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Sample records for agent carbonyl cyanide

  1. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide

    PubMed Central

    Bteich, S.B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R.A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Context More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152 - 308 GHz and analyzed using Watson’s A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. PMID:27738349

  2. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bteich, S. B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-07-01

    Context. More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims: The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods: The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152-308 GHz and analyzed using Watson's A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results: The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. This paper makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2011.0.00009.SV. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA), and NINS (Japan) with NRC (Canada), NSC, and ASIAA (Taiwan), and KASI (Republic of

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide (Bteich+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bteich, S. B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margules, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-05-01

    Table 3 contains assigned rotational transitions of the ground state and the first excited vibrational state (v5=1) of carbonyl cyanide. Table 4 contains predicted transitions of the ground vibrational state of carbonyl cyanide in the frequency range up to 1THz. (2 data files).

  4. Carbonylation of {alpha}-ketoalkynes catalyzed by nickel cyanide under phase transfer conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Arzoumanian, H.; Jean, M.; Nuel, D.; Guiterrez, J.L.; Rosas, N. |

    1995-12-31

    Carbonylation of organic substrates mediated by transition metal complexes under phase transfer conditions is a well studied reaction. Although cobalt and iron have been the most commonly used metals, nickel has aroused increasing interest since Alper and coworkers showed that nickel cyanide is a versatile carbonylation catalyst precursor. The active species formed in situ is postulated as being an anionic reduced nickel species [Ni(CO){sub 3}(CN)]{sup -}. Using this system, a variety of substrates have been successfully carbonylated. The authors have now extended this reaction to alkynes bearing a keto function in the propargylic position. When treated by Ni(CN){sub 2} under CO (1 atm) under biphasic conditions (NaOH, organic solvent) {alpha}-ketoalkynes are carboxylated to give either unsaturated hydroxylactones or unsaturated keto-acids. The structure of the final product is dependent of the nature of the sustituent on the alkynyl group.

  5. Role of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone in enhancing photobiological hydrogen production by marine green alga Platymonas subcordiformis.

    PubMed

    Ran, Chunqiu; Yu, Xingju; Jin, Meifang; Zhang, Wei

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrated that a significant volume of H(2) gas could be photobiologically produced by a marine green alga Platymonas subcordiformis when an uncoupler of photophosphorylation, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), was added after 32 h of anaerobic dark incubation, whereas a negligible volume of H(2) gas was produced without CCCP. The role of CCCP in enhancing photobiological H(2) production was delineated. CCCP as an ADRY agent (agent accelerating the deactivation reactions of water-splitting enzyme system Y) rapidly inhibited the photosystem II (PSII) activity of P. subcordiformis cells, resulting in a markedly decline in the coupled oxygen evolution. The mitochondrial oxidative respiration was only slightly inactivated by CCCP, which depleted O(2) in the light. As a result, anaerobiosis during the stage of photobiological H(2) evolution was established, preventing severe O(2) inactivation of the reversible hydrogenase in P. subcordiformis. The uncoupling effect of CCCP accelerates electron transfer from water due to a disruption of the proton motive force and release of DeltapH across the thylakoid membrane and thus enhances the accessibility of electron and H(+) to hydrogenase. The electrons for hydrogen photoevolution are mainly from the photolysis of water (90%). Upon the addition of CCCP, Chl a/b ratio increased, which implies a decrease in the light-harvesting PSII antennae or an increase in PSII/PSI ratio, possibly resulting in higher efficiency of utilization of light energy. The enhancement of H(2) evolution by the addition of CCCP is mostly due to the combination of the above three mechanisms. However, the disruption of the proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane may prevent a sustained photobiological H(2) evolution due to a shortfall of ATP generation essential for the maintenance and repair functions of the cells.

  6. Role of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone in enhancing photobiological hydrogen production by marine green alga Platymonas subcordiformis.

    PubMed

    Ran, Chunqiu; Yu, Xingju; Jin, Meifang; Zhang, Wei

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrated that a significant volume of H(2) gas could be photobiologically produced by a marine green alga Platymonas subcordiformis when an uncoupler of photophosphorylation, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), was added after 32 h of anaerobic dark incubation, whereas a negligible volume of H(2) gas was produced without CCCP. The role of CCCP in enhancing photobiological H(2) production was delineated. CCCP as an ADRY agent (agent accelerating the deactivation reactions of water-splitting enzyme system Y) rapidly inhibited the photosystem II (PSII) activity of P. subcordiformis cells, resulting in a markedly decline in the coupled oxygen evolution. The mitochondrial oxidative respiration was only slightly inactivated by CCCP, which depleted O(2) in the light. As a result, anaerobiosis during the stage of photobiological H(2) evolution was established, preventing severe O(2) inactivation of the reversible hydrogenase in P. subcordiformis. The uncoupling effect of CCCP accelerates electron transfer from water due to a disruption of the proton motive force and release of DeltapH across the thylakoid membrane and thus enhances the accessibility of electron and H(+) to hydrogenase. The electrons for hydrogen photoevolution are mainly from the photolysis of water (90%). Upon the addition of CCCP, Chl a/b ratio increased, which implies a decrease in the light-harvesting PSII antennae or an increase in PSII/PSI ratio, possibly resulting in higher efficiency of utilization of light energy. The enhancement of H(2) evolution by the addition of CCCP is mostly due to the combination of the above three mechanisms. However, the disruption of the proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane may prevent a sustained photobiological H(2) evolution due to a shortfall of ATP generation essential for the maintenance and repair functions of the cells. PMID:16599559

  7. Cyanide

    MedlinePlus

    ... the combustion products of synthetic materials such as plastics. Combustion products are substances given off when things ... cyanide is used to make paper, textiles, and plastics. It is present in the chemicals used to ...

  8. Targeting Reactive Carbonyl Species with Natural Sequestering Agents.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung Won; Lee, Yoon-Mi; Aldini, Giancarlo; Yeum, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Reactive carbonyl species generated by the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and sugars are highly reactive due to their electrophilic nature, and are able to easily react with the nucleophilic sites of proteins as well as DNA causing cellular dysfunction. Levels of reactive carbonyl species and their reaction products have been reported to be elevated in various chronic diseases, including metabolic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. In an effort to identify sequestering agents for reactive carbonyl species, various analytical techniques such as spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography, western blot, and mass spectrometry have been utilized. In particular, recent advances using a novel high resolution mass spectrometry approach allows screening of complex mixtures such as natural products for their sequestering ability of reactive carbonyl species. To overcome the limited bioavailability and bioefficacy of natural products, new techniques using nanoparticles and nanocarriers may offer a new attractive strategy for increased in vivo utilization and targeted delivery of bioactives. PMID:26927058

  9. Synthesis of potential prophylactic agents against cyanide intoxication. Annual report, 3 September 1992-3 August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, J.R.

    1993-04-12

    The goal of the proposed research is to provide prophylaxis against cyanide through its sequestration by covalent bond formation. Three strategies were pursued: (1) sulfur-rich compounds which could serve as sulfane sulfur donors to rhodanese and other sulfur transferases; (2) compounds containing multiple carbonyl moieties, including analogs of pyruvate and alpha-ketoglutarate, which can bind cyanide through cyanohydrin formation; and (3) additional classes of compounds that can directly react with cyanide, such as (1) N-alkoxy and N-alkylthio heterocycles, and (2) phthalocyanines and porphyrins. During this report period we prepared examples of all compound types just described. The 33 new compounds submitted this period were distributed among these compound classes as follows: sulfur-rich species, 12; polycarbonyl compounds, 13; nitrogenous heterocycles, 1; and metal complexes, 7. Some of these compounds contained multiple functionality that could react with cyanide. One of the sulfur compounds was prepared at the request of the CO and was a re-submission of an additional quantity of a previously submitted sample which had displayed positive biological results during screening (SoRI 7638; WR 268831). We have received biological testing data for 20 compounds during this same period, and now have demonstrated activity in three of our four primary target classes (no phthalocyanines have been tested for efficacy at this point). Of these 20 screened compounds, the S-sulfo derivative of cysteine (SoRI 7913; WR000125AC) was found to have potential as an improved pretreatment for NaCN poisoning. Anticyanide agents, Polysulfides, Sulfurtransferases (Rhodanese), Cyanohydrin formation, Compounds reactive toward cyanide, Cyanide removal through covalent bonding, RA V.

  10. Potential water-quality effects from iron cyanide anticaking agents in road salt

    SciTech Connect

    Paschka, M.G.; Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.

    1999-10-01

    Water-soluble iron cyanide compounds are widely used as anticaking agents in road salt, which creates potential contamination of surface and groundwater with these compounds when the salt dissolves and is washed off roads in runoff. This paper presents a summary of available information on iron cyanide use in road salt and its potential effects on water quality. Also, estimates of total cyanide concentrations in snow-melt runoff from roadways are presented as simple mass-balance calculations. Although available information does not indicate a widespread problem, it also is clear that the water-quality effects of cyanide in road salt have not been examined much. Considering the large, and increasing, volume of road salt used for deicing, studies are needed to determine levels of total and free cyanide in surface and groundwater adjacent to salt storage facilities and along roads with open drainage ditches. Results could be combined with current knowledge of the fate and transport of cyanide to assess water-quality effects of iron cyanide anticaking agents used in road salt.

  11. Concentrations of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide in the free upper troposphere and lower stratosphere deduced from ATMOS/Spacelab 3 infrared solar occultation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the results on the volume mixing ratio profiles of carbonyl sulfide and hydrogen cyanide, deduced from the spectroscopic analysis of IR solar absorption spectra obtained in the occultation mode with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument during its mission aboard Spacelab 3. A comparison of the ATMOS measurements for both northern and southern latitudes with previous field investigations at low midlatitudes shows a relatively good agreement. Southern Hemisphere volume mixing ratio profiles for both molecules were obtained for the first time, as were the profiles for the Northern Hemisphere covering the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere simultaneously.

  12. A new agent for derivatizing carbonyl species used to investigate limonene ozonolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, J. R.; Ham, Jason E.

    2014-12-01

    A new method for derivatizing carbonyl compounds is presented. The conversion of a series of dicarbonyls to oximes in aqueous solution and from gas-phase sampling was achieved using O-tert-butylhydroxylamine hydrochloride (TBOX). Some advantages of using this derivatization agent include: aqueous reactions, lower molecular weight oximes, and shortened oxime-formation reaction time. Additionally, the TBOX derivatization technique was used to investigate the carbonyl reaction products from limonene ozonolysis. With ozone (O3) as the limiting reagent, four carbonyl compounds were detected: 7-hydroxy-6-oxo-3-(prop-1-en-2-yl)heptanal; 3-Isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanal (IPOH), 3-acetyl-6-oxoheptanal (3A6O) and one carbonyl of unknown structure. Using cyclohexane as a hydroxyl (OHrad) radical scavenger, the relative yields (peak area) of the unknown carbonyl, IPOH, and 3A6O were reduced indicating the influence secondary OH radicals have on limonene ozonolysis products. The relative yield of the hydroxy-dicarbonyl based on the chromatogram was unchanged suggesting it is only made by the limonene + O3 reaction. The detection of 3A6O using TBOX highlights the advantages of a smaller molecular weight derivatization agent for the detection of multi-carbonyl compounds. The use of TBOX derivatization if combined with other derivatization agents may address a recurring need to simply and accurately detect multi-functional oxygenated species in air.

  13. Separation of thiol and cyanide hydrolysis products of chemical warfare agents by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Copper, Christine L; Collins, Greg E

    2004-03-01

    The fluorescence derivatizing agent, o-phthalaldehyde (OPA), has been applied to the separation and detection of cyanide and several structurally similar thiols by capillary electrophoresis (CE)-laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Of particular interest to this investigation was the separation of 2-dimethylaminoethanethiol, 2-diethylaminoethanethiol, and cyanide, each of which are hydrolysis products or hydrolysis product simulants of the chemical warfare (CW) agents O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX), O-isobutyl S-2-diethylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (R-VX), and tabun (GA). Other structurally similar thiols simultaneously resolved by this method include 1-pentanethiol and 2-mercaptoethanol. Instrumental parameters were probed and optimum values for capillary length (50 cm) and inner diameter (75 microm), injection time (30 s) and field strength (15 kV) were determined. Sample stacking methods enabled detection limits of 9.3 microg/L for cyanide, 1.8 microg/L for 2-diethylaminoethanethiol, 35 microg/L for 2-dimethylaminoethanethiol, 15 microg/L for 2-mercaptoethanol, and 89 microg/L for 1-pentanethiol. The linearity of the method was verified over an order of magnitude and the reproducibility was found to be 3.0%.

  14. Separation of thiol and cyanide hydrolysis products of chemical warfare agents by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Copper, Christine L; Collins, Greg E

    2004-03-01

    The fluorescence derivatizing agent, o-phthalaldehyde (OPA), has been applied to the separation and detection of cyanide and several structurally similar thiols by capillary electrophoresis (CE)-laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Of particular interest to this investigation was the separation of 2-dimethylaminoethanethiol, 2-diethylaminoethanethiol, and cyanide, each of which are hydrolysis products or hydrolysis product simulants of the chemical warfare (CW) agents O-ethyl S-2-diisopropylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (VX), O-isobutyl S-2-diethylaminoethyl methylphosphonothiolate (R-VX), and tabun (GA). Other structurally similar thiols simultaneously resolved by this method include 1-pentanethiol and 2-mercaptoethanol. Instrumental parameters were probed and optimum values for capillary length (50 cm) and inner diameter (75 microm), injection time (30 s) and field strength (15 kV) were determined. Sample stacking methods enabled detection limits of 9.3 microg/L for cyanide, 1.8 microg/L for 2-diethylaminoethanethiol, 35 microg/L for 2-dimethylaminoethanethiol, 15 microg/L for 2-mercaptoethanol, and 89 microg/L for 1-pentanethiol. The linearity of the method was verified over an order of magnitude and the reproducibility was found to be 3.0%. PMID:15004852

  15. Effect of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon on the glutamate release from rat brain nerve terminals under altered gravity conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.

    L-glutamate acts within the mammalian central nervous system as the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter and as a potent neurotoxin The balance between these physiological and pathological actions of glutamate is thought to be kept in check by the rapid removal of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft The majority of uptake is mediated by the high-affinity Na -dependent glutamate transporters Depolarization leads to stimulation of glutamate efflux mediated by reversal of the high-affinity glutamate transporters The effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon FCCP on the glutamate release from isolated nerve terminals rat brain synaptosomes were investigated in control and after centrifuge-induced hypergravity rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period The treatment of synaptosomes with 1 mu M FCCP during 11 min resulted in the increase in L- 14 C glutamate release by 23 0 pm 2 3 of total accumulated synaptosomal label in control animals and 24 0 pm 2 3 animals subjected to hypergravity FCCP evoked release of L- 14 C glutamate from synaptosomes was not altered in animals exposed to hypergravity as compared to control Glutamate transport is of electrogenic nature and thus depends on the membrane potential The high-KCl stimulated L- 14 C glutamate release in Ca 2 -free media occurred due to reversal of the glutamate transporters Carrier --mediated release of L- 14 C glutamate 6 min slightly increased as a result of

  16. CO-releasing Metal Carbonyl Compounds as Antimicrobial Agents in the Post-antibiotic Era*

    PubMed Central

    Wareham, Lauren K.; Poole, Robert K.; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of a “post-antibiotic era” in the 21st century, in which common infections may kill, has prompted research into radically new antimicrobials. CO-releasing molecules (CORMs), mostly metal carbonyl compounds, originally developed for therapeutic CO delivery in animals, are potent antimicrobial agents. Certain CORMs inhibit growth and respiration, reduce viability, and release CO to intracellular hemes, as predicted, but their actions are more complex, as revealed by transcriptomic datasets and modeling. Progress is hindered by difficulties in detecting CO release intracellularly, limited understanding of the biological chemistry of CO reactions with non-heme targets, and the cytotoxicity of some CORMs to mammalian cells. PMID:26055702

  17. Carbonyl traps as potential protective agents against methimazole-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Reza; Niknahad, Hossein; Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Azarpira, Negar; Bazyari, Mandana; Najibi, Asma

    2015-04-01

    Liver injury is a deleterious adverse effect associated with methimazole administration, and reactive intermediates are suspected to be involved in this complication. Glyoxal is an expected reactive intermediate produced during methimazole metabolism. Current investigation was undertaken to evaluate the role of carnosine, metformin, and N-acetyl cysteine as putative glyoxal (carbonyl) traps, against methimazole-induced hepatotoxicity. Methimazole (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was administered to intact and/or glutathione (GSH)-depleted mice and the role of glyoxal trapping agents was investigated. Methimazole caused liver injury as revealed by an increase in serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase. Moreover, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation occurred significantly in methimazole-treated animals' liver. Hepatic GSH reservoirs were decreased, and inflammatory cells infiltration was observed in liver histopathology. Methimazole-induced hepatotoxicity was severe in GSH-depleted mice and accompanied with interstitial hemorrhage and necrosis of the liver. Glyoxal trapping agents effectively diminished methimazole-induced liver injury both in intact and/or GSH-depleted animals. PMID:25545158

  18. Discovery and evaluation of piperid-4-one-containing mono-carbonyl analogs of curcumin as anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianzhang; Zhang, Yali; Cai, Yuepiao; Wang, Jian; Weng, Bixia; Tang, Qinqin; Chen, Xiangjian; Pan, Zheer; Liang, Guang; Yang, Shulin

    2013-06-01

    We previously reported the design and discovery of three series of 5-carbon linker-containing mono-carbonyl analogs of curcumin (MCACs) as excellent anti-inflammatory agents. In continuation of our ongoing research, we designed and synthesized the fourth series of MCACs, whose central linker is a piperid-4-one. Their inhibitory effects against IL-6 production were evaluated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. Among them, compounds F8, F29, F33, F35, and F36 exhibited the IC50 values under 5 μM. The structure-activity relationship was discussed. Mechanistically, F35 and F36 dose-dependently prevented LPS-induced NF-κB and ERK activation. Finally, pretreatment with F35 and F36 significantly protected the C57B/L6 mice from LPS-induced septic death. Together, these data present a series of new analogs of curcumin as promising anti-inflammatory agents.

  19. Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 08 / 016 F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE AND CYANIDE SALTS ( CAS No . various ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2010 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This docu

  20. Pd/C-catalyzed synthesis of oxamates by oxidative cross double carbonylation of amines and alcohols under co-catalyst, base, dehydrating agent, and ligand-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Gadge, Sandip T; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2013-07-01

    This work reports a mild, efficient, and ligand-free Pd/C-catalyzed protocol for the oxidative cross double carbonylation of amines and alcohols. Notably, the reaction does not requires any base, co-catalyst, dehydrating agent, or ligand. Pd/C solves the problem of catalyst recovery, and the catalyst was recycled up to six times. PMID:23734639

  1. Chlorine cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine cyanide ; CASRN 506 - 77 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  2. Zinc cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Zinc cyanide ; CASRN 557 - 21 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  3. Silver cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Silver cyanide ; CASRN 506 - 64 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  4. Barium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Barium cyanide ; CASRN 542 - 62 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  5. Copper cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper cyanide ; CASRN 544 - 92 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  6. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  7. Potassium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for potassium cyanide is included in

  8. Sodium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for sodium cyanide is included in the

  9. Dormancy alleviation by NO or HCN leading to decline of protein carbonylation levels in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos.

    PubMed

    Krasuska, Urszula; Ciacka, Katarzyna; Dębska, Karolina; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-08-15

    Deep dormancy of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos can be overcome by short-term pre-treatment with nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Dormancy alleviation of embryos modulated by NO or HCN and the first step of germination depend on temporary increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Direct oxidative attack on some amino acid residues or secondary reactions via reactive carbohydrates and lipids can lead to the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives. Protein carbonylation is a widely accepted covalent and irreversible modification resulting in inhibition or alteration of enzyme/protein activities. It also increases the susceptibility of proteins to proteolytic degradation. The aim of this work was to investigate protein carbonylation in germinating apple embryos, the dormancy of which was removed by pre-treatment with NO or HCN donors. It was performed using a quantitative spectrophotometric method, while patterns of carbonylated protein in embryo axes were analyzed by immunochemical techniques. The highest concentration of protein carbonyl groups was observed in dormant embryos. It declined in germinating embryos pre-treated with NO or HCN, suggesting elevated degradation of modified proteins during seedling formation. A decrease in the concentration of carbonylated proteins was accompanied by modification in proteolytic activity in germinating apple embryos. A strict correlation between the level of protein carbonyl groups and cotyledon growth and greening was detected. Moreover, direct in vitro carbonylation of BSA treated with NO or HCN donors was analyzed, showing action of both signaling molecules as protein oxidation agents. PMID:24973585

  10. Dormancy alleviation by NO or HCN leading to decline of protein carbonylation levels in apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos.

    PubMed

    Krasuska, Urszula; Ciacka, Katarzyna; Dębska, Karolina; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-08-15

    Deep dormancy of apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) embryos can be overcome by short-term pre-treatment with nitric oxide (NO) or hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Dormancy alleviation of embryos modulated by NO or HCN and the first step of germination depend on temporary increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Direct oxidative attack on some amino acid residues or secondary reactions via reactive carbohydrates and lipids can lead to the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives. Protein carbonylation is a widely accepted covalent and irreversible modification resulting in inhibition or alteration of enzyme/protein activities. It also increases the susceptibility of proteins to proteolytic degradation. The aim of this work was to investigate protein carbonylation in germinating apple embryos, the dormancy of which was removed by pre-treatment with NO or HCN donors. It was performed using a quantitative spectrophotometric method, while patterns of carbonylated protein in embryo axes were analyzed by immunochemical techniques. The highest concentration of protein carbonyl groups was observed in dormant embryos. It declined in germinating embryos pre-treated with NO or HCN, suggesting elevated degradation of modified proteins during seedling formation. A decrease in the concentration of carbonylated proteins was accompanied by modification in proteolytic activity in germinating apple embryos. A strict correlation between the level of protein carbonyl groups and cotyledon growth and greening was detected. Moreover, direct in vitro carbonylation of BSA treated with NO or HCN donors was analyzed, showing action of both signaling molecules as protein oxidation agents.

  11. Cholinergic aspects of cyanide intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Von Bredow, J.D.; Vick, J.A.

    1993-05-13

    The acute exposure of pentobarbital anesthetized dogs to cyanide leads to a rapid increase and sudden halt in respiration accompanied by cardiovascular irregularities and extreme bradycardia which ultimately lead to cardiac arrest and death. Cardiac irregularities and cardiac arrest in the presence of cyanide induced respiratory arrest are assumed to be due to anoxia and therefore unresponsive to cardiotonic agents. Pretreatment or treatment with atropine sulfate or methyl atropine nitrate provides a marked reduction in the cardiovascular irregularities, bradycardia and hypotension. The cyanide induced cardiovascular effect can also be prevented by bilateral vagotomy. An intramuscularly injected combination of 20 mg/kg sodium nitrite and 1 mg/kg of atropine sulfate ensured recovery of pentobarbital anesthetized dogs exposed to lethal concentrations (2.5 mg/kg i.v.) of sodium cyanide.

  12. Acute nickel carbonyl poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kurta, D L; Dean, B S; Krenzelok, E P

    1993-01-01

    Nickel carbonyl [Ni(CO)4], is formed when metallic nickel combines with carbon monoxide. It is used in the refining process of nickel and as a catalyst in petroleum, plastic, and rubber production. Nickel carbonyl is considered to be one of the most toxic chemicals used industrially and the magnitude of its morbidity and mortality has been compared to that of hydrogen cyanide. A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency department 24 hours after accidental occupational exposure to nickel carbonyl. He admitted to dermal contamination and inhaling the vapor from his clothing after his respiratory protection was removed. On presentation the patient was alert and oriented, complained of shortness of breath, chest tightness, and paresthesias. Examination revealed decreased breath sounds bilaterally and arterial blood gas PO2 of 39% with calculated O2 saturation of 75%. After face mask O2 at 60% his PO2 increased to 85%. The patient required 60% O2 with continuous positive airway pressure of 5 for 4 days. Disulfiram (Antabuse) was administered for the first 2 days until sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (dithiocarb) was obtained. Disulfiram was used because it is metabolized to two molecules of dithiocarb and is hypothetically of value. Dithiocarb was obtained and continued over the next several days. The patient's urine nickel level on the day of admission was 172 micrograms/dL (normal < 5 micrograms/dL) and a serum level of 14.6 micrograms/dL (normal .26-.46 micrograms/dL). The patient's condition gradually improved over the next 10 days. Nickel carbonyl exposure produces mild transient initial symptoms which are followed within 24 hours by more severe life-threatening events.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Acute nickel carbonyl poisoning.

    PubMed

    Kurta, D L; Dean, B S; Krenzelok, E P

    1993-01-01

    Nickel carbonyl [Ni(CO)4], is formed when metallic nickel combines with carbon monoxide. It is used in the refining process of nickel and as a catalyst in petroleum, plastic, and rubber production. Nickel carbonyl is considered to be one of the most toxic chemicals used industrially and the magnitude of its morbidity and mortality has been compared to that of hydrogen cyanide. A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency department 24 hours after accidental occupational exposure to nickel carbonyl. He admitted to dermal contamination and inhaling the vapor from his clothing after his respiratory protection was removed. On presentation the patient was alert and oriented, complained of shortness of breath, chest tightness, and paresthesias. Examination revealed decreased breath sounds bilaterally and arterial blood gas PO2 of 39% with calculated O2 saturation of 75%. After face mask O2 at 60% his PO2 increased to 85%. The patient required 60% O2 with continuous positive airway pressure of 5 for 4 days. Disulfiram (Antabuse) was administered for the first 2 days until sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (dithiocarb) was obtained. Disulfiram was used because it is metabolized to two molecules of dithiocarb and is hypothetically of value. Dithiocarb was obtained and continued over the next several days. The patient's urine nickel level on the day of admission was 172 micrograms/dL (normal < 5 micrograms/dL) and a serum level of 14.6 micrograms/dL (normal .26-.46 micrograms/dL). The patient's condition gradually improved over the next 10 days. Nickel carbonyl exposure produces mild transient initial symptoms which are followed within 24 hours by more severe life-threatening events.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8383493

  14. Nickel carbonyl

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel carbonyl ; CASRN 13463 - 39 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  15. Carbonyl sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Carbonyl sulfide ; CASRN 463 - 58 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  16. Process for the displacement of cyanide ions from metal-cyanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F.; Robinson, Thomas W.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to water-soluble polymers and the use of such water-soluble polymers in a process for the displacement of the cyanide ions from the metal ions within metal-cyanide complexes. The process waste streams can include metal-cyanide containing electroplating waste streams, mining leach waste streams, mineral processing waste streams, and related metal-cyanide containing waste streams. The metal ions of interest are metals that give very strong complexes with cyanide, mostly iron, nickel, and copper. The physical separation of the water-soluble polymer-metal complex from the cyanide ions can be accomplished through the use of ultrafiltration. Once the metal-cyanide complex is disrupted, the freed cyanide ions can be recovered for reuse or destroyed using available oxidative processes rendering the cyanide nonhazardous. The metal ions are released from the polymer, using dilute acid, metal ion oxidation state adjustment, or competing chelating agents, and collected and recovered or disposed of by appropriate waste management techniques. The water-soluble polymer can then be recycled. Preferred water-soluble polymers include polyethyleneimine and polyethyleneimine having a catechol or hydroxamate group.

  17. Photochemical destruction of cyanide in landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.R.; Podsiadlik, D.H.; Hartlund, J.L.; Gaines, W.A.; Kalis, E.M.

    1998-11-01

    The Allen Park Clay Mine Landfill, owned by Ford, produces a leachate that occasionally contains cyanide at levels marginally below the discharge limit. The form of the cyanide in the leachate was found to be iron-cyanide complexes that resist oxidation by a conventional treatment method, alkaline oxidation. Furthermore, the leachate also was found to contain a relatively large amount of organics which would exert additional demand for oxidizing agents (e.g., chlorine). A study was performed to determine what treatment technology could be employed in the event treatment becomes necessary because of potential changes in the leachate characteristics and/or discharge limits. In this study, among several chemical oxidation methods, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation with or without ozone was investigated as a treatment option. The following are the primary findings: (1) UV irradiation alone was effective for removing the iron-cyanide complex in both the leachate and the clean water; (2) the demand for UV or ozone by chemical oxygen demand was relatively low for this leachate; (3) ozone alone was not effective for removing the iron-cyanide complex; and (4) UV irradiation alone and UV irradiation with ozone resulted in the same removal for total cyanide in clean-water experiments, but the UV irradiation alone left some free cyanide whereas the UV irradiation with ozone did not.

  18. Biological activity and molecular docking studies of curcumin-related α,β-unsaturated carbonyl-based synthetic compounds as anticancer agents and mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Jantan, Ibrahim; Unsal Tan, Oya; Sher, Muhammad; Naeem-Ul-Hassan, M; Qin, Hua-Li

    2014-06-18

    Hyperpigmentation in human skin and enzymatic browning in fruits, which are caused by tyrosinase enzyme, are not desirable. Investigations in the discovery of tyrosinase enzyme inhibitors and search for improved cytotoxic agents continue to be an important line in drug discovery and development. In present work, a new series of 30 compounds bearing α,β-unsaturated carbonyl moiety was designed and synthesized following curcumin as model. All compounds were evaluated for their effects on human cancer cell lines and mushroom tyrosinase enzyme. Moreover, the structure-activity relationships of these compounds are also explained. Molecular modeling studies of these new compounds were carried out to explore interactions with tyrosinase enzyme. Synthetic curcumin-like compounds (2a-b) were identified as potent anticancer agents with 81-82% cytotoxicity. Five of these newly synthesized compounds (1a, 8a-b, 10a-b) emerged to be the potent inhibitors of mushroom tyrosinase, providing further insight into designing compounds useful in fields of food, health, and agriculture.

  19. Biological activity and molecular docking studies of curcumin-related α,β-unsaturated carbonyl-based synthetic compounds as anticancer agents and mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Jantan, Ibrahim; Unsal Tan, Oya; Sher, Muhammad; Naeem-Ul-Hassan, M; Qin, Hua-Li

    2014-06-18

    Hyperpigmentation in human skin and enzymatic browning in fruits, which are caused by tyrosinase enzyme, are not desirable. Investigations in the discovery of tyrosinase enzyme inhibitors and search for improved cytotoxic agents continue to be an important line in drug discovery and development. In present work, a new series of 30 compounds bearing α,β-unsaturated carbonyl moiety was designed and synthesized following curcumin as model. All compounds were evaluated for their effects on human cancer cell lines and mushroom tyrosinase enzyme. Moreover, the structure-activity relationships of these compounds are also explained. Molecular modeling studies of these new compounds were carried out to explore interactions with tyrosinase enzyme. Synthetic curcumin-like compounds (2a-b) were identified as potent anticancer agents with 81-82% cytotoxicity. Five of these newly synthesized compounds (1a, 8a-b, 10a-b) emerged to be the potent inhibitors of mushroom tyrosinase, providing further insight into designing compounds useful in fields of food, health, and agriculture. PMID:24901506

  20. Oxidative removal of cyanide from aqueous streams abetted by ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, R.R.; Kalnes, T.N.; Moser, M.D.

    1993-08-24

    A method is described of reducing the concentration of complexed cyanide in an aqueous stream containing at least one complexed cyanide which dissociates to afford less than 10% of the total cyanide present in the complexed cyanide as free cyanide ions. The method comprises the following: irradiating the aqueous stream with light of a wavelength effective to dissociate the complexed cyanide and afford free cyanide ions, and oxidizing the cyanide to carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and isocyanate with an oxidizing agent selected from the group consisting of oxygen ozone, and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a metal chelate at oxidation conditions. The metal chelate is selected from the group consisting of metal compounds of tetrapyridinoporphyrazine, porphyrin, corrinoid materials, and the phthalocyanines.

  1. Remediation of manufactured gas plant soils contaminated with free and complex cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Maka, A.; Aronstein, B.N.; Srivastava, V.J.; Theis, T.L.; Young, T.C.

    1992-12-31

    Cyanide is one of the main contaminants present in soil from manufactured gas plants (MGP) . Several treatment methods including thermal treatment, chemical treatment, ultraviolet irradiation, and biological treatment were evaluated for their ability to degrade the cyanide present in these soils. In the thermal treatment, raising the temperature of the purified waste to 2000--3000C resulted in complete removal of complex cyanide from the soil; however, the cyanide emitted was in a the toxic gaseous HCN form. Chemical treatment, using the oxidant Fenton`s reagent in a 10% soil slurry, resulted in the destruction of 80% of the free cyanide but little, if any, complex cyanide. Ultraviolet irradiation of the basic leachate from MGP wastes in the presence of the chelating agent EDTA yielded 90% degradation of the complex cyanide. For biological treatment, using an aerobic mixed culture, almost 60% of the free cyanide disappeared from the system with minimal degradation of the complex cyanide. Each treatment has its limitations. Thus, a combined physical-chemical-biological treatment in which the complex cyanide is degraded to free cyanide by photodegradation under alkaline conditions, the free cyanide then chemically (by Fenton`s reagent) or biologically converted to NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, is proposed for the removal of cyanide from MGP sites.

  2. Occupational cyanide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Amizet, Loic; Pruvot, Gauthier; Remy, Sophie; Kfoury, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Cyanide poisoning has existed for centuries. In most cases, cyanide is combined with other toxic substances; for example with carbon monoxide in fire smoke. Cases of pure cyanide poisoning are rare, and usually due to accidental exposure. Their treatment is based on oxygenation and the infusion of hydroxocobalamin. The seriousness of this type of poisoning calls for a rapid and specific response, which demonstrates the usefulness of non-hospital based medical treatment. The authors report here the case of a man who was the victim of occupational poisoning with sodium cyanide and who was treated at the workplace by fire-fighters and the Service Mobile d'Urgence et Reanimation emergency ambulance service. PMID:22674698

  3. Occupational cyanide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Amizet, Loic; Pruvot, Gauthier; Remy, Sophie; Kfoury, Michel

    2011-11-21

    Cyanide poisoning has existed for centuries. In most cases, cyanide is combined with other toxic substances; for example with carbon monoxide in fire smoke. Cases of pure cyanide poisoning are rare, and usually due to accidental exposure. Their treatment is based on oxygenation and the infusion of hydroxocobalamin. The seriousness of this type of poisoning calls for a rapid and specific response, which demonstrates the usefulness of non-hospital based medical treatment. The authors report here the case of a man who was the victim of occupational poisoning with sodium cyanide and who was treated at the workplace by fire-fighters and the Service Mobile d'Urgence et Reanimation emergency ambulance service.

  4. Occupational cyanide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Amizet, Loic; Pruvot, Gauthier; Remy, Sophie; Kfoury, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Cyanide poisoning has existed for centuries. In most cases, cyanide is combined with other toxic substances; for example with carbon monoxide in fire smoke. Cases of pure cyanide poisoning are rare, and usually due to accidental exposure. Their treatment is based on oxygenation and the infusion of hydroxocobalamin. The seriousness of this type of poisoning calls for a rapid and specific response, which demonstrates the usefulness of non-hospital based medical treatment. The authors report here the case of a man who was the victim of occupational poisoning with sodium cyanide and who was treated at the workplace by fire-fighters and the Service Mobile d’Urgence et Reanimation emergency ambulance service. PMID:22674698

  5. Potassium silver cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for potassium silver cyanide is inclu

  6. Electroplating and Cyanide Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpy, Michael F.; Runke, Henry M.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from electroplating industry, covering publications of 1977. This review covers studies such as: (1) ion exchange treatment process; (2) use of reverse osmosis; and (3) cyanide removal and detection. A list of 75 references is also presented. (HM)

  7. Comparison of sampling methods for radiocarbon dating of carbonyls in air samples via accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Matthias; Kretschmer, Wolfgang; Scharf, Andreas; Tschekalinskij, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Three new methods to sample and prepare various carbonyl compounds for radiocarbon measurements were developed and tested. Two of these procedures utilized the Strecker synthetic method to form amino acids from carbonyl compounds with either sodium cyanide or trimethylsilyl cyanide. The third procedure used semicarbazide to form crystalline carbazones with the carbonyl compounds. The resulting amino acids and semicarbazones were then separated and purified using thin layer chromatography. The separated compounds were then combusted to CO2 and reduced to graphite to determine 14C content by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). All of these methods were also compared with the standard carbonyl compound sampling method wherein a compound is derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine and then separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  8. Cyanide Formation by Chromobacterium violaceum

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, Ruth; Corpe, W. A.

    1965-01-01

    Michaels, Ruth (Columbia University, New York, N.Y.), and W. A. Corpe. Cyanide formation by Chromobacterium violaceum. J. Bacteriol. 89:106–112. 1965.—The formation of cyanide by a Chromobacterium violaceum strain was studied with growing cultures and with nonproliferating cells grown in complex and chemically defined media. Most of the cyanide was produced during the log-phase growth of the organism, and accumulated in the culture supernatant fluid. A synergistic effect of glycine and methionine on cyanide formation in a chemically defined medium was observed, and the amount of cyanide formed was found to be dependent on the concentrations of the two substances. Cyanide formation by nonproliferating cells was stimulated by preincubation with glycine and methionine. Cyanide formation by adapted cells in the presence of glycine and methionine was stimulated by succinate, malate, or fumarate, and depressed by azide and 2,4-dinitrophenol. Methionine could be replaced by betaine, dimethylglycine, and choline. PMID:14255648

  9. Light addressable photoelectrochemical cyanide sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, S.; Myung, N.; Sun, Y.

    1996-03-15

    A sensor is demonstrated that is capable of spatial discrimination of cyanide with use of only a single stationary sensing element. Different spatial regions of the sensing element are light activated to reveal the solution cyanide concentration only at the point of illumination. In this light addressable photoelectrochemical (LAP) sensor the sensing element consists of an n-CdSe electrode immersed in solution, with the open-circuit potential determined under illumination. In alkaline ferro-ferri-cyanide solution, the open-circuit photopotential is highly responsive to cyanide, with a linear response of (120 mV) log [KCN]. LAP detection with a spatial resolution of {+-}1 mm for cyanide detection is demonstrated. The response is almost linear for 0.001-0.100 m cyanide with a resolution of 5 mV. 38 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Letter: α,ω,N,N-Dimethylaminoalkylamines as possible derivatization agents for the analysis of small carbonyl compounds by low energy mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhilyaev, Dmitry I; Borisov, Roman S; Polovkov, Nikolai Yu; Zaikin, Vladimir G

    2016-01-01

    Reaction with α,ω-N,N-dimethylaminoalkylamines (2-dimethylaminoethylamine, 3- dimethylaminopropylamine, 4-dimethylaminobutylamine) to form Schiff bases followed by quaternization of the N,N-dimethylamino group by alkyl (deuteroalkyl) halides to generate fixed-charge fragments is suggested for the characterization of carbonyl compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry. As model objects, some aliphatic aldehydes and alicyclic and steroid ketones were involved in the modification. Using gas chromatography mass spectrometry, the first modification stage proved to be quantitative. Not only the MALDI conditions but also the nanostructurized target provided spectra that revealed peaks for the cationic parts of derivatives. It was shown that the use of deuterated alkyl halides allows one to prepare deuterium-labeled standards for possible quantitative analysis. PMID:27553738

  11. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzer, Helen W; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Janszen, Derek B; Carman, April

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  12. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J.; Tomkins, Bruce; Janszen, Derek B.; Carman, April J.

    2012-01-03

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  13. Antidotal action of sodium nitrite and sodium thiosulfate against cyanide poisoning. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, S.I.; Horowitz, A.M.; Nealley, E.W.

    1992-04-01

    The combination of sodium thiosulfate and sodium nitrite has been used in the United States since the 1930s as the primary antidote for cyanide intoxication. Although this combination was shown to exhibit much greater efficacy than either ingredient alone, the two compounds could not be used prophylactically because each exhibits a number of side effects. This review discusses the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and toxicology of the individual agents, and their combination....Cyanide, Blood agent, Chemical warfare agents, Antidotes, Sodium nitrite, Sodium thiosulfate.

  14. Cyanide analyses for risk and treatability assessments

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, I.D.; Elseroad, H.J.; Pergrin, D.E.; Logan, C.M.

    1994-12-31

    Cyanide, an EPA priority pollutant and target analyte, is typically measured as total. However, cyanide complexation, information which is not acquired through total cyanide analysis, is often a driver of cyanide toxicity and treatability. A case study of a former manufacture gas plant (MGP) is used to demonstrate the usability of various cyanide analytical methods for risk and treatability assessments. Several analytical methods, including cyanide amenable to chlorination and weak acid dissociable cyanide help test the degree of cyanide complexation. Generally, free or uncomplexed cyanide is more biologically available, toxic, and reactive than complexed cyanide. Extensive site testing has shown that free and weakly dissociable cyanide composes only a small fraction of total cyanide as would be expected from the literature, and that risk assessment will be more realistic considering cyanide form. Likewise, aqueous treatment for cyanide can be properly tested if cyanide form is accounted for. Weak acid dissociable cyanide analyses proved to be the most reliable (and potentially acceptable) cyanide method, as well as represent the most toxic and reactive cyanide forms.

  15. Triazole linked mono carbonyl curcumin-isatin bifunctional hybrids as novel anti tubulin agents: Design, synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sahil; Gupta, Manish K; Saxena, Ajit K; Bedi, Preet Mohinder S

    2015-11-15

    Keeping in view the limitations associated with currently available anticancer drugs, molecular hybrids of mono carbonyl curcumin and isatin tethered by triazole ring have been synthesized and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against THP-1, COLO-205, HCT-116, A549, HeLa, CAKI-I, PC-3, MiaPaca-2 human cancer cell lines. The results revealed that the compounds SA-1 to SA-9, SB-2, SB-3, SB-4, SB-7 and SC-2 showed a good range of IC50 values against THP-1, COLO-205, HCT-116 and PC-3 cell lines, while the other four cell lines among these were found to be almost resistant. Structure activity relationship revealed that the nature of Ring X and substitution at position R influences the activity. Methoxy substituted phenyl ring as Ring X and H as R were found to be the ideal structural features. The most potent compounds (SA-2, SA-3, SA-4, SA-7) were further tested for tubulin inhibition. Compound SA-2 was found to significantly inhibit the tubulin polymerization (IC50=1.2 μM against HCT-116). Compound SA-2, moreover, lead to the disruption of microtubules as confirmed by immunofluorescence technique. The significant cytotoxicity and tubulin inhibition by SA-2 was streamlined by molecular modeling studies where it was docked at the curcumin binding site of tubulin.

  16. Triazole linked mono carbonyl curcumin-isatin bifunctional hybrids as novel anti tubulin agents: Design, synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sahil; Gupta, Manish K; Saxena, Ajit K; Bedi, Preet Mohinder S

    2015-11-15

    Keeping in view the limitations associated with currently available anticancer drugs, molecular hybrids of mono carbonyl curcumin and isatin tethered by triazole ring have been synthesized and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity against THP-1, COLO-205, HCT-116, A549, HeLa, CAKI-I, PC-3, MiaPaca-2 human cancer cell lines. The results revealed that the compounds SA-1 to SA-9, SB-2, SB-3, SB-4, SB-7 and SC-2 showed a good range of IC50 values against THP-1, COLO-205, HCT-116 and PC-3 cell lines, while the other four cell lines among these were found to be almost resistant. Structure activity relationship revealed that the nature of Ring X and substitution at position R influences the activity. Methoxy substituted phenyl ring as Ring X and H as R were found to be the ideal structural features. The most potent compounds (SA-2, SA-3, SA-4, SA-7) were further tested for tubulin inhibition. Compound SA-2 was found to significantly inhibit the tubulin polymerization (IC50=1.2 μM against HCT-116). Compound SA-2, moreover, lead to the disruption of microtubules as confirmed by immunofluorescence technique. The significant cytotoxicity and tubulin inhibition by SA-2 was streamlined by molecular modeling studies where it was docked at the curcumin binding site of tubulin. PMID:26515041

  17. Sulfanegen Sodium Treatment in a Rabbit Model of Sub-Lethal Cyanide Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Matthew; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Jangwoen; Mahon, Sari B.; Lemor, Daniel; Ahdout, Rebecca; Boss, Gerry R.; Blackledge, William; Jann, Lauren; Nagasawa, Herbert T.; Patterson, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of intramuscular and intravenous sulfanegen sodium treatment to reverse cyanide effects in a rabbit model as a potential treatment for mass casualty resulting from cyanide exposure. Cyanide poisoning is a serious chemical threat from accidental or intentional exposures. Current cyanide exposure treatments, including direct binding agents, methemoglobin donors, and sulfur donors, have several limitations. Non-rhodanese mediated sulfur transferase pathways, including 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MPST) catalyze the transfer of sulfur from 3-MP to cyanide, forming pyruvate and less toxic thiocyanate. We developed a water soluble 3-MP prodrug, 3-mercaptopyruvatedithiane (sulfanegen sodium), with the potential to provide a continuous supply of substrate for CN detoxification. In addition to developing a mass casualty cyanide reversal agent, methods are needed to rapidly and reliably diagnose and monitor cyanide poisoning and reversal. We use non-invasive technology, diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS) to monitor physiologic changes associated with cyanide exposure and reversal. A total of 35 animals were studied. Sulfanegen sodium was shown to reverse the effects of cyanide exposure on oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin rapidly, significantly faster than control animals when administered by intravenous or intramuscular routes. RBC cyanide levels also returned to normal faster following both intramuscular and intravenous sulfanegen sodium treatment than controls. These studies demonstrate the clinical potential for the novel approach of supplying substrate for non-rhodanese mediated sulfur transferase pathways for cyanide detoxification. DOS and CWNIRS demonstrated their usefulness in optimizing the dose of sulfanegen sodium treatment. PMID:20705081

  18. Sulfanegen sodium treatment in a rabbit model of sub-lethal cyanide toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, Matthew; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Jangwoen; Mahon, Sari B.; Lemor, Daniel; Ahdout, Rebecca; Boss, Gerry R.; Blackledge, William; Jann, Lauren; Nagasawa, Herbert T.; Patterson, Steven E.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of intramuscular and intravenous sulfanegen sodium treatment to reverse cyanide effects in a rabbit model as a potential treatment for mass casualty resulting from cyanide exposure. Cyanide poisoning is a serious chemical threat from accidental or intentional exposures. Current cyanide exposure treatments, including direct binding agents, methemoglobin donors, and sulfur donors, have several limitations. Non-rhodanese mediated sulfur transferase pathways, including 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MPST) catalyze the transfer of sulfur from 3-MP to cyanide, forming pyruvate and less toxic thiocyanate. We developed a water-soluble 3-MP prodrug, 3-mercaptopyruvatedithiane (sulfanegen sodium), with the potential to provide a continuous supply of substrate for CN detoxification. In addition to developing a mass casualty cyanide reversal agent, methods are needed to rapidly and reliably diagnose and monitor cyanide poisoning and reversal. We use non-invasive technology, diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS) to monitor physiologic changes associated with cyanide exposure and reversal. A total of 35 animals were studied. Sulfanegen sodium was shown to reverse the effects of cyanide exposure on oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin rapidly, significantly faster than control animals when administered by intravenous or intramuscular routes. RBC cyanide levels also returned to normal faster following both intramuscular and intravenous sulfanegen sodium treatment than controls. These studies demonstrate the clinical potential for the novel approach of supplying substrate for non-rhodanese mediated sulfur transferase pathways for cyanide detoxification. DOS and CWNIRS demonstrated their usefulness in optimizing the dose of sulfanegen sodium treatment.

  19. COATING URANIUM FROM CARBONYLS

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.; Storrs, S.S.

    1959-07-14

    Methods are described for making adherent corrosion resistant coatings on uranium metal. According to the invention, the uranium metal is heated in the presence of an organometallic compound such as the carbonyls of nickel, molybdenum, chromium, niobium, and tungsten at a temperature sufficient to decompose the metal carbonyl and dry plate the resultant free metal on the surface of the uranium metal body. The metal coated body is then further heated at a higher temperature to thermally diffuse the coating metal within the uranium bcdy.

  20. Synthesis of α,β-Unsaturated Carbonyl-Based Compounds, Oxime and Oxime Ether Analogs as Potential Anticancer Agents for Overcoming Cancer Multidrug Resistance by Modulation of Efflux Pumps in Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hua-Li; Leng, Jing; Zhang, Cheng-Pan; Jantan, Ibrahim; Amjad, Muhammad Wahab; Sher, Muhammad; Naeem-Ul-Hassan, Muhammad; Hussain, Muhammad Ajaz; Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas

    2016-04-14

    Sixty-nine novel α,β-unsaturated carbonyl based compounds, including cyclohexanone, tetralone, oxime, and oxime ether analogs, were synthesized. The antiproliferative activity determined by using seven different human cancer cell lines provided a structure-activity relationship. Compound 8ag exhibited high antiproliferative activity against Panc-1, PaCa-2, A-549, and PC-3 cell lines, with IC50 value of 0.02 μM, comparable to the positive control Erlotinib. The ten most active antiproliferative compounds were assessed for mechanistic effects on BRAF(V600E), EGFR TK kinases, and tubulin polymerization, and were investigated in vitro to reverse efflux-mediated resistance developed by cancer cells. Compound 8af exhibited the most potent BRAF(V600E) inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.9 μM. Oxime analog 7o displayed the most potent EGFR TK inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 0.07 μM, which was analogous to the positive control. Some analogs including 7f, 8af, and 8ag showed a dual role as anticancer and MDR reversal agents.

  1. Cyanide hydratases and cyanide dihydratases: emerging tools in the biodegradation and biodetection of cyanide.

    PubMed

    Martínková, Ludmila; Veselá, Alicja Barbara; Rinágelová, Anna; Chmátal, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to summarize the current knowledge of the enzymes which are involved in the hydrolysis of cyanide, i.e., cyanide hydratases (CHTs; EC 4.2.1.66) and cyanide dihydratases (CynD; EC 3.5.5.1). CHTs are probably exclusively produced by filamentous fungi and widely occur in these organisms; in contrast, CynDs were only found in a few bacterial genera. CHTs differ from CynDs in their reaction products (formamide vs. formic acid and ammonia, respectively). Several CHTs were also found to transform nitriles but with lower relative activities compared to HCN. Mutants of CynDs and CHTs were constructed to study the structure-activity relationships in these enzymes or to improve their catalytic properties. The effect of the C-terminal part of the protein on the enzyme activity was determined by constructing the corresponding deletion mutants. CynDs are less active at alkaline pH than CHTs. To improve its bioremediation potential, CynD from Bacillus pumilus was engineered by directed evolution combined with site-directed mutagenesis, and its operation at pH 10 was thus enabled. Some of the enzymes have been tested for their potential to eliminate cyanide from cyanide-containing wastewaters. CynDs were also used to construct cyanide biosensors.

  2. Carbonyl stress and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Arai, Makoto; Miyashita, Mitsuhiro; Kobori, Akiko; Toriumi, Kazuya; Horiuchi, Yasue; Itokawa, Masanari

    2014-09-01

    Appropriate biological treatment and psychosocial support are essential to achieve and maintain recovery for patients with schizophrenia. Despite extensive efforts to clarify the underlying disease mechanisms, the main cause and pathophysiology of schizophrenia remain unclear. This is due in large part to disease heterogeneity, which results in biochemical differences within a single disease entity. Other factors include variability across clinical symptoms and disease course, along with varied risk factors and treatment responses. Although schizophrenia's positive symptoms are largely managed through treatment with atypical antipsychotics, new classes of drugs are needed to address the unmet medical need for improving cognitive dysfunction and promoting recovery of negative symptoms in these patients. Accumulation of toxic reactive dicarbonyls, such as methylglyoxal, are typical indicators of carbonyl stress, and result in the modification of proteins and the formation of advanced glycation end products, such as pentosidine. In June 2010, we reported on idiopathic carbonyl stress in a subpopulation of schizophrenia patients, leading to a failure of metabolic systems with plasma pentosidine accumulation and serum pyridoxal depletion. Our findings suggest two markers, pentosidine and pyridoxal, as beneficial for distinguishing a specific subgroup of schizophrenics. We believe that this information, derived from in vitro and in vivo studies, is beneficial in the search for personalized and hopefully more effective treatment regimens in schizophrenia. Here, we define a subtype of schizophrenia based on carbonyl stress and the potential for using carbonyl stress as a biomarker in the challenge of overcoming heterogeneity in schizophrenia treatment. PMID:24995521

  3. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Cyanide is a life-threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species. This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain barrier to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. Cyanide, a potential bioterrorist agent, can produce a chronic delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Here, cyanide poisoning treated with the proelectrophillic compound carnosic acid, results in reduced neuronal cell death in both in vitro and in vivo models through activation of the Nrf2/ARE transcriptional pathway. Carnosic acid is therefore a potential treatment for the toxic central nervous system (CNS) effects of cyanide poisoning. ARE, antioxidant responsive element; Nrf2 (NFE2L2, Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2).

  4. Bioavailability of cyanide and metal-cyanide mixtures to aquatic life.

    PubMed

    Redman, Aaron; Santore, Robert

    2012-08-01

    Cyanide can be toxic to aquatic organisms, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed ambient water-quality criteria to protect aquatic life. Recent work suggests that considering free, rather than total, cyanide provides a more accurate measure of the biological effects of cyanides and provides a basis for water-quality criteria. Aquatic organisms are sensitive to free cyanide, although certain metals can form stable complexes and reduce the amount of free cyanide. As a result, total cyanide is less toxic when complexing metals are present. Cyanide is often present in complex effluents, which requires understanding how other components within these complex effluents can affect cyanide speciation and bioavailability. The authors have developed a model to predict the aqueous speciation of cyanide and have shown that this model can predict the toxicity of metal-cyanide complexes in terms of free cyanide in solutions with varying water chemistry. Toxicity endpoints based on total cyanide ranged over several orders of magnitude for various metal-cyanide mixtures. However, predicted free cyanide concentrations among these same tests described the observed toxicity data to within a factor of 2. Aquatic toxicity can be well-described using free cyanide, and under certain conditions the toxicity was jointly described by free cyanide and elevated levels of bioavailable metals.

  5. CYANIDE HEAP BILOGICAL DETOXIFICATION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many active mine sites, mines in closure stage and some abandoned mines are and have utilized cyanidation to remove and recover precious metals. Discharges from these sites normally contain significant amounts of metal cyanide complexes and concentrations of thiocyanate, soluble...

  6. Antidotes for acute cyanide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Borron, Stephen W; Baud, Frederic J

    2012-08-01

    Cyanide poisoning can present in multiple ways, given its widespread industrial use, presence in combustion products, multiple physical forms, and chemical structures. The primary target of toxicity is mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase. The onset and severity of poisoning depend on the route, dose, physicochemical structure and other variables. Common poisoning features include dyspnea, altered respiratory patterns, abnormal vital signs, altered mental status, seizures, and lactic acidosis. Our present knowledge supports cyanide poisoning treatment based on excellent supportive care with adjunctive antidotal therapy. Multiple antidotes exist and vary in regional availability. All currently marketed antidotes appear to be effective. Antidotal mechanisms include chelation, formation of stable, less toxic complexes, methemoglobin induction, and sulfane sulfur supplementation for detoxification by endogenous rhodanese. Each antidote has advantages and disadvantages. For example, hydroxocobalamin is safer than the methemoglobin inducers in patients with smoke inhalation. Research for new, safer and more effective cyanide antidotes continues.

  7. THE METAL CARBONYLS.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, A A

    1941-10-01

    When the metal carbonyls were first discovered, their properties were startling because they seemed to violate nearly all the previously recognized generalizations of chemistry. Even to-day the existence of the carbonyls is not particularly emphasized in elementary courses of chemistry because it is rather hard to reconcile them with the first presentations of the generalizations of chemistry. Nevertheless, as the student progresses deeper into the knowledge of chemistry it becomes desirable to include the knowledge of the carbonyls both because they become more comprehensible when viewed in the light of Werner's system of coordination and because they themselves contribute to the comprehension of the Werner theory. As long ago as 1931, Reiff in his discussion of cobalt nitrosyl carbonyl recognized the correlation between the effective atomic number and the volatility of carbonyls. A more recent study of charged Werner coordination complexes, that is, of complex ions, has shown a similar role of the effective atomic number. We are standing on fairly firm ground when we point out the correlation between E.A.N. and the volatility of the carbonyl complexes and the existence of complex ions. Be it noted that we have made no postulates as to the arrangement of the electrons in quantum levels. In the inert gases the outer principal quantum group is supposed always to contain eight electrons. In the carbonyls and other Werner complexes there is no compelling reason to suppose that the electrons in the coordinating layer, be this layer of eight, ten, twelve or sixteen electrons, are not all at the same energy level. Although we have confined our discussion almost exclusively to the property of volatility, the carbonyls are very interesting from the standpoint of several other properties, for example, magnetic susceptibility and dielectric constant. Enthusiasts in the interpretation of such properties try to draw conclusions as to the condition of the electrons, sometimes

  8. Solar-Assisted Oxidation of Toxic Cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Miles, A.

    1985-01-01

    In solar-assisted oxidation technique, oxygen-bearing air bubbled through cyanide solution in which platinized powdered TiO2 is suspended. Light from either artifical source or natural Sunlight irradiates. Experiments demonstrated this technique effective in reducing concentration of cyanide to levels well below those achieved by other methods. Results suggest effective and inexpensive method for oxidizing cyanide in industrial wastewaters.

  9. 2-(3-{1-Carboxy-5-[(6-[18F]fluoro-pyridine-3-carbonyl)-amino]-pentyl}-ureido)-pentanedioic acid, [18F]DCFPyL, a PSMA-based PET Imaging Agent for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Foss, Catherine A.; Byun, Youngjoo; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Srinivasan, Senthamil; Sgouros, George; Mease, Ronnie C.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We have synthesized and evaluated in vivo 2-(3-{1-carboxy-5-[(6-[18F]fluoro-pyridine-3-carbonyl)-amino]-pentyl}-ureido)-pentanedioic acid, [18F]DCFPyL, as a potential imaging agent for the prostate-specific membrane antigen, PSMA. PSMA is upregulated in prostate cancer epithelia as well as in the neovasculature of most solid tumors. Experimental Design [18F]DCFPyL was synthesized in two steps from the p-methoxybenzyl (PMB) protected lys-C(O)-glu urea precursor using 6-[18F]fluoronicotinic acid tetrafluorophenyl ester ([18F]F-Py-TFP) for introduction of 18F. Radiochemical synthesis was followed by biodistribution and imaging with PET in immunocompromised mice using isogenic PC3 PSMA+ and PSMA− xenograft models. Human radiation dosimetry estimates were calculated using OLINDA/EXM 1.0. Results DCFPyL displays a Ki value of 1.1 ± 0.1 nM for PSMA. [18F]DCFPyL was produced in radiochemical yields of 36-53% (decay corrected) and specific radioactivities of 340 – 480 Ci/mmol (12.6 – 17.8 GBq/μmol, n = 3). In an immunocompromised mouse model [18F]DCFPyL clearly delineated PSMA+ PC3 PIP prostate tumor xenografts on imaging with PET. At 2 h post-injection, 39.4 ± 5.4 percent injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g) was evident within the PIP tumor, with a ratio of 358:1 of uptake within PIP to PSMA− PC3 flu tumor placed in the opposite flank. At or after 1 h post-injection, minimal non-target tissue uptake of [18F]DCFPyL was observed. The bladder wall is the dose-limiting organ. Conclusions These data suggest [18F]DCFPyL as a viable, new positron-emitting imaging agent for PSMA-expressing tissues. PMID:22042970

  10. Cyanide-insensitive Respiration in Pea Cotyledons.

    PubMed

    James, T W; Spencer, M S

    1979-09-01

    Mitochondria isolated by a zonal procedure from the cotyledons of germinating peas possessed a cyanide-resistant respiration. This respiration was virtually absent in mitochondria isolated during the first 24 hours of germination but thereafter increased gradually until the 6th or 7th day of seedling development. At this time between 15 and 20% of the succinate oxidation was not inhibited by cyanide. The activity of the cyanide-resistant respiration was also determined in the absence of cyanide. Relationships among mitochondrial structure, cyanide-resistant respiration, and seedling development are discussed.

  11. Detection of interstellar ethyl cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Lovas, F. J.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Gottlieb, E. W.; Litvak, M. M.; Thaddeus, P.; Guelin, M.

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-four millimeter-wave emission lines of ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN) have been detected in the Orion Nebula (OMC-1) and seven in Sgr B2. To derive precise radial velocities from the astronomical data, a laboratory measurement of the rotational spectrum of ethyl cyanide has been made at frequencies above 41 GHz. In OMC-1, the rotational temperature of ethyl cyanide is 90 K (in good agreement with other molecules), the local-standard-of-rest radial velocity is 4.5 + or - 1.0 km/s (versus 8.5 km/s for most molecules), and the column density is 1.8 by 10 to the 14th power per sq cm (a surprisingly high figure for a complicated molecule). The high abundance of ethyl cyanide in the Orion Nebula suggests that ethane and perhaps larger saturated hydrocarbons may be common constituents of molecular clouds and have escaped detection only because they are nonpolar or only weakly polar.

  12. The oxidative disposition of potassium cyanide in mice.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J D; Isom, G E

    1985-12-01

    The role of oxidative metabolism in the disposition of potassium cyanide (KCN), was investigated in mice administered KCN, (4.6 mg/kg, s.c.) containing 4.5 microCi [14C]KCN. The expired pulmonary metabolites, [14C]hydrocyanic acid (HCN) and 14CO2, were collected and analyzed. Approximately 1% and 2% of the KCN dose was expired as [14C]HCN and 14CO2, respectively. Expiration of the pulmonary metabolites was decreased following pretreatment with sodium nitrite, sodium thiosulfate, oxygen, or a combination of cyanide antidotes. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide lowered the amount of [14C]HCN expired and did not alter the expiration of 14CO2. Treatment with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (catalase inhibitor), superoxide dismutase, or diethyldithiocarbamic acid (superoxide dismutase inhibitor) did not change the amount of [14C]HCN expired. However, superoxide dismutase significantly increased the amount of 14CO2 expired, whereas diethyldithiocarbamic acid decreased 14CO2 expiration. The results from these studies suggest that in vivo cyanide can be oxidized to CO2 and treatment with agents that alter the availability of endogenous superoxide and/or hydrogen peroxide can alter the rate of cyanide oxidation. PMID:3000027

  13. A disposable blood cyanide sensor.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yong; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Mahon, Sari B; Ma, Jian; Brenner, Matthew; Wang, Jian-Hua; Boss, Gerry R

    2013-03-20

    Deaths due to smoke inhalation in fires are often due to poisoning by HCN. Rapid administration of antidotes can result in complete resuscitation of the patient but judicious dosing requires the knowledge of the level of cyanide exposure. Rapid sensitive means for blood cyanide quantitation are needed. Hydroxocyanocobinamide (OH(CN)Cbi) reacts with cyanide rapidly; this is accompanied by a large spectral change. The disposable device consists of a pair of nested petri dish bottoms and a single top that fits the outer bottom dish. The top cover has a diametrically strung porous polypropylene membrane tube filled with aqueous OH(CN)Cbi. One end of the tube terminates in an amber (583nm) light emitting diode; the other end in a photodiode via an acrylic optical fiber. An aliquot of the blood sample is put in the inner dish, the assembly covered and acid is added through a port in the cover. Evolved HCN diffuses into the OH(CN)Cbi solution and the absorbance in the long path porous membrane tube cell is measured within 160 s. The LOD was 0.047, 1.0, 0.15, 5.0 and 2.2 μM, respectively, for water (1 mL), bovine blood (100 μL, 1 mL), and rabbit blood (20 μL, 50 μL). RSDs were<10% in all cases and the linear range extended from 0.5 to 200 μM. The method was validated against a microdiffusion approach and applied to the measurement of cyanide in rabbit and human blood. The disposable device permits field measurement of blood cyanide in <4 min.

  14. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R.; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is a life threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain-barrier to upregulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino (NSA) mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. PMID:25692407

  15. Optimization of cyanide extraction from wastewater using emulsion liquid membrane system by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Xue, Juan Qin; Liu, Ni Na; Li, Guo Ping; Dang, Long Tao

    2016-01-01

    To solve the disposal problem of cyanide wastewater, removal of cyanide from wastewater using a water-in-oil emulsion type of emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) was studied in this work. Specifically, the effects of surfactant Span-80, carrier trioctylamine (TOA), stripping agent NaOH solution and the emulsion-to-external-phase-volume ratio on removal of cyanide were investigated. Removal of total cyanide was determined using the silver nitrate titration method. Regression analysis and optimization of the conditions were conducted using the Design-Expert software and response surface methodology (RSM). The actual cyanide removals and the removals predicted using RSM analysis were in close agreement, and the optimal conditions were determined to be as follows: the volume fraction of Span-80, 4% (v/v); the volume fraction of TOA, 4% (v/v); the concentration of NaOH, 1% (w/v); and the emulsion-to-external-phase volume ratio, 1:7. Under the optimum conditions, the removal of total cyanide was 95.07%, and the RSM predicted removal was 94.90%, with a small exception. The treatment of cyanide wastewater using an ELM is an effective technique for application in industry. PMID:27533852

  16. Cyanide inactivation of hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii

    SciTech Connect

    Seefeldt, L.C.; Arp, D.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The effects of cyanide on membrane-associated and purified hydrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii were characterized. Inactivation of hydrogenase by cyanide was dependent on the activity (oxidation) state of the enzyme. Active (reduced) hydrogenase showed no inactivation when treated with cyanide over several hours. Treatment of reversibly inactive (oxidized) states of both membrane-associated and purified hydrogenase, however, resulted in a time-dependent, irreversible loss of hydrogenase activity. The rate of cyanide inactivation was dependent on the cyanide concentration and was an apparent first-order process for purified enzyme (bimolecular rate constant, 23.1 M{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} for CN{sup {minus}}). The rate of inactivation decreased with decreasing pH. ({sup 14}C)cyanide remained associated with cyanide-inactivated hydrogenase after gel filtration chromatography, with a stoichiometry of 1.7 mol of cyanide bound per mol of inactive enzyme. The presence of saturating concentrations of CO had no effect on the rate or extent of cyanide inactivation of hydrogenases. The results indicate that cyanide can cause a time-dependent, irreversible inactivation of hydrogenase in the oxidized, activatable state but has no effect when hydrogenase is in the reduced, active state.

  17. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity☆

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, N.; Cavaille, J.P.; Graziani, F.; Robin, M.; Ouari, O.; Pietri, S.; Stocker, P.

    2014-01-01

    Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal. PMID:24688895

  18. High throughput assay for evaluation of reactive carbonyl scavenging capacity.

    PubMed

    Vidal, N; Cavaille, J P; Graziani, F; Robin, M; Ouari, O; Pietri, S; Stocker, P

    2014-01-01

    Many carbonyl species from either lipid peroxidation or glycoxidation are extremely reactive and can disrupt the function of proteins and enzymes. 4-hydroxynonenal and methylglyoxal are the most abundant and toxic lipid-derived reactive carbonyl species. The presence of these toxics leads to carbonyl stress and cause a significant amount of macromolecular damages in several diseases. Much evidence indicates trapping of reactive carbonyl intermediates may be a useful strategy for inhibiting or decreasing carbonyl stress-associated pathologies. There is no rapid and convenient analytical method available for the assessment of direct carbonyl scavenging capacity, and a very limited number of carbonyl scavengers have been identified to date, their therapeutic potential being highlighted only recently. In this context, we have developed a new and rapid sensitive fluorimetric method for the assessment of reactive carbonyl scavengers without involvement glycoxidation systems. Efficacy of various thiol- and non-thiol-carbonyl scavenger pharmacophores was tested both using this screening assay adapted to 96-well microplates and in cultured cells. The scavenging effects on the formation of Advanced Glycation End-product of Bovine Serum Albumin formed with methylglyoxal, 4-hydroxynonenal and glucose-glycated as molecular models were also examined. Low molecular mass thiols with an α-amino-β-mercaptoethane structure showed the highest degree of inhibitory activity toward both α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyls. Cysteine and cysteamine have the best scavenging ability toward methylglyoxal. WR-1065 which is currently approved for clinical use as a protective agent against radiation and renal toxicity was identified as the best inhibitor of 4-hydroxynonenal.

  19. In situ treatment of cyanide-contaminated groundwater by iron cyanide precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.; Luthy, R.G.; Smith, J.R.

    1999-10-01

    Groundwater contamination with cyanide is common at many former or active industrial sites. Metal-cyanide complexes typically dominate aqueous speciation of cyanide in groundwater systems, with iron-cyanide complexes often most abundant. Typically, metal-cyanide complexes behave as nonadsorbing solutes in sand-gravel aquifer systems in the neutral pH range, rendering cyanide relatively mobile in groundwater systems. Groundwater pump-and-treat systems have often been used to manage cyanide contamination in groundwater. This study examined the feasibility of using in situ precipitation of iron cyanide in a reactive barrier to attenuate the movement of cyanide in groundwater. Laboratory column experiments were performed in which cyanide solutions were passed through mixtures of sand and elemental iron filings. Removal of dissolved cyanide was evaluated in a variety of cyanide-containing influents under various flow rates and sand-to-iron weight ratios. Long-term column tests performed with various cyanide-containing influents under both oxic and anoxic conditions, at neutral pH and at flow rates typical of sand-gravel porous media, yielded effluent concentrations of total cyanide as low as 0.5 mg/L. Effluent cyanide concentrations achieved were close to the solubilities of Turnbull's blue-hydrous ferric oxide solid solutions, indicating co-precipitation of the two solids. Maximum cyanide removal efficiency was achieved with approximately 10% by weight of iron in the sand-iron mixtures; higher iron contents did not increase removal efficiency significantly. Results obtained indicate that in situ precipitation is a promising passive treatment approach for cyanide in groundwater.

  20. Regioselective Acylation of Diols and Triols: The Cyanide Effect.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Linseis, Michael; Winter, Rainer F; Schmidt, Richard R

    2016-05-11

    Central topics of carbohydrate chemistry embrace structural modifications of carbohydrates and oligosaccharide synthesis. Both require regioselectively protected building blocks that are mainly available via indirect multistep procedures. Hence, direct protection methods targeting a specific hydroxy group are demanded. Dual hydrogen bonding will eventually differentiate between differently positioned hydroxy groups. As cyanide is capable of various kinds of hydrogen bonding and as it is a quite strong sterically nondemanding base, regioselective O-acylations should be possible at low temperatures even at sterically congested positions, thus permitting formation and also isolation of the kinetic product. Indeed, 1,2-cis-diols, having an equatorial and an axial hydroxy group, benzoyl cyanide or acetyl cyanide as an acylating agent, and DMAP as a catalyst yield at -78 °C the thermodynamically unfavorable axial O-acylation product; acyl migration is not observed under these conditions. This phenomenon was substantiated with 3,4-O-unproteced galacto- and fucopyranosides and 2,3-O-unprotected mannopyranosides. Even for 3,4,6-O-unprotected galactopyranosides as triols, axial 4-O-acylation is appreciably faster than O-acylation of the primary 6-hydroxy group. The importance of hydrogen bonding for this unusual regioselectivity could be confirmed by NMR studies and DFT calculations, which indicate favorable hydrogen bonding of cyanide to the most acidic axial hydroxy group supported by hydrogen bonding of the equatorial hydroxy group to the axial oxygen. Thus, the "cyanide effect" is due to dual hydrogen bonding of the axial hydroxy group which enhances the nucleophilicity of the respective oxygen atom, permitting an even faster reaction for diols than for mono-ols. In contrast, fluoride as a counterion favors dual hydrogen bonding to both hydroxy groups leading to equatorial O-acylation. PMID:27104625

  1. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts (2010 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanide compounds are used in a number of industrial processes including mining, electroplating, metallurgy, chemical manufacturing, and photography because these compounds can form stable complexes with a range of metals. Hydrogen cyanide is also a component of tobacco smoke, v...

  2. Dinosaurs victims of cyanide poisoning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Talbot A.

    The Eos article, Comets and Life (March 28, 1989), reports on the work of Paul Thomas, Christophere Chyba, Carl Sagan and Leigh Brookshaw on cometary impact production of cyanides and other organics that may have been precursors of life. The article was based on material presented at the 20th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference [Thomas et al, 1989].As pointed out in the article, comets may contain 20% organic matter in the form of a complex interbonded mass. This kerogen-like material contains CN bonds as well as CC and CO bonds. Evidence for cyanide protection from light-element “CHON” solids was observed in the recent Halley's comet encounter in the form of CN plumes [Eberhardt et al., 1986; Schlosser et al., 1986]. An additional, and possibly more important source of cyanide, is HCN, which was observed [Schloerb et al., 1986] to be emitted from Halley's comet as part of the normal neutral gas emission with an abundance equal to 10-3 that of H2O. H2O is the dominant volatile species in comets and appears to constitute 80% or more of the total molecular release [Mendis, 1986].

  3. Assay development status report for total cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, B.C.; Jones, T.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-02-01

    A validated cyanide assay that is applicable to a variety of tank waste matrices is necessary to resolve certain waste tank safety issues and for purposes of overall waste characterization. The target for this effort is an assay with an applicable range of greater than 1,000 ppM (0.10 wt%) total cyanide and a confidence level greater than 80%. Figure 1 illustrates the operating regime of the proposed cyanide assay method. The Assay Development Status Report for Total Cyanide will summarize the past experience with cyanide analyses on-tank waste matrices and will rate the status of the analytical methods used to assay total cyanide (CN{sup {minus}} ion) in the tank waste matrices as acceptable or unacceptable. This paper will also briefly describe the current efforts for improving analytical resolution of the assays and the attempts at speciation.

  4. Age-related carbonyl stress and erythrocyte membrane protein carbonylation.

    PubMed

    Li, Guolin; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Zhao, Qiong; Xie, Fuxia; Chen, Keke; Liu, Shenglin; Chen, Yaqin; Shi, Wang; Yin, Dazhong

    2010-01-01

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) have been widely used as indicators of oxidative stress. However, the associations of carbonyl stress with aging process and biochemical alteration of erythrocyte are still poorly understood. Fresh blood samples in vacutainer tubes containing sodium heparinate were obtained from 874 volunteers who were divided into young, adult and old groups based on their age. Plasma RCS and thiols concentrations between different age groups and erythrocyte membrane protein carbonylation in the adult group were detected within 24h of the blood sampling. Results showed that the plasma thiols concentration decreased gradually during aging process, and the p-values between all three groups are less than 0.05. The plasma RCS concentration in different age groups showed a nonlinear association with age. The levels in the young group were slightly higher than the adult group (not significant) and lower than the old group (p < 0.01). The protein carbonylation of erythrocyte membrane was positively correlated with plasma RCS concentration (p < 0.01), but not plasma thiols concentration. We conclude that higher levels of RCS, not lower levels of thiols, in plasma are a direct risk factor for the protein carbonylation of erythrocyte membrane. Owing to the decrease of thiols levels and increase of RCS levels during aging process, a shift from RCS-related redox allostasis to carbonyl stress would contribute to age-related biological dysfunction and even aging process.

  5. Sodium thiosulfate or hydroxocobalamin for the empiric treatment of cyanide poisoning?

    PubMed

    Hall, Alan H; Dart, Richard; Bogdan, Gregory

    2007-06-01

    Cyanide poisoning must be seriously considered in victims of smoke inhalation from enclosed space fires; it is also a credible terrorism threat agent. The treatment of cyanide poisoning is empiric because laboratory confirmation can take hours or days. Empiric treatment requires a safe and effective antidote that can be rapidly administered by either out-of-hospital or emergency department personnel. Among several cyanide antidotes available, sodium thiosulfate and hydroxocobalamin have been proposed for use in these circumstances. The evidence available to assess either sodium thiosulfate or hydroxocobalamin is incomplete. According to recent safety and efficacy studies in animals and human safety and uncontrolled efficacy studies, hydroxocobalamin seems to be an appropriate antidote for empiric treatment of smoke inhalation and other suspected cyanide poisoning victims in the out-of-hospital setting. Sodium thiosulfate can also be administered in the out-of-hospital setting. The efficacy of sodium thiosulfate is based on individual case studies, and there are contradictory conclusions about efficacy in animal models. The onset of antidotal action of sodium thiosulfate may be too slow for it to be the only cyanide antidote for emergency use. Hydroxocobalamin is being developed for potential introduction in the United States and may represent a new option for emergency personnel in cases of suspected or confirmed cyanide poisoning in the out-of-hospital setting. PMID:17098327

  6. Source Attribution of Cyanides Using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S; Fraga, Carlos G; Carman, April J; Moran, James J

    2016-02-01

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs), such as cyanides, are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. Herein, stocks of KCN and NaCN were analyzed for trace anions by high performance ion chromatography (HPIC), carbon stable isotope ratio (δ(13)C) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The collected analytical data were evaluated using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least-squares (iPLS), genetic algorithm-based partial least-squares (GAPLS), partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminant analysis (SVMDA). HCA of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported countries of origin resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries each having one known solid cyanide factory: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). Classification errors for two validation studies using anion impurity profiles collected over five years on different instruments were as low as zero for KNN and SVMDA, demonstrating the excellent reliability associated with using anion impurities for matching a cyanide sample to its factory using our current cyanide stocks. Variable selection methods reduced errors for those classification methods having errors greater than zero; iPLS-forward selection and F-ratio typically provided the lowest errors. Finally, using anion profiles to classify cyanides to a specific stock

  7. Source Attribution of Cyanides Using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S; Fraga, Carlos G; Carman, April J; Moran, James J

    2016-02-01

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs), such as cyanides, are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. Herein, stocks of KCN and NaCN were analyzed for trace anions by high performance ion chromatography (HPIC), carbon stable isotope ratio (δ(13)C) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The collected analytical data were evaluated using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least-squares (iPLS), genetic algorithm-based partial least-squares (GAPLS), partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminant analysis (SVMDA). HCA of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported countries of origin resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries each having one known solid cyanide factory: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). Classification errors for two validation studies using anion impurity profiles collected over five years on different instruments were as low as zero for KNN and SVMDA, demonstrating the excellent reliability associated with using anion impurities for matching a cyanide sample to its factory using our current cyanide stocks. Variable selection methods reduced errors for those classification methods having errors greater than zero; iPLS-forward selection and F-ratio typically provided the lowest errors. Finally, using anion profiles to classify cyanides to a specific stock

  8. CYANIDE HEAP BIOLOGICAL DETOXIFICATION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many active mine sites, mines in the closure stage and some abandoned mines are and have utilized cyanidation to remove and recover precious metals. Discharges from these sites normally contain significant amounts of metal cyanide complexes and concentrations of thiocyanate, solu...

  9. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  10. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  11. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  12. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  13. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  14. Anaerobic biodegradation of cyanide under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, R D; Cooper, D A; Speece, R; Henson, M

    1991-01-01

    Upflow, anaerobic, fixed-bed, activated charcoal biotreatment columns capable of operating at free cyanide concentrations of greater than 100 mg liter-1 with a hydraulic retention time of less than 48 h were developed. Methanogenesis was maintained under a variety of feed medium conditions which included ethanol, phenol, or methanol as the primary reduced carbon source. Under optimal conditions, greater than 70% of the inflow free cyanide was removed in the first 30% of the column height. Strongly complexed cyanides were resistant to removal. Ammonia was the nitrogen end product of cyanide transformation. In cell material removed from the charcoal columns, [14C]bicarbonate was the major carbon end product of [14C]cyanide transformation. PMID:1872600

  15. Fiber optic sensing of cyanides in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.S.; Mackenzie, J.D.; Li, C.Y.; Guerreiro, P.; Peyghambarian, N.

    1996-12-31

    A novel sol-gel technique was used to immobilize malachite green ions (MG{sup +}) in stable, optically transparent, porous silica gel films. A simple and sensitive method was developed for the detection of cyanides in solutions using spectrophotometry to measure changes caused by cyanide ions (CN{sup {minus}}) in the absorption spectra of the green-colored silica gel films. After reaction with cyanide ions, the absorption spectra of the films changed with a typical decrease in absorbance at 620 nm. On the basis of the absorption spectra of the films, a portable and easy to use fiber optic cyanide film sensor was fabricated. Decolorization undergone by the green-colored gel films, as they were exposed to cyanide ions, was detected through a fiber. Preliminary results indicate concentrations on the order of a few ppm are detected using the fiber optic sensor.

  16. Determination of cyanide using a microbial sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Keijiro; Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Karube, Isao

    1996-08-01

    A microbial cyanide sensor was prepared, consisting of immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae and an oxygen electrode. When the electrode was inserted into a solution containing glucose, the respiration activity of the microorganisms increased. The change in the respiration activity is monitored with the oxygen electrode. When cyanide is added to the sample solution, the electron transport chain reaction of the respiration system in the mitochondria is inhibited, resulting in a decrease in respiration. The inhibition is caused by cyanide binding with respiration enzymes such as the cytochrome oxidase complex in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Therefore, the cyanide concentration can be measured from the change in the respiration rate. When the sensor was applied to a batch system at pH 8.0 and 30{degrees}C, the cyanide calibration curve showed linearity in the concentration range between 0.3 pM and 150 {mu}m CN{sup -}. 13 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Treatment of cyanide-containing wastewater from the food industry in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed methanogenic reactor.

    PubMed

    Siller, H; Winter, J

    1998-02-01

    During the process of producing cassava starch from Manihot esculenta roots, large amounts of cyanoglycosides were released, which rapidly decayed to CN- following enzymatic hydrolysis. Depending on the varying cyanoglycoside content of the cassava varieties, the cyanide concentration in the wastewater was as high as 200 mg/l. To simulate anaerobic stabilization, a wastewater with a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of about 20 g/l was prepared from cassava roots and was fermented in a fixed-bed methanogenic reactor. The start-up phase for a 99% degradation of low concentrations of cyanide (10 mg/l) required about 6 months. After establishment of the biofilm, a cyanide concentration of up to 150 mg CN-/l in the fresh wastewater was degraded during anaerobic treatment at a hydraulic retention time of 3 days. All nitrogen from the degraded cyanide was converted to organic nitrogen by the biomass of the effluent. The cyanide-degrading biocoenosis of the anaerobic reactor could tolerate shock concentrations of cyanide up to 240 mg CN-/l for a short time. Up to 5 mmol/l NH4Cl (i.e. 70 mg N/l = 265 mg NH4Cl/l) in the fresh wastewater did not affect cyanide degradation. The bleaching agent sulphite, however, had a negative effect on COD and cyanide removal. For anaerobic treatment, the maximum COD space loading was 12 g l-1 day-1, equivalent to a hydraulic retention time of 1.8 days. The COD removal efficiency was around 90%. The maximum permanent cyanide space loading was 50 mg CN- l-1 day-1, with tolerable shock loadings up to 75 mg CN- l-1 day-1. Under steady-state conditions, the cyanide concentration of the effluent was lower than 0.5 mg/l.

  18. Effects of Cyanide and Ethylene on the Respiration of Cyanide-sensitive and Cyanide-resistant Plant Tissues 1

    PubMed Central

    Solomos, Theophanes; Laties, George G.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of cyanide and ethylene, respectively, were studied on the respiration of a fully cyanide-sensitive tissue-the fresh pea, a slightly cyanide-sensitive tissue-the germinating pea seedling, and a cyanide-insensitive tissue-the cherimoya fruit. Cyanide inhibition of both fresh pea and pea seedling respiration was attended by a conventional Pasteur effect where fermentation was enhanced with an accumulation of lactate and ethanol and a change in the level of glycolytic intermediates indicative of the activation of phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase accompanied by a sharp decline in ATP level. In these tissues, ethylene had little or no effect on the respiration rate, or on the level of glycolytic intermediates or ATP. By contrast, ethylene as well as cyanide enhanced both respiration and aerobic glycolysis in cherimoya fruits with no buildup of lactate and ethanol and with an increase in the level of ATP. The data support the proposition that for ethylene to stimulate respiration the capacity for cyanide-resistant respiration must be present. PMID:16659618

  19. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide...

  20. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide...

  1. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide...

  2. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide...

  3. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide...

  4. Alkaline cyanide biodegradation by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, V M; Blasco, R; Huertas, M J; Martínez-Luque, M; Moreno-Vivián, C; Castillo, F; Roldán, M D

    2005-02-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 uses cyanide, cyanate, beta-cyanoalanine, and other cyanoderivatives as nitrogen sources under alkaline conditions, which prevents volatile HCN (pK(a) 9.2) formation. The cyanide consumed by this strain is stoichiometrically converted into ammonium. In addition, this bacterium grows with the heavy metal, cyanide-containing waste water generated by the jewellery industry, and is also a cyanide-resistant strain which induces an alternative oxidase and a siderophore-based mechanism for iron acquisition in the presence of cyanide. The detection of cyanase and beta-cyanoalanine nitrilase activities in cyanide-induced cells suggests their implication in the cyanide degradation pathway.

  5. Acute effects of road salts and associated cyanide compounds on the early life stages of the unionid mussel Villosa iris.

    PubMed

    Pandolfo, Tamara J; Cope, W Gregory; Young, George B; Jones, Jess W; Hua, Dan; Lingenfelser, Susan F

    2012-08-01

    The toxicity of cyanide to the early life stages of freshwater mussels (order Unionida) has remained unexplored. Cyanide is known to be acutely toxic to other aquatic organisms. Cyanide-containing compounds, such as sodium ferrocyanide and ferric ferrocyanide, are commonly added to road deicing salts as anticaking agents. The purpose of the present study was to assess the acute toxicity of three cyanide compounds (sodium cyanide, sodium ferrocyanide, and ferric ferrocyanide), two road salts containing cyanide anticaking agents (Morton and Cargill brands), a brine deicing solution (Liquidow brand), and a reference salt (sodium chloride) on glochidia (larvae) and juveniles of the freshwater mussel Villosa iris. Sodium ferrocyanide and ferric ferrocyanide were not acutely toxic to glochidia and juvenile mussels at concentrations up to 1,000 mg/L and 100 mg/L, respectively. Lowest observed effect concentrations (LOECs) for these two chemicals ranged from 10 to >1,000 mg/L. Sodium cyanide was acutely toxic to juvenile mussels, with a 96-h median effective concentration (EC50) of 1.10 mg/L, although glochidia tolerated concentrations up to 10 mg/L. The EC50s for sodium chloride, Liquidow brine, Morton road salt, and Cargill road salt were not significantly different for tests within the same life stage and test duration (range, 1.66-4.92 g/L). These results indicate that cyanide-containing anticaking agents do not exacerbate the toxicity of road salts, but that the use of road salts and brine solutions for deicing or dust control on roads may warrant further investigation.

  6. [Protein carbonylation and its role in physiological processes in plants].

    PubMed

    Debska, Karolina; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Plant cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) continuously as a byproducts of oxygen metabolism and reaction to various environmental stresses. ROS are considered as chemicals inducing damage of cellular components (DNA, lipids and proteins), but also might act as signaling agents. Protein oxidation is one of covalent modification of protein induced by ROS or other products of oxidative stress. Carbonylation of particular amino acid residues (arginine, lysine, treonine or proline) is one of the most commonly occurring oxidative modification of proteins. This modification might lead to alteration in protein activity, its proteolytic breakdown or, in the opposite, aggregate formation. Carbonylated proteins have been identified in many plant species at different stage of growth and development. The analysis of subcellular localization of carbonylated proteins arised the hypothesis on their signaling function. We summarize the current knowledge on the detection of carbonylation protein in plants taking to the account the conditions which may influence their production or removal. We present also their putative role in plant physiology and discuss interaction between ROS and RNS in regulation of protein carbonylation. PMID:23214127

  7. Growth and cyanide degradation of Azotobacter vinelandii in cyanide-containing wastewater system.

    PubMed

    Koksunan, Sarawut; Vichitphan, Sukanda; Laopaiboon, Lakkana; Vichitphan, Kanit; Han, Jaehong

    2013-04-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii, a strict aerobic nitrogen-fixing bacterium, has been extensively studied with regard to the ability of N2-fixation due to its high expression of nitrogenase and fast growth. Because nitrogenase can also reduce cyanide to ammonia and methane, cyanide degradation by A. vinelandii has been studied for the application in the bioremediation of cyanide-contaminated wastewater. Cyanide degradation by A. vinelandii in NFS (nitrogen-free sucrose) medium was examined in terms of cell growth and cyanide reduction, and the results were applied for cyanide-contaminated cassava mill wastewater. From the NFS medium study in the 300 ml flask, it was found that A. vinelandii in the early stationary growth phase could reduce cyanide more rapidly than the cells in the exponential growth phase, and 84.4% of cyanide was degraded in 66 h incubation upon addition of 3.0 mM of NaCN. The resting cells of A. vinelandii could also reduce cyanide concentration by 90.4% with 3.0 mM of NaCN in the large-scale (3 L) fermentation with the same incubation time. Finally, the optimized conditions were applied to the cassava mill wastewater bioremediation, and A. vinelandii was able to reduce the cyanide concentration by 69.7% after 66 h in the cassava mill wastewater containing 4.0 mM of NaCN in the 3 L fermenter. Related to cyanide degradation in the cassava mill wastewater, nitrogenase was the responsible enzyme, which was confirmed by methane production. These findings would be helpful to design a practical bioremediation system for the treatment of cyanide-contaminated wastewater. PMID:23568214

  8. Removal of Zn or Cd and cyanide from cyanide electroplating wastes

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Fletcher L.

    1977-05-31

    A method is described for the efficient stripping of stable complexes of a selected quaternary amine and a cyanide of Zn or Cd. An alkali metal hydroxide solution such as NaOH or KOH will quantitatively strip a pregnant extract of the quaternary ammonium complex of its metal and cyanide content and regenerate a quaternary ammonium hydroxide salt which can be used for extracting further metal cyanide values.

  9. Growth and cyanide degradation of Azotobacter vinelandii in cyanide-containing wastewater system.

    PubMed

    Koksunan, Sarawut; Vichitphan, Sukanda; Laopaiboon, Lakkana; Vichitphan, Kanit; Han, Jaehong

    2013-04-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii, a strict aerobic nitrogen-fixing bacterium, has been extensively studied with regard to the ability of N2-fixation due to its high expression of nitrogenase and fast growth. Because nitrogenase can also reduce cyanide to ammonia and methane, cyanide degradation by A. vinelandii has been studied for the application in the bioremediation of cyanide-contaminated wastewater. Cyanide degradation by A. vinelandii in NFS (nitrogen-free sucrose) medium was examined in terms of cell growth and cyanide reduction, and the results were applied for cyanide-contaminated cassava mill wastewater. From the NFS medium study in the 300 ml flask, it was found that A. vinelandii in the early stationary growth phase could reduce cyanide more rapidly than the cells in the exponential growth phase, and 84.4% of cyanide was degraded in 66 h incubation upon addition of 3.0 mM of NaCN. The resting cells of A. vinelandii could also reduce cyanide concentration by 90.4% with 3.0 mM of NaCN in the large-scale (3 L) fermentation with the same incubation time. Finally, the optimized conditions were applied to the cassava mill wastewater bioremediation, and A. vinelandii was able to reduce the cyanide concentration by 69.7% after 66 h in the cassava mill wastewater containing 4.0 mM of NaCN in the 3 L fermenter. Related to cyanide degradation in the cassava mill wastewater, nitrogenase was the responsible enzyme, which was confirmed by methane production. These findings would be helpful to design a practical bioremediation system for the treatment of cyanide-contaminated wastewater.

  10. Toxicokinetic profiles of α-ketoglutarate cyanohydrin, a cyanide detoxification product, following exposure to potassium cyanide.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Brendan L; Bhandari, Raj K; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Rockwood, Gary A; Boss, Gerry R; Logue, Brian A

    2013-09-12

    Poisoning by cyanide can be verified by analysis of the cyanide detoxification product, α-ketoglutarate cyanohydrin (α-KgCN), which is produced from the reaction of cyanide and endogenous α-ketoglutarate. Although α-KgCN can potentially be used to verify cyanide exposure, limited toxicokinetic data in cyanide-poisoned animals are available. We, therefore, studied the toxicokinetics of α-KgCN and compared its behavior to other cyanide metabolites, thiocyanate and 2-amino-2-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (ATCA), in the plasma of 31 Yorkshire pigs that received KCN (4mg/mL) intravenously (IV) (0.17 mg/kg/min). α-KgCN concentrations rose rapidly during KCN administration until the onset of apnea, and then decreased over time in all groups with a half-life of 15 min. The maximum concentrations of α-KgCN and cyanide were 2.35 and 30.18 μM, respectively, suggesting that only a small fraction of the administered cyanide is converted to α-KgCN. Although this is the case, the α-KgCN concentration increased >100-fold over endogenous concentrations compared to only a three-fold increase for cyanide and ATCA. The plasma profile of α-KgCN was similar to that of cyanide, ATCA, and thiocyanate. The results of this study suggest that the use of α-KgCN as a biomarker for cyanide exposure is best suited immediately following exposure for instances of acute, high-dose cyanide poisoning.

  11. Modeling hydrogen-cyanide absorption in fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Islas, A.

    1981-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for predicting blood concentrations of cyanide as functions of exposure time to constant levels of cyanide in the atmosphere. A toxic gas (which may form as a result of decomposition of combustion materials used in transportation vehicles) is breathed into the alveolar space and transferred from the alveolar space to the blood by a first-order process, dependent on the concentration of the toxicant in the alveolar space. The model predicts that blood cyanide levels are more sensitive to the breathing cycle than to blood circulation. A model estimate of the relative effects of CO and HCN atmospheres, generated in an experimental chamber with an epoxy polymer, shows that toxic effects of cyanide occur long before those of carbon monoxide.

  12. Cyanide and arsenic poisoning by intravenous injection.

    PubMed

    DiNapoli, J; Hall, A H; Drake, R; Rumack, B H

    1989-03-01

    A 29-year-old man was found unresponsive a few minutes after self-injecting undetermined amounts of potassium cyanide and sodium arsenite intravenously in a suicide attempt. Treatment with the Lilly Cyanide Antidote kit rapidly resolved the initial coma, despite a whole blood cyanide level of 4.4 micrograms/mL. A 12-hour urine arsenic collection begun on admission showed 10,065 micrograms arsenic/12 hr. The patient received intramuscular BAL initially, which was followed by two ten-day courses of oral D-penicillamine. Complications included upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding requiring transfusion, transient elevations of liver function tests, self-limited complaints of decreased vision with conjunctival hyperemia and photophobia, and an abscess at the injection site. Although specific antidote therapy completely resolved the cyanide toxicity, early and prolonged arsenic chelation did not prevent a mild sensory peripheral neuropathy from developing with onset about 17 days after self-injection.

  13. CAPSULE REPORT - MANAGING CYANIDE IN METAL FINISHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to surface finishing manufacturers, metal finishing decision maker and regulators on management practices and control technologies for managing cyanide in the workplace. This information can benefit key industry stakeholder gro...

  14. Spectroscopic detection of stratospheric hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, M. T.; Mankin, W. G.; Cicerone, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A number of features have been identified as absorption lines of hydrogen cyanide in infrared spectra of stratospheric absorption obtained from a high-altitude aircraft. Column amounts of stratospheric hydrogen cyanide have been derived from spectra recorded on eight flights. The average vertical column amount above 12 kilometers is 7.1 + or - 0.8 x 10 to the 14th molecules per square centimeter, corresponding to an average mixing ratio of 170 parts per trillion by volume.

  15. Pure zinc sulfide quantum dot as highly selective luminescent probe for determination of hazardous cyanide ion.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hamid Reza

    2014-03-01

    A rapid and simple fluorescence method is presented for selective and sensitive determination of hazardous cyanide ion in aqueous solution based on functionalized zinc sulfide (ZnS) quantum dot (QD) as luminescent prob. The ultra-small ZnS QDs were synthesized using a chemical co-precipitation method in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) as an efficient capping agent. The prepared pure ZnS QDs was applied as an optical sensor for determination of cyanide ions in aqueous solutions. ZnS nanoparticles have exhibited a strong fluorescent emission at about 424 nm. The fluorescence intensity of QDs is linearly proportional to the cyanide ion concentration in the range 2.44×10(-6) to 2.59×10(-5)M with a detection limit of 1.70×10(-7)M at pH11. The designed fluorescent sensor possesses remarkable selectivity for cyanide ion over other anions such as Cl(-), Br(-), F(-), I(-), IO3(-), ClO4(-), BrO3(-), CO3(2-), NO2(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), S2O4(2-), C2O4(2-), SCN(-), N3(-), citrate and tartarate with negligible influences on the cyanide detection by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  16. Development of sulfanegen for mass cyanide casualties.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Steven E; Moeller, Bryant; Nagasawa, Herbert T; Vince, Robert; Crankshaw, Daune L; Briggs, Jacquie; Stutelberg, Michael W; Vinnakota, Chakravarthy V; Logue, Brian A

    2016-06-01

    Cyanide is a metabolic poison that inhibits the utilization of oxygen to form ATP. The consequences of acute cyanide exposure are severe; exposure results in loss of consciousness, cardiac and respiratory failure, hypoxic brain injury, and dose-dependent death within minutes to hours. In a mass-casualty scenario, such as an industrial accident or terrorist attack, currently available cyanide antidotes would leave many victims untreated in the short time available for successful administration of a medical countermeasure. This restricted therapeutic window reflects the rate-limiting step of intravenous administration, which requires both time and trained medical personnel. Therefore, there is a need for rapidly acting antidotes that can be quickly administered to large numbers of people. To meet this need, our laboratory is developing sulfanegen, a potential antidote for cyanide poisoning with a novel mechanism based on 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST) for the detoxification of cyanide. Additionally, sulfanegen can be rapidly administered by intramuscular injection and has shown efficacy in many species of animal models. This article summarizes the journey from concept to clinical leads for this promising cyanide antidote. PMID:27308865

  17. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of aqueous cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, V.K.; Rivera, W.; Smith, J.O.; O`Brien, B.

    1998-09-01

    The rates of oxidation of cyanide with Fe(VI) were measured as a function of pH and temperature. The reaction was found to be first order for each reactant. The rates decrease with increasing pH. The energy of activation was found to be 38.9 {+-} 1.0 kJ mol{sup {minus}1} at pH 9.0. The removal of cyanide by oxidation with Fe(VI) was studied at pH 7.5, 9.0, and 12.0. Fe(VI) removal efficiency was greater at pH 9.0 than at pH 7.5 and 12.0. At pH 9.0, Fe(VI) molar consumption was nearly equal to that of oxidized cyanide. Cyanate and nitrite ions were identified as the products of the reaction at pH 7.5. The experiments indicated 1:1 stoichiometric conversion of cyanide to nitrite ion at pH 9.0 and 12.0. Experiments were conducted to test the Fe(VI) removal efficiency of cyanide in electroplating rinsewater. The results indicate that Fe(VI) has the potential to serve as a reliable and safe oxidative treatment for removing cyanide in wastewater effluent.

  18. Development of sulfanegen for mass cyanide casualties.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Steven E; Moeller, Bryant; Nagasawa, Herbert T; Vince, Robert; Crankshaw, Daune L; Briggs, Jacquie; Stutelberg, Michael W; Vinnakota, Chakravarthy V; Logue, Brian A

    2016-06-01

    Cyanide is a metabolic poison that inhibits the utilization of oxygen to form ATP. The consequences of acute cyanide exposure are severe; exposure results in loss of consciousness, cardiac and respiratory failure, hypoxic brain injury, and dose-dependent death within minutes to hours. In a mass-casualty scenario, such as an industrial accident or terrorist attack, currently available cyanide antidotes would leave many victims untreated in the short time available for successful administration of a medical countermeasure. This restricted therapeutic window reflects the rate-limiting step of intravenous administration, which requires both time and trained medical personnel. Therefore, there is a need for rapidly acting antidotes that can be quickly administered to large numbers of people. To meet this need, our laboratory is developing sulfanegen, a potential antidote for cyanide poisoning with a novel mechanism based on 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST) for the detoxification of cyanide. Additionally, sulfanegen can be rapidly administered by intramuscular injection and has shown efficacy in many species of animal models. This article summarizes the journey from concept to clinical leads for this promising cyanide antidote.

  19. Mobility control agent

    SciTech Connect

    Argabright, P.A.; Phillips, B.L.; Rhudy, J.S.

    1983-05-17

    Polymer mobility control agents useful in supplemental oil recovery processes, which give improved reciprocal relative mobilities, are prepared by initiating the polymerization of a monomer containing a vinyl group with a catalyst comprising a persulfate and ferrous ammonium sulfate. The vinyl monomer is an acrylyl, a vinyl cyanide, a styryl and water soluble salts thereof.

  20. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) and Cyanide Salts, that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS As...

  1. Cyanide fishing and cyanide detection in coral reef fish using chemical tests and biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mak, Karen K W; Yanase, Hideshi; Renneberg, Reinhard

    2005-06-15

    Sodium cyanide has been used in the Philippines to collect tropical marine fish for aquarium and food trades since the early 1960s. Cyanide fishing is a fast method to stun and collect fish. This practice is damaging the coral reefs irreversibly. In most countries cyanide fishing is illegal, but most of the exporting and importing countries do not have test and certificate systems. Many analytical methods are available for the detection of cyanide in environmental and biological samples. However, most of the techniques are time consuming, and some lack specificity or sensitivity. Besides, an ultra sensitive cyanide detection method is needed due to the rapid detoxification mechanisms in fish. The aim of this review is to give an overview of cyanide fishing problem in the south-east Asia and current strategies to combat this destructive practice, summarise some of the methods for cyanide detection in biological samples and their disadvantages. A novel approach to detect cyanide in marine fish tissues is briefly discussed.

  2. MIN-CYANIDE: An expert system for cyanide waste minimization in electroplating plants

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.L.; Sundar, G.; Fan, L.T. )

    1991-05-01

    An expert system, MIN-CYANIDE, has been constructed to assist engineers and technicians in the source reduction of cyanide-waste solutions in an electroplating plant by resorting to these techniques and experience, and to train plant operators in the application of the techniques. MIN-CYANIDE evaluates options, such as drag-out minimization, bath-life extension, rinse-water reduction, replacement with a non-cyanide solution, use of an alternative plating technique, and improvement of the operating procedure; furthermore, it identifies the most effective among them. The knowledge about the cyanide source reduction is acquired from available publications, represented by numerous fuzzy or non-fuzzy heuristic rules, and codified into a commercial export system shell, Personal Consultant Plus, on an IBM PC/AT compatible computer. MIN-CYANIDE provides a user friendly interface; in operating it, the user answers various questions concerning the operational situations of the production and/or current equipment and techniques in the plant. In response, MIN-CYANIDE will present instantaneously a series of options for cyanide minimization and eventually rank them.

  3. Cyanide fishing and cyanide detection in coral reef fish using chemical tests and biosensors.

    PubMed

    Mak, Karen K W; Yanase, Hideshi; Renneberg, Reinhard

    2005-06-15

    Sodium cyanide has been used in the Philippines to collect tropical marine fish for aquarium and food trades since the early 1960s. Cyanide fishing is a fast method to stun and collect fish. This practice is damaging the coral reefs irreversibly. In most countries cyanide fishing is illegal, but most of the exporting and importing countries do not have test and certificate systems. Many analytical methods are available for the detection of cyanide in environmental and biological samples. However, most of the techniques are time consuming, and some lack specificity or sensitivity. Besides, an ultra sensitive cyanide detection method is needed due to the rapid detoxification mechanisms in fish. The aim of this review is to give an overview of cyanide fishing problem in the south-east Asia and current strategies to combat this destructive practice, summarise some of the methods for cyanide detection in biological samples and their disadvantages. A novel approach to detect cyanide in marine fish tissues is briefly discussed. PMID:15854827

  4. C-11 cyanide production system

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Dohyun; Alexoff, David; Kim, Sung Won; Hooker, Jacob; Ferrieri, Richard A

    2015-01-13

    A method for providing .sup.11C-labeled cyanides from .sup.11C labeled oxides in a target gas stream retrieved from an irradiated high pressure gaseous target containing O.sub.2 is provided, wherein .sup.11C labeled oxides are reduced with H.sub.2 in the presence of a nickel catalyst under a pressure and a temperature sufficient to form a product stream comprising at least about 95% .sup.11CH.sup.4 , the .sup.11CH.sub.4 is then combined with an excess of NH.sub.3 in a carrier/reaction stream flowing at an accelerated velocity and the combined .sup.11CH4 carrier/reaction stream is then contacted with a platinum (Pt) catalyst particulate supported on a substantially-chemically-nonreactive heat-stable support at a temperature of at least about 900 .degree. C., whereby a product stream comprising at least about 60%H.sup.11CN is provided in less than 10 minutes from retrieval of the .sup.11C labeled oxide.

  5. Dissimilarities between methylene blue and cyanide on relaxation and cyclic GMP formation in endothelium-intact intrapulmonary artery caused by nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators and acetylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to ascertain whether cyanide shares the properties of methylene blue as a selective inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle relaxation elicited by agents that stimulate the formation of cyclic GMP. Experiments were performed with endothelium-intact rings prepared from bovine intrapulmonary artery. Methylene blue, a good inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase, antagonized both arterial relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation in response to sodium nitroprusside, glyceryl trinitrate, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine and acetylcholine. In contrast, cyanide inhibited only the responses to sodium nitroprusside. Increasing concentrations of methylene blue depressed resting arterial levels of cyclic GMP and caused slowly developing but marked contractions whereas cyanide was without effect. Contractile responses to phenylephrine, potassium and U46619 were potentiated by methylene blue but not by cyanide. Preincubation of dilute solutions of cyanide containing sodium nitroprusside in oxygenated Krebs' buffer at 37 degrees C for 15 min before addition to bath chambers depressed relaxation and cyclic GMP accumulation caused by sodium nitroprusside markedly. Similar treatment of glyceryl trinitrate, however, failed to alter its effects in arterial rings. A chemical inactivation of sodium nitroprusside by cyanide appears to account for the specific inhibitory action of cyanide on arterial responses to sodium nitroprusside. This study indicates clearly that cyanide does not share the properties of methylene blue as an inhibitor of arterial relaxation elicited by vasodilators that stimulate cyclic GMP formation.

  6. Recent developments in cyanide detection: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    2010-01-01

    The extreme toxicity of cyanide and environmental concerns from its continued industrial use continue to generate interest in facile and sensitive methods for cyanide detection. In recent years there is also additional recognition of HCN toxicity from smoke inhalation and potential use of cyanide as a weapon of terrorism. This review summarizes the literature since 2005 on cyanide measurement in different matrices ranging from drinking water and wastewater, to cigarette smoke and exhaled breath to biological fluids like blood, urine and saliva. The dramatic increase in the number of publications on cyanide measurement is indicative of the great interest in this field not only from analytical chemists, but also researchers from diverse environmental, medical, forensic and clinical arena. The recent methods cover both established and emerging analytical disciplines and include naked eye visual detection, spectrophotometry/colorimetry, capillary electrophoresis with optical absorbance detection, fluorometry, chemiluminescence, near-infrared cavity ring down spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, electrochemical methods (potentiometry/amperometry/ion chromatography-pulsed amperometry), mass spectrometry (selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), gas chromatography (nitrogen phosphorus detector, electron capture detector) and quartz crystal mass monitors. PMID:20599024

  7. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hydrogen cyanide and cyanide salts that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  8. SUBSTITUTION OF CADMIUM CYANIDE ELECTROPLATING WITH ZINC CHLORIDE ELECTROPLATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study evaluated the zinc chloride electroplating process as a substitute for cadmium cyanide electroplating in the manufacture of industrial connectors and fittings at Aeroquip Corporation. The process substitution eliminates certain wastes, specifically cadmium and cyanide, ...

  9. Beyond toxicity: a regulatory role for mitochondrial cyanide.

    PubMed

    García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2014-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic plants, cyanide is a co-product of ethylene and camalexin biosynthesis. To maintain cyanide at non-toxic levels, Arabidopsis plants express the mitochondrial β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1. CYS-C1 knockout leads to an increased level of cyanide in the roots and leaves and a severe defect in root hair morphogenesis, suggesting that cyanide acts as a signaling factor in root development. During compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions, cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated. Moreover, CYS-C1 mutation increases both plant tolerance to biotrophic pathogens and their susceptibility to necrotrophic fungi, indicating that cyanide could stimulate the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. We hypothesize that CYS-C1 is essential for maintaining non-toxic concentrations of cyanide in the mitochondria to facilitate cyanide's role in signaling.

  10. Delayed presentation of nitroprusside-induced cyanide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Udeh, Chiedozie I; Ting, Michael; Arango, Matthew; Mick, Stephanie

    2015-04-01

    Cyanide toxicity is a rare complication of sodium nitroprusside that can be difficult to diagnose in critically ill patients. We describe a case of cyanide toxicity after cardiac surgery that presented as lactic acidosis after discontinuation of nitroprusside.

  11. Total cyanide analysis of tank core samples: Analytical results and supporting investigations. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.

    1994-03-01

    The potential for a ferrocyanide explosion in Hanford site single-shelled waste storage tanks (SSTS) poses a serious safety concern. This potential danger developed in the 1950s when {sup 137}Cs was scavenged during the reprocessing of uranium recovery process waste by co-precipitating it along with sodium in nickel ferrocyanide salt. Sodium or potassium ferrocyanide and nickel sulfate were added to the liquid waste stored in SSTs. The tank storage space resulting from the scavenging process was subsequently used to store other waste types. Ferrocyanide salts in combinations with oxidizing agents, such as nitrate and nitrite, are known to explode when key parameters (temperature, water content, oxidant concentration, and fuel [cyanide]) are in place. Therefore, reliable total cyanide analysis data for actual SST materials are required to address the safety issue. Accepted cyanide analysis procedures do not yield reliable results for samples containing nickel ferrocyanide materials because the compounds are insoluble in acidic media. Analytical chemists at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) have developed a modified microdistillation procedure (see below) for analyzing total cyanide in waste tank matrices containing nickel ferrocyanide materials. Pacific Northwest Laboratory analyzed samples from Hanford Waste Tank 241-C-112 cores 34, 35, and 36 for total cyanide content using technical procedure PNL-ALO-285 {open_quotes}Total Cyanide by Remote Microdistillation and Agrentometric Titration,{close_quotes} Rev. 0. This report summarizes the results of these analyses along with supporting quality control data, and, in addition, summarizes the results of the test to check the efficacy of sodium nickel ferrocyanide solubilization from an actual core sample by aqueous EDTA/en to verify that nickel ferrocyanide compounds were quantitatively solubilized before actual distillation.

  12. Analysis of hydrogen cyanide in air in a case of attempted cyanide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, R; Nyholm, S; Åstot, C

    2012-10-10

    A 32-year-old man attempted to poison his ex-girlfriend with hydrogen cyanide by hiding the pesticide Uragan D2 in her car. During the police investigation, chemical analysis of the air inside the car was performed. Hydrogen cyanide was detected through on-site air analysis using a portable Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy gas analyzer and colorimetric gas detection tubes. Furthermore, impinger air-sampling was performed for off-site sample preparation and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All three independent techniques demonstrated the presence of hydrogen cyanide, at concentrations of 14-20 ppm. Owing to the high volatility of hydrogen cyanide, the temperature and the time since exposure have a substantial effect on the likelihood of detecting hydrogen cyanide at a crime scene. The prevailing conditions (closed space, low temperature) must have supported the preservation of HCN in the car thus enabling the identification even though the analysis was performed several days after the hydrogen cyanide source was removed. This paper demonstrates the applicability of combining on-site FTIR measurements and off-site GC-MS analysis of a crime scene in order to ensure fast detection as well as unambiguous identification for forensic purposes of hydrogen cyanide in air. PMID:22704552

  13. Analysis of hydrogen cyanide in air in a case of attempted cyanide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, R; Nyholm, S; Åstot, C

    2012-10-10

    A 32-year-old man attempted to poison his ex-girlfriend with hydrogen cyanide by hiding the pesticide Uragan D2 in her car. During the police investigation, chemical analysis of the air inside the car was performed. Hydrogen cyanide was detected through on-site air analysis using a portable Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy gas analyzer and colorimetric gas detection tubes. Furthermore, impinger air-sampling was performed for off-site sample preparation and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All three independent techniques demonstrated the presence of hydrogen cyanide, at concentrations of 14-20 ppm. Owing to the high volatility of hydrogen cyanide, the temperature and the time since exposure have a substantial effect on the likelihood of detecting hydrogen cyanide at a crime scene. The prevailing conditions (closed space, low temperature) must have supported the preservation of HCN in the car thus enabling the identification even though the analysis was performed several days after the hydrogen cyanide source was removed. This paper demonstrates the applicability of combining on-site FTIR measurements and off-site GC-MS analysis of a crime scene in order to ensure fast detection as well as unambiguous identification for forensic purposes of hydrogen cyanide in air.

  14. Fatal methane and cyanide poisoning as a result of handling industrial fish: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cherian, M A; Richmond, I

    2000-10-01

    The potential health hazards of handling industrial fish are well documented. Wet fish in storage consume oxygen and produce poisonous gases as they spoil. In addition to oxygen depletion, various noxious agents have been demonstrated in association with spoilage including carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide, and ammonia. A fatal case of methane and cyanide poisoning among a group of deep sea trawler men is described. Subsequent independent investigation as a result of this case led to the discovery of cyanides as a further potential noxious agent. This is thus the first case in which cyanide poisoning has been recognised as a potentially fatal complication of handling spoiled fish. The previous literature is reviewed and the implications of the current case are discussed. PMID:11064677

  15. Cyanide speciation at four gold leach operations undergoing remediation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Craig A.; Grimes, David J.; Leinz, Reinhard W.; Rye, Robert O.

    2008-01-01

    Analyses have been made of 81 effluents from four gold leach operations in various stages of remediation to identify the most-persistent cyanide species. Total cyanide and weak acid-dissociable (WAD) cyanide were measured using improved methods, and metals known to form stable cyanocomplexes were also measured. Typically, total cyanide greatly exceeded WAD indicating that cyanide was predominantly in strong cyanometallic complexes. Iron was generally too low to accommodate the strongly complexed cyanide as Fe(CN)63- or Fe(CN)64-, but cobalt was abundant enough to implicate Co(CN)63- or its dissociation products (Co(CN)6-x(H2O)x(3-x)-). Supporting evidence for cobalt-cyanide complexation was found in tight correlations between cobalt and cyanide in some sample suites. Also, abundant free cyanide was produced upon UV illumination. Iron and cobalt cyanocomplexes both photodissociate; however, the iron concentration was insufficient to have carried the liberated cyanide, while the cobalt concentration was sufficient. Cobalt cyanocomplexes have not previously been recognized in cyanidation wastes. Their identification at four separate operations, which had treated ores that were not especially rich in cobalt, suggests that cobalt complexation may be a common source of cyanide persistence. There is a need for more information on the importance and behavior of cobalt cyanocomplexes in ore-processing wastes at gold mines.

  16. Cyanide-insensitive Respiration in Pea Cotyledons 1

    PubMed Central

    James, Terrance W.; Spencer, Mary S.

    1979-01-01

    Mitochondria isolated by a zonal procedure from the cotyledons of germinating peas possessed a cyanide-resistant respiration. This respiration was virtually absent in mitochondria isolated during the first 24 hours of germination but thereafter increased gradually until the 6th or 7th day of seedling development. At this time between 15 and 20% of the succinate oxidation was not inhibited by cyanide. The activity of the cyanide-resistant respiration was also determined in the absence of cyanide. Relationships among mitochondrial structure, cyanide-resistant respiration, and seedling development are discussed. PMID:16660982

  17. Several hemicyanine dyes as fluorescence chemosensors for cyanide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Muhan; Wang, Kangnan; Guan, Ruifang; Liu, Zhiqiang; Cao, Duxia; Wu, Qianqian; Shan, Yanyan; Xu, Yongxiao

    2016-05-01

    Four hemicyanine dyes as chemosensors for cyanide anions were synthesized easily. Their photophysical properties and recognition properties for cyanide anions were investigated. The results indicate that all the dyes can recognize cyanide anions with obvious color, absorption and fluorescence change. The recognition mechanism analysis basing on in situ 1H NMR and Job plot data indicates that to the compounds with hydroxyl group, the recognition mechanism is intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction. However, to the compounds without hydroxyl group, cyanide anion is bonded to carbon-carbon double bond in conjugated bridge and induces N+ CH3 to neutral NCH3. Fluorescence of the compounds is almost quenched upon the addition of cyanide anions.

  18. Review article: management of cyanide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Reade, Michael C; Davies, Suzanne R; Morley, Peter T; Dennett, Jennifer; Jacobs, Ian C

    2012-06-01

    Cyanide poisoning is uncommon, but generates interest because of the presumed utility of an antidote immediately available in those areas with a high risk of cyanide exposure. As part of its regular review of guidelines, the Australian Resuscitation Council conducted a systematic review of the human evidence for the use of various proposed cyanide antidotes, and a narrative review of the relevant pharmacological and animal studies. There have been no relevant comparative or placebo-controlled human trials. Nine case series were identified. Treatment with hydroxocobalamin was reported in a total of 361 cases. No serious adverse effects of hydroxocobalamin were reported, and many patients with otherwise presumably fatal poisoning survived. Sodium thiosulphate use was reported in two case series, similarly with no adverse effects. Treatment with a combination of sodium nitrite, amyl nitrite and sodium thiosulphate was reported in 74 patients, with results indistinguishable from those of hydroxocobalamin and sodium thiosulphate. No case series using dicobalt edetate or 4-dimethylaminophenol were identified, but successful use in single cases has been reported. Hydroxocobalamin and sodium thiosulphate differ from alternatives in having negligible adverse effects, and on the basis of current evidence are the antidotes of choice. The indications for the use of an antidote, the requirements for supportive care and a recommended approach for workplaces where there is a risk of cyanide poisoning are presented.

  19. Vibrational scaling factors for transition metal carbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assefa, M. K.; Devera, J. L.; Brathwaite, A. D.; Mosley, J. D.; Duncan, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Vibrational frequencies for a selected set of transition metal carbonyl complexes are computed with various forms of density functional theory (B3LYP, BP86, M06, and M06-L), employing several different basis sets. The computed frequencies for the carbonyl stretches are compared to the experimental values obtained from gas phase infrared spectra of isolated neutrals and ions. Recommended carbonyl-stretch scaling factors which are developed vary significantly for different functionals, but there is little variation with basis set. Scaled frequencies compared to experimental spectra for cobalt and tantalum carbonyl cations reveal additional variations in multiplet patterns and relative band intensities for different functionals.

  20. Copper recovery and cyanide oxidation by electrowinning from a spent copper-cyanide electroplating electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Dutra, A J B; Rocha, G P; Pombo, F R

    2008-04-01

    Copper-cyanide bleed streams arise from contaminated baths from industrial electroplating processes due to the buildup of impurities during continuous operation. These streams present an elevated concentration of carbonate, cyanide and copper, constituting a heavy hazard, which has to be treated for cyanide destruction and heavy metals removal, according to the local environmental laws. In the Brazilian Mint, bleed streams are treated with sodium hypochlorite, to destroy cyanide and precipitate copper hydroxide, a solid hazardous waste that has to be disposed properly in a landfill or treated for metal recovery. In this paper, a laboratory-scale electrolytic cell was developed to remove the copper from the bleed stream of the electroplating unit of the Brazilian Mint, permitting its reutilization in the plant and decreasing the amount of sludge to waste. Under favorable conditions copper recoveries around 99.9% were achieved, with an energy consumption of about 11 kWh/kg, after a 5-h electrolysis of a bath containing copper and total cyanide concentrations of 26 and 27 g/L, respectively. Additionally, a substantial reduction of the cyanide concentration was also achieved, decreasing the pollution load and final treatment costs. PMID:17728063

  1. Rapid sodium cyanide depletion in cell culture media: outgassing of hydrogen cyanide at physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Arun, Peethambaran; Moffett, John R; Ives, John A; Todorov, Todor I; Centeno, Jose A; Namboodiri, M A Aryan; Jonas, Wayne B

    2005-04-15

    During the course of in vitro studies on cyanide exposure with SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells, we found that sodium cyanide (NaCN) up to a concentration of 10 mM had no significant toxic effect under our culture conditions. Further investigation of this apparent cyanide resistance revealed that the sodium cyanide was being rapidly depleted from the cell culture medium. Cyanide was interacting with constituents of the cell culture medium and was somehow being detoxified or removed from solution. The reaction of cyanide with cell culture media in 96-well culture plates reduced cyanide concentrations rapidly (80-90% in 2 h at 37 degrees C). Running the same reaction in capped tubes significantly reduced cyanide loss from solution. Incubation of cyanide with individual constituents of the cell culture medium in solution showed that glucose, phenol red, and amino acids all acted to detoxify or remove cyanide from solution. When amino acids or buffers were incubated with sodium cyanide in aqueous solution at pH 7.4, hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was found to degas from the solutions. We compared HCN outgassing over a range of pH values. As expected, HCN remained very soluble at high pH, but as the pH was reduced to 7.0, the rate of HCN formation and outgassing increased dramatically. Acid-base reactions involving cyanide and proton donors, such as amino acids and other cell culture media constituents, at physiological pH result in rapid HCN outgassing from solution at 37 degrees C. These results indicate that previous in vitro cyanide toxicity studies done in standard culture media with prolonged incubation times using gas-exchanging culture containers might have to be reevaluated in light of the fact that the effective cyanide concentrations in the culture media were significantly lower than reported.

  2. Increased Adipose Protein Carbonylation in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frohnert, Brigitte I.; Sinaiko, Alan R.; Serrot, Federico J.; Foncea, Rocio E.; Moran, Antoinette; Ikramuddin, Sayeed; Choudry, Umar; Bernlohr, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with obesity but mechanisms controlling this relationship in humans are not fully understood. Studies in animal models suggest a linkage between adipose reactive oxygen species (ROS) and insulin resistance. ROS oxidize cellular lipids to produce a variety of lipid hydroperoxides that in turn generate reactive lipid aldehydes that covalently modify cellular proteins in a process termed carbonylation. Mammalian cells defend against reactive lipid aldehydes and protein carbonylation by glutathionylation using glutathione-S-transferase A4 (GSTA4) or carbonyl reduction/oxidation via reductases and/or dehydrogenases. Insulin resistance in mice is linked to ROS production and increased level of protein carbonylation, mitochondrial dysfunction, decreased insulin-stimulated glucose transport, and altered adipokine secretion. To assess protein carbonylation and insulin resistance in humans, eight healthy participants underwent subcutaneous fat biopsy from the periumbilical region for protein analysis and frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance testing to measure insulin sensitivity. Soluble proteins from adipose tissue were analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the major carbonylated proteins identified as the adipocyte and epithelial fatty acid–binding proteins. The level of protein carbonylation was directly correlated with adiposity and serum free fatty acids (FFAs). These results suggest that in human obesity oxidative stress is linked to protein carbonylation and such events may contribute to the development of insulin resistance. PMID:21593812

  3. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  4. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  5. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters.

  6. Cyanide in the chemical arsenal of garlic mustard, Alliaria petiolata.

    PubMed

    Cipollini, Don; Gruner, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Cyanide production has been reported from over 2500 plant species, including some members of the Brassicaceae. We report that the important invasive plant, Alliaria petiolata, produces levels of cyanide in its tissues that can reach 100 ppm fresh weight (FW), a level considered toxic to many vertebrates. In a comparative study, levels of cyanide in leaves of young first-year plants were 25 times higher than in leaves of young Arabidopsis thaliana plants and over 150 times higher than in leaves of young Brassica kaber, B. rapa, and B. napus. In first-year plants, cyanide levels were highest in young leaves of seedlings and declined with leaf age on individual plants. Leaves of young plants infested with green peach aphids (Myzus persicae) produced just over half as much cyanide as leaves of healthy plants, suggesting that aphid feeding led to loss of cyanide from intact tissues before analysis, or that aphid feeding inhibited cyanide precursor production. In a developmental study, levels of cyanide in the youngest and oldest leaf of young garlic mustard plants were four times lower than in the youngest and oldest leaf of young Sorghum sudanense (cv. Cadan 97) plants, but cyanide levels did not decline in these leaves with plant age as in S. sudanense. Different populations of garlic mustard varied moderately in the constitutive and inducible expression of cyanide in leaves, but no populations studied were acyanogenic. Although cyanide production could result from breakdown products of glucosinolates, no cyanide was detected in vitro from decomposition of sinigrin, the major glucosinolate of garlic mustard. These studies indicate that cyanide produced from an as yet unidentified cyanogenic compound is a part of the battery of chemical defenses expressed by garlic mustard.

  7. Surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Longoni, Giuliano; Zacchini, Stefano; Zarra, Salvatore

    2012-06-01

    Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters.Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters. CCDC 867747 and 867748. For crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30400g

  8. Catalytic Carbonylative Spirolactonization of Hydroxycyclopropanols.

    PubMed

    Davis, Dexter C; Walker, Katherine L; Hu, Chunhua; Zare, Richard N; Waymouth, Robert M; Dai, Mingji

    2016-08-24

    A palladium-catalyzed cascade carbonylative spirolactonization of hydroxycyclopropanols has been developed to efficiently synthesize oxaspirolactones common to many complex natural products of important therapeutic value. The mild reaction conditions, high atom economy, broad substrate scope, and scalability of this new method were highlighted in expedient total syntheses of the Turkish tobacco natural products α-levantanolide and α-levantenolide in two and four steps, respectively. The hydroxycyclopropanol substrates are readily available in one step via a Kulinkovich reaction of the corresponding lactones. Mechanistic studies utilizing high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) identified several key intermediates in the catalytic cycle, as well as those related to catalyst decomposition and competitive pathways. PMID:27459274

  9. Aqueous Phase Non Enzymatic Chemistry of Cyanide, Formaldehyde and RNH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Narcinda R.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    It is postulated that amino acids were produced on the early earth from dilute aqueous solution of cyanide, carbonyls and ammonia (the Strecker synthesis RNH2 + R"R""C=O + KCN yields H-N(R)-C(R")(R"")-CO2H. We have studied the products obtained from dilute aqueous solutions of cyanide, formaldehyde (R"=R""=H), ammonia (R=H) and amino acids. Solutions in the pH range from 8 to 10. at room temperature and at reactant concentrations from 0.001 M to 0.3 M have been studied. With R= H product yields were low (less than 3%). Only with R"=R""=H and R represented by the following: CH2CO2H (glycine); CH(CH3)CO2H (alanine); CH(CH2CH3)CO2H (a-amino n=butyric acids); C(CH3)2(CO2H) (a-aminoisobutyric acid); CH(CH(CH3)2)CO2H (valine); and CH(CH2CO2H)CO2H (aspartic acid), were product yields high (greater than 10%). The yields of glycine were larger with R not equal to H. The prebiotic implications of these findings will be discussed.

  10. Hydrogen cyanide polymerization: a preferred cosmochemical pathway.

    PubMed

    Matthews, C N

    1992-01-01

    Current research in cosmochemistry shows that crude organic solids of high molecular weight are readily formed in planetary, interplanetary and interstellar environments. Underlying much of this ubiquitous chemistry is a low energy route leading directly to the synthesis of hydrogen cyanide and its polymers. Evidence from laboratory and extraterrestrial investigations suggests that these polymers plus water yield heteropolypeptides, a truly universal process that accounts not only for the past synthesis of protein ancestors on Earth but also for reactions proceeding elsewhere today within our solar system, on planetary bodies and satellites around other stars and in the dusty molecular clouds of spiral galaxies. The existence of this preferred pathway - hydrogen cyanide polymerization - surely increases greatly the probability that carbon-based life is widespread in the universe.

  11. Hydrogen cyanide health effects. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, B.L.; Baker, L.H.; Herndon, B.L.; Ellis, H.V. III; Horn, E.M.

    1981-09-01

    Health effects literature primarily related to inhalation exposures to hydrogen cyanide was collected, evaluated, tabulated and summarized. Approximately 170 documents were collected from computerized and manual literature searches covering the period 1899-1981. Pharmacologists and an M.D. epidemiologist rated the documents according to their applicability to the study and their methodology. The approximately 20 documents considered useful for deriving a range of concern for human exposure to hydrogen cyanide from automotive emissions were tabulated. The 25 pages of tables detail the results of acute and repeated dose testing of mice, rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, cats, monkeys, dogs, goats, donkeys and humans as well as human occupational studies. Most of the documents evaluated are described in an annotated bibliography.

  12. Collisional excitation of interstellar methyl cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical calculations are used to determine the collisional excitation rates of methyl cyanide under interstellar molecular cloud conditions. The required Q(L,M) as a function of kinetic temperature were determined by averaging fixed energy IOS (infinite order sudden) results over appropriate Boltzmann distributions of collision energies. At a kinetic temperature of 40 K, rates within a K ladder were found to be accurate to generally better than about 30 percent.

  13. [Acute cyanide poisoning in an infant].

    PubMed

    Haasnoot, K; van Vught, A J; Meulenbelt, J; Bergman, L R

    1989-09-01

    An infant of 9 months was admitted to hospital in comatose condition; cyanide poisoning was suspected. This poisoning was caused by the desorption of hydrocyanic acid from building materials after the house had been fumigated with hydrocyanic acid under strict supervision and observed safety measures. Administration of 4-dimethyl-aminophenol, a methaemoglobin inducer, and sodium thiosulphate together with supportive measures, led to complete recovery of the infant, although the general hypotony persisted for a few weeks. PMID:2797290

  14. Cyanide treatment options in coke plants

    SciTech Connect

    Minak, H.P.; Lepke, P.

    1997-12-31

    The paper discusses the formation of cyanides in coke oven gas and describes and compares waste processing options. These include desulfurization by aqueous ammonia solution, desulfurization using potash solution, desulfurization in oxide boxes, decomposition of NH{sub 3} and HCN for gas scrubbing. Waste water treatment methods include chemical oxidation, precipitation, ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and biological treatment. It is concluded that biological treatment is the most economical process, safe in operation and requires a minimum of manpower.

  15. High Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis after a Suicide Attempt with Cyanide: The Rebirth of Cyanide Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Po-Jen; Chang, Che-Fu; Chiu, Chih-Chien; Chan, Jenq-Shyong; Chiang, Wen-Fang; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lin, Shih-Hua; Chen, Jin-Shuen

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old woman was admitted to our emergency department in a state of unconsciousness after attempting suicide with unknown substances. Severe metabolic acidosis (pH: 6.81), with a high anion gap (36.2) and high lactate level (20.2 mmol/L), was observed. After four hours of intensive medical treatment, the patient regained consciousness, with a return of the arterial pH to 7.42. Finally, cyanide intoxication was diagnosed based on the detection of a serum cyanide level of 3.5 mg/L. The presence of a high anion gap associated with severe lactic acidosis is a clue for making a rapid differential diagnosis of acute cyanide intoxication. Providing intensive and immediate supportive management is also crucial, even in cases without obtainable specific antidotes.

  16. Analysis of cyanide in whole blood of dosed cathartids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krynitsky, A.J.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Hill, E.F.; Carpenter, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-liquid chromatographic method was modified to quantify both unmetabolized ('free') and metabolized ('bound', i.e., thiocyanates) cyanides. The methods for both are efficient and sensitive to 0.05 ppm. Repeated freezing and thawing of whole blood from treated cathartids caused an initial increase in free cyanide concentrations, followed by a gradual decline to a plateau. Bound cyanide concentrations declined after repeated freezing and thawing.

  17. Carbon monoxide and cyanide toxicity: etiology, pathophysiology and treatment in inhalation injury.

    PubMed

    Huzar, Todd F; George, Tonya; Cross, James M

    2013-04-01

    Inhalation injury is most commonly associated with damage to the mucosal surfaces of the small and large airways after exposure to smoke and other products of incomplete combustion. Yet, there are far deadlier things lurking within the smoke than just the heat and particulate matter: carbon monoxide and cyanide. These two toxic substances are found in varying concentrations within the fire room and are associated with early on-scene death and in-hospital morbidity and mortality. Patients suffering from carbon monoxide and/or cyanide poisoning present with vague symptoms requiring an astute physician to make the diagnosis. Fortunately, the toxic effects related to exposure to these agents can be reversed with readily available antidotes.

  18. An integrated biological approach for treatment of cyanidation wastewater.

    PubMed

    Mekuto, Lukhanyo; Ntwampe, S K O; Akcil, Ata

    2016-11-15

    The cyanidation process has been, and still remains, a profitable and highly efficient process for the recovery of precious metals from ores. However, this process has contributed to environmental deterioration and potable water reserve contamination due to the discharge of poorly treated, or untreated, cyanide containing wastewater. The process produces numerous cyanide complexes in addition to the gold cyanocomplex. Additionally, the discharge constituents also include hydrogen cyanide (HCN) - metallic complexes with iron, nickel, copper, zinc, cobalt and other metals; thiocyanate (SCN); and cyanate (CNO). The fate of these complexes in the environment dictates the degree to which these species pose a threat to living organisms. This paper reviews the impact that the cyanidation process has on the environment, the ecotoxicology of the cyanidation wastewater and the treatment methods that are currently utilised to treat cyanidation wastewater. Furthermore, this review proposes an integrated biological approach for the treatment of the cyanidation process wastewater using microbial consortia that is insensitive and able to degrade cyanide species, in all stages of the proposed process. PMID:27424119

  19. Chronic cyanide poisoning: unifying concept for alcoholic and tropical pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Pitchumoni, C S; Jain, N K; Lowenfels, A B; DiMagno, E P

    1988-01-01

    We hypothesize that chronic cyanide toxicity may explain the occurrence of calcific pancreatitis in chronic alcoholic individuals in affluent Western nations and malnourished children and young adults in developing tropical regions. In alcoholic persons the source of cyanide is cigarette smoke, and in tropical countries the source could be cassava or other plants. The cyanide hypothesis is consistent with the known epidemiologic and metabolic characteristics of these two contrasting forms of pancreatitis. We believe that continued chronic cyanide poisoning could reinforce any independent effect of alcohol or malnutrition on the pancreas, resulting in an exaggerated and perhaps irreversible form of the disease.

  20. Continuous real-time measurement of aqueous cyanide

    DOEpatents

    Rosentreter, Jeffrey J.; Gering, Kevin L.

    2007-03-06

    This invention provides a method and system capable of the continuous, real-time measurement of low concentrations of aqueous free cyanide (CN) using an on-line, flow through system. The system is based on the selective reactivity of cyanide anions and the characteristically nonreactive nature of metallic gold films, wherein this selective reactivity is exploited as an indirect measurement for aqueous cyanide. In the present invention the dissolution of gold, due to the solubilization reaction with the analyte cyanide anion, is monitored using a piezoelectric microbalance contained within a flow cell.

  1. Removal of cyanides by complexation with ferrous compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Varuntanya, C.P.; Zabban, W.

    1995-12-31

    Alkaline chlorination, an oxidation process with chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) or hypochlorite (ClO{sup {minus}}), is the most widely accepted method of cyanide treatment. However, removal of cyanide from wastewater to the extent required by the effluent limits imposed by Federal and State regulatory authorities is practically impossible, especially when the majority of the cyanide is present as an iron-cyanide complex. One potential treatment method being further investigated uses ferrous (Fe{sup 2+}) compounds to react with free and complex cyanide ions and produce insoluble iron-cyanide complexes. However, sludges generated by this treatment method contain cyanide wastes which may be considered a hazardous waste by the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). The studies reported in this paper demonstrate that ferrous (Fe{sup 2+}) precipitation can remove cyanide ions (both free and complex) to a concentration within the range of 1 to 2 mg/L. The wastewaters utilized in these tests were collected from a coke plant facility. Synthetic cyanide solutions were used in the studied as well. Ferrous compounds used in the studies included commercial-grade ferrous sulfate, commercial-grade ferrous chloride, and spent pickle liquor (containing ferrous ion). The desired effluent quality was successfully attained in the treatment of the above-mentioned wastewaters by using ferrous compounds as well as spent pickle liquor.

  2. Cyanide toxicokinetics: the behavior of cyanide, thiocyanate and 2-amino-2-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid in multiple animal models.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Raj K; Oda, Robert P; Petrikovics, Ilona; Thompson, David E; Brenner, Matthew; Mahon, Sari B; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2014-05-01

    Cyanide causes toxic effects by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cellular hypoxia and cytotoxic anoxia, and can eventually lead to death. Cyanide exposure can be verified by direct analysis of cyanide concentrations or analyzing its metabolites, including thiocyanate (SCN(-)) and 2-amino-2-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (ATCA) in blood. To determine the behavior of these markers following cyanide exposure, a toxicokinetics study was performed in three animal models: (i) rats (250-300 g), (ii) rabbits (3.5-4.2 kg) and (iii) swine (47-54 kg). Cyanide reached a maximum in blood and declined rapidly in each animal model as it was absorbed, distributed, metabolized and eliminated. Thiocyanate concentrations rose more slowly as cyanide was enzymatically converted to SCN(-). Concentrations of ATCA did not rise significantly above the baseline in the rat model, but rose quickly in rabbits (up to a 40-fold increase) and swine (up to a 3-fold increase) and then fell rapidly, generally following the relative behavior of cyanide. Rats were administered cyanide subcutaneously and the apparent half-life (t1/2) was determined to be 1,510 min. Rabbits were administered cyanide intravenously and the t1/2 was determined to be 177 min. Swine were administered cyanide intravenously and the t1/2 was determined to be 26.9 min. The SCN(-) t1/2 in rats was 3,010 min, but was not calculated in rabbits and swine because SCN(-) concentrations did not reach a maximum. The t1/2 of ATCA was 40.7 and 13.9 min in rabbits and swine, respectively, while it could not be determined in rats with confidence. The current study suggests that cyanide exposure may be verified shortly after exposure by determining significantly elevated cyanide and SCN(-) in each animal model and ATCA may be used when the ATCA detoxification pathway is significant.

  3. Protein Carbonylation and Adipocyte Mitochondrial Function*

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Jessica M.; Hahn, Wendy S.; Stone, Matthew D.; Inda, Jacob J.; Droullard, David J.; Kuzmicic, Jovan P.; Donoghue, Margaret A.; Long, Eric K.; Armien, Anibal G.; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar; Griffin, Timothy J.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonylation is the covalent, non-reversible modification of the side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues by lipid peroxidation end products such as 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxononenal. In adipose tissue the effects of such modifications are associated with increased oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation centered on mitochondrial energy metabolism. To address the role of protein carbonylation in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction, quantitative proteomics was employed to identify specific targets of carbonylation in GSTA4-silenced or overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GSTA4-silenced adipocytes displayed elevated carbonylation of several key mitochondrial proteins including the phosphate carrier protein, NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 and 3, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 50, and valyl-tRNA synthetase. Elevated protein carbonylation is accompanied by diminished complex I activity, impaired respiration, increased superoxide production, and a reduction in membrane potential without changes in mitochondrial number, area, or density. Silencing of the phosphate carrier or NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 or 3 in 3T3-L1 cells results in decreased basal and maximal respiration. These results suggest that protein carbonylation plays a major instigating role in cytokine-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and may be linked to the development of insulin resistance in the adipocyte. PMID:22822087

  4. HYDROGEN CYANIDE IN THE MURCHISON METEORITE

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    2012-08-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are meteorites that may contain abundant organic materials, including soluble compounds as diverse as amino acids and hydrocarbons. We report here the finding of hydrogen cyanide in the Murchison meteorite in amounts {<=} 10 ppm. HCN was never searched for in meteorites and its detection in sizeable amount is surprising in view of the extensive water phase that is recorded by the petrology of this type of meteorites and could have exhausted their HCN content through multiple reactions. The finding adds to the inventory of simple volatile molecules found in both comets and meteorites.

  5. Novel cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Ingvorsen, K; Højer-Pedersen, B; Godtfredsen, S E

    1991-01-01

    A cyanide-metabolizing bacterium, strain DF3, isolated from soil was identified as Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans. Whole cells and cell extracts of strain DF3 catalyzed hydrolysis of cyanide to formate and ammonia (HCN + 2H2O----HCOOH + NH3) without forming formamide as a free intermediate. The cyanide-hydrolyzing activity was inducibly produced in cells during growth in cyanide-containing media. Cyanate (OCN-) and a wide range of aliphatic and aromatic nitriles were not hydrolyzed by intact cells of A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3. Strain DF3 hydrolyzed cyanide with great efficacy. Thus, by using resting induced cells at a concentration of 11.3 mg (dry weight) per ml, the cyanide concentration could be reduced from 0.97 M (approximately 25,220 ppm) to less than 77 nM (approximately 0.002 ppm) in 55 h. Enzyme purification established that cyanide hydrolysis by A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3 was due to a single intracellular enzyme. The soluble enzyme was purified approximately 160-fold, and the first 25 NH2-terminal amino acids were determined by automated Edman degradation. The molecular mass of the active enzyme (purity, greater than 97% as determined by amino acid sequencing) was estimated to be greater than 300,000 Da. The cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme of A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3 was tentatively named cyanidase to distinguish it from known nitrilases (EC 3.5.5.1) which act on organic nitriles. Images PMID:1872607

  6. Evidence of hydrolytic route for anaerobic cyanide degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, R D

    1992-01-01

    Products observed during anaerobic cyanide transformation are consistent with a hydrolytic pathway (HCN + H2O <--> HCONH2 + H2O <--> HCOOH + NH3). Formate, the most frequently observed product, was generally converted to bicarbonate. Formamide was rapidly hydrolyzed to formate upon exposure to the anaerobic consortium but was not detected as an intermediate of cyanide transformation. PMID:1444430

  7. 38. DETAIL OF RUINS OF CYANIDE MIXING AND EXTRACTION SHED, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. DETAIL OF RUINS OF CYANIDE MIXING AND EXTRACTION SHED, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE SOLUTION WAS PREPARED HERE AND PUMPED UP INTO THE PROCESSING TANKS, AND THE PREGNANT SOLUTION WAS ALSO EXTRACTED HERE AFTER THE LEACHING PROCESS WAS COMPLETE - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  8. Cyanide toxicity in hepatocytes under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Aw, T Y; Jones, D P

    1989-09-01

    The effect of cyanide on cell viability and mitochondrial function was studied in hepatocytes exposed to air or argon. Cells were more susceptible to cyanide toxicity under air than under argon. Analysis of the disposition of cyanide showed that the difference in susceptibility to KCN was not due to O2-dependent differences in cyanide metabolism or elimination. Studies of mitochondrial function revealed that cyanide under aerobic conditions resulted in substantial swelling of the mitochondria, which corresponded to a matrix loading of phosphate. In addition, cyanide caused a loss of the mitochondrial protonmotive force. This was in contrast to the results for cells exposed to 30 min of anoxia alone in which there was no loss of mitochondrial delta pH, no detectable change in mitochondrial volume, and little matrix loading of phosphate. These results show that at least some of the protective mechanisms elicited by anoxia (B. S. Andersson, T. Y. Aw, and D. P. Jones. Am. J. Physiol. 252 (Cell Physiol. 21): C349-C355, 1987) are not elicited by cyanide alone. Thus cyanide under aerobic conditions does not provide a completely valid model for simple anoxia. Moreover, the results suggest that the molecular sensor necessary to signal suppression of metabolic and transport functions during neahypoxia is dependent on O2 and is neither stimulated nor antagonized by KCN. PMID:2782387

  9. Cyanide and migratory birds at gold mines in Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Hallock, R.J.; Hill, E.F.

    1994-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, cyanide in heap leach solutions and mill tailings ponds at gold mines in Nevada has killed a large but incompletely documented number of wildlife ( gt 9,500 individuals, primarily migratory birds). This field investigation documents the availability of cyanide at a variety of 'typical' Nevada gold mines during 1990 and 1991, describes wildlife reactions to cyanide solutions, and discusses procedures for eliminating wildlife loss from cyanide poisoning. Substantial progress has been made to reduce wildlife loss. About half of the mill tailings ponds (some up to 150 ha) in Nevada have been chemically treated to reduce cyanide concentrations (the number needing treatment is uncertain) and many of the smaller heap leach solution ponds and channels are now covered with netting to exclude birds and most mammals. The discovery of a cyanide gradient in mill tailings ponds (concentration usually 2-3 times higher at the inflow point than at reclaim point) provides new insight into wildlife responses (mortality) observed in different portions of the ponds. Finding dead birds on the tops of ore heaps and associated with solution puddling is a new problem, but management procedures for eliminating this source of mortality are available. A safe threshold concentration of cyanide to eliminate wildlife loss could not be determined from the field data and initial laboratory studies. New analytical methods may be required to assess further the wildlife hazard of cyanide in mining solutions.

  10. Hydrogen cyanide poisoning in a prison environment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fortin, Jean-Luc; Judic-Peureux, Virginie; Desmettre, Thibault; Manzon, Cyril; Grimon, Daniel; Hostalek, Ulrike; Fétro, Christine; Capellier, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Cyanide poisoning is an important source of morbidity and mortality from smoke exposure in structural fires. This case involved administration of a cyanide antidote to a prisoner (male, 23 years) in France, discovered in cardiorespiratory arrest after about 30 minutes exposure to smoke from a burning mattress during an apparent suicide attempt. Smoke exposure, circulatory failure during initial resuscitation, and elevated blood cyanide and lactate led to the diagnosis of cyanide poisoning. Hydroxocobalamin (Cyanokit®), 5 g intravenous) was given immediately and on arrival at the hospital. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation restored cardiovascular function after 33 minutes. There were no neurological or other sequelae. Timely hydroxocobalamin administration contributed to full recovery from cardiorespiratory arrest secondary to cyanide poisoning from smoke inhalation. Hydroxocobalamin should be available to emergency medical teams attending fire scenes. PMID:21278317

  11. Biodegradation of cyanide wastes from mining and jewellery industries.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Roldán, María Dolores

    2016-04-01

    Cyanide, one of the known most toxic chemicals, is widely used in mining and jewellery industries for gold extraction and recovery from crushed ores or electroplating residues. Cyanide toxicity occurs because this compound strongly binds to metals, inactivating metalloenzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase. Despite the toxicity of cyanide, cyanotrophic microorganisms such as the alkaliphilic bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 may use cyanide and its derivatives as a nitrogen source for growth, making biodegradation of cyanurated industrial waste possible. Genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic techniques applied to cyanide biodegradation ('cyan-omics') provide a holistic view that increases the global insights into the genetic background of cyanotrophic microorganisms that could be used for biodegradation of industrial cyanurated wastes and other biotechnological applications. PMID:26745356

  12. Biodegradation of cyanide wastes from mining and jewellery industries.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Roldán, María Dolores

    2016-04-01

    Cyanide, one of the known most toxic chemicals, is widely used in mining and jewellery industries for gold extraction and recovery from crushed ores or electroplating residues. Cyanide toxicity occurs because this compound strongly binds to metals, inactivating metalloenzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase. Despite the toxicity of cyanide, cyanotrophic microorganisms such as the alkaliphilic bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 may use cyanide and its derivatives as a nitrogen source for growth, making biodegradation of cyanurated industrial waste possible. Genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic techniques applied to cyanide biodegradation ('cyan-omics') provide a holistic view that increases the global insights into the genetic background of cyanotrophic microorganisms that could be used for biodegradation of industrial cyanurated wastes and other biotechnological applications.

  13. A review of acute cyanide poisoning with a treatment update.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Jillian

    2011-02-01

    Cyanide causes intracellular hypoxia by reversibly binding to mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase a(3). Signs and symptoms of cyanide poisoning usually occur less than 1 minute after inhalation and within a few minutes after ingestion. Early manifestations include anxiety, headache, giddiness, inability to focus the eyes, and mydriasis. As hypoxia progresses, progressively lower levels of consciousness, seizures, and coma can occur. Skin may look normal or slightly ashen, and arterial oxygen saturation may be normal. Early respiratory signs include transient rapid and deep respirations. As poisoning progresses, hemodynamic status may become unstable. The key treatment is early administration of 1 of the 2 antidotes currently available in the United States: the well-known cyanide antidote kit and hydroxocobalamin. Hydroxocobalamin detoxifies cyanide by binding with it to form the renally excreted, non-toxic cyanocobalamin. Because it binds with cyanide without forming methemoglobin, hydroxocobalamin can be used to treat patients without compromising the oxygen-carrying capacity of hemoglobin.

  14. Cyanide poisoning by fire smoke inhalation: a European expert consensus.

    PubMed

    Anseeuw, Kurt; Delvau, Nicolas; Burillo-Putze, Guillermo; De Iaco, Fabio; Geldner, Götz; Holmström, Peter; Lambert, Yves; Sabbe, Marc

    2013-02-01

    Smoke inhalation is a common cause of cyanide poisoning during fires, resulting in injury and even death. In many cases of smoke inhalation, cyanide has increasingly been recognized as a significant toxicant. The diagnosis of cyanide poisoning remains very difficult, and failure to recognize it may result in inadequate or inappropriate treatment. Findings suggesting cyanide toxicity include the following: (a) a history of enclosed-space fire; (b) any alteration in the level of consciousness; (c) any cardiovascular changes (particularly inexplicable hypotension); and (d) elevated plasma lactate. The feasibility and safety of empiric treatment with hydroxocobalamin for fire smoke victims have been reported in the literature. On the basis of a literature review and a panel discussion, a group of European experts has proposed emergency management protocols for cyanide toxicity in fire smoke victims.

  15. Process and catalyst for carbonylating olefins

    DOEpatents

    Zoeller, J.R.

    1998-06-02

    Disclosed is an improved catalyst system and process for preparing aliphatic carbonyl compounds such as aliphatic carboxylic acids, alkyl esters of aliphatic carboxylic acids and anhydrides of aliphatic carboxylic acids by carbonylating olefins in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (1) a first component selected from at least one Group 6 metal, i.e., chromium, molybdenum, and/or tungsten and (2) a second component selected from at least one of certain halides and tertiary and quaternary compounds of a Group 15 element, i.e., nitrogen, phosphorus and/or arsenic, and (3) as a third component, a polar, aprotic solvent. The process employing the improved catalyst system is carried out under carbonylating conditions of pressure and temperature discussed herein. The process constitutes and improvement over known processes since it can be carried out at moderate carbonylation conditions without the necessity of using an expensive noble metal catalyst, volatile, toxic materials such as nickel tetracarbonyl, formic acid or a formate ester. Further, the addition of a polar, aprotic solvent to the catalyst system significantly increases, or accelerates, the rate at which the carbonylation takes place.

  16. Characteristic infrared intensities of carbonyl stretching vibrations.

    PubMed

    Richter, Wagner E; Silva, Arnaldo F; Vidal, Luciano N; Bruns, Roy E

    2016-07-14

    The experimental infrared fundamental intensities of gas phase carbonyl compounds obtained by the integration of spectral bands in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) spectral database are in good agreement with the intensities reported by other laboratories having a root mean square error of 27 km mol(-1) or about 13% of the average intensity value. The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules/Charge-Charge Transfer-Counterpolarization (QTAIM/CCTCP) model indicates that the large intensity variation from 61.7 to 415.4 km mol(-1) is largely due to static atomic charge contributions, whereas charge transfer and counterpolarization effects essentially cancel one another leaving only a small net effect. The Characteristic Substituent Shift Model estimates the atomic charge contributions to the carbonyl stretching intensities within 30 km mol(-1) or 10% of the average contribution. However, owing to the size of the 2 × C × CTCP interaction contribution, the total intensities cannot be estimated with this degree of accuracy. The dynamic intensity contributions of the carbon and oxygen atoms account for almost all of the total stretching intensities. These contributions vary over large ranges with the dynamic contributions of carbon being about twice the size of the oxygen ones for a large majority of carbonyls. Although the carbon monoxide molecule has an almost null dipole moment contrary to the very polar bond of the characteristic carbonyl group, its QTAIM/CCTCP model is very similar to those found for the carbonyl compounds. PMID:27306140

  17. Fructose-Induced Carbonyl/Oxidative Stress in S. cerevisiae: Involvement of TOR.

    PubMed

    Valishkevych, Bohdana V; Vasylkovska, Ruslana A; Lozinska, Liudmyla M; Semchyshyn, Halyna M

    2016-01-01

    The TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling pathway first described in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is highly conserved in eukaryotes effector of cell growth, longevity, and stress response. TOR activation by nitrogen sources, in particular amino acids, is well studied; however its interplay with carbohydrates and carbonyl stress is poorly investigated. Fructose is a more potent glycoxidation agent capable of producing greater amounts of reactive carbonyl (RCS) and oxygen species (ROS) than glucose. The increased RCS/ROS production, as a result of glycoxidation in vivo, is supposed to be involved in carbonyl/oxidative stress, metabolic disorders, and lifespan shortening of eukaryotes. In this work we aim to expand our understanding of how TOR is involved in carbonyl/oxidative stress caused by reducing monosaccharides. It was found that in fructose-grown compared with glucose-grown cells the level of carbonyl/oxidative stress markers was higher. The defects in the TOR pathway inhibited metabolic rate and suppressed generation of glycoxidation products in fructose-grown yeast. PMID:27019749

  18. Fructose-Induced Carbonyl/Oxidative Stress in S. cerevisiae: Involvement of TOR

    PubMed Central

    Valishkevych, Bohdana V.; Vasylkovska, Ruslana A.; Lozinska, Liudmyla M.; Semchyshyn, Halyna M.

    2016-01-01

    The TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling pathway first described in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is highly conserved in eukaryotes effector of cell growth, longevity, and stress response. TOR activation by nitrogen sources, in particular amino acids, is well studied; however its interplay with carbohydrates and carbonyl stress is poorly investigated. Fructose is a more potent glycoxidation agent capable of producing greater amounts of reactive carbonyl (RCS) and oxygen species (ROS) than glucose. The increased RCS/ROS production, as a result of glycoxidation in vivo, is supposed to be involved in carbonyl/oxidative stress, metabolic disorders, and lifespan shortening of eukaryotes. In this work we aim to expand our understanding of how TOR is involved in carbonyl/oxidative stress caused by reducing monosaccharides. It was found that in fructose-grown compared with glucose-grown cells the level of carbonyl/oxidative stress markers was higher. The defects in the TOR pathway inhibited metabolic rate and suppressed generation of glycoxidation products in fructose-grown yeast. PMID:27019749

  19. Fructose-Induced Carbonyl/Oxidative Stress in S. cerevisiae: Involvement of TOR.

    PubMed

    Valishkevych, Bohdana V; Vasylkovska, Ruslana A; Lozinska, Liudmyla M; Semchyshyn, Halyna M

    2016-01-01

    The TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling pathway first described in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is highly conserved in eukaryotes effector of cell growth, longevity, and stress response. TOR activation by nitrogen sources, in particular amino acids, is well studied; however its interplay with carbohydrates and carbonyl stress is poorly investigated. Fructose is a more potent glycoxidation agent capable of producing greater amounts of reactive carbonyl (RCS) and oxygen species (ROS) than glucose. The increased RCS/ROS production, as a result of glycoxidation in vivo, is supposed to be involved in carbonyl/oxidative stress, metabolic disorders, and lifespan shortening of eukaryotes. In this work we aim to expand our understanding of how TOR is involved in carbonyl/oxidative stress caused by reducing monosaccharides. It was found that in fructose-grown compared with glucose-grown cells the level of carbonyl/oxidative stress markers was higher. The defects in the TOR pathway inhibited metabolic rate and suppressed generation of glycoxidation products in fructose-grown yeast.

  20. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF AN EXPERIMENT FOR ASSESSING CYANIDE IN GOLD MINING WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gold mining wastes treated by heap leaching cyanidization typically contain several metallo-cyanide species. Accurate measurement of total cyanide by the most common methods in such a case may be hampered by the inadequate recoveries that occur for certain cyanide compounds (e.g....

  1. Antiatherogenic effect of bisvanillyl-hydralazone, a new hydralazine derivative with antioxidant, carbonyl scavenger, and antiapoptotic properties.

    PubMed

    Bouguerne, Benaissa; Belkheiri, Nadji; Bedos-Belval, Florence; Vindis, Cécile; Uchida, Koji; Duran, Hubert; Grazide, Marie-Hélène; Baltas, Michel; Salvayre, Robert; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne

    2011-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated within the vascular wall trigger low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and carbonyl stress that are involved in atherogenesis. We recently reported that the antihypertensive drug, hydralazine, exhibits carbonyl scavenger and antiatherogenic properties, but only moderate antioxidant activity, so that high concentrations are required for inhibiting LDL oxidation. We aimed to develop agents sharing both antioxidant and carbonyl scavenger properties. We have synthesized a new hydralazine derivative, the bisvanillyl-hydralazone (BVH). BVH strongly inhibited LDL oxidation induced by copper and by human endothelial cells (HMEC-1), and prevented the formation of macrophagic foam cells. BVH reduced both the extracellular generation of ROS (superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide) induced by oxidized LDL (oxLDL), as well as intracellular oxidative stress and proteasome activation, NFkappaB activation, and oxLDL-mediated proinflammatory signaling. In parallel, BVH prevented the carbonyl stress induced by oxLDL on cellular proteins, and blocked the apoptotic cascade as assessed by the inhibition of Bid cleavage, cytochrome C release, and DEVDase activation. Lastly, BVH prevented atherogenesis and carbonyl stress in apoE(-/-) mice. In conclusion, BVH is the prototype of a new class of antioxidant and carbonyl scavenger agents designed for new therapeutical approaches in atherosclerosis.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Kills Caenorhabditis elegans by Cyanide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Larry A.; Manoil, Colin

    2001-01-01

    In this report we describe experiments to investigate a simple virulence model in which Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 rapidly paralyzes and kills the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results imply that hydrogen cyanide is the sole or primary toxic factor produced by P. aeruginosa that is responsible for killing of the nematode. Four lines of evidence support this conclusion. First, a transposon insertion mutation in a gene encoding a subunit of hydrogen cyanide synthase (hcnC) eliminated nematode killing. Second, the 17 avirulent mutants examined all exhibited reduced cyanide synthesis, and the residual production levels correlated with killing efficiency. Third, exposure to exogenous cyanide alone at levels comparable to the level produced by PAO1 killed nematodes with kinetics similar to those observed with bacteria. The killing was not enhanced if hcnC mutant bacteria were present during cyanide exposure. And fourth, a nematode mutant (egl-9) resistant to P. aeruginosa was also resistant to killing by exogenous cyanide in the absence of bacteria. A model for nematode killing based on inhibition of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase is presented. The action of cyanide helps account for the unusually broad host range of virulence of P. aeruginosa and may contribute to the pathogenesis in opportunistic human infections due to the bacterium. PMID:11591663

  3. Fluorescence of carbonyl-containing intraionic polymethines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulinich, Andrii V.

    2016-09-01

    Electronic structure and spectral-fluorescent properties of four related indole-based intraionic polymethines are discussed. They all comprise at least one carbonyl group in the acceptor part of their molecule but the effects of the carbonyls upon their UV/Vis and fluorescence spectra depend substantially on its position within the polymethine chromophore. At that, solvation of the carbonyls with highly electrophilic protic solvents can, as a function of dye structure, cause both a rise and decrease of fluorescence quantum yield of a dye or have no tangible effect at all. To get insight into the regularities of such behaviour, the dyes were examined closely using both their absorption and fluorescence spectral data and the (TD) DFT quantum chemical simulation.

  4. Carbonyl compounds indoors in a changing climate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Formic acid, acetic acid and formaldehyde are important compounds in the indoor environment because of the potential for these acids to degrade calcareous materials (shells, eggs, tiles and geological specimens), paper and corrode or tarnish metals, especially copper and lead. Carbonyl sulfide tarnishes both silver and copper encouraging the formation of surface sulfides. Results Carbonyls are evolved more quickly at higher temperatures likely in the Cartoon Gallery at Knole, an important historic house near Sevenoaks in Kent, England where the study is focused. There is a potential for higher concentrations to accumulate. However, it may well be that in warmer climates they will be depleted more rapidly if ventilation increases. Conclusions Carbonyls are likely to have a greater impact in the future. PMID:22439648

  5. Copper-Catalyzed Carbonylative Coupling of Cycloalkanes and Amides.

    PubMed

    Li, Yahui; Dong, Kaiwu; Zhu, Fengxiang; Wang, Zechao; Wu, Xiao-Feng

    2016-06-13

    Carbonylation reactions are a most powerful method for the synthesis of carbonyl-containing compounds. However, most known carbonylation procedures still require noble-metal catalysts and the use of activated compounds and good nucleophiles as substrates. Herein, we developed a copper-catalyzed carbonylative transformation of cycloalkanes and amides. Imides were prepared in good yields by carbonylation of a C(sp(3) )-H bond of the cycloalkane with the amides acting as weak nucleophiles. Notably, this is the first report of copper-catalyzed carbonylative C-H activation. PMID:27167881

  6. Isotopic Fingerprints of Iron-Cyanide Complexes in the Environment.

    PubMed

    Mansfeldt, Tim; Höhener, Patrick

    2016-07-19

    Tracing the origin of iron-cyanide complexes in the environment is important because these compounds are potentially toxic. We determined the stable isotopic compositions of cyanide-carbon (CCN) and cyanide-nitrogen (NCN) in 127 contaminated solids and 11 samples of contaminated groundwater from coal carbonization sites, blast furnace operations, and commercial cyanide applications. Coal-carbonization-related cyanides had unique high mean δ(13)CCN values of -10.5 ± 3.5‰ for the solids and -16.1 ± 1.2‰ for the groundwater samples, while the values for blast furnace sludge (-26.9 ± 1.5‰), commercial cyanides (-26.0 ± 3.0‰), and their corresponding groundwaters were significantly lower. Determination of δ(13)CCN is a promising tool for identifying the source of cyanide contamination. However, for coal carbonization sites, historical research into the manufacturing process is necessary because a nonconventional gas works site exhibited exceptionally low δ(13)CCN values of -22.7 ± 1.7‰. The δ(15)NCN values for samples related to coal carbonization and blast furnaces overlapped within a range of +0.1 to +10.3‰, but very high δ(15)NCN values seemed to be indicative for a cyanide source in the blast furnace. In contrast, commercial cyanides tend to have lower δ(15)NCN values of -5.6 to +1.9‰ in solids and -0.5 to +3.0‰ in the groundwater.

  7. Isotopic Fingerprints of Iron-Cyanide Complexes in the Environment.

    PubMed

    Mansfeldt, Tim; Höhener, Patrick

    2016-07-19

    Tracing the origin of iron-cyanide complexes in the environment is important because these compounds are potentially toxic. We determined the stable isotopic compositions of cyanide-carbon (CCN) and cyanide-nitrogen (NCN) in 127 contaminated solids and 11 samples of contaminated groundwater from coal carbonization sites, blast furnace operations, and commercial cyanide applications. Coal-carbonization-related cyanides had unique high mean δ(13)CCN values of -10.5 ± 3.5‰ for the solids and -16.1 ± 1.2‰ for the groundwater samples, while the values for blast furnace sludge (-26.9 ± 1.5‰), commercial cyanides (-26.0 ± 3.0‰), and their corresponding groundwaters were significantly lower. Determination of δ(13)CCN is a promising tool for identifying the source of cyanide contamination. However, for coal carbonization sites, historical research into the manufacturing process is necessary because a nonconventional gas works site exhibited exceptionally low δ(13)CCN values of -22.7 ± 1.7‰. The δ(15)NCN values for samples related to coal carbonization and blast furnaces overlapped within a range of +0.1 to +10.3‰, but very high δ(15)NCN values seemed to be indicative for a cyanide source in the blast furnace. In contrast, commercial cyanides tend to have lower δ(15)NCN values of -5.6 to +1.9‰ in solids and -0.5 to +3.0‰ in the groundwater. PMID:27345699

  8. Ocular scanning instrumentation: confirmation of biomarkers for anticholinesterase and cyanide exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Lance R.; Henry, Kurt A.; Odom, James V.; Kolanko, Christopher J.

    2003-09-01

    The sensitivity of the eye"s reaction to a wide variety of chemicals/toxins and its role as a gauge for internal homeostasis (e.g., cardiovascular and neurophysiological imbalances) has been extensively researched via many scientific disciplines. New techniques and equipment are both harnessing and utilizing this information to define a modern approach to the field of non-invasive early detection of a vast range of physical abnormalities, injuries, and illnesses. Early detection provides an invaluable tool in the subsequent success of treating such conditions. The application of these techniques to the detection of exposure to chemical threat agents such as organophosphate nerve agents and cyanide provides an important advancement in the ability to limit the deleterious effects of these agents. The Ocular Scanning Instrumentation (OSI) technology involves the use of an automated device for the continuous or programmed monitoring of optically apparent characteristic(s) and attributes of the eye that may serve as an early-warning system for possible complications based upon generalized information obtained from ocular biomarkers. Described herein is the analysis of primary ocular biomarkers for organophosphate (miosis) and cyanide (venous blood coloration) exposure.

  9. Chemical evolution. XXIX - Pyrimidines from hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Joshi, P. C.; Lawless, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    Compounds obtained by hydrolysis of HCN oligomers formed by allowing pH 9.2, 0.1 M cyanide to stand at room temperature for 4 to 12 months were analyzed. Hydrolysis of HCN oligomers yielded 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidine and 5-hydroxyuracil; orotic acid was detected after hydrolysis at pH 8.5. A unified pathway from diaminofumaronitrile to the pyrimidines observed is suggested. As purines, pyrimidines and amino acids are released by hydrolysis of HCN oligomers in either acidic or mildly basic aqueous solutions, they could have been formed on the primitive earth in spite of fluctuations in pH. 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidines appear to be likely candidates for incorporation into primitive nucleic acids, as they should undergo Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding with adenine.

  10. Radiation synthesis of polymers in aqueous cyanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niketić, Vesna

    Structures and properties of polymers isolated from the reaction mixtures obtained upon irradiation of dilute aqueous solutions of ammonium cyanide and HCN with gamma rays of 60Co were studied. On the basis of spectroscopic and chemical data it was concluded that two principal classes of polymers occur each of them having molecular weights that range from about 5000 to over 20000. In both types of polymers peptidic, urea-formaldehyde, and complex heterocyclic fragments are identified. In one type aliphatic fragments are more pronounced, while in the other heterocyclic structures predominate. The polymers interact with nucleic acid bases and some of them show catalytic properties as demonstrated by the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylacetate

  11. Cyanide Soap? Dissolved material in Titan's Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.; Lunine, J. I.; Neish, C. D.

    2011-10-01

    Although it is evident that Titan's lakes and seas are dominated by ethane, methane, nitrogen, and (in some models) propane, there is divergence on the predicted relative abundance of minor constituents such as nitriles and C-4 alkanes. Nitriles such as hydrogen cyanide and acetonitrile, which have a significant dipole moment, may have a disproportionate influence on the dielectric properties of Titan seas and may act to solvate polar molecules such as water ice. The hypothesis is offered that such salvation may act to enhance the otherwise negligible solubility of water ice bedrock in liquid hydrocarbons. Such enhanced solubility may permit solution erosion as a formation mechanism for the widespread pits and apparently karstic lakes on Titan. Prospects for testing this hypothesis in the laboratory, and with measurements on Titan, will be discussed.

  12. Physiologically available cyanide (PAC) in manufactured gas plant waste and soil samples

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, B.; Taft, A.; Ratliff, W.; Kelley, J.; Sullivan, J.; Pancorbo, O.

    1995-12-31

    Iron-complexed cyanide compounds, such as ferri-ferrocyanide (Prussian Blue), are wastes associated with former manufactured gas plant (MGP) facilities. When tested for total cyanide, these wastes often show a high total cyanide content. Because simple cyanide salts are acutely toxic, cyanide compounds can be the subject of concern. However, Prussian Blue and related species are known to have a low order of human and animal toxicity. Toxicology data on complexed cyanides will be presented. Another issue regarding Prussian Blue and related species is that the total cyanide method does not accurately represent the amount of free cyanide released from these cyanide species. The method involves boiling the sample in an acidic solution under vacuum to force the formation of HCN gas. Thus, Prussian Blue, which is known to be low in toxicity, cannot be properly evaluated with current methods. The Massachusetts Natural Gas Council initiated a program with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection to develop a method that would define the amount of cyanide that is able to be converted into hydrogen cyanide under the pH conditions of the stomach. It is demonstrated that less than 1% of the cyanide present in Prussian Blue samples and soils from MGP sites can be converted to HCN under the conditions of the human stomach. The physiologically available cyanide method has been designed to be executed at a higher temperature for one hour. It is shown that physiologically available cyanide in MGP samples is < 5--15% of total cyanide.

  13. High Pressure Synthesis of Transition Metal Carbonyls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, A. P.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents an experiment which uses readily available starting materials and inexpensive equipment for synthesis of transition metal carbonyls at 1000 atm and which is intended to give students experience in techniques used in research and industry. Safety precautions are emphasized. (Author/SA)

  14. Organocatalyzed Intramolecular Carbonyl-Ene Reactions.

    PubMed

    Dahlmann, Heidi A; McKinney, Amanda J; Santos, Maria P; Davis, Lindsey O

    2016-05-31

    An organocatalyzed intramolecular carbonyl-ene reaction was developed to produce carbocyclic and heterocyclic 5- and 6-membered rings from a citronellal-derived trifluoroketone and a variety of aldehydes. A phosphoramide derivative was found to promote the cyclization of the trifluoroketone, whereas a less acidic phosphoric acid proved to be a superior catalyst for the aldehyde substrates.

  15. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CYANIDE-RESISTANT AND AZIDE-RESISTANT CATALASE OF LACTOBACILLUS PLANTARUM.

    PubMed

    JOHNSTON, M A; DELWICHE, E A

    1965-08-01

    Johnston, M. A. (Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.), and E. A. Delwiche. Isolation and characterization of the cyanide-resistant and azide-resistant catalase of Lactobacillus plantarum. J. Bacteriol. 90:352-356. 1965.-Lactobacillus plantarum T-1403-5 has been shown to possess a very active cyanide- and azide-resistant catalase. By means of fractional ammonium sulfate precipitation, removal of nucleic acids with protamine sulfate, adsorption on calcium phosphate gel, and pH gradient chromatography on diethylaminoethyl cellulose, the catalase "activity" was purified approximately 14-fold. The purified enzyme preparation was insensitive to the heme poisons cyanide and azide, the metal chelating agents ethylenediaminetetraacetate and o-phenanthroline, and the sulfhydryl binding agent p-chloromercuribenzoate. The purified enzyme moved at a uniform rate in the electrophoretic field (isoelectric point, pH 4.7). The ultraviolet-light absorption spectrum was negative for heme-iron components, and fluorescence measurements yielded negative results with regard to flavin components. Acriflavin and Atabrine had no effect on enzyme activity. The nonheme catalase displayed a much broader pH range of activity than the heme-iron catalase of a control culture of Escherichia coli and the azide-sensitive catalase developed by L. plantarum NZ48 when grown in the presence of preformed hematin. The nonheme catalase was more resistant to heat inactivation. No retention of the enzyme on a chromatographic column could be obtained with Sephadex 200, nor could the enzyme be separated from crystalline beef-liver catalase by the gel filtration technique. Sedimentation was obtained in a centrifugal field of 144,000 x g for 12 hr. PMID:14329447

  16. Formation of urea and guanidine by irradiation of ammonium cyanide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohrmann, R.

    1972-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of ammonium cyanide yield urea, cyanamide and guanidine when exposed to sunlight or an unfiltered 254 nm ultraviolet source. The prebiotic significance of these results is discussed.

  17. Severe keloids caused by hydrogen cyanide injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xiangdong; Guo, Guangran; Ruan, Yanjun; Lin, Dawei; Zhao, Bo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report severe keloids caused by hydrogen cyanide injury. Hydrogen cyanide poisoning is still a problem as an occupational disease in China. We report a 37-year-old man with severe hydrogen cyanide poisoning. The patient fell on the floor after inhalation of hydrogen cyanide and was burned on his back by hydrocyanic acid. Sequential treatment included amyl nitrite by inhalation, intravenous sodium nitrite 3%, and intravenous sodium thiosulfate 25%. Other treatment consisted of incision of the trachea, mannitol and furosemide, antibiotics, and nutrient support measures. The patient also received hyperbaric oxygen therapy; during the first treatment, he became apneic and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was supplied in the hyperbaric oxygen chamber. He eventually recovered, but a large amount of keloids developed on his back and buttocks. PMID:18568895

  18. Cyanide Suicide After Deep Web Shopping: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Le Garff, Erwan; Delannoy, Yann; Mesli, Vadim; Allorge, Delphine; Hédouin, Valéry; Tournel, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    Cyanide is a product that is known for its use in industrial or laboratory processes, as well as for intentional intoxication. The toxicity of cyanide is well described in humans with rapid inhibition of cellular aerobic metabolism after ingestion or inhalation, leading to severe clinical effects that are frequently lethal. We report the case of a young white man found dead in a hotel room after self-poisoning with cyanide ordered in the deep Web. This case shows a probable complex suicide kit use including cyanide, as a lethal tool, and dextromethorphan, as a sedative and anxiolytic substance. This case is an original example of the emerging deep Web shopping in illegal drug procurement.

  19. Cyanide Suicide After Deep Web Shopping: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Le Garff, Erwan; Delannoy, Yann; Mesli, Vadim; Allorge, Delphine; Hédouin, Valéry; Tournel, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    Cyanide is a product that is known for its use in industrial or laboratory processes, as well as for intentional intoxication. The toxicity of cyanide is well described in humans with rapid inhibition of cellular aerobic metabolism after ingestion or inhalation, leading to severe clinical effects that are frequently lethal. We report the case of a young white man found dead in a hotel room after self-poisoning with cyanide ordered in the deep Web. This case shows a probable complex suicide kit use including cyanide, as a lethal tool, and dextromethorphan, as a sedative and anxiolytic substance. This case is an original example of the emerging deep Web shopping in illegal drug procurement. PMID:27367575

  20. Management of cyanide toxicity in patients with burns.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Louise; Moiemen, Naiem

    2015-02-01

    The importance of cyanide toxicity as a component of inhalational injury in patients with burns is increasingly being recognised, and its prompt recognition and management is vital for optimising burns survival. The evidence base for the use of cyanide antidotes is limited by a lack of randomised controlled trials in humans, and in addition consideration must be given to the concomitant pathophysiological processes in patients with burns when interpreting the literature. We present a literature review of the evidence base for cyanide antidotes with interpretation in the context of patients with burns. We conclude that hydroxycobalamin should be utilised as the first-line antidote of choice in patients with burns with inhalational injury where features consistent with cyanide toxicity are present.

  1. Cyanide intoxication in the rat: physiological and neuropathological aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Brierley, J B; Brown, A W; Calverley, J

    1976-01-01

    Sodium cyanide was given to rats by intravenous infusion at a rate that would avert apnoea (the first sign of overdosage) in the majority. There was full physiological monitoring in a group under anaesthesia and more limited monitoring in an unanaesthetized group. White matter was damaged in six animals and grey matter additionally in only one. It was concluded that cyanide can damage neurones only through the medium of secondary effects on circulation and respiration. Images PMID:4588

  2. AN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE INDUSTRIAL TEST SYSTEM, INC. CYANIDE REAGENTSTRIP™ TEST KIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanide can be present in various forms in water. The cyanide test kit evaluated in this verification study (Industrial Test System, Inc. Cyanide Regent Strip ™ Test Kit) was designed to detect free cyanide in water. This is done by converting cyanide in water to cyanogen...

  3. Equilibrium isotherm and kinetic studies for the simultaneous removal of phenol and cyanide by use of S. odorifera (MTCC 5700) immobilized on coconut shell activated carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Neetu; Balomajumder, Chandrajit

    2016-09-01

    In this study, simultaneous removal of phenol and cyanide by a microorganism S. odorifera (MTCC 5700) immobilized onto coconut shell activated carbon surface (CSAC) was studied in batch reactor from mono and binary component aqueous solution. Activated carbon was derived from coconut shell by chemical activation method. Ferric chloride (Fecl3), used as surface modification agents was applied to biomass. Optimum biosorption conditions were obtained as a function of biosorbent dosage, pH, temperature, contact time and initial phenol and cyanide concentration. To define the equilibrium isotherms, experimental data were analyzed by five mono component isotherm and six binary component isotherm models. The higher uptake capacity of phenol and cyanide onto CSAC biosorbent surface was 450.02 and 2.58 mg/g, respectively. Nonlinear regression analysis was used for determining the best fit model on the basis of error functions and also for calculating the parameters involved in kinetic and isotherm models. The kinetic study results revealed that Fractal-like mixed first second order model and Brouser-Weron-Sototlongo models for phenol and cyanide were capable to offer accurate explanation of biosorption kinetic. According to the experimental data results, CSAC with immobilization of bacterium S. odorifera (MTCC 5700) seems to be an alternative and effective biosorbent for the elimination of phenol and cyanide from binary component aqueous solution.

  4. Method for conversion of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds

    DOEpatents

    Lilga, Michael A.; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Zacher, Alan H.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Orth, Rick J.

    2010-03-30

    A process is disclosed for conversion of salts of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds forming useful conversion products including, e.g., .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and/or salts of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Conversion products find use, e.g., as feedstock and/or end-use chemicals.

  5. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Carbonylation of Methyl Acetate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polichnowski, S. W.

    1986-01-01

    Presents a study of the rhodium-catalyzed, ioding-promoted carbonylation of methyl acetate. This study provides an interesting contrast between the carbonylation of methyl acetate and the carbonylation of methanol when similar rhodium/iodine catalyst systems are used. (JN)

  6. Cyanide: an unreported cause of neurological complications following smoke inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Frédéric; Boukobza, Monique; Borron, Stephen W

    2011-01-01

    Although the combustion of natural and synthetic products can yield cyanide, its toxic role in residential fires is unclear. This case concerns a woman aged over 50 years who presented comatose, pulseless and apnoeic after a domestic fire. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and on-site administration of 2.5 g hydroxocobalamin as an antidote to cyanide resulted in a return of spontaneous circulation. On admission to the intensive care unit, the patient was treated with hyperbaric oxygen for suspected carbon monoxide poisoning. In a blood specimen collected at the scene before hydroxocobalamin administration, blood cyanide and carbon monoxide levels were 68 µmol/l and 10.9%. On admission to hospital, plasma lactate was at 4.6 mmol/l. Brain scans revealed lesions which were confirmed 2 months later, consistent with the haemorrhagic necrosis often seen after poisoning by cyanide. These data suggest that smoke inhalation in a residential fire may cause cyanide poisoning. This case provides clinical, biological, analytical and brain imaging data supporting the hypothesis of the toxic role of smoke-induced cyanide poisoning which may result in neurological sequelae. PMID:22675114

  7. Adsorption of copper cyanide on chemically active adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.S.; Deorkar, N.V.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1998-07-01

    An inorganic chemically active adsorbent (ICAA), SG(1)-TEPA (tetraethylenepentaamine)-propyl, is developed for removal, recovery, and recycling of copper cyanide from industrial waste streams. Equilibrium studies are executed to determine and model adsorption of the copper cyanide complex from aqueous solutions in a batch and packed column. It appears that adsorption is dependent on anionic copper cyanide species and the basicity of the ligand. Aqueous-phase equilibrium modeling shows that monovalent (Cu(CN){sub 2}{sup {minus}}), divalent (Cu(CN){sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), and trivalent (Cu(CN){sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}) species of copper cyanide exist in the solution, depending on the pH and the concentration of total cyanide ions. Batch adsorption data are modeled using a modified multicomponent Langmuir isotherm which includes aqueous-phase speciation and basicity of the SG(1)-TEPA-propyl. This developed model is applied with a mass balance equation to describe the adsorption of copper cyanide complexes in a packed column.

  8. Acute cyanide poisoning among jewelry and textile industry workers.

    PubMed

    Coentrão, Luís; Moura, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Limited work has focused on occupational exposures that may increase the risk of cyanide poisoning by ingestion. A retrospective chart review of all admissions for acute cyanide poisoning by ingestion for the years 1988 to 2008 was conducted in a tertiary university hospital serving the largest population in the country working in jewelry and textile facilities. Of the 9 patients admitted to the hospital during the study period, 8 (7 males, 1 female; age 36 ± 11 years, mean ± SD) attempted suicide by ingestion of potassium cyanide used in their profession as goldsmiths or textile industry workers. Five patients had severe neurologic impairment and severe metabolic acidosis (pH 7.02 ± 0.08, mean ± SD) with high anion gap (23 ± 4 mmol/L, mean ± SD). Of the 5 severely intoxicated patients, 3 received antidote therapy (sodium thiosulfate or hydroxocobalamin) and resumed full consciousness in less than 8 hours. All patients survived without major sequelae. Cyanide intoxication by ingestion in our patients was mainly suicidal and occurred in specific jobs where potassium cyanide is used. Metabolic acidosis with high anion is a good surrogated marker of severe cyanide poisoning. Sodium thiosulfate and hydroxocobalamin are both safe and effective antidotes.

  9. Cyanide: an unreported cause of neurological complications following smoke inhalation.

    PubMed

    Baud, Frédéric; Boukobza, Monique; Borron, Stephen W

    2011-10-28

    Although the combustion of natural and synthetic products can yield cyanide, its toxic role in residential fires is unclear. This case concerns a woman aged over 50 years who presented comatose, pulseless and apnoeic after a domestic fire. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and on-site administration of 2.5 g hydroxocobalamin as an antidote to cyanide resulted in a return of spontaneous circulation. On admission to the intensive care unit, the patient was treated with hyperbaric oxygen for suspected carbon monoxide poisoning. In a blood specimen collected at the scene before hydroxocobalamin administration, blood cyanide and carbon monoxide levels were 68 µmol/l and 10.9%. On admission to hospital, plasma lactate was at 4.6 mmol/l. Brain scans revealed lesions which were confirmed 2 months later, consistent with the haemorrhagic necrosis often seen after poisoning by cyanide. These data suggest that smoke inhalation in a residential fire may cause cyanide poisoning. This case provides clinical, biological, analytical and brain imaging data supporting the hypothesis of the toxic role of smoke-induced cyanide poisoning which may result in neurological sequelae.

  10. Chemical and metabolomic screens identify novel biomarkers and antidotes for cyanide exposure.

    PubMed

    Nath, Anjali K; Roberts, Lee D; Liu, Yan; Mahon, Sari B; Kim, Sonia; Ryu, Justine H; Werdich, Andreas; Januzzi, James L; Boss, Gerry R; Rockwood, Gary A; MacRae, Calum A; Brenner, Matthew; Gerszten, Robert E; Peterson, Randall T

    2013-05-01

    Exposure to cyanide causes a spectrum of cardiac, neurological, and metabolic dysfunctions that can be fatal. Improved cyanide antidotes are needed, but the ideal biological pathways to target are not known. To understand better the metabolic effects of cyanide and to discover novel cyanide antidotes, we developed a zebrafish model of cyanide exposure and scaled it for high-throughput chemical screening. In a screen of 3120 small molecules, we discovered 4 novel antidotes that block cyanide toxicity. The most potent antidote was riboflavin. Metabolomic profiling of cyanide-treated zebrafish revealed changes in bile acid and purine metabolism, most notably by an increase in inosine levels. Riboflavin normalizes many of the cyanide-induced neurological and metabolic perturbations in zebrafish. The metabolic effects of cyanide observed in zebrafish were conserved in a rabbit model of cyanide toxicity. Further, humans treated with nitroprusside, a drug that releases nitric oxide and cyanide ions, display increased circulating bile acids and inosine. In summary, riboflavin may be a novel treatment for cyanide toxicity and prophylactic measure during nitroprusside treatment, inosine may serve as a biomarker of cyanide exposure, and metabolites in the bile acid and purine metabolism pathways may shed light on the pathways critical to reversing cyanide toxicity.

  11. C1-C14 carbonyls in Los Angeles air

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, E.; Grosjean, D.; Fraser, M.; Cass, G.R.

    1995-12-01

    Air samples collected at five Los Angeles locations have been analyzed for carbonyls as their DNPH derivatives using liquid chromatography and chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Twenty-three carbonyls have been measured: 14 aliphatic aldehydes (from formaldehyde to tetradecanal); 2 aromatics (benzaldehyde and m-tolualdehyde), 3 ketones (acetone, 2-butanone and cyclohexanone), one unsaturated carbonyl (crotonaldehyde) and 3 dicarbonyls (glyoxal, methylglyoxal and biacetyl). Another nineteen carbonyls have been tentatively identified including four high MW (C{sub 15}-C{sub 18}) aliphatic carbonyls.

  12. Simple catalytic mechanism for the direct coupling of α-carbonyls with functionalized amines: a one-step synthesis of Plavix.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ryan W; Zbieg, Jason R; Zhu, Shaolin; Li, Wei; MacMillan, David W C

    2013-10-30

    The direct α-amination of ketones, esters, and aldehydes has been accomplished via copper catalysis. In the presence of catalytic copper(II) bromide, a diverse range of carbonyl and amine substrates undergo fragment coupling to produce synthetically useful α-amino-substituted motifs. The transformation is proposed to proceed via a catalytically generated α-bromo carbonyl species; nucleophilic displacement of the bromide by the amine then delivers the α-amino carbonyl adduct while the catalyst is reconstituted. The practical value of this transformation is highlighted through one-step syntheses of two high-profile pharmaceutical agents, Plavix and amfepramone. PMID:24107144

  13. Ferrate(VI) oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides

    SciTech Connect

    Ria A. Yngard; Virender K. Sharma; Jan Filip; Radek Zboril

    2008-04-15

    Cyanide is commonly found in electroplating, mining, coal gasification, and petroleum refining effluents, which require treatment before being discharged. Cyanide in effluents exists either as free cyanide or as a metal complex. The kinetics of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by an environmentally friendly oxidant, ferrate, were studied as a function of pH (9.1-10.5) and temperature (15-45{sup o}C) using a stopped-flow technique. The weak-acid dissociable cyanides were Cd(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ni(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}, and the rate-laws for the oxidation may be -d(Fe(VI))/dt = k (Fe(VI))(M(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}){sup n} where n = 0.5 and 1 for Cd(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} and Ni(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-}, respectively. The rates decreased with increasing pH and were mostly related to a decrease in concentration of the reactive protonated Fe(VI) species, HFeO{sub 4}{sup -}. The stoichiometries with Fe(VI) were determined to be: 4HFeO{sub 4}{sup -} + M(CN){sub 4}{sup 2-} + 6H{sub 2}O {yields} 4Fe(OH){sub 3} + M{sup 2+} + 4NCO{sup -} + O{sub 2} + 4OH{sup -}. Mechanisms are proposed that agree with the observed reaction rate-laws and stoichiometries of the oxidation of weak-acid dissociable cyanides by Fe(VI). Results indicate that Fe(VI) is effective in removing cyanide in coke oven plant effluent, where organics are also present. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Oxidative carbonylation of styrene to methyl cinnamate

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.Y.

    1987-04-01

    Oxidative carbonylation technology is used for making methyl cinnamate from styrene as an alternative to Claisen condensation of benzaldehyde with methyl acetate. Using this approach, the optimum yield of cinnamate is greater than 90%, with CO{sub 2}, acetophenone, and phenylsuccinate as the major by-products. The conversion of styrene and the selectivity to cinnamate depend upon the types of catalysts and reaction conditions used. A plausible reaction mechanism is proposed to account for the selective formation of cinnamate.

  15. Carbonyl compounds generated from electronic cigarettes.

    PubMed

    Bekki, Kanae; Uchiyama, Shigehisa; Ohta, Kazushi; Inaba, Yohei; Nakagome, Hideki; Kunugita, Naoki

    2014-10-28

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are advertised as being safer than tobacco cigarettes products as the chemical compounds inhaled from e-cigarettes are believed to be fewer and less toxic than those from tobacco cigarettes. Therefore, continuous careful monitoring and risk management of e-cigarettes should be implemented, with the aim of protecting and promoting public health worldwide. Moreover, basic scientific data are required for the regulation of e-cigarette. To date, there have been reports of many hazardous chemical compounds generated from e-cigarettes, particularly carbonyl compounds such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and glyoxal, which are often found in e-cigarette aerosols. These carbonyl compounds are incidentally generated by the oxidation of e-liquid (liquid in e-cigarette; glycerol and glycols) when the liquid comes in contact with the heated nichrome wire. The compositions and concentrations of these compounds vary depending on the type of e-liquid and the battery voltage. In some cases, extremely high concentrations of these carbonyl compounds are generated, and may contribute to various health effects. Suppliers, risk management organizations, and users of e-cigarettes should be aware of this phenomenon.

  16. Bacterial degradation of cyanide and its metal complexes under alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Huertas, María-J; Martínez-Luque, Manuel; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Roldán, M Dolores; García-Gil, L Jesús; Castillo, Francisco; Blasco, Rafael

    2005-02-01

    A bacterial strain able to use cyanide as the sole nitrogen source under alkaline conditions has been isolated. The bacterium was classified as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes by comparison of its 16S RNA gene sequence to those of existing strains and deposited in the Coleccion Espanola de Cultivos Tipo (Spanish Type Culture Collection) as strain CECT5344. Cyanide consumption is an assimilative process, since (i) bacterial growth was concomitant and proportional to cyanide degradation and (ii) the bacterium stoichiometrically converted cyanide into ammonium in the presence of l-methionine-d,l-sulfoximine, a glutamine synthetase inhibitor. The bacterium was able to grow in alkaline media, up to an initial pH of 11.5, and tolerated free cyanide in concentrations of up to 30 mM, which makes it a good candidate for the biological treatment of cyanide-contaminated residues. Both acetate and d,l-malate were suitable carbon sources for cyanotrophic growth, but no growth was detected in media with cyanide as the sole carbon source. In addition to cyanide, P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 used other nitrogen sources, namely ammonium, nitrate, cyanate, cyanoacetamide, nitroferricyanide (nitroprusside), and a variety of cyanide-metal complexes. Cyanide and ammonium were assimilated simultaneously, whereas cyanide strongly inhibited nitrate and nitrite assimilation. Cyanase activity was induced during growth with cyanide or cyanate, but not with ammonium or nitrate as the nitrogen source. This result suggests that cyanate could be an intermediate in the cyanide degradation pathway, but alternative routes cannot be excluded.

  17. Precious metal recovery from waste printed circuit boards using cyanide and non-cyanide lixiviants--A review.

    PubMed

    Akcil, Ata; Erust, Ceren; Gahan, Chandra Sekhar; Ozgun, Mehmet; Sahin, Merve; Tuncuk, Aysenur

    2015-11-01

    Waste generated by the electrical and electronic devices is huge concern worldwide. With decreasing life cycle of most electronic devices and unavailability of the suitable recycling technologies it is expected to have huge electronic and electrical wastes to be generated in the coming years. The environmental threats caused by the disposal and incineration of electronic waste starting from the atmosphere to the aquatic and terrestrial living system have raised high alerts and concerns on the gases produced (dioxins, furans, polybrominated organic pollutants, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) by thermal treatments and can cause serious health problems if the flue gas cleaning systems are not developed and implemented. Apart from that there can be also dissolution of heavy metals released to the ground water from the landfill sites. As all these electronic and electrical waste do posses richness in the metal values it would be worth recovering the metal content and protect the environmental from the pollution. Cyanide leaching has been a successful technology worldwide for the recovery of precious metals (especially Au and Ag) from ores/concentrates/waste materials. Nevertheless, cyanide is always preferred over others because of its potential to deliver high recovery with a cheaper cost. Cyanidation process also increases the additional work of effluent treatment prior to disposal. Several non-cyanide leaching processes have been developed considering toxic nature and handling problems of cyanide with non-toxic lixiviants such as thiourea, thiosulphate, aqua regia and iodine. Therefore, several recycling technologies have been developed using cyanide or non-cyanide leaching methods to recover precious and valuable metals.

  18. Biodegradation of free cyanide by bacterial species isolated from cyanide-contaminated artisanal gold mining catchment area in Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Razanamahandry, Lovasoa Christine; Andrianisa, Harinaivo Anderson; Karoui, Hela; Kouakou, Koffi Marcelin; Yacouba, Hamma

    2016-08-01

    Soil and water samples were collected from a watershed in Burkina Faso where illegal artisanal gold extraction using cyanidation occurs. The samples were used to evaluate cyanide contamination and the presence of cyanide degrading bacteria (CDB). Free cyanide (F-CN) was detected in all samples, with concentrations varying from 0.023 to 0.9 mg kg(-1), and 0.7-23 μg L(-1) in the soil and water samples, respectively. Potential CDB also were present in the samples. To test the effective F-CN degradation capacity of the isolated CDB species, the species were cultivated in growth media containing 40, 60 or 80 mg F-CN L(-1), with or without nutrients, at pH 9.5 and at room temperature. More than 95% of F-CN was degraded within 25 h, and F-CN degradation was associated with bacterial growth and ammonium production. However, initial concentrations of F-CN higher than 100 mg L(-1) inhibited bacterial growth and cyanide degradation. Abiotic tests showed that less than 3% of F-CN was removed by volatilization. Thus, the degradation of F-CN occurred predominately by biological mechanisms, and such mechanisms are recommended for remediation of contaminated soil and water. The bacteria consortium used in the experiment described above exist in a Sahelian climate, which is characterized by a long hot and dry season. Because the bacteria are already adapted to the local climate conditions and show the potential for cyanide biodegradation, further applicability to other contaminated areas in West Africa, where illegal gold cyanidation is widespread, should be explored. PMID:27209555

  19. Acute oral toxicity of sodium cyanide in birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Hill, E.F.; Carpenter, J.W.; Krynitsky, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Sensitivities of six avian species, black vulture (Coragyps atratus), American kestrel (Falco sparverius), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), eastern screech-owl (Otus asio), and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris), to acute poisoning by sodium cyanide (NaCN) were compared by single dose LD50's. Three species, domestic chickens, black vultures, and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), were dosed with NaCN to determine cyanide residues in those that died and also in survivors, in addition to postmortem fate. Three flesh-eating species (black vulture, American kestrel, and eastern screech-owl; LD50's 4.0-8.6 mg/kg) were more sensitive to NaCN than three species (Japanese quail, domestic chicken, and European starling; LD50's 9.4-21 mg/kg) that fed predominantly on plant material. Elevated concentrations of cyanide were found in the blood of birds that died of cyanide poisoning; however, concentrations in birds that died overlapped those in survivors. Blood was superior to liver as the tissue of choice for detecting cyanide exposure. No gross pathological changes related to dosing were observed at necropsy.

  20. Sources and geochemical evolution of cyanide and formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrhenius, G.

    1991-01-01

    The major source of cyanide has, in current paleoatmospheric models, been assumed to be the reaction of photodissociated thermospheric nitrogen with a limiting supply of stratospheric methane. Formaldehyde may be produced with more ease from an atmosphere of carbon dioxide as the dominant carbon species, and from carbonate in solution or sorbed in double layer hydroxide minerals. Potentially more important sources for cyanide and other carbon containing molecules are the partially photoprotected northern and southern auroral ovals where continuous currents reaching several mega-amperes induce ion-molecule reactions, extending into the lower stratosphere. In simulated environments of this kind, the cyanide ion is known to be produced from oxidized carbon species potentially more abundant than methane. Rainout of cyanide and formaldehyde place them in two different geochemical reaction reservoirs. In the anoxic Archean hydrosphere, about 1mM in Fe2(+), the cyanide ion would have been efficiently converted to the stable ferrocyanide complex Fe(CN) sub 6(4-), protecting it from the commonly considered fate of decomposition by hydrolysis, and eventually incorporating it in pyroaurite type minerals, most efficiently in green rust where it converts to insoluble ferriferrocyanide, prussian blue.

  1. Leaching of petroleum catalysts with cyanide for palladium recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sibrell, P.L.; Atkinson, G.B.

    1995-12-31

    The US Bureau of Mines has tested cyanide leaching for recovery of palladium (Pd) from spent petroleum processing catalysts. Three different catalyst samples were supplied by a spent-catalyst processor. These catalysts consisted of a zeolite base and contained 0.4 to 0.7 pct Pd. During alkaline cyanide leaching, the catalysts exhibited ion-exchange properties due to their zeolite matrices. Hydrogen ions were released from the zeolite in exchange for sodium ions in solution, resulting in a significant decrease in solution pH. This could present a safety hazard because of the potential for release of toxic hydrogen cyanide gas. A pretreatment step where the catalysts were contacted with a 1.OM sodium hydroxide solution was found to prevent the pH shift from occurring. Following the sodium hydroxide pretreatment, two stages of leaching at 160 C with solution containing 1 pct sodium cyanide and 0.1M sodium hydroxide gave at least 75 and up to 95 pct Pd recovery. The Pd was quantitatively recovered from the leach solution by thermal decomposition in an autoclave at 250 C for 1 h. The Pd content of the precipitate was over 50 pct. Thermal decomposition also decreased the total cyanide content of the barren solution to less than 0.2 mg/L. The catalyst leach residues passed the Federal Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and the California Waste Extraction Test, indicating that landfill disposal of the leach residues would be acceptable.

  2. Leaching of petroleum catalysts with cyanide for palladium recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sibrell, P.L.; Atkinson, G.B.

    1995-06-01

    The US Bureau of Mines has tested cyanide leaching for recovery of palladium (Pd) from spent petroleum processing catalysts. Three different catalyst samples were supplied by a spent-catalyst processor. These catalysts consisted of a zeolite base and contained 0.4 to 0.7% Pd. During alkaline cyanide leaching, the catalysts exhibited ion-exchange properties due to their zeolite matrices. Hydrogen ions were released from the zeolite in exchange for sodium ions in solution, resulting in a significant decrease in solution pH. This could present a safety hazard because of the potential for release of toxic hydrogen cyanide gas. A pretreatment step where the catalysts were contacted with a 1.0 M sodium hydroxide was found to prevent the pH shift from occurring. Following the sodium hydroxide pretreatment, two stages of leaching at 160 C with solution containing 1% sodium cyanide and 0.1 M sodium hydroxide gave at least 75 and up to 95% Pd recovery. The Pd was quantitatively recovered from the leach solution by thermal decomposition in an autoclave at 250 C for 1 h. The Pd content of the precipitate was over 50%. Thermal decomposition also decreased the total cyanide content of the barren solution to less than 0.2 mg/L. The catalyst leach residues passed the Federal Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and the California Waste Extraction Test, indicating that landfill disposal of the leach residues would be acceptable.

  3. Unusual reaction of [NiFe]-hydrogenases with cyanide.

    PubMed

    Hexter, Suzannah V; Chung, Min-Wen; Vincent, Kylie A; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2014-07-23

    Cyanide reacts rapidly with [NiFe]-hydrogenases (hydrogenase-1 and hydrogenase-2 from Escherichia coli) under mild oxidizing conditions, inhibiting the electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrogen as recorded by protein film electrochemistry. Electrochemical, EPR, and FTIR measurements show that the final enzyme product, formed within a second (even under 100% H2), is the resting state known as Ni-B, which contains a hydroxido-bridged species, Ni(III)-μ(OH)-Fe(II), at the active site. "Cyanide inhibition" is easily reversed because it is simply the reductive activation of Ni-B. This paper brings back into focus an observation originally made in the 1940s that cyanide inhibits microbial H2 oxidation and addresses the interesting mechanism by which cyanide promotes the formation of Ni-B. As a much stronger nucleophile than hydroxide, cyanide binds more rapidly and promotes oxidation of Ni(II) to Ni(III); however, it is quickly replaced by hydroxide which is a far superior bridging ligand.

  4. Spectroscopic study of acetylene and hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozario, Hoimonti Immaculata

    High-resolution molecular spectroscopy has been used to study acetylene line parameters and emission spectra of hydrogen cyanide. All acetylene spectra were recorded in our laboratory at the University of Lethbridge using a 3-channel tuneable diode laser spectrometer. N2-broadened line widths and N2-pressure induced line shifts have been measured for transitions in the v1+v3 band of acetylene at seven temperatures in the range 213-333K to obtain the temperature dependences of broadening and shift coefficients. The Voigt and hard-collision line profile models were used to retrieve the line parameters. The line-broadening and line-shift coefficients as well as their temperature-dependent parameters have been also evaluated theoretically, in the frame work of a semi-classical approach based on an exponential representation of the scattering operator, an intermolecular potential composed of electrostatic quadrupole--quadrupole and pairwise atom--atom interactions as well as on exact trajectories driven by an effective isotropic potential. The experimental results for both N2-broadening and shifting show good agreement with the theoretical results. We have studied the line intensities of the 1vl 20←0v120 band system from the HCN emission spectrum. The infrared emission spectrum of H12C 14N was measured at the Justus-Liebig University, Giessen, Germany. The emission spectrum was analyzed with the spectrum analysis software Symath running using Mathematica as a platform. This approach allowed us to retrieve information on band intensity parameters.

  5. Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Destaillats, Hugo; Jakober, Chris A.; Robert, Michael A.; Riddle, Sarah G.; Destaillats, Hugo; Charles, M. Judith; Green, Peter G.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    2007-12-01

    Carbonyls from gasoline powered light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and heavy-duty diesel powered vehicles (HDDVs) operated on chassis dynamometers were measured using an annular denuder-quartz filter-polyurethane foam sampler with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization and chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Two internal standards were utilized based on carbonyl recovery, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde forcarbonyls and 6-fluoro-4-chromanone for>_C8 compounds. Gas- and particle-phase emissions for 39 aliphatic and 20 aromatic carbonyls ranged from 0.1 ? 2000 ?g/L fuel for LDVs and 1.8 - 27000 mu g/L fuel for HDDVs. Gas-phase species accounted for 81-95percent of the total carbonyls from LDVs and 86-88percent from HDDVs. Particulate carbonyls emitted from a HDDV under realistic driving conditions were similar to concentrations measured in a diesel particulate matter (PM) standard reference material. Carbonyls accounted for 19percent of particulate organic carbon (POC) emissions from low-emission LDVs and 37percent of POC emissions from three-way catalyst equipped LDVs. This identifies carbonyls as one of the largest classes of compounds in LDV PM emissions. The carbonyl fraction of HDDV POC was lower, 3.3-3.9percent depending upon operational conditions. Partitioning analysis indicates the carbonyls had not achieved equilibrium between the gas- and particle-phase under the dilution factors of 126-584 used in the current study.

  6. Carbonyl emissions from gasoline and diesel motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Jakober, Chris A; Robert, Michael A; Riddle, Sarah G; Destaillats, Hugo; Charles, M Judith; Green, Peter G; Kleeman, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Carbonyls from gasoline-powered light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and heavy-duty diesel-powered vehicles (HDDVs) operated on chassis dynamometers were measured by use of an annular denuder-quartz filter-polyurethane foam sampler with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization and chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Two internal standards were utilized based on carbonyl recovery: 4-fluorobenzaldehyde for < C8 carbonyls and 6-fluoro-4-chromanone for > or = C8 compounds. Gas- and particle-phase emissions for 39 aliphatic and 20 aromatic carbonyls ranged from 0.1 to 2000 microg/L of fuel for LDVs and from 1.8 to 27 000 microg/L of fuel for HDDVs. Gas-phase species accounted for 81-95% of the total carbonyls from LDVs and 86-88% from HDDVs. Particulate carbonyls emitted from a HDDV under realistic driving conditions were similar to concentrations measured in a diesel particulate matter (PM) standard reference material. Carbonyls accounted for 19% of particulate organic carbon (POC) emissions from low-emission LDVs and 37% of POC emissions from three-way catalyst-equipped LDVs. This identifies carbonyls as one of the largest classes of compounds in LDV PM emissions. The carbonyl fraction of HDDV POC was lower, 3.3-3.9% depending upon operational conditions. Partitioning analysis indicates the carbonyls had not achieved equilibrium between the gas and particle phases under the dilution factors of 126-584 used in the present study.

  7. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase catalysts enables effective degradation of cyanide and phenol in coking wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Martínková, Ludmila; Chmátal, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to design an effective method for the bioremediation of coking wastewaters, specifically for the concurrent elimination of their highly toxic components - cyanide and phenols. Almost full degradation of free cyanide (0.32-20 mM; 8.3-520 mg L(-1)) in the model and the real coking wastewaters was achieved by using a recombinant cyanide hydratase in the first step. The removal of cyanide, a strong inhibitor of tyrosinase, enabled an effective degradation of phenols by this enzyme in the second step. Phenol (16.5 mM, 1,552 mg L(-1)) was completely removed from a real coking wastewater within 20 h and cresols (5.0 mM, 540 mg L(-1)) were removed by 66% under the same conditions. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase open up new possibilities for the bioremediation of wastewaters with complex pollution.

  8. Red-shifted cyanide stretching frequencies in cyanide-bridged transition metal donor-acceptor complexes. Support for vibronic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Watzky, M.A.; Endicott, J.F.; Song, X.

    1996-06-05

    Patterns in the cyanide stretching frequencies have been examined in several series of monometal- and CN{sup {minus}} bridged transition metal complexes. Metal-to-cyanide back-bonding can be identified as a major factor contributing to red shifts of v{sub CN} in monometal complexes. This effect is complicated in cyanide-bridged complexes in two ways: (a) when both metals can back-bond to cyanide, the net interaction is repulsive and results in a blue shift of v{sub CN}: and (b) when a donor and acceptor are bridged, V{sub CN} undergoes a substantial red shift (sometimes more than 60 cm{sup {minus}1} lower in energy than the parent monometal complex). These effects can be described by simple perturbational models for the electronic interactions. Monometal cyanide complexes and CN{sup {minus}}-bridged backbonding metals can be treated in terms of their perturbations of the CN{sup {minus}} {pi} and {pi}* orbitals by using a simple, Hueckel-like, three-center perturbational treatment of electronic interactions. However, bridged donor-acceptor pairs are best described by a vibronic model in which it is assumed that the extent of electronic delocalization is in equilibrium with variations of some nuclear coordinates. Consistent with this approach, it is found that (a) the oscillator strength of the donor-acceptor charge transfer (DACT) absorption is roughly proportional to the red shift of v{sub CN} and (b) there are strong symmetry constraints on the coupling.

  9. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase catalysts enables effective degradation of cyanide and phenol in coking wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Martínková, Ludmila; Chmátal, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to design an effective method for the bioremediation of coking wastewaters, specifically for the concurrent elimination of their highly toxic components - cyanide and phenols. Almost full degradation of free cyanide (0.32-20 mM; 8.3-520 mg L(-1)) in the model and the real coking wastewaters was achieved by using a recombinant cyanide hydratase in the first step. The removal of cyanide, a strong inhibitor of tyrosinase, enabled an effective degradation of phenols by this enzyme in the second step. Phenol (16.5 mM, 1,552 mg L(-1)) was completely removed from a real coking wastewater within 20 h and cresols (5.0 mM, 540 mg L(-1)) were removed by 66% under the same conditions. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase open up new possibilities for the bioremediation of wastewaters with complex pollution. PMID:27328365

  10. Cyanide toxicity and exposure risk. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the biological hazards associated with exposure to cyanide. Cyanide poisoning and antidotes, combustion products containing cyanide, clinical toxicology, environmental effects, exposure hazards, occupational safety, and other topics relating to the health hazards of cyanide compounds are discussed. Methods of analysis and monitoring are also considered. (Contains a minimum of 188 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Acute Cyanide Poisoning: Hydroxocobalamin and Sodium Thiosulfate Treatments with Two Outcomes following One Exposure Event.

    PubMed

    Meillier, Andrew; Heller, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is rapidly reacting and causes arrest of aerobic metabolism. The symptoms are diffuse and lethal and require high clinical suspicion. Remediation of symptoms and mortality is highly dependent on quick treatment with a cyanide antidote. Presently, there are two widely accepted antidotes: sodium thiosulfate and hydroxocobalamin. These treatments act on different components of cyanide's metabolism. Here, we present two cases resulting from the same source of cyanide poisoning and the use of both antidotes separately used with differing outcomes.

  12. Encapsulation of thiosulfate: cyanide sulfurtransferase by mouse erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, P.; Ray, L.E.; Sander, C.; Way, J.L.; Sylvester, D.M.; Way, J.L.

    1986-03-30

    Murine carrier erythrocytes, prepared by hypotonic dialysis, were employed in the encapsulation of several compounds including (14C)sucrose, (3H)inulin, and bovine thiosulfate:cyanide sulfurtransferase (rhodanese), a mitochondrial enzyme which converts cyanide to thiocyanate. Approximately 30% of the added (14C)sucrose, (3H)inulin, and rhodanese was encapsulated by predialyzed erythrocytes, and a decrease in the mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin was observed. In the encapsulation of rhodanese a recovery of 95% of the erythrocytes was achieved and an 85% equilibrium was established. The addition of potassium cyanide (50 mM) to intact, rhodanese-loaded erythrocytes containing sodium thiosulfate resulted in its metabolism to thiocyanate. These results establish the potential use of erythrocytes as biodegradable drug carrier in drug antagonism.

  13. Cardiorespiratory response to cyanide of arterial chemoreceptors in fetal lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Itskovitz, J.; Rudolph, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Cardiorespiratory response to the stimulation of the carotid and aortic receptors by sodium cyanide was examined in fetal lambs in utero at 0.8 (120 days) gestation. Injections of 50-400 ..mu..g cyanide into the inferior vena cava or the carotid artery of intact fetuses elicited bradycardia and respiratory responses that varied from a single gasp to rhythmic respiratory movements but no significant change in arterial blood pressure. Carotid sinus denervation eliminated the cardiorespiratory response to intracarotid injection of cyanide and sinoaortic denervation abolished the response to inferior vena caval injection. It is concluded that in fetal lamb in utero the aortic and carotid bodies are active, and hypoxic stimulation of these chemoreceptors results in cardiorespiratory response characterized by slowing of fetal heart rate, respiratory effort, and no consistent change in arterial blood pressure.

  14. OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS, ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND TAILINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS, ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND TAILINGS PILES, LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND MILL SITE IS AT TOP CENTER IN THE DISTANCE. THE DARK SPOT JUST BELOW THE TRAM TERMINAL ARE REMAINS OF THE DEWATERING BUILDING. THE MAIN ACCESS ROAD IS AT UPPER LEFT. THE FOUNDATIONS AT CENTER SUPPORTED SIX 25 FT. OR GREATER DIAMETER SETTLING TANKS WHERE TAILINGS FROM THE MILL SETTLED IN A CYANIDE SOLUTION IN ORDER TO RECLAIM ANY GOLD CONTENT. THE PREGNANT SOLUTION WAS THEN RUN THROUGH THE ZINC BOXES ON THE GROUND AT CENTER RIGHT, WHERE ZINC SHAVINGS WERE INTRODUCED, CAUSING THE GOLD TO PRECIPITATE OUT OF THE CYANIDE SOLUTION, WHICH COULD BE USED AGAIN. THE FLAT AREA IN THE FOREGROUND WITH THE TANK AND TANK HOOPS IS THE FOOTPRINT OF A LARGE BUILDING WHERE THE PRECIPITATION AND FURTHER FILTERING AND FINAL CASTING TOOK PLACE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  15. Flotation purification of industrial wastewater by removing cyanide ions

    SciTech Connect

    Evtyugina, N.M.; Derbysheva, E.K.; Kopktova, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    One of the oldest and most common methods of purifying sewage by removing cyanide ions is binding them to nontoxic compounds of ferrous salts, principally divalent ferrous salts. Research in this direction has also been realized for the sewage of coking plants. One of the reasons why the method has not been introduced is tied to the difficulty of separating the finely-dispersed slime of the divalent ferrous cyanide K/sub 4/(Fe(CN)/sub 6/). This study investigates methods of producing complex compounds of cyanide ions with ferrous salts which have low solubility and, as far as possible, are easily extracted from water. To achieve this, it is suggested that one of the promising methods of water purification - flotation - be used and that the sludge extracted be utilized in accordance with wellknown plans.

  16. NEW GROUND-STATE MEASUREMENTS OF ETHYL CYANIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Pearson, John C.; Drouin, Brian J.; Yu, Shanshan

    2009-09-01

    The spectrum of ethyl cyanide, or propionitrile (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN), has been repeatedly observed in the interstellar medium with large column densities and surprisingly high temperatures in hot core sources. The construction of new, more sensitive, observatories accessing higher frequencies such as Herschel, ALMA, and SOFIA have made it important to extend the laboratory data for ethyl cyanide to coincide with the capabilities of the new instruments. We report extensions of the laboratory measurements of the rotational spectrum of ethyl cyanide in its ground vibrational state to 1.6 THz. A global analysis of the ground state, which includes all of the previous data and 3356 newly assigned transitions, has been fitted to within experimental error to J = 132, K = 36, using both Watson A-reduced and Watson S-reduced Hamiltonians.

  17. Hydroxocobalamin treatment of acute cyanide poisoning from apricot kernels.

    PubMed

    Cigolini, Davide; Ricci, Giogio; Zannoni, Massimo; Codogni, Rosalia; De Luca, Manuela; Perfetti, Paola; Rocca, Giampaolo

    2011-05-24

    Clinical experience with hydroxocobalamin in acute cyanide poisoning via ingestion remains limited. This case concerns a 35-year-old mentally ill woman who consumed more than 20 apricot kernels. Published literature suggests each kernel would have contained cyanide concentrations ranging from 0.122 to 4.09 mg/g (average 2.92 mg/g). On arrival, the woman appeared asymptomatic with a raised pulse rate and slight metabolic acidosis. Forty minutes after admission (approximately 70 min postingestion), the patient experienced headache, nausea and dyspnoea, and was hypotensive, hypoxic and tachypnoeic. Following treatment with amyl nitrite and sodium thiosulphate, her methaemoglobin level was 10%. This prompted the administration of oxygen, which evoked a slight improvement in her vital signs. Hydroxocobalamin was then administered. After 24 h, she was completely asymptomatic with normalised blood pressure and other haemodynamic parameters. This case reinforces the safety and effectiveness of hydroxocobalamin in acute cyanide poisoning by ingestion.

  18. Hydroxocobalamin treatment of acute cyanide poisoning from apricot kernels.

    PubMed

    Cigolini, Davide; Ricci, Giogio; Zannoni, Massimo; Codogni, Rosalia; De Luca, Manuela; Perfetti, Paola; Rocca, Giampaolo

    2011-09-01

    Clinical experience with hydroxocobalamin in acute cyanide poisoning via ingestion remains limited. This case concerns a 35-year-old mentally ill woman who consumed more than 20 apricot kernels. Published literature suggests each kernel would have contained cyanide concentrations ranging from 0.122 to 4.09 mg/g (average 2.92 mg/g). On arrival, the woman appeared asymptomatic with a raised pulse rate and slight metabolic acidosis. Forty minutes after admission (approximately 70 min postingestion), the patient experienced headache, nausea and dyspnoea, and was hypotensive, hypoxic and tachypnoeic. Following treatment with amyl nitrite and sodium thiosulphate, her methaemoglobin level was 10%. This prompted the administration of oxygen, which evoked a slight improvement in her vital signs. Hydroxocobalamin was then administered. After 24 h, she was completely asymptomatic with normalised blood pressure and other haemodynamic parameters. This case reinforces the safety and effectiveness of hydroxocobalamin in acute cyanide poisoning by ingestion.

  19. Cyanide complexes of Ti(IV): a computational study.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2009-09-01

    Density functional theory (B3LYP) and coupled-cluster techniques [CCSD(T)] including solvent effects have been used to study the homoleptic and mixed cyanide/isocyanide complexes of Ti(IV), [Ti(CN)(n)](4-n) (n=1-6). The most stable isomer is found to be the isocyanide form except for n=6 where the cyanide isomer is preferred. Calculations accounting for solvent effects show that, irrespective of the solvent employed, the hexacyanocomplex should be formed. We have additionally analyzed the bonding situation in these complexes in order to shed some light on the reasons for the predicted cyano-/isocyano preference. We have found that the more advantageous sigma-bonding capabilities of the cyanide form become increasingly important for larger n eventually favoring the cyanoisomer for n=6. We finally compare the bonding situation in hexacyanotitanate(IV) with that of hexacyanoferrate(II).

  20. [Degradation of cyanide and maturity in cassava processing wastes composting].

    PubMed

    Lü, Yu-Cai; Wang, Xiao-Fen; Zhu, Wan-Bin; Cheng, Xu; Cui, Zong-Jun

    2009-05-15

    An investigation was carried out to approach the degradation of cyanide and maturity during the cassava processing wastes composting process. Mixtures of cassava hull, cassava residues and pig manure were used in the experiment. Parameters like temperature, pH, cyanide, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and C/N ratio were assessed during the composting process, the effect of composting process on the degradation of cyanide and maturity were evaluated. The results reveal that the content of cyanide decreases sharply and declines to 2.08 mg/kg (30 days of composting), the degradation rate of cyanide is 94.16% and is in accord with food safety standard. After 15 days of the composting process, degradation of composting materials containing carbon (starch, cellulose, hemicellulose) and cyanide are quick and the degradation rates of them are more than 80%, properties tend towards stability basically. During 30 days of the composting process, the composting temperature drops to normal temperature and tends to stability, pH remains stable at 7.2. Parameters like C/N ratio, nitrate-nitrogen (NO3(-)-N) and ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) as maturity evaluation index were measured, and the results indicate that physical and chemical properties keep stability after 15 days of cassava processing wastes composting process. At the end of fermentation, C/N ratio is 17.55, the content of nitrate-nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen reach 2.5g/kg and 10 mg/kg respectively, NO3(-)-N/NH4(+)-N ratio is 250. The changes of these above mentioned parameters meet with maturity evaluation standard. Proving that cassava processing wastes during 30 days of composting treatment can achieve stability and security state.

  1. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  2. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  3. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  4. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  5. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  6. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  7. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  8. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  9. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  10. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  11. INTEGRATED BIOREACTOR SYSTEM FOR THE TREATMENT OF CYANIDE, METALS AND NITRATES IN MINE PROCESS WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative biological process is described for the tratment of cyanide-, metals- and nitrate-contaminated mine process water. The technology was tested for its ability to detoxify cyanide and nitrate and to immobilize metals in wastewater from agitation cyanide leaching. A pil...

  12. Antidotes and treatments for chemical warfare/terrorism agents: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, G C; Condurache, C T

    2010-09-01

    This article reviews the evidence supporting the efficacy of antidotes used or recommended for the potential chemical warfare agents of most concern. Chemical warfare agents considered include cyanide, vesicants, pulmonary irritants such as chlorine and phosgene, and nerve agents. The strength of evidence for most antidotes is weak, highlighting the need for additional research in this area.

  13. On OMC-1 temperatures determined from methyl cyanide observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis is performed on the J(k) = 12(k)-11(k) and 13(k)-12(k) transitions of methyl cyanide detected by other investigators in the direction of OMC-1. The original interpretation of those observations argues for the presence of two distinct temperature regions or possibly a temperature gradient within the cloud. The analysis presented here demonstrates that the observations of these particular molecular transitions are consistent with a single methyl cyanide emission region with a source kinetic temperature of 121.2 + or - 8.2 K and a molecular rotational temperature of 16.6 + or - 1.8 K.

  14. Quantitative measurement of cyanide species in simulated ferrocyanide Hanford waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pool, K.H.; Matheson, J.D.

    1993-02-01

    Analytical methods for the quantification of cyanide species in Hanford simulated high-level radioactive waste were pursued in this work. Methods studied include infrared spectroscopy (solid state and solution), Raman spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), and ion chromatography. Of these, infrared, Raman, X-ray diffraction, and ion chromatography techniques show promise in the concentration range of interest. Quantitation limits for these latter four techniques were demonstrated to be approximately 0.1 wt% (as cyanide) using simulated Hanford wastes.

  15. 37. DETAIL OF CYANIDE LEACHING TANK DRAIN DOOR AND PIPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. DETAIL OF CYANIDE LEACHING TANK DRAIN DOOR AND PIPING SYSTEM. NOTE SPIGOT UNDER BOARD AT UPPER LEFT INSERTS INTO HOLE IN PIPE AT BOTTOM OF FRAME. CYANIDE SOLUTION WAS PUMPED INTO THE TANKS AND THE PREGNANT SOLUTION DRAINED OUT OF THE TANKS THROUGH THIS PIPE, AND BACK INTO A SEPARATE HOLDING TANK ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE MILL. TAILINGS WERE REMOVED FROM THE TANKS THROUGH THE ROUND DRAIN DOOR IN THE BOTTOM OF THE TANK (MISSING) SEEN AT TOP CENTER. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  16. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, J.M.; Hahn, F.F.; Barr, E.B.

    1995-12-01

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a colorless gas, is a side product of industrial procedures sure as coal hydrogenation and gasification. It is structurally related to and is a metabolite of carbon disulfide. COS is metabolized in the body by carbonic anhydrase to hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), which is thought to be responsible for COS toxicity. No threshold limit value for COS has been established. Results of these studies indicate COS (with an LC{sub 50} of 590 ppm) is slightly less acutely toxic than H{sub 2}S (LC{sub 50} of 440 ppm).

  17. A computational method to predict carbonylation sites in yeast proteins.

    PubMed

    Lv, H Q; Liu, J; Han, J Q; Zheng, J G; Liu, R L

    2016-01-01

    Several post-translational modifications (PTM) have been discussed in literature. Among a variety of oxidative stress-induced PTM, protein carbonylation is considered a biomarker of oxidative stress. Only certain proteins can be carbonylated because only four amino acid residues, namely lysine (K), arginine (R), threonine (T) and proline (P), are susceptible to carbonylation. The yeast proteome is an excellent model to explore oxidative stress, especially protein carbonylation. Current experimental approaches in identifying carbonylation sites are expensive, time-consuming and limited in their abilities to process proteins. Furthermore, there is no bioinformational method to predict carbonylation sites in yeast proteins. Therefore, we propose a computational method to predict yeast carbonylation sites. This method has total accuracies of 86.32, 85.89, 84.80, and 86.80% in predicting the carbonylation sites of K, R, T, and P, respectively. These results were confirmed by 10-fold cross-validation. The ability to identify carbonylation sites in different kinds of features was analyzed and the position-specific composition of the modification site-flanking residues was discussed. Additionally, a software tool has been developed to help with the calculations in this method. Datasets and the software are available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/hqlstudio/ files/CarSpred.Y/. PMID:27420944

  18. Effect of hydrogen atoms on the structures of trinuclear metal carbonyl clusters: trinuclear manganese carbonyl hydrides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-mei; Wang, Chao-yang; Li, Qian-shu; Xie, Yaoming; King, R Bruce; Schaefer, Henry F

    2009-05-18

    The structures of the trinuclear manganese carbonyl hydrides H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(n) (n = 12, 11, 10, 9) have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT). Optimization of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) gives the experimentally known structure in which all carbonyl groups are terminal and each edge of a central Mn(3) equilateral triangle is bridged by a single hydrogen atom. This structure establishes the canonical distance 3.11 A for the Mn-Mn single bond satisfying the 18-electron rule. The central triangular (mu-H)(3)Mn(3) unit is retained in the lowest energy structure of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(11), which may thus be derived from the H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) structure by removal of a carbonyl group with concurrent conversion of one of the remaining carbonyl groups into a semibridging carbonyl group to fill the resulting hole. The potential energy surface of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) is relatively complicated with six singlet and five triplet structures. One of the lower energy H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structures has one of the hydrogen atoms bridging the entire Mn(3) triangle and the other two hydrogen atoms bridging Mn-Mn edges. This H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structure achieves the favored 18-electron configuration with a very short MnMn triple bond of 2.36 A. The other low energy H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(10) structure retains the (mu-H)(3)Mn(3) core of H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(12) but has a unique six-electron donor eta(2)-mu(3) carbonyl group bridging the entire Mn(3) triangle similar to the unique carbonyl group in the known compound Cp(3)Nb(3)(CO)(6)(eta(2)-mu(3)-CO). For H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(9) a structure with a central (mu(3)-H)(2)Mn(3) trigonal bipyramid lies >20 kcal/mol below any of the other structures. Triplet structures were found for the unsaturated H(3)Mn(3)(CO)(n) (n = 11, 10, 9) systems but at significantly higher energies than the lowest lying singlet structures.

  19. Field observations on the use of sodium cyanide in stream surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Tatum, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Sodium cyanide has been an effective method for sampling the stream fish populations in Eastern Tennessee. Its portability makes it a practical stream management tool. Cyanide is an excellent cold weather sampling method. Three ounces of cyanide in trout streams and 6 ounces in warmwater streams per cubic foot a second flow will sample 100 yards. In water colder than 55/sup 0/F mortality of fish is not acute. Rainbow trout and various warmwater fish collected with cyanide and held in aquaria showed no deleterious effects from exposure to the chemical. Reduction in stream invertebrate populations after cyanide application is evident. 3 references, 1 table.

  20. Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1990-01-01

    This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

  1. Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1990-02-06

    This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

  2. 169. PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR FROM SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE FEED TOWER TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    169. PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR FROM SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE FEED TOWER TO SUMP, LOWER RIGHT QUADRANT. DIAGONAL PIPE IN UPPER RIGHT IS AIR LINE TO AGITATORS. LAUNDER PARALLEL TO LEFT EDGE (FILLED WITH DEBRIS) RUNS FROM PRIMARY THICKENER No. 2 TO GOLD TANK No. 2 - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  3. 90. PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR FROM SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE FEED TOWER TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR FROM SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE FEED TOWER TO SUMP, LOWER RIGHT QUADRANT. DIAGONAL PIPE IN UPPER RIGHT IS AIR LINE TO AGITATORS. LAUNDER PARALLEL TO LEFT EDGE (FILLED WITH DEBRIS) RUNS FROM PRIMARY THICKENER No. 2 TO GOLD TANK No. 2. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  4. Intoxication by Cyanide in Pregnant Sows: Prenatal and Postnatal Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Gotardo, André T.; Hueza, Isis M.; Manzano, Helena; Maruo, Viviane M.; Maiorka, Paulo C.; Górniak, Silvana L.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is a ubiquitous chemical in the environment and has been associated with many intoxication episodes; however, little is known about its potentially toxic effects on development. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of maternal exposure to potassium cyanide (KCN) during pregnancy on both sows and their offspring. Twenty-four pregnant sows were allocated into four groups that orally received different doses of KCN (0.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 6.0 mg/kg of body weight) from day 21 of pregnancy to term. The KCN-treated sows showed histological lesions in the CNS, thyroid follicle enlargement, thyroid epithelial thickening, colloid reabsorption changes, and vacuolar degeneration of the renal tubular epithelium. Sows treated with 4.0 mg/kg KCN showed an increase in the number of dead piglets at birth. Weaned piglets from all KCN-treated groups showed histological lesions in the thyroid glands with features similar to those found in their mothers. The exposure of pregnant sows to cyanide thus caused toxic effects in both mothers and piglets. We suggest that swine can serve as a useful animal model to assess the neurological, goitrogenic, and reproductive effects of cyanide toxicosis. PMID:26101526

  5. Thermodeformational Behavior of Cubic Crystals of Sodium Cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesleva, E. P.; Gil, L. B.; Solovyan, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    In the paper the authors provide results of the study of anisotropic and isotropic acoustic (elastic waves propagation velocities), dimensional (elastic moduli) and nondimensional (Poisson's ratios) elastic characteristics of mono- and polycrystals of sodium cyanide within the temperature range 283.7÷473 K.

  6. Gas-phase chemistry of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shiwei; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fangli; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Wu, Xiaolei; Tan, Cunmin; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes were produced from a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Their volatile carbonyl complexes were formed in gas-phase reactions in situ with the carbon-monoxide containing gas. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyls from the recoil chamber to the chemical separation apparatus. The gas-phase chemical behaviors of these carbonyl complexes were studied using an online low temperature isothermal chromatography (IC) technique. Long IC columns made up of FEP Teflon were used to obtain the chemical information of the high-volatile Ru and Rh carbonyls. By excluding the influence of precursor effects, short-lived isotopes of (109-110)Ru and (111-112)Rh were used to represent the chemical behaviours of Ru and Rh carbonyls. Relative chemical yields of about 75% and 20% were measured for Ru(CO)5 and Rh(CO)4, respectively, relative to the yields of KCl aerosols transported in Ar gas. The adsorption enthalpies of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes on a Teflon surface were determined to be around ΔHads = -33(+1)(-2) kJ mol(-1) and -36(+2)(-1) kJ mol(-1), respectively, by fitting the breakthrough curves of the corresponding carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Different from Mo and Tc carbonyls, a small amount of oxygen gas was found to be not effective for the chemical yields of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes. The general chemical behaviors of short-lived carbonyl complexes of group VI-IX elements were discussed, which can be used in the future study on the gas-phase chemistry of superheavy elements - Bh, Hs, and Mt carbonyls. PMID:26573993

  7. Interlaboratory study of free cyanide methods compared to total cyanide measurements and the effect of preservation with sodium hydroxide for secondary- and tertiary-treated waste water samples.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Brett J; Antonio, Karen

    2012-11-01

    Several methods exist for the measurement of cyanide levels in treated wastewater,typically requiring preservation of the sample with sodium hydroxide to minimize loss of hydrogen cyanide gas (HCN). Recent reports have shown that cyanide levels may increase with chlorination or preservation. In this study, three flow injection analysis methods involving colorimetric and amperometric detection were compared within one laboratory, as well as across separate laboratories and equipment. Split wastewater samples from eight facilities and three different sampling periods were tested. An interlaboratory confidence interval of 3.5 ppb was calculated compared with the intralaboratory reporting limit of 2 ppb. The results show that free cyanide measurements are not statistically different than total cyanide levels. An artificial increase in cyanide level is observed with all methods for preserved samples relative to nonpreserved samples, with an average increase of 2.3 ppb. The possible loss of cyanide without preservation is shown to be statistically insignificant if properly stored up to 48 hours. The cyanide increase with preservation is further substantiated with the method of standard additions and is not a matrix interference. The increase appears to be correlated with the amount of cyanide observed without preservation, which appears to be greater in those facilities that disinfect their wastewater with chlorine, followed by dechlorination with sodium bisulfite.

  8. Cyanide degradation by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 involves a malate:quinone oxidoreductase and an associated cyanide-insensitive electron transfer chain.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, Victor M; Merchán, Faustino; Blasco, Rafael; Igeño, M Isabel; Martínez-Luque, Manuel; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Castillo, Francisco; Roldán, M Dolores

    2011-03-01

    The alkaliphilic bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 is able to grow with cyanide as the sole nitrogen source. Membrane fractions from cells grown under cyanotrophic conditions catalysed the production of oxaloacetate from L-malate. Several enzymic activities of the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate cycles in association with the cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway seem to be responsible for the oxaloacetate formation in vivo. Thus, in cyanide-grown cells, citrate synthase and isocitrate lyase activities were significantly higher than those observed with other nitrogen sources. Malate dehydrogenase activity was undetectable, but a malate:quinone oxidoreductase activity coupled to the cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase was found in membrane fractions from cyanide-grown cells. Therefore, oxaloacetate production was linked to the cyanide-insensitive respiration in P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344. Cyanide and oxaloacetate reacted chemically inside the cells to produce a cyanohydrin (2-hydroxynitrile), which was further converted to ammonium. In addition to cyanide, strain CECT5344 was able to grow with several cyano derivatives, such as 2- and 3-hydroxynitriles. The specific system required for uptake and metabolization of cyanohydrins was induced by cyanide and by 2-hydroxynitriles, such as the cyanohydrins of oxaloacetate and 2-oxoglutarate.

  9. A Direct and Rapid Method to Determine Cyanide in Urine by Capillary Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiyang; Maddukuri, Naveen; Gong, Maojun

    2015-01-01

    Cyanides are poisonous chemicals that widely exist in nature and industrial processes as well as accidental fires. Rapid and accurate determination of cyanide exposure would facilitate forensic investigation, medical diagnosis, and chronic cyanide monitoring. Here, a rapid and direct method was developed for the determination of cyanide ions in urinary samples. This technique was based on an integrated capillary electrophoresis system coupled with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. Cyanide ions were derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) and a primary amine (glycine) for LIF detection. Three separate reagents, NDA, glycine, and cyanide sample, were mixed online, which secured uniform conditions between samples for cyanide derivatization and reduced the risk of precipitation formation of mixtures. Conditions were optimized; the derivatization was completed in 2-4 minutes, and the separation was observed in 25 s. The limit of detection (LOD) was 4.0 nM at 3-fold signal-to-noise ratio for standard cyanide in buffer. The cyanide levels in urine samples from smokers and non-smokers were determined by using the method of standard addition, which demonstrated significant difference of cyanide levels in urinary samples from the two groups of people. The developed method was rapid and accurate, and is anticipated to be applicable to cyanide detection in waste water with appropriate modification. PMID:26342870

  10. Development of a Fluorescence-Based Sensor for Rapid Diagnosis of Cyanide Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although commonly known as a highly toxic chemical, cyanide is also an essential reagent for many industrial processes in areas such as mining, electroplating, and synthetic fiber production. The “heavy” use of cyanide in these industries, along with its necessary transportation, increases the possibility of human exposure. Because the onset of cyanide toxicity is fast, a rapid, sensitive, and accurate method for the diagnosis of cyanide exposure is necessary. Therefore, a field sensor for the diagnosis of cyanide exposure was developed based on the reaction of naphthalene dialdehyde, taurine, and cyanide, yielding a fluorescent β-isoindole. An integrated cyanide capture “apparatus”, consisting of sample and cyanide capture chambers, allowed rapid separation of cyanide from blood samples. Rabbit whole blood was added to the sample chamber, acidified, and the HCN gas evolved was actively transferred through a stainless steel channel to the capture chamber containing a basic solution of naphthalene dialdehyde (NDA) and taurine. The overall analysis time (including the addition of the sample) was <3 min, the linear range was 3.13–200 μM, and the limit of detection was 0.78 μM. None of the potential interferents investigated (NaHS, NH4OH, NaSCN, and human serum albumin) produced a signal that could be interpreted as a false positive or a false negative for cyanide exposure. Most importantly, the sensor was 100% accurate in diagnosing cyanide poisoning for acutely exposed rabbits. PMID:24383576

  11. Novel actinomycete and a cyanide-degrading pseudomonad isolated from industrial sludge

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    A novel actinomycete was the predominant filamentous microorganism in bulking activated sludge in a bench-scale reactor treating coke plant wastewater. The bacterium was isolated and identified as an actinomycete that is biochemically and morphologically similar to Amycolatopsis orientalis; however, a lack of DNA homology excludes true relatedness. At present, the isolate (NRRL B 16216) cannot be assigned to the recognized taxa of actinomycetes. Cyanide-degrading microorganisms were selected in chemostats maintained at a low dilution rate for several weeks. Cyanide alone or cyanide plus phenol were fully degraded when equilibrium was achieved, and increasing concentrations of cyanide were degraded until inhibition of cell division resulted in cell washout. An isolated non-fluorescent pseudomonad could be adapted to degrade high concentrations of cyanide and to utilize cyanide-nitrogen when phenol or lactate was the carbon source. Although one-carbon compounds such as methanol and methylamine were growth substrates, cyanide was not utilized as a carbon source. In the absence of cyanide, adaptation was gradually lost. Oxygen consumption of adapted cells was stimulated in the presence of cyanide whereas that of unadapted cells was depressed. Cyanide was degraded by growing or resting cells and by cell-free extracts. Cyanide degrading activity of cell-free extracts, lost upon dialysis, was fully restored with NAD(P)H.

  12. Development of a fluorescence-based sensor for rapid diagnosis of cyanide exposure.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Randy; Oda, Robert P; Bhandari, Raj K; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2014-02-01

    Although commonly known as a highly toxic chemical, cyanide is also an essential reagent for many industrial processes in areas such as mining, electroplating, and synthetic fiber production. The "heavy" use of cyanide in these industries, along with its necessary transportation, increases the possibility of human exposure. Because the onset of cyanide toxicity is fast, a rapid, sensitive, and accurate method for the diagnosis of cyanide exposure is necessary. Therefore, a field sensor for the diagnosis of cyanide exposure was developed based on the reaction of naphthalene dialdehyde, taurine, and cyanide, yielding a fluorescent β-isoindole. An integrated cyanide capture "apparatus", consisting of sample and cyanide capture chambers, allowed rapid separation of cyanide from blood samples. Rabbit whole blood was added to the sample chamber, acidified, and the HCN gas evolved was actively transferred through a stainless steel channel to the capture chamber containing a basic solution of naphthalene dialdehyde (NDA) and taurine. The overall analysis time (including the addition of the sample) was <3 min, the linear range was 3.13-200 μM, and the limit of detection was 0.78 μM. None of the potential interferents investigated (NaHS, NH4OH, NaSCN, and human serum albumin) produced a signal that could be interpreted as a false positive or a false negative for cyanide exposure. Most importantly, the sensor was 100% accurate in diagnosing cyanide poisoning for acutely exposed rabbits.

  13. A direct and rapid method to determine cyanide in urine by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiyang; Maddukuri, Naveen; Gong, Maojun

    2015-10-01

    Cyanides are poisonous chemicals that widely exist in nature and industrial processes as well as accidental fires. Rapid and accurate determination of cyanide exposure would facilitate forensic investigation, medical diagnosis, and chronic cyanide monitoring. Here, a rapid and direct method was developed for the determination of cyanide ions in urinary samples. This technique was based on an integrated capillary electrophoresis system coupled with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. Cyanide ions were derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) and a primary amine (glycine) for LIF detection. Three separate reagents, NDA, glycine, and cyanide sample, were mixed online, which secured uniform conditions between samples for cyanide derivatization and reduced the risk of precipitation formation of mixtures. Conditions were optimized; the derivatization was completed in 2-4min, and the separation was observed in 25s. The limit of detection (LOD) was 4.0nM at 3-fold signal-to-noise ratio for standard cyanide in buffer. The cyanide levels in urine samples from smokers and non-smokers were determined by using the method of standard addition, which demonstrated significant difference of cyanide levels in urinary samples from the two groups of people. The developed method was rapid and accurate, and is anticipated to be applicable to cyanide detection in waste water with appropriate modification.

  14. Destruction of cyanide waste solutions using chlorine dioxide, ozone and titania sol.

    PubMed

    Parga, J R; Shukla, S S; Carrillo-Pedroza, F R

    2003-01-01

    Increasingly, there are severe environmental controls in the mining industry. Because of lack of technological advances, waste management practices are severely limited. Most of the wastes in the milling industrial effluents are known to contain cyanides and it is recognized that after extraction and recovery of precious metals, substantial amounts of cyanide are delivered to tailings ponds. The toxicity of cyanide creates serious environmental problems. In this paper we describe several methods for the treatment of cyanide solutions. These include: (1) cyanide destruction by oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) in a Gas-Sparged Hydrocyclone (GSH) reactor; (2) destruction of cyanide by ozone (O(3)) using a stirred batch reactor, and finally, (3) the photolysis of cyanide with UV light in presence of titania sol. In all cases excellent performance were observed as measured by the extent and of the destruction.

  15. An enzymatic method for determination of azide and cyanide in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Wan, Nan-Wei; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Xue, Feng; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2015-11-20

    A halohydrin dehalogenase (HHDH-PL) from Parvibaculum lavamentivorans DS-1 was characterized and applied to determine azide and cyanide in the water. In this methodology, HHDH-PL catalysed azide and cyanide to react with butylene oxide and form corresponding β-substituted alcohols 1-azidobutan-2-ol (ABO) and 3-hydroxypentanenitrile (HPN) that could be quantitatively detected by gas chromatograph. The detection calibration curves for azide (R(2)=0.997) and cyanide (R(2)=0.995) were linear and the lower limits of detection for azide and cyanide were 0.1 and 0.3mM, respectively. Several other nucleophiles were identified having no effect on the analysis of azide and cyanide, excepting nitrite which influenced the detection of cyanide. This was the first report of a biological method to determine the inorganic azide and cyanide by converting them to the measurable organics.

  16. Destruction of cyanide waste solutions using chlorine dioxide, ozone and titania sol

    SciTech Connect

    Parga, J.R.; Shukla, S.S.; Carrillo-Pedroza, F.R

    2003-07-01

    Increasingly, there are severe environmental controls in the mining industry. Because of lack of technological advances, waste management practices are severely limited. Most of the wastes in the milling industrial effluents are known to contain cyanides and it is recognized that after extraction and recovery of precious metals, substantial amounts of cyanide are delivered to tailings ponds. The toxicity of cyanide creates serious environmental problems. In this paper we describe several methods for the treatment of cyanide solutions. These include: (1) cyanide destruction by oxidation with chlorine dioxide (ClO{sub 2}) in a Gas-Sparged Hydrocyclone (GSH) reactor; (2) destruction of cyanide by ozone (O{sub 3}) using a stirred batch reactor, and finally, (3) the photolysis of cyanide with UV light in presence of titania sol. In all cases excellent performance were observed as measured by the extent and of the destruction.

  17. The aquatic toxicity and chemical forms of coke plant effluent cyanide -- Implications for discharge limits

    SciTech Connect

    Garibay, R.; Rupnow, M.; Godwin-Saad, E.; Hall, S.

    1995-12-31

    Cyanide is present in treated cokemaking process waters at concentrations as high as 8.0 mg/L. In assessing options for managing the discharge of a treated effluent, the development and implementation of discharge limits for cyanide became a critical issue. A study was initiated to evaluate possible alternatives to cyanide permit limits at the US Steel Gary Works Facility. The objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluation the forms of cyanide present in coke plant effluent; (2) determine whether these forms of cyanide are toxic to selected aquatic organisms; (3) compare the aquatic toxicity of various chemical forms of cyanide; (4) identify if the receiving water modifies cyanide bioavailability; and (5) confirm, with respect to water quality-based effluent limits, an appropriate analytical method for monitoring cyanide in a coke plant effluent. The results of aquatic toxicity tests and corresponding analytical data are presented. Toxicity tests were conducted with various pure chemical forms of cyanide as well as whole coke plant effluent (generated from a pilot-scale treatment system). Test species included the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia) and Daphnia magna (D. magna). Analytical measurements for cyanide included total, weak acid dissociable, diffusible cyanide and selected metal species of cyanide. The findings presented by the paper are relevant with respect to the application of cyanide water quality criteria for a coke plant effluent discharge, the translation of these water quality-based effluent limits to permit limits, and methods for compliance monitoring for cyanide.

  18. Carbonyl emissions in diesel and biodiesel exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado Corrêa, Sérgio; Arbilla, Graciela

    With the use of biodiesel in clear growth, it is important to quantify any potential emission benefits or liabilities of this fuel. Several researches are available concerning the regulated emissions of biodiesel/diesel blends, but there is a lack of information about non-regulated emissions. In a previous paper [Corrêa, S.M., Arbilla, G., 2006. Emissões de formaldeído e acetaldeído de misturas biodiesel/diesel. Periódico Tchê Química, 3, 54-68], the emissions of aromatic hydrocarbons were reported. In this work, seven carbonyl emissions (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, acetone, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, and benzaldehyde) were evaluated by a heavy-duty diesel engine fueled with pure diesel (D) and biodiesel blends (v/v) of 2% (B2), 5% (B5), 10% (B10), and 20% (B20). The tests were conducted using a six cylinder heavy-duty engine, typical of the Brazilian fleet of urban buses, in a steady-state condition under 1000, 1500, and 2000 rpm. The exhaust gases were diluted nearly 20 times and the carbonyls were sampled with SiO 2-C18 cartridges, impregnated with acid solution of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The chemical analyses were performed by high performance liquid chromatography using UV detection. Using average values for the three modes of operation (1000, 1500, and 2000 rpm) benzaldehyde showed a reduction on the emission (-3.4% for B2, -5.3% for B5, -5.7% for B10, and -6.9% for B20) and all other carbonyls showed a significative increase: 2.6, 7.3, 17.6, and 35.5% for formaldehyde; 1.4, 2.5, 5.4, and 15.8% for acetaldehyde; 2.1, 5.4, 11.1, and 22.0% for acrolein+acetone; 0.8, 2.7, 4.6, and 10.0% for propionaldehyde; 3.3, 7.8, 16.0, and 26.0% for butyraldehyde.

  19. Synthesis of main-chain metal carbonyl organometallic macromolecules (MCMCOMs).

    PubMed

    Cao, Kai; Murshid, Nimer; Wang, Xiaosong

    2015-04-01

    Synthesis of main-chain metal carbonyl organometallic macromolecules (MCMCOMs) is difficult, mainly due to the instability of metal carbonyl complexes. Despite its challenge a number of MCMCOMs has been prepared by strategically using organometallic, organic, and polymer synthetic chemistry. Main contributions to this research field were reported by the groups of Tyler, Pannell, and Wang and are briefly summarized in this article.

  20. Protein carbonylation as a novel mechanism in redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi Ming; Cheema, Amrita K; Zhang, Lihua; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2008-02-15

    Reactive oxygen species serve as second messengers for signal transduction; however, molecular targets of oxidant signaling have not been defined. Here, we show that ligand-receptor-mediated signaling promotes reactive oxygen species-dependent protein carbonylation. Treatment of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells with endothelin-1 increased protein carbonyls. Carbonylation of the majority of proteins occurred transiently, suggesting that there is also a mechanism for decarbonylation induced by endothelin-1. Decarbonylation was suppressed by inhibition of thioredoxin reductase, and cellular thioredoxin was upregulated during the decarbonylation phase. These results indicate that endothelin-1 promotes oxidant signaling as well as thioredoxin-mediated reductive signaling to regulate carbonylation and decarbonylation mechanisms. In cells treated with endothelin receptor antagonists, hydrogen peroxide scavengers, or an iron chelator, we identified, via mass spectrometry, proteins that are carbonylated in a receptor- and Fenton reaction-dependent manner, including annexin A1, which promotes apoptosis and suppresses cell growth. Carbonylation of annexin A1 by endothelin-1 was followed by proteasome-dependent degradation of this protein. We propose that carbonylation and subsequent degradation of annexin A1 may play a role in endothelin-mediated cell growth and survival, important events in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Protein carbonylation in response to ligand-receptor interactions represents a novel mechanism in redox signaling.

  1. The Hydrolysis of Carbonyl Sulfide at Low Temperature: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shunzheng; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Jiang, Shanxue; Gao, Fengyu; Zhang, Bowen; Zuo, Yanran; Wang, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic hydrolysis technology of carbonyl sulfide (COS) at low temperature was reviewed, including the development of catalysts, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanism of COS hydrolysis. It was indicated that the catalysts are mainly involved metal oxide and activated carbon. The active ingredients which can load on COS hydrolysis catalyst include alkali metal, alkaline earth metal, transition metal oxides, rare earth metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, and nanometal oxides. The catalytic hydrolysis of COS is a first-order reaction with respect to carbonyl sulfide, while the reaction order of water changes as the reaction conditions change. The controlling steps are also different because the reaction conditions such as concentration of carbonyl sulfide, reaction temperature, water-air ratio, and reaction atmosphere are different. The hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide is base-catalyzed reaction, and the force of the base site has an important effect on the hydrolysis of carbonyl sulfide. PMID:23956697

  2. Carbonyl-Olefin Exchange Reaction: Present State and Outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinova, Radostina; Jossifov, Christo

    The carbonyl-olefin exchange reaction (COER) is a new reaction between carbonyl group and olefin double bond, which has a formal similarity with the olefin metathesis (OM) - one carbon atom in the latter is replaced with an oxygen atom. Till now the new reaction is performed successfully only when the two functional groups (carbonyl group and olefin double bond) are in one molecule and are conjugated. The α, β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds (substituted propenones) are the compounds with such a structure. They polymerize giving substituted polyacetylenes. The chain propagation step of this polymerization is in fact the COER. The question arises: is it possible the COER to take place when the two functional groups are not in one molecule and are not conjugated, and could this reaction became an alternative of the existing carbonyl olefination reactions?

  3. Total Synthesis of (-)-Spinosyn A via Carbonylative Macrolactonization.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Shen, Xingyu; Li, Yong; Dai, Mingji

    2016-08-31

    Spinosyn A (1), a complex natural product featuring a unique 5,6,5,12-fused tetracyclic core structure, is the major component of spinosad, an organic insecticide and an FDA-approved agent used worldwide. Herein, we report an efficient total synthesis of (-)-spinosyn A with 15 steps in the longest linear sequence and 23 steps total from readily available compounds 14 and 23. The synthetic approach features several important catalytic transformations including a chiral amine-catalyzed intramolecular Diels-Alder reaction to afford 22 in excellent diastereoselectivity, a one-step gold-catalyzed propargylic acetate rearrangement to convert 28 to α-iodoenone 31, an unprecedented palladium-catalyzed carbonylative Heck macrolactonization to form the 5,12-fused macrolactone in one step, and a gold-catalyzed Yu glycosylation to install the challenging β-forosamine. This total synthesis is highly convergent and modular, thus offering opportunities to synthesize spinosyn analogues in order to address the emerging cross-resistance problems. PMID:27510806

  4. Detection of carbonyl fluoride in the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Park, J. H.; Russell, J. M., III; Zander, R.; Brown, L. R.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.; Raper, O. F.

    1986-01-01

    Infrared solar absorption spectra of the stratosphere recorded at a resolution of 0.01/cm by the ATMOS (Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy) instrument from onboard Spacelab 3 (04/30 to 05/6/85) have revealed the existence of many previously unobserved absorption features in the 1925 to 1960/cm and 1249 to 1255/cm regions and one at 774/cm. On the basis of comparisons with laboratory spectra, these features have been identified as belonging to the nu1, nu4, and nu6 bands of carbonyl fluoride, respectively. Volume mixing ratios of COF2 between 17 and 40 km have been deduced from analysis of the nu1 and nu6 bands.

  5. Atmospheric carbonyl sulfide exchange in bog microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, A.; Klinger, L.F.; Erickson, D.J. III )

    1993-01-22

    Measurements of Carbonyl sulfide (OCS) fluxes were carried out on bog microcosms using chamber sampling and tunable diode laser analysis. Intact bog microcosms (vascular plants, mosses, and peat) removed ambient levels of OCS in the light and dark with rates from [minus]2.4 to [minus]8.1 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2]. Peat and peat plus mosses emitted OCS in the light with rates of 17.4 and 10.9 ng S min[sup [minus]1] m[sup [minus]2], respectively. In the dark, the mosses apparently removed OCS at a rate equivalent to the peat emissions. A 3-D numerical tracer model using this data indicated that boreal bog ecosystems remove at most 1% of ambient OCS, not sufficient to account for an observed OCS depletion in boreal air masses. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Metal-free carbonylations by photoredox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Majek, Michal; Jacobi von Wangelin, Axel

    2015-02-01

    The synthesis of benzoates from aryl electrophiles and carbon monoxide is a prime example of a transition-metal-catalyzed carbonylation reaction which is widely applied in research and industrial processes. Such reactions proceed in the presence of Pd or Ni catalysts, suitable ligands, and stoichiometric bases. We have developed an alternative procedure that is free of any metal, ligand, and base. The method involves a redox reaction driven by visible light and catalyzed by eosin Y which affords alkyl benzoates from arene diazonium salts, carbon monoxide, and alcohols under mild conditions. Tertiary esters can also be prepared in high yields. DFT calculations and radical trapping experiments support a catalytic photoredox pathway without the requirement for sacrificial redox partners.

  7. Reductive carbonylation of aromatic nitro compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wehman, P.; Kamer, P.C.J.; Leeuwen, P.W.N.M. van

    1995-12-31

    In the reductive carbonylation of aromatic nitro compounds carbamates and isocyanates are prepared through a direct reaction between the nitro group and CO under the influence of a catalyst. This route avoids the major disadvantages of the traditional process for the production of the industrially important isocyanates and carbamates. The authors have developed a stable, active, and rather selective homogeneous palladium catalyst for the reductive carbonylation of the nitro substrate. Best results were obtained with Pd-phenanthroline complexes in which the ligands bear moderately donating substituents. Noncoordinating anions in the catalyst complex are clearly preferable. The highest activity was reached with the Pd(4,7-Me{sub 2}-1,10-phen){sub 2}(OTf){sub 2} catalyst complex (t.o.f. = 311 mol/mol/h, selectivity toward the desired carbamate = 84%). With the Pd(1,10-phenanthroline){sub 2}(OTf){sub 2} catalyst complex, the authors studied the scope of the reaction in order to prepare a wide range of functionalized carbamates for the fine chemistry. During this study, it was found that a remarkable improvement of the catalytic activity and selectivity on addition of a benzoic acid (t.o.f. > 365 mol/mol/h, selectivity toward carbamate = 94%). In the presence of 4-chlorobenzoic acid even aromatic dinitro compounds could be converted easily, resulting in the best results reported ever for the conversion of 1,4-dinitrobenzene into the corresponding dicarbamate (t.o.f. = 73 mol/mol/h, selectivity toward the dicarbamate = 86%).

  8. Gas-phase chemistry of technetium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fang-Li; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Cao, Shi-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Tan, Cun-Min

    2015-05-28

    Gas-phase chemical behaviors of short-lived technetium carbonyl complexes were studied using a low temperature isothermal chromatograph (IC) coupled with a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Fission products recoiled from the (252)Cf SF source were thermalized in a mixed gas containing CO, and then technetium carbonyl complexes were formed from reactions between CO gas and various technetium isotopes. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyl complexes from a recoil chamber to the IC. Short IC columns made of Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon and quartz were used to obtain chemical information about the technetium carbonyl complexes. The results for the (104)Tc-(106)Tc carbonyl complexes were found to be strongly influenced by the precursors, and showed the chemical behaviors of (104)Mo-(106)Mo carbonyl complexes, respectively. However, (107)Tc and (108)Tc could represent the chemical information of the element technetium due to their high independent yields and the very short half-lives of their precursors (107)Mo and (108)Mo. An adsorption enthalpy of about ΔHads = -43 kJ mol(-1) was determined for the Tc carbonyl complexes on both the Teflon and quartz surfaces by fitting the breakthrough curves of the (107)Tc and (108)Tc carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Chemical yields of around 25% were measured for the Tc carbonyl complexes relative to the transport yields obtained with the gas-jet transport of KCl aerosol particles with Ar carrier gas. Furthermore, the influence of a small amount of O2 gas on the yields of the Mo and Tc carbonyl complexes was studied.

  9. Carbonyl emissions from gasoline and diesel motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Jakober, Chris A; Robert, Michael A; Riddle, Sarah G; Destaillats, Hugo; Charles, M Judith; Green, Peter G; Kleeman, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Carbonyls from gasoline-powered light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and heavy-duty diesel-powered vehicles (HDDVs) operated on chassis dynamometers were measured by use of an annular denuder-quartz filter-polyurethane foam sampler with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization and chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Two internal standards were utilized based on carbonyl recovery: 4-fluorobenzaldehyde for < C8 carbonyls and 6-fluoro-4-chromanone for > or = C8 compounds. Gas- and particle-phase emissions for 39 aliphatic and 20 aromatic carbonyls ranged from 0.1 to 2000 microg/L of fuel for LDVs and from 1.8 to 27 000 microg/L of fuel for HDDVs. Gas-phase species accounted for 81-95% of the total carbonyls from LDVs and 86-88% from HDDVs. Particulate carbonyls emitted from a HDDV under realistic driving conditions were similar to concentrations measured in a diesel particulate matter (PM) standard reference material. Carbonyls accounted for 19% of particulate organic carbon (POC) emissions from low-emission LDVs and 37% of POC emissions from three-way catalyst-equipped LDVs. This identifies carbonyls as one of the largest classes of compounds in LDV PM emissions. The carbonyl fraction of HDDV POC was lower, 3.3-3.9% depending upon operational conditions. Partitioning analysis indicates the carbonyls had not achieved equilibrium between the gas and particle phases under the dilution factors of 126-584 used in the present study. PMID:18677993

  10. Gas-phase chemistry of technetium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fang-Li; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Cao, Shi-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Tan, Cun-Min

    2015-05-28

    Gas-phase chemical behaviors of short-lived technetium carbonyl complexes were studied using a low temperature isothermal chromatograph (IC) coupled with a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Fission products recoiled from the (252)Cf SF source were thermalized in a mixed gas containing CO, and then technetium carbonyl complexes were formed from reactions between CO gas and various technetium isotopes. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyl complexes from a recoil chamber to the IC. Short IC columns made of Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon and quartz were used to obtain chemical information about the technetium carbonyl complexes. The results for the (104)Tc-(106)Tc carbonyl complexes were found to be strongly influenced by the precursors, and showed the chemical behaviors of (104)Mo-(106)Mo carbonyl complexes, respectively. However, (107)Tc and (108)Tc could represent the chemical information of the element technetium due to their high independent yields and the very short half-lives of their precursors (107)Mo and (108)Mo. An adsorption enthalpy of about ΔHads = -43 kJ mol(-1) was determined for the Tc carbonyl complexes on both the Teflon and quartz surfaces by fitting the breakthrough curves of the (107)Tc and (108)Tc carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Chemical yields of around 25% were measured for the Tc carbonyl complexes relative to the transport yields obtained with the gas-jet transport of KCl aerosol particles with Ar carrier gas. Furthermore, the influence of a small amount of O2 gas on the yields of the Mo and Tc carbonyl complexes was studied. PMID:25920667

  11. Carbonyl Emissions From Oil and Gas Production Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyman, S. N.; O'Neil, T.; Tran, T.

    2015-12-01

    A number of recent studies have targeted emissions of methane and other hydrocarbons from oil and gas exploration and production activity. These measurements are greatly increasing understanding of the atmospheric impacts of oil and gas development. Very few measurements exist, however, of emissions of formaldehyde and other carbonyls from oil and gas equipment. Carbonyls are toxic and serve as important ozone precursors, especially during winter ozone episodes in places like Utah's Uintah Basin. Current air quality models are only able to reproduce observed high wintertime ozone if they incorporate emissions inventories with very high carbonyl emissions. We measured carbonyl emissions from oil and gas equipment and facilities—including glycol dehydrators, liquid storage tanks, raw gas leaks, raw gas-burning engines, and produced water surface impoundments—in Rocky Mountain oil and gas fields. Carbonyl emissions from raw gas were below detection, but emissions of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and other carbonyls were detected from liquid storage tanks, glycol dehydrators, and other oil and gas equipment. In some cases, carbonyls may be formed from the degradation of methanol and other chemicals used in oil and gas production, but the collected data provide evidence for other non-combustion formation pathways. Raw gas-burning engines also emitted carbonyls. Emissions from all measured sources were a small fraction of total volatile organic compound emissions. We incorporated our measurements into an emissions inventory, used that inventory in an air quality model (WRF-SMOKE-CAMx), and were unable to reproduce observed high wintertime ozone. This could be because (1) emission sources we have not yet measured, including compressors, gas processing plants, and others, are large; (2) non-carbonyl emissions, especially those that quickly degrade into carbonyls during photochemical processing, are underestimated in the inventory; or (3) the air quality model is unable

  12. Nitrite promotes protein carbonylation and Strecker aldehyde formation in experimental fermented sausages: are both events connected?

    PubMed

    Villaverde, A; Ventanas, J; Estévez, M

    2014-12-01

    The role played by curing agents (nitrite, ascorbate) on protein oxidation and Strecker aldehyde formation is studied. To fulfill this objective, increasing concentrations of nitrite (0, 75 and 150ppm) and ascorbate (0, 250 and 500ppm) were added to sausages subjected to a 54day drying process. The concurrence of intense proteolysis, protein carbonylation and formation of Strecker aldehydes during processing of sausages suggests that α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AAS) and γ-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) may be implicated in the formation of Strecker aldehydes. The fact that nitrite (150ppm, ingoing amount) significantly promoted the formation of protein carbonyls at early stages of processing and the subsequent formation of Strecker aldehydes provides strength to this hypothesis. Ascorbate (125 and 250ppm) controlled the overall extent of protein carbonylation in sausages without declining the formation of Strecker aldehydes. These results may contribute to understanding the chemistry fundamentals of the positive influence of nitrite on the flavor and overall acceptability of cured muscle foods.

  13. A field-deployable device for the rapid detection of cyanide poisoning in whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehringer, Hans; Tong, Winnie; Chung, Roy; Boss, Gerry; O'Farrell, Brendan

    2012-06-01

    Feasibility of a field-deployable device for the rapid and early diagnosis of cyanide poisoning in whole blood using the spectral shift of the vitamin B12 precursor cobinamide upon binding with cyanide as an indicator is being assessed. Cyanide is an extremely potent and rapid acting poison with as little as 50 mg fatal to humans. Cyanide poisoning has been recognized as a threat from smoke inhalation and potentially through weapons of mass destruction. Currently, no portable rapid tests for the detection of cyanide in whole blood are available. Cobinamide has an extremely high affinity for cyanide and captures hemoglobin associated cyanide from red blood cells. Upon binding of cyanide, cobinamide undergoes a spectral shift that can be measured with a spectrophotometer. We have combined the unique cyanide-binding properties of cobinamide with blood separation technology, sample transport and a detection system, and are developing a rapid, field deployable, disposable device which will deliver an intuitive result to a first responder, allowing for rapid response to exposure events. Feasibility of the cobinamide-Cyanide chemistry in a rapid test using a whole blood sample from a finger-stick has been demonstrated with an assay time from sample collection to a valid result of under 5 minutes. Data showing the efficacy of the diagnostic method and initial device design concepts will be shown.

  14. The Combination of Cobinamide and Sulfanegen Is Highly Effective in Mouse Models of Cyanide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Adriano; Crankshaw, Daune L.; Monteil, Alexandre; Patterson, Steven E.; Nagasawa, Herbert T.; Briggs, Jackie E.; Kozocas, Joseph A.; Mahon, Sari B.; Brenner, Matthew; Pilz, Renate B.; Bigby, Timothy D.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Context Cyanide poisoning is a major contributor to death in smoke inhalation victims and accidental exposure to cyanide occurs in a variety of industries. Moreover, cyanide has the potential to be used by terrorists, particularly in a closed space such as an airport or train station. Current therapies for cyanide poisoning must be given by intravenous administration, limiting their use in treating mass casualties. Objective We are developing two new cyanide antidotes—cobinamide, a vitamin B12 analog, and sulfanegen, a 3-mercaptopyruvate prodrug. Both drugs can be given by intramuscular administration, and therefore could be used to treat a large number of people quickly. We now asked if the two drugs would have an augmented effect when combined. Materials and Methods We used a non-lethal and two different lethal models of cyanide poisoning in mice. The non-lethal model assesses neurologic recovery by quantitatively evaluating the innate righting reflex time of a mouse. The two lethal models are a cyanide injection and a cyanide inhalation model. Results We found that the two drugs are at least additive when used together in both the non-lethal and lethal models: at doses where all animals died with either drug alone, the combination yielded 80 and 40% survival in the injection and inhalation models, respectively. Similarly, drug doses that yielded 40% survival with either drug alone yielded 80 and 100% survival in the injection and inhalatiion models, respectively. As part of the inhalation model, we developed a new paradigm in which animals are exposed to cyanide gas, injected intramuscularly with antidote, and then re-exposed to cyanide gas. This simulates cyanide exposure of a large number of people in a closed space, because people would remain exposed to cyanide, even after receiving an antidote. Conclusion The combination of cobinamide and sulfanegen shows great promise as a new approach to treating cyanide poisoning. PMID:21740135

  15. Terrorism involving cyanide: the prospect of improving preparedness in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Keim, Mark E

    2006-01-01

    The potential for domestic or international terrorism involving cyanide has not diminished and in fact may have increased in recent years. This paper discusses cyanide as a terrorist weapon and the current state of readiness for a cyanide attack in the United States. Many of the factors that render cyanide appealing to terrorists are difficult to modify sufficiently to decrease the probability of a cyanide attack. For example, the relative ease with which cyanide can be used as a weapon without special training, its versatile means of delivery to intended victims, and to a large degree, its ready availability cannot be significantly modified through preparedness efforts. On the other hand, the impact of an attack can be mitigated through preparedness measures designed to minimize the physical, psychological, and social consequences of cyanide exposure. Although the nation remains ill-equipped to manage a cyanide disaster, significant progress is being realized in some aspects of preparedness. Hydroxocobalamin-a cyanide antidote that may be appropriate for use in the prehospital setting for presumptive cases of cyanide poisoning-currently is under development for potential introduction in the US. If it becomes available in the US, hydroxocobalamin could enhance the role of the prehospital emergency responder in providing care to victims of a cyanide disaster. Additional progress is required in the areas of ensuring local and regional availability of antidotal treatment and supportive interventions, educating emergency healthcare providers about cyanide poisoning and its management, and raising public awareness of the potential for a cyanide attack and how to respond.

  16. Bacterial Degradation of Cyanide and Its Metal Complexes under Alkaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M.; Huertas, María-J.; Martínez-Luque, Manuel; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Roldán, M. Dolores; García-Gil, L. Jesús; Castillo, Francisco; Blasco, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    A bacterial strain able to use cyanide as the sole nitrogen source under alkaline conditions has been isolated. The bacterium was classified as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes by comparison of its 16S RNA gene sequence to those of existing strains and deposited in the Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo (Spanish Type Culture Collection) as strain CECT5344. Cyanide consumption is an assimilative process, since (i) bacterial growth was concomitant and proportional to cyanide degradation and (ii) the bacterium stoichiometrically converted cyanide into ammonium in the presence of l-methionine-d,l-sulfoximine, a glutamine synthetase inhibitor. The bacterium was able to grow in alkaline media, up to an initial pH of 11.5, and tolerated free cyanide in concentrations of up to 30 mM, which makes it a good candidate for the biological treatment of cyanide-contaminated residues. Both acetate and d,l-malate were suitable carbon sources for cyanotrophic growth, but no growth was detected in media with cyanide as the sole carbon source. In addition to cyanide, P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 used other nitrogen sources, namely ammonium, nitrate, cyanate, cyanoacetamide, nitroferricyanide (nitroprusside), and a variety of cyanide-metal complexes. Cyanide and ammonium were assimilated simultaneously, whereas cyanide strongly inhibited nitrate and nitrite assimilation. Cyanase activity was induced during growth with cyanide or cyanate, but not with ammonium or nitrate as the nitrogen source. This result suggests that cyanate could be an intermediate in the cyanide degradation pathway, but alternative routes cannot be excluded. PMID:15691951

  17. An efficient probe for rapid detection of cyanide in water at parts per billion levels and naked-eye detection of endogenous cyanide.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Namita; Jha, Satadru; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-03-01

    A new molecular probe based on an oxidized bis-indolyl skeleton has been developed for rapid and sensitive visual detection of cyanide ions in water and also for the detection of endogenously bound cyanide. The probe allows the "naked-eye" detection of cyanide ions in water with a visual color change from red to yellow (Δλmax =80 nm) with the immediate addition of the probe. It shows high selectivity towards the cyanide ion without any interference from other anions. The detection of cyanide by the probe is ratiometric, thus making the detection quantitative. A Michael-type addition reaction of the probe with the cyanide ion takes place during this chemodosimetric process. In water, the detection limit was found to be at the parts per million level, which improved drastically when a neutral micellar medium was employed, and it showed a parts-per-billion-level detection, which is even 25-fold lower than the permitted limits of cyanide in water. The probe could also efficiently detect the endogenously bound cyanide in cassava (a staple food) with a clear visual color change without requiring any sample pretreatment and/or any special reaction conditions such as pH or temperature. Thus the probe could serve as a practical naked-eye probe for "in-field" experiments without requiring any sophisticated instruments. PMID:24449698

  18. An assessment of the release of inorganic cyanide from the fragrance materials benzyl cyanide, geranyl nitrile and citronellyl nitrile applied dermally to the rat.

    PubMed

    Potter, J; Smith, R L; Api, A M

    2001-02-01

    Organonitriles are widely used as components of fragrances that are incorporated into consumer products, many of which are for human topical use. Some organontriles are readily broken down metabolically to potentially toxic inorganic cyanide. Studies were therefore undertaken to assess whether this occurs with three representative fragrance nitriles, namely, benzyl cyanide, geranyl nitrile and citronellyl nitrile when applied dermally to the rat. The nitriles (benzyl cyanide, 150 mg/kg; geranyl and citronellyl nitriles, 400 mg/kg) were applied to the shaved backs of rats and maintained under occlusion for 24 h. Urine samples were collected for 0-24 h, 24-48 h and 48-72 h from the time of first application. These samples were analysed for thiocyanate, a biomarker for cyanide formation in vivo, as described previously (Potter, J., Smith, R.L., Api, A.M., 2000. Urinary thiocyanate levels as a biomarker for the generation of inorganic cyanide from benzyl cyanide in the rat. Food and Chemical Toxicology 39, 141-146). In the case of benzyl cyanide, there was a marked increase in urinary thiocyanate levels attributable to the release of cyanide in vivo. The amount of thiocyanate recovered was equivalent to 37% of the dose for males and 32% for females. For geranyl nitrile there was no significant increase in urinary thiocyanate excretion and there was only a marginal increase in the case of citronellyl nitrile that was equivalent to 0.40% of the applied dose for males and 0.29% for females.

  19. Monitoring of river water for free cyanide pollution from mining activity in Papua New Guinea and attenuation of cyanide by biochar.

    PubMed

    Sawaraba, Ian; Rao, B K Rajashekhar

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide (CN) pollution was reported in the downstream areas of Watut and Markham Rivers due to effluent discharges from gold mining and processing activities of Hidden Valley mines in Morobe province of Papua New Guinea. We monitored free cyanide levels in Watut and Markham River waters randomly three times in years for 2 years (2012 and 2013). Besides, a short-term static laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the potential of river sediment to attenuate externally added cyanide, with and without the presence of biochar material. Results indicated that the free cyanide content ranged between 0.17 and 1.32 μg L(-1) in the river waters. The free cyanide content were found to be significantly (p < 0.05) greater in June (0.87 μg L(-1)) and May (0.77 μg L(-1)) months of 2012 and 2013, respectively, than the rest of the months. However, free cyanide levels in all four monitoring sites across three sampling intervals were lower than 0.20 mg L(-1) which is the maximum contaminant level (MCL) permitted according to US Environmental Protection Agency. Under laboratory conditions, the biochar-impregnated sediment showed ∼3 times more attenuation capacity for cyanide than non-amended sediment, thus indicating possibility of using biochar to cleanse cyanide from spills or other sources of pollution.

  20. An efficient probe for rapid detection of cyanide in water at parts per billion levels and naked-eye detection of endogenous cyanide.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Namita; Jha, Satadru; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-03-01

    A new molecular probe based on an oxidized bis-indolyl skeleton has been developed for rapid and sensitive visual detection of cyanide ions in water and also for the detection of endogenously bound cyanide. The probe allows the "naked-eye" detection of cyanide ions in water with a visual color change from red to yellow (Δλmax =80 nm) with the immediate addition of the probe. It shows high selectivity towards the cyanide ion without any interference from other anions. The detection of cyanide by the probe is ratiometric, thus making the detection quantitative. A Michael-type addition reaction of the probe with the cyanide ion takes place during this chemodosimetric process. In water, the detection limit was found to be at the parts per million level, which improved drastically when a neutral micellar medium was employed, and it showed a parts-per-billion-level detection, which is even 25-fold lower than the permitted limits of cyanide in water. The probe could also efficiently detect the endogenously bound cyanide in cassava (a staple food) with a clear visual color change without requiring any sample pretreatment and/or any special reaction conditions such as pH or temperature. Thus the probe could serve as a practical naked-eye probe for "in-field" experiments without requiring any sophisticated instruments.

  1. Self-assembly of graphene oxide coated soft magnetic carbonyl iron particles and their magnetorheology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, W. L.; Choi, H. J.

    2014-05-07

    The surface of carbonyl iron (CI) microspheres was modified with graphene oxide (GO) as a coating material using 4-aminobenzoic acid as the grafting agent. The morphology, elemental composition, and magnetic properties of the GO-coated CI (GO/CI) particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry, respectively, confirming their composite formation. The magnetorheological (MR) performance of the GO/CI particle-based suspension was examined using a rotational rheometer connected to a magnetic field supply. The GO/CI particles suspension exhibited typical MR properties with increasing shear stress and viscosity depending on the applied magnetic field strength.

  2. Seasonal and diurnal characteristics of atmospheric carbonyls in Nanning, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Songjun; Chen, Mei; Tan, Jihua

    2016-03-01

    For the first time, atmospheric carbonyls were measured to identify seasonal and diurnal variations in Nanning from October 2011 to July 2012. Formaldehyde (6.79 ± 3.39 μg/m3), acetaldehyde (15.81 ± 10.48 μg/m3) and acetone (5.43 ± 6.91 μg/m3) were the three most abundant carbonyls, accounting for ~ 85% of the total carbonyls. The average total concentrations of carbonyls and three abundant carbonyls showed significant high levels in summer compared to those in winter. Diurnal variations suggested that photochemical conditions, combustion of charcoal and straw, and solvent usage are important for the distributions of atmospheric carbonyls. The highest average C1/C2 ratio was observed in summer (0.75) compared to those (0.31-0.70) in other seasons, implying the positive effect of photochemical activities on raising C1/C2 ratio, and the significant low C2/C3 ratio (12.01-18.23) in winter and autumn than those (95.83-24.49) in both spring and summer suggested the important anthropogenic emissions such as charcoal and biomass combustion. O3 formation potentials in summer and spring were significantly higher by ~ 2 times than those in autumn and winter. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde are the top two carbonyls which contribute 82-97% to total O3 formation potentials.

  3. Recovery of Copper from Cyanidation Tailing by Flotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tingsheng; Huang, Xiong; Yang, Xiuli

    2016-02-01

    In this work, sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, sodium metabisulfite and copper sulfate as activators were investigated to lessen the depression effect of cyanide for deep-depressing chalcopyrite. The experimental results indicate that the copper recovery exceeded 94%, 84% and 97% at the dosage: sodium hypochlorite 3 mL/L, hydrogen peroxide 2 mL/L, sodium metabisulfite 2 × 10-3 mol/L and copper sulfate 1.67 × 10-4 mol/L, respectively. According to the results of zeta potential and Fourier transform infrared spectrum, it is suggested that chalcopyrite was depressed because of the chemical adsorption of cyanide on the chalcopyrite surfaces. Sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide and sodium metabisulfite can destroy Cu-C bond on the deep-depressing chalcopyrite surface by chemical reaction. Copper sulfate can activate deep-depressing chalcopyrite by copper ion adsorption.

  4. Electrochemical oxidation of cyanide in the hydrocyclone cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dhamo, N.

    1996-12-31

    A diluted electroplating cyanide rinse water has been used to test the use of the hydrocyclone cell (HCC) in batch recycle mode of operation for the simultaneous oxidation of cyanide during the electrodeposition of silver. The results obtained in this work with regard to the final products, current efficiency and the number of transferred electrons per CN{sup {minus}} helped to establish a probable reaction scheme. According to this, the process occurs mainly with one-electron transfer, through cyanate and cyanogen as intermediate species. Meanwhile, under conditions where the electrolyte circulates in an open bath and flows successively through the cathodic and the anodic compartments, as in the case of the HCC system, the cyanate could be produced by the direct oxidation through air and/or generated peroxide and CN could be lost as HCN (g).

  5. Characterization of a Mouse Model of Oral Potassium Cyanide Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Patrick J; Kobs, Christina L; Gibbs, Seth T; Hong, Peter; Matthews, Claire M; Patton, Kristen M; Sabourin, Carol L; Wakayama, Edgar J

    2016-09-01

    Potassium cyanide (KCN) is an inhibitor of cytochrome C oxidase causing rapid death due to hypoxia. A well-characterized model of oral KCN intoxication is needed to test new therapeutics under the Food and Drug Administration Animal Rule. Clinical signs, plasma pH and lactate concentrations, biomarkers, histopathology, and cyanide and thiocyanate toxicokinetics were used to characterize the pathology of KCN intoxication in adult and juvenile mice. The acute oral LD50s were determined to be 11.8, 11.0, 10.9, and 9.9 mg/kg in water for adult male, adult female, juvenile male, and juvenile female mice, respectively. The time to death was rapid and dose dependent; juvenile mice had a shorter mean time to death. Juvenile mice displayed a more rapid onset and higher incidence of seizures. The time to observance of respiratory signs and prostration was rapid, but mice surviving beyond 2 hours generally recovered fully within 8 hours. At doses up to the LD50, there were no gross necropsy or microscopic findings clearly attributed to administration of KCN in juvenile or adult CD-1 mice from 24 hours to 28 days post-KCN challenge. Toxicokinetic analysis indicated rapid uptake, metabolism, and clearance of plasma cyanide. Potassium cyanide caused a rapid, dose-related decrease in blood pH and increase in serum lactate concentration. An increase in fatty acid-binding protein 3 was observed at 11.5 mg/kg KCN in adult but not in juvenile mice. These studies provide a characterization of KCN intoxication in adult and juvenile mice that can be used to screen or conduct preclinical efficacy studies of potential countermeasures.

  6. Ferrocyanide Safety Program cyanide speciation studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pool, K.H.; Bryan, S.L.

    1995-07-01

    This report summarizes Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s fiscal year (FY) 1995 progress toward developing and implementing methods to identify and quantify cyanide species in ferrocyanide tank waste. This work was conducted for Westinghouse Hanfbrd Company`s (WHC`s) Ferrocyanide Safety Program. Currently, there are 18 high-level waste storage tanks at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site that are on a Ferrocyanide Tank Watchlist because they contain an estimated 1000 g-moles or more of precipitated ferrocyanide. In the presence of oxidizing material such as sodium nitrate or nitrite, ferrocyanide can be made to react exothermally by heating it to high temperatures or by applying an electrical spark of sufficient energy (Cady 1993). However, fuel, oxidizers, and temperature are all important parameters. If fuel, oxidizers, or high temperatures (initiators) are not present in sufficient amounts, then a runaway or propagating reaction cannot occur. To bound the safety concern, methods are needed to definitively measure and quantitate ferrocyanide concentration present within the actual waste. The target analyte concentration for cyanide in waste is approximately 0.1 to 15 wt % (as cyanide) in the original undiluted sample. After dissolution of the original sample and appropriate dilutions, the concentration range of interest in the analytical solutions can vary between 0.001 to 0.1 wt % (as cyanide). In FY 1992, 1993, and 1994, two solution (wet) methods were developed based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and ion chromatography (IC); these methods were chosen for further development activities. The results of these activities are described.

  7. 36. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CYANIDE TANKS, LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CYANIDE TANKS, LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST, SHOWING TANK SUPPORTS AND MASONRY FOUNDATIONS. THE SUPPORTING TIMBERS WERE ADDED DURING THE MILL STABILIZATION EFFORT IN THE 1990'S THE TANKS ARE HANGING OVER THE FOUNDATIONS TO GIVE ACCESS TO THE TRAP DOOR IN THEIR BOTTOMS FOR EMPTYING THE SANDS AFTER PROCESSING (SEE CA-290-37). SEE CA-290-50 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  8. 50. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CYANIDE TANKS, LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CYANIDE TANKS, LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST, SHOWING TANK SUPPORTS AND MASONRY FOUNDATIONS. THE SUPPORTING TIMBERS WERE ADDED DURING THE MILL STABILIZATION EFFORT IN THE 1990'S. THE TANKS ARE HANGING OVER THE FOUNDATIONS TO GIVE ACCESS TO THE TRAP DOOR IN THEIR BOTTOMS FOR EMPTYING THE SANDS AFTER PROCESSING (SEE CA-290-37). SEE CA-290-36 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  9. Investigation of carbonyl compounds in bottled waters from Poland.

    PubMed

    Nawrocki, J; Dabrowska, A; Borcz, A

    2002-11-01

    Poly(ethylene terephtalate) (PET) bottles are commonly used for storing mineral water. The migration of carbonyl compounds from PET bottles into mineral water was observed. Carbonation of water, sunlight and high temperature enhance the process of migration. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone were the most important carbonyls identified in series of bottled water samples. The concentration of carbonyls can change depending on the time of storage as well as storage conditions. It was identified particularly high concentration of acetaldehyde (more than 100 microg 1(-1)) in samples of mineral water saturated with CO2 gas. PMID:12448533

  10. Coumarin benzothiazole derivatives as chemosensors for cyanide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kangnan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Guan, Ruifang; Cao, Duxia; Chen, Hongyu; Shan, Yanyan; Wu, Qianqian; Xu, Yongxiao

    2015-06-01

    Four coumarin benzothiazole derivatives, N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide (1), (Z)-N-(3-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-2(3H)-ylidene)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide (2), 7-(diethylamino)-N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide (3) and (Z)-7-(diethylamino)-N-(3-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-2(3H)-ylidene)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide) (4), have been synthesized. Their crystal structures, photophysical properties in acetonitrile and recognition properties for cyanide anions have been investigated. All the compounds are generally planar, especially compound 1 exhibits perfect planarity with dihedral angle between benzothiazolyl group and coumarin group being only 3.63°. Coumarin benzothiazole compounds 1 and 3 can recognize cyanide anions by Michael addition reaction and compound 3 exhibits color change from yellow to colorless and green fluorescence was quenched completely, which can be observed by naked eye. Coumarin benzothiazolyliden compound 4 can recognize cyanide anions with fluorescence turn-on response based on the copper complex ensemble displacement mechanism.

  11. Coumarin benzothiazole derivatives as chemosensors for cyanide anions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kangnan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Guan, Ruifang; Cao, Duxia; Chen, Hongyu; Shan, Yanyan; Wu, Qianqian; Xu, Yongxiao

    2015-06-01

    Four coumarin benzothiazole derivatives, N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide (1), (Z)-N-(3-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-2(3H)-ylidene)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide (2), 7-(diethylamino)-N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide (3) and (Z)-7-(diethylamino)-N-(3-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-2(3H)-ylidene)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide) (4), have been synthesized. Their crystal structures, photophysical properties in acetonitrile and recognition properties for cyanide anions have been investigated. All the compounds are generally planar, especially compound 1 exhibits perfect planarity with dihedral angle between benzothiazolyl group and coumarin group being only 3.63°. Coumarin benzothiazole compounds 1 and 3 can recognize cyanide anions by Michael addition reaction and compound 3 exhibits color change from yellow to colorless and green fluorescence was quenched completely, which can be observed by naked eye. Coumarin benzothiazolyliden compound 4 can recognize cyanide anions with fluorescence turn-on response based on the copper complex ensemble displacement mechanism.

  12. Bacillus pumilus Cyanide Dihydratase Mutants with Higher Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Crum, Mary A.; Sewell, B. Trevor; Benedik, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide degrading nitrilases are noted for their potential to detoxify industrial wastewater contaminated with cyanide. However, such application would benefit from an improvement to characteristics such as their catalytic activity and stability. Following error-prone PCR for random mutagenesis, several cyanide dihydratase mutants from Bacillus pumilus were isolated based on improved catalysis. Four point mutations, K93R, D172N, A202T, and E327K were characterized and their effects on kinetics, thermostability and pH tolerance were studied. K93R and D172N increased the enzyme’s thermostability whereas E327K mutation had a less pronounced effect on stability. The D172N mutation also increased the affinity of the enzyme for its substrate at pH 7.7 but lowered its kcat. However, the A202T mutation, located in the dimerization or the A surface, destabilized the protein and abolished its activity. No significant effect on activity at alkaline pH was observed for any of the purified mutants. These mutations help confirm the model of CynD and are discussed in the context of the protein–protein interfaces leading to the protein quaternary structure. PMID:27570524

  13. Bacillus pumilus Cyanide Dihydratase Mutants with Higher Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Crum, Mary A; Sewell, B Trevor; Benedik, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide degrading nitrilases are noted for their potential to detoxify industrial wastewater contaminated with cyanide. However, such application would benefit from an improvement to characteristics such as their catalytic activity and stability. Following error-prone PCR for random mutagenesis, several cyanide dihydratase mutants from Bacillus pumilus were isolated based on improved catalysis. Four point mutations, K93R, D172N, A202T, and E327K were characterized and their effects on kinetics, thermostability and pH tolerance were studied. K93R and D172N increased the enzyme's thermostability whereas E327K mutation had a less pronounced effect on stability. The D172N mutation also increased the affinity of the enzyme for its substrate at pH 7.7 but lowered its k cat. However, the A202T mutation, located in the dimerization or the A surface, destabilized the protein and abolished its activity. No significant effect on activity at alkaline pH was observed for any of the purified mutants. These mutations help confirm the model of CynD and are discussed in the context of the protein-protein interfaces leading to the protein quaternary structure. PMID:27570524

  14. Acute cyanide Intoxication: A rare case of survival.

    PubMed

    Jethava, Durga; Gupta, Priyamvada; Kothari, Sandeep; Rijhwani, Puneet; Kumar, Ankit

    2014-05-01

    A 30-year-old male jewellery factory worker accidentally ingested silver potassium cyanide and was brought to the emergency department in a state of shock and profound metabolic acidosis. This patient was managed hypothetically with use of injection thiopentone sodium intravenously until the antidote was received. Cyanide is a highly cytotoxic poison and it rapidly reacts with the trivalent iron of cytochrome oxidase thus paralysing the aerobic respiration. The result is severe lactic acidosis, profound shock, and its fatal outcome. The patient dies of cardio-respiratory arrest secondary to dysfunction of the medullary centres. It is rapidly absorbed, symptoms begin few seconds after exposure and death usually occurs in <30 min. The average lethal dose for potassium cyanide is about 250 mg. We used repeated doses of thiopentone sodium till the antidote kit was finally in our hands, hypothesising that it contains thiol group similar to the antidote thiosulphate. Moreover, it is an anticonvulsant. We were successful in our attempts and the patient survived though the specific antidotes could be administered after about an hour. PMID:25024476

  15. Physiology and pathophysiology of respiratory arrest by cyanide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Klimmek, R.

    1993-05-13

    Respiratory arrest, preceded by hyperventilation, is the primary cause of death in acute cyanide poisoning. Hyperventilation followed by apnea is also observed without intoxication. Hyperventilation and apnea in untoxicated subjects and animals are analyzed for the underlying physiological and biochemical changes and compared with those found during cyanide poisoning. The study reveals that the respiratory autoregulation appears to be the same under both conditions. Respiratory arrest is controlled by cerebral PCO2 and can occur without hypoxia or inhibition of cytochrome oxidase. It is postulated that respiratory arrest is a 'desperate act' thrust on the respiratory neurons by a critical exhaustion of their energy store (ATP) due to the rapid firing in the period of hyperventilation. The point of no return may be reached when anoxia and/or partial inhibition of cytochrome oxidase prevent the neurons from replenishing the ATP store. The formation of Fe3+ cyanide complexes. exemplified by the metHb producer DMAP, appears to give the best results with regard to the restoration of spontaneous respiration. The study of respiratory autoregulation may also be helpful in developing and understanding other therapeutic approaches.

  16. Calcium antagonists. A role in the management of cyanide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Maduh, E.U.; Porter, D.W.; Baskin, S.I.

    1993-12-31

    The physiological role of calcium was demonstrated by Ringer (1883) when he linked the omission of calcium (Ca++) from the bathing medium to the induction of cardiac arrest in the isolated frog heart. This observation established that Ca++ controlled muscle contraction but it was not until the autumn of 1963 that the specific pharmacological significance of this contribution was realised by Fleckenstein (1964), leading to the development of Ca++ antagonism as a concept in drug action (Fleckenstein 1977). Identifying the precise role of Ca++ ions in toxic cell injury and tissue death attributable to drug and chemical intoxication has lagged behind developments in Ca++ physiology and pharmacology and to date, much remains to be learned, although studies aimed at characterising the role of Ca++ in cytotoxic cell injury are receiving intense attention (Bondy Komulainen 1988; Maduh et al. l988a, l99Oa,b; Orrenius et al. 1989; Trump et al. 1989). On the other hand, the importance of cyanide as a poison has been known from antiquity (for references to earlier literature see Baskin Fricke 1992; Solomonson 1981). In experimental cyanide poisoning, recent studies have examined alterations in cell Ca++ and the influence of Ca++ antagonists in the management of this chemical toxicological emergency. These efforts have principally focused on the cellular Ca++ homeostasis system, its interrelationship with cellular components, and its susceptibility to cyanide action.

  17. Draft whole genome sequence of the cyanide-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, Víctor M; Acera, Felipe; Igeño, Ma Isabel; Wibberg, Daniel; Roldán, Ma Dolores; Sáez, Lara P; Hennig, Magdalena; Quesada, Alberto; Huertas, Ma José; Blom, Jochen; Merchán, Faustino; Escribano, Ma Paz; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Estepa, Jessica; Guijo, Ma Isabel; Martínez-Luque, Manuel; Macías, Daniel; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Becerra, Gracia; Ramirez, Silvia; Carmona, Ma Isabel; Gutiérrez, Oscar; Manso, Isabel; Pühler, Alfred; Castillo, Francisco; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Schlüter, Andreas; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 is a Gram-negative bacterium able to tolerate cyanide and to use it as the sole nitrogen source. We report here the first draft of the whole genome sequence of a P. pseudoalcaligenes strain that assimilates cyanide. Three aspects are specially emphasized in this manuscript. First, some generalities of the genome are shown and discussed in the context of other Pseudomonadaceae genomes, including genome size, G + C content, core genome and singletons among other features. Second, the genome is analysed in the context of cyanide metabolism, describing genes probably involved in cyanide assimilation, like those encoding nitrilases, and genes related to cyanide resistance, like the cio genes encoding the cyanide insensitive oxidases. Finally, the presence of genes probably involved in other processes with a great biotechnological potential like production of bioplastics and biodegradation of pollutants also is discussed. PMID:22998548

  18. Cyanide toxicity during cardiopulmonary bypass with small dose of nitroprusside: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kum-Hee; Park, Seo Min; Baek, In Chan; Jang, Junheum; Hong, Yong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) is an anti-hypertensive drug, commonly used to decrease the systemic vascular resistance and lower the blood pressure. When the amount of cyanide generated by the SNP exceeds the metabolic capacity for detoxification, cyanide toxicity occurs. Under general anesthesia and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), it may be difficult to detect the development of cyanide toxicity. In cardiac surgical patients, hemolysis, hypothermia and decreased organ perfusion, which emphasize the risk of cyanide toxicity, may develop as a consequence of CPB. In particular, hemolysis during CPB may cause an unexpected overproduction of cyanide due to free hemoglobin release. We experienced a patient who demonstrated SNP tachyphylaxis and cyanide toxicity during CPB, even though the total amount of SNP administered was much lower than the recommended dose. We therefore report this case with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:27064896

  19. A triazole-bearing picket fence type nickel porphyrin as a cyanide selective allosteric host.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyeong-Im; Yoon, Hongsik; Jang, Woo-Dong

    2015-05-01

    A triazole-bearing picket fence type nickel porphyrin (1) has been synthesized as a host compound for anion binding. Among the various anionic species examined, cyanide was the only one that affected a spectral change of 1. Moreover, 1 exhibited strong homotropic positive allosterism against cyanide binding due to an electronic effect as well as multiple hydrogen bonds formed between cyanide and the triazole groups.

  20. Deposition of carbonyl sulphide to soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluczewski, S. M.; Brown, K. A.; Bel, J. N. B.

    Carbonyl sulphide (COS) is a trace constituent of the atmosphere and is also the main form in which 35S is released from CO 2-cooled nuclear reactors. Measurements of its deposition velocity ( Vg) are therefore important for validating radiological dose models and for interpreting the role of COS in the global S cycle. The Vg of [ 35S]COS to thin layers of several contrasting soils was measured in a through-flow fumigation system. Deposition velocity was not significantly affected by soil type, although deposition to moist soil was significantly greater ( P < 0.001) than for air-dried soils, mean values being 5.71 × 10 -6 ms -1 and 3.06 × 10 -6 ms -1, respectively. The results obtained are about three orders of magnitude smaller than published Vg values for SO 2 to similar soils, which suggests that uptake by soils is not a major sink for atmospheric COS. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that deposition to soil of [ 35S]COS from nuclear reactors is unlikely to contribute significantly to radiation dose from the food chain pathway. The reduction in Vg observed in heat-treated soils indicates a microbial involvement in uptake. However, it seems unlikely that microbial metabolism is the rate-controlling step, since stimulation of the microflora by the addition of nutrients did not increase COS deposition.

  1. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide.

    PubMed

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J; Fowler, Joanna S; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-08-01

    In this research, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([(11)C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [(11)C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of (12)C-cyanide ((12)CN¯). The [(11)C]CN¯ is produced from [(11)C]CO2, which is generated by the (14)N(p,α)(11)C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [(11)C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to (12)CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33µA for 1 and 10min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [(11)C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [(11)C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.

  2. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    DOE PAGES

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,α)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass.more » It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.« less

  3. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,α)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.

  4. 31P{1H}NMR and carbonyl force constants of unsymmetrical bidentate phosphine complexes of group (VI) metal carbonyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesu Raj, Joe Gerald; Pathak, Devendra Deo; Kapoor, Pramesh N.

    2015-05-01

    In our present work we report synthesis of an unsymmetrical diphos ligand, 1-diphenylphosphino-2-di-m-tolylphosphinoethane and its coordinate complexes with group (VI) metal carbonyls such as Cr(CO)6 Mo(CO)6 and W(CO)6. The synthesized ligand and its complexes have been completely characterized by elemental analyses, FTIR, 1HNMR, 31P{1H}NMR and FAB mass spectrometry methods. Special emphasis has been given to calculations of carbonyl force constants. Based on the spectroscopic evidences it has been confirmed that these metal carbonyl complexes with the ditertiary phosphine ligand showed cis geometry in their molecular structure.

  5. Hydrogen cyanide polymers, comets and the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Clifford N; Minard, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide polymers--heterogeneous solids ranging in colour from yellow to orange to brown to black--could be major components of the dark matter observed on many bodies of the outer solar system including asteroids, moons, planets and, especially, comets. The presence on cometary nuclei of frozen volatiles such as methane, ammonia and water subjected to high energy sources makes them attractive sites for the ready formation and condensed-phase polymerization of hydrogen cyanide. This could account for the dark crust observed on Comet Halley in 1986 by the Vega and Giotto missions. Dust emanating from its nucleus would arise partly from HCN polymers as suggested by the Giotto detection of free hydrogen cyanide, CN radicals, solid particles consisting only of H, C and N, or only of H, C, N, O, and nitrogen-containing organic compounds. Further evidence for cometary HCN polymers could be expected from in situ analysis of the ejected material from Comet Tempel 1 after collision with the impactor probe from the two-stage Deep Impact mission on July 4, 2005. Even more revealing will be actual samples of dust collected from the coma of Comet Wild 2 by the Stardust mission, due to return to Earth in January 2006 for analyses which we have predicted will detect these polymers and related compounds. In situ results have already shown that nitriles and polymers of hydrogen cyanide are probable components of the cometary dust that struck the Cometary and Interstellar Dust Analyzer of the Stardust spacecraft as it approached Comet Wild 2 on January 2, 2004. Preliminary evidence (January 2005) obtained by the Huygens probe of the ongoing Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and its satellites indicates the presence of nitrogen-containing organic compounds in the refractory organic cores of the aerosols that give rise to the orange haze high in the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Our continuing investigations suggest that HCN polymers are basically of two types

  6. Hydrogen cyanide polymers, comets and the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Clifford N; Minard, Robert D

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide polymers--heterogeneous solids ranging in colour from yellow to orange to brown to black--could be major components of the dark matter observed on many bodies of the outer solar system including asteroids, moons, planets and, especially, comets. The presence on cometary nuclei of frozen volatiles such as methane, ammonia and water subjected to high energy sources makes them attractive sites for the ready formation and condensed-phase polymerization of hydrogen cyanide. This could account for the dark crust observed on Comet Halley in 1986 by the Vega and Giotto missions. Dust emanating from its nucleus would arise partly from HCN polymers as suggested by the Giotto detection of free hydrogen cyanide, CN radicals, solid particles consisting only of H, C and N, or only of H, C, N, O, and nitrogen-containing organic compounds. Further evidence for cometary HCN polymers could be expected from in situ analysis of the ejected material from Comet Tempel 1 after collision with the impactor probe from the two-stage Deep Impact mission on July 4, 2005. Even more revealing will be actual samples of dust collected from the coma of Comet Wild 2 by the Stardust mission, due to return to Earth in January 2006 for analyses which we have predicted will detect these polymers and related compounds. In situ results have already shown that nitriles and polymers of hydrogen cyanide are probable components of the cometary dust that struck the Cometary and Interstellar Dust Analyzer of the Stardust spacecraft as it approached Comet Wild 2 on January 2, 2004. Preliminary evidence (January 2005) obtained by the Huygens probe of the ongoing Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and its satellites indicates the presence of nitrogen-containing organic compounds in the refractory organic cores of the aerosols that give rise to the orange haze high in the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. Our continuing investigations suggest that HCN polymers are basically of two types

  7. The fate of cyanide in leach wastes at gold mines: an environmental perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide-containing and cyanide-related species are subject to attenuation mechanisms that lead to dispersal to the atmosphere, chemical transformation to other carbon and nitrogen species, or sequestration as cyanometallic precipitates or adsorbed species on mineral surfaces. Dispersal to the atmosphere and chemical transformation amount to permanent elimination of cyanide, whereas sequestration amounts to storage of cyanide in locations from which it can potentially be remobilized by infiltrating waters if conditions change. From an environmental perspective, the most significant cyanide releases from gold leach operations involve catastrophic spills of process solutions or leakage of effluent to the unsaturated or saturated zones. These release pathways are unfavorable for two important cyanide attenuation mechanisms that tend to occur naturally: dispersal of free cyanide to the atmosphere and sunlight-catalyzed dissociation of strong cyanometallic complexes, which produces free cyanide that can then disperse to the atmosphere. The widest margins of environmental safety will be achieved where mineral processing operations are designed so that time for offgassing, aeration, and sunlight exposure are maximized in the event that cyanide-bearing solutions are released inadvertently.

  8. Determination of cyanide in blood by reaction head-space gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Felby, Søren

    2009-01-01

    A method describing determination of cyanide in blood by head-space gas chromatography with electron capture detector was reported. The method involves transformation of cyanide into cyanogen chloride by reacting hydrogen cyanide with chloramine-T on a stick of filter paper in the space above the blood in the head-space vial. The recovery was 84-96% and the coefficient of variation was 3.3-7.2%. The limit of quantitation was about 0.01 mg cyanide/l.

  9. Improving the cyanide toxicity tolerance of anaerobic reactor: Microbial interactions and toxin reduction.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pragya; Ahammad, S Z; Sreekrishnan, T R

    2016-09-01

    Anaerobic biological treatment of high organics containing wastewater is amongst the preferred treatment options but poor tolerance to toxins makes its use prohibitive. In this study, efforts have been made to understand the key parameters for developing anaerobic reactor, resilient to cyanide toxicity. A laboratory scale anaerobic batch reactor was set up to treat cyanide containing wastewater. The reactor was inoculated with anaerobic sludge obtained from a wastewater treatment plant and fresh cow dung in the ratio of 3:1. The focus was on acclimatization and development of cyanide-degrading biomass and to understand the toxic effects of cyanide on the dynamic equilibrium between various microbial groups. The sludge exposed to cyanide was found to have higher bacterial diversity than the control. It was observed that certain hydrogenotrophic methanogens and bacterial groups were able to grow and produce methane in the presence of cyanide. Also, it was found that hydrogen utilizing methanogens were more cyanide tolerant than acetate utilizing methanogens. So, effluents from various industries like electroplating, coke oven plant, petroleum refining, explosive manufacturing, and pesticides industries which are having high concentrations of cyanide can be treated by favoring the growth of the tolerant microbes in the reactors. It will provide much better treatment efficiency by overcoming the inhibitory effects of cyanide to certain extent. PMID:27179200

  10. Amygdalin Toxicity Studies in Rats Predict Chronic Cyanide Poisoning in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Newton, George W.; Schmidt, Eric S.; Lewis, Jerry P.; Lawrence, Ruth; Conn, Eric

    1981-01-01

    Significant amounts of cyanide are released when amygdalin (Laetrile), a cyanogenic glycoside, is given orally or intravenously to rats. The amount of cyanide liberated following oral administration is dependent in part on the bacterial flora of the gut and can be suppressed by antibiotic pretreatment of the animals. Bacteria from human feces likewise hydrolyze amygdalin with release of cyanide. Humans taking amygdalin orally in the hope of preventing cancer are likely to be exposed to levels of cyanide in excess of that associated with the development of tropical ataxic neuropathy in people of underdeveloped countries where food containing cyanogenic glycosides is a staple part of the diet. PMID:7222669

  11. Subsurface fate and transport of cyanide species at a manufactured-gas plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.; Luthy, R.G.; Nakles, D.V.

    1999-10-01

    Cyanide is present at manufactured-gas plant (MGP) sites in oxide-box residuals, which were often managed on-site as fill during active operations. Cyanide can leach from these materials, causing groundwater contamination. Speciation, fate, and transport of cyanide in a sand-gravel aquifer underlying an MGP site in the upper Midwest region of the US were studied through characterization, monitoring, and modeling of a plume of cyanide-contaminated groundwater emanating from the site. Results indicate that cyanide in the groundwater is primarily in the form of iron-cyanide complexes (>98%), that these complexes are stable under the conditions of the aquifer, and that they are transported as nonreactive solutes in the sand-gravel aquifer material. Weak-acid-dissociable cyanide, which represents a minute fraction of total cyanide in the site groundwater, may undergo chemical-biological degradation in the sand-gravel aquifer. It seems that dilution may be the only natural attenuation mechanism for iron-cyanide complexes in sand-gravel aquifers at MGP sites.

  12. [Suicidal poisoning with cyanide bought on the internet--case report].

    PubMed

    Sommerfeld, Karina; Łukasik-Głebocka, Magdalena; Górny, Jacek; Tobolski, Jarosław; Zielińska-Psuja, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Cyanides are relatively rare cause of acute poisonings. The majority of data on toxic effects of cyanide compounds on the human body, come from the experiences gained from accidental poisonings in the workplace, with fire smokes or during chemical incidents. However, from immemorial time, cyanides were also used in suicide attempts. The aim of this paper is to present the case of suicidal cyanide poisoning of 26-year-old woman, who was admitted to the toxicology department one hour after ingestion of unknown cyanogenic compound, probably bought on the Internet. Despite intensive symptomatic treatment and antidote administration (hydroxocobalamine), patient died after 78 hours of treatment.

  13. pH dependence of methyl phosphonic acid, dipicolinic acid, and cyanide by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart; Gift, Alan; Maksymiuk, Paul; Inscore, Frank E.; Smith, Wayne W.

    2004-03-01

    U.S. and Coalition forces fighting terrorism in Afghanistan and Iraq must consider a wide range of attack scenarios in addition to car bombings. Among these is the intentional poisoning of water supplies to obstruct military operations. To counter such attacks, the military is developing portable analyzers that can identify and quantify potential chemical agents in water supplies at microgram per liter concentrations within 10 minutes. To aid this effort we have been investigating the value of a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based portable analyzer. In particular we have been developing silver-doped sol-gels to generate SER spectra of chemical agents and their hydrolysis products. Here we present SER spectra of methyl phosphonic acid and cyanide as a function of pH, an important factor affecting quantitation measurements, which to our knowledge has not been examined. In addition, dipicolinic acid, a chemical signature associated with anthrax-causing spores, is also presented.

  14. Carbonyl-Olefin Exchange Reaction and Related Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jossifov, Christo; Kalinova, Radostina

    A new carbon—carbon double bond forming reaction (carbonyl olefin exchange reaction) mediated by transition metal catalytic systems has been discovered. The catalytic systems used (transition metal halides or oxohalides alone or in combination with Lewis acids) are active only in the case when the two reacting groups are in one molecules and are conjugated. In addition these systems accelerate other reactions which run simultaneously with the carbonyl olefin metathesis rendering a detailed investigation of the process very complicated.

  15. Ecosystem photosynthesis inferred from measurements of carbonyl sulphide flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaf, David; Rotenberg, Eyal; Tatarinov, Fyodor; Dicken, Uri; Montzka, Stephen A.; Yakir, Dan

    2013-03-01

    Limited understanding of carbon dioxide sinks and sources on land is often linked to the inability to distinguish between the carbon dioxide taken up by photosynthesis, and that released by respiration. Carbonyl sulphide, a sulphur-containing analogue of carbon dioxide, is also taken up by plants, and could potentially serve as a powerful proxy for photosynthetic carbon dioxide uptake, which cannot be directly measured above the leaf scale. Indeed, variations in atmospheric concentrations of carbonyl sulphide are closely related to those of carbon dioxide at regional, local and leaf scales. Here, we use eddy covariance and laser spectroscopy to estimate the net exchange of carbon dioxide and carbonyl sulphide across three pine forests, a cotton field and a wheat field in Israel. We estimate gross primary productivity--a measure of ecosystem photosynthesis--directly from the carbonyl sulphide fluxes, and indirectly from carbon dioxide fluxes. The two estimates agree within an error of +/-15%. The ratio of carbonyl sulphide to carbon dioxide flux at the ecosystem scale was consistent with the variability in mixing ratios observed on seasonal timescales in the background atmosphere. We suggest that atmospheric measurements of carbonyl sulphide flux could provide an independent constraint on estimates of gross primary productivity, key to projecting the response of the land biosphere to climate change.

  16. Carbonyl species characteristics during the evaporation of essential oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Hsiu-Mei; Chiu, Hua-Hsien; Lai, Yen-Ming; Chen, Ching-Yen; Chiang, Hung-Lung

    2010-06-01

    Carbonyls emitted from essential oils can affect the air quality when they are used in indoors, especially under poor ventilation conditions. Lavender, lemon, rose, rosemary, and tea tree oils were selected as typical and popular essential oils to investigate in terms of composition, thermal characteristics and fifteen carbonyl constituents. Based on thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, the activation energy was 7.6-8.3 kcal mol -1, the reaction order was in the range of 0.6-0.7 and the frequency factor was 360-2838 min -1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, and propionaldehyde were the dominant carbonyl compounds, and their concentrations were 0.034-0.170 ppm. The emission factors of carbonyl compounds were 2.10-3.70 mg g -1, and acetone, propionaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde accounted for a high portion of the emission factor of carbonyl compounds in essential oil exhaust. Some unhealthy carbonyl species such as formaldehyde and valeraldehyde, were measured at low-temperature during the vaporization of essential oils, indicating a potential effect on indoor air quality and human health.

  17. Determination of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and the genes expression involved in phyto-degradation of cyanide and ferri-cyanide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Zhang, Xue-Hong

    2016-07-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted with different species of plants (rice, maize, soybean and willow) exposed to ferri-cyanide to investigate the half-saturation constant (K M ) and the maximal metabolic capacity (v max ) involved in phyto-assimilation. Three varieties for each testing species were collected from different origins. Measured concentrations show that the uptake rates responded biphasically to ferri-cyanide treatments by showing increases linearly at low and almost constant at high concentrations from all treatments, indicating that phyto-assimilation of ferri-cyanide followed the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Using non-linear regression, the highest v max was by rice, followed by willows. The lowest v max was found for soybean. All plants, except maize (DY26) and rice (XJ12), had a similar K M value, suggesting the same enzyme was active in phyto-assimilation of ferri-cyanide. Transcript level, by real-time quantitative PCR, of enzymes involved in degradation of cyanides showed that the analyzed genes were differently expressed during different cyanides exposure. The expression of CAS and ST genes responded positively to KCN exposure, suggesting that β-CAS and ST pathways were two possible pathways for cyanide detoxification in rice. The transcript level of NIT and ASPNASE genes also showed a remarkable up-regulation to KCN, implying the contribution to the pool of amino acid aspartate, which is an end product of CN metabolism. Up-regulation of GS genes suggests that acquisition of ammonium released from cyanide degradation may be an additional nitrogen source for plant nutrition. Results also revealed that the expressions of these genes, except for GS, were relatively constant during iron cyanide exposure, suggesting that they are likely metabolized by plants through a non-defined pathway rather than the β-CAS pathway. PMID:26992391

  18. Determination of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and the genes expression involved in phyto-degradation of cyanide and ferri-cyanide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Zhang, Xue-Hong

    2016-07-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted with different species of plants (rice, maize, soybean and willow) exposed to ferri-cyanide to investigate the half-saturation constant (K M ) and the maximal metabolic capacity (v max ) involved in phyto-assimilation. Three varieties for each testing species were collected from different origins. Measured concentrations show that the uptake rates responded biphasically to ferri-cyanide treatments by showing increases linearly at low and almost constant at high concentrations from all treatments, indicating that phyto-assimilation of ferri-cyanide followed the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Using non-linear regression, the highest v max was by rice, followed by willows. The lowest v max was found for soybean. All plants, except maize (DY26) and rice (XJ12), had a similar K M value, suggesting the same enzyme was active in phyto-assimilation of ferri-cyanide. Transcript level, by real-time quantitative PCR, of enzymes involved in degradation of cyanides showed that the analyzed genes were differently expressed during different cyanides exposure. The expression of CAS and ST genes responded positively to KCN exposure, suggesting that β-CAS and ST pathways were two possible pathways for cyanide detoxification in rice. The transcript level of NIT and ASPNASE genes also showed a remarkable up-regulation to KCN, implying the contribution to the pool of amino acid aspartate, which is an end product of CN metabolism. Up-regulation of GS genes suggests that acquisition of ammonium released from cyanide degradation may be an additional nitrogen source for plant nutrition. Results also revealed that the expressions of these genes, except for GS, were relatively constant during iron cyanide exposure, suggesting that they are likely metabolized by plants through a non-defined pathway rather than the β-CAS pathway.

  19. A critical review of the effects of gold cyanide-bearing tailings solutions on wildlife.

    PubMed

    Donato, D B; Nichols, O; Possingham, H; Moore, M; Ricci, P F; Noller, B N

    2007-10-01

    Wildlife deaths associated with cyanide-bearing mine waste solutions have plagued the gold mining industries for many years, yet there is little published data showing the relationship between wildlife mortality and cyanide toxicity. A gap of knowledge exists in monitoring, understanding the causal relationships and managing risks to wildlife from cyanide-bearing waste solutions and tailings. There is a need for the gold industry to address this issue and to meet the International Cyanide Management Code (ICMC) guidelines. The perceived extent of the issue varies, with one study finding the issue inadequately monitored and wildlife deaths grossly underestimated. In Nevada, USA during 1990 and 1991, 9512 carcasses were reported of over 100 species, although there was underestimation due to reporting being voluntary. Of these, birds comprised 80-91% of vertebrate carcasses reported annually. At Northparkes, Australia in 1995, it was initially estimated that 100 bird carcasses were present by mine staff following a tailings incident; when a thorough count was conducted, 1583 bird carcasses were recorded. Eventually, 2700 bird deaths were documented over a four-month period. It is identified that avian deaths are usually undetected and significantly underestimated, leading to a perception that a risk does not exist. Few guidelines and information are available to manage the risks of cyanide to wildlife, although detoxification, habitat modification and denying wildlife access have been used effectively. Hazing techniques have proven ineffective. Apparently no literature exists that documents accurate wildlife monitoring protocols on potentially toxic cyanide-bearing mine waste solutions or any understanding on the analysis of any derived dataset. This places the onus on mining operations to document that no risk to wildlife exists. Cyanide-bearing tailings storage facilities are environmental control structures to contain tailings, a standard practice in the mining

  20. A critical review of the effects of gold cyanide-bearing tailings solutions on wildlife.

    PubMed

    Donato, D B; Nichols, O; Possingham, H; Moore, M; Ricci, P F; Noller, B N

    2007-10-01

    Wildlife deaths associated with cyanide-bearing mine waste solutions have plagued the gold mining industries for many years, yet there is little published data showing the relationship between wildlife mortality and cyanide toxicity. A gap of knowledge exists in monitoring, understanding the causal relationships and managing risks to wildlife from cyanide-bearing waste solutions and tailings. There is a need for the gold industry to address this issue and to meet the International Cyanide Management Code (ICMC) guidelines. The perceived extent of the issue varies, with one study finding the issue inadequately monitored and wildlife deaths grossly underestimated. In Nevada, USA during 1990 and 1991, 9512 carcasses were reported of over 100 species, although there was underestimation due to reporting being voluntary. Of these, birds comprised 80-91% of vertebrate carcasses reported annually. At Northparkes, Australia in 1995, it was initially estimated that 100 bird carcasses were present by mine staff following a tailings incident; when a thorough count was conducted, 1583 bird carcasses were recorded. Eventually, 2700 bird deaths were documented over a four-month period. It is identified that avian deaths are usually undetected and significantly underestimated, leading to a perception that a risk does not exist. Few guidelines and information are available to manage the risks of cyanide to wildlife, although detoxification, habitat modification and denying wildlife access have been used effectively. Hazing techniques have proven ineffective. Apparently no literature exists that documents accurate wildlife monitoring protocols on potentially toxic cyanide-bearing mine waste solutions or any understanding on the analysis of any derived dataset. This places the onus on mining operations to document that no risk to wildlife exists. Cyanide-bearing tailings storage facilities are environmental control structures to contain tailings, a standard practice in the mining

  1. Degradation of soil cyanide by single and mixed cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Nwokoro, Ogbonnaya; Dibua, Marie Esther Uju

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study whether certain bacteria could be used for cyanide degradation in soil. The bacteria Pseudomonas stutzeri and Bacillus subtilis were selected based on their good growth in a minimal medium containing 0.8 mg mL-1 potassium cyanide (KCN). In this study we tested their ability to reduce cyanide levels in a medium containing 1.5 mg mL-1 of KCN. Although both microorganisms reduced cyanide levels, Pseudomonas stutzeri was the more effective test organism. Later on, the selected cultures were grown, diluted and their various cell concentrations were used individually and in combination to test their ability of cyanide degradation in soil samples collected around a cassava processing mill. Bacillus subtilis caused degradation of soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil immediately with an inoculum concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) to 0.072 mg g-1 soil after 10 days with an inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) implying a 66.9 % reduction. Pseudomonas stutzeri cell concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) decreased soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil initially to 0.061 mg g-1 soil after 10 days with an inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) (72 % reduction). The mixed culture of the two bacteria produced the best degradation of soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil sample with a combined inoculum concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) initially to 0.025 mg g-1 soil with a combined inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) after 10 days incubation resulting in an 88.5 % degradation of soil cyanide. The analysed bacteria displayed high cyanide degradation potential and may be useful for efficient decontamination of cyanide contaminated sites.

  2. Amino acid dependent formation of phosphate anhydrides in water mediated by carbonyl sulfide.

    PubMed

    Leman, Luke J; Orgel, Leslie E; Ghadiri, M Reza

    2006-01-11

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS), a component of volcanic gas emissions and interstellar gas clouds, is shown to be an efficient condensing agent in the context of phosphate chemistry in aqueous solutions. We report that high-energy aminoacyl-phosphate anhydrides and aminoacyl adenylates are generated in solutions containing amino acids, COS, and the corresponding phosphate molecule. We further show that the mixed anhydrides of amino acids and inorganic phosphate are phosphorylating agents, producing pyrophosphate in better than 30% yield in the presence of Ca2+ precipitates. The amino acid dependent activations of phosphate reported here, which occur in parallel with the production of peptides, suggest that these two reactions may have shared a common intermediate on the prebiotic Earth.

  3. Cyanide in MGP (manufactured gas plant) wastes: Investigation of analytical methods. Topical report, January 1988-June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, J.E.; Theis, T.L.; Luthy, R.G.

    1989-06-01

    Wastes associated with manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites are known to contain various cyanide complexes. Problems exist relative to evaluating the true cyanide content of these solid wastes. These problems are, in general, related to lack of standard laboratory methods for extracting and analyzing leachate or distillates from solid samples. Samples of MGP purifier wastes were analyzed by two university laboratories under carefully controlled conditions to establish absolute levels of total cyanide in the samples. Duplicate samples were submitted to several commercial laboratories for analysis of total cyanide. Results from the university studies and commercial laboratories were compared. Based on the study, an extraction method can be defined that will provide more accurate and reproducible results for total cyanide contained in solid samples. A high alkaline extraction is recommended when analyzing MGP samples for cyanide. When disposing of cyanide-containing wastes, maintaining the natural acidic pH will control leaching of cyanide.

  4. Carbonyl emissions from vehicular exhausts sources in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Ho, Kin Fai; Lee, Shun Cheng; Cheng, Yan; Yu, Jian Zhen; Lam, Ka Man; Feng, Natale Sin Yau; Huang, Yu

    2012-02-01

    Vehicular emission (VE) is one of the important anthropogenic sources for airborne carbonyls in urban area. Six types of VE-dominated samples were collected at representative locations in Hong Kong where polluted by a particular fueled type of vehicles, including (i) a gas refilling taxis station (liquefied petroleum gas [LPG] emission); (ii) a light-duty passenger car park (gasoline emission); (iii) a minibus station (diesel emission); (iv) a single-deck-bus depot (diesel emission); (v) a double-deck-bus depot (diesel emission); and (vi) a whole-food market entrance for light- and heavy-duty vehicles (diesel emission). A total of 15 carbonyls in the samples were quantified. Formaldehyde was the most abundant carbonyl among the VE-dominated samples, and its contribution to the total quantified amount on a molar basis ranged from 54.8% to 60.8%. Acetaldehyde and acetone were the next two abundant carbonyls. The carbonyls were quantified at three roadside locations in Hong Kong. The highest concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, 22.7 +/- 8.4 and 6.0 +/- 2.8 microg/m3, respectively, were determined in the samples collected at a main transportation gate for goods between Hong Kong and Mainland China. The total quantified carbonyl concentration, 37.9 +/- 9.3 microg/m3, was the highest at an entrance of a cross-harbor tunnel in downtown area. The theoretical carbonyls compositions of the three roadside locations were estimated according to the VE-dominated sample profiles and the statistics on vehicle numbers and types during the sampling period. The measured compositions of formaldehyde were much higher than the theoretical compositions in summer, demonstrating that photochemical reactions significantly contributed to the formaldehyde production in the roadsides. PMID:22442938

  5. [A method of cleaning overalls contaminated with sodium cyanide].

    PubMed

    Beliakov, A A; Mironov, L A

    1990-01-01

    The contributors propose a new technique of cleaning overalls in galvanic shops from crystalline natrium cyanide (NC) and alkaline solutions. The technique includes washing in hot 0.05% syntamide-5 solution for 4-5 min., double rinsing and centrifuging. The remaining quantity of NC on washed overalls does not exceed 0.02 mg/m2 (evaluated in hydrocyanic acid). Subsequent contaminations of the overalls with NC do not entail the accumulation of NC residual content. The physical and chemical characteristics of this type of overall washing are more preferable as compared to those attained through soaking in ferric sulfate solution. PMID:2161780

  6. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER CYANIDE PROCESSING WORKS, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER CYANIDE PROCESSING WORKS, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM LARGE TAILINGS PILE. THE REMAINS OF THREE TEN FOOT DIAMETER SETTLING TANKS ARE AT CENTER. THE SCATTER IN THE CENTER FOREGROUND IS THE REMAINS OF A LARGE RECTANGULAR HOLDING TANK POSSIBLY A SETTLING TANK. THIS AREA WAS MOST LIKELY CONSTRUCTED LATER IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY AFTER MINING HAD CEASED AND ONLY TAILINGS WERE BEING RECLAIMED. AN EXACT DATE CANNOT BE DETERMINED HOWEVER THESE WORKS ARE DISTINCTLY DIFFERENT THAN THE ORIGINAL LAYOUT. THE SANDY AREA THAT OCCUPIES THE FOREGROUND AND THE CENTER ARE TAILINGS. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  7. OVERVIEW OF REMAINS OF DEWATERING BUILDING, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD CYANIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF REMAINS OF DEWATERING BUILDING, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD CYANIDE PROCESSING AREA. WATER USED IN PROCESSING AT THE STAMP MILL WAS CIRCULATED HERE FOR RECLAMATION. SANDS WERE SETTLED OUT AND DEPOSITED IN ONE OF TWO TAILINGS HOLDING AREAS. CLEARED WATER WAS PUMPED BACK TO THE MILL FOR REUSE. THIS PROCESS WAS ACCOMPLISHED BY THE USE OF SETTLING CONES, EIGHT FEET IN DIAMETER AND SIX FEET HIGH. THE REMAINS OF FOUR CONES ARE AT CENTER, BEHIND THE TANK IN THE FOREGROUND. TO THE LEFT IS THE MAIN ACCESS ROAD BETWEEN THE MILL AND THE PARKING LOT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  8. Cyanide in bronchoalveolar lavage is not diagnostic for Pseudomonas aeruginosa in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Stutz, M D; Gangell, C L; Berry, L J; Garratt, L W; Sheil, B; Sly, P D

    2011-03-01

    Early detection of the cyanobacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lungs of young children with cystic fibrosis (CF) is considered the key to delaying chronic pulmonary disease. We investigated whether cyanide in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid could be used as an early diagnostic biomarker of infection. Cyanide was measured in 226 BAL samples (36 P. aeruginosa infected) obtained from 96 infants and young children with CF participating in an early surveillance programme involving annual BAL. Cyanide was detected in 97.2% of P. aeruginosa infected and 60.5% of uninfected samples. Cyanide concentrations were significantly higher in BALs infected with P. aeruginosa (median (25th-75th percentile) 27.3 (22.1-33.3) μM) than those which were not (17.2 (7.85-23.0) μM, p<0.001). The best sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were obtained with a cut-off concentration of 20.6 μM, and were 83%, 66%, 32% and 96%, respectively. Neutrophil number in BAL was a significant predictor of cyanide concentration (p<0.001). Cyanide concentration can distinguish between P. aeruginosa infected and uninfected BALs as a group, but not individually; therefore, cyanide is a poor diagnostic biomarker of P. aeruginosa infection. Cyanide levels in BAL are related to the level of neutrophilic inflammation.

  9. Development of a site-specific marine water quality standard for cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Arredondo, L.A.; Brix, K.V.; Cardwell, R.D.; Marsden, A.

    1995-12-31

    A study was conducted to develop a site-specific marine standard for cyanide. The generic cyanide standard of 1 {micro}g/L is ``driven`` by toxicity data for eastern rock crab (Cancer irroratus) zoeae. The reported LC50 for C. irroratus is 4.9 {micro}g/L cyanide and is six times more sensitive that any other marine species tested. In order to develop a site-specific standard for Washington state, cyanide toxicity tests were conducted using the first stage zoeae of Cancer magister and Cancer oregonensis, two Cancer resident to Puget Sound, in accordance with standard ASTM test methods. Testing with C. magister and C. oregonensis resulted in Species Mean Acute Values (SMAVS) of 68 and 131 {micro}g/L cyanide based on measured test concentrations. This is considerably higher than that reported for C. irroratus, is more consistent with cyanide toxicity values for other species tested, and results in a water quality criterion of 9.85 {micro}g/L cyanide with inclusion of these values in the data set. This paper presents the test methods used and the potential effects the test results may have on the marine water quality criterion for cyanide.

  10. Simultaneous degradation of cyanide and phenol in upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, M Suresh; Mishra, Ram Sushil; Jadhav, Shilpa V; Vaidya, A N; Chakrabarti, T

    2011-07-01

    Coal coking, precious metals mining and nitrile polymer industries generate over several billion liters of cyanide-containing waste annually. Economic and environmental considerations make biological technologies attractive for treatment of wastes containing high organic content, in which the microbial cultures can remove concentrations of organics and cyanide simultaneously. For cyanide and phenol bearing waste treatment, an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor has been developed, which successfully removed free cyanide 98% (with feed concentration of 20 mg 1(-1)) in presence of phenol. The effect of cyanide on phenol degradation was studied with varying concentrations of phenol as well as cyanide under anaerobic conditions. This study revealed that the methanogenic degradation of phenol can occur in the presence of cyanide concentration 30-38 mg 1(-1). Higher cyanide concentration inhibited the phenol degradation rate. The inhibition constant Ki was found to be 38 mg 1(-1) with phenol removal rate of 9.09 mg 1(-1.) x h.

  11. Turn-on fluorescent detection of cyanide based on the inner filter effect of silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shang, Li; Qin, Chuanjiang; Jin, Lihua; Wang, Lixiang; Dong, Shaojun

    2009-07-01

    A simple, sensitive fluorescent method for detecting cyanide has been developed based on the inner filter effect (IFE) of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs). With a high extinction coefficient and tunable plasmon absorption feature, Ag NPs are expected to be a powerful absorber to tune the emission of the fluorophore in the IFE-based fluorescent assays. In the present work, we developed a turn-on fluorescent assay for cyanide based on the strong absorption of Ag NPs to both excitation and emission light of an isolated fluorescence indicator. In the presence of cyanide, the absorber Ag NPs will dissolve gradually, which then leads to recovery of the IFE-decreased emission of the fluorophore. The concentration of Ag NPs in the detection system was found to affect the fluorescence response toward cyanide greatly. Under the optimum conditions, the present IFE-based approach can detect cyanide ranging from 5.0 x 10(-7) to 6.0 x 10(-4) M with a detection limit of 2.5 x 10(-7) M, which is much lower than the corresponding absorbance-based approach and compares favorably with other reported fluorescent methods. In addition, the present method possesses a good selectivity for cyanide over other common anions and further application in cyanide-spiked water samples suggested a recovery between 98.2 and 101.4%. Therefore, our proposed IFE-based fluorescent method is expected to be applied for cyanide determination in practical applications.

  12. Cyanide hazards to plants and animals from gold mining and related water issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.

    2004-01-01

    Highly toxic sodium cyanide (NaCN) is used by the international mining community to extract gold and other precious metals through milling of high-grade ores and heap leaching of low-grade ores (Korte et al. 2000). The process to concentrate gold using cyanide was developed in Scotland in 1887 and was used almost immediately in the Witwatersrand gold fields of the Republic of South Africa. Heap leaching with cyanide was proposed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines in 1969 as a means of extracting gold from low-grade ores. The gold industry adopted the technique in the 1970s, soon making heap leaching the dominant technology in gold extraction (Da Rosa and Lyon 1997). The heap leach and milling processes, which involve dewatering of gold-bearing ores, spraying of dilute cyanide solutions on extremely large heaps of ores containing low concentrations of gold, or the milling of ores with the use of cyanide and subsequent recovery of the gold-cyanide complex, have created a number of serious environmental problems affecting wildlife and water management. In this account, we review the history of cyanide use in gold mining with emphasis on heap leach gold mining, cyanide hazards to plants and animals, water management issues associated with gold mining, and proposed mitigation and research needs.

  13. Modelling anaerobic digestion acclimatisation to a biodegradable toxicant: application to cyanide.

    PubMed

    Zaher, U; Moussa, M S; Widyatmika, I N; van Der Steen, P; Gijzen, H J; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2006-01-01

    The observed acclimatisation to biodegradable toxicants in anaerobic cassava wastewater treatment is explained by modelling anaerobic cyanide degradation. A complete degradation pathway is proposed for cyanide. Cyanide degradation is modelled as enzymatic hydrolysis to formate and ammonia. Ammonia is added to the inorganic nitrogen content of the digester while formate is degraded by the hydrogenotrophic methanogens. Cyanide irreversible enzyme inhibition is modelled as an inhibition factor to acetate uptake processes. Cyanide irreversible toxicity is modelled as a decay factor to the acetate degraders. Cyanide as well as added phosphorus buffer solution were considered in the chemical equilibrium calculations of pH. The observed reversible effect after acclimatisation of sludge is modelled by a population shift between two aceticlastic methanogens that have different tolerance to cyanide toxicity. The proposed pathway is added to the IWA Anaerobic Digestion Model no.1 (ADM1). The ADM1 model with the designed extension is validated by an experiment using three lab-scale upflow anaerobic sludge bed reactors which were exposed to different cyanide loadings.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a cyanide dihydratase from Bacillus pumilus C1.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, P R; Rawlings, D E; Woods, D R; Lindsey, G G

    1993-01-01

    A cyanide-degrading enzyme from Bacillus pumilus C1 has been purified and characterized. This enzyme consisted of three polypeptides of 45.6, 44.6, and 41.2 kDa; the molecular mass by gel filtration was 417 kDa. Electron microscopy revealed a multimeric, rod-shaped protein approximately 9 by 50 nm. Cyanide was rapidly degraded to formate and ammonia. Enzyme activity was optimal at 37 degrees C and pH 7.8 to 8.0. Activity was enhanced by Sc3+, Cr3+, Fe3+, and Tb3+; enhancement was independent of metal ion concentration at concentrations above 5 microM. Reversible enhancement of enzymatic activity by azide was maximal at 4.5 mM azide and increased with time. No activity was recorded with the cyanide substrate analogs CNO-, SCN-, CH3CN, and N3- and the possible degradation intermediate HCONH2. Kinetic studies indicated a Km of 2.56 +/- 0.48 mM for cyanide and a Vmax of 88.03 +/- 4.67 mmol of cyanide per min/mg/liter. The Km increased approximately twofold in the presence of 10 microM Cr3+ to 5.28 +/- 0.38 mM for cyanide, and the Vmax increased to 197.11 +/- 8.51 mmol of cyanide per min/mg/liter. We propose naming this enzyme cyanide dihydratase. Images PMID:8407782

  15. Development of biochemical and transformation cyanide antidotes. Final report, 13 January 1993-12 January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Isom, G.E.

    1996-02-01

    Work for this contract involved both cyanide (Part 1) and sulfur mustard vesicants (Part 2). Part (1) To develop an in vitro screen for cyanide antidotes, compounds were tested empirically for ability to block the biochemical effects of cyanide in isolated rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells. Effects in vitro were then compared to ability to block cyanide toxicity in mice. Of the five biochemical actions of cyanide tested, blockade of catalase activity was the one most correlated with in vivo protection. Overall, significant correlations were found between catalase protection in vitro and cyanide antidotal effects in vivo. Data involving 40 different chemical compounds showed that approximately 75% of the time, the in vitro assay was predictive of effectiveness in vivo. The results indicate that the ability of a compound to protect catalase in cultured PC 12 cells against cyanide is a useful screen for cyanide antidotal action in mice. Part (2) To develop an in vitro screen for antivesicant compounds. Mechanisms by which sulfur mustards cause cell death were studied in differentiated PC 12 cells. Both the `Apotag` method and electron microscopy indicated that apoptosis occurred after sulfur mustard exposure. A necrotic mechanism was also evident at higher concentrations (>10-4M). It may be possible to identify sulfur mustard antidotes by their ability to block each of these mechanisms in differentiated PC12 cells.

  16. Cyanide Antidotes for Mass Casualties: Water-Soluble Salts of the Dithiane (Sulfanegen) from 3-Mercaptopyruvate for Intramuscular Administration

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Steven E.; Monteil, Alexandre R.; Cohen, Jonathan F.; Crankshaw, Daune L.; Vince, Robert; Nagasawa, Herbert T.

    2013-01-01

    Current cyanide antidotes are administered by IV infusion which is suboptimal for mass casualties. Therefore, in a cyanide disaster intramuscular (IM) injectable antidotes would be more appropriate. We report the discovery of the highly water-soluble sulfanegen triethanolamine as a promising lead for development as an IM injectable cyanide antidote. PMID:23301495

  17. Cyanide antidotes for mass casualties: water-soluble salts of the dithiane (sulfanegen) from 3-mercaptopyruvate for intramuscular administration.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Steven E; Monteil, Alexandre R; Cohen, Jonathan F; Crankshaw, Daune L; Vince, Robert; Nagasawa, Herbert T

    2013-02-14

    Current cyanide antidotes are administered by IV infusion, which is suboptimal for mass casualties. Therefore, in a cyanide disaster, intramuscular (IM) injectable antidotes would be more appropriate. We report the discovery of the highly water-soluble sulfanegen triethanolamine as a promising lead for development as an IM injectable cyanide antidote.

  18. Bioconversion of cyanide and acetonitrile by a municipal-sewage-derived anaerobic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Nagle, N.J.; Rivard, C.J.; Mohagheghi, A.; Philippidis, G.

    1995-12-31

    In this study, an anaerobic consortium was examined for its ability to adapt to and degrade the representative organonitriles, cyanide and acetonitrile. Adaptation to cyanide and acetonitrile was achieved by adding increasing levels of cyanide and acetonitrile to the anaerobic consortium, followed by extensive incubation over a 90-day period. The anaerobic consortium adapted most rapidly to the lower concentrations of each substrate and resulted in reductions of 85% and 83% of the cyanide and acetonitrile, respectively, at the 50 mg/L addition level. Increasing the concentration of both cyanide and acetonitrile resulted in reduced bioconversion. Two continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were set up to examine the potential for continuous bioconversion of organonitriles. The anaerobic consortium was adapted to continuous infusion of acetonitrile at an initial concentration of 10 mg/L{center_dot}day in phosphate buffer.

  19. Nitrocobinamide, a new cyanide antidote that can be administered by intramuscular injection.

    PubMed

    Chan, Adriano; Jiang, Jingjing; Fridman, Alla; Guo, Ling T; Shelton, G Diane; Liu, Ming-Tao; Green, Carol; Haushalter, Kristofer J; Patel, Hemal H; Lee, Jangwoen; Yoon, David; Burney, Tanya; Mukai, David; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Pilz, Renate B; Boss, Gerry R

    2015-02-26

    Currently available cyanide antidotes must be given by intravenous injection over 5-10 min, making them ill-suited for treating many people in the field, as could occur in a major fire, an industrial accident, or a terrorist attack. These scenarios call for a drug that can be given quickly, e.g., by intramuscular injection. We have shown that aquohydroxocobinamide is a potent cyanide antidote in animal models of cyanide poisoning, but it is unstable in solution and poorly absorbed after intramuscular injection. Here we show that adding sodium nitrite to cobinamide yields a stable derivative (referred to as nitrocobinamide) that rescues cyanide-poisoned mice and rabbits when given by intramuscular injection. We also show that the efficacy of nitrocobinamide is markedly enhanced by coadministering sodium thiosulfate (reducing the total injected volume), and we calculate that ∼1.4 mL each of nitrocobinamide and sodium thiosulfate should rescue a human from a lethal cyanide exposure.

  20. Emissions of carbonyl compounds from various cookstoves in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J. . Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Inst. East-West Center, Honolulu, HI ); Smith, K.R. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA . Center for Occupational and Environmental Health)

    1999-07-15

    This paper presents a new database of carbonyl emission factors for commonly used cookstoves in China. The emission factors, reported both on a fuel-mass basis (mg/kg) and on a defined cooking-task basis (mg/task), were determined using a carbon balance approach for 22 types of fuel/stove combinations. These include various stoves using different species of crop residues and wood, kerosene, and several types of coals and gases. The results show that all the tested cookstoves produced formaldehyde and acetaldehyde and that the vast majority of the biomass stoves produced additional carbonyl compounds such as acetone, acrolein, propionaldehyde, crotonaldehyde, 2-butanone, isobutyraldehyde, butyraldehyde, isovaleraldehyde, valeraldehyde, hexaldehyde, benzaldehyde, o-tolualdehyde, m,p-tolualdehyde, and 2,4-dimethylbenzaldehyde. Carbonyls other than formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, however, were rarely generated by burning coal, coal gas, and natural gas. Kerosene and LPG stoves generated more carbonyl compounds than coal, coal gas, and natural gas stoves, but less than biomass stoves. Indoor levels of carbonyl compounds for typical village houses during cooking hours, estimated using a mass balance model and the measured emission factors, can be high enough to cause acute health effects documented for formaldehyde exposure, depending upon house parameters and individuals' susceptibility.

  1. Cobinamide is superior to other treatments in a mouse model of cyanide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Adriano; Balasubramanian, Maheswari; Blackledge, William; Mohammad, Othman M.; Alvarez, Luis; Boss, Gerry R.; Bigby, Timothy D.

    2011-01-01

    Context Cyanide is a rapidly acting cellular poison, primarily targeting cytochrome c oxidase, and is a common occupational and residential toxin, mostly via smoke inhalation. Cyanide is also a potential weapon of mass destruction, with recent credible threats of attacks focusing the need for better treatments, since current cyanide antidotes are limited and impractical for rapid deployment in mass casualty settings. Objective We have used mouse models of cyanide poisoning to compare the efficacy of cobinamide, the precursor to cobalamin (vitamin B12), to currently approved cyanide antidotes. Cobinamide has extremely high affinity for cyanide and substantial solubility in water. Materials and Methods We studied cobinamide in both an inhaled and intraperitoneal model of cyanide poisoning in mice. Results We found cobinamide more effective than hydroxocobalamin, sodium thiosulfate, sodium nitrite, and the combination of sodium thiosulfate-sodium nitrite in treating cyanide poisoning. Compared to hydroxocobalamin, cobinamide was 3 and 11 times more potent in the intraperitoneal and inhalation models, respectively. Cobinamide sulfite was rapidly absorbed after intramuscular injection, and mice recovered from a lethal dose of cyanide even when given at a time when they had been apneic for over two minutes. In range finding studies, cobinamide sulfite at doses up to 2000 mg/kg exhibited no clinical toxicity. Discussion and Conclusion These studies demonstrate that cobinamide is a highly effective cyanide antidote in mouse models, and suggest it could be used in a mass casualty setting, because it can be given rapidly as an intramuscular injection when administered as cobinamide sulfite. Based on these animal data cobinamide sulfite appears to be an antidote worthy of further testing as a therapy for mass casualties. PMID:20704457

  2. Photobiomodulation partially rescues visual cortical neurons from cyanide-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, H L; Whelan, H T; Eells, J T; Meng, H; Buchmann, E; Lerch-Gaggl, A; Wong-Riley, M

    2006-05-12

    Near-infrared light via light-emitting diode treatment has documented therapeutic effects on neurons functionally inactivated by tetrodotoxin or methanol intoxication. Light-emitting diode pretreatment also reduced potassium cyanide-induced cell death, but the mode of death via the apoptotic or necrotic pathway was unclear. The current study tested our hypothesis that light-emitting diode rescues neurons from apoptotic cell death. Primary neuronal cultures from postnatal rat visual cortex were pretreated with light-emitting diode for 10 min at a total energy density of 30 J/cm2 before exposing to potassium cyanide for 28 h. With 100 or 300 microM potassium cyanide, neurons died mainly via the apoptotic pathway, as confirmed by electron microscopy, Hoechst 33258, single-stranded DNA, Bax, and active caspase-3. In the presence of caspase inhibitor I, the percentage of apoptotic cells in 300microM potassium cyanide was significantly decreased. Light-emitting diode pretreatment reduced apoptosis from 36% to 17.9% (100 microM potassium cyanide) and from 58.9% to 39.6% (300 microM potassium cyanide), representing a 50.3% and 32.8% reduction, respectively. Light-emitting diode pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of caspase-3 elicited by potassium cyanide. It also reversed the potassium cyanide-induced increased expression of Bax and decreased expression of Bcl-2 to control levels. Moreover, light-emitting diode decreased the intensity of 5-(and -6) chloromethy-2', 7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate acetyl ester, a marker of reactive oxygen species, in neurons exposed to 300 microM potassium cyanide. These results indicate that light-emitting diode pretreatment partially protects neurons against cyanide-induced caspase-mediated apoptosis, most likely by decreasing reactive oxygen species production, down-regulating pro-apoptotic proteins and activating anti-apoptotic proteins, as well as increasing energy metabolism in neurons as reported previously.

  3. OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND MINE MANAGER'S HOME, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHEAST. RIGHT, TAILINGS PILES ARE AT CENTER WITH CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS TO THE LEFT OF THE PILES. PARKING LOT IS AT UPPER LEFT. THE AREA BETWEEN THE COLLAPSED TANK AT CENTER LEFT AND THE REMAINS OF THE MANAGER'S HOUSE AT LOWER RIGHT IS A TAILINGS HOLDING AREA. TAILINGS FROM THE MILL WERE HELD HERE. THE LARGE SETTLING TANKS WERE CHARGED FROM THIS HOLDING AREA BY A TRAM ON RAILS AND BY A SLUICEWAY SEEN AS THE DARK SPOT ON THE CENTER LEFT EDGE OF THE FRAME. AFTER THE TAILINGS WERE LEACHED, THEY WERE DEPOSITED ON THE LARGE WASTE PILE AT CENTER RIGHT. THE TANK AT CENTER RIGHT EDGE IS WHERE THE WATER PIPELINE ENTERED THE WORKS. A STRAIGHT LINE OF POSTS IN THE GROUND GO ACROSS THE CENTER FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, WHICH ORIGINALLY SUSPENDED THE WATER PIPELINE GOING FROM THE WATER HOLDING TANK AT RIGHT UP TO THE SECONDARY WATER TANKS ABOVE THE MILL. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  4. The potential for phytoremediation of iron cyanide complex by willows.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Zhou, Pu-Hua; Yang, Yong-Miao

    2006-07-01

    Hybrid willows (Salix matsudana Koidz x Salix alba L.), weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) and hankow willows (Salix matsudana Koidz) were exposed to potassium ferrocyanide to determine the potential of these plants to extract, transport and metabolize this iron cyanide complex. Young rooted cuttings were grown in hydroponic solution at 24.0 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 144 h. Ferrocyanide in solution, air, and aerial tissues of plants was analyzed spectrophotometrically. Uptake of ferrocyanide from the aqueous solution by plants was evident for all treatments and varied with plant species, ranging from 8.64 to 15.67% of initial mass. The uptake processes observed from hydroponic solution showed exponential disappearance kinetics. Very little amounts of the applied ferrocyanide were detected in all parts of plant materials, confirming passage of ferrocyanide through the plants. No ferrocyanide in air was found due to plant transpiration. Mass balance analysis showed that a large fraction of the reduction of initial mass in hydroponic solution was metabolized during transport within the plant materials. The difference in the metabolic rate of ferrocyanide between the three plant species was comparably small, indicating transport of ferrocyanide from hydroponic solution to plant materials and further transport within plant materials was a limiting step for assimilating this iron cyanide complex. In conclusion, phytoremediation of ferrocyanide by the plants tested in this study has potential field application.

  5. Cyanide detection using a benzimidazole derivative in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Bin; Hu, Jing-Han; Chen, Juan-Juan; Qi, Jing

    2014-12-01

    A novel cyanide selective fluorescent chemosensor S1 based on benzimidazole group and naphthalene group as the fluorescence signal group had been designed and synthesized. The receptor could instantly detect CN- anion over other anions such as F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, AcO-, H2PO4-, HSO4-, SCN- and ClO4- by fluorescence spectroscopy changes in aqueous solution (H2O/DMSO, 8:2, v/v) with specific selectivity and high sensitivity. The fluorescence color of the solution containing sensor S1 induced a remarkable color change from pale blue to mazarine only after the addition of CN- in aqueous solution while other anions did not cause obvious color change. Moreover, further study demonstrates the detection limit on fluorescence response of the sensor to CN- is down to 8.8 × 10-8 M, which is far lower than the WHO guideline of 1.9 × 10-6 M. Test strips based on S1 were fabricated, which could act as a convenient and efficient CN- test kit to detect CN- in pure water for “in-the-field” measurement. Thus, the probe should be potential applications in an aqueous environment for the monitoring of cyanide.

  6. Cyanide detection using a benzimidazole derivative in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Bin; Hu, Jing-Han; Chen, Juan-Juan; Qi, Jing

    2014-12-10

    A novel cyanide selective fluorescent chemosensor S1 based on benzimidazole group and naphthalene group as the fluorescence signal group had been designed and synthesized. The receptor could instantly detect CN(-) anion over other anions such as F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), AcO(-), H2PO4(-), HSO4(-), SCN(-) and ClO4(-) by fluorescence spectroscopy changes in aqueous solution (H2O/DMSO, 8:2, v/v) with specific selectivity and high sensitivity. The fluorescence color of the solution containing sensor S1 induced a remarkable color change from pale blue to mazarine only after the addition of CN(-) in aqueous solution while other anions did not cause obvious color change. Moreover, further study demonstrates the detection limit on fluorescence response of the sensor to CN(-) is down to 8.8×10(-8)M, which is far lower than the WHO guideline of 1.9×10(-6)M. Test strips based on S1 were fabricated, which could act as a convenient and efficient CN(-) test kit to detect CN(-) in pure water for "in-the-field" measurement. Thus, the probe should be potential applications in an aqueous environment for the monitoring of cyanide.

  7. Reversible mechanism for spin crossover in transition-metal cyanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Mukul; van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    2011-03-01

    Spin transitions generally occur in compounds of octahedrally coordinated 3 d transition metal ions. These transitions can be induced by external perturbations such as light, heat, pressure, magnetic field, and chemical substitution. Transition metal cyanides are one such material, which exhibit reversible spin transition while perturbed with light at T < 10 K . Here we report the first-principles (DFT+U) study of anhydrated KCoFe (CN)6 . We find that the complete spin transition from the low spin ground sate (S=0) to a high spin (S=2) state takes place due to intra-atomic and inter-atomic charge transfers in two steps. In the first step a d-electron is transferred from Fe to Co through cyanide ligand, which is followed by the d-electron rearrangement in the Co. This spin transition is strongly correlated with the internal lattice, and we find as large as 10% extension of the Co -N bond via a Jahn-Teller active (tetragonally distorted) lattice in the intermediate spin (S = 1) state. The calculated energy required for this transition is in agreement with experiments. We further predict that this spin transition in such materials can be induced, and further tuned, by external pressure to enable realization of such reversible transitions at ambient temperatures.

  8. Electron and bromine transfer reactions between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl bromides. Crystal and molecular structure of dimeric indenyl molybdenum tricarbonyl

    SciTech Connect

    Striejewske, W.S.; See, R.F.; Churchill, M.R.; Atwood, J.D. )

    1993-11-01

    Reactions of metal carbonyl anions with metal carbonyl halides proceed by two separate paths. When the reactant anion is a strong nucleophile, the halogen is transferred, resulting in a new metal carbonyl halide and a new metal carbonyl anion as intermediates. The ultimate products, in this case, are the homobimetallic complexes. In cases where the reactant metal carbonyl anion is a poor nucleophile, a single electron transfer occurs, leading to the two homobimetallic complexes and to the heterobimetallic complex. Halide effects and possible indenyl effects are examined. The complex [Mo(indenyl)(CO)[sub 3

  9. Formation and emissions of carbonyls during and following gas-phase ozonation of indoor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppendieck, D. G.; Hubbard, H. F.; Weschler, C. J.; Corsi, R. L.

    Ozone concentrations that are several orders of magnitude greater than typical urban ambient concentrations are necessary for gas-phase ozonation of buildings, either for deodorization or for disinfection of biological agents. However, there is currently no published literature on the interaction of building materials and ozone under such extreme conditions. It would be useful to understand, for example in the case of building re-occupation planning, what types and amounts of reaction products may form and persist in a building after ozonation. In this study, 24 materials were exposed to ozone at concentrations of 1000 ppm in the inlet stream of experimental chambers. Fifteen target carbonyls were selected and measured as building ozonation by-products (BOBPs). During the 36 h that include the 16 h ozonation and 20 h persistence phase, the total BOBP mass released from flooring and wall coverings ranged from 1 to 20 mg m -2, with most of the carbonyls being of lower molecular weight (C 1-C 4). In contrast, total BOBP mass released from wood-based products ranged from 20 to 100 mg m -2, with a greater fraction of the BOBPs being heavier carbonyls (C 5-C 9). The total BOBP mass released during an ozonation event is a function of both the total surface area of the material and the BOBP emission rate per unit area of material. Ceiling tile, carpet, office partition, and gypsum wallboard with flat latex paint often have large surface areas in commercial buildings and these same materials exhibited relatively high BOBP releases. The greatest overall BOBP mass releases were observed for three materials that building occupants might have significant contact with: paper, office partition, and medium density fiberboard, e.g., often used in office furniture. These materials also exhibited extended BOBP persistence following ozonation; some BOBPs (e.g., nonanal) persist for months or more at emission rates large enough to result in indoor concentrations that exceed their odor

  10. Biotic and abiotic processes contribute to successful anaerobic degradation of cyanide by UASB reactor biomass treating brewery waste water.

    PubMed

    Novak, Domen; Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H; Pirc, Elizabeta Tratar; Jerman, Vesna; Insam, Heribert; Logar, Romana Marinšek; Stres, Blaž

    2013-07-01

    In contrast to the general aerobic detoxification of industrial effluents containing cyanide, anaerobic cyanide degradation is not well understood, including the microbial communities involved. To address this knowledge gap, this study measured anaerobic cyanide degradation and the rearrangements in bacterial and archaeal microbial communities in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor biomass treating brewery waste water using bio-methane potential assays, molecular profiling, sequencing and microarray approaches. Successful biogas formation and cyanide removal without inhibition were observed at cyanide concentrations up to 5 mg l(-1). At 8.5 mg l(-1) cyanide, there was a 22 day lag phase in microbial activity, but subsequent methane production rates were equivalent to when 5 mg l(-1) was used. The higher cumulative methane production in cyanide-amended samples indicated that part of the biogas was derived from cyanide degradation. Anaerobic degradation of cyanide using autoclaved UASB biomass proceeded at a rate more than two times lower than when UASB biomass was not autoclaved, indicating that anaerobic cyanide degradation was in fact a combination of simultaneous abiotic and biotic processes. Phylogenetic analyses of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes for the first time identified and linked the bacterial phylum Firmicutes and the archaeal genus Methanosarcina sp. as important microbial groups involved in cyanide degradation. Methanogenic activity of unadapted granulated biomass was detected at higher cyanide concentrations than reported previously for the unadapted suspended biomass, making the aggregated structure and predominantly hydrogenotrophic nature of methanogenic community important features in cyanide degradation. The combination of brewery waste water and cyanide substrate was thus shown to be of high interest for industrial level anaerobic cyanide degradation.

  11. Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; Foran, M.T.

    1984-01-06

    This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150 to 260/sup 0/C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO/sub 4/ and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect. 3 tables.

  12. Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; Foran, Michael T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150.degree.-260.degree. C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO.sub.4 and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect.

  13. Determination of Protein Carbonylation and Proteasome Activity in Seeds.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qiong; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Bailly, Christophe; Meimoun, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to be toxic but also function as signaling molecules in a process called redox signaling. In seeds, ROS are produced at different developmental stages including dormancy release and germination. Main targets of oxidation events by ROS in cell are lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. Protein oxidation has various effects on their function, stability, location, and degradation. Carbonylation represents an irreversible and unrepairable modification that can lead to protein degradation through the action of the 20S proteasome. Here, we present techniques which allow the quantification of protein carbonyls in complex protein samples after derivatization by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) and the determination proteasome activity by an activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) using the probe MV151. These techniques, routinely easy to handle, allow the rapid assessment of protein carbonyls and proteasome activity in seeds in various physiological conditions where ROS may act as signaling or toxic elements. PMID:27424756

  14. Comparison of antimicrobial properties of monoterpenes and their carbonylated products.

    PubMed

    Naigre, R; Kalck, P; Roques, C; Roux, I; Michel, G

    1996-06-01

    Some monoterpenes and their carbonylated products were evaluated for their antibacterial and antifungal properties. The carbonylation of tested monoterpenes was shown to increase the bacteriostatic and fungistatic activities specifically by the contact method. Concerning the killing effects, only (1R,2S,5R)-isopulegol, its carbonylated products, and (R)-carvone showed significant bactericidal activities, particularly against Enterococcus faecium and Escherichia coli above a concentration of 10 microliters/ml. A fungicidal efficiency of (1R,2S,5R)-isopulegol and (R)-carvone against Aspergillus niger was also noted. It seems that the presence of an oxygenated function in the framework increases the antimicrobial properties. However, monoterpenes were more active using a micro-atmosphere method. PMID:8693045

  15. Piezoelectric quartz crystal microbalance sensor for trace aqueous cyanide ion determination.

    PubMed

    Timofeyenko, Yegor G; Rosentreter, Jeffrey J; Mayo, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Using selective reaction chemistry, our present research has developed an online, real-time sensor capable of monitoring toxic cyanide at both drinking water standard and environmental regulatory concentrations. Through the use of a flow cell, aqueous samples containing cyanide are reacted with a gold electrode of a piezoelectric crystal to indirectly sense cyanide concentration by the dissolution of metallic gold. The quartz crystal is an AT-cut wafer sandwiched between two neoprene O-rings within the liquid flow cell. The presence of cyanide in solution results in the selective formation of a soluble dicyano-gold complex according to the Elsner reaction: 4Au + 8CN- + 2H2O + O2 <=> 4Au(CN)2- + 4OH-. The resulting loss of gold from the electrode is detected by the piezoelectric crystal as a resonant frequency change. Since free cyanide is a weak acid (pKa = 9.3), available protons compete for cyanide ligands. Therefore, increased sample pH provides higher sensitivity. The detection limits at pH 12 are 16.1 and 2.7 ppb for analysis times of 10 min and 1 h, respectively. The incorporation of the flow cell improves both analyte sensitivity and instrument precision, with an average signal intensity drift of only 5% over a 2-h analysis. The calibrations show excellent linearity over a variety of cyanide concentrations ranging from low ppb to hundreds of ppm. This detection method offers the advantage of selectively detecting cyanides posing a biohazard while avoiding detection of stable metal cyanides. This aspect of the system is based on competitive exchange of available metals and gold with cyanide ligands. Stable metal cyanide complexes possess a higher formation constant than cyanoaurate. This detection system has been configured into a flow injection analysis array for simple adaptation to automation. Anions commonly found in natural waters have been examined for interference effects. Additionally, the sensor is free from interference by aqueous cyanide analogues

  16. Modulating effect of aqueous extract of Telfairia occidentalis on induced cyanide toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, O M; Olabode, O O

    2011-12-20

    The effect of lyophilised aqueous extract of Telfairia occidentalis (TO) on induced cyanide toxicity in rats was investigated. Twenty 3-week old male wistar albino rats were randomly distributed into one control and three treatment groups of five rats each: control group (group1), group treated with 3mg/kg body wt of cyanide only (group2), group treated with 3mg/kg body wt. each of cyanide and extract (group3), and a group treated with 3mg/kg Body wt of extract only (group4) were used for the investigation. Cyanide toxicity reduced both food and water intake (p<0.05), while the food intake was improved in group3, this effect of the extract on food was not observed on water intake. Cyanide reduced average body weight of rats significantly (p<0.05). The reduction effect of cyanide on body weight was countered by Telfairia occidentalis extract. The extract did not have an observable effect on rats' body weight. Ocular lesion was observed in 67% of rats in group2 . This ocular effect of cyanide was mitigated significantly by Telfairia occidentalis as only 17% of the rats in group3 had ocular lesion. Cyanide toxicity produced nasal discharge in 39% of the rat population in group2 while there was a partial but considerable reduction (21%) in the severity of nasal discharge in group 3. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) in the organ/body wt.ratio between the treatments and the control groups for all the organs examined in the study. Biochemical analysis of liver enzymes showed that cyanide (group2) damaged the liver as there was significantly elevated presence (p<0.05) of Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and Alanine aminotransferase (ALP) above those of the control group. The damaging effect of cyanide on the liver was ameliorated by Telfairia occidentalis considerably.Histopathological effect of cyanide toxicity on the organs examined included multifocal degeneration and necrosis of the liver, mild kidney congestion and congestion of the brain. These effects

  17. Hydrocarboxylation of olefins in presence of carbonyl forms of cobalt

    SciTech Connect

    Gvozdovskii, G.N.; Gavrilova, V.M.; Rybakov, V.A.; Blanshtein, I.B.

    1987-09-10

    The increasing shortage of plant and animal fats for the production of the higher carboxylic acids has necessitated the development of methods for the production of these acids from petroleum. This paper studies the hydrocarboxylation of petroleum olefins in the presence of cobalt carbonyls and the effect of three promoters--pyridine, acetone, and cyclohexanone--on the hydrolysis rate and catalytic behavior of the carbonyls and the subsequent rate of hydrocarboxylation of the olefines. Ethylene is used as the sample olefin. The role of water in the reactions is also assessed.

  18. Magnetorheological Fluids with Carbonyl and Water Atomized Iron Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombard, Antonio J. F.; Teodoro, João Victor R.

    Our aim in this work was to propose the use of a ternary blend of two carbonyl iron powder CIP, mixed with water atomized iron powder (WAIP), to reduce the off-state viscosity, without prejudice of MRF performance in terms of yield stress and torque output. The idea of mix water atomized iron powder with carbonyl iron powder is not new. The US Pat. # 5,900,184 by Weiss et al. (1999) describes that a binary blend, half-to-half, can reduces the viscosity of MRF in the absence of magnetic field, and increase the torque output under field.

  19. Cyanide toxicity and exposure risk. January 1970-November 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for January 1970-November 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the biological hazards associated with exposure to cyanide. Cyanide poisoning and antidotes, combustion products containing cyanide, clinical toxicology, environmental effects, exposure hazards, occupational safety, and other topics relating to the health hazards of cyanide compounds are discussed. Methods of analysis and monitoring are also considered. (Contains 126 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  20. Cyanide toxicity and exposure risk. January 1980-March 1992 (Citations from the NTIS Data Base). Rept. for Jan 80-Mar 92

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the biological hazards associated with exposure to cyanide. Cyanide poisoning and antidotes, combustion products containing cyanide, clinical toxicology, environmental effects, exposure hazards, occupational safety, and other topics relating to the health hazards of cyanide compounds are discussed. Methods of analysis and monitoring are also considered. (Contains 119 citations with title list and subject index.)

  1. Cyanide hazards to plants and animals from gold mining and related water issues.

    PubMed

    Eisler, Ronald; Wiemeyer, Stanley N

    2004-01-01

    Cyanide extraction of gold through milling of high-grade ores and heap leaching of low-grade ores requires cycling of millions of liters of alkaline water containing high concentrations of potentially toxic sodium cyanide (NaCN), free cyanide, and metal-cyanide complexes. Some milling operations result in tailings ponds of 150 ha and larger. Heap leach operations that spray or drip cyanide onto the flattened top of the ore heap require solution processing ponds of about 1 ha in surface area. Puddles of various sizes may occur on the top of heaps, where the highest concentrations of NaCN are found. Solution recovery channels are usually constructed at the base of leach heaps, some of which may be exposed. All these cyanide-containing water bodies are hazardous to wildlife, especially migratory waterfowl and bats, if not properly managed. Accidental spills of cyanide solutions into rivers and streams have produced massive kills of fish and other aquatic biota. Freshwater fish are the most cyanide-sensitive group of aquatic organisms tested, with high mortality documented at free cyanide concentrations >20 microg/L and adverse effects on swimming and reproduction at >5 microg/L. Exclusion from cyanide solutions or reductions of cyanide concentrations to nontoxic levels are the only certain methods of protecting terrestrial vertebrate wildlife from cyanide poisoning; a variety of exclusion/cyanide reduction techniques are presented and discussed. Additional research is recommended on (1) effects of low-level, long-term, cyanide intoxication in birds and mammals by oral and inhalation routes in the vicinity of high cyanide concentrations; (2) long-term effects of low concentrations of cyanide on aquatic biota; (3) adaptive resistance to cyanide; and (4) usefulness of various biochemical indicators of cyanide poisoning. To prevent flooding in mine open pits, and to enable earth moving on a large scale, it is often necessary to withdraw groundwater and use it for

  2. Cyanide hazards to plants and animals from gold mining and related water issues.

    PubMed

    Eisler, Ronald; Wiemeyer, Stanley N

    2004-01-01

    Cyanide extraction of gold through milling of high-grade ores and heap leaching of low-grade ores requires cycling of millions of liters of alkaline water containing high concentrations of potentially toxic sodium cyanide (NaCN), free cyanide, and metal-cyanide complexes. Some milling operations result in tailings ponds of 150 ha and larger. Heap leach operations that spray or drip cyanide onto the flattened top of the ore heap require solution processing ponds of about 1 ha in surface area. Puddles of various sizes may occur on the top of heaps, where the highest concentrations of NaCN are found. Solution recovery channels are usually constructed at the base of leach heaps, some of which may be exposed. All these cyanide-containing water bodies are hazardous to wildlife, especially migratory waterfowl and bats, if not properly managed. Accidental spills of cyanide solutions into rivers and streams have produced massive kills of fish and other aquatic biota. Freshwater fish are the most cyanide-sensitive group of aquatic organisms tested, with high mortality documented at free cyanide concentrations >20 microg/L and adverse effects on swimming and reproduction at >5 microg/L. Exclusion from cyanide solutions or reductions of cyanide concentrations to nontoxic levels are the only certain methods of protecting terrestrial vertebrate wildlife from cyanide poisoning; a variety of exclusion/cyanide reduction techniques are presented and discussed. Additional research is recommended on (1) effects of low-level, long-term, cyanide intoxication in birds and mammals by oral and inhalation routes in the vicinity of high cyanide concentrations; (2) long-term effects of low concentrations of cyanide on aquatic biota; (3) adaptive resistance to cyanide; and (4) usefulness of various biochemical indicators of cyanide poisoning. To prevent flooding in mine open pits, and to enable earth moving on a large scale, it is often necessary to withdraw groundwater and use it for

  3. Inhibitory effect of cyanide on nitrification process and its eliminating method in a suspended activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Han, Yuanyuan; Jin, Xibiao; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Yongdi; Chen, Xiurong

    2014-02-01

    Inhibition of nitrification by four typical pollutants (acrylonitrile, acrylic acid, acetonitrile and cyanide) in acrylonitrile wastewater was investigated. The inhibitory effect of cyanide on nitrification was strongest, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.218 mg·gVSS-1 being observed in a municipal activated sludge system. However, the performance of nitrification was recovered when cyanide was completely degraded. The nitrification, which had been inhibited by 4.17 mg·gVSS-1 of free cyanide for 24 h, was recovered to greater than 95% of that without cyanide after 10 days of recovery. To overcome cyanide inhibition, cyanide-degrading bacteria were cultivated in a batch reactor by increasing the influent cyanide concentration in a stepwise manner, which resulted in an increase in the average cyanide degradation rate from 0.14 to 1.01 mg CN-·gVSS-1·h-1 over 20 days. The cultured cyanide-degrading bacteria were shaped like short rods, and the dominant cyanide-degrading bacteria strain was identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB by PCR.

  4. In vivo screening of candidate pretreatment compounds against cyanide using mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kiser, R.C.; Olson, C.T.; Menton, R.G.; Hobson, D.W.; Moore, D.M.

    1993-05-13

    An in vivo screening procedure was established at Battelle's Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) to evaluate the efficacy of candidate pretreatment compounds in mice challenged with the blood agent, sodium cyanide (NaCN). Male albino mice of ICR outbred stock weighing between 22.5 and 27.5 g are challenged by intramuscular (i.m.) injection, at a volume of 0.5 mL/kg, of a dose of NaCN twice the LD50 of untreated mice as determined on that day of testing. Candidate drugs are tested at fractions of their LD50 or their limit of solubility in the most optimum vehicle and given intraperitoneally (i.p.) to separate groups of mice at either 60 or 15 min prior to NaCN challenge. Sodium thiosulfate (1000 mg/kg)/sodium nitrite (100 mg/kg) controls are injected i.p. only at 60 min prior to challenge. A test compound is deemed effective if, at any of three concentrations tested, or at either pretreatment time, it is statistically more efficacious in preventing lethality than is a negative control substance (candidate compound vehicle).

  5. Archean geochemistry of formaldehyde and cyanide and the oligomerization of cyanohydrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrhenius, T.; Arrhenius, G.; Paplawsky, W.

    1994-01-01

    The sources and speciation of reduced carbon and nitrogen inferred for the early Archean are reviewed in terms of current observations and models, and known chemical reactions. Within this framework hydrogen cyanide and cyanide ion in significant concentration would have been eliminated by reaction with excess formaldehyde to form cyanohydrin (glycolonitrile), and with ferrous ion to formferrocyanide. Natural reactions of these molecules would under such conditions deserve special consideration in modeling of primordial organochemical processes. As a step in this direction, transformation reactions have been investigated involving glycolonitrile in the presence of water. We find that glycolonitrile, formed from formaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide or cyanide ion, spontaneously cyclodimerizes to 4-amino-2-hydroxymethyloxazole. The crystalline dimer is the major product at low temperatue (approximately 0 C); the yield diminishes with increasing temperature at the expense of polymerization and hydrolysis products. Hydrolysis of glycolamide and of oxazole yields a number of simpler organic molecules, including ammonia and glycolamide. The spontaneous polymerization of glycolonitrile and its dimer gives rise to soluble, cationic oligomers of as yet unknown structure, and, unless arrested, to a viscous liquid, insoluble in water. A loss of cyanide by reaction with formaldehyde, inferred for the early terrestrial hydrosphere and cryosphere would present a dilemma for hypotheses invoking cyanide and related compounds as concentrated reactants capable of forming biomolecular precursor species. Attempts to escape from its horns may take advantage of the efficient concentration and separation of cyanide as solid ferriferrocyanide, and most directly of reactions of glycolonitrile and its derivatives.

  6. Aposematism in Archips cerasivoranus not linked to the sequestration of host-derived cyanide.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, T D; Stevens, M A; Miller, S; Jeffers, P

    2008-10-01

    This study addressed the question of how caterpillars of Archips cerasivoranus feeding upon Prunus virginiana cope with the cyanogenic compounds of their food. Analysis by ion chromatography showed that young and aged leaves of P. virginiana consumed by the caterpillars during spring have hydrogen cyanide potentials (HCN-ps) of 2,473 +/- 130 ppm and 1,058 +/- 98 ppm, respectively. Although less than 3% of the cyanide released as the caterpillars feed escapes into the atmosphere, the larva's bright-yellow aposematic coloration and conspicuous activity can not be attributed to the sequestration of cyanide. Only six of 25 samples of the caterpillars' defensive regurgitants collected from 12 field colonies contained cyanide (17.6 +/- 6.54 ppm), less than 5% of the quantity previously reported to occur in the regurgitant of the tent caterpillar M. americanum. Only seven of 13 caterpillars assayed had detectable quantities of cyanide in their bodies (3.9 +/- 0.9 ppm). The fecal pellets that encase the cocoon contained no cyanide, nor did the frass that litters the leaf shelters. The small quantities of cyanide that occur in the caterpillar compared to the HCN-p of ingested plant material appear attributable to paced bouts of feeding and the maintenance of a highly alkaline foregut that inhibits cyanogenesis. PMID:18810551

  7. Cyanide and sulfide interact with nitrogenous compounds to influence the relaxation of various smooth muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Kruszyna, H.; Kruszyna, R.; Smith, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    Sodium nitroprusside relaxed guinea pig ileum after the segment had been submaximally contracted by either histamine or acetylcholine, intact isolated rabbit gall bladder after submaximal contraction by either acetylcholine or cholecystokinin octapeptide, and rat pulmonary artery helical strips after submaximal contraction with norepinephrine. In each of these cases the relaxation produced by nitroprusside was at least partially reversed by the subsequent addition of excess sodium cyanide. Cyanide, however, in nontoxic concentrations did not reverse the spasmolytic effects of hydroxylamine hydrochloride, sodium azide, nitroglycerin, sodium nitrite, or nitric oxide hemoglobin on guinea pig ileum, nor did cyanide alone in the same concentrations have any effect. The similar interaction between nitroprusside and cyanide on rabbit aortic strips is not dependent on the presence of an intact endothelia cell layer. Also, on rabbit aortic strips and like cyanide, sodium sulfide reversed the spasmolytic effects of azide and hydroxylamine, but it had little or no effect on the relaxation induced by papaverine. Unlike cyanide, however, sulfide augmented the relaxation induced by nitroprusside, and it reversed the effects of nitric oxide hemoglobin, nitroglycerin, and nitrite. A direct chemical reaction between sulfide and nitroprusside may account for the difference between it and cyanide. Although evidence was obtained also for a direct chemical reaction between sulfide and norepinephrine, that reaction does not seem to have played a role in these results.

  8. Depletion of host-derived cyanide in the gut of the eastern tent caterpillar, Malacosoma americanum.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, T D; Jeffers, P M; Mantella, D

    2002-02-01

    Using a colorimetric procedure, we assessed the HCN-p of black cherry leaves (Prunus serotina) ingested by the eastern tent caterpillar, Malacosoma americanum, and the cyanide content of the bolus as it passed thorough the caterpillar's digestive tract and into the detritus pool. The mean HCN-p of leaves in our study area was 1902 +/- 174 (SE) ppm. Young leaves found at the tips of growing branches, which the caterpillars preferred, had a significantly higher HCN-p (3032 +/- 258 ppm) than older leaves found at the middle (1542 +/- 243 ppm) or base of the shoot (1131 +/- 159 ppm). Following a bout of overnight feeding on young leaves, the cyanide content of the foregut and midgut boluses of early sixth-instar caterpillars averaged 631 +/- 161 ppm, and 14 +/- 3 ppm, respectively, indicating that host-derived cyanide is rapidly depleted as the bolus transits the gut. Some cyanide, however, remains. In three studies, the mean cyanide content of fresh fecal pellets ranged from approximately 20 to 38 ppm, while the dried, compacted pellets ranged from 63 to 85 ppm. Food in the foreguts of mature caterpillars dispersing over the ground in search of pupation sites had 417 +/- 99 ppm cyanide. The potential impact of this egested and caterpillar-transported cyanide on the consumer and detritivore communities is discussed.

  9. Aposematism in Archips cerasivoranus not linked to the sequestration of host-derived cyanide.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, T D; Stevens, M A; Miller, S; Jeffers, P

    2008-10-01

    This study addressed the question of how caterpillars of Archips cerasivoranus feeding upon Prunus virginiana cope with the cyanogenic compounds of their food. Analysis by ion chromatography showed that young and aged leaves of P. virginiana consumed by the caterpillars during spring have hydrogen cyanide potentials (HCN-ps) of 2,473 +/- 130 ppm and 1,058 +/- 98 ppm, respectively. Although less than 3% of the cyanide released as the caterpillars feed escapes into the atmosphere, the larva's bright-yellow aposematic coloration and conspicuous activity can not be attributed to the sequestration of cyanide. Only six of 25 samples of the caterpillars' defensive regurgitants collected from 12 field colonies contained cyanide (17.6 +/- 6.54 ppm), less than 5% of the quantity previously reported to occur in the regurgitant of the tent caterpillar M. americanum. Only seven of 13 caterpillars assayed had detectable quantities of cyanide in their bodies (3.9 +/- 0.9 ppm). The fecal pellets that encase the cocoon contained no cyanide, nor did the frass that litters the leaf shelters. The small quantities of cyanide that occur in the caterpillar compared to the HCN-p of ingested plant material appear attributable to paced bouts of feeding and the maintenance of a highly alkaline foregut that inhibits cyanogenesis.

  10. Effect of organic matter on cyanide removal by illuminated titanium dioxide or zinc oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Effect of different type of organic compounds (humic acid, oxalate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, phenol) on the photocatalytic removal of cyanide with TiO2 or ZnO was studied in this work with variation of the solution pH, contact time, initial cyanide concentration and type of organic compounds. Photocatalytic oxidation efficiency of cyanide with TiO2 was greatly affected by the solution pH. It increased as the solution pH decreased. Also maximum removal of cyanide by ZnO was observed near at neutral pH because of the reduced photocatalytic activity of ZnO at exceedingly low and high pH values originated from either acidic/photochemical corrosion of the catalyst and/or surface passivation with Zn(OH)2. Removal efficiency of cyanide greatly decreased in the presence of humic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid compared to that without presence of organic compound because of the competitive oxidation as well as surface blocking by relatively large organic compounds. The oxidation pattern of cyanide was better described by first-order kinetic model. Finally photocatalytic reaction with TiO2 or ZnO can be effectively applied to treat synthetic wastewater contaminated with cyanide. PMID:24499704

  11. Depletion of host-derived cyanide in the gut of the eastern tent caterpillar, Malacosoma americanum.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, T D; Jeffers, P M; Mantella, D

    2002-02-01

    Using a colorimetric procedure, we assessed the HCN-p of black cherry leaves (Prunus serotina) ingested by the eastern tent caterpillar, Malacosoma americanum, and the cyanide content of the bolus as it passed thorough the caterpillar's digestive tract and into the detritus pool. The mean HCN-p of leaves in our study area was 1902 +/- 174 (SE) ppm. Young leaves found at the tips of growing branches, which the caterpillars preferred, had a significantly higher HCN-p (3032 +/- 258 ppm) than older leaves found at the middle (1542 +/- 243 ppm) or base of the shoot (1131 +/- 159 ppm). Following a bout of overnight feeding on young leaves, the cyanide content of the foregut and midgut boluses of early sixth-instar caterpillars averaged 631 +/- 161 ppm, and 14 +/- 3 ppm, respectively, indicating that host-derived cyanide is rapidly depleted as the bolus transits the gut. Some cyanide, however, remains. In three studies, the mean cyanide content of fresh fecal pellets ranged from approximately 20 to 38 ppm, while the dried, compacted pellets ranged from 63 to 85 ppm. Food in the foreguts of mature caterpillars dispersing over the ground in search of pupation sites had 417 +/- 99 ppm cyanide. The potential impact of this egested and caterpillar-transported cyanide on the consumer and detritivore communities is discussed. PMID:11925066

  12. Correlation of atmospheric and inhaled blood cyanide levels in miniature pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Stemler, F.W.; Kaminskis, A.; Tezak-Reid, T.M.; Stotts, R.R.; Moran, T.S.

    1995-12-31

    The LCT5O (exposure time and atmospheric concentration needed to produce 50% lethality) has been commonly used to quantify the toxicity of a gas such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Few studies have been performed in which blood cyanide concentrations were measured simultaneously in animals at Imown exposure concentrations and time. This study was an attempt to correlate which blood cyanide levels would cause lethality in miniature pigs when exposed to hydrogen cyanide (HCN) for a fixed time. An automated microdistillation assay (1) was used to continuously monitor arterial blood cyanide before, during and after the exposures to a HCN/air mixture. Seven animals were exposed to a HCN/air mixture for two minutes each, four to 1176 + or - SD 70 mg/m3, and three animals to 2125 + or - SD 91 mg/m3. Two of the three animals exposed to the high HCN/air mixture died with a peak blood cyanide concentration of about 4.1 + or - SD 0.38 ug/mL. Four animals exposed to the low HCN/air mixture had a peak blood cyanide concentration of 2.94 i SD 0.71 ug/mL. All four survived for a 24-bour post-exposure observation period before they were sacrificed. Several physiological parameters were also monitored.

  13. Development and activation of cyanide-resistant respiration in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Medentsev, A G; Akimenko, V K

    1999-08-01

    Changes in respiratory activity and in the contents of adenine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, AMP) were studied in cells of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica during the development of cyanide-resistant respiration. The transition of the yeast from the logarithmic to the stationary growth phase due to exhaustion of glucose was associated with decreased endogenous respiration and with the activation of a cyanide-resistant oxidase. Cyanide activated cell respiration during the stationary growth phase. The cyanide-resistant respiration was inhibited by benzohydroxamic acid (BHA), an inhibitor of the alternative oxidase. In the absence of cyanide, BHA had no effect on the cells which had the cyanide-resistant oxidase. This indicates that the cells do not use the alternative pathway in vivo. The decreased endogenous respiration of the cells was accompanied by decreased contents of adenine nucleotides. Addition of cyanide resulted in a sharp decrease in the content of ATP, in a twofold increase in the content of ADP, and in a fivefold increase in the content of AMP. In the absence of cyanide, BHA had virtually no effect on the contents of adenine nucleotides. The decreased rate of oxygen consumption during the transition of the cells to the stationary growth phase was caused by the decreased activity of the main cytochrome-containing respiratory chain (2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) stimulated respiration). The alternative oxidase was synthesized in the cell but was inactive. Cyanide stimulated respiration due to activation of the alternative oxidase via the AMP produced. The decrease in the cell content of ATP is suggested to be a factor inducing the synthesis of the alternative oxidase.

  14. Enzymatic cyanide degradation by cell-free extract of Rhodococcus UKMP-5M.

    PubMed

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Latif Ibrahim, Abdul; Cass, Anthony E G

    2015-01-01

    The cell-free extract of locally isolated Rhodococcus UKMP-5M strain was used as an alternative to develop greener and cost effective cyanide removal technology. The present study aims to assess the viability of the cell-free extract to detoxify high concentrations of cyanide which is measured through the monitoring of protein concentration and specific cyanide-degrading activity. When cyanide-grown cells were subjected to grinding in liquid nitrogen which is relatively an inexpressive and fast cell disruption method, highest cyanide-degrading activity of 0.63 mM min(-1) mg(-1) protein was obtained in comparison to enzymatic lysis and agitation with fine glass beads. The cell-free extracts managed to degrade 80% of 20 mM KCN within 80 min and the rate of cyanide consumption increased linearly as the concentration of protein was raised. In both cases, the addition of co-factor was not required which proved to be advantageous economically. The successful formation of ammonia and formate as endproducts indicated that the degradation of cyanide by Rhodococcus UKMP-5M proceeded via the activity of cyanidase and the resulting non-toxic products are safe for disposal into the environment. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Thus, the utilization of cell-free extracts as an alternative to live microbial in cyanide degradation offers numerous advantageous such as the potential to tolerate and degrade higher concentration of cyanide and total reduction in the overall cost of operation since the requirement for nutrient support is irrelevant. PMID:25723061

  15. Heterogeneous catalytic degradation of cyanide using copper-impregnated pumice and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kitis, Mehmet; Karakaya, Emine; Yigit, Nevzat O; Civelekoglu, Gokhan; Akcil, Ata

    2005-04-01

    The main objective of this research was to investigate the oxidative destruction of free cyanide with hydrogen peroxide and copper-impregnated pumice as a heterogeneous catalyst. Original or copper-impregnated pumices added alone were not effective adsorbents of negatively charged cyanide ions due to incompatible surface interactions. Peroxide and original pumices added together were also ineffective in removing cyanide. However, for all of the three natural pumices tested with various particle size fractions, the use of copper-impregnated pumices and peroxide together significantly enhanced both the initial rate and extent of cyanide removal. Although copper-impregnated specific surface area was the major factor affecting the rate and extent of cyanide destruction for a particular pumice source with similar surface chemistries, the type of surface chemistry (i.e., specific functional groups) within different pumice sources also appears to be a very important factor. Lower rates and extents of cyanide removals were observed at pH 11 compared to pH 8 probably because of the negative impacts of alkaline conditions in terms of scavenging peroxide and forming more negatively charged pumice surfaces. Both the initial rate and ultimate extent of cyanide removals were generally higher at a temperature of 20 degrees C compared with those found at 10 degrees C. The use of copper-impregnated pumice as a light, cheap, readily available, natural, and porous heterogeneous catalyst either in completely mixed/suspended or fixed-bed reactor configurations may be an effective treatment technology for cyanide removal from solution. This new approach may minimize downstream metal removal problems experienced in conventional cyanide oxidation technologies.

  16. Enzymatic cyanide degradation by cell-free extract of Rhodococcus UKMP-5M.

    PubMed

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Latif Ibrahim, Abdul; Cass, Anthony E G

    2015-01-01

    The cell-free extract of locally isolated Rhodococcus UKMP-5M strain was used as an alternative to develop greener and cost effective cyanide removal technology. The present study aims to assess the viability of the cell-free extract to detoxify high concentrations of cyanide which is measured through the monitoring of protein concentration and specific cyanide-degrading activity. When cyanide-grown cells were subjected to grinding in liquid nitrogen which is relatively an inexpressive and fast cell disruption method, highest cyanide-degrading activity of 0.63 mM min(-1) mg(-1) protein was obtained in comparison to enzymatic lysis and agitation with fine glass beads. The cell-free extracts managed to degrade 80% of 20 mM KCN within 80 min and the rate of cyanide consumption increased linearly as the concentration of protein was raised. In both cases, the addition of co-factor was not required which proved to be advantageous economically. The successful formation of ammonia and formate as endproducts indicated that the degradation of cyanide by Rhodococcus UKMP-5M proceeded via the activity of cyanidase and the resulting non-toxic products are safe for disposal into the environment. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Thus, the utilization of cell-free extracts as an alternative to live microbial in cyanide degradation offers numerous advantageous such as the potential to tolerate and degrade higher concentration of cyanide and total reduction in the overall cost of operation since the requirement for nutrient support is irrelevant.

  17. Mammal mortality at Arizona, California, and Nevada gold mines using cyanide extraction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R.; Hothem, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    Five-hundred nineteen mammals were reported dead at cyanide-extraction gold mines in Arizona [USA], California, and Nevada from 1984 through 1989. Most numerous were rodents (34.9%) and bats (33.7%); 'bat' was the most often reported category among 24 species or species groups. There are an estimated 160 cyanide-extraction gold mines in these three states, and the number is increasing. Ten mammal species listed as endangered, threatened, rare, protected, or species of special concern are known to have cyanide-extraction gold mines within their geographic ranges.

  18. Acute cyanide intoxication treated with a combination of hydroxycobalamin, sodium nitrite, and sodium thiosulfate.

    PubMed

    Mannaioni, Guido; Vannacci, Alfredo; Marzocca, Cosimo; Zorn, Anna Monica; Peruzzi, Sandro; Moroni, Flavio

    2002-01-01

    An 80-year-old diabetic patient was admitted to the hospital because of sudden unconsciousness and severe metabolic acidosis. His son reported the possibility of cyanide poisoning. Clinical data and the detection of cyanide in blood and gastric material confirmed this possibility. Supportive therapy and the following antidotes--sodium nitrite two doses 300 mg i.v., sodium thiosulfate 3 g i.v., and hydroxocobalamin 4 g in 24 hours--were administered immediately and the patient completely recovered in 48 hours. Our observations suggest that timely and appropriate use of antidotes for cyanide intoxication may prevent death, even in aged diabetic patients. PMID:12126191

  19. Carbonyl atmospheric reaction products of aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermeyer, Genevieve; Aschmann, Sara M.; Atkinson, Roger; Arey, Janet

    To convert gaseous carbonyls to oximes during sampling, an XAD-4 resin denuder system pre-coated with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine and followed by analysis with methane positive chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to measure carbonyls in ambient air samples in Riverside, CA. In conjunction with similar analyses of environmental chamber OH radical-initiated reactions of o- and p-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, ethylbenzene, 4-hydroxy-2-butanone and 1,4-butanediol, we identified benzaldehyde, o-, m- and p-tolualdehyde and acetophenone and the dicarbonyls glyoxal, methylglyoxal, biacetyl, ethylglyoxal, 1,4-butenedial, 3-hexene-2,5-dione, 3-oxo-butanal, 1,4-butanedial and malonaldehyde in the ambient air samples. As discussed, these carbonyls and dicarbonyls can be formed from the OH radical-initiated reactions of aromatic hydrocarbons and other volatile organic compounds emitted into the atmosphere, and we conclude that in situ atmospheric formation is a major source of these carbonyls in our Riverside, CA, ambient air samples.

  20. Metal-Diazo Radicals of α-Carbonyl Diazomethanes.

    PubMed

    Li, Feifei; Xiao, Longqiang; Liu, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Metal-diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes are new members of the radical family and are precursors to metal-carbene radicals. Herein, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin-trapping, we detect diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes, induced by [Rh(I)Cl(cod)]2, [Co(II)(por)] and PdCl2, at room temperature. The unique quintet signal of the Rh-diazo radical was observed in measurements of α-carbonyl diazomethane adducts of [Rh(I)Cl(cod)]2 in the presence of 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-1-N-oxide (DMPO). DFT calculations indicated that 97.2% of spin density is localized on the diazo moiety. Co- and Pd-diazo radicals are EPR silent but were captured by DMPO to form spin adducts of DMPO-N∙ (triplet-of-sextets signal). The spin-trapping also provides a powerful tool for detection of metal-carbene radicals, as evidenced by the DMPO-trapped carbene radicals (DMPO-C∙, sextet signal) and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane-carbene adducts (MNP-C∙, doublet-of-triplets signal). The transformation of α-carbonyl diazomethanes to metal-carbene radicals was confirmed to be a two-step process via metal-diazo radicals. PMID:26960916

  1. CARBONYLATION OF MYOSIN HEAVY CHAINS IN RAT HEARTS DURING DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chun-Hong; Rozanski, George J.; Nagai, Ryoji; Stockdale, Frank E.; Patel, Kaushik P.; Wang, Mu; Singh, Jaipaul; Mayhan, William G.; Bidasee, Keshore R.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac inotropy progressively declines during diabetes mellitus. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying this defect remain incompletely characterized. This study tests the hypothesis that ventricular myosin heavy chains (MHC) undergo carbonylation by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) during diabetes and these modifications contribute to the inotropic decline. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with streptozotocin (STZ). Fourteen days later animals were divided into two groups: one group was treated with the RCS blocker aminoguanidine for six weeks, while the other group received no treatment. After eight weeks of diabetes, cardiac ejection fraction, fractional shortening, left ventricular pressure development (+dP/dt) and myocyte shortening were decreased by 9%, 16%, 34% and 18%, respectively. Ca2+- and Mg2+-actomyosin ATPase activities and peak actomyosin syneresis were also reduced by 35%, 28%, and 72%. MHC-α to MHC-β ratio was 12:88. Mass spectrometry and Western blots revealed the presence of carbonyl adducts on MHC-α and MHC-β. Aminoguandine treatment did not alter MHC composition, but it blunted formation of carbonyl adducts and decreases in actomyosin Ca2+-sensitive ATPase activity, syneresis, myocyte shortening, cardiac ejection fraction, fractional shortening and +dP/dt induced by diabetes. From these new data it can be concluded that in addition to isozyme switching, modification of MHC by RCS also contributes to the inotropic decline seen during diabetes. PMID:20359464

  2. Carbonylation of myosin heavy chains in rat heart during diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chun-Hong; Rozanski, George J; Nagai, Ryoji; Stockdale, Frank E; Patel, Kaushik P; Wang, Mu; Singh, Jaipaul; Mayhan, William G; Bidasee, Keshore R

    2010-07-15

    Cardiac inotropy progressively declines during diabetes mellitus. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying this defect remain incompletely characterized. This study tests the hypothesis that ventricular myosin heavy chains (MHC) undergo carbonylation by reactive carbonyl species (RCS) during diabetes and these modifications contribute to the inotropic decline. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with streptozotocin (STZ). Fourteen days later the animals were divided into two groups: one group was treated with the RCS blocker aminoguanidine for 6 weeks, while the other group received no treatment. After 8 weeks of diabetes, cardiac ejection fraction, fractional shortening, left ventricular pressure development (+dP/dt) and myocyte shortening were decreased by 9%, 16%, 34% and 18%, respectively. Ca(2+)- and Mg(2+)-actomyosin ATPase activities and peak actomyosin syneresis were also reduced by 35%, 28%, and 72%. MHC-alpha to MHC-beta ratio was 12:88. Mass spectrometry and Western blots revealed the presence of carbonyl adducts on MHC-alpha and MHC-beta. Aminoguanidine treatment did not alter MHC composition, but it blunted formation of carbonyl adducts and decreases in actomyosin Ca(2+)-sensitive ATPase activity, syneresis, myocyte shortening, cardiac ejection fraction, fractional shortening and +dP/dt induced by diabetes. From these new data it can be concluded that in addition to isozyme switching, modification of MHC by RCS also contributes to the inotropic decline seen during diabetes.

  3. Iron-Sulfur-Carbonyl and -Nitrosyl Complexes: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glidewell, Christopher; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Background information, materials needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained, are provided for an experiment on iron-sulfur-carbonyl and -nitrosyl complexes. The experiment involved (1) use of inert atmospheric techniques and thin-layer and flexible-column chromatography and (2) interpretation of infrared, hydrogen and carbon-13 nuclear…

  4. Methyl substituted polyimides containing carbonyl and ether connecting groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Havens, Stephen J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Polyimides were prepared from the reaction of aromatic dianhydrides with novel aromatic diamines having carbonyl and ether groups connecting aromatic rings containing pendant methyl groups. The methyl substituent polyimides exhibit good solubility and form tough, strong films. Upon exposure to ultraviolet irradiation and/or heat, the methyl substituted polyimides crosslink to become insoluble.

  5. Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

    1993-03-30

    A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

  6. Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide

    DOEpatents

    Rathke, Jerome W.; Klingler, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

  7. Comparing Carbonyl Chemistry in Comprehensive Introductory Organic Chemistry Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Donna J.; Kumar, Ravi; Ramasamy, Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Learning the chemistry of compounds containing carbonyl groups is difficult for undergraduate students partly because of a convolution of multiple possible reaction sites, competitive reactions taking place at those sites, different criteria needed to discern between the mechanisms of these reactions, and no straightforward selection method…

  8. Metal-Diazo Radicals of α-Carbonyl Diazomethanes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feifei; Xiao, Longqiang; Liu, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Metal-diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes are new members of the radical family and are precursors to metal-carbene radicals. Herein, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin-trapping, we detect diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes, induced by [RhICl(cod)]2, [CoII(por)] and PdCl2, at room temperature. The unique quintet signal of the Rh-diazo radical was observed in measurements of α-carbonyl diazomethane adducts of [RhICl(cod)]2 in the presence of 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-1-N-oxide (DMPO). DFT calculations indicated that 97.2% of spin density is localized on the diazo moiety. Co- and Pd-diazo radicals are EPR silent but were captured by DMPO to form spin adducts of DMPO-N∙ (triplet-of-sextets signal). The spin-trapping also provides a powerful tool for detection of metal-carbene radicals, as evidenced by the DMPO-trapped carbene radicals (DMPO-C∙, sextet signal) and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane-carbene adducts (MNP-C∙, doublet-of-triplets signal). The transformation of α-carbonyl diazomethanes to metal-carbene radicals was confirmed to be a two-step process via metal-diazo radicals. PMID:26960916

  9. Metal-Diazo Radicals of α-Carbonyl Diazomethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feifei; Xiao, Longqiang; Liu, Lijian

    2016-03-01

    Metal-diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes are new members of the radical family and are precursors to metal-carbene radicals. Herein, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with spin-trapping, we detect diazo radicals of α-carbonyl diazomethanes, induced by [RhICl(cod)]2, [CoII(por)] and PdCl2, at room temperature. The unique quintet signal of the Rh-diazo radical was observed in measurements of α-carbonyl diazomethane adducts of [RhICl(cod)]2 in the presence of 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-1-N-oxide (DMPO). DFT calculations indicated that 97.2% of spin density is localized on the diazo moiety. Co- and Pd-diazo radicals are EPR silent but were captured by DMPO to form spin adducts of DMPO-N• (triplet-of-sextets signal). The spin-trapping also provides a powerful tool for detection of metal-carbene radicals, as evidenced by the DMPO-trapped carbene radicals (DMPO-C•, sextet signal) and 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane-carbene adducts (MNP-C•, doublet-of-triplets signal). The transformation of α-carbonyl diazomethanes to metal-carbene radicals was confirmed to be a two-step process via metal-diazo radicals.

  10. Exploring the biology of lipid peroxidation-derived protein carbonylation.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Kristofer S; Petersen, Dennis R

    2011-09-19

    The sustained overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species results in an imbalance of cellular prooxidant-antioxidant systems and is implicated in numerous disease states, including alcoholic liver disease, cancer, neurological disorders, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. The accumulation of reactive aldehydes resulting from sustained oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation is an underlying factor in the development of these pathologies. Determining the biochemical factors that elicit cellular responses resulting from protein carbonylation remains a key element to developing therapeutic approaches and ameliorating disease pathologies. This review details our current understanding of the generation of reactive aldehydes via lipid peroxidation resulting in protein carbonylation, focusing on pathophysiologic factors associated with 4-hydroxynonenal-protein modification. Additionally, an overview of in vitro and in vivo model systems used to study the physiologic impact of protein carbonylation is presented. Finally, an update of the methods commonly used in characterizing protein modification by reactive aldehydes provides an overview of isolation techniques, mass spectrometry, and computational biology. It is apparent that research in this area employing state-of-the-art proteomics, mass spectrometry, and computational biology is rapidly evolving, yielding foundational knowledge concerning the molecular mechanisms of protein carbonylation and its relation to a spectrum of diseases associated with oxidative stress. PMID:21812433

  11. CARBONYL SULFIDE INHALATION PRODUCES BRAIN LESIONS IN F344 RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is an intermediate in the production of pesticides and herbicides, and is a metabolite of the neurotoxicant carbon disulfide. The potential neurotoxicity of inhaled COS was investigated in F344 rats. Male rats were exposed to 0, 75, 150, 300, or 600 ppm COS...

  12. TOP VIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS, ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP VIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS, ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND TAILINGS PILES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM MAIN ACCESS ROAD. THE FOUNDATIONS AT CENTER SUPPORTED SIX 25 FT. OR GREATER DIAMETER SETTLING TANKS. IN THE FOREGROUND ARE REMAINS OF TWO PREPARATION TANKS AT LEFT NEXT TO A BUILDING FOOTPRINT AT RIGHT. ZINC BOXES ARE JUST ABOVE THE PREPARATION TANKS ON LEFT. THE WATER TANK AT CENTER IS NEARBY A SHAFT. THE COLLAPSED TANK JUST IN FRONT OF THE WATER TANK IS ANOTHER WATER HOLDING TANK THAT CONNECTS DIRECTLY TO THE PIPELINE THAT CARRIED WATER FROM A NEARBY SPRING A QUARTER MILE OFF TO THE RIGHT (SEE CA-291-41 FOR DETAIL). THE LEFT OF THE CENTER WATER TANK IS A LARGE TAILINGS PILE. DEATH VALLEY IS IN THE DISTANCE. SEE CA-291-53 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  13. TOP VIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS. ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP VIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS. ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND TAILINGS PILES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM MAIN ACCESS ROAD. THE FOUNDATIONS AT CENTER SUPPORTED SIX 25 FT. OR GREATER DIAMETER SETTLING TANKS. IN THE FOREGROUND ARE REMAINS OF TWO PREPARATION TANKS AT LEFT NEXT TO A BUILDING FOOTPRINT AT RIGHT. ZINC BOXES ARE JUST ABOVE THE PREPARATION TANKS ON LEFT. THE WATER TANK AT CENTER IS NEARBY A SHAFT. THE COLLAPSED TANK JUST IN FRONT OF THE WATER TANK IS ANOTHER WATER HOLDING TANK THAT CONNECTS DIRECTLY TO THE PIPELINE THAT CARRIED WATER FROM A NEARBY SPRING A QUARTER MILE OFF TO THE RIGHT (SEE CA-291-41 FOR DETAIL). THE LEFT OF THE CENTER WATER TANK IS A LARGE TAILINGS PILE. DEATH VALLEY IS IN THE DISTANCE. SEE CA-291-40 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  14. Ground-based infrared spectroscopic measurements of atmospheric hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Smith, M. A. H.; Rinsland, P. L.; Goldman, A.; Brault, J. W.; Stokes, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A number of lines of the nu-3 band of hydrogen cyanide have been detected in solar absorption spectra recorded near sunrise and sunset at Kitt Peak National Observatory (elevation 2095 m) with a 0.01/cm resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Analysis of two of the strongest and best isolated lines has led to a value of 2.73 x 10 to the 15th molecules/sq cm for the vertical column abundance of HCN above Kitt Peak. The accuracy of this value is estimated as + or - 25%. This result, combined with the stratospheric concentration of HCN derived by Coffey, Mankin, and Cicerone (1981), yields 166 parts per trillion by volume for the average mixing ratio of HCN between 2 and 12 km. This is the first determination of the HCN concentration in the nonurban troposphere.

  15. The Submillimeter Wave Spectrum of Isotopic Methyl Cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. C.; Mueller, H. S. P.

    1996-01-01

    The laboratory submillimeter wave rotational spectrum of the 13CH3CN, CH3C13CN, and CH3C15N isotopomers of methyl cyanide has been observed in natural abundance in the 294 to 607 GHz region. The maximum J and K values are 34 and 14, respectively. Fifteen additional CH3CN transitions up to K = 21 were also measured. The transitions of all four species are fitted to a symmetric top Hamiltonian, and the rotation and distortion constants are determined. The 14N quadrupole and spin rotation coupling constants are also calculated and presented. Suggested values for many other parameters, which could not be directly determined from the isotope spectra, are calculated from the normal species values and isotope relationships. The determined and calculated constants should predict the spectrum of the three isotopomers to well over 1 THz accurately enough for astronomical assignments.

  16. A Peptoid-Based Fluorescent Sensor for Cyanide Detection.

    PubMed

    Lim, Bumhee; Lee, Jeeyeon

    2016-01-01

    Peptoids, N-substituted glycine oligomers, are versatile peptidomimetics with diverse biomedical applications. However, strategies to the development of novel fluorescent peptoids as chemical sensors have not been extensively explored, yet. Here, we synthesized a novel peptoid-based fluorescent probe in which a coumarin moiety was incorporated via copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. Fluorescence of the newly generated coumarin-peptoid was dramatically quenched upon coordination of the Cu(2+) ion, and the resulting peptoid-Cu(2+) complex exhibited significant Turn-ON fluorescence following the addition of CN(-). The rapid and reversible response, combined with cyanide selectivity of the synthesized peptoid, reflects a multistep photo-process and supports its utility as a new type of CN(-) sensor. PMID:26978334

  17. A ferromagnetically coupled Fe42 cyanide-bridged nanocage

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soonchul; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Tao; Hamachi, Kohei; Kanegawa, Shinji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Shiota, Yoshihito; Hayami, Shinya; Mito, Masaki; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Nakano, Motohiro; Baker, Michael L.; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Duan, Chunying; Sato, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of artificial nanoscale units into superstructures is a prevalent topic in science. In biomimicry, scientists attempt to develop artificial self-assembled nanoarchitectures. However, despite extensive efforts, the preparation of nanoarchitectures with superior physical properties remains a challenge. For example, one of the major topics in the field of molecular magnetism is the development of high-spin (HS) molecules. Here, we report a cyanide-bridged magnetic nanocage composed of 18 HS iron(III) ions and 24 low-spin iron(II) ions. The magnetic iron(III) centres are ferromagnetically coupled, yielding the highest ground-state spin number (S=45) of any molecule reported to date. PMID:25562786

  18. A ferromagnetically coupled Fe42 cyanide-bridged nanocage.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soonchul; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Tao; Hamachi, Kohei; Kanegawa, Shinji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Shiota, Yoshihito; Hayami, Shinya; Mito, Masaki; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Nakano, Motohiro; Baker, Michael L; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Duan, Chunying; Sato, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of artificial nanoscale units into superstructures is a prevalent topic in science. In biomimicry, scientists attempt to develop artificial self-assembled nanoarchitectures. However, despite extensive efforts, the preparation of nanoarchitectures with superior physical properties remains a challenge. For example, one of the major topics in the field of molecular magnetism is the development of high-spin (HS) molecules. Here, we report a cyanide-bridged magnetic nanocage composed of 18 HS iron(III) ions and 24 low-spin iron(II) ions. The magnetic iron(III) centres are ferromagnetically coupled, yielding the highest ground-state spin number (S = 45) of any molecule reported to date. PMID:25562786

  19. Age-related variations of protein carbonyls in human saliva and plasma: is saliva protein carbonyls an alternative biomarker of aging?

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhihui; Wang, Yanyi; Liu, Hongchen; Che, Yuwei; Xu, Yingying; E, Lingling

    2015-06-01

    Free radical hypothesis which is one of the most acknowledged aging theories was developed into oxidative stress hypothesis. Protein carbonylation is by far one of the most widely used markers of protein oxidation. We studied the role of age and gender in protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma among 273 Chinese healthy subjects (137 females and 136 males aged between 20 and 79) and discussed the correlation between protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma. Protein carbonyl content of saliva and plasma were, respectively, 2.391 ± 0.639 and 0.838 ± 0.274 nmol/mg. Variations of saliva and plasma different age groups all reached significant differences in both male and female (all p < 0.05) while both saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were found to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.6582 and r = 0.5176, all p < 0.001). Gender was discovered to be unrelated to saliva and plasma protein carbonyl levels (all p > 0.05). Saliva and plasma protein carbonyls were positively related (r = 0.4405, p < 0.001). Surprisingly, saliva and plasma protein carbonyls/ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) ratios were proved to be significantly correlated with age (r = 0.7796 and r = 0.6938, all p < 0.001) while saliva protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio and plasma protein carbonyls/FRAP ratio were also correlated (r = 0.5573, p < 0.001). We concluded that saliva protein carbonyls seem to be an alternative biomarker of aging while the mechanisms of protein carbonylation and oxidative stress and the relationship between saliva protein carbonyls and diseases need to be further investigated.

  20. Protein kinase c inhibitor attenuates cyanide toxicity in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Maduh, E.U.; Nealley, E.W.; Song, H.; Wang, P.C.; Baskin, S.I.

    1995-12-31

    We have examined the effect of pretreatment with a potent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, l-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7), against metabolic alterations induced by sodium cyanide (NaCN), 4.2 mg/kg, in brain of anesthetized male micropigs (6-10 kg). Brain high energy phosphates were analyzed using a 3/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic surface coil in a 4.7 Tesla horizontal bore magnet. H-7, I mg/kg, was given intravenously (i.v.) 30 min before NaCN challenge (H-7 + CN). Prior to NaCN, H-7, or H-7 + CN administration, baseline 31P resonance spectra of 1-min duration were acquired for 5-10 min, and continued for an additional 60 min following i.v. NaCN injection, each animal serving as its own control. Peaks were identified as phosphomonoester (PME), inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphodiester (PDE), phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), based on their respective chemical shifts. Without H-7 pretreatment, NaCN effects were marked by a rising Pi and a declining PCr peak 2 min after injection, with only 2/5 of the animals surviving the 60 min experiment. Through a pretreatment period of 30 min, H-7 did not affect baseline cell energy profile as reflected by the 31P-NMR spectra, but in its presence, those changes (i.e. diminishing PCr and rising Pi peaks) elicited by NaCN were markedly blunted; 4/5 of the animals in this group survived the NaCN challenge. It is proposed that H-7, a pharmacologic inhibitor of PKC, may be useful in CN antagonism, underscoring the role of PKC in cyanide intoxication.

  1. Past, present and future of cyanide antagonism research: From the early remedies to the current therapies

    PubMed Central

    Petrikovics, Ilona; Budai, Marianna; Kovacs, Kristof; Thompson, David E

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews milestones in antidotal therapies for cyanide (CN) spanning early remedies, current antidotal systems and research towards next generation therapies. CN has been a part of plant defense mechanisms for millions of years. It became industrially important in the nineteenth century with the advent of CN assisted gold mining and the use of CN as a pest control agent. The biochemical basis of CN poisoning was actively studied and key mechanisms were understood as early as 1929. These fundamental studies led to a variety of antidotes, including indirect CN binders that generate methemoglobin, direct CN binders such as hydroxocobalamin, and sulfur donors that convert CN to the less toxic thiocyanate. Research on blood gases at the end of the twentieth century shed new light on the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the body. The discovery of NO’s ability to compete with CN for enzymatic binding sites provided a previously missed explanation for the rapid efficacy of NO generating antidotes such as the nitrites. Presently used CN therapies include: methemoglobin/NO generators (e.g., sodium nitrite, amyl nitrite, and dimethyl aminophenol), sulfur donors (e.g., sodium thiosulfate and glutathione), and direct binding agents [(e.g., hydroxocobalamin and dicobalt salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (dicobalt edetate)]. A strong effort is being made to explore novel antidotal systems and to formulate them for rapid administration at the point of intoxication in mass casualty scenarios. New antidotes, formulations, and delivery systems are enhancing bioavailability and efficacy and hold promise for a new generation of improved CN countermeasures. PMID:26140275

  2. Past, present and future of cyanide antagonism research: From the early remedies to the current therapies.

    PubMed

    Petrikovics, Ilona; Budai, Marianna; Kovacs, Kristof; Thompson, David E

    2015-06-26

    This paper reviews milestones in antidotal therapies for cyanide (CN) spanning early remedies, current antidotal systems and research towards next generation therapies. CN has been a part of plant defense mechanisms for millions of years. It became industrially important in the nineteenth century with the advent of CN assisted gold mining and the use of CN as a pest control agent. The biochemical basis of CN poisoning was actively studied and key mechanisms were understood as early as 1929. These fundamental studies led to a variety of antidotes, including indirect CN binders that generate methemoglobin, direct CN binders such as hydroxocobalamin, and sulfur donors that convert CN to the less toxic thiocyanate. Research on blood gases at the end of the twentieth century shed new light on the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the body. The discovery of NO's ability to compete with CN for enzymatic binding sites provided a previously missed explanation for the rapid efficacy of NO generating antidotes such as the nitrites. Presently used CN therapies include: methemoglobin/NO generators (e.g., sodium nitrite, amyl nitrite, and dimethyl aminophenol), sulfur donors (e.g., sodium thiosulfate and glutathione), and direct binding agents [(e.g., hydroxocobalamin and dicobalt salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (dicobalt edetate)]. A strong effort is being made to explore novel antidotal systems and to formulate them for rapid administration at the point of intoxication in mass casualty scenarios. New antidotes, formulations, and delivery systems are enhancing bioavailability and efficacy and hold promise for a new generation of improved CN countermeasures.

  3. Past, present and future of cyanide antagonism research: From the early remedies to the current therapies.

    PubMed

    Petrikovics, Ilona; Budai, Marianna; Kovacs, Kristof; Thompson, David E

    2015-06-26

    This paper reviews milestones in antidotal therapies for cyanide (CN) spanning early remedies, current antidotal systems and research towards next generation therapies. CN has been a part of plant defense mechanisms for millions of years. It became industrially important in the nineteenth century with the advent of CN assisted gold mining and the use of CN as a pest control agent. The biochemical basis of CN poisoning was actively studied and key mechanisms were understood as early as 1929. These fundamental studies led to a variety of antidotes, including indirect CN binders that generate methemoglobin, direct CN binders such as hydroxocobalamin, and sulfur donors that convert CN to the less toxic thiocyanate. Research on blood gases at the end of the twentieth century shed new light on the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the body. The discovery of NO's ability to compete with CN for enzymatic binding sites provided a previously missed explanation for the rapid efficacy of NO generating antidotes such as the nitrites. Presently used CN therapies include: methemoglobin/NO generators (e.g., sodium nitrite, amyl nitrite, and dimethyl aminophenol), sulfur donors (e.g., sodium thiosulfate and glutathione), and direct binding agents [(e.g., hydroxocobalamin and dicobalt salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (dicobalt edetate)]. A strong effort is being made to explore novel antidotal systems and to formulate them for rapid administration at the point of intoxication in mass casualty scenarios. New antidotes, formulations, and delivery systems are enhancing bioavailability and efficacy and hold promise for a new generation of improved CN countermeasures. PMID:26140275

  4. Plasma protein carbonyl levels and breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Pavel; Terry, Mary Beth; Gammon, Marilie D; Agrawal, Meenakshi; Zhang, Fang Fang; Ferris, Jennifer S; Teitelbaum, Susan L; Eng, Sybil M; Gaudet, Mia M; Neugut, Alfred I; Santella, Regina M

    2007-01-01

    To study the role of oxidative stress in breast cancer risk, we analysed plasma levels of protein carbonyls in 1050 cases and 1107 controls. We found a statistically significant trend in breast cancer risk in relation to increasing quartiles of plasma protein carbonyl levels (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 0.9-1.5; OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2-2.0; OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.1, for the 2(nd), 3(rd) and 4(th) quartile relative to the lowest quartile, respectively, P for trend = 0.0001). The increase in risk was similar for younger (<50 years) and older women, more pronounced among women with higher physical activity levels (0.7 hrs/week for 4(th) quartile versus lowest quartile OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.4-3.0), higher alcohol consumption (> or = 15 grams/day for 4(th) quartile versus lowest quartile OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.1-4.7), and hormone replacement therapy use (HRT, OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.6-4.4 for 4(th) quartile versus lowest quartile). The multiplicative interaction terms were statistically significant only for physical activity and HRT. The positive association between plasma protein carbonyl levels and breast cancer risk was also observed when the analysis was restricted to women who had not received chemotherapy or radiation therapy prior to blood collection. Among controls, oxidized protein levels significantly increased with cigarette smoking and higher fruit and vegetable consumption, and decreased with alcohol consumption >30 grams per day. Women with higher levels of plasma protein carbonyl and urinary 15F(2t)-isoprostane had an 80% increase in breast cancer risk (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.6) compared to women with levels below the median for both markers of oxidative stress. In summary, our results suggest that increased plasma protein carbonyl levels may be associated with breast cancer risk.

  5. 40 CFR 721.10409 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha. - [ [ [methyl - 3 - [ [ [ (polyfluoroalkyl)oxy]carbonyl ] amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha. - carbonyl ] amino] phenyl]amino]carbonyl] - .omega. - methoxy... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha.- carbonyl]amino]phenyl]amino]...

  6. Microarray Analysis and Mutagenesis of the Biological Control Agent Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biological control agent Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 suppresses seedling emergence diseases caused by soilborne fungi and Oomycetes. Pf-5 produces at least ten secondary metabolites. These include hydrogen cyanide, pyrrolnitrin, pyoluteorin and 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, which have known funct...

  7. Determination of total cyanide in Hanford Site high-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.; Pool, K.H.

    1994-05-01

    Nickel ferrocyanide compounds (Na{sub 2-x}Cs{sub x}NiFe (CN){sub 6}) were produced in a scavenging process to remove {sup 137}Cs from Hanford Site single-shell tank waste supernates. Methods for determining total cyanide in Hanford Site high-level wastes are needed for the evaluation of potential exothermic reactions between cyanide and oxidizers such as nitrate and for safe storage, processing, and management of the wastes in compliance with regulatory requirements. Hanford Site laboratory experience in determining cyanide in high-level wastes is summarized. Modifications were made to standard cyanide methods to permit improved handling of high-level waste samples and to eliminate interferences found in Hanford Site waste matrices. Interferences and associated procedure modifications caused by high nitrates/nitrite concentrations, insoluble nickel ferrocyanides, and organic complexants are described.

  8. Photochemical changes in cyanide speciation in drainage from a precious metal ore heap

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.; Leinz, R.W.; Grimes, D.J.; Rye, R.O.

    2002-01-01

    In drainage from an inactive ore heap at a former gold mine, the speciation of cyanide and the concentrations of several metals were found to follow diurnal cycles. Concentrations of the hexacyanoferrate complex, iron, manganese, and ammonium were higher at night than during the day, whereas weak-acid-dissociable cyanide, silver, gold, copper, nitrite, and pH displayed the reverse behavior. The changes in cyanide speciation, iron, and trace metals can be explained by photodissociation of iron and cobalt cyanocomplexes as the solutions emerged from the heap into sunlight-exposed channels. At midday, environmentally significant concentrations of free cyanide were produced in a matter of minutes, causing trace copper, silver, and gold to be mobilized as cyanocomplexes from solids. Whether rapid photodissociation is a general phenomenon common to other sites will be important to determine in reaching a general understanding of the environmental risks posed by routine or accidental water discharges from precious metal mining facilities.

  9. A coumarin-indole based colorimetric and 'turn on' fluorescent probe for cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yu; Dai, Xi; Zhao, Bao-Xiang

    2015-03-01

    A novel coumarin-indole based chemodosimeter with a simple structure was designed and prepared via a condensation reaction in high yield. The probe exhibited very high selectivity towards cyanide on both fluorescence and UV-vis spectra, which allowed it to quantitatively detect and imaging cyanide ions in organic-aqueous solution by either fluorescence enhancement or colorimetric changes. Confirmed by 1H NMR and HRMS spectra, the detection mechanism was proved to be related with the Michael addition reaction induced by cyanide ions, which blocked the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) of the probe. Moreover, the probe was able to be utilized efficiently in a wide pH range (7.5-10) with negligible interference from other anions and a low detection limit of 0.51 μM. Application in 5 kinds of natural water source and accurate detection of cyanide in tap water solvent system also indicated the high practical significance of the probe.

  10. Proton-Coupled Reduction of an Iron Cyanide Complex to Methane and Ammonia.

    PubMed

    Rittle, Jonathan; Peters, Jonas C

    2016-09-26

    Nitrogenase enzymes mediate the six-electron reductive cleavage of cyanide to CH4 and NH3 . Herein we demonstrate for the first time the liberation of CH4 and NH3 from a well-defined iron cyanide coordination complex, [SiP(iPr) 3 ]Fe(CN) (where [SiP(iPr) 3 ] represents a tris(phosphine)silyl ligand), on exposure to proton and electron equivalents. [SiP(iPr) 3 ]Fe(CN) additionally serves as a useful entry point to rare examples of terminally-bound Fe(CNH) and Fe(CNH2 ) species that, in accord with preliminary mechanistic studies, are plausible intermediates of the cyanide reductive protonation to generate CH4 and NH3 . Comparative studies with a related [SiP(iPr) 3 ]Fe(CNMe2 ) complex suggests the possibility of multiple, competing mechanisms for cyanide activation and reduction. PMID:27607732

  11. Incorporation of Molecular Oxygen and Water during Enzymatic Oxidation of Cyanide by Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C.; Kunz, D. A.; Venables, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    Cell extracts (high-speed [150,000 x g] supernatants) from Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764 catalyzed the oxidation of cyanide to CO(inf2) (and NH(inf3)). Conversion was both oxygen and NADH dependent, with 1 mol of each being consumed per mol of cyanide degraded. Analysis of (sup13)CO(inf2) by mass spectrometry indicated that one atom each of isotopically labelled oxygen 18 from molecular oxygen and water were incorporated during enzymatic conversion. The results confirm earlier reports of oxygenase-mediated cyanide conversion in this organism. A reaction pathway for cyanide oxidation involving initial monooxygenation followed by hydrolysis of a hypothetical oxygenated intermediate to CO(inf2) (and NH(inf3)) is proposed. PMID:16535345

  12. Determination of 15N/14N and 13C/12C in Solid and Aqueous Cyanides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The stable isotopic compositions of nitrogen and carbon in cyanide compounds can be determined by combusting aliquots in sealed tubes to form N2 gas and CO2 gas and analyzing the gases by mass spectrometry. Free cyanide (CN-aq + HCNaq) in simple solutions can also be analyzed by first precipitating the cyanide as copper(II) ferrocyanide and then combusting the precipitate. Reproducibility is ??0.5??? or better for both ??15N and ??13C. If empirical corrections are made on the basis of carbon yields, the reproducibility of ??13C can be improved to ??0.2???. The analytical methods described herein are sufficiently accurate and precise to apply stable isotope techniques to problems of cyanide degradation in natural waters and industrial process solutions.

  13. A coumarin-indole based colorimetric and "turn on" fluorescent probe for cyanide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu; Dai, Xi; Zhao, Bao-Xiang

    2015-03-01

    A novel coumarin-indole based chemodosimeter with a simple structure was designed and prepared via a condensation reaction in high yield. The probe exhibited very high selectivity towards cyanide on both fluorescence and UV-vis spectra, which allowed it to quantitatively detect and imaging cyanide ions in organic-aqueous solution by either fluorescence enhancement or colorimetric changes. Confirmed by (1)H NMR and HRMS spectra, the detection mechanism was proved to be related with the Michael addition reaction induced by cyanide ions, which blocked the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) of the probe. Moreover, the probe was able to be utilized efficiently in a wide pH range (7.5-10) with negligible interference from other anions and a low detection limit of 0.51μM. Application in 5 kinds of natural water source and accurate detection of cyanide in tap water solvent system also indicated the high practical significance of the probe.

  14. Comparison of cobinamide to hydroxocobalamin in reversing cyanide physiologic effects in rabbits using diffuse optical spectroscopy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Matthew; Mahon, Sari B.; Lee, Jangwoen; Kim, Jae; Mukai, David; Goodman, Seth; Kreuter, Kelly A.; Ahdout, Rebecca; Mohammad, Othman; Sharma, Vijay S.; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R.

    2010-01-01

    Our purpose is to compare cobinamide to hydroxocobalamin in reversing cyanide (CN)-induced physiologic effects in an animal model using diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS). Cyanide poisoning is a major threat worldwide. Cobinamide is a novel molecule that can bind two molecules of cyanide, has a much higher binding affinity than hydroxocobalamin, and is more water soluble. We investigated the ability of equimolar doses of cobinamide and hydroxocobalamin to reverse the effects of cyanide exposure in an animal model monitored continuously by DOS. Cyanide toxicity was induced in 16 New Zealand white rabbits by intravenous infusion. Animals were divided into three groups: controls (n=5) received saline following cyanide, hydroxocobalamin (N=6) following cyanide, and cobinamide (N=5) following cyanide. Cobinamide caused significantly faster and more complete recovery of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in cyanide-exposed animals than hydroxocobalamin- or saline-treated animals, with a recovery time constant of 13.8+/-7.1 min compared to 75.4+/-25.1 and 76.4+/-42.7 min, for hydroxocobalamin- and saline-treated animals, respectively (p<0.0001). This study indicates that cobinamide more rapidly and completely reverses the physiologic effects of cyanide than equimolar doses of cobalamin at the dose used in this study, and CN effects and response can be followed noninvasively using DOS.

  15. Biodegradation of cyanide by a new isolated strain under alkaline conditions and optimization by response surface methodology (RSM)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biodegradation of free cyanide from industrial wastewaters has been proven as a viable and robust method for treatment of wastewaters containing cyanide. Results Cyanide degrading bacteria were isolated from a wastewater treatment plant for coke-oven-gas condensate by enrichment culture technique. Five strains were able to use cyanide as the sole nitrogen source under alkaline conditions and among them; one strain (C2) was selected for further studies on the basis of the higher efficiency of cyanide degradation. The bacterium was able to tolerate free cyanide at concentrations of up to 500 ppm which makes it a good potentially candidate for the biological treatment of cyanide contaminated residues. Cyanide degradation corresponded with growth and reached a maximum level 96% during the exponential phase. The highest growth rate (1.23 × 108) was obtained on day 4 of the incubation time. Both glucose and fructose were suitable carbon sources for cyanotrophic growth. No growth was detected in media with cyanide as the sole carbon source. Four control factors including, pH, temperature, agitation speed and glucose concentration were optimized according to central composite design in response surface method. Cyanide degradation was optimum at 34.2°C, pH 10.3 and glucose concentration 0.44 (g/l). Conclusions Bacterial species degrade cyanide into less toxic products as they are able to use the cyanide as a nitrogen source, forming ammonia and carbon dioxide as end products. Alkaliphilic bacterial strains screened in this study evidentially showed the potential to possess degradative activities that can be harnessed to remediate cyanide wastes. PMID:24921051

  16. Measurement of the methyl cyanide E/A ratio in TMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Irvine, W. M.; Ohishi, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Saito, S.; Kaifu, N.

    1993-01-01

    We have observed the methyl cyanide (CH3CN) J = 2-1 K = 0 and 1 transitions toward the cyanopolyyne peak of TMC-1 and have derived an E/A (ortho/para)abundance ratio N(E)/N(A) = 0.75 +/- 0.10. The total methyl cyanide column density is N(total) = 5 x 10 exp 12/sq cm toward TMC-1, in agreement with earlier results from the J = 1-0 lines.

  17. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of cyanide and thiocyanate after separation on a melamine-formaldehyde resin.

    PubMed

    Gümüş, G; Demirata, B; Apak, R

    2000-11-01

    A simple indirect spectrophotometric method for the determination of cyanide, based on the oxidation of the cyanide with chlorine (Cl(2)) is described. The residual chlorine is determined by the color reaction with o-tolidine (3,3'-dimethylbenzidine). The maximum absorbance for Cl(2) is at 437 nm. A linear calibration graph (0-4.0x10(-5) M CN(-)) is obtained under optimal reaction conditions at room temperature and pH 11-12. The stoichiometric mole ratio of chlorine to cyanide is 1:1. The effective molar absorptivity for cyanide is 5.87x10(4) l mol(-1) cm(-1) at pH 1.6. The limit of quantification (LOQ) is 3.6x10(-7) M or 9.4 ppb. Effects of pH, excess reagent, sensitivity, reaction time and tolerance limits of interferent ions are reported. The method was applied to the determination of cyanide in a real sample. The basic interferent usually accompanying CN(-), i.e. thiocyanate, is separated from cyanide by sorption on a melamine-formaldehyde resin at pH 9 while cyanide is not retained. Thiocyanate is eluted with 0.4 M NaOH from the column and determined spectrophotometrically using the acidic FeCl(3) reagent. The initial column effluent containing cyanide was analyzed by both the developed chlorine-o-tolidine method and the conventional barbituric acid-pyridine (Spectroquant 14800) procedure, and the results were statistically compared. The developed method is relatively inexpensive and less laborious than the standard (Spectroquant) procedure, and insensitive to the common interferent, cyanate (CNO(-)).

  18. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins' active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  19. PEPTIDE FORMATION MEDIATED BY HYDROGEN CYANIDE TETRAMER: A POSSIBLE PREBIOTIC PROCESS

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sherwood; Flores, Jose; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1969-01-01

    Chemical evolution on the primitive earth must have involved condensation of α-amino acids to peptides. Under aqueous conditions consistent with current conceptions of primordial waters, heating glycerine with the hydrogen cyanide tetramer, diaminomaleonitrile, yields dipeptide. If nitrogen was cycled through primordial waters as cyanide, peptide synthesis by stepwise tetramer-mediated condensation of α-amino acids would have been a plausible process. PMID:5264133

  20. Release of sunflower seed dormancy by cyanide: cross-talk with ethylene signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Oracz, Krystyna; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Bogatek, Renata; Corbineau, Françoise; Bailly, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Freshly harvested sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seeds are considered to be dormant because they fail to germinate at relatively low temperatures (10 degrees C). This dormancy results mainly from an embryo dormancy and disappears during dry storage. Although endogenous ethylene is known to be involved in sunflower seed alleviation of dormancy, little attention had been paid to the possible role of cyanide, which is produced by the conversion of 1-aminocyclopropane 1-carboxylic acid to ethylene, in this process. The aims of this work were to investigate whether exogenous cyanide could improve the germination of dormant sunflower seeds and to elucidate its putative mechanisms of action. Naked dormant seeds became able to germinate at 10 degrees C when they were incubated in the presence of 1 mM gaseous cyanide. Other respiratory inhibitors showed that this effect did not result from an activation of the pentose phosphate pathway or the cyanide-insensitive pathway. Cyanide stimulated germination of dormant seeds in the presence of inhibitors of ethylene biosynthesis, but its improving effect required functional ethylene receptors. It did not significantly affect ethylene production and the expression of genes involved in ethylene biosynthesis or in the first steps of ethylene signalling pathway. However, the expression of the transcription factor Ethylene Response Factor 1 (ERF1) was markedly stimulated in the presence of gaseous cyanide. It is proposed that the mode of action of cyanide in sunflower seed dormancy alleviation does not involve ethylene production and that ERF1 is a common component of the ethylene and cyanide signalling pathways.

  1. Understanding the Factors Affecting the Formation of Carbonyl Iron Electrodes in Rechargeable Alkaline Iron Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar, AK; Yang, CG; Malkhandi, S; Yang, B; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2012-01-01

    Rechargeable iron-based alkaline batteries such as iron - air and nickel - iron batteries are attractive for large-scale electrical energy storage because iron is inexpensive, globally-abundant and environmentally-friendly. Further, the iron electrode is known for its robustness to repeated charge/discharge cycling. During manufacturing these batteries are charged and discharged 20 to 50 times during which the discharge capacity of the iron electrode increases gradually and attains a stable value. This process of achieving stable capacity is called formation. In this study we have focused our efforts on understanding the effect of electrode design on formation. We have investigated the role of wetting agent, pore-former additive, and sulfide additive on the formation of carbonyl iron electrodes. The wetting agent increased the rate of formation while the pore-former additive increased the final capacity. Sodium sulfide added to the electrolyte worked as a de-passivation agent and increased the final discharge capacity. We have proposed a phenomenological model for the formation process that predicts the rate of formation and final discharge capacity given the design parameters for the electrode. The understanding gained here will be useful in reducing the time lost in formation and in maximizing the utilization of the iron electrode. (C) 2012 The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/2.021301jes] All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of germination and autoclaving of sprouted finger millet and kidney beans on cyanide content.

    PubMed

    Chove, Bernard E; Mamiro, Peter R S

    2010-10-01

    Cyanide contents of locally purchased brown finger millet (Eleusine corocana L. Gaertner) and brown speckled kidney bean seeds (Phaseolus vulgaries var. Rose Coco) were determined using raw, germinated and autoclaved samples. The aim was to establish the extent of cyanide content increase resulting from the germination process and the effectiveness of the autoclaving process on the reduction of cyanide levels in the samples, for safety considerations. Autoclaving was carried out at 121degree C for 20 minutes. It was found that germination increased the cyanide content by 2.11 to 2.14 fold in finger millet for laboratory processed samples. In the case of kidney beans the increment was 1.76 to 1.77 fold for laboratory samples. The increments for field processed samples were in the same range as those for laboratory samples. Autoclaving reduced the cyanide content to between 61.8 and 65.9 % of the original raw contents for finger millet and between 56.6 to 57.8% in the case of kidney beans. The corresponding reductions for field samples were also found to be within the same ranges as the laboratory processed samples. It was concluded that autoclaving significantly reduced the cyanide levels in germinated finger millet and kidney beans.

  3. Dietary resources shape the adaptive changes of cyanide detoxification function in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Yie, Shangmian; Liu, Yuliang; Wang, Chengdong; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Wenping; Lan, Jingchao; Huang, Xiangming; Luo, Li; Cai, Kailai; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-01-01

    The functional adaptive changes in cyanide detoxification in giant panda appear to be response to dietary transition from typical carnivore to herbivorous bear. We tested the absorption of cyanide contained in bamboo/bamboo shoots with a feeding trial in 20 adult giant pandas. We determined total cyanide content in bamboo shoots and giant panda’s feces, levels of urinary thiocyanate and tissue rhodanese activity using color reactions with a spectrophotometer. Rhodanese expression in liver and kidney at transcription and translation levels were measured using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We compared differences of rhodanese activity and gene expressions among giant panda, rabbit (herbivore) and cat (carnivore), and between newborn and adult giant pandas. Bamboo shoots contained 3.2 mg/kg of cyanide and giant pandas absorbed more than 65% of cyanide. However, approximately 80% of absorbed cyanide was metabolized to less toxic thiocyanate that was discharged in urine. Rhodanese expression and activity in liver and kidney of giant panda were significantly higher than in cat, but lower than in rabbit (all P < 0.05). Levels in adult pandas were higher than that in newborn cub. Phylogenetic analysis of both nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the rhodanese gene supported a closer relationship of giant panda with carnivores than with herbivores. PMID:27703267

  4. An effective method for the detoxification of cyanide-rich wastewater by Bacillus sp. CN-22.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chou-Fei; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Qing; Deng, Mao-Cheng; Feng, Lei; Peng, Juan; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2014-04-01

    The biodetoxification of cyanide-rich wastewater has become increasingly popular because of its cost-effectiveness and environmental friendliness. Therefore, we have developed an effective method, optimised by response surface methodology, for detoxifying cyanide-rich wastewater using Bacillus sp. CN-22, which was newly isolated from a cyanide-contaminated electroplating sludge and could tolerate a CN⁻ concentration of 700 mg L⁻¹. The concentration of CN⁻ in the treated wastewater decreased from 200 to 6.62 mg L⁻¹ after cultivation with 2.38 % inocula for 72 h on the medium, consisting of 0.05 % KH₂PO₄, 0.15 % K₂HPO₄, 1.0 mM MgCl₂, 1.0 mM FeCl₃, 0.1 % NH₄Cl, and 0.1 % glycerol. The CN⁻ degradability of 96.69 % is similar to the predicted value of 96.82 %. The optimal cultivation conditions were controlled as follows: initial pH, 10.3; temperature, 31 °C; and rotary speed, 193 rpm. The maintenance of higher pH in the overall treatment procedures may avoid the production of volatile HCN and the risk associated with cyanide detoxification. Additionally, the bacterial strain Bacillus sp. CN-22, with its potent cyanide-degrading activity at the initial CN⁻ concentration of 200 mg L⁻¹, may be employed to effectively treat cyanide-rich wastewater, especially electroplating effluent.

  5. Effect of germination and autoclaving of sprouted finger millet and kidney beans on cyanide content.

    PubMed

    Chove, Bernard E; Mamiro, Peter R S

    2010-10-01

    Cyanide contents of locally purchased brown finger millet (Eleusine corocana L. Gaertner) and brown speckled kidney bean seeds (Phaseolus vulgaries var. Rose Coco) were determined using raw, germinated and autoclaved samples. The aim was to establish the extent of cyanide content increase resulting from the germination process and the effectiveness of the autoclaving process on the reduction of cyanide levels in the samples, for safety considerations. Autoclaving was carried out at 121degree C for 20 minutes. It was found that germination increased the cyanide content by 2.11 to 2.14 fold in finger millet for laboratory processed samples. In the case of kidney beans the increment was 1.76 to 1.77 fold for laboratory samples. The increments for field processed samples were in the same range as those for laboratory samples. Autoclaving reduced the cyanide content to between 61.8 and 65.9 % of the original raw contents for finger millet and between 56.6 to 57.8% in the case of kidney beans. The corresponding reductions for field samples were also found to be within the same ranges as the laboratory processed samples. It was concluded that autoclaving significantly reduced the cyanide levels in germinated finger millet and kidney beans. PMID:24409633

  6. An uncommon case of a suicide with inhalation of hydrogen cyanide.

    PubMed

    Musshoff, F; Kirschbaum, K M; Madea, B

    2011-01-30

    An uncommon suicide by oral ingestion of potassium cyanide salts and contemporaneous inhalation of hydrogen cyanide is presented. A 48-year-old tradesman was found dead sitting in his car. A penetrating odor of bitter almonds was noticed when opening the doors. A camping stove and a cooking pot containing large amounts of dark blue crystals were found in the footwell of the car. White powder adhered to his fingers and to the area around the mouth. Furthermore bottles containing potassium ferrocyanide and different kinds of acid and leach were found in the car together with internet information about, e.g. potassium ferrocyanide and potassium cyanide. At autopsy hemorrhages and erosions of the mucosa of the respiratory tract, esophagus and stomach were found. Concentrations of cyanide were 0.2mg/l in stomach contents, 0.96mg/kg in brain tissue, 2.79mg/kg in lungs, and 5.3mg/l in blood. The white and toxic powder potassium cyanide was formed by heating of the yellow crystals of potassium ferrocyanide on the camping stove. This powder was probably ingested orally. Addition of acid converted the salt into the highly toxic gas hydrogen cyanide. Oxidation with atmospheric oxygen built the dark blue ferrous compound Prussian blue. This case report of a person who was not familiar with chemicals demonstrates the acquisition of professional information via the internet, enabling a suicide with a complex procedure.

  7. An effective method for the detoxification of cyanide-rich wastewater by Bacillus sp. CN-22.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chou-Fei; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Qing; Deng, Mao-Cheng; Feng, Lei; Peng, Juan; Yuan, Jian-Ping; Wang, Jiang-Hai

    2014-04-01

    The biodetoxification of cyanide-rich wastewater has become increasingly popular because of its cost-effectiveness and environmental friendliness. Therefore, we have developed an effective method, optimised by response surface methodology, for detoxifying cyanide-rich wastewater using Bacillus sp. CN-22, which was newly isolated from a cyanide-contaminated electroplating sludge and could tolerate a CN⁻ concentration of 700 mg L⁻¹. The concentration of CN⁻ in the treated wastewater decreased from 200 to 6.62 mg L⁻¹ after cultivation with 2.38 % inocula for 72 h on the medium, consisting of 0.05 % KH₂PO₄, 0.15 % K₂HPO₄, 1.0 mM MgCl₂, 1.0 mM FeCl₃, 0.1 % NH₄Cl, and 0.1 % glycerol. The CN⁻ degradability of 96.69 % is similar to the predicted value of 96.82 %. The optimal cultivation conditions were controlled as follows: initial pH, 10.3; temperature, 31 °C; and rotary speed, 193 rpm. The maintenance of higher pH in the overall treatment procedures may avoid the production of volatile HCN and the risk associated with cyanide detoxification. Additionally, the bacterial strain Bacillus sp. CN-22, with its potent cyanide-degrading activity at the initial CN⁻ concentration of 200 mg L⁻¹, may be employed to effectively treat cyanide-rich wastewater, especially electroplating effluent. PMID:24337345

  8. Treatment of cyanide wastewater by bulk liquid membrane using tricaprylamine as a carrier.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoping; Xue, Juanqin; Liu, Nina; Yu, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    The transport of cyanide from wastewater through a bulk liquid membrane (BLM) containing tricaprylamine (TOA) as a carrier was studied. The effect of cyanide concentration in the feed solution, TOA concentration in the organic phase, the stirring speed, NaOH concentration in the stripping solution and temperature on cyanide transport was determined through BLM. Mass transfer of cyanide through BLM was analyzed by following the kinetic laws of two consecutive irreversible first-order reactions, and the kinetic parameters (k(1), k(2), R(m)(max), t(max), J(a)(max), J(d)(max)) were also calculated. Apparently, increase in membrane entrance (k(1)) and exit rate (k(2)) constants was accompanied by a rise in temperature. The values of activation energies were obtained as 35.6 kJ/mol and 18.2 kJ/mol for removal and recovery, respectively. These values showed that both removal and recovery steps in cyanide transport is controlled by the rate of the chemical complexation reaction. The optimal reaction conditions were determined by BLM using trioctylamine as the carrier: feed phase: pH 4, carrier TOA possession ratio in organic phase: 2% (V/V), stripping phase concentration of NaOH: 1% (W/V), reaction time: 60 min, stirring speed: 250 r/min. Under the above conditions, the removal rate was up to 92.96%. The experiments demonstrated that TOA was a good carrier for cyanide transport through BLM in this study. PMID:27332833

  9. Cyanide levels found in infected cystic fibrosis sputum inhibit airway ciliary function.

    PubMed

    Nair, Chandrika; Shoemark, Amelia; Chan, Mario; Ollosson, Sarah; Dixon, Mellissa; Hogg, Claire; Alton, Eric W F W; Davies, Jane C; Williams, Huw D

    2014-11-01

    We have previously reported cyanide at concentrations of up to 150 μM in the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a negative correlation with lung function. Our aim was to investigate possible mechanisms for this association, focusing on the effect of pathophysiologically relevant cyanide levels on human respiratory cell function. Ciliary beat frequency measurements were performed on nasal brushings and nasal air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures obtained from healthy volunteers and cystic fibrosis patients. Potassium cyanide decreased ciliary beat frequency in healthy nasal brushings (n = 6) after 60 min (150 μM: 47% fall, p<0.0012; 75 μM: 32% fall, p<0.0001). Samples from cystic fibrosis patients (n = 3) showed similar results (150 μM: 55% fall, p = 0.001). Ciliary beat frequency inhibition was not due to loss of cell viability and was reversible. The inhibitory mechanism was independent of ATP levels. KCN also significantly inhibited ciliary beat frequency in ALI cultures, albeit to a lesser extent. Ciliary beat frequency measurements on ALI cultures treated with culture supernatants from P. aeruginosa mutants defective in virulence factor production implicated cyanide as a key component inhibiting the ciliary beat frequency. If cyanide production similarly impairs mucocilliary clearance in vivo, it could explain the link with increased disease severity observed in cystic fibrosis patients with detectable cyanide in their airway.

  10. Treatment of cyanide wastewater by bulk liquid membrane using tricaprylamine as a carrier.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoping; Xue, Juanqin; Liu, Nina; Yu, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    The transport of cyanide from wastewater through a bulk liquid membrane (BLM) containing tricaprylamine (TOA) as a carrier was studied. The effect of cyanide concentration in the feed solution, TOA concentration in the organic phase, the stirring speed, NaOH concentration in the stripping solution and temperature on cyanide transport was determined through BLM. Mass transfer of cyanide through BLM was analyzed by following the kinetic laws of two consecutive irreversible first-order reactions, and the kinetic parameters (k(1), k(2), R(m)(max), t(max), J(a)(max), J(d)(max)) were also calculated. Apparently, increase in membrane entrance (k(1)) and exit rate (k(2)) constants was accompanied by a rise in temperature. The values of activation energies were obtained as 35.6 kJ/mol and 18.2 kJ/mol for removal and recovery, respectively. These values showed that both removal and recovery steps in cyanide transport is controlled by the rate of the chemical complexation reaction. The optimal reaction conditions were determined by BLM using trioctylamine as the carrier: feed phase: pH 4, carrier TOA possession ratio in organic phase: 2% (V/V), stripping phase concentration of NaOH: 1% (W/V), reaction time: 60 min, stirring speed: 250 r/min. Under the above conditions, the removal rate was up to 92.96%. The experiments demonstrated that TOA was a good carrier for cyanide transport through BLM in this study.

  11. Effectiveness of intramuscularly administered cyanide antidotes and the rate of methemoglobin formation

    SciTech Connect

    Vick, J.A.; Von Bredow, J.D.

    1993-05-13

    Successful first aid therapy for cyanide intoxication is dependent upon the immediate administration of antidotes which directly or indirectly interact with the cyanide ion to remove it from circulation. Exceptionally rapid methemoglobin formers (hydroxylamine hydrochloride 'HA) and Dimethylaminophenol (DMAP) are usually able to prevent the lethal effect of cyanide following intramuscular injections in doses sufficient to induce 20% methemoglobin (HA = 20 mg/kg and DMAP= 2 mg/kg). Sodium nitrite, the methemoglobin inducer approved by the FDA and is available for military use, must be administered by intravenous infusion since it is not an effective cyanide antidote by the intramuscular route. In the normal un-intoxicated animal an intramuscular injection of 20 mg/kg sodium nitrite will form 20% methemoglobin at a rapid rate; however, in the presence of acute cyanide intoxication the associated severe bradycardia appears to limit the rate of absorption of sodium nitrite from the intramuscular site which prevents the rapid formation of sufficient methemoglobin to counteract cyanide intoxication.

  12. Novel colorimetric sensors for cyanide based on azo-hydrazone tautomeric skeletons.

    PubMed

    Adegoke, Olajire A; Adesuji, Temitope E; Thomas, Olusegun E

    2014-07-15

    The monoazo dyes, 4-carboxyl-2, 6-dinitrophenylazohydroxynaphthalenes dyes (AZ-01, AZ-03 and AZ-04), were evaluated as a highly selective colorimetric chemosensor for cyanide ion. The recognition of cyanide ion gave an obvious colour change from light yellow to brownish red and upon dilution with acetone produced a purple to lilac colour. Optimum conditions for the reaction between the azo dyes and cyanide ion were established at 30°C for 5 min, and different variables affecting the reaction were carefully studied and optimised. Under the optimum conditions, linear relationships between the CN(-) concentrations and light absorption were established. Using these azo-hydrazone molecular switch entities, excellent selectivity towards the detection of CN(-) in aqueous solution over miscellaneous competitive anions was observed. Such selectivity mainly results from the possibility of nucleophilic attack on the azo-hydrazone chemosensors by cyanide anions in aqueous system, which is not afforded by other competing anions. The cyanide chemosensor method described here should have potential application as a new family probes for detecting cyanide in aqueous solution.

  13. The chemistry of carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere—A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, P.; Hannachi, H.; Mouvier, G.

    Carbonyl compounds are very important for the trophospheric physico-chemistry because they are the result of the first photo-oxidation stage of almost all organic compounds and they are the essential originators of the free radicals. In the present review we make a synthesis of the studies on the carbonyl compounds chemistry in the trophosphere by successively examining: measurement methods in the trophosphere, sources of primary carbonyl compounds, formation of secondary carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere, reactivity of carbonyl compounds in the atmosphere.

  14. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  15. Phenolic carbonyls undergo rapid aqueous photodegradation to form low-volatility, light-absorbing products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeremy D.; Kinney, Haley; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the aqueous photochemistry of six phenolic carbonyls - vanillin, acetovanillone, guaiacyl acetone, syringaldehyde, acetosyringone, and coniferyl aldehyde - that are emitted from wood combustion. The phenolic carbonyls absorb significant amounts of solar radiation and decay rapidly via direct photodegradation, with lifetimes (τ) of 13-140 min under Davis, CA winter solstice sunlight at midday (solar zenith angle = 62°). The one exception is guaiacyl acetone, where the carbonyl group is not directly connected to the aromatic ring: This species absorbs very little sunlight and undergoes direct photodegradation very slowly (τ > 103 min). We also found that the triplet excited states (3C*) of the phenolic carbonyls rapidly oxidize syringol (a methoxyphenol without a carbonyl group), on timescales of 1-5 h for solutions containing 5 μM phenolic carbonyl. The direct photodegradation of the phenolic carbonyls, and the oxidation of syringol by 3C*, both efficiently produce low volatility products, with SOA mass yields ranging from 80 to 140%. Contrary to most aliphatic carbonyls, under typical fog conditions we find that the primary sink for the aromatic phenolic carbonyls is direct photodegradation in the aqueous phase. In areas of significant wood combustion, phenolic carbonyls appear to be small but significant sources of aqueous SOA: over the course of a few hours, nearly all of the phenolic carbonyls will be converted to SOA via direct photodegradation, enhancing the POA mass from wood combustion by approximately 3-5%.

  16. Role of Carbonyl Modifications on Aging-Associated Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanase, Maya; Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C.; Huang, Liling; Morozova, Kateryna; Follo, Carlo; Goldberg, Michael; Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common biological phenomenon, observed in different physiological and pathological conditions. Decreased protein solubility and a tendency to aggregate is also observed during physiological aging but the causes are currently unknown. Herein we performed a biophysical separation of aging-related high molecular weight aggregates, isolated from the bone marrow and splenic cells of aging mice and followed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis. The analysis indicated that compared to younger mice an increase in protein post-translational carbonylation was observed. The causative role of these modifications in inducing protein misfolding and aggregation was determined by inducing carbonyl stress in young mice, which recapitulated the increased protein aggregation observed in old mice. Altogether our analysis indicates that oxidative stress-related post-translational modifications accumulate in the aging proteome and are responsible for increased protein aggregation and altered cell proteostasis.

  17. Nuclear chemistry. Synthesis and detection of a seaborgium carbonyl complex.

    PubMed

    Even, J; Yakushev, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Haba, H; Asai, M; Sato, T K; Brand, H; Di Nitto, A; Eichler, R; Fan, F L; Hartmann, W; Huang, M; Jäger, E; Kaji, D; Kanaya, J; Kaneya, Y; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kindler, B; Kratz, J V; Krier, J; Kudou, Y; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Miyashita, S; Morimoto, K; Morita, K; Murakami, M; Nagame, Y; Nitsche, H; Ooe, K; Qin, Z; Schädel, M; Steiner, J; Sumita, T; Takeyama, M; Tanaka, K; Toyoshima, A; Tsukada, K; Türler, A; Usoltsev, I; Wakabayashi, Y; Wang, Y; Wiehl, N; Yamaki, S

    2014-09-19

    Experimental investigations of transactinoide elements provide benchmark results for chemical theory and probe the predictive power of trends in the periodic table. So far, in gas-phase chemical reactions, simple inorganic compounds with the transactinoide in its highest oxidation state have been synthesized. Single-atom production rates, short half-lives, and harsh experimental conditions limited the number of experimentally accessible compounds. We applied a gas-phase carbonylation technique previously tested on short-lived molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) isotopes to the preparation of a carbonyl complex of seaborgium, the 106th element. The volatile seaborgium complex showed the same volatility and reactivity with a silicon dioxide surface as those of the hexacarbonyl complexes of the lighter homologs Mo and W. Comparison of the product's adsorption enthalpy with theoretical predictions and data for the lighter congeners supported a Sg(CO)6 formulation.

  18. Nuclear chemistry. Synthesis and detection of a seaborgium carbonyl complex.

    PubMed

    Even, J; Yakushev, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Haba, H; Asai, M; Sato, T K; Brand, H; Di Nitto, A; Eichler, R; Fan, F L; Hartmann, W; Huang, M; Jäger, E; Kaji, D; Kanaya, J; Kaneya, Y; Khuyagbaatar, J; Kindler, B; Kratz, J V; Krier, J; Kudou, Y; Kurz, N; Lommel, B; Miyashita, S; Morimoto, K; Morita, K; Murakami, M; Nagame, Y; Nitsche, H; Ooe, K; Qin, Z; Schädel, M; Steiner, J; Sumita, T; Takeyama, M; Tanaka, K; Toyoshima, A; Tsukada, K; Türler, A; Usoltsev, I; Wakabayashi, Y; Wang, Y; Wiehl, N; Yamaki, S

    2014-09-19

    Experimental investigations of transactinoide elements provide benchmark results for chemical theory and probe the predictive power of trends in the periodic table. So far, in gas-phase chemical reactions, simple inorganic compounds with the transactinoide in its highest oxidation state have been synthesized. Single-atom production rates, short half-lives, and harsh experimental conditions limited the number of experimentally accessible compounds. We applied a gas-phase carbonylation technique previously tested on short-lived molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) isotopes to the preparation of a carbonyl complex of seaborgium, the 106th element. The volatile seaborgium complex showed the same volatility and reactivity with a silicon dioxide surface as those of the hexacarbonyl complexes of the lighter homologs Mo and W. Comparison of the product's adsorption enthalpy with theoretical predictions and data for the lighter congeners supported a Sg(CO)6 formulation. PMID:25237098

  19. Role of Carbonyl Modifications on Aging-Associated Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Maya; Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C.; Huang, Liling; Morozova, Kateryna; Follo, Carlo; Goldberg, Michael; Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common biological phenomenon, observed in different physiological and pathological conditions. Decreased protein solubility and a tendency to aggregate is also observed during physiological aging but the causes are currently unknown. Herein we performed a biophysical separation of aging-related high molecular weight aggregates, isolated from the bone marrow and splenic cells of aging mice and followed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis. The analysis indicated that compared to younger mice an increase in protein post-translational carbonylation was observed. The causative role of these modifications in inducing protein misfolding and aggregation was determined by inducing carbonyl stress in young mice, which recapitulated the increased protein aggregation observed in old mice. Altogether our analysis indicates that oxidative stress-related post-translational modifications accumulate in the aging proteome and are responsible for increased protein aggregation and altered cell proteostasis. PMID:26776680

  20. Metal Carbonyl-Hydrosilane Reactions and Hydrosilation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, A. R.

    2001-04-14

    Manganese carbonyl complexes serve as hydrosilation precatalysts for selectively transforming a carbonyl group into a siloxy methylene or a fully reduced methylene group. Substrates of interest include (1) aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, silyl esters, and esters, and (2) their organometallic acyl counterparts. Three relevant catalytic reactions are shown. Two types of manganese precatalysts have been reported: (a) alkyl and acyl complexes (L)(C0){sub 4}MnR [L = CO, PPh{sub 3}; R = COCH{sub 3}, COPh, CH{sub 3}] and (b) halides (CO){sub 5}MnX and [(CO){sub 4}MnX]{sub 2} (X = Br, I). The former promote hydrosilation and deoxygenation catalysis; the latter promote dehydrogenative silation of alcohols and carboxylic acids as well as hydrosilation and deoxygenation of some metallocarboxylic acid derivatives. In every case studied, these Mn precatalysts are far more reactive or selective than traditional Rh(I) precatalysts.

  1. [Carbonyl stress and oxidatively modified proteins in chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Bargnoux, A-S; Morena, M; Badiou, S; Dupuy, A-M; Canaud, B; Cristol, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly observed in chronic renal failure patients resulting from an unbalance between overproduction of reactive oxygen species and impairement of defense mechanisms. Proteins appear as potential targets of uremia-induced oxidative stress and may undergo qualitative modifications. Proteins could be directly modified by reactive oxygen species which leads to amino acid oxydation and cross-linking. Proteins could be indirectly modified by reactive carbonyl compounds produced by glycoxidation and lipo-peroxidation. The resulting post-traductional modifications are known as carbonyl stress. In addition, thiols could be oxidized or could react with homocystein leading to homocysteinylation. Finally, tyrosin could be oxidized by myeloperoxidase leading to advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP). Oxidatively modified proteins are increased in chronic renal failure patients and may contribute to exacerbate the oxidative stress/inflammation syndrome. They have been involved in long term complications of uremia such as amyloidosis and accelerated atherosclerosis. PMID:19297289

  2. Round Robin analysis of alcolol and carbonyl synthetic exhaust samples

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.L.; Biller, W.F.; Tejada, S.B.; Siegl, W.O.; Jensen, T.E.

    1994-07-25

    Recent changes in regulatory practices have brought about a need for speciated analysis of the volatile organic components of vehicle exhaust. The purpose of the study was to allow interested laboratories to participate in a Round Robin so that each could assess their speciation methodologies. 'Synthetic exhaust' samples were prepared of mixed DN-carbonyl standards deposited on DNPH-coated cartridges, and solutions of alcohol in water. The fifteen participating laboratories included automotive, contract, petroleum, and regulatory organizations. The results described in this paper consider only variability asociated with the analytical measurement of the samples that have already been collected in impingers or on cartridges. In general, alochols (methanol and ethanol) were quantified without difficulty. With the exception of acrolein and crotonaldehyde, the quantitation of the carbonyl samples was fairly good considering the variety of analytical methods that were employed.

  3. Round robin analysis of alcohol and carbonyl synthetic exhaust samples

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.L.; Biller, W.F.; Tejada, S.B.; Siegl, W.O.; Rosenhamer, D.; Newkirk, M.S.; Crowley, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    Recent changes in regulatory practices have brought about a need for speciated analysis of the volatile organic components of vehicle exhaust. The purpose of this study was to allow interested laboratories to participate in a Round Robin so that each could assess their speciation methodologies. `Synthetic exhaust` samples were prepared of mixed DNPH-carbonyl standards deposited on DNPH cartridges, and solutions of alcohol in water. The fifteen participating laboratories included automotive, contract, petroleum and regulatory organizations. The results described in this paper consider only variability associated with the analyltical measurement of samples that have already been collected in impingers or on cartridges. In general, alcohols (methanol and ethanol) were quantified without difficulty. With the exception of acrolein and crotonaldehyde, the quantitation of the carbonyl samples was very good considering the variety of analytical methods that were used. 9 refs., 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. Hydrogenation of coal liquid utilizing a metal carbonyl catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Feder, Harold M.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    1979-01-01

    Coal liquid having a dissolved transition metal, catalyst as a carbonyl complex such as Co.sub.2 (CO.sub.8) is hydrogenated with hydrogen gas or a hydrogen donor. A dissociating solvent contacts the coal liquid during hydrogenation to form an immiscible liquid mixture at a high carbon monoxide pressure. The dissociating solvent, e.g. ethylene glycol, is of moderate coordinating ability, while sufficiently polar to solvate the transition metal as a complex cation along with a transition metal, carbonyl anion in solution at a decreased carbon monoxide pressure. The carbon monoxide pressure is reduced and the liquids are separated to recover the hydrogenated coal liquid as product. The dissociating solvent with the catalyst in ionized form is recycled to the hydrogenation step at the elevated carbon monoxide pressure for reforming the catalyst complex within fresh coal liquid.

  5. Synthetic and mechanistic aspects of titanium-mediated carbonyl olefinations

    SciTech Connect

    Petasis, N.A.; Staszewski, J.P.; Hu, Yong-Han; Lu, Shao-Po

    1995-12-31

    A new method for the olefination of carbonyl compounds with dimethyl titanocene, and other related bishydrocarbyl titanocene derivatives has been recently developed in the author`s laboratories. This process is experimentally convenient and works with various types of carbonyl compounds, including aldehydes, ketones, esters, lactones, carbonates, anhydrides, amides, imides, lactams, thioesters, selenoesters, and acylsilanes. More recent studies have focused on the scope and utility of this reaction, including mechanistic studies and synthetic applications. In addition to varying the reaction conditions, the authors have examined several mixed titanocene derivatives and have found ways for carrying out this type of olefination at room temperature, such as the use of tris(trimethylsilyl) titanacyclobutene. The authors have also employed this reaction in the modification of carbohydrates and cyclobutenediones. This olefination was also followed-up with subsequent transformations to produce carbocycles and heterocycles, including tetrahydrofurans and tetrahydropyrans.

  6. The modulation of carbonyl reductase 1 by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Boušová, Iva; Skálová, Lenka; Souček, Pavel; Matoušková, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1), an enzyme belonging to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family, has been detected in all human tissues. CBR1 catalyzes the reduction of many xenobiotics, including important drugs (e.g. anthracyclines, nabumetone, bupropion, dolasetron) and harmful carbonyls and quinones. Moreover, it participates in the metabolism of a number of endogenous compounds and it may play a role in certain pathologies. Plant polyphenols are not only present in many human food sources, but are also a component of many popular dietary supplements and herbal medicines. Many studies reviewed herein have demonstrated the potency of certain flavonoids, stilbenes and curcuminoids in the inhibition of the activity of CBR1. Interactions of these polyphenols with transcriptional factors, which regulate CBR1 expression, have also been reported in several studies. As CBR1 plays an important role in drug metabolism as well as in the protection of the organism against potentially harmful carbonyls, the modulation of its expression/activity may have significant pharmacological and/or toxicological consequences. Some polyphenols (e.g. luteolin, apigenin and curcumin) have been shown to be very potent CBR1 inhibitors. The inhibition of CBR1 seems useful regarding the increased efficacy of anthracycline therapy, but it may cause the worse detoxification of reactive carbonyls. Nevertheless, all known information about the interactions of polyphenols with CBR1 have only been based on the results of in vitro studies. With respect to the high importance of CBR1 and the frequent consumption of polyphenols, in vivo studies would be very helpful for the evaluation of risks/benefits of polyphenol interactions with CBR1.

  7. Strongly driven quantum pendulum of the carbonyl sulfide molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trippel, Sebastian; Mullins, Terry; Müller, Nele L. M.; Kienitz, Jens S.; Omiste, Juan J.; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; González-Férez, Rosario; Küpper, Jochen

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate and analyze a strongly driven quantum pendulum in the angular motion of state-selected and laser-aligned carbonyl sulfide molecules. Raman couplings during the rising edge of a 50-ps laser pulse create a wave packet of pendular states, which propagates in the confining potential formed by the polarizability interaction between the molecule and the laser field. This wave-packet dynamics manifests itself as pronounced oscillations in the degree of alignment with a laser-intensity-dependent period.

  8. Cyanide binding to human plasma heme-hemopexin: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Leboffe, Loris; Polticelli, Fabio

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanide binding to ferric HHPX-heme-Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanide binding to ferrous HHPX-heme-Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dithionite-mediated reduction of ferric HHPX-heme-Fe-cyanide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanide binding to HHPX-heme-Fe is limited by ligand deprotonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanide dissociation from HHPX-heme-Fe-cyanide is limited by ligand protonation. -- Abstract: Hemopexin (HPX) displays a pivotal role in heme scavenging and delivery to the liver. In turn, heme-Fe-hemopexin (HPX-heme-Fe) displays heme-based spectroscopic and reactivity properties. Here, kinetics and thermodynamics of cyanide binding to ferric and ferrous hexa-coordinate human plasma HPX-heme-Fe (HHPX-heme-Fe(III) and HHPX-heme-Fe(II), respectively), and for the dithionite-mediated reduction of the HHPX-heme-Fe(III)-cyanide complex, at pH 7.4 and 20.0 Degree-Sign C, are reported. Values of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for cyanide binding to HHPX-heme-Fe(III) and HHPX-heme-Fe(II) are K = (4.1 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M, k{sub on} = (6.9 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 1} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and k{sub off} = 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}; and H = (6 {+-} 1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -1} M, h{sub on} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -1} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and h{sub off} = (7.1 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, respectively. The value of the rate constant for the dithionite-mediated reduction of the HHPX-heme-Fe(III)-cyanide complex is l = 8.9 {+-} 0.8 M{sup -1/2} s{sup -1}. HHPX-heme-Fe reactivity is modulated by proton acceptor/donor amino acid residue(s) (e.g., His236) assisting the deprotonation and protonation of the incoming and outgoing ligand, respectively.

  9. Iron(III)-catalysed carbonyl-olefin metathesis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Jacob R; Zimmerman, Paul M; Gianino, Joseph B; Schindler, Corinna S

    2016-04-27

    The olefin metathesis reaction of two unsaturated substrates is one of the most powerful carbon-carbon-bond-forming reactions in organic chemistry. Specifically, the catalytic olefin metathesis reaction has led to profound developments in the synthesis of molecules relevant to the petroleum, materials, agricultural and pharmaceutical industries. These reactions are characterized by their use of discrete metal alkylidene catalysts that operate via a well-established mechanism. While the corresponding carbonyl-olefin metathesis reaction can also be used to construct carbon-carbon bonds, currently available methods are scarce and severely hampered by either harsh reaction conditions or the required use of stoichiometric transition metals as reagents. To date, no general protocol for catalytic carbonyl-olefin metathesis has been reported. Here we demonstrate a catalytic carbonyl-olefin ring-closing metathesis reaction that uses iron, an Earth-abundant and environmentally benign transition metal, as a catalyst. This transformation accommodates a variety of substrates and is distinguished by its operational simplicity, mild reaction conditions, high functional-group tolerance, and amenability to gram-scale synthesis. We anticipate that these characteristics, coupled with the efficiency of this reaction, will allow for further advances in areas that have historically been enhanced by olefin metathesis.

  10. Iron(III)-catalysed carbonyl-olefin metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, Jacob R.; Zimmerman, Paul M.; Gianino, Joseph B.; Schindler, Corinna S.

    2016-05-01

    The olefin metathesis reaction of two unsaturated substrates is one of the most powerful carbon-carbon-bond-forming reactions in organic chemistry. Specifically, the catalytic olefin metathesis reaction has led to profound developments in the synthesis of molecules relevant to the petroleum, materials, agricultural and pharmaceutical industries. These reactions are characterized by their use of discrete metal alkylidene catalysts that operate via a well-established mechanism. While the corresponding carbonyl-olefin metathesis reaction can also be used to construct carbon-carbon bonds, currently available methods are scarce and severely hampered by either harsh reaction conditions or the required use of stoichiometric transition metals as reagents. To date, no general protocol for catalytic carbonyl-olefin metathesis has been reported. Here we demonstrate a catalytic carbonyl-olefin ring-closing metathesis reaction that uses iron, an Earth-abundant and environmentally benign transition metal, as a catalyst. This transformation accommodates a variety of substrates and is distinguished by its operational simplicity, mild reaction conditions, high functional-group tolerance, and amenability to gram-scale synthesis. We anticipate that these characteristics, coupled with the efficiency of this reaction, will allow for further advances in areas that have historically been enhanced by olefin metathesis.

  11. Method for determination of some soluble atmospheric carbonyl compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.N.; Zhou, X. )

    1993-04-01

    A technique was developed for the measurement of soluble atmospheric carbonyl compounds, which uses a pyrex coil gas-liquid scrubber sampler in conjunction with a high-performance liquid chromatograph equipped with a UV-visible detector for separation and identification following derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Carbonyls exhibiting a Henry's law solubility similar to or greater than that of formaldehyde (FA) can be determined by this method; these include FA, glycolaldehyde (GA), glyoxal (GL), and methylglyoxal (MG). Based on liquid standards and field-developed chromatographic characteristics, the limits of detection are about 0.005 ppb (in the gas phase) for MG, about 0.01 ppb for GL, and about 0.02 ppb for FA and GA. Because of the short air-liquid contact time in the coil sampler (smaller than 10 s), interferences from aqueous-phase reactions of ozone are insignificant. Also, at the low pH of the scrubbing solution, interference resulting from reactions of carbonyls with S(IV) is unimportant. 43 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Iron(III)-catalysed carbonyl-olefin metathesis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Jacob R; Zimmerman, Paul M; Gianino, Joseph B; Schindler, Corinna S

    2016-05-19

    The olefin metathesis reaction of two unsaturated substrates is one of the most powerful carbon-carbon-bond-forming reactions in organic chemistry. Specifically, the catalytic olefin metathesis reaction has led to profound developments in the synthesis of molecules relevant to the petroleum, materials, agricultural and pharmaceutical industries. These reactions are characterized by their use of discrete metal alkylidene catalysts that operate via a well-established mechanism. While the corresponding carbonyl-olefin metathesis reaction can also be used to construct carbon-carbon bonds, currently available methods are scarce and severely hampered by either harsh reaction conditions or the required use of stoichiometric transition metals as reagents. To date, no general protocol for catalytic carbonyl-olefin metathesis has been reported. Here we demonstrate a catalytic carbonyl-olefin ring-closing metathesis reaction that uses iron, an Earth-abundant and environmentally benign transition metal, as a catalyst. This transformation accommodates a variety of substrates and is distinguished by its operational simplicity, mild reaction conditions, high functional-group tolerance, and amenability to gram-scale synthesis. We anticipate that these characteristics, coupled with the efficiency of this reaction, will allow for further advances in areas that have historically been enhanced by olefin metathesis. PMID:27120158

  13. Fate of process solution cyanide and nitrate at three nevada gold mines inferred from stable carbon and nitrogen isotope measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.; Grimes, D.J.; Rye, R.O.

    2000-01-01

    Stable isotope methods have been used to identify the mechanisms responsible for cyanide consumption at three heap-leach operations that process Carlin-type gold ores in Nevada, U.S.A. The reagent cyanide had ??15N values ranging from -5 to -2??? and ??13C values from -60 to -35???. The wide ??13C range reflects the use by different suppliers of isotopically distinct natural-gas feedstocks and indicates that isotopes may be useful in environmental studies where there is a need to trace cyanide sources. In heap-leach circuits displaying from 5 to 98% consumption of cyanide, barren-solution and pregnant-solution cyanide were isotopically indistinguishable. The similarity is inconsistent with cyanide loss predominantly by HCN offgassing (a process that in laboratory experiments caused substantial isotopic changes), but it is consistent with cyanide retention within the heaps as solids, a process that caused minimal isotopic changes in laboratory simulations, or with cyanide oxidation, which also appears to cause minimal changes. In many pregnant solutions cyanide was carried entirely as metal complexes, which is consistent with ferrocyanides having precipitated or cyanocomplexes having been adsorbed within the heaps. It is inferred that gaseous cyanide emissions from operations of this type are less important than has generally been thought and that the dissolution or desorption kinetics of solid species is an important control on cyanide elution when the spent heaps undergo rinsing. Nitrate, nitrite and ammonium had ??15N values of 1-16???. The data reflect isotopic fractionation during ammonia offgassing or denitrification of nitrate - particularly in reclaim ponds - but do not indicate the extent to which nitrate is derived from cyanide or from explosive residues. ?? The Institution of Mining and Metallurgy 2000.

  14. 40 CFR 721.10409 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha.-[[[methyl-3-[[[(polyfluoroalkyl)oxy]carbonyl] amino]phenyl]amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha...(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha.- carbonyl] amino]phenyl]amino]carbonyl]- .omega.-methoxy-(generic). (a) Chemical... as poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha.- carbonyl]amino]phenyl]amino] carbonyl]-.omega.-methoxy- (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10409 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha.-[[[methyl-3-[[[(polyfluoroalkyl) oxy]carbonyl]amino]phenyl]amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha...(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha.- carbonyl]amino]phenyl]amino] carbonyl]-.omega.-methoxy- (generic). (a) Chemical... as poly(oxyalkylenediyl), .alpha.- carbonyl]amino]phenyl]amino] carbonyl]-.omega.-methoxy- (PMN...

  16. Selective electrowinning of silver and gold from cyanide process solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Nehl, F.H.; Murphy, J.E.; Atkinson, G.B.; Walters, L.A.

    1993-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines investigated the selective electrowinning of Ag and Au from cyanide solutions contaminated with Cu, with the goal of decreasing the amount of Cu codeposited. Decreasing Cu codeposited will reduce refinery costs. Direct current was applied to the cell in pulsed and square wave voltages at 0.70 A [center dot] h per 150 mL of solution. Times tested for each cycle ranged from 1 to 100,000 ms. Graphite, lead, and stainless steel were evaluated as electrode materials. Square wave electrowinning at 70 C gave the best separation of Ag and Au from Cu. Applying 2.5 V during the duty cycle, 0.0 V the rest of the period, a duty cycle to 10 to 30%, and a period of 100 to 1,000 ms gave the following results: Ag concentrations decreased from 34 to 0.1 [mu]g/mL, Au concentrations decreased from 54 to 0.2 [mu]g/mL, and Cu concentrations remained almost constant at 560 [mu]g/mL.

  17. Cyanide conversion to thiocyanate by 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST)

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, S.I.; Wing, D.A.; Kirby, S.D.

    1990-02-26

    Cyanide (CN) metabolism by MPST may detoxify CN to its less harmful product thiocyanate (SCN). In addition, MPST displays greater activity than rhodanese in extramitochondrial sites and in other organs which may play an important role in CN's toxicity. A 3% (W/V) homogenate of bovine kidney MPST was prepared. It was assayed using CN and mercaptopyruvate. The buffered (pH 9.5) suspension was incubated for 10 minutes. The reaction was stopped with 38% formaldehyde containing 20% ferric nitrate in nitric acid and measured at 460 nm. Phosphate buffer decreased the apparent rate of conversion of CN to SCN by 90% compared with glycine, borate, or bistris propane buffers. Hypotaurine and propanethiosulfate, but not taurine or thiomallic acid, increased the activity of MPST in a dose-related manner; e.g., hypotaurine, 0.1, 1 and 10 mmole, increased MPST indicates that several compounds increase the rate of formation of SCN from CN and may provide a potential new class of antidotes against the toxicity of CN.

  18. Transport of cyanide into guinea pig cardiac mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wisler, J A; Dulaney, M D; Pellicore, L S; Lenz, D E

    1991-05-01

    The transport of cyanide (CN) into cells has been presumed to be by passive diffusion. Recently, there have been reports that CN, in the form of an anion, may enter the cell by active or facilitated transport. To characterize the mechanism(s) and kinetics of CN movement across the cell membrane, we measured the rate of 14CN (Na salt) uptake into guinea-pig mitochondria. Initial velocities of CN movement into mitochondria were determined at time points ranging from 10-100 msec and at CN concentrations ranging from 1 microM-10 mM using a rapid filtration device. A Hofstee plot of the data suggests that an active or facilitated transport predominates at lower CN concentrations (less than 10 microM), whereas passive diffusion of CN predominates at higher CN concentrations. The kinetic constants for the active phase transport were Jmax = 0.9 pmol/ms and Kt = 14 microM. These results suggest that a large portion of CN movement across the cell membrane is due to an active or facilitated transport phenomenon.

  19. Hydrogen cyanide exhaust emissions from in-use motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Baum, Marc M; Moss, John A; Pastel, Stephen H; Poskrebyshev, Gregory A

    2007-02-01

    Motor vehicle exhaust emissions are known to contain hydrogen cyanide (HCN), but emission rate data are scarce and, in the case of idling vehicles, date back over 20 years. For the first time, vehicular HCN exhaust emissions from a modern, in-use fleet at idle have been measured. The 14 tested light duty motor vehicles were operating at idle as these conditions are associated with the highest risk exposure scenarios (i.e., enclosed spaces). Vehicular HCN was detected in 89% of the sampled exhaust streams and did not correlate with instantaneous air-fuel-ratio or with any single, coemitted pollutant. However, a moderate correlation between HCN emissions and the product of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide emissions was observed under cold-start conditions. Fleet average, cold-start, undiluted HCN emissions were 105 +/- 97 ppbV (maximum: 278 ppbV), whereas corresponding emissions from vehicles operating under stabilized conditions were 79 +/- 71 ppbV (maximum: 245 ppbV); mean idle fleet HCN emission rates were 39 +/- 35 and 21 +/- 18 microg-min(-1) for cold-start and stabilized vehicles, respectively. The significance of these results is discussed in terms of HCN emissions inventories in the South Coast Air Basin of California and of health risks due to exposure to vehicular HCN.

  20. Physical and chemical transformations of sodium cyanide at high pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing-Yin; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2009-12-01

    Pressure-induced physical and chemical transformations of sodium cyanide (NaCN) have been studied up to 50 GPa in diamond-anvil cells, using micro-Raman spectroscopy and angle-resolved synchrotron x-ray diffraction. We observe three phase transitions in this pressure range: NaCN-IIA (orthorhombic, Immm), to NaCN-IIB (orthorhombic, Pmmn) at 4 GPa, to NaCN-III (monoclinic, Cm) at 8 GPa, and to NaCN-IV (tetragonal, P4mm) at 15 GPa, which is stable to 25 GPa. At higher pressures, NaCN-IV undergoes an irreversible chemical change, which occurs over a large pressure range between 25 and 34 GPa. The new material exhibits a broad yet strong Raman band at around 1550 cm{sup -1}, indicating the formation of C = N bonds in a similar configuration of carbon graphite. The absence of sharp diffraction lines in this material suggests an amorphous nature of CN polymer products.

  1. Lactoperoxidase catalyzes in vitro activation of acrylonitrile to cyanide.

    PubMed

    Nasralla, Sherry N; Ghoneim, Asser I; Khalifa, Amani E; Gad, Mohamed Z; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2009-12-15

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used industrial chemical. Although it is a well reported animal carcinogen, its current designation to humans is "possibly carcinogenic". The present study aimed at investigating the ability of LPO enzyme system to oxidize ACN to cyanide (CN(-)) in vitro. Detection of CN(-) served as a marker for the possible generation of free radical intermediates implicated in ACN induced toxicity in the activation process. Optimum conditions for the oxidation of ACN to CN(-) were characterized with respect to pH, temperature and time of incubation as well as ACN, LPO and H(2)O(2) concentrations in incubation mixtures. Maximum reaction velocity (V(max)) and Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) were assessed. Addition of nitrite (NO(2)(-)) salts to the reaction mixtures significantly enhanced the rate of the reaction. Free radical scavengers (quercetin and trolox C), LPO enzyme inhibitor (resorcinol) and competitors for LPO binding (sodium azide and indomethacin) were found to reduce the rate of CN(-) production. Inclusion of the sulfhydryl compounds glutathione (GSH), NAC (N-acetylcysteine), D-penicillamine or L-cysteine enhanced the rate of ACN oxidation. The present results demonstrate the ability of LPO enzyme system to oxidize ACN to CN(-) and provide insight for the elucidation of ACN chronic toxicity.

  2. Changes in zooxanthellae density, morphology, and mitotic index in hermatypic corals and anemones exposed to cyanide.

    PubMed

    Cervino, J M; Hayes, R L; Honovich, M; Goreau, T J; Jones, S; Rubec, P J

    2003-05-01

    Sodium cyanide (NaCN) is widely used for the capture of reef fish throughout Southeast Asia and causes extensive fish mortality, but the effect of NaCN on reef corals remains debated. To document the impact of cyanide exposure on corals, the species Acropora millepora, Goniopora sp., Favites abdita, Trachyphyllia geoffrio, Plerogyra sp., Heliofungia actinformis, Euphyllia divisa, and Scarophyton sp., and the sea anemone Aiptasia pallida were exposed to varying concentrations of cyanide for varying time periods. Corals were exposed to 50, 100, 300, and 600 mg/l of cyanide ion (CN(-)) for 1-2 min (in seawater, the CN(-) forms hydrocyanic acid). These concentrations are much lower than those reportedly used by fish collectors. Exposed corals and anemones immediately retracted their tentacles and mesenterial filaments, and discharged copious amounts of mucus containing zooxanthellae. Gel electrophoreses techniques found changes in protein expression in both zooxanthellae and host tissue. Corals and anemones exposed to cyanide showed an immediate increase in mitotic cell division of their zooxenthellae, and a decrease in zooxanthellae density. In contrast, zooxanthellae cell division and density remained constant in controls. Histopathological changes included gastrodermal disruption, mesogleal degradation, and increased mucus in coral tissues. Zooxanthellae showed pigment loss, swelling, and deformation. Mortality occurred at all exposure levels. Exposed specimens experienced an increase in the ratio of gram-negative to gram-positive bacteria on the coral surface. The results demonstrate that exposure cyanide causes mortality to corals and anemones, even when applied at lower levels than that used by fish collectors. Even brief exposure to cyanide caused slow-acting and long-term damage to corals and their zooxanthellae. PMID:12735955

  3. Retardation of iron-cyanide complexes in the soil of a former manufactured gas plant site.

    PubMed

    Sut, Magdalena; Repmann, Frank; Raab, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The soil in the vicinities of former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites is commonly contaminated with iron-cyanide complexes (ferric ferrocyanide). The phenomenon of cyanide mobility in soil, according to the literature, is mainly governed by the dissolution and precipitation of ferric ferrocyanide, which is only slightly soluble (<1 mg L(-1)) under acidic conditions. In this paper, retention properties of the sandy loam soil and the potential vertical movement of the solid iron-cyanide complexes, co-existing with the dissolution, sorption and precipitation reactions were investigated. Preliminary research conducted on a former MGP site implied colloidal transport of ferric ferricyanide from the initial deposition in the wastes layer towards the sandy loam material (secondary accumulation), which possibly retarded the mobility of cyanide (CN). A series of batch and column experiments were applied in order to investigate the retardation of iron-cyanide complexes by the sandy loam soil. Batch experiments revealed that in circumneutral pH conditions sandy loam material decreases the potassium ferro- and ferricyanide concentration. In column experiments a minor reduction in CN concentration was observed prior to addition of iron sulfide (FeS) layer, which induced the formation of the Prussian blue colloids in circumneutral pH conditions. Precipitated solid iron-cyanide complexes were mechanically filtered by the coherent structure of the investigated soil. Additionally, the reduction of the CN concentration of the percolation solutions by the sandy loam soil was presumably induced due to the formation of potassium manganese iron-cyanide (K2Mn[Fe(CN)6]).

  4. Interresidue carbonyl-carbonyl polarization transfer experiments in uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled peptides and proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janik, Rafal; Ritz, Emily; Gravelle, Andrew; Shi, Lichi; Peng, Xiaohu; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that Homonuclear Rotary Resonance Recoupling (HORROR) can be used to reintroduce carbonyl-carbonyl interresidue dipolar interactions and to achieve efficient polarization transfer between carbonyl atoms in uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled peptides and proteins. We show that the HORROR condition is anisotropically broadened and overall shifted to higher radio frequency intensities because of the CSA effects. These effects are analyzed theoretically using Average Hamiltonian Theory. At spinning frequencies used in this study, 22 kHz, this broadening is experimentally found to be on the order of a kilohertz at a proton field of 600 MHz. To match HORROR condition over all powder orientations, variable amplitude radio frequency (RF) fields are required, and efficient direct transfers on the order of 20-30% can be straightforwardly established. Two- and three-dimensional chemical shift correlation experiments establishing long-range interresidue connectivities (e.g., (N[i]-CO[i - 2])) are demonstrated on the model peptide N-acetyl-valine-leucine, and on the third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G. Possible future developments are discussed.

  5. Interresidue carbonyl-carbonyl polarization transfer experiments in uniformly 13C,15N-labeled peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Janik, Rafal; Ritz, Emily; Gravelle, Andrew; Shi, Lichi; Peng, Xiaohu; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that Homonuclear Rotary Resonance Recoupling (HORROR) can be used to reintroduce carbonyl-carbonyl interresidue dipolar interactions and to achieve efficient polarization transfer between carbonyl atoms in uniformly (13)C,(15)N-labeled peptides and proteins. We show that the HORROR condition is anisotropically broadened and overall shifted to higher radio frequency intensities because of the CSA effects. These effects are analyzed theoretically using Average Hamiltonian Theory. At spinning frequencies used in this study, 22kHz, this broadening is experimentally found to be on the order of a kilohertz at a proton field of 600MHz. To match HORROR condition over all powder orientations, variable amplitude radio frequency (RF) fields are required, and efficient direct transfers on the order of 20-30% can be straightforwardly established. Two- and three-dimensional chemical shift correlation experiments establishing long-range interresidue connectivities (e.g., (N[i]-CO[i-2])) are demonstrated on the model peptide N-acetyl-valine-leucine, and on the third immunoglobulin binding domain of protein G. Possible future developments are discussed. PMID:20060344

  6. Ambient levels of carbonyl compounds and their sources in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yanli; Wen, Sheng; Chen, Yingjun; Wang, Xinming; Lü, Huixiong; Bi, Xinhui; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    Ambient levels of carbonyl compounds and their possible sources, vehicular exhaust and cooking exhaust, were studied at seven places in Guangzhou, including five districts (a residential area, an industrial area, a botanical garden, a downtown area and a semi-rural area), a bus station and a restaurant during the period of June-September 2003. Nineteen carbonyl compounds were identified in the ambient air, of which acetone was the most abundant carbonyl, followed by formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Only little changes were found in carbonyl concentration levels in the five different districts because of their dispersion and mixture in the atmosphere in summer. The lower correlations between the carbonyls' concentrations might result from the mixture of carbonyls derived from different sources, including strong photochemical reactions at noon in summer. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were the main carbonyls in bus station, while straight-chain carbonyls were comparatively abundant in cooking exhaust. Besides vehicular exhaust, cooking might be another major source of carbonyl compounds in Guangzhou City, especially for high molecular weight carbonyls.

  7. [Chemical Characteristics and Sources of Atmospheric Carbonyls During the 2014 Beijing APEC].

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-lang; Tan, Ji-hua; Guo, Song-jun; Ma, Yong-liang; He, Ke-bin

    2016-03-15

    Pollution characteristic and variation trend of atmospheric carbonyls were investigated in November during the 2014 Beijing APEC. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone were the dominant carbonyls, accounting for 82.66% of total carbonyls, and especially, formaldehyde accounted for 40.12% of total carbonyls. Atmospheric concentrations of total carbonyls decreased by around 64.10% after the clean air policy was carried out during the Beijing APEC, and the variation trend of carbonyls showed a similar pattern to those of other pollutants like PM₂.₅ during the APEC. Strong correlations (R² of 0.67-0.98) were observed among formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone and total carbonyls during and after the APEC, indicating that they had similar sources; however, poor correlations (R² of -0.11-0.42 and 0.16-0.94, respectively) were observed before the APEC, implying different emission sources for ambient carbonyls. The calculated ratios of C1/C2, C2/C3 and OC/EC indicated that both vehicles and coal emissions were responsible for atmospheric carbonyls before the APEC, and emissions from coal burning were the major contributor to atmospheric carbonyls during and after the APEC, especially after the APEC. PMID:27337869

  8. On-road measurement of carbonyls in California light-duty vehicle emissions.

    PubMed

    Kean, A J; Grosjean, E; Grosjean, D; Harley, R A

    2001-11-01

    Emissions of carbonyls by motor vehicles are of concern because these species can be hazardous to human health and highly reactive in the atmosphere. The objective of this research was to measure carbonyl emission factors for California light-duty motor vehicles. Measurements were made at the entrance and exit of a San Francisco Bay area highway tunnel, in the center bore where heavy-duty trucks are not allowed. During summer 1999, approximately 100 carbonyls were identified, including saturated aliphatic aldehydes and ketones, unsaturated aliphatic carbonyls, aliphatic dicarbonyls, and aromatic carbonyls. Concentrations were measured for 32 carbonyls and were combined with NMOC, CO, and CO2 concentrations to calculate by carbon balance emission factors per unit of fuel burned. The measured carbonyl mass emitted from light-duty vehicles was 68 +/- 4 mg L(-1). Formaldehyde accounted for 45% of the measured mass emissions, acetaldehyde 12%, tolualdehydes 10%, benzaldehyde 7.2%, and acetone 5.9%. The ozone forming potential of the carbonyl emissions was dominated by formaldehyde (70%) and acetaldehyde (14%). Between 1994 and 1999, emission factors measured at the same tunnel for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and benzaldehyde decreased by 45-70%. Carbonyls constituted 3.9% of total NMOC mass emissions and 5.2% of NMOC reactivity. A comparison of carbonyl emissions with gasoline composition supports previous findings that aromatic aldehyde emissions are related to aromatics in gasoline. Carbonyl concentrations in liquid gasoline were also measured. Acetone and MEK were the most abundant carbonyls in unburned gasoline; eight other carbonyls were detected and quantified.

  9. Molecular Structures of Sulfur Cyanide Trifluoride, SF(3)CN, and Sulfinyl Cyanide Fluoride, FS(O)CN.

    PubMed

    Mack, Hans-Georg; Oberhammer, Heinz; Jacobs, Jürgen; Kronberg, Marc; Willner, Helge

    1996-02-14

    General valence force fields for SF(3)CN and FS(O)CN are derived from vibrational data taken from the literature and from theoretical calculations. Gas phase electron diffraction studies on both molecules yield the following geometric parameters (r(a) distances and angles with 3sigma uncertainties). SF(3)CN: r(S-F(e)) = 155.2(4) r(S-F(a)) = 165.7(3), r(S-C) = 173.6(8), r(C&tbd1;N) = 115.9(4) pm; angle(F(a)SF(e)) = 86.9(3), angle(F(a)SC) = 86.0(4) angle(F(e)SC) = 98.7(8), angle(F(a)SF(a)) = 169.0(6), angle(SCN) = 171(4) degrees. FS(O)CN: r(S-F) = 159.8(3), r(S=O) = 143.2(2), r(S-C) = 178.3(3), r(C&tbd1;N) = 115.0(3) pm; angle(FSO) = 104.9(4), angle(FSC) = 93.9(4), angle(CSO) = 105.3(5), angle(SCN) = 176(4) degrees. These experimental results are compared to ab initio values (HF/3-21G, HF/6-31G, and MP2/6-31G), and the bonding properties in these sulfur (IV) cyanides are discussed.

  10. Vertical movement of iron-cyanide complexes in soils of a former Manufactured Gas Plant site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sut, Magdalena; Repmann, Frank; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In Germany, soil and groundwater at more than a thousand sites are contaminated with iron-cyanide complexes. These contaminations originate from the gas purification process that was conducted in Manufactured Gas Plants (MGP). The phenomenon of iron-cyanide complexes mobility in soil, according to the literature, is mainly governed by the dissolution and precipitation of ferric ferrocyanide, which is only slightly soluble (< 1 mg L-1) under acidic conditions. This study suggests vertical transport of a colloidal ferric ferrocyanide, in the excess of iron and circum-neutral pH conditions, as an alternative process that influences the retardation of the pollutant movement through the soil profile. Preliminary in situ investigations of the two boreholes implied transport of ferric ferricyanide from the initial deposition in the wastes layer towards the sandy loam material (secondary accumulation), which possibly retarded the mobility of cyanide (CN). The acidic character of the wastes and the accumulation of the blue patches suggested the potential filter function of a sandy loam material due to colloidal transport of the ferric ferricyanide. Series of batch and column experiments, using sandy loam soil, revealed reduction of CN concentration due to mechanical filtration of precipitated solid iron-cyanide complexes and due to the formation of potassium manganese iron-cyanide (K2Mn[Fe(CN)6]).

  11. Cyanides and isocyanides of first-row transition metals: molecular structure, bonding, and isomerization barriers.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Redondo, Pilar; Valdés, Haydee; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2007-07-19

    Cyanides and isocyanides of first-row transition metal M(CN) (M=Sc-Zn) are investigated with quantum chemistry techniques, providing predictions for their molecular properties. A careful analysis of the competition between cyanide and isocyanide isomers along the transition series has been carried out. In agreement with the experimental observations, late transition metals (Co-Zn) clearly prefer a cyanide arrangement. On the other hand, early transition metals (Sc-Fe), with the only exception of the Cr(CN) system, favor the isocyanide isomer. The theoretical calculations predict the following unknown isocyanides, ScNC(3Delta), TiNC(4Phi), VNC(5Delta), and MnNC(7Sigma+), and agree with the experimental observation of FeNC(6Delta) and the CrCN(6Sigma+) cyanide. First-row transition metal cyanides and isocyanides are predicted to have relatively large dissociation energies with values within the range 80-101 kcal mol(-1), except Zn(CN), which has a dissociation energy around 50-55 kcal mol(-1), and low isomerization barriers. A detailed analysis of the bonding has been carried out employing the topological analysis of the charge density and an energy decomposition analysis. The role of the covalent and electrostatic contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, as well as the importance of pi bonding, are discussed. PMID:17580838

  12. Effects of illegal cyanide fishing on vitellogenin in the freshwater African catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822).

    PubMed

    Authman, Mohammad M N; Abbas, Wafaa T; Abumourad, Iman M K; Kenawy, Amany M

    2013-05-01

    The effects of cyanide, used in illegal fishing, on one of the most economically important Nile fishes, the African catfish (Clarias gariepinus), were studied. Cyanide impacts were evaluated in terms of biochemical, molecular and histopathological characteristics. After exposure to sublethal concentration (0.05mg/l) of potassium cyanide (KCN) for two and four weeks, GOT (glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase) was significantly increased in both male and female, while GPT (glutamate pyruvate transaminase), total plasma protein, phosphoprotein phosphorus (Vgt) in serum, vitellogenin gene expression (Vtg mRNA) and estrogen receptors (ER mRNA) were significantly decreased in female. On the other hand, male C. gariepinus showed a significant increase in Vtg and Vtg mRNA. Liver, testis and ovaries showed distinct histopathological changes. It was concluded that, cyanide caused damaging effects to fish and can cause serious disturbance in the natural reproduction and a drastic decline in fish population. Therefore, it is recommended that, the use of cyanide compounds must be prohibited to conserve the fisheries resources.

  13. Forward Genetics by Genome Sequencing Reveals That Rapid Cyanide Release Deters Insect Herbivory of Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Krothapalli, Kartikeya; Buescher, Elizabeth M.; Li, Xu; Brown, Elliot; Chapple, Clint; Dilkes, Brian P.; Tuinstra, Mitchell R.

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing has allowed rapid progress in the application of forward genetics in model species. In this study, we demonstrated an application of next-generation sequencing for forward genetics in a complex crop genome. We sequenced an ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutant of Sorghum bicolor defective in hydrogen cyanide release and identified the causal mutation. A workflow identified the causal polymorphism relative to the reference BTx623 genome by integrating data from single nucleotide polymorphism identification, prior information about candidate gene(s) implicated in cyanogenesis, mutation spectra, and polymorphisms likely to affect phenotypic changes. A point mutation resulting in a premature stop codon in the coding sequence of dhurrinase2, which encodes a protein involved in the dhurrin catabolic pathway, was responsible for the acyanogenic phenotype. Cyanogenic glucosides are not cyanogenic compounds but their cyanohydrins derivatives do release cyanide. The mutant accumulated the glucoside, dhurrin, but failed to efficiently release cyanide upon tissue disruption. Thus, we tested the effects of cyanide release on insect herbivory in a genetic background in which accumulation of cyanogenic glucoside is unchanged. Insect preference choice experiments and herbivory measurements demonstrate a deterrent effect of cyanide release capacity, even in the presence of wild-type levels of cyanogenic glucoside accumulation. Our gene cloning method substantiates the value of (1) a sequenced genome, (2) a strongly penetrant and easily measurable phenotype, and (3) a workflow to pinpoint a causal mutation in crop genomes and accelerate in the discovery of gene function in the postgenomic era. PMID:23893483

  14. Hexagonal cadmium oxide nanodisks: Efficient scaffold for cyanide ion sensing and photo-catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Rana, Dilbag Singh; Umar, Ahmad; Kumar, Ramesh; Chauhan, Mohinder Singh; Chauhan, Suvarcha

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we report the large-scale low-temperature aqueous solution based synthesis of hexagonal-shaped cadmium oxide (CdO) nanodisks. The synthesized nanodisks were characterized in detail to investigate the morphological, structural, optical and compositional properties using various analytical tools. The detailed characterizations revealed that the synthesized CdO nanodisks are grown in high-density, possessing well-crystallinity with cubic crystal phase and exhibiting good optical properties. Further, the prepared CdO nanodisks were used as efficient scaffold for cyanide ion sensor and photocatalyst applications. A luminescent sensor for the determination of cyanide ion in aqueous solution was fabricated based on synthesized CdO nanodisks. The fabricated luminescent sensor exhibited an extremely low detection limit (~1.40μmolL(-1)) towards cyanide ion which is significantly lower than the maximum permitted value of cyanide ion by United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for drinking water (7.69μmolL(-1)). The interference studies of the fabricated sensor also demonstrate excellent selectivity towards cyanide ions compared to other coexisting ions. As a photocatalyst, the synthesized CdO nanodisks exhibited high photodegradation (~99.7%) of toxic methyl orange dye just in 90min using 0.25g of CdO nanodisks. PMID:27130090

  15. Malate Oxidation and Cyanide-Insensitive Respiration in Avocado Mitochondria during the Climacteric Cycle.

    PubMed

    Moreau, F; Romani, R

    1982-11-01

    After preparation on self-generated Percoll gradients, avocado (Persea americana Mill, var. Fuerte and Hass) mitochondria retain a high proportion of cyanide-insensitive respiration, especially with alpha-ketoglutarate and malate as substrates. Whereas alpha-ketoglutarate oxidation remains unchanged, the rate of malate oxidation increases as ripening advances through the climacteric. An enhancement of mitochondrial malic enzyme activity, measured by the accumulation of pyruvate, closely parallels the increase of malate oxidation. The capacity for cyanide-insensitive respiration is also considerably enhanced while respiratory control decreases (from 3.3 to 1.7), leading to high state 4 rates.Both malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme are functional in state 3, but malic enzyme appears to predominate before the addition of ADP and after its depletion. In the presence of cyanide, a membrane potential is generated when the alterntive pathway is operating. Cyanide-insensitive malate oxidation can be either coupled to the first phosphorylation site, sensitive to rotenone, or by-pass this site. In the absence of phosphate acceptor, malate oxidation is mainly carried out via malic enzyme and the alternative pathway. Experimental modification of the external mitochondrial environment in vitro (pH, NAD(+), glutamade) results in changes in malate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme activities, which also modify cyanide resistance. It appears that a functional connection exists between malic enzyme and the alternative pathway via a rotenone-insensitive NADH dehydrogenase and that this pathway is responsible, in part, for nonphosphorylating respiratory activity during the climacteric.

  16. Operating conditions for the continuous bioremediation of free cyanide contaminated wastewater using Aspergillus awamori.

    PubMed

    Santos, B A Q; Ntwampe, S K O; Doughari, J H; Muchatibaya, G

    2014-01-01

    Generation of cyanide-containing wastewater is a growing problem worldwide as numerous cyanide complexes are highly unstable and degrade to form free cyanide (F-CN), the most toxic form of cyanide. Agro-waste materials, such as sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) waste from the citrus industry, are rich in readily metabolisable carbohydrates that can supplement microbial activity and thus support biodegradation of toxic compounds in wastewater. This study reports on optimal operating conditions for the continuous biodegradation of F-CN in wastewater using an Aspergillus awamori isolate in a process supported solely using C. sinensis waste extract. The optimal degradation conditions were pH 8.75 and 37.02 °C with the isolate's F-CN tolerance being observed up to 430 mg F-CN/L. Furthermore, the ammonium produced as a by-product of F-CN degradation was also metabolised by the A. awamori, with negligible residual citric acid and formate being observed in the effluent post treatment. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using agricultural waste as a primary and sole carbon source for the cultivation of a cyanide-degrading A. awamori species for F-CN degradation under alkaline conditions. PMID:24622547

  17. Poisoning and suicide by cyanide jewelry cleaner in the US Hmong community: a case series.

    PubMed

    Garlich, Fiona M; Alsop, Judith Ann; Anderson, Deborah L; Geller, Richard J; Kalugdan, Theresa Thao; Roberts, David J; Thomas, Lindsey C

    2012-02-01

    Over 200 000 persons of Hmong ethnicity live in the United States. The majority of this Southeast Asian ethnic group live in California, Minnesota and Wisconsin. Tradition plays a strong role in the Hmong population, and difficulty in assimilation into "Western ways" has been reported to result in depression and suicide attempts. Some products sold at Southeast Asian ethnic markets are well-known within the Hmong community to be lethal but are essentially unknown to the outside community. We describe eight cases in which cyanide-containing products were ingested by Hmong patients. Seven cases were suicide attempts involving the ingestion of a locally-purchased substance intended for cleaning metal, coins, or jewelry. One case involved the fatal ingestion of a cyanide-containing "herbal" cure. In the majority of the cases, cyanide was not initially suspected, and treatment was delayed due to lack of information regarding the product ingested. In the two patients who survived, the cyanide antidote kit (sodium nitrite, amyl nitrite, and sodium thiosulfate) was administered early. Clinicians should be aware that unusual and potentially lethal products are easily available at ethnic markets. Cyanide toxicity should be suspected, and empiric antidote therapy initiated early, in patients of Hmong or Southeast Asian descent who present with sudden and unexplained cardiovascular collapse and metabolic acidosis, especially in the setting of a suspected suicidal ingestion.

  18. QCM Real-Time Sensor for monitoring of Poisonous Cyanide from Drinking Water and Environmental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimpoca, Gh. V.; Radulescu, C.; Popescu, I. V.; Dulama, I. D.; Bancuta, I.; Gheboianu, A. I.; Cimpoca, M.; Cernica, I.; Staicu, L.

    2010-01-01

    The paper present Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) used for monitoring of poisonous cyanide in real-time at both drinking water standard and environmental regulatory concentrations. Through the use of a flow cell, aqueous samples containing cyanide react with a gold electrode of a piezoelectric quartz crystal and extract the gold from electrode in solution. The dissolution of metallic gold depends by cyanide concentration, pH of solution, the flow debit and the time. The sensor is an AT-cut quartz crystal with CrAu or TiAu electrode metallization, 1.27 cm2 active areas and 5 MHz resonance frequency. We use QCM with the static liquid from 0.2 to 1 ml solution and dynamic liquid with flow debit from 0.2 to 1 mL/minute. The detection limits at pH 12 are about 5 ppb for analysis times of 10 min, and 2 ppb for analysis times of 20 minutes. The calibrations show excellent linearity over a variety of cyanide concentrations ranging from 50 ppb to hundreds of ppm. The ability to provide real-time monitoring of cyanide contaminants in water samples can be used for a variety of applications: on-line monitoring of contaminants in process, recycle, and waste water; groundwater quality monitoring; detection of contaminants in streams, lakes and water supplies; monitoring dumping in off-shore waterways.

  19. Cyanides and isocyanides of first-row transition metals: molecular structure, bonding, and isomerization barriers.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Redondo, Pilar; Valdés, Haydee; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2007-07-19

    Cyanides and isocyanides of first-row transition metal M(CN) (M=Sc-Zn) are investigated with quantum chemistry techniques, providing predictions for their molecular properties. A careful analysis of the competition between cyanide and isocyanide isomers along the transition series has been carried out. In agreement with the experimental observations, late transition metals (Co-Zn) clearly prefer a cyanide arrangement. On the other hand, early transition metals (Sc-Fe), with the only exception of the Cr(CN) system, favor the isocyanide isomer. The theoretical calculations predict the following unknown isocyanides, ScNC(3Delta), TiNC(4Phi), VNC(5Delta), and MnNC(7Sigma+), and agree with the experimental observation of FeNC(6Delta) and the CrCN(6Sigma+) cyanide. First-row transition metal cyanides and isocyanides are predicted to have relatively large dissociation energies with values within the range 80-101 kcal mol(-1), except Zn(CN), which has a dissociation energy around 50-55 kcal mol(-1), and low isomerization barriers. A detailed analysis of the bonding has been carried out employing the topological analysis of the charge density and an energy decomposition analysis. The role of the covalent and electrostatic contributions to the metal-ligand bonding, as well as the importance of pi bonding, are discussed.

  20. High levels of activity of bats at gold mining water bodies: implications for compliance with the International Cyanide Management Code.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Stephen R; Donato, David B; Coulson, Graeme; Lumsden, Linda F

    2014-06-01

    Wildlife and livestock are known to visit and interact with tailings dam and other wastewater impoundments at gold mines. When cyanide concentrations within these water bodies exceed a critical toxicity threshold, significant cyanide-related mortality events can occur in wildlife. Highly mobile taxa such as birds are particularly susceptible to cyanide toxicosis. Nocturnally active bats have similar access to uncovered wastewater impoundments as birds; however, cyanide toxicosis risks to bats remain ambiguous. This study investigated activity of bats in the airspace above two water bodies at an Australian gold mine, to assess the extent to which bats use these water bodies and hence are at potential risk of exposure to cyanide. Bat activity was present on most nights sampled during the 16-month survey period, although it was highly variable across nights and months. Therefore, despite the artificial nature of wastewater impoundments at gold mines, these structures present attractive habitats to bats. As tailings slurry and supernatant pooling within the tailings dam were consistently well below the industry protective concentration limit of 50 mg/L weak acid dissociable (WAD) cyanide, wastewater solutions stored within the tailings dam posed a minimal risk of cyanide toxicosis for wildlife, including bats. This study showed that passively recorded bat echolocation call data provides evidence of the presence and relative activity of bats above water bodies at mine sites. Furthermore, echolocation buzz calls recorded in the airspace directly above water provide indirect evidence of foraging and/or drinking. Both echolocation monitoring and systematic sampling of cyanide concentration in open wastewater impoundments can be incorporated into a gold mine risk-assessment model in order to evaluate the risk of bat exposure to cyanide. In relation to risk minimisation management practices, the most effective mechanism for preventing cyanide toxicosis to wildlife