Science.gov

Sample records for agent development research

  1. About the Chemopreventive Agent Development Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Chemopreventive Agent Development Research Group promotes and supports research on early chemopreventive agent development, from preclinical studies to phase I clinical trials. The group’s projects aim to identify and develop prevention agents with the potential to block, reverse, or delay the early stages of cancer. The overarching goal is to determine positive and negative predictive values of preclinical models for clinical development. |

  2. Current Research and Development of Chemotherapeutic Agents for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hsan, Kyaw Minn; Chen, Chun-Chieh; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer and an increasingly common disease worldwide. It remains one of the most treatment-refractory malignancies. The current treatment options for patients with metastatic melanoma are limited and in most cases non-curative. This review focuses on conventional chemotherapeutic drugs for melanoma treatment, by a single or combinational agent approach, but also summarizes some potential novel phytoagents discovered from dietary vegetables or traditional herbal medicines as alternative options or future medicine for melanoma prevention. We explore the mode of actions of these natural phytoagents against metastatic melanoma. PMID:24281076

  3. Spacecraft sanitation agent development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The development of an effective sanitizing agent that is compatible with the spacecraft environment and the human occupant is discussed. Experimental results show that two sanitation agents must be used to satisfy mission requirements: one agent for personal hygiene and one for equipment maintenance. It was also recommended that a water rinse be used with the agents for best results, and that consideration be given to using the agents pressure packed or in aerosol formulations.

  4. Research and Development for an Operational Information Ecology: The User-System Interface Agent Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Sadanand; deLamadrid, James

    1998-01-01

    The User System Interface Agent (USIA) is a special type of software agent which acts as the "middle man" between a human user and an information processing environment. USIA consists of a group of cooperating agents which are responsible for assisting users in obtaining information processing services intuitively and efficiently. Some of the main features of USIA include: (1) multiple interaction modes and (2) user-specific and stereotype modeling and adaptation. This prototype system provides us with a development platform towards the realization of an operational information ecology. In the first phase of this project we focus on the design and implementation of prototype system of the User-System Interface Agent (USIA). The second face of USIA allows user interaction via a restricted query language as well as through a taxonomy of windows. In third phase the USIA system architecture was revised.

  5. Chemopreventive Agent Development | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    [[{"fid":"174","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Chemoprevenentive Agent Development Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Chemoprevenentive Agent Development Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Chemoprevenentive Agent Development Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Chemoprevenentive Agent Development Research Group Homepage Logo","heigh | Research on early chemopreventive agent development, from preclinical studies to phase I clinical trials.

  6. Agents Technology Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    62702F 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert Wright, Jeffrey Hudack, Nathaniel Gemelli, Steven Loscalzo, and Tsu Kong Lue 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 558S 5e. TASK...NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Robert Wright a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c. THIS PAGE U 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) N/A...avoided by the other agents removing the incentive to lie or free-load. This phenomenon is termed as the shadow of the future and was shown in Robert

  7. Incorporating BDI Agents into Human-Agent Decision Making Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamphorst, Bart; van Wissen, Arlette; Dignum, Virginia

    Artificial agents, people, institutes and societies all have the ability to make decisions. Decision making as a research area therefore involves a broad spectrum of sciences, ranging from Artificial Intelligence to economics to psychology. The Colored Trails (CT) framework is designed to aid researchers in all fields in examining decision making processes. It is developed both to study interaction between multiple actors (humans or software agents) in a dynamic environment, and to study and model the decision making of these actors. However, agents in the current implementation of CT lack the explanatory power to help understand the reasoning processes involved in decision making. The BDI paradigm that has been proposed in the agent research area to describe rational agents, enables the specification of agents that reason in abstract concepts such as beliefs, goals, plans and events. In this paper, we present CTAPL: an extension to CT that allows BDI software agents that are written in the practical agent programming language 2APL to reason about and interact with a CT environment.

  8. Flexible, secure agent development framework

    DOEpatents

    Goldsmith; Steven Y.

    2009-04-07

    While an agent generator is generating an intelligent agent, it can also evaluate the data processing platform on which it is executing, in order to assess a risk factor associated with operation of the agent generator on the data processing platform. The agent generator can retrieve from a location external to the data processing platform an open site that is configurable by the user, and load the open site into an agent substrate, thereby creating a development agent with code development capabilities. While an intelligent agent is executing a functional program on a data processing platform, it can also evaluate the data processing platform to assess a risk factor associated with performing the data processing function on the data processing platform.

  9. Agent-based modeling: a systematic assessment of use cases and requirements for enhancing pharmaceutical research and development productivity.

    PubMed

    Hunt, C Anthony; Kennedy, Ryan C; Kim, Sean H J; Ropella, Glen E P

    2013-01-01

    A crisis continues to brew within the pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) enterprise: productivity continues declining as costs rise, despite ongoing, often dramatic scientific and technical advances. To reverse this trend, we offer various suggestions for both the expansion and broader adoption of modeling and simulation (M&S) methods. We suggest strategies and scenarios intended to enable new M&S use cases that directly engage R&D knowledge generation and build actionable mechanistic insight, thereby opening the door to enhanced productivity. What M&S requirements must be satisfied to access and open the door, and begin reversing the productivity decline? Can current methods and tools fulfill the requirements, or are new methods necessary? We draw on the relevant, recent literature to provide and explore answers. In so doing, we identify essential, key roles for agent-based and other methods. We assemble a list of requirements necessary for M&S to meet the diverse needs distilled from a collection of research, review, and opinion articles. We argue that to realize its full potential, M&S should be actualized within a larger information technology framework--a dynamic knowledge repository--wherein models of various types execute, evolve, and increase in accuracy over time. We offer some details of the issues that must be addressed for such a repository to accrue the capabilities needed to reverse the productivity decline.

  10. Agent-based modeling: a systematic assessment of use cases and requirements for enhancing pharmaceutical research and development productivity

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, C Anthony; Kennedy, Ryan C; Kim, Sean H J; Ropella, Glen E P

    2013-01-01

    A crisis continues to brew within the pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) enterprise: productivity continues declining as costs rise, despite ongoing, often dramatic scientific and technical advances. To reverse this trend, we offer various suggestions for both the expansion and broader adoption of modeling and simulation (M&S) methods. We suggest strategies and scenarios intended to enable new M&S use cases that directly engage R&D knowledge generation and build actionable mechanistic insight, thereby opening the door to enhanced productivity. What M&S requirements must be satisfied to access and open the door, and begin reversing the productivity decline? Can current methods and tools fulfill the requirements, or are new methods necessary? We draw on the relevant, recent literature to provide and explore answers. In so doing, we identify essential, key roles for agent-based and other methods. We assemble a list of requirements necessary for M&S to meet the diverse needs distilled from a collection of research, review, and opinion articles. We argue that to realize its full potential, M&S should be actualized within a larger information technology framework—a dynamic knowledge repository—wherein models of various types execute, evolve, and increase in accuracy over time. We offer some details of the issues that must be addressed for such a repository to accrue the capabilities needed to reverse the productivity decline. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23737142

  11. Proceedings of the Indo-U.S. bilateral workshop on accelerating botanicals/biologics agent development research for cancer chemoprevention, treatment, and survival

    PubMed Central

    B. Kumar, Nagi; Dhurandhar, Medha; Aggarwal, Bharat; Anant, Shrikant; Daniel, Kenyon; Deng, Gary; Djeu, Julie; Dou, Jinhui; Hawk, Ernest; Jayaram, B.; Jia, Libin; Joshi, Rajendra; Kararala, Madhuri; Karunagaran, Devarajan; Kucuk, Omer; Kumar, Lalit; Malafa, Mokenge; Samathanam, G. J.; Sarkar, Fazlul; Siddiqi, Maqsood; Singh, Rana P.; Srivastava, Anil; White, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    With the evolving evidence of the promise of botanicals/biologics for cancer chemoprevention and treatment, an Indo-U.S. collaborative Workshop focusing on “Accelerating Botanicals Agent Development Research for Cancer Chemoprevention and Treatment” was conducted at the Moffitt Cancer Center, 29–31 May 2012. Funded by the Indo-U.S. Science and Technology Forum, a joint initiative of Governments of India and the United States of America and the Moffitt Cancer Center, the overall goals of this workshop were to enhance the knowledge (agents, molecular targets, biomarkers, approaches, target populations, regulatory standards, priorities, resources) of a multinational, multidisciplinary team of researcher's to systematically accelerate the design, to conduct a successful clinical trials to evaluate botanicals/biologics for cancer chemoprevention and treatment, and to achieve efficient translation of these discoveries into the standards for clinical practice that will ultimately impact cancer morbidity and mortality. Expert panelists were drawn from a diverse group of stakeholders, representing the leadership from the National Cancer Institute's Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM), NCI Experimental Therapeutics (NExT), Food and Drug Administration, national scientific leadership from India, and a distinguished group of population, basic and clinical scientists from the two countries, including leaders in bioinformatics, social sciences, and biostatisticians. At the end of the workshop, we established four Indo-U.S. working research collaborative teams focused on identifying and prioritizing agents targeting four cancers that are of priority to both countries. Presented are some of the key proceedings and future goals discussed in the proceedings of this workshop. PMID:24279005

  12. Discovery and development of new antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Gootz, T D

    1990-01-01

    The unprecedented growth in the number of new antibiotics over the past two decades has been the result of extensive research efforts that have exploited the growing body of knowledge describing the interactions of antibiotics with their targets in bacterial cells. Information gained from one class of antimicrobial agents has often been used to advance the development of other classes. In the case of beta-lactams, information on structure-activity relationships gleaned from penicillins and cephalosporins was rapidly applied to the cephamycins, monobactams, penems, and carbapenems in order to discover broad-spectrum agents with markedly improved potency. These efforts have led to the introduction of many new antibiotics that demonstrate outstanding clinical efficacy and improved pharmacokinetics in humans. The current review discusses those factors that have influenced the rapid proliferation of new antimicrobial agents, including the discovery of new lead structures from natural products and the impact of bacterial resistance development in the clinical setting. The development process for a new antibiotic is discussed in detail, from the stage of early safety testing in animals through phase I, II, and III clinical trials. PMID:2404566

  13. Research Recommendations for Selected IARC-Classified Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Elizabeth M.; Schulte, Paul A.; Straif, Kurt; Hopf, Nancy B.; Caldwell, Jane C.; Carreón, Tania; DeMarini, David M.; Fowler, Bruce A.; Goldstein, Bernard D.; Hemminki, Kari; Hines, Cynthia J.; Pursiainen, Kirsti Husgafvel; Kuempel, Eileen; Lewtas, Joellen; Lunn, Ruth M.; Lynge, Elsebeth; McElvenny, Damien M.; Muhle, Hartwig; Nakajima, Tamie; Robertson, Larry W.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ruder, Avima M.; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K.; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silverman, Debra; Smith, Martyn T.; Sorahan, Tom; Steenland, Kyle; Stevens, Richard G.; Vineis, Paolo; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Zeise, Lauren; Cogliano, Vincent J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives There are some common occupational agents and exposure circumstances for which evidence of carcinogenicity is substantial but not yet conclusive for humans. Our objectives were to identify research gaps and needs for 20 agents prioritized for review based on evidence of widespread human exposures and potential carcinogenicity in animals or humans. Data sources For each chemical agent (or category of agents), a systematic review was conducted of new data published since the most recent pertinent International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monograph meeting on that agent. Data extraction Reviewers were charged with identifying data gaps and general and specific approaches to address them, focusing on research that would be important in resolving classification uncertainties. An expert meeting brought reviewers together to discuss each agent and the identified data gaps and approaches. Data synthesis Several overarching issues were identified that pertained to multiple agents; these included the importance of recognizing that carcinogenic agents can act through multiple toxicity pathways and mechanisms, including epigenetic mechanisms, oxidative stress, and immuno- and hormonal modulation. Conclusions Studies in occupational populations provide important opportunities to understand the mechanisms through which exogenous agents cause cancer and intervene to prevent human exposure and/or prevent or detect cancer among those already exposed. Scientific developments are likely to increase the challenges and complexities of carcinogen testing and evaluation in the future, and epidemiologic studies will be particularly critical to inform carcinogen classification and risk assessment processes. PMID:20562050

  14. Abundance and Scarcity: A Prospect for Emancipation Using Educational Institutions Where Research and Development Are Change Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Doug

    Two things are required to bridge the technology gap between rich and poor countries that has resulted from the scientific and technological revolution: (1) a national development strategy that places a high priority on studies of global technological strategies for each sector of the economy; and (2) very high level educational institutions…

  15. [Contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging: development and problems].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi-kai

    2002-09-01

    In spite of the inherent versatility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), researchers and clinicians from both home and aboard have made great achievements in developing safe and effective contrast agents. Many new agents are expected to be available for clinical use in the near future. It is of clinical importance that the agents should expand the diagnostic utility of MRI, improve the detection of tiny lesions and help evaluate specific tissue or organ functions. This article aims to examine current status of contrast agents for MRI and the problems waiting for solutions.

  16. Vaccines against biologic agents: uses and developments.

    PubMed

    Ales, Noel C; Katial, Rohit K

    2004-03-01

    concentrations of organisms may overcome vaccine protection. Finally,exposure may not be immediately noted until it is too late to vaccinate, as was the case with anthrax. Even in a case, such as smallpox, in which postexposure vaccination is possible, patients will still develop disease, and the health care system may be overwhelmed. The United States government has been defensively planning and researching the use of vaccines and chemoprophylaxis against any potential biologic agents since at least 1953, and resources are still lacking. There are inadequate stockpiles of vaccine to protect the entire population. The pharmaceutical industry also lacks a means of mass producing vaccines ina short timeframe. There is no policy in place for the use of vaccines that are yet unlicensed and experimental but may be the only therapy in the event ofa terrorist attack. Investigations into these solutions have been instituted only after the September 11, 2001, attacks heightened the awareness of terrorism. Although vaccination is an effective means of prophylaxis and a means of terminating epidemics or treating active disease, there is also resistance from the general public. In some instances there is a lack of acceptance of vaccines, or the risk of side effects is too great. In other cases, a questionable benefit does not justify the expense of mass vaccination. Because of this uncertainty, mass vaccination is deemed an impractical solution to the threat of bioterrorism. Extending vaccination with most vaccines to include all members of society who may be first responders in the event of an attack should be considered. In all instances, the benefit-to-risk must be weighed ratio when deciding how and when to offer preemptive prophylaxis to protect society from a real but unknown threat.

  17. The discovery and development of antiretroviral agents.

    PubMed

    Lange, Joep M A; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of HIV as the causative agent of AIDS in 1983/1984, remarkable progress has been made in finding antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) that are effective against it. A major breakthrough occurred in 1996 when it was found that triple drug therapy (HAART) could durably suppress viral replication to minimal levels. It was then widely felt, however, that HAART was too expensive and complex for low- and middle-income countries, and so, with the exception of a few of these countries, such as Brazil, a massive scale-up did not begin until the WHO launched its '3 by 5' initiative and sizeable funding mechanisms, such as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria and the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), came into existence. A pivotal enabler of the scale-up was a steady lowering of drug prices through entry of generic antiretrovirals, competition between generic manufacturers and the making of volume commitments. The WHO Prequalification of Medicines Programme and the Expedited Review Provision of the US Food and Drug Administration have been important for the assurance of quality standards. Antiretroviral drug development by research-based pharmaceutical companies continues, with several important innovative products, such as long-acting agents, in the pipeline.

  18. Web Search Agents: "One-Stop Shopping" for Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Ernest

    2002-01-01

    Explains Web search agents as tools that apply intelligent agent software technology for the purpose of automating, improving, and speeding up online search operations. Topics include intelligent desktop agents; search agent marketplace; comparing Web search agents; subjective evaluations; and use by researchers. (LRW)

  19. Bioengineering of noncoding RNAs for research agents and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pui Yan; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of functional small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, in the control of human cellular processes has opened new avenues to develop RNA-based therapies for various diseases including viral infections and cancers. However, studying ncRNA functions and developing RNA-based therapeutics relies on access to large quantities of affordable ncRNA agents. Currently, synthetic RNAs account for the major source of agents for RNA research and development, yet carry artificial modifications on the ribose ring and phosphate backbone in sharp contrast to posttranscriptional modifications present on the nucleobases or unmodified natural RNA molecules produced within cells. Therefore, large efforts have been made in recent years to develop recombinant RNA techniques to cost-effectively produce biological RNA agents that may better capture the structure, function, and safety properties of natural RNAs. In this article, we summarize and compare current in vitro and in vivo methods for the production of RNA agents including chemical synthesis, in vitro transcription, and bioengineering approaches. We highlight the latest recombinant RNA approaches using transfer RNA (tRNA), ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and optimal ncRNA scaffold (OnRS), and discuss the applications of bioengineered ncRNA agents (BERAs) that should facilitate RNA research and development.

  20. Infectious Agents and Cancer Epidemiology Research Webinar Series

    Cancer.gov

    Infectious Agents and Cancer Epidemiology Research Webinar Series highlights emerging and cutting-edge research related to infection-associated cancers, shares scientific knowledge about technologies and methods, and fosters cross-disciplinary discussions on infectious agents and cancer epidemiology.

  1. The New Agent: A Qualitative Study to Strategically Adapt New Agent Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Lauri M.; Hadley, Gregg

    2014-01-01

    The qualitative study reported here assessed the needs of agents related to new agent professional development to improve the current model. Agents who participated in new agent professional development within the last 5 years were selected to participate in focus groups to determine concerns and continued needs. Agents enjoyed networking and…

  2. The Development of Sugar-Based Anti-Melanogenic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Kim, Sung Tae; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Lee, Tae Ryong; Cho, Eun-Gyung

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of melanin production is important for managing skin darkness and hyperpigmentary disorders. Numerous anti-melanogenic agents that target tyrosinase activity/stability, melanosome maturation/transfer, or melanogenesis-related signaling pathways have been developed. As a rate-limiting enzyme in melanogenesis, tyrosinase has been the most attractive target, but tyrosinase-targeted treatments still pose serious potential risks, indicating the necessity of developing lower-risk anti-melanogenic agents. Sugars are ubiquitous natural compounds found in humans and other organisms. Here, we review the recent advances in research on the roles of sugars and sugar-related agents in melanogenesis and in the development of sugar-based anti-melanogenic agents. The proposed mechanisms of action of these agents include: (a) (natural sugars) disturbing proper melanosome maturation by inducing osmotic stress and inhibiting the PI3 kinase pathway and (b) (sugar derivatives) inhibiting tyrosinase maturation by blocking N-glycosylation. Finally, we propose an alternative strategy for developing anti-melanogenic sugars that theoretically reduce melanosomal pH by inhibiting a sucrose transporter and reduce tyrosinase activity by inhibiting copper incorporation into an active site. These studies provide evidence of the utility of sugar-based anti-melanogenic agents in managing skin darkness and curing pigmentary disorders and suggest a future direction for the development of physiologically favorable anti-melanogenic agents. PMID:27092497

  3. The Development of Sugar-Based Anti-Melanogenic Agents.

    PubMed

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Kim, Sung Tae; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Lee, Tae Ryong; Cho, Eun-Gyung

    2016-04-16

    The regulation of melanin production is important for managing skin darkness and hyperpigmentary disorders. Numerous anti-melanogenic agents that target tyrosinase activity/stability, melanosome maturation/transfer, or melanogenesis-related signaling pathways have been developed. As a rate-limiting enzyme in melanogenesis, tyrosinase has been the most attractive target, but tyrosinase-targeted treatments still pose serious potential risks, indicating the necessity of developing lower-risk anti-melanogenic agents. Sugars are ubiquitous natural compounds found in humans and other organisms. Here, we review the recent advances in research on the roles of sugars and sugar-related agents in melanogenesis and in the development of sugar-based anti-melanogenic agents. The proposed mechanisms of action of these agents include: (a) (natural sugars) disturbing proper melanosome maturation by inducing osmotic stress and inhibiting the PI3 kinase pathway and (b) (sugar derivatives) inhibiting tyrosinase maturation by blocking N-glycosylation. Finally, we propose an alternative strategy for developing anti-melanogenic sugars that theoretically reduce melanosomal pH by inhibiting a sucrose transporter and reduce tyrosinase activity by inhibiting copper incorporation into an active site. These studies provide evidence of the utility of sugar-based anti-melanogenic agents in managing skin darkness and curing pigmentary disorders and suggest a future direction for the development of physiologically favorable anti-melanogenic agents.

  4. Development of Methodology for Programming Autonomous Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erol, Kutluhan; Levy, Renato; Lang, Lun

    2004-01-01

    A brief report discusses the rationale for, and the development of, a methodology for generating computer code for autonomous-agent-based systems. The methodology is characterized as enabling an increase in the reusability of the generated code among and within such systems, thereby making it possible to reduce the time and cost of development of the systems. The methodology is also characterized as enabling reduction of the incidence of those software errors that are attributable to the human failure to anticipate distributed behaviors caused by the software. A major conceptual problem said to be addressed in the development of the methodology was that of how to efficiently describe the interfaces between several layers of agent composition by use of a language that is both familiar to engineers and descriptive enough to describe such interfaces unambivalently

  5. (Coordinated research of chemotherapeutic agents and radiopharmaceuticals)

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, P.C.

    1991-01-14

    The traveler received a United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Award for Distinguished Scientists to visit Indian Research Institutions including Central Drug Research Institute (CDRI), Lucknow, the host institution, in cooperation with the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) of India. At CDRI, the traveler had meetings to discuss progress and future directions of on-going collaborative research work on nucleosides and had the opportunity to initiate new projects with the divisions of pharmacology, biopolymers, and membrane biology. As a part of this program, the traveler also visited Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute (SGPI) of Medical Sciences, Lucknow; Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) and Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC), Bombay; Variable Energy Cyclotron Center (VECC) and Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Calcutta. He also attended the Indo-American Society of Nuclear Medicine Meeting held in Calcutta. The traveler delivered five seminars describing various aspects of radiopharmaceutical development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and discussed the opportunities for exchange visits to ORNL by Indian scientists.

  6. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action.

  7. Spacecraft disinfectant/cleansing agent development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbate, M.

    1977-01-01

    The sanitation agent container, which was selected in a trade off study, employs two chambers, a rigid outer container and an inner flexible bladder. The bladder contains the sanitation agent formulation and its release is controlled by a manually operated valve. The outer container holds a high pressure vapor. There is no void in the bladder which makes the package operation independent of orientation and therefore usable in zero gravity. Foam is developed by a low boiling point fluid or dissolved in the product. When the product is dispensed at atmospheric presure, the evolved gas or vapor whips up a goam in the valve. The sanitation agents were initially formulated with freons which produces an excellent foam. However freon is incompatible with the life support system and was replaced with carbon dioxide dissolved at high pressure. The CO2 system may limit high temperature exposure to prevent leakage or package distortion. The sanitation agents have been shown to be effective in cleaning soils from personnel and material.

  8. Agent Model Development for Assessing Climate-Induced Geopolitical Instability.

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, Mark B.; Backus, George A.

    2005-12-01

    We present the initial stages of development of new agent-based computational methods to generate and test hypotheses about linkages between environmental change and international instability. This report summarizes the first year's effort of an originally proposed three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The preliminary work focused on a set of simple agent-based models and benefited from lessons learned in previous related projects and case studies of human response to climate change and environmental scarcity. Our approach was to define a qualitative model using extremely simple cellular agent models akin to Lovelock's Daisyworld and Schelling's segregation model. Such models do not require significant computing resources, and users can modify behavior rules to gain insights. One of the difficulties in agent-based modeling is finding the right balance between model simplicity and real-world representation. Our approach was to keep agent behaviors as simple as possible during the development stage (described herein) and to ground them with a realistic geospatial Earth system model in subsequent years. This work is directed toward incorporating projected climate data--including various C02 scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Assessment Report--and ultimately toward coupling a useful agent-based model to a general circulation model.3

  9. Development of male-fertility-regulating agents.

    PubMed

    Ray, S; Verma, P; Kumar, A

    1991-09-01

    Steroidal, nonsteroidal, plant-derived, gonadotropin-related and immunological agents investigated for control of male fertility are reviewed with brief descriptions of their effects, and illustrations of their structures. The physiology of the male reproductive system is presented as an introduction: an ideal male antifertility agent would inhibit spermatogenesis at the level of the Sertoli cells, without affecting endogenous androgen production by Leydig cells, needed for libido and potency. Androgens down-regulate their own production at physiological levels, but few long-acting orally active derivatives are available. Anti-androgens with mixed androgen and progestin activity, combined with a pure androgen are potentially useful. Androgen-progestin combinations are being tested by WHO as implants. Dozens of miscellaneous nonsteroidal compounds have been discovered serendipitously to have antifertility activity in men or male animals, including alkylating agents antimetabolites, antibiotics, sulfa derivatives, fungicides, trichomonocides, amebicides, alpha blockers, antimalarials, coumarins, and carbohydrate derivatives. Various plant alkaloids have been screened. Those of Hibiscus, Vitex and Plumbago species, as well as Tripterygium wilfordii glycosides, which are being evaluated in combination with gossypol, are mentioned here. Gossypol has been thoroughly tested in China, but rejected because of its side effects, particularly hypokalemic paralysis, its low therapeutic index, and uncertain recovery of fertility. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists and antagonists are being researched in combination with androgens with some success. The GnRH antagonists to date have low activity , or cause histamine-related side effects at higher doses; the androgens require a new route such as a long-acting implant to overcome the need for daily injections. Immunological contraception for males has not progressed beyond the research stage.

  10. Novel oral anticoagulants and reversal agents: Considerations for clinical development.

    PubMed

    Sarich, Troy C; Seltzer, Jonathan H; Berkowitz, Scott D; Costin', James; Curnutte, John T; Gibson, C Michael; Hoffman, Maureane; Kaminskas, Edvardas; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Levy, Jerrold H; Mintz, Paul D; Reilly, Paul A; Sager, Philip T; Singer, Daniel E; Stockbridge, Norman; Weitz, Jeffrey I; Kowey, Peter R

    2015-06-01

    This white paper provides a summary of presentations and discussions that were held at an Anticoagulant-Induced Bleeding and Reversal Agents Think Tank co-sponsored by the Cardiac Safety Research Consortium and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) at the FDA's White Oak Headquarters on April 22, 2014. Attention focused on a development pathway for reversal agents for the novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs). This is important because anticoagulation is still widely underused for stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation. Undertreatment persists, although NOACs, in general, overcome some of the difficulties associated with anticoagulation provided by vitamin K antagonists. One reason for the lack of a wider uptake is the absence of NOAC reversal agents. As there are neither widely accepted academic and industry standards nor a definitive regulatory policy on the development of such reversal agents, this meeting provided a forum for leaders in the fields of cardiovascular clinical trials and cardiovascular safety to discuss the issues and develop recommendations. Attendees included representatives from pharmaceutical companies; regulatory agencies; end point adjudication specialist groups; contract research organizations; and active, academically based physicians. There was wide and solid consensus that NOACs overall offer improvements in convenience, efficacy, and safety compared with warfarin, even without reversal agents. Still, it was broadly accepted that it would be helpful to have reversal agents available for clinicians to use. Because it is not feasible to do definitive outcomes studies demonstrating a reversal agent's clinical benefits, it was felt that these agents could be approved for use in life-threatening bleeding situations if the molecules were well characterized preclinically, their pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles were well understood, and showed no harmful adverse events in early human testing. There was also consensus

  11. Clinical development of demethylating agents in hematology

    PubMed Central

    Navada, Shyamala C.; Steinmann, Juliane; Lübbert, Michael; Silverman, Lewis R.

    2014-01-01

    The term epigenetics refers to the heritable changes in gene expression that are not associated with a change in the actual DNA sequence. Epigenetic dysregulation is linked to the pathogenesis of a number of malignancies and has been studied extensively in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. DNA methylation is frequently altered in cancerous cells and likely results in transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes. Re-expression of these genes by inhibition of the DNA methyltransferases has been successful in the treatment of benign and malignant disease. In this Review, we discuss the clinical development of demethylating agents in hematology, with a focus on azacitidine and decitabine. PMID:24382388

  12. Babybot: a biologically inspired developing robotic agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metta, Giorgio; Panerai, Francesco M.; Sandini, Giulio

    2000-10-01

    The study of development, either artificial or biological, can highlight the mechanisms underlying learning and adaptive behavior. We shall argue whether developmental studies might provide a different and potentially interesting perspective either on how to build an artificial adaptive agent, or on understanding how the brain solves sensory, motor, and cognitive tasks. It is our opinion that the acquisition of the proper behavior might indeed be facilitated because within an ecological context, the agent, its adaptive structure and the environment dynamically interact thus constraining the otherwise difficult learning problem. In very general terms we shall describe the proposed approach and supporting biological related facts. In order to further analyze these aspects from the modeling point of view, we shall demonstrate how a twelve degrees of freedom baby humanoid robot acquires orienting and reaching behaviors, and what advantages the proposed framework might offer. In particular, the experimental setup consists of five degrees-of-freedom (dof) robot head, and an off-the-shelf six dof robot manipulator, both mounted on a rotating base: i.e. the torso. From the sensory point of view, the robot is equipped with two space-variant cameras, an inertial sensor simulating the vestibular system, and proprioceptive information through motor encoders. The biological parallel is exploited at many implementation levels. It is worth mentioning, for example, the space- variant eyes, exploiting foveal and peripheral vision in a single arrangement, the inertial sensor providing efficient image stabilization (vestibulo-ocular reflex).

  13. Development of spacecraft toxic gas removal agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The development of agents suitable for removal of CO, NH3, NO2 SO2, and other spacecraft contaminants was approached. An extensive technology review was conducted, yielding a large number of potentially useful materials and/or concepts. Because the two toxic gases of greatest interest, CO and NH3, suggested the use of catalysis principles emphasis was placed on the intestigation of transition metals on various supports. Forty-three materials were prepared or obtained and 25 were tested. Gas chromatographic techniques were used to find seven candidates that effectively managed various combinations of the four toxic gases: none managed all. These candidates included six transition metal-containing preparations and a supported LiOH material. Three commercial charcoals showed some efficiency for the toxic gases and may constitute candidates for enhancement by doping with transition metals.

  14. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1993-10-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990, 1991, and 1992). The objectives of the present study were to select and evaluate candidate fungicides.

  15. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1991-09-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990). The objectives of the present study was to evaluate up to 10 candidate fungicides.

  16. New approaches to drug discovery and development: a mechanism-based approach to pharmaceutical research and its application to BNP7787, a novel chemoprotective agent.

    PubMed

    Hausheer, Frederick H; Kochat, Harry; Parker, Aulma R; Ding, Daoyuan; Yao, Shije; Hamilton, Susan E; Petluru, Pavankumar N; Leverett, Betsy D; Bain, Stacey H; Saxe, Jeffrey D

    2003-07-01

    Any approach applied to drug discovery and development by the medical community and pharmaceutical industry has a direct impact on the future availability of improved, novel, and curative therapies for patients with cancer. By definition, drug discovery is a complex learning process whereby research efforts are directed toward uncovering and assimilating new knowledge to create and develop a drug for the purpose of providing benefit to a defined patient population. Accordingly, a highly desirable technology or approach to drug discovery should facilitate both effective learning and the application of newly discovered observations that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. However, some believe that drug discovery is largely accomplished by serendipity and therefore appropriately addressed by screening a large number of compounds. Clearly, this approach has not generated an abundance of new drugs for cancer patients and suggests that a tangibly different approach in drug discovery is warranted. We employ an alternative approach to drug discovery, which is based on the elucidation and exploitation of biological, pharmacological, and biochemical mechanisms that have not been previously recognized or fully understood. Mechanism-based drug discovery involves the combined application of physics-based computer simulations and laboratory experimentation. There is increasing evidence that agreement between simulations based on the laws of physics and experimental observations results in a higher probability that such observations are more accurate and better understood as compared with either approach used alone. Physics-based computer simulation applied to drug discovery is now considered by experts in the field to be one of the ultimate methodologies for drug discovery. However, the ability to perform truly comprehensive physics-based molecular simulations remains limited by several factors, including the enormous computer-processing power that is required to perform

  17. AGENT-BASED MODELS IN EMPIRICAL SOCIAL RESEARCH*

    PubMed Central

    Bruch, Elizabeth; Atwell, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Agent-based modeling has become increasingly popular in recent years, but there is still no codified set of recommendations or practices for how to use these models within a program of empirical research. This article provides ideas and practical guidelines drawn from sociology, biology, computer science, epidemiology, and statistics. We first discuss the motivations for using agent-based models in both basic science and policy-oriented social research. Next, we provide an overview of methods and strategies for incorporating data on behavior and populations into agent-based models, and review techniques for validating and testing the sensitivity of agent-based models. We close with suggested directions for future research. PMID:25983351

  18. Recent developments in antiviral agents against enterovirus 71 infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV-71) is the main etiological agent of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Recent EV-71 outbreaks in Asia-Pacific were not limited to mild HFMD, but were associated with severe neurological complications such as aseptic meningitis and brainstem encephalitis, which may lead to cardiopulmonary failure and death. The absence of licensed therapeutics for clinical use has intensified research into anti-EV-71 development. This review highlights the potential antiviral agents targeting EV-71 attachment, entry, uncoating, translation, polyprotein processing, virus-induced formation of membranous RNA replication complexes, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. The strategies for antiviral development include target-based synthetic compounds, anti-rhinovirus and poliovirus libraries screening, and natural compound libraries screening. Growing knowledge of the EV-71 life cycle will lead to successful development of antivirals. The continued effort to develop antiviral agents for treatment is crucial in the absence of a vaccine. The coupling of antivirals with an effective vaccine will accelerate eradication of the disease. PMID:24521134

  19. Current and future challenges in the development of antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Rennie, Robert P

    2012-01-01

    Micro-organisms exist to survive. Even in the absence of antimicrobial agents, many have determinants of resistance that may be expressed phenotypically, should the need arise. With the advent of the antibiotic age, as more and more drugs were developed to treat serious infections, micro-organisms (particularly bacteria) rapidly developed resistance determinants to prevent their own demise.The most important determinants of resistance have been in the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Among Gram-positive bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) have taxed researchers and pharmaceutical companies to develop new agents that are effective against these resistant strains. Among the Gram-negative bacteria, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes, carbapenemases (CREs) and the so-called amp-C enzymes that may be readily transferred between species of enterobacteriaceae and other facultative species have created multi-drug resistant organisms that are difficult to treat. Other resistance determinants have been seen in other clinically important bacterial species such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Clostridium difficile, Haemophilus influenzae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These issues have now spread to fungal agents of infection.A variety of modalities have been used to stem the tide of resistance. These include the development of niche compounds that target specific resistance determinants. Other approaches have been to find new targets for antimicrobial activity, use of combination agents that are effective against more than one target in the cell, or new delivery mechanism to maximize the concentration of antimicrobial agents at the site of infection without causing toxicity to the host. It is important that such new modalities have been proved effective for clinical therapy. Animal models and non-mammalian systems have been developed to

  20. Development of spraying agent for reducing drying shrinkage of mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Hiromi; Maruoka, Masanori; Liu, Lingling

    2017-02-01

    Mortar used to repair is sometimes exposed to drying state in early ages after construction and a few days later water is sprayed frequently on the surface of the mortar in order to prevent cracks. This research studied on shrinkage characteristic of mortar subjected to drying conditions like this. The result showed that the water spraying on the mortar after initial drying did not have any effect to prevent shrinkage, but increased. And it also showed when various chemical agents are mixed and used in watersprayingit had the prevention effect on shrinkage. This report was to understand this kind of phenomenon and clarify the mechanism. In addition, based on the results, the new spraying agent was developed to reduce drying shrinkage.

  1. Recent Development of Benzimidazole-Containing Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    Song, Di; Ma, Shutao

    2016-04-05

    Clinically significant antibiotic resistance is one of the greatest challenges of the twenty-first century. However, new antibacterial agents are currently being developed at a much slower pace than our growing need for such drugs. Given their diverse biological activities and clinical applications, many bioactive heterocyclic compounds containing a benzimidazole nucleus have been the focus of interest for many researchers. The benzimidazole nucleus is a structural isostere of naturally occurring nucleotides. This advantage allows benzimidazoles to readily interact with the various biopolymers found in living systems. In view of this situation, much attention has been given to the exploration of benzimidazole-based antibacterial agents, leading to the discovery of many new chemical entities with intriguing profiles. In this minireview we summarize novel benzimidazole derivatives active against various bacterial strains. In particular, we outline the relationship between the structures of variously modified benzimidazoles and their antibacterial activity.

  2. Hereditary cancer syndromes as model systems for chemopreventive agent development.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Farzana L; Patel, Jigar; Lubet, Ronald; Rodriguez, Luz; Calzone, Kathleen A

    2016-02-01

    Research in chemoprevention has undergone a shift in emphasis for pragmatic reasons from large, phase III randomized studies to earlier phase studies focused on safety, mechanisms, and utilization of surrogate endpoints such as biomarkers instead of cancer incidence. This transition permits trials to be conducted in smaller populations and at substantially reduced costs while still yielding valuable information. This article will summarize some of the current chemoprevention challenges and the justification for the use of animal models to facilitate identification and testing of chemopreventive agents as illustrated though four inherited cancer syndromes. Preclinical models of inherited cancer syndromes serve as prototypical systems in which chemopreventive agents can be developed for ultimate application to both the sporadic and inherited cancer settings.

  3. The Assessment Agent System: Design, Development, and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the design, development, and evaluation of an online software application for assessing students' understanding of curricular content based on concept maps. This computer-based assessment program, called the Assessment Agent System, was designed by following an agent-oriented software design method. The Assessment Agent System…

  4. Brief introductory guide to agent-based modeling and an illustration from urban health research.

    PubMed

    Auchincloss, Amy H; Garcia, Leandro Martin Totaro

    2015-11-01

    There is growing interest among urban health researchers in addressing complex problems using conceptual and computation models from the field of complex systems. Agent-based modeling (ABM) is one computational modeling tool that has received a lot of interest. However, many researchers remain unfamiliar with developing and carrying out an ABM, hindering the understanding and application of it. This paper first presents a brief introductory guide to carrying out a simple agent-based model. Then, the method is illustrated by discussing a previously developed agent-based model, which explored inequalities in diet in the context of urban residential segregation.

  5. Development of polyimide foams with blowing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method of preparing a polyimide foam which includes the steps of: preparing, foaming, and curing a precursor containing at least one alkyl ester of 3,3'4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid; a meta- or para-substituted aromatic diamine; a heterocyclic diamine; an aliphatic diamine; and a solid blowing agent. The blowing agent is added to said precursor in a concentration which is sufficient to effect at least one of the following attributes of the foam: cell size, proportion of open cells, cell density, and indentation load deflection.

  6. Developing Effective Extension Agents: Experience Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goddu, Roland

    This paper is a description of the requirements placed on persons selected to fill the role of extension agents for the purpose of penetrating an educational environment, installing change in an educational organization, and completing tasks as a resource outside of the education establishment. These experience concerns are summarized by…

  7. Development of Multifunctional Luminomagnetic Nanoparticles as Bioimaging Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimun, Lawrence C.; Rightsell, Chris; Kumar, G. A.; Pedraza, Francisco; Montelongo, Sergio A.; Guda, Teja; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2015-03-01

    Trivalent rare earth doped nanocrystalline materials with multiple functionalities have drawn special attention in biomedical industry. Current research is focused on the use of various materials with dual functionality for potential multifunctional applications. In this project, we are developing near infrared(NIR) based nanocrystals (NCs) as contrast agents with multimodal features comprising of strong NIR fluorescence, X-ray fluorescence and magnetic properties by utilizing the superparamagnetic features of Gd3+, the high X-ray excitation cross section of Lu3+, and the NIR fluorescence of Nd3+. Halides, such as MGdLuF4 (M=K,Na), were doped with NIR active rare earth ions, Nd3+, where synthesis conditions have been optimized to obtain the brightest phosphor with a size of sub-50 nm. Characterization of the NCs were performed to explore the excitation and emission properties, crystal structure, morphology, magnetization properties, and X-ray fluorescence properties. The potential use of these NCs can be utilized as contrast agents for medical imaging application such as optical imaging, magnetic resonance (MRI) and X-ray imaging. This research was, in part, funded by NIGMS MBRS-RISE GM060655 and from the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials (NSF-PREM) Grant N0-DMR-0934218.

  8. System integration and development for biological warfare agent surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, Jacob A.; Green, Lance D.; Deshpande, Alina; White, P. Scott

    2007-04-01

    A wide variety of technical needs exist for surveillance, monitoring, identifying, or detecting pathogens with potential use as biological terrorism or warfare agents. Because the needs vary greatly among diverse applications, tailored systems are needed that meet performance, information, and cost requirements. A systems perspective allows developers to identify chokepoints for each application, and focus R&D investments on the limiting factors. Surveillance and detection systems are comprised of three primary components: information (markers), chemistries (assays), and instrumentation for "readout". Careful consideration of these components within the context of each application will allow for increases in efficiency and performance not generally realized when researchers focus on a single component in isolation. In fact, many application requirements can be met with simple novel combinations of existing technologies, without the need for huge investments in basic research. Here we discuss some of the key parameters for surveillance, detection, and identification of biothreat agents, and provide examples of focused development that addresses key bottlenecks, and greatly improve system performance.

  9. Developing an Agent Systems Reference Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    The notion of a reference architecture has different meanings based on the view- points and concerns of the stakeholders. In this work, a reference...functional concept defined by the ASRM and further elaborating actors and invoca- tion points . The intended audience are high-level practitioners who need...execution. Figure 1(a) displays the temporal view of a scenario demonstrating the invocation points of the agent mobility functional con- cept. The

  10. The Agent-based Approach: A New Direction for Computational Models of Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlesinger, Matthew; Parisi, Domenico

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the concepts of online and offline sampling and highlights the role of online sampling in agent-based models of learning and development. Compares the strengths of each approach for modeling particular developmental phenomena and research questions. Describes a recent agent-based model of infant causal perception. Discusses limitations…

  11. Research Recommendations for Selected IARC-Classified Agents

    EPA Science Inventory

    History of the NORA process and framework for the meeting. This is a concerted effort to identify means of reducing the insufficiency of available data for classifying particular agents in the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) system by identifying information n...

  12. Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents, 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Schreck, Carl

    1993-03-01

    This study is a continuation of ``Research to Identify Effective Antifungal Agents'' sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (Schreck et al. 1990 and Schreck et al. 1991). The objectives of the present study were to select and evaluate up to 10 candidate fungicides.

  13. The cost of developing imaging agents for routine clinical use.

    PubMed

    Nunn, Adrian D

    2006-03-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the financial cost of developing new imaging agents for clinical use and to discuss the effects of these costs on the future clinical imaging agent environment. Publicly available financial data from the annual reports of major companies developing and selling imaging agents were examined and the data used to develop cost estimates. These estimates were compared with the in-depth data and analyses available for the development costs of therapeutic drugs. The cost of developing a drug for diagnostic imaging to commercialization is in the 100 dollars to 200 million dollars range, whereas a blockbuster imaging drug has current sales of 200 dollars to 400 million dollars. Most of these blockbuster imaging agents have been on the market for some time. The majority provide morphologic images with general indications in a slowly changing section of the market. Future agents will most likely address smaller markets and be in the rapidly developing molecular imaging field. The costs are high and are a significant brake on the development of imaging agents for commercialization. If new imaging agents are to realize their commercial potential, ways must be found to make the financials more attractive. The prices per dose are currently low so they must either be greatly increased for new imaging agents, with a corresponding increase in the value of the information they provide, or the use of imaging agents must be widened and/or their development made less costly in time and money. Without addressing these issues, the commercialization of new imaging agents will continue to be slow and may get slower. This will impact the progress of imaging agents toward use as validated biomarkers.

  14. Discovery and Development of Topoisomerase Inhibitors as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Kathiravan, Muthu K; Kale, Anuj N; Nilewar, Shrikant

    2016-01-01

    As one of the leading causes of deaths worldwide, cancer is posing threat despite efforts being taken to develop effective anticancer drugs. There is an increase in number of chemotherapy treatments due to growing number of manifestations causing increasing toxicities of cytotoxic agents. Almost all the anticancer agents available till date have one or the other side effects. Topoisomerases are the attractive targets to develop effective anticancer agents. There has been development of many topoisomerase inhibitors till date and has shown good anticancer activity but their side effects outnumber their anticancer potential. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutic agents with fewer side effects. This review deals with design and development aspect of topoisomerase inhibitors as exciting novel anticancer agents. The emphasis has been laid in particular on the new potential heterocyles as TOP inhibitors in the field of medicinal chemistry. The review discusses about the topoisomerase poisons, TOP1 suppressors, TOP inhibitors and Dual TOP 1/2 inhibitors.

  15. Space biology research development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonting, Sjoerd L.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Institute is to conduct and promote research related activities regarding the search for extraterrestrial life, particularly intelligent life. Such research encompasses the broad discipline of 'Life in the Universe', including all scientific and technological aspects of astronomy and the planetary sciences, chemical evolution, the origin of life, biological evolution, and cultural evolution. The primary purpose was to provide funding for the Principal Investigator to collaborate with the personnel of the SETI Institute and the NASA-Ames Research center in order to plan and develop space biology research on and in connection with Space Station Freedom; to promote cooperation with the international partners in the space station; to conduct a study on the use of biosensors in space biology research and life support system operation; and to promote space biology research through the initiation of an annual publication 'Advances in Space Biology and Medicine'.

  16. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Tian, Ye; Yang, Yanling; Hao, Jijun

    2017-03-17

    Hedgehog signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway which is essential in embryonic and postnatal development as well as adult organ homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of Hedgehog signaling is implicated in many diseases including cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made in the past to develop potential therapeutic agents that specifically target the Hedgehog signaling for cancer treatment. Here, we review the therapeutic agents for inhibition of the Hedgehog signaling and their clinical advances in cancer treatment.

  17. Who will develop new antibacterial agents?

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Stewart T.

    2014-01-01

    The golden age of antimicrobial drug development is a distant memory, and the likelihood of there being another seems slim. In part, this is because the pharmaceutical industry, which has now adopted an unsustainable business model, abandoned the anti-infective sector, and the pipeline is almost empty. The contribution to this crisis of national governments, health agencies and funders also merits discussion. Much of the basis for drug discovery is funded by the public sector, thereby generating intellectual property and leads for drug development that are often not pursued owing to funding gaps. In particular, the cost of testing drug efficacy in clinical trials is beyond the means of most companies and organizations. Lack of a concerted international effort to develop new antimicrobials is particularly alarming at a time when multidrug-resistant bacteria threaten all areas of human medicine globally. Here, the steps that led to this situation are retraced, and some possible solutions to the dilemma are proposed. PMID:24821916

  18. Identification, Development, and Release of Insect Biocontrol Agents for the Management of Phragmites australis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    ER D C/ EL C R- 14 -2 Aquatic Plant Control Research Program Identification, Development, and Release of Insect Biocontrol Agents for...ERDC/EL CR-14-2 July 2014 Identification, Development, and Release of Insect Biocontrol Agents for the Management of Phragmites australis Bernd...and (5) assess the extent of hybridization between native and introduced genotypes. All selected insect species are stem miners that overwinter as

  19. Parents as Agents of Career Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Sylvia; Cochran, Larry

    1988-01-01

    Tested the effectiveness of program for parents to help their adolescent children in career planning using pretest-posttest control group design. Found significant effects for groups over time; of five parent-child relations and career development variables, career orientation and career items proved significant; results approached significance…

  20. Developing positive deviants as change agents.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Michael R

    2014-11-01

    In nearly every quagmire, one or more individuals surpass the issue being faced. Knowledge gained from these positive deviants-who fall outside the norm-leads to a six-step approach to problem solving that is fundamentally different than reductionistic approaches. Professional development educators can train leaders to this technique.

  1. Individualizing Professional Development for Educational Change Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Alice; Meredith, Keith

    This booklet describes the training strategies and materials developed as part of the Tucson Early Education Model (TEEM) program for training Program Assistants to foster implementation of TEEM in local school districts. The booklet contains samples of various training materials, as well as descriptions and outlines of the Summer Training…

  2. Research progress of cardioprotective agents for prevention of anthracycline cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Cui, Xiaohai; Yan, Yan; Li, Min; Yang, Ya; Wang, Jiansheng; Zhang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Anthracyclines, including doxorubicin, epirubicin, daunorubicin and aclarubicin, are widely used as chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of hematologic and solid tumor, including acute leukemia, lymphoma, breast cancer, gastric cancer, soft tissue sarcomas and ovarian cancer. In the cancer treatment, anthracyclines also can be combined with other chemotherapies and molecular-targeted drugs. The combination of anthracyclines with other therapies is usually the first-line treatment. Anthracyclines are effective and potent agents with a broad antitumor spectrum, but may cause adverse reactions, including hair loss, myelotoxicity, as well as cardiotoxicity. We used hematopoietic stimulating factors to control the myelotoxicity, such as G-CSF, EPO and TPO. However, the cardiotoxicity is the most serious side effect of anthracyclines. Clinical research and practical observations indicated that the cardiotoxicity of anthracyclines is commonly progressive and irreversible. Especially to those patients who have the first time use of anthracyclines, the damage is common. Therefore, early detection and prevention of anthracyclines induced cardiotoxicity are particularly important and has already aroused more attention in clinic. By literature review, we reviewed the research progress of cardioprotective agents for prevention of anthracycline cardiotoxicity. PMID:27508008

  3. IMS software developments for the detection of chemical warfare agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klepel, ST.; Graefenhain, U.; Lippe, R.; Stach, J.; Starrock, V.

    1995-01-01

    Interference compounds like gasoline, diesel, burning wood or fuel, etc. are presented in common battlefield situations. These compounds can cause detectors to respond as a false positive or interfere with the detector's ability to respond to target compounds such as chemical warfare agents. To ensure proper response of the ion mobility spectrometer to chemical warfare agents, two special software packages were developed and incorporated into the Bruker RAID-1. The programs suppress interferring signals caused by car exhaust or smoke gases resulting from burning materials and correct the influence of variable sample gas humidity which is important for detection and quantification of blister agents like mustard gas or lewisite.

  4. Development of a persistent chemical agent simulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A Persistent Chemical Agent Simulation System was developed (PCASS) to simulate, for force-on-force training exercises, the field environment produced by the presence of persistent chemical agents. Such a simulant system must satisfy several requirements to be of value as a training aid. Specifically, it must provide for realistic training which will generate competency in at least the following areas: (1) detection of the persistent agent presence; (2) proper use of protective equipment and procedures; (3) determination of the extent of contamination; and (4) decontamination of equipment and personnel.

  5. Development and Applications of Photo-triggered Theranostic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Prakash; Mallidi, Srivallesha; Zheng, Xiang; Rahmanzadeh, Ramtin; Mir, Youssef; Elrington, Stefan; Khurshid, Ahmat; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2010-01-01

    Theranostics, the fusion of therapy and diagnostics for optimizing efficacy and safety of therapeutic regimes, is a growing field that is paving the way towards the goal of personalized medicine for the benefit of patients. The use of light as a remote-activation mechanism for drug delivery has received increased attention due to its advantages in highly specific spatial and temporal control of compound release. Photo-triggered theranostic constructs could facilitate an entirely new category of clinical solutions which permit early recognition of the disease by enhancing contrast in various imaging modalities followed by the tailored guidance of therapy. Finally, such theranostic agents could aid imaging modalities in monitoring response to therapy. This article reviews recent developments in the use of light-triggered theranostic agents for simultaneous imaging and photoactivation of therapeutic agents. Specifically, we discuss recent developments in the use of theranostic agents for photodynamic-, photothermal- or photo-triggered chemo-therapy for several diseases. PMID:20858520

  6. Clinical nurse educators as agents for change: increasing research utilization.

    PubMed

    Milner, F Margaret; Estabrooks, C A; Humphrey, C

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research utilization among clinical nurse educators. The primary goal for clinical nurse educators is the facilitation of professional development of practicing nurses. Responsibilities include promoting best practice by mentoring others, acting as an information source, and assisting in the development of policies and procedures based on available research evidence. Using Rogers' (Diffusion of Innovations, 4th edn., The Free Press, New York) diffusion of innovations theory as a theoretical foundation, we conducted a secondary analysis to test a predictive model of research utilization using linear regression. Results show that educators report significantly higher research use than staff nurses and managers. Predictors of research utilization include attitude toward research, awareness of information based on research, and involvement in research activities. Localite communication predicted conceptual research use and mass media predicted symbolic use, lending support to the idea that overall, instrumental, conceptual, and symbolic research utilization are conceptually different from one another. Our findings show that the research utilization behaviors of clinical nurse educators position them to facilitate evidence-based nursing practice in organizations. We discuss the theoretical, conceptual, and nursing role implications of our findings for nursing practice, education, and research. Suggestions for future research includes studying actual use of research findings of clinical nurse educators and designing intervention studies that assesses the effectiveness of clinical nurse educators as facilitators of research utilization in organizations.

  7. Development of Solar Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Axel D.; Wolfschmidt, Gudrun; Duerbeck, Hilmar W.

    Originally based on a workshop on “Development of Solar Research”, held in Freiburg/Breisgau, this book contains articles on megalithic structures, the Nebra sky-disk, ancient sun cults, the observation of sunspots, the photography of the sun during eclipses, eclipse maps and expeditions, solar telescopes, solar physics during the Nazi era, archives of solar observations, scientific ballooning for solar research, site-testing on the Canary Islands, as well as on international cooperation.

  8. Hydropower research and development

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This report is a compilation of information on hydropower research and development (R and D) activities of the Federal government and hydropower industry. The report includes descriptions of on-going and planned R and D activities, 1996 funding, and anticipated future funding. Summary information on R and D projects and funding is classified into eight categories: fish passage, behavior, and response; turbine-related; monitoring tool development; hydrology; water quality; dam safety; operations and maintenance; and water resources management. Several issues in hydropower R and D are briefly discussed: duplication; priorities; coordination; technical/peer review; and technology transfer/commercialization. Project information sheets from contributors are included as an appendix.

  9. Photonics Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, Elizabeth

    2010-01-15

    During the period August 2005 through October 2009, the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF), a non-profit affiliate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), in collaboration with UNLV's Colleges of Science and Engineering; Boston University (BU); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and Sunlight Direct, LLC, has managed and conducted a diverse and comprehensive research and development program focused on light-emitting diode (LED) technologies that provide significantly improved characteristics for lighting and display applications. This final technical report provides detailed information on the nature of the tasks, the results of the research, and the deliverables. It is estimated that about five percent of the energy used in the nation is for lighting homes, buildings and streets, accounting for some 25 percent of the average home's electric bill. However, the figure is significantly higher for the commercial sector. About 60 percent of the electricity for businesses is for lighting. Thus replacement of current lighting with solid-state lighting technology has the potential to significantly reduce this nation's energy consumption by some estimates, possibly as high as 20%. The primary objective of this multi-year R&D project has been to develop and advance lighting technologies to improve national energy conversion efficiencies; reduce heat load; and significantly lower the cost of conventional lighting technologies. The UNLVRF and its partners have specifically focused these talents on (1) improving LED technologies; (2) optimizing hybrid solar lighting, a technology which potentially offers the benefits of blending natural with artificial lighting systems, thus improving energy efficiency; and (3) building a comprehensive academic infrastructure within UNLV which concentrates on photonics R&D. Task researchers have reported impressive progress in (1) the development of quantum dot laser emitting diodes (QDLEDs) which will ultimately improve energy

  10. Novel therapeutic agents in clinical development for systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Conventional immunosuppressive therapies have radically transformed patient survival in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but their use is associated with considerable toxicity and a substantial proportion of patients remain refractory to treatment. A more comprehensive understanding of the complexity of SLE immunopathogenesis has evolved over the past decade and has led to the testing of several biologic agents in clinical trials. There is a clear need for new therapeutic agents that overcome these issues, and biologic agents offer exciting prospects as future SLE therapies. An array of promising new therapies are currently emerging or are under development including B-cell depletion therapies, agents targeting B-cell survival factors, blockade of T-cell co-stimulation and anti-cytokine therapies, such as monoclonal antibodies against interleukin-6 and interferon-α. PMID:23642011

  11. Research on monocentric model of urbanization by agent-based simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ling; Yang, Kaizhong

    2008-10-01

    Over the past years, GIS have been widely used for modeling urbanization from a variety of perspectives such as digital terrain representation and overlay analysis using cell-based data platform. Similarly, simulation of urban dynamics has been achieved with the use of Cellular Automata. In contrast to these approaches, agent-based simulation provides a much more powerful set of tools. This allows researchers to set up a counterpart for real environmental and urban systems in computer for experimentation and scenario analysis. This Paper basically reviews the research on the economic mechanism of urbanization and an agent-based monocentric model is setup for further understanding the urbanization process and mechanism in China. We build an endogenous growth model with dynamic interactions between spatial agglomeration and urban development by using agent-based simulation. It simulates the migration decisions of two main types of agents, namely rural and urban households between rural and urban area. The model contains multiple economic interactions that are crucial in understanding urbanization and industrial process in China. These adaptive agents can adjust their supply and demand according to the market situation by a learning algorithm. The simulation result shows this agent-based urban model is able to perform the regeneration and to produce likely-to-occur projections of reality.

  12. Semantic Development in Infants: The Concepts of Agent and Recipient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick

    Cognitive categories in infants that have relevance for linguistic development were investigated. "Agent" and "recipient," the categories chosen, are relational categories which by definition involve action. This experiment explored infants' (48 males, 14-24 months of age) sensitivity to certain "action parameters" of events. The question of…

  13. Extension Agents as Educators for Local Volunteer Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navaratnam, K. K.

    Increasing demands for human services and current government fiscal policies may make volunteerism the major way of improving the individual living conditions and society as a whole. Extension agents are in the front line of persons capable of developing volunteerism at the local level. They have a direct link with local citizens and are familiar…

  14. New agents in development for the treatment of bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Abbanat, Darren; Morrow, Brian; Bush, Karen

    2008-10-01

    New antibacterial agents to treat infections caused by antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant pathogens are in various stages of clinical development. In this review are compounds with demonstrated activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococci including investigational cephalosporins, carbapenems, and a new tetracycline, as well as glycopeptides effective against vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and fluoroquinolones with improved potency against respiratory pathogens and multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Although most recent progress has occurred in the identification of agents for Gram-positive infections, broad-spectrum carbapenems are described for the treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Also discussed are agents with mechanisms of action other than inhibition of protein synthesis, penicillin-binding proteins, and DNA topoisomerases; among these are inhibitors of bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis, peptidoglycan synthesis, and dihydrofolate reductase.

  15. Development of a chemical vision spectrometer to detect chemical agents.

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.

    1999-02-23

    This paper describes initial work in developing a no-moving-parts hyperspectral-imaging camera that provides both a thermal image and specific identification of chemical agents, even in the presence of nontoxic plumes. The camera uses enhanced stand-off chemical agent detector (ESCAD) technology based on a conventional thermal-imaging camera interfaced with an acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF). The AOTF is programmed to allow selected spectral frequencies to reach the two dimensional array detector. These frequencies are combined to produce a spectrum that is used for identification. If a chemical agent is detected, pixels containing the agent-absorbing bands are given a colored hue to indicate the presence of the agent. In test runs, two thermal-imaging cameras were used with a specially designed vaporizer capable of controlled low-level (low ppm-m) dynamic chemical releases. The objective was to obtain baseline information about detection levels. Dynamic releases allowed for realistic detection scenarios such as low sky, grass, and wall structures, in addition to reproducible laboratory releases. Chemical releases consisted of dimethylmethylphosphonate (DMMP) and methanol. Initial results show that the combination of AOTF and thermal imaging will produce a chemical image of a plume that can be detected in the presence of interfering substances.

  16. Eltron Research & Development

    SciTech Connect

    Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard; Faull, John

    2014-03-01

    This topical report covers technical work conducted under contract DE-FC26-05NT42469 between FY06 Q1 through FY14 Q2. The project evolved through several budget periods, budget revisions and continuation applications. This report covers work performed under the “base” program. In 2010 ARRA funding was added to the project. A separate report covering the ARRA portion of the project was submitted to DOE. The original project was focused on research and development for scale-up of hydrogen separation membrane for a FutureGen type power plant. The work included membrane testing and evaluation of metal alloy flat plates vs. tubes and metal membranes vs. cermet membranes. In addition, economic analysis and process modeling was performed. The original project team included CoorsTek, NORAM, and Praxair. In FY10Q2 a continuation application was filed for conducting a scale-up test at Eastman Chemical. In this part of the project a Subscale Engineering Prototype (SEP) membrane skid was designed, fabricated, and operated on a gasified coal slip-stream on Eastman’s site in Kingsport, TN. Following operation, the project was reorganized and a second continuation application with a new statement of work was initiated in FY12Q1. Finally, based on DOE’s decision not to proceed with a Process Development Unit (PDU) field test, a third continuation application and statement of work was initiated in FY13Q1 to close out the project.

  17. Teachers as Agents of Sustainable Peace, Social Cohesion and Development: Theory, Practice & Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novelli, Mario; Sayed, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a "peace with social justice" framework for analysing the role of teachers as agents of sustainable peace, social cohesion and development and applies this to research evidence from Pakistan, Uganda, Myanmar and South Africa. The paper draws on evidence from a recently completed UNICEF and ESRC funded project on…

  18. The Role of Social Context and Agent in the Development of Abstract Rights Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helwig, Charles C.

    Research suggests that adolescents as young as 13 years old reason about such abstract rights as freedom of speech and religion. It is unclear whether such reasoning develops earlier. Also unclear is the role of adults as agents in inculating in children the adults' views on such rights. A study examined 184 Canadian students in the first, third,…

  19. Supporting Teachers in Becoming Agents of Social Cohesion: Professional Development in Post- Apartheid South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogliacci, Rada Jancic; Raanhuis, Joyce; Howell, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Policy and research have been advocating the importance of teachers in achieving equity and teachers are called to act as agents of social justice. This issue remains central to the development of a post-apartheid South Africa, where a need for reconciliation and healing still dominates the society. Such a landscape requires adequate support…

  20. Work-Based Research in a Large Organisation: The Transformation from Change Agent to Researcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a reflection on my journey in a work-based (WB) research project while completing my PhD at a large Australian university. The paper explores issues that arose as I studied strategic change in the university and my role evolved from that of a "change agent" working as part of a project team to that of a researcher. A case…

  1. External Change Agents in Developed and Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tajik, Mir Afzal

    2008-01-01

    During the last four decades, educational researchers and practitioners have intensively engaged in bringing about positive changes in schools. Therefore, the kinds of changes introduced to schools have become complex in nature and overwhelming in number--from improving teacher professional knowledge base and teaching repertoires to developing…

  2. Development of a Rapid Decontamination System for the Nerve Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-15

    using Ag+ and Fe2O3 as dopants on sodalite , Y zeolite and MCM-41 supports were investigated in order to develop a...more efficient and safe catalyst for the photodecomposition of dangerous nerve agents. Ag- sodalite , Ag/Fe2O3- sodalite , Ag-Y zeolite, Ag-MCM-41 and Ag...at the Edgewood Chemical and Biological Center. While catalysts perform differently depending on the excitation wavelength used, the Ag- sodalite

  3. Chromatographic immunoassays: strategies and recent developments in the analysis of drugs and biological agents

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Ryan; Rodriguez, Elliott; Suresh, Doddavenkatanna; Hage, David S

    2015-01-01

    A chromatographic immunoassay is a technique in which an antibody or antibody-related agent is used as part of a chromatographic system for the isolation or measurement of a specific target. Various binding agents, detection methods, supports and assay formats have been developed for this group of methods, and applications have been reported that range from drugs, hormones and herbicides to peptides, proteins and bacteria. This review discusses the general principles and applications of chromatographic immunoassays, with an emphasis being given to methods and formats that have been developed for the analysis of drugs and biological agents. The relative advantages or limitations of each format are discussed. Recent developments and research in this field, as well as possible future directions, are also considered. PMID:26571109

  4. The utility of animal models in developing immunosuppressive agents.

    PubMed

    McDaid, James; Scott, Christopher J; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Chen, Huifang; Martins, Paulo N

    2015-07-15

    The immune system comprises an integrated network of cellular interactions. Some responses are predictable, while others are more stochastic. While in vitro the outcome of stimulating a single type of cell may be stereotyped and reproducible, in vivo this is often not the case. This phenomenon often merits the use of animal models in predicting the impact of immunosuppressant drugs. A heavy burden of responsibility lies on the shoulders of the investigator when using animal models to study immunosuppressive agents. The principles of the three R׳s: refine (less suffering,), reduce (lower animal numbers) and replace (alternative in vitro assays) must be applied, as described elsewhere in this issue. Well designed animal model experiments have allowed us to develop all the immunosuppressive agents currently available for treating autoimmune disease and transplant recipients. In this review, we examine the common animal models used in developing immunosuppressive agents, focusing on drugs used in transplant surgery. Autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, are covered elsewhere in this issue. We look at the utility and limitations of small and large animal models in measuring potency and toxicity of immunosuppressive therapies.

  5. Biologic Agents for Periodontal Regeneration and Implant Site Development

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-López del Amo, Fernando; Monje, Alberto; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Tang, ZhiHui; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of molecular mediators or biologic agents has increased tremendously during the last decade in periodontology and dental implantology. Implant site development and reconstruction of the lost periodontium represent main fields in which these molecular mediators have been employed and investigated. Different growth factors trigger different reactions in the tissues of the periodontium at various cellular levels. Proliferation, migration, and differentiation constitute the main target areas of these molecular mediators. It was the purpose of this comprehensive review to describe the origin and rationale, evidence, and the most current understanding of the following biologic agents: Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB), Enamel Matrix Derivate (EMD), Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) and Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF), Recombinant Human Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 (rhFGF-2), Bone Morphogenic Proteins (BMPs, BMP-2 and BMP-7), Teriparatide PTH, and Growth Differential Factor-5 (GDF-5). PMID:26509173

  6. Development and characterization of a nano-scale contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Oeffinger, Brian E; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2004-04-01

    Agents injected parenterally must be less than approximately 8 microm diameter in order to traverse the capillaries in the pulmonary bed, but these agents remain in the vasculature until they are eliminated from the body by a variety of mechanisms. Targeting of cells outside the capillaries requires agent diameters of less than approximately 700 nm to enable escape through the larger-than-usual pores that have been noted in the leaky vasculature of a tumor. The objective of this study was to test the feasibility of creating a surfactant-stabilized nano-bubble with favorable acoustic properties, and identify the key parameters that influence size, yield and stability. Size distribution was characterized using laser light scattering. In vitro acoustic enhancement was assessed by generation of dose and time response curves. We previously developed a successful protocol to generate gas-filled microbubbles (containing perfluorocarbon, sulfur hexafluoride or air) with mean diameter of 1.5 microm, using sonication of carefully selected surfactant mixtures. This presentation describes generation of nano-bubbles with mean diameters ranging from 700 to 450 nm, depending on process variables. In all cases a centrifugation step was employed to separate the nano-sized particles. The in vitro dose response curves gave a maximum of 23-27 dB enhancement compared to buffer in the absence of agent, with the maximum enhancement and presence of shadowing at higher doses being dependent on the fabrication protocol. The effect of sonication time for solutions containing a mixture of the surfactants (Span 60 and Tween 80) was also tested, but was determined not to be an influencing factor. Future studies will involve development of a mathematical model characterizing the mean size as a function of centrifugal force, spin time and initial size distribution. Future work will also include imaging of tumor-bearing mice and measuring imaging potential in vivo in New Zealand white rabbits

  7. Agent-Based Learning Environments as a Research Tool for Investigating Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylor, Amy L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses intelligent learning environments for computer-based learning, such as agent-based learning environments, and their advantages over human-based instruction. Considers the effects of multiple agents; agents and research design; the use of Multiple Intelligent Mentors Instructing Collaboratively (MIMIC) for instructional design for…

  8. Career Development in Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark D.

    1982-01-01

    The background, skills, and views of 20 distinguished professionals were surveyed to provide information about career development in institutional research and to provide ideas about program development. The respondents were members of the Association for Institutional Research and they included seven institutional researchers and planners, three…

  9. Research and Development for Safeguards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Guy M.

    This report summarizes the results of unclassified research and development contracts in the field of peaceful use safeguards regarding the use of nuclear material. These summaries indicate there is really no sharp line of demarcation between research for safeguards and research for many other purposes. It includes areas of research effort and…

  10. The development of immunoassays for detection of chemical warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, D.E.; Brimfield, A.A.; Cook, L.

    1996-10-01

    With the advent of enzyme linked immunoabsorbent assays (ELISA) and monoclonal antibodies in the last two decades, there has been considerable effort devoted to the development of antibodies to detect and quantify low molecular weight toxic substances in environmental or biological fluids. Polyclonal antibodies against paraoxon (the toxic metabolite of parathion) were capable of detecting paraoxon in body fluids at a level of 10{sup -9} M ({approximately}260 pg/mL) when used in a competitive inhibition enzyme immunoassay (CIEIA). Monoclonal antibodies developed against a structural analogue of the chemical warfare agent soman were capable of detection soman in buffer solutions at a level of 10{sup -6} M ({approximately}180 ng/mL). In addition these antibodies were found to be highly specific for soman even in the presence of its major hydrolysis product. Subsequent studies with antisoman monoclonal antibodies extended the level of sensitivity to {approximately}80 ng/mL. Furthermore these antibodies did not cross react with other chemical warfare nerve agents such as sarin or tabun. In all cases, the time for a confirmatory test was two hours or less. Immunoassays for T-2 micotoxins have also been reported with a minimal detection range of 2 pg/assay to 50 ng/assay for the polyclonal and monoclonal T-2 antibodies respectively. These reagents offer a sensitive, rapid and low cost approach to the diagnosis or detection of the presence of toxic chemical substances. More recent efforts have focussed on developing antibodies specific for sulfur mustard a highly reactive vesicating agent.

  11. Agents.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    Although health care is inherently an economic activity, it is inadequately described as a market process. An alternative, grounded in organizational economic theory, is to view professionals and many others as agents, contracted to advance the best interests of their principals (patients). This view untangles some of the ethical conflicts in dentistry. It also helps identify major controllable costs in dentistry and suggests that dentists can act as a group to increase or decrease agency costs, primarily by controlling the bad actors who damage the value of all dentists.

  12. Developing the Manufacturing Process for Hylene MP Curing Agent

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, Eric

    2009-02-16

    This report details efforts to scale-up and re-establish the manufacturing process for the curing agent known as Hylene MP. First, small scale reactions were completed with varying conditions to determine key drivers for yielding high quality product. Once the optimum conditions were determined on the small scale, the scaled-up process conditions were determined. New equipment was incorporated into the manufacturing process to create a closed production system and improve chemical exposure controls and improve worker safety. A safe, efficient manufacturing process was developed to manufacture high quality Hylene MP in large quantities.

  13. Development and Structural Modifications of Cholinesterase Reactivators against Chemical Warfare Agents in Last Decade: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rahul; Gupta, Bhanushree; Singh, Namrata; Acharya, J R; Musilek, Kamil; Kuca, Kamil; Ghosh, Kallol Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate (OP) pesticides and nerve agents are responsible for suicidal and accidental poisonings. The acute toxicity of nerve agents leads to progressive inhibition of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by phosphylation of serine residue at the active site of gorge. The recent massive destruction of Syrian civilians by nerve gas sarin, has again renewed the research attention of global science fraternity towards nerve agents, their mode of action and most prominently their therapeutic treatment. This review is principally focused on nerve agent intoxication. The common approach to deal with OP-intoxication is, application of antimuscarinic drug (atropine), anticonvulsant drug (diazepam) and clinically used oximes (pralidoxime, trimedoxime, obidoxime and asoxime). However, the existing therapeutic approach is arguable and has several failings to cure all kinds of nerve agent poisonings. Considering this issue, numerous oximes have been synthesized and screened through various in-vitro and in-vivo studies in last decade to overcome the downsides. At present, only a few oximes (bis pyridinum-oximes) exhibit sound efficacy against selective OPs. In spite of extensive efforts, till date no oxime is available as a universal antidote against all the classes of OPs. This review is centered on the recent developments and structural modification of AChE reactivators against nerve agent toxicity. In particular, a deeper look has been taken into chemical modifications of the reactivators by incorporation of different structural moieties targeted towards the increased reactivation affinity and improved blood brain barrier (BBB) penetration.

  14. Professional Development. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2004-01-01

    According to the literature, the purpose of professional development is to improve student learning. It was noted that there appeared to be a direct correlation between the depth of the teacher's content knowledge, methodologies, student-teacher relationships, and reflection, that when applied to an improvement in practices, positively affected…

  15. Development of a Persistent Chemical Agent Simulator System (PCASS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginness, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a persistent chemical agent simulation system (PCASS) is described. This PCASS is to be used for the military training of troops to simulate actual chemical warfare. The purpose of this system is to facilitate in the determination of chemical contamination and effectiveness of decontamination for training purposes. The fluorescent tracer employed has no daylight activation, but yet is easily removed with a decontaminate solution or water and surfactants. Also employed is a time delayed color developing system. When an individual is subjected to the PCASS and does not decontaminate adequately, red blotches or red coloration will develop as a function of time and temperature. The intent of this is to simulate the delayed chemical reaction of mustard contaminates.

  16. Texas 4-H Agents' Perceptions of Selected Competencies in the 4-H Professional Research, Knowledge, and Competencies Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harder, Amy; Wingenbach, Gary J.

    2008-01-01

    There are many competencies necessary for success as a 4-H agent. The 4-H Professional Research, Knowledge, and Competencies (PRKC) Model organizes competencies into six domains: (a) Youth Development, (b) Youth Program Development, (c) Volunteerism, (d) Partnerships, (e) Organizational Systems, and (f) Equity, Access and Opportunity (National 4-H…

  17. A task-oriented modular and agent-based collaborative design mechanism for distributed product development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinfei; Chen, Ming; Wang, Lei; Wu, Qidi

    2014-05-01

    The rapid expansion of enterprises makes product collaborative design (PCD) a critical issue under the distributed heterogeneous environment, but as the collaborative task of large-scale network becomes more complicated, neither unified task decomposition and allocation methodology nor Agent-based network management platform can satisfy the increasing demands. In this paper, to meet requirements of PCD for distributed product development, a collaborative design mechanism based on the thought of modularity and the Agent technology is presented. First, the top-down 4-tier process model based on task-oriented modular and Agent is constructed for PCD after analyzing the mapping relationships between requirements and functions in the collaborative design. Second, on basis of sub-task decomposition for PCD based on a mixed method, the mathematic model of task-oriented modular based on multi-objective optimization is established to maximize the module cohesion degree and minimize the module coupling degree, while considering the module executable degree as a restriction. The mathematic model is optimized and simulated by the modified PSO, and the decomposed modules are obtained. Finally, the Agent structure model for collaborative design is put forward, and the optimism matching Agents are selected by using similarity algorithm to implement different task-modules by the integrated reasoning and decision-making mechanism with the behavioral model of collaborative design Agents. With the results of experimental studies for automobile collaborative design, the feasibility and efficiency of this methodology of task-oriented modular and Agent-based collaborative design in the distributed heterogeneous environment are verified. On this basis, an integrative automobile collaborative R&D platform is developed. This research provides an effective platform for automobile manufacturing enterprises to achieve PCD, and helps to promote product numeralization collaborative R&D and

  18. Funding Research Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momcheva, Ivelina G.

    2017-01-01

    Astronomical software is used by each and every member of our scientific community. Purpose-build software is becoming ever more critical as we enter the regime of large datasets and simulations of increasing complexity. However, financial investments in building, maintaining and renovating the software infrastructure have been uneven. In this talk I will summarize past and current funding sources for astronomical software development, discuss other models of funding and introduce a new initiative for supporting community software at STScI. The purpose of this talk is to prompt discussion about how we allocate resources to this vital infrastructure.

  19. The development of immunoassays for detection of chemical warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lenz, D.E.

    1995-06-01

    With the advent of enzyme linked immunoabsorbant assays (ELISA) and monoclonal antibodies in the last two decades, there has been considerable effort devoted to the development of antibodies to detect and quantify low molecular weight toxic substances in environmental or biological fluids. Polyclonal antibodies against paraoxon (the toxic metabolite of parathion) were reported as capable of detecting paraoxon in body fluids at a level of 10{sup -9} M ({approximately}260 pg/mL) when used in a competitive inhibition enzyme immunoassay (CIEIA). Monoclonal antibodies developed against a structural analogue of the chemical warfare agent soman were capable of detecting soman in buffer solutions at a level of 10{sup -6} M ({approximately}180 ng/mL). In addition, these antibodies were highly specific for soman even in the presence of its major hydrolysis product. Subsequent studies with antisoman monoclonal antibodies reported an extension of the level of sensitivity to -80 ng/mL. Furthermore these antibodies did not cross react with other chemical warfare nerve agents such as sarin or tabun. In all cases, the time for a confirmatory test was two hours or less. Immunoassays for T-2 micotoxins have also been reported with a minimal detection range of 2 pg/assay to 50 ng/assay for the polyclonal and monoclonal T-2 antibodies respectively. These antibodies offer a sensitive, rapid and low cost approach to the diagnosis or detection of the presence of toxic chemical substances.

  20. Translational Research and Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Borrowing the term "translational research" (TR) from medicine, along with some of the ideas and practices that define it, holds promise as a way of linking research more closely to the practice of youth development. However, doing so entails substantial adaptation. TR is more than a new name for applied research. It comprehends the…

  1. Research and Development. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    Research and Development is a laboratory-oriented course that includes the appropriate common essential elements for industrial technology education plus concepts and skills related to research and development. This guide provides teachers of the course with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an…

  2. Technical Report (Final): Development of Solid State Reagents for Preparing Radiolabeled Imaging Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Kabalka, George W

    2011-05-20

    The goal of this research was on the development of new, rapid, and efficient synthetic methods for incorporating short-lived radionuclides into agents of use in measuring dynamic processes. The initial project period (Year 1) was focused on the preparation of stable, solid state precursors that could be used to efficiently incorporate short-lived radioisotopes into small molecules of use in biological applications (environmental, plant, and animal). The investigation included development and evaluation of new methods for preparing carbon-carbon and carbon-halogen bonds for use in constructing the substrates to be radiolabeled. The second phase (Year 2) was focused on developing isotope incorporation techniques using the stable, boronated polymeric precursors. The final phase (Year 3), was focused on the preparation of specific radiolabeled agents and evaluation of their biodistribution using micro-PET and micro-SPECT. In addition, we began the development of a new series of polymeric borane reagents based on polyethylene glycol backbones.

  3. Career Development of Free Agent Workers. ERIC Digest No. 228.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Susan

    Various economic, technology-related, and other factors have converged to serve as a catalyst for the emergence of workers who consider themselves free agents. Estimates of the number of free agent workers range from 12.9 to 25 million. Individual free agent workers may take widely varying approaches to their careers; however, all have taken…

  4. Discovery and development of natural product-derived chemotherapeutic agents based on a medicinal chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2010-03-26

    Medicinal plants have long been an excellent source of pharmaceutical agents. Accordingly, the long-term objectives of the author's research program are to discover and design new chemotherapeutic agents based on plant-derived compound leads by using a medicinal chemistry approach, which is a combination of chemistry and biology. Different examples of promising bioactive natural products and their synthetic analogues, including sesquiterpene lactones, quassinoids, naphthoquinones, phenylquinolones, dithiophenediones, neo-tanshinlactone, tylophorine, suksdorfin, DCK, and DCP, will be presented with respect to their discovery and preclinical development as potential clinical trial candidates. Research approaches include bioactivity- or mechanism of action-directed isolation and characterization of active compounds, rational drug design-based modification and analogue synthesis, and structure-activity relationship and mechanism of action studies. Current clinical trial agents discovered by the Natural Products Research Laboratories, University of North Carolina, include bevirimat (dimethyl succinyl betulinic acid), which is now in phase IIb trials for treating AIDS. Bevirimat is also the first in a new class of HIV drug candidates called "maturation inhibitors". In addition, an etoposide analogue, GL-331, progressed to anticancer phase II clinical trials, and the curcumin analogue JC-9 is in phase II clinical trials for treating acne and in development for trials against prostate cancer. The discovery and development of these clinical trial candidates will also be discussed.

  5. Development of Tc-99m Imaging Agents for Abeta Plaques

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Ping, Zhuang; Mei-Ping Kung; Catherihne Hou; Hank F. Kung

    2008-09-26

    Development of SPECT imaging agents based on Tc-99m targeting Aβ plaques is useful for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A stilbene derivative, [11C]SB-13, showing promise in detecting senile plaques present in AD patients has been reported previously1,2. Based on the 4’-amino-stilbene core structure we have added substituted groups through which a chelating group, N2S2, was conjugated. We report herein a series of Tc-99m labeled stilbene derivative conjugated with a TcO[N2S2] core. The syntheses of stilbenes containing a N2S2 chelating ligand are achieved by a scheme shown. Lipophilic 99mTc stilbene complexes were successfully prepared and purified through HPLC. Preliminary results of in vitro labeling of brain sections from transgenic mice showed very promising plaque labeling. These 99mTc stilbene derivatives are warranted for further evaluations as potential imaging agents targeting amyloid plaques.

  6. Cyclodepsipeptides from Marine Sponges: Natural Agents for Drug Research

    PubMed Central

    Andavan, Gowri Shankar Bagavananthem; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    A number of natural products from marine sponges, such as cyclodepsipeptides, have been identified. The structural characteristics of this family of cyclic peptides include various unusual amino acid residues and unique N-terminal polyketide-derived moieties. Papuamides are representatives of a class of marine sponge derived cyclic depsipeptides, including callipeltin A, celebesides A and B, homophymine A, mirabamides, microspinosamide, neamphamide A and theopapuamides. They are thought to have cytoprotective activity against HIV-1 in vitro by inhibiting viral entry. Jasplakinolide, a representative member of marine sponge-derived cyclodepsipeptides that include arenastatin A, geodiamolides, homophymines, spongidepsin and theopapuamides, is a potent inducer of actin polymerization in vitro. Although actin dynamics is essential for tumor metasasis, no actin targeting drugs have been used in clinical trials due to their severe cytotoxicity. Nonetheless, the actin cytoskeleton remains a potential target for anti-cancer drug development. These features imply the use of cyclodepsipeptides as molecular models in drug research. PMID:20411126

  7. Development of pretreatment compounds against nerve-gas agents. Annual report (Final), 16 May 88-30 Sep 90

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, F.I.; Abraham, P.

    1990-09-30

    The U. S. Army Medical Research and Development Command is interested in research directed toward the development of countermeasures to chemical warfare (CW) agents such as the nerve gas poison soman. Soman and other nerve gas poisons are extremely potent cholinesterase inhibitors. This inhibition leads to a buildup of excess acetylcholine resulting in over-stimulation of both the peripheral and central nervous system and can lead to death. Standard therapy for organophosphate nerve agent poisoning is based on co-administration of an anticholinergic agent such as atropine to antagonize the effects of accumulated acetylcholine and a cholinesterase reactivator such as 2-PAM to dephosphorylate the inhibited enzyme. However, since many problems remain in the treatment of organophosphate nerve agent poisoning, there is considerable interest and need to develop new pretreatment and treatment drugs, particularly for soman poisoning.

  8. Development of biosensors for the detection of biological warfare agents: its issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Harish; Rani, Renu

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses current development in biosensors for the detection of biological warfare agents (BWAs). BWAs include bacteria, virus and toxins that are added deliberately into air water and food to spread terrorism and cause disease or death. The rapid and unambiguous detection and identification of BWAs with early warning signals for detecting possible biological attack is a major challenge for government agencies particularly military and health. The detection devices--biosensors--can be classified (according to their physicochemical transducers) into four types: electrochemical, nucleic acid, optical and piezoelectric. Advantages and limitations of biosensors are discussed in this review followed by an assessment of the current state of development of different types of biosensors. The research and development in biosensors for biological warfare agent detection is of great interest for the public as well as for governments.

  9. Using Agent Based Modeling (ABM) to Develop Cultural Interaction Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drucker, Nick; Jones, Phillip N.

    2012-01-01

    Today, most cultural training is based on or built around "cultural engagements" or discrete interactions between the individual learner and one or more cultural "others". Often, success in the engagement is the end or the objective. In reality, these interactions usually involve secondary and tertiary effects with potentially wide ranging consequences. The concern is that learning culture within a strict engagement context might lead to "checklist" cultural thinking that will not empower learners to understand the full consequence of their actions. We propose the use of agent based modeling (ABM) to collect, store, and, simulating the effects of social networks, promulgate engagement effects over time, distance, and consequence. The ABM development allows for rapid modification to re-create any number of population types, extending the applicability of the model to any requirement for social modeling.

  10. Current contraceptive research and development.

    PubMed

    Reape, Kathleen Z

    2005-10-01

    The approval of various new contraceptive products in recent years has resulted in broadening the options available to women. Trends in contraceptive research for hormonal products include variations in dose and dosing regimens, introduction of novel compounds, evaluation of products for noncontraceptive indications, and development of nonoral delivery systems and male contraceptives. Nonhormonal areas of research include microbicidal products, dual protection methods, and contraceptive vaccines. For each of these categories, contraceptive products currently in development and the potential implications for adolescents are discussed. Ongoing contraceptive research and development activity is robust and should ensure the continued availability of various new products for adolescents.

  11. Development of superior asphalt recycling agents. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Glover, C.J.; Davison, R.R.; Chaffin, J.; Lin, Moon-Sun

    1995-07-01

    About 27 million tons of asphalt and nearly twenty times this much aggregate are consumed each year to build and maintain over two million miles of roads in this country. Over a cycle of about 12 years on the average, these roads must be reworked and much of these millions of tons of rock and asphalt cannot be reused with present recycling technology. Instead, much of the maintenance is accomplished by placing thick layers (hot-mix overlays) of new material on top of the failed material. This results in considerable waste of material, both in terms of quality aggregate and in terms of asphalt binder. In addition, the new asphalt binder represents a significant source of potential energy. The main impediment to recycling asphalt binder is the poorly developed science of recycling agent composition and, as a result, optimum recycling agents are not available. An excellent recycling agent should not only be able to reduce the viscosity of the aged material, but it must also be able to restore compatibility. The properties of the old material and recycling agent must be compatible to give both good initial properties and aging characteristics, and this must be understood. The agent must also be inexpensive and easily manufactured. A large quantity of potential feedstock for the production of recycling agents is available and much of it is now fed to cokers. This material could be recovered by supercritical extraction which is an existing refinery technology. A supercritical pilot plant is available at Texas A&M and has been used to produce fractions for study. The objective of this research is to establish the technical feasibility of determining the specifications and operating parameters necessary to produce high quality recycling agents which will allow most old asphalt-based road material to be recycled.

  12. Mentoring for research skill development.

    PubMed

    Records, Kathie; Emerson, Roberta J

    2003-12-01

    The nursing shortage is significantly affecting the nursing academic environment. A self-perpetuating cycle of insufficient numbers of faculty with inadequate preparation for academia could lead to a profound decline in the nursing profession. Institutions often implement mentoring plans for new tenure track faculty, and the challenge is even greater in environments that are not research intensive. This article describes the implementation of the research arm of an institutional mentoring plan for new tenure track faculty. The plan was designed to facilitate new faculty's attainment of tenure, while expediting the development of a satisfying career in academia. Doctoral education does not necessarily provide graduates with all the tools required to be successful researchers. However, specific guidance may be provided in the developing of a research program; creating networks and selecting consultants; preparing presentations and publications; and developing grantsmanship skills, particularly for institutions without established research centers.

  13. Choice of approaches in developing novel medical countermeasures for nerve agent poisoning.

    PubMed

    Myhrer, Trond; Aas, Pål

    2014-09-01

    During the establishment of a research branch, all relevant matters encountered will be of interest to study. After having acquired a body of basal knowledge, it becomes possible to derive ideas or hypotheses for further elaboration of information. The purpose of the present study was to show that therapies for nerve agent poisoning based on specific neuropharmacological approaches can have greater probability for being successful than treatment regimens based on fragmental research or serendipitous discoveries. By following the guidelines for research in experimental epilepsy, neuronal target areas for nerve agents have been identified through lesion studies, and critical receptors for pharmacological treatment have been specified through microinfusion studies of rats. Subsequent experimentations have shown that the results achieved from microinfusion studies are transferable to systemic administration. It is demonstrated that a treatment regimen developed through the novel approach is more efficacious than regimens derived from conventional research on countermeasures. A therapy consisting of HI-6, levetiracetam, and procyclidine that has been worked out along the new lines, exerts powerful anticonvulsant capacity and appears to have universal utility as a stand-alone therapy against soman intoxication in rats. It would be of great interest to examine whether the latter findings can be expanded to other animal species than rats and other classical nerve agents than soman.

  14. Small business innovation, research & development

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, D.P.

    1995-12-31

    Historically, small businesses have been the innovation engine of the United States (US). The author provides statistical data that indicates that small business is really big business in the U.S. Small businesses are responsible for much of the applied research necessary for new product development. The author examines productivity, academic research and teaming as a cost-effective and time effective way to develop new products and technologies.

  15. A Methodology For Developing an Agent Systems Reference Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    are the start- ing point for the analysis process. 2.3 The Agent Systems Reference Architecture The Agent Systems Reference Architecture (ASRA) is an...process diagram from the common features across the agent framework implementations while documenting differences as points of variation. This abstract...architecture for the functional concept and the points for variation comprise the Process View. 3. Construct the Implementation View using the static

  16. Research of negotiation in network trade system based on multi-agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jun; Wang, Guozheng; Wu, Haiyan

    2009-07-01

    A construction and implementation technology of network trade based on multi-agent is described in this paper. First, we researched the technology of multi-agent, then we discussed the consumer's behaviors and the negotiation between purchaser and bargainer which emerges in the traditional business mode and analysed the key technology to implement the network trade system. Finally, we implement the system.

  17. School Development Program. Research Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Norris M., Ed.

    This book presents a compilation of papers generated by the research unit of the Comer School Development Program. The program operates from the basic theme that if school staff understand child development and how to organize and manage their school building as a social system, a climate that facilitates learning among the greatest number of…

  18. Using software agents to maintain autonomous patient registries for clinical research.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, S. N.; Rabbani, U. H.; Barnett, G. O.

    1997-01-01

    A software agent is an application that can function in an autonomous and intelligent fashion. We have used mobile software agents to maintain clinicians' patient research databases (patient registries). Agents were used to acquire data from the clinician and place it into the registries, copy data from hospital databases into the registries, and report data from the registries. The agents were programmed with the intelligence to navigate through complex network security, interact with legacy systems, and protect themselves from various forms of failure at multiple levels. To maximize the separation between our system and the hospital information infrastructure we often used Java, a platform-independent language, to program and distribute our software agents. By using mobile agents, we were able to distribute the computing time required by these applications to underutilized host machines upon which the registries could be maintained. PMID:9357591

  19. Using software agents to maintain autonomous patient registries for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Murphy, S N; Rabbani, U H; Barnett, G O

    1997-01-01

    A software agent is an application that can function in an autonomous and intelligent fashion. We have used mobile software agents to maintain clinicians' patient research databases (patient registries). Agents were used to acquire data from the clinician and place it into the registries, copy data from hospital databases into the registries, and report data from the registries. The agents were programmed with the intelligence to navigate through complex network security, interact with legacy systems, and protect themselves from various forms of failure at multiple levels. To maximize the separation between our system and the hospital information infrastructure we often used Java, a platform-independent language, to program and distribute our software agents. By using mobile agents, we were able to distribute the computing time required by these applications to underutilized host machines upon which the registries could be maintained.

  20. Development of novel epidermal growth receptor-basedradiopharmaceuticals: Imaging agents for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Van Brocklin, Henry F.

    2001-09-25

    The goal of this research was to develop epidermal growthfactor receptor (EGFR) nuclear medicine breast cancer imaging agents. Ourapproach was to synthesize small molecule inhibitors of the EGFR tyrosinekinase (tk) suitable for labeling with single photon or positron-emittingradioisotopes and evaluate the imaging potential of these new molecules.We have synthesized and fully characterized 22 quinazoline compounds. Allcompounds inhibit EGFR tk phosphorylation activity in the nanomolarrange. All compounds tested exhibited specificity for the EGFR tk versusthe ErbB2 and ErbB4 tyrosine kinases. A radiometric binding assay usingan iodine-125 labeled quinazoline was developed to determine the affinityof the quinazolines for the EGFR tk ATP binding site. The affinitiesranged from 0.4-51 nM. The octanol/water partition coefficients (Log P;lipophilicity) of the new compounds ranged from 2.2-5.5. Six compoundshave been labeled with fluorine-18. Biodistribution in EGFRoverexpressing tumor bearing mice demonstrated tumor uptake buthighlighted delivery and metabolism issues. The 2-fluoro quinazoline wasnot metabolized in an in vitro hepatocyte study. From this work a breadthof agent characteristics was created establishing the foundation forfuture research toward the optimal EGFR imaging agent.

  1. Development of Oseltamivir Phosphonate Congeners as Anti-Influenza Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ting-Jen R.; Weinheimer, Steven; Tarbet, E. Bart; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Cheng, Yih-Shyun E.; Shie, Jiun-Jie; Chen, Chun-Lin; Chen, Chih-An; Hsieh, Wei-Che; Huang, Pei-Wei; Lin, Wen-Hao; Wang, Shi-Yun; Fang, Jim-Min; Hu, Oliver Yoa-Pu; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2012-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphonic acid (tamiphosphor, 3a), its monoethyl ester (3c), guanidino-tamiphosphor (4a) and its monoethyl ester (4c) are potent inhibitors of influenza neuraminidases. They inhibit the replication of influenza viruses, including the oseltamivir-resistant H275Y strain, at low nM to pM levels, and significantly protect mice from infection with lethal doses of influenza viruses when orally administered with 1 mg/kg or higher doses. These compounds are stable in simulated gastric fluid, liver microsomes and human blood, and are largely free from binding to plasma proteins. Pharmacokinetic properties of these inhibitors are thoroughly studied in dogs, rats and mice. The absolute oral bioavailability of these compounds was lower than 12%. No conversion of monoester 4c to phosphonic acid 4a was observed in rats after intravenous administration, but partial conversion of 4c was observed with oral administration. Advanced formulation may be investigated to develop these new anti-influenza agents for better therapeutic use. PMID:23009169

  2. UCLA accelerator research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This progress report covers work supported by the above DOE grant over the period November 1, 1991 to July 31, 1992. The work is a program of experimental and theoretical studies in advanced particle accelerator research and development for high energy physics applications. The program features research at particle beam facilities in the United States and includes research on novel high power sources, novel focussing systems (e.g. plasma lens), beam monitors, novel high brightness, high current gun systems, and novel flavor factories in particular the {phi} Factory.

  3. Magnesium Research and Technology Development

    SciTech Connect

    Nyberg, Eric A.; Joost, William; Smith, Mark T.

    2009-12-30

    The Magnesium Research and Technical Development (MR&TD) project supports efforts to increase using magnesium in automotive applications, including improving technology, lowering costs and increasing the knowledge needed to enable alloy and manufacturing process optimization. MR&TD supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/United States Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) Magnesium Front End Research and Development (MFERD) project in collaboration with China and Canada. The MR&TD projects also maintains the magnesium bibliographic database at magnesium.pnl.gov.

  4. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  5. Recent progress in the development of tubulin inhibitors as antimitotic antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Chen, K; Morris-Natschke, S L; Lee, K H

    1998-06-01

    Tubulin protein is a major target of drug molecules, and consequently, tubulin inhibitors have attracted great attention as antimitotic antitumor agents for chemotherapeutic use. Hundreds of synthetic or semisynthetic tubulin inhibitors have been discovered and developed recently that are related to the natural products colchicine, vinblastine, and taxol. Representatives include allothiocolchicinoids, vinorelbine, and taxotere. This review will describe the recent progress being made in the development of novel antimitotic antitumor tubulin inhibitors. The emphasis has been placed on related research in the author's laboratory, including development of colchicine derivatives and other colchicine binding site drugs, such as flavonoids and quinolone derivatives. Syntheses and modifications of novel compounds, biological activity evaluation, and structural activity relationships will be discussed as well. Further research will undoubtedly lead to the discovery of additional tubulin inhibitors that have potential for use as anticancer drugs.

  6. Developing Professional Researchers: Research Students' Graduate Attributes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manathunga, Catherine; Lant, Paul; Mellick, George

    2007-01-01

    The impetus to broaden the scope of research education is not new. Since the 1970s, concern has been expressed about the suitability of research education as preparation for a research career outside academe. Universities have been criticized for producing over-specialized research graduates, who struggle to apply their expertise to new workplace…

  7. NGNP Research and Development Status

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Petti

    2010-08-01

    At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, experts from the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, gas reactor vendors, and universities collaborated to establish technology research and development (R&D) roadmaps. These roadmaps outlined the testing and computational development activities needed to qualify the materials and validate the modeling and simulation tools to be used in the design and safe operation of the NGNP, a helium-cooled, high temperature gas reactor (HTGR).

  8. Developing Effective Undergraduate Research Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Michael; Ilie, Carolina C.

    2011-03-01

    Undergraduate research is a valuable educational tool for students pursuing a degree in physics, but these experiences can become problematic and ineffective if not handled properly. Undergraduate research should be planned as an immersive learning experience in which the student has the opportunity to develop his/her skills in accordance with their interests. Effective undergraduate research experiences are marked by clear, measurable objectives and frequent student-professor collaboration. These objectives should reflect the long and short-term goals of the individual undergraduates, with a heightened focus on developing research skills for future use. 1. Seymour, E., Hunter, A.-B., Laursen, S. L. and DeAntoni, T. (2004), ``Establishing the benefits of research experiences for undergraduates in the sciences: First findings from a three-year study''. Science Education, 88: 493--534. 2. Behar-Horenstein, Linda S., Johnson, Melissa L. ``Enticing Students to Enter Into Undergraduate Research: The Instrumentality of an Undergraduate Course.'' Journal of College Science Teaching 39.3 (2010): 62-70.

  9. SAL: a language for developing an agent-based architecture for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Willie Y.; Verzulli, Joe

    1993-05-01

    SAL (the SmartyCat Agent Language) is a language being developed for programming SmartyCat, our mobile robot. SmartyCat's underlying software architecture is agent-based. At the lowest level, the robot sensors and actuators are controlled by agents (viz., the sensing and acting agents, respectively). SAL provides the constructs for organizing these agents into many structures. In particular, SAL supports the subsumption architecture approach. At higher levels of abstraction, SAL can be used for writing programs based on Minsky's Society of Mind paradigm. Structurally, a SAL program is a graph, where the nodes are software modules called agents, and the arcs represent abstract communication links between agents. In SAL, an agent is a CLOS object with input and output ports. Input ports are used for presenting data from the outside world (i.e., other agents) to the agent. Data are presented to the outside world by the agent through its output ports. The main body of the SAL code for the agent specifies the computation or the action performed by the agent. This paper describes how SAL is being used for implementing the agent-based SmartyCat software architecture on a Cybermotion K2A platform.

  10. Developments in Applied Psycholinguistics Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Sheldon, Ed.; Koplin, James H., Ed.

    The eight articles in this volume reflect the increased tendency in recent years to consider problems of language acquisition and language pathology in the context of basic research and theory. They also reflect the two major approaches to language development: the transformational-linguistic approach which puts its emphasis on an innate…

  11. Suborbital Research and Development Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the new strategies for problem solving in the life sciences in the suborbital realm. Topics covered are: an overview of the space life sciences, the strategic initiatives that the Space Life Sciences organization engaged in, and the new business model that these initiatives were developed. Several opportunities for research are also reviewed.

  12. Development of inhibition as a function of the presence of a supernatural agent.

    PubMed

    King, Ashley C

    2011-01-01

    In this study the author examined the developmental differences in inhibition and cognition of 4-8-year-old children as a function of the suggested presence of a supernatural agent. Previous evolutionarily-relevant research has suggested that humans are naturally primed to think in terms of supernatural agents and that, given the correct context, individuals readily accept novel supernatural entities and alter their behavior accordingly. All children in this study played 4 games designed to assess their present level of inhibitory and cognitive development. Children in the experimental condition were also introduced to an invisible Princess Alice and were told that she was watching during the games. Following these measures, all children engaged in a resistance-to-temptation task. Results revealed that cognitively advanced children were more likely to express belief in Princess Alice than were less cognitively advanced children. This research provides support that cognitive maturity, rather than immaturity, may be necessary for children to express belief in novel supernatural agents.

  13. Agent-Based Modeling of Chronic Diseases: A Narrative Review and Future Research Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Mark A.; Siscovick, David S.; Zhang, Donglan; Pagán, José A.

    2016-01-01

    The United States is experiencing an epidemic of chronic disease. As the US population ages, health care providers and policy makers urgently need decision models that provide systematic, credible prediction regarding the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases to improve population health management and medical decision-making. Agent-based modeling is a promising systems science approach that can model complex interactions and processes related to chronic health conditions, such as adaptive behaviors, feedback loops, and contextual effects. This article introduces agent-based modeling by providing a narrative review of agent-based models of chronic disease and identifying the characteristics of various chronic health conditions that must be taken into account to build effective clinical- and policy-relevant models. We also identify barriers to adopting agent-based models to study chronic diseases. Finally, we discuss future research directions of agent-based modeling applied to problems related to specific chronic health conditions. PMID:27236380

  14. Agent-Based Modeling of Chronic Diseases: A Narrative Review and Future Research Directions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Lawley, Mark A; Siscovick, David S; Zhang, Donglan; Pagán, José A

    2016-05-26

    The United States is experiencing an epidemic of chronic disease. As the US population ages, health care providers and policy makers urgently need decision models that provide systematic, credible prediction regarding the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases to improve population health management and medical decision-making. Agent-based modeling is a promising systems science approach that can model complex interactions and processes related to chronic health conditions, such as adaptive behaviors, feedback loops, and contextual effects. This article introduces agent-based modeling by providing a narrative review of agent-based models of chronic disease and identifying the characteristics of various chronic health conditions that must be taken into account to build effective clinical- and policy-relevant models. We also identify barriers to adopting agent-based models to study chronic diseases. Finally, we discuss future research directions of agent-based modeling applied to problems related to specific chronic health conditions.

  15. CELSS research and development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubenheim, David

    1990-01-01

    Research in Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) conducted by NASA indicate that plant based systems are feasible candidates for human support in space. Ames has responsibility for research and development, systems integration and control, and space flight experiment portions of the CELSS program. Important areas for development of new methods and technologies are biomass production, waste processing, water purification, air revitalization, and food processing. For the plant system, the approach was to identify the flexibility and response time for the food, water, and oxygen production, and carbon dioxide consumption processes. Tremendous increases in productivity, compared with terrestrial agriculture, were realized. Waste processing research emphasizes recycle (transformation) of human wastes, trash, and inedible biomass to forms usable as inputs to the plant production system. Efforts to improve efficiency of the plant system, select new CELSS crops for a balanced diet, and initiate closed system research with the Crop Growth Research Chambers continue. The System Control and Integration program goal is to insure orchestrated system operation of the biological, physical, and chemical operation of the biological, physical, and chemical component processors of the CELSS. Space flight studies are planned to verify adequate operation of the system in reduced gravity or microgravity environments.

  16. Development of [F-18]-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, CA

    2007-05-09

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  17. Pharmacological agents under research for the maintenance treatment in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakopoulos, S; Konstantakopoulos, G

    2015-01-01

    " for preventing recurrence in bipolar disorder. Major therapeutic targets are synthetic glucose kinase 3 (GSK-3) and the path of phosphoinositol (IMP), both probably involved in the action of lithium. Furthermore, the role of circadian rhythms maintenance is being studied in preclinical and clinical trials investigating the efficacy and safety of compounds CK-01 and ramelteon, respectively. Research also focuses on pharmacological agents based on epigenetic changes and gene expression modulation, as the inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC). Of note, the development of valid and reliable experimental models for bipolar disorder, which currently remains quite controversial, will contribute to the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and the development of new effective treatments. Improving methodology aspects of clinical trials, such as diagnosis, clinical heterogeneity, monitoring time, gender differences and comorbidities, may promote research. Current studies seem promising for the development of novel pharmacological agents in the near future, although there are methodological limitations in the search for the maintenance treatment in bipolar disorder. New therapeutic targets include not only the already known mechanisms of action, but also novel pathophysiological pathways, probably implicated in bipolar disorder.

  18. Development and characterization of site specific target sensitive liposomes for the delivery of thrombolytic agents.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Bhuvaneshwar; Nayak, Manasa K; Dash, Debabrata; Agrawal, G P; Vyas, Suresh P

    2011-01-17

    In recent times, search for potent and highly selective thrombolytic agents with minimal side effects has become a major area of research. The aim of the present study was to develop and characterize target sensitive (TS) liposomes encapsulating streptokinase, a thrombolytic agent. The developed TS liposomes were composed of dioleylphophatidyl ethanolamine (DOPE) and dipalmityl-c(RGDfK) (10:1mol/mol). Dipalmityl-c(RGDfK) was synthesized using typical carbodiimide chemistry using palmitic acid and c(RGDfK), while lysine was used as a spacer. Liposomes were of 100-120nm size. In vitro drug release study showed that nearly 40% drug of the entrapped drug was released in 12h in the PBS (pH 7.4), however on incubation with activated platelet about 90% of drug was released within 45min. The results suggested target sensitivity of the liposomes. Further, targeting potential was confirmed using fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Clot lysis study revealed that TS liposomes could not only reduce the clot lysis time but also increase the extent of clot lysis as compared to non-liposomal streptokinase solution. In conclusion, the present liposomal formulation will target the thrombolytic agent to the activated platelets in the thrombus and hence will improve the therapeutic efficacy of the drug.

  19. Thiazole: a promising heterocycle for the development of potent CNS active agents.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Chandra Bhushan; Kumari, Shikha; Tiwari, Manisha

    2015-03-06

    Thiazole is a valuable scaffold in the field of medicinal chemistry and has accounted to display a variety of biological activities. Thiazole and its derivatives have attracted continuing interest to design various novel CNS active agents. In the past few decades, thiazoles have been widely used to develop a variety of therapeutic agents against numerous CNS targets. Thiazole containing drug molecules are currently being used in treatment of various CNS disorders and a number of thiazole derivatives are also presently in clinical trials. A lot of research has been carried out on thiazole and their analogues, which has proved their efficacy to overcome several CNS disorders in rodent as well as primate models. The aim of present review is to highlights diverse CNS activities displayed by thiazole and their derivatives. SAR of this nucleus has also been well discussed. This review covers the recent updates present in literature and will surely provide a greater insight for the designing and development of potent thiazole based CNS active agents in future.

  20. ROADS: An Environment for Developing Automated Intelligent Agents To Support Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesley, Leonard P.; Shim, Simon S. Y.; Booth, Robert P.; Atreya, Shreemathi D.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses intelligent agent development environments and distance learning environments, and describes ROADS (Real-time Object-oriented Agent Development System) that has been developed and used to manage the acquisition and presentation of multimedia information in distance learning. Explains a theory of objects and gives a distance learning…

  1. Hyperspectral imager development at Army Research Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neelam

    2008-04-01

    Development of robust compact optical imagers that can acquire both spectral and spatial features from a scene of interest is of utmost importance for standoff detection of chemical and biological agents as well as targets and backgrounds. Spectral features arise due to the material properties of objects as a result of the emission, reflection, and absorption of light. Using hyperspectral imaging one can acquire images with narrow spectral bands and take advantage of the characteristic spectral signatures of different materials making up the scene in detection of objects. Traditional hyperspectral imaging systems use gratings and prisms that acquire one-dimensional spectral images and require relative motion of sensor and scene in addition to data processing to form a two-dimensional image cube. There is much interest in developing hyperspectral imagers using tunable filters that acquire a two-dimensional spectral image and build up an image cube as a function of time. At the Army Research Laboratory (ARL), we are developing hyperspectral imagers using a number of novel tunable filter technologies. These include acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) that can provide adaptive no-moving-parts imagers from the UV to the long wave infrared, diffractive optics technology that can provide image cubes either in a single spectral region or simultaneously in different spectral regions using a single moving lens or by using a lenslet array, and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS)-based Fabry-Perot (FP) tunable etalons to develop miniature sensors that take advantage of the advances in microfabrication and packaging technologies. New materials are being developed to design AOTFs and a full Stokes polarization imager has been developed, diffractive optics lenslet arrays are being explored, and novel FP tunable filters are under fabrication for the development of novel miniature hyperspectral imagers. Here we will brief on all the technologies being developed and present

  2. Challenges and Practices in Building and Implementing Biosafety and Biosecurity Programs to Enable Basic and Translational Research with Select Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jonsson, Colleen B.; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Roy, Chad J.; Perlin, David S.; Byrne, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Select agent research in the United States must meet federally-mandated biological surety guidelines and rules which are comprised of two main components: biosecurity and biosafety. Biosecurity is the process employed for ensuring biological agents are properly safeguarded against theft, loss, diversion, unauthorized access or use/release. Biosafety is those processes that ensure that operations with such agents are conducted in a safe, secure and reliable manner. As such, a biological surety program is generally concerned with biological agents that present high risk for adverse medical and/or agricultural consequences upon release outside of proper containment. The U.S. Regional and National Biocontainment Laboratories (RBL, NBL) represent expertise in this type of research, and are actively engaged in the development of programs to address these critical needs and federal requirements. While this comprises an ongoing activity for the RBLs, NBLs and other facilities that handle select agents as new guidelines and regulations are implemented, the present article is written with the goal of presenting a simplified yet comprehensive review of these requirements. Herein, we discuss the requirements and the various activities that the RBL/NBL programs have implemented to achieve these metrics set forth by various agencies within the U.S. Federal government. PMID:24900945

  3. Challenges and Practices in Building and Implementing Biosafety and Biosecurity Programs to Enable Basic and Translational Research with Select Agents.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Colleen B; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Roy, Chad J; Perlin, David S; Byrne, Gerald

    2013-04-29

    Select agent research in the United States must meet federally-mandated biological surety guidelines and rules which are comprised of two main components: biosecurity and biosafety. Biosecurity is the process employed for ensuring biological agents are properly safeguarded against theft, loss, diversion, unauthorized access or use/release. Biosafety is those processes that ensure that operations with such agents are conducted in a safe, secure and reliable manner. As such, a biological surety program is generally concerned with biological agents that present high risk for adverse medical and/or agricultural consequences upon release outside of proper containment. The U.S. Regional and National Biocontainment Laboratories (RBL, NBL) represent expertise in this type of research, and are actively engaged in the development of programs to address these critical needs and federal requirements. While this comprises an ongoing activity for the RBLs, NBLs and other facilities that handle select agents as new guidelines and regulations are implemented, the present article is written with the goal of presenting a simplified yet comprehensive review of these requirements. Herein, we discuss the requirements and the various activities that the RBL/NBL programs have implemented to achieve these metrics set forth by various agencies within the U.S. Federal government.

  4. Leadership Competencies of Tennessee Extension Agents: Implications for Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, John L.; Broyles, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    The study's purpose was to determine Extension agents' (n= 111) perceived level of importance, knowledge, and training needs for leadership skills. Mean Weighted Discrepancy Scores were calculated to determine training needs. Participants' perceived responses were average to above average importance for all skills; however, the participants'…

  5. Development of high temperature resistant graphite fiber coupling agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, R. N.

    1975-01-01

    Surface treatments were investigated as potential coupling agents to improve the elevated temperature shear strength retention of polyimide/graphite and polyphenylquinoxaline/graphite composites. The potential coupling agents were evaluated by fiber strand tensile tests, fiber and composite weight losses at 533 and 588K, and by interlaminar shear strength retention at 533 and 588K. The two surface treatments selected for more extensive evaluation were a coating of Ventromer T-1, a complex organometallic reaction product of titanium tetrachloride and trimethyl borate, and a polyphenylquinoxaline (PPQ) sizing which was pyrolyzed in nitrogen to form a carbonaceous layer on the fiber. Pyrolyzed polyphenylquinoxaline is a satisfactory coupling agent for polyimide/Thornel 300 graphite fiber composites. During 1000 hours aging at 588K such composites lose a little over half their transverse tensile strength, and suffer a slight loss in flexural modulus. No degradation of flexural strength or interlaminar shear strength occured during 1000 hours aging at 588K. None of the coupling agents examined had a markedly beneficial effect with polyphenylquinoxaline composites.

  6. Improving the Outcome for Children With Cancer: Development of Targeted New Agents

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    The outcome for children with cancer has improved significantly over the past 60 years, with greater than 80% of patients today becoming 5-year survivors. Despite this progress, cancer remains the leading cause of death from disease in children in the United States, and significant short-term and long-term treatment toxicities continue to impact the majority of children with cancer. The development of targeted new agents offers the prospect of potentially more effective and less toxic treatment for children. More than a decade since imatinib mesylate was introduced into the treatment of children with Philadelphia chromosomepositive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, transforming its outcome, a range of targeted agents has undergone study in pediatric cancer patients. Early lessons learned from these studies include a better understanding of the adverse event profile of these drugs in children, the challenge of developing pediatric-specific formulations, and the continued reliance on successful development for adult cancer indications on pediatric drug development. The collaborative research infrastructure for children with cancer in the United States is well positioned to advance novel treatments into clinical investigations for a spectrum of rare and ultra-rare childhood cancers. A greater investment of resources in target discovery and validation can help drive much needed development of new, more effective treatments for children with cancer. PMID:25754421

  7. Laboratory directed research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle''; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  8. Photovoltaic research and development status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feucht, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    The goals of the Photovoltaic R&D Program are to develop thin film semiconductor and novel photovoltaic conversion concepts, and to demonstrate the feasibility of producing these cells for a price of $100 - $300 per peak electric output (in 1975) by FY1985. The approaches that are used to determine which research should be funded are formal solicitations, an innovative concepts program which will be launched in FY79, and the review of unsolicited proposals.

  9. Towards a nanoscale mammographic contrast agent: development of a modular pre-clinical dual optical/x-ray agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Gorelikov, Ivan; Niroui, Farnaz; Levitin, Ronald B.; Mainprize, James G.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Rowlands, J. A.; Matsuura, Naomi

    2013-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) can provide improved breast cancer detection and characterization compared to conventional mammography by imaging the effects of tumour angiogenesis. Current small-molecule contrast agents used for CEDM are limited by a short plasma half-life and rapid extravasation into tissue interstitial space. To address these limitations, nanoscale agents that can remain intravascular except at sites of tumour angiogenesis can be used. For CEDM, this agent must be both biocompatible and strongly attenuate mammographic energy x-rays. Nanoscale perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) droplets have good x-ray attenuation and have been used in patients for other applications. However, the macroscopic scale of x-ray imaging (50-100 µm) is inadequate for direct verification that PFOB droplets localize at sites of breast tumour angiogenesis. For efficient pre-clinical optimization for CEDM, we integrated an optical marker into PFOB droplets for microscopic assessment (≪50 µm). To develop PFOB droplets as a new nanoscale mammographic contrast agent, PFOB droplets were labelled with fluorescent quantum dots (QDs). The droplets had mean diameters of 160 nm, fluoresced at 635 nm and attenuated x-ray spectra at 30.5 keV mean energy with a relative attenuation of 5.6 ± 0.3 Hounsfield units (HU) mg-1 mL-1 QD-PFOB. With the agent loaded into tissue phantoms, good correlation between x-ray attenuation and optical fluorescence was found (R2 = 0.96), confirming co-localization of the QDs with PFOB for quantitative assessment using x-ray or optical methods. Furthermore, the QDs can be removed from the PFOB agent without affecting its x-ray attenuation or structural properties for expedited translation of optimized PFOB droplet formulations into patients.

  10. Standard Agent Framework 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    1999-04-06

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4) Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.

  11. A Buyer Behaviour Framework for the Development and Design of Software Agents in E-Commerce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sproule, Susan; Archer, Norm

    2000-01-01

    Software agents are computer programs that run in the background and perform tasks autonomously as delegated by the user. This paper blends models from marketing research and findings from the field of decision support systems to build a framework for the design of software agents to support in e-commerce buying applications. (Contains 35…

  12. Development and Evaluation of Intelligent Agent-Based Teaching Assistant in e-Learning Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouhani, Saeed; Mirhosseini, Seyed Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Today, several educational portals established by organizations to enhance web E-learning. Intelligence agent's usage is necessary to improve the system's quality and cover limitations such as face-to-face relation. In this research, after finding two main approaches in this field that are fundamental use of intelligent agents in systems design…

  13. Development of USES Specific Aptitude Test Battery for Ticket Agent (any ind.) 238.367-026.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Dept. of Employment Security, Salt Lake City. Western Test Development Field Center.

    The United States Employment Service (USES) Specific Aptitude Test Battery (SATB) for Ticket Agent is evaluated from three points of view: (1) technical adequacy of the research; (2) fairness to minorities; and (3) usefulness of the battery to Employment Service staff and employers in selecting individuals for ticket agent positions. Research…

  14. Development of a Multifaceted Ovarian Cancer Imaging Agent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    method for a recombinant disintegrin vicrostatin (VN), whose structure is based on the snake venom disintegrin contortrostatin (CN), and the use of the...an innovative imaging and diagnostic agent for ovarian cancer (OC). Vicrostatin (VN) is a recombinant protein based on the venom disintegrin...form of the venom derived disintegrin contortrostatin, was compared to a cyclic peptide, cyclo(-RGDfV-), similar to Cilengitide, which is currently in

  15. Research and Development at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Vision for Space Exploration marks the next segment of NASA's continuing journey to find answers to compelling questions about the origins of the solar system, the existence of life beyond Earth, and the ability of humankind to live on other worlds. The success of the Vision relies upon the ongoing research and development activities conducted at each of NASA's 10 field centers. In an effort to promote synergy across NASA as it works to meet its long-term goals, the Agency restructured its Strategic Enterprises into four Mission Directorates that align with the Vision. Consisting of Exploration Systems, Space Operations, Science, and Aeronautics Research, these directorates provide NASA Headquarters and the field centers with a streamlined approach to continue exploration both in space and on Earth.

  16. Developing a consensus framework and risk profile for agents of opportunity in academic medical centers: implications for public health preparedness.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Brenna M; Nelson, Lewis S; Graham, Margaret E; Bendzans, Carly; McCrillis, Aileen M; Portelli, Ian; Zhang, Meng; Goldberg, Judith; Rosenberg, Sheldon D; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Tunik, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Agents of opportunity (AO) in academic medical centers (AMC) are defined as unregulated or lightly regulated substances used for medical research or patient care that can be used as "dual purpose" substances by terrorists to inflict damage upon populations. Most of these agents are used routinely throughout AMC either during research or for general clinical practice. To date, the lack of careful regulations for AOs creates uncertain security conditions and increased malicious potential. Using a consensus-based approach, we collected information and opinions from staff working in an AMC and 4 AMC-affiliated hospitals concerning identification of AO, AO attributes, and AMC risk and preparedness, focusing on AO security and dissemination mechanisms and likely hospital response. The goal was to develop a risk profile and framework for AO in the institution. Agents of opportunity in 4 classes were identified and an AO profile was developed, comprising 16 attributes denoting information critical to preparedness for AO misuse. Agents of opportunity found in AMC present a unique and vital gap in public health preparedness. Findings of this project may provide a foundation for a discussion and consensus efforts to determine a nationally accepted risk profile framework for AO. This foundation may further lead to the implementation of appropriate regulatory policies to improve public health preparedness. Agents of opportunity modeling of dissemination properties should be developed to better predict AO risk.

  17. A spatial web/agent-based model to support stakeholders' negotiation regarding land development.

    PubMed

    Pooyandeh, Majeed; Marceau, Danielle J

    2013-11-15

    Decision making in land management can be greatly enhanced if the perspectives of concerned stakeholders are taken into consideration. This often implies negotiation in order to reach an agreement based on the examination of multiple alternatives. This paper describes a spatial web/agent-based modeling system that was developed to support the negotiation process of stakeholders regarding land development in southern Alberta, Canada. This system integrates a fuzzy analytic hierarchy procedure within an agent-based model in an interactive visualization environment provided through a web interface to facilitate the learning and negotiation of the stakeholders. In the pre-negotiation phase, the stakeholders compare their evaluation criteria using linguistic expressions. Due to the uncertainty and fuzzy nature of such comparisons, a fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process is then used to prioritize the criteria. The negotiation starts by a development plan being submitted by a user (stakeholder) through the web interface. An agent called the proposer, which represents the proposer of the plan, receives this plan and starts negotiating with all other agents. The negotiation is conducted in a step-wise manner where the agents change their attitudes by assigning a new set of weights to their criteria. If an agreement is not achieved, a new location for development is proposed by the proposer agent. This process is repeated until a location is found that satisfies all agents to a certain predefined degree. To evaluate the performance of the model, the negotiation was simulated with four agents, one of which being the proposer agent, using two hypothetical development plans. The first plan was selected randomly; the other one was chosen in an area that is of high importance to one of the agents. While the agents managed to achieve an agreement about the location of the land development after three rounds of negotiation in the first scenario, seven rounds were required in the second

  18. Carbon sequestration research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Reichle, Dave; Houghton, John; Kane, Bob; Ekmann, Jim; and others

    1999-12-31

    Predictions of global energy use in the next century suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere unless major changes are made in the way we produce and use energy--in particular, how we manage carbon. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts in its 1995 ''business as usual'' energy scenario that future global emissions of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere will increase from 7.4 billion tonnes of carbon (GtC) per year in 1997 to approximately 26 GtC/year by 2100. IPCC also projects a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration by the middle of next century and growing rates of increase beyond. Although the effects of increased CO{sub 2} levels on global climate are uncertain, many scientists agree that a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations could have a variety of serious environmental consequences. The goal of this report is to identify key areas for research and development (R&D) that could lead to an understanding of the potential for future use of carbon sequestration as a major tool for managing carbon emissions. Under the leadership of DOE, researchers from universities, industry, other government agencies, and DOE national laboratories were brought together to develop the technical basis for conceiving a science and technology road map. That effort has resulted in this report, which develops much of the information needed for the road map.

  19. Development Model for Research Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wächter, Joachim; Hammitzsch, Martin; Kerschke, Dorit; Lauterjung, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    Research infrastructures (RIs) are platforms integrating facilities, resources and services used by the research communities to conduct research and foster innovation. RIs include scientific equipment, e.g., sensor platforms, satellites or other instruments, but also scientific data, sample repositories or archives. E-infrastructures on the other hand provide the technological substratum and middleware to interlink distributed RI components with computing systems and communication networks. The resulting platforms provide the foundation for the design and implementation of RIs and play an increasing role in the advancement and exploitation of knowledge and technology. RIs are regarded as essential to achieve and maintain excellence in research and innovation crucial for the European Research Area (ERA). The implementation of RIs has to be considered as a long-term, complex development process often over a period of 10 or more years. The ongoing construction of Spatial Data Infrastructures (SDIs) provides a good example for the general complexity of infrastructure development processes especially in system-of-systems environments. A set of directives issued by the European Commission provided a framework of guidelines for the implementation processes addressing the relevant content and the encoding of data as well as the standards for service interfaces and the integration of these services into networks. Additionally, a time schedule for the overall construction process has been specified. As a result this process advances with a strong participation of member states and responsible organisations. Today, SDIs provide the operational basis for new digital business processes in both national and local authorities. Currently, the development of integrated RIs in Earth and Environmental Sciences is characterised by the following properties: • A high number of parallel activities on European and national levels with numerous institutes and organisations participating

  20. Development of more efficacious [Tc]-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect

    Heineman, W.R.

    1993-05-03

    This research program is detailed at development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. We seek to isolate and develop distinct site imaging agents to provide diagnostic information concerning a given pathological condition. Analytical techniques are being developed to enable complete analysis of radiopharmaceutical preparations so that individual complexes can be characterized with respect to imaging efficacy and to enable a radiopharmaceutical to be monitored after injection into a test animal to determine the species that actually accumulates in an organ to provide the image. Administration of the isolated, single most effective imaging complex, rather than a mixture of technetium-containing complexes, wi-11 minimize radiation exposure to the patient and maximize diagnostic information available to the clinician. This report specifically describes the development of capillary electrophoresis (CE) for characterizating diphosphonate skeletal imaging agents. Advances in the development of electrochemical and fiber optic sensors for Tc and Re imaging agents are described. These sensors will ultimately be capable of monitoring a specific chemical state of an imaging agent in vivo after injection into a test animal by implantation in the organ of interest.

  1. Online Deception Detection Using BDI Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritts, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    This research has two facets within separate research areas. The research area of Belief, Desire and Intention (BDI) agent capability development was extended. Deception detection research has been advanced with the development of automation using BDI agents. BDI agents performed tasks automatically and autonomously. This study used these…

  2. Development of non-natural flavanones as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Zachary L; Shah, Karan; Panepinto, John C; Jacobs, Amy; Koffas, Mattheos A G

    2011-01-01

    With growing concerns over multidrug resistance microorganisms, particularly strains of bacteria and fungi, evolving to become resistant to the antimicrobial agents used against them, the identification of new molecular targets becomes paramount for novel treatment options. Recently, the use of new treatments containing multiple active ingredients has been shown to increase the effectiveness of existing molecules for some infections, often with these added compounds enabling the transport of a toxic molecule into the infecting species. Flavonoids are among the most abundant plant secondary metabolites and have been shown to have natural abilities as microbial deterrents and anti-infection agents in plants. Combining these ideas we first sought to investigate the potency of natural flavonoids in the presence of efflux pump inhibitors to limit Escherichia coli growth. Then we used the natural flavonoid scaffold to synthesize non-natural flavanone molecules and further evaluate their antimicrobial efficacy on Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and the fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus. Of those screened, we identified the synthetic molecule 4-chloro-flavanone as the most potent antimicrobial compound with a MIC value of 70 µg/mL in E. coli when combined with the inhibitor Phe-Arg-ß-naphthylamide, and MICs of 30 µg/mL in S. cerevesiae and 30 µg/mL in C. neoformans when used alone. Through this study we have demonstrated that combinatorial synthesis of non-natural flavonones can identify novel antimicrobial agents with activity against bacteria and fungi but with minimal toxicity to human cells.

  3. Surfactant-Based Chemical and Biological Agent Decontaminating Solution Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-11-19

    10^8 4 PAA in uEm 10^8 8 (1) C10 Amine oxide (2) di-C10 Amine oxide ! Peracetic Acid (PAA) Found to Be an Effective Disinfectant Decon Conf 11-03...Utilize as Environmentally Green Reactant for Both Chemical and Biological Agents – Some Peracids Available in Neat Form ( Peracetic acid ) and In-Situ...Formulation Components – Peroxygen Compounds and Catalysts Oxidation of Calmagite Dye by Peracetic Acid TAML FeMB Catalyst 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 0 2 4 6

  4. Targeting Bacterial Dsb Proteins for the Development of Anti-Virulence Agents.

    PubMed

    Smith, Roxanne P; Paxman, Jason J; Scanlon, Martin J; Heras, Begoña

    2016-07-16

    Recent years have witnessed a dramatic increase in bacterial antimicrobial resistance and a decline in the development of novel antibiotics. New therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to combat the growing threat posed by multidrug resistant bacterial infections. The Dsb disulfide bond forming pathways are potential targets for the development of antimicrobial agents because they play a central role in bacterial pathogenesis. In particular, the DsbA/DsbB system catalyses disulfide bond formation in a wide array of virulence factors, which are essential for many pathogens to establish infections and cause disease. These redox enzymes are well placed as antimicrobial targets because they are taxonomically widespread, share low sequence identity with human proteins, and many years of basic research have provided a deep molecular understanding of these systems in bacteria. In this review, we discuss disulfide bond catalytic pathways in bacteria and their significance in pathogenesis. We also review the use of different approaches to develop inhibitors against Dsb proteins as potential anti-virulence agents, including fragment-based drug discovery, high-throughput screening and other structure-based drug discovery methods.

  5. Development of superior asphalt recycling agents. Phase 1, Technical feasibility. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J.; Chaffin, J.; Liu, M.; Madrid, R.

    1997-07-01

    After an introduction and a literature survey in Chap. 1, Chap. 2 describes the tasks, together with objectives and important results obtained for each task throughout the entire project. Chaps. 3 thru 7 detail work in developing a qualitative and quantitative knowledge of asphalt oxidation, composition dependence of asphalt properties, and guidelines for producing superior asphalt binders through composition control. They also detail the development of a kinetic model for asphalt oxidative aging and present an understanding of the composition dependence of asphalt oxidation as well as other performance-related properties. Chaps. 8 and 9 compare the aging performance of recycled blends produced using commercial recycling agents and industrial supercritical fractions as rejuvenating agents. Oxidative aging of the recycled blends were evaluated along with the performance of the recycled blends in terms of the strategic highway research program performance grading procedure. Chap. 10 summarizes the work completed in the areas of processing schemes development, projection updates, and scale-up and commercialization plans.

  6. Advances in the Development of Multimodal Imaging Agents for Nuclear/Near-infrared Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S C; Azhdarinia, A

    2015-01-01

    Multimodal imaging agents were first introduced a decade ago and consist of a targeting moiety that is dual-labeled with radioactive and fluorescent contrast. These compounds allow whole-body and intraoperative imaging to be performed through administration of a single agent and provide complementary diagnostic information that can be used to guide tumor resection. Since their initial evaluation, interest in dual-labeled agents has continued to grow and their design has subsequently evolved alongside the development of novel chelating agents, improved fluorophores, and highly selective coupling techniques for bioconjugate formation. In this review, will discuss how changes in the labeling components and schemes for multimodal agent development have impacted imaging performance and will focus on antibody- and peptide-based agents as models for dual labeling. We will also describe the growing role of modular dual labeling strategies as well as direct labeling methods using radiohalogens.

  7. Developing a Research Component of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, Lindley J.

    1972-01-01

    The lack of effective research constituency has led to a negative image of educational research. Educators and researchers must get involved in public policy development in order to expand educational research. (MF)

  8. The Development of a Bi-Lingual Assessment Instrument to Measure Agentic and Communal Consumer Motives in English and French.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mike; Bartier, Anne-Laure; Lown, Josh; Hopwood, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Consumer behavior is driven, in part, by the degree to which goods and services appeal to underlying motives for agency and communion. The purpose of this research was to develop a brief individual differences measure of these motivations for use in behavioral research and theoretical and applied consumer psychology and marketing studies. We employed a bi-lingual scale development procedure to create the 10-item Agentic and Communal Consumer Motivation Inventory (ACCMI) in English and French. Two studies show that the ACCMI is language invariant, demonstrates convergent and discriminant validity with consumer, motivational, and interpersonal constructs, and predicts evaluations of products described in agentic and communal terms, respectively, in both languages. The general conclusion of this research is that agency and communion provide a useful framework for understanding and studying consumer buying motivations. Discussion focuses on the relevance of motivational factors for studying human behavior and the applied utility of the ACCMI.

  9. The Development of a Bi-Lingual Assessment Instrument to Measure Agentic and Communal Consumer Motives in English and French

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Mike; Bartier, Anne-Laure; Lown, Josh; Hopwood, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Consumer behavior is driven, in part, by the degree to which goods and services appeal to underlying motives for agency and communion. The purpose of this research was to develop a brief individual differences measure of these motivations for use in behavioral research and theoretical and applied consumer psychology and marketing studies. We employed a bi-lingual scale development procedure to create the 10-item Agentic and Communal Consumer Motivation Inventory (ACCMI) in English and French. Two studies show that the ACCMI is language invariant, demonstrates convergent and discriminant validity with consumer, motivational, and interpersonal constructs, and predicts evaluations of products described in agentic and communal terms, respectively, in both languages. The general conclusion of this research is that agency and communion provide a useful framework for understanding and studying consumer buying motivations. Discussion focuses on the relevance of motivational factors for studying human behavior and the applied utility of the ACCMI. PMID:27563295

  10. The CTIS Womb to Classroom Screening Program for the detection of agents with adverse effects on neuropsychological development.

    PubMed

    Adams, Jane; Janulewicz, Patricia A; Kao, Kelly; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; Chambers, Christina

    2012-06-01

    Over the last several decades, federal agencies engaged in the screening of environmental or pharmaceutical agents have recognized the need to conduct research in animal models to identify agents that have classic teratogenic effects as well as effects on neural and behavioral development. Many questions typically addressed in rodent models can be further addressed using real-world, everyday human exposures. Although some postmarketing surveillance programs have been put in place to examine the influences on birth characteristics, it is now urgent that programs be launched to examine the long-term risks associated with exposure to the many medications, drugs, and environmental chemicals for which data are currently unavailable and unexplored. The California Teratogen Information Service (CTIS), established in 1983, and its corresponding Clinical Research Program represent the oldest national program directed at identifying pregnancy risk factors and exposures associated with adverse pregnancy outcome, including behavioral dysfunction. In recognition of the rising rates of developmental disorders involving compromised mental ability, in 2007, CTIS committed to the development of a more comprehensive screening program designed to detect relationships between adverse prenatal exposures and compromised human neurobehavioral development. The "CTIS Womb to Classroom Screening Program for the Detection of Agents with Adverse Effects on Neuropsychological Development" is the first program designed to identify agents not yet known to be of concern.

  11. Developing a Research Skill Set

    PubMed Central

    You, Y. Nancy; Bednarski, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The recent decades have witnessed a significant expansion in the diversity of career paths within academic surgery. Although the skills for providing exemplary surgical care and for maintaining a strong work ethic are the foundations of an academic surgeon, deliberate career planning and organized acquisition of research skills contribute to the success of an academic career. In this article, we identify a set of core academic skills and propose a framework for acquiring them. We also describe specific career paths within academic surgery and provide an overview of the opportunities for acquiring specific skill sets. The development of an academic career is challenging, and firm knowledge of the personal motivations will sustain and endure the time needed for acquiring the needed skills. PMID:25067917

  12. Developing a research skill set.

    PubMed

    You, Y Nancy; Bednarski, Brian

    2014-06-01

    The recent decades have witnessed a significant expansion in the diversity of career paths within academic surgery. Although the skills for providing exemplary surgical care and for maintaining a strong work ethic are the foundations of an academic surgeon, deliberate career planning and organized acquisition of research skills contribute to the success of an academic career. In this article, we identify a set of core academic skills and propose a framework for acquiring them. We also describe specific career paths within academic surgery and provide an overview of the opportunities for acquiring specific skill sets. The development of an academic career is challenging, and firm knowledge of the personal motivations will sustain and endure the time needed for acquiring the needed skills.

  13. From Agents of Change to Partners in Arms: The Emerging Academic Developer Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debowski, Shelda

    2014-01-01

    This commentary explores the role that academic developers (ADs) play in universities. Three case studies illustrate the roles that ADs may enact as agents of change. They reflect an emergent shift from acting as the institutional teaching and learning "'expert" (i.e. agent of change) to a more adaptive, collaborative partnership model…

  14. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Hao, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays indispensable roles in both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of this pathway is implicated in many types of cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made to develop therapeutic agents as anticancer drugs by specifically targeting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here we systematically review the potential therapeutic agents that have been developed to date for inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin cascade as well as current status of clinical trials of some of these agents. PMID:26396911

  15. Development of Iron Doped Silicon Nanoparticles as Bimodal Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mani P.; Atkins, Tonya M.; Muthuswamy, Elayaraja; Kamali, Saeed; Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of water-soluble allylamine terminated Fe doped Si (SixFe) nanoparticles as bimodal agents for optical and magnetic imaging. The preparation involves the synthesis of a single source iron containing precursor, Na4Si4 with x% Fe (x = 1, 5, 10), and its subsequent reaction with NH4Br to produce hydrogen terminated SixFe nanoparticles. The hydrogen-capped nanoparticles are further terminated with allylamine via thermal hydrosilylation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicates that the average particle diameter is ~3.0±1.0 nm. The Si5Fe nanoparticles show strong photoluminescence quantum yield in water (~ 10 %) with significant T2 contrast (r2/r1value of 4.31). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Mössbauer spectroscopies indicate that iron in the nanoparticles is in the +3 oxidation state. Analysis of cytotoxicity using the resazurin assay on HepG2 liver cells indicates that the particles have minimal toxicity. PMID:22616623

  16. Agents in development for the management of cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Gardner, Eliot L; Xi, Zheng-Xiong

    2004-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is a serious health problem in many areas of the world, yet there are no proven effective medications for the treatment of cocaine dependence. Preclinical studies suggest that the reinforcing effect of cocaine that promotes its abuse is mediated by blockade of the presynaptic dopamine transporter. This results in increased dopamine activity in the mesolimbic or meso-accumbens dopamine reward system of brain. Development of new medications to treat cocaine dependence has focused on manipulation of this dopamine system, either by direct action on dopamine binding sites (transporter or receptors) or indirectly by affecting other neurotransmitter systems that modulate the dopamine system. In principle, a medication could act via one of three mechanisms: (i) as a substitute for cocaine by producing similar dopamine effects; (ii) as a cocaine antagonist by blocking the binding of cocaine to the dopamine transporter; or (iii) as a modulator of cocaine effects by acting at other than the cocaine binding site. The US National Institute on Drug Abuse has a Clinical Research Efficacy Screening Trial (CREST) programme to rapidly screen existing medications. CREST identified four medications warranting phase II controlled clinical trials: cabergoline, reserpine, sertraline and tiagabine. In addition, disulfiram and selegiline (deprenyl) have been effective and well tolerated in phase II trials. However, selegiline was found ineffective in a recent phase III trial. Promising existing medications probably act via the first or third aforementioned mechanisms. Sustained-release formulations of stimulants such as methylphenidate and amfetamine (amphetamine) have shown promise in a stimulant substitution approach. Disulfiram and selegiline increase brain dopamine concentrations by inhibition of dopamine-catabolising enzymes (dopamine-beta-hydroxylase and monoamine oxidase B, respectively). Cabergoline is a direct dopamine receptor agonist, while reserpine depletes

  17. The Mobile Agents Integrated Field Test: Mars Desert Research Station April 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Sierhuis, Maarten; Alena, Rick; Crawford, Sekou; Dowding, John; Graham, Jeff; Kaskiris, Charis; Tyree, Kim S.; vanHoof, Ron

    2003-01-01

    The Mobile Agents model-based, distributed architecture, which integrates diverse components in a system for lunar and planetary surface operations, was extensively tested in a two-week field "technology retreat" at the Mars Society s Desert Research Station (MDRS) during April 2003. More than twenty scientists and engineers from three NASA centers and two universities refined and tested the system through a series of incremental scenarios. Agent software, implemented in runtime Brahms, processed GPS, health data, and voice commands-monitoring, controlling and logging science data throughout simulated EVAs with two geologists. Predefined EVA plans, modified on the fly by voice command, enabled the Mobile Agents system to provide navigation and timing advice. Communications were maintained over five wireless nodes distributed over hills and into canyons for 5 km; data, including photographs and status was transmitted automatically to the desktop at mission control in Houston. This paper describes the system configurations, communication protocols, scenarios, and test results.

  18. Development of Research in Marriage Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Elizabeth S.

    This study traces the development of research in marriage counseling to discover whether generalizations concerning development in a scientific field also apply to research in marriage counseling. It is hypothesized that it is possible to identify development in a field along the lines of productivity of research, development of accretive studies,…

  19. Electronic Publishing and Collection Development, a Subscription Agent's View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallas, Philip

    Trends in publishing, advances in technology and pressures on library budgets have combined to put libraries and publishers at odds with each other. Research libraries expect broad, easy access to electronic information, greater convenience and faster delivery but at reduced cost. Publishers are exploring new channels for distributing their…

  20. Chemopreventive Agent Development Funding Opportunities | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Chemopreventive Agent Development Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Active Chemopreventive Agent Development Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Chemopreventive Agent Development Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Evolving Agents as a Metaphor for the Developing Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlesinger, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    The emerging field of Evolutionary Computation (EC), inspired by neo-Darwinian principles (e.g. natural selection, mutation, etc.), offers developmental psychologists a wide array of mathematical tools for simulating ontogenetic processes. In this brief review, I begin by highlighting three of the approaches that EC researchers employ (Artificial…

  5. Research Engagement for School Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    This thought-provoking book examines the new and growing phenomenon of the "research-engaged school"--schools that not only encourage their staff to carry out their own research, but also use published research to inform practice and improve the quality of education. The author draws upon his scholarship and practice in local authorities, schools…

  6. Development of the 5-cm Agent Fate Wind Tunnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    fixture commenced in June 2002. 22 Hot Wire Vernier Anemometer Height Gage Straightener / Test Section \\: Inlet Exhaust Plexi-Glass Blower Figure 4. Plexi...Glass Test Fixture Velocity measurements in the test section were achieved using a TSI Model IFA 300 hot wire anemometer , a research grade instrument...Prototype) Type a 3 4Poucin Evluin f -m in une APPENDDý- A 15, Tunnel Designation: Plexi-Glass Test Fixture Hot Wire Vernier Anemometer Height

  7. Methodology Development for Measurement of Agent Fate in an Environmental Wind Tunnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    METHODOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR MEASUREMENT OF AGENT FATE IN AN ENVIRONMENTAL WIND TUNNEL Wendel Shuely, Robert Nickol, GEO-Centers, and...managerial support by Dr. H. Durst , Mr. L. Bickford and Dr. J. Savage, ECBC, and Mr. Tim Bauer, NSWC.

  8. Recent Advances in the Development of Novel Pharmacological Agents for the Treatment of Cognitive Impairments in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Robert W.; Freedman, Robert; Javitt, Daniel C.; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.

    2007-01-01

    Wayne Fenton was a major driving force behind the establishment of the Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia (MATRICS) and Treatment Units for Research on Neurocognition and Schizophrenia (TURNS) project mechanisms. These projects were designed to facilitate the development of new drugs for the treatment of cognitive impairments in people with schizophrenia. The MATRICS project identified 3 drug mechanisms of particular interest: cholinergic, dopaminergic, and glutamatergic. The TURNS project is designed to select potential cognitive-enhancing agents and evaluate their potential efficacy in the context of proof of concept or clinical efficacy trials. This article reviews the rationale for these 3 approaches and provides an update on the development of therapeutic agents, which act through one of these 3 mechanisms. PMID:17641146

  9. Development of Anti-Infectives Using Phage Display: Biological Agents against Bacteria, Viruses, and Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Johnny X.; Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of anti-infective therapeutics on the market or in development are small molecules; however, there is now a nascent pipeline of biological agents in development. Until recently, phage display technologies were used mainly to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) targeted against cancer or inflammatory disease targets. Patent disputes impeded broad use of these methods and contributed to the dearth of candidates in the clinic during the 1990s. Today, however, phage display is recognized as a powerful tool for selecting novel peptides and antibodies that can bind to a wide range of antigens, ranging from whole cells to proteins and lipid targets. In this review, we highlight research that exploits phage display technology as a means of discovering novel therapeutics against infectious diseases, with a focus on antimicrobial peptides and antibodies in clinical or preclinical development. We discuss the different strategies and methods used to derive, select, and develop anti-infectives from phage display libraries and then highlight case studies of drug candidates in the process of development and commercialization. Advances in screening, manufacturing, and humanization technologies now mean that phage display can make a significant contribution in the fight against clinically important pathogens. PMID:22664969

  10. Institutional research and development, FY 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.L.; Lawler, G.M.; Crawford, R.B.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.M.; Prono, J.K.; Strack, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    The Institutional Research and Development program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory fosters exploratory work to advance science and technology, disciplinary research to develop innovative solutions to problems in various scientific fields, and long-term interdisciplinary research in support of defense and energy missions. This annual report describes research funded under this program for FY87. (DWL)

  11. Historical development of origins research.

    PubMed

    Lazcano, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    Following the publication of the Origin of Species in 1859, many naturalists adopted the idea that living organisms were the historical outcome of gradual transformation of lifeless matter. These views soon merged with the developments of biochemistry and cell biology and led to proposals in which the origin of protoplasm was equated with the origin of life. The heterotrophic origin of life proposed by Oparin and Haldane in the 1920s was part of this tradition, which Oparin enriched by transforming the discussion of the emergence of the first cells into a workable multidisciplinary research program. On the other hand, the scientific trend toward understanding biological phenomena at the molecular level led authors like Troland, Muller, and others to propose that single molecules or viruses represented primordial living systems. The contrast between these opposing views on the origin of life represents not only contrasting views of the nature of life itself, but also major ideological discussions that reached a surprising intensity in the years following Stanley Miller's seminal result which showed the ease with which organic compounds of biochemical significance could be synthesized under putative primitive conditions. In fact, during the years following the Miller experiment, attempts to understand the origin of life were strongly influenced by research on DNA replication and protein biosynthesis, and, in socio-political terms, by the atmosphere created by Cold War tensions. The catalytic versatility of RNA molecules clearly merits a critical reappraisal of Muller's viewpoint. However, the discovery of ribozymes does not imply that autocatalytic nucleic acid molecules ready to be used as primordial genes were floating in the primitive oceans, or that the RNA world emerged completely assembled from simple precursors present in the prebiotic soup. The evidence supporting the presence of a wide range of organic molecules on the primitive Earth, including membrane

  12. Historical Development of Origins Research

    PubMed Central

    Lazcano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Following the publication of the Origin of Species in 1859, many naturalists adopted the idea that living organisms were the historical outcome of gradual transformation of lifeless matter. These views soon merged with the developments of biochemistry and cell biology and led to proposals in which the origin of protoplasm was equated with the origin of life. The heterotrophic origin of life proposed by Oparin and Haldane in the 1920s was part of this tradition, which Oparin enriched by transforming the discussion of the emergence of the first cells into a workable multidisciplinary research program. On the other hand, the scientific trend toward understanding biological phenomena at the molecular level led authors like Troland, Muller, and others to propose that single molecules or viruses represented primordial living systems. The contrast between these opposing views on the origin of life represents not only contrasting views of the nature of life itself, but also major ideological discussions that reached a surprising intensity in the years following Stanley Miller’s seminal result which showed the ease with which organic compounds of biochemical significance could be synthesized under putative primitive conditions. In fact, during the years following the Miller experiment, attempts to understand the origin of life were strongly influenced by research on DNA replication and protein biosynthesis, and, in socio-political terms, by the atmosphere created by Cold War tensions. The catalytic versatility of RNA molecules clearly merits a critical reappraisal of Muller’s viewpoint. However, the discovery of ribozymes does not imply that autocatalytic nucleic acid molecules ready to be used as primordial genes were floating in the primitive oceans, or that the RNA world emerged completely assembled from simple precursors present in the prebiotic soup. The evidence supporting the presence of a wide range of organic molecules on the primitive Earth, including membrane

  13. [Developing FGFR inhibitors as potential anti-cancer agents].

    PubMed

    Zsákai, Lilian; Németh, Gábor; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Greff, Zoltán; Horváth, Zoltán; Szokol, Bálint; Baska, Ferenc; Boon, Tin Chuad; Orfi, Lászlo; Kéri, Györgya

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) family is a sequentially highly related subgroup of membrane proteins consisting of four tyrosine kinase type enzyme: FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4. These are kinases of great interest in a wide spectrum of physiological processes such as tissue repair via controlling cell proliferation. As initiatiors of cell proliferation, in some cases they have leading roles in several types of cancer, eg. breast cancer, pancreas cancer, gastric tumors and multiple myeloma via overexpression and/or mutation. This phenomenon makes them promising targets for drug development in order to develop signal transduction therapies based on small molecule FGFR inhibitors. We have developed two main groups of lead molecules: compounds with benzotiophene and oxindole cores utilizing numerous methods from in silico modelling via in vitro biochemichal assays and testing on relevant cell lines to cytotoxicity assays.

  14. Academic Institutions as Change Agents for Territorial Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aranguren, Mari Jose; Guibert, José María; Valdaliso, Jesús M.; Wilson, James R.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the role academic institutions can play as catalysts of change within the territories in which they are located, by contributing proactively to shaping socio-economic development processes. This role for universities takes us beyond the typical focus on knowledge transfer activities or broad economic impacts. It…

  15. [Research on multi-agent based modeling and simulation of hospital system].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junping; Yang, Hongqiao; Guo, Huayuan; Li, Yi; Zhang, Zhenjiang; Li, Shuzhang

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, the theory of complex adaptive system (CAS) and its modeling method are introduced. The complex characters of the hospital system is analyzed. The agile manufacturing and cell reconstruction technologies are used to reconstruct the hospital system. Then we set forth a research for simulation of hospital system based on the methodology of Multi-Agent technology and high level architecture (HLA). Finally, a simulation framework based on HLA for hospital system is presented.

  16. Managing Researcher Development: "Drastic Transition"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Rowena; Cunningham, Everarda

    2011-01-01

    Academics are expected to write for publication and meet publication targets in research assessment processes. These targets are set by national bodies and institutions, and they can be daunting for academics at the start of a research career. This article reports on an intervention designed to address this issue, writer's retreat, where academics…

  17. Developing Software for Corpus Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Despite the central role of the computer in corpus research, programming is generally not seen as a core skill within corpus linguistics. As a consequence, limitations in software for text and corpus analysis slow down the progress of research while analysts often have to rely on third party software or even manual data analysis if no suitable…

  18. Development of Antibacterials Targeting the MEP Pathway of Select Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    tularensis and M. tuberculosis . This allosteric site has not been previously identified and represents a new site for the rational design of a new...Mycobacterium tuberculosis MEP synthase. This exciting discovery affords the development of a completely new family of antibiotics targeting MEP synthase...structures of the M. tuberculosis MEP synthase in complex with fosmidomycin or FR900098 [4], [5]. As introduced elsewhere [6], the strategy for the

  19. Interactive Research and Development: Another Aspect of Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Marsha A.; And Others

    An interactive research and development (IR&D) project brings together teachers, university researchers, and staff development specialists as a team to identify, research, and disseminate findings from questions of interest to teachers. Six major features of an interactive IR&D project are: (1) teams having at least one teacher, one researcher,…

  20. Current and Developing Technologies for Monitoring Agents of Bioterrorism and Biowarfare

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daniel V.; Simpson, Joyce M.; Kearns, Elizabeth A.; Kramer, Marianne F.

    2005-01-01

    Recent events have made public health officials acutely aware of the importance of rapidly and accurately detecting acts of bioterrorism. Because bioterrorism is difficult to predict or prevent, reliable platforms to rapidly detect and identify biothreat agents are important to minimize the spread of these agents and to protect the public health. These platforms must not only be sensitive and specific, but must also be able to accurately detect a variety of pathogens, including modified or previously uncharacterized agents, directly from complex sample matrices. Various commercial tests utilizing biochemical, immunological, nucleic acid, and bioluminescence procedures are currently available to identify biological threat agents. Newer tests have also been developed to identify such agents using aptamers, biochips, evanescent wave biosensors, cantilevers, living cells, and other innovative technologies. This review describes these current and developing technologies and considers challenges to rapid, accurate detection of biothreat agents. Although there is no ideal platform, many of these technologies have proved invaluable for the detection and identification of biothreat agents. PMID:16223949

  1. Recent progress in the drug development of coumarin derivatives as potent antituberculosis agents.

    PubMed

    Keri, Rangappa S; Sasidhar, B S; Nagaraja, Bhari Mallanna; Santos, M Amélia

    2015-07-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a challenging worldwide health problem and mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) remains one of the most deadly human pathogens. TB is the second leading infectious cause of mortality today behind only HIV/AIDS. The impetus for developing new structural classes of antituberculosis drugs comes from the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains. The development of MDR strains to commonly used drugs is due to, longer durations of therapy as results of resistance, and the resurgence of the disease in immune compromised patients. Therefore, there is an urgent need to explore new antitubercular (anti-TB) agents. Ironically, the low number of potentially new chemical entities which can act as anti-TB candidates is of great importance at present situation. Considering the severity of the problem, WHO has prepared a strategic plan in Berlin declaration 2007 to stop TB, globally. Among the oxygen heterocycles, coumarin derivatives are important motifs, which can be widely found in many natural products, and many of them displaying diverse biological activities. This spectacular spectrum of applications has intrigued organic and medicinal chemists for decades to explore the natural coumarins or their synthetic analogs for their applicability as anti-TB drugs. To pave the way for the future research, there is a need to collect the latest information in this promising area. In the present review, we collated published reports on coumarin derivatives to shed light on the insights on different types of methods reported for their preparations, characterizations and anti-TB applications, so that its full therapeutic potential class of compounds can be utilized for the treatment of tuberculosis. Therefore, the objective of this review is to focus on important coumarin analogs with anti-TB activities, and structure-activity relationships (SAR) for designing the better anti-TB agents. It is hoped that, this review will be helpful for new thoughts in the

  2. [New aspects in the development of sunscreening agents].

    PubMed

    Lademann, J; Meinke, M C; Schanzer, S; Albrecht, S; Zastrow, L

    2017-03-09

    Sunlight is indispensable for life. Skin aging is determined not only by genetic factors but also by the influence of solar radiation which in all its spectral regions induces free radicals in the human skin. Below a critical concentration, free radicals are important for signaling processes in the human body. Exceeding a critical threshold value (FRTV), however, free radicals lead to cellular damage which, in turn, can induce skin aging, immunosuppression and even skin cancer. Recently it could be shown that 50% of the free radicals induced in the human skin by solar radiation were caused by the visible and infrared spectral regions. Taking into consideration that people who use sunscreen stay considerably longer in the sun than unprotected people, their skin could be exposed to free radical formation in the visible and infrared spectral regions, which far exceeds the critical threshold. Filter substances like those used in sunscreens for skin protection in the ultraviolet region are not available for the visible and infrared spectral regions. Using the natural protection mechanisms of the human skin as examples, however, the protective effect of sunscreens can be considerably enhanced by the addition of scattering and reflective pigments, such as titanium dioxide, as well as of antioxidants which neutralize the free radicals. Currently the focus of sunscreen development is shifting from mere UV protection to protection covering the entire solar spectrum.

  3. Principles of antidote pharmacology: an update on prophylaxis, post-exposure treatment recommendations and research initiatives for biological agents

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, S; Liu, CQ; Tran, H; Gubala, A; Gauci, P; McAllister, J; Vo, T

    2010-01-01

    The use of biological agents has generally been confined to military-led conflicts. However, there has been an increase in non-state-based terrorism, including the use of asymmetric warfare, such as biological agents in the past few decades. Thus, it is becoming increasingly important to consider strategies for preventing and preparing for attacks by insurgents, such as the development of pre- and post-exposure medical countermeasures. There are a wide range of prophylactics and treatments being investigated to combat the effects of biological agents. These include antibiotics (for both conventional and unconventional use), antibodies, anti-virals, immunomodulators, nucleic acids (analogues, antisense, ribozymes and DNAzymes), bacteriophage therapy and micro-encapsulation. While vaccines are commercially available for the prevention of anthrax, cholera, plague, Q fever and smallpox, there are no licensed vaccines available for use in the case of botulinum toxins, viral encephalitis, melioidosis or ricin. Antibiotics are still recommended as the mainstay treatment following exposure to anthrax, plague, Q fever and melioidosis. Anti-toxin therapy and anti-virals may be used in the case of botulinum toxins or smallpox respectively. However, supportive care is the only, or mainstay, post-exposure treatment for cholera, viral encephalitis and ricin – a recommendation that has not changed in decades. Indeed, with the difficulty that antibiotic resistance poses, the development and further evaluation of techniques and atypical pharmaceuticals are fundamental to the development of prophylaxis and post-exposure treatment options. The aim of this review is to present an update on prophylaxis and post-exposure treatment recommendations and research initiatives for biological agents in the open literature from 2007 to 2009. PMID:20860656

  4. Developing Realistic Cooperative Behaviors for Autonomous Agents in Air Combat Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    development environment windows or to a log file. Position data for each agent is also captured in log files for later display using the Gnuplot ...parameters for Gnuplot files, but agents were not restricted to specific 3-5 boundaries. Using the ratio of velocity to time increment, one unit of...PDPC can also generate data files compatible with the Gnuplot interactive plotting program. Figures presented in Chapter Five were generated using

  5. Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0238 TITLE: Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL...of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Oxygen-rich environments can create pro-mutagenic DNA lesions such as 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) that can be misreplicated during translesion DNA synthesis

  6. Progressive development in experimental models of transungual drug delivery of anti-fungal agents.

    PubMed

    Thatai, P; Tiwary, A K; Sapra, B

    2016-02-01

    Pre-clinical development comprises of different procedures that relate drug discovery in the laboratory for commencement of human clinical trials. Pre-clinical studies can be designed to recognize a lead candidate from a list to develop the procedure for scale-up, to choose the unsurpassed formulation, to determine the frequency, and duration of exposure; and eventually make the foundation of the anticipated clinical trial design. The foremost aim in the pharmaceutical research and industry is the claim of drug product quality throughout a drug's life cycle. The particulars of the pre-clinical development process for different candidates may vary; however, all have some common features. Typically in vitro, in vivo or ex vivo studies are elements of pre-clinical studies. Human pharmacokinetic in vivo studies are often supposed to serve as the 'gold standard' to assess product performance. On the other hand, when this general assumption is revisited, it appears that in vitro studies are occasionally better than in vivo studies in assessing dosage forms. The present review is compendious of different such models or approaches that can be used for designing and evaluation of formulations for nail delivery with special reference to anti-fungal agents.

  7. Development of the Research Competencies Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swank, Jacqueline M.; Lambie, Glenn W.

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the development of the Research Competencies Scale (RCS). The purpose of this article is threefold: (a) present a rationale for the RCS, (b) review statistical analysis procedures used in developing the RCS, and (c) offer implications for counselor education, the enhancement of scholar-researchers, and future research.

  8. Research and Development Conference CIEE Program 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    CIEE`s second annual Research and Development Conference will introduce you to some of the results achieved to date through CIEE-sponsored multiyear research performed in three programs: Building Energy Efficiency, Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency, and End-Use Resource Planning. Results from scoping studies, Director`s discretionary research, and exploratory research will also be featured in this report.

  9. Research and Development Conference CIEE Program 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    CIEE's second annual Research and Development Conference will introduce you to some of the results achieved to date through CIEE-sponsored multiyear research performed in three programs: Building Energy Efficiency, Air Quality Impacts of Energy Efficiency, and End-Use Resource Planning. Results from scoping studies, Director's discretionary research, and exploratory research will also be featured in this report.

  10. Developing Learning Cohorts for Postgraduate Research Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choy, Sarojni; Delahaye, Brian L.; Saggers, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Development of researchers through higher degree research studies is a high priority in most universities. Yet, research about supervision as pedagogy and models of supervision is only recently gained increasing attention. Charged with producing good researchers within very limited resources, academics are constantly looking for more efficient…

  11. Developing a Shared Research Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Ira S.; Newcomb, Elizabeth W.

    1990-01-01

    Planning, creation, and current operation of the Transgenic Mouse Research Facility at the New York University Kaplan Cancer Center are discussed. The university considered need, space, funding, supervision, and marketing and followed a logical and structured management process embodying both scientific and administrative input. (Author/MSE)

  12. Effects of exogenous agents on brain development: stress, abuse and therapeutic compounds.

    PubMed

    Archer, Trevor

    2011-10-01

    The range of exogenous agents likely to affect, generally detrimentally, the normal development of the brain and central nervous system defies estimation although the amount of accumulated evidence is enormous. The present review is limited to certain types of chemotherapeutic and "use-and-abuse" compounds and environmental agents, exemplified by anesthetic, antiepileptic, sleep-inducing and anxiolytic compounds, nicotine and alcohol, and stress as well as agents of infection; each of these agents have been investigated quite extensively and have been shown to contribute to the etiopathogenesis of serious neuropsychiatric disorders. To greater or lesser extent, all of the exogenous agents discussed in the present treatise have been investigated for their influence upon neurodevelopmental processes during the period of the brain growth spurt and during other phases uptill adulthood, thereby maintaining the notion of critical phases for the outcome of treatment whether prenatal, postnatal, or adolescent. Several of these agents have contributed to the developmental disruptions underlying structural and functional brain abnormalities that are observed in the symptom and biomarker profiles of the schizophrenia spectrum disorders and the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. In each case, the effects of the exogenous agents upon the status of the affected brain, within defined parameters and conditions, is generally permanent and irreversible.

  13. Research and Infrastructure Development Center for Nanomaterials Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    1 ARMY RESEARCH LABORATORY Research and Infrastructure Development Center for Nanomaterials Research FINAL REPORT 15 AUG 2003... Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per...including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports , 1215 Jefferson

  14. 2010-11 Research Portfolio: Research & Development Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This document describes the breadth of the research that the ETS (Educational Testing Service) Research & Development division is conducting in 2010. This portfolio will be updated in early 2011 to reflect changes to existing projects and new projects that were added after this document was completed. The research described in this portfolio falls…

  15. Development of drug-approval regulations for medical countermeasures against CBRN agents in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimazawa, Rumiko; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    To develop approval regulations for drugs against chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) agents in Japan, and to help inform arguments about the development of anti-CBRN agents, we analyzed documentation describing approval processes and data for drugs against CBRN agents. Sixteen countermeasure products against 10 CBRN agents have been approved in Japan. Approval schemes were grouped into 3 categories: application for off-label uses, expedited review for antiterrorism measures, and expedited review. Ten drug applications were designated "priority reviews," and the median review time was 4.4 months. No application relied exclusively on clinical trials to expose patients to CBRN threats. Clinical experience with drugs in victims of unexpected exposure was not necessarily important for approval. The United States is the most advanced country in terms of developing medical countermeasure products against CBRN agents. Japan has similarities with the US in approved products and application packages, but there were 3 unapproved products or indications that were approved under the Animal Rule in the US. The Animal Rule might encourage development of a novel product by providing efficacy evaluation in animal studies. The US also has regulations that do not exist in Japan that authorize administration of an investigational drug outside a clinical trial for patients. Introduction of the Animal Rule and expanded access of investigational drugs could contribute to development and approvals of novel countermeasure products and improve an emergency response in a crisis in Japan.

  16. The Development of Educational Games Supported by a Pedagogical Tutor Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Lewandowski, Franciele; Pereira, Adriana Soares

    New technologies of information provide facilities for the didactic means of education. This article presents the development of two educational games supported by agents that help students during their interaction with the games. The proposed agent is based on a pedagogical concept that seeks to respect students’ individual development and learning. The educational games are: “Password Game”, which stimulates logic reasoning; and “Math Space”, which helps the basic learning of mathematics. They were developed in Flash programming, and were aimed at children from the first to the third years of Elementary School.

  17. Brown Adipose Tissue and Browning Agents: Irisin and FGF21 in the Development of Obesity in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pyrżak, B; Demkow, U; Kucharska, A M

    2015-01-01

    In the pediatric population, especially in early infancy, the activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is the highest. Further in life BAT is more active in individuals with a lower body mass index and one can expect that BAT is protective against childhood obesity. The development of BAT throughout the whole life can be regulated by genetic, endocrine, and environmental factors. Three distinct adipose depots have been identified: white, brown, and beige adipocytes. The process by which BAT can become beige is still unclear and is an area of intensive research. The "browning agents" increase energy expenditure through the production of heat. Numerous factors known as "browning agents" have currently been described. In humans, recent studies justify a notion of a role of novel myokines: irisin and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in the metabolism and development of obesity. This review describes a possible role of irisin and FGF21 in the pathogenesis of obesity in children.

  18. Design and Research on e-Business Platform Based on Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Z.; Li, L. X.

    The efficiency of enterprises can be improved and made more competitive by e-business. Consequently, e-business is developing in a swift and violent manner as a new type of business mode all over the world. But with the rapid increase of information on the Internet, the traditional technology cannot meet the requirement of information development well. Soon, high-efficient e-business system needs to be set up by a new kind of technology. Since the agent has the characteristic of movement, cooperation as well as some intelligence, it can compensate the shortcoming of the current e-business system. So how to lead the agent into e-business soon becomes the focus of academic and enterprises. This chapter analyzes the existing electronic business mode and designs a kind of the electronic business model based on the agent intelligence. It searches the goods information that match the customer request and negotiates goods price and the bargain conditions with seller, and recommends reasonable goods for the double win both the customer and the safer. The language of the system development is Java and use the B/S structure.

  19. Variables and Strategies in Development of Therapeutic Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Jack M.; Yau, Edwin H.; Kolniak, Tiffany A.; Sheflin, Lowell G.; Taggart, R. Thomas; Abdelmaksoud, Heba E.

    2011-01-01

    Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) agents such as ribozymes, RNAi and antisense have substantial potential for gene therapy of human retinal degenerations. These technologies are used to knockdown a specific target RNA and its cognate protein. The disease target mRNA may be a mutant mRNA causing an autosomal dominant retinal degeneration or a normal mRNA that is overexpressed in certain diseases. All PTGS technologies depend upon the initial critical annealing event of the PTGS ligand to the target RNA. This event requires that the PTGS agent is in a conformational state able to support hybridization and that the target have a large and accessible single-stranded platform to allow rapid annealing, although such platforms are rare. We address the biocomplexity that currently limits PTGS therapeutic development with particular emphasis on biophysical variables that influence cellular performance. We address the different strategies that can be used for development of PTGS agents intended for therapeutic translation. These issues apply generally to the development of PTGS agents for retinal, ocular, or systemic diseases. This review should assist the interested reader to rapidly appreciate critical variables in PTGS development and facilitate initial design and testing of such agents against new targets of clinical interest. PMID:21785698

  20. Recent developments in photorespiration research.

    PubMed

    Bauwe, Hermann

    2010-04-01

    Photorespiration is the light-dependent release of CO(2) initiated by Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) during oxygenic photosynthesis. It occurs during the biochemical reactions of the photorespiratory C(2) cycle, which is an ancillary metabolic process that allows photosynthesis to occur in oxygen-containing environments. Recent research has identified the genes for many plant photorespiratory enzymes, allowing precise functional analyses by reverse genetics. Similar studies with cyanobacteria disclosed the evolutionary origin of photorespiratory metabolism in these ancestors of plastids.

  1. Sports Institute for Research/Change Agent Research--SIR/CAR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; Duthie, James

    1974-01-01

    The decline of the independent, scholar-scientist closeted in a library and/or laboratory resulting from increased social stress on universities for "more scholar per dollar" and "more relevance for the real world" predicts an inevitable shift to action research. The shift in system from relatively independent basic researchers…

  2. Faculty development in medical education research.

    PubMed

    LaMantia, Joseph; Hamstra, Stanley J; Martin, Daniel R; Searle, Nancy; Love, Jeffrey; Castaneda, Jill; Aziz-Bose, Rahela; Smith, Michael; Griswold-Therodorson, Sharon; Leuck, JoAnna

    2012-12-01

    This 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference breakout session was devoted to the task of identifying the history and current state of faculty development in education research in emergency medicine (EM). The participants set a future agenda for successful faculty development in education research. A number of education research and content experts collaborated during the session. This article summarizes existing academic and medical literature, expert opinions, and audience consensus to report our agreement and findings related to the promotion of faculty development.

  3. Worldwide Report. Telecommunications Policy, Research, and Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    044110 JPRS-TTP-85-027 6 November 1985 Worldwide Report TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY , RESEARCH , AND DEVELOPMENT * DISTRIBUTION STATEl^TT A...Arlington, Virginia 22201. JPRS-TTP-85-027 6 November 1985 WORLDWIDE REPORT TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY , RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CONTENTS ASIA...into an expenditure of 3.25 bil- lion in current lire on research and development —a period that corresponds on the average to 11.5 percent of

  4. Development of reactive topical skin protectants against sulfur mustard and nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Koper, O; Lucas, E; Klabunde, K J

    1999-12-01

    The potential for highly reactive nanoparticles (RNP) to absorb destructively, i.e. to neutralize highly toxic substances such as the warfare agents GA, GB, HD and VX, has been demonstrated in the laboratory. Reactive nanoparticles represent a new class of nanoscale particles of metals and metal oxides that differ from other nanoparticles in reactivity and crystalline morphology. The potential for incorporating RNP into a protective barrier skin cream also has been demonstrated. Preliminary studies indicate that RNP are physically and chemically compatible with a base cream provided by the Army Medical Research Office and, importantly, remain reactive with chemical agents while promising to be compatible with skin contact.

  5. Recent developments. [Lead toxicity research

    SciTech Connect

    Needleman, H.L.; Bellinger, D.

    1988-08-01

    This commentary was made to further interpret the authors' studies of lead and child development and to place these studies in the proper biological and epidemiological context. Their studies demonstrate that the use of more sensitive measures of outcome and better epidemiological designs leads to identification of effects at doses previously held to be harmless.

  6. Doe Research and Development Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gell-Mann, Murray

    Forty years ago, I arrived at M.I.T. as a graduate student. I was discouraged at having been rejected by Princeton and granted insufficient financial aid by Harvard. The only really friendly letter that I received from a graduate school in physics was one from M.I.T. welcoming me as a potential student and as a research assistant in theoretical physics to a certain Professor Weisskopf, of whom I had never heard, but who added a personal letter of invitation of his own. I have described elsewhere how that letter arrived as I was contemplating suicide, as befits someone rejected by the Ivy League. It occurred to me however, (and it is an interesting example of non-commutation of operators) that I could try M.I.T. first and kill myself later, while the reverse order of events was impossible…

  7. A meta-composite software development approach for translational research.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Rajani S; Tanik, Murat M

    2013-06-01

    Translational researchers conduct research in a highly data-intensive and continuously changing environment and need to use multiple, disparate tools to achieve their goals. These researchers would greatly benefit from meta-composite software development or the ability to continuously compose and recompose tools together in response to their ever-changing needs. However, the available tools are largely disconnected, and current software approaches are inefficient and ineffective in their support for meta-composite software development. Building on the composite services development approach, the de facto standard for developing integrated software systems, we propose a concept-map and agent-based meta-composite software development approach. A crucial step in composite services development is the modeling of users' needs as processes, which can then be specified in an executable format for system composition. We have two key innovations. First, our approach allows researchers (who understand their needs best) instead of technicians to take a leadership role in the development of process models, reducing inefficiencies and errors. A second innovation is that our approach also allows for modeling of complex user interactions as part of the process, overcoming the technical limitations of current tools. We demonstrate the feasibility of our approach using a real-world translational research use case. We also present results of usability studies evaluating our approach for future refinements.

  8. Bottlenecks in Development of Retinal Therapeutic Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Jack M.; Yau, Edwin H.; Taggart, R. Thomas; Butler, Mark C.; Kolniak, Tiffany A.

    2011-01-01

    Development of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) agents for therapeutic purposes is an immense challenge in modern biology. Established technologies used to knockdown a specific target RNA and its cognate protein: antisense, ribozyme, RNAi, all conditionally depend upon an initial, critical annealing event of the PTGS ligand to a target RNA. In this review we address the nature of the bottlenecks, emphasizing the biocomplexity of target RNA structure, that currently limit PTGS therapeutic development. We briefly review existing and emerging technologies designed to release these constraints to realize the potential of PTGS agents in gene based therapies. PMID:17976683

  9. Bridging the Gap between Academic Research and Regional Development in the Basque Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsen, James; Larrea, Miren; Wilson, James R.; Aranguren, Mari Jose

    2012-01-01

    The discussion in this article focuses on how the gap between academic knowledge and regional development can be bridged, creating conditions for change processes between researchers and regional agents. Institutional entrepreneurs can create regional development organisations and research organisations, but in order to fulfil regional needs it is…

  10. Development of proteasome inhibitors as research tools and cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The proteasome is the primary site for protein degradation in mammalian cells, and proteasome inhibitors have been invaluable tools in clarifying its cellular functions. The anticancer agent bortezomib inhibits the major peptidase sites in the proteasome’s 20S core particle. It is a “blockbuster drug” that has led to dramatic improvements in the treatment of multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells. The development of proteasome inhibitors illustrates the unpredictability, frustrations, and potential rewards of drug development but also emphasizes the dependence of medical advances on basic biological research. PMID:23148232

  11. Energy storage research and development

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, US consumers experienced the highest sustained gasoline prices in recent history, in real terms, including those seen in the early 1980s1. Partially as a result of the $3/gallon gasoline prices, sales of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) increased almost 60% in 20072, and several automakers announced plans to develop plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs)3. However, total sales of HEVs remained in the 2-3 percent range of all vehicle sales. An important step for continued HEV market penetration, as well as electrifying the nation's personal transportation, is the development of cost effective, long lasting, and abuse tolerant Li-ion batteries.

  12. A Software Product Line Process to Develop Agents for the IoT.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Inmaculada; Amor, Mercedes; Fuentes, Lidia; Troya, José M

    2015-07-01

    One of the most important challenges of this decade is the Internet of Things (IoT), which aims to enable things to be connected anytime, anyplace, with anything and anyone, ideally using any path/network and any service. IoT systems are usually composed of heterogeneous and interconnected lightweight devices that support applications that are subject to change in their external environment and in the functioning of these devices. The management of the variability of these changes, autonomously, is a challenge in the development of these systems. Agents are a good option for developing self-managed IoT systems due to their distributed nature, context-awareness and self-adaptation. Our goal is to enhance the development of IoT applications using agents and software product lines (SPL). Specifically, we propose to use Self-StarMASMAS, multi-agent system) agents and to define an SPL process using the Common Variability Language. In this contribution, we propose an SPL process for Self-StarMAS, paying particular attention to agents embedded in sensor motes.

  13. Evaluation of oxime efficacy in nerve agent poisoning: Development of a kinetic-based dynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Worek, Franz . E-mail: FranzWorek@Bundeswehr.org; Szinicz, Ladislaus; Eyer, Peter; Thiermann, Horst

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of organophosphorus compounds (OP) as pesticides and the repeated misuse of highly toxic OP as chemical warfare agents (nerve agents) emphasize the necessity for the development of effective medical countermeasures. Standard treatment with atropine and the established acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reactivators, obidoxime and pralidoxime, is considered to be ineffective with certain nerve agents due to low oxime effectiveness. From obvious ethical reasons only animal experiments can be used to evaluate new oximes as nerve agent antidotes. However, the extrapolation of data from animal to humans is hampered by marked species differences. Since reactivation of OP-inhibited AChE is considered to be the main mechanism of action of oximes, human erythrocyte AChE can be exploited to test the efficacy of new oximes. By combining enzyme kinetics (inhibition, reactivation, aging) with OP toxicokinetics and oxime pharmacokinetics a dynamic in vitro model was developed which allows the calculation of AChE activities at different scenarios. This model was validated with data from pesticide-poisoned patients and simulations were performed for intravenous and percutaneous nerve agent exposure and intramuscular oxime treatment using published data. The model presented may serve as a tool for defining effective oxime concentrations and for optimizing oxime treatment. In addition, this model can be useful for the development of meaningful therapeutic animal models.

  14. A Software Product Line Process to Develop Agents for the IoT

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Inmaculada; Amor, Mercedes; Fuentes, Lidia; Troya, José M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important challenges of this decade is the Internet of Things (IoT), which aims to enable things to be connected anytime, anyplace, with anything and anyone, ideally using any path/network and any service. IoT systems are usually composed of heterogeneous and interconnected lightweight devices that support applications that are subject to change in their external environment and in the functioning of these devices. The management of the variability of these changes, autonomously, is a challenge in the development of these systems. Agents are a good option for developing self-managed IoT systems due to their distributed nature, context-awareness and self-adaptation. Our goal is to enhance the development of IoT applications using agents and software product lines (SPL). Specifically, we propose to use Self-StarMASMAS, multi-agent system) agents and to define an SPL process using the Common Variability Language. In this contribution, we propose an SPL process for Self-StarMAS, paying particular attention to agents embedded in sensor motes. PMID:26140350

  15. Materials Processing Research and Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    of microstructural evolution, (5) development of Gamma and Beta-Gamma titanium alloys towards rolled sheets for thermal protection applications, ( 6 ...the hydrostatic stress. This work was published in Metallurgical and Materials Transactions A by Nicolaou, Miller, and Semiatin [ 6 ]. 4 2.2.2 The...observed values for the Titanium 6242s measured by Porter and John, as well as Ti6- 4 alloy reported on by Chan in Mater. Trans, 2008. In addition

  16. Surface inspection: Research and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batchelder, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    Surface inspection techniques are used for process learning, quality verification, and postmortem analysis in manufacturing for a spectrum of disciplines. First, trends in surface analysis are summarized for integrated circuits, high density interconnection boards, and magnetic disks, emphasizing on-line applications as opposed to off-line or development techniques. Then, a closer look is taken at microcontamination detection from both a patterned defect and a particulate inspection point of view.

  17. From actors to agents to persons: the development of character representation in young children's narratives.

    PubMed

    Nicolopoulou, Ageliki; Richner, Elizabeth S

    2007-01-01

    This study addressed a puzzling discrepancy in existing research about when children achieve and manifest a mentalistic conception of the person. Narrative research suggests that children do not represent characters as mental agents until middle childhood, whereas social cognition research places this understanding at around 4 years. Using a theoretically informed typology, 617 stories were analyzed composed by 30 children participating in a storytelling and story-acting practice integrated into their preschool curriculum. Results indicated that children's representation of characters shifted from almost exclusively physical and external portrayals of "actors" at 3 to increasing inclusion of "agents" with rudimentary mental states at 4 and of "persons" with mental representational capacities by 5. The developmental trajectories of boys and girls differed somewhat.

  18. Codes & standards research, development & demonstration Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2008-07-22

    This Roadmap is a guide to the Research, Development & Demonstration activities that will provide data required for SDOs to develop performance-based codes and standards for a commercial hydrogen fueled transportation sector in the U.S.

  19. Research in Review: Prosocial Development in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    1982-01-01

    Reviews theory and research on various aspects of prosocial development, discusses curricula designed to increase the ability of young children to behave in prosocial ways, and lists six factors that can be used to facilitate children's prosocial development. (RH)

  20. Reusable launch vehicle development research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA has generated a program approach for a SSTO reusable launch vehicle technology (RLV) development which includes a follow-on to the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization's (BMDO) successful DC-X program, the DC-XA (Advanced). Also, a separate sub-scale flight demonstrator, designated the X-33, will be built and flight tested along with numerous ground based technologies programs. For this to be a successful effort, a balance between technical, schedule, and budgetary risks must be attained. The adoption of BMDO's 'fast track' management practices will be a key element in the eventual success of NASA's effort.

  1. An Agenda for Research on Instructional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenda, Michael

    This assessment of the status of research on instructional development (ID) discusses such conceptual problems as the confusion between ID and instructional design, reviews previous research, and proposes a framework for future ID research. Decision-oriented issues discussed within this framework include: (1) administrative and policy issues of ID…

  2. Partnering for Effective Educational Researching for Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onuka, Adams O. U.

    2012-01-01

    That research is a veritable tool for rapid social and economic development is undoubtedly well known globally. That educational researching is fraught with multi-dimensional challenges cannot be over-stressed. That multi-disciplinary approach and public-private, public-public, private-private partnership in educational researching for better and…

  3. Developing Qualitative Research Questions: A Reflective Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agee, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The reflective and interrogative processes required for developing effective qualitative research questions can give shape and direction to a study in ways that are often underestimated. Good research questions do not necessarily produce good research, but poorly conceived or constructed questions will likely create problems that affect all…

  4. Recent advances in the discovery and development of quinolones and analogs as antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Xia, Y; Yang, Z Y; Morris-Natschke, S L; Lee, K H

    1999-03-01

    Compounds that interact with DNA or microtubules by multiple mechanisms and cause diverse cytotoxic lesions are potential targets for anticancer drug development. Accordingly, a relatively new approach to the rational design of antitumor agents is based on the quinolone class of antibacterials. Their mechanism of antibacterial action involves inhibition of DNA gyrase, and numerous new quinolones do exhibit antitumor activity. Thus, these new quinolone structures display a novel mode of action for the quinolone class as antitumor agents. The potential for quinolones to be used as topoisomerase II inhibitors, as well as antimitotic agents, is reviewed with a focus on recent discoveries and development of antitumor quinolones, especially related work in the author's laboratory.

  5. Current developments of coumarin-based anti-cancer agents in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Emami, Saeed; Dadashpour, Sakineh

    2015-09-18

    Cancer is one of the leading health hazards and the prominent cause of death in the world. A number of anticancer agents are currently in clinical practice and used for treatment of various kinds of cancers. There is no doubt that the existing arsenal of anticancer agents is insufficient due to the high incidence of side effects and multidrug resistance. In the efforts to develop suitable anticancer drugs, medicinal chemists have focused on coumarin derivatives. Coumarin is a naturally occurring compound and a versatile synthetic scaffold possessing wide spectrum of biological effects including potential anticancer activity. This review article covers the current developments of coumarin-based anticancer agents and also discusses the structure-activity relationship of the most potent compounds.

  6. Role of research aircraft in technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szalai, K. J.

    1984-01-01

    The United States's aeronautical research program has been rich in the use of research aircraft to explore new flight regimes, develop individual aeronautical concepts, and investigate new vehicle classes and configurations. This paper reviews the NASA supercritical wing, digital fly-by-wire, HiMAT, and AD-1 oblique-wing flight research programs, and draws from these examples general conclusions regarding the role and impact of research aircraft in technology development. The impact of a flight program on spinoff technology is also addressed. The secondary, serendipitous results are often highly significant. Finally, future research aircraft programs are examined for technology trends and expected results.

  7. Reconstructing exposures from the UK chemical warfare agent human research programme.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Tj; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mj; Fletcher, T; Brooks, C; Doyle, P; Maconochie, Nes; Carpenter, Lm; Venables, Km

    2007-07-01

    The UK government has carried out a research programme studying military capability under conditions of chemical warfare at a facility at Porton Down, Wiltshire, since World War I. In 2001 the Ministry of Defence commissioned a cohort study to investigate the long-term health effects on military veterans of their participation in this programme. We assessed the availability and quality of exposure assessment data held in the archive at Porton Down for the purpose of this study. This involved looking in detail at exposure data in a sample of 150 veterans and undertaking a general review of all available records held in the archive. These sources suggested that the Porton Down records were largely complete and included sufficient identifying information for linkage with service personnel data and with national mortality and cancer registration records. Servicemen usually had multiple tests so data were most readily available in a test-wise format, allowing subsequent aggregation of tests by individual. The name of the chemical used in each test could be determined for most tests and most of the named chemicals could be categorized into major groups for epidemiological analyses. For the major groups (vesicants and nerve agents), quantitative data were available on exposure and on acute toxicity. Standardization will be required of the several different units which were used. Based on this study, exposure assessment for the cohort study of Porton Down veterans will involve abstraction of the name of the chemical used in each test, with quantitative data on exposure and acute toxicity for vesicants and nerve agents. Our results here show that experimental records at Porton Down offer a unique and valuable resource for reconstructing the chemical exposures used in this research programme. The resulting cohort study has the potential to provide information which will assist in understanding the long-term health impact of chemical warfare agent exposure on these veterans.

  8. Research in Review. Malnutrition and Children's Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Joseph H., Jr.; Baxter, Delia H.

    1981-01-01

    Indicates how various degrees of malnutrition affect children's development. Reviews research conducted in several developing countries and the United States, and describes the nutritional status of children in the United States. Implications for nutrition programs, research and policy formation are pointed out. (Author/RH)

  9. Future of federal research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, D.T.

    1995-12-31

    This paper very briefly describes factors affecting federal funding for research and development. Historical, political, and economic aspects of funding are outlined. Projections of future funding is provided in general terms. The potential of the national laboratories for continued research and development contributions is described.

  10. Genomics and proteomics in chemical warfare agent research: recent studies and future applications.

    PubMed

    Everley, Patrick A; Dillman, James F

    2010-10-20

    Medical research on the effects of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) has been ongoing for nearly 100 years, yet these agents continue to pose a serious threat to deployed military forces and civilian populations. CWAs are extremely toxic, relatively inexpensive, and easy to produce, making them a legitimate weapon of choice for terrorist organizations. While the mechanisms of action for many CWAs have been known for years, questions about their molecular effects following acute and chronic exposure remain largely unanswered. Global approaches that can pinpoint which cellular pathways are altered in response to CWAs and characterize long-term toxicity have not been widely used. Fortunately, innovations in genomics and proteomics technologies now allow for thousands of genes and proteins to be identified and subsequently quantified in a single experiment. Advanced bioinformatics software can also help decipher large-scale changes observed, leading to mapping of signaling pathways, functional characterization, and identification of potential therapeutic targets. Here we present an overview of how genomics and proteomics technologies have been applied to CWA research and also provide a series of questions focused on how these techniques could further our understanding of CWA toxicity.

  11. A Diversity Research Initiative: How Diverse Undergraduate Students Become Researchers, Change Agents, and Members of a Research Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston-Mann, Esther, Ed.

    This report presents information on the University of Massachusetts Boston's Diversity Research Initiative (DRI). Section 1, "Essays by Participant Observers," includes "Building a Diversity Research Initiative: An Introduction" (Esther Kingston-Mann); "Diversity Imperative: Reflections on the Diversity Research…

  12. Recent developments in L-asparaginase discovery and its potential as anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Abhinav; Khan, Abdul Arif; Khurshid, Mohsin; Kalam, Mohd Abul; Jain, Sudhir K; Singhal, Pradeep K

    2016-04-01

    L-Asparaginase (EC3.5.1.1) is an enzyme, which is used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and other related blood cancers from a long time. This enzyme selectively hydrolyzes the extracellular amino acid L-asparagine into L-aspartate and ammonia, leading to nutritional deficiencies, protein synthesis inhibition, and ultimately death of lymphoblastic cells by apoptosis. Currently, bacterial asparaginases are used for treatment purpose but offers scepticism due to a number of toxicities, including thrombosis, pancreatitis, hyperglycemia, and hepatotoxicity. Resistance towards bacterial asparaginase is another major disadvantage during cancer management. This situation attracted attention of researchers towards alternative sources of L-asparaginase, including plants and fungi. Present article discusses about potential of L-asparaginase as an anticancer agent, its mechanism of action, and adverse effects related to current asparaginase formulations. This article also provides an outlook for recent developments in L-asparaginase discovery from alternative sources and their potential as a less toxic alternative to current formulations.

  13. Action Research for Developing Social Workers' Research Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunt, Neil; Fouche, Christa

    2009-01-01

    We reflect on the action research process implemented in assisting the development of a culture of practitioner inquiry amongst social workers in social services agencies, and highlight the overall outcomes of the intervention. The paper outlines the rationale and process for undertaking an action research process with social services…

  14. Academic Developers as Change Agents Improving Quality in a Large Interprofessional Undergraduate Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordiner, Moira

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written about academic developers as change agents but not in an interprofessional education (IPE) context. IPE involves teaching students in different health professions how to work effectively in teams across professional boundaries to improve the quality of patient care. Extensive evidence reveals that implementing sustainable IPE…

  15. Developing an Argument Learning Environment Using Agent-Based ITS (ALES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbas, Safia; Sawamura, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an agent-based educational environment to teach argument analysis (ALES). The idea is based on the Argumentation Interchange Format Ontology (AIF)using "Walton Theory". ALES uses different mining techniques to manage a highly structured arguments repertoire. This repertoire was designed, developed and implemented by us. Our aim…

  16. An Occupational Analysis Comparing 4-H Youth Development Agents Serving Traditional and Non-Traditional Clientele.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Lynne M.; Harris, William

    1998-01-01

    Six 4-H agents working with traditional clients and six with nontraditional clients participated in a DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) analysis of job tasks. They performed similar duties but the nontraditional group spent more time assessing individual members; the traditional group focused more on program management. (SK)

  17. [Forensic medical assessment of the mechanisms of development of gunshot lesions caused by elastic destructive agents].

    PubMed

    Musin, É Kh; Roman'ko, N A; Makarov, I Iu; Kutsenko, K I

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the results of analysis of the data obtained in experimental studies and practical expert assessments of body injuries inflicted by rubber balls for traumatic weapons. The causes accounting for the polymorphism of such injuries and the mechanisms of their development were elucidated by means of damage simulation taking into consideration the physical and dynamic properties of elastic ball-type destructive agents and the morphological structure of different anatomical regions of the human body. The results of the study may be of interest for differential diagnostics of gunshot lesions caused by elastic destructive agents.

  18. Professional development workshops for physics education research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayre, Eleanor C.; Franklin, Scott V.; Kustusch, Mary Bridget

    2017-01-01

    Physics education research holds the promise of satisfying expectations of both scholarship, which is increasing at teaching-centric institutions, and teaching effectiveness, a concern at all institutions. Additionally, junior physics education researchers seek more diverse training in research methods and theories. Emerging education researchers need support as they develop their research programs and expand their theoretical and methodological expertise, and they benefit from the guidance of knowledgable peers and near-peers. Our two-part professional development model combines intensive in-person workshops with long-term remote activities. During a two-week in-person workshop, emerging and established education researchers work closely together to develop research questions, learn appropriate analytic techniques, and collect a corpus of data appropriate to their research questions. Afterwards, they meet biweekly in a distributed, mentored research group to share analyses and develop their ideas into publishable papers. In this talk, we discuss this model for professional development and show results from one three-year implementation in the IMPRESS program at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Partially funded by the PERTG of the AAPT.

  19. Development of a Broad-Spectrum Oxime for the Treatment of Nerve Agent Toxicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    A. Saxena Division of Biochemistry, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD 20910 K. Brecht , and D. M. Maxwell US Army Medical...wild-type and mutant AChEs revealed that the peripheral anionic site of AChE plays a critical role in the reactivation of nerve agent-inhibited AChE...reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching

  20. Structural Studies on Acetylcholinesterase and Paraoxonase Directed Towards Development of Therapeutic Biomolecules for the Treatment of Degenerative Diseases and Protection Against Chemical Threat Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Joel L.; Silman, Israel

    Acetylcholinesterase and paraoxonase are important targets for treatment of degenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis, respectively, both of which impose major burdens on the health care systems in Western society. Acetylcholinesterase is the target of lethal nerve agents, and paraoxonase is under consideration as a bioscavenger for their detoxification. Both are thus the subject of research and development in the context of nerve agent toxicology. The crystal structures of the two enzymes are described, and structure/function relationships are discussed in the context of drug development and of development of means of protection against chemical threats.

  1. Current Development of ROS-Modulating Agents as Novel Antitumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Wu, Yue; Bian, Jinlei; Qian, Xue; Lin, Hongzhi; Sun, Haopeng; You, Qidong; Zhang, Xiaojin

    2017-01-01

    Compared to normal cells, usually cancer cells are under higher oxidative stress. Elevating intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by introducing excessive ROS or inhibiting antioxidant system may enhance selectively of cancer cell killing by ROS-modulating agents through stress sensitization or stress overload. Meanwhile due to the adaptive response, normal cells may be capable of maintaining redox homeostasis under exogenous ROS. Here we review ROS-modulating agents in different mechanisms and classify them into groups by various targets for illustrating more clearly. At last, we discuss their side effects and the potential troubles of developing these agents and argue that might be an effective strategy for further exploring to modulate the unique redox regulatory mechanisms of cancer cells.

  2. Developing new antiviral agents for influenza treatment: what does the future hold?

    PubMed

    Hayden, Frederick

    2009-01-01

    Antiviral agents for the treatment of influenza are urgently needed to circumvent the limitations of current drugs in several critical areas: high frequencies of resistance to M2 inhibitors among currently circulating strains and variable frequencies of resistance to oseltamivir among A(H1N1) strains, limited efficacy of treatment and treatment-emergent antiviral resistance in cases of avian influenza A(H5N1) illness in humans, and lack of parenteral agents for seriously ill patients. Two neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), zanamivir and peramivir, have undergone or are undergoing clinical trials for use by intravenous or intramuscular administration, and one long-acting NAI, designated CS-8958, is under study for use by inhalation. Advances in understanding the mechanisms involved in influenza virus replication have revealed a number of potential targets that might be exploited in the development of new agents. Among these agents are T-705, a polymerase inhibitor, and DAS181, an attachment inhibitor. Combination therapy with currently available agents is supported by data from animal models but has received limited clinical study to date.

  3. Role of noroviruses as aetiological agents of diarrhoea in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Ayukekbong, James Ayukepi; Mesumbe, Henry Nzike; Oyero, Olufunmilayo G; Lindh, Magnus; Bergström, Tomas

    2015-08-01

    Diarrhoea is considered to be the second leading cause of death due to infections among children  < 5 years of age worldwide that may be caused by bacteria, parasites, viruses and non-infectious agents. The major causative agents of diarrhoea in developing countries may vary from those in developed countries. Noroviruses are considered to be the most common cause of acute diarrhoea in both children and adults in industrialized countries. On the other hand, there is a lack of comprehensive epidemiological evidence from developing countries that norovirus is a major cause of diarrhoea. In these regions, asymptomatic norovirus infections are very common, and similar detection rates have been observed in patients with diarrhoea and asymptomatic persons. This review summarizes the current knowledge of norovirus infection in developing countries and seeks to position infections with noroviruses among those of other enteropathogens in terms of disease burden in these regions.

  4. Software Development as Music Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Andrew R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses how software development can be used as a method for music education research. It explains how software development can externalize ideas, stimulate action and reflection, and provide evidence to support the educative value of new software-based experiences. Parallels between the interactive software development process and…

  5. Advances in Child Development: Theory and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesdale, Andrew R., Ed.; And Others

    This book consists of 31 papers focusing on aspects of child development. Mainly reports of research, papers are grouped topically into four sections dealing respectively with perceptual, language/communication, cognitive, and social development. Most of the nine papers in section 1 focus on the perceptual development of infants. Topics include…

  6. Novel compounds in the treatment of lung cancer: current and developing therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rudi; Chan, Pokman

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Though incremental advances have been made in the treatment of this devastating disease during the past decade, new therapies are urgently needed. Traditional cytotoxic agents have been combined with other modalities with improved survival for early-stage patients. Newer cytotoxic agents targeting the same or different mechanisms have been developed at different stages. Optimization of various chemotherapy regimens in different settings is one of the aims of current clinical trials. Some predictive biomarkers (eg, excision repair cross-complementing 1, ERCC1) and histotypes (eg, adenocarcinoma) are found to be associated with resistance/response to some cytotoxic drugs. Another notable advance is the addition of targeted therapy to lung cancer treatment. Targeted agents such as erlotinib and bevacizumab have demonstrated clinical benefits and gained Food and Drug Administration approval for lung cancer. More agents targeting various signaling pathways critical to lung cancer are at different stages of development. Along with the effort of new targeted drug discovery, biomarkers such as epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase mutations have proven useful for patient selection, and more predictive biomarkers have been actively evaluated in non-small cell lung cancer. The paradigm of lung cancer treatment has shifted towards biomarker-based personalized medicine. PMID:27186107

  7. Approach to the development of a short-term whole-animal bioassay to distinguish initiating agents (incomplete carcinogens), promoting agents, complete carcinogens, and noncarcinogens in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsworthy, T.L.; Pitot, H.C.

    1985-01-01

    Utilizing data obtained from the published literature as well as further observations, the experimental findings reported in this paper serve to indicate an approach to the development of a short-term whole-animal bioassay capable of distinguishing agents that act at one or the other or both of the stages of initiation and promotion in rat liver. Because of the tissue specificity for both complete carcinogens and promoting agents, this bioassay system is not likely to identify the initiating and promoting capabilities of all carcinogenic agents and, thus, at present is not designed to replace the standard chronic bioassay systems. However, in view of the diverse metabolic capabilities of hepatic tissue, the system proposed may represent a model capable of distinguishing the stages of carcinogenesis at which many, if not most, specific carcinogenic chemicals exert their primary action. Test agents included diethylnitrosamine, dimethylbenzanthracene, proflavin, phenobarbital, butylated hydroxyanisole, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, and red beet betalain pigments.

  8. Research and Development of an Electrochemical Biocide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    normal flora of microorganisms found in domestic raw settled sewage. A literature search was conducted on prior research and development efforts related to the electrolytic disinfection of water and waste water.

  9. Participatory Research for a Radical Community Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulenga, Derek C.

    1994-01-01

    Critically examines community development assumptions through historical analysis and mapping of political discourse. Using the methods of Foucault, Said, and Gramsci, demonstrates how participatory research, concerned with releasing people's knowledge through transformation, can expose and resist dominant discourses. (SK)

  10. Computational Research on Mobile Pastoralism Using Agent-Based Modeling and Satellite Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Takuto

    2016-01-01

    Dryland pastoralism has long attracted considerable attention from researchers in diverse fields. However, rigorous formal study is made difficult by the high level of mobility of pastoralists as well as by the sizable spatio-temporal variability of their environment. This article presents a new computational approach for studying mobile pastoralism that overcomes these issues. Combining multi-temporal satellite images and agent-based modeling allows a comprehensive examination of pastoral resource access over a realistic dryland landscape with unpredictable ecological dynamics. The article demonstrates the analytical potential of this approach through its application to mobile pastoralism in northeast Nigeria. Employing more than 100 satellite images of the area, extensive simulations are conducted under a wide array of circumstances, including different land-use constraints. The simulation results reveal complex dependencies of pastoral resource access on these circumstances along with persistent patterns of seasonal land use observed at the macro level. PMID:26963526

  11. Computational Research on Mobile Pastoralism Using Agent-Based Modeling and Satellite Imagery.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Takuto

    2016-01-01

    Dryland pastoralism has long attracted considerable attention from researchers in diverse fields. However, rigorous formal study is made difficult by the high level of mobility of pastoralists as well as by the sizable spatio-temporal variability of their environment. This article presents a new computational approach for studying mobile pastoralism that overcomes these issues. Combining multi-temporal satellite images and agent-based modeling allows a comprehensive examination of pastoral resource access over a realistic dryland landscape with unpredictable ecological dynamics. The article demonstrates the analytical potential of this approach through its application to mobile pastoralism in northeast Nigeria. Employing more than 100 satellite images of the area, extensive simulations are conducted under a wide array of circumstances, including different land-use constraints. The simulation results reveal complex dependencies of pastoral resource access on these circumstances along with persistent patterns of seasonal land use observed at the macro level.

  12. Developing Research Skills across the Undergraduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Simon; Coates, Lee; Fraser, Ann; Pierce, Pam

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes consortial efforts within the Great Lakes Colleges Association to share expertise and programming to build research skills throughout the undergraduate curriculum. Strategies to scaffold research skill development are provided from Allegheny College, Kalamazoo College, and The College of Wooster.

  13. Research and Curriculum Development in Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, David P., Ed.

    This is the second in a series of reports of research and curriculum development in science education. This monograph contains 16 papers reporting on research studies related to curriculum implementation in elementary school science. The reports are titled as follows: The Educational Experience: Toward a Paradigm of Teacher Education; Development…

  14. It's Not Magic! Research on Developing Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peskin, Joan

    2011-01-01

    In the past two decades, a large body of research has examined the differences between novices and experts in subject areas ranging from physics to poetry. Yet research on developing expertise has found no "magic bullet" in becoming an expert and has concluded that innate talent plays a less prominent role than previously imagined.…

  15. Advancing Administrative Supports for Research Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briar-Lawson, Katharine; Korr, Wynne; White, Barbara; Vroom, Phyllis; Zabora, James; Middleton, Jane; Shank, Barbara; Schatz, Mona

    2008-01-01

    Research administrative supports must parallel and reinforce faculty initiatives in research grant procurement. This article features several types of developments that draw on presentations at the National Association of Deans and Directors of Schools of Social Work meetings. Key changes in social work programs are addressed, including the…

  16. Antimicrobial action of chelating agents: repercussions on the microorganism development, virulence and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Santos, A L S; Sodre, C L; Valle, R S; Silva, B A; Abi-Chacra, E A; Silva, L V; Souza-Goncalves, A L; Sangenito, L S; Goncalves, D S; Souza, L O P; Palmeira, V F; d'Avila-Levy, C M; Kneipp, L F; Kellett, A; McCann, M; Branquinha, M H

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by resistant microorganisms often fail to respond to conventional therapy, resulting in prolonged illness, increased treatment costs and greater risk of death. Consequently, the development of novel antimicrobial drugs is becoming more demanding every day since the existing drugs either have too many side-effects or they tend to lose effectiveness due to the selection of resistant strains. In view of these facts, a number of new strategies to obstruct vital biological processes of a microbial cell have emerged; one of these is focused on the use of metal-chelating agents, which are able to selectively disturb the essential metal metabolism of the microorganism by interfering with metal acquisition and bioavailability for crucial reactions. The chelation activity is able to inhibit the biological role of metal-dependent proteins (e.g., metalloproteases and transcription factors), disturbing the microbial cell homeostasis and culminating in the blockage of microbial nutrition, growth and development, cellular differentiation, adhesion to biotic (e.g., extracellular matrix components, cell and/or tissue) and abiotic (e.g., plastic, silicone and acrylic) structures as well as controlling the in vivo infection progression. Interestingly, chelating agents also potentiate the activity of classical antimicrobial compounds. The differences between the microorganism and host in terms of the behavior displayed in the presence of chelating agents could provide exploitable targets for the development of an effective chemotherapy for these diseases. Consequently, metal chelators represent a novel group of antimicrobial agents with potential therapeutic applications. This review will focus on the anti-fungal and anti-protozoan action of the most common chelating agents, deciphering and discussing their mode of action.

  17. Steroid hormones and brain development: some guidelines for understanding actions of pseudohormones and other toxic agents

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, B.S.

    1987-10-01

    Gonadal, adrenal, and thyroid hormones affect the brain directly, and the sensitivity to hormones begins in embryonic life with the appearance of hormone receptor sites in discrete populations of neurons. Because the secretion of hormones is also under control by its neural and pituitary targets, the brain-endocrine axis during development is in a delicately balanced state that can be upset in various ways, and any agent that disrupts normal hormone secretion can upset normal brain development. Moreover, exogenous substances that mimic the actions of natural hormones can also play havoc with CNS development and differentiation. This paper addresses these issues in the following order: First, actions of glucocorticoids on the developing nervous system related to cell division dendritic growth and neurotransmitter phenotype will be presented followed by a discussion of the developmental effects of synthetic steroids. Second, actions of estrogens related to brain sexual differentiation will be described, followed by a discussion of the actions of the nonsteroidal estrogen, diethylstilbestrol, as an example of exogenous estrogenic substances. The most important aspect of the potency of exogenous estrogens appears to be the degree to which they either bypass protective mechanisms or are subject to transformations to more active metabolites. Third, agents that influence hormone levels or otherwise modify the neuroendocrine system, such as nicotine, barbiturates, alcohol, opiates, and tetrahydrocannabinol, will be noted briefly to demonstrate the diversity of toxic agents that can influence neural development and affect personality, cognitive ability, and other aspects of behavior. 53 references.

  18. 78 FR 22622 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... medical specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research....

  19. 76 FR 19188 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... medical specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research....

  20. 77 FR 23810 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to...

  1. 76 FR 66367 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... medical specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research....

  2. 78 FR 66992 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral, and clinical science research. The...

  3. Hydrogen energy research and developments in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, T.; Abe, I.

    A development history and current status report is presented for Japanese hydrogen-based energy research and development. The most ambitious of the national programs is the 'Sunshine Project' conducted by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, which has spent $20 million for hydrogen-related development since its inception in 1974. The Science and Technology Agency has conducted development efforts for windpower energy heat storage in a metal hydride system. University-based research efforts are primarily concerned with hydrogen production by semiconductor-liquid junction, photochemical, and biological methods. Private enterprise initiatives in this field are also noted.

  4. Challenges in the research and development of new human vaccines.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, T; Barral-Netto, M

    2013-02-01

    The field of vaccinology was born from the observations by the fathers of vaccination, Edward Jenner and Louis Pasteur, that a permanent, positive change in the way our bodies respond to life-threatening infectious diseases can be obtained by specific challenge with the inactivated infectious agent performed in a controlled manner, avoiding the development of clinical disease upon exposure to the virulent pathogen. Many of the vaccines still in use today were developed on an empirical basis, essentially following the paradigm established by Pasteur, "isolate, inactivate, and inject" the disease-causing microorganism, and are capable of eliciting uniform, long-term immune memory responses that constitute the key to their proven efficacy. However, vaccines for pathogens considered as priority targets of public health concern are still lacking. The literature tends to focus more often on vaccine research problems associated with specific pathogens, but it is increasingly clear that there are common bottlenecks in vaccine research, which need to be solved in order to advance the development of the field as a whole. As part of a group of articles, the objective of the present report is to pinpoint these bottlenecks, exploring the literature for common problems and solutions in vaccine research applied to different situations. Our goal is to stimulate brainstorming among specialists of different fields related to vaccine research and development. Here, we briefly summarize the topics we intend to deal with in this discussion.

  5. Preclinical animal acute toxicity studies of new developed MRI contrast agent based on gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, I. F.; Zhuk, V. V.

    2015-04-01

    Acute toxicity test of new developed MRI contrast agent based on disodium salt of gadopentetic acid complex were carried out on Mus musculus and Sprague Dawley rats according to guidelines of preclinical studies [1]. Groups of six animals each were selected for experiment. Death and clinical symptoms of animals were recorded during 14 days. As a result the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for female mice is 2.8 mM/kg of body weight, male mice - 1.4 mM/kg, female rats - 2.8 mM/kg, male rats - 5.6 mM/kg of body weight. No Observed Adverse Effect Dose (NOAEL) for female mice is 1.4 mM/kg, male mice - 0.7 mM/kg, male and female rats - 0.7 mM/kg. According to experimental data new developed MRI contrast agent based on Gd-DTPA complex is low-toxic.

  6. Development of an integrated system for rapid detection of biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terazono, Hideyuki; Takei, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Masahito; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2010-04-01

    Weaponized biological agents are as great a threat as nuclear or chemical weapons. They must be detected at the earliest stage to prevent diffusion because once these agents are dispersed into the air, the rapidly decreasing concentration makes detection more of a challenge. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common method to create copies of a specific target region of a DNA sequence and to produce large quantities of DNA molecules. A few DNA molecules are rapidly amplified by PCR into billions of copies. While PCR is a powerful technique and is capable of countering new threats relatively easily, it is plagued by the number of processes necessary. Therefore, we have developed an integrated PCR system for rapid detection of biological agents captured from the air. Each processing function is performed by a dedicated module, and reduction in the process time has been made the top priority, without loss in the signal/noise ratio of the total system. Agents can be identified within 15 min from capture. A fully automated operation protects operators from exposure to potentially highly lethal samples.

  7. [Landscape classification: research progress and development trend].

    PubMed

    Liang, Fa-Chao; Liu, Li-Ming

    2011-06-01

    Landscape classification is the basis of the researches on landscape structure, process, and function, and also, the prerequisite for landscape evaluation, planning, protection, and management, directly affecting the precision and practicability of landscape research. This paper reviewed the research progress on the landscape classification system, theory, and methodology, and summarized the key problems and deficiencies of current researches. Some major landscape classification systems, e. g. , LANMAP and MUFIC, were introduced and discussed. It was suggested that a qualitative and quantitative comprehensive classification based on the ideology of functional structure shape and on the integral consideration of landscape classification utility, landscape function, landscape structure, physiogeographical factors, and human disturbance intensity should be the major research directions in the future. The integration of mapping, 3S technology, quantitative mathematics modeling, computer artificial intelligence, and professional knowledge to enhance the precision of landscape classification would be the key issues and the development trend in the researches of landscape classification.

  8. Entrepreneurship research in Spain: developments and distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, José C; Gutiérrez, Andrea

    2011-08-01

    This article presents a review of research on entrepreneurship in Spain, paying particular attention to its beginnings, nature and main focus of interest. We have developed a database based on the review of 471 works produced between 1977 and 2009, including articles published in national and international journals and dissertations (read in Spain) that allowed us to extract the following results. There is a preference for qualitative methods, conceptual contributions and the entrepreneurial process as the privileged research theme. There is also a strong focus of interest on micro and small enterprises. These characteristics of Spanish research in areas of entrepreneurship can make a distinctive contribution to international research. However, the dissemination of knowledge and inadequate strategies for international publication limit the diffusion of Spanish research in entrepreneurship. Lastly, we discuss the implications for future research.

  9. Current Issues in Research on Early Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Alberta E.

    Research on early development is moving apace. Developmental psychology is again giving serious attention to ages and stages. This attention is due, in great part, to the formulations about cognitive development by Piaget. Earlier in the century, the experimental approach to child study came to reflect psychology's generally heavy commitment to…

  10. Research and Development of Future Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next generation high-energy lepton collider machine. A novel accelerator technology must be developed to overcome several intrinsic issues of muon acceleration. Recent research and development of critical beam elements for a muon accelerator, especially muon beam phase space ionization cooling channel, are reviewed in this paper.

  11. Issues in International Communications: Development Communications Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Thomas

    One debate in the field of development communications research focuses on the type of science that ought to be practiced: empirical or critical. The issues involved are many, but epistemological analysis can shed light on a number of them. Traditional empiricism as embodied in the "classical" development communications work is deserving…

  12. Early Brain Development Research Review and Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Pam

    2010-01-01

    Thanks to imaging technology used in neurobiology, people have access to useful and critical information regarding the development of the human brain. This information allows them to become much more effective in helping children in their early development. In fact, when people base their practices on the findings from medical science research,…

  13. Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response to Marrow Toxic Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-30

    MD Anderson Cancer Center BCPeX Business Continuity Plan Exercise MDS Myelodysplastic Syndrome BMCC Bone Marrow Coordinating Center MHC Major...Histocompatibility Complex BMDW Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide MICA MHC Class I-Like Molecule, Chain A BMT Bone Marrow Transplantation MICB MHC Class I-Like...1 of 16 Grant Award N00014-13-1-0039 DEVELOPMENT OF MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTINGENCY RESPONSE TO MARROW TOXIC AGENTS QUARTERLY

  14. [The history of the development and changes of quinolone antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hisashi; Hayakawa, Isao; Akimoto, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    were patented in the next three years, several of which reached the market. Among the drugs, ofloxacin (OFLX) and ciprofloxacin (CPFX) are recognized as superior in several respects to the oral beta-lactam antibiotics as an antibacterial agent. With a focus on OFLX and CPFX, numerous research groups entered the antibacterial therapeutic field, triggering intense competition in the search to find newer, more effective quinolones. After NFLX was introduced in the market, while resulting by the end of today, eleven kinds of other new quinolones launched in Japan. They are enoxacin (ENX), OFLX, CPFX, lomefloxacin (LFLX), fleroxacin (FRLX), tosufloxacin (TFLX), levofloxacin (LVFX), sparfloxacin (SPFX), gatifloxacin (GFLX), prulifloxacin (PULX) and also pazufloxacin (PZFX). The advantages of these compounds, e.g., LVFX, SPFX and GFLX, are that their spectrum includes Gram-positive bacteria species as well as Gram-negative bacteria and they improve bioavailability results when a daily dose is administered for systemic infections including RTIs. However, unexpected adverse reactions, such as the CNS reaction, the drug-drug interaction, phototoxicity, hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity such as the QTc interval prolongation of ECG, have been reported in the clinical evaluations or the post-marketing surveillance of several new quinolones. Moreover, the adverse reactions of arthropathy (the joint toxicity) predicated from studies in juvenile animals have never materialized in clinical use. Therefore, no drugs other than NFLX have yet been approved for pediatric use. Fortunately, the newer quinolones are being developed and tested to reduce these adverse reactions on the basis of recent studies. On the other hand, multi-drug resistant Gram-positive bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphycolocci (MRCNS), penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have

  15. JPL basic research review. [research and advanced development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Current status, projected goals, and results of 49 research and advanced development programs at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are reported in abstract form. Areas of investigation include: aerodynamics and fluid mechanics, applied mathematics and computer sciences, environment protection, materials science, propulsion, electric and solar power, guidance and navigation, communication and information sciences, general physics, and chemistry.

  16. Is Mixed Methods Research Used in Australian Career Development Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Roslyn

    2010-01-01

    Mixed methods research has become a substantive and growing methodological force that is growing in popularity within the human and social sciences. This article reports the findings of a study that has systematically reviewed articles from the "Australian Journal of Career Development" from 2004 to 2009. The aim of the study was to…

  17. Gastric cancer in the era of molecularly targeted agents: current drug development strategies.

    PubMed

    Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias

    2009-07-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death worldwide with approximately one million cases diagnosed annually. Despite considerable improvements in surgical techniques, innovations in clinical diagnostics and the development of new chemotherapy regimens, the clinical outcome for patients with advanced gastric cancer and cancer of the GEJ is generally poor with 5-year survival rates ranging between 5 and 15%. The understanding of cancer relevant events has resulted in new therapeutic strategies, particularly in developing of new molecular targeted agents. These agents have the ability to target a variety of cancer relevant receptors and downstream pathways including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR), the c-Met pathway, cell-cycle pathways, and down-stream signalling pathways such as the Akt-PI3k-mTOR pathway. In the era of new molecularly targeted agents this review focuses on recent developments of targeting relevant pathways involved in gastric cancer and cancer of the GEJ.

  18. Agent oriented programming: An overview of the framework and summary of recent research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoham, Yoav

    1993-01-01

    This is a short overview of the agent-oriented programming (AOP) framework. AOP can be viewed as an specialization of object-oriented programming. The state of an agent consists of components called beliefs, choices, capabilities, commitments, and possibly others; for this reason the state of an agent is called its mental state. The mental state of agents is captured formally in an extension of standard epistemic logics: beside temporalizing the knowledge and belief operators, AOP introduces operators for commitment, choice and capability. Agents are controlled by agent programs, which include primitives for communicating with other agents. In the spirit of speech-act theory, each communication primitive is of a certain type: informing, requesting, offering, etc. This document describes these features in more detail and summarizes recent results and ongoing AOP-related work.

  19. Development and Evaluation of Novel Coupling Agents for Kenaf-Fiber-Reinforced Unsaturated Polyester Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaofeng

    Natural fibers are gaining popularity as reinforcement materials for thermoset resins over the last two decades. Natural fibers are inexpensive, abundant, renewable and environmentally friendly. Kenaf fibers are one of the natural fibers that can potentially be used for reinforcing unsaturated polyester (UPE). As a polymer matrix, UPE enjoys a 40% market share of all the thermoset composites. This widespread application is due to many favorable characteristics including low cost, ease of cure at room temperature, ease of molding, a good balance of mechanical, electrical and chemical properties. One of the barriers for the full utilization of the kenaf fiber reinforced UPE composites, however, is the poor interfacial adhesion between the natural fibers and the UPE resins. The good interfacial adhesion between kenaf fibers and UPE matrix is essential for generating the desired properties of kenaf-UPE composites for most of the end applications. Use of a coupling agent is one of the most effective ways of improving the interfacial adhesion. In this study, six novel effective coupling agents were developed and investigated for kenaf-UPE composites: DIH-HEA, MFA, NMA, AESO-DIH, AESO-MDI, and AESO-PMDI. All the coupling agents were able to improve the interfacial adhesion between kanaf and UPE resins. The coupling agents were found to significantly enhance the flexural properties and water resistance of the kenaf-UPE composites. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed all the coupling agents were covalently bonded onto kenaf fibers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the composites revealed the improved interfacial adhesion between kanaf fibers and UPE resins.

  20. Effect of Antibiotics and Antibiofilm Agents in the Ultrastructure and Development of Biofilms Developed by Nonpigmented Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Egea, María-Carmen; García-Pedrazuela, María; Mahillo-Fernandez, Ignacio; Esteban, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the effect of amikacin, ciprofloxacin, and clarithromycin, alone and associated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and Tween 80, at different times and concentrations in nonpigmented rapidly growing mycobacteria (NPRGM) biofilms. For this purpose, confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis were used to study the development and behavior of intrinsic autofluorescence, covered area, thickness, and cell viability in NPRGM biofilms after adding antibiotics alone and associated with antibiofilm agents. In this study, ciprofloxacin is the most active antibiotic against this type of biofilm and thickness is the most affected parameter. NAC and Tween 80 combined with antibiotics exert a synergistic effect in increasing the percentage of dead bacteria and also reducing the percentage of covered surface and thickness of NPRGM biofilms. Tween 80 seems to be an antibiofilm agent more effective than NAC due to its higher reduction in the percentage of cover surface and thickness. In conclusion, the results obtained in this work show that phenotypic parameters (thickness, percentage of covered surface, autofluorescence, percentage of live/dead bacteria) are affected by combining antibiotics and antibiofilm agents, ciprofloxacin and Tween 80 being the most active agents against NPRGM biofilms.

  1. The role of research efficiency in the evolution of scientific productivity and impact: An agent-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Zhi-Qiang; Han, Xiao-Pu; Hadzibeganovic, Tarik

    2016-02-01

    We introduce an agent-based model to investigate the effects of production efficiency (PE) and hot field tracing capability (HFTC) on productivity and impact of scientists embedded in a competitive research environment. Agents compete to publish and become cited by occupying the nodes of a citation network calibrated by real-world citation datasets. Our Monte-Carlo simulations reveal that differences in individual performance are strongly related to PE, whereas HFTC alone cannot provide sustainable academic careers under intensely competitive conditions. Remarkably, the negative effect of high competition levels on productivity can be buffered by elevated research efficiency if simultaneously HFTC is sufficiently low.

  2. Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Research and Development Roadmaps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Nuclear Security Administration,U.S. Department of Energy ,1000 Independence Ave., S.W.,Washington,DC,20585 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9...that better match observables), and 2010 Monitoring Research Review: Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Technologies 5 WSO6. Calculate energy ... NUCLEAR EXPLOSION MONITORING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ROADMAPS Leslie A. Casey and W. Randy Bell Sponsored by the National Nuclear Security

  3. Wave Rotor Research and Technology Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Gerard E.

    1998-01-01

    Wave rotor technology offers the potential to increase the performance of gas turbine engines significantly, within the constraints imposed by current material temperature limits. The wave rotor research at the NASA Lewis Research Center is a three-element effort: 1) Development of design and analysis tools to accurately predict the performance of wave rotor components; 2) Experiments to characterize component performance; 3) System integration studies to evaluate the effect of wave rotor topping on the gas turbine engine system.

  4. Federal research and development for satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A Committee on Satellite Communication (COSC) was formed under the auspices of the Space Applications Board (SAB) in order to study Federal research and development on satellite communications (SC). Discussion on whether to continue the research and development and the proper role of the Federal Government are addressed. Discussion focussed on six possible options for a Federal role in SC research and development: (1) the current NASA SC program; (2) an expanded NASA SC technology program; (3) a SC technology flight test support program; (4) an experimental SC technology flight program; (5) an experimental public service SC system program; and (6) an operational public service SC system program. Decision criteria and recommendations are presented.

  5. Collaborative Engineering for Research and Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jose M.; Keys, L. Ken; Chen, Injazz J.

    2004-01-01

    Research and development (R&D) organizations are being required to be relevant, to be more application-oriented, and to be partners in the strategic management of the business while meeting the same challenges as the rest of the organization, namely: (1) reduced time to market; (2) reduced cost; (3) improved quality; (4) increased reliability; and (5) increased focus on customer needs. Recent advances in computer technology and the Internet have created a new paradigm of collaborative engineering or collaborative product development (CPD), from which new types of relationships among researchers and their partners have emerged. Research into the applicability and benefits of CPD in a low/no production, R&D, and/or government environment is limited. In addition, the supply chain management (SCM) aspects of these relationships have not been studied. This paper presents research conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) investigating the applicability of CPD and SCM in an R&D organization. The study concentrates on the management and implementation of space research activities at GRC. Results indicate that although the organization is engaged in collaborative relationships that incorporate aspects of SCM, a number of areas, such as development of trust and information sharing merit special attention.

  6. Characterization of imidazoline receptors in blood vessels for the development of antihypertensive agents.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Fen; Tsai, Jo-Ting; Chen, Li-Jen; Wu, Tung-Pi; Yang, Jia-Jang; Yin, Li-Te; Yang, Yu-Lin; Chiang, Tai-An; Lu, Han-Lin; Wu, Ming-Chang

    2014-01-01

    It has been indicated that activation of peripheral imidazoline I2-receptor (I-2R) may reduce the blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Also, guanidinium derivatives show the ability to activate imidazoline receptors. Thus, it is of special interest to characterize the I-2R using guanidinium derivatives in blood vessels for development of antihypertensive agent(s). Six guanidinium derivatives including agmatine, amiloride, aminoguanidine, allantoin, canavanine, and metformin were applied in this study. Western blot analysis was used for detecting the expression of imidazoline receptor in tissues of Wistar rats. The isometric tension of aortic rings isolated from male rats was also estimated. The expression of imidazoline receptor on rat aorta was identified. However, guanidinium derivatives for detection of aortic relaxation were not observed except agmatine and amiloride which induced a marked relaxation in isolated aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine or KCl. Both relaxations induced by agmatine and amiloride were attenuated by glibenclamide at concentration enough to block ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. Meanwhile, only agmatine-induced relaxation was abolished by BU224, a selective antagonist of imidazoline I2-receptors. Taken together, we suggest that agmatine can induce vascular relaxation through activation of peripheral imidazoline I2-receptor to open KATP channels. Thus, agmatine-like compound has the potential to develop as a new therapeutic agent for hypertension in the future.

  7. Characterization of Imidazoline Receptors in Blood Vessels for the Development of Antihypertensive Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Fen; Chen, Li-Jen; Wu, Tung-Pi; Yang, Jia-Jang; Yin, Li-Te; Yang, Yu-lin; Chiang, Tai-An; Lu, Han-Lin; Wu, Ming-Chang

    2014-01-01

    It has been indicated that activation of peripheral imidazoline I2-receptor (I-2R) may reduce the blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Also, guanidinium derivatives show the ability to activate imidazoline receptors. Thus, it is of special interest to characterize the I-2R using guanidinium derivatives in blood vessels for development of antihypertensive agent(s). Six guanidinium derivatives including agmatine, amiloride, aminoguanidine, allantoin, canavanine, and metformin were applied in this study. Western blot analysis was used for detecting the expression of imidazoline receptor in tissues of Wistar rats. The isometric tension of aortic rings isolated from male rats was also estimated. The expression of imidazoline receptor on rat aorta was identified. However, guanidinium derivatives for detection of aortic relaxation were not observed except agmatine and amiloride which induced a marked relaxation in isolated aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine or KCl. Both relaxations induced by agmatine and amiloride were attenuated by glibenclamide at concentration enough to block ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. Meanwhile, only agmatine-induced relaxation was abolished by BU224, a selective antagonist of imidazoline I2-receptors. Taken together, we suggest that agmatine can induce vascular relaxation through activation of peripheral imidazoline I2-receptor to open KATP channels. Thus, agmatine-like compound has the potential to develop as a new therapeutic agent for hypertension in the future. PMID:24800210

  8. Progress of small molecular inhibitors in the development of anti-influenza virus agents

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoai; Wu, Xiuli; Sun, Qizheng; Zhang, Chunhui; Yang, Shengyong; Li, Lin; Jia, Zhiyun

    2017-01-01

    The influenza pandemic is a major threat to human health, and highly aggressive strains such as H1N1, H5N1 and H7N9 have emphasized the need for therapeutic strategies to combat these pathogens. Influenza anti-viral agents, especially active small molecular inhibitors play important roles in controlling pandemics while vaccines are developed. Currently, only a few drugs, which function as influenza neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors and M2 ion channel protein inhibitors, are approved in clinical. However, the acquired resistance against current anti-influenza drugs and the emerging mutations of influenza virus itself remain the major challenging unmet medical needs for influenza treatment. It is highly desirable to identify novel anti-influenza agents. This paper reviews the progress of small molecular inhibitors act as antiviral agents, which include hemagglutinin (HA) inhibitors, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) inhibitors, NA inhibitors and M2 ion channel protein inhibitors etc. Moreover, we also summarize new, recently reported potential targets and discuss strategies for the development of new anti-influenza virus drugs. PMID:28382157

  9. Development of Ultrasound-switchable Fluorescence Imaging Contrast Agents based on Thermosensitive Polymers and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Yuan; Pitta, Harish; Xie, Zhiwei; Hong, Yi; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Yuan, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first introduced a recently developed high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging technique, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF). The imaging principles based on two types of USF contrast agents were reviewed. To improve USF imaging techniques further, excellent USF contrast agents were developed based on high-performance thermoresponsive polymers and environment-sensitive fluorophores. Herein, such contrast agents were synthesized and characterized with five key parameters: (1) peak excitation and emission wavelengths (λex and λem), (2) the fluorescence intensity ratio between on and off states (IOn/IOff), (3) the fluorescence lifetime ratio between on and off states (τOn/τOff), (4) the temperature threshold to switch on fluorophores (Tth), and (5) the temperature transition bandwidth (TBW). We mainly investigated fluorescence intensity and lifetime changes of four environment-sensitive dyes [7-(2-Aminoethylamino)-N,N-dimethyl-4-benzofurazansulfonamide (DBD-ED), St633, Sq660, and St700] as a function of temperature, while the dye was attached to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) linear polymers or encapsulated in nanoparticles. Six fluorescence resonance energy transfer systems were invented in which both the donor (DBD-ED or ST425) and the acceptor (Sq660) were adopted. Our results indicate that three Förster resonance energy transfer systems, where both IOn/IOff and τOn/τOff are larger than 2.5, are promising for application in future surface tissue bioimaging by USF technique. PMID:26052192

  10. Drug Development for Hypertension: Do We Need Another Antihypertensive Agent for Resistant Hypertension?

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo; Calhoun, David A

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of resistant hypertension is seemingly much lower than had been reported in early studies. Recent analyses suggest that <5 % of treated hypertensive patients remain uncontrolled if fully adherent to an optimized antihypertensive treatment. However, these patients do have increased cardiovascular risk and need effective therapeutic approaches. Drug development is a high-risk, complex, lengthy, and very expensive process. In this article, we discuss the factors that should be considered in the process of developing a new agent for treatment of resistant hypertension.

  11. Facilitating the Specification Capture and Transformation Process in the Development of Multi-Agent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filho, Aluzio Haendehen; Caminada, Numo; Haeusler, Edward Hermann; vonStaa, Arndt

    2004-01-01

    To support the development of flexible and reusable MAS, we have built a framework designated MAS-CF. MAS-CF is a component framework that implements a layered architecture based on contextual composition. Interaction rules, controlled by architecture mechanisms, ensure very low coupling, making possible the sharing of distributed services in a transparent, dynamic and independent way. These properties propitiate large-scale reuse, since organizational abstractions can be reused and propagated to all instances created from a framework. The objective is to reduce complexity and development time of multi-agent systems through the reuse of generic organizational abstractions.

  12. Why develop antidotes and reversal agents for non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants?

    PubMed

    Washam, Jeffrey B; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2016-02-01

    Over the past several years, non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been introduced into clinical practice for the treatment of venous thromboembolism and prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Clinical trials have shown these agents to have similar or less risk of major bleeding as compared to warfarin therapy. Moreover, when patients do experience a major bleeding event administration of advanced factor products is rare, and post-bleed outcomes are similar in those receiving a NOAC compared to those receiving warfarin. However, there are situations where urgent reversal of NOAC anticoagulation would be desirable. The following review focuses on the outcomes and management strategies for patients experiencing a major bleed with warfarin or NOAC agents and describes the rationale for the development of therapies capable of targeted NOAC-reversal.

  13. Discovery and development of natural product oridonin-inspired anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ye; Ding, Chunyong; Ye, Na; Liu, Zhiqing; Wold, Eric A; Chen, Haiying; Wild, Christopher; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2016-10-21

    Natural products have historically been, and continue to be, an invaluable source for the discovery of various therapeutic agents. Oridonin, a natural diterpenoid widely applied in traditional Chinese medicines, exhibits a broad range of biological effects including anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. To further improve its potency, aqueous solubility and bioavailability, the oridonin template serves as an exciting platform for drug discovery to yield better candidates with unique targets and enhanced drug properties. A number of oridonin derivatives (e.g. HAO472) have been designed and synthesized, and have contributed to substantial progress in the identification of new agents and relevant molecular mechanistic studies toward the treatment of human cancers and other diseases. This review summarizes the recent advances in medicinal chemistry on the explorations of novel oridonin analogues as potential anticancer therapeutics, and provides a detailed discussion of future directions for the development and progression of this class of molecules into the clinic.

  14. A new agent developed by biotransformation of polyphyllin VII inhibits chemoresistance in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Mao, Ai-Qin; Wei, Juan; Liu, De-Quan; Shi, Gui-Yang; Ma, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Biotransformation by the endophytes of certain plants changes various compounds, and this ‘green’ chemistry becomes increasingly important for finding new products with pharmacological activity. In this study, polyphyllin VII (PPL7) was biotransformed by endophytes from the medicinal plant Paris polyphylla Smith, var. yunnanensis. This produced a new compound, ZH-2, with pharmacological activity in vitro and in vivo. ZH-2 was more potent than PPL7 in selectively killing more chemoresistant than chemosensitive breast cancer cells. ZH-2 also re-sensitized chemoresistant breast cancer cells, as evidenced by the improved anti-cancer activity of commonly-used chemotherapeutic agent in vitro, in vivo, and in clinical samples. This anti-chemoresistance effect of ZH-2 was associated with inhibiting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway. Taken together, our findings are the first one to link biotransformation with a biomedicine. The results provide insights into developing new pharmacologically-active agents via biotransformation by endophytes. PMID:26701723

  15. Recent development in [1,4]benzodiazepines as potent anticancer agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Gill, Rupinder Kaur; Kaushik, Shiv Om; Chugh, Jasreen; Bansal, Sumit; Shah, Anamik; Bariwal, Jitender

    2014-01-01

    The [1,4]benzodiazepine is an important class of heterocyclic compounds and clinically used for many ailments in humans. The [1,4]benzodiazepine has unique structure that mimics the peptide linkage. This interesting observation completely shifted the interest of medicinal chemist for [1,4]benzodiazepine from CNS acting drugs to anticancer agents. During last few decades, a large number of reports have appeared in the literature highlighting the anticancer activity of [1,4]benzodiazepines. Here, in this article, we have discussed the brief synthesis, origin of [1,4]benzodiazepines as anticancer agent, their mechanism of action and latest developments in this field. We have compiled the most important literature reports from last few decades till date.

  16. Developing High-Affinity Protein Capture Agents and Nanotechnology-Based Platforms for In Vitro Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohde, Rosemary Dyane

    In this thesis, I describe projects that were aimed at improving ways to capture proteins for clinical diagnostics. Nanoelectronic sensors, such as silicon nanowires (SiNWs), can provide label-free quantitative measurements of protein biomarkers in real time. One technical challenge for SiNWs is to develop chemistry that can be applied for selectively encoding the nanowire surfaces with capture agents, thus making them sensors that have selectivity for specific proteins. Furthermore, because of the nature of how the sensor works, it is desirable to achieve this spatially selective chemical functionalization without having the silicon undergo oxidation. This method is described here and provides a general platform that can incorporate organic and biological molecules on Si (111) with minimal oxidation of the silicon surface. The development of these devices is, in part, driven by early diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, and personalized medicine---all of which are increasingly requiring quantitative, rapid, and multiparameter measurements. To begin achieving this goal, a large number of protein biomarkers need to be captured and quantitatively measured to create a diagnostic panel. One of the greatest challenges towards making protein-biomarker-based in vitro diagnostics inexpensive involves developing capture agents to detect the proteins. A major thrust of this thesis is to develop multi-valent, high-affinity and high-selectivity protein capture agents using in situ click chemistry. In situ click chemistry is a tool that utilizes the protein itself to catalyze the formation of a biligand from individual azide and alkyne ligands that are co-localized. Large one-bead one-compound (OBOC) libraries of peptides are used to form the body of these ligands, also providing high chemical diversity with minimal synthetic effort. This process can be repeated to identify a triligand, tetraligand, and so forth. Moreover, the resulting multiligand protein capture agents can be

  17. Research related to variable sweep aircraft development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polhamus, E. C.; Toll, T. A.

    1981-01-01

    Development in high speed, variable sweep aircraft research is reviewed. The 1946 Langley wind tunnel studies related to variable oblique and variable sweep wings and results from the X-5 and the XF1OF variable sweep aircraft are discussed. A joint program with the British, evaluation of the British "Swallow", development of the outboard pivot wing/aft tail configuration concept by Langley, and the applied research program that followed and which provided the technology for the current, variable sweep military aircraft is outlined. The relative state of variable sweep as a design option is also covered.

  18. Cooperative research and development agreements at METC

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, J.C.; Jarr, L.A.; Anderson, R.J.

    1995-06-01

    The Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986 (P.L. 99-502) provided a new mechanism for joint research between private parties and the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Joint projects under this law are called Cooperative Research And Development Agreements (CRADAs) and are simply agreements between METC and the private sector to work together on a mutually beneficial project. Of primary interest to METC is the development and deployment of: (1) clean, efficient power generation technologies, (2) technologies for the characterization and exploitation of the Nation`s natural gas resource, and (3) environmental remediation technologies.

  19. The Clinical Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Combination With Radiation Therapy: A Pharmaceutical Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Ataman, Ozlem U.; Sambrook, Sally J.; Wilks, Chris; Lloyd, Andrew; Taylor, Amanda E.; Wedge, Stephen R.

    2012-11-15

    Summary: This paper explores historical and current roles of pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of clinical trials testing radiation therapy combinations with molecularly targeted agents and attempts to identify potential solutions to expediting further combination studies. An analysis of clinical trials involving a combination of radiation therapy and novel cancer therapies was performed. Ongoing and completed trials were identified by searching the (clinicaltrials.gov) Web site, in the first instance, with published trials of drugs of interest identified through American Society of Clinical Oncology, European CanCer Organisation/European Society for Medical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and PubMed databases and then cross-correlated with (clinicaltrials.gov) protocols. We examined combination trials involving radiation therapy with novel agents and determined their distribution by tumor type, predominant molecular mechanisms examined in combination to date, timing of initiation of trials relative to a novel agent's primary development, and source of sponsorship of such trials. A total of 564 studies of targeted agents in combination with radiation therapy were identified with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Most studies were in phase I/II development, with only 36 trials in phase III. The tumor site most frequently studied was head and neck (26%), followed by non-small cell lung cancer. Pharmaceutical companies were the sponsors of 33% of studies overall and provided support for only 16% of phase III studies. In terms of pharmaceutical sponsorship, Genentech was the most active sponsor of radiation therapy combinations (22%), followed by AstraZeneca (14%). Most radiation therapy combination trials do not appear to be initiated until after drug approval. In phase III studies, the most common (58%) primary endpoint was overall survival. Collectively, this analysis suggests that such

  20. Development of a novel compound microbial agent for degradation of kitchen waste.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kaining; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Ying; Tang, Hao; Zhou, Chuanbin; Cao, Aixin; Zhao, Guozhu; Guo, Hui

    2017-02-21

    Large quantities of kitchen waste are produced in modern society and its disposal poses serious environmental and social problems. The aim of this study was to isolate degradative strains from kitchen waste and to develop a novel and effective microbial agent. One hundred and four strains were isolated from kitchen waste and the 84 dominant strains were used to inoculate protein-, starch-, fat- and cellulose-containing media for detecting their degradability. Twelve dominant strains of various species with high degradability (eight bacteria, one actinomycetes and three fungi) were selected to develop a compound microbial agent "YH" and five strains of these species including H7 (Brevibacterium epidermidis), A3 (Paenibacillus polymyxa), E3 (Aspergillus japonicus), F9 (Aspergillus versicolor) and A5 (Penicillium digitatum), were new for kitchen waste degradation. YH was compared with three commercial microbial agents-"Tiangeng" (TG), "Yilezai" (YLZ) and Effective Microorganisms (EM), by their effects on reduction, maturity and deodorization. The results showed that YH exerted the greatest efficacy on mass loss which decreased about 65.87% after 14 days. The agent inhibited NH3 and H2S emissions significantly during composting process. The concentration of NH3 decreased from 7.1 to 3.2ppm and that of H2S reduced from 0.7 to 0.2ppm. Moreover, E4/E6 (Extinction value460nm/Extinction value665nm) of YH decreased from 2.51 to 1.31, which meant YH had an obvious maturity effect. These results highlighted the potential application of YH in composting kitchen waste.

  1. Nicotinamide Inhibits Alkylating Agent-Induced Apoptotic Neurodegeneration in the Developing Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Ullah, Ikram; Suh, Joo Won; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure to the chemotherapeutic alkylating agent thiotepa during brain development leads to neurological complications arising from neurodegeneration and irreversible damage to the developing central nerve system (CNS). Administration of single dose of thiotepa in 7-d postnatal (P7) rat triggers activation of apoptotic cascade and widespread neuronal death. The present study was aimed to elucidate whether nicotinamide may prevent thiotepa-induced neurodegeneration in the developing rat brain. Methodology/Principal Findings Neuronal cell death induced by thiotepa was associated with the induction of Bax, release of cytochrome-c from mitochondria into the cytosol, activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1). Post-treatment of developing rats with nicotinamide suppressed thiotepa-induced upregulation of Bax, reduced cytochrome-c release into the cytosol and reduced expression of activated caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP-1. Cresyl violet staining showed numerous dead cells in the cortex hippocampus and thalamus; post-treatment with nicotinamide reduced the number of dead cells in these brain regions. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) and immunohistochemical analysis of caspase-3 show that thiotepa-induced cell death is apoptotic and that it is inhibited by nicotinamide treatment. Conclusion Nicotinamide (Nic) treatment with thiotepa significantly improved neuronal survival and alleviated neuronal cell death in the developing rat. These data demonstrate that nicotinamide shows promise as a therapeutic and neuroprotective agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders in newborns and infants. PMID:22164206

  2. KSC Education Technology Research and Development Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odell, Michael R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Educational technology is facilitating new approaches to teaching and learning science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Cognitive research is beginning to inform educators about how students learn providing a basis for design of more effective learning environments incorporating technology. At the same time, access to computers, the Internet and other technology tools are becoming common features in K-20 classrooms. Encouraged by these developments, STEM educators are transforming traditional STEM education into active learning environments that hold the promise of enhancing learning. This document illustrates the use of technology in STEM education today, identifies possible areas of development, links this development to the NASA Strategic Plan, and makes recommendations for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Education Office for consideration in the research, development, and design of new educational technologies and applications.

  3. Physics Research Integrated Development Environment (PRIDE)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J.; Cormell, L.

    1993-12-01

    Past efforts to implement a Software Engineering approach to High Energy Physics computing have been met with significant resistance and have been, in many cases, only marginally successful. At least a portion of the problem has been the Lick of an integrated development environment, tailored to High Energy Physics and incorporating a suite of Computer Aided Software Engineering tools. The Superconducting Super Collider Physics Research Division Computing Department is implementing pilot projects to develop just such an environment.

  4. Productivity Research and Development Planning Workshop.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    Force Institute of Technology (AFIT), Leadership and Management Development Center (LMDC), Army Research Institute (ARI), and the Navy Personnel...Lloyd Woodman Leadership and Management Development Center 1555 Quality Circles Dr. Bob Steel Air Force Institute of Technology 1620 NPRDC...is that it is easier to think about productivity in orthodox or conventional terms than in the sense of weapons systems and technology . People plus

  5. Comparative effectiveness research: Policy context, methods development and research infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Tunis, Sean R; Benner, Joshua; McClellan, Mark

    2010-08-30

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has received substantial attention as a potential approach for improving health outcomes while lowering costs of care, and for improving the relevance and quality of clinical and health services research. The Institute of Medicine defines CER as 'the conduct and synthesis of systematic research comparing different interventions and strategies to prevent, diagnose, treat, and monitor health conditions. The purpose of this research is to inform patients, providers, and decision-makers, responding to their expressed needs, about which interventions are most effective for which patients under specific circumstances.' Improving the methods and infrastructure for CER will require sustained attention to the following issues: (1) Meaningful involvement of patients, consumers, clinicians, payers, and policymakers in key phases of CER study design and implementation; (2) Development of methodological 'best practices' for the design of CER studies that reflect decision-maker needs and balance internal validity with relevance, feasibility and timeliness; and (3) Improvements in research infrastructure to enhance the validity and efficiency with which CER studies are implemented. The approach to addressing each of these issues should be informed by the understanding that the primary purpose of CER is to help health care decision makers make informed clinical and health policy decisions.

  6. A primer on the requirements for select agents and toxins used in biomedical and agricultural research applications.

    PubMed

    Johnston, T P

    2006-05-01

    A basic overview of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture List of Regulated Select Agents and Toxins used in biomedical and agricultural research, as controlled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is presented. The objective of the primer is to introduce to the health physics community a brief history, discuss basic terminology, review current legislation, and describe rules and regulations for the possession, use, and transfer of select agents and toxins. As with many institutions facing staff and budget restrictions, there is increased frequency of health physics professionals being designated the Responsible Official. This summary is necessary since radiolabeled select agents and toxins are being utilized in research applications and require oversight by the health physicist.

  7. Tabanids: neglected subjects of research, but important vectors of disease agents!

    PubMed

    Baldacchino, Frédéric; Desquesnes, Marc; Mihok, Steve; Foil, Lane D; Duvallet, Gérard; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn

    2014-12-01

    Tabanids are nuisance pests for people and livestock because of their painful and irritating bite, persistent biting behavior, and blood ingestion. About 4400 tabanid species have been described; they are seasonally present in all kinds of landscapes, latitudes, and altitudes. High populations have a significant economic impact on outdoor activities, tourism, and livestock production. Tabanids are also vectors of animal disease agents, including viruses, bacteria and parasites. However, tabanids have received little attention in comparison with other hematophagous Diptera. Here, we highlight the many direct and indirect impacts of tabanids and provide a brief summary of tabanid morphology, biology, and life cycle. Impacts include pathogen transmission, parasite transportation (Dermatobia hominis), biological transmission (Loa loa), and mechanical transmission of viruses, such as equine infectious anemia virus, protozoa, such as Trypanosoma evansi and Besnotia besnoiti, and bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis and Anaplasma marginale. We discuss parameters of mechanical transmission and its mathematical modeling. Control methods for tabanid populations are also summarized; these include trapping, the use of insecticides, repellents, and livestock protection. Lastly recommendations are provided for the direction of future research.

  8. CATS-based Agents That Err

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes preliminary research on intelligent agents that make errors. Such agents are crucial to the development of novel agent-based techniques for assessing system safety. The agents extend an agent architecture derived from the Crew Activity Tracking System that has been used as the basis for air traffic controller agents. The report first reviews several error taxonomies. Next, it presents an overview of the air traffic controller agents, then details several mechanisms for causing the agents to err in realistic ways. The report presents a performance assessment of the error-generating agents, and identifies directions for further research. The research was supported by the System-Wide Accident Prevention element of the FAA/NASA Aviation Safety Program.

  9. NASA research and development for space telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenker, Paul S.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of this research is to explore and prove out robust concepts for telerobotic support of space servicing, assembly, maintenance, and telescience tasks. This goal is being addressed through a program of coordinated work in artificial intelligence, robotics, and human factors. The general research objective is the fusion of robot sensing and manipulation, teleoperation, and human and machine cognitive skills into an effective architecture for supervised task automation. NASA is evaluating results of this research program in a ground laboratory telerobot testbed under development at JPL. The testbed development activity includes integrated technology demonstrations. The demonstrations will show telerobot capabilities to perform tasks of increasing complexity, and duration in increasingly unstructured environments. The first such demonstration is the ground-based grappling, dockling, and servicing of a satellite taskboard.

  10. Research and Development Trends for Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Runci, Paul J.; Dooley, James J.

    2004-05-01

    Invited chapter for the Encyclopedia of Energy focusing on Energy Research and Development trends and the analysis of these trends. Article surveys energy R&D data from a number of industrialized nations and list some cautions for those who rely on these data for decisionmaking.

  11. The Research and Development Program on Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spache, George D.

    The author quotes the statement that the primary goal of the Research and Development Program on Reading is to "produce functional reading competence on the part of all persons reading age 10." In evaluating this goal, he considers it to be questionable for several reasons. First, there is no high correlation between reading ability at the age of…

  12. Engineering Research in Irish Economic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, John

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the main findings and recommendations of a report published in December 2010 by the Irish Academy of Engineering (IAE). The report, representing the views of a committee of distinguished Irish engineers from a wide range of disciplines, addresses the role of engineering research in Ireland's economic development and the…

  13. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2013-06-28

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

  14. Human Support Technology Research, Development and Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Jitendra; Trinh, Eugene

    2004-01-01

    The Human Support Technology research, development, and demonstration program address es the following areas at TRL: Advanced Power and Propulsion. Cryogenic fluid management. Closed-loop life support and Habitability. Extravehicular activity systems. Scientific data collection and analysis. and Planetary in-situ resource utilization.

  15. Educational Research Environments in the Developing World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaeffer, Sheldon, Ed.; Nkinyangi, John A., Ed.

    In much of the developing world, research environments are in many ways the same--burdened by the same weight of colonial dependency, underfinanced, and with products undervalued and underutilized. The primary purpose of this book is to analyze such environments for the sake of assessing whether and how they might be changed to enhance national…

  16. Discovery of piperlongumine as a potential novel lead for the development of senolytic agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingying; Chang, Jianhui; Liu, Xingui; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Suping; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Daohong; Zheng, Guangrong

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that senescent cells play an important role in many age-associated diseases. The pharmacological depletion of senescent cells (SCs) with a “senolytic agent”, a small molecule that selectively kills SCs, is a potential novel therapeutic approach for these diseases. Recently, we discovered ABT-263, a potent and highly selective senolytic agent, by screening a library of rationally-selected compounds. With this screening approach, we also identified a second senolytic agent called piperlongumine (PL). PL is a natural product that is reported to have many pharmacological effects, including anti-tumor activity. We show here that PL preferentially killed senescent human WI-38 fibroblasts when senescence was induced by ionizing radiation, replicative exhaustion, or ectopic expression of the oncogene Ras. PL killed SCs by inducing apoptosis, and this process did not require the induction of reactive oxygen species. In addition, we found that PL synergistically killed SCs in combination with ABT-263, and initial structural modifications to PL identified analogs with improved potency and/or selectivity in inducing SC death. Overall, our studies demonstrate that PL is a novel lead for developing senolytic agents. PMID:27913811

  17. Development and evaluation of liquid embolic agents based on liquid crystalline material of glyceryl monooleate.

    PubMed

    Du, Ling-Ran; Lu, Xiao-Jing; Guan, Hai-Tao; Yang, Yong-Jie; Gu, Meng-Jie; Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao; Lv, Tian-Shi; Yan, Zi-Guang; Song, Li; Zou, Ying-Hua; Fu, Nai-Qi; Qi, Xian-Rong; Fan, Tian-Yuan

    2014-08-25

    New type of liquid embolic agents based on a liquid crystalline material of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) was developed and evaluated in this study. Ternary phase diagram of GMO, water and ethanol was constructed and three isotropic liquids (ILs, GMO:ethanol:water=49:21:30, 60:20:20 and 72:18:10 (w/w/w)) were selected as potential liquid embolic agents, which could spontaneously form viscous gel cast when contacting with water or physiological fluid. The ILs exhibited excellent microcatheter deliverability due to low viscosity, and were proved to successfully block the saline flow when performed in a device to simulate embolization in vitro. The ILs also showed good cytocompatibility on L929 mouse fibroblast cell line. The embolization of ILs to rabbit kidneys was performed successfully under monitoring of digital subtraction angiography (DSA), and embolic degree was affected by the initial formulation composition and used volume. At 5th week after embolization, DSA and computed tomography (CT) confirmed the renal arteries embolized with IL did not recanalize in follow-up period, and an obvious atrophy of the embolized kidney was observed. Therefore, the GMO-based liquid embolic agents showed feasible and effective to embolize, and potential use in clinical interventional embolization therapy.

  18. Developing Short Films of Geoscience Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, J. S.; Webley, P. W.; Dehn, J.; Harrild, M.; Kienenberger, D.; Salganek, M.

    2015-12-01

    In today's prevalence of social media and networking, video products are becoming increasingly more useful to communicate research quickly and effectively to a diverse audience, including outreach activities as well as within the research community and to funding agencies. Due to the observational nature of geoscience, researchers often take photos and video footage to document fieldwork or to record laboratory experiments. Here we present how researchers can become more effective storytellers by collaborating with filmmakers to produce short documentary films of their research. We will focus on the use of traditional high-definition (HD) camcorders and HD DSLR cameras to record the scientific story while our research topic focuses on the use of remote sensing techniques, specifically thermal infrared imaging that is often used to analyze time varying natural processes such as volcanic hazards. By capturing the story in the thermal infrared wavelength range, in addition to traditional red-green-blue (RGB) color space, the audience is able to experience the world differently. We will develop a short film specifically designed using thermal infrared cameras that illustrates how visual storytellers can use these new tools to capture unique and important aspects of their research, convey their passion for earth systems science, as well as engage and captive the viewer.

  19. Development and Application of Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) for Chemical Warfare Nerve and Sulfur Mustard Agents.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Annetta Paule; Opresko, Dennis M; Young, Robert A; Hauschild, Veronique

    2006-01-01

    Acute exposure guideline levels (AEGLs) have been developed for the chemical warfare agents GB, GA, GD, GF, VX, and sulfur mustard. These AEGLs were approved by the National Advisory Committee for Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Substances after Federal Register publication and comment, and judged as scientifically valid by the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology Subcommittee on AEGLs. AEGLs represent general public exposure limits for durations ranging from 10 min to 8 h, and for three levels of severity (AEGL-1, AEGL-2, AEGL-3). Mild effects are possible at concentrations greater than AEGL-1, while life-threatening effects are expected at concentrations greater than AEGL-3. AEGLs can be applied to various civilian and national defense purposes, including evacuation and shelter-in-place protocols, reentry levels, protective clothing specifications, and analytical monitoring requirements. This report documents development and derivation of AEGL values for six key chemical warfare agents, and makes recommendations for their application to various potential exposure scenarios.

  20. Virus-based nanomaterials as PET and MR contrast agents: from technology development to translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses have recently emerged as ideal protein scaffolds for a new class of contrast agents that can be used in medical imaging procedures such as positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Whereas synthetic nanoparticles are difficult to produce as homogeneous formulations due to the inherently stochastic nature of the synthesis process, virus-based nanoparticles are genetically encoded and are therefore produced as homogeneous and monodisperse preparations with a high degree of quality control. Because the virus capsids have a defined chemical structure that has evolved to carry cargoes of nucleic acids, they can be modified to carry precisely defined cargoes of contrast agents and can be decorated with spatially defined contrast reagents on the internal or external surfaces. Viral nanoparticles can also be genetically programed or conjugated with targeting ligands to deliver contrast agents to specific cells, and the natural biocompatibility of viruses means they are cleared rapidly from the body. Nanoparticles based on bacteriophages and plant viruses are safe for use in humans and can be produced inexpensively in large quantities as self-assembling recombinant proteins. Based on these considerations, a new generation of contrast agents has been developed using bacteriophages and plant viruses as scaffolds to carry positron-emitting radioisotopes such as [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose for PET imaging and iron oxide or Gd3+ for MRI. Although challenges such as immunogenicity, loading efficiency and regulatory compliance remain to be address, virus-based nanoparticles represent a promising new enabling technology for a new generation of highly biocompatible and biodegradable targeted imaging reagents. PMID:25683790

  1. Professional Competencies Needed by Extension Agents in the Florida Cooperative Extension Service. A Report of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeman, Carl E.; And Others

    A study was conducted to identify and verify the professional competencies needed by extension agents in Florida. Closed form opinionnaires were used to survey 254 extension agents and fifteen state staff members concerning 158 competencies. Among the findings was that state staff members rated all competency categories higher than did incumbent…

  2. Agricultural Research Needs and Priorities as Perceived by West Virginia Vocational Agriculture Teachers and County Extension Agents. Miscellaneous Publication 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalamira, Lucas R.; Lawrence, Layle D.

    Data were obtained in 1982 from 196 vocational agriculture teachers and 48 county agricultural extension agents identifying specific problems in West Virginia's agriculture that were most in need of research solutions. Multiflora rose eradication, coping with high production costs and interest rates, and improving state level funding for extension…

  3. 1999 LDRD Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Spencer; Kyle Wheeler

    2000-06-01

    This is the FY 1999 Progress Report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes work done on individual research projects, relates the projects to major Laboratory program sponsors, and provides an index to the principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by their LDRD component: Competency Development, Program Development, and Individual Projects. Within each component, they are further grouped into nine technical categories: (1) materials science, (2) chemistry, (3) mathematics and computational science, (4) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and particle beams, (5) engineering science, (6) instrumentation and diagnostics, (7) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (8) nuclear and particle physics, and (9) bioscience.

  4. Research and Development Trends of Car Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Li, Zhixiong; Xie, Guotao

    With the rapid development of the world economy, road transport has become increasingly busy. An unexpected incident would cause serious traffic disaster due to traffic accidents. To solve this problem, the intelligent transportation system (ITS), which is important for the health developments of the city transportation, has become a hot topic. The car networking provides a new way for intelligent transportation system. It can ensure intelligent control and monitoring of urban road with high performance. This paper described the concept of car networking and related technology both in oversea and domestic. The importance of car networking to achieve vehicle and details of the car networking related technologies were illustrated firstly. Then, attentions focus on the research nodus of the car networking. Lastly, the development trend of car networking research was discussed.

  5. Development of neuroleptic agents: pharmacogenetics and current safety issues of regulatory concern.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi

    2002-12-01

    The development of safe and effective new drug treatments for schizophrenia poses a challenging task. This class of drugs is known to be associated with a wide range of serious and troublesome safety problems that include neurological, cardiac, endocrine, and metabolic side effects. Many of these drugs have a narrow therapeutic index and generate metabolites that often have their own unique pharmacological profile different from the parent compound. These features make it imperative that the optimal dose schedules for neuroleptic drugs are carefully characterized. Many of these drugs are metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes, which show genetic polymorphism and a bi modal distribution within the population, A significant subset of the population cannot eliminate these drugs as effectively as the majority. This brings an added dimension of complexity in characterizing the dose and individualizing therapy. Many neuroleptic agents are proarrhythmic with an adverse effect on cardiac repolarization. They are prone to prolonging the QT interval and inducing torsade de pointes. Given the potentially fatal outcome of this ventricular tachyarrhythmia, drug development programs need to ensure that the proarrhythmic potential of any new neuroleptic agent is thoroughly explored and its proarrhythmic risk characterized. The clinical use of many of these drugs is further troubled by their high potential for drug-drug interactions. These too need to be adequately investigated during development The approval and the labeling of a new neuroleptic agent require a careful regulatory assessment of its risk/benefit ratio in comparison with the available alternatives. Their safe and effective use in routine clinical practice depends on careful attention to prescribing information, especially the contraindications, precautions, and patient-monitoring requirements.

  6. Advanced heat pump research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliasha, M. A.

    The Office of Building Energy Research and Development of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has been funding R&D in advanced heat pumps and appliances since 1976. Much of that research has been managed for DOE by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of the Building Equipment Research (BER) program at ORNL has been to generate new concepts and develop a technology base for improving the energy efficiency and load characteristics of energy conversion equipment used in residential and commercial buildings. The research being pursued to achieve these objectives falls under three general areas: thermally activated heat pumps (TAHP), refrigeration systems, and building equipment systems. The TAHP work is concentrated on three technologies: (1) absorption heat pumps; (2) Stirling engine-driven heat pumps; and (3) internal combustion (IC) engine-driven heat pumps. Major project areas in refrigeration systems research include electric heat pumps, ground-coupled heat pumps, and refigerant mixtures. In the building equipment systems areas, project areas include advanced distribution systems, advanced insulation for appliances, and commercial building equipment.

  7. IT roadmap requirements for research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Geyer, Leslie J; Kinkead, Susan F

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, members representing the programmatic community of the Laboratory presented a request to the Information Architecture Steering Committee (IASC) to form a committee within the Information Architecture Program (IAP) to review and consider the needs of researchers. In response, a Research and Development Subteam under the Infrastructure Team was created. Members included volunteer representatives of groups performing research and development throughout the Laboratory. This paper represents the product of this review. The R&D computing environment has languished while Los Alamos has been very compliance driven for the past few years under a set of directives that have eliminated our ability to innovate and to push the envelope of R&D computing. The appeal for outside collaborations is rapidly becoming tarnished, as colleagues from outside the NNSA environment view our restrictions as increasingly oppressive. We are losing the ability to conduct cutting-edge research and losing money to competitors who are able to quickly react and pursue program dollars while we are still creating compliant but less than useful computing solutions. Research programs depend on collaboration, employees, foreign nationals, and frequent travel, including travel to foreign countries. Solutions need to facilitate these activities and be based on the risk that the activities actually pose to the infrastructure and data at LANL. Furthermore, when problems are solved, it is essential that the solutions are evaluated for cost/benefit to the programs, that programmatic impact is well identified, and that solutions have sufficient long term resource for collaborations.

  8. Articulating a policy resolution for sexual diversity research: nurses as moral agents.

    PubMed

    MacDonnell, Judith A

    2007-12-01

    This case study of community nurses in the Canadian province of Ontario explores the relevance of power relations to nursing ethical inquiry. Public health nurses critically reflected on their role in challenging social inequities as they generated evidence to inform practice. In the process, they developed a policy resolution articulating values and principles for ethical nursing research with diversely situated sexual minorities. The author uses a qualitative case study design and applies a feminist bioethics framework using critical literature to analyze this document and the practice context. The findings suggest that dynamics of power, including gender, influence nurses' ability to advocate for sexual minorities through research, prompting the development of a public statement on knowledge production. There are implications for undertaking nursing ethical inquiries that explore how dominant and counter-discourses and multiple dimensions of power shape nurses' moral agency in challenging the status quo.

  9. Development of an automated sample preparation module for environmental monitoring of biowarfare agents.

    PubMed

    Hindson, Benjamin J; Brown, Steve B; Marshall, Graham D; McBride, Mary T; Makarewicz, Anthony J; Gutierrez, Dora M; Wolcott, Duane K; Metz, Thomas R; Madabhushi, Ramakrishna S; Dzenitis, John M; Colston, Billy W

    2004-07-01

    An automated sample preparation module, based upon sequential injection analysis (SIA), has been developed for use within an autonomous pathogen detection system. The SIA system interfaced aerosol sampling with multiplexed microsphere immunoassay-flow cytometric detection. Metering and sequestering of microspheres using SIA was found to be reproducible and reliable, over 24-h periods of autonomous operation. Four inbuilt immunoassay controls showed excellent immunoassay and system stability over five days of unattended continuous operation. Titration curves for two biological warfare agents, Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis, obtained using the automated SIA procedure were shown to be similar to those generated using a manual microtiter plate procedure.

  10. Comparison of Herpes simplex virus plaque development after viral treatment with anti-DNA or antilipid agents

    SciTech Connect

    Coohill, T.P.; Babich, M.; Taylor, W.D.; Snipes, W.

    1980-06-01

    The plaque development of Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV) is slower for viruses treated with two anti-DNA agents: ultraviolet radiation (uv) or n-acetoxy-2-acetyl-aminofluorene. For HSV treated with three antimembrane agents - butylated hydroxytoluene, acridine plus near uv radiation, or ether - the plaque development time is the same as for untreated viruses. These differences hold even for viruses that survived treatment that lowered viability below the 1% level. Gamma ray inactivation of HSV produces no change in plaque development even though this agent is believed to preferentially affect viral DNA.

  11. Institutional research and development, FY 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Laboratory's Institutional Research and Development (IR and D) Program was established in 1984 to foster exploratory work to advance science and technology, disciplinary research to develop innovative solutions to support our national defense and energy missions. In FY 1988, the IR and D Program was funded by a 2% assessment on the Laboratory's operating budget. Our policy is to use these funds for researching innovative ideas in LLNL's areas of expertise and for developing new areas of expertise that we perceive to be in the national interest. The technical and scientific accomplishments of each project and of each institute funded this year are presented in this report. The projects were selected because they are expected to advance research in important areas that are too basic or too time consuming to be funded by the developmental programs or because they are somewhat risky projects that have the promise of high payoff. We are continually reappraising the IR and D Program. In particular, we seek new candidates for the Director's Initiatives, and we constantly reassess the work in progress. Each year, we make adjustments to further the Laboratory's policy of using the IR and D Program to fund innovative ideas with high potential for enhancing programmatic activities of national importance.

  12. Global action plan for childhood diarrhoea: Developing research priorities

    PubMed Central

    Zipursky, Alvin; Wazny, Kerri; Black, Robert; Keenan, William; Duggan, Christopher; Olness, Karen; Simon, Jonathan; Simpson, Evan; Sherman, Philip; Santosham, Mathuram; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Childhood diarrhoea remains a major public health problem responsible for the deaths of approximately 800 000 children annually, worldwide. The present study was undertaken to further define research priorities for the prevention and treatment of diarrhoea in low and middle income countries. We used the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative (CHNRI) process for defining research priorities. This provided a transparent, systematic method of obtaining the opinions of experts regarding research priorities in childhood diarrhoea. The present report describes the deliberations of a workshop that reviewed these research priorities by stakeholders including colleagues from: government agencies, academic institutions, major funding agencies and non–governmental organizations. Methods The workshop included 38 participants, divided into four groups to consider issues in the categories of description, delivery, development and discovery. Each group received 20 to 23 questions/research priorities previously identified by the CHNRI process. Deliberations and conclusions of each group were summarized in separate reports that were further discussed in a plenary session including all workshop participants. Results The reports of the working groups emphasized the following five key points: 1) A common theme was the need to substantially increase the use of oral rehydration salts (ORS) and zinc in the prevention and treatment of diarrhoea. There is a need for better definitions of those factors that supported and interfered with the use of these agents; 2) There is an urgent need to determine the long–term effects of chronic and recurrent bouts of diarrhoea on the physical and intellectual development of affected children; 3) Improvements in water, sanitation and hygiene facilities are critical steps required to reduce the incidence and severity of childhood diarrhoea; 4)Risk factors enhancing the susceptibility and clinical response to diarrhoea were

  13. Assay Development for the Discovery of Semaphorin 3B Inducing Agents from Natural Product Sources

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yeonjoong; Pan, Li; Ren, Yulin; Fatima, Nighat; Ahmed, Safia; Chang, Leng Chee; Zhang, Xiaoli; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Swanson, Steven M.; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.

    2014-01-01

    Semaphorins are a class of membrane-bound and secreted proteins. They have been found to regulate basic cell functions such as axonal growth cone guidance and recent studies have focused on their effect on tumor progression. Semaphorin 3B (Sema 3B) particularly is a secreted protein that has been known to modulate proliferation and apoptosis, processes that are critical for tumor progression and development. In spite of its importance, there is yet no high-throughput screening assay available to detect or quantify the expression of Sema 3B for natural product anticancer drug discovery purposes. Therefore, the development of a new high-throughput bioassay for the discovery of Sema 3B inducing agents from natural product sources is described herein. A wide variety of pure compounds and extracts from plants and microorganisms has been found suitable for screening using this Sema 3B assay to detect and quantify the effect of Sema 3B inducing agents and thereby identify new selective bioactive Sema 3B lead compounds for anticancer drug discovery and development. Also, this new bioassay procedure is based on a high-throughput platform using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that involves the optimization of sensitivity and selectivity levels as well as accuracy, reproducibility, robustness, and cost effectiveness. PMID:25016954

  14. Development of molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Adam; Bhosle, Jaishree; Abdelraouf, Fatma; Popat, Sanjay; O'Brien, Mary; Yap, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a smoking-induced malignancy with multiple toxin-associated mutations, which accounts for 15% of all lung cancers. It remains a clinical challenge with a rapid doubling time, early dissemination and poor prognosis. Despite multiple clinical trials in SCLC, platinum-based chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment in the first line advanced disease setting; good initial responses are nevertheless inevitably followed by disease relapse and survival ultimately remains poor. There are currently no molecularly targeted agents licenced for use in SCLC. Advances in sequencing the cancer genome and other high-throughput profiling technologies have identified aberrant pathways and mechanisms implicated in SCLC development and progression. Novel anti-tumour therapeutics that impact these putative targets are now being developed and investigated in SCLC. In this review, we discuss novel anti-tumour agents assessed in SCLC with reference to the complex molecular mechanisms implicated in SCLC development and progression. We focus on novel DNA damage response inhibitors, immune checkpoint modulators and antibody-drug conjugates that have shown promise in SCLC, and which may potentially transform treatment strategies in this disease. Finally, we envision the future management of SCLC and propose a biomarker-driven translational treatment paradigm for SCLC that incorporates next generation sequencing studies with patient tumours, circulating plasma DNA and functional imaging. Such modern strategies have the potential to transform the management and improve patient outcomes in SCLC.

  15. Assay development for the discovery of semaphorin 3B inducing agents from natural product sources.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yeonjoong; Pan, Li; Ren, Yulin; Fatima, Nighat; Ahmed, Safia; Chang, Leng Chee; Zhang, Xiaoli; Kinghorn, A Douglas; Swanson, Steven M; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J

    2014-10-01

    Semaphorins are a class of membrane-bound and secreted proteins. They have been found to regulate basic cell functions such as axonal growth cone guidance and recent studies have focused on their effect on tumor progression. Semaphorin 3B (Sema3B) particularly is a secreted protein that has been known to modulate proliferation and apoptosis, processes that are critical for tumor progression and development. In spite of its importance, there is yet no high-throughput screening assay available to detect or quantify the expression of Sema3B for natural product anticancer drug discovery purposes. Therefore, the development of a new high-throughput bioassay for the discovery of Sema3B inducing agents from natural product sources is described herein. A wide variety of pure compounds and extracts from plants and microorganisms has been found suitable for screening using this Sema3B assay to detect and quantify the effect of Sema3B inducing agents and thereby identify new selective bioactive Sema3B lead compounds for anticancer drug discovery and development. Also, this new bioassay procedure is based on a high-throughput platform using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that involves the optimization of sensitivity and selectivity levels as well as accuracy, reproducibility, robustness, and cost effectiveness.

  16. Empowering Change Agents in Hierarchical Organizations: Participatory Action Research in Prisons.

    PubMed

    Penrod, Janice; Loeb, Susan J; Ladonne, Robert A; Martin, Lea M

    2016-06-01

    Participatory action research (PAR) approaches harness collaborative partnerships to stimulate change in defined communities. The purpose of this article is to illustrate key methodological strategies used in the application of PAR methods in the particularly challenging environment of a hierarchical organization. A study designed to promote sustainable, insider-generated system-level changes in the provision of end-of-life (EOL) care in the restrictive setting of six state prisons is used as an exemplar of the application of three cardinal principles of PAR. First, development of a collaborative network with active partnership between outsider academic researchers and insider co-researchers began with careful attention to understanding the culture and processes of prisons and gaining the support of organizational leadership, using qualitative data gathering and trust-building. During the implementation phase, promoting co-ownership of change in EOL care through the co-construction of knowledge and systems to enhance sustainable change required carefully-orchestrated strategies to maximize the collaborative spirit of the project. Co-researchers were empowered to examine their worlds and capture opportunities for change using new leadership skills role-modeled by the research team. Third, their local knowledge of the barriers inherent in the contextual reality of prisons was translated into achievable system change by production of a toolkit of formalized and well-rehearsed change strategies that collaborative teams were empowered to enact within their hierarchical prison environment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Exploratory research and development FY90

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Baldwin, G.; Cherniak, J.; Clements, W.; Donohue, M.L.; Francke, A.; Kirvel, R.D.; MacGregor, P.; Shaw, G.

    1990-01-01

    In general, the Exploratory Research and Development (ER D) Program supports research projects considered too basic or long-range to be funded by other Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) programs. This Program is managed for the Laboratory Director by a special assistant who chairs the LLNL's IR D Review Committee. Membership in the Review Committee comprises senior LLNL scientists, engineers, and managers whose areas of expertise span the range of scientific disciplines pursued at the Laboratory. The research supported by the Program falls into three categories: Exploratory Research in the Disciplines, Director's Initiatives, and Laboratory-Wide Competition. The first two, Exploratory Research and Director's Initiatives, promote pioneering work in the various scientific disciplines and programmatic areas. Laboratory departments and divisions propose and manage projects in the Exploratory Research category. The Laboratory Director, with the advice of the Review Committee, selects several larger projects to fund as Director's Initiative. These projects, which are proposed and managed by the responsible associate director, are intended to enhance the scope of existing programs or establish new technical directions and programs for the Laboratory. All FY90 projects are described in detail in this report. Other publications on ER D projects are included in the Publications List at the back of this report.

  18. Antibiotic research and development: business as usual?

    PubMed

    Harbarth, S; Theuretzbacher, U; Hackett, J

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of antibiotic resistance is tremendous and, without new anti-infective strategies, will continue to increase in the coming decades. Despite the growing need for new antibiotics, few pharmaceutical companies today retain active antibacterial drug discovery programmes. One reason is that it is scientifically challenging to discover new antibiotics that are active against the antibiotic-resistant bacteria of current clinical concern. However, the main hurdle is diminishing economic incentives. Increased global calls to minimize the overuse of antibiotics, the cost of meeting regulatory requirements and the low prices of currently marketed antibiotics are strong deterrents to antibacterial drug development programmes. New economic models that create incentives for the discovery of new antibiotics and yet reconcile these incentives with responsible antibiotic use are long overdue. DRIVE-AB is a €9.4 million public-private consortium, funded by the EU Innovative Medicines Initiative, that aims to define a standard for the responsible use of antibiotics and to develop, test and recommend new economic models to incentivize investment in producing new anti-infective agents.

  19. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.

    1991-12-01

    Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new fundable'' R D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

  20. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Z) Hepatitis HIV Mental Health Mental Health Home Suicide Prevention Substance Abuse Military Sexual Trauma PTSD Research ( ... eligible Veterans a free Agent Orange Registry health exam for possible long-term health problems related to ...

  1. Developing a New Sampling And Analysis Method For Hydrazine And Monomethyl Hydrazine: Using a Derivatizing Agent With Solid Phase Microextraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, John

    2001-01-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) will be used to develop a method for detecting monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and hydrazine (Hz). A derivatizing agent, pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (PFBCI), is known to react readily with MMH and Hz. The SPME fiber can either be coated with PFBCl and introduced into a gaseous stream containing MMH, or PFBCl and MMH can react first in a syringe barrel and after a short equilibration period a SPME is used to sample the resulting solution. These methods were optimized and compared. Because Hz and MMH can degrade the SPME, letting the reaction occur first gave better results. Only MMH could be detected using either of these methods. Future research will concentrate on constructing calibration curves and determining the detection limit.

  2. Soviet chemical propellant research and development

    SciTech Connect

    deButts, E.H.; Baum, K.; Beckstead, M.W.; Christe, K.O.; Hartman, K.O.; Jeffrey, W.A.

    1991-12-01

    In the second half of the 1980s, the Soviet Union had a strong and continuing research effort devoted to understanding the behavior of chemical propellants suitable to support development of advanced propellants for practical applications. Recent Soviet work concentrated on solid propellants, though liquid propellants powered the largest and most advanced deployed Soviet rockets. This assessment summarizes the Soviet state of the art in chemical propellants in the late 1980s and projects the trends of that period into the next decade. It is based on a broad and deep review of Soviet literature published in 1985--1991 and is presented in an unclassified report. Speculation about or prediction of the effects of recent political and social events on chemical propellant research and development in the old Soviet Union is outside the scope of this assessment, though the effects are likely to be profound.

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Todd; Levy, Karin

    2001-02-27

    The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Annual report on Laboratory Directed Research and Development for FY2000.

  4. Oil heat technology research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Kweller, E.R.; McDonald, R.J.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this United States Department of Energy (DOE)/Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) program is to develop a technology base for advancing the state-of-the-art related to oilfired combustion equipment. The major thrust is through technology based research that will seek new knowledge leading to improved designs and equipment optimization. The Combustion Equipment space Conditioning Technology program currently deals exclusively with residential and small commercial building oil heat technology.

  5. Research and Development of the Aeroturbine Engine,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-15

    whether the selection of a turbojet or turbofan carries increased power. Afterwards, the engine cycle parameters (such as the pressurized ratio of the gns...into production. Conclusion The emergence of a new model aviation turbine engine is the achievement of the collective labors of a multitude of people...under unified organiza- tional leadership. Each organization and individual engaged in aviation turbine engine research and development resemble each

  6. Combining Bayesian Networks and Agent Based Modeling to develop a decision-support model in Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nong, Bao Anh; Ertsen, Maurits; Schoups, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Complexity and uncertainty in natural resources management have been focus themes in recent years. Within these debates, with the aim to define an approach feasible for water management practice, we are developing an integrated conceptual modeling framework for simulating decision-making processes of citizens, in our case in the Day river area, Vietnam. The model combines Bayesian Networks (BNs) and Agent-Based Modeling (ABM). BNs are able to combine both qualitative data from consultants / experts / stakeholders, and quantitative data from observations on different phenomena or outcomes from other models. Further strengths of BNs are that the relationship between variables in the system is presented in a graphical interface, and that components of uncertainty are explicitly related to their probabilistic dependencies. A disadvantage is that BNs cannot easily identify the feedback of agents in the system once changes appear. Hence, ABM was adopted to represent the reaction among stakeholders under changes. The modeling framework is developed as an attempt to gain better understanding about citizen's behavior and factors influencing their decisions in order to reduce uncertainty in the implementation of water management policy.

  7. Water vapor radiometry research and development phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Resch, G. M.; Chavez, M. C.; Yamane, N. L.; Barbier, K. M.; Chandlee, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the research and development phase for eight dual-channel water vapor radiometers constructed for the Crustal Dynamics Project at the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, and for the NASA Deep Space Network. These instruments were developed to demonstrate that the variable path delay imposed on microwave radio transmissions by atmospheric water vapor can be calibrated, particularly as this phenomenon affects very long baseline interferometry measurement systems. Water vapor radiometry technology can also be used in systems that involve moist air meteorology and propagation studies.

  8. Bacteriophages as anti-infective agents: recent developments and regulatory challenges.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Brendan F

    2012-05-01

    The biennial meeting on 'Exploiting Bacteriophages for Bioscience, Biotechnology and Medicine', held in London, UK, on 20 January 2012, and chaired by George Salmond (University of Cambridge, UK) hosted over 50 participants representing 13 countries. The highly multidisciplinary meeting covered a diverse range of topics, reflecting the current expansion of interest in this field, including the use of bacteriophages as the source of biochemical reagents for molecular biology, bacteriophages for the treatment of human and animal diseases, bacteriophage-based diagnostics and therapeutic delivery technologies and necessity for, and regulatory challenges associated with, robust clinical trials of phage-based therapeutics. This report focuses on a number of presentations from the meeting relating to cutting-edge research on bacteriophages as anti-infective agents.

  9. Recent developments of C-4 substituted coumarin derivatives as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Dandriyal, Jyoti; Singla, Ramit; Kumar, Manvendra; Jaitak, Vikas

    2016-08-25

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death in global. Currently, the numbers of drugs that are in clinical practice are having a high prevalence of side effect and multidrug resistance. Researchers have made an attempt to expand a suitable anticancer drug that has no MDR and side effect. Coumarin scaffold became an attractive subject due to their broad spectrum of pharmacological activities. Coumarin derivatives extensively explored for anticancer activities as it possesses minimum side effect along with multi-drug reversal activity. Coumarin derivatives can act by various mechanisms on different tumor cell lines depending on substitution pattern of the core structure of coumarin. Substitution on coumarin nucleus leads to the search for more potent compounds. In this review, we have made an effort to give a synthetic strategy for the preparation of C-4 substituted coumarin derivatives as anticancer agents based on their mechanism of action and also discuss the SAR of the most active compound.

  10. Development of a model representing systems protected against research*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styugin, M.

    2016-04-01

    The research described herein presents a method of modeling information systems with dynamic parameters. The model includes elements with discrete internal states and agents, which can act in the system by modifying states of the system’s elements. The research has two objectives aimed at protection against research, which are as follows: inadmissibility for the system to transfer into some specific states and invisibility of actions taken by the agents. The present paper establishes stable secure states and proves algorithmic insolubility of Problem 1 in its general case.

  11. SAF1. Standard Agent Framework 1

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, S.Y

    1997-06-01

    The Standard Agent framework provides an extensible object-oriented development environment suitable for use in both research and applications projects. The SAF provides a means for constructing and customizing multi-agent systems through specialization of standard base classes (architecture-driven framework) and by composition of component classes (data driven framework). The standard agent system is implemented as an extensible object-centerd framework. Four concrete base classes are developed: (1) Standard Agency; (2) Standard Agent; (3) Human Factor, and (4) Resources. The object-centered framework developed and utilized provides the best comprimise between generality and flexibility available in agent development systems today.

  12. The importance of triazole scaffold in the development of anticonvulsant agents.

    PubMed

    Ayati, Adile; Emami, Saeed; Foroumadi, Alireza

    2016-02-15

    Epilepsy is one of the most important neurological disorders with high prevalence worldwide. Many epileptic patients are not completely treated with available drugs and need multiple therapies. Also, many antiepileptic drugs have shown unwanted side effects and drug interactions. Therefore there are continuing interests to find new anticonvulsant drugs. Triazole ring has been found in the structure of many compounds with diverse biological effects. Due to the success of several triazole-containing drugs that entered the pharmaceutical market as CNS-active drugs, this class of heterocyclic compounds has great importance for discovery and development of new anticonvulsant drugs. In this article, we have tried to summarize the latest efforts which have been made in the design and development of triazole-derived anticonvulsant agents.

  13. Research and development quality assurance planning

    SciTech Connect

    Hoke, P.B.

    1990-05-14

    Planning for quality assurance (QA) in research and development (R D) is like stealing eggs without waking up the chickens. The QA program should be as unobtrusive as possible. Researchers require a QA program that affords them an environment capable of supporting repeatable experiments with accurate data without unduly stifling their creative abilities. Careful advance planning ensures that the intensity of control provided by quality-related systems is commensurate with the importance and scope of the activities being performed. Good scientific practices applied to small bench-scale projects may require minimal additional controls. As projects increase in size and complexity the controls imposed through planning must, by necessity, be increased. Research and development QA planning, just like any other planning, involves all affected individuals. The application of control systems is determined by factors such as customer or sponsor requirements, the importance of an item or activity to the experiment's success, and the organizational complexity of the project. Many larger experiments are highly dependent on quality-related support activities such as calibration, engineering design, and inspection provided by organizations outside the R D group. Since, in most cases, the expense of support activities is taken directly from funds available for research, it is important for the researchers to be involved in the planning efforts to help determine and agree with the level of QA effort required. A single plan will often suffice for organizations engaged in large numbers of similar experiments. Complex experiments may require unique QA plans or additions to existing plans. Once implemented, the R D QA plans, like any others, require audits or surveillances and may require revisions if the scope of the experiment changes. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  14. Biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Thavaselvam, Duraipandian; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2010-07-01

    The recent bioterrorist attacks using anthrax spores have emphasized the need to detect and decontaminate critical facilities in the shortest possible time. There has been a remarkable progress in the detection, protection and decontamination of biological warfare agents as many instrumentation platforms and detection methodologies are developed and commissioned. Even then the threat of biological warfare agents and their use in bioterrorist attacks still remain a leading cause of global concern. Furthermore in the past decade there have been threats due to the emerging new diseases and also the re-emergence of old diseases and development of antimicrobial resistance and spread to new geographical regions. The preparedness against these agents need complete knowledge about the disease, better research and training facilities, diagnostic facilities and improved public health system. This review on the biological warfare agents will provide information on the biological warfare agents, their mode of transmission and spread and also the detection systems available to detect them. In addition the current information on the availability of commercially available and developing technologies against biological warfare agents has also been discussed. The risk that arise due to the use of these agents in warfare or bioterrorism related scenario can be mitigated with the availability of improved detection technologies.

  15. Novel antiplatelet agents in development: prasugrel, ticagrelor, and cangrelor and beyond.

    PubMed

    Shalito, Inna; Kopyleva, Olga; Serebruany, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Coronary artery disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease are known as "atherothrombotic" manifestations of atherosclerosis. These devastating conditions remain the major contributor of mortality and disability in a modern Western world, with estimated direct and indirect cost for 403.1 billion dollars in the United States alone. The application of current evidence-based therapy including the administration of low-dose aspirin and standard of care with clopidogrel proved to exhibit absolute mortality reduction in the randomized clinical trials International Study for Infarct Survival and Clopidogrel and Metoprolol in Myocardial Infarction Trial among patients after acute vascular events. However, these established antiplatelet medications have certain shortcomings including lack of efficacy in some patients, significant response variability, and potential "resistance." Therefore, intelligent development of novel oral antiplatelet agents is difficult to underestimate. In this review, we will focus on the developmental efforts with regard to the experimental agents such as adenosine diphosphate receptor blockers (prasugrel, ticagrelor, and cangrelor) and platelet glycoprotein VI adhesion antagonist [ProCorde GmbH 15 (PR-15)].

  16. Development and application of a HPLC method for eight sunscreen agents in suncare products.

    PubMed

    Peruchi, L M; Rath, S

    2012-06-01

    This work describes the development, validation and application of a simple and fast high-performance liquid chromatography-with diode array dectection (HPLC-DAD) method for the determination of eight sunscreen agents: benzophenone-3, octocrylene, ethylhexyl methoxycinnamate, ethylhexyl salicylate, homosalate (used in two isomeric forms), butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane, 4-methylbenzylidene camphor and ethylhexyl dimethyl PABA in sunscreen formulations. The separation of the eight sunscreen compounds was achieved using an ACE C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm), with a column temperature 20°C, and a mobile phase of 88 : 12 (v/v) methanol-water with isocratic elution. Column temperature strongly influences the retention time and resolution of the compounds. The flow rate was 1.0 mL min(-1) and quantitation was performed by external calibration at the maximum wavelength of each compound. The sample preparation was simple and consisted basically of sample dilution with methanol, centrifugation and filtration in syringe filters before quantitation. Total run time was 18 min. The method was validated according to the parameters: linear range, linearity, selectivity, intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy. Ten samples of sunscreen emulsions commercially available in Brazil (SPF 30) from different manufacturers were analysed using the proposed method. The number of the sunscreen agents varied between one and five in a single sample. The concentrations of all compounds were in the range of 0.9-10% (w/w) and were in accordance with the current Brazilian legislation.

  17. A useful way to develop effective in vivo skin optical clearing agents.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rui; Guo, Li; Zhang, Chao; Feng, Wei; Li, Peng; Ding, Zhihua; Zhu, Dan

    2016-12-23

    Skin optical clearing has shown tremendous potential in improving various optical imaging performances, but there is some certain blindness in screening out high-efficiency in vivo optical clearing methods. In this work, three optical clearing agents: sucrose (Suc), fructose (Fruc) and PEG-400 (PEG), and two chemical penetration enhancers: propylene glycol (PG) and thiazone (Thiaz) were used. PEG was firstly mixed with the two penetration enhancers, respectively, and then mixed with Fruc and Suc, respectively, to obtain six kinds of skin optical clearing agents (SOCAs). Optical coherence tomography angiography was applied to monitor SOCAs-induced changes in imaging performances, skin optical properties, refractive index mismatching extent, and permeability rate. Experimental results demonstrated that PEG+Thiaz+Suc has the optimal capacity in enhancing the imaging performances, decreasing the scattering and the refractive index mismatching since Thiaz is superior to PG, and Suc is superior to Fruc. This study indicates that the optimal SOCA can be obtained directly by means of additionally adding or replacing the similar category substance in preexisting SOCAs with some more effective reagents. It not only provides an optimal SOCA, but also provides a useful way to develop more effective SOCAs. Cross-section skin structural texture (a), reconstructed blood flow distribution information (b), before or after treated with different SOCAs.

  18. Quercetin as an Emerging Anti-Melanoma Agent: A Four-Focus Area Therapeutic Development Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Zoey; Donovan, Micah G.; Branco, Gisele Morais; Limesand, Kirsten H.; Burd, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Replacing current refractory treatments for melanoma with new prevention and therapeutic approaches is crucial in order to successfully treat this aggressive cancer form. Melanoma develops from neural crest cells, which express tyrosinase – a key enzyme in the pigmentation pathway. The tyrosinase enzyme is highly active in melanoma cells and metabolizes polyphenolic compounds; tyrosinase expression thus makes feasible a target for polyphenol-based therapies. For example, quercetin (3,3′,4′,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) is a highly ubiquitous and well-classified dietary polyphenol found in various fruits, vegetables, and other plant products including onions, broccoli, kale, oranges, blueberries, apples, and tea. Quercetin has demonstrated antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity in various cancer cell types. Quercetin is readily metabolized by tyrosinase into various compounds that promote anticancer activity; additionally, given that tyrosinase expression increases during tumorigenesis, and its activity is associated with pigmentation changes in both early- and late-stage melanocytic lesions, it suggests that quercetin can be used to target melanoma. In this review, we explore the potential of quercetin as an anti-melanoma agent utilizing and extrapolating on evidence from previous in vitro studies in various human malignant cell lines and propose a “four-focus area strategy” to develop quercetin as a targeted anti-melanoma compound for use as either a preventative or therapeutic agent. The four areas of focus include utilizing quercetin to (i) modulate cellular bioreduction potential and associated signaling cascades, (ii) affect transcription of relevant genes, (iii) regulate epigenetic processes, and (iv) develop effective combination therapies and delivery modalities/protocols. In general, quercetin could be used to exploit tyrosinase activity to prevent, and/or treat, melanoma with minimal additional side effects. PMID:27843913

  19. 3-DTV research and development in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, Ruediger

    1991-08-01

    An overview on the state of the art of 3-DTV in Europe is given, and the new European Co- operation in the Field of Scientific and Technical Research (COST) project and its objectives are described. The paper starts with a report on 3-DTV broadcast transmissions in 1982 using the simple anaglyph technique, which in many European countries found enthusiastic public interest. Following that, in three international audio and video fairs in 1983, 1985, and 1987 in Berlin, presentations of a high-quality two-channel 3-DTV system using large screen projection, showing professionally produced demonstration programs, attracted about 50,000 visitors. Meanwhile, several 3-DTV activities for advertising, information, and special applications such as medical imaging are to be found. In the broadcast domain, research and development aim to transmit 3-DTV within a high-definition TV channel.

  20. Research and Development Annual Report, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Issued as a companion to Johnson Space Center's Research and Technology Annual Report, which reports JSC accomplishments under NASA Research and Technology Operating Plan (RTOP) funding, this report describes 42 additional JSC projects that are funded through sources other than the RTOP. Emerging technologies in four major disciplines are summarized: space systems technology, medical and life sciences, mission operations, and computer systems. Although these projects focus on support of human spacecraft design, development, and safety, most have wide civil and commercial applications in areas such as advanced materials, superconductors, advanced semiconductors, digital imaging, high density data storage, high performance computers, optoelectronics, artificial intelligence, robotics and automation, sensors, biotechnology, medical devices and diagnosis, and human factors engineering.

  1. 78 FR 28630 - Pfizer Therapeutic Research, Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development Division, Formerly Known as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-15

    ... Employment and Training Administration Pfizer Therapeutic Research, Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development Division, Formerly Known as Warner Lambert Company, Comparative Medicine Department, Including On-Site... Therapeutic Research, Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development Division, Comparative Medicine...

  2. Energy research and development profile of Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Kenkeremath, L.

    1986-01-01

    Australia is a large, sparsely populated country with an economy based traditionally on raw materials exports. Though still a major international trader in minerals and agricultural products, Australia has suffered a decline in productivity, employment, exports, and economic growth since the 1950s. Most energy research and development (R and D) and policymaking activities are carried out under the National Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration (NERDD) program. The NERDD program priorities include, among others, production of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from natural gas or coal-derived synthesis gas and oil and gas exploration, assessment, and recovery technology (high priority); production of liquid fuels from coal and oil shale by hydrogenation or pyrolysis, coal gasification, and achievement of cost reductions in coal and oil shale exploration and assessment techniques (medium priority); and in-situ coal gasification (low priority). Bilateral agreements for energy R and D with other countries are carried out under the Australian Department of National Development and Energy. Australia currently has agreements related to oil, gas, shale, and coal liquids R and D with the UK, the US, Japan, and West Germany.

  3. Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Anderson, S.E.; Baldwin, G.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W.; Kirvel, R.D.; McElroy, L.A.

    1992-12-31

    The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) funds projects that nurture and enrich the core competencies of the Laboratory. The scientific and technical output from the FY 1992 RD Program has been significant. Highlights include (1) Creating the first laser guide star to be coupled with adaptive optics, thus permitting ground-based telescopes to obtain the same resolution as smaller space-based instruments but with more light-gathering power. (2) Significantly improving the limit on the mass of the electron antineutrino so that neutrinos now become a useful tool in diagnosing supernovas and we disproved the existence of a 17-keV neutrino. (3) Developing a new class of organic aerogels that have robust mechanical properties and that have significantly lower thermal conductivity than inorganic aerogels. (4) Developing a new heavy-ion accelerator concept, which may enable us to design heavy-ion experimental systems and use a heavy-ion driver for inertial fusion. (5) Designing and demonstrating a high-power, diode-pumped, solid-state laser concept that will allow us to pursue a variety of research projects, including laser material processing. (6) Demonstrating that high-performance semiconductor arrays can be fabricated more efficiently, which will make this technology available to a broad range of applications such as inertial confinement fusion for civilian power. (7) Developing a new type of fiber channel switch and new fiber channel standards for use in local- and wide-area networks, which will allow scientists and engineers to transfer data at gigabit rates. (8) Developing the nation`s only numerical model for high-technology air filtration systems. Filter designs that use this model will provide safer and cleaner environments in work areas where contamination with particulate hazardous materials is possible.

  4. Control of research oriented software development

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L.C.; Dronkers, J.J.; Pitsker, B.

    1985-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to dispose permanently high level radioactive waste and civilian spent nuclear fuel by January 31, 1998. DOE has responded by creating an organizational structure that directs all the activities necessary to carry out the legislative demands. LLNL is conducting research in the earth sciences and is developing some unique computer codes to help establish the feasibility of geologic repositories for nuclear waste. LLNL has several codes under development. This paper examines the administrative and organizational measures that were and still are being undertaken in order to control the development of the two major codes. In the case of one code, the software quality assurance requirements were imposed five years after the code began its development. This required a retroactive application of requirements. The other code is still in the conceptual stages of development and here requirements can be applied as soon as the initial code design begins. Both codes are being developed by scientists, not computer programmers, and both are modeling codes, not data acquisition and reduction codes. Also the projects for which these codes are being developed have slightly different software quality assurance requirements. All these factors contribute unique difficulties in attempts to assure that the development not only results in a reliable prediction, but that whatever the reliability, it can be objectively shown to exist. The paper will examine a software management model. It will also discuss the reasons why it is felt that this particular model would stand a reasonable chance for success. The paper will then describe the way in which the model should be integrated into the existing management configuration and tradition.

  5. Research into europium complexes as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (Review)

    PubMed Central

    HAN, GUOCAN; DENG, YANGWEI; SUN, JIHONG; LING, JUN; SHEN, ZHIQUAN

    2015-01-01

    Europium (Eu) is a paramagnetic lanthanide element that possesses an outstanding luminescent property. Eu complexes are ideal fluorescence imaging (FI) agents. Eu2+ has satisfactory relaxivity and optical properties, and can realize magnetic resonance (MRI)-FI dual imaging applications when used with appropriate cryptands that render it oxidatively stable. By contrast, based on the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) mechanism, Eu3+ complexes can provide enhanced MRI sensitivity when used with optimal cryptands, incorporated into polymeric CEST agents or blended with Gd3+. Eu complexes are promising in MRI-FI dual imaging applications and have a bright future. PMID:26136858

  6. Important Developments in Romanian Propolis Research

    PubMed Central

    Mărghitaş, Liviu Al; Dezmirean, Daniel S.; Bobiş, Otilia

    2013-01-01

    The most important developments in propolis analysis and pharmacological properties are discussed. In order to help in the Romanian propolis standardization, different methodologies for chemical composition analysis (UV-VIS, HP-TLC, and HPLC-DAD) are reviewed using new approaches and software (fuzzy divisive hierarchical clustering approach and ChromQuest software) and compared with international studies made until now in propolis research. Practical applications of Romanian propolis in medicinal therapy and cosmetics are reviewed, and quality criteria for further standardization are proposed. PMID:23818918

  7. Guidelines for Clinical Research in Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Vray, Muriel; Simon, François; Bompart, François

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of a review of current clinical research conditions in developing countries, guidelines have been formulated to ensure scientific validity as well as adherence to universal ethical principles. The main recommendation is that projects should be reviewed by two Institutional Review Boards, one in the country where the Study Sponsor is based, and another in the country where the study is being carried out. In addition, an independent Data Safety Monitoring Board should be set up and systems established to ensure the effective reporting of Serious Adverse Events and to specify the Sponsor's obligations after the end of the Study.

  8. An Android Research and Development Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    Patterson Air Force Base , Ohio S APR28 I3U " a3 04 28 087 E V AFIT/GE/EE/83M-3 AN AhjROID RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM THESIS AFIT/GE/EE/83M-3...stores.. .Jerome Hamlin constructed a robot ’butler’ at home. He named it Comro I and persuaded Neiman-Marcus to feature the robot, priced at $15,000, in...already selling computer controlled arms and bodies in kit form that range in price from $700 to $2500, and there are rumors that some toy companies have 2

  9. 7 CFR 930.48 - Research, market development and promotion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Research, market development and promotion. 930.48... Order Regulating Handling Research, Market Development and Promotion § 930.48 Research, market... establishment of production and processing research, market research and development, and/or...

  10. 7 CFR 981.41 - Research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Research and development. 981.41 Section 981.41... Regulating Handling Research § 981.41 Research and development. (a) General. The Board, with the approval of... research, marketing research and development projects, and marketing promotion including paid...

  11. 7 CFR 927.47 - Research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Research and development. 927.47 Section 927.47... WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Research and Development § 927.47 Research and development. The Fresh... provide for the establishment of production and post-harvest research, or marketing research...

  12. 7 CFR 930.48 - Research, market development and promotion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Research, market development and promotion. 930.48... Order Regulating Handling Research, Market Development and Promotion § 930.48 Research, market... establishment of production and processing research, market research and development, and/or...

  13. [Development of new antiatherosclerotic agents--ACAT inhibitors and CETP inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, A; Horiuchi, S

    1999-12-01

    Development of new antiatherosclerotic agents were reviewed focusing on ACAT inhibitors and CETP inhibitors. ACAT inhibitors enhance intracellular degradation of VLDL in hepatocytes. Cholesterol absorption in small intestine is inhibited by ACAT inhibitors. Thus, ACAT inhibitors reduce plasma cholesterol levels. In atherosclerotic lesions, ACAT inhibitors suppress foam cell formation (cholesteryl ester accumulation) in macrophages. Since ACAT inhibitors have multiple anti-atherogenic effects, they are considered future drugs controlling hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. CETP inhibitors are expected to increase HDL and decrease LDL. Although the patients with CETP deficiency show high level of HDL, recent studies showed that they are not necessarily resistant to atherosclerosis. The strategy to inhibit CETP for suppressing atherosclerosis has not been established.

  14. Update on the Development of Anti-Viral Agents Against Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Macarthur, Kristin L.; Smolic, Robert; Smolic, Martina V.; Wu, Catherine H.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects nearly 170 million people worldwide and causes chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The search for a drug regimen that maximizes efficacy and minimizes side effects is quickly evolving. This review will discuss a wide range of drug targets currently in all phases of development for the treatment of HCV. Direct data from agents in phase III/IV clinical trials will be presented, along with reported side-effect profiles. The mechanism of action of all treatments and resistance issues are highlighted. Special attention is given to available trial data supporting interferon-free treatment regimens. HCV has become an increasingly important public health concern, and it is important for physicians to stay up to date on the rapidly growing novel therapeutic options. PMID:26357602

  15. Approach and development strategy for an agent-based model of economic confidence.

    SciTech Connect

    Sprigg, James A.; Pryor, Richard J.; Jorgensen, Craig Reed

    2004-08-01

    We are extending the existing features of Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool, and introducing new features to simulate the role of confidence in economic activity. The new model is built from a collection of autonomous agents that represent households, firms, and other relevant entities like financial exchanges and governmental authorities. We simultaneously model several interrelated markets, including those for labor, products, stocks, and bonds. We also model economic tradeoffs, such as decisions of households and firms regarding spending, savings, and investment. In this paper, we review some of the basic principles and model components and describe our approach and development strategy for emulating consumer, investor, and business confidence. The model of confidence is explored within the context of economic disruptions, such as those resulting from disasters or terrorist events.

  16. [Research and development of Fructus Gardeniae].

    PubMed

    Ni, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Fu, Hai-Zhen

    2006-04-01

    Survey on research and development of Fructus Gardeniae in the recent 10 years. Gardenia yellow has been used for food colorent, medicine, feedingstuff and cosmetic. Garnedia blue has been used for developing another pigment with red and yellow. Fructus Gardeniae has been used in digestive system for cholecyst constracting and gall-stone eliminating, for declining peroxide on SAP mouse and increasing immune ability, for protecting liver against cancel, anti-acetylcholinic restraining on stomach enginery, in cardiovascular system it has been used for centrally anti-hypertension, preventing atheroma and thrombus, also Fructus Gardeniae has been used for anti-inflammation, treating parenchyma injure etc. Geniposide used for increasing production in agriculture has wider perspect.

  17. Research-Based Design of Pedagogical Agent Roles: A Review, Progress, and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yanghee; Baylor, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we review the contribution of our original work titled "Simulating Instructional Roles Through Pedagogical Agents" published in the "International Journal of Artificial Intelligence and Education" (Baylor and Kim in "Computers and Human Behavior," 25(2), 450-457, 2005). Our original work operationalized…

  18. 77 FR 14462 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee Pursuant to... given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. Name: Research, Engineering &...

  19. 75 FR 14243 - Research, Engineering And Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering And Development Advisory Committee Pursuant to... given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. Agency: Federal Aviation Administration. Action: Notice of Meeting. Name: Research, Engineering &...

  20. 78 FR 47049 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee Pursuant to... hereby given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. Name: Research,...

  1. 78 FR 16357 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal... Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. Name: Research, Engineering &...

  2. 76 FR 44648 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee Pursuant to... given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, DOT. ACTION: Notice of meeting. Name: Research, Engineering &...

  3. 76 FR 12404 - Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee Pursuant to... given of a meeting of the FAA Research, Engineering and Development (R,E&D) Advisory Committee. AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration. ACTION: Notice of meeting. Name: Research, Engineering &...

  4. Life Cycle Impact Assessment Research Developments and Needs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) developments are explained along with key publications which record discussions which comprised ISO 14042 and SETAC document development, UNEP SETAC Life Cycle Initiative research, and research from public and private research institutions. It ...

  5. Is astronomical research appropriate for developing countries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snowden, Michael S.

    An unproductive 45-cm astronomical telescope, given by JICA (Japan) to Sri Lanka, raises general questions as to the reasons for unproductive pure science in developing countries. Before installation, site, maintenance, and scientific objectives were discussed. The facility was launched with a conference organised by the UN Office for Outer Space Affairs. Unfortunately, no research or significant education has resulted after four years. The annual operating cost is U.S. $5000 per year, including salary for a trainee, maintenance, and a modest promotional programme. Comparison with a similar installation in Auckland suggests lack of funding or technical competence do not explain the failure in Sri Lanka. The facility in New Zealand, on the roof of Auckland University's Physics Department, has a slightly smaller budget but has led to modest but useful research and teaching. Lack of financial backing and expertise are often blamed for weak science in developing countries, but examination shows most of these countries have adequately skilled people, and plenty of resources for religion and military. General lack of motivation for science appears to be the principal reason. This lack of interest and highly inefficient bureaucracies are common to scientifically unproductive countries. They mostly lack the cultural and philosophical base of the European Renaissance that motivate the pursuit of modern science, an activity that violates human preferences. There are excellent facilities (ESO, SAAO, Cerro Tololo, and GONG) in some of these same countries, when administered from the West.

  6. 75 FR 23847 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and ] Development Services Scientific Merit.... Clinical Research Program June 9, 2010 *VA Central Office. Oncology June 10-11, 2010....... L'Enfant...

  7. 77 FR 64598 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services..., behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately...

  8. 75 FR 57833 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit..., behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately...

  9. 77 FR 20489 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately one-half hour at...

  10. 78 FR 28292 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit Review... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to...

  11. 48 CFR 31.205-48 - Research and development costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Research and development... Organizations 31.205-48 Research and development costs. Research and development, as used in this subsection... grant for research and development effort, the excess is unallowable under any other Government contract....

  12. Being an "Agent Provocateur": Utilising Online Spaces for Teacher Professional Development in Virtual Simulation Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deNoyelles, Aimee; Raider-Roth, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    This article details the results of an action research study which investigated how teachers used online learning community spaces to develop and support their teaching and learning of the Jewish Court of All Time (JCAT), a web-mediated, character-playing, simulation game that engages participants with social, historical and cultural curricula.…

  13. Research and Development in the Anthropogenic Cryosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, C.; Luthe, T.; Hohenwallne, D.

    2009-04-01

    Much of todays cryosphere research is oriented towards the polar regions and is strongly supported by large associations and funding. On the other hand, funding and institutional support is still limited for mountains. In Europe, mountain research is mainly funded through Alpine Space Interregs, FP7, ESF and COST. However, there is growing global change pressure on mountain regions, particularly in the more fragile, higher altitudes such as between 1000 - 3200 m in the Alps. Although these zones are comparable to the Arctic in terms of climatic and physiographic conditions, they are not in terms of human pressures and atmospheric pollution released from surrounding agglomerations. A re-orientation of research into more applied projects that tackle present day problems is necessary. Not only is climate change rapidly changing the face of mountains, socio-economic multipliers are also acting fast. New problems such as conflicts over natural resources are evolving at a rapid rate, requiring research funding and projects to respond at according rates if timely and efficient solutions are to be proposed. Other problems include contamination of high altitude lakes and ecosystems through atmospheric precipitation of persistent organic pollutants and concentration of radio-active substances. The rapid melt of glacier ice is also releasing pollutants that have been captured for many decades. Many of the present day problems develop due to a miscomprehension of the cryosphere. Short-term economical reasoning outweighs the long-term ecological impacts that could be very counter-productive at the long term. Both the glaciological, snow, permafrost, geomorphological, ecological, hydrological and atmospheric conditions are increasingly heavily modified by human impacts. The effects include the alteration of the ice cover (by artificial covering of glaciers), production of artificial snow cover, snow and ground compaction, erosion, landsliding, change in vegetation cover and

  14. Research and development of therapeutic mAbs: An analysis based on pipeline projects

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiaomei; Kong, Xiangjun; Hu, Hao; Chen, Jiayu; Yang, Fengqing; Liang, Hongyu; Chen, Xin; Hu, Yuanjia

    2015-01-01

    As the subject of active research and development (R&D) in recent decades, monoclonal antibodies have emerged among the major classes of therapeutic agents for treatment of many human diseases, especially cancers, infections, and immunological disorders. This article surveys the landscape of R&D projects of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which are mostly used for disease immunotherapy, from a number of perspectives, including therapeutic indications, development phases, participants, and citation of related patents. The results of this research can be used as a reference resource for pharmaceutical researchers, investors, and policymakers in the field of therapeutic mAbs PMID:26211701

  15. Developing Agentic Learners for 21st Century Practice: A Pedagogic Approach in Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoe C-Y; Flavell, Helen; Parsons, Dave; Parsons, Richard; Falkmer, Torbjorn

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an approach to teaching occupational therapy students how to create orthoses, whilst at the same time developing higher-order critical thinking, reflective, and clinical reasoning skills is described. The scaffolded nature of the learning activities, incorporating Kolb's reflective learning cycle, was used to support students' capacity for clinical reasoning and better prepare them for clinical placement. The peer-assessment element was also designed to support the experiential learning by allowing students to test their evaluation of hand orthoses, compare their assessment with an expert's, and identify areas for improvement. Students who demonstrated higher grades for the written reflection assessment showed better agreement with the experts (smaller bias, p<0.01). This study concluded there was a correlation between students' capacity for reflective thinking and the development of clinical reasoning. Furthermore, the reflective writing exercise encouraged students to generalise their skills beyond the classroom. The approach and findings of this study are relevant to a range of allied health professions through providing a process to support the development of higher-order critical thinking, reflection, and reasoning skills. Furthermore, the study provides an evidence base to demonstrate that higher reflective skill capacity and critical thinking are crucial to creating agentic learners.

  16. Shear strength of resin developed by four bonding agents used with cast metal restorations.

    PubMed

    Reilly, B; Davis, E L; Joynt, R B; Quevedo, J

    1992-07-01

    The evolution of the acid etch technique has made possible a more conservative approach to the fabrication of cast metal restorations. The resin bonding technique, however, places a greater burden for success on the selection of a bonding agent. This study examined the shear bond strength durability of cast metal restorations bonded to tooth structure with one of four metal adhesive bonding agents. Results indicated stronger bonds for restorations cemented with Panavia EX bonding agent than with any of the other bonding agents tested, both with and without exposure to thermal stress. Although it was one of the easier materials with which to work, Panavia EX bonding agent requires the additional step of applying an agent to prevent oxygen contact in the setting process.

  17. Transferable Skills Training for Researchers: Supporting Career Development and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Researchers are embarking on increasingly diverse careers where collaboration, networking and interdisciplinarity are becoming more important. Transferable skills (e.g. communication skills and problem-solving abilities) can help researchers operate more effectively in different work environments. While researchers acquire some of these skills in…

  18. Development of Microbubble Contrast Agents with Biochemical Recognition and Tunable Acoustic Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Matthew Allan Masao

    Microbubbles, consisting of gas-filled cores encapsulated within phospholipid or polymer shells, are the most widely used ultrasound contrast agents in the world. Because of their acoustic impedance mismatch with surrounding tissues and compressible gaseous interiors, they have high echogenicities that allow for efficient backscatter of ultrasound. They can also generate unique harmonic frequencies when insonated near their resonance frequency, depending on physical microbubble properties such as the stiffness and thickness of the encapsulating shell. Microbubbles are used to detect a number of cardiovascular diseases, but current methodologies lack the ability to detect and distinguish small, rapidly growing abnormalities that do not produce visible blockage or slowing of blood flow. This work describes the development, formulation, and validation of microbubbles with various polymer shell architectures designed to modulate their acoustic ability. We demonstrate that the addition of a thick disulfide crosslinked, poly(acrylic acid) encapsulating shell increases a bubble's resistance to cavitation and changes its resonance frequency. Modification of this shell architecture to use hybridized DNA strands to form crosslinks between the polymer chains allows for tuning of the bubble acoustic response. When the DNA crosslinks are in place, shell stiffness is increased so the bubbles do not oscillate and acoustic signal is muted. Subsequently, when these DNA strands are displaced, partial acoustic activity is restored. By using aptamer sequences with a specific affinity towards the biomolecule thrombin as the DNA crosslinking strand, this acoustic "ON/OFF" behavior can be specifically tailored towards the presence of a specific biomarker, and produces a change in acoustic signal at concentrations of thrombin consistent with acute deep venous thrombosis. Incorporation of the emulsifying agent poly(ethylene glycol) into the encapsulating shell improves microbubble yield

  19. Developments of Anticoagulants and New Agents with Anti-Coagulant Effects in Deep Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Dang, Yi-Ping; Chen, Yun-Fei; Li, Yi-Qing; Zhao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) has been known as a common medical problem all over the world. Thrombus traveling in blood vessels may lead to pulmonary embolism (PE), associated with high rates of mortality. Anticoagulant therapy is the mainstay treatment of DVT. Common anticoagulants, Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), unfractionated heparin (UFH) and Low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) have been used in clinical application over decades, but can increase the risk of hemorrhage. Thereby, several new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been developed, which includes direct thrombin inhibitors (DTI) and direct factor Xa inhibitors. To be contrast with VKAs and UFH, NOACs have many advantages such as rapid offset action, few drug/food interactions and no need for routine coagulation monitoring, etc. Many NOACs are still being evaluated in Phase III clinical trials such as Betrixaban and Darexaban (YM150). However, NOACs still have problems to be solved such as lack of antidotes and laboratory monitoring, high drug costs, etc. Besides, several agents have already shown the potential to be new anticoagulants. Factor Xa play an important role in thrombin generation and coagulation pathway. Thus, the new compounds directly targeting on factor Xa for prevention DVT are highly anticipated. DPC423, a new series of 6-substituted coumarin derivatives and Phenyltriazolinones as potent factor Xa inhibitors have been recently reported. Recent studies revealed that agents extracted from botanicals not only have anti-coagulant effects but also possess other pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammation to alleviate the post-thrombotic syndromes. All the evidence above suggests that many new compounds might have great potential to be more effective and safe oral anticoagulants.

  20. Development and Qualification of Alternate Blowing Agents for Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Charles W.; Cavalaris, James G.

    1994-01-01

    The Aerospace industry has a long history of using low density polyurethane and polyurethane-modified isocyanurate foam systems as lightweight, low cost, easily processed cryogenic Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) for ascent vehicles. The Thermal Protection System of the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET) is required so that quality liquid cryogenic propellant can be supplied to the Orbiter main engines and to protect the metal structure of the tanks from becoming too hot from aerodynamic heating, hence preventing premature break-up of the tank. These foams are all blown with CFC-1 I blowing agent which has been identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an ozone depleting substance. CFCs will not be manufactured after 1995, Consequently, alternate blowing agent substances must be identified and implemented to assure continued ET manufacture and delivery. This paper describes the various testing performed to select and qualify HCFC-1 41 b as a near term drop-in replacement for CFC-11. Although originally intended to be a one for one substitution in the formulation, several technical issues were identified regarding material performance and processability which required both formulation changes and special processing considerations to overcome. In order to evaluate these material changes, each material was subjected to various tests to qualify them to meet the various loads imposed on them during long term storage, pre-launch operations, launch, separation and re-entry. Each material was tested for structural, thermal, aeroshear, and stress/strain loads for the various flight environments each encounters. Details of the development and qualification program and the resolution of specific problems are discussed in this paper.

  1. Fast Charging Electric Vehicle Research & Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heny, Michael

    2014-03-31

    The research and development project supported the engineering, design and implementation of on-road Electric Vehicle (“EV”) charging technologies. It included development of potential solutions for DC fast chargers (“DCFC”) capable of converting high voltage AC power to the DC power required by EVs. Additional development evaluated solutions related to the packaging of power electronic components and enclosure design, as well as for the design and evaluation of EV charging stations. Research compared different charging technologies to identify optimum applications in a municipal fleet. This project collected EV usage data and generated a report demonstrating that EVs, when supported by adequate charging infrastructure, are capable of replacing traditional internal combustion vehicles in many municipal applications. The project’s period of performance has demonstrated various methods of incorporating EVs into a municipal environment, and has identified three general categories for EV applications: Short Commute: Defined as EVs performing in limited duration, routine commutes. - Long Commute: Defined as tasks that require EVs to operate in longer daily mileage patterns. - Critical Needs: Defined as the need for EVs to be ready at every moment for indefinite periods. Together, the City of Charlottesville, VA (the “City”) and Aker Wade Power Technologies, LLC (“Aker Wade”) concluded that the EV has a viable position in many municipal fleets but with limited recommendation for use in Critical Needs applications such as Police fleets. The report also documented that, compared to internal combustion vehicles, BEVs have lower vehicle-related greenhouse gas (“GHG”) emissions and contribute to a reduction of air pollution in urban areas. The enhanced integration of EVs in a municipal fleet can result in reduced demand for imported oil and reduced municipal operating costs. The conclusions indicated in the project’s Engineering Report (see Attachment

  2. CURRENT ANSTO RESEARCH ON WASTEFORM DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, E.R.; Perera, D.S.; Stewart, M.W.A.; Begg, B.D.; Carter, M.L.; Day, R.A.; Moricca, S.; Smith, K.L.; Lumpkin, G.R.; Hanna, J.V.

    2003-02-27

    Current ANSTO scientific research on wasteform development for mainly high-level radioactive waste is directed towards practical applications. Titanate wasteform products we have developed or are developing are aimed at immobilization of: (a) tank wastes and sludges; (b) U-rich wastes from radioisotope production from reactor irradiation of UO2 targets; (c) Al-rich wastes arising from reprocessing of Al-clad fuels; (d) 99Tc; (e) high- Mo wastes arising from reprocessing of U-Mo fuels and (f) partitioned Cs-rich wastes. Other wasteforms include encapsulated zeolites or silica/alumina beads for immobilization of 129I. Wasteform production techniques cover hot isostatic and uniaxial pressing, sintering, and cold-crucible melting. In addition, building on previous work on speciation and leach resistance of Cs in cementitious products, we are studying geopolymers. Although we have a strong focus on candidate wasteforms for actual wastes, we have a considerable program directed at basic understanding of the wasteforms in regard to crystal chemistry, their dissolution behavior in aqueous media, radiation damage effects and processing techniques.

  3. Challenges of Research and Human Capital Development in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chikwe, Christian K.; Ogidi, Reuben C.; Nwachukwu, K.

    2015-01-01

    The paper discussed the challenges of research and human capital development in Nigeria. Research and human capital development are critical to the development of any nation. Research facilitates human capital development. A high rating in human capital development indices places a country among the leading countries of the world. The paper…

  4. Chemical Warfare Agent Operational Exposure Hazard Assessment Research: FY07 Report and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    ventral and dorsal neck were infused with SC injections of 0.1% lidocaine . For carotid cannula placement, a midline incision was made in the neck just...maximum values in the plasma difficult. This effect was also observed in the GF agent regeneration data, which indicated a delayed infusion of GF from...each blood draw, an equivalent volume of Lactated Ringers was infused to replace sample volumes. Whole blood samples were stored on ice immediately

  5. Development of a Rotating Human Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M.; Caldwell, William F.; Tucker, John; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A unique facility has been developed at the NASA Ames Research Center to provide scientists with unusual research opportunities at greater than Earth's gravity. In addition to its use for basic research, this facility will help provide answers to many of the questions posed by proponents of rotating human space vehicles. This paper describes the design and planned use of this facility, the Spaceflight Environmental Simulator. Using an existing 52-foot diameter cylindrical rotating platform design centrifuge, the revised facility design includes the provision of two human habitats for long duration studies of the effects of hypergravity. Up to four humans (per habitat) will be able to live at up to 2 G for as long as one month without stopping the centrifuge. Each habitat, constructed of lightweight honeycomb sandwich panels, is nominally 9 ft high x 11 ft wide x 25 1/2 ft long. A radial positioning system provides for positioning each habitat at a distance of 15 to 21 feet from the centrifuge's axis of rotation to the midpoint of the habitat's interior floor. As centrifugal acceleration changes with rotation rate, a habitat floor-mounted accelerometer signal provides automatic servo controlled adjustment of each habitat's angle of inclination to provide an environment for the habitat's crew and cargo in which the resultant gravity vector is normal to the habitat floor at all times. Design of the habitats and modifications to the centrifuge are complete, and are currently under construction. Design philosophy and operational rationale are presented along with complete descriptions of the facility and its systems.

  6. New developments in craniofacial surgery research.

    PubMed

    Mehrara, B J; Longaker, M T

    1999-09-01

    The recent explosion in our understanding of developmental biology and genetics has enhanced our understanding of craniofacial biology. While it is not possible to summarize all new developments in craniofacial research, this article will review three areas: fetal models and surgery for craniofacial disorders, the biology of distraction osteogenesis, and the molecular mechanisms of cranial suture fusion. Numerous models of craniofacial disorders have been described, including small, short gestation and large, long gestation. The benefits and shortcomings of each are discussed. In addition, we discuss recent studies investigating the molecular mechanisms of mandibular distraction osteogenesis. Finally, we present a review of recent advances in the understanding of mechanisms of craniosynostosis, with particular emphasis on the biology of programmed cranial suture fusion in rodents.

  7. Research and development: widening the energy horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Darmstadter, J.; Landsberg, H.H.; Morton, H.C.

    1984-04-01

    Research and Development (R and D) is not a recent phenomenon. Only the name is new; the substance is old. Such scientists as Alessandro Volta, James Watt, or Thomas Edison would have been surprised to be told that they were in the R and D business, but, of course, they were. In fact, Edison was in the RDD and D business, the extra two D's standing for Demonstration and Deployment. In their lifetime such people were generally called inventors. Today, there are not only multitudes of individuals who engage in R and D, in small or large commercial groups, in government laboratories, or in universities, but there is also a substantial literature on just what R and D is and how it functions. In this article the authors try to identify current trends and where they might lead us and what policies are either in place or are desirable to draw the greatest benefit from R and D endeavors.

  8. Recent developments in blood cell labeling research

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Straub, R.F.; Meinken, G.E.

    1988-09-07

    A number of recent developments in research on blood cell labeling techniques are presented. The discussion relates to three specific areas: (1) a new in vitro method for red blood cell labeling with /sup 99m/Tc; (2) a method for labeling leukocytes and platelets with /sup 99m/Tc; and (3) the use of monoclonal antibody technique for platelet labeling. The advantages and the pitfalls of these techniques are examined in the light of available mechanistic information. Problems that remain to be resolved are reviewed. An assessment is made of the progress as well as prospects in blood cell labeling methodology including that using the monoclonal antibody approach. 37 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Particle Detectors: Research and Development at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Fabjan, C. W.

    2008-04-21

    Over the past 15 years a worldwide Detector R and D Programme has made the LHC experiments possible. These experiments operate at a new level of event rate and detection capabilities. Based on these advances, Detector R and D is continuing at CERN in close collaboration with University and Research Institutes. Several main directions are being pursued for solid-state and gaseous tracking devices, advanced crystal and noble liquid calorimetry, particle identification methods, and advanced signal-processing techniques. This effort is directed towards experiments at even higher collision rates at the LHC, the requirements for the next generation of linear electron-positron colliders and for applications outside particle physics, such as medical diagnostics instrumentation. We shall illustrate this challenging, stimulating and creative programme with examples and show how these developments are taking place in close collaboration between CERN and institutions around the globe.

  10. Multiyear Research, Development and Demonstration Plan

    SciTech Connect

    EERE

    2012-03-16

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration (MYRD&D) Plan describes the goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for all activities within the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Office, which is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The MYRD&D Plan is a living document, which is revised periodically to reflect progress in the technologies, revisions to developmental timelines and targets, updates based on external reviews, and changes in the scope of the FCT Office. The document was first published in 2003, and revised in 2005. The document was significantly revised in 2012 to reflect scientific advancements and the changing technological landscape. Any revisions made to the MYRD&D Plan are conducted through a rigorous Change Control process as documented in the Systems Integration section of this report. The hydrogen and fuel cell activities within DOE continue to receive extensive review by stakeholders in the hydrogen and fuel cell community, including panels of the National Research Council and the National Academy of Engineering.

  11. Biomedical engineering for health research and development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X-Y

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical engineering is a new area of research in medicine and biology, providing new concepts and designs for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of various diseases. There are several types of biomedical engineering, such as tissue, genetic, neural and stem cells, as well as chemical and clinical engineering for health care. Many electronic and magnetic methods and equipments are used for the biomedical engineering such as Computed Tomography (CT) scans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans, Electroencephalography (EEG), Ultrasound and regenerative medicine and stem cell cultures, preparations of artificial cells and organs, such as pancreas, urinary bladders, liver cells, and fibroblasts cells of foreskin and others. The principle of tissue engineering is described with various types of cells used for tissue engineering purposes. The use of several medical devices and bionics are mentioned with scaffold, cells and tissue cultures and various materials are used for biomedical engineering. The use of biomedical engineering methods is very important for the human health, and research and development of diseases. The bioreactors and preparations of artificial cells or tissues and organs are described here.

  12. Recent Development of Multifunctional Agents as Potential Drug Candidates for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guzior, Natalia; ckowska,, Anna Wię; Panek, Dawid; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a complex and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The available therapy is limited to the symptomatic treatment and its efficacy remains unsatisfactory. In view of the prevalence and expected increase in the incidence of AD, the development of an effective therapy is crucial for public health. Due to the multifactorial aetiology of this disease, the multi-target-directed ligand (MTDL) approach is a promising method in search for new drugs for AD. This review updates information on the development of multifunctional potential anti-AD agents published within the last three years. The majority of the recently reported structures are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, often endowed with some additional properties. These properties enrich the pharmacological profile of the compounds giving hope for not only symptomatic but also causal treatment of the disease. Among these advantageous properties, the most often reported are an amyloid-β anti-aggregation activity, inhibition of β-secretase and monoamine oxidase, an antioxidant and metal chelating activity, NO-releasing ability and interaction with cannabinoid, NMDA or histamine H3 receptors. The majority of novel molecules possess heterodimeric structures, able to interact with multiple targets by combining different pharmacophores, original or derived from natural products or existing therapeutics (tacrine, donepezil, galantamine, memantine). Among the described compounds, several seem to be promising drug candidates, while others may serve as a valuable inspiration in the search for new effective therapies for AD. PMID:25386820

  13. Human DDX3 protein is a valuable target to develop broad spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Brai, Annalaura; Fazi, Roberta; Tintori, Cristina; Zamperini, Claudio; Bugli, Francesca; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Stigliano, Egidio; Esté, José; Badia, Roger; Franco, Sandra; Martinez, Javier P.; Meyerhans, Andreas; Saladini, Francesco; Zazzi, Maurizio; Garbelli, Anna; Botta, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Targeting a host factor essential for the replication of different viruses but not for the cells offers a higher genetic barrier to the development of resistance, may simplify therapy regimens for coinfections, and facilitates management of emerging viral diseases. DEAD-box polypeptide 3 (DDX3) is a human host factor required for the replication of several DNA and RNA viruses, including some of the most challenging human pathogens currently circulating, such as HIV-1, Hepatitis C virus, Dengue virus, and West Nile virus. Herein, we showed for the first time, to our knowledge, that the inhibition of DDX3 by a small molecule could be successfully exploited for the development of a broad spectrum antiviral agent. In addition to the multiple antiviral activities, hit compound 16d retained full activity against drug-resistant HIV-1 strains in the absence of cellular toxicity. Pharmacokinetics and toxicity studies in rats confirmed a good safety profile and bioavailability of 16d. Thus, DDX3 is here validated as a valuable therapeutic target. PMID:27118832

  14. Recent development of multifunctional agents as potential drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Guzior, Natalia; Wieckowska, Anna; Panek, Dawid; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The available therapy is limited to the symptomatic treatment and its efficacy remains unsatisfactory. In view of the prevalence and expected increase in the incidence of AD, the development of an effective therapy is crucial for public health. Due to the multifactorial aetiology of this disease, the multi-target-directed ligand (MTDL) approach is a promising method in search for new drugs for AD. This review updates information on the development of multifunctional potential anti-AD agents published within the last three years. The majority of the recently reported structures are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, often endowed with some additional properties. These properties enrich the pharmacological profile of the compounds giving hope for not only symptomatic but also causal treatment of the disease. Among these advantageous properties, the most often reported are an amyloid-β antiaggregation activity, inhibition of β-secretase and monoamine oxidase, an antioxidant and metal chelating activity, NOreleasing ability and interaction with cannabinoid, NMDA or histamine H3 receptors. The majority of novel molecules possess heterodimeric structures, able to interact with multiple targets by combining different pharmacophores, original or derived from natural products or existing therapeutics (tacrine, donepezil, galantamine, memantine). Among the described compounds, several seem to be promising drug candidates, while others may serve as a valuable inspiration in the search for new effective therapies for AD.

  15. From chemical agent alarm to fugitive vapor detection: development of a rugged commercial spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costello, William E.; Simonds, Jo Ann; Milchling, Suzanne

    1996-06-01

    Intellitec, a division of Technical Products Group, Inc., is developing and testing a ruggedized commercial spectrometer for stable platform applications. This spectrometer design incorporates the key components utilized in the M21 remote sensing chemical agent alarm (RSCAAL). The spectrometer, which has a resolution of 4 wavenumbers (cm-1), can be used to remotely sense fugitive vapors with spectral features in the 8 - 12 micrometer region. Intellitec has initiated a parallel effort to complete the development of personal computer (PC) based vapor identification software. The spectrometer's detection capability was tested by placing small amounts of anhydrous hydrazine vapor in a cell positioned in front of a black body reference. The data collected from the spectrometer clearly showed characteristic spectral features of hydrazine vapor. A developmental set of hydrazine coefficients was generated for use with the vapor identification software utilized in the M21. The coefficients were programmed into the M21. The effectiveness of the coefficients in the M21 was then tested by attempting to detect hydrazine vapor contained in a cell positioned in front of a black body. The developmental coefficient set successfully detected the hydrazine vapor. Further testing is required to improve detection sensitivity and confirm the spectrometer's ability to detect these vapors in an open path environment.

  16. Taurine release modified by GABAergic agents in hippocampal slices from adult and developing mice.

    PubMed

    Saransaari, P; Oja, S S

    2000-01-01

    In order to characterize the possible regulation of taurine release by GABAergic terminals, the effects of several agonists and antagonists of GABA receptors on the basal and K+-stimulated release of [3H]taurine were investigated in hippocampal slices from adult (3-month-old) and developing (7-day-old) mice using a superfusion system. Taurine release was concentration-dependently potentiated by GABA, which effect was reduced by phaclofen, saclofen and (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-4-yl)methylphosphinic acid (TPMPA) at both ages, suggesting regulation by both GABA(B) and GABA(C) receptors. The involvement of GABA(A) receptors could not be excluded since the antagonist bicuculline was able to affect both basal and K+-evoked taurine release. Furthermore, several GABA(B) receptor effectors were able to inhibit K+-stimulated taurine release in the adults, while the GABA(C) receptor agonists trans-4-aminocrotonic acid (TACA) and cis-4-aminocrotonic acid (CACA) potentiated this release. The potentiation of taurine release by agents acting on the three types of GABA receptors in both adult and developing hippocampus further indicates the involvement of transporters operating in an outward direction. This inference is corroborated by the moderate but significant inhibition of taurine uptake by the same compounds.

  17. Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) infected with the agent of bovine spongiform encephalopathy develop tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Piccardo, P; Cervenak, J; Yakovleva, O; Gregori, L; Pomeroy, K; Cook, A; Muhammad, F S; Seuberlich, T; Cervenakova, L; Asher, D M

    2012-07-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) were infected experimentally with the agent of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). Two to four years later, six of the monkeys developed alterations in interactive behaviour and cognition and other neurological signs typical of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). At necropsy examination, the brains from all of the monkeys showed pathological changes similar to those described in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) of man, except that the squirrel monkey brains contained no PrP-amyloid plaques typical of that disease. Constant neuropathological features included spongiform degeneration, gliosis, deposition of abnormal prion protein (PrP(TSE)) and many deposits of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein (p-Tau) in several areas of the cerebrum and cerebellum. Western blots showed large amounts of proteinase K-resistant prion protein in the central nervous system. The striking absence of PrP plaques (prominent in brains of cynomolgus macaques [Macaca fascicularis] with experimentally-induced BSE and vCJD and in human patients with vCJD) reinforces the conclusion that the host plays a major role in determining the neuropathology of TSEs. Results of this study suggest that p-Tau, found in the brains of all BSE-infected monkeys, might play a role in the pathogenesis of TSEs. Whether p-Tau contributes to development of disease or appears as a secondary change late in the course of illness remains to be determined.

  18. Development of a panel of recombinase polymerase amplification assays for detection of biothreat agents.

    PubMed

    Euler, Milena; Wang, Yongjie; Heidenreich, Doris; Patel, Pranav; Strohmeier, Oliver; Hakenberg, Sydney; Niedrig, Matthias; Hufert, Frank T; Weidmann, Manfred

    2013-04-01

    Syndromic panels for infectious disease have been suggested to be of value in point-of-care diagnostics for developing countries and for biodefense. To test the performance of isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assays, we developed a panel of 10 RPAs for biothreat agents. The panel included RPAs for Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus anthracis, variola virus, and reverse transcriptase RPA (RT-RPA) assays for Rift Valley fever virus, Ebola virus, Sudan virus, and Marburg virus. Their analytical sensitivities ranged from 16 to 21 molecules detected (probit analysis) for the majority of RPA and RT-RPA assays. A magnetic bead-based total nucleic acid extraction method was combined with the RPAs and tested using inactivated whole organisms spiked into plasma. The RPA showed comparable sensitivities to real-time RCR assays in these extracts. The run times of the assays at 42°C ranged from 6 to 10 min, and they showed no cross-detection of any of the target genomes of the panel nor of the human genome. The RPAs therefore seem suitable for the implementation of syndromic panels onto microfluidic platforms.

  19. Development of a power protection system using an agent based architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, S.K.; Kalam, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an approach to the development of a system for the design, analysis and assessment of power protection schemes. The system aims to assist the protection experts in automating their work and aids them in diagnosing, planning and remembering. The system could also be used as a teaching or training tool for the inexperienced fresh graduates in the field. Protection for power system can be viewed as a sum of coordinated protective devices located in the various parts of a power system. The design of protection schemes depends on the configuration of the system, the specifications the system must meet and the constraints that must be satisfied. Selecting and setting the appropriate relays and protective devices are no easy tasks and require skill, experience, heuristics and common sense knowledge. This paper presents a generic architecture based on multi agent paradigm and introduces a novel approach in the development of an intelligent system. It uses distributed problem solving technique and integrates different reasoning methodologies such as case based, rule based and explanation based. The architecture of the system is based on an object oriented paradigm and utilizes a multi knowledge representation scheme in a case based framework. Part of the system which has been implemented in an object oriented environment shows a promising and convincing demonstration of the system`s architecture and approach.

  20. Status of Job Motivation and Job Performance of Field Level Extension Agents in Ogun State: Implications for Agricultural Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabusoro, E.; Awotunde, J. A.; Sodiya, C. I.; Alarima, C. I.

    2008-01-01

    The field level extension agents (FLEAs) are the lifeline of the agricultural extension system in Nigeria. Their motivation and job performance are therefore important to achieving faster agricultural development in Nigeria. The study identified the factors motivating the FLEAs working with Ogun State Agricultural development programme (OGADEP)…

  1. 76 FR 79273 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... biomedical, behavioral, and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to the public...

  2. 76 FR 1212 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to...

  3. Research, Development and Innovation: Contextual Analysis. Part One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radnor, Michael; And Others

    Part 1 of a three-part volume for research and development (R & D) systems researchers, this report attempts to provide a basic understanding of the process of contextual analysis for research, development, and innovation. The term "research development and innovation" (RD & I) is used to describe the total process of innovation…

  4. 7 CFR 906.37 - Research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Research and development. 906.37 Section 906.37... LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Research and Development § 906.37 Research... establishment of marketing research and development projects, including paid advertising, designed to...

  5. Development of peptide-based reversing agents for p-glycoprotein-mediated resistance to carfilzomib.

    PubMed

    Ao, Lin; Wu, Ying; Kim, Donghern; Jang, Eun Ryoung; Kim, Kyunghwa; Lee, Do-Min; Kim, Kyung Bo; Lee, Wooin

    2012-08-06

    Carfilzomib is a novel class of peptidyl epoxyketone proteasome inhibitor and has demonstrated promising activity in multiple clinical trials to treat patients with multiple myeloma and other types of cancers. Here, we investigated molecular mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to carfilzomib and a potential strategy to restore cellular sensitivity to carfilzomib. H23 and DLD-1 cells (human lung and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines) with acquired resistance to carfilzomib displayed marked cross-resistance to YU-101, a closely related proteasome inhibitor, and paclitaxel, a known substrate of Pgp. However, carfilzomib-resistant cells remained sensitive to bortezomib, a clinically used dipeptide with boronic acid pharmacophore. In accordance with these observations, carfilzomib-resistant H23 and DLD-1 cells showed marked upregulation of P-glycoprotein (Pgp) as compared to their parental controls, and coincubation with verapamil, a Pgp inhibitor, led to an almost complete restoration of cellular sensitivity to carfilzomib. These results indicate that Pgp upregulation plays a major role in the development of carfilzomib resistance in these cell lines. In developing a potential strategy to overcome carfilzomib resistance, we as a proof of concept prepared a small library of peptide analogues derived from the peptide backbone of carfilzomib and screened these molecules for their activity to restore carfilzomib sensitivity when cotreated with carfilzomib. We found that compounds as small as dipeptides are sufficient in restoring carfilzomib sensitivity. Taken together, we found that Pgp upregulation plays a major role in the development of resistance to carfilzomib in lung and colon adenocarcinoma cell lines and that small peptide analogues lacking the pharmacophore can be used as agents to reverse acquired carfilzomib resistance. Our findings may provide important information in developing a potential strategy to overcome drug resistance.

  6. Shikimate kinase: a potential target for development of novel antitubercular agents.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José H; Vasconcelos, Igor B; Oliveira, Jaim S; Caceres, Rafael A; de Azevedo, Walter F; Basso, Luis A; Santos, Diógenes S

    2007-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the leading cause of mortality due to a bacterial pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, no new classes of drugs for TB have been developed in the past 30 years. Therefore there is an urgent need to develop faster acting and effective new antitubercular agents, preferably belonging to new structural classes, to better combat TB, including MDR-TB, to shorten the duration of current treatment to improve patient compliance, and to provide effective treatment of latent tuberculosis infection. The enzymes in the shikimate pathway are potential targets for development of a new generation of antitubercular drugs. The shikimate pathway has been shown by disruption of aroK gene to be essential for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The shikimate kinase (SK) catalyses the phosphorylation of the 3-hydroxyl group of shikimic acid (shikimate) using ATP as a co-substrate. SK belongs to family of nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinases. The enzyme is an alpha/beta protein consisting of a central sheet of five parallel beta-strands flanked by alpha-helices. The shikimate kinases are composed of three domains: Core domain, Lid domain and Shikimate-binding domain. The Lid and Shikimate-binding domains are responsible for large conformational changes during catalysis. More recently, the precise interactions between SK and substrate have been elucidated, showing the binding of shikimate with three charged residues conserved among the SK sequences. The elucidation of interactions between MtSK and their substrates is crucial for the development of a new generation of drugs against tuberculosis through rational drug design.

  7. 77 FR 59930 - Clinical Development Programs for Disease-Modifying Agents for Peripheral Neuropathy; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... for Peripheral Neuropathy; Public Workshop; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration...-modifying agents for the treatment of peripheral neuropathy. Discussion will focus on possible therapeutic targets for these agents, the types of painful peripheral neuropathies amenable to treatment with...

  8. "Comments on Coulter and Smith": Narrative Researchers as Witnesses of Injustice and Agents of Social Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barone, Tom

    2009-01-01

    In commenting on Coulter and Smith (2009), the author explores issues related to the place of the political in education research and in literature, but especially in forms of narrative research that possess both scientific and literary dimensions. More specifically, the author examines four sets of issues related to the researching and writing of…

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ogeka, G.J.; Romano, A.J.

    1992-12-01

    This report briefly discusses the following research: Advances in Geoexploration; Transvenous Coronary Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays; Borehole Measurements of Global Warming; Molecular Ecology: Development of Field Methods for Microbial Growth Rate and Activity Measurements; A New Malaria Enzyme - A Potential Source for a New Diagnostic Test for Malaria and a Target for a New Antimalarial Drug; Basic Studies on Thoron and Thoron Precursors; Cloning of the cDNA for a Human Serine/Threonine Protein Kinase that is Activated Specifically by Double-Stranded DNA; Development of an Ultra-Fast Laser System for Accelerator Applications; Cluster Impact Fusion; Effect of a Bacterial Spore Protein on Mutagenesis; Structure and Function of Adenovirus Penton Base Protein; High Resolution Fast X-Ray Detector; Coherent Synchrotron Radiation Longitudinal Bunch Shape Monitor; High Grain Harmonic Generation Experiment; BNL Maglev Studies; Structural Investigations of Pt-Based Catalysts; Studies on the Cellular Toxicity of Cocaine and Cocaethylene; Human Melanocyte Transformation; Exploratory Applications of X-Ray Microscopy; Determination of the Higher Ordered Structure of Eukaryotic Chromosomes; Uranium Neutron Capture Therapy; Tunneling Microscopy Studies of Nanoscale Structures; Nuclear Techiques for Study of Biological Channels; RF Sources for Accelerator Physics; Induction and Repair of Double-Strand Breaks in the DNA of Human Lymphocytes; and An EBIS Source of High Charge State Ions up to Uranium.

  10. Southwest Research Institute intensified detector development capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Erik; Vincent, Michael; Kofoed, Christopher; Andrews, John; Brownsberger, Judith; Siegmund, Oswald

    2012-09-01

    Imaging detectors for wavelengths between 10 nm and 105 nm generally rely on microchannel plates (MCPs) to provide photon detection (via the photo-electric effect) and charge amplification. This is because silicon-based detectors (CCD or APS) have near zero quantum detection efficiency (QDE) over this wavelength regime. Combining a MCP based intensifier tube with a silicon detector creates a detector system that can be tuned to the wavelength regime of interest for a variety of applications. Intensified detectors are used in a variety of scientific (e.g. Solar Physics) and commercial applications (spectroscopic test instrumentation, night vision goggles, low intensity cameras, etc.). Building an intensified detector requires the mastery of a variety of technologies involved in integrating and testing of these detector systems. We report on an internally funded development program within the Southwest Research Institute to architect, design, integrate, and test intensified imaging detectors for space-based applications. Through a rigorous hardware program the effort is developing and maturing the technologies necessary to build and test a large format (2k × 2k) UV intensified CCD detector. The intensified CCD is designed around a commercially available CCD that is optically coupled to a UV Intensifier Tube from Sensor Sciences, LLC. The program aims to demonstrate, through hardware validation, the ability to architect and execute the integration steps necessary to produce detector systems suitable for space-based applications.

  11. Further development of high temperature-resistant graphite fiber coupling agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    Potential coupling agents for graphite fibers were screened by their effect on the weight losses of Thornel 300, HMS, and HTS fibers at 588K for 200 and 400 hours. Unidirectional laminates were made from HMS and HTS fibers, untreated, and treated with each of the seven coupling agents. The matrix of all laminates was PMR polyimide (PMR-PR). On the basis of the best overall retention of elevated temperature interlaminar shear strength after 200 hours at 588K, composite weight after 200 hours at 588K, and fiber weight after 400 hours at 588K, ventromer T-1 applied from aqueous solution and pyrolyzed PPQ were selected for further evaluation as coupling agents for HTS fiber while ventromer T-2 and pyrolyzed PPQ were selected as coupling agents for HMS fiber. It was shown that pyrolyzed PPQ as a coupling agent improves the oxidative stability of HTS/PMR-PI composites.

  12. Bifunctional chelating agent for the design and development of site specific radiopharmaceuticals and biomolecule conjugation strategy

    DOEpatents

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Prabhu, Kandikere R.; Gali, Hariprasad; Pillarsetty, Nagavara Kishore; Volkert, Wynn A.

    2003-10-21

    There is provided a method of labeling a biomolecule with a transition metal or radiometal in a site specific manner to produce a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical compound by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radio metal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. Also provided is a method of synthesizing the --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecules by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radiometal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting radio metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. There is provided a therapeutic or diagnostic agent comprising a --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecule.

  13. Development and characterization of hollow polymeric microcapsules for use as contrast agents for diagnostic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Padma Jyothi

    1999-09-01

    This thesis concerns the development and characterization of a new type of rigid-shelled ultrasound contrast agent. A novel method was devised for producing hollow, gas- filled, polymer microcapsules, sized to less than 10 μm in diameter for contrast imaging. This method involved the encapsulation of a solid, volatile core material, and its subsequent evacuation by sublimation. The biodegradable polymer, 50/50 poly(D,L-lactide-co- glycolide), was the main focus of this study. Polymer- based contrast agents have many advantages, such as their applicability for concomitant imaging and drug delivery. Three encapsulation techniques were evaluated: solvent evaporation, coacervation, and spray drying. The polymer molecular weight and polydispersity in the solvent evaporation and coacervation techniques strongly affected microcapsule size and morphology. Efficient mechanical agitation and shear were crucial for obtaining high yields in the desired size range (less than 6 μm). In spray drying, a factorial design approach was used to optimize conditions to produce microcapsules. The main factors affecting spray drying were found to be the temperature driving force for drying and initial polymer concentration. The smallest microcapsule mean diameters were produced by spray drying (3-4 μm) and solvent evaporation (5-6 μm). Zeta potential (ζ) studies for all microcapsule types indicated that the encapsulation technique affected their surface properties due to the orientation of the polymer chains within nascent polymer droplets. Microcapsules with the most hydrophilic tendency were produced with solvent evaporation (ζ ~ -50 mV). In vitro acoustic testing revealed that the 20-41 μm size fractions of coacervate microcapsules were the most echogenic. In vivo ultrasound studies with both solvent evaporation and coacervate microcapsules showed visible enhancement of the color Doppler image in the rabbit kidney for the samples less than 10 μm in diameter. A mathematical

  14. Outlook on Research in Education for Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grasel, Cornelia; Bormann, Inka; Schutte, Kerstin; Trempler, Kati; Fischbach, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current research on Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). It shows a lack of correspondence between ESD research and recent debates in educational research. Research on ESD has established as a field of research with insufficient relations to other fields in educational research. Based on the overview…

  15. 77 FR 26069 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit Review Board, Notice of... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... science research. The panel meetings will be open to the public for approximately one-half hour at...

  16. Complex systems approach to scientific publication and peer-review system: development of an agent-based model calibrated with empirical journal data.

    PubMed

    Kovanis, Michail; Porcher, Raphaël; Ravaud, Philippe; Trinquart, Ludovic

    Scientific peer-review and publication systems incur a huge burden in terms of costs and time. Innovative alternatives have been proposed to improve the systems, but assessing their impact in experimental studies is not feasible at a systemic level. We developed an agent-based model by adopting a unified view of peer review and publication systems and calibrating it with empirical journal data in the biomedical and life sciences. We modeled researchers, research manuscripts and scientific journals as agents. Researchers were characterized by their scientific level and resources, manuscripts by their scientific value, and journals by their reputation and acceptance or rejection thresholds. These state variables were used in submodels for various processes such as production of articles, submissions to target journals, in-house and external peer review, and resubmissions. We collected data for a sample of biomedical and life sciences journals regarding acceptance rates, resubmission patterns and total number of published articles. We adjusted submodel parameters so that the agent-based model outputs fit these empirical data. We simulated 105 journals, 25,000 researchers and 410,000 manuscripts over 10 years. A mean of 33,600 articles were published per year; 19 % of submitted manuscripts remained unpublished. The mean acceptance rate was 21 % after external peer review and rejection rate 32 % after in-house review; 15 % publications resulted from the first submission, 47 % the second submission and 20 % the third submission. All decisions in the model were mainly driven by the scientific value, whereas journal targeting and persistence in resubmission defined whether a manuscript would be published or abandoned after one or many rejections. This agent-based model may help in better understanding the determinants of the scientific publication and peer-review systems. It may also help in assessing and identifying the most promising alternative systems of peer

  17. Research of Network Security Situational Assessment Quantization Based on Mobile Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaorong, Cheng; Su, Lang; Mingxuan, Li

    As the security situational assessment widely applying to the computer network field, scholars have designed and implemented a large number of network security situational assessment methods. However, most works are based on local area network and single host, which is hardly to meet the demand of large-scale network security assessment. In this paper, we based on quantitative hierarchical network security situational assessment model, introduced the mobile agent technology, designed the distributed computing for large-scale network and evaluated the whole network security situation for future prediction.

  18. Biological agent detection since Desert Storm--from theory to practice. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Shockley, L.J.

    1997-04-16

    Proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, especially biological warfare (BW) weapons, continues apace in today`s world, both by nation states and terrorist groups. This paper details the progress made in BW agent detection in the six years since the Gulf War. With two new systems, we have the technology to provide the combatant commander with a credible bio-detection array. What we have failed to do in the near term is to supply the requisite force structure in the Active Component to make the technology work for the commander.

  19. Developing an effective quantitative research proposal.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Katreena Collette

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the Infusion Nurses Society began work to identify research priorities for infusion nursing. Nurses need to understand the research process and become proficient in collaboration to promote research in their specialty. One of the most important components of conducting research is the written research proposal. A poorly written proposal may result in denial of funding, rejected publications, and prolonged discussion and revision at the institutional or ethics review board. This article provides an overview of the elements needed in a research proposal, identifies institutional review board requirements, and highlights important criteria for recruitment and consent of subjects.

  20. Advances in the Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dolly, Saoirse O; Collins, Dearbhaile C; Sundar, Raghav; Popat, Sanjay; Yap, Timothy A

    2017-04-04

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a significant global health challenge and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. The traditional 'one-size-fits-all' treatment approach has now evolved into one that involves personalized strategies based on histological and molecular subtypes. The molecular era has revolutionized the treatment of patients harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and ROS1 gene aberrations. In the appropriately selected population, anti-tumor agents against these molecular targets can significantly improve progression-free survival. However, the emergence of acquired resistance is inevitable. Novel potent compounds with much improved and rational selectivity profiles, such as third-generation EGFR T790M resistance mutation-specific inhibitors, have been developed and added to the NSCLC armamentarium. To date, attempts to overcome resistance bypass pathways through downstream signaling blockade has had limited success. Furthermore, the majority of patients still do not harbor known driver genetic or epigenetic alterations and/or have no new available treatment options, with chemotherapy remaining their standard of care. Several potentially actionable driver aberrations have recently been identified, with the early clinical development of multiple inhibitors against these promising targets currently in progress. The advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors has led to significant benefit for advanced NSCLC patients with durable responses observed. Further interrogation of the underlying biology of NSCLC, coupled with modern clinical trial designs, is now required to develop novel targeted therapeutics rationally matched with predictive biomarkers of response, so as to further advance NSCLC therapeutics through the next decade.

  1. Development of a 9-months pregnant hybrid phantom and its internal dosimetry for thyroid agents

    PubMed Central

    Hoseinian-Azghadi, E.; Rafat-Motavalli, L.; Miri-Hakimabad, H.

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of fetal radiosensitivity, the estimation of internal dose received by a fetus from radiopharmaceuticals applied to the mother is often important in nuclear medicine. A new 9-months pregnant phantom based on magnetic resonance (MR) images tied to the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantom has been developed. Maternal and fetal organs were segmented from a set of pelvic MR images of a 9-months pregnant subject using 3D-DOCTORTM and then imported into the 3D modeling software package RhinocerosTM for combining with the adult female ICRP voxel phantom and further modeling. Next, the phantom organs were rescaled to match with reference masses described in ICRP Publications. The internal anatomy of previous pregnant phantom models had been limited to the fetal brain and skeleton only, but the fetus model developed in this study incorporates 20 different organs. The current reference phantom has been developed for application in comprehensive dosimetric study in nuclear medicine. The internal dosimetry calculations were performed for thyroid agents using the Monte Carlo transport method. Biokinetic data for these radiopharmaceuticals were used to estimate cumulated activity during pregnancy and maternal and fetal organ doses at seven different maximum thyroid uptake levels. Calculating the dose distribution was also presented in a sagittal view of the pregnant model utilizing the mesh tally function. The comparisons showed, in general, an overestimation of the absorbed dose to the fetus and an underestimation of the fetal thyroid dose in previous studies compared with the values based on the current hybrid phantom. PMID:24515254

  2. Korean Anaphora Recognition System to Develop Healthcare Dialogue-Type Agent

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junggi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Anaphora recognition is a process to identify exactly which noun has been used previously and relates to a pronoun that is included in a specific sentence later. Therefore, anaphora recognition is an essential element of a dialogue agent system. In the current study, all the merits of rule-based, machine learning-based, semantic-based anaphora recognition systems were combined to design and realize a new hybrid-type anaphora recognition system with an optimum capacity. Methods Anaphora recognition rules were encoded on the basis of the internal traits of referred expressions and adjacent contexts to realize a rule-based system and to serve as a baseline. A semantic database, related to predicate instances of sentences including referred expressions, was constructed to identify semantic co-relationships between the referent candidates (to which semantic tags were attached) and the semantic information of predicates. This approach would upgrade the anaphora recognition system by reducing the number of referent candidates. Additionally, to realize a machine learning-based system, an anaphora recognition model was developed on the basis of training data, which indicated referred expressions and referents. The three methods were further combined to develop a new single hybrid-based anaphora recognition system. Results The precision rate of the rule-based systems was 54.9%. However, the precision rate of the hybrid-based system was 63.7%, proving it to be the most efficient method. Conclusions The hybrid-based method, developed by the combination of rule-based and machine learning-based methods, represents a new system with enhanced functional capabilities as compared to other pre-existing individual methods. PMID:25405063

  3. Development of a 9-months pregnant hybrid phantom and its internal dosimetry for thyroid agents.

    PubMed

    Hoseinian-Azghadi, E; Rafat-Motavalli, L; Miri-Hakimabad, H

    2014-07-01

    As a consequence of fetal radiosensitivity, the estimation of internal dose received by a fetus from radiopharmaceuticals applied to the mother is often important in nuclear medicine. A new 9-months pregnant phantom based on magnetic resonance (MR) images tied to the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantom has been developed. Maternal and fetal organs were segmented from a set of pelvic MR images of a 9-months pregnant subject using 3D-DOCTOR(TM) and then imported into the 3D modeling software package Rhinoceros(TM) for combining with the adult female ICRP voxel phantom and further modeling. Next, the phantom organs were rescaled to match with reference masses described in ICRP Publications. The internal anatomy of previous pregnant phantom models had been limited to the fetal brain and skeleton only, but the fetus model developed in this study incorporates 20 different organs. The current reference phantom has been developed for application in comprehensive dosimetric study in nuclear medicine. The internal dosimetry calculations were performed for thyroid agents using the Monte Carlo transport method. Biokinetic data for these radiopharmaceuticals were used to estimate cumulated activity during pregnancy and maternal and fetal organ doses at seven different maximum thyroid uptake levels. Calculating the dose distribution was also presented in a sagittal view of the pregnant model utilizing the mesh tally function. The comparisons showed, in general, an overestimation of the absorbed dose to the fetus and an underestimation of the fetal thyroid dose in previous studies compared with the values based on the current hybrid phantom.

  4. Selection rhizosphere-competent microbes for development of microbial products as biocontrol agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinistova, A. V.; Elchin, A. A.; Gorbunova, N. V.; Muratov, V. S.; Kydralieva, K. A.; Khudaibergenova, B. M.; Shabaev, V. P.; Jorobekova, Sh. J.

    2009-04-01

    Rhizosphere-borne microorganisms reintroduced to the soil-root interface can establish without inducing permanent disturbance in the microbial balance and effectively colonise the rhizosphere due to carbon sources of plant root exudates. A challenge for future development of microbial products for use in agriculture will be selection of rhizosphere-competent microbes that both protect the plant from pathogens and improve crop establishment and persistence. In this study screening, collection, identification and expression of stable and technological microbial strains living in soils and in the rhizosphere of abundant weed - couch-grass Elytrigia repens L. Nevski were conducted. A total of 98 bacteria isolated from the rhizosphere were assessed for biocontrol activity in vitro against phytopathogenic fungi including Fusarium culmorum, Fusarium heterosporum, Fusarium oxysporum, Drechslera teres, Bipolaris sorokiniana, Piricularia oryzae, Botrytis cinerea, Colletothrichum atramentarium and Cladosporium sp., Stagonospora nodorum. Biocontrol activity were performed by the following methods: radial and parallel streaks, "host - pathogen" on the cuts of wheat leaves. A culture collection comprising 64 potential biocontrol agents (BCA) against wheat and barley root diseases has been established. Of these, the most effective were 8 isolates inhibitory to at least 4 out of 5 phytopathogenic fungi tested. The remaining isolates inhibited at least 1 of 5 fungi tested. Growth stimulating activity of proposed rhizobacteria-based preparations was estimated using seedling and vegetative pot techniques. Seeds-inoculation and the tests in laboratory and field conditions were conducted for different agricultural crops - wheat and barley. Intact cells, liquid culture filtrates and crude extracts of the four beneficial bacterial strains isolated from the rhizosphere of weed were studied to stimulate plant growth. As a result, four bacterial strains selected from rhizosphere of weed

  5. Federal Research and Development Funding: FY2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-19

    damages have been particularly acute for early- and mid- career scientists seeking a first or second grant.6 Analysis of federal R&D funding is... careers in research and to help them speed their transition from training to independent research. The Pathway to Independence program provides, through...and focus on high-risk, high-return research, on multidisciplinary research, and on scientists and engineers at the beginning of their careers . The

  6. Cancer Prevention and Control Research Manpower Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    physical function- Disadvantages of multi-institutional team research ing. Differences were not related to stage of disease , occur as well and can be...life research, and expertise in multicultural research among responses of patients with cancer to disease related to four cultural groups: African... related to disease or treatment. This sensation is multidimensional, is Multicultural Research Issues not easily relieved by rest, and has a profound

  7. Instructional Developer as Content Specialist: Three Case Studies Utilizing the Instructional Development-Operations Research Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faust, Stephen M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a 3-phase model (content research, specification, delivery) for instructional development-operations research and describes its application in developing courses in zoology, geology, and paleontology. (MER)

  8. Developing a multiscale, multi-resolution agent-based brain tumor model by graphics processing units

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Multiscale agent-based modeling (MABM) has been widely used to simulate Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) and its progression. At the intracellular level, the MABM approach employs a system of ordinary differential equations to describe quantitatively specific intracellular molecular pathways that determine phenotypic switches among cells (e.g. from migration to proliferation and vice versa). At the intercellular level, MABM describes cell-cell interactions by a discrete module. At the tissue level, partial differential equations are employed to model the diffusion of chemoattractants, which are the input factors of the intracellular molecular pathway. Moreover, multiscale analysis makes it possible to explore the molecules that play important roles in determining the cellular phenotypic switches that in turn drive the whole GBM expansion. However, owing to limited computational resources, MABM is currently a theoretical biological model that uses relatively coarse grids to simulate a few cancer cells in a small slice of brain cancer tissue. In order to improve this theoretical model to simulate and predict actual GBM cancer progression in real time, a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based parallel computing algorithm was developed and combined with the multi-resolution design to speed up the MABM. The simulated results demonstrated that the GPU-based, multi-resolution and multiscale approach can accelerate the previous MABM around 30-fold with relatively fine grids in a large extracellular matrix. Therefore, the new model has great potential for simulating and predicting real-time GBM progression, if real experimental data are incorporated. PMID:22176732

  9. Hsp90 inhibitors as anti-cancer agents, from basic discoveries to clinical development.

    PubMed

    Soga, Shiro; Akinaga, Shiro; Shiotsu, Yukimasa

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which stabilizes various oncogenic kinases, including HER2, EGFR, BCR-ABL, B-Raf and EML4-ALK, which are essential for tumor growth. Several monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors which target these kinases have been identified as potential new molecular target therapeutics. Previous reports have shown that many oncogenic proteins essential for cancer transformation are chaperoned by the Hsp90 complex, and some of these client proteins have been discovered by using Hsp90 inhibitors, such as geldanamycin (GA) and radicicol (RD).Thus far more than 200 client proteins have been identified. In past derivatives of these natural products have been evaluated in clinical trials, but none of the 1st generation of Hsp90 inhibitors has been approved yet because of their limitations in physico-chemical properties and/or safety profiles. However, recent reports have indicated that more than 10 new agents, 2nd generation of Hsp90 inhibitors with different chemotypes from GA and RD, have entered clinical trials and some of them showed clinical efficacy. In this review article, we describe the discoveries of major Hsp90 client proteins in the cancer field by RD derivatives, the history of KW-2478 discovery and development by Kyowa Hakko Kirin, and gave an update on the current status of new Hsp90 inhibitors in clinical trials.

  10. Cyclooxygenase‐2 facilitates dengue virus replication and serves as a potential target for developing antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun-Kuang; Tseng, Chin-Kai; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Liaw, Chih-Chuang; Lin, Chun-Yu; Huang, Chung-Hao; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is one of the important mediators of inflammation in response to viral infection, and it contributes to viral replication, for example, cytomegalovirus or hepatitis C virus replication. The role of COX-2 in dengue virus (DENV) replication remains unclear. In the present study, we observed an increased level of COX-2 in patients with dengue fever compared with healthy donors. Consistent with the clinical data, an elevated level of COX-2 expression was also observed in DENV-infected ICR suckling mice. Using cell-based experiments, we revealed that DENV-2 infection significantly induced COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells. The exogenous expression of COX-2 or PGE2 treatment dose-dependently enhanced DENV-2 replication. In contrast, COX-2 gene silencing and catalytic inhibition sufficiently suppressed DENV-2 replication. In an ICR suckling mouse model, we identified that the COX-2 inhibitor NS398 protected mice from succumbing to life-threatening DENV-2 infection. By using COX-2 promoter-based analysis and specific inhibitors against signaling molecules, we identified that NF-κB and MAPK/JNK are critical factors for DENV-2-induced COX-2 expression and viral replication. Altogether, our results reveal that COX-2 is an important factor for DENV replication and can serve as a potential target for developing therapeutic agents against DENV infection. PMID:28317866

  11. Structural overview of toxin-antitoxin systems in infectious bacteria: a target for developing antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Jean; Son, Woo Sung; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2013-06-01

    The bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA) system is a module that may play a role in cell survival under stress conditions. Generally, toxin molecules act as negative regulators in cell survival and antitoxin molecules as positive regulators. Thus, the expression levels and interactions between toxins and antitoxins should be systematically harmonized so that bacteria can escape such harmful conditions. Since TA systems are able to control the fate of bacteria, they are considered potent targets for the development of new antimicrobial agents. TA systems are widely prevalent with a variety of systems existing in bacteria: there are three types of bacterial TA systems depending on the property of the antitoxin which binds either the protein toxin or mRNA coding the toxin protein. Moreover, the multiplicity of TA genes has been observed even in species of bacteria. Therefore, knowledge on TA systems such as the individual characteristics of TA systems, integrative working mechanisms of various TA systems in bacteria, interactions between toxin molecules and cellular targets, and so on is currently limited due to their complexity. In this regard, it would be helpful to know the structural characteristics of TA modules for understanding TA systems in bacteria. Until now, 85 out of the total structures deposited in PDB have been bacterial TA system proteins including TA complexes or isolated toxins/antitoxins. Here, we summarized the structural information of TA systems and analyzed the structural characteristics of known TA modules from several bacteria, especially focusing on the TA modules of several infectious bacteria.

  12. Development of improved-mobility control agents for surfactant/polymer flooding. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F D; Donaruma, L G; Hatch, M J

    1982-02-23

    During the first year, the initial phase of the project included a literature survey of surfactant/polymer flooding, a summary of the current status of DOE-sponsored polymer and surfactant/polymer field projects, and a survey of oil industry personnel regarding difficulties encountered in the use of commercially available polymers. Major problems in the use of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamides were identified. Purpose of Phase 1 was to delineate the strengths and weaknesses of commercial polymers. Laboratory tests in the second phase then were designed to measure and compare the factors considered to be of greatest importance. During the second year of the project, the Phase 2 baseline screening tests were completed, and Phase 3 work commenced on the synthesis, characterization, and preliminary screening of new or modified polymers. During the final year of the project, the preliminary screening tests were completed and polymers of interest were evaluated in more detail. This final report contains highlights of the significant accomplishments of the project and presents our conclusions regarding the development of improved mobility control agents. The work has shown that moderate changes in the basic structure of acrylamide polymers can produce significant effects on performance in oil recovery applications. Better viscosity retention in brine can be obtained by stiffening the polymer chain of acrylamide-type materials. Enhanced shear stability can be attained by increasing the polymer hydrophilicity.

  13. Agents and strategies in development for improved management of herpes simplex virus infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Kleymann, Gerald

    2005-02-01

    The quiet pandemic of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections has plagued humanity since ancient times, causing mucocutaneous infection such as herpes labialis and herpes genitalis. Disease symptoms often interfere with every-day activities and occasionally HSV infections are the cause of life-threatening or sight-impairing disease, especially in neonates and the immuno-compromised patient population. After infection the virus persists for life in neurons of the host in a latent form, periodically reactivating and often resulting in significant psychosocial distress for the patient. Currently no cure is available. So far, vaccines, ILs, IFNs, therapeutic proteins, antibodies, immunomodulators and small-molecule drugs with specific or non-specific modes of action lacked either efficacy or the required safety profile to replace the nucleosidic drugs acyclovir, valacyclovir, penciclovir and famciclovir as the first choice of treatment. The recently discovered inhibitors of the HSV helicase-primase are the most potent development candidates today. These antiviral agents act by a novel mechanism of action and display low resistance rates in vitro and superior efficacy in animal models. This review summarises the current therapeutic options, discusses the potential of preclinical or investigational drugs and provides an up-to-date interpretation of the challenge to establish novel treatments for herpes simplex disease.

  14. Development of analysis technique to predict the material behavior of blowing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ji Hoon; Lee, Seonggi; Hwang, So Young; Kim, Naksoo

    2014-11-01

    In order to numerically simulate the foaming behavior of mastic sealer containing the blowing agent, a foaming and driving force model are needed which incorporate the foaming characteristics. Also, the elastic stress model is required to represent the material behavior of co-existing phase of liquid state and the cured polymer. It is important to determine the thermal properties such as thermal conductivity and specific heat because foaming behavior is heavily influenced by temperature change. In this study, three models are proposed to explain the foaming process and material behavior during and after the process. To obtain the material parameters in each model, following experiments and the numerical simulations are performed: thermal test, simple shear test and foaming test. The error functions are defined as differences between the experimental measurements and the numerical simulation results, and then the parameters are determined by minimizing the error functions. To ensure the validity of the obtained parameters, the confirmation simulation for each model is conducted by applying the determined parameters. The cross-verification is performed by measuring the foaming/shrinkage force. The results of cross-verification tended to follow the experimental results. Interestingly, it was possible to estimate the micro-deformation occurring in automobile roof surface by applying the proposed model to oven process analysis. The application of developed analysis technique will contribute to the design with minimized micro-deformation.

  15. Developing a Research Agenda for Assisted Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Rosalie A.; Wilson, Keren Brown; Spector, William

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We describe an approach to identifying knowledge gaps, research questions, and methodological issues for assisted living (AL) research. Design and Methods: We undertook an inventory of AL literature and research in progress and commissioned background papers critiquing knowledge on selected subtopics. With an advisory committee, we…

  16. Developing Research Relationships toward a Learning Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaasila, Raimo; Lutovac, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Research relationships are often poorly understood. Why are some collaborations between research partners more productive than others? This question was a starting point of this paper. By describing their own experiences over a period of three years, the authors evaluated research relationships through collaborative self-study. At the beginning,…

  17. Action Research as a Professional Development Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Chad

    2011-01-01

    Reflective teachers are always searching for ways to improve their teaching. When this reflection becomes intentional and systematic, they are engaging in teacher research. This type of research, sometimes called "action research", can help bridge the gap between theory and practice by addressing topics that are relevant to practicing teachers.…

  18. Practitioner Research and Professional Development in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Anne; McNamara, Olwen; Gilroy, Peter

    2004-01-01

    This book aims to support and prepare practitioners to undertake small-scale inquiries and research investigations. The processes of research and inquiry-based learning help teachers come to terms with the complexities and challenges of teaching as their responsibilities widen to include the notion of the teacher as researcher. This major shift in…

  19. Research and Development Concerning Coalbed Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    William Ruckelshaus

    2008-09-30

    , most of it is discharged to surface drainages or to soil (for irrigation). CBNG water quality generally declines when moving from the Cheyenne River drainage northwestward to the Belle Fourche, Little Powder, and Powder River drainages and in the central and western part of the PRB, most CBNG water goes to evaporation-infiltration ponds or is discharged directly to surface drainages. Concerns center on the salinity of the water, usually measured as total dissolved solids (TDS), or electrical conductivity (EC) and sodium adsorption ratio (SAR). Other management options currently in use include injection, managed irrigation (with additives to mitigate the effects of high salinity), atomization, and treatment by reverse osmosis or ion exchange. A key water quality issue is the cumulative effect of numerous CBNG water discharges on the overall water quality of basin streams. This leads to one of the most contentious issues in CBNG development in Wyoming's PRB: Montana's concern about the potential downstream effects of water quality degradation on rivers flowing north into Montana. Many of the benefits and costs associated with CBNG development have been debated, but dealing with CBNG water quantity and quality arguably has been the most difficult of all the issues. Given the importance of these issues for continued development of CBNG resources in Wyoming and elsewhere, the DOE-NETL funded project presented here focuses on CBNG co-produced water management. The research was organized around nine separate, but interrelated, technical project tasks and one administrative task (Task 1). The nine technical project tasks were pursued by separate research teams at the University of Wyoming, but all nine tasks were coordinated to the extent possible in order to maximize information gained about CBNG co-produced waters. In addition to project management in Task 1, the key research tasks included: (2) estimating groundwater recharge rates in the PRB; (3) groundwater contamination

  20. Protein Crystallography in Vaccine Research and Development

    PubMed Central

    Malito, Enrico; Carfi, Andrea; Bottomley, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of protein X-ray crystallography for structure-based design of small-molecule drugs is well-documented and includes several notable success stories. However, it is less well-known that structural biology has emerged as a major tool for the design of novel vaccine antigens. Here, we review the important contributions that protein crystallography has made so far to vaccine research and development. We discuss several examples of the crystallographic characterization of vaccine antigen structures, alone or in complexes with ligands or receptors. We cover the critical role of high-resolution epitope mapping by reviewing structures of complexes between antigens and their cognate neutralizing, or protective, antibody fragments. Most importantly, we provide recent examples where structural insights obtained via protein crystallography have been used to design novel optimized vaccine antigens. This review aims to illustrate the value of protein crystallography in the emerging discipline of structural vaccinology and its impact on the rational design of vaccines. PMID:26068237

  1. Research and Development in Optical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Keith

    2004-01-01

    A report in the form of lecture slides summarizes the optical-communications program of NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and describes the JPL Optical Communications Telescope Laboratory (OCTL) and its role in the program. The purpose of the program is to develop equipment and techniques for laser communication between (1) ground stations and (2) spacecraft (both near Earth and in deep space) and aircraft. The OCTL is an astronomical- style telescope facility that includes a 1-m-diameter, 75.8-m-focal length telescope in an elevation/azimuth mount, plus optical and electronic subsystems for tracking spacecraft and aircraft, receiving laser signals from such moving targets, and transmitting high-power laser signals to such targets. Near-term research at the OCTL is expected to focus on mitigating the effects of atmospheric scintillation on uplinks and on beacon-assisted tracking of ground stations by stations in deep space. Near-term experiments are expected to be performed with retroreflector-equipped aircraft and Earth-orbiting spacecraft techniques to test mathematical models of propagation of laser beams, multiple-beam strategies to mitigate uplink scintillation, and pointing and tracking accuracy of the telescope.

  2. Space research policies in advanced and developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Juan G.

    The motivations for the conduct of space research and the development of space research policies by different constituencies and different types of countries are analyzed. Concerning space research in developing countries, four main aspects are discussed: 1. The role of space research for the achievement of ``critical mass'' by research groups; 2. The role of space research in higher education; 3. The identification of space research problems to which a country can make significant contributions; and 4. Multinational cooperation among developing countries in space research.

  3. Exopolysaccharide matrix of developed Candida albicans biofilms after exposure to antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Wander José; Gonçalves, Letícia Machado; Seneviratne, Jayampath; Parahitiyawa, Nipuna; Samaranayake, Lakshman Perera; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of fluconazole or nystatin exposure on developed Candida albicans biofilms regarding their exopolysaccharide matrix. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) against fluconazole or nystatin was determined for C. albicans reference strain (ATCC 90028). Poly(methlymethacrylate) resin (PMMA) specimens were fabricated according to the manufacturer's instructions and had their surface roughness measured. Biofilms were developed on specimens surfaces for 48 h and after that were exposed during 24 h to fluconazole or nystatin prepared in a medium at MIC, 10 x MIC or 100 x MIC. Metabolic activity was evaluated using an XTT assay. Production of soluble and insoluble exopolysaccharide and intracellular polysaccharides was evaluated by the phenol-sulfuric method. Confocal laser scanning microscope was used to evaluate biofilm architecture and percentage of dead/live cells. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. The presence of fluconazole or nystatin at concentrations higher than MIC results in a great reduction of metabolic activity (p<0.001). At MIC or 10 x MIC, fluconazole showed high amounts of intracellular polysaccharides (p<0.05), but did not affect the exopolysaccharide matrix (p>0.05). The exposure to nystatin also did not alter the exopolysaccharide matrix at all the tested concentrations (p>0.05). Biofilm architecture was not affected by either of the antifungal agents (p>0.05). Nystatin promoted higher proportion of dead cells (p<0.05). It may be concluded that fluconazole and nystatin above the MIC concentration reduced the metabolic activity of C. albicans biofilms; however, they were not able to alter the exopolysaccharide matrix and biofilm architecture.

  4. EERA: A Participant or an Agent in European Research Policy? A Governance Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Lejf; Wubbels, Theo

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors begin to frame a discussion of the educational research space that the European Educational Research Association (EERA) has been given and aims to take. The educational space is not merely a geographical phenomenon, but rather refers to the networks, flows and scapes that form the foundation for the construction of…

  5. Seeking stability for research and applied uses of entomopathogenic fungi as biological control agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Future progress in research with entomopathogenic fungi depends on a number of diverse considerations that help to stabilize the state of knowledge while supporting research about the documentation of the biodiversity and systematics of these fungi as well as those studies about their actions as pat...

  6. Anchoring Globalization in Hong Kong's Research Universities: Network Agents, Institutional Arrangements, and Brain Circulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Postiglione, Gerard A.

    2013-01-01

    International competition drives research universities to find ways to anchor globalization for academic productivity and innovation through cross-border collaboration. This article examines the case of pre- and post-colonial Hong Kong and how its universities transited from undergraduate institutions to highly ranked research universities within…

  7. Computational Investigations of Potential Energy Function Development for Metal--Organic Framework Simulations, Metal Carbenes, and Chemical Warfare Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioce, Christian R.

    sigma donates, and subsequent back-bonding occurs into a pi* antibonding orbital. This is a different type of interaction not seen in the three existing classes of metal-carbene complexes, namely Fischer, Schrock, and Grubbs. Finally, the virtual engineering of enhanced chemical warfare agent (CWA) detection systems is discussed. As part of a U.S. Department of Defense supported research project, in silico chemical modifications to a previously synthesized zinc-porphyrin, ZnCS1, were made to attempt to achieve preferential binding of the nerve agent sarin versus its simulant, DIMP (diisopropyl methylphosphonate). Upon modification, a combination of steric effects and induced hydrogen bonding allowed for the selective binding of sarin. The success of this work demonstrates the role that high performance computing can play in national security research, without the associated costs and high security required for experimentation.

  8. Developing a Conceptual Architecture for a Generalized Agent-based Modeling Environment (GAME)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    possible. A conceptual architecture for a generalized agent- based modeling environment (GAME) based upon design principles from OR/MS systems was created...conceptual architecture for a generalized agent-based modeling environment (GAME) based upon design principles from OR/MS systems was created that...handle the event, and subsequently form the relevant plans. One of these plans will be selected, and either pushed to the top of the current

  9. 7 CFR 993.37 - Research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... research and development projects designed to assist, improve, or promote the marketing, distribution, and... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Prune Marketing Committee § 993.37 Research and development....

  10. 7 CFR 993.37 - Research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... research and development projects designed to assist, improve, or promote the marketing, distribution, and... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Prune Marketing Committee § 993.37 Research and development....

  11. 7 CFR 993.37 - Research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... research and development projects designed to assist, improve, or promote the marketing, distribution, and... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Prune Marketing Committee § 993.37 Research and development....

  12. 7 CFR 993.37 - Research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... research and development projects designed to assist, improve, or promote the marketing, distribution, and... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Prune Marketing Committee § 993.37 Research and development....

  13. 7 CFR 993.37 - Research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... research and development projects designed to assist, improve, or promote the marketing, distribution, and... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Prune Marketing Committee § 993.37 Research and development....

  14. 7 CFR 925.45 - Production research and market research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Production research and market research and... AGRICULTURE GRAPES GROWN IN A DESIGNATED AREA OF SOUTHEASTERN CALIFORNIA Research and Market Development § 925.45 Production research and market research and development. The committee, with the approval of...

  15. 7 CFR 915.45 - Production research, marketing research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Production research, marketing research and... AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Research and Development § 915.45 Production research, marketing research and development. The committee may, with the approval of...

  16. 7 CFR 917.39 - Production research, market research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Production research, market research and development... AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Research § 917.39 Production research, market research and development. The committees, with the approval of the Secretary,...

  17. 7 CFR 915.45 - Production research, marketing research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Production research, marketing research and... AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Research and Development § 915.45 Production research, marketing research and development. The committee may, with the approval of...

  18. 7 CFR 917.39 - Production research, market research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Production research, market research and development... AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Research § 917.39 Production research, market research and development. The committees, with the approval of the Secretary,...

  19. 78 FR 78506 - Research and Development; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Research and Development; Public Meeting AGENCY... public meeting for the Research and Development Forum to be held January 17, 2014, in Washington, DC... research projects. In addition, PHMSA will solicit comments relative to potential new research...

  20. 7 CFR 905.54 - Marketing, research and development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Marketing, research and development. 905.54 Section... Marketing, research and development. The committee may, with the approval of the Secretary, establish, or provide for the establishment of, projects including production research, marketing research...