration and other related disciplines. PMID:22087317

  4. Predicting the timing of cherry blossoms in Washington, DC and Mid-Atlantic States in response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Chung, Uran; Mack, Liz; Yun, Jin I; Kim, Soo-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    Cherry blossoms, an icon of spring, are celebrated in many cultures of the temperate region. For its sensitivity to winter and early spring temperatures, the timing of cherry blossoms is an ideal indicator of the impacts of climate change on tree phenology. Here, we applied a process-based phenology model for temperate deciduous trees to predict peak bloom dates (PBD) of flowering cherry trees (Prunus×yedoensis 'Yoshino' and Prunus serrulata 'Kwanzan') in the Tidal Basin, Washington, DC and the surrounding Mid-Atlantic States in response to climate change. We parameterized the model with observed PBD data from 1991 to 2010. The calibrated model was tested against independent datasets of the past PBD data from 1951 to 1970 in the Tidal Basin and more recent PBD data from other locations (e.g., Seattle, WA). The model performance against these independent data was satisfactory (Yoshino: r(2) = 0.57, RMSE = 6.6 days, bias = 0.9 days and Kwanzan: r(2) = 0.76, RMSE = 5.5 days, bias = -2.0 days). We then applied the model to forecast future PBD for the region using downscaled climate projections based on IPCC's A1B and A2 emissions scenarios. Our results indicate that PBD at the Tidal Basin are likely to be accelerated by an average of five days by 2050 s and 10 days by 2080 s for these cultivars under a mid-range (A1B) emissions scenario projected by ECHAM5 general circulation model. The acceleration is likely to be much greater (13 days for 2050 s and 29 days for 2080s) under a higher (A2) emissions scenario projected by CGCM2 general circulation model. Our results demonstrate the potential impacts of climate change on the timing of cherry blossoms and illustrate the utility of a simple process-based phenology model for developing adaptation strategies to climate change in horticulture, conservation planning, restoration and other related disciplines.

  5. Water mass properties on their way over the Mid-Atlantic-Ridge through the Faraday Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, C.; Kieke, D.; Klein, B.; Klein, H.; Rhein, M.

    2012-04-01

    Over the last decades there have been major changes in the water mass properties and production of Labrador Sea Water (LSW) in the subpolar North Atlantic. A dedicated work package in the framework of the German research project "North Atlantic" examines therefore the variability of deep water formation in the Labrador Sea and connections to transport variations of the North Atlantic Current (NAC), the strength of the subpolar gyre and the propagation of water masses into the East Atlantic. In the focus of this study are the pathways of the NAC over the Mid-Atlantic-Ridge (MAR) and the LSW T/S- properties that are carried over the MAR in the LSW range below the NAC. Since November 2009 three moorings have been collecting data at the western entrance of the Faraday Fracture Zone (FFZ) to monitor water mass variability. FFZ is situated south of the Charlie-Gibbs-Fracture Zone (CGFZ) and is one of the major passages for deep water masses across the MAR into the East Atlantic basin. Moorings have been serviced annually and data from the first two deployments are presented here. The analysis presented here combines in-situ time series from the moorings with satellite and Argo data to identify the pathways of the NAC over the MAR in local velocity and temperature and salinity data. First results show a persistent occurrence of the NAC over the FFZ from mid 2009 until early 2010 based on sea surface height fields, which is reflected in strong convergent velocity signals at the mooring sites. From 2010 onward, a northern NAC branch over the CGFZ is prominent in the altimeter record but the core seem to split again in mid 2010 into a northern and a southern branch. The branching of the NAC is also reflected in the trajectories of Argo floats over the MAR which are locked to the various fracture zones. The T/S - time series from the moored instruments show extreme saline as well as fresh variations of the LSW, which are related to the variability of the current system. Argo

  6. Legacy effects of colonial millponds on floodplain sedimentation, bank erosion, and channel morphology, MID-Atlantic, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, E.R.; Hupp, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Many rivers and streams of the Mid-Atlantic Region, United States (U.S.) have been altered by postcolonial floodplain sedimentation (legacy sediment) associated with numerous milldams. Little Conestoga Creek, Pennsylvania, a tributary to the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay, is one of these streams. Floodplain sedimentation rates, bank erosion rates, and channel morphology were measured annually during 2004-2007 at five sites along a 28-km length of Little Conestoga Creek with nine colonial era milldams (one dam was still in place in 2007). This study was part of a larger cooperative effort to quantify floodplain sedimentation, bank erosion, and channel morphology in a high sediment yielding region of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Data from the five sites were used to estimate the annual volume and mass of sediment stored on the floodplain and eroded from the banks for 14 segments along the 28-km length of creek. A bank and floodplain reach based sediment budget (sediment budget) was constructed for the 28 km by summing the net volume of sediment deposited and eroded from each segment. Mean floodplain sedimentation rates for Little Conestoga Creek were variable, with erosion at one upstream site (-5 mm/year) to deposition at the other four sites (highest = 11 mm/year) despite over a meter of floodplain aggradation from postcolonial sedimentation. Mean bank erosion rates range between 29 and 163 mm/year among the five sites. Bank height increased 1 m for every 10.6 m of channel width, from upstream to downstream (R2 = 0.79, p < 0.0001) resulting in progressively lowered hydraulic connectivity between the channel and the floodplain. Floodplain sedimentation and bank erosion rates also appear to be affected by the proximity of the segments to one existing milldam, which promotes deposition upstream and scouring downstream. The floodplain and bank along the 28-km reach produced a net mean sediment loss of 5,634 Mg/year for 2004-2007, indicating that bank

  7. A geological perspective on sea-level rise and its impacts along the U.S. mid-Atlantic coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth G.; Kopp, Robert E.; Horton, Benjamin P.; Browning, James V.; Kemp, Andrew C.

    2013-12-01

    We evaluate paleo-, historical, and future sea-level rise along the U.S. mid-Atlantic coast. The rate of relative sea-level rise in New Jersey decreased from 3.5 ± 1.0 mm/yr at 7.5-6.5 ka, to 2.2 ± 0.8 mm/yr at 5.5-4.5 ka to a minimum of 0.9 ± 0.4 mm/yr at 3.3-2.3 ka. Relative sea level rose at a rate of 1.6 ± 0.1 mm/yr from 2.2 to 1.2 ka (750 Common Era [CE]) and 1.4 ± 0.1 mm/yr from 800 to 1800 CE. Geological and tide-gauge data show that sea-level rise was more rapid throughout the region since the Industrial Revolution (19th century = 2.7 ± 0.4 mm/yr; 20th century = 3.8 ± 0.2 mm/yr). There is a 95% probability that the 20th century rate of sea-level rise was faster than it was in any century in the last 4.3 kyr. These records reflect global rise (˜1.7 ± 0.2 mm/yr since 1880 CE) and subsidence from glacio-isostatic adjustment (˜1.3 ± 0.4 mm/yr) at bedrock locations (e.g., New York City). At coastal plain locations, the rate of rise is 0.3-1.3 mm/yr higher due to groundwater withdrawal and compaction. We construct 21st century relative sea-level rise scenarios including global, regional, and local processes. We project a 22 cm rise at bedrock locations by 2030 (central scenario; low- and high-end scenarios range of 16-38 cm), 40 cm by 2050 (range 28-65 cm), and 96 cm by 2100 (range 66-168 cm), with coastal plain locations having higher rises (3, 5-6, and 10-12 cm higher, respectively). By 2050 CE in the central scenario, a storm with a 10 year recurrence interval will exceed all historic storms at Atlantic City.

  8. METHOD-SPECIFIC PRECISION AND BIAS RELATIONSHIPS DEVELOPED FROM DATA SUBMITTED DURING USEPA DRINKING WATER LABORATORY PERFORMANCE EVALUATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper documents the process used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to estimate the mean and standard deviation of data reported by in-control drinking water laboratories during Water Supply (WS) studies. This process is then applied to the data re...

  9. METHOD-SPECIFIC PRECISION AND BIAS RELATIONSHIPS DEVELOPED FROM DATA SUBMITTED DURING USEPA WASTEWATER LABORATORY PERFORMANCE EVALUATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper documents the process used by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to estimate the mean and standard deviation of data reported by in-control wastewater laboratories during Water Pollution (WP) studies. This process is then applied to the data rep...

  10. USEPA RESEARCH ACTIVITIES TO CHARACTERIZE CHILDREN'S ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Given the vulnerability of children to effects from environmental exposures, understanding links between children's health and environmental exposures is critical. In recent years, significant research has been initiated at USEPA to characterize children's exposures.

  11. Distribution, population biology, and trophic ecology of the deepwater demersal fish Halosauropsis macrochir (Pisces: Halosauridae) on the mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Bergstad, Odd Aksel; Clark, Laura; Hansen, Hege Øverbø; Cousins, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Halosauropsis macrochir ranked amongst the most abundant and widespread demersal fishes on the mid-Atlantic Ridge of the North Atlantic (Iceland-Azores) with greatest abundance at 1700-3500 m. All sizes, ranging from 10-76 cm total length, occurred in the area without any apparent spatial pattern or depth trend. Using otolith sections displaying growth increments assumed to represent annuli, the age range recorded was 2-36 years, but most individuals were <20 years. Length and weight at age data were used to fit growth models. No differences between sexes in length and weight at age were observed. The majority of samples had a surplus of males. Diet analysis showed that H. macrochir feeds on Crustacea, Teleostei, Polychaeta, and Cephalopoda, but few prey could be identified to lower taxonomical levels. The mid-Atlantic Ridge constitutes a major portion of the North Atlantic living space of the abyssal halosaur where it completes its full life cycle, primarily as an actively foraging euryophagous micronekton/epibenthos and infauna feeder, becoming a partial piscivore with increasing size. PMID:22384030

  12. Dynamic Management of NOx and SO2 Emissions in the Texas and Mid-Atlantic Electric Power Systems and Implications for Air Quality.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Buller, Elena; Kimura, Yosuke; Craig, Michael; McGaughey, Gary; Allen, David; Webster, Mort

    2016-02-01

    Cap and trade programs have historically been designed to achieve annual or seasonal reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide from power plants. Emissions reductions may not be temporally coincident with meteorological conditions conducive to the formation of peak ozone and fine particulate matter concentrations. Integrated power system and air quality modeling methods were developed to evaluate time-differentiated emissions price signals on high ozone days in the Mid-Atlantic portion of the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland (PJM) Interconnection and Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) grids. Sufficient flexibility exists in the two grids with marked differences in demand and fuel generation mix to accommodate time-differentiated emissions pricing alone or in combination with a season-wide program. System-wide emissions reductions and production costs from time-differentiated pricing are shown to be competitive with those of a season-wide program on high ozone days and would be more cost-effective if the primary policy goal was to target emissions reductions on these days. Time-differentiated pricing layered as a complement to the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule had particularly pronounced benefits for the Mid-Atlantic PJM system that relies heavily on coal-fired generation. Time-differentiated pricing aimed at reducing ozone concentrations had particulate matter reduction co-benefits, but if particulate matter reductions are the primary objective, other approaches to time-differentiated pricing may lead to greater benefits.

  13. Dynamic Management of NOx and SO2 Emissions in the Texas and Mid-Atlantic Electric Power Systems and Implications for Air Quality.

    PubMed

    McDonald-Buller, Elena; Kimura, Yosuke; Craig, Michael; McGaughey, Gary; Allen, David; Webster, Mort

    2016-02-01

    Cap and trade programs have historically been designed to achieve annual or seasonal reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide from power plants. Emissions reductions may not be temporally coincident with meteorological conditions conducive to the formation of peak ozone and fine particulate matter concentrations. Integrated power system and air quality modeling methods were developed to evaluate time-differentiated emissions price signals on high ozone days in the Mid-Atlantic portion of the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland (PJM) Interconnection and Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) grids. Sufficient flexibility exists in the two grids with marked differences in demand and fuel generation mix to accommodate time-differentiated emissions pricing alone or in combination with a season-wide program. System-wide emissions reductions and production costs from time-differentiated pricing are shown to be competitive with those of a season-wide program on high ozone days and would be more cost-effective if the primary policy goal was to target emissions reductions on these days. Time-differentiated pricing layered as a complement to the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule had particularly pronounced benefits for the Mid-Atlantic PJM system that relies heavily on coal-fired generation. Time-differentiated pricing aimed at reducing ozone concentrations had particulate matter reduction co-benefits, but if particulate matter reductions are the primary objective, other approaches to time-differentiated pricing may lead to greater benefits. PMID:26727552

  14. A New Method for MCS Refraction Data Analysis of the Uppermost Section at a Mid-Atlantic Ridge Core Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.; Blackman, D. K.; Singh, S.; Canales, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    The first refraction arrival or moveout of reflection arrivals are generally used to obtain velocity structure of the sub- surface. However, in deep-water environments and in the absence of near seafloor reflections, it is not possible to determine uniquely the velocity structure just below the seafloor from conventional methods. Here a new approach to analyzing seismic refractions recorded on a multi-channel streamer is tested with a subset of R/V Ewing data obtained over the central dome of Atlantis Massif in order to determine the high-resolution P-wave velocity of the uppermost ~1 km. This oceanic core complex on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge 30°N provides access to intrusive crust exposed at the seafloor via detachment faulting, thus eliminating the imaging problems due rough seafloor and heterogeneous basaltic carapace that can mask lower crustal structure at most mid-ocean ridges. In addition, IODP drilling results in the vicinity provide ground truth to depths of 1.4 km. Multi-channel seismic (MCS) data were downward continued to a new datum 1.5 km below the sea surface using a prestack phase shift approach. A filtered receiver wavefield from a single shot point was first extrapolated to depth, and this step was repeated for all shots. Next, the data were sorted into common-receiver location space and the 160 shots per common-receiver gather were downward continued to 1.5 km below the sea surface, producing a dataset that is equivalent to a reflection profile collected at a water depth of 1.5 km. Because the trace spacing in these two domains differ by a factor of 3 (i.e., 12.5 m versus 37.5 m), filtering parameters were changed prior to invoking a phase shift in the F-K domain, to minimize aliasing (with the common receiver domain trace spacing being most problematic at the 37.5 m distance corresponding to the shot spacing). The requirement of a second extrapolation in common-receiver location space reduces the full-fold line length, within the downward

  15. Magmatic ^18O in Zircons From Gabbros and Serpentinized Peridotite at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (ODP Leg 153)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavosie, A. J.; Kita, N. T.; Valley, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    Zircons from gabbros and serpentinized ultramafic rocks from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near the Kane Transform (MARK area) drilled during Leg 153 of the Ocean Drilling Program were analyzed for δ18O in situ in rock chips by ion microprobe. The gabbros contain clinopyroxene, plagioclase, apatite, Fe-oxides, with zircon occurring primarily along grain boundaries and as inclusions in other minerals (e.g. plagioclase). The mineralogy of the serpentinites is more complex, as they are comprised predominantly of a serpentine matrix that is cross-cut by multiple generations of intrusions, including zircon-bearing magmas emplaced as cm- to mm-scale gabbroic dikes and also lower temperature hydrothermal veins. The gabbroic dikes were pervasively altered at greenschist facies conditions, leaving zircon ± apatite as the only preserved magmatic phases. In some serpentinites it is difficult to distinguish altered magmatic veins from lower temperature hydrothermal veins. Zircons in serpentinite and gabbroic samples yield average δ18O values of 4.94±0.80‰ VSMOW (2 SD, N=33 analyses on 12 grains). This value would be in high temperature, magmatic equilibrium with MORB if δ18O (WR) ~ 5.3‰, or mantle peridotite if δ18O (Ol) = ~4.8‰. Equilibrium fractionation factors for δ18O between zircon-water (Zrc-H2O) were calculated by combining fractionation factors for Zrc-quartz (Valley et al. 2003) and quartz-H2O (Clayton et al., 1972; Matsuhisa et al., 1979). Over the temperature range of the calibrated fractionation factors (i.e. 500-800°C), calculated δ18O (zircon) values would be < 1 ‰ for zircon in equilibrium with previously measured MARK hydrothermal fluids (e.g. δ18O = 2.3‰). Zircon in equilibrium with seawater with δ18O = 0.0‰ would have 2.3‰ lower values. We note that extrapolation of the Zrc-H2O fractionation factors to temperatures below the calibrations of Zrc-Qtz and Qtz-H2O (e.g. <500°C) does not yield a typical mineral-water `crossover' at lower

  16. Investigation of extractable organic compounds in deep-sea hydrothermal vent fluids along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; German, Christopher R.

    2015-05-01

    The possibility that deep-sea hydrothermal vents may contain organic compounds produced by abiotic synthesis or by microbial communities living deep beneath the surface has led to numerous studies of the organic composition of vent fluids. Most of these studies have focused on methane and other light hydrocarbons, while the possible occurrence of more complex organic compounds in the fluids has remained largely unstudied. To address this issue, the presence of higher molecular weight organic compounds in deep-sea hydrothermal fluids was assessed at three sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that span a range of temperatures (51 to >360 °C), fluid compositions, and host-rock lithologies (mafic to ultramafic). Samples were obtained at several sites within the Lucky Strike, Rainbow, and Lost City hydrothermal fields. Three methods were employed to extract organic compounds for analysis, including liquid:liquid extraction, cold trapping on the walls of a coil of titanium tubing, and pumping fluids through cartridges filled with solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbents. The only samples to consistently yield high amounts of extractable organic compounds were the warm (51-91 °C), highly alkaline fluids from Lost City, which contained elevated concentrations of C8, C10, and C12n-alkanoic acids and, in some cases, trithiolane, hexadecanol, squalene, and cholesterol. Collectively, the C8-C12 acids can account for about 15% of the total dissolved organic carbon in the Lost City fluids. The even-carbon-number predominance of the alkanoic acids indicates a biological origin, but it is unclear whether these compounds are derived from microbial activity occurring within the hydrothermal chimney proximal to the site of fluid discharge or are transported from deeper within the system. Hydrothermal fluids from the Lucky Strike and Rainbow fields were characterized by an overall scarcity of extractable dissolved organic compounds. Trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons including

  17. Patterns and contributions of floodplain and legacy sediments remobilized from Piedmont streams of the mid-Atlantic U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Mitchell; Miller, Andrew; Baker, Matthew; Gellis, Allen

    2015-04-01

    The perceived role of streambank erosion as a contributor to watershed sediment yield is an important driver of policy decisions for managing downstream impacts in the United States. In the Piedmont physiographic province of the eastern U.S. and in other regions of the south and midwest, the issue of 'legacy' sediment stored in stream valleys has long been recognized as a consequence of rapid deforestation and erosive agricultural practices following European settlement. Remobilization of stored floodplain sediment by bank erosion is frequently cited as a dominant component of watershed sediment budgets, with legacy sediment comprising the largest portion of this source. However there are few published studies documenting spatially extensive measurements of channel change throughout the drainage network on time scales of more than a few years. In this study we document 1) rates of sediment remobilization from Baltimore County floodplains by channel migration and bank erosion, 2) proportions of streambank sediment derived from legacy deposits, and 3) potential contribution of net streambank erosion and legacy sediments to downstream sediment yield within the Mid-Atlantic Piedmont. We measured gross erosion and channel deposition rates over 45 years within the fluvial corridor along 40 valley segments from 18 watersheds with drainage areas between 0.18 and 155 km2 by comparing stream channel and floodplain morphology from LiDAR-based digital elevation data collected in 2005 with channel positions recorded on 1:2400-scale topographic maps from 1959-1961. Results were extrapolated to estimate contributions to watershed sediment yield from 1005 km2 of northern Baltimore County. Results indicate that legacy sediment is a dominant component (62%) of the sediment derived from bank erosion and that its relative importance is greater in larger valleys with broader valley floors and lower gradients. Although mass of sediment remobilized per unit channel length is greater in

  18. THE USEPA'S LANDFILL RESEARCH AND REGULATORY STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The priorities and initiatives of Environmental Protection Agency's landfill research and regulatory program over the next five years will be described. This will include municipal solid waste landfills as well as abandoned hazardous waste landfills.

    Regarding municipals s...

  19. UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS INITIATIVE AND BIOMARKERS DATABASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Within the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), there are several on-going programs and projects that collect health and environmental information. The USEPA's Environmental Indicators Initiative is one such program which includes the development of environmenta...

  20. Microbial Iron Mats at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and Evidence that Zetaproteobacteria May Be Restricted to Iron-Oxidizing Marine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Jarrod J.; Breier, John A.; Luther, George W.; Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria play an essential role in the global iron cycle. Thus far, the majority of marine iron-oxidizing bacteria have been identified as Zetaproteobacteria, a novel class within the phylum Proteobacteria. Marine iron-oxidizing microbial communities have been found associated with volcanically active seamounts, crustal spreading centers, and coastal waters. However, little is known about the presence and diversity of iron-oxidizing communities at hydrothermal systems along the slow crustal spreading center of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. From October to November 2012, samples were collected from rust-colored mats at three well-known hydrothermal vent systems on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Rainbow, Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse, and Snake Pit) using the ROV Jason II. The goal of these efforts was to determine if iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria were present at sites proximal to black smoker vent fields. Small, diffuse flow venting areas with high iron(II) concentrations and rust-colored microbial mats were observed at all three sites proximal to black smoker chimneys. A novel, syringe-based precision sampler was used to collect discrete microbial iron mat samples at the three sites. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a combination of 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and single-cell sorting, while light micros-copy revealed a variety of iron-oxyhydroxide structures, indicating that active iron-oxidizing communities exist along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Sequencing analysis suggests that these iron mats contain cosmopolitan representatives of Zetaproteobacteria, but also exhibit diversity that may be uncommon at other iron-rich marine sites studied to date. A meta-analysis of publically available data encompassing a variety of aquatic habitats indicates that Zetaproteobacteria are rare if an iron source is not readily available. This work adds to the growing understanding of Zetaproteobacteria ecology and suggests that this organism

  1. Microbial iron mats at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and evidence that Zetaproteobacteria may be restricted to iron-oxidizing marine systems.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jarrod J; Breier, John A; Luther, George W; Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria play an essential role in the global iron cycle. Thus far, the majority of marine iron-oxidizing bacteria have been identified as Zetaproteobacteria, a novel class within the phylum Proteobacteria. Marine iron-oxidizing microbial communities have been found associated with volcanically active seamounts, crustal spreading centers, and coastal waters. However, little is known about the presence and diversity of iron-oxidizing communities at hydrothermal systems along the slow crustal spreading center of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. From October to November 2012, samples were collected from rust-colored mats at three well-known hydrothermal vent systems on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Rainbow, Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse, and Snake Pit) using the ROV Jason II. The goal of these efforts was to determine if iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria were present at sites proximal to black smoker vent fields. Small, diffuse flow venting areas with high iron(II) concentrations and rust-colored microbial mats were observed at all three sites proximal to black smoker chimneys. A novel, syringe-based precision sampler was used to collect discrete microbial iron mat samples at the three sites. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a combination of 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and single-cell sorting, while light micros-copy revealed a variety of iron-oxyhydroxide structures, indicating that active iron-oxidizing communities exist along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Sequencing analysis suggests that these iron mats contain cosmopolitan representatives of Zetaproteobacteria, but also exhibit diversity that may be uncommon at other iron-rich marine sites studied to date. A meta-analysis of publically available data encompassing a variety of aquatic habitats indicates that Zetaproteobacteria are rare if an iron source is not readily available. This work adds to the growing understanding of Zetaproteobacteria ecology and suggests that this organism

  2. Microbial iron mats at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and evidence that Zetaproteobacteria may be restricted to iron-oxidizing marine systems.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jarrod J; Breier, John A; Luther, George W; Emerson, David

    2015-01-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria play an essential role in the global iron cycle. Thus far, the majority of marine iron-oxidizing bacteria have been identified as Zetaproteobacteria, a novel class within the phylum Proteobacteria. Marine iron-oxidizing microbial communities have been found associated with volcanically active seamounts, crustal spreading centers, and coastal waters. However, little is known about the presence and diversity of iron-oxidizing communities at hydrothermal systems along the slow crustal spreading center of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. From October to November 2012, samples were collected from rust-colored mats at three well-known hydrothermal vent systems on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Rainbow, Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse, and Snake Pit) using the ROV Jason II. The goal of these efforts was to determine if iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria were present at sites proximal to black smoker vent fields. Small, diffuse flow venting areas with high iron(II) concentrations and rust-colored microbial mats were observed at all three sites proximal to black smoker chimneys. A novel, syringe-based precision sampler was used to collect discrete microbial iron mat samples at the three sites. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a combination of 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and single-cell sorting, while light micros-copy revealed a variety of iron-oxyhydroxide structures, indicating that active iron-oxidizing communities exist along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Sequencing analysis suggests that these iron mats contain cosmopolitan representatives of Zetaproteobacteria, but also exhibit diversity that may be uncommon at other iron-rich marine sites studied to date. A meta-analysis of publically available data encompassing a variety of aquatic habitats indicates that Zetaproteobacteria are rare if an iron source is not readily available. This work adds to the growing understanding of Zetaproteobacteria ecology and suggests that this organism

  3. Field observations and model simulations of low-level flows in the mid-Atlantic during August 1-5, 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabenhorst, Scott Daniel

    For years, basic mountain, sea breeze, and low-level jet (LLJ) circulations have been studied, usually in locations with a high frequency of occurrence, sharp gradients, or significant geographic prominence. However, there is evidence that similar circulations exist in non-classic locations with more mild topography and atmospheric gradients. One such understudied area is the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region. The Water Vapor Variability -- Satellite/Sondes (WAVES) 2006 field campaign provided a contiguous 5-day period of concentrated high resolution observations to examine fine-scale details of a weather pattern typical of the Mid-Atlantic summertime. These measurements presented an opportunity for an intensive modeling study to further investigate peculiar phenomena with verification against research-grade observations. The observations captured two significant events: an official LLJ and a cold front with a prefrontal trough. A pronounced diurnal cycle was revealed which can be categorized into three stages: (1) daytime growth of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), (2) flow intensification into a LLJ regime after dusk, and (3) interruption by downslope winds (DW) after midnight. The third stage is most interesting owing to the lack of literature documenting similar occurrences in the Mid-Atlantic, which can impact air quality forecasting. Prior to high resolution modeling of the case study, sensitivity studies were conducted examining four areas to which the model was believed most sensitive: (1) initial condition data, (2) cumulus schemes, (3) PBL parameterizations, and (4) initialization times. Results also revealed shortcomings in model precipitation and PBL profiles, model biases, urban anomalies, and tendencies for forecast convergence. High resolution regional modeling showed the evolution of these nocturnal events and were verified against WAVES observations. A hybrid solenoidal influenced afternoon and early evening circulation east of the mountains. Afternoon

  4. Interaction between the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the Azores hot spot during the last 85 Myr: Emplacement and rifting of the hot spot-derived plateaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gente, Pascal; Dyment, JéRôMe; Maia, Marcia; Goslin, Jean

    2003-10-01

    Multiple- and single-beam bathymetric data are compiled over the Azores plateau to produce a 1 km × 1 km grid between latitudes 32°N and 49°N and longitudes 22°W and 43°W. Mantle Bouguer anomalies are then calculated from this grid and the satellite-derived gravity. These grids provide new insights on the temporal and spatial variations of melt supply to the ridge axis. The elevated seafloor of the Azores plateau is interpreted as resulting from the interaction of a mantle plume with the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The presence of a large region of elevated seafloor associated with a thick crust between the Great Meteor Seamounts and the Azores platform on the Africa plate, and less developed conjugate structures on the North America plate, favors genetic relations between these hot spot-derived structures. This suggests that a ridge-hot spot interaction has occurred in this region since 85 Ma. This interaction migrated northward along the ridge axis as a result of the SSE absolute motion of the Africa plate, following a direction grossly parallel to the orientation of the MAR. Kinematic reconstructions from chron 13 (˜35 Ma) to the present allow a proposal that the formation of the Azores plateau began around 20 Ma and ended around 7 Ma. A sharp bathymetric step is associated with the beginning of important melt supply around 20 Ma. The excess of melt production is controlled by the interaction of the ridge and hot spot melting zones. The geometry and distribution of the smaller-scale features on the plateau record episodic variations of the hot spot melt production. The periodicity of these variations is about 3-5 Myr. Following the rapid decrease of widespread volcanism, the plateau was subsequently rifted from north to south by the Mid-Atlantic Ridge since 7 Ma. This rifting begins when the MAR melting zone is progressively shifted away from the 200-km plume thermal anomaly. These results bear important consequences on the motion of the Africa plate

  5. Small-scale distribution of deep-sea demersal nekton and other megafauna in the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felley, J. D.; Vecchione, M.; Wilson, R. R., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Videotapes from manned submersibles diving in the area of the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge were used to investigate the distribution of fishes, large crustaceans, epifaunal and sessile organisms, and environmental features along a series of transects. Submersibles MIR 1 and MIR 2 conducted paired dives in an area of mixed sediment and rock (beginning depth ca. 3000 m) and on a large pocket of abyssal-like sediments (depth ca. 4000 m). In the shallower area, the submersibles passed over extremely heterogeneous terrain with a diversity of nekton, epifaunal forms and sessile forms. In the first pair of dives, MIR 1 rose along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from 3000 to 1700 m, while MIR 2 remained near the 3000 m isobath. Nekton seen in these relatively shallow dives included large and small macrourids (genus Coryphaenoides), shrimp (infraorder Penaeidea), Halosauropsis macrochir, Aldrovandia sp., Antimora rostrata, and alepocephalids. The last two were more characteristic of the upper areas of the slope reached by MIR 1, as it rose along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge to depths less than 3000 m. Distributions of some forms seemed associated with depth and/or the presence of hard substrate. Sessile organisms such as sponges and large cnidaria were more likely to be found in rocky areas. The second pair of dives occurred in an abyssal area and the submersibles passed over sediment-covered plains, with little relief and many fewer countable organisms and features. The most evident of these were holes, mounds, small cerianthid anemones, small macrourids and the holothurian Benthodytes sp. A few large macrourids and shrimp also were seen in these deeper dives, as well as squat lobsters ( Munidopsis sp.). Sponges and larger cnidaria were mostly associated with a few small areas of rocky substrate. Holes and mounds showed distributions suggesting large-scale patterning. Over all dives, most sessile and epifaunal forms showed clumped distributions. However, large

  6. Sea floor cycling of organic matter in the continental margin of the mid-Atlantic Bight. Final report, May 1, 1995--April 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Jahnke, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this project was to examine quantitatively the cycling of organic matter at the sea floor of the mid-Atlantic Bight continental margin. This information would be used to better understand sedimentary geochemical processes and, when used in conjunction with other measurements made within the DOE Ocean Margins Program, would be used to constrain the offshore and surface-to-deep water transport of organic carbon in this region. The latter information is critical in assessing the role of continental margins in the sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide, the dominant greenhouse gas, in the deep ocean. Because the build-up of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere may cause significant changes in climate, this project had major societal importance.

  7. A new species of Comephoronema (Nematoda: Cystidicolidae) from the stomach of the abyssal halosaur Halosauropsis macrochir (Teleostei) from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Moravec, Frantisek; Klimpel, Sven

    2007-08-01

    A new species of parasitic nematode Comephoronema macrochiri n. sp. (Cystidicolidae), is described from the stomach of the marine deep-sea fish Halosauropsis macrochir (abyssal halosaur) from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The new species, studied with both light and scanning electron microscopy, is characterized mainly by 6 pairs of preanal papillae, by which it principally differs from members of Ascarophis; the spicules are 297-375 microm and 99-120 microm long and fully developed eggs possess 2 long filaments on 1 pole. Rhabdochona beatriceinsleyae is transferred to Comephoronema as C. beatriceinsleyae (Holloway and Klewer, 1969) n. comb. Comephoronema macrochiri differs from all other congeners mainly in having eggs with filaments on 1 pole only, and from individual species by some additional features such as the number of preanal papillae, the shape of pseudolabial projections, and the body and organ measurements. PMID:17918373

  8. The national assessment of shoreline change: A GIS compilation of vector shorelines and associated shoreline change data for the New England and Mid-Atlantic Coasts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Kratzmann, Meredith; Hapke, Cheryl; Thieler, E. Robert; List, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the fact that coastal infrastructure is subjected to flooding and erosion. As a result, there is an increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present shoreline changes. The U.S. Geological Survey's National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project has compiled a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines and shoreline-change rates for the New England and Mid-Atlantic Coasts. There is currently no widely accepted standard for analyzing shoreline change. Existing measurement and rate-calculation methods vary from study to study and preclude combining results into statewide or regional assessments. The impetus behind the National Assessment project was to develop a standardized method that is consistent from coast to coast for measuring changes in shoreline position. The goal was to facilitate the process of periodically and systematically updating the results in an internally consistent manner.

  9. Hydrothermal circulation, serpentinization, and degassing at a rift valley-fracture zone intersection: Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 15[degree]N, 45[degree]W

    SciTech Connect

    Rona, P.A.; Nelson, T.A. ); Bougault, H.; Charlou, J.L.; Needham, H.D. ); Appriou, P. ); Trefry, J.H. ); Eberhart, G.L.; Barone, A. )

    1992-09-01

    A hydrothermal system characterized by high ratios of methane to both manganese and suspended particulate matter was detected in seawater sampled at the eastern intersection of the rift valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge with the Fifteen-Twenty Fracture Zone. This finding contrasts with low ratios in black smoker-type hydrothermal systems that occur within spreading segments. Near-bottom water sampling coordinated with SeaBeam bathymetry and camera-temperature tows detected the highest concentrations of methane at fault zones in rocks with the appearance of altered ultramafic units in a large dome that forms part of the inside corner high at the intersection. The distinct chemical signatures of the two types of hydrothermal systems are inferred to be controlled by different circulation pathways related to reaction of seawater primarily with ultramafic rocks at intersections of spreading segments with fracture zones but with mafic rocks within spreading segments.

  10. Biodiversity and degradation potential of oil-degrading bacteria isolated from deep-sea sediments of South Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiangxing; Gao, Wei; Cui, Zhisong; Han, Bin; Yang, Peihua; Sun, Chengjun; Zheng, Li

    2015-08-15

    The indigenous oil-degrading bacterial consortia MARA and MARB were enriched from the deep-sea sediments of South Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) with crude oil as sole carbon and energy sources. Biodiversity and community analyses showed that members of α-Proteobacteria were the key players in consortium MARA, whereas those of γ-Proteobacteria were the key players in consortium MARB, which were studied by MiSeq sequencing method. Gravimetric method estimated the oil degradation rates of MARA and MARB to be 63.4% and 85.8%, respectively, after 20d. Eleven cultivable oil degraders with different morphologies were isolated. These strains were identified as Alcanivorax, Bacillus, Dietzia, Erythrobacter, Marinobacter, Nitratireductor, and Oceanicola based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. Three strains belonging to Dietzia exhibited the highest oil degradation capability. Results indicated that the intrinsic biodegradation capacity of oil contaminants by indigenous microbial communities exists in South MAR sediments.

  11. Quantification of the effects of eustasy, subsidence, and sediment supply on Miocene sequences, mid-Atlantic margin of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Browning, J.V.; Miller, K.G.; McLaughlin, P.P.; Kominz, M.A.; Sugarman, P.J.; Monteverde, D.; Feigenson, M.D.; Hernandez, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    We use backstripping to quantify the roles of variations in global sea level (eustasy), subsidence, and sediment supply on the development of the Miocene stratigraphic record of the mid-Atlantic continental margin of the United States (New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland). Eustasy is a primary influence on sequence patterns, determining the global template of sequences (i.e., times when sequences can be preserved) and explaining similarities in Miocene sequence architecture on margins throughout the world. Sequences can be correlated throughout the mid-Atlantic region with Sr-isotopic chronology (??0.6 m.y. to ??1.2 m.y.). Eight Miocene sequences correlate regionally and can be correlated to global ??18O increases, indicating glacioeustatic control. This margin is dominated by passive subsidence with little evidence for active tectonic overprints, except possibly in Maryland during the early Miocene. However, early Miocene sequences in New Jersey and Delaware display a patchwork distribution that is attributable to minor (tens of meters) intervals of excess subsidence. Backstripping quantifies that excess subsidence began in Delaware at ca. 21 Ma and continued until 12 Ma, with maximum rates from ca. 21-16 Ma. We attribute this enhanced subsidence to local flexural response to the progradation of thick sequences offshore and adjacent to this area. Removing this excess subsidence in Delaware yields a record that is remarkably similar to New Jersey eustatic estimates. We conclude that sea-level rise and fall is a first-order control on accommodation providing similar timing on all margins to the sequence record. Tectonic changes due to movement of the crust can overprint the record, resulting in large gaps in the stratigraphic record. Smaller differences in sequences can be attributed to local flexural loading effects, particularly in regions experiencing large-scale progradation. ?? 2006 Geological Society of America.

  12. The tectonic evolution of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 55°55'N and the Bight Transform Fault during the past 6 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benediktsdottir, A.; Hey, R. N.; Martinez, F.; Hoskuldsson, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present a new propagating rift model of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 55°55'N and the Bight Transform Fault (BTF) explaining the tectonic history of the area during the past 6 Ma, using marine magnetic anomalies collected in the fall of 2013. The data consist of thirteen flowline parallel lines across the ridge and they show that the accretion across the ridge has not been symmetric. Using Magellan, a new tool to model magnetic anomalies, we obtain a tectonic evolution of the area for the past 6 Ma. The area just south of the BTF (at 0-20 km distance) is characterized by a very large asymmetry in the magnetic data. This asymmetry is most clearly seen within the Brunhes anomaly, which has a big divide in it. Our model suggests that the ridge has shifted twice some 8-12 km to the east within the past 2 Ma resulting from two very rapid rift propagations. We could not determine whether the propagations were to the south or north because of very rapid propagation rates. The tectonic evolution of the area 20-90 km south of the BTF is simpler and the model is more readily understood. The model suggests that a few short lived propagators cause asymmetry in the area. They all, but one, propagate north toward the BTF and all, but one, transfer lithosphere from the Eurasian plate to the North-American plate. Unlike the prominent far reaching (> 100km) propagators just south of Iceland these propagators are short. They play an important role in the tectonic evolution of the ridge and our results suggest that the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in this area is very dynamic.

  13. An Exploratory Study on Initial STEM Classes and African American Freshman Males Who Are STEM Majors at a Large Mid-Atlantic State University: Factors Affecting Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Persistence in the STEM Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, William Jason

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test how well social cognitive career theory (SCCT) explains the effects of an introductory freshman year science course on the career perspectives of African American males at a large, public mid-Atlantic state university. Embracing SCCT as the foundation of this project, the dissertation intended to gather data…

  14. Assisting Students Struggling with Mathematics: Response to Intervention (RtI) for Elementary and Middle Schools. Q&A with Ben Clarke Ph.D and Paul Riccomini, Ph.D. REL Mid-Atlantic Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ben; Riccomini, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This REL Mid-Atlantic Event focused on effective strategies for screening, instruction, and differentiation of instruction as part of math RtI implementation. The Q&A presented in this document address the questions participants had for Dr. Clarke and Dr. Riccomini following the event. Dr. Clarke's and Dr. Riccomini's PowerPoint presentations…

  15. A Multisite Cluster Randomized Trial of the Effects of CompassLearning Odyssey[R] Math on the Math Achievement of Selected Grade 4 Students in the Mid-Atlantic Region. Final Report. NCEE 2009-4068

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wijekumar, Kay; Hitchcock, John; Turner, Herb; Lei, PuiWa; Peck, Kyle

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to identify instructional methods that might improve mathematics learning at the grade 4 level when used in a variety of educational settings under typical conditions, the REL Mid-Atlantic research team looked for promising, replicable practices that were being used broadly by teachers in U.S. schools, for which research showed…

  16. Effects of the Connected Mathematics Project 2 (CMP2) on the Mathematics Achievement of Grade 6 Students in the Mid-Atlantic Region. Final Report. NCEE 2012-4017

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Taylor; Brasiel, Sarah J.; Turner, Herb; Wise, John C.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effects of Connected Mathematics Project 2 (CMP2) on grade 6 student mathematics achievement and engagement using a cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) design. It responds to a need to improve mathematics learning in the Mid-Atlantic Region (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Washington, DC). Findings…

  17. THE EFFECTS OF MACROINVERTEBRATE TAXONOMIC RESOLUTION IN LARGE LANDSCAPE BIOASSESSMENTS: AN EXAMPLE FROM THE MID-ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The macroinvertebrate taxonomic resolution needed for detecting human impacts on stream ecosystems draws continued attention from stream ecologists. During late spring 1993-1995, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) sam...

  18. CONCERNS/ISSUES OF USEPA'S ORD PATHOGEN EQUIVALENCY COMMITTEE

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA/ORD's emphasis is on protection of public health and good science. EPA's approach of minimizing health risks of land application by reducing pathogens below the detection limit via Class A treatment or Class B treatment followed by natural attenuation is discussed. The June...

  19. USEPA MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A description of the upcoming USEPA manual is presented along with discussion of salient points of the conceptual approach employed in its development. The manual is the first to recognize and identify the primary removal mechanisms in these systems when they are applied to preli...

  20. LAND USE CHANGE DUE TO URBANIZATION FOR THE MID-ATLANTIC INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT REGION OF THE EASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Regional Vulnerability Assessment Pro- gram (REVA) is designed to develop and demonstrate approaches to identify the ecosystems at the greatest risk from regional population growth and economic activity (Smith, 1999). A region is a...

  1. HYDROGEOLOGIC FOUNDATION IN SUPPORT OF ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION: BASE-FLOW LOADINGS OF NITRATE IN MID-ATLANTIC AGRICULTURAL WATERSHEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study is a consortium between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (National Risk Management Research Laboratory) and the U.S. Geological Survey (Baltimore and Dover). The objectives of this study are: (1) to develop a geohydrological database for paired agricultural wate...

  2. Metals fate and transport modelling in streams and watersheds: state of the science and USEPA workshop review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caruso, B.S.; Cox, T.J.; Runkel, Robert L.; Velleux, M.L.; Bencala, Kenneth E.; Nordstrom, D. Kirk; Julien, P.Y.; Butler, B.A.; Alpers, Charles N.; Marion, A.; Smith, Kathleen S.

    2008-01-01

    Metals pollution in surface waters from point and non-point sources (NPS) is a widespread problem in the United States and worldwide (Lofts et al., 2007; USEPA, 2007). In the western United States, metals associated with acid mine drainage (AMD) from hardrock mines in mountainous areas impact aquatic ecosystems and human health (USEPA, 1997a; Caruso and Ward, 1998; Church et al., 2007). Metals fate and transport modelling in streams and watersheds is sometimes needed for assessment and restoration of surface waters, including mining-impacted streams (Runkel and Kimball, 2002; Caruso, 2003; Velleux et al., 2006). The Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP; Wool et al., 2001), developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), is an example of a model used for such analyses. Other approaches exist and appropriate model selection depends on site characteristics, data availability and modelling objectives. However, there are a wide range of assumptions, input parameters, data requirements and gaps, and calibration and validation issues that must be addressed by model developers, users and decision makers. Despite substantial work on model development, their successful application has been more limited because they are not often used by decision makers for stream and watershed assessment and restoration. Bringing together scientists, model developers, users and decision makers should stimulate the development of appropriate models and improve the applicability of their results. To address these issues, the USEPA Office of Research and Development and Region 8 (Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming) hosted a workshop in Denver, Colorado on February 13–14, 2007. The workshop brought together approximately 35 experts from government, academia and consulting to address the state of the art for modelling metals fate and transport, knowledge gaps and future directions in metals modelling. It focused on modelling metals in high

  3. Hydrothermal activity on the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Tectonically- and volcanically-controlled venting at 4 5°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    German, C. R.; Bennett, S. A.; Connelly, D. P.; Evans, A. J.; Murton, B. J.; Parson, L. M.; Prien, R. D.; Ramirez-Llodra, E.; Jakuba, M.; Shank, T. M.; Yoerger, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Walker, S. L.; Nakamura, K.

    2008-09-01

    We report results from an investigation of the geologic processes controlling hydrothermal activity along the previously-unstudied southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (3-7°S). Our study employed the NOC (UK) deep-tow sidescan sonar instrument, TOBI, in concert with the WHOI (USA) autonomous underwater vehicle, ABE, to collect information concerning hydrothermal plume distributions in the water column co-registered with geologic investigations of the underlying seafloor. Two areas of high-temperature hydrothermal venting were identified. The first was situated in a non-transform discontinuity (NTD) between two adjacent second-order ridge-segments near 4°02'S, distant from any neovolcanic activity. This geologic setting is very similar to that of the ultramafic-hosted and tectonically-controlled Rainbow vent-site on the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The second site was located at 4°48'S at the axial-summit centre of a second-order ridge-segment. There, high-temperature venting is hosted in an ˜ 18 km 2 area of young lava flows which in some cases are observed to have flowed over and engulfed pre-existing chemosynthetic vent-fauna. In both appearance and extent, these lava flows are directly reminiscent of those emplaced in Winter 2005-06 at the East Pacific Rise, 9°50'N and reference to global seismic catalogues reveals that a swarm of large (M 4.6-5.6) seismic events was centred on the 5°S segment over a ˜ 24 h period in late June 2002, perhaps indicating the precise timing of this volcanic eruptive episode. Temperature measurements at one of the vents found directly adjacent to the fresh lava flows at 5°S MAR (Turtle Pits) have subsequently revealed vent-fluids that are actively phase separating under conditions very close to the Critical Point for seawater, at ˜ 3000 m depth and 407 °C: the hottest vent-fluids yet reported from anywhere along the global ridge crest.

  4. Flux and dispersion of gases from the “Drachenschlund” hydrothermal vent at 8°18' S, 13°30' W on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keir, Robin S.; Schmale, Oliver; Walter, Maren; Sültenfuß, Jürgen; Seifert, Richard; Rhein, Monika

    2008-06-01

    Hydrothermal emission of mantle helium appears to be directly related to magma production rate, but other processes can generate methane and hydrogen on mid-ocean ridges. In an on-going effort to characterize these processes in the South Atlantic, the flux and distribution of these gases were investigated in the vicinity of a powerful black smoker recently discovered at 8°17.9' S, 13°30.4' W. The vent lies on the shoulder of an oblique offset in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and discharges high concentrations of methane and hydrogen. Measurements during expeditions in 2004 and 2006 show that the ratio of CH 4 to 3He in the neutrally buoyant plume is quite high, 4 × 10 8. The CTD stations were accompanied by velocity measurements with lowered acoustic Doppler current profilers (LADCP), and from these data we estimate the methane transport to have been 0.5 mol s - 1 in a WSW-trending plume that seems to develop during the ebb tidal phase. This transport is an order of magnitude greater than the source of CH 4 calculated from its concentration in the vent fluid and the rise height of the plume. From this range of methane fluxes, the source of 3He is estimated to be between 0.14 and 1.2 nmol s - 1 . In either case, the 3He source is significantly lower than expected from the spreading rate of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. From the inventory of methane in the rift valley adjacent to the vent, it appears that the average specific rate of oxidation is 2.6 to 23 yr - 1 , corresponding to a turnover time between 140 and 16 days. Vertical profiles of methane in the surrounding region often exhibited Gaussian-like distributions, and the variances appear to increase with distance from the vent. Using a Gaussian plume model, we obtained a range of vertical eddy diffusivities between 0.009 and 0.08 m 2m 2 s - 1 . These high values may be due to tidally driven internal waves across the promontory on which the vent is located.

  5. Deep-pelagic (0-3000 m) fish assemblage structure over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the area of the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, April B.; Sutton, Tracey T.; Galbraith, John K.; Vecchione, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Only a miniscule fraction of the world’s largest volume of living space, the ocean’s midwater biome, has ever been sampled. As part of the International Census of Marine Life field project on Mid-Atlantic Ridge ecosystems (MAR-ECO), a discrete-depth trawling survey was conducted in 2009 aboard the NOAA FSV Henry B. Bigelow to examine the pelagic faunal assemblage structure and distribution over the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ) of the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Day/night sampling at closely spaced stations allowed the first characterization of diel vertical migration of pelagic nekton over the MAR-ECO study area. Discrete-depth sampling from 0-3000 m was conducted using a Norwegian “Krill” trawl with five codends that were opened and closed via a pre-programmed timer. Seventy-five species of fish were collected, with a maximum diversity and biomass observed between depths of 700-1900 m. A gradient in sea-surface temperature and underlying watermasses, from northwest to southeast, was mirrored by a similar gradient in ichthyofaunal diversity. Using multivariate analyses, eight deep-pelagic fish assemblages were identified, with depth as the primary discriminatory variable. Strong diel vertical migration (DVM) of the mesopelagic fauna was a prevalent feature of the study area, though the numerically dominant fish, Cyclothone microdon (Gonostomatidae), exhibited a broad (0-3000 m) vertical distribution and did not appear to migrate on a diel basis. Three patterns of vertical distribution were observed in the study area: (a) DVM of mesopelagic, and possibly bathypelagic, taxa; (b) broad vertical distribution spanning meso- and bathypelagic depths; and (c) discrete vertical distribution within a limited depth range. Overall species composition and rank order of abundance of fish species agreed with two previous expeditions to the CGFZ (1982-1983 and 2004), suggesting some long-term consistency in the ichthyofaunal composition of the study area, at least

  6. Joint inversion of shear wave travel time residuals and geoid and depth anomalies for long-wavelength variations in upper mantle temperature and composition along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehan, Anne F.; Solomon, Sean C.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements were carried out for SS-S differential travel time residuals for nearly 500 paths crossing the northern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, assuming that the residuals are dominated by contributions from the upper mantle near the surface bounce point of the reflected phase SS. Results indicate that the SS-S travel time residuals decrease linearly with square root of age, to an age of 80-100 Ma, in general agreement with the plate cooling model. A joint inversion was formulated of travel time residuals and geoid and bathymetric anomalies for lateral variation in the upper mantle temperature and composition. The preferred inversion solutions were found to have variations in upper mantle temperature along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge of about 100 K. It was calculated that, for a constant bulk composition, such a temperature variation would produce about a 7-km variation in crustal thickness, larger than is generally observed.

  7. Distribution and spatial variation of hydrothermal faunal assemblages at Lucky Strike (Mid-Atlantic Ridge) revealed by high-resolution video image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuvelier, Daphne; Sarrazin, Jozée; Colaço, Ana; Copley, Jon; Desbruyères, Daniel; Glover, Adrian G.; Tyler, Paul; Serrão Santos, Ricardo

    2009-11-01

    Whilst the fauna inhabiting hydrothermal vent structures in the Atlantic Ocean is reasonably well known, less is understood about the spatial distributions of the fauna in relation to abiotic and biotic factors. In this study, a major active hydrothermal edifice (Eiffel Tower, at 1690 m depth) on the Lucky Strike vent field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR)) was investigated. Video transects were carried out by ROV Victor 6000 and complete image coverage was acquired. Four distinct assemblages, ranging from dense larger-sized Bathymodiolus mussel beds to smaller-sized mussel clumps and alvinocaridid shrimps, and two types of substrata were defined based on high definition photographs and video imagery. To evaluate spatial variation, faunal distribution was mapped in three dimensions. A high degree of patchiness characterizes this 11 m high sulfide structure. The differences observed in assemblage and substratum distribution were related to habitat characteristics (fluid exits, depth and structure orientation). Gradients in community structure were observed, which coincided with an increasing distance from the fluid exits. A biological zonation model for the Eiffel Tower edifice was created in which faunal composition and distribution can be visually explained by the presence/absence of fluid exits.

  8. Development and application of a monoclonal-antibody technique for counting Aureococcus anophagefferens, an alga causing recurrent brown tides in the Mid-Atlantic United States.

    PubMed

    Caron, David A; Dennett, Mark R; Moran, Dawn M; Schaffner, Rebecca A; Lonsdale, Darcy J; Gobler, Christopher J; Nuzzi, Robert; McLean, Tim I

    2003-09-01

    A method was developed for the rapid detection and enumeration of Aureococcus anophagefferens, the cause of harmful algal blooms called "brown tides" in estuaries of the Mid-Atlantic United States. The method employs a monoclonal antibody (MAb) and a colorimetric, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay format. The MAb obtained exhibits high reactivity with A. anophagefferens and very low cross-reactivities with a phylogenetically diverse array of other protists and bacteria. Standard curves are constructed for each 96-well microtiter plate by using known amounts of a preserved culture of A. anophagefferens. This approach allows estimation of the abundance of the alga in natural samples. The MAb method was compared to an existing method that employs polyclonal antibodies and epifluorescence microscopy and to direct microscopic counts of A. anophagefferens in samples with high abundances of the alga. The MAb method provided increased quantitative accuracy and greatly reduced sample processing time. A spatial survey of several Long Island estuaries in May 2000 using this new approach documented a range of abundances of A. anophagefferens in these bays spanning nearly 3 orders of magnitude.

  9. Source and Delivery of Nutrients to Receiving Waters in the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic Regions of the United States1

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Richard B; Johnston, Craig M; Smith, Richard A; Milstead, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This study investigates nutrient sources and transport to receiving waters, in order to provide spatially detailed information to aid water-resources managers concerned with eutrophication and nutrient management strategies. SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) nutrient models were developed for the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic (NE US) regions of the United States to represent source conditions for the year 2002. The model developed to examine the source and delivery of nitrogen to the estuaries of nine large rivers along the NE US Seaboard indicated that agricultural sources contribute the largest percentage (37%) of the total nitrogen load delivered to the estuaries. Point sources account for 28% while atmospheric deposition accounts for 20%. A second SPARROW model was used to examine the sources and delivery of phosphorus to lakes and reservoirs throughout the NE US. The greatest attenuation of phosphorus occurred in lakes that were large relative to the size of their watershed. Model results show that, within the NE US, aquatic decay of nutrients is quite limited on an annual basis and that we especially cannot rely on natural attenuation to remove nutrients within the larger rivers nor within lakes with large watersheds relative to the size of the lake. PMID:22457578

  10. Long-term trends of PBDEs, triclosan, and triclocarban in biosolids from a wastewater treatment plant in the Mid-Atlantic region of the US.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Natasha A; Lozano, Nuria; McConnell, Laura L; Torrents, Alba; Rice, Clifford P; Ramirez, Mark

    2015-01-23

    In the US, land application of biosolids has been utilized in government-regulated programs to recycle valuable nutrients and organic carbon that would otherwise be incinerated or buried in landfills. While many benefits have been reported, there are concerns that these practices represent a source of organic micropollutants to the environment. In this study, biosolids samples from a wastewater treatment plant in the Mid-Atlantic region of the US were collected approximately every 2 months over a 7-year period and analyzed for brominated diphenyl ethers (BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-209), triclosan, and triclocarban. During the collection period of 2005-2011, concentrations of the brominated diphenyl ethers BDE-47+BDE-99 decreased by 42%, triclocarban decreased by 47%, but BDE-209 and triclosan remained fairly constant. Observed reductions in contaminant concentrations could not be explained by different seasons or by volumetric changes of wastewaters arriving at the treatment plant and instead may be the result of the recent phaseout of BDE-47 and BDE-99 as well as potential reductions in the use of triclocarban. PMID:25282513

  11. Variability in pigment concentration in warm-core rings as determined by coastal zone color scanner satellite imagery from the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Moliner, Graciela; Yoder, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A time series of coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) derived chlorophyll (CZCS-chl) and sea surface temperature (SST) satellite imagery was developed for the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). Warm-core rings (WCR) were identified by both the warmer SST signal as well as the low pigment concentrations of their cores. The variation in pigment concentrations and SST observed in satellite imagery over the geographic range and life span of four WCRs is investigated. The hypotheses are that pigment concentration increase during the lifetime of the WCR is a response to processes such as convective overturn, upwelling, edge enhancement due to increased vertical mixing, active convergence, or lateral exchange. Empirical orthogonal function analysis (EOF) is used to investigate the relationship between SST and pigment patterns observed in the presence of a WCR. The first two EOF modes explain more than 80% of the variability observed in all four WCRs and in both (SST and pigment) data sets. The results of this study show that, at the synoptic scales of staellite data, the variability observed in the WCRs is greater at the periphery of the rings. These results show that advective entrainment, rather than processes at ring center (e.g., shoaling of the pycnocline/nutricline in response to frictional decay) or at the periphery due to other processes such as vertical mixing, is the mechanism responsible for the observed variability.

  12. Non-medical use of prescription drugs and HIV risk behaviour in transgender women in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

    PubMed

    Benotsch, Eric G; Zimmerman, Rick S; Cathers, Laurie; Pierce, Juan; McNulty, Shawn; Heck, Ted; Perrin, Paul B; Snipes, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    Male-to-female transgender women (TGW) experience high rates of substance use and HIV. A recent substance use trend is the use of prescription medication without a doctor's consent. No research to date has examined the associations between this non-medical use of prescription drugs and HIV risk behaviour in TGW. In the present study, TGW recruited from community venues (N = 104) in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States completed surveys assessing demographic information, non-medical use of prescription drugs, other substance use, injection practices and sexual risk behaviour. Twenty-four per cent of the sample reported lifetime non-medical use of prescription drugs across the following categories: analgesics (21.2%), anxiolytics (14.4%), stimulants (12.5%) and sedatives (8.7%). Participants reporting non-medical use of prescription drugs were more likely to report other substance use, needle use to inject drugs, injecting silicone and sharing needles. In multivariable analyses, non-medical use of prescription drugs was associated with unprotected sex, sex after engaging in substance use, and commercial sex work, after controlling for demographic factors. Self-esteem and social support from family served as protective factors for non-medical use of prescription drugs. HIV-prevention programmes focused on TGW in the United States may wish to expand their assessment of substance use to include the use of prescription medications without a physician's consent.

  13. Microbe-mediated transformations of marine dissolved organic matter during 2,100 years of natural incubation in the cold, oxic crust of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah Walter, S. R.; Jaekel, U.; Huber, J. A.; Dittmar, T.; Girguis, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    On the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, oxic seawater from the deep ocean is downwelled into the basaltic crust, supplying the crustal aquifer with an initial inoculum of organic matter and electron acceptors. Studies have shown that fluids circulating within the crust are minimally altered from original seawater, making this subsurface environment a unique natural experiment in which the fate of marine organic matter and the limitations of microbial adaptability in the context of reduced carbon supply can be examined. To make the subsurface crustal aquifer accessible, two CORK (Circulation Obviation Retrofit Kit) observatories have been installed at North Pond, a sediment-filled depression beneath the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea. Radiocarbon analysis of dissolved inorganic (DIC) and organic carbon (DOC) in samples recovered from these observatories show uncoupled aging between DOC and DIC with Δ14C values of DOC as low as -933‰ despite isolation from the open ocean for, at most, 2,100 years. This extreme value is part of a general trend of decreasing DOC δ13C and Δ14C values with increasing incubation time within the aquifer. Combined with reduced concentrations of DOC, our results argue for selective microbial oxidation of the youngest, most 13C-enriched components of downwelled DOC, possibly identifying these as characteristics of the more bioavailable fractions of deep-ocean dissolved organic matter. They also suggest that microbial oxidation during low-temperature hydrothermal circulation could be an important sink for aged marine dissolved organic matter.

  14. Metal concentrations and metallothionein-like protein levels in deep-sea fishes captured near hydrothermal vents in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge off Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Company, R.; Felícia, H.; Serafim, A.; Almeida, A. J.; Biscoito, M.; Bebianno, M. J.

    2010-07-01

    The knowledge of metal contamination in deep-sea fishes living in the surroundings of hydrothermal vents is very scarce, along with the detoxification mechanisms that allow them to live near one of the most metal contaminated marine environments. Six deep-sea fish species, although not vent endemic were collected near three Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) hydrothermal vents (Menez Gwen, Lucky Strike and Rainbow) and the gills, muscle and liver were selected for this study due to their importance in metal metabolism and storage. The concentrations of seven metals (Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Ni) and a metal-related biomarker (metallothionein-like proteins-MTL) were assessed. Major differences in metal accumulation among fish species are related to their feeding habits and vent site of their capture. The liver and gills are in general the most important tissues for metal accumulation compared to the muscle, but tissue partitioning is very dependent on the fish species considered. Compared to other deep-sea fishes, fish capture in the vicinity of hydrothermal vents accumulates higher amounts of metals in general. However, MTL levels are not considerably different from what is found in commercial coastal fishes, and is poorly correlated with metal concentrations in the tissues. Therefore, MTL may not constitute one major detoxification system for deep-sea species living in the vicinity of three important MAR vent sites.

  15. PGE fractionation in seafloor hydrothermal systems: examples from mafic- and ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal fields at the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pašava, Jan; Vymazalová, Anna; Petersen, Sven

    2007-04-01

    The distribution of platinum group elements (PGEs) in massive sulfides and hematite-magnetite±pyrite assemblages from the recently discovered basalt-hosted Turtle Pits hydrothermal field and in massive sulfides from the ultramafic-hosted Logatchev vent field both on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge was studied and compared to that from selected ancient volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VHMS) deposits. Cu-rich samples from black smoker chimneys of both vent fields are enriched in Pd and Rh (Pd up to 227 ppb and Rh up to 149 ppb) when compared to hematite-magnetite-rich samples from Turtle Pits (Pd up to 10 ppb, Rh up to 1.9 ppb). A significant positive correlation was established between Cu and Rh in sulfide samples from Turtle Pits. PGE chondrite-normalized patterns (with a positive Rh anomaly and Pd and Au enrichment), Pd/Pt and Pd/Au ratios close to global MORB, and high values of Pd/Ir and Pt/Ir ratios indicate mafic source rock and seawater involvement in the hydrothermal system at Turtle Pits. Similarly shaped PGE chondrite-normalized patterns and high values of Pd/Pt and Pd/Ir ratios in Cu-rich sulfides at Logatchev likely reflect a similar mechanism of PGE enrichment but with involvement of ultramafic source rocks.

  16. Absorption and Attenuation Coefficients Using the WET Labs ac-s in the Mid-Atlantic Bight: Field Measurements and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, Nobuaki; Makinen, Carla P.; Mitchell, Richard; Moisan, Tiffany A.

    2008-01-01

    Ocean color algorithms are based on the parameterization of apparent optical properties as a function of inherent optical properties. WET Labs underwater absorption and attenuation meters (ac-9 and ac-s) measure both the spectral beam attenuation [c (lambda)] and absorption coefficient [a (lambda)]. The ac-s reports in a continuous range of 390-750 nm with a band pass of 4 nm, totaling approximately 83 distinct wavelengths, while the ac-9 reports at 9 wavelengths. We performed the ac-s field measurements at nine stations in the Mid-Atlantic Bight from water calibrations to data analysis. Onboard the ship, the ac-s was calibrated daily using Milli Q-water. Corrections for the in situ temperature and salinity effects on optical properties of water were applied. Corrections for incomplete recovery of the scattered light in the ac-s absorption tube were performed. The fine scale of spectral and vertical distributions of c (lambda) and a (lambda) were described from the ac-s. The significant relationships between a (674) and that of spectrophotometric analysis and chlorophyll a concentration of discrete water samples were observed.

  17. Bacteria dominate the ammonia-oxidizing community in a hydrothermal vent site at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge of the South Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Li, Meng; Ding, Jie-Fei; Gu, Ji-Dong; Luo, Zhu-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification, which is carried out by two groups of microorganisms: ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and the recently discovered ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). In this study, diversity and abundance of AOB and AOA were investigated in five rock samples from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent site at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) of the South Atlantic Ocean. Both bacterial and archaeal ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA) gene sequences obtained in this study were closely related to the sequences retrieved from deep-sea environments, indicating that AOB and AOA in this hydrothermal vent site showed typical deep ocean features. AOA were more diverse but less abundant than AOB. The ratios of AOA/AOB amoA gene abundance ranged from 1/3893 to 1/242 in all investigate samples, indicating that bacteria may be the major members responding to the aerobic ammonia oxidation in this hydrothermal vent site. Furthermore, diversity and abundance of AOA and AOB were significantly correlated with the contents of total nitrogen and total sulfur in investigated samples, suggesting that these two environmental factors exert strong influences on distribution of ammonia oxidizers in deep-sea hydrothermal vent environment.

  18. On the role of abiogenic factors in the bioaccumulation of heavy metals by the hydrothermal fauna of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, L. L.; Galkin, S. V.

    2008-12-01

    The distributions of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Pb, As, Ag, Cd, Se, Sb, and Hg in 128 samples of tissues of the organisms that inhabit hydrothermal vent fields of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (Menez Gwen, Snake Pit, and Rainbow) depending on the abiotic environmental parameters were studied. The majority of the elements studied showed direct correlations between their concentrations in the fluids released and in the tissues of hydrothermal organisms. A higher degree of bioaccumulation of metals was revealed in the Bathymodiolus mussels and Rimicaris shrimps from the Rainbow hydrothermal vent field as compared to their analogues from Menez Gwen and Snake Pit. This corresponds to the maximum concentrations of the majority of the metals studied in the Rainbow high-temperature hydrothermal fluids. The highest degree of bioaccumulation of heavy metals was found in gills of the symbiotrophic mussels Bathymodiolus and in maxillipeds of the ectosymbiotic shrimps Rimicaris, i.e., in the organs that function in dependence on chemosynthetic bacteria. Within the Rainbow vent field, the shrimps, which inhabit in biotopes with more high-temperature conditions and therefore are more strongly subjected to the influence of fluids, were found to contain higher metal contents than mollusks. The Fe-Mn hydroxide films that cover mussel shells might serve as important reservoirs of other metals related to Fe and Mn.

  19. Late Neogene changes in North America and Antarctica absolute plate motions inferred from the Mid-Atlantic and Southwest Indian Ridges spreading histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaffaldano, G.; DeMets, C.

    2016-08-01

    Reconstructions of absolute plate motions underpin our understanding of the plate torque balance, but are challenging due to difficulties in inferring well-dated rates and directions of plate movements from hot spot tracks. Useful information about plate dynamics can be inferred from rapid absolute plate motion changes, as these are linked only to the torque(s) that changed. Here we infer late Neogene changes in the absolute motions of North America and possibly Antarctica from changes in the easier-to-determine relative plate motions recorded along the Arctic, northern Mid-Atlantic and Southwest Indian Ridges. We show that Eurasia/North America and Nubia/North America motions changed by the same amount between 8 and 5 Ma, as may have Nubia/Antarctica and Somalia/Antarctica plate motions. By considering additional, independent constraints on Somalia/India plate motion, we argue that a scenario in which North America and Antarctica absolute motions changed is the simplest one that explains the observed changes in relative motions. We speculate that these changes are linked to the late Neogene dynamics of the Pacific plate.

  20. Diversity, distribution and antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus spp. recovered from tomatoes, leaves, water and soil on U.S. Mid-Atlantic farms.

    PubMed

    Micallef, Shirley A; Goldstein, Rachel E Rosenberg; George, Ashish; Ewing, Laura; Tall, Ben D; Boyer, Marc S; Joseph, Sam W; Sapkota, Amy R

    2013-12-01

    Antibiotic-resistant enterococci are important opportunistic pathogens and have been recovered from retail tomatoes. However, it is unclear where and how tomatoes are contaminated along the farm-to-fork continuum. Specifically, the degree of pre-harvest contamination with enterococci is unknown. We evaluated the prevalence, diversity and antimicrobial susceptibilities of enterococci collected from tomato farms in the Mid-Atlantic United States. Tomatoes, leaves, groundwater, pond water, irrigation ditch water, and soil were sampled and tested for enterococci using standard methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the Sensititre microbroth dilution system. Enterococcus faecalis isolates were characterized using amplified fragment length polymorphism to assess dispersal potential. Enterococci (n = 307) occurred in all habitats and colonization of tomatoes was common. Seven species were identified: Enterococcus casseliflavus, E. faecalis, Enterococcus gallinarum, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus avis, Enterococcus hirae and Enterococcus raffinosus. E. casseliflavus predominated in soil and on tomatoes and leaves, and E. faecalis predominated in pond water. On plants, distance from the ground influenced presence of enterococci. E. faecalis from samples within a farm were more closely related than those from samples between farms. Resistance to rifampicin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin was prevalent. Consumption of raw tomatoes as a potential exposure risk for antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus spp. deserves further attention.

  1. High frequency sampling of the 1984 spring bloom within the mid-Atlantic Bight: Synoptic shipboard, aircraft, and in situ perspectives of the SEEP-I experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, J. J.; Wirick, C. D.; Pietrafesa, L. J.; Whitledge, T. E.; Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    Moorings of current meters, thermistors, transmissometers, and fluorometers on the mid-Atlantic shelf, south of Long Island, suggest a cumulative seaward export of perhaps 0.35 g C/sq m/day between the 80 and 120 m isobaths during February-April 1984. Such a horizontal loss of algal carbon over the lower third of the water column would be 23 to 78% of the March-April 1984 primary production. This physical carbon loss is similar to daily grazing losses from zooplankton of 32-40% of the algal fixation of carbon. Metabolic demands of the benthos could be met by just the estimated fecal pellet flux, without direct consumption of algal carbon, while bacterioplankton needs could be served by excretory release of dissolved organic matter during photosynthesis. Sediment traps tethered 10 m off the bottom at the 120 m isobath and 50 m above the 500 m isobath caught as much as 0.16 to 0.26 g C /sq m/day during March-April 1984, in reasonable agreement with the flux estimated from the other moored instruments.

  2. Long-term trends of PBDEs, triclosan, and triclocarban in biosolids from a wastewater treatment plant in the Mid-Atlantic region of the US.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Natasha A; Lozano, Nuria; McConnell, Laura L; Torrents, Alba; Rice, Clifford P; Ramirez, Mark

    2015-01-23

    In the US, land application of biosolids has been utilized in government-regulated programs to recycle valuable nutrients and organic carbon that would otherwise be incinerated or buried in landfills. While many benefits have been reported, there are concerns that these practices represent a source of organic micropollutants to the environment. In this study, biosolids samples from a wastewater treatment plant in the Mid-Atlantic region of the US were collected approximately every 2 months over a 7-year period and analyzed for brominated diphenyl ethers (BDE-47, BDE-99, and BDE-209), triclosan, and triclocarban. During the collection period of 2005-2011, concentrations of the brominated diphenyl ethers BDE-47+BDE-99 decreased by 42%, triclocarban decreased by 47%, but BDE-209 and triclosan remained fairly constant. Observed reductions in contaminant concentrations could not be explained by different seasons or by volumetric changes of wastewaters arriving at the treatment plant and instead may be the result of the recent phaseout of BDE-47 and BDE-99 as well as potential reductions in the use of triclocarban.

  3. Finescale parameterizations of energy dissipation in a region of strong internal tides and sheared flow, the Lucky-Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquet, Simon; Bouruet-Aubertot, Pascale; Reverdin, Gilles; Turnherr, Andreas; Laurent, Lou St.

    2016-06-01

    The relevance of finescale parameterizations of dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy is addressed using finescale and microstructure measurements collected in the Lucky Strike segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). There, high amplitude internal tides and a strongly sheared mean flow sustain a high level of dissipation rate and turbulent mixing. Two sets of parameterizations are considered: the first ones (Gregg, 1989; Kunze et al., 2006) were derived to estimate dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy induced by internal wave breaking, while the second one aimed to estimate dissipation induced by shear instability of a strongly sheared mean flow and is a function of the Richardson number (Kunze et al., 1990; Polzin, 1996). The latter parameterization has low skill in reproducing the observed dissipation rate when shear unstable events are resolved presumably because there is no scale separation between the duration of unstable events and the inverse growth rate of unstable billows. Instead GM based parameterizations were found to be relevant although slight biases were observed. Part of these biases result from the small value of the upper vertical wavenumber integration limit in the computation of shear variance in Kunze et al. (2006) parameterization that does not take into account internal wave signal of high vertical wavenumbers. We showed that significant improvement is obtained when the upper integration limit is set using a signal to noise ratio criterion and that the spatial structure of dissipation rates is reproduced with this parameterization.

  4. Summary of environmental geologic studies in the Mid-Atlantic outer continental shelf area; results of 1978-1979 field seasons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robb, James M.

    1983-01-01

    Because of the need for knowledge of an offshore area that is undergoing exploration for oil and gas resources, since 1975 the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has funded studies of the environmental characteristics of the Mid-Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. This volume briefly summarizes a final report to the BLM on the results of U.S. Geological Survey investigations stemming from data acquired during 1978 and 1979. The parent final report contains complete accounts of those investigations. The subjects of the studies range from the geologic effects of water currents and their capabilities of erosion and transportation, to delineation of potentially hazardous geologic characteristics of the area. Nine specific studies address the complexities of water currents, the nature of materials suspended in the sea waters, rates of mixing-in of material deposited on the bottom, and the sites of probable deposition of such materials, as well as sites and mechanisms of possible submarine landsliding or unstable bottom (engineering characteristics) of the Continental Slope and shelf.

  5. Organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, dioxins, and metals in postterm peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) eggs from the Mid-Atlantic states, 1993-1999.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kathleen E; Zhao, Yuan; Kane, Cynthia M

    2009-07-01

    Peregrine falcons were extirpated from the eastern United States by 1964 due to the effects of dichloro-diphenyl-trichlorethane (DDT) (Peakall and Kiff 1988). As a result of restoration efforts, peregrines have largely recovered in the region but remain a barometer of environmental contamination. In the course of monitoring nests, biologists in the mid-Atlantic states collected peregrine falcon eggs that failed to hatch. In the period 1993-1999, 93 eggs were collected from 66 nests in 31 locations in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia. We analyzed eggs for organochlorine pesticides, PCBs, and metals, and calculated toxic equivalencies (TEQs) for dioxins and furans. Organochlorine contaminants were detected in eggs from all parts of the region. Although nest success in all parts of the region was good, the PCB TEQ in the Atlantic-New Jersey region was significantly related to nest success, and the regionwide PCB TEQ was nearly significant for nest success across the five-state area. dichloro-diphenyl-dichloroethylene (DDE), DDT, and total PCBs were negatively correlated with eggshell thickness, although eggshell thinning (10.4%) was not at a level associated with deleterious population effects. The five states represented in this study are productive for peregrine falcons and have contributed to the recovery of this species. However, the results suggest that Atlantic coastal peregrines might be subject to contaminant burdens that have the potential to decrease nest success and productivity. PMID:18853082

  6. Efficacy of major anthelmintics for reduction of fecal shedding of strongyle-type eggs in horses in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

    PubMed

    Smith, M A; Nolan, T J; Rieger, R; Aceto, H; Levine, D G; Nolen-Walston, R; Smith, B I

    2015-11-30

    In the last decade there have been numerous reports of anthelmintic resistant cyathostomins in many parts of the world. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the commercially available anthelmintics against cyathostomin egg shedding in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. A total of 989 horses from 67 different farms located in southeastern Pennsylvania, northern Delaware, and northeastern Maryland were treated with fenbendazole, oxibendazole, pyrantel pamoate, ivermectin, or moxidectin at their recommended dosages. Fecal egg count reduction testing was used to determine the efficacy of each anthelmintic on those horses with fecal egg counts of ≥ 200 eggs per gram on the day of treatment (272 horses). Decreased efficacy (reduction of strongyle-type fecal egg counts by less than 90%) was found for fenbendazole, oxibendazole, and pyrantel pamoate, with only 6%, 21% and 43% of horses showing reductions of greater than 90%, respectively. The macrocyclic lactones showed high efficacy in all horses sampled in this study. The decreased anthelmintic efficacy detected in this study adds further evidence for the existence of resistant cyathostomins throughout much of the eastern United States. Findings from this study can be used to create a more sustainable approach for parasite control programs.

  7. Low haemosporidian diversity and one key-host species in a bird malaria community on a mid-Atlantic island (São Miguel, Azores).

    PubMed

    Hellgren, Olof; Križanauskienė, Asta; Hasselquist, Dennis; Bensch, Staffan

    2011-10-01

    When host species colonize new areas, the parasite assemblage infecting the hosts might change, with some parasite species being lost and others newly acquired. These changes would likely lead to novel selective forces on both host and its parasites. We investigated the avian blood parasites in the passerine bird community on the mid-Atlantic island of São Miguel, Azores, a bird community originating from continental Europe. The presence of haemosporidian blood parasites belonging to the genera Haemoproteus, Plasmodium, and Leucocytozoon was assessed using polymerase chain reaction. We found two Plasmodium lineages and two Leucocytozoon lineages in 11 bird species (84% of all breeding passerine species) on the island. These lineages were unevenly distributed across bird species. The Eurasian Blackbird (Turdus merula) was the key-host species (total parasite prevalence of 57%), harboring the main proportion of parasite infections. Except for Eurasian Blackbirds, all bird species had significantly lower prevalence and parasite diversity compared to their continental populations. We propose that in evolutionary novel bird communities, single species may act as key hosts by harboring the main part of the parasite fauna from which parasites "leak" into the other species. This would create very different host-parasite associations in areas recently colonized by hosts as compared to in their source populations. PMID:22102655

  8. Insights about the genetic diversity and population structure of an offshore group of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Mid-Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Castilho, C S; Pedone-Valdez, F; Bertuol, F; Fruet, P; Genoves, R C; Di Tullio, J C; Caon, G; Hoffmann, L S; Freitas, T R O

    2015-04-15

    Although the genus Tursiops has a worldwide distribution and is globally well-studied, some dolphin populations continue to face high risks of decline. Hence, it is necessary to assess the genetic diversity and structure of this genus to properly assess its conservation status and to implement appropriate management actions. In Brazil, genetic studies on this group remain rare, particularly for populations inhabiting offshore waters. Saint Peter and Saint Paul Archipelago (SPSPA) is a small group of islands located in the Mid- Atlantic Ridge, where recent studies of the Tursiops truncatus group indicate that individuals are resident throughout the year around the archipelago, exhibiting considerable site fidelity. A previous study with this group indicated that the individuals form an isolated population. To test this hypothesis, and describe the genetic diversity of SPSPA individuals, we assessed 12 microsatellite loci and a portion of the mitochondrial control region. Bayesian analysis revealed that SPSPA bottlenose dolphins form a unique population. In a phylogeographic perspective, we found that individuals from SPSPA shared mtDNA haplotypes with inshore and offshore individuals from North Atlantic, suggesting that they are not currently isolated from their conspecifics. Mirroring mtDNA findings, microsatellite analysis revealed that most of the pairs of individuals sampled seem to be unrelated (83.8%) and no indication of inbreeding, what would be expected if a small population such as SPSPA was reproductively isolated.

  9. Use of geochemical mass balance modelling to evaluate the role of weathering in determining stream chemistry in five mid-Atlantic watersheds on different lithologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Brien, A. K.; Rice, K.C.; Bricker, O.P.; Kennedy, M.M.; Anderson, R.T.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of mineral weathering was assessed and compared for five mid-Atlantic watersheds receiving similar atmospheric inputs but underlain by differing bedrock. Annual solute mass balances and volume-weighted mean solute concentrations were calculated for each watershed for each year of record. In addition, primary and secondary mineralogy were determined for each of the watersheds through analysis of soil samples and thin sections using petrographic, scanning electron microscope, electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction techniques. Mineralogical data were also compiled from the literature. These data were input to NETPATH, a geochemical program that calculates the masses of minerals that react with precipitation to produce stream water chemistry. The feasibilities of the weathering scenarios calculated by NETPATH were evaluated based on relative abundances and reactivities of minerals in the watershed. In watersheds underlain by reactive bedrocks, weathering reactions explained the stream base cation loading. In the acid-sensitive watersheds on unreactive bedrock, calculated weathering scenarios were not consistent with the abundance of reactive minerals in the underlying bedrock, and alternative sources of base cations are discussed. ?? 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. 2-D difference gel electrophoresis approach to assess protein expression profiles in Bathymodiolus azoricus from Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Company, Rui; Antúnez, Oreto; Bebianno, Maria João; Cajaraville, Miren P; Torreblanca, Amparo

    2011-11-18

    Hydrothermal vent mussels Bathymodiolus azoricus are naturally exposed to toxic chemical species originated directly from vent chimneys. The amount of toxic elements varies significantly among vent sites along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and B. azoricus must be able to adapt to changes in hydrothermal fluid composition, temperature and pressure. The aim of this work was to study changes in the proteome in the "gill-bacteria complex" of mussels B. azoricus from three hydrothermal vent sites with distinct environmental characteristics using 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE). Results showed that 31 proteins had different expression profiles among vent sites and both cluster and principal component analysis confirm a clear separation of mussels between sites. This suggests the existence of specific parameters grouping individuals from the same hydrothermal site. Protein spots of the more abundant differentially expressed proteins were excised, digested with trypsin and identified by mass spectrometry. All identified proteins (actin, ubiquinone, S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase, cysteine peptidases, chaperonin and catalase) have been related previously with oxidative stress conditions and are known to be affected by ROS inducing stressors, including metals. Results point out to specific adaptations at the proteome level of B. azoricus depending on the level of toxicants present in their environment.

  11. Fault scarp identification in side-scan sonar and bathymetry images from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge using wavelet-based digital filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Sarah A.; Smith, Deborah K.

    1996-12-01

    Digital filters designed using wavelet theory are applied to high resolution deep-towed side-scan sonar data from the median valley walls, crestal mountains, and flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 29°10' N. With proper tuning, the digital filters are able to identify the location, orientation, length, and width of highly reflective linear features in sonar images. These features are presumed to represent the acoustic backscatter from axis-facing normal faults. The fault locations obtained from the digital filters are well correlated with visual geologic interpretation of the images. The side-scan sonar images are also compared with swath bathymetry from the same area. The digitally filtered bathymetry images contain nine of the eleven faults identified by eye in the detailed geologic interpretation of the side-scan data. Faults with widths (measured perpendicular to their strike) of less than about 150 m are missed in the bathymetry analysis due to the coarser resolution of these data. This digital image processing technique demonstrates the potential of wavelet-based analysis to reduce subjectivity and labor involved in mapping and analyzing topographic features in side-scan sonar and bathymetric image data.

  12. Generalization and formalization of the USEPA procedure for design of treated wastewater aquifer recharge basins: I. Theoretical development.

    PubMed

    Kallali, Hamadi; Yoshida, Mitsuo; Tarhouni, Jamila; Jedidi, Naceur

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater is vulnerable to overdraft and depletion, especially in relatively dry regions where natural recharge rates are very low and groundwater is the main source of water. Artificial recharge of groundwater with treated wastewater has been widely adopted as a technique to replenish the overdraft aquifers. Indeed, in the USA, the technique has been practised for a long time. In 1981, a design procedure manual was developed for practitioners by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). It was updated in 1984 and lastly in 2006. However, the design procedure has not been fully generalized for the different situations and has not been fully formalized in order to allow its automated implementation on calculation software (i.e. spreadsheet). Therefore, in this paper we formalized and generalized the USEPA design procedure to achieve an automated iterative method of calculation which can be easily implemented in a spreadsheet.

  13. Effects of Climate Change on Stormwater Capture Depths in the U.S. Mid-Atlantic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, I.; Moglen, G. E.; Hubacek, K.

    2014-12-01

    Increases in storm intensity and magnitude affects regional and local scale watershed hydrology and corresponding impacts. Information pertaining to the annual rainfall is valuable in flood mitigation and water quality concerns. The approach of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to provide onsite detention of various percentile capture depths stormwater management is examined here. Such information is pertinent to construct new or extend current undersized drainage infrastructures with consideration of future high intensity flood events which are anticipated to increase. In this study, the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) regional climate model (RCM) precipitation baseline (1973-2000) and future (2041-2070) data are used to generate annual 85% and 95% capture depths for Washington D.C.-Baltimore metropolitan area. The RCM data contain systematic biases and are therefore adjusted to produce appropriate estimates at the local scale. Depending on the adjustment technique used, the statistically transformed data leads to increased precipitation capture depths. In this study, several approaches: non-parametric, parametric, and modified parametric methods are employed for bias correction. Graphical comparisons of the adjustment techniques using National Climate Data Center (NCDC) and several model combinations (GCM+RCM) daily rainfall data are presented. Comparisons are made between NCDC daily rainfall and simulated (uncorrected and corrected) data to assess mean absolute error.

  14. Mapping the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of N and O Isotopes in Precipitation Nitrate Across the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, E. M.; Kendall, C.; Harlin, K.; Butler, T.; Carlton, R.; Wankel, S.

    2004-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of N is a universally important pathway by which ecosystems receive fixed, bioavailable N. Since the 1880s, atmospheric deposition of N has become increasingly important, as NOx emissions from fossil fuel combustion have steadily increased. In particular, the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic U.S. receive some of the highest rates of nitrate wet deposition in the country, causing a cascade of detrimental effects. In order to effectively mediate the impacts of nitrate deposition, it is critical to understand the dynamics among NOx sources, atmospheric chemical transformations and transport, and the characteristics of the nitrate that is ultimately deposited. To address this need, this research takes advantage of recent methodological improvements, coupled with national networks (NADP, AIRMoN) of archived precipitation, to characterize N and O isotopic composition of nitrate in precipitation across the Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic U.S. We investigate the critical question of whether variations in \\delta15N and \\delta18O of nitrate wet deposition are mainly a function of atmospheric processes (e.g., seasonal variations in reaction pathways) or variable NOx source contributions (e.g., power plant emissions, vehicle exhaust). Spatial and seasonal variability of \\delta15N and \\delta18O is investigated using bimonthly archived samples from 2000. Furthermore, a high resolution record of daily precipitation from a single site is used to highlight within-season isotopic variability. Potential correlations between isotopic values and major NOx sources are explored using EPA datasets for monthly county-level emissions from two major NOx sources, electric generating units and on-road vehicles. Analysis of samples for \\Delta17O is in progress. A key concern regarding analysis of archived samples is nitrate preservation. We tested the stability of nitrate concentrations, and hence potential isotopic fractionations, by reanalyzing filtered, refrigerated

  15. An Alternative to Channel-Centered Views of the Landscape for Understanding Modern Streams in the Mid-Atlantic Piedmont Region, Eastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritts, D. J.; Walter, R. C.; Rahnis, M. A.; Oberholtzer, W.

    2008-12-01

    Stream channels generally are the focus of conceptual models of valley bottom geomorphology. The channel-centered model prevalent in the tectonically inactive eastern U. S. invokes meandering stream channels migrating laterally across valley floors, eroding one bank while depositing relatively coarse sediment in point bars on the other. According to this model, overbank deposition during flooding deposits a veneer of fine sediment over the gravel substrate. Erosion is considered normal, and the net volume of sediment is relatively constant with time. A dramatic change in conditions-land-clearing during European settlement--led to widespread aggradation on valley bottoms. This historic sedimentation was incorporated in the channel-centered view by assuming that meandering streams were overwhelmed by the increased sediment load and rapidly aggraded vertically. Later, elevated stream channels cut through these deposits because of decreased sediment supply and increased stormwater runoff accompanying urbanization. This view can be traced to early ideas of stream equilibrium in which incoming sediment supply and runoff determine stream-channel form. We propose a different conceptual model. Our trenching and field work along hundreds of km of stream length in the mid-Atlantic Piedmont reveal no point bars prior to European settlement. Instead, a polygenetic valley-bottom landscape underlies the drape of historic sediment. The planar surface of this veneer gives the appearance of a broad floodplain generated by long-term meandering and overbank deposition, but the "floodplain" is a recent aggradational surface from regional base-level rise due to thousands of early American dams that spanned valley bottoms. As modern streams incise into the historic fine-grained slackwater sediment, they expose organic-rich hydric soils along original valley bottom centers; talus, colluvium, bedrock, and saprolite with forest soils along valley margins; and weathered Pleistocene (and

  16. Crustal structure and kinematics of the TAMMAR propagating rift system on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from seismic refraction and satellite altimetry gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahle, Richard L.; Tilmann, Frederik; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2016-08-01

    The TAMMAR segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge forms a classic propagating system centred about two degrees south of the Kane Fracture Zone. The segment is propagating to the south at a rate of 14 mm yr-1, 15 per cent faster than the half-spreading rate. Here, we use seismic refraction data across the propagating rift, sheared zone and failed rift to investigate the crustal structure of the system. Inversion of the seismic data agrees remarkably well with crustal thicknesses determined from gravity modelling. We show that the crust is thickened beneath the highly magmatic propagating rift, reaching a maximum thickness of almost 8 km along the seismic line and an inferred (from gravity) thickness of about 9 km at its centre. In contrast, the crust in the sheared zone is mostly 4.5-6.5 km thick, averaging over 1 km thinner than normal oceanic crust, and reaching a minimum thickness of only 3.5 km in its NW corner. Along the seismic line, it reaches a minimum thickness of under 5 km. The PmP reflection beneath the sheared zone and failed rift is very weak or absent, suggesting serpentinisation beneath the Moho, and thus effective transport of water through the sheared zone crust. We ascribe this increased porosity in the sheared zone to extensive fracturing and faulting during deformation. We show that a bookshelf-faulting kinematic model predicts significantly more crustal thinning than is observed, suggesting that an additional mechanism of deformation is required. We therefore propose that deformation is partitioned between bookshelf faulting and simple shear, with no more than 60 per cent taken up by bookshelf faulting.

  17. Using ecological indicators and a decision support system for integrated ecological assessment at two national park units in the mid-Atlantic region, USA.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Carolyn G; Young, John A; Miller, Bruce J; Saunders, Michael C

    2015-02-01

    We implemented an integrated ecological assessment using a GIS-based decision support system model for Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River (UPDE) and Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DEWA)-national park units with the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Our assessment examined a variety of aquatic and terrestrial indicators of ecosystem components that reflect the parks' conservation purpose and reference condition. Our assessment compared these indicators to ecological thresholds to determine the condition of park watersheds. Selected indicators included chemical and physical measures of water quality, biologic indicators of water quality, and landscape condition measures. For the chemical and physical measures of water quality, we used a water quality index and each of its nine components to assess the condition of water quality in each watershed. For biologic measures of water quality, we used the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera aquatic macroinvertebrate index and, secondarily, the Hilsenhoff aquatic macroinvertebrate index. Finally, for the landscape condition measures of our model, we used percent forest and percent impervious surface. Based on our overall assessment, UPDE and DEWA watersheds had an ecological assessment score of 0.433 on a -1 to 1 fuzzy logic scale. This score indicates that, in general, the natural resource condition within watersheds at these parks is healthy or ecologically unimpaired; however, we had only partial data for many of our indicators. Our model is iterative and new data may be incorporated as they become available. These natural parks are located within a rapidly urbanizing landscape-we recommend that natural resource managers remain vigilant to surrounding land uses that may adversely affect natural resources within the parks.

  18. Dependence of waterbirds and shorebirds on shallow-water habitats in the Mid-Atlantic coastal region: An ecological profile and management recommendations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Waterbirds (waterfowl, colonially nesting wading and seabirds, ospreys [Pandion haliaetus], and bald eagles [Haliaeetus leucocephalus]) and shorebirds (sandpipers, plovers, and relatives) may constitute a large fraction of the top level carnivore trophic component in many shallow-water areas of the mid-Atlantic region. The large biomass of many species (>1 kg body mass for the two raptors and some waterfowl) and enormous populations (e.g., >1 million shorebirds in late May in parts of Delaware Bay) reveal the importance of waterbirds as consumers and as linkages in nutrient flux in many shallow-water habitats. Salt and brackish marsh shallow-water habitats, including marsh pannes and tidal pools and creeks as well as constructed impoundments, are used intensively during most months of the year; in fall and winter, mostly by dabbling ducks, in spring and summer by migrant shorebirds and breeding colonial wading birds and seabirds. In adjacent estuaries, the intertidal flats and littoral zones of shallow embayments are heavily used by shorebirds, raptors, and colonial waterbirds in the May to September periods, with use by duck and geese heaviest from October to March. With the regional degradation of estuarine habitats and population declines of many species of waterbirds in the past 20 yr, some management recommendations relevant to shallow waters include: better protection, enhancement, and creation of small bay islands (small and isolated to preclude most mammalian predators) for nesting and brooding birds, especially colonial species; establishment of sanctuaries from human disturbance (e.g., boating, hunting) both in open water (waterfowl) and on land, better allocation of sandy dredged materials to augment islands or stabilize eroding islands; improvement in water management of existing impoundments to ensure good feeding, resting, and nesting opportunities for all the waterbirds, support for policies to preclude point and nonpoint source runoff of chemicals

  19. The growing season, but not the farming system, is a food safety risk determinant for leafy greens in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States.

    PubMed

    Marine, Sasha C; Pagadala, Sivaranjani; Wang, Fei; Pahl, Donna M; Melendez, Meredith V; Kline, Wesley L; Oni, Ruth A; Walsh, Christopher S; Everts, Kathryne L; Buchanan, Robert L; Micallef, Shirley A

    2015-04-01

    Small- and medium-size farms in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States use varied agricultural practices to produce leafy greens during spring and fall, but the impact of preharvest practices on food safety risk remains unclear. To assess farm-level risk factors, bacterial indicators, Salmonella enterica, and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) from 32 organic and conventional farms were analyzed. A total of 577 leafy greens, irrigation water, compost, field soil, and pond sediment samples were collected. Salmonella was recovered from 2.2% of leafy greens (n = 369) and 7.7% of sediment (n = 13) samples. There was an association between Salmonella recovery and growing season (fall versus spring) (P = 0.006) but not farming system (organic or conventional) (P = 0.920) or region (P = 0.991). No STEC was isolated. In all, 10% of samples were positive for E. coli: 6% of leafy greens, 18% of irrigation water, 10% of soil, 38% of sediment, and 27% of compost samples. Farming system was not a significant factor for levels of E. coli or aerobic mesophiles on leafy greens but was a significant factor for total coliforms (TC) (P < 0.001), with higher counts from organic farm samples. Growing season was a factor for aerobic mesophiles on leafy greens (P = 0.004), with higher levels in fall than in spring. Water source was a factor for all indicator bacteria (P < 0.001), and end-of-line groundwater had marginally higher TC counts than source samples (P = 0.059). Overall, the data suggest that seasonal events, weather conditions, and proximity of compost piles might be important factors contributing to microbial contamination on farms growing leafy greens.

  20. Watershed-scale impacts of stormwater green infrastructure on hydrology, nutrient fluxes, and combined sewer overflows in the mid-Atlantic region.

    PubMed

    Pennino, Michael J; McDonald, Rob I; Jaffe, Peter R

    2016-09-15

    Stormwater green infrastructure (SGI), including rain gardens, detention ponds, bioswales, and green roofs, is being implemented in cities across the globe to reduce flooding, combined sewer overflows, and pollutant transport to streams and rivers. Despite the increasing use of urban SGI, few studies have quantified the cumulative effects of multiple SGI projects on hydrology and water quality at the watershed scale. To assess the effects of SGI, Washington, DC, Montgomery County, MD, and Baltimore County, MD, were selected based on the availability of data on SGI, water quality, and stream flow. The cumulative impact of SGI was evaluated over space and time by comparing watersheds with and without SGI, and by assessing how long-term changes in SGI impact hydrologic and water quality metrics over time. Most Mid-Atlantic municipalities have a goal of achieving 10-20% of the landscape drain runoff through SGI by 2030. Of these areas, Washington, DC currently has the greatest amount of SGI (12.7% of the landscape drained through SGI), while Baltimore County has the lowest (7.9%). When controlling for watersheds size and percent impervious surface cover, watersheds with greater amounts of SGI have less flashy hydrology, with 44% lower peak runoff, 26% less frequent runoff events, and 26% less variable runoff. Watersheds with more SGI also show 44% less NO3(-) and 48% less total nitrogen exports compared to watersheds with minimal SGI. There was no significant reduction in phosphorus exports or combined sewer overflows in watersheds with greater SGI. When comparing individual watersheds over time, increases in SGI corresponded to non-significant reductions in hydrologic flashiness compared to watersheds with no change in SGI. While the implementation of SGI is somewhat in its infancy in some regions, cities are beginning to have a scale of SGI where there are statistically significant differences in hydrologic patterns and water quality. PMID:27261425

  1. Variability of low temperature hydrothermal alteration in upper ocean crust: Juan de Fuca Ridge and North Pond, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, J.; Harris, M.; Coggon, R. M.; Alt, J.; Teagle, D. A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Over 2/3 of the global hydrothermal heat flux occurs at low temperatures (< 150°) on the ridge flanks carried by fluid volumes comparable to riverine discharge. Understanding ridge flank hydrothermal exchange is important to quantify global geochemical cycles. Hydrothermal chemical pathways are complex and the effects of water-rock reactions remain poorly constrained. Factors controlling fluid flow include volcanic structure, sediment thickness, and basement topography. This study compares the effects of low temperature alteration in two locations with contrasting hydrogeological regimes. The intermediate spreading Juan de Fuca ridge flank (JdF) in the northeast Pacific sports a thick sediment blanket. Rare basement outcrops are sites of fluid recharge and discharge. The average alteration extent (~10% secondary minerals), oxidation ratio (Fe3+/FeTOT=34%), and alteration character (orange, green, grey halos) of basement is constant with crustal age and depth along a 0.97-3.6 m.yr transect of ODP basement holes. However, vesicle fills record an increasingly complex history of successive alteration with age. In contrast, North Pond, a ~8 m.yr-old sediment-filled basin at 22N on the slow spreading Mid Atlantic Ridge, hosts rapid, relatively cool SE to NW basinal fluid flow. Average alteration extent (~10%) and oxidation ratio (33%) of Hole 395A basalts are similar to JdF. However, 395A cores are dominated by orange alteration halos, lack celadonite, but have abundant zeolite. Vesicle fill combinations are highly variable, but the most common fill progression is from oxidising to less oxidising secondary assemblages. The comparable extent of alteration between these two sites and the absence of an age relationship on the JdF suggests that the alteration extent of the upper crust is uniform and mostly established by 1 Myr. However, the variable alteration character reflects the influence of regional hydrology on hydrothermal alteration.

  2. Analysis of microearthquakes at the non-transform offset of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hosting the Rainbow hydrothermal system (36°14'N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horning, G.; Canales, J. P.; Sohn, R. A.; Dunn, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Rainbow hydrothermal field is an active, ultramafic-hosted system located on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 36° 14'N. It is located at a non-transform discontinuity (NTD) of the MAR at the AMAR-AMAR minor segment intersection [German et al., 1996]. Rainbow, in contrast to other ultramafic-hosted systems such as Lost City, is a high-temperature site with fluids up to 365 °C [Douville et al., 2002]. A magmatic heat source must be present to account for the long-lived, high-temperature, heat flux of 1-5 GW [Thurnherr and Richards, 2001], but the nearest, known neovolcanic activity is 15-20 km away on the AMAR segment [German and Parson, 1998]. In 2013, a long-term, ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) microearthquake network of 13 instruments was deployed as part of the MARINER geophysical experiment [Dunn et al., 2013]. Over 40,000 events were detected and located within ~16 km of the active hydrothermal field during the ~200 day deployment. We present hypocenters estimated using P- and S-wave arrival times and a crustal velocity model derived from the active-source tomography component of the MARINER experiment. Moment/magnitude estimates from spectral methods indicate that the majority of events have local magnitudes (ML) of 0-1, with the largest events approaching ML ~2. First arrival polarity data demonstrate that many of the events have non-double couple source mechanisms, and we explore the use of P/S-wave amplitude ratios to constrain these focal mechanisms. The detection of predominantly non-double events indicates processes other than simple fault slip (e.g., serpentinization) are contributing to the observed seismicity and deformation. We use the spatial distribution, magnitudes, rate, and source mechanisms of the seismic events to constrain the coupled processes of hydrothermal circulation and deformation at the Rainbow massif.

  3. Aircraft vertical profiles of trace gas and aerosol pollution over the mid-Atlantic United States: Statistics and meteorological cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubman, B. F.; Hains, J. C.; Thompson, A. M.; Marufu, L. T.; Doddridge, B. G.; Stehr, J. W.; Piety, C. A.; Dickerson, R. R.

    2006-05-01

    From 1997 to 2003, airborne measurements of O3, CO, SO2, and aerosol properties were made during summertime air pollution episodes over the mid-Atlantic United States (34.7-44.6°N, 68.4-81.6°W) as part of the Regional Atmospheric Measurement, Modeling, and Prediction Program (RAMMPP). Little diurnal variation was identified in the CO, SO2, and Ångström exponent profiles, although the Ångström exponent profiles decreased with altitude. Boundary layer O3 was greater in the afternoon, while lower free tropospheric O3 was invariant at ˜55 ppbv. The single scattering albedo increased from morning to afternoon (0.93 ± 0.01-0.94 ± 0.01); however, both profiles decreased with altitude. A cluster analysis of back trajectories in conjunction with the vertical profile data was used to identify source regions and characteristic transport patterns during summertime pollution episodes. When the greatest trajectory density lay over the northern Ohio River Valley, the result was large O3 values, large SO2/CO ratios, highly scattering particles, and large aerosol optical depths. Maximum trajectory density over the southern Ohio River Valley resulted in little pollution. The greatest afternoon O3 values occurred during periods of stagnation. North-northwesterly and northerly flow brought the least pollution overall. The contribution of regional transport to afternoon boundary layer O3 was quantified. When the greatest cluster trajectory density lay over the Ohio River Valley (˜59% of the profiles), transport accounted for 69-82% of the afternoon boundary layer O3. Under stagnant conditions (˜27% of the profiles), transport only accounted for 58% of the afternoon boundary layer O3. The results from this study provide a description of regional chemical and transport processes that will be valuable to investigators from the Baltimore, New York, and Pittsburgh EPA Supersites.

  4. Using ecological indicators and a decision support system for integrated ecological assessment at two national park units in the Mid-Atlantic region, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, Carolyn G.; Young, John A.; Miller, Bruce; Saunders, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    We implemented an integrated ecological assessment using a GIS-based decision support system model for Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River (UPDE) and Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (DEWA)—national park units with the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Our assessment examined a variety of aquatic and terrestrial indicators of ecosystem components that reflect the parks’ conservation purpose and reference condition. Our assessment compared these indicators to ecological thresholds to determine the condition of park watersheds. Selected indicators included chemical and physical measures of water quality, biologic indicators of water quality, and landscape condition measures. For the chemical and physical measures of water quality, we used a water quality index and each of its nine components to assess the condition of water quality in each watershed. For biologic measures of water quality, we used the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera aquatic macroinvertebrate index and, secondarily, the Hilsenhoff aquatic macroinvertebrate index. Finally, for the landscape condition measures of our model, we used percent forest and percent impervious surface. Based on our overall assessment, UPDE and DEWA watersheds had an ecological assessment score of 0.433 on a −1 to 1 fuzzy logic scale. This score indicates that, in general, the natural resource condition within watersheds at these parks is healthy or ecologically unimpaired; however, we had only partial data for many of our indicators. Our model is iterative and new data may be incorporated as they become available. These natural parks are located within a rapidly urbanizing landscape—we recommend that natural resource managers remain vigilant to surrounding land uses that may adversely affect natural resources within the parks.

  5. Modelling of hydrothermal fluid circulation in a heterogeneous medium: Application to the Rainbow Vent site (Mid-Atlantic-Ridge, 36°14N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, F.; Mügler, C.; Jean-Baptiste, P.; Charlou, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    Hydrothermal activity at the axis of mid-ocean ridges is a key driver for energy and matter transfer from the interior of the Earth to the ocean floor. At mid-ocean ridges, seawater penetrates through the permeable young crust, warms at depth and exchanges chemicals with the surrounding rocks. This hot fluid focuses and flows upwards, then is expelled from the crust at hydrothermal vent sites in the form of black or white smokers completed by diffusive emissions. We developed a new numerical tool in the Cast3M software framework to model such hydrothermal circulations. Thermodynamic properties of one-phase pure water were calculated from the IAPWS formulation. This new numerical tool was validated on several test cases of convection in closed-top and open-top boxes. Simulations of hydrothermal circulation in a homogeneous-permeability porous medium also gave results in good agreement with already published simulations. We used this new numerical tool to construct a geometric and physical model configuration of the Rainbow Vent site at 36°14'N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In this presentation, several configurations will be discussed, showing that high temperatures and high mass fluxes measured at the Rainbow site cannot be modelled with hydrothermal circulation in a homogeneous-permeability porous medium. We will show that these high values require the presence of a fault or a preferential pathway right below the venting site. We will propose and discuss a 2-D one-path model that allows us to simulate both high temperatures and high mass fluxes. This modelling of the hydrothermal circulation at the Rainbow site constitutes a first but necessary step to understand the origin of high concentrations of hydrogen issued from this ultramafic-hosted vent field.

  6. Spatial and temporal variations in crustal production at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 25°N-27°30'N and 0-27 Ma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tingting; Tucholke, Brian E.; Lin, Jian

    2015-04-01

    We use high-resolution multibeam bathymetry, shipboard gravity, side-scan sonar images, and magnetic anomaly data collected on conjugate flanks of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 25°N-27°30'N and out to ~27 Ma crust to investigate the crustal evolution of the ridge. Substantial variations in crustal structure and thickness are observed both along and across isochrons. Along isochrons within spreading segments, there are distinct differences in seafloor morphology and gravity-derived crustal thickness between inside and outside corners. Inside corners are associated with shallow depths, thin crust, and enhanced normal faulting while outside corners have greater depths, thicker crust, and more limited faulting. Across-isochrons, systematic variations in crustal thickness are observed at two different timescales, one at ~2-3 Myr and another at >10 Myr, and these are attributed to temporal changes in melt supply at the ridge axis. The shorter-term variations mostly are in-phase between conjugate ridge flanks, although the actual crustal thickness can be significantly different on the two flanks at any given time. We observe no correlation between crustal thickness and spreading rate. Thus, during periods of low melt supply, tectonic extension must increase to accommodate the full plate separation rate. This extension commonly is concentrated in long-lived faults on only one side of the axial valley, resulting in strong across-axis asymmetries in crustal thickness and seafloor morphology. The thin-crust flank has few volcanic features and exhibits elevated, blocky topography with large-offset, often irregular faults, while the conjugate thicker-crust flank shows shorter-offset, regular faulting, and common volcanic features. The variations in melt supply at the ridge axis most likely are caused either by episodic convection in the subaxial mantle or by variable melting of chemically heterogeneous mantle.

  7. Structural Iron (II) of Basaltic Glass as an Energy Source for Zetaproteobacteria in an Abyssal Plain Environment, Off the Mid Atlantic Ridge.

    PubMed

    Henri, Pauline A; Rommevaux-Jestin, Céline; Lesongeur, Françoise; Mumford, Adam; Emerson, David; Godfroy, Anne; Ménez, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    To explore the capability of basaltic glass to support the growth of chemosynthetic microorganisms, complementary in situ and in vitro colonization experiments were performed. Microbial colonizers containing synthetic tholeitic basaltic glasses, either enriched in reduced or oxidized iron, were deployed off-axis from the Mid Atlantic Ridge on surface sediments of the abyssal plain (35°N; 29°W). In situ microbial colonization was assessed by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and basaltic glass alteration was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, micro-X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure at the Fe-K-edge and Raman microspectroscopy. The colonized surface of the reduced basaltic glass was covered by a rind of alteration made of iron-oxides trapped in a palagonite-like structure with thicknesses up to 150 μm. The relative abundance of the associated microbial community was dominated (39% of all reads) by a single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) that shared 92% identity with the iron-oxidizer Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1. Conversely, the oxidized basaltic glass showed the absence of iron-oxides enriched surface deposits and correspondingly there was a lack of known iron-oxidizing bacteria in the inventoried diversity. In vitro, a similar reduced basaltic glass was incubated in artificial seawater with a pure culture of the iron-oxidizing M. ferrooxydans DIS-1 for 2 weeks, without any additional nutrients or minerals. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy revealed that the glass surface was covered by twisted stalks characteristic of this iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria. This result supported findings of the in situ experiments indicating that the Fe(II) present in the basalt was the energy source for the growth of representatives of Zetaproteobacteria in both the abyssal plain and the in vitro experiment. In accordance, the surface alteration rind observed on the reduced basaltic glass incubated in situ could at least partly result from their activity

  8. Legal Preparedness for Hurricane Sandy: Authority to Order Hospital Evacuation or Shelter-in-Place in the Mid-Atlantic Region.

    PubMed

    McGinty, Meghan D; Burke, Thomas A; Resnick, Beth A; Smith, Katherine C; Barnett, Daniel J; Rutkow, Lainie

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals were once thought to be places of refuge during catastrophic hurricanes, but recent disasters such as Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy have demonstrated that some hospitals are unable to ensure the safety of patients and staff and the continuity of medical care at key times. The government has a duty to safeguard public health and a responsibility to ensure that appropriate protective action is taken when disasters threaten or impair the ability of hospitals to sustain essential services. The law can enable the government to fulfill this duty by providing necessary authority to order preventive or reactive responses--such as ordering evacuation of or sheltering-in-place in hospitals--when safety is imperiled. We systematically identified and analyzed state emergency preparedness laws that could have affected evacuation of and sheltering-in-place in hospitals in order to characterize the public health legal preparedness of 4 states (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, and New York) in the mid-Atlantic region during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. At that time, none of these 4 states had enacted statutes or regulations explicitly granting the government the authority to order hospitals to shelter-in-place. Whereas all 4 states had enacted laws explicitly enabling the government to order evacuation, the nature of this authority and the individuals empowered to execute it varied. We present empirical analyses intended to enhance public health legal preparedness and ensure these states and others are better able to respond to future natural disasters, which are predicted to be more severe and frequent as a result of climate change, as well as other hazards. States can further improve their readiness for catastrophic disasters by ensuring explicit statutory authority to order evacuation and to order sheltering-in-place, particularly of hospitals, where it does not currently exist. PMID:27081887

  9. Public support for a sugar-sweetened beverage tax and pro-tax messages in a Mid-Atlantic US state

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Elisabeth A; Cohen, Joanna E; Rutkow, Lainie; Villanti, Andrea C; Kanarek, Norma F; Barry, Colleen L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the characteristics of supporters and opponents of a sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) tax and to identify pro-tax messages that resonate with the public. Design A survey was administered by telephone in February 2013 to assess public opinion about a penny-per-ounce tax on SSB. Support was also examined for SSB consumption reduction and pro-tax messages. Individual characteristics including sociodemographics, political affiliation, SSB consumption behaviours and beliefs were explored as predictors of support using logistic regression. Setting A representative sample of voters was recruited from a Mid-Atlantic US state. Subjects The sample included 1000 registered voters. Results Findings indicate considerable support (50 %) for an SSB tax. Support was stronger among Democrats, those who believe SSB are a major cause of childhood obesity and those who believe childhood obesity warrants a societal intervention. Belief that a tax would be effective in lowering obesity rates was associated with support for the tax and pro-tax messages. Respondents reporting that a health-care provider had recommended they lose weight were less convinced by pro-tax messages. Women, Independents and those concerned about childhood obesity were more convinced by the SSB reduction messages. Overall, the most popular messages focused on the importance of reducing consumption among children without mentioning the tax. Conclusions Understanding who supports and opposes SSB tax measures can assist advocates in developing strategies to maximize support for this type of intervention. Messages that focus on the effect of consumption on children may be useful in framing the discussion around SSB tax proposals. PMID:25430945

  10. Expanding Access to Care and Improving Quality in the Mid-Atlantic States Safety-Net Clinics: Kaiser Permanente’s Community Ambassador Program

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Jared Lane K; Bradley, Jacqueline J; Eissler, Sarah R; LoBrano, Marcia; Rubin, Mindy R; Gay, Maritha; Horberg, Michael A; Loftus, Bernadette C

    2015-01-01

    Context: As part of its longstanding commitment to improve the health of the communities it serves, Kaiser Permanente (KP) established the Community Ambassador Program (CAP) in the Mid-Atlantic States Region. The CAP places KP-employed nurse practitioners, midwives, and physician assistants to work in the safety-net clinics and to share best practices through a long-term community collaboration. Objective: To share the early experiences of the CAP and describe the initial results of the program’s impact on the safety-net clinics. Methods: We conducted an evaluation of 18 safety-net clinics that participated in the CAP in 2012 to determine the program’s early impact in expanding access to care, increasing the capacity of safety-net providers, and improving the quality of care on evidence-based measures in the year following program implementation. The safety-net clinics are comprised of federally qualified health centers, free clinics, and other community-based organizations. The clinics were asked to respond to questions regarding their evidence-based practices promoted by KP and on primary care-related utilization. Results: The Community Ambassadors provided an estimated 32,249 encounters to 11,988 patients. Performance by the Community Ambassadors was at or near 90% for 2 adult quality measures (weight screening and tobacco use assessment). For breast cancer screenings, however, performance among the Community Ambassadors was much lower (48%). Conclusion: The CAP demonstrated some early success in expanding access and improving quality of care on several key measures for certain subpopulations. Despite these achievements, opportunities remain for quality improvement, expanded capacity, and enhanced data reporting infrastructure. PMID:25785638

  11. PAHs and PCBs deposited in surficial sediments along a rural to urban transect in a mid-Atlantic coastal river basin (USA).

    PubMed

    Foster, Gregory D; Cui, Vickie

    2008-10-01

    PAHs and PCBs were measured in river sediments along a 226 km longitudinal transect that spanned rural to urban land use settings through Valley and Ridge, Piedmont Plateau and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces in the Potomac River basin (mid-Atlantic USA). A gradient in PAH concentrations was found in river bed sediments along the upstream transect in the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers that correlated with population densities in the nearby sub-basins. Sediment PAH concentrations halved per each approximately 40 km of transect distance upstream (i.e., the half-concentration distance) from the urban center (Washington, DC) of the Potomac River basin in direct proportion to population density. The PAH molecular composition was consistent across all geologic provinces, revealing a dominant pyrogenic source. Fluoranthene to perylene ratios served as useful markers for urban inputs, with a ratio > 2.4 observed in sediments near urban structures such as roadways, bridges and sewer outfalls. PCBs in sediments were not well correlated with population densities along the river basin transect, but the highest concentrations were found in the urban Coastal Plain region near Washington, DC and in the Shenandoah River near a known industrial Superfund site. PAHs were moderately correlated with sediment total organic carbon (TOC) in the Shenandoah River and Coastal Plain Potomac River regions, but TOC was poorly correlated with PCB concentrations throughout the entire basin. Although both PAHs and PCBs are widely recognized as urban-derived contaminants, their concentration profiles and geochemistry in river sediments were uniquely different throughout the upper Potomac River basin. PMID:18780210

  12. The Growing Season, but Not the Farming System, Is a Food Safety Risk Determinant for Leafy Greens in the Mid-Atlantic Region of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Marine, Sasha C.; Pagadala, Sivaranjani; Wang, Fei; Pahl, Donna M.; Melendez, Meredith V.; Kline, Wesley L.; Oni, Ruth A.; Walsh, Christopher S.; Everts, Kathryne L.; Buchanan, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Small- and medium-size farms in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States use varied agricultural practices to produce leafy greens during spring and fall, but the impact of preharvest practices on food safety risk remains unclear. To assess farm-level risk factors, bacterial indicators, Salmonella enterica, and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) from 32 organic and conventional farms were analyzed. A total of 577 leafy greens, irrigation water, compost, field soil, and pond sediment samples were collected. Salmonella was recovered from 2.2% of leafy greens (n = 369) and 7.7% of sediment (n = 13) samples. There was an association between Salmonella recovery and growing season (fall versus spring) (P = 0.006) but not farming system (organic or conventional) (P = 0.920) or region (P = 0.991). No STEC was isolated. In all, 10% of samples were positive for E. coli: 6% of leafy greens, 18% of irrigation water, 10% of soil, 38% of sediment, and 27% of compost samples. Farming system was not a significant factor for levels of E. coli or aerobic mesophiles on leafy greens but was a significant factor for total coliforms (TC) (P < 0.001), with higher counts from organic farm samples. Growing season was a factor for aerobic mesophiles on leafy greens (P = 0.004), with higher levels in fall than in spring. Water source was a factor for all indicator bacteria (P < 0.001), and end-of-line groundwater had marginally higher TC counts than source samples (P = 0.059). Overall, the data suggest that seasonal events, weather conditions, and proximity of compost piles might be important factors contributing to microbial contamination on farms growing leafy greens. PMID:25616798

  13. Structural Iron (II) of Basaltic Glass as an Energy Source for Zetaproteobacteria in an Abyssal Plain Environment, Off the Mid Atlantic Ridge

    PubMed Central

    Henri, Pauline A.; Rommevaux-Jestin, Céline; Lesongeur, Françoise; Mumford, Adam; Emerson, David; Godfroy, Anne; Ménez, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    To explore the capability of basaltic glass to support the growth of chemosynthetic microorganisms, complementary in situ and in vitro colonization experiments were performed. Microbial colonizers containing synthetic tholeitic basaltic glasses, either enriched in reduced or oxidized iron, were deployed off-axis from the Mid Atlantic Ridge on surface sediments of the abyssal plain (35°N; 29°W). In situ microbial colonization was assessed by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and basaltic glass alteration was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy, micro-X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure at the Fe-K-edge and Raman microspectroscopy. The colonized surface of the reduced basaltic glass was covered by a rind of alteration made of iron-oxides trapped in a palagonite-like structure with thicknesses up to 150 μm. The relative abundance of the associated microbial community was dominated (39% of all reads) by a single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) that shared 92% identity with the iron-oxidizer Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1. Conversely, the oxidized basaltic glass showed the absence of iron-oxides enriched surface deposits and correspondingly there was a lack of known iron-oxidizing bacteria in the inventoried diversity. In vitro, a similar reduced basaltic glass was incubated in artificial seawater with a pure culture of the iron-oxidizing M. ferrooxydans DIS-1 for 2 weeks, without any additional nutrients or minerals. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy revealed that the glass surface was covered by twisted stalks characteristic of this iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria. This result supported findings of the in situ experiments indicating that the Fe(II) present in the basalt was the energy source for the growth of representatives of Zetaproteobacteria in both the abyssal plain and the in vitro experiment. In accordance, the surface alteration rind observed on the reduced basaltic glass incubated in situ could at least partly result from their activity

  14. First evidence for high-temperature off-axis venting of deep crustal/mantle heat: The Nibelungen hydrothermal field, southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchert, B.; Devey, C. W.; German, C. R.; Lackschewitz, K. S.; Seifert, R.; Walter, M.; Mertens, C.; Yoerger, D. R.; Baker, E. T.; Paulick, H.; Nakamura, K.

    2008-10-01

    During segment-scale studies of the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), 7-12° S, we found evidence in the water column for high-temperature hydrothermal activity, off-axis, east of Ascension Island. Extensive water column and seafloor work using both standard CTD and deep submergence AUV and ROV deployments led to the discovery and sampling of the "Drachenschlund" ("Dragon Throat") black smoker vent at 8°17.87' S/13°30.45' W in 2915 m water depth. The vent is flanked by several inactive chimney structures in a field we have named "Nibelungen". The site is located 6 km south of a non-transform offset between two adjacent 2nd-order ridge-segments and 9 km east of the presently-active, northward-propagating A2 ridge-segment, on a prominent outward-facing fault scarp. Both vent-fluid compositions and host-rock analyses show this site to be an ultramafic-hosted system, the first of its kind to be found on the southern MAR. The thermal output of this single vent, based on plume rise-height information, is estimated to be 60 ± 15 MW. This value is high for a single "black smoker" vent but small for an entire field. The tectonic setting and low He content of the vent fluids imply that high-temperature off-axis venting at "Drachenschlund" is driven not by magmatic processes, as at the majority of on-axis hydrothermal systems, but by residual heat "mined" from the deeper lithosphere. Whether this heat is being extracted from high-temperature mantle peridotites or deep crustal cumulates formed at the "duelling" non-transfrom offset is unclear, in either case the Drachenschlund vent provides the first direct observations of how cooling of deeper parts of the lithosphere, at least at slow-spreading ridges, may be occurring.

  15. Different TDM/CH4 hydrothermal plume signatures: TAG site at 26N and serpentinized ultrabasic diapir at 15 degrees 05'N on the Mid-Atlantic ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Charlou, J.L.; Bougault, H. ); Appriou, P. ); Nelsen, T.; Rona, P. )

    1991-11-01

    As a part of the 1988 NOAA VENTS Program, CH{sub 4} and Mn tracers were used to identify and compare hydrothermal plumes found above the TAG Field (26{degrees}N) and in the rift valley at 15{degrees}N close to the eastern intersection of the ridge axis with the 15{degrees}20'N Fracture Zone at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Active hydrothermal venting was confirmed at TAG, based on elevated concentrations of total dissolved Mn (TDM up to 30 nmol/kg), high CH{sub 4} concentrations (up to 200 nL/L), and elevated nephelometry signals. Plumes of a different composition were identified at 15{degree}N with high CH{sub 4} concentrations (up to 400 nL/L), low total dissolved Mn concentrations (TDM < 1 nmol/kg) and no significant nephelometry signal. The different properties of these tracers and the different tracer ratios can be used to deduce vent fluid characteristics and compare one hydrothermal area to another. TDM/CH{sub 4} and Nephel/CH{sub 4} ratios at TEG are of the same order of magnitude as those observed at other spreading axis hydrothermal fields. At 15{degrees}N, the low TDM/CH{sub 4} ratio provides evidence of fluid circulation into ultrabasic rocks and offers a potentially useful and single method of exploring for hydrothermal activity associated with serpentinization. Mantle degassing through hydrothermal activity associated with serpentinization is an important process with respect to chemical and thermal exchanges between the upper mantle and the ocean. Different ratios of hydrothermal tracers (i.e., TDM/CH{sub 4}) provide a useful framework for identifying subseafloor processes along mid-oceanic ridges.

  16. Development and evolution of detachment faulting along 50 km of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 16.5°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Deborah K.; Schouten, Hans; Dick, Henry J. B.; Cann, Johnson R.; Salters, Vincent; Marschall, Horst R.; Ji, Fuwu; Yoerger, Dana; Sanfilippo, Alessio; Parnell-Turner, Ross; Palmiotto, Camilla; Zheleznov, Alexei; Bai, Hailong; Junkin, Will; Urann, Ben; Dick, Spencer; Sulanowska, Margaret; Lemmond, Peter; Curry, Scott

    2014-12-01

    multifaceted study of the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 16.5°N provides new insights into detachment faulting and its evolution through time. The survey included regional multibeam bathymetry mapping, high-resolution mapping using AUV Sentry, seafloor imaging using the TowCam system, and an extensive rock-dredging program. At different times, detachment faulting was active along ˜50 km of the western flank of the study area, and may have dominated spreading on that flank for the last 5 Ma. Detachment morphologies vary and include a classic corrugated massif, noncorrugated massifs, and back-tilted ridges marking detachment breakaways. High-resolution Sentry data reveal a new detachment morphology; a low-angle, irregular surface in the regional bathymetry is shown to be a finely corrugated detachment surface (corrugation wavelength of only tens of meters and relief of just a few meters). Multiscale corrugations are observed 2-3 km from the detachment breakaway suggesting that they formed in the brittle layer, perhaps by anastomosing faults. The thin wedge of hanging wall lavas that covers a low-angle (6°) detachment footwall near its termination are intensely faulted and fissured; this deformation may be enhanced by the low angle of the emerging footwall. Active detachment faulting currently is limited to the western side of the rift valley. Nonetheless, detachment fault morphologies also are present over a large portion of the eastern flank on crust >2 Ma, indicating that within the last 5 Ma parts of the ridge axis have experienced periods of two-sided detachment faulting.

  17. First-order major element variation in basalt glasses from the Mid-Atlantic ridge : 29/sup 0/N to 73/sup 0/N

    SciTech Connect

    Sigurdsson, H.

    1981-10-10

    Basaltic glasses from 29/sup 0/N to 73/sup 0/N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge define two geographic and compositional groups that are characterized by different major element concentrations, phase assemblages and partition coefficients. Group A glasses occur on the ridge segment north of Gibbs Fracture Zone, from 54/sup 0/N, along the Reykjanes Ridge, the western volcanic zone of Iceland and Kolbeinsey Ridge, up to 70/sup 0/N. Similar glasses occur also on the ridge from 29/sup 0/N to 34/sup 0/N. Group A is characterized by pronounced alumina depletion and iron-enrichment trends, lower silica and alkalis and higher iron and high CaO/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Clinopyroxene is only present in the more evolved group A glasses (Mg-value<58). Olivine-glass partition coefficients for Mg and Fe are systematically lower in group A than group B (Schilling and Sigurdsson, 1979), reflecting effects of melt composition on structure of the liquids. Group B glasses define the ridge segment north of 35/sup 0/N over the Azores platform and up to Gibbs F. Z., at 53/sup 0/N. They are also present on the Mohns Ridge north of the Jan Mayen F. Z. at 71/sup 0/N and at least as far north as 73/sup 0/. Group B glasses are characterized by higher silica and alkalis, low iron and lack of alumina depletion and iron-enrichment trends. They contain calcic clinopyroxene (Cpx) throughout the compositional range, whereas the sub-calcic augite is absent. The major-element variation within each group can be modeled quantitatively by fractional crystallization involving the phenocryst phases. The range of glass compositions in the two groups forms two distinct but parallel cotectic trends within the basalt tetrahedron, which are believed to define the quaternary univariant line 01-P1-Cpx-Liq along which the magmas evolved during fractionation at low to intermediate pressure.

  18. Hexavalent chromium reduction by tartaric acid and isopropyl alcohol in Mid-Atlantic soils and the role of Mn(III,IV)(hydr)oxides.

    PubMed

    Brose, Dominic A; James, Bruce R

    2013-11-19

    Chromium is a naturally occurring transition metal and a soil contaminant in the Cr(VI) oxidation state, but reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) mitigates its toxicity. Tartaric acid reduces Cr(VI) via a termolecular complex with isopropyl alcohol and Cr(VI), but its efficacy in soils has not been demonstrated. Five Mid-Atlantic soils from Maryland, U.S. were examined for their potential to enhance the reduction of Cr(VI). A control treatment (no soil +12 mM tartaric acid + 0.29 M isopropyl alcohol) reduced 0.37 mM Cr(VI) (19%) in 99 h. Reduction was enhanced to 1.97 mM (99%) with addition of a Russett Ap soil horizon (fine-loamy, mixed, semiactive, mesic Typic Hapludult). With a half-life of 18.7 h, the rate of reduction of Cr(VI) with the Russett soil sample was 20 times faster than with no soil (371 h). Soil Mn was solubilized in this reaction and plays a role in the enhanced reduction of Cr(VI). Mn(III/IV)(hydr)oxide-coated quartz sand reduced 1.24 mM (62%) Cr(VI), with all of the Mn(III,IV)(hydr)oxides solubilized. The addition of isopropyl alcohol and tartaric acid to soils enhances the reduction of Cr(VI), and this reduction is further enhanced by the catalytic behavior of Mn(II) from easily reducible Mn(III,IV)(hydr)oxides in soil.

  19. Legal Preparedness for Hurricane Sandy: Authority to Order Hospital Evacuation or Shelter-in-Place in the Mid-Atlantic Region.

    PubMed

    McGinty, Meghan D; Burke, Thomas A; Resnick, Beth A; Smith, Katherine C; Barnett, Daniel J; Rutkow, Lainie

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals were once thought to be places of refuge during catastrophic hurricanes, but recent disasters such as Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy have demonstrated that some hospitals are unable to ensure the safety of patients and staff and the continuity of medical care at key times. The government has a duty to safeguard public health and a responsibility to ensure that appropriate protective action is taken when disasters threaten or impair the ability of hospitals to sustain essential services. The law can enable the government to fulfill this duty by providing necessary authority to order preventive or reactive responses--such as ordering evacuation of or sheltering-in-place in hospitals--when safety is imperiled. We systematically identified and analyzed state emergency preparedness laws that could have affected evacuation of and sheltering-in-place in hospitals in order to characterize the public health legal preparedness of 4 states (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, and New York) in the mid-Atlantic region during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. At that time, none of these 4 states had enacted statutes or regulations explicitly granting the government the authority to order hospitals to shelter-in-place. Whereas all 4 states had enacted laws explicitly enabling the government to order evacuation, the nature of this authority and the individuals empowered to execute it varied. We present empirical analyses intended to enhance public health legal preparedness and ensure these states and others are better able to respond to future natural disasters, which are predicted to be more severe and frequent as a result of climate change, as well as other hazards. States can further improve their readiness for catastrophic disasters by ensuring explicit statutory authority to order evacuation and to order sheltering-in-place, particularly of hospitals, where it does not currently exist.

  20. High variability in spatial and temporal size-based trophodynamics of deep-sea fishes from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge elucidated by stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, William D. K.; Sweeting, Christopher J.; Wigham, Ben D.; McGill, Rona A. R.; Polunin, Nicholas V. C.

    2013-12-01

    Demersal fish play an important role in the deep-sea ecosystem by acting as a link to mobile food in the water column, consuming benthic fauna, breaking down large food parcels and dispersing organic matter over large areas. Poor diet resolution from stomach content analysis often impairs the ability to assess differences in inter- and intra-population trophodynamics and therefore understand resource partitioning among deep-sea fishes. Antimora rostrata (predator-scavenger), Coryphaenoides armatus (predator-scavenger), Coryphaenoides brevibarbis (predator) and Halosauropsis macrochir (predator) were collected from 3 stations on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) in 2007 and 2009 to investigate trophic ecology using δ13C and δ15N. Variability in lipid-normalised δ13C (δ13Cn) and δ15N was explained by body length in all species but slope and significance of the isotope-length relationships varied both temporally and spatially. δ15N increases with length were observed in A. rostrata at all stations, C. brevibarbis and H. macrochir at one or more stations but were absent in C. armatus. δ13Cn increased with length in A. rostrata but the slope of δ13Cn-length relationships varied spatially and temporally in C. armatus and C. brevibarbis. The co-occurring δ13Cn and δ15N size-based trends in A. rostrata and H. macrochir suggested that size-based trends were a result of increasing trophic position. In C. armatus and C. brevibarbis the isotope-length trends were difficult to distinguish among trophic position increases, shifts in resource use i.e. benthic to pelagic or internal physiology. However, the overall strength, direction and significance of isotope-length trends varied temporally and spatially which suggested varying degrees of overlap in trophic ecology and feeding plasticity among these species.

  1. A systematic analysis of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge morphology and gravity between 15°N and 40°N: Constraints of the thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibaud, RéMy; Gente, Pascal; Maia, MáRcia

    1998-10-01

    Multibeam bathymetry data obtained along a 2400 km long section of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) from 15°N to the Azores platform (40°N) and satellite-derived gravity data were used to calculate the mantle Bouguer anomaly (MBA) along this portion of the MAR. Both data sets were used to determine the relations between gravity anomalies and topographic variations and discuss these in terms of thermal difference. A long-wavelength influence of the Azores hot spot is characterized by a gentle, continuous slope of the average ridge axial depth and a general gradient in the along-axis MBA profile. This thermal influence of the Azores hot spot controls a systematic southward propagation of the spreading segments at least to 26°30'N. South of 26°30'N, the direction of the segment propagation is controlled by the local difference in thermal state between adjacent segments. Except on the Azores platform, the systematic along-axis 11-90 km long wavelength segmentation is independent of the long-wavelength influence of the Azores. At the segment center, the axial morphology is linked to the thermal state of the segments between: (1) "Hotter segments" characterized by a smooth axial morphology, a well-defined shallow "inner valley", high ΔMBA and a long length;(2) "colder segments" which present a rough axial morphology with a deep, wide and well-defined rift valley, a low ΔMBA and a small length. For "hotter segments" the formation of the abyssal hills is mainly due to a magmato-tectonic cycle over periods of 0.3 to 1 Myr, whereas on "colder segments" the axial morphology is mainly controlled by a tectonic rift valley formation. We propose that these different segment types correspond to a temporal evolution of the rift valley morphology over periods of several million years.

  2. Watershed-scale impacts of stormwater green infrastructure on hydrology, nutrient fluxes, and combined sewer overflows in the mid-Atlantic region.

    PubMed

    Pennino, Michael J; McDonald, Rob I; Jaffe, Peter R

    2016-09-15

    Stormwater green infrastructure (SGI), including rain gardens, detention ponds, bioswales, and green roofs, is being implemented in cities across the globe to reduce flooding, combined sewer overflows, and pollutant transport to streams and rivers. Despite the increasing use of urban SGI, few studies have quantified the cumulative effects of multiple SGI projects on hydrology and water quality at the watershed scale. To assess the effects of SGI, Washington, DC, Montgomery County, MD, and Baltimore County, MD, were selected based on the availability of data on SGI, water quality, and stream flow. The cumulative impact of SGI was evaluated over space and time by comparing watersheds with and without SGI, and by assessing how long-term changes in SGI impact hydrologic and water quality metrics over time. Most Mid-Atlantic municipalities have a goal of achieving 10-20% of the landscape drain runoff through SGI by 2030. Of these areas, Washington, DC currently has the greatest amount of SGI (12.7% of the landscape drained through SGI), while Baltimore County has the lowest (7.9%). When controlling for watersheds size and percent impervious surface cover, watersheds with greater amounts of SGI have less flashy hydrology, with 44% lower peak runoff, 26% less frequent runoff events, and 26% less variable runoff. Watersheds with more SGI also show 44% less NO3(-) and 48% less total nitrogen exports compared to watersheds with minimal SGI. There was no significant reduction in phosphorus exports or combined sewer overflows in watersheds with greater SGI. When comparing individual watersheds over time, increases in SGI corresponded to non-significant reductions in hydrologic flashiness compared to watersheds with no change in SGI. While the implementation of SGI is somewhat in its infancy in some regions, cities are beginning to have a scale of SGI where there are statistically significant differences in hydrologic patterns and water quality.

  3. Compositional variation and 226Ra-230Th model ages of axial lavas from the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 8°48'S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. M.; Brandl, P. A.; Devey, C. W.; Hauff, F.; Melchert, B.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Kokfelt, T. F.; Paulick, H.

    2016-01-01

    We present geological observations and geochemical data for the youngest volcanic features on the slow spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 8°48'S that shows seismic evidence for a thickened crust and excess magma formation. Young lava flows with high sonar reflectivity cover about 14 km2 in the axial rift and were probably erupted from two axial volcanic ridges each of about 3 km in length. Three different lava units occur along an about 11 km long portion of the ridge, and lavas from the northern axial volcanic ridge differ from those of the southern axial volcanic ridge and surrounding lava flows. Basalts from the axial rift flanks and from a pillow mound within the young flows are more incompatible element depleted than those from the young volcanic field. Lavas from this volcanic area have 226Ra-230Th disequilibria model ages of 1000 and 4000 years whereas the older lavas from the rift flank and the pillow mound, but also some of the lava field, are older than 8000 years. Glasses from the northern and southern ends of the southern lava unit indicate up to 100°C cooler magma temperatures than in the center and increased assimilation of hydrothermally altered material. The compositional heterogeneity on a scale of 3 km suggests small magma batches rising vertically from the mantle to the surface without significant lateral flow and mixing. The observations on the 8°48'S lava field support the model of low-frequency eruptions from single ascending magma batches that has been developed for slow spreading ridges.

  4. Crustal structure and kinematics of the TAMMAR propagating rift system on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from seismic refraction and satellite altimetry gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahle, Richard L.; Tilmann, Frederik; Grevemeyer, Ingo

    2016-06-01

    The TAMMAR segment of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge forms a classic propagating system centred about two degrees south of the Kane Fracture Zone. The segment is propagating to the south at a rate of 14 mm/yr, 15 % faster than the half-spreading rate. Here we use seismic refraction data across the propagating rift, sheared zone and failed rift to investigate the crustal structure of the system. Inversion of the seismic data agrees remarkably well with crustal thicknesses determined from gravity modelling. We show that the crust is thickened beneath the highly magmatic propagating rift, reaching a maximum thickness of almost 8 km along the seismic line and an inferred (from gravity) thickness of about 9 km at its centre. In contrast, the crust in the sheared zone is mostly 4.5-6.5 km thick, averaging over 1 km thinner than normal oceanic crust, and reaching a minimum thickness of only 3.5 km in its NW corner. Along the seismic line it reaches a minimum thickness of under 5 km. The PmP reflection beneath the sheared zone and failed rift is very weak or absent, suggesting serpentinisation beneath the Moho, and thus effective transport of water through the sheared zone crust. We ascribe this increased porosity in the sheared zone to extensive fracturing and faulting during deformation. We show that a bookshelf-faulting kinematic model predicts significantly more crustal thinning than is observed, suggesting that an additional mechanism of deformation is required. We therefore propose that deformation is partitioned between bookshelf faulting and simple shear, with no more than 60 % taken up by bookshelf faulting.

  5. Investigation of the Oceanic Crust and Mantle in the Eastern Mid Atlantic Next to a Major Transform Fault (Gloria Fault) By Receiver Function Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannemann, K.; Krueger, F.; Dahm, T.

    2014-12-01

    Within the project Deep OCean Test ARray (DOCTAR), we want to test how much we can enhance the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of teleseismic and regional events recorded at the ocean bottom by using broad band array methods. Furthermore, we want to learn more about the structure of the oceanic crust and mantle 100 km North of the Gloria Fault (major transform fault at the plate boundary between Eurasian and African plate in the Atlantic ocean). For the latter, we employ receiver functions and apparent P-wave incidence angles. We deployed 12 ocean bottom stations (OBS) as a mid aperture array (75 km) in the deep Eastern Mid Atlantic (4-6 km) in 2011. Each free fall station consists of a broad band seismometer and a hydrophone. After 10 month of recording, the stations were recovered. We use P phase and Rayleigh phase polarization to estimate the orientation of the stations. Different data quality and site effects at the stations need a careful review of the processing parameters (filter, deconvolution length) used for the calculation of the receiver functions. We defined different criteria as relative spike position within the deconvolution time window, and energy ratios of several time windows of the deconvolved traces to assess an evaluation of the receiver function quality in dependence on the used processing parameters. Additionally, we had a look at the relationship between the apparent incidence angle and the S-velocity and find that it differs for the ocean bottom in comparison to the free surface. Surprisingly, the densities of the oceanic crust and the water column, as well as the P-velocity of the water column have also an influence on the apparent incidence angle. We measured incidence angles for several events and find that the angles show a dependence on the dominant frequency of the event. By comparison with synthetic receiver functions, we find that water multiples have a small or no influence at all on the real data receiver functions. We identify the

  6. Laser Ablation Trace Element Analysis of Modern and Fossil Desmophyllum dianthus from Norfolk and Baltimore Canyons in Mid-Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoemann, M.; Roark, B.; Fallon, S.; Eggins, S.; Kinsley, L.; Prouty, N.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea cup corals are a promising archive for paleoceanographic reconstructions as they are globally distributed with some fossil specimens living throughout the Holocene and into the Last Glacial period. Here we explore the utility of using laser ablation (LA)- ICP-MS to measure the trace elements and δ11B in solitary scleractinian, cup corals, Desmophyllum dianthus collected in Norfolk and Baltimore Canyons from the Mid-Atlantic Ocean. Twelve modern and twenty-six sub-fossil D. dianthus, were collected between a depth range of 400m - 1400m with ambient seawater pH range of 7.89 - 8.00. Modern seawater column chemistry including radiocarbon, nutrients, total alkalinity and particulate trace elements were measured to calibrate geochemical proxies in the live specimens. Radiocarbon measurements indicate sub-fossil specimens lived as long ago as 800 years. A suite of trace elements including P/Ca, Ba/Ca, and U/Ca were analyzed to reconstruct nutrient changes and carbonate ion concentrations. Using previously published calibration equations, modern coral P/Ca ratios yield dissolved inorganic P values of 0.24 - 1.70 μmol/L in line with measured values of 0.1-2.5 μmol/L in the water column. In addition, Ba/Ca (nutrients) yield dissolved Ba values of 25-137 ±16 nmol/kg and U/Ca results yield carbonate ion concentrations of 40-129 ±29 μmol/kg, which are both consistent with previously published work. This study represents the first ever LA-ICP-MS measurements of δ11B using modern and sub-fossil D. dianthus where the modern corals averaged δ11B=18.15±0.01‰. These results are similar to previously published solution ICP-MS results, but using published pH-δ11B calibration equation yields higher pH values than in-situ pH values suggesting future modern calibration work is necessary. Overall, these results show promise for using sub-fossil D. dianthus to reconstruct biogeochemical processes at intermediate and deep waters in Norfolk and Baltimore Canyons.

  7. Geochemical characteristics of basaltic glasses from the AMAR and FAMOUS axial valleys, Mid-Atlantic Ridge (36°-37°N): Petrogenetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, F. A.; Walker, N.; Stakes, D.; Hart, S. R.; Nielsen, R.

    1993-03-01

    The axial valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from 36° to 37°N was intensively sampled by submersible during the FAMOUS and AMAR projects. Our research focussed on the compositional and isotopic characteristics of basaltic glasses from the AMAR valley and the NARROWGATE region of the FAMOUS valley. These basaltic glasses are characterized by: (1) major element abundance trends that are consistent with control by multiphase fractionation (olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene) and magma mixing, (2) near isotopic homogeneity δ 18O= 5.2to6.4 , 87Sr/ 86Sr= 0.70288to0.70299 and 206Pb/ 204Pb= 18.57to18.84 , and (3) a wide range of incompatible element abundance ratios; e.g., within the AMAR valley chondrite-normalized La/Sm ranges from 0.7 to 1.5 and La/Yb from 0.6 to 1.6. These ratios increase with decreasing MgO content. Because of the limited variations in isotopic ratios of Sr, Nd and Pb, it is plausible that these compositional variations reflect post-melting magmatic processes. However, it is not possible to explain the correlated variation in MgO content and incompatible element abundance ratios, such as La/Sm and Zr/Nb, by fractional crystallization or more complex processes such as boundary layer fractionation. These geochemical trends can be explained by mixing of parental magmas that formed by very different extents of melting. In particular, the factor of three variation in Ce content in samples with ˜ 2.1% Na 2O and 8% MgO requires a component derived by < 1% melting. If the large variations in abundance ratios of incompatible elements reflect the melting process, a large, long-lived magma chamber was not present during eruption of these AMAR lavas. The geological characteristics of the AMAR valley and the compositions of AMAR lavas are consistent with episodic volcanism; i.e., periods of magma eruption were followed by extensive periods of tectonism with little or no magmatism.

  8. Mantle heterogeneities beneath the South Atlantic: a Nd sbnd Sr sbnd Pb isotope study along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (3°S-46°S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontignie, Denis; Schilling, Jean-Guy

    1996-07-01

    We report on 55 Nd and Sr isotope analyses of Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) basalt glasses from 3°S to 46°S, using the same samples on which Pb and He isotope ratios were reported earlier (Hanan et al. [1] and Graham et al. [2]). Eighteen new Pb, Sr, and Nd isotope analyses are also reported on basalt glasses from 17 stations from the same region. 87Sr 86Sr ratios range from 0.70212 to 0.70410 and 143Nd 144Nd from 0.51285 to 0.51331. The along-ridge long wavelength 87Sr 86Sr variation delineated by light-REE depleted basalts increases progressively southward toward Tristan da Cunha. Short wavelength, spike-like, positive 87Sr 86Sr anomalies composed of light-REE enriched basalts are found opposite the Tristan, St. Helena, and Circe (Ascension) hotspots (as for the Pb isotopes). The short and long wavelength 143Nd 144Nd variations anti-correlate with those of 87Sr 86Sr . The 17 new Pb isotope analyses confirm both the short and long wavelength trends previously reported by Hanan et al. [1]. These spatial variations, as well as the variations in Nd sbnd Sr sbnd Pb isotopic space fully confirm the mantle plume-ridge interaction model and upper mantle mixing conditions beneath the South Atlantic inferred previously on the basis of Pb isotopic data only (Hanan et al. [1]). However, in Nd sbnd Sr isotopic subspace the Circe and the St. Helena mixing vector are not distinguishable. The short wavelength Nd sbnd Sr sbnd Pb sbnd He anomalies suggest recent lateral sublithospheric channeled flows from these off-ridge plumes to the migrating MAR axis. The long wavelength variations reflect a broad pollution of the asthenosphere by Pb and Sr radiogenic, isotope-rich, mantle material, which has been partly depleted of incompatible elements relatively recently. This broad pollution may be related to the partial melting and dispersion of the Tristan and St. Helena plume heads into the subcontinental asthenosphere, prior to the opening of the South Atlantic. In this two-stage model

  9. Analysis of the Spatial and Temporal Distribution of the Seismicity of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge Using the SIRENA and the South Azores Autonomous Hydrophone Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão, N.; Goslin, J.; Perrot, J.; Haxel, J.; Dziak, R.

    2006-12-01

    Acoustic data recorded by two Autonomous Hydrophone Arrays (AHA) were jointly processed in Brest (IUEM) and Newport (PMEL-VENTS) to monitor the seismicity of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) over a ten month period, at a wide range of spatial scales. Over the deployment period, nearly 6000 T-phase generating earthquakes were localized using a semi-automatic algorithm. Our analysis of the temporal and spatial distribution of these events combined with their acoustic energy source levels provides important insights for the generation mechanisms and characteristic behavior of MAR seismicity. It shows for the AHA catalog a variation of the cumulative number of events with time almost linear. Taking in account the area inside the arrays, the section of the ridge north of the Azores is more seismically active than the southern part of it and the seismic activity occurs in large localized clusters. Our (AHA) catalog of acoustic events was used to compare locations, focal mechanisms and magnitude observations with correlated data from land-based stations of the NEIC global seismic network to establish completeness levels from both within and outside of the hydrophone array. The (AHA) catalog has a Source Level of Completeness (SLc) of 204dB, and a b-value of 0.0605. The NEIC catalog for this region during this period has a Magnitude of Completeness (Mc) of 4.6 and a b-value of 1.01. Regressing the AHA values onto the NEIC derived Mc/b-value relationship suggests a Mc of 3.2 for the AHA catalog. By restricting the events to the region inside the AHA, the NEIC catalog has an Mc of 4.7 with a b-value of 1.09, while the AHA catalog has a SLc of 205dB with a b-value of 0.0753. Comparing the b-values of the NEIC catalog with the AHA catalog, we obtain an improved Mc of 3.0 for the AHA inside the array. A time- and space-dependent Single-Link-Cluster algorithm was applied to the events localized inside the AHA. This allowed us to gather cluster sequences of earthquakes for higher

  10. Shallow origin for South Atlantic Dupal Anomaly from lower continental crust: Geochemical evidence from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 26°S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regelous, Marcel; Niu, Yaoling; Abouchami, Wafa; Castillo, Pat R.

    2009-09-01

    We measured trace element concentrations and Pb isotope compositions of fresh volcanic glass samples from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 26°S, and from nearby off-axis seamounts. The samples have previously been studied for major elements and Sr-Nd-He isotopes. All samples are depleted MORB, and include some of the most incompatible trace element depleted lavas yet reported from the Atlantic. The seamount lavas are more depleted in highly incompatible elements than the axial lavas, but have high Sr, Pb and Eu concentrations, relative to REE of similar incompatibility. The lavas with the highest Sr/Nd, Pb/Ce and Eu/Eu* have the highest 3He/4He (up to 11.0 R/RA) ratios and the lowest incompatible trace element concentrations. They also have the highest 87Sr/86Sr (up to 0.7036) and 208Pb/204Pb for a given 206Pb/204Pb ratio, which are characteristics of lavas from the Dupal Anomaly in the South Atlantic, and of many EM-1 type intraplate lavas generally. Our data place constraints on the origin of the Dupal Anomaly. The enrichments in Sr, Pb and Eu, together with the low Ca/Al ratios of the seamount lavas indicate that their mantle source consists of material that at one time contained plagioclase, and must therefore have resided at crustal pressures. We argue that the trace element and isotopic compositions of the seamount lavas are best explained by derivation from a mantle source contaminated with lower continental crust, which was introduced into the upper mantle during continental rifting and breakup in the South Atlantic. Our results support previous suggestions that the Dupal Anomaly in the South Atlantic has a relatively recent, shallow origin in lower continental crust and continental lithospheric mantle, rather than in recycled material supplied from the deeper mantle by plumes. Plate reconstructions place the Parana-Etendeka flood basalt province over the central part of the Dupal Anomaly at the time of rifting of South America and Africa at 134 Ma. The flood

  11. Thermo-chemical fluxes, reactions and mixing in hydrothermal plumes at Oceanic Core complexes (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 13°30'N and 13°20'N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destrigneville, C.; Chavagnac, V.; Olive, J. A. L.; Leleu, T.; Rommevaux, C.; Escartin, J.; Jamieson, J. W.; Petersen, S.

    2015-12-01

    Large-offset detachment faults are widespread along the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), exhume ultramafic rocks, and host a great diversity of hydrothermal systems. During the ODEMAR'13 cruise, the fully developed 13º20'N and 13º30'N oceanic core complexes (OCC) along MAR were investigated to constrain the tectonic, hydrothermal and magmatic processes enabling detachment formation. Here we focus on the composition and fluxes of hydrothermal fluids discharging out of these OCCs. ROV Victor6000 dives confirmed the occurrence of active discharge near the breakaway side of the 13º30'N OCC (Semenov-2), and observed high-temperature venting on the striated fault surface of the 13º20'N OCC (Irinovskoe). Black smoker fluids and hydrothermal plume waters (2-110ºC) were collected using gas-tight titanium syringes and in-situ pumping fluid samplers mounted on the ROV, respectively. The Semenov-2 fluids (3 vent sites at 317ºC) are characterized by lower chlorinity than seawater (Cl = 525 mmol/l) and extremely low metal concentrations (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn < ~20 μmol/l). By contrast, the Irinovskoe fluids (2 vent sites at 364ºC) exhibit higher chlorinity than seawater at Cl = 605 mmol/l, high Fe and Mn concentrations, and yet low metal concentrations. Temperature and concentration of conservative species were also measured along the centerlines of selected plumes within the first ~3 m above the vents. These measurements were inverted to constrain vent heat and mass fluxes using a plume entrainment model, yielding for individual plumes values of ~1-95 MW and 1-60 10-3 m3/s, respectively. We use these to calculate annual filterable iron fluxes at both sites of the 13º20'N OCC of 2.6 - 3.9 106 mol/yr, which are 4 orders of magnitude higher than those calculated for the 13º30'N OCC. We estimate, however, that ~94% of this Fe flux is lost through precipitation when rising hydrothermal fluids mix with entrained seawater.

  12. Seismic Reflection Imaging of the Heat Source of an Ultramafic-Hosted Hydrothermal System (Rainbow, Mid-Atlantic Ridge 36° 10-17'N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canales, J. P.; Dunn, R. A.; Sohn, R. A.; Horning, G.; Arai, R.; Paulatto, M.

    2015-12-01

    Most of our understanding of hydrothermal systems and the nature of their heat sources comes from models and observations at fast and intermediate spreading ridges. In these settings, hydrothermal systems are mainly located within the axial zone of a spreading segment, hosted in basaltic rock, and primarily driven by heat extracted from crystallization of crustal melt sills. In contrast, hydrothermal systems at slow-spreading ridges like the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) show a great variety of venting styles and host-rock lithology, and are located in diverse tectonic settings like axial volcanic ridges, non-transform discontinuities (NTDs), the foot of ridge valley walls, and off-axis inside corner highs. Among MAR systems, the Rainbow hydrothermal field (RHF) stands out as an end-member of this diversity: an ultramafic-hosted system emitting H2 and CH4-rich fluids at high temperatures and high flow rates, which suggests a magmatic heat source despite the lack of evidence for recent volcanism and its location within an NTD with presumably low magma budget. We present 2D multichannel seismic reflection images across the Rainbow massif from the NSF-funded MARINER multidisciplinary geophysical study that reveal, for the first time, the magmatic system driving hydrothermal circulation in an ultramafic setting. Data were acquired in 2013 onboard the RV M. Langseth with an 8-km-long hydrophone streamer. The images have been obtained from pre-stack depth migrations using a regional 3D P-wave velocity model from a coincident controlled-source seismic tomography experiment using ocean bottom seismometers. Our images show a complex magmatic system centered beneath the RHF occupying an areal extent of ~3.7x6 km2, with partially molten sills ranging in depth between ~3.4 km and ~6.9 km below the seafloor. Our data also image high-amplitude dipping reflections within the massif coincident with strong lateral velocity gradients that may arise from detachment fault planes

  13. The effects of acidic deposition on streams in the Appalachian Mountain and Piedmont region of the mid-Atlantic United States

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufman, P.R. ); Church, M.R.; Wigington, P.J. Jr. ); Webb, J.R. ); Sale, M.J. )

    1993-08-01

    Streams in the Appalachian Mountain area of the mid-Atlantic receive some of the largest acidic deposition loadings of any region of the US. A synthesis of the survey data from the mid-Appalachians yields a consistent picture of the acid base status of streams. Acidic streams, and streams with very low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), are almost all located in small (<20 km[sup 2]), upland, forested catchments in areas of base-poor bedrock. In the subpopulation in the mid-Appalachian area, data from various local surveys show that 6-27% of the streams are acidic, and about 25-50% have ANC less than 50 [mu]eq L[sup [minus]1]. After excluding streams with acid mine drainage, National Stream Survey estimates for the whole region show that there are 2330 km of acidic streams and 7500 km of streams with ANC less than 50 [mu]eq L[sup [minus]1]. Many of the streams with base flow ANC less than 50 [mu]eq L[sup [minus]1] become acidic during storm or snowmelt episodes. Sulfate from atmospheric deposition is the dominant source of strong acid anions in acid mid-Appalachian streams. Their low pH (median, 4.9) and high levels of inorganic monomeric aluminum (median, 129 [mu]g L[sup [minus]1]) leached through soils by acidic deposition are causing damage to aquatic biota. Quantification of the extent of biological effects, however, is not possible with available data. Localized studies have shown that stream water ANC is closely related to bedrock mineralogy. Attempts to quantify this relationship across the mid-Appalachians, however, were frustrated by the lack of adequate scale geologic mapping throughout the region. Sulfate mass balance analyses indicate that soils and surface waters of the region have not yet realized the full effects of elevated sulfur deposition due to watershed sulfate retention. Sulfur retention is likely to decrease in the future, resulting in further losses of stream ANC. 70 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Surface elevation dynamics in vegetated Spartina marshes versus unvegetated tidal ponds along the mid-Atlantic coast, USA, with implications to waterbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R. Michael; Cahoon, Donald R.; Prosser, Diann J.; Sanders, Geoffrey; Hensel, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Mid Atlantic coastal salt marshes contain a matrix of vegetation diversified by tidal pools, pannes, and creeks, providing habitats of varying importance to many species of breeding, migrating, and wintering waterbirds. We hypothesized that changes in marsh elevation were not sufficient to keep pace with those of sea level in both vegetated and unvegetated Spartina alterniflora sites at a number of mid lagoon marsh areas along the Atlantic coast. We also predicted that northern areas would suffer less of a deficit than would southern sites. Beginning in August 1998, we installed surface elevation tables at study sites on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, southern New Jersey, and two locations along Virginia's eastern shore. We compared these elevation changes over the 4-4.5 yr record with the long-term (> 50 yr) tidal records for each locale. We also collected data on waterbird use of these sites during all seasons of the year, based on ground surveys and replicated surveys from observation platforms. Three patterns of marsh elevation change were found. At Nauset Marsh, Cape Cod, the Spartina marsh surface tracked the pond surface, both keeping pace with regional sea-level rise rates. In New Jersey, the ponds are becoming deeper while marsh surface elevation remains unchanged from the initial reading. This may result in a submergence of the marsh in the future, assuming sea-level rise continues at current rates. Ponds at both Virginia sites are filling in, while marsh surface elevation rates do not seem to be keeping pace with local sea-level rise. An additional finding at all sites was that subsidence in the vegetated marsh surfaces was less than in unvegetated areas, reflecting the importance of the root mat in stabilizing sediments. The implications to migratory waterbirds are significant. Submergence of much of the lagoonal marsh area in Virginia and New Jersey over the next century could have major negative (i.e., flooding) effects on nesting populations of marsh

  15. Small-scale spatial variability of sperm and sei whales in relation to oceanographic and topographic features along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skov, H.; Gunnlaugsson, T.; Budgell, W. P.; Horne, J.; Nøttestad, L.; Olsen, E.; Søiland, H.; Víkingsson, G.; Waring, G.

    2008-01-01

    The 2004 Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR)-ECO expedition on the R.V. G.O. Sars provided the first opportunity to correlate oceanic distributions of cetaceans with synoptic acoustic (ADCP to 700 m depth, multi-beam echosounders) measurements of high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) potential habitat (spatial scale<100 km). The identified habitat features were tested with independent observations from the Icelandic combined cetacean and redfish cruises in 2001 and 2003 using data from a 3D ocean general circulation model of the MAR region (Regional Oceans Modelling System (ROMS) model 5 km resolution). The spatial autocorrelation of sampled encounter rates of sperm Physeter macrocephalus and sei whales Balaenoptera borealis indicated scale-dependent variability in the distribution of both species. Despite the large area surveyed, the observations of both species exhibited a strong small-scale structure (range parameter 20-50 km), indicating affinities to cross-seamount or cross-frontal structures. Potential cross-seamount and cross-frontal habitat structures were derived from the acoustic transect data by analysing fine-scale gradients in the 3D flow patterns and bathymetry, including interactions between frontal and topographic parameters. PLS regression was used to determine the potential habitat drivers of sperm and sei whales, both during the G.O. Sars cruise and during the Icelandic cruises in 2001 and 2003. The selected parameters, which reflected flow gradients interacting with the steep topography, were finally applied for modelling the habitat suitability of both target species along the northern MAR using Ecological Niche Factor Analysis. The results suggest aggregations of sperm and sei whales along the MAR are primarily associated with fine-scale frontal processes interacting with the topography in the upper 100 m of the water column just north of the Sub-Polar Front (SPF) and the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ). As moderate and high habitat suitabilities

  16. Seismicity of the Equatorial Mid-Atlantic Ridge and its Large Offset Transforms recorded during a multi-year hydrophone array deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. K.; Dziak, R. P.; Haxel, J.; Meyer, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    To increase our understanding of the slow-spreading, equatorial Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), we deployed an array of eight autonomous hydrophones centered on the ridge axis between ~20°N and ~10°S. The hydrophones were deployed for 2+ years (500 Hz sample rate) and obtained a continuous record of the regional seismicity. This region is especially interesting for many reasons. A strongly segmented MAR is offset by some of the longest transform faults in the global oceans. In addition, the North America-South America-Africa (NA-SA-AF) triple junction is thought to be between 10°N and 20°N at the MAR, but its exact location is not well-defined. And finally, the NA-SA plate boundary is not clearly delineated by teleseismicity or prominent seafloor structures despite known relative motion between the plates. Seven of the eight hydrophones were recovered in January 2015 and earthquake location analysis is underway. These seismic data will be used to understand the modes of spreading, short-term earthquake predictability, and triple junction dynamics. In particular, we will use patterns in the earthquake data to address the following: 1) Whether long-lived detachment faults play a central role in accretion at the equatorial MAR similar to what is observed to the north (Escartin et al., 2008). 2) Whether foreshock sequences can be used to predict (retrospectively) earthquakes with magnitudes ≥ 5.4 mb on equatorial Atlantic transform faults as they can be on Pacific transforms (McGuire et al., 2005). A total of eighteen teleseismic earthquakes ≥ 5.4 mb occurred in this region during the hydrophone deployment providing a robust data base to test this foreshock precursor hypothesis. 3) Lastly, whether or not the geometry and crustal stress patterns induced by the NA-SA-AF triple junction are apparent in the earthquake data. If so, the earthquake patterns will help improve our understanding of triple junction dynamics and overall lithospheric strength.

  17. The effects of acidic deposition on streams in the Appalachian Mountain and Piedmont Region of the Mid-Atlantic United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlihy, A. T.; Kaufmann, P. R.; Church, M. R.; Wigington, P. J.; Webb, J. R.; Sale, M. J.

    1993-08-01

    Streams in the Appalachian Mountain area of the mid-Atlantic receive some of the largest acidic deposition loadings of any region of the United States. A synthesis of the survey data from the mid-Appalachians yields a consistent picture of the acid base status of streams. Acidic streams, and streams with very low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), are almost all located in small (<20 km2), upland, forested catchments in areas of base-poor bedrock. In the subpopulation of upland forested systems, which comprises about half the total stream population in the mid-Appalachian area, data from various local surveys show that 6-27% of the streams are acidic, and about 25-50% have ANC less than 50 μeq L-1. After excluding streams with acid mine drainage, National Stream Survey estimates for the whole region show that there are 2330 km of acidic streams and 7500 km of streams with ANC less than 50 μeq L-1. Many of the streams with base flow ANC less than 50 μeq L-1 become acidic during storm or snowmelt episodes. Sulfate from atmospheric deposition is the dominant source of strong acid anions in acidic mid-Appalachian streams. Their low pH (median, 4.9) and high levels of inorganic monomeric aluminum (median, 129 μg L-1) leached through soils by acidic deposition are causing damage to aquatic biota. Quantification of the extent of biological effects, however, is not possible with available data. Localized studies have shown that stream water ANC is closely related to bedrock mineralogy. Attempts to quantify this relationship across the mid-Appalachians, however, were frustrated by the lack of adequate scale geologic mapping throughout the region. Sulfate mass balance analyses indicate that soils and surface waters of the region have not yet realized the full effects of elevated sulfur deposition due to watershed sulfate retention. Sulfur retention is likely to decrease in the future, resulting in further losses of stream ANC.

  18. Rain rate statistics and fade distributions at 20 and 30 GHz derived from a network of rain gauges in the Mid-Atlantic coast over a five year period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Krichevsky, Vladimir; Gebo, Norman E.

    1992-01-01

    A network of ten tipping bucket rain gauges located within a grid 70 km north-south and 47 km east-west in the Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States was used to analyze rain rate and modeled slant path attenuation distributions at 20 and 30 GHz. It was shown that, for realistic fade margins at 20 GHz and above, the variable integration times results are adequate to estimate slant path attenuations using models which require 1 min averages. Crane's Global Model was used to derive fade distributions at 20 and 30 GHz.

  19. Tracking a northern fulmar from a Scottish nesting site to the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone: Evidence of linkage between coastal breeding seabirds and Mid-Atlantic Ridge feeding sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Ewan W. J.; Quinn, Lucy R.; Wakefield, Ewan D.; Miller, Peter I.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2013-12-01

    The seas above mid-ocean ridges are biodiversity hotspots in an otherwise largely oligotrophic environment, but the nature and extent of linkage between these offshore regimes and coastal ecosystems remains uncertain. Using a combination of GPS and geolocation tracking data, we show that a male fulmar, breeding on the Scottish coast, foraged over areas of persistent thermal fronts along the Charlie-Gibbs Fracture Zone (CGFZ) of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge during the incubation period. The bird travelled over 6200 km in 14.9 days. First-passage time analysis identified seven areas of restricted search, four on the shelf and three in the vicinity of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Previous studies of incubation foraging trip durations at this site suggest that a trip of this duration is unusual, and further work is required to assess the extent to which different individuals use these offshore resources. Nevertheless, these data highlight the potential importance of high sea areas beyond the limits of national jurisdiction when considering the management and conservation of seabirds breeding in NW Europe, and raises the potential for even greater linkage between the CGFZ and seabirds breeding colonies in other regions.

  20. The Condor seamount at Mid-Atlantic Ridge as a supplementary source of trace and rare earth elements to the sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos; Anes, Bárbara; Raimundo, Joana; Drago, Teresa; Schimdt, Sabine; Nogueira, Marta; Oliveira, Anabela; Prego, Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    The Condor Seamount rises from seabed to 180m water depth, being located 10 nautical miles southwest of the island of Faial, Azores Archipelago at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). The vertical distribution of major, minor, trace and rare earth elements (REE) and Pb isotopes was studied in four sediment cores: one from the top of the Condor Seamount (200m, MC9), two from the seamount base (1400m, MC2 and MC4), and one from a deep area (1900m, MC8). Sediments from the top of the Condor were composed by coarser particles being the fine fraction lower than 1%. Conversely the other sediments were constituted by 51-92% of fine particles (<63μm). Individual fragments of volcanic material (>2mm) were found at several depths of the cores sampled at the base of the seamount. The core collected in the top of the Condor showed higher carbonate content (76-86%) compared with the other cores (41-64%). The chemical compositions of MC2 and MC4 point to an enhancement of V, Cr, Co, Ni and Fe concentrations. Lower concentrations in MC8 hypothesis that Condor seamount constitutes a supplementary source of trace elements. The most plausible explanation for the enhancement found in sediments of the seamount base is the weathering of slopes with volcanic activities, which supply particles with higher element concentrations than pelagic sediments. This hypothesis is corroborated by REE data, showing increased chondrite normalized ratios in MC2 and MC4. Moreover, the REE pattern found in those cores was comparable to that existing in volcanic material with Light REE enrichment in comparison to Heavy REE. These results indicate a substantial contribution of particles derived from volcanic activities to sediments settled in the vicinity of the Condor Seamount. It is argued the potential use of REE in sediments from this region as tracers of volcanic activities. Depth profiles of 206Pb/207Pb and 206Pb/208Pb showed lower ratios in the first 8cm sediment layers, reflecting atmospheric input of