Science.gov

Sample records for agent model compounds

  1. Chemical synthesis of two series of nerve agent model compounds and their stereoselective interaction with human acetylcholinesterase and human butyrylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Nora H.; Zheng, Xueying; Gilley, Cynthia B.; MacDonald, Mary; Okolotowicz, Karl; Cashman, John R.; Vyas, Shubham; Beck, Jeremy M.; Hadad, Christopher M.; Zhang, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Both G- and V-type nerve agents possess a center of chirality about phosphorus. The Sp-enantiomers are generally more potent inhibitors than their Rp-counterparts toward acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). To develop model compounds with defined centers of chirality that mimic the target nerve agent structures, we synthesized both the Sp and Rp stereoisomers of two series of G-type nerve agent model compounds in enantiomerically enriched form. The two series of model compounds contained identical substituents on the phosphorus as the G-type agents, except that thiomethyl (CH3-S-) and thiocholine ((CH3)3NCH2CH2-S-) groups were used to replace the traditional nerve agent leaving groups (i.e., fluoro for GB, GF, and GD; and cyano for GA). Inhibition kinetic studies of the thiomethyl- and thiocholine-substituted series of nerve agent model compounds revealed that the Sp enantiomers of both series of compounds showed greater inhibition potency toward AChE and BChE. The level of stereoselectivity, as indicated by the ratio of the bimolecular inhibition rate constants between Sp and Rp enantiomers, was greatest for the GF model compounds in both series. The thiocholine analogs were much more potent than the corresponding thiomethyl analogs. With the exception of the GA model compounds, both series showed greater potency against AChE than BChE. The stereoselectivity (i.e., Sp > Rp), enzyme selectivity, and dynamic range of inhibition potency contributed from these two series of compounds suggest that the combined application of these model compounds will provide useful research tools for understanding interactions of nerve agents with cholinesterase and other enzymes involved in nerve agent and organophosphate pharmacology. The potential of and limitations for using these model compounds in the development of biological therapeutics against nerve agent toxicity are also discussed. PMID:19715346

  2. Natural compounds as anticancer agents: Experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiao; Jiang, Yang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer prevention research has drawn much attention worldwide. It is believed that some types of cancer can be prevented by following a healthy life style. Cancer chemoprevention by either natural or synthetic agents is a promising route towards lowering cancer incidence. In recent years, the concept of cancer chemoprevention has evolved greatly. Experimental studies in animal models demonstrate that the reversal or suppression of premalignant lesions by chemopreventive agents is achievable. Natural occurring agents such as dietary phytochemicals, tea polyphenols and resveratrol show chemopreventive activity in animal models. Moreover, clinical trials for testing the safety and efficacy of a variety of natural agents in preventing or treating human malignancy have been ongoing. Here, we summarize experimental data on the chemopreventive or tumor suppressive effects of several natural compounds including curcumin, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and vitamin D. PMID:24520533

  3. Evaluation of triacontanol-containing compounds as anti-inflammatory agents using guinea pig models.

    PubMed

    McBride, P T; Clark, L; Krueger, G G

    1987-10-01

    A mixture of the aliphatic alcohol, triacontanol, and other chemically associated naturally occurring alcohols was applied to the denuded dorsal cutaneous surface of guinea pigs to evaluate anti-inflammatory activity. In the setting of a chemical irritation with 2% croton oil and in an allergic dermatitis created with dinitrochlorobenzene sensitization and challenge, the triacontanol-containing preparation was significantly more effective than vehicle alone (DHL skin cream) but not as effective as 0.05% Diprolene ointment. Lymphocyte stimulation was studied by tritiated thymidine uptake and morphologic examination for blast transformation. When triacontanol-containing compounds were solubilized in aqueous media, effects on lymphocytes were insignificant. When solubilized in ethanol, there was a marked effect on thymidine uptake but not on blast transformation when compared to parallel controls. PMID:3668280

  4. Antitumor agents. 1. Synthesis, biological evaluation, and molecular modeling of 5H-pyrido[3,2-a]phenoxazin-5-one, a compound with potent antiproliferative activity.

    PubMed

    Bolognese, Adele; Correale, Gaetano; Manfra, Michele; Lavecchia, Antonio; Mazzoni, Orazio; Novellino, Ettore; Barone, Vincenzo; Pani, Alessandra; Tramontano, Enzo; La Colla, Paolo; Murgioni, Chiara; Serra, Ilaria; Setzu, Giovanna; Loddo, Roberta

    2002-11-21

    The iminoquinone is an important moiety of a large number of antineoplastic drugs and plays a significant role in the nucleus of actinomycins, powerful, highly toxic, natural antibiotics that target DNA as intercalating agents. A series of polycyclic iminoquinonic compounds, 2-amino-3H-phenoxazin-3-one (1), 2-amino-1,9-diacetyl-3H-phenoxazin-3-one (2), 2-acetylamino-3H-phenoxazin-3-one (3), 3H-phenoxazin-3-one (4), 5H-pyrido[3,2-a]phenoxazin-5-one (5), and 5H-pyrido[3,2-a]phenothiazin-5-one (6), strictly related to the actinomycin chromophore, were synthesized for developing new anticancer intercalating drugs. The antiproliferative activity of these compounds, evaluated against representative human liquid and solid neoplastic cell lines, showed that 5 and its isoster 6 were the most active compounds inhibiting cell proliferation in a submicromolar range. Compound 5 was also evaluated against KB subclones (KBMDR, KB7D, and KBV20C), which overexpress the MDR1/P-glycoprotein drug efflux pump responsible for drug resistance. All the above KB subclones did not show altered sensitivity to the antiproliferative activity of 5. UV-vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy experiments support the phenoxazinone 5/DNA binding. Molecular mechanics methods were used to build a three-dimensional model of the 5/[d(GAAGCTTC)]2 complex. Electrostatic interactions between the hydrogen of the positively charged pyridine nitrogen of 5 and the negatively charged oxygen atoms (O4' and O5') of the cytosine C5 residue together with stacking forces contribute to the high antiproliferative activity. The metal(II)-assisted synthesis procedure of 5 is described, and the formation mechanism is proposed. PMID:12431048

  5. XAFS Model Compound Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Newville, Matthew

    The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

  6. Anticancer agent-based marine natural products and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Wei; Wu, Qi-Hao; Rowley, David C; Al-Kareef, Ammar M Q; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Marine natural products constitute a huge reservoir of anticancer agents. Consequently during the past decades, several marine anticancer compounds have been isolated, identified, and approved for anticancer treatment or are under trials. In this article the sources, structure, bioactivities, mode of actions, and analogs of some promising marine and derived anticancer compounds have been discussed. PMID:25559315

  7. Learning models of intelligent agents

    SciTech Connect

    Carmel, D.; Markovitch, S.

    1996-12-31

    Agents that operate in a multi-agent system need an efficient strategy to handle their encounters with other agents involved. Searching for an optimal interactive strategy is a hard problem because it depends mostly on the behavior of the others. In this work, interaction among agents is represented as a repeated two-player game, where the agents` objective is to look for a strategy that maximizes their expected sum of rewards in the game. We assume that agents` strategies can be modeled as finite automata. A model-based approach is presented as a possible method for learning an effective interactive strategy. First, we describe how an agent should find an optimal strategy against a given model. Second, we present an unsupervised algorithm that infers a model of the opponent`s automaton from its input/output behavior. A set of experiments that show the potential merit of the algorithm is reported as well.

  8. [Clinical pharmacology of anticancer agents. (Part 1) Introduction, alkylating agents and platinum compounds].

    PubMed

    Fujita, H

    1991-11-01

    Pharmacokinetic concepts as to absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of anticancer agents, and how drugs reach to the site of action were reviewed. Then, roles of the liver and kidney to the excretion and metabolism, intracellular pharmacokinetics, and relationships between drug response and cell proliferation kinetics or cell cycle phase were explained. Drug development, mode of action and pharmacokinetics of alkylating agents and platinum compounds were reviewed. This includes: alkylating agents: nitrogen mustard, phenylalanine mustard, estracyte, cyclophosphamide, carboquone, busulfan, nitrosourea, etc., and platinum compounds: cisplatin, carboplatin, 254-S, DWA-2114 R, NK-121. PMID:1952967

  9. Natural Compounds as Therapeutic Agents in the Treatment Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Isha; Shah, Kalpit; Bradbury, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    The recent FDA approval of two drugs to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis has given hope to patients and their families battling this devastating disease. Over many years, with heavy financial investment from Vertex Pharmaceuticals and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, pre-clinical evaluation of thousands of synthetic drugs resulted in the production of Kalydeco and Orkambi. Yet, despite the success of this endeavor, many other compounds have been proposed as therapeutic agents in the treatment of CF. Of note, several of these compounds are naturally occurring, and are present in spices from the grocery store and over the counter preparations in health food stores. In this short review, we look at three such compounds, genistein, curcumin, and resveratrol, and evaluate the scientific support for their use as therapeutic agents in the treatment of patients with CF. PMID:27081574

  10. Steroidal Ammonium Compounds as New Neuromuscular Blocking Agents.

    PubMed

    Rao, Zhigang; Hu, Hao; Tang, Jiazhi; Liu, Zhiying; Yang, Yue; Qiu, Guofu; Xiao, Yuling; Liu, Peng; Hu, Xianming; Zhou, Xiaoju; Hong, Xuechuan

    2016-05-01

    Neuromuscular blocking agents are widely used as an anesthesia auxiliary in surgery, which induce relaxation of skeletal muscles by blocking signal transmission at the neuromuscular junction. Many neuromuscular blocking agents s were developed over the past decades, but none of them fully meets the needs of the clinic by various reasons. In this study, a series of quaternary ammonium steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents were synthesized and evaluated on isolated mouse phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragms for their bioactivities. The initial separation of mono- and bis-quaternary ammonium compounds turned out to be very challenging on regular silica gel chromatography. Therefore, a facile purification method, in which the silica gel was pretreated with methanolic sodium bromide solution, was finally achieved. Compounds 3g (0.36 μm) and 4g (0.37 μm) exhibited excellent neuromuscular blocking activities, which were about sixfold to sevenfold higher in potency than that of rocuronium (2.50 μm). In addition, other bis-quaternized compounds also showed good potencies close to that of rocuronium. Furthermore, the preliminary structure-activity relationship of this series was also elucidated. Benzyl group was found to be a promising quaternary group in this series. PMID:26684806

  11. Essential oil compounds as stress reducing agents in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaewwongse, M; Sanesuwan, K; Pupa, P; Bullangpoti, V

    2013-01-01

    Essential oil compounds were studied to demonstrate their potential as stress reducing agents against rats. Rats were intraperitoneal administered with Linalool, Cineole and Thymol, respectively. Anxiety-related behaviors were determined by open field test and elevated plus maze test. Thymol reduced anxiety-related behavior of the animals. Linalool had no effect in both sexes of rats in the open field test. Thus, the results suggested that Thymol and Linalool are safe to control pets without harming non-target mammals PMID:25145237

  12. Polyimidazopyrrolone model compounds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    The model reactions between phthalic anhydride and o-phenylenediamine were studied under conditions analogous to the polymerization and post-cyclization of dianhydrides with bis(o-diamines) to form polyimidazopyrrolones (Pyrrones). The route from the initial amide-acid-amine to the tetracyclic Pyrrone model when the reactions are conducted in aprotic solvents is highly competitive between isolatable benzimidazole-acid and imide-amine intermediates. Solid-state thermal conversion of the amide-acid-amine affords a unique dimeric species containing amide, imide, and benzimidazole functions. It was confirmed that melt techniques lead to disproportionation products. The application of these findings to related polymer synthesis is discussed.

  13. Polyimidazopyrrolone model compounds.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    Study of model reactions between phthalic anhydride and o-phenylenediamine under conditions analogous to the polymerization and post cyclization of dianhydrides with bis(o-diamines) to form polyimidazopyrrolones (Pyrrones). Solid-state thermal conversion of the amide-acid-amine affords a unique dimeric species containing amide, imide, and benzimidazole functions. It was confirmed that melt techniques lead to disproportionation products. The application of these findings to related polymer syntheses is discussed.

  14. Aromatic amine N-oxide organometallic compounds: searching for prospective agents against infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Arce, Esteban; Mosquillo, M Florencia; Pérez-Díaz, Leticia; Echeverría, Gustavo A; Piro, Oscar E; Merlino, Alicia; Coitiño, E Laura; Maríngolo Ribeiro, Camila; Leite, Clarice Q F; Pavan, Fernando R; Otero, Lucía; Gambino, Dinorah

    2015-08-28

    In search of prospective agents against infectious diseases, 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene pyridine-2-thiolato-1-oxide M(ii) hexafluorophosphate compounds [M(mpo)(dppf)](PF6), where M = palladium or platinum, were synthesized and fully characterized in the solid state and in solution using experimental and DFT computational techniques. The compounds are isomorphous and the M(ii) transition metal ions are in a nearly planar trapezoidal cis-coordination bound to the pyridine-2-thiolato-1-oxide (mpo) and to the 1,1'-bis(diphenylphosphino)ferrocene molecules, both acting as bidentate ligands. Both compounds showed high cytotoxic activity on Trypanosoma cruzi and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and acceptable selectivities towards MTB, but good to excellent selectivity index values as anti-T. cruzi compounds. The inclusion of the ferrocene moiety (dppf ligand) improved the selectivity towards the parasite when compared to the previously reported [M(mpo)2] complexes. Related to the probable mechanism of action of the complexes, molecular docking studies on modelled T. cruzi NADH-fumarate reductase (TcFR) predicted that both be very good inhibitors of the enzyme. The effect of the compounds on the enzyme activity was experimentally confirmed using T. cruzi protein extracts. According to all obtained results, both [M(mpo)(dppf)](PF6) compounds could be considered prospective anti-trypanosomal agents that deserve further research. PMID:26203896

  15. Quantitative risk modelling for new pharmaceutical compounds.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhengru; Taylor, Mark J; Lisboa, Paulo; Dyas, Mark

    2005-11-15

    The process of discovering and developing new drugs is long, costly and risk-laden. Faced with a wealth of newly discovered compounds, industrial scientists need to target resources carefully to discern the key attributes of a drug candidate and to make informed decisions. Here, we describe a quantitative approach to modelling the risk associated with drug development as a tool for scenario analysis concerning the probability of success of a compound as a potential pharmaceutical agent. We bring together the three strands of manufacture, clinical effectiveness and financial returns. This approach involves the application of a Bayesian Network. A simulation model is demonstrated with an implementation in MS Excel using the modelling engine Crystal Ball. PMID:16257374

  16. Molecular modeling of organophosphorous agents and their aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Gor, Gennady Yu; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Neimark, Alexander V

    2011-05-26

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we modeled solvation and diffusion in aqueous solutions of organophosphorous compounds, including nerve G-agents sarin and soman (methylphosphonofluoridates) and their common simulants DMMP (dimethyl methylphosphonate) and DIFP (diisopropyl fluorophosphate). The aqueous solutions of the organophosphorous compounds were found to display complex molecular scale structures and dynamic properties due to competing interactions between strongly hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups. The mixing of agents with water was proved to be exothermic with negative excess mixing volume, indicating a strongly hydrophilic solvation. This effect was confirmed in a specially performed experiment. We discuss to what extent DMMP and DIFP are suitable simulants for G-agents in experimental studies, as far as their interactions with water are concerned. We also focus on the relevance of the structural features and mobilities of agents in water to their interactions with permselective polyelectrolyte membranes that may be employed as protective barriers against chemical warfare agents. PMID:21542641

  17. BTF Potts compound texture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haindl, Michal; Reměs, Václav; Havlíček, Vojtěch

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces a method for modeling mosaic-like textures using a multispectral parametric Bidirectional Texture Function (BTF) compound Markov random field model (CMRF). The primary purpose of our synthetic texture approach is to reproduce, compress, and enlarge a given measured texture image so that ideally both natural and synthetic texture will be visually indiscernible, but the model can be easily applied for BFT material editing. The CMRF model consist of several sub-models each having different characteristics along with an underlying structure model which controls transitions between these sub models. The proposed model uses the Potts random field for distributing local texture models in the form of analytically solvable wide-sense BTF Markovian representation for single regions among the fields of a mosaic approximated by the Voronoi diagram. The control field of the BTF-CMRF is generated by the Potts random field model build on top of the adjacency graph of a measured mosaic. The compound random field synthesis combines the modified fast Swendsen- Wang Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the hierarchical Potts MRF part with the fast and analytical synthesis of single regional BTF MRFs. The local texture regions (not necessarily continuous) are represented by an analytical BTF model which consists of single factors modeled by the adaptive 3D causal auto-regressive (3DCAR) random field model which can be analytically estimated as well as synthesized. The visual quality of the resulting complex synthetic textures generally surpasses the outputs of the previously published simpler non-compound BTF-MRF models.

  18. Agent-based modeling of complex infrastructures

    SciTech Connect

    North, M. J.

    2001-06-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) can be applied to investigate complex infrastructures and infrastructure interdependencies. The CAS model agents within the Spot Market Agent Research Tool (SMART) and Flexible Agent Simulation Toolkit (FAST) allow investigation of the electric power infrastructure, the natural gas infrastructure and their interdependencies.

  19. Boron compounds as anion binding agents for nonaqueous battery electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xia-Oing; McBreen, James; Xiang, Caili

    2000-02-08

    Novel fluorinated boron-based compounds which act as anion receptors in non-aqueous battery electrolytes are provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the fluorinated boron-based compounds of the invention enhance ionic conductivity and cation transference number of non-aqueous electrolytes. The fluorinated boron-based anion receptors include borane and borate compounds bearing different fluorinated alkyl and aryl groups.

  20. Statistical Modelling of Compound Floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevacqua, Emanuele; Maraun, Douglas; Vrac, Mathieu; Widmann, Martin; Manning, Colin

    2016-04-01

    In the recent special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on extreme events it has been highlighted that an important class of extreme events has received little attention so far: so-called compound events (CEs) (Seneviratne et al., 2012). Compound events (CEs) are multivariate extreme events in which the individual contributing events might not be extreme themselves, but their joint occurrence causes an extreme impact. Following Leonard et al., 2013, we define events as CEs only when the contributing events are statistically dependent. For many events analysed so far, the contributing events have not been statistically dependent (e.g. the floods in Rotterdam, Van den Brink et al., 2005). Two typical examples of CEs are severe drought in conjunction with a heatwave, and storm surges coinciding with heavy rain that cause the so-called Compound Floods in the lower section of a river. We develop a multivariate statistical model to represent and analyse the physical mechanisms driving CEs, and to quantify the risk associated with these events. The model is based on pair-copula construction theory, which has the advantage of building joint probability distributions modeling the marginal distributions separately from the dependence structure among variables. This allows to analyse the individual contributing variables underlying the CE separately to their dependence structure. Here is presented an application of the statistical model for Compound Floods, based on a conceptual case study. For these particular events it is not trivial to find satisfying data. Usually, water level stations are not present in the area of the river where both the influence of the sea and river are seen. The main reason being that this critical area is small and stakeholders have little interest in measuring both effect from the sea and from the river. For these reasons we have developed a conceptual case study which allows us to vary the system's physical parameters

  1. CO-releasing Metal Carbonyl Compounds as Antimicrobial Agents in the Post-antibiotic Era*

    PubMed Central

    Wareham, Lauren K.; Poole, Robert K.; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of a “post-antibiotic era” in the 21st century, in which common infections may kill, has prompted research into radically new antimicrobials. CO-releasing molecules (CORMs), mostly metal carbonyl compounds, originally developed for therapeutic CO delivery in animals, are potent antimicrobial agents. Certain CORMs inhibit growth and respiration, reduce viability, and release CO to intracellular hemes, as predicted, but their actions are more complex, as revealed by transcriptomic datasets and modeling. Progress is hindered by difficulties in detecting CO release intracellularly, limited understanding of the biological chemistry of CO reactions with non-heme targets, and the cytotoxicity of some CORMs to mammalian cells. PMID:26055702

  2. An agent based model of genotype editing

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, L. M.; Huang, C. F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents our investigation on an agent-based model of Genotype Editing. This model is based on several characteristics that are gleaned from the RNA editing system as observed in several organisms. The incorporation of editing mechanisms in an evolutionary agent-based model provides a means for evolving agents with heterogenous post-transcriptional processes. The study of this agent-based genotype-editing model has shed some light into the evolutionary implications of RNA editing as well as established an advantageous evolutionary computation algorithm for machine learning. We expect that our proposed model may both facilitate determining the evolutionary role of RNA editing in biology, and advance the current state of research in agent-based optimization.

  3. Vanadium Compounds as Pro-Inflammatory Agents: Effects on Cyclooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Korbecki, Jan; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Gutowska, Izabela; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how the activity and expression of cyclooxygenases are influenced by vanadium compounds at anticancer concentrations and recorded in inorganic vanadium poisonings. We refer mainly to the effects of vanadate (orthovanadate), vanadyl and pervanadate ions; the main focus is placed on their impact on intracellular signaling. We describe the exact mechanism of the effect of vanadium compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), PLCγ, Src, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, transcription factor NF-κB, the effect on the proteolysis of COX-2 and the activity of cPLA2. For a better understanding of these processes, a lot of space is devoted to the transformation of vanadium compounds within the cell and the molecular influence on the direct targets of the discussed vanadium compounds. PMID:26053397

  4. Vanadium Compounds as Pro-Inflammatory Agents: Effects on Cyclooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Korbecki, Jan; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Gutowska, Izabela; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how the activity and expression of cyclooxygenases are influenced by vanadium compounds at anticancer concentrations and recorded in inorganic vanadium poisonings. We refer mainly to the effects of vanadate (orthovanadate), vanadyl and pervanadate ions; the main focus is placed on their impact on intracellular signaling. We describe the exact mechanism of the effect of vanadium compounds on protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), PLCγ, Src, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, transcription factor NF-κB, the effect on the proteolysis of COX-2 and the activity of cPLA2. For a better understanding of these processes, a lot of space is devoted to the transformation of vanadium compounds within the cell and the molecular influence on the direct targets of the discussed vanadium compounds. PMID:26053397

  5. Gold compounds as therapeutic agents for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Berners-Price, Susan J; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2011-09-01

    The application of gold in medicine is traceable for several thousand years and Au(i) compounds have been used clinically to treat rheumatoid arthritis since the last century. Recently research into gold-based drugs for a range of human diseases has seen a renaissance. Old as well as new Au(i) and Au(iii) compounds have been used and designed with an aim of targeting cellular components that are implicated in the onset or progression of cancers, rheumatoid arthiritis, viral and parasitic diseases. In addition, new disease targets have been found for gold compounds that have given insight into the mechanism of action of these compounds, as well as in the molecular pathophysiology of human diseases. Here we discuss the rationale for the design and use of gold compounds that have specific and selective targets in cells to alleviate the symptoms of a range of human diseases. We summarise the most recent findings in this research and our own discoveries to show that gold compounds can be developed to become versatile and powerful drugs for diseases caused by dysfunction of selenol and thiol containing proteins. PMID:21755088

  6. Bisamide bisthiol compounds useful for making technetium radiodiagnostic renal agents

    DOEpatents

    Davison, Alan; Brenner, David; Lister-James, John; Jones, Alun G.

    1987-06-16

    A radiodiagnostic bisamido-bisthio ligand useful for producing Tc-labelled radiodiagnostic renal agents is described. The ligand forms a complex with the radionuclide .sup.99m Tc suitable for administration as a radiopharmaceutical to obtain images of the kidney for diagnosis of kidney disfunction.

  7. LOW VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) CHEMICAL AGENT RESISTANT COATING (CARC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical warfare causes many problems on the battlefield, among which is decontamination of exposed equipment. Because of this threat, the US Army ahs required the use of a Chemical Agent Resistant Coating (CARC) system on its equipment, beginning in FY 85. The equipment covere...

  8. Scoping Planning Agents With Shared Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedrax-Weiss, Tania; Frank, Jeremy D.; Jonsson, Ari K.; McGann, Conor

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we provide a formal framework to define the scope of planning agents based on a single declarative model. Having multiple agents sharing a single model provides numerous advantages that lead to reduced development costs and increase reliability of the system. We formally define planning in terms of extensions of an initial partial plan, and a set of flaws that make the plan unacceptable. A Flaw Filter (FF) allows us to identify those flaws relevant to an agent. Flaw filters motivate the Plan Identification Function (PIF), which specifies when an agent is is ready hand control to another agent for further work. PIFs define a set of plan extensions that can be generated from a model and a plan request. FFs and PIFs can be used to define the scope of agents without changing the model. We describe an implementation of PIFsand FFswithin the context of EUROPA, a constraint-based planning architecture, and show how it can be used to easily design many different agents.

  9. (-)-Arctigenin as a lead compound for anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gui-Rong; Li, Hong-Fu; Dou, De-Qiang; Xu, Yu-Bin; Jiang, Hong-Shuai; Li, Fu-Rui; Kang, Ting-Guo

    2013-01-01

    (-)-Arctigenin, an important active constituent of the traditional Chinese herb Fructus Arctii, was found to exhibit various bioactivities, so it can be used as a good lead compound for further structure modification in order to find a safer and more potent medicine. (-)-Arctigenin derivatives 1-5 of (-)-arctingen were obtained by modifying with ammonolysis at the lactone ring and sulphonylation at C (6') and C (6″) and O-demethylation at CH3O-C (3'), CH3O-C (3″) and CH3O-C (4″), and their anticancer bioactivities were examined. PMID:23962054

  10. Persistent agents in Axelrod's social dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reia, Sandro M.; Neves, Ubiraci P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Axelrod's model of social dynamics has been studied under the effect of external media. Here we study the formation of cultural domains in the model by introducing persistent agents. These are agents whose cultural traits are not allowed to change but may be spread through local neighborhood. In the absence of persistent agents, the system is known to present a transition from a monocultural to a multicultural regime at some critical Q (number of traits). Our results reveal a dependence of critical Q on the occupation probability p of persistent agents and we obtain the phase diagram of the model in the (p,Q) -plane. The critical locus is explained by the competition of two opposite forces named here barrier and bonding effects. Such forces are verified to be caused by non-persistent agents which adhere (adherent agents) to the set of traits of persistent ones. The adherence (concentration of adherent agents) as a function of p is found to decay for constant Q. Furthermore, adherence as a function of Q is found to decay as a power law with constant p.

  11. The models for assessment of chemopreventive agents: single organ models.

    PubMed

    Das, Sukta; Banerjee, Sarmistha; Saha, Prosenjit

    2004-01-01

    Research in cancer chemoprevention involves a number of activities, the first and foremost of which is acquisition of detailed knowledge concerning the process of carcinogenesis and identification of points of intervention whereby the process can be reversed or stalled. Parallel to this is the search for ideal chemopreventive agents--natural or synthetic--and screening for their activity and efficacy in vitro and in vivo. For ethical reasons it is not possible to test new agents on humans, so preclinical studies are dependent on results first being obtained with suitable animal models. Since it is not possible for a single model to reflect the diversity and heterogeneity of human cancers, it is necessary to have as many different models as possible, depending on the requirement of the studies on different aspects of cancer biology. Advances in research on carcinogenesis and chemoprevention therefore have to be accompanied by development of appropriate laboratory animal models using a variety of carcinogens that produce tumours at different sites. Animal models have contributed significantly to our understanding of carcinogenesis and ways to intervene in the underlying processes. Many animal carcinogenesis and tumour models have been found to mirror corresponding human cancers with respect to cell of origin, morphogenesis, phenotype markers and genetic alteration. In spite of the fact that interpolation of data from animal studies to humans is difficult for various reasons, animal models are widely used for assessment of new compounds with cancer chemopreventive potential and for preclinical trials. So despite the movements of animal rights activists, animal models will continue to be used for biomedical research for saving human lives. In doing so, care should be taken to treat and handle the animals with minimal discomfort to them and ensuring that alternatives are used whenever possible. PMID:15074999

  12. Distributed knowledge model for multiple intelligent agents

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.P.

    1987-01-01

    In the Distributed AI context, there have been some general principles developed to manage the problem solving activities of multiple agents. But there is not yet a domain-independent structure available for organizing multiple agents and managing of the interactions among agents. An organization metaphor is proposed to establish the hierarchical organization as the preferable takes environment for the decision-oriented applications of Distributed AI. As such, distributed problem solving is modeled as organizational problem solving. A generic structure for multiple intelligent agents is then developed. The organization metaphor is a problem-solving method. It outlines the organizational principles for distributed problem solving. However, a problem-solving model does not specify how it itself is to be realized as a computational entity. Therefore, a distributed knowledge model (DKM) is proposed to define the computational constructs in order to realize a distributed problem-solving environment for multiple intelligent agents. A prototype was implemented to show the feasibility of building a multi-agent environment based on DKM.

  13. Agent Based Modeling Applications for Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    Agent-based modeling techniques have successfully been applied to systems in which complex behaviors or outcomes arise from varied interactions between individuals in the system. Each individual interacts with its environment, as well as with other individuals, by following a set of relatively simple rules. Traditionally this "bottom-up" modeling approach has been applied to problems in the fields of economics and sociology, but more recently has been introduced to various disciplines in the geosciences. This technique can help explain the origin of complex processes from a relatively simple set of rules, incorporate large and detailed datasets when they exist, and simulate the effects of extreme events on system-wide behavior. Some of the challenges associated with this modeling method include: significant computational requirements in order to keep track of thousands to millions of agents, methods and strategies of model validation are lacking, as is a formal methodology for evaluating model uncertainty. Challenges specific to the geosciences, include how to define agents that control water, contaminant fluxes, climate forcing and other physical processes and how to link these "geo-agents" into larger agent-based simulations that include social systems such as demographics economics and regulations. Effective management of limited natural resources (such as water, hydrocarbons, or land) requires an understanding of what factors influence the demand for these resources on a regional and temporal scale. Agent-based models can be used to simulate this demand across a variety of sectors under a range of conditions and determine effective and robust management policies and monitoring strategies. The recent focus on the role of biological processes in the geosciences is another example of an area that could benefit from agent-based applications. A typical approach to modeling the effect of biological processes in geologic media has been to represent these processes in

  14. Multiscale agent-based consumer market modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    North, M. J.; Macal, C. M.; St. Aubin, J.; Thimmapuram, P.; Bragen, M.; Hahn, J.; Karr, J.; Brigham, N.; Lacy, M. E.; Hampton, D.; Decision and Information Sciences; Procter & Gamble Co.

    2010-05-01

    Consumer markets have been studied in great depth, and many techniques have been used to represent them. These have included regression-based models, logit models, and theoretical market-level models, such as the NBD-Dirichlet approach. Although many important contributions and insights have resulted from studies that relied on these models, there is still a need for a model that could more holistically represent the interdependencies of the decisions made by consumers, retailers, and manufacturers. When the need is for a model that could be used repeatedly over time to support decisions in an industrial setting, it is particularly critical. Although some existing methods can, in principle, represent such complex interdependencies, their capabilities might be outstripped if they had to be used for industrial applications, because of the details this type of modeling requires. However, a complementary method - agent-based modeling - shows promise for addressing these issues. Agent-based models use business-driven rules for individuals (e.g., individual consumer rules for buying items, individual retailer rules for stocking items, or individual firm rules for advertizing items) to determine holistic, system-level outcomes (e.g., to determine if brand X's market share is increasing). We applied agent-based modeling to develop a multi-scale consumer market model. We then conducted calibration, verification, and validation tests of this model. The model was successfully applied by Procter & Gamble to several challenging business problems. In these situations, it directly influenced managerial decision making and produced substantial cost savings.

  15. Constructing Agent Model for Virtual Training Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Yohei; Sugimoto, Yuki; Ishida, Toru

    Constructing highly realistic agents is essential if agents are to be employed in virtual training systems. In training for collaboration based on face-to-face interaction, the generation of emotional expressions is one key. In training for guidance based on one-to-many interaction such as direction giving for evacuations, emotional expressions must be supplemented by diverse agent behaviors to make the training realistic. To reproduce diverse behavior, we characterize agents by using a various combinations of operation rules instantiated by the user operating the agent. To accomplish this goal, we introduce a user modeling method based on participatory simulations. These simulations enable us to acquire information observed by each user in the simulation and the operating history. Using these data and the domain knowledge including known operation rules, we can generate an explanation for each behavior. Moreover, the application of hypothetical reasoning, which offers consistent selection of hypotheses, to the generation of explanations allows us to use otherwise incompatible operation rules as domain knowledge. In order to validate the proposed modeling method, we apply it to the acquisition of an evacuee's model in a fire-drill experiment. We successfully acquire a subject's model corresponding to the results of an interview with the subject.

  16. Agent-Based Modeling in Systems Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, J; Butler, J; Alden, K; Read, M; Kumar, V; Cucurull-Sanchez, L; Timmis, J; Coles, M

    2015-11-01

    Modeling and simulation (M&S) techniques provide a platform for knowledge integration and hypothesis testing to gain insights into biological systems that would not be possible a priori. Agent-based modeling (ABM) is an M&S technique that focuses on describing individual components rather than homogenous populations. This tutorial introduces ABM to systems pharmacologists, using relevant case studies to highlight how ABM-specific strengths have yielded success in the area of preclinical mechanistic modeling. PMID:26783498

  17. Use of model compounds in coal chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, C J

    1980-01-01

    The use of model compounds in coal chemistry has been summarized. Several examples from the literature, and also from work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been used to illustrate the main principles involved. The current controversy on the subject of model compounds is believed to stem from a semantic misunderstanding owing to different definitions of what a model compound is. The definition of a model compound from the organic chemist's point of view is that it is a substance which may possess at least one property or structural feature suspected of being present in the sample investigated. The sample may be coal itself, a maceral, a coal-derived material or a hydrogen-donor solvent. It is stressed that a recognition of the structure-reactivity relationship in organic compounds is necessary to avoid false conclusions.

  18. Computed structures of polyimides model compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Phillips, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    Using a semi-empirical approach, a computer study was made of 8 model compounds of polyimides. The compounds represent subunits from which NASA Langley Research Center has successfully synthesized polymers for aerospace high performance material application, including one of the most promising, LARC-TPI polymer. Three-dimensional graphic display as well as important molecular structure data pertaining to these 8 compounds are obtained.

  19. A 'chemically-gated' photoresponsive compound as a visible detector for organophosphorus nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Nourmohammadian, Farahnaz; Wu, Tuoqi; Branda, Neil R

    2011-10-21

    We describe a versatile and convenient visible detection method for organophosphorus compounds based on a colorless 'pro-photoresponsive' organic molecule that undergoes photochemical ring-closing to produce a colored isomer only after it reacts with vapors of the phosphorylating agent. PMID:21901219

  20. Tutorial on agent-based modeling and simulation. Part 2 : how to model with agents.

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C. M.; North, M. J.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2006-01-01

    Agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS) is a new approach to modeling systems comprised of interacting autonomous agents. ABMS promises to have far-reaching effects on the way that businesses use computers to support decision-making and researchers use electronic laboratories to do research. Some have gone so far as to contend that ABMS is a new way of doing science. Computational advances make possible a growing number of agent-based applications across many fields. Applications range from modeling agent behavior in the stock market and supply chains, to predicting the spread of epidemics and the threat of bio-warfare, from modeling the growth and decline of ancient civilizations to modeling the complexities of the human immune system, and many more. This tutorial describes the foundations of ABMS, identifies ABMS toolkits and development methods illustrated through a supply chain example, and provides thoughts on the appropriate contexts for ABMS versus conventional modeling techniques.

  1. Redox-active compounds with a history of human use: antistaphylococcal action and potential for repurposing as topical antibiofilm agents

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, N.; Eady, E. A.; Cove, J. H.; O'Neill, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the antistaphylococcal/antibiofilm activity and mode of action (MOA) of a panel of redox-active (RA) compounds with a history of human use and to provide a preliminary preclinical assessment of their potential for topical treatment of staphylococcal infections, including those involving a biofilm component. Methods Antistaphylococcal activity was evaluated by broth microdilution and by time–kill studies with growing and slow- or non-growing cells. The antibiofilm activity of RA compounds, alone and in combination with established antibacterial agents, was assessed using the Calgary Biofilm Device. Established assays were used to examine the membrane-perturbing effects of RA compounds, to measure penetration into biofilms and physical disruption of biofilms and to assess resistance potential. A living skin equivalent model was used to assess the effects of RA compounds on human skin. Results All 15 RA compounds tested displayed antistaphylococcal activity against planktonic cultures (MIC 0.25–128 mg/L) and 7 eradicated staphylococcal biofilms (minimum biofilm eradication concentration 4–256 mg/L). The MOA of all compounds involved perturbation of the bacterial membrane, whilst selected compounds with antibiofilm activity caused destructuring of the biofilm matrix. The two most promising agents [celastrol and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA)] in respect of antibacterial potency and selective toxicity against bacterial membranes acted synergistically with gentamicin against biofilms, did not damage artificial skin following topical application and exhibited low resistance potential. Conclusions In contrast to established antibacterial drugs, some RA compounds are capable of eradicating staphylococcal biofilms. Of these, celastrol and NDGA represent particularly attractive candidates for development as topical antistaphylococcal biofilm treatments. PMID:25368206

  2. Dense iodine-rich compounds with low detonation pressures as biocidal agents.

    PubMed

    He, Chunlin; Zhang, Jiaheng; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2013-06-01

    Fifteen iodo compounds and six iodyl compounds with an iodine content between 45.3 and 89.0 % were prepared. The mono, di, and triiodyl compounds were obtained from the corresponding iodo compound by employing Oxone. All the compounds were characterized by IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, elemental analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The impact sensitivity was measured by using BAM (Bundesamt für Materialforschung) methodology. Based on the calculated heats of formation and experimental densities, the detonation properties and detonation products were predicted by employing Cheetah 6.0. A total percentage of iodine-containing species in wt % (I2, HI, and I in gas phase) ranged from 46.7 (21) to 88.94 % (11) was found in the detonation products. The high concentration and easy accessibility of iodine and/or iodine-containing species is very important in developing materials suitable as Agent Defeat Weapons (ADWs). PMID:23576298

  3. Fragmentation pathways and structural characterization of 14 nerve agent compounds by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Housman, Kathleen J; Swift, Austin T; Oyler, Jonathan M

    2015-03-01

    Organophosphate nerve agents (OPNAs) are some of the most widely used and proliferated chemical warfare agents. As evidenced by recent events in Syria, these compounds remain a serious military and terrorist threat to human health because of their toxicity and the ease with which they can be used, produced and stored. There are over 2,000 known, scheduled compounds derived from common parent structures with many more possible. To address medical, forensic, attribution, remediation and other requirements, laboratory systems have been established to provide the capability to analyze 'unknown' samples for the presence of these compounds. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric methods have been validated and are routinely used in the analysis of samples for a very limited number of these compounds, but limited data exist characterizing the electrospray ionization (ESI) and mass spectrometric fragmentation pathways of the compound families. This report describes results from direct infusion ESI/MS, ESI/MS(2) and ESI/MS(3) analysis of 14 G and V agents, the major OPNA families, using an AB Sciex 4000 QTrap. Using a range of conditions, spectra were acquired and characteristic fragments identified. The results demonstrated that the reproducible and predictable fragmentation of these compounds by ESI/MS, ESI/MS(2) and ESI/MS(3) can be used to describe systematic fragmentation pathways specific to compound structural class. These fragmentation pathways, in turn, may be useful as a predictive tool in the analysis of samples by screening and confirmatory laboratories to identify related compounds for which authentic standards are not readily available. PMID:25519457

  4. Volatility clustering in agent based market models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, Irene; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe

    2003-06-01

    We define and study a market model, where agents have different strategies among which they can choose, according to their relative profitability, with the possibility of not participating to the market. The price is updated according to the excess demand, and the wealth of the agents is properly accounted for. Only two parameters play a significant role: one describes the impact of trading on the price, and the other describes the propensity of agents to be trend following or contrarian. We observe three different regimes, depending on the value of these two parameters: an oscillating phase with bubbles and crashes, an intermittent phase and a stable ‘rational’ market phase. The statistics of price changes in the intermittent phase resembles that of real price changes, with small linear correlations, fat tails and long-range volatility clustering. We discuss how the time dependence of these two parameters spontaneously drives the system in the intermittent region.

  5. Screening of Pharmacologically Active Small Molecule Compounds Identifies Antifungal Agents Against Candida Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Watamoto, Takao; Egusa, Hiroshi; Sawase, Takashi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Candida species have emerged as important and common opportunistic human pathogens, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. The current antifungal therapies either have toxic side effects or are insufficiently effect. The aim of this study is develop new small-molecule antifungal compounds by library screening methods using Candida albicans, and to evaluate their antifungal effects on Candida biofilms and cytotoxic effects on human cells. Wild-type C. albicans strain SC5314 was used in library screening. To identify antifungal compounds, we screened a small-molecule library of 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds (LOPAC1280TM) using an antifungal susceptibility test (AST). To investigate the antifungal effects of the hit compounds, ASTs were conducted using Candida strains in various growth modes, including biofilms. We tested the cytotoxicity of the hit compounds using human gingival fibroblast (hGF) cells to evaluate their clinical safety. Only 35 compounds were identified by screening, which inhibited the metabolic activity of C. albicans by >50%. Of these, 26 compounds had fungistatic effects and nine compounds had fungicidal effects on C. albicans. Five compounds, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate, ellipticine and CV-3988, had strong fungicidal effects and could inhibit the metabolic activity of Candida biofilms. However, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate and ellipticine were cytotoxic to hGF cells at low concentrations. CV-3988 showed no cytotoxicity at a fungicidal concentration. Four of the compounds identified, BAY11-7082, BAY11-7085, sanguinarine chloride hydrate and ellipticine, had toxic effects on Candida strains and hGF cells. In contrast, CV-3988 had fungicidal effects on Candida strains, but low cytotoxic effects on hGF cells. Therefore, this screening reveals agent, CV-3988 that was previously unknown to be antifungal agent, which could be a novel therapies for superficial mucosal candidiasis. PMID

  6. Agents: An approach for dynamic process modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohmann, Axel; Kopetzky, Roland; Lurk, Alexander

    1999-03-01

    With the growing amount of distributed and heterogeneous information and services, conventional information systems have come to their limits. This gave rise to the development of a Multi-Agent System (the "Logical Client") which can be used in complex information systems as well as in other advanced software systems. Computer agents are proactive, reactive and social. They form a community of independent software components that can communicate and co-operate in order to accomplish complex tasks. Thus the agent-oriented paradigm provides a new and powerful approach to programming distributed systems. The communication framework developed is based on standards like CORBA, KQML and KIF. It provides an embedded rule based system to find adequate reactions to incoming messages. The macro-architecture of the Logical Client consists of independent agents and uses artificial intelligence to cope with complex patterns of communication and actions. A set of system agents is also provided, including the Strategy Service as a core component for modelling processes at runtime, the Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) Component for supporting remote co-operation between human users and the Repository for managing and hiding the file based data flow in heterogeneous networks. This architecture seems to be capable of managing complexity in information systems. It is also being implemented in a complex simulation system that monitors and simulates the environmental radioactivity in the country Baden-Württemberg.

  7. Endogenizing geopolitical boundaries with agent-based modeling.

    PubMed

    Cederman, Lars-Erik

    2002-05-14

    Agent-based modeling promises to overcome the reification of actors. Whereas this common, but limiting, assumption makes a lot of sense during periods characterized by stable actor boundaries, other historical junctures, such as the end of the Cold War, exhibit far-reaching and swift transformations of actors' spatial and organizational existence. Moreover, because actors cannot be assumed to remain constant in the long run, analysis of macrohistorical processes virtually always requires "sociational" endogenization. This paper presents a series of computational models, implemented with the software package REPAST, which trace complex macrohistorical transformations of actors be they hierarchically organized as relational networks or as collections of symbolic categories. With respect to the former, dynamic networks featuring emergent compound actors with agent compartments represented in a spatial grid capture organizational domination of the territorial state. In addition, models of "tagged" social processes allows the analyst to show how democratic states predicate their behavior on categorical traits. Finally, categorical schemata that select out politically relevant cultural traits in ethnic landscapes formalize a constructivist notion of national identity in conformance with the qualitative literature on nationalism. This "finite-agent method", representing both states and nations as higher-level structures superimposed on a lower-level grid of primitive agents or cultural traits, avoids reification of agency. Furthermore, it opens the door to explicit analysis of entity processes, such as the integration and disintegration of actors as well as boundary transformations. PMID:12011409

  8. Endogenizing geopolitical boundaries with agent-based modeling

    PubMed Central

    Cederman, Lars-Erik

    2002-01-01

    Agent-based modeling promises to overcome the reification of actors. Whereas this common, but limiting, assumption makes a lot of sense during periods characterized by stable actor boundaries, other historical junctures, such as the end of the Cold War, exhibit far-reaching and swift transformations of actors' spatial and organizational existence. Moreover, because actors cannot be assumed to remain constant in the long run, analysis of macrohistorical processes virtually always requires “sociational” endogenization. This paper presents a series of computational models, implemented with the software package REPAST, which trace complex macrohistorical transformations of actors be they hierarchically organized as relational networks or as collections of symbolic categories. With respect to the former, dynamic networks featuring emergent compound actors with agent compartments represented in a spatial grid capture organizational domination of the territorial state. In addition, models of “tagged” social processes allows the analyst to show how democratic states predicate their behavior on categorical traits. Finally, categorical schemata that select out politically relevant cultural traits in ethnic landscapes formalize a constructivist notion of national identity in conformance with the qualitative literature on nationalism. This “finite-agent method”, representing both states and nations as higher-level structures superimposed on a lower-level grid of primitive agents or cultural traits, avoids reification of agency. Furthermore, it opens the door to explicit analysis of entity processes, such as the integration and disintegration of actors as well as boundary transformations. PMID:12011409

  9. Economic modelling with low-cognition agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormerod, Paul

    2006-10-01

    The standard socio-economic model (SSSM) postulates very considerable cognitive powers on the part of its agents. They are able to gather all relevant information in any given situation, and to take the optimal decision on the basis of it, given their tastes and preferences. This behavioural rule is postulated to be universal. The concept of bounded rationality relaxes this somewhat, by permitting agents to have access to only limited amounts of information. But agents still optimise subject to their information set and tastes. Empirical work in economics over the past 20 years or so has shown that in general these behavioural postulates lack empirical validity. Instead, agents appear to have limited ability to gather information, and use simple rules of thumb to process the information which they have in order to take decisions. Building theoretical models on these realistic foundations which give better accounts of empirical phenomena than does the SSSM is an important challenge to both economists and econophysicists. Considerable progress has already been made in a short space of time, and examples are given in this paper.

  10. Encapsulation of a model compound in pectin delays its release from a biobased polymeric material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A model compound was encapsulated in pectin and then extruded with thermoplastic starch to form a composite. The intended product was a food-contact tray made of biobased polymers infused with an anti-microbial agent; however, caffeine was used as the model compound in the preliminary work. The mode...

  11. Hydroxytyrosol-Derived Compounds: A Basis for the Creation of New Pharmacological Agents for Cancer Prevention and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bernini, Roberta; Gilardini Montani, Maria Saveria; Merendino, Nicolò; Romani, Annalisa; Velotti, Francesca

    2015-12-10

    Hydroxytyrosol [2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethanol, HTyr] is a phenolic compound found in olive leaves and fruits and extra-virgin olive oil, which has well-known strong antioxidant and radical-scavenging properties. Recently, it has received particular attention for its antiproliferative and apoptotic activities and its anti-inflammatory properties. During the past few years, more efforts have been focused on synthesizing HTyr-derived compounds with enhanced biological activities for their potential use in different chronic degenerative diseases. In this paper, we report a dissertation on the current knowledge of selected synthetic HTyr derivatives and analogues and their potential use in cancer prevention and therapy, which are related to their antioxidant, antiproliferative/apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory properties. On the basis of the perspective of using HTyr-derived compounds as anticancer agents, we have taken into account only studies that were performed in experimental cell-based models. PMID:26225717

  12. Model Checking the Remote Agent Planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khatib, Lina; Muscettola, Nicola; Havelund, Klaus; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This work tackles the problem of using Model Checking for the purpose of verifying the HSTS (Scheduling Testbed System) planning system. HSTS is the planner and scheduler of the remote agent autonomous control system deployed in Deep Space One (DS1). Model Checking allows for the verification of domain models as well as planning entries. We have chosen the real-time model checker UPPAAL for this work. We start by motivating our work in the introduction. Then we give a brief description of HSTS and UPPAAL. After that, we give a sketch for the mapping of HSTS models into UPPAAL and we present samples of plan model properties one may want to verify.

  13. Petri Nets as Modeling Tool for Emergent Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Marto

    2004-01-01

    Emergent agents, those agents whose local interactions can cause unexpected global results, require a method of modeling that is both dynamic and structured Petri Nets, a modeling tool developed for dynamic discrete event system of mainly functional agents, provide this, and have the benefit of being an established tool. We present here the details of the modeling method here and discuss how to implement its use for modeling agent-based systems. Petri Nets have been used extensively in the modeling of functional agents, those agents who have defined purposes and whose actions should result in a know outcome. However, emergent agents, those agents who have a defined structure but whose interaction causes outcomes that are unpredictable, have not yet found a modeling style that suits them. A problem with formally modeling emergent agents that any formal modeling style usually expects to show the results of a problem and the results of problems studied using emergent agents are not apparent from the initial construction. However, the study of emergent agents still requires a method to analyze the agents themselves, and have sensible conversation about the differences and similarities between types of emergent agents. We attempt to correct this problem by applying Petri Nets to the characterization of emergent agents. In doing so, the emergent properties of these agents can be highlighted, and conversation about the nature and compatibility of the differing methods of agent creation can begin.

  14. The use of marine-derived bioactive compounds as potential hepatoprotective agents

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Dileep G; Weiskirchen, Ralf; Al-Musharafi, Salma K

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment may be explored as a rich source for novel drugs. A number of marine-derived compounds have been isolated and identified, and their therapeutic effects and pharmacological profiles are characterized. In the present review, we highlight the recent studies using marine compounds as potential hepatoprotective agents for the treatment of liver fibrotic diseases and discuss the proposed mechanisms of their activities. In addition, we discuss the significance of similar studies in Oman, where the rich marine life provides a potential for the isolation of novel natural, bioactive products that display therapeutic effects on liver diseases. PMID:25500871

  15. Agent-based modeling in ecological economics.

    PubMed

    Heckbert, Scott; Baynes, Tim; Reeson, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Interconnected social and environmental systems are the domain of ecological economics, and models can be used to explore feedbacks and adaptations inherent in these systems. Agent-based modeling (ABM) represents autonomous entities, each with dynamic behavior and heterogeneous characteristics. Agents interact with each other and their environment, resulting in emergent outcomes at the macroscale that can be used to quantitatively analyze complex systems. ABM is contributing to research questions in ecological economics in the areas of natural resource management and land-use change, urban systems modeling, market dynamics, changes in consumer attitudes, innovation, and diffusion of technology and management practices, commons dilemmas and self-governance, and psychological aspects to human decision making and behavior change. Frontiers for ABM research in ecological economics involve advancing the empirical calibration and validation of models through mixed methods, including surveys, interviews, participatory modeling, and, notably, experimental economics to test specific decision-making hypotheses. Linking ABM with other modeling techniques at the level of emergent properties will further advance efforts to understand dynamics of social-environmental systems. PMID:20146761

  16. Agent Based Model of Livestock Movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miron, D. J.; Emelyanova, I. V.; Donald, G. E.; Garner, G. M.

    The modelling of livestock movements within Australia is of national importance for the purposes of the management and control of exotic disease spread, infrastructure development and the economic forecasting of livestock markets. In this paper an agent based model for the forecasting of livestock movements is presented. This models livestock movements from farm to farm through a saleyard. The decision of farmers to sell or buy cattle is often complex and involves many factors such as climate forecast, commodity prices, the type of farm enterprise, the number of animals available and associated off-shore effects. In this model the farm agent's intelligence is implemented using a fuzzy decision tree that utilises two of these factors. These two factors are the livestock price fetched at the last sale and the number of stock on the farm. On each iteration of the model farms choose either to buy, sell or abstain from the market thus creating an artificial supply and demand. The buyers and sellers then congregate at the saleyard where livestock are auctioned using a second price sealed bid. The price time series output by the model exhibits properties similar to those found in real livestock markets.

  17. Biodegradation of coal-related model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.; Stewart, D.L.; McCulloch, M.; Lucke, R.B.; Bean, R.M.

    1988-06-01

    We have studied the reactions of model compounds having coal-related functionalities (ester linkages, ether linkages, PAH) with the intact organism, cell-free filtrate, and cell-free enzyme of C. versicolor to better understand the process of biosolubilization. Many of the degradation products have been identified by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS). Results indicate that the two compounds tested with the intact fungal organism were completely degraded. Complete degradation refers to no recovery of model compound. We can probably assume that the other two would also be totally degraded, since we have not yet found a simple compound that will survive long-term exposure to the intact fungus. The ease of degradation with the cell-free filtrate appears to be in the order: phenylbenzoate > benzylbenzoate > benzyl ether > methoxybenzophenone. Esters and ethers that are activated by aromatic rings appear to be susceptible to the fungal extract; however, aromatic ketones are not affected by the extract. From the limited results we have obtained from the isolated enzyme, it appears that the activity may parallel the cell-free filtrate. When the cell-free extract was tested with the model compounds indole, dibenzothiophene, and bibenzyl, no degradation with the enzyme was noted: however, exposure of these compounds to the intact organism resulted in complete degradation. Analysis of the controls indicated no degradation. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Agent-based models of financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanidou, E.; Zschischang, E.; Stauffer, D.; Lux, T.

    2007-03-01

    This review deals with several microscopic ('agent-based') models of financial markets which have been studied by economists and physicists over the last decade: Kim-Markowitz, Levy-Levy-Solomon, Cont-Bouchaud, Solomon-Weisbuch, Lux-Marchesi, Donangelo-Sneppen and Solomon-Levy-Huang. After an overview of simulation approaches in financial economics, we first give a summary of the Donangelo-Sneppen model of monetary exchange and compare it with related models in economics literature. Our selective review then outlines the main ingredients of some influential early models of multi-agent dynamics in financial markets (Kim-Markowitz, Levy-Levy-Solomon). As will be seen, these contributions draw their inspiration from the complex appearance of investors' interactions in real-life markets. Their main aim is to reproduce (and, thereby, provide possible explanations) for the spectacular bubbles and crashes seen in certain historical episodes, but they lack (like almost all the work before 1998 or so) a perspective in terms of the universal statistical features of financial time series. In fact, awareness of a set of such regularities (power-law tails of the distribution of returns, temporal scaling of volatility) only gradually appeared over the nineties. With the more precise description of the formerly relatively vague characteristics (e.g. moving from the notion of fat tails to the more concrete one of a power law with index around three), it became clear that financial market dynamics give rise to some kind of universal scaling law. Showing similarities with scaling laws for other systems with many interacting sub-units, an exploration of financial markets as multi-agent systems appeared to be a natural consequence. This topic has been pursued by quite a number of contributions appearing in both the physics and economics literature since the late nineties. From the wealth of different flavours of multi-agent models that have appeared up to now, we discuss the Cont

  19. Agent Based Modeling as an Educational Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, J. H.; Johnson, R.; Castillo, V.

    2012-12-01

    Motivation is a key element in high school education. One way to improve motivation and provide content, while helping address critical thinking and problem solving skills, is to have students build and study agent based models in the classroom. This activity visually connects concepts with their applied mathematical representation. "Engaging students in constructing models may provide a bridge between frequently disconnected conceptual and mathematical forms of knowledge." (Levy and Wilensky, 2011) We wanted to discover the feasibility of implementing a model based curriculum in the classroom given current and anticipated core and content standards.; Simulation using California GIS data ; Simulation of high school student lunch popularity using aerial photograph on top of terrain value map.

  20. Safe motion planning for mobile agents: A model of reactive planning for multiple mobile agents

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimura, Kikuo.

    1990-01-01

    The problem of motion planning for multiple mobile agents is studied. Each planning agent independently plans its own action based on its map which contains a limited information about the environment. In an environment where more than one mobile agent interacts, the motions of the robots are uncertain and dynamic. A model for reactive agents is described and simulation results are presented to show their behavior patterns. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  1. 4,5-Diaryl-3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thiones and related compounds as combretastatin A-4/oltipraz hybrids: Synthesis, molecular modelling and evaluation as antiproliferative agents and inhibitors of tubulin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Qi, Huan; Shen, Qirong; Lu, Guodong; Li, Mingyang; Bao, Kai; Wu, Yingliang; Zhang, Weige

    2016-10-21

    A new series of 4,5-diaryl-3H-1,2-dithiole-3-thiones and related compounds were designed and synthesised as combretastatin A-4/oltipraz hybrids. We evaluated the antiproliferative activities, inhibition of tubulin polymerization, and cell-cycle effects of these compounds. Several compounds in this series, such as 4d and 5c, displayed significant activity against SGC-7901, KB and HT-1080 cell lines, as determined using MTT assays. The most active compound, 4d, markedly inhibited tubulin polymerization, with an IC50 value of 4.44 μM being observed. In mechanistic studies, 4d caused cell arrest in G2/M phase, induced apoptotic cell death, and disrupted microtubule formation. Molecular docking studies revealed that 4d interacts and binds efficiently with the tubulin protein. PMID:27428395

  2. Hygrometers and thermohygrometers: environmental monitoring ensures the potency and stability of compounding agents.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V; McKenzie, Robert; Ainsworth, Ron; Kastango, Eric S; Kaestner, Rick; Rebelo, Andre; Burnside, Paul; Schultz, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    Although the terms humidity and relative humidity are often used interchangeably, they are not synonymous. Humidity is the amount of water in the air, and relative humidity is the ratio of the amount of water vapor in the air at a specific temperature to the maximum possible amount of water vapor in the air at that temperature. Thus humidity and temperature are inextricably bound in their effects on the environment. In a compounding pharmacy, humidity can affect the stability and quality of the compounds prepared, as well as equipment, chemicals, and polymers. Devices that measure relative humidity (hygrometers) or humidity and temperature (thermohygrometers) are essential instruments in a compounding pharmacy. They must be chosen carefully, however, to ensure that the measurements they yield are accurate, that they are reliable over time. Most desirable are devices that alert the pharmacist immediately at any time if levels of humidity or temperature at a designated site differ from a specific norm. In this report, we discuss the effects of humidity on the process of compounding and on the agents used in customized preparations. A Table that lists essential features of a variety of hygrometers and thermohygrometers appropriate for use in a compounding pharmacy is presented for easy reference. PMID:23965535

  3. Pyrolysis mechanisms of lignin model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III; Cooney, M.J.

    1997-06-01

    The flash vacuum pyrolysis of lignin model compounds was studied under conditions optimized for the production of liquid products to provide mechanistic insight into the reaction pathways that lead to product formation. The major reaction products can be explained by cleavage of the C-O either linkage by a free radial or concerted 1,2-elimination.

  4. Model compound vulcanization studied by XANES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taweepreda, W.; Nu-Mard, R.; Pattanasiriwisawa, W.; Songsiriritthigul, P.

    2009-11-01

    Squalene has been used as a model compound for the investigation of sulphur crosslink in the vulcanization process. The effects of the accelerator on the crosslink were deduced from the sulfur K-edge absorption spectra. The majority of the crosslinks for the squalene vulcanized with ZDEC or TMTD is likely disulfidic, while that vulcanized with CBS or MBTS is monosulfidic.

  5. C6-Perfluorinated Compounds: The New Greaseproofing Agents in Food Packaging.

    PubMed

    Rice, Penelope A

    2015-03-01

    Due to their oleophobic and hydrophobic properties and stability, perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are used in many applications, particularly as greaseproofing agents for food contact. However, PFCs 8-carbons in length or greater (C8-PFCs) have raised concerns regarding environmental biopersistence, bioaccumulation in humans, and potent toxicity that have resulted in their gradual phase-out for food contact use. Industry has replaced C8-PFCs with shorter-chained C6-based greaseproofing agents, which are intended to have the same favorable physicochemical properties without the problematic toxicological effects in humans and wildlife. Compared with the large body of data available for C8 compounds, however, the available database on toxicity and exposure to the C6 compounds is fairly limited. This article summarizes the information in this database, focusing on aspects of human exposure and potential health risks associated with two types of C6 PFCs found in food packaging: perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) and 6-2 fluorotelomer alcohol (C6-FTOH). PMID:26231240

  6. Low molecular weight compounds with transition metals as free radical scavengers and novel therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Bencini, Andrea; Failli, Paola; Valtancoli, Barbara; Bani, Daniele

    2010-07-01

    Molecules able to modulate the levels of endogenous free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO), are of pivotal interest for pharmacological and pharmaceutical sciences because of their potential therapeutic relevance. In fact, ROS and NO, which are normal products of cell metabolism, may play a dual beneficial/deleterious role, depending on local concentration and mode of generation. As such, they have been identified as key pathogenic factors for many inflammatory, vascular dysfunctional and degenerative disorders, including atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and ageing. Therefore, the identification and characterization of novel antioxidant/free radical scavenger molecules may expand the current therapeutic implements for the treatment and prevention of the above diseases. In this perspective, low molecular weight complexes of transition metals with organic scaffolds are viewed and investigated as promising pharmaceutical agents. These complexes take advantage of the known principles of inorganic chemistry, i.e. the ability of transition metals, Fe(II), Co(II), Mn(II) and Ru(II), to bind to and react with NO and/or ROS, to counterbalance excessive endogenous free radical generation in biological systems. Among NO scavengers, representative examples are iron complexes with dithiocarbamates or ruthenium compounds with polyamine-polycarboxylate scaffolds; on the other hand, manganese-based molecules appear effective as ROS scavengers. Of note, Mn(II)-containing molecules, currently under study as ROS scavengers, have major functional similarities to Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), a Mn-containing enzyme acting as potent endogenous anti-oxidant. In this article, we briefly summarize the state-of-the-art concerning the chemical and biological properties of transition metal ion complexes with low molecular weight synthetic ligands as ROS/NO scavengers provided with

  7. Global Exposure Modelling of Semivolatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmo, F.; Lammel, G.; Maier-Reimer, E.

    2008-12-01

    Organic compounds which are persistent and toxic as the agrochemicals γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH, lindane) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) pose a hazard for the ecosystems. These compounds are semivolatile, hence multicompartmental substances and subject to long-range transport (LRT) in atmosphere and ocean. Being lipophilic, they accumulate in exposed organism tissues and biomagnify along food chains. The multicompartmental global fate and LRT of DDT and lindane in the atmosphere and ocean have been studied using application data for 1980, on a decadal scale using a model based on the coupling of atmosphere and (for the first time for these compounds) ocean General Circulation Models (ECHAM5 and MPI-OM). The model system encompasses furthermore 2D terrestrial compartments (soil and vegetation) and sea ice, a fully dynamic atmospheric aerosol (HAM) module and an ocean biogeochemistry module (HAMOCC5). Large mass fractions of the compounds are found in soil. Lindane is also found in comparable amount in ocean. DDT has the longest residence time in almost all compartments. The sea ice compartment locally almost inhibits volatilization from the sea. The air/sea exchange is also affected , up to a reduction of 35 % for DDT by partitioning to the organic phases (suspended and dissolved particulate matter) in the global oceans. Partitioning enhances vertical transport in the sea. Ocean dynamics are found to be more significant for vertical transport than sinking associated with particulate matter. LRT in the global environment is determined by the fast atmospheric circulation. Net meridional transport taking place in the ocean is locally effective mostly via western boundary currents, upon applications at mid- latitudes. The pathways of the long-lived semivolatile organic compounds studied include a sequence of several cycles of volatilisation, transport in the atmosphere, deposition and transport in the ocean (multihopping substances). Multihopping is

  8. An Extension Dynamic Model Based on BDI Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wang; Feng, Zhu; Hua, Geng; WangJing, Zhu

    this paper's researching is based on the model of BDI Agent. Firstly, This paper analyze the deficiencies of the traditional BDI Agent model, Then propose an extension dynamic model of BDI Agent based on the traditional ones. It can quickly achieve the internal interaction of the tradition model of BDI Agent, deal with complex issues under dynamic and open environment and achieve quick reaction of the model. The new model is a natural and reasonable model by verifying the origin of civilization using the model of monkeys to eat sweet potato based on the design of the extension dynamic model. It is verified to be feasible by comparing the extended dynamic BDI Agent model with the traditional BDI Agent Model uses the SWARM, it has important theoretical significance.

  9. Enhancement of intestinal absorption of poorly absorbed hydrophilic compounds by simultaneous use of mucolytic agent and non-ionic surfactant.

    PubMed

    Takatsuka, Shinya; Kitazawa, Takeo; Morita, Takahiro; Horikiri, Yuji; Yoshino, Hiroyuki

    2006-01-01

    The effect of co-administration of a mucolytic agent with a penetration enhancer was assessed on the intestinal absorption of poorly absorbed hydrophilic compounds. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran with average molecular weight of ca. 4.4 kDa (FD-4) was used as a model compound, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was used as a mucolytic agent. Sodium caprate (C10), tartaric acid (TA), sodium taurodeoxycholate (TDC), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), p-t-octyl phenol polyoxyethylene-9.5 (Triton X-100, TX-100) were selected as penetration enhancers with different mechanisms of action. Various dosing solutions containing a penetration enhancer in the absence or in the presence of NAC were directly administered into the exposed rat jejunum, and the bioavailability of FD-4 up to 2 h was determined. The extent of improvement by co-administration was highly dependent on the penetration enhancer species applied. The observed enhancement was thought to result from the mucolytic activity of NAC, which can reduce the mucus viscosity and facilitate the penetration of FD-4 to mucosal membrane. Among the combinations tested, the simultaneous administration of NAC and TX-100 provided the highest enhancement (22.5-fold) of intestinal FD-4 absorption compared to the control. Although the detailed mechanism for the observed drastic improvement is unclear, one possible reason was thought to be due to the improved diffusivity of TX-100 micellar system in the mucus layer. All these results suggest that the combination of a mucolytic agent and a non-ionic surfactant may have potential as an enhancing system for peroral delivery of poorly absorbed hydrophilic compounds like protein and peptide drugs. PMID:16289777

  10. An Active Learning Exercise for Introducing Agent-Based Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in agent-based modeling as a method of systems analysis and optimization indicate that students in business analytics need an introduction to the terminology, concepts, and framework of agent-based modeling. This article presents an active learning exercise for MBA students in business analytics that demonstrates agent-based…

  11. Chain termination in polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis: involvement of exogenous hydroxy-compounds as chain transfer agents.

    PubMed

    Madden, L A; Anderson, A J; Shah, D T; Asrar, J

    1999-01-01

    We have identified a range of compounds which, when present during poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] accumulation by Ralstonia eutropha (reclassified from Alcaligenes eutrophus), can act as chain transfer agents in the chain termination step of polymerization. End-group analysis by 31P NMR of polymer derivatized with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane revealed that all these compounds were covalently linked to P(3HB) at the carboxyl terminus. All chain transfer agents possessed one or more hydroxyl groups, and glycerol was selected for further investigation. The number-average molecular mass (Mn) of P(3HB) produced by R. eutropha from glycerol was substantially lower than for polymer produced from glucose, and we identified two new end-group structures. These were attributed to a glycerol molecule bound to the P(3HB) chain via the primary or secondary hydroxyl groups. When a primary hydroxyl group of glycerol is involved in chain transfer, the end-group structure is in both [R] and [S] configurations, implying that chain transfer to glycerol is a random transesterification and that PHA synthase does not catalyse chain transfer. 3-Hydroxybutyric acid is the most probable chain transfer agent in vivo, with propagation and termination reactions involving transfer of the P(3HB) chain to enzyme-bound and free 3-hydroxybutyrate, respectively. Only carboxyl end-groups were detected in P(3HB) extracted from exponentially growing bacteria. It is proposed that a compound other than 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA acts as a primer in the initiation of polymer synthesis. PMID:10416649

  12. Spermicides, microbicides and antiviral agents: recent advances in the development of novel multi-functional compounds.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Marta; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2009-11-01

    Non-ionic surfactants have been proposed as dual action anti-viral and spermicidal agents to tackle viral infections, namely HIV. Given very promising in vitro results, nonoxynol-9 has been widely used. However, toxic effects were reported, paradoxically increasing the incidence of transmission of HIV/Sexually Transmitted Diseases in vivo. Thus, there has been a growing interest in identifying and evaluating a new generation of accessible and easy-to-use molecules with simultaneous spermicidal and microbicide action. Different biochemical compounds and mechanisms of action are currently being studied. This article reviews the diverse strategies and mechanisms of action of these novel compounds, as well the necessary systematic studies needed to evaluate their possible toxicity. PMID:20205637

  13. Sulfur compounds in therapy: Radiation-protective agents, amphetamines, and mucopolysaccharide sulfation

    SciTech Connect

    Foye, W.O. )

    1992-09-01

    Sulfur-containing compounds have been used in the search for whole-body radiation-protective compounds, in the design of amphetamine derivatives that retain appetite-suppressive effects but lack most behavioral effects characteristic of amphetamines, and in the search for the cause of kidney stone formation in recurrently stoneforming patients. Organic synthetic procedures were used to prepare radiation-protective compounds having a variety of sulfur-containing functional groups, and to prepare amphetamine derivatives having electron-attracting sulfur functions. In the case of the kidney stone causation research, isolation of urinary mucopolysaccharides (MPS) from recurrently stoneforming patients was carried out and the extent of sulfation of the MPS was determined by electrophoresis. Whole-body radiation-protective agents with a high degree of protection against lethal doses of gamma-radiation in mice were found in a series of quinolinium and pyridinium bis(methylthio) and methylthio amino derivatives. Mechanism studies showed that the copper complexes of these agents mimicked the beneficial action of superoxide dismutase. Electron-attracting sulfur-containing functions on amphetamine nitrogen, as well as 4'-amino nitrogen provided amphetamine derivatives with good appetite-suppressant effects and few or no adverse behavioral effects. Higher than normal levels of sulfation of the urinary MPS of stone formers suggested a cause for recurrent kidney stone formation. A sulfation inhibitor was found to prevent recurrence of stone formation and inhibit growth of existing stones. The inclusion of various sulfur-containing functions in organic molecules yielded compounds having whole-body radiation protection from lethal doses of gamma-radiation in animals. The presence of electron-attracting sulfur functions in amphetamine gave derivatives that retained appetite-suppressant effects and eliminated most adverse behavioral effects.

  14. A Drosophila Model for Screening Antiobesity Agents

    PubMed Central

    Men, Tran Thanh; Thanh, Duong Ngoc Van; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Hattori, Gen; Arii, Masayuki; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Kamei, Kaeko

    2016-01-01

    Although triacylglycerol, the major component for lipid storage, is essential for normal physiology, its excessive accumulation causes obesity in adipose tissue and is associated with organ dysfunction in nonadipose tissue. Here, we focused on the Drosophila model to develop therapeutics for preventing obesity. The brummer (bmm) gene in Drosophila melanogaster is known to be homologous with human adipocyte triglyceride lipase, which is related to the regulation of lipid storage. We established a Drosophila model for monitoring bmm expression by introducing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene as a downstream reporter of the bmm promoter. The third-instar larvae of Drosophila showed the GFP signal in all tissues observed and specifically in the salivary gland nucleus. To confirm the relationship between bmm expression and obesity, the effect of oral administration of glucose diets on bmm promoter activity was analyzed. The Drosophila flies given high-glucose diets showed higher lipid contents, indicating the obesity phenotype; this was suggested by a weaker intensity of the GFP signal as well as reduced bmm mRNA expression. These results demonstrated that the transgenic Drosophila model established in this study is useful for screening antiobesity agents. We also report the effects of oral administration of histone deacetylase inhibitors and some vegetables on the bmm promoter activity. PMID:27247940

  15. [Experimental research on printing and dyeing wastewater treatment through new compound flocculation agent].

    PubMed

    Fan, Di; Wang, Lin; Wang, Juan

    2007-06-01

    Research on the treatment efficiency and coagulation experiments was done using a new compound flocculation agent SE in printing and dyeing wastewater. Taking COD and chromaticity color as indexes, We did research on the coagulation efficiency under different condition of SE dosage, pH value, settling time, and agitation speed, and then we did comparative experiments between SE and PAC, SE and PFS. The experiments show that SE can effectively remove COD and chromaticity color. The four parameters namely pH of 8 - 10, settling of 30 min, agitation of 75 r/min and dosage of 155 mg/L were chosen, the COD and chromaticity color removal rate were recorded as high as 83% and 94% respectively, and the optimum effluent COD and chromaticity color were 155 mg/L and 37 respectively. Compared with PAC and PFS, SE produced bigger and more compact floc, settling time was shorter, the amount of mud and chemical dosage were less, and effluent quality was much better. The results show that SE is a high-effective and practical compound coagulant agent. PMID:17674737

  16. Esters of Bendamustine Are by Far More Potent Cytotoxic Agents than the Parent Compound against Human Sarcoma and Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Stefan; Huettner, Johannes Philip; Hacker, Kristina; Bernhardt, Günther; König, Jörg; Buschauer, Armin

    2015-01-01

    The alkylating agent bendamustine is approved for the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies such as non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma. As preliminary data on recently disclosed bendamustine esters suggested increased cytotoxicity, we investigated representative derivatives in more detail. Especially basic esters, which are positively charged under physiological conditions, were in the crystal violet and the MTT assay up to approximately 100 times more effective than bendamustine, paralleled by a higher fraction of early apoptotic cancer cells and increased expression of p53. Analytical studies performed with bendamustine and representative esters revealed pronounced cellular accumulation of the derivatives compared to the parent compound. In particular, the pyrrolidinoethyl ester showed a high enrichment in tumor cells and inhibition of OCT1- and OCT3-mediated transport processes, suggesting organic cation transporters to be involved. However, this hypothesis was not supported by the differential expression of OCT1 (SLC22A1) and OCT3 (SLC22A3), comparing a panel of human cancer cells. Bendamustine esters proved to be considerably more potent cytotoxic agents than the parent compound against a broad panel of human cancer cell types, including hematologic and solid malignancies (e.g. malignant melanoma, colorectal carcinoma and lung cancer), which are resistant to bendamustine. Interestingly, spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes, as a model of “normal” cells, were by far less sensitive than tumor cells against the most potent bendamustine esters. PMID:26196503

  17. Validating agent based models through virtual worlds.

    SciTech Connect

    Lakkaraju, Kiran; Whetzel, Jonathan H.; Lee, Jina; Bier, Asmeret Brooke; Cardona-Rivera, Rogelio E.; Bernstein, Jeremy Ray Rhythm

    2014-01-01

    As the US continues its vigilance against distributed, embedded threats, understanding the political and social structure of these groups becomes paramount for predicting and dis- rupting their attacks. Agent-based models (ABMs) serve as a powerful tool to study these groups. While the popularity of social network tools (e.g., Facebook, Twitter) has provided extensive communication data, there is a lack of ne-grained behavioral data with which to inform and validate existing ABMs. Virtual worlds, in particular massively multiplayer online games (MMOG), where large numbers of people interact within a complex environ- ment for long periods of time provide an alternative source of data. These environments provide a rich social environment where players engage in a variety of activities observed between real-world groups: collaborating and/or competing with other groups, conducting battles for scarce resources, and trading in a market economy. Strategies employed by player groups surprisingly re ect those seen in present-day con icts, where players use diplomacy or espionage as their means for accomplishing their goals. In this project, we propose to address the need for ne-grained behavioral data by acquiring and analyzing game data a commercial MMOG, referred to within this report as Game X. The goals of this research were: (1) devising toolsets for analyzing virtual world data to better inform the rules that govern a social ABM and (2) exploring how virtual worlds could serve as a source of data to validate ABMs established for analogous real-world phenomena. During this research, we studied certain patterns of group behavior to compliment social modeling e orts where a signi cant lack of detailed examples of observed phenomena exists. This report outlines our work examining group behaviors that underly what we have termed the Expression-To-Action (E2A) problem: determining the changes in social contact that lead individuals/groups to engage in a particular behavior

  18. Enhanced bioavailability of a poorly water-soluble weakly basic compound using a combination approach of solubilization agents and precipitation inhibitors: a case study.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Pollock-Dove, Crystal; Dong, Liang C; Chen, Jing; Creasey, Abla A; Dai, Wei-Guo

    2012-05-01

    Poorly water-soluble weakly basic compounds which are solubilized in gastric fluid are likely to precipitate after the solution empties from the stomach into the small intestine, leading to a low oral bioavailability. In this study, we reported an approach of combining solubilization agents and precipitation inhibitors to produce a supersaturated drug concentration and to prolong such a drug concentration for an extended period of time for an optimal absorption, thereby improving oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. A weakly basic compound from Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development was used as a model compound. A parallel microscreening precipitation method using 96-well plates and a TECAN robot was used to assess the precipitation of the tested compound in the simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and the simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), respectively, for lead solubilizing agents and precipitation inhibitors. The precipitation screening results showed vitamin E TPGS was an effective solubilizing agent and Pluronic F127 was a potent precipitation inhibitor for the tested compound. Interestingly, the combination of Pluronic F127 with vitamin E TPGS resulted in a synergistic effect in prolonging compound concentration upon dilution in SIF. In addition, HPMC E5 and Eudragit L100-55 were found to be effective precipitation inhibitors for the tested compounds in SGF. Furthermore, optimization DOE study results suggested a formulation sweet spot comprising HPMC, Eudragit L 100-55, vitamin E TPGS, and Pluronic F127. The lead formulation maintained the tested compound concentration at 300 μg/mL upon dilution in SIF, and more than 70% of the compound remained solubilized compared with the compound alone at <1 μg/mL of its concentration. Dosing of the solid dosage form predissolved in SGF in dogs resulted in 52% of oral bioavailability compared to 26% for the suspension control, a statistically significant increase (p = 0.002). The enhanced

  19. Who's your neighbor? neighbor identification for agent-based modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C. M.; Howe, T. R.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Chicago

    2006-01-01

    Agent-based modeling and simulation, based on the cellular automata paradigm, is an approach to modeling complex systems comprised of interacting autonomous agents. Open questions in agent-based simulation focus on scale-up issues encountered in simulating large numbers of agents. Specifically, how many agents can be included in a workable agent-based simulation? One of the basic tenets of agent-based modeling and simulation is that agents only interact and exchange locally available information with other agents located in their immediate proximity or neighborhood of the space in which the agents are situated. Generally, an agent's set of neighbors changes rapidly as a simulation proceeds through time and as the agents move through space. Depending on the topology defined for agent interactions, proximity may be defined by spatial distance for continuous space, adjacency for grid cells (as in cellular automata), or by connectivity in social networks. Identifying an agent's neighbors is a particularly time-consuming computational task and can dominate the computational effort in a simulation. Two challenges in agent simulation are (1) efficiently representing an agent's neighborhood and the neighbors in it and (2) efficiently identifying an agent's neighbors at any time in the simulation. These problems are addressed differently for different agent interaction topologies. While efficient approaches have been identified for agent neighborhood representation and neighbor identification for agents on a lattice with general neighborhood configurations, other techniques must be used when agents are able to move freely in space. Techniques for the analysis and representation of spatial data are applicable to the agent neighbor identification problem. This paper extends agent neighborhood simulation techniques from the lattice topology to continuous space, specifically R2. Algorithms based on hierarchical (quad trees) or non-hierarchical data structures (grid cells) are

  20. The highly intelligent virtual agents for modeling financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G.; Chen, Y.; Huang, J. P.

    2016-02-01

    Researchers have borrowed many theories from statistical physics, like ensemble, Ising model, etc., to study complex adaptive systems through agent-based modeling. However, one fundamental difference between entities (such as spins) in physics and micro-units in complex adaptive systems is that the latter are usually with high intelligence, such as investors in financial markets. Although highly intelligent virtual agents are essential for agent-based modeling to play a full role in the study of complex adaptive systems, how to create such agents is still an open question. Hence, we propose three principles for designing high artificial intelligence in financial markets and then build a specific class of agents called iAgents based on these three principles. Finally, we evaluate the intelligence of iAgents through virtual index trading in two different stock markets. For comparison, we also include three other types of agents in this contest, namely, random traders, agents from the wealth game (modified on the famous minority game), and agents from an upgraded wealth game. As a result, iAgents perform the best, which gives a well support for the three principles. This work offers a general framework for the further development of agent-based modeling for various kinds of complex adaptive systems.

  1. Computational Spectrum of Agent Model Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2010-01-01

    The study of human social behavioral systems is finding renewed interest in military, homeland security and other applications. Simulation is the most generally applied approach to studying complex scenarios in such systems. Here, we outline some of the important considerations that underlie the computational aspects of simulation-based study of human social systems. The fundamental imprecision underlying questions and answers in social science makes it necessary to carefully distinguish among different simulation problem classes and to identify the most pertinent set of computational dimensions associated with those classes. We identify a few such classes and present their computational implications. The focus is then shifted to the most challenging combinations in the computational spectrum, namely, large-scale entity counts at moderate to high levels of fidelity. Recent developments in furthering the state-of-the-art in these challenging cases are outlined. A case study of large-scale agent simulation is provided in simulating large numbers (millions) of social entities at real-time speeds on inexpensive hardware. Recent computational results are identified that highlight the potential of modern high-end computing platforms to push the envelope with respect to speed, scale and fidelity of social system simulations. Finally, the problem of shielding the modeler or domain expert from the complex computational aspects is discussed and a few potential solution approaches are identified.

  2. Exploring cooperation and competition using agent-based modeling

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Euel; Kiel, L. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Agent-based modeling enhances our capacity to model competitive and cooperative behaviors at both the individual and group levels of analysis. Models presented in these proceedings produce consistent results regarding the relative fragility of cooperative regimes among agents operating under diverse rules. These studies also show how competition and cooperation may generate change at both the group and societal level. Agent-based simulation of competitive and cooperative behaviors may reveal the greatest payoff to social science research of all agent-based modeling efforts because of the need to better understand the dynamics of these behaviors in an increasingly interconnected world. PMID:12011396

  3. Relaxation in statistical many-agent economy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarca, M.; Chakraborti, A.; Heinsalu, E.; Germano, G.

    2007-05-01

    We review some statistical many-agent models of economic and social systems inspired by microscopic molecular models and discuss their stochastic interpretation. We apply these models to wealth exchange in economics and study how the relaxation process depends on the parameters of the system, in particular on the saving propensities that define and diversify the agent profiles.

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Non-Platinum-Based Halogenated Compounds as Potent Antitumor Agents for Natural Targeted Chemotherapy of Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Bin; Zhang, Qin-Rong; Ou, Ning; Wang, Chun-Rong; Warrington, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Based on a molecular-mechanism-based anticancer drug discovery program enabled by an innovative femtomedicine approach, we have found a previously unknown class of non-platinum-based halogenated molecules (called FMD compounds) as potent antitumor agents for effective treatment of cancers. Here, we present in vitro and in vivo studies of the compounds for targeted chemotherapy of cervical, breast, ovarian, and lung cancers. Our results show that these FMD agents led to DNA damage, cell cycle arrest in the S phase, and apoptosis in cancer cells. We also observed that such a FMD compound caused an increase of reduced glutathione (GSH, an endogenous antioxidant) levels in human normal cells, while it largely depleted GSH in cancer cells. We correspondingly found that these FMD agents exhibited no or little toxicity toward normal cells/tissues, while causing significant cytotoxicity against cancer cells, as well as suppression and delay in tumor growth in mouse xenograft models of cervical, ovarian, breast and lung cancers. These compounds are therefore a previously undiscovered class of potent antitumor agents that can be translated into clinical trials for natural targeted chemotherapy of multiple cancers. PMID:26351651

  5. Clinical Strategies and Animal Models for Developing Senolytic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Kirkland, James L.; Tchkonia, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with increasing predisposition to multiple chronic diseases. One fundamental aging process that is often operative at sites of the pathology underlying chronic age-related diseases is cellular senescence. Small molecule senolytic agents are being developed. For successful drug development: 1) appropriate animal models of human age-related diseases need to be devised. 2) Models have to be made in which it can be proven that beneficial phenotypic effects are actually caused through clearing senescent cells by putative senolytic agents, as opposed to “off-target” effects of these agents on non-senescent cells. 3) Models are needed to test efficacy of drugs and to uncover potential side effects of senolytic agents. Development of the optimal animal models and clinical trial paradigms for senolytic agents warrants an intensive effort, since senolytic agents, if successful in delaying, preventing, alleviating, or reversing age-related diseases as a group would be transformative. PMID:25446976

  6. Radiohalogen-labeled imaging agents. 3. Compounds for measurement of brain blood flow by emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, T.; Shulgin, A.T.; Mathis, C.A.

    1984-08-01

    The radioiodine-labeled amines currently available as brain-imaging agents, based on our previous work and that of others, are prepared either by exchange labeling or by direct iodination of a protected intermediate. The intrinsic slowness of these processes limits their potential for use with the positron-emitting 122I, as it has a half-life of only 3.6 min. This isotope has advantages of a low dose to the patient and availability from a generator containing the parent 20-h 122Xe. To develop a radiopharmaceutical in which 122I could be utilized, we prepared a number of secondary and tertiary amines (maintaining the 2,5-dimethoxy substitution pattern which allows direct iodination at the 4-position) with 131I. The organ distributions of these compounds were studied, and the best properties were found in the N,N-dimethyl homologue (2,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethyl-4-iodoamphetamine). This compound was successfully synthesized in a matter of seconds, with a chemical yield and radioactive purity both in excess of 90% and an incorporation efficiency of radioiodine of about 40%.

  7. Volatile Organic Compounds from Native Potato-associated Pseudomonas as Potential Anti-oomycete Agents

    PubMed Central

    De Vrieze, Mout; Pandey, Piyush; Bucheli, Thomas D.; Varadarajan, Adithi R.; Ahrens, Christian H.; Weisskopf, Laure; Bailly, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    The plant kingdom represents a prominent biodiversity island for microbes that associate with the below- or aboveground organs of vegetal species. Both the root and the leaf represent interfaces where dynamic biological interactions influence plant life. Beside well-studied communication strategies based on soluble compounds and protein effectors, bacteria were recently shown to interact both with host plants and other microbial species through the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Focusing on the potato late blight-causing agent Phytophthora infestans, this work addresses the potential role of the bacterial volatilome in suppressing plant diseases. In a previous study, we isolated and identified a large collection of strains with anti-Phytophthora potential from both the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potato. Here we report the characterization and quantification of their emissions of biogenic volatiles, comparing 16 Pseudomonas strains differing in (i) origin of isolation (phyllosphere vs. rhizosphere), (ii) in vitro inhibition of P. infestans growth and sporulation behavior, and (iii) protective effects against late blight on potato leaf disks. We systematically tested the pharmacological inhibitory activity of core and strain-specific single compounds against P. infestans mycelial growth and sporangial behavior in order to identify key effective candidate molecules present in the complex natural VOCs blends. We envisage the plant bacterial microbiome as a reservoir for functional VOCs and establish the basis for finding the primary enzymatic toolset that enables the production of active components of the volatile bouquet in plant-associated bacteria. Comprehension of these functional interspecies interactions will open perspectives for the sustainable control of plant diseases in forthcoming agriculture. PMID:26635763

  8. Volatile Organic Compounds from Native Potato-associated Pseudomonas as Potential Anti-oomycete Agents.

    PubMed

    De Vrieze, Mout; Pandey, Piyush; Bucheli, Thomas D; Varadarajan, Adithi R; Ahrens, Christian H; Weisskopf, Laure; Bailly, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    The plant kingdom represents a prominent biodiversity island for microbes that associate with the below- or aboveground organs of vegetal species. Both the root and the leaf represent interfaces where dynamic biological interactions influence plant life. Beside well-studied communication strategies based on soluble compounds and protein effectors, bacteria were recently shown to interact both with host plants and other microbial species through the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Focusing on the potato late blight-causing agent Phytophthora infestans, this work addresses the potential role of the bacterial volatilome in suppressing plant diseases. In a previous study, we isolated and identified a large collection of strains with anti-Phytophthora potential from both the phyllosphere and the rhizosphere of potato. Here we report the characterization and quantification of their emissions of biogenic volatiles, comparing 16 Pseudomonas strains differing in (i) origin of isolation (phyllosphere vs. rhizosphere), (ii) in vitro inhibition of P. infestans growth and sporulation behavior, and (iii) protective effects against late blight on potato leaf disks. We systematically tested the pharmacological inhibitory activity of core and strain-specific single compounds against P. infestans mycelial growth and sporangial behavior in order to identify key effective candidate molecules present in the complex natural VOCs blends. We envisage the plant bacterial microbiome as a reservoir for functional VOCs and establish the basis for finding the primary enzymatic toolset that enables the production of active components of the volatile bouquet in plant-associated bacteria. Comprehension of these functional interspecies interactions will open perspectives for the sustainable control of plant diseases in forthcoming agriculture. PMID:26635763

  9. MASDynamics: Toward Systemic Modeling of Decentralized Agent Coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudeikat, Jan; Renz, Wolfgang

    Enabling distributed software systems to purposefully self-organize, i.e. to adapt to dynamically changing execution contexts by the collective adjustment of individual components, challenges current development practices. Since the dynamics of self-organizing systems arise from agent coaction, developers cannot directly infer the macroscopic system behavior from established agent design models. This paper plays a part in an ongoing research effort that addresses the provision of self-organizing processes as design elements, i.e. reusable patterns of agent interrelations. We propose a systemic modeling approach and support the application independent description of (inter-) agent coordination patterns by a domain specific language that allows to map interrelations of agent activity to detailed agent design models. This facilitates the separation of decentralized coordination strategies from domain specific agent implementations and enables development teams to treat nature-inspired coordination strategies, which steer self-organizing dynamics, as design concepts. In addition, we show how this modeling conception provides a declarative programming approach by the automated supplementation of conventional developed agent models with non-linear, inter-agent coordination mechanisms.

  10. Synthesis of a naphthalene-hydroxynaphthalene polymer model compound

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-02

    The objective of this project was the synthesis of one pound of a new naphthalene-hydroxynaphthalene polymer model compound for use in coal combustion studies. Since this compound was an unreported compound, this effort also required the development of a synthetic route to this compound (including routes to the unique and unreported intermediates leading to its synthesis).

  11. Model of mobile agents for sexual interactions networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M. C.; Lind, P. G.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2006-02-01

    We present a novel model to simulate real social networks of complex interactions, based in a system of colliding particles (agents). The network is build by keeping track of the collisions and evolves in time with correlations which emerge due to the mobility of the agents. Therefore, statistical features are a consequence only of local collisions among its individual agents. Agent dynamics is realized by an event-driven algorithm of collisions where energy is gained as opposed to physical systems which have dissipation. The model reproduces empirical data from networks of sexual interactions, not previously obtained with other approaches.

  12. Agent-Based Modeling of Growth Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Growth processes abound in nature, and are frequently the target of modeling exercises in the sciences. In this article we illustrate an agent-based approach to modeling, in the case of a single example from the social sciences: bullying.

  13. AGENT-BASED MODELING OF INDUSTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this research are to investigate behavioral and organizational questions associated with environmental regulation of firms, and to test specifically whether a bottom-up approach that highlights principal-agent problems offers new insights and empirical validi...

  14. The fractional volatility model: An agent-based interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilela Mendes, R.

    2008-06-01

    Based on the criteria of mathematical simplicity and consistency with empirical market data, a model with volatility driven by fractional noise has been constructed which provides a fairly accurate mathematical parametrization of the data. Here, some features of the model are reviewed and extended to account for leverage effects. Using agent-based models, one tries to find which agent strategies and (or) properties of the financial institutions might be responsible for the features of the fractional volatility model.

  15. Predictive Modeling of Estrogen Receptor Binding Agents Using Advanced Cheminformatics Tools and Massive Public Data

    PubMed Central

    Ribay, Kathryn; Kim, Marlene T.; Wang, Wenyi; Pinolini, Daniel; Zhu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERα) are a critical target for drug design as well as a potential source of toxicity when activated unintentionally. Thus, evaluating potential ERα binding agents is critical in both drug discovery and chemical toxicity areas. Using computational tools, e.g., Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models, can predict potential ERα binding agents before chemical synthesis. The purpose of this project was to develop enhanced predictive models of ERα binding agents by utilizing advanced cheminformatics tools that can integrate publicly available bioassay data. The initial ERα binding agent data set, consisting of 446 binders and 8307 non-binders, was obtained from the Tox21 Challenge project organized by the NIH Chemical Genomics Center (NCGC). After removing the duplicates and inorganic compounds, this data set was used to create a training set (259 binders and 259 non-binders). This training set was used to develop QSAR models using chemical descriptors. The resulting models were then used to predict the binding activity of 264 external compounds, which were available to us after the models were developed. The cross-validation results of training set [Correct Classification Rate (CCR) = 0.72] were much higher than the external predictivity of the unknown compounds (CCR = 0.59). To improve the conventional QSAR models, all compounds in the training set were used to search PubChem and generate a profile of their biological responses across thousands of bioassays. The most important bioassays were prioritized to generate a similarity index that was used to calculate the biosimilarity score between each two compounds. The nearest neighbors for each compound within the set were then identified and its ERα binding potential was predicted by its nearest neighbors in the training set. The hybrid model performance (CCR = 0.94 for cross validation; CCR = 0.68 for external prediction) showed significant improvement over the original QSAR

  16. Agent based modeling of the coevolution of hostility and pacifism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmagro, Fermin; Jimenez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    We propose a model based on a population of agents whose states represent either hostile or peaceful behavior. Randomly selected pairs of agents interact according to a variation of the Prisoners Dilemma game, and the probabilities that the agents behave aggressively or not are constantly updated by the model so that the agents that remain in the game are those with the highest fitness. We show that the population of agents oscillate between generalized conflict and global peace, without either reaching a stable state. We then use this model to explain some of the emergent behaviors in collective conflicts, by comparing the simulated results with empirical data obtained from social systems. In particular, using public data reports we show how the model precisely reproduces interesting quantitative characteristics of diverse types of armed conflicts, public protests, riots and strikes.

  17. Verifying Multi-Agent Systems via Unbounded Model Checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacprzak, M.; Lomuscio, A.; Lasica, T.; Penczek, W.; Szreter, M.

    2004-01-01

    We present an approach to the problem of verification of epistemic properties in multi-agent systems by means of symbolic model checking. In particular, it is shown how to extend the technique of unbounded model checking from a purely temporal setting to a temporal-epistemic one. In order to achieve this, we base our discussion on interpreted systems semantics, a popular semantics used in multi-agent systems literature. We give details of the technique and show how it can be applied to the well known train, gate and controller problem. Keywords: model checking, unbounded model checking, multi-agent systems

  18. Pharmacophore modeling and in silico toxicity assessment of potential anticancer agents from African medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Simoben, Conrad Veranso; Karaman, Berin; Ngwa, Valery Fuh; Judson, Philip Neville; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva’a

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling has been employed in the search for lead compounds of chemotherapy to fight cancer. In this study, pharmacophore models have been generated and validated for use in virtual screening protocols for eight known anticancer drug targets, including tyrosine kinase, protein kinase B β, cyclin-dependent kinase, protein farnesyltransferase, human protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1. Pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic and Güner–Henry scoring methods, indicating that several of the models generated could be useful for the identification of potential anticancer agents from natural product databases. The validated pharmacophore models were used as three-dimensional search queries for virtual screening of the newly developed AfroCancer database (~400 compounds from African medicinal plants), along with the Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anticancer Compound-Activity-Target dataset (comprising ~1,500 published naturally occurring plant-based compounds from around the world). Additionally, an in silico assessment of toxicity of the two datasets was carried out by the use of 88 toxicity end points predicted by the Lhasa’s expert knowledge-based system (Derek), showing that only an insignificant proportion of the promising anticancer agents would be likely showing high toxicity profiles. A diversity study of the two datasets, carried out using the analysis of principal components from the most important physicochemical properties often used to access drug-likeness of compound datasets, showed that the two datasets do not occupy the same chemical space. PMID:27445461

  19. Antithrombotic Activity of a New Hypoglycemic Compound Limiglidole in Mouse Model of Cell Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Kucheryavenko, A F; Spasov, A A; Smirnov, A V

    2015-05-01

    Antithrombotic activity of hypoglycemic compound limiglidole that exhibits antiplatelet activity 2-fold exceeded activity of antiplatelet agent acetylsalicylic acid in the mouse model of systemic collagen-epinephrine thrombosis. Limiglidole signifi cantly reduced the relative and mean area of blood clots in the sections of mouse lungs. PMID:26033587

  20. Tutorial on agent-based modeling and simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C. M.; North, M. J.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2005-01-01

    Agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS) is a new approach to modeling systems comprised of autonomous, interacting agents. ABMS promises to have far-reaching effects on the way that businesses use computers to support decision-making and researchers use electronic laboratories to support their research. Some have gone so far as to contend that ABMS is a third way of doing science besides deductive and inductive reasoning. Computational advances have made possible a growing number of agent-based applications in a variety of fields. Applications range from modeling agent behavior in the stock market and supply chains, to predicting the spread of epidemics and the threat of bio-warfare, from modeling consumer behavior to understanding the fall of ancient civilizations, to name a few. This tutorial describes the theoretical and practical foundations of ABMS, identifies toolkits and methods for developing ABMS models, and provides some thoughts on the relationship between ABMS and traditional modeling techniques.

  1. A CSP-Based Agent Modeling Framework for the Cougaar Agent-Based Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gracanin, Denis; Singh, H. Lally; Eltoweissy, Mohamed; Hinchey, Michael G.; Bohner, Shawn A.

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive Agent Architecture (Cougaar) is a Java-based architecture for large-scale distributed agent-based applications. A Cougaar agent is an autonomous software entity with behaviors that represent a real-world entity (e.g., a business process). A Cougaar-based Model Driven Architecture approach, currently under development, uses a description of system's functionality (requirements) to automatically implement the system in Cougaar. The Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) formalism is used for the formal validation of the generated system. Two main agent components, a blackboard and a plugin, are modeled as CSP processes. A set of channels represents communications between the blackboard and individual plugins. The blackboard is represented as a CSP process that communicates with every agent in the collection. The developed CSP-based Cougaar modeling framework provides a starting point for a more complete formal verification of the automatically generated Cougaar code. Currently it is used to verify the behavior of an individual agent in terms of CSP properties and to analyze the corresponding Cougaar society.

  2. Characterization of Novel Diaryl Oxazole-Based Compounds as Potential Agents to Treat Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Arthur Y.; Henderson, Meredith C.; Flynn, Gary; Samulitis, Betty; Han, Haiyong; Stratton, Steve P.; Chow, H.-H. Sherry; Hurley, Laurence H.

    2009-01-01

    A series of diaryl- and fluorenone-based analogs of the lead compound UA-62784 [4-(5-(4-methoxyphenyl)oxazol-2-yl)-9H-fluoren-9-one] was synthesized with the intention of improving upon the selective cytotoxicity of UA-62784 against human pancreatic cancer cell lines with a deletion of the tumor suppressor gene deleted in pancreas cancer locus 4 (DPC-4, SMAD-4). Over 80 analogs were synthesized and tested for antitumor activity against pancreatic cancer (PC) cell lines (the PC series). Despite a structural relationship to UA-62784, which inhibits the mitotic kinesin centromere protein E (CENP-E), none of the analogs was selective for DPC-4-deleted pancreatic cancer cell lines. Furthermore, none of the analogs was a potent or selective inhibitor of four different mitotic kinesins (mitotic kinesin-5, CENP-E, mitotic kinesin-like protein-1, and mitotic centromere-associated kinesin). Therefore, other potential mechanisms of action were evaluated. A diaryl oxazole lead analog from this series, PC-046 [5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-2-(3-(3-methoxyphenyl)pyridin-4-yl) oxazole], was shown to potently inhibit several protein kinases that are overexpressed in human pancreatic cancers, including tyrosine receptor kinase B, interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4, and proto-oncogene Pim-1. Cells exposed to PC-046 exhibit a cell cycle block in the S-phase followed by apoptotic death and necrosis. PC-046 effectively reduced MiaPaca-2 tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficiency mice by 80% compared with untreated controls. The plasma half-life was 7.5 h, and cytotoxic drug concentrations of >3 μM were achieved in vivo in mice. The diaryl oxazole series of compounds represent a new chemical class of anticancer agents that inhibit several types of cancer-relevant protein kinases. PMID:19657049

  3. First-in-class cardiolipin-protective compound as a therapeutic agent to restore mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Szeto, Hazel H

    2014-01-01

    A decline in energy is common in aging, and the restoration of mitochondrial bioenergetics may offer a common approach for the treatment of numerous age-associated diseases. Cardiolipin is a unique phospholipid that is exclusively expressed on the inner mitochondrial membrane where it plays an important structural role in cristae formation and the organization of the respiratory complexes into supercomplexes for optimal oxidative phosphorylation. The interaction between cardiolipin and cytochrome c determines whether cytochrome c acts as an electron carrier or peroxidase. Cardiolipin peroxidation and depletion have been reported in a variety of pathological conditions associated with energy deficiency, and cardiolipin has been identified as a target for drug development. This review focuses on the discovery and development of the first cardiolipin-protective compound as a therapeutic agent. SS-31 is a member of the Szeto-Schiller (SS) peptides known to selectively target the inner mitochondrial membrane. SS-31 binds selectively to cardiolipin via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. By interacting with cardiolipin, SS-31 prevents cardiolipin from converting cytochrome c into a peroxidase while protecting its electron carrying function. As a result, SS-31 protects the structure of mitochondrial cristae and promotes oxidative phosphorylation. SS-31 represents a new class of compounds that can recharge the cellular powerhouse and restore bioenergetics. Extensive animal studies have shown that targeting such a fundamental mechanism can benefit highly complex diseases that share a common pathogenesis of bioenergetics failure. This review summarizes the mechanisms of action and therapeutic potential of SS-31 and provides an update of its clinical development programme. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014

  4. Agent Model Development for Assessing Climate-Induced Geopolitical Instability.

    SciTech Connect

    Boslough, Mark B.; Backus, George A.

    2005-12-01

    We present the initial stages of development of new agent-based computational methods to generate and test hypotheses about linkages between environmental change and international instability. This report summarizes the first year's effort of an originally proposed three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project. The preliminary work focused on a set of simple agent-based models and benefited from lessons learned in previous related projects and case studies of human response to climate change and environmental scarcity. Our approach was to define a qualitative model using extremely simple cellular agent models akin to Lovelock's Daisyworld and Schelling's segregation model. Such models do not require significant computing resources, and users can modify behavior rules to gain insights. One of the difficulties in agent-based modeling is finding the right balance between model simplicity and real-world representation. Our approach was to keep agent behaviors as simple as possible during the development stage (described herein) and to ground them with a realistic geospatial Earth system model in subsequent years. This work is directed toward incorporating projected climate data--including various C02 scenarios from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Assessment Report--and ultimately toward coupling a useful agent-based model to a general circulation model.3

  5. Molecular Modeling Approaches to Study the Binding Mode on Tubulin of Microtubule Destabilizing and Stabilizing Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Maurizio; Forli, Stefano; Magnani, Matteo; Manetti, Fabrizio

    Tubulin targeting agents constitute an important class of anticancer drugs. By acting either as microtubule stabilizers or destabilizers, they disrupt microtubule dynamics, thus inducing mitotic arrest and, ultimately, cell death by apoptosis. Three different binding sites, whose exact location on tubulin has been experimentally detected, have been identified so far for antimitotic compound targeting microtubules, namely the taxoid, the colchicine and the vinka alkaloid binding site. A number of ligand- and structure-based molecular modeling studies in this field has been reported over the years, aimed at elucidating the binding modes of both stabilizing and destabilizing agent, as well as the molecular features responsible for their efficacious interaction with tubulin. Such studies are described in this review, focusing on information provided by different modeling approaches on the structural determinants of antitubulin agents and the interactions with the binding pockets on tubulin emerged as fundamental for antitumor activity.To describe molecular modeling approaches applied to date to molecules known to bind microtubules, this paper has been divided into two main parts: microtubule destabilizing (Part 1) and stabilizing (Part 2) agents. The first part includes structure-based and ligand-based approaches to study molecules targeting colchicine (1.1) and vinca alkaloid (1.2) binding sites, respectively. In the second part, the studies performed on microtubule-stabilizing antimitotic agents (MSAA) are described. Starting from the first representative compound of this class, paclitaxel, molecular modeling studies (quantitative structure-activity relationships - QSAR - and structure-based approaches), performed on natural compounds acting with the same mechanism of action and temptative common pharmacophoric hypotheses for all of these compounds, are reported.

  6. AGENT-BASED MODELS IN EMPIRICAL SOCIAL RESEARCH*

    PubMed Central

    Bruch, Elizabeth; Atwell, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Agent-based modeling has become increasingly popular in recent years, but there is still no codified set of recommendations or practices for how to use these models within a program of empirical research. This article provides ideas and practical guidelines drawn from sociology, biology, computer science, epidemiology, and statistics. We first discuss the motivations for using agent-based models in both basic science and policy-oriented social research. Next, we provide an overview of methods and strategies for incorporating data on behavior and populations into agent-based models, and review techniques for validating and testing the sensitivity of agent-based models. We close with suggested directions for future research. PMID:25983351

  7. Ferulic acid-carbazole hybrid compounds: Combination of cholinesterase inhibition, antioxidant and neuroprotection as multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lei; Chen, Mohao; Liu, Zhikun; Fang, Xubin; Gou, Shaohua; Chen, Li

    2016-02-15

    In order to search for novel multifunctional anti-Alzheimer agents, a series of ferulic acid-carbazole hybrid compounds were designed and synthesized. Ellman's assay revealed that the hybrid compounds showed moderate to potent inhibitory activity against the cholinesterases. Particularly, the AChE inhibition potency of compound 5k (IC50 1.9μM) was even 5-fold higher than that of galantamine. In addition, the target compounds showed pronounced antioxidant ability and neuroprotective property, especially against the ROS-induced toxicity. Notably, the neuroprotective effect of 5k was obviously superior to that of the mixture of ferulic acid and carbazole, indicating the therapeutic effect of the hybrid compound is better than the combination administration of the corresponding mixture. PMID:26795115

  8. The Deontic Transaction Model in Multi-Agent Normative Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Yonghua; Esterline, Albert

    1998-01-01

    In the area of multi-agent systems, much research is devoted to the coordination of the agents. There exist several issues, two of which are summarized. The first is that, although agents are said to be autonomous, they always react in a predictable way to each message, and they cannot decide to violate the conventions that are hard-wired into the protocol. In fact, there might be circumstances in which the agent violates a convention in order to realize a private goal that it considers to be more important. Another issue is that, if the protocols that agents use to react to the environment are fixed, they have no way to respond to changes. However, an important characteristic of agents is that they eon react to a changing environment. Although transaction models ([BOH92], [GR93]) evolved from the database domain, they establish a general execution paradigm that ideally covers all the subsystems invoked in a sequence of transactions. So transaction models apply to multi-agent systems. Recently, some research has been devoted to overcoming the limitations of the traditional transaction models which are suitable for conventional systems and focus on system integrity, e,g., [SJ97]. Here we solve above issues by turning to a deontic concept: obligation. In multi-agent systems, agents interact with each other according to norms, We use deontic logic ([And58], [Aqv84], [B C96], [JS94], [MW93]) to model norms. Here the norms prescribe how the agents ought to behave, but-- and this is essential-- they do not exclude the possibility of "bad" behavior (i.e., the actual behavior may deviate from the ideal), and so they also prescribe what should be done in circumstances of norm violation. Thus, we propose a new approach --- a deontic transaction model for multi-agent normative systems. Our approach improves the protocol of "abort/commit" of traditional transaction models to a protocol of "abort/exception/commit". In multi-agent normative systems, we can see the violation of a

  9. Agent Models for Self-Motivated Home-Assistant Bots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrick, Kathryn; Shafi, Kamran

    2010-01-01

    Modern society increasingly relies on technology to support everyday activities. In the past, this technology has focused on automation, using computer technology embedded in physical objects. More recently, there is an expectation that this technology will not just embed reactive automation, but also embed intelligent, proactive automation in the environment. That is, there is an emerging desire for novel technologies that can monitor, assist, inform or entertain when required, and not just when requested. This paper presents three self-motivated, home-assistant bot applications using different self-motivated agent models. Self-motivated agents use a computational model of motivation to generate goals proactively. Technologies based on self-motivated agents can thus respond autonomously and proactively to stimuli from their environment. Three prototypes of different self-motivated agent models, using different computational models of motivation, are described to demonstrate these concepts.

  10. A Cybernetic Approach to the Modeling of Agent Communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Karlin, Jay

    2000-01-01

    In an earlier paper [1] examples of agent technology in a NASA context were presented. Both groundbased and space-based applications were addressed. This paper continues the discussion of one aspect of the Goddard Space Flight Center's continuing efforts to develop a community of agents that can support both ground-based and space-based systems autonomy. The paper focuses on an approach to agent-community modeling based on the theory of viable systems developed by Stafford Beer. It gives the status of an initial attempt to capture some of the agent-community behaviors in a viable system context. This paper is expository in nature and focuses on a discussion of the modeling of some of the underlying concepts and infrastructure that will serve as the basis of more detailed investigative work into the behavior of agent communities. The paper is organized as follows. First, a general introduction to agent community requirements is presented. Secondly, a brief introduction to the cybernetic concept of a viable system is given. This concept forms the foundation of the modeling approach. Then the concept of an agent community is modeled in the cybernetic context.

  11. Techniques and Issues in Agent-Based Modeling Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Pullum, Laura L; Cui, Xiaohui

    2012-01-01

    Validation of simulation models is extremely important. It ensures that the right model has been built and lends confidence to the use of that model to inform critical decisions. Agent-based models (ABM) have been widely deployed in different fields for studying the collective behavior of large numbers of interacting agents. However, researchers have only recently started to consider the issues of validation. Compared to other simulation models, ABM has many differences in model development, usage and validation. An ABM is inherently easier to build than a classical simulation, but more difficult to describe formally since they are closer to human cognition. Using multi-agent models to study complex systems has attracted criticisms because of the challenges involved in their validation [1]. In this report, we describe the challenge of ABM validation and present a novel approach we recently developed for an ABM system.

  12. Agent-based modeling and simulation Part 3 : desktop ABMS.

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C. M.; North, M. J.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2007-01-01

    Agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS) is a new approach to modeling systems comprised of autonomous, interacting agents. ABMS promises to have far-reaching effects on the way that businesses use computers to support decision-making and researchers use electronic laboratories to support their research. Some have gone so far as to contend that ABMS 'is a third way of doing science,' in addition to traditional deductive and inductive reasoning (Axelrod 1997b). Computational advances have made possible a growing number of agent-based models across a variety of application domains. Applications range from modeling agent behavior in the stock market, supply chains, and consumer markets, to predicting the spread of epidemics, the threat of bio-warfare, and the factors responsible for the fall of ancient civilizations. This tutorial describes the theoretical and practical foundations of ABMS, identifies toolkits and methods for developing agent models, and illustrates the development of a simple agent-based model of shopper behavior using spreadsheets.

  13. Flash vacuum pyrolysis of lignin model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, M.J.; Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III

    1997-03-01

    Despite the extensive research into the pyrolysis of lignin, the underlying chemical reactions that lead to product formation are poorly understood. Detailed mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of biomass and lignin under conditions relevant to current process conditions could provide insight into utilizing this renewable resource for the production of chemicals and fuel. Currently, flash or fast pyrolysis is the most promising process to maximize the yields of liquid products (up to 80 wt %) from biomass by rapidly heating the substrate to moderate temperatures, typically 500{degrees}C, for short residence times, typically less than two seconds. To provide mechanistic insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds that contain a {beta}-ether. linkage and {alpha}- or {gamma}-alcohol, which are key structural elements in lignin. The dominant products from the FVP of PhCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OPh (PPE), PhC(OH)HCH{sub 2}OPh, and PhCH{sub 2}CH(CH{sub 2}OH)OPh at 500{degrees}C can be attributed to homolysis of the weakest bond in the molecule (C-O bond) or 1,2-elimination. Surprisingly, the hydroxy-substituent dramatically increases the decomposition of PPE. It is proposed that internal hydrogen bonding is accelerating the reaction.

  14. A New Method of Comparing Forcing Agents in Climate Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; MacMartin, Douglas; Rasch, Philip J.; Jarvis, Andrew

    2015-10-14

    We describe a new method of comparing different climate forcing agents (e.g., CO2, CH4, and solar irradiance) that avoids many of the ambiguities introduced by temperature-related climate feedbacks. This is achieved by introducing an explicit feedback loop external to the climate model that adjusts one forcing agent to balance another while keeping global mean surface temperature constant. Compared to current approaches, this method has two main advantages: (i) the need to define radiative forcing is bypassed and (ii) by maintaining roughly constant global mean temperature, the effects of state dependence on internal feedback strengths are minimized. We demonstrate this approach for several different forcing agents and derive the relationships between these forcing agents in two climate models; comparisons between forcing agents are highly linear in concordance with predicted functional forms. Transitivity of the relationships between the forcing agents appears to hold within a wide range of forcing. The relationships between the forcing agents obtained from this method are consistent across both models but differ from relationships that would be obtained from calculations of radiative forcing, highlighting the importance of controlling for surface temperature feedback effects when separating radiative forcing and climate response.

  15. A physical data model for fields and agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Kor; de Bakker, Merijn; Karssenberg, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Two approaches exist in simulation modeling: agent-based and field-based modeling. In agent-based (or individual-based) simulation modeling, the entities representing the system's state are represented by objects, which are bounded in space and time. Individual objects, like an animal, a house, or a more abstract entity like a country's economy, have properties representing their state. In an agent-based model this state is manipulated. In field-based modeling, the entities representing the system's state are represented by fields. Fields capture the state of a continuous property within a spatial extent, examples of which are elevation, atmospheric pressure, and water flow velocity. With respect to the technology used to create these models, the domains of agent-based and field-based modeling have often been separate worlds. In environmental modeling, widely used logical data models include feature data models for point, line and polygon objects, and the raster data model for fields. Simulation models are often either agent-based or field-based, even though the modeled system might contain both entities that are better represented by individuals and entities that are better represented by fields. We think that the reason for this dichotomy in kinds of models might be that the traditional object and field data models underlying those models are relatively low level. We have developed a higher level conceptual data model for representing both non-spatial and spatial objects, and spatial fields (De Bakker et al. 2016). Based on this conceptual data model we designed a logical and physical data model for representing many kinds of data, including the kinds used in earth system modeling (e.g. hydrological and ecological models). The goal of this work is to be able to create high level code and tools for the creation of models in which entities are representable by both objects and fields. Our conceptual data model is capable of representing the traditional feature data

  16. Evaluating Water Demand Using Agent-Based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, T. S.

    2004-12-01

    The supply and demand of water resources are functions of complex, inter-related systems including hydrology, climate, demographics, economics, and policy. To assess the safety and sustainability of water resources, planners often rely on complex numerical models that relate some or all of these systems using mathematical abstractions. The accuracy of these models relies on how well the abstractions capture the true nature of the systems interactions. Typically, these abstractions are based on analyses of observations and/or experiments that account only for the statistical mean behavior of each system. This limits the approach in two important ways: 1) It cannot capture cross-system disruptive events, such as major drought, significant policy change, or terrorist attack, and 2) it cannot resolve sub-system level responses. To overcome these limitations, we are developing an agent-based water resources model that includes the systems of hydrology, climate, demographics, economics, and policy, to examine water demand during normal and extraordinary conditions. Agent-based modeling (ABM) develops functional relationships between systems by modeling the interaction between individuals (agents), who behave according to a probabilistic set of rules. ABM is a "bottom-up" modeling approach in that it defines macro-system behavior by modeling the micro-behavior of individual agents. While each agent's behavior is often simple and predictable, the aggregate behavior of all agents in each system can be complex, unpredictable, and different than behaviors observed in mean-behavior models. Furthermore, the ABM approach creates a virtual laboratory where the effects of policy changes and/or extraordinary events can be simulated. Our model, which is based on the demographics and hydrology of the Middle Rio Grande Basin in the state of New Mexico, includes agent groups of residential, agricultural, and industrial users. Each agent within each group determines its water usage

  17. Evaluation of oxime efficacy in nerve agent poisoning: Development of a kinetic-based dynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Worek, Franz . E-mail: FranzWorek@Bundeswehr.org; Szinicz, Ladislaus; Eyer, Peter; Thiermann, Horst

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of organophosphorus compounds (OP) as pesticides and the repeated misuse of highly toxic OP as chemical warfare agents (nerve agents) emphasize the necessity for the development of effective medical countermeasures. Standard treatment with atropine and the established acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reactivators, obidoxime and pralidoxime, is considered to be ineffective with certain nerve agents due to low oxime effectiveness. From obvious ethical reasons only animal experiments can be used to evaluate new oximes as nerve agent antidotes. However, the extrapolation of data from animal to humans is hampered by marked species differences. Since reactivation of OP-inhibited AChE is considered to be the main mechanism of action of oximes, human erythrocyte AChE can be exploited to test the efficacy of new oximes. By combining enzyme kinetics (inhibition, reactivation, aging) with OP toxicokinetics and oxime pharmacokinetics a dynamic in vitro model was developed which allows the calculation of AChE activities at different scenarios. This model was validated with data from pesticide-poisoned patients and simulations were performed for intravenous and percutaneous nerve agent exposure and intramuscular oxime treatment using published data. The model presented may serve as a tool for defining effective oxime concentrations and for optimizing oxime treatment. In addition, this model can be useful for the development of meaningful therapeutic animal models.

  18. Cognitive Modeling for Agent-Based Simulation of Child Maltreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaolin; Puddy, Richard

    This paper extends previous work to develop cognitive modeling for agent-based simulation of child maltreatment (CM). The developed model is inspired from parental efficacy, parenting stress, and the theory of planned behavior. It provides an explanatory, process-oriented model of CM and incorporates causality relationship and feedback loops from different factors in the social ecology in order for simulating the dynamics of CM. We describe the model and present simulation results to demonstrate the features of this model.

  19. Modified agar dilution susceptibility testing method for determining in vitro activities of antifungal agents, including azole compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T; Jono, K; Okonogi, K

    1997-01-01

    In vitro activities of antifungal agents, including azole compounds, against yeasts were easily determined by using RPMI-1640 agar medium and by incubating the plates in the presence of 20% CO2. The end point of inhibition was clear by this method, even in the case of azole compounds, because of the almost complete inhibition of yeast growth at high concentrations which permitted weak growth of some Candida strains by traditional methods. MICs obtained by the agar dilution method were similar to those obtained by the broth dilution method proposed by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. PMID:9174197

  20. Novel R-roscovitine NO-donor hybrid compounds as potential pro-resolution of inflammation agents

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, Gabriele; Bertinaria, Massimo; Rolando, Barbara; Fruttero, Roberta; Lucas, Christopher D.; Dorward, David A.; Rossi, Adriano G.; Megson, Ian L.; Gasco, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of multiple human inflammatory diseases. Novel pharmacological strategies which drive neutrophils to undergo programmed cell death (apoptosis) have been shown to facilitate the resolution of inflammation. Both the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKi) R-roscovitine and nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to enhance apoptosis of neutrophils and possess pro-resolution of inflammation properties. In order to search for new multi-target pro-resolution derivatives, here we describe the design, synthesis and investigation of the biological potential of a small series of hybrid compounds obtained by conjugating R-roscovitine with two different NO-donor moieties (compounds 2, 9a, 9c). The synthesized compounds were tested as potential pro-resolution agents, with their ability to promote human neutrophil apoptosis evaluated. Both compound 9a and 9c showed an increased pro-apoptotic activity when compared with either R-roscovitine or structurally related compounds devoid of the ability to release NO (des-NO analogues). Inhibition of either NO-synthase or soluble guanylate cyclase did not affect the induction of apoptosis by the R-roscovitine derivatives, similar to that reported for other classes of NO-donors. In contrast the NO scavenger PTIO prevented the enhanced apoptosis seen with compound 9a over R-roscovitine. These data show that novel compounds such as CDKi–NO-donor hybrids may have additive pro-resolution of inflammation effects. PMID:23394865

  1. Agent-based Modeling with MATSim for Hazards Evacuation Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. M.; Ng, P.; Henry, K.; Peters, J.; Wood, N. J.

    2015-12-01

    Hazard evacuation planning requires robust modeling tools and techniques, such as least cost distance or agent-based modeling, to gain an understanding of a community's potential to reach safety before event (e.g. tsunami) arrival. Least cost distance modeling provides a static view of the evacuation landscape with an estimate of travel times to safety from each location in the hazard space. With this information, practitioners can assess a community's overall ability for timely evacuation. More information may be needed if evacuee congestion creates bottlenecks in the flow patterns. Dynamic movement patterns are best explored with agent-based models that simulate movement of and interaction between individual agents as evacuees through the hazard space, reacting to potential congestion areas along the evacuation route. The multi-agent transport simulation model MATSim is an agent-based modeling framework that can be applied to hazard evacuation planning. Developed jointly by universities in Switzerland and Germany, MATSim is open-source software written in Java and freely available for modification or enhancement. We successfully used MATSim to illustrate tsunami evacuation challenges in two island communities in California, USA, that are impacted by limited escape routes. However, working with MATSim's data preparation, simulation, and visualization modules in an integrated development environment requires a significant investment of time to develop the software expertise to link the modules and run a simulation. To facilitate our evacuation research, we packaged the MATSim modules into a single application tailored to the needs of the hazards community. By exposing the modeling parameters of interest to researchers in an intuitive user interface and hiding the software complexities, we bring agent-based modeling closer to practitioners and provide access to the powerful visual and analytic information that this modeling can provide.

  2. Adding ecosystem function to agent-based land use models

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, V.; Del Grosso, S.J.; Parton, W.J.; Malanson, G.P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine issues in the inclusion of simulations of ecosystem functions in agent-based models of land use decision-making. The reasons for incorporating these simulations include local interests in land fertility and global interests in carbon sequestration. Biogeochemical models are needed in order to calculate such fluxes. The Century model is described with particular attention to the land use choices that it can encompass. When Century is applied to a land use problem the combinatorial choices lead to a potentially unmanageable number of simulation runs. Century is also parameter-intensive. Three ways of including Century output in agent-based models, ranging from separately calculated look-up tables to agents running Century within the simulation, are presented. The latter may be most efficient, but it moves the computing costs to where they are most problematic. Concern for computing costs should not be a roadblock. PMID:26191077

  3. [Effects of plant polysaccharides-containing compound agents on yield and matter accumulation and transportation of winter wheat].

    PubMed

    Bai, Wen-Ho; Lü, Guo-Hu; Zhang, Yuan-Cheng; Song, Ji-Qing; Liu, Xing-Hai; Li, Ji-Hui

    2014-04-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of foliar spraying of three kinds of compound agents [plant polysaccharides (P1), plant polysaccharides plus 5-aminolevulinic acid (P2), and plant polysaccharides plus 5-aminolevulinic acid and dimethylpiperidinium chloride (P3)] at the initial flowering stage of winter wheat on its yield components, sucrose content, soluble sugar content, the accumulation and translocation of dry matter, nitrogen and phosphorus. The grain number per spike and kilo-grains mass of winter wheat increased with the spray of the compound agents. The grain yield increased by more than 8.5% compared with the control. Within 20 days after spraying the three compound agents, the sucrose content of flag leaf had an obvious increase. Compared with the control, P1 and P3 increased the soluble sugar content by more than 4.5% and 11.0%, respectively. P3 enhanced the accumulations of post-anthesis dry matter, nitrogen and phosphorus by 48.5%, 116.9% and 18. 1%, respectively. Correspondingly, contributions of accumulated post-anthesis dry matter and nutrient to grain yield increased significantly. Whereas, the contribution of translocated pre-anthesis nutrient to grain yield in P3 treatment was smaller than in the other treatments. The high yield of winter wheat was related to the regulation of photosynthetic product supply in vegetative organ, the increased soluble sugar content in grain, and the accumulation of post-anthesis dry matter and nutrient regulated by the plant polysaccharides-containing compound agent. PMID:25011292

  4. Model-Drive Architecture for Agent-Based Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gradanin, Denis; Singh, H. Lally; Bohner, Shawn A.; Hinchey, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    The Model Driven Architecture (MDA) approach uses a platform-independent model to define system functionality, or requirements, using some specification language. The requirements are then translated to a platform-specific model for implementation. An agent architecture based on the human cognitive model of planning, the Cognitive Agent Architecture (Cougaar) is selected for the implementation platform. The resulting Cougaar MDA prescribes certain kinds of models to be used, how those models may be prepared and the relationships of the different kinds of models. Using the existing Cougaar architecture, the level of application composition is elevated from individual components to domain level model specifications in order to generate software artifacts. The software artifacts generation is based on a metamodel. Each component maps to a UML structured component which is then converted into multiple artifacts: Cougaar/Java code, documentation, and test cases.

  5. Vitamin D compounds: clinical development as cancer therapy and prevention agents.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald L; Muindi, Josephia; Fakih, Marwan; Yu, Wei-Dong; Johnson, Candace S

    2006-01-01

    While 1,25 dihydroxycholecalciferol (calcitriol) is best recognized for its effects on bone and mineral metabolism, epidemiological data indicate that low vitamin D levels may play a role in the genesis and progression of breast, lung, colorectal and prostate cancer, as well as malignant lymphoma and melanoma. Calcitriol has strong antiproliferative effects in prostate, breast, colorectal, head/neck and lung cancer, as well as lymphoma, leukemia and myeloma model systems. Antiproliferative effects are seen in vitro and in vivo. The mechanisms of these effects are associated with G0/G1 arrest, induction of apoptosis, differentiation and modulation of growth factor-mediated signaling in tumor cells. In addition to the direct effects on tumor cells, recent data strongly support the hypothesis that the stromal effects of vitamin D analogs (e.g., direct effects on tumor vasculature) are also important in the antiproliferative effects. Antitumor effects are seen in a wide variety of tumor types and there are few data to suggest that vitamin D-based approaches are more effective in any one tumor type. Glucocorticoids potentiate the antitumor effect of calcitriol and decrease calcitriol-induced hypercalcemia. In addition, calcitriol potentiates the antitumor effects of many cytotoxic agents. Preclinical data indicate that maximal antitumor effects are seen with pharmacological doses of calcitriol and that such exposure can be safely achieved in animals using a high dose, intermittent schedule of administration. AUC and C(max) calcitriol concentrations of 32 ng.h/ml and 9.2 ng/ml are associated with striking antitumor effects in a murine squamous cell carcinoma model and there is increasing evidence from clinical trials that such exposures can be safely attained in patients. Another approach to maximizing intra-tumoral exposure to vitamin D analogs is to inhibit their catabolism. The data clearly indicate that agents which inhibit the major vitamin D catabolizing enzyme

  6. Modeling civil violence: An agent-based computational approach

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Joshua M.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents an agent-based computational model of civil violence. Two variants of the civil violence model are presented. In the first a central authority seeks to suppress decentralized rebellion. In the second a central authority seeks to suppress communal violence between two warring ethnic groups. PMID:11997450

  7. Scopolamine provocation-based pharmacological MRI model for testing procognitive agents.

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Nikolett; Laszy, Judit; Gyertyán, István; Kocsis, Pál; Gajári, Dávid; Dávid, Szabolcs; Deli, Levente; Pozsgay, Zsófia; Tihanyi, Károly

    2015-04-01

    There is a huge unmet need to understand and treat pathological cognitive impairment. The development of disease modifying cognitive enhancers is hindered by the lack of correct pathomechanism and suitable animal models. Most animal models to study cognition and pathology do not fulfil either the predictive validity, face validity or construct validity criteria, and also outcome measures greatly differ from those of human trials. Fortunately, some pharmacological agents such as scopolamine evoke similar effects on cognition and cerebral circulation in rodents and humans and functional MRI enables us to compare cognitive agents directly in different species. In this paper we report the validation of a scopolamine based rodent pharmacological MRI provocation model. The effects of deemed procognitive agents (donepezil, vinpocetine, piracetam, alpha 7 selective cholinergic compounds EVP-6124, PNU-120596) were compared on the blood-oxygen-level dependent responses and also linked to rodent cognitive models. These drugs revealed significant effect on scopolamine induced blood-oxygen-level dependent change except for piracetam. In the water labyrinth test only PNU-120596 did not show a significant effect. This provocational model is suitable for testing procognitive compounds. These functional MR imaging experiments can be paralleled with human studies, which may help reduce the number of false cognitive clinical trials. PMID:25586394

  8. Assessing Uncertainty of Interspecies Correlation Estimation Models for Aromatic Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed Interspecies Correlation Estimation (ICE) models for aromatic compounds containing 1 to 4 benzene rings to assess uncertainty in toxicity extrapolation in two data compilation approaches. ICE models are mathematical relationships between surrogate and predicted test ...

  9. Modeling and simulating human teamwork behaviors using intelligent agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaocong; Yen, John

    2004-12-01

    Among researchers in multi-agent systems there has been growing interest in using intelligent agents to model and simulate human teamwork behaviors. Teamwork modeling is important for training humans in gaining collaborative skills, for supporting humans in making critical decisions by proactively gathering, fusing, and sharing information, and for building coherent teams with both humans and agents working effectively on intelligence-intensive problems. Teamwork modeling is also challenging because the research has spanned diverse disciplines from business management to cognitive science, human discourse, and distributed artificial intelligence. This article presents an extensive, but not exhaustive, list of work in the field, where the taxonomy is organized along two main dimensions: team social structure and social behaviors. Along the dimension of social structure, we consider agent-only teams and mixed human-agent teams. Along the dimension of social behaviors, we consider collaborative behaviors, communicative behaviors, helping behaviors, and the underpinning of effective teamwork-shared mental models. The contribution of this article is that it presents an organizational framework for analyzing a variety of teamwork simulation systems and for further studying simulated teamwork behaviors.

  10. A Culture-Sensitive Agent in Kirman's Ant Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shu-Heng; Liou, Wen-Ching; Chen, Ting-Yu

    The global financial crisis brought a serious collapse involving a "systemic" meltdown. Internet technology and globalization have increased the chances for interaction between countries and people. The global economy has become more complex than ever before. Mark Buchanan [12] indicated that agent-based computer models will prevent another financial crisis and has been particularly influential in contributing insights. There are two reasons why culture-sensitive agent on the financial market has become so important. Therefore, the aim of this article is to establish a culture-sensitive agent and forecast the process of change regarding herding behavior in the financial market. We based our study on the Kirman's Ant Model[4,5] and Hofstede's Natational Culture[11] to establish our culture-sensitive agent based model. Kirman's Ant Model is quite famous and describes financial market herding behavior from the expectations of the future of financial investors. Hofstede's cultural consequence used the staff of IBM in 72 different countries to understand the cultural difference. As a result, this paper focuses on one of the five dimensions of culture from Hofstede: individualism versus collectivism and creates a culture-sensitive agent and predicts the process of change regarding herding behavior in the financial market. To conclude, this study will be of importance in explaining the herding behavior with cultural factors, as well as in providing researchers with a clearer understanding of how herding beliefs of people about different cultures relate to their finance market strategies.

  11. Effective Team Support: From Modeling to Software Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W. (Technical Monitor); John, Bonnie; Sycara, Katia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research contract was to perform multidisciplinary research between CMU psychologists, computer scientists and engineers and NASA researchers to design a next generation collaborative system to support a team of human experts and intelligent agents. To achieve robust performance enhancement of such a system, we had proposed to perform task and cognitive modeling to thoroughly understand the impact technology makes on the organization and on key individual personnel. Guided by cognitively-inspired requirements, we would then develop software agents that support the human team in decision making, information filtering, information distribution and integration to enhance team situational awareness. During the period covered by this final report, we made substantial progress in modeling infrastructure and task infrastructure. Work is continuing under a different contract to complete empirical data collection, cognitive modeling, and the building of software agents to support the teams task.

  12. An Agent Based Model for Social Class Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoxiang; Rodriguez Segura, Daniel; Lin, Fei; Mazilu, Irina

    We present an open system agent-based model to analyze the effects of education and the society-specific wealth transactions on the emergence of social classes. Building on previous studies, we use realistic functions to model how years of education affect the income level. Numerical simulations show that the fraction of an individual's total transactions that is invested rather than consumed can cause wealth gaps between different income brackets in the long run. In an attempt to incorporate the network effects, we also explore how the probability of interactions among agents depending on the spread of their income brackets affects wealth distribution.

  13. Efficient Agent-Based Models for Non-Genomic Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Nachi; Agogino, Adrian; Tumer, Kagan

    2006-01-01

    Modeling dynamical systems composed of aggregations of primitive proteins is critical to the field of astrobiological science involving early evolutionary structures and the origins of life. Unfortunately traditional non-multi-agent methods either require oversimplified models or are slow to converge to adequate solutions. This paper shows how to address these deficiencies by modeling the protein aggregations through a utility based multi-agent system. In this method each agent controls the properties of a set of proteins assigned to that agent. Some of these properties determine the dynamics of the system, such as the ability for some proteins to join or split other proteins, while additional properties determine the aggregation s fitness as a viable primitive cell. We show that over a wide range of starting conditions, there are mechanisins that allow protein aggregations to achieve high values of overall fitness. In addition through the use of agent-specific utilities that remain aligned with the overall global utility, we are able to reach these conclusions with 50 times fewer learning steps.

  14. A multi agent model for the limit order book dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolozzi, M.

    2010-11-01

    In the present work we introduce a novel multi-agent model with the aim to reproduce the dynamics of a double auction market at microscopic time scale through a faithful simulation of the matching mechanics in the limit order book. The agents follow a noise decision making process where their actions are related to a stochastic variable, the market sentiment, which we define as a mixture of public and private information. The model, despite making just few basic assumptions over the trading strategies of the agents, is able to reproduce several empirical features of the high-frequency dynamics of the market microstructure not only related to the price movements but also to the deposition of the orders in the book.

  15. Adding ecosystem function to agent-based land use models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper is to examine issues in the inclusion of simulations of ecosystem functions in agent-based models of land use decision-making. The reasons for incorporating these simulations include local interests in land fertility and global interests in carbon sequestration. Biogeoche...

  16. Improving Agent Based Models and Validation through Data Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Marek; Demianyk, Bryan C.P.; Friesen, Marcia R.; McLeod, Robert D.; Mukhi, Shamir N.

    2011-01-01

    This work is contextualized in research in modeling and simulation of infection spread within a community or population, with the objective to provide a public health and policy tool in assessing the dynamics of infection spread and the qualitative impacts of public health interventions. This work uses the integration of real data sources into an Agent Based Model (ABM) to simulate respiratory infection spread within a small municipality. Novelty is derived in that the data sources are not necessarily obvious within ABM infection spread models. The ABM is a spatial-temporal model inclusive of behavioral and interaction patterns between individual agents on a real topography. The agent behaviours (movements and interactions) are fed by census / demographic data, integrated with real data from a telecommunication service provider (cellular records) and person-person contact data obtained via a custom 3G Smartphone application that logs Bluetooth connectivity between devices. Each source provides data of varying type and granularity, thereby enhancing the robustness of the model. The work demonstrates opportunities in data mining and fusion that can be used by policy and decision makers. The data become real-world inputs into individual SIR disease spread models and variants, thereby building credible and non-intrusive models to qualitatively simulate and assess public health interventions at the population level. PMID:23569606

  17. Interactive agent based modeling of public health decision-making.

    PubMed

    Parks, Amanda L; Walker, Brett; Pettey, Warren; Benuzillo, Jose; Gesteland, Per; Grant, Juliana; Koopman, James; Drews, Frank; Samore, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Agent-based models have yielded important insights regarding the transmission dynamics of communicable diseases. To better understand how these models can be used to study decision making of public health officials, we developed a computer program that linked an agent-based model of pertussis with an agent-based model of public health management. The program, which we call the Public Health Interactive Model & simulation (PHIMs) encompassed the reporting of cases to public health, case investigation, and public health response. The user directly interacted with the model in the role of the public health decision-maker. In this paper we describe the design of our model, and present the results of a pilot study to assess its usability and potential for future development. Affinity for specific tools was demonstrated. Participants ranked the program high in usability and considered it useful for training. Our ultimate goal is to achieve better public health decisions and outcomes through use of public health decision support tools. PMID:20351907

  18. The effect of alkylating agents on model supported metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Erdem-Senatalar, A.; Blackmond, D.G.; Wender, I. . Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering); Oukaci, R. )

    1988-01-01

    Interactions between model supported metal clusters and alkylating agents were studied in an effort to understand a novel chemical trapping technique developed for identifying species adsorbed on catalyst surfaces. It was found that these interactions are more complex than had previously been suggested. Studies were completed using deuterium-labeled dimethyl sulfate (DMS), (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}SO{sub 4}, as a trapping agent to interact with the supported metal cluster ethylidyne tricobalt enneacarbonyl. Results showed that oxygenated products formed during the trapping reaction contained {minus}OCD{sub 3} groups from the DMS, indicating that the interaction was not a simple alkylation. 18 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Complex groundwater flow systems as traveling agent models

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Pablo; Escolero, Oscar; González, Tomas; Morales-Casique, Eric; Osorio-Olvera, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing field data from pumping tests, we show that as with many other natural phenomena, groundwater flow exhibits complex dynamics described by 1/f power spectrum. This result is theoretically studied within an agent perspective. Using a traveling agent model, we prove that this statistical behavior emerges when the medium is complex. Some heuristic reasoning is provided to justify both spatial and dynamic complexity, as the result of the superposition of an infinite number of stochastic processes. Even more, we show that this implies that non-Kolmogorovian probability is needed for its study, and provide a set of new partial differential equations for groundwater flow. PMID:25337455

  20. From actors to agents in socio-ecological systems models.

    PubMed

    Rounsevell, M D A; Robinson, D T; Murray-Rust, D

    2012-01-19

    The ecosystem service concept has emphasized the role of people within socio-ecological systems (SESs). In this paper, we review and discuss alternative ways of representing people, their behaviour and decision-making processes in SES models using an agent-based modelling (ABM) approach. We also explore how ABM can be empirically grounded using information from social survey. The capacity for ABM to be generalized beyond case studies represents a crucial next step in modelling SESs, although this comes with considerable intellectual challenges. We propose the notion of human functional types, as an analogy of plant functional types, to support the expansion (scaling) of ABM to larger areas. The expansion of scope also implies the need to represent institutional agents in SES models in order to account for alternative governance structures and policy feedbacks. Further development in the coupling of human-environment systems would contribute considerably to better application and use of the ecosystem service concept. PMID:22144388

  1. Agent-based models in translational systems biology

    PubMed Central

    An, Gary; Mi, Qi; Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Vodovotz, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Effective translational methodologies for knowledge representation are needed in order to make strides against the constellation of diseases that affect the world today. These diseases are defined by their mechanistic complexity, redundancy, and nonlinearity. Translational systems biology aims to harness the power of computational simulation to streamline drug/device design, simulate clinical trials, and eventually to predict the effects of drugs on individuals. The ability of agent-based modeling to encompass multiple scales of biological process as well as spatial considerations, coupled with an intuitive modeling paradigm, suggests that this modeling framework is well suited for translational systems biology. This review describes agent-based modeling and gives examples of its translational applications in the context of acute inflammation and wound healing. PMID:20835989

  2. From actors to agents in socio-ecological systems models

    PubMed Central

    Rounsevell, M. D. A.; Robinson, D. T.; Murray-Rust, D.

    2012-01-01

    The ecosystem service concept has emphasized the role of people within socio-ecological systems (SESs). In this paper, we review and discuss alternative ways of representing people, their behaviour and decision-making processes in SES models using an agent-based modelling (ABM) approach. We also explore how ABM can be empirically grounded using information from social survey. The capacity for ABM to be generalized beyond case studies represents a crucial next step in modelling SESs, although this comes with considerable intellectual challenges. We propose the notion of human functional types, as an analogy of plant functional types, to support the expansion (scaling) of ABM to larger areas. The expansion of scope also implies the need to represent institutional agents in SES models in order to account for alternative governance structures and policy feedbacks. Further development in the coupling of human-environment systems would contribute considerably to better application and use of the ecosystem service concept. PMID:22144388

  3. From Compartmentalized to Agent-based Models of Epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macal, Charles

    Supporting decisions in the throes of an impending epidemic poses distinct technical challenges arising from the uncertainties in modeling disease propagation processes and the need for producing timely answers to policy questions. Compartmental models, because of their relative simplicity, produce timely information, but often do not include the level of fidelity of the information needed to answer specific policy questions. Highly granular agent-based simulations produce an extensive amount of information on all aspects of a simulated epidemic, yet complex models often cannot produce this information in a timely manner. We propose a two-phased approach to addressing the tradeoff between model complexity and the speed at which models can be used to answer to questions about an impending outbreak. In the first phase, in advance of an epidemic, ensembles of highly granular agent-based simulations are run over the entire parameter space, characterizing the space of possible model outcomes and uncertainties. Meta-models are derived that characterize model outcomes as dependent on uncertainties in disease parameters, data, and structural relationships. In the second phase, envisioned as during an epidemic, the meta-model is run in combination with compartmental models, which can be run very quickly. Model outcomes are compared as a basis for establishing uncertainties in model forecasts. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357 and National Science Foundation (NSF) RAPID Award DEB-1516428.

  4. Agents, Bayes, and Climatic Risks - a modular modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, A.; Jaeger, C.

    2005-08-01

    When insurance firms, energy companies, governments, NGOs, and other agents strive to manage climatic risks, it is by no way clear what the aggregate outcome should and will be. As a framework for investigating this subject, we present the LAGOM model family. It is based on modules depicting learning social agents. For managing climate risks, our agents use second order probabilities and update them by means of a Bayesian mechanism while differing in priors and risk aversion. The interactions between these modules and the aggregate outcomes of their actions are implemented using further modules. The software system is implemented as a series of parallel processes using the CIAMn approach. It is possible to couple modules irrespective of the language they are written in, the operating system under which they are run, and the physical location of the machine.

  5. N,N'-Dithiobisphthalimide, a disulfide aromatic compound, is a potent spermicide agent in humans.

    PubMed

    Florez, Martha; Díaz, Emilce S; Brito, Iván; González, Jorge; Morales, Patricio

    2011-12-01

    Several studies have shown that users of vaginal preparations containing nonoxynol-9 (N-9) are at a high risk for sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV. Therefore, there is a great interest in identifying compounds that can specifically inhibit sperm without damaging the vaginal lining, possess a powerful spermicide activity, and can be used in contraceptive vaginal preparations to replace N-9. In this work, we studied the spermostatic and/or spermicidal activity of five non-detergent, disulfide compounds on human sperm, HeLa cells, and Lactobacillus acidophilus. The motility and viability of human sperm in semen and culture medium was evaluated after treatment with different concentrations of the disulfide compounds (2.5 - 100 µM). In addition, we evaluated the cytotoxic effect on HeLa cells and L. acidophilus. We identified compound 101, N,N'-dithiobisphthalimide (No. CAS 7764-30-9), as the most effective molecule. It has a half maximal effective concentration (EC(50)) of 8 µM and a minimum effective concentration (defined as the concentration that immobilizes 100 percent of the sperm in 20 sec) of 24 µM. At these concentrations, compound 101 does not affect the viability of the sperm, HeLa cells, or L. acidophilus. Our results indicate that dithiobisphthalimide has a potent spermostatic, irreversible effect with no toxic effects on HeLa cells and L. acidophilus. PMID:21942567

  6. Effects of bulking agent addition on odorous compounds emissions during composting of OFMSW.

    PubMed

    Shao, Li-Ming; Zhang, Chun-Yan; Wu, Duo; Lü, Fan; Li, Tian-Shui; He, Pin-Jing

    2014-08-01

    The effects of rice straw addition level on odorous compounds emissions in a pilot-scale organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) composting plant were investigated. The cumulative odorous compounds emissions occurred in a descending order of 40.22, 28.71 and 27.83 mg/dry kg of OFMSW for piles with rice straw addition level at ratio of 1:10, 2:10 and 3:10 (mixing ratio of rice straw to OFMSW on a wet basis), respectively. The mixing ratio of rice straw to OFMSW had a statistically significant effect on the reduction of malodorous sulfur compounds emissions, which had no statistically significant effect on the reduction of VFAs, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, aromatics and ammonia emissions during composting, respectively. The cumulative emissions of malodorous sulfur compounds from piles with the increasing rice straw addition level were 1.17, 1.08 and 0.88 mg/dry kg of OFMSW, respectively. The optimal mixing ratio of rice straw to OFMSW was 1:5. Using this addition level, the cumulative malodorous sulfur compounds emissions based on the organic matter degradation were the lowest during composting of OFMSW. PMID:24820662

  7. DESI-MS/MS of Chemical Warfare Agents and Related Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Paul A.

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers were used to headspace ­sample chemical warfare agents and their hydrolysis products from glass vials and glass vials containing spiked media, including Dacron swabs, office carpet, paper and fabric. The interface of the Z-spray source was modified to permit safe introduction of the SPME fibers for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (DESI-MS) analysis. A "dip and shoot" method was also developed for the rapid sampling and DESI-MS analysis of chemical warfare agents and their hydrolysis products in liquid samples. Sampling was performed by simply dipping fused silica, stainless steel or SPME tips into the organic or aqueous samples. Replicate analyses were completed within several minutes under ambient conditions with no sample pre-treatment, resulting in a significant increase in sample throughput. The developed sample handling and analysis method was applied to the determination of chemical warfare agent content in samples containing unknown chemical and/or biological warfare agents. Ottawa sand was spiked with sulfur mustard, extracted with water and autoclaved to ensure sterility. Sulfur mustard was completely hydrolysed during the extraction/autoclave step and thiodiglycol was identified by DESI-MS, with analyses generally being completed within 1 min using the "dip and shoot" method.

  8. Novel compounds in the treatment of lung cancer: current and developing therapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rudi; Chan, Pokman

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Though incremental advances have been made in the treatment of this devastating disease during the past decade, new therapies are urgently needed. Traditional cytotoxic agents have been combined with other modalities with improved survival for early-stage patients. Newer cytotoxic agents targeting the same or different mechanisms have been developed at different stages. Optimization of various chemotherapy regimens in different settings is one of the aims of current clinical trials. Some predictive biomarkers (eg, excision repair cross-complementing 1, ERCC1) and histotypes (eg, adenocarcinoma) are found to be associated with resistance/response to some cytotoxic drugs. Another notable advance is the addition of targeted therapy to lung cancer treatment. Targeted agents such as erlotinib and bevacizumab have demonstrated clinical benefits and gained Food and Drug Administration approval for lung cancer. More agents targeting various signaling pathways critical to lung cancer are at different stages of development. Along with the effort of new targeted drug discovery, biomarkers such as epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase mutations have proven useful for patient selection, and more predictive biomarkers have been actively evaluated in non-small cell lung cancer. The paradigm of lung cancer treatment has shifted towards biomarker-based personalized medicine.

  9. Multi-platinum anti-cancer agents. Substitution-inert compounds for tumor selectivity and new targets.

    PubMed

    Farrell, N P

    2015-12-21

    This tutorial review summarizes chemical, biophysical and cellular biological properties of formally substitution-inert "non-covalent" polynuclear platinum complexes (PPCs). We demonstrate how modulation of the pharmacological factors affecting platinum compound cytotoxicity such as cellular accumulation, reactivity toward extracellular and intracellular sulfur-ligand nucleophiles and consequences of DNA binding is achieved to afford a profile of biological activity distinct from that of covalently-binding agents. The DNA binding of substitution-inert complexes is achieved by molecular recognition through minor groove spanning and backbone tracking of the phosphate clamp. In this situation, the square-planar tetra-am(m)ine Pt(ii) coordination units hydrogen bond to phosphate oxygen OP atoms to form bidentate N-O-N motifs. The modular nature of the polynuclear compounds results in high-affinity binding to DNA and very efficient nuclear condensation. These combined effects distinguish the phosphate clamp as a third mode of ligand-DNA binding, discrete from intercalation and minor-groove binding. The cellular consequences mirror those of the biophysical studies and a significant portion of nuclear DNA is compacted, a unique effect different from mitosis, senescence or apoptosis. Substitution-inert PPCs display cytotoxicity similar to cisplatin in a wide range of cell lines, and sensitivity is indifferent to p53 status. Cellular accumulation is mediated through binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) allowing for possibilities of tumor selectivity as well as disruption of HSPG function, opening new targets for platinum antitumor agents. The combined properties show that covalently-binding chemotypes are not the unique arbiters of cytotoxicity and antitumor activity and meaningful antitumor profiles can be achieved even in the absence of Pt-DNA bond formation. These dual properties make the substitution-inert compounds a unique class of inherently dual

  10. Polyoxometalates as antitumor agents: Bioactivity of a new polyoxometalate with copper on a human osteosarcoma model.

    PubMed

    León, I E; Porro, V; Astrada, S; Egusquiza, M G; Cabello, C I; Bollati-Fogolin, M; Etcheverry, S B

    2014-10-01

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) are early transition metal oxygen anion clusters. They display interesting biological effects mainly related to their antiviral and antitumor properties. On the other hand, copper compounds also show different biological and pharmacological effects in cell culture and in animal models. We report herein for the first time, a detailed study of the mechanisms of action of a copper(II) compound of the group of HPOMs with the formula K7Na3[Cu4(H2O)2(PW9034)2]20H2O (PW9Cu), in a model of human osteosarcoma derived cell line, MG-63. The compound inhibited selectively the viability of the osteosarcoma cells in the range of 25-100μM (p<0.01). Besides, we have clearly shown a more deleterious action of PW9Cu on tumor osteoblasts than in normal cells. Cytotoxicity studies also showed deleterious effects for PW9Cu. The increment of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the decrease of the GSH/GSSG ratio were involved in the antiproliferative effects of PW9Cu. Moreover, the compound caused cell cycle arrest in G2 phase, triggering apoptosis as determined by flow cytometry. As a whole, these results showed the main mechanisms of the deleterious effects of PW9Cu in the osteosarcoma cell line MG-63, demonstrating that this compound is a promissory agent for cancer treatments. PMID:25451568

  11. Agent-based model of macrophage action on endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ignacio V; Gómez, Enrique J; Hernando, M Elena; Villares, Ricardo; Mellado, Mario

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an agent-based model of the action of macrophages on the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas. The aim of this model is to simulate the processes of beta cell proliferation and apoptosis and also the process of phagocytosis of cell debris by macrophages, all of which are related to the onset of the autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes. We have used data from the scientific literature to design the model. The results show that the model obtains good approximations to real processes and could be used to shed light on some open questions concerning such processes. PMID:23155767

  12. Agent-based modeling of urban land-use change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinyan; Li, Deren

    2005-10-01

    ABM (Agent-Based Modeling) is a newly developed method of computer simulation. It has characteristics such as active, dynamic, and operational. Urban land-use change has been a focus problem all over the world, especially for the developing countries. We try to use ABM to model the urban land-use changes. By studying the mechanism of urban land use evolvement, we put forwards the thinking of modeling. And an urban land-use change model is built primarily based on the RePast software and GIS spatial database.

  13. SYNTHESIS OF HIGHLY FLUORINATED CHLOROFORMATES AND THEIR USE AS DERIVATIZING AGENTS FOR HYDROPHILIC COMPOUNDS AND DRINKING WATER DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid, safe and efficient procedure was developed to synthesize perfluorinated chloroformates in the small scale generally required to perform analytical derivatizations. This new family of derivatizing agents allows straightforward derivatization of highly polar compounds, co...

  14. Agent-Based Modeling of Noncommunicable Diseases: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed the use of agent-based modeling (ABM), a systems science method, in understanding noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and their public health risk factors. We systematically reviewed studies in PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Sciences published from January 2003 to July 2014. We retrieved 22 relevant articles; each had an observational or interventional design. Physical activity and diet were the most-studied outcomes. Often, single agent types were modeled, and the environment was usually irrelevant to the studied outcome. Predictive validation and sensitivity analyses were most used to validate models. Although increasingly used to study NCDs, ABM remains underutilized and, where used, is suboptimally reported in public health studies. Its use in studying NCDs will benefit from clarified best practices and improved rigor to establish its usefulness and facilitate replication, interpretation, and application. PMID:25602871

  15. Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide as a cleaving agent for colorimetric determination of pyridyl and pyrimidinyl compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.C.

    1985-06-01

    By use of dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) and dimethylbarbituric acid (DMBA) as reagents, a colorimetric method for the determination of pyridyl and pyrimidinyl compounds has been established. DCC breaks the pyridine or pyrimidine ring to afford glutaconaldehyde or malonaldehyde and then reacts with DMBA to produce chromophores. These heterocycles could be determined by measuring the chromophores. The relative standard deviations obtained with different amounts of these compounds were in a range of 0.63 to 5.36% (n = 10). The reaction mechanism is also discussed. 22 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  16. Agent-Based Deterministic Modeling of the Bone Marrow Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of stem cells not only describes but also predicts how a stem cell's environment can control its fate. The first stem cell populations discovered were hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In this paper, we present a deterministic model of bone marrow (that hosts HSCs) that is consistent with several of the qualitative biological observations. This model incorporates stem cell death (apoptosis) after a certain number of cell divisions and also demonstrates that a single HSC can potentially populate the entire bone marrow. It also demonstrates that there is a production of sufficient number of differentiated cells (RBCs, WBCs, etc.). We prove that our model of bone marrow is biologically consistent and it overcomes the biological feasibility limitations of previously reported models. The major contribution of our model is the flexibility it allows in choosing model parameters which permits several different simulations to be carried out in silico without affecting the homeostatic properties of the model. We have also performed agent-based simulation of the model of bone marrow system proposed in this paper. We have also included parameter details and the results obtained from the simulation. The program of the agent-based simulation of the proposed model is made available on a publicly accessible website. PMID:27340402

  17. Agent-Based Deterministic Modeling of the Bone Marrow Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kurhekar, Manish; Deshpande, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of stem cells not only describes but also predicts how a stem cell's environment can control its fate. The first stem cell populations discovered were hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In this paper, we present a deterministic model of bone marrow (that hosts HSCs) that is consistent with several of the qualitative biological observations. This model incorporates stem cell death (apoptosis) after a certain number of cell divisions and also demonstrates that a single HSC can potentially populate the entire bone marrow. It also demonstrates that there is a production of sufficient number of differentiated cells (RBCs, WBCs, etc.). We prove that our model of bone marrow is biologically consistent and it overcomes the biological feasibility limitations of previously reported models. The major contribution of our model is the flexibility it allows in choosing model parameters which permits several different simulations to be carried out in silico without affecting the homeostatic properties of the model. We have also performed agent-based simulation of the model of bone marrow system proposed in this paper. We have also included parameter details and the results obtained from the simulation. The program of the agent-based simulation of the proposed model is made available on a publicly accessible website. PMID:27340402

  18. Calibrating Building Energy Models Using Supercomputer Trained Machine Learning Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyal, Jibonananda; New, Joshua Ryan; Edwards, Richard; Parker, Lynne Edwards

    2014-01-01

    Building Energy Modeling (BEM) is an approach to model the energy usage in buildings for design and retrofit purposes. EnergyPlus is the flagship Department of Energy software that performs BEM for different types of buildings. The input to EnergyPlus can often extend in the order of a few thousand parameters which have to be calibrated manually by an expert for realistic energy modeling. This makes it challenging and expensive thereby making building energy modeling unfeasible for smaller projects. In this paper, we describe the Autotune research which employs machine learning algorithms to generate agents for the different kinds of standard reference buildings in the U.S. building stock. The parametric space and the variety of building locations and types make this a challenging computational problem necessitating the use of supercomputers. Millions of EnergyPlus simulations are run on supercomputers which are subsequently used to train machine learning algorithms to generate agents. These agents, once created, can then run in a fraction of the time thereby allowing cost-effective calibration of building models.

  19. Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation on Emergency Evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Chuanjun; Yang, Chenghui; Jin, Shiyao

    Crowd stampedes and evacuation induced by panic caused by emergences often lead to fatalities as people are crushed, injured, trampled or even dead. Such phenomena may be triggered in life-threatening situations such as fires, explosions in crowded buildings. Emergency evacuation simulation has recently attracted the interest of a rapidly increasing number of scientists. This paper presents an Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation using Repast software to construct crowd evacuations for emergency response from an area under a fire. Various types of agents and different attributes of agents are designed in contrast to traditional modeling. The attributes that govern the characteristics of the people are studied and tested by iterative simulations. Simulations are also conducted to demonstrate the effect of various parameters of agents. Some interesting results were observed such as "faster is slower" and the ignorance of available exits. At last, simulation results suggest practical ways of minimizing the harmful consequences of such events and the existence of an optimal escape strategy.

  20. Simulation of convoy of unmanned vehicles using agent based modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sharad; Singh, Harpreet; Gerhart, G. R.

    2007-10-01

    There has been an increasing interest of unmanned vehicles keeping the importance of defense and security. A few models for a convoy of unmanned vehicle exist in literature. The objective of this paper is to exploit agent based modeling technique for a convoy of unmanned vehicles where each vehicle is an agent. Using this approach, the convoy of vehicles reaches a specified goal from a starting point. Each agent is associated with number of sensors. The agents make intelligent decisions based on sensor inputs and at the same time maintaining their group capability and behavior. The simulation is done for a battlefield environment from a single starting point to a single goal. This approach can be extended for multiple starting points to reach multiple goals. The simulation gives the time taken by the convoy to reach a goal from its initial position. In the battlefield environment, commanders make various tactical decisions depending upon the location of an enemy outpost, minefields, number of soldiers in platoons, and barriers. The simulation can help the commander to make effective decisions depending on battlefield, convoy and obstacles to reach a particular goal. The paper describes the proposed approach and gives the simulation results. The paper also gives problems for future research in this area.

  1. 3D Printed Microtransporters: Compound Micromachines for Spatiotemporally Controlled Delivery of Therapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian-Yun; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Mao, Angelo; Petruska, Andrew J; Qiu, Famin; Chen, Xue-Bo; Kennedy, Stephen; Mooney, David; Nelson, Bradley J

    2015-11-01

    Functional compound micromachines are fabricated by a design methodology using 3D direct laser writing and selective physical vapor deposition of magnetic materials. Microtransporters with a wirelessly controlled Archimedes screw pumping mechanism are engineered. Spatiotemporally controlled collection, transport, and delivery of micro particles, as well as magnetic nanohelices inside microfluidic channels are demonstrated. PMID:26415002

  2. Thorium and actinium polyphosphonate compounds as bone-seeking alpha particle-emitting agents.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Gjermund; Bruland, Oyvind S; Larsen, Roy H

    2004-01-01

    The present study explores the use of alpha-particle-emitting, bone-seeking agents as candidates for targeted radiotherapy. Actinium and thorium 1,4,7,10 tetraazacyclododecane N,N',N'',N''' 1,4,7,10-tetra(methylene) phosphonic acid (DOTMP) and thorium-diethylene triamine N,N',N'' penta(methylene) phosphonic acid (DTMP) were prepared and their biodistribution evaluated in conventional Balb/C mice at four hours after injection. All three bone-seeking agents showed a high uptake in bone and a low uptake in soft tissues. Among the soft tissue organs, only kidney had a relatively high uptake. The femur/kidney ratios for 227Th-DTMP, 228-Ac-DOTMP and 227Th-DOTMP were 14.2, 7.6 and 6.0, respectively. A higher liver uptake of 228Ac-DOTMP was seen than for 227Th-DTMP and 227Th-DOTMP. This suggests that some demetallation of the 228Ac-DOTMP complex had occurred. The results indicate that 225Ac-DOTMP, 227Th-DOTMP and 227Th-DTMP have promising properties as potential therapeutic bone-seeking agents. PMID:15015582

  3. Synthesis of a naphthalene-hydroxynaphthalene polymer model compound

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, C.D.

    1991-07-22

    The objective of this project is the synthesis of a new naphthalene-hydroxynaphthalene polymer model compound for use in coal combustion studies. Since this compound is an unreported compound, this effort also requires the development of a synthetic route to this compound, including the synthesis of unreported intermediates leading to its synthesis. Complex product mixtures have been consistently obtained with all of our approaches. As a result, we have been constantly making small modifications to our technical approach. These changes are discussed in this report. Our synthesis efforts resulted in a number of potential precursors and intermediates. When appropriate, these compounds were submitted to the Organic Chemistry Research Area's Analytical Section for characterization and identification.

  4. Economic evaluations with agent-based modelling: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Chhatwal, Jagpreet; He, Tianhua

    2015-05-01

    Agent-based modelling (ABM) is a relatively new technique, which overcomes some of the limitations of other methods commonly used for economic evaluations. These limitations include linearity, homogeneity and stationarity. Agents in ABMs are autonomous entities, who interact with each other and with the environment. ABMs provide an inductive or 'bottom-up' approach, i.e. individual-level behaviours define system-level components. ABMs have a unique property to capture emergence phenomena that otherwise cannot be predicted by the combination of individual-level interactions. In this tutorial, we discuss the basic concepts and important features of ABMs. We present a case study of an application of a simple ABM to evaluate the cost effectiveness of screening of an infectious disease. We also provide our model, which was developed using an open-source software program, NetLogo. We discuss software, resources, challenges and future research opportunities of ABMs for economic evaluations. PMID:25609398

  5. Hypercompetitive Environments: An Agent-based model approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Manuel; Araújo, Tanya

    Information technology (IT) environments are characterized by complex changes and rapid evolution. Globalization and the spread of technological innovation have increased the need for new strategic information resources, both from individual firms and management environments. Improvements in multidisciplinary methods and, particularly, the availability of powerful computational tools, are giving researchers an increasing opportunity to investigate management environments in their true complex nature. The adoption of a complex systems approach allows for modeling business strategies from a bottom-up perspective — understood as resulting from repeated and local interaction of economic agents — without disregarding the consequences of the business strategies themselves to individual behavior of enterprises, emergence of interaction patterns between firms and management environments. Agent-based models are at the leading approach of this attempt.

  6. Hereditary cancer syndromes as model systems for chemopreventive agent development.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Farzana L; Patel, Jigar; Lubet, Ronald; Rodriguez, Luz; Calzone, Kathleen A

    2016-02-01

    Research in chemoprevention has undergone a shift in emphasis for pragmatic reasons from large, phase III randomized studies to earlier phase studies focused on safety, mechanisms, and utilization of surrogate endpoints such as biomarkers instead of cancer incidence. This transition permits trials to be conducted in smaller populations and at substantially reduced costs while still yielding valuable information. This article will summarize some of the current chemoprevention challenges and the justification for the use of animal models to facilitate identification and testing of chemopreventive agents as illustrated though four inherited cancer syndromes. Preclinical models of inherited cancer syndromes serve as prototypical systems in which chemopreventive agents can be developed for ultimate application to both the sporadic and inherited cancer settings. PMID:26970132

  7. Statistical Agent Based Modelization of the Phenomenon of Drug Abuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Clemente, Riccardo; Pietronero, Luciano

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a statistical agent based model to describe the phenomenon of drug abuse and its dynamical evolution at the individual and global level. The agents are heterogeneous with respect to their intrinsic inclination to drugs, to their budget attitude and social environment. The various levels of drug use were inspired by the professional description of the phenomenon and this permits a direct comparison with all available data. We show that certain elements have a great importance to start the use of drugs, for example the rare events in the personal experiences which permit to overcame the barrier of drug use occasionally. The analysis of how the system reacts to perturbations is very important to understand its key elements and it provides strategies for effective policy making. The present model represents the first step of a realistic description of this phenomenon and can be easily generalized in various directions.

  8. Reaction to Extreme Events in a Minimal Agent Based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccaria, Andrea; Cristelli, Matthieu; Pietronero, Luciano

    We consider the issue of the overreaction of financial markets to a sudden price change. In particular, we focus on the price and the population dynamics which follows a large fluctuation. In order to investigate these aspects from different perspectives we discuss the known results for empirical data, the Lux-Marchesi model and a minimal agent based model which we have recently proposed. We show that, in this framework, the presence of a overreaction is deeply linked to the population dynamics. In particular, the presence of a destabilizing strategy in the market is a necessary condition to have an overshoot with respect to the exogenously induced price fluctuation. Finally, we analyze how the memory of the agents can quantitatively affect this behavior.

  9. Immobilization of organophosphate hydrolase on biocompatible gelatin pads and its use in removal of organophosphate compounds and nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Kanugula, Anantha KoteswaraRao; Repalle, Elisha Raju; Pandey, Jay Prakash; Sripad, Gunwar; Mitra, Chanchal Kumar; Dubey, Devender Kumar; Siddavattam, Dayananda

    2011-02-01

    Bacterial organophosphate hydrolases (OPH) have been shown to hydrolyze structurally diverse group of organophosphate (OP) compounds and nerve agents. Due to broad substrate range and unusual catalytic properties, the OPH has successfully been used to develop eco-friendly strategies for detection and decontamination of OP compounds. However, their usage has failed to gain necessary acceptance, due to short half-life of the enzyme and loss of activity during process development. In the present study, we report a simple procedure for immobilization of OPH on biocompatible gelatin pads. The covalent coupling of OPH using glutaraldehyde spacer has been found to dramatically improve the enzyme stability. There is no apparent loss of OPH activity in OPH-gelatin pads stored at room temperature for more than six months. As revealed by a number of kinetic parameters, the catalytic properties of immobilized enzyme are found to be comparable to the free enzyme. Further, the OPH-gelatin pads effectively eliminate OP insecticide methyl parathion and nerve agent sarin. PMID:21469599

  10. Effects of Agent's Repulsion in 2d Flocking Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Najem; Tarras, Iliass; Mazroui, M'hammed; Boughaleb, Yahya

    In nature many animal groups, such as fish schools or bird flocks, clearly display structural order and appear to move as a single coherent entity. In order to understand the complex behavior of these systems, many models have been proposed and tested so far. This paper deals with an extension of the Vicsek model, by including a second zone of repulsion, where each agent attempts to maintain a minimum distance from the others. The consideration of this zone in our study seems to play an important role during the travel of agents in the two-dimensional (2D) flocking models. Our numerical investigations show that depending on the basic ingredients such as repulsion radius (R1), effect of density of agents (ρ) and noise (η), our nonequilibrium system can undergo a kinetic phase transition from no transport to finite net transport. For different values of ρ, kinetic phase diagrams in the plane (η ,R1) are found. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Domination and evolution in agent based model of an economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmi, Syed S.

    We introduce Agent Based Model of a pure exchange economy and a simple economy that includes production, consumption and distributions. Markets are described by Edgeworth Exchange in both models. Trades are binary bilateral trades at prices that are set in each trade. We found that the prices converge over time to a value that is not the standard Equilibrium value given by the Walrasian Tattonement fiction. The average price, and the distributions of Wealth, depends on the degree of Domination (persuasive power) we introduced based on differentials in trading "leverage" due to wealth differences. The full economy model is allowed to evolve by replacement of agents that do not survive with agents having random properties. We found that, depending upon the average productivity compared to the average consumption, very different kinds of behavior emerged. The Economy as a whole reaches a steady state by the population adapting to the conditions of productivity and consumption. Correlations develop in a population between what would be for each individual a random assignment of Productivity, Labor power, Wealth, and Preferences. The population adapts to the economic environment by development of these Correlations and without any learning process. We see signs of emerging social structure as a result of necessity of survival.

  12. Modeling anti-allergic natural compounds by molecular topology.

    PubMed

    García-Domenech, Ramón; Zanni, Riccardo; Galvez-Llompart, María; de Julián-Ortiz, J Vicente

    2013-09-01

    Molecular topology has been applied to the search of QSAR models able to identify the anti-allergic activity of a wide group of heterogeneous compounds. Through the linear discriminant analysis and artificial neural networks, correct classification percentages above 85% for both the training set and the test set have been obtained. After carrying out a virtual screening with a natural product library, about thirty compounds with theoretical anti-allergic activity have been selected. Among them, hesperidin, naringin, salinomycin, sorbitol, curcumol, myricitrin, diosmin and kinetin stand out. Some of these compounds have already been referenced as having anti-allergic activity. PMID:23597273

  13. Disaggregation and Refinement of System Dynamics Models via Agent-based Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J; Ozmen, Ozgur; Schryver, Jack C

    2014-01-01

    System dynamics models are usually used to investigate aggregate level behavior, but these models can be decomposed into agents that have more realistic individual behaviors. Here we develop a simple model of the STEM workforce to illuminate the impacts that arise from the disaggregation and refinement of system dynamics models via agent-based modeling. Particularly, alteration of Poisson assumptions, adding heterogeneity to decision-making processes of agents, and discrete-time formulation are investigated and their impacts are illustrated. The goal is to demonstrate both the promise and danger of agent-based modeling in the context of a relatively simple model and to delineate the importance of modeling decisions that are often overlooked.

  14. Behavior of asphaltene model compounds at w/o interfaces.

    PubMed

    Nordgård, Erland L; Sørland, Geir; Sjöblom, Johan

    2010-02-16

    Asphaltenes, present in significant amounts in heavy crude oil, contains subfractions capable of stabilizing water-in-oil emulsions. Still, the composition of these subfractions is not known in detail, and the actual mechanism behind emulsion stability is dependent on perceived interfacial concentrations and compositions. This study aims at utilizing polyaromatic surfactants which contains an acidic moiety as model compounds for the surface-active subfraction of asphaltenes. A modified pulse-field gradient (PFG) NMR method has been used to study droplet sizes and stability of emulsions prepared with asphaltene model compounds. The method has been compared to the standard microscopy droplet counting method. Arithmetic and volumetric mean droplet sizes as a function of surfactant concentration and water content clearly showed that the interfacial area was dependent on the available surfactant at the emulsion interface. Adsorption of the model compounds onto hydrophilic silica has been investigated by UV depletion, and minor differences in the chemical structure of the model compounds caused significant differences in the affinity toward this highly polar surface. The cross-sectional areas obtained have been compared to areas from the surface-to-volume ratio found by NMR and gave similar results for one of the two model compounds. The mean molecular area for this compound suggested a tilted geometry of the aromatic core with respect to the interface, which has also been proposed for real asphaltenic samples. The film behavior was further investigated using a liquid-liquid Langmuir trough supporting the ability to form stable interfacial films. This study supports that acidic, or strong hydrogen-bonding fractions, can promote stable water-in-oil emulsion. The use of model compounds opens up for studying emulsion behavior and demulsifier efficiency based on true interfacial concentrations rather than perceived interfaces. PMID:19852481

  15. Reactions of Lignin Model Compounds in Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, John E.; Binder, Joseph B.; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2009-09-15

    Lignin, a readily available form of biomass, awaits novel chemistry for converting it to valuable aromatic chemicals. Recent work has demonstrated that ionic liquids are excellent solvents for processing woody biomass and lignin. Seeking to exploit ionic liquids as media for depolymerization of lignin, we investigated reactions of lignin model compounds in these solvents. Using Brønsted acid catalysts in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate at moderate temperatures, we obtained up to 11.6% yield of the dealkylation product guaiacol from the model compound eugenol and cleaved phenethyl phenyl ether, a model for lignin ethers. Despite these successes, acid catalysis failed in dealkylation of the unsaturated model compound 4-ethylguaiacol and did not produce monomeric products from organosolv lignin, demonstrating that further work is required to understand the complex chemistry of lignin depolymerization.

  16. An ambient agent model for analyzing managers' performance during stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ChePa, Noraziah; Aziz, Azizi Ab; Gratim, Haned

    2016-08-01

    Stress at work have been reported everywhere. Work related performance during stress is a pattern of reactions that occurs when managers are presented with work demands that are not matched with their knowledge, skills, or abilities, and which challenge their ability to cope. Although there are many prior findings pertaining to explain the development of manager performance during stress, less attention has been given to explain the same concept through computational models. In such, a descriptive nature in psychological theories about managers' performance during stress can be transformed into a causal-mechanistic stage that explains the relationship between a series of observed phenomena. This paper proposed an ambient agent model for analyzing managers' performance during stress. Set of properties and variables are identified through past literatures to construct the model. Differential equations have been used in formalizing the model. Set of equations reflecting relations involved in the proposed model are presented. The proposed model is essential and can be encapsulated within an intelligent agent or robots that can be used to support managers during stress.

  17. Chemical degradation of fluorosulfonamide fuel cell membrane polymer model compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsheheri, Jamela M.; Ghassemi, Hossein; Schiraldi, David A.

    2014-12-01

    The durability of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell membrane, along with high proton conductivity and mechanical performance is critical to the success of these energy conversion devices. Extending our work in perfluorinated membrane stability, aromatic trifluoromethyl sulfonamide model compounds were prepared, and their oxidative degradation was examined. The chemical structures for the models were based on mono-, di- and tri-perfluorinated sulfonamide modified phenyl rings. Durability of the model compounds was evaluated by exposure to hydroxyl radicals generated using Fenton reagent and UV irradiation of hydrogen peroxide. LC-MS results for the mono-substituted model compound indicate greater stability to radical oxidation than the di-substituted species; loss of perfluorinated fonamide side chains appears to be an important pathway, along with dimerization and aromatic ring hydroxylation. The tri-substituted model compound also shows loss of side chains, with the mono-substituted compound being a major oxidation product, along with a limited amount of hydroxylation and dimerization of the starting material.

  18. Synthesis of triazoloquinazolinone based compounds as tubulin polymerization inhibitors and vascular disrupting agents.

    PubMed

    Driowya, Mohsine; Leclercq, Julien; Verones, Valerie; Barczyk, Amélie; Lecoeur, Marie; Renault, Nicolas; Flouquet, Nathalie; Ghinet, Alina; Berthelot, Pascal; Lebegue, Nicolas

    2016-06-10

    A series of 1-phenyl-[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]quinazolin-5-ones designed as conformationally restricted CA-4 analogues, were tested for their tubulin polymerization and growth inhibitory activities. The 3-hydroxy-4-methoxy derivatives 11d and 12d are potent inhibitors of tubulin assembly but only the N-methylated amid counterpart 12d possesses potent anticancer activity in a large panel of cancer cell lines. Upon treatment with compound 12d, remarkable cell shape changes as cell migration and tube formation were elicited in HUVECs, consistent with vasculature damaging activity. PMID:27031215

  19. Agent-based modelling of consumer energy choices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Varun; Henry, Adam Douglas

    2016-06-01

    Strategies to mitigate global climate change should be grounded in a rigorous understanding of energy systems, particularly the factors that drive energy demand. Agent-based modelling (ABM) is a powerful tool for representing the complexities of energy demand, such as social interactions and spatial constraints. Unlike other approaches for modelling energy demand, ABM is not limited to studying perfectly rational agents or to abstracting micro details into system-level equations. Instead, ABM provides the ability to represent behaviours of energy consumers -- such as individual households -- using a range of theories, and to examine how the interaction of heterogeneous agents at the micro-level produces macro outcomes of importance to the global climate, such as the adoption of low-carbon behaviours and technologies over space and time. We provide an overview of ABM work in the area of consumer energy choices, with a focus on identifying specific ways in which ABM can improve understanding of both fundamental scientific and applied aspects of the demand side of energy to aid the design of better policies and programmes. Future research needs for improving the practice of ABM to better understand energy demand are also discussed.

  20. Irradiation effects on polymer-model compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguchi, Tadao; Katsumura, Yosuke; Hayashi, Nariyuki; Hayakawa, Naohiro; Tamura, Naoyuki; Tabata, Yoneho

    Irradiation effects on n-paraffins and squalane, used as models of polymers, were investigated by product analysis. Four n-paraffins, C 20H 42, C 21H 44, C 23H 48 and C 24H 50, and squalane (C 30H 62) were γ-irradiated under vacuum in liquid, crystalline and glassy states. The evolved gases were analyzed by gas chromatography and changes in molecular weight were analyzed by liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy. G-values for crosslinking of n-paraffins were 1.2 for crystalline states (at 25°C) and 1.7 for liquid states (at 55°C), and showed no difference between odd and even carbon numbers. The G-value of liquid squalane was 1.7; it was 1.3 for the glassy state at low temperature (-77°C). Double bonds were common in the crosslinked products, especially after liquid-phase irradiation. The probability of chain scission was estimated as being negligible, though a small number of chain-scission products (which were products of scission at chain-ends or side chains) were observed by gas analysis.

  1. Synthesis of Silicate Zeolite Analogues Using Organic Sulfonium Compounds as Structure-Directing Agents.

    PubMed

    Jo, Changbum; Lee, Sungjune; Cho, Sung June; Ryoo, Ryong

    2015-10-19

    A microporous crystalline silica zeolite of the MEL structure type and three other zeolite analogues composed of germanosilicate frameworks were synthesized using tributylsulfonium, triphenylsulfonium, or tri(para-tolyl)sulfonium as the structure-directing agent. The germanosilicates thus obtained had ISV, ITT, or a new zeolite structure depending on the synthesis conditions. The structure of the new germanosilicate was solved using X-ray powder diffraction data with the aid of a charge-flipping method. The solution indicated a crystal structure belonging to the P63/mmc space group with cell parameters of a=16.2003 Å and c=21.8579 Å. After calcination, the new germanosilicate material exhibited two types of accessible micropores with diameters of 0.61 and 0.78 nm. PMID:26302889

  2. Langmuir films of asphaltene model compounds and their fluorescent properties.

    PubMed

    Nordgård, Erland L; Landsem, Eva; Sjöblom, Johan

    2008-08-19

    The relationship between the physicochemical properties of asphaltenes and asphaltene structure is an issue of increasing focus. Surface pressure-area isotherms of asphaltene model compounds have been investigated to gain more knowledge of their arrangement at an aqueous surface. Variations in interfacial activity have been correlated to proposed arrangements. The presence of a carboxylic acid has shown to be crucial for their interfacial activity and film properties. The acid group directs the molecules normal to the surface, forming a stable monolayer film. The high stability was absent when no acidic groups were present. Fluorescence spectra of deposited Langmuir-Blodgett films showed only the presence of the excimer emission for thin films of acidic model compounds, indicating a close face-to-face arrangement of the molecules. Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) of the model compounds in toluene indicated the presence of aggregates for two of four compounds at low concentrations. However, a sudden drop of interfacial tension observed could not be correlated to the aggregation. Instead, aggregation induced by addition of a "poor" solvent showed decreased interfacial activity when aggregated due to decrease of monomers in bulk. The findings regarding these asphaltene model compounds and their structural differences show the great effect an acidic group has on their physicochemical properties. PMID:18652499

  3. A Systematic Review of Agent-Based Modelling and Simulation Applications in the Higher Education Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, X.; Blackmore, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a systematic review of agent-based modelling and simulation (ABMS) applications in the higher education (HE) domain. Agent-based modelling is a "bottom-up" modelling paradigm in which system-level behaviour (macro) is modelled through the behaviour of individual local-level agent interactions (micro).…

  4. Analysis of gaseous toxic industrial compounds and chemical warfare agent simulants by atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cotte-Rodríguez, Ismael; Justes, Dina R; Nanita, Sergio C; Noll, Robert J; Mulligan, Christopher C; Sanders, Nathaniel L; Cooks, R Graham

    2006-04-01

    The suitability of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry as sensing instrumentation for the real-time monitoring of low levels of toxic compounds is assessed, especially with respect to public safety applications. Gaseous samples of nine toxic industrial compounds, NH3, H2S, Cl2, CS2, SO2, C2H4O, HBr, C6H6 and AsH3, and two chemical warfare agent simulants, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) and methyl salicylate (MeS), were studied. API-MS proves highly suited to this application, with speedy analysis times (<30 seconds), high sensitivity, high selectivity towards analytes, good precision, dynamic range and accuracy. Tandem MS methods were implemented in selected cases for improved selectivity, sensitivity, and limits of detection. Limits of detection in the parts-per-billion and parts-per-trillion range were achieved for this set of analytes. In all cases detection limits were well below the compounds' permissible exposure limits (PELs), even in the presence of added complex mixtures of alkanes. Linear responses, up to several orders of magnitude, were obtained over the concentration ranges studied (sub-ppb to ppm), with relative standard deviations less than 3%, regardless of the presence of alkane interferents. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves are presented to show the performance trade-off between sensitivity, probability of correct detection, and false positive rate. A dynamic sample preparation system for the production of gas phase analyte concentrations ranging from 100 pptr to 100 ppm and capable of admixing gaseous matrix compounds and control of relative humidity and temperature is also described. PMID:16568176

  5. Agent-based modeling and systems dynamics model reproduction.

    SciTech Connect

    North, M. J.; Macal, C. M.

    2009-01-01

    Reproducibility is a pillar of the scientific endeavour. We view computer simulations as laboratories for electronic experimentation and therefore as tools for science. Recent studies have addressed model reproduction and found it to be surprisingly difficult to replicate published findings. There have been enough failed simulation replications to raise the question, 'can computer models be fully replicated?' This paper answers in the affirmative by reporting on a successful reproduction study using Mathematica, Repast and Swarm for the Beer Game supply chain model. The reproduction process was valuable because it demonstrated the original result's robustness across modelling methodologies and implementation environments.

  6. Synthesis of model compounds for coal liquification research

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, P.K.

    1990-10-08

    Research continued on the synthesis of model compounds for coal liquefaction research. This report covers the actual laboratory investigation performed during the reporting period in order to attain the stated objective of the project, viz, the synthesis of a model compound containing tetrahydronaphthalene, naphthalene and phenyl moieties linked by methylene, ethylene and ether bonds. The overall synthetic approach aimed at obtaining the end product has been broken down into three major steps that involve the synthesis of three key reactive intermediates. These are: (1) 3,5-dimethyl-5-bromobenzyl chloride, (2) 1-chloromethylene-2-hydroxytetralin and (3) 2-chloromethylene-1-hydroxynaphthalene.

  7. Langevin processes, agent models and socio-economic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Peter; Sabatelli, Lorenzo

    2004-05-01

    We review some approaches to the understanding of fluctuations of financial asset prices. Our approach builds on the development of a simple Langevin equation that characterises stochastic processes. This provides a unifying approach that allows first a straightforward description of the early approaches of Bachelier. We generalize the approach to stochastic equations that model interacting agents. The agent models recently advocated by Marsilli and Solomon are motivated. Using a simple change of variable, we show that the peer pressure model of Marsilli and the wealth dynamics model of Solomon are essentially equivalent. The methods are further shown to be consistent with a global free energy functional that invokes an entropy term based on the Boltzmann formula. There follows a brief digression on the Heston model that extends the simple model to one that, in the language of physics, exhibits a temperature this is subject to stochastic fluctuations. Mathematically the model corresponds to a Feller process. Dragulescu and Yakovenko have shown how the model yields some of the stylised features of asset prices. A more recent approach by Michael and Johnson maximised a Tsallis entropy function subject to simple constraints. They obtain a distribution function for financial returns that exhibits power law tails and which can describe the distribution of returns not only over low but also high frequencies (minute by minute) data for the Dow Jones index. We show how this approach can be developed from an agent model, where the simple Langevin process is now conditioned by local rather than global noise. Such local noise may of course be the origin of speculative frenzy or herding in the market place. The approach yields a BBGKY type hierarchy of equations for the system correlation functions. Of especial interest is that the results can be obtained from a new free energy functional similar to that mentioned above except that a Tsallis like entropy term replaces the

  8. Modeling Natural Anti-Inflammatory Compounds by Molecular Topology

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Llompart, María; Zanni, Riccardo; García-Domenech, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    One of the main pharmacological problems today in the treatment of chronic inflammation diseases consists of the fact that anti-inflammatory drugs usually exhibit side effects. The natural products offer a great hope in the identification of bioactive lead compounds and their development into drugs for treating inflammatory diseases. Computer-aided drug design has proved to be a very useful tool for discovering new drugs and, specifically, Molecular Topology has become a good technique for such a goal. A topological-mathematical model, obtained by linear discriminant analysis, has been developed for the search of new anti-inflammatory natural compounds. An external validation obtained with the remaining compounds (those not used in building up the model), has been carried out. Finally, a virtual screening on natural products was performed and 74 compounds showed actual anti-inflammatory activity. From them, 54 had been previously described as anti-inflammatory in the literature. This can be seen as a plus in the model validation and as a reinforcement of the role of Molecular Topology as an efficient tool for the discovery of new anti-inflammatory natural compounds. PMID:22272145

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of novel polysaccharide-Gd-DTPA compounds as contrast agent for MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guoying; Feng, Jianghua; Jing, Fengying; Pei, Fengkui; Liu, Maili

    2003-09-01

    Macromolecular conjugates of two kinds of natural polysaccharides, that from Panax quinquefolium linn (PQPS) and Ganoderma applanatum pat (GAPS), with gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) have been synthesized and characterized by means of FTIR, elementary analysis and ICP-AES. Their stability was investigated by competition study with Ca 2+, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) and DTPA. Polysaccharide-bound complexes exhibit T1 relaxivities of 1.5-1.7 times that of Gd-DTPA in D 2O at 25°C and 9.4 T. MR imaging of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats showed remarkable enhancement in rat liver and kidney after i.v. injection of these two complexes: liver parenchyma 60.9±5.6%, 57.8±7.4% at 65-85 min; kidney 144.9±14.5%, 199.9±25.4% at 10-30 min for PQPS-Gd-DTPA, GAPS-Gd-DTPA at gadolinium dose of 0.083 and 0.082 mmol/kg, respectively. Our preliminary in vivo and in vitro study indicates that the two kinds of polysaccharide-bound complexes are potential tissue-specific contrast agents for MRI.

  10. [Oxidation of nicotine and chelating agent by mercury(II)-compounds].

    PubMed

    Möhrle, H; Berlitz, J

    2008-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of (S)-nicotine (1) with mercuric acetate in diluted acetic acid yields no cotinine (3), but reacts only to the iminium stage, resulting far predominant the 5'-iminium structure without affecting the chiral center at 2', therefore the reduction with borohydride nearly quantitatively gives rise to (S)-nicotine (1). For the preparation of cotinine (3) the best method proves the oxidation of (S)-1 with the equimolecular complex Hg(II)-EDTA in pure water. With preliminary alkalization of the preparation an oxidation also of the liberated EDTA to iminodiacetic acid (10) and oxalic acid (15) occurs. This side reaction increase with an excess of chelating agent, which makes the precipitation of mercury as measuring system for control of the dehydrogenation invalid. Surprising is the nearly complete failure of the dehydrogenation to the tertiary carbenium ion and the consecutive reaction of the secondary carbenium ion 5, which in equilibrium with its carbinolamine 5a is again dehydrogenated with Hg(II)-EDTA to the lactam 3 with retention of the configuration. PMID:18271295

  11. QSAR modeling, synthesis and bioassay of diverse leukemia RPMI-8226 cell line active agents.

    PubMed

    Katritzky, Alan R; Girgis, Adel S; Slavov, Svetoslav; Tala, Srinivasa R; Stoyanova-Slavova, Iva

    2010-11-01

    A rigorous QSAR modeling procedure employing CODESSA PRO descriptors has been utilized for the prediction of more efficient anti-leukemia agents. Experimental data concerning the effect on leukemia RPMI-8226 cell line tumor growth of 34 compounds (treated at a dose of 10 μM) was related to their chemical structures by a 4-descriptor QSAR model. Four bis(oxy)bis-urea and bis(sulfanediyl)bis-urea derivatives (4a, 4b, 8, 11a) predicted as active by this model, together with 11b predicted to be of low activity, were synthesized and screened for anti-tumor activity utilizing 55 different tumor cell lines. Compounds 8 and 11a showed anti-tumor properties against most of the adopted cell lines with growth inhibition exceeding 50%. The highly promising preliminary anti-tumor properties of compounds 8 and 11a, were screened at serial dilutions (10(-4)-10(-8) μM) for determination of their GI(50) and TGI against the screened human tumor cell lines. Compound 11a (GI(50) = 1.55, TGI = 8.68 μM) is more effective than compound 8 (GI(50)=58.30, TGI = > 100 μM) against the target leukemia RPMI-8226 cell line. Compound 11a also exhibits highly pronounced anti-tumor properties against NCI-H226, NCI-H23 (non-small cell lung cancer), COLO 205 (colon cancer), SNB-75 (CNS cancer), OVCAR-3, SK-OV-3 (ovarian cancer), A498 (renal cancer) MDA-MB-231/ATCC and MDA-MB-468 (breast cancer) cell lines (GI(50) = 1.95, 1.61, 1.38, 1.56, 1.30, 1.98, 1.18, 1.85, 1.08, TGI = 8.35, 6.01, 2.67, 8.59, 4.01, 7.01, 5.62, 6.38, 5.63 μM, respectively). Thus 11a could be a suitable lead towards the design of broad spectrum anti-tumor active agents targeting various human tumor cell lines. PMID:20843586

  12. The role of model compound studies in coal research

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.

    1994-03-01

    The extraordinarily complex chemical and physical structure of coals continues to present coal scientists with major challenges in advancing the base of scientific knowledge required for the development of substantially improved coal utilization technologies. As a consequence, model compound studies play a foundational role in advancing coal science. Model compounds are employed in studies for: (a) determination of kinetic and mechanistic information relevant to coal pyrolysis and liquefaction chemistry, and to computational modeling of these processes; (b) development of new catalysts for coal conversion or upgrading of coal-derived liquids; (c) development and benchmarking of various spectroscopic methods for analysis of coal structure and constitution by NMR, FTIR, mass spectrometry, X-ray techniques (XPS, XANES), etc.; and, (d) exploration and development of new chemical reactions for coal such as deploymerization under mild conditions, selective heteroatom removal etc. The choice of a model compound should not be prescribed, and the rational for the selection can vary with the goal of the research. The breadth of use of model compounds in coal research precludes a thorough examination in this report.

  13. Modeling and Visualizing Flow of Chemical Agents Across Complex Terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Kramer, Marc; Chaderjian, Neal

    2005-01-01

    Release of chemical agents across complex terrain presents a real threat to homeland security. Modeling and visualization tools are being developed that capture flow fluid terrain interaction as well as point dispersal downstream flow paths. These analytic tools when coupled with UAV atmospheric observations provide predictive capabilities to allow for rapid emergency response as well as developing a comprehensive preemptive counter-threat evacuation plan. The visualization tools involve high-end computing and massive parallel processing combined with texture mapping. We demonstrate our approach across a mountainous portion of North California under two contrasting meteorological conditions. Animations depicting flow over this geographical location provide immediate assistance in decision support and crisis management.

  14. Candidate anti-Aβ fluorene compounds selected from analogs of amyloid imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hyun-Seok; Maezawa, Izumi; Budamagunta, Madhu; Rana, Sandeep; Shi, Aibin; Vassar, Robert; Liu, Ruiwu; Lam, Kit S.; Cheng, R. Holland; Hua, Duy H.; Voss, John C.; Jin, Lee-Way

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by depositions of β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates as amyloid in the brain. To facilitate diagnosis of AD by radioligand imaging, several highly specific small-molecule amyloid ligands have been developed. Because amyloid ligands display excellent pharmacokinetics properties and brain bioavailability, and because we have previously shown that some amyloid ligands bind the highly neurotoxic Aβ oligomers (AβO) with high affinities, they may also be valuable candidates for anti-Aβ therapies. Here we identified two fluorene compounds from libraries of amyloid ligands, initially based on their ability to block cell death secondary to intracellular AβO. We found that the lead fluorenes were able to reduce the amyloid burden including the levels of AβO in cultured neurons and in 5xFAD mice. To explain these in vitro and in vivo effects, we found that the lead fluorenes bind and destabilize AβO as shown by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy studies, and block the harmful AβO-synapse interaction. These fluorenes and future derivatives, therefore, have a potential use in AD therapy and research. PMID:19022536

  15. Multi-agent-based Order Book Model of financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preis, T.; Golke, S.; Paul, W.; Schneider, J. J.

    2006-08-01

    We introduce a simple model for simulating financial markets, based on an order book, in which several agents trade one asset at a virtual exchange continuously. For a stationary market the structure of the model, the order flow rates of the different kinds of order types and the used price time priority matching algorithm produce only a diffusive price behavior. We show that a market trend, i.e. an asymmetric order flow of any type, leads to a non-trivial Hurst exponent for the price development, but not to "fat-tailed" return distributions. When one additionally couples the order entry depth to the prevailing trend, also the stylized empirical fact of "fat tails" can be reproduced by our Order Book Model.

  16. Using Agent Based Modeling (ABM) to Develop Cultural Interaction Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drucker, Nick; Jones, Phillip N.

    2012-01-01

    Today, most cultural training is based on or built around "cultural engagements" or discrete interactions between the individual learner and one or more cultural "others". Often, success in the engagement is the end or the objective. In reality, these interactions usually involve secondary and tertiary effects with potentially wide ranging consequences. The concern is that learning culture within a strict engagement context might lead to "checklist" cultural thinking that will not empower learners to understand the full consequence of their actions. We propose the use of agent based modeling (ABM) to collect, store, and, simulating the effects of social networks, promulgate engagement effects over time, distance, and consequence. The ABM development allows for rapid modification to re-create any number of population types, extending the applicability of the model to any requirement for social modeling.

  17. A generic biokinetic model for carbon-14 labelled compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manger, Ryan Paul

    Carbon-14, a radioactive nuclide, is used in many industrial applications. Due to its wide range of uses in industry, many workers are at risk of accidental internal exposure to 14C. Being a low energy beta emitter, 14C is not a significant external radiation hazard, but the internal consequences posed by 14C are important, especially because of its long half life of 5730 years [46]. The current biokinetic model recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is a conservative estimate of how radiocarbon is treated by the human body. The ICRP generic radiocarbon model consists of a single compartment representing the entire human body. This compartment has a biological half life of 40 days yielding an effective dose coefficient of 5.8x10-10 Sv B q-1 [44, 45, 49, 53, 54]. This overestimates the dose of all radiocarbon compounds that have been studied [96]. An improved model has been developed that includes and alimentary tract, a urinary bladder, CO2 model, and an "Other" compartment used to model systemic tissues. The model can be adapted to replicate any excretion curve and excretion pattern. In addition, the effective dose coefficient produced by the updated model is near the mean effective dose coefficient of carbon compounds that have been considered in this research. The major areas of improvement are: more anatomically significant, a less conservative dose coefficient, and the ability to manipulate the model for known excretion data. Due to the wide variety of carbon compounds, it is suggested that specific biokinetic models be implemented for known radiocarbon substances. If the source of radiocarbon is dietary, then the physiologically based model proposed by Whillans [102] that splits all ingested radiocarbon compounds into carbohydrates, fats, and proteins should be used.

  18. Molecular targets of organophosphorus compounds and antidotal agents on nicotinic, glutamatergic and gabaergic synapses. Appendix 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, E.X.

    1994-03-16

    There are several major motivators behind this work. We need to understand OP intoxication sufficiently to provide insight and direction for development of improved antidotal therapy. The persistent environmental use of chemical insecticides, which some feel is necessary for optimal agricultural production but others challenge vehemently, requires that we understand the toxicological consequences of such use. Also, OPs have such a powerful effect or, vital functions, it could be immensely beneficial to understand in great detail the physiological mechanisms that are targeted by OPs. Such information could benefit medical treatments of diseases and pathologies other than those directly caused by OPs. Finally, we hope to present the material in a manner that will be instructive to a broad spectrum of professionals in pharmacology and toxicology. Where it is appropriate, we may draw heavily from other topical reviews. In all cases, we will provide citations to original work and/or well-referenced RA I, Lab Animals, Rats, Frogs, Compounds, Nerve Agents, Organophosphorous, BD, CD Agents, XCSM, Neurotransmitters, Receptors, Ion Channel, Oximes.

  19. Anticonvulsant discovery through animal models of status epilepticus induced by organophosphorus nerve agents and pesticides.

    PubMed

    McCarren, Hilary S; McDonough, John H

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and nerve agents (NAs) are highly toxic chemicals that pose a significant threat to human health worldwide. These compounds induce status epilepticus (SE) by irreversibly blocking the ability of acetylcholinesterase to break down acetylcholine at neural synapses. Animal models of organophosphate-induced SE are a crucial resource for identifying new anticonvulsant therapies. Here, we describe the development of various animal models of SE induced by NA or OP exposure. Experiments in nonhuman primates, rats, mice, and guinea pigs have helped to identify novel therapeutic targets in the central nervous system, with particular success at modulating GABAergic and glutamatergic receptors. The anticonvulsants identified by NA- and OP-induced SE models are well poised for fast advancement into clinical development, and their potential utility in the broader field of epilepsy should make them all the more attractive for commercial pursuit. PMID:27258770

  20. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), necessary reactants for photochemical smog formation, are emitted from numerous sources. Limited available data suggest that dairy farms emit VOCs with cattle feed, primarily silage, being the primary source. Process-based models of VOC transfer within and from si...

  1. Modeling complex diffusion mechanisms in L1 2 -structured compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacate, M. O.; Lape, M.; Stufflebeam, M.; Evenson, W. E.

    2010-04-01

    We report on a procedure developed to create stochastic models of hyperfine interactions for complex diffusion mechanisms and demonstrate its application to simulate perturbed angular correlation spectra for the divacancy and 6-jump cycle diffusion mechanisms in L12-structured compounds.

  2. Laccase-mediator catalyzed conversion of model lignin compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laccases play an important role in the biological breakdown of lignin and have great potential in the deconstruction of lignocellulosic feedstocks. We examined a variety of laccases, both commercially prepared and crude extracts, for their ability to oxidize three model lignol compounds (p-coumaryl...

  3. VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND) FUGITIVE EMISSION PREDICTIVE MODEL - USER'S GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses a mathematical model that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of various leak detection and repair (LDAR) programs on controlling volatile organic compound (VOC) fugitive emissions from chemical, petroleum, and other process units. The report also descr...

  4. Enhanced removal of aqueous BPA model compounds using Metalloligs.

    PubMed

    Franz, Douglas M; Martin, Dean F

    2014-01-01

    A model compound, 4-(t-butyl)phenol, was used as a substitute for BPA (bisphenol acetone or Bisphenol A) a material used for the production of a large volume of common plastics. Unfortunately, BPA is suspected to have estrogenic properties, and there is a suspicion that even small amounts can have a deleterious effect against humans, especially female infants. The model compound has some similarities to BPA, but lacks some of the serious properties of BPA dust. Since other workers have demonstrated the capability of removing BPA from plastics by extraction with saline or alcohol, we studied whether Octolig, a polyethylenediimine supported on silica gel, or transition metal derivatives of Octolig could be used to remove concentrations for model compounds from aqueous solution. Octolig gave modest results 20%, the manganese (II) and iron (III) derivatives gave poor results, Cuprilig was an improvement over those two Metalloligs, but the cobalt(II) derivative was able to remove up to 56% of the model compound. Two methods were studied, batch and column chromatography. Under the conditions used in this study, the batch method was superior. PMID:24279622

  5. Laccase-Mediator catalyzed conversion of model Lignin compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laccases play an important role in the biological breakdown of lignin and have great potential in the deconstruction of lignocellulosic feedstocks. We examined a variety of laccases, both commercially prepared and crude extracts, for their ability to oxidize three model lignol compounds (p-coumaryl...

  6. Synthesis and Utilization of Trialkylammonium-Substituted Cyclodextrins as Water-Soluble Chiral NMR Solvating Agents for Anionic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Dowey, Alison E; Puentes, Cira Mollings; Carey-Hatch, Mira; Sandridge, Keyana L; Krishna, Nikhil B; Wenzel, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    Cationic trialkylammonium-substituted α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrins containing trimethyl-, triethyl-, and tri-n-propylammonium substituent groups were synthesized and analyzed for utility as water-soluble chiral nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solvating agents. Racemic and enantiomerically pure (3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl)trimethyl-, triethyl-, and tri-n-propyl ammonium chloride were synthesized from the corresponding trialkyl amine hydrochloride and either racemic or enantiomerically pure epichlorohydrin. The ammonium salts were then reacted with α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrins at basic pH to provide the corresponding randomly substituted cationic cyclodextrins. The (1) H NMR spectra of a range of anionic, aromatic compounds was recorded with the cationic cyclodextrins. Cyclodextrins with a single stereochemistry at the hydroxy group on the (2-hydroxypropyl)trialkylammonium chloride substituent were often but not always more effective than the corresponding cyclodextrin in which the C-2 position was racemic. In several cases, the larger triethyl or tri-n-propyl derivatives were more effective than the corresponding trimethyl derivative at causing enantiomeric differentiation. None of the cyclodextrin derivatives were consistently the most effective for all of the anionic compounds studied. PMID:26881414

  7. From Agents to Continuous Change via Aesthetics: Learning Mechanics with Visual Agent-Based Computational Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Pratim; Farris, Amy Voss; Wright, Mason

    2012-01-01

    Novice learners find motion as a continuous process of change challenging to understand. In this paper, we present a pedagogical approach based on agent-based, visual programming to address this issue. Integrating agent-based programming, in particular, Logo programming, with curricular science has been shown to be challenging in previous research…

  8. Validation techniques of agent based modelling for geospatial simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvishi, M.; Ahmadi, G.

    2014-10-01

    One of the most interesting aspects of modelling and simulation study is to describe the real world phenomena that have specific properties; especially those that are in large scales and have dynamic and complex behaviours. Studying these phenomena in the laboratory is costly and in most cases it is impossible. Therefore, Miniaturization of world phenomena in the framework of a model in order to simulate the real phenomena is a reasonable and scientific approach to understand the world. Agent-based modelling and simulation (ABMS) is a new modelling method comprising of multiple interacting agent. They have been used in the different areas; for instance, geographic information system (GIS), biology, economics, social science and computer science. The emergence of ABM toolkits in GIS software libraries (e.g. ESRI's ArcGIS, OpenMap, GeoTools, etc) for geospatial modelling is an indication of the growing interest of users to use of special capabilities of ABMS. Since ABMS is inherently similar to human cognition, therefore it could be built easily and applicable to wide range applications than a traditional simulation. But a key challenge about ABMS is difficulty in their validation and verification. Because of frequent emergence patterns, strong dynamics in the system and the complex nature of ABMS, it is hard to validate and verify ABMS by conventional validation methods. Therefore, attempt to find appropriate validation techniques for ABM seems to be necessary. In this paper, after reviewing on Principles and Concepts of ABM for and its applications, the validation techniques and challenges of ABM validation are discussed.

  9. A bivariate survival model with compound Poisson frailty

    PubMed Central

    Wienke, A.; Ripatti, S.; Palmgren, J.; Yashin, A.

    2015-01-01

    A correlated frailty model is suggested for analysis of bivariate time-to-event data. The model is an extension of the correlated power variance function (PVF) frailty model (correlated three-parameter frailty model). It is based on a bivariate extension of the compound Poisson frailty model in univariate survival analysis. It allows for a non-susceptible fraction (of zero frailty) in the population, overcoming the common assumption in survival analysis that all individuals are susceptible to the event under study. The model contains the correlated gamma frailty model and the correlated inverse Gaussian frailty model as special cases. A maximum likelihood estimation procedure for the parameters is presented and its properties are studied in a small simulation study. This model is applied to breast cancer incidence data of Swedish twins. The proportion of women susceptible to breast cancer is estimated to be 15 per cent. PMID:19856276

  10. On agent-based modeling and computational social science

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Rosaria; Paolucci, Mario

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, the field of agent-based modeling (ABM) is discussed focusing on the role of generative theories, aiming at explaining phenomena by growing them. After a brief analysis of the major strengths of the field some crucial weaknesses are analyzed. In particular, the generative power of ABM is found to have been underexploited, as the pressure for simple recipes has prevailed and shadowed the application of rich cognitive models. In the second part of the paper, the renewal of interest for Computational Social Science (CSS) is focused upon, and several of its variants, such as deductive, generative, and complex CSS, are identified and described. In the concluding remarks, an interdisciplinary variant, which takes after ABM, reconciling it with the quantitative one, is proposed as a fundamental requirement for a new program of the CSS. PMID:25071642

  11. On agent-based modeling and computational social science.

    PubMed

    Conte, Rosaria; Paolucci, Mario

    2014-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, the field of agent-based modeling (ABM) is discussed focusing on the role of generative theories, aiming at explaining phenomena by growing them. After a brief analysis of the major strengths of the field some crucial weaknesses are analyzed. In particular, the generative power of ABM is found to have been underexploited, as the pressure for simple recipes has prevailed and shadowed the application of rich cognitive models. In the second part of the paper, the renewal of interest for Computational Social Science (CSS) is focused upon, and several of its variants, such as deductive, generative, and complex CSS, are identified and described. In the concluding remarks, an interdisciplinary variant, which takes after ABM, reconciling it with the quantitative one, is proposed as a fundamental requirement for a new program of the CSS. PMID:25071642

  12. Stylized facts from a threshold-based heterogeneous agent model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, R.; Grinfeld, M.; Lamba, H.; Seaman, T.

    2007-05-01

    A class of heterogeneous agent models is investigated where investors switch trading position whenever their motivation to do so exceeds some critical threshold. These motivations can be psychological in nature or reflect behaviour suggested by the efficient market hypothesis (EMH). By introducing different propensities into a baseline model that displays EMH behaviour, one can attempt to isolate their effects upon the market dynamics. The simulation results indicate that the introduction of a herding propensity results in excess kurtosis and power-law decay consistent with those observed in actual return distributions, but not in significant long-term volatility correlations. Possible alternatives for introducing such long-term volatility correlations are then identified and discussed.

  13. Modeling toxic compounds from nitric oxide emission measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallero, Daniel A.; Peirce, Jeffrey; Cho, Ki Don

    Determining the amount and rate of degradation of toxic pollutants in soil and groundwater is difficult and often requires invasive techniques, such as deploying extensive monitoring well networks. Even with these networks, degradation rates across entire systems cannot readily be extrapolated from the samples. When organic compounds are degraded by microbes, especially nitrifying bacteria, oxides or nitrogen (NO x) are released to the atmosphere. Thus, the flux of nitric oxide (NO) from the soil to the lower troposphere can be used to predict the rate at which organic compounds are degraded. By characterizing and applying biogenic and anthropogenic processes in soils the rates of degradation of organic compounds. Toluene was selected as a representative of toxic aromatic compounds, since it is inherently toxic, it is a substituted benzene compound and is listed as a hazardous air pollutant under Section 12 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Measured toluene concentrations in soil, microbial population growth and NO fluxes in chamber studies were used to develop and parameterize a numerical model based on carbon and nitrogen cycling. These measurements, in turn, were used as indicators of bioremediation of air toxic (i.e. toluene) concentrations. The model found that chemical concentration, soil microbial abundance, and NO production can be directly related to the experimental results (significant at P < 0.01) for all toluene concentrations tested. This indicates that the model may prove useful in monitoring and predicting the fate of toxic aromatic contaminants in a complex soil system. It may also be useful in predicting the release of ozone precursors, such as changes in reservoirs of hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen. As such, the model may be a tool for decision makers in ozone non-attainment areas.

  14. An agent-based mathematical model about carp aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu; Wu, Chao

    2005-05-01

    This work presents an agent-based mathematical model to simulate the aggregation of carp, a harmful fish in North America. The referred mathematical model is derived from the following assumptions: (1) instead of the consensus among every carps involved in the aggregation, the aggregation of carp is completely a random and spontaneous physical behavior of numerous of independent carp; (2) carp aggregation is a collective effect of inter-carp and carp-environment interaction; (3) the inter-carp interaction can be derived from the statistical analytics about large-scale observed data. The proposed mathematical model is mainly based on empirical inter-carp force field, whose effect is featured with repulsion, parallel orientation, attraction, out-of-perception zone, and blind. Based on above mathematical model, the aggregation behavior of carp is formulated and preliminary simulation results about the aggregation of small number of carps within simple environment are provided. Further experiment-based validation about the mathematical model will be made in our future work.

  15. Photochemical oxidation of coals and some selected model compounds by using copper(II) chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, M.

    1999-12-01

    The H-donor ability of different rank coals was examined by using a copper(II)chloride-acetonitrile system as the dehydrogenator. A bituminous coal and two lignites were irradiated in the UV in the presence of copper(II)chloride in acetonitrile. The coal was dehydrogenated while the Cu(II) was reduced to CU(I). Considerable amounts of aliphatic or alicyclic hydrogen were removed from the coals. In the process, while the oxygen contents of coals do not increase, more condensed aromatic products occur. It was concluded that lignites are better reducing agents than bituminous coals. A photooxidation mechanism is proposed on the basis of the model compound reaction. Photooxidation of alcohols (ethanol, 2-propanol, benzyl alcohol, 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, and diphenyl carbinol), a hydroaromatic compound (tetrahydronaphthalene), and an aromatic ether (dibenzyl ether) was performed under similar reaction conditions.

  16. Efficacy of Several Therapeutic Agents in a Murine Model of Dry Eye Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Servet; Kulualp, Kadri

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we used 56 female BALB/c mice with induced dry eye syndrome to evaluate the therapeutic effects of formal saline (FS), sodium hyaluronate (SH), diclofenac sodium (DS), olopatadine (OP), retinoic acid (RA), fluoromethanole (FML), cyclosporine A (CsA), and doxycycline hyclate (DH). All subjects were kept in an evaporative 'dry eye cabinet' for the assessment of blink rate, tear production, tear break-up time, and impression cytology prior to (baseline) and during weeks 2, 4, and 6 of the study. The right eyes of all subjects were treated topically with 5 μL of the test agent twice daily during weeks 2 through 6. Impression cytology and tear break-up time differed between time points in all groups and differed between groups at weeks 4 and 6. Blink rate differed by time point only in the FS, FML, and DH groups. Tear production according to the phenol red cotton thread test differed by time point for all groups except RA, CsA, and DH and differed between groups only at week 6. Among the compounds tested in the present study, DS and CsA were the most effective therapeutic agents in our mouse model of dry eye syndrome; these agents likely exert their therapeutic effect through their antiinflammatory activity. PMID:27053565

  17. Modeling and informatics in designing anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Bharatam, P V; Patel, D S; Adane, L; Mittal, A; Sundriyal, S

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder, characterized by glucose overproduction and glucose underutilization. Current therapy for T2DM includes drugs, like metformin, glitazones, sulphonyl ureas, etc. Extensive research has been carried out world wide on molecular targets for T2DM like PPARgamma, PTP1B, DPP-IV, GSK-3, cannabinoid receptor, fructose-bisphosphatases, beta3 adrenoceptor, etc. in the development of newer anti-diabetic agents. These therapeutic targets are quite important and most of them are suitable for in silico analysis. Hence, many molecular modeling and informatics studies like, molecular docking, pharmacophore mapping, 3D-QSAR, virtual screening, quantum chemical studies, and pharmacoinformatics like bioinformatics and chemoinformatics studies have been performed on the drugs/leads/targets associated with T2DM. Several of these in silico efforts are exemplary studies; the methodologies adopted in these studies can be emulated in many other therapeutic areas. A review of the rational approaches reported in designing anti-diabetic agents is presented in this article. PMID:18220788

  18. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from new carpets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, John C.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

    A simple model is proposed to account for observed emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from new carpets. The model assumes that the VOCs originate predominantly in a uniform slab of polymer backing material. Parameters for the model (the initial concentration of a VOC in the polymer, a diffusion coefficient and an equilibrium polymer/air partition coefficient) are obtained from experimental data produced by a previous chamber study. The diffusion coefficients generally decrease as the molecular weight of the VOCs increase, while the partition coefficients generally increase as the vapor pressure of the compounds decreases. In addition, for two of the study carpets that have a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) backing, the diffusion and partition coefficients are similar to independently reported values for SBR. The results suggest that prediction of VOC emissions from new carpets may be possible based solely on a knowledge of the physical properties of the relevant compounds and the carpet backing material. However, a more rigorous validation of the model is desirable.

  19. Modeling Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from New Carpets

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.C.; Hodgson, A.T.; Gadgil, A.J.

    1993-02-01

    A simple model is proposed to account for observed emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from new carpets. The model assumes that the VOCs originate predominantly in a uniform slab of polymer backing material. Parameters for the model (the initial concentration of a VOC in the polymer, a diffusion coefficient and an equilibrium polymer/air partition coefficient) are obtained from experimental data produced by a previous chamber study. The diffusion coefficients generally decrease as the molecular weight of the VOCs increase, while the polymer/air partition coefficients generally increase as the vapor pressure of the compounds decrease. In addition, for two of the study carpets that have a styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) backing, the diffusion and partition coefficients are similar to independently reported values for SBR. The results suggest that predictions of VOCs emissions from new carpets may be possible based solely on a knowledge of the physical properties of the relevant compounds and the carpet backing material. However, a more rigorous validation of the model is desirable.

  20. Dynamic calibration of agent-based models using data assimilation.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jonathan A; Evans, Andrew J; Malleson, Nicolas S

    2016-04-01

    A widespread approach to investigating the dynamical behaviour of complex social systems is via agent-based models (ABMs). In this paper, we describe how such models can be dynamically calibrated using the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), a standard method of data assimilation. Our goal is twofold. First, we want to present the EnKF in a simple setting for the benefit of ABM practitioners who are unfamiliar with it. Second, we want to illustrate to data assimilation experts the value of using such methods in the context of ABMs of complex social systems and the new challenges these types of model present. We work towards these goals within the context of a simple question of practical value: how many people are there in Leeds (or any other major city) right now? We build a hierarchy of exemplar models that we use to demonstrate how to apply the EnKF and calibrate these using open data of footfall counts in Leeds. PMID:27152214

  1. Dynamic calibration of agent-based models using data assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Jonathan A.; Evans, Andrew J.; Malleson, Nicolas S.

    2016-01-01

    A widespread approach to investigating the dynamical behaviour of complex social systems is via agent-based models (ABMs). In this paper, we describe how such models can be dynamically calibrated using the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), a standard method of data assimilation. Our goal is twofold. First, we want to present the EnKF in a simple setting for the benefit of ABM practitioners who are unfamiliar with it. Second, we want to illustrate to data assimilation experts the value of using such methods in the context of ABMs of complex social systems and the new challenges these types of model present. We work towards these goals within the context of a simple question of practical value: how many people are there in Leeds (or any other major city) right now? We build a hierarchy of exemplar models that we use to demonstrate how to apply the EnKF and calibrate these using open data of footfall counts in Leeds. PMID:27152214

  2. A Hybrid Sensitivity Analysis Approach for Agent-based Disease Spread Models

    SciTech Connect

    Pullum, Laura L; Cui, Xiaohui

    2012-01-01

    Agent-based models (ABM) have been widely deployed in different fields for studying the collective behavior of large numbers of interacting agents. Of particular interest lately is the application of agent-based and hybrid models to epidemiology, specifically Agent-based Disease Spread Models (ABDSM). Validation (one aspect of the means to achieve dependability) of ABDSM simulation models is extremely important. It ensures that the right model has been built and lends confidence to the use of that model to inform critical decisions. In this report, we describe our preliminary efforts in ABDSM validation by using hybrid model fusion technology.

  3. Remote Continuous Wave and Pulsed Laser Raman Detection of Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants and Toxic Industrial Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Rivera, William; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2010-09-01

    This study describes the design, assembly, testing and comparison of two Remote Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) systems intended for standoff detection of hazardous chemical liquids. Raman spectra of Chemical Warfare Agents Simulants (CWAS) and Toxic Industrial Compounds (TIC) were measured in the laboratory at a 6.6 m source-target distance using continuous wave (CW) laser detection. Standoff distances for pulsed measurements were 35 m for dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) detection and 60, 90 and 140 m for cyclohexane detection. The prototype systems consisted of a Raman spectrometer equipped with a CCD detector (for CW measurements) and an I-CCD camera with time-gated electronics (for pulsed laser measurements), a reflecting telescope, a fiber optic assembly, a single-line CW laser source (514.5, 488.0, 351.1 and 363.8 nm) and a frequency-doubled single frequency Nd:YAG 532 nm laser (5 ns pulses at 10 Hz). The telescope was coupled to the spectrograph using an optical fiber, and filters were used to reject laser radiation and Rayleigh scattering. Two quartz convex lenses were used to collimate the light from the telescope from which the telescope-focusing eyepiece was removed, and direct it to the fiber optic assembly. To test the standoff sensing system, the Raman Telescope was used in the detection of liquid TIC: benzene, chlorobenzene, toluene, carbon tetrachloride, cyclohexane and carbon disulfide. Other compounds studied were CWAS: dimethylmethyl phosphonate, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-(butylamino)-ethanethiol. Relative Raman scattering cross sections of liquid CWAS were measured using single-line sources at 532.0, 488.0, 363.8 and 351.1 nm. Samples were placed in glass and quartz vials at the standoff distances from the telescope for the Remote Raman measurements. The mass of DMMP present in water solutions was also quantified as part of the system performance tests.

  4. Ensuring Congruency in Multiscale Modeling: Towards Linking Agent Based and Continuum Biomechanical Models of Arterial Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Hayenga, Heather N.; Thorne, Bryan C.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Humphrey, Jay D.

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to develop multiscale models of vascular adaptations to understand tissue level manifestations of cellular level mechanisms. Continuum based biomechanical models are well suited for relating blood pressures and flows to stress-mediated changes in geometry and properties, but less so for describing underlying mechanobiological processes. Discrete stochastic agent based models are well suited for representing biological processes at a cellular level, but not for describing tissue level mechanical changes. We present here a conceptually new approach to facilitate the coupling of continuum and agent based models. Because of ubiquitous limitations in both the tissue- and cell-level data from which one derives constitutive relations for continuum models and rule-sets for agent based models, we suggest that model verification should enforce congruency across scales. That is, multiscale model parameters initially determined from data sets representing different scales should be refined, when possible, to ensure that common outputs are consistent. Potential advantages of this approach are illustrated by comparing simulated aortic responses to a sustained increase in blood pressure predicted by continuum and agent based models both before and after instituting a genetic algorithm to refine 16 objectively bounded model parameters. We show that congruency-based parameter refinement not only yielded increased consistency across scales, it also yielded predictions that are closer to in vivo observations. PMID:21809144

  5. Agent-Based vs. Equation-based Epidemiological Models:A Model Selection Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Nutaro, James J

    2012-01-01

    This paper is motivated by the need to design model validation strategies for epidemiological disease-spread models. We consider both agent-based and equation-based models of pandemic disease spread and study the nuances and complexities one has to consider from the perspective of model validation. For this purpose, we instantiate an equation based model and an agent based model of the 1918 Spanish flu and we leverage data published in the literature for our case- study. We present our observations from the perspective of each implementation and discuss the application of model-selection criteria to compare the risk in choosing one modeling paradigm to another. We conclude with a discussion of our experience and document future ideas for a model validation framework.

  6. Model Checking Degrees of Belief in a System of Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raimondi, Franco; Primero, Giuseppe; Rungta, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Reasoning about degrees of belief has been investigated in the past by a number of authors and has a number of practical applications in real life. In this paper we present a unified framework to model and verify degrees of belief in a system of agents. In particular, we describe an extension of the temporal-epistemic logic CTLK and we introduce a semantics based on interpreted systems for this extension. In this way, degrees of beliefs do not need to be provided externally, but can be derived automatically from the possible executions of the system, thereby providing a computationally grounded formalism. We leverage the semantics to (a) construct a model checking algorithm, (b) investigate its complexity, (c) provide a Java implementation of the model checking algorithm, and (d) evaluate our approach using the standard benchmark of the dining cryptographers. Finally, we provide a detailed case study: using our framework and our implementation, we assess and verify the situational awareness of the pilot of Air France 447 flying in off-nominal conditions.

  7. Direct quantification of chemical warfare agents and related compounds at low ppt levels: comparing active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization and secondary electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Schaer, Martin; Siegenthaler, Peter; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-01-01

    A novel active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization (DBDI) technique for mass spectrometry is applied to the direct detection of 13 chemical warfare related compounds, including sarin, and compared to secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) in terms of selectivity and sensitivity. The investigated compounds include an intact chemical warfare agent and structurally related molecules, hydrolysis products and/or precursors of highly toxic nerve agents (G-series, V-series, and "new" nerve agents), and blistering and incapacitating warfare agents. Well-defined analyte gas phase concentrations were generated by a pressure-assisted nanospray with consecutive thermal evaporation and dilution. Identification was achieved by selected reaction monitoring (SRM). The most abundant fragment ion intensity of each compound was used for quantification. For DBDI and SESI, absolute gas phase detection limits in the low ppt range (in MS/MS mode) were achieved for all compounds investigated. Although the sensitivity of both methods was comparable, the active capillary DBDI sensitivity was found to be dependent on the applied AC voltage, thus enabling direct tuning of the sensitivity and the in-source fragmentation, which may become a key feature in terms of field applicability. Our findings underline the applicability of DBDI and SESI for the direct, sensitive detection and quantification of several CWA types and their degradation products. Furthermore, they suggest the use of DBDI in combination with hand-held instruments for CWAs on-site monitoring. PMID:25427190

  8. Effect of mechanical damage on emission of volatile organic compounds from plant leaves and implications for evaluation of host plant specificity of prospective biological control agents of weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessment of host plant specificity is a critical step in the evaluation of classical biological control agents of weeds, which is necessary for avoiding possible damage to nontarget plants. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted by plants likely play an important role in determining which plant...

  9. Spatial process and data models : toward integration of agent-based models and GIS.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D. G.; North, M. J.; Robinson, D. T.; Riolo, R.; Rand, W.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Michigan

    2007-10-01

    The use of object-orientation for both spatial data and spatial process models facilitates their integration, which can allow exploration and explanation of spatial-temporal phenomena. In order to better understand how tight coupling might proceed and to evaluate the possible functional and efficiency gains from such a tight coupling, we identify four key relationships affecting how geographic data (fields and objects) and agent-based process models can interact: identity, causal, temporal and topological. We discuss approaches to implementing tight integration, focusing on a middleware approach that links existing GIS and ABM development platforms, and illustrate the need and approaches with example agent-based models.

  10. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of paralleled Aza resveratrol-chalcone compounds as potential anti-inflammatory agents for the treatment of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenbo; Ge, Xiangting; Xu, Fengli; Zhang, Yali; Liu, Zhiguo; Pan, Jialing; Song, Jiao; Dai, Yuanrong; Zhou, Jianmin; Feng, Jianpeng; Liang, Guang

    2015-08-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of acute respiratory failure in critically-ill patients. It has been reported that both resveratrol and chalcone derivatives could ameliorate lung injury induced by inflammation. A series of paralleled Aza resveratrol-chalcone compounds (5a-5m, 6a-6i) were designed, synthesized and screened for anti-inflammatory activity. A majority showed potent inhibition on the IL-6 and TNF-α expression-stimulated by LPS in macrophages, of which compound 6b is the most potent analog by inhibition of LPS-induced IL-6 release in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, 6b exhibited protection against LPS-induced acute lung injury in vivo. These results offer further insight into the use of Aza resveratrol-chalcone compounds for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, and the use of compound 6b as a lead compound for the development of anti-ALI agents. PMID:26048788

  11. A conceptual data model and modelling language for fields and agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Bakker, Merijn; de Jong, Kor; Schmitz, Oliver; Karssenberg, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Modelling is essential in order to understand environmental systems. Environmental systems are heterogeneous because they consist of fields and agents. Fields have a value defined everywhere at all times, for example surface elevation and temperature. Agents are bounded in space and time and have a value only within their bounds, for example biomass of a tree crown or the speed of a car. Many phenomena have properties of both fields and agents. Although many systems contain both fields and agents and integration of these concepts would be required for modelling, existing modelling frameworks concentrate on either agent-based or field-based modelling and are often low-level programming frameworks. A concept is lacking that integrates fields and agents in a way that is easy to use for modelers who are not software engineers. To address this issue, we develop a conceptual data model that represents fields and agents uniformly. We then show how the data model can be used in a high-level modelling language. The data model represents fields and agents in space-time. Also relations and networks can be represented using the same concepts. Using the conceptual data model we can represent static and mobile agents that may have spatial and temporal variation within their extent. The concepts we use are phenomenon, property set, item, property, domain and value. The phenomenon is the thing that is modelled, which can be any real world thing, for example trees. A phenomenon usually consists of several items, e.g. single trees. The domain is the spatiotemporal location and/or extent for which the items in the phenomenon are defined. Multiple different domains can coexist for a given phenomenon. For example a domain describing the extent of the trees and a domain describing the stem locations. The same goes for the property, which is an attribute of the thing that is being modeled. A property has a value, which is possibly discretized, for example the biomass over the tree crown

  12. Agent Based Modeling of Human Gut Microbiome Interactions and Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Shashkova, Tatiana; Popenko, Anna; Tyakht, Alexander; Peskov, Kirill; Kosinsky, Yuri; Bogolubsky, Lev; Raigorodskii, Andrei; Ischenko, Dmitry; Alexeev, Dmitry; Govorun, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Background Intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the human health. It is involved in the digestion and protects the host against external pathogens. Examination of the intestinal microbiome interactions is required for understanding of the community influence on host health. Studies of the microbiome can provide insight on methods of improving health, including specific clinical procedures for individual microbial community composition modification and microbiota correction by colonizing with new bacterial species or dietary changes. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work we report an agent-based model of interactions between two bacterial species and between species and the gut. The model is based on reactions describing bacterial fermentation of polysaccharides to acetate and propionate and fermentation of acetate to butyrate. Antibiotic treatment was chosen as disturbance factor and used to investigate stability of the system. System recovery after antibiotic treatment was analyzed as dependence on quantity of feedback interactions inside the community, therapy duration and amount of antibiotics. Bacterial species are known to mutate and acquire resistance to the antibiotics. The ability to mutate was considered to be a stochastic process, under this suggestion ratio of sensitive to resistant bacteria was calculated during antibiotic therapy and recovery. Conclusion/Significance The model confirms a hypothesis of feedbacks mechanisms necessity for providing functionality and stability of the system after disturbance. High fraction of bacterial community was shown to mutate during antibiotic treatment, though sensitive strains could become dominating after recovery. The recovery of sensitive strains is explained by fitness cost of the resistance. The model demonstrates not only quantitative dynamics of bacterial species, but also gives an ability to observe the emergent spatial structure and its alteration, depending on various feedback mechanisms

  13. Synthesized Population Databases: A US Geospatial Database for Agent-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Wheaton, William D.; Cajka, James C.; Chasteen, Bernadette M.; Wagener, Diane K.; Cooley, Philip C.; Ganapathi, Laxminarayana; Roberts, Douglas J.; Allpress, Justine L.

    2010-01-01

    Agent-based models simulate large-scale social systems. They assign behaviors and activities to “agents” (individuals) within the population being modeled and then allow the agents to interact with the environment and each other in complex simulations. Agent-based models are frequently used to simulate infectious disease outbreaks, among other uses. RTI used and extended an iterative proportional fitting method to generate a synthesized, geospatially explicit, human agent database that represents the US population in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in the year 2000. Each agent is assigned to a household; other agents make up the household occupants. For this database, RTI developed the methods for generating synthesized households and personsassigning agents to schools and workplaces so that complex interactions among agents as they go about their daily activities can be taken into accountgenerating synthesized human agents who occupy group quarters (military bases, college dormitories, prisons, nursing homes).In this report, we describe both the methods used to generate the synthesized population database and the final data structure and data content of the database. This information will provide researchers with the information they need to use the database in developing agent-based models. Portions of the synthesized agent database are available to any user upon request. RTI will extract a portion (a county, region, or state) of the database for users who wish to use this database in their own agent-based models. PMID:20505787

  14. Task 89-07: Evaluation of the in vitro efficacy of candidate pretreatment and treatment (pt) compounds against vesicants and nerve agents. Final report, January 1990-January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hobson, D.W.; Blank, J.A.; Starner, R.A.

    1993-10-01

    MREF Task 89-07 encompassed four vesicant assays and four nerve agent assays. The four vesicant assays evaluated the candidate P and T compound solubility limitations, direct cytotoxic effects, efficacy against HD-induced cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) depletion, and efficacy against HD-induced cytotoxicity. Normal human epidermal cells (NHEKs) were used to evaluate candidate PT compound efficacy against HD-induced NAD+ depletion, and peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBMC) were used in direct cytotoxicity and HD-induced cytotoxicity assays. The four nerve agent assays assessed candidate PT compound direct inhibitory effects on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, candidate PT compound efficacy in reactivating Tabun (GA) - and O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate (VX)-inhibited A ThE, and candidate PT compound efficacy in slowing the aging rate of Soman (GD) inhibited AChE. All nerve agent and vesicant assays with the exception of the direct cytotoxicity and HD-induced cytotoxicity assays were initially established under MREF Task 88-36. The direct cytotoxicity and HD-induced cytotoxicity assays were transitioned to the MREF from USAMRICD and validated for use in routine screening procedures, including the generation of control database values, under Task 89-07. Solubility data were obtained for 37 compounds submitted for evaluation in the vesicant assays. Thirty-five of these compounds were evaluated for direct cytotoxicity, and their effect against HD-induced cytotoxicity, while 13 compound is were evaluated for efficacy against HD-induced NAD+ depletion. AChE reactivation, ACHE aging, ACHE inhibition, In vitro, Cytotoxicity , Vesicant assays, Nerve ag.

  15. Representations in Dynamical Embodied Agents: Re-Analyzing a Minimally Cognitive Model Agent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirolli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the role of "representations" in cognitive science is a fundamental problem facing the emerging framework of embodied, situated, dynamical cognition. To make progress, I follow the approach proposed by an influential representational skeptic, Randall Beer: building artificial agents capable of minimally cognitive behaviors and…

  16. N-Acetylgalactosamino Dendrons as Clearing Agents to Enhance Liver Targeting of Model Antibody-Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Barney; Cheal, Sarah M.; Torchon, Geralda; Dilhas, Anna; Yang, Guangbin; Pu, Jun; Punzalan, Blesida; Larson, Steven M.; Ouerfelli, Ouathek

    2014-01-01

    Dendrimer clearing agents represent a unique class of compounds for use in multistep targeting (MST) in radioimmunotherapy and imaging. These compounds were developed to facilitate the removal of excess tumor-targeting monoclonal antibody (mAb) prior to administration of the radionuclide to minimize exposure of normal tissue to radiation. Clearing agents are designed to capture the circulating mAb, and target it to the liver for metabolism. Glycodendrons are ideally suited for MST applications as these highly branched compounds are chemically well-defined thus advantageous over heterogeneous macromolecules. Previous studies have described glycodendron 3 as a clearing agent for use in three-step MST protocols, and early in vivo assessment of 3 showed promise. However, synthetic challenges have hampered its availability for further development. In this report we describe a new sequence of chemical steps which enables the straightforward synthesis and analytical characterization of this class of dendrons. With accessibility and analytical identification solved, we sought to evaluate both lower and higher generation dendrons for hepatocyte targeting as well as clearance of a model protein. We prepared a series of clearing agents where a single biotin is connected to glycodendrons displaying four, eight, sixteen or thirty-two α-thio-N-acetylgalactosamine (α–SGalNAc) units, resulting in compounds with molecular weights ranging from 2 to 17 kDa, respectively. These compounds were fully characterized by LCMS and NMR. We then evaluated the capacity of these agents to clear a model 131I-labeled single chain variable fragment antibody-streptavidin (131I-scFv-SAv) fusion protein from blood and tissue in mice, and compared their clearing efficiencies to that of a 500 kDa dextran-biotin conjugate. Glycodendrons and dextran-biotin exhibited enhanced blood clearance of the scFv-SAv construct. Biodistribution analysis showed liver targeting/uptake of the scFv-SAv construct to

  17. E-laboratories : agent-based modeling of electricity markets.

    SciTech Connect

    North, M.; Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Macal, C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Veselka, T.

    2002-05-03

    Electricity markets are complex adaptive systems that operate under a wide range of rules that span a variety of time scales. These rules are imposed both from above by society and below by physics. Many electricity markets are undergoing or are about to undergo a transition from centrally regulated systems to decentralized markets. Furthermore, several electricity markets have recently undergone this transition with extremely unsatisfactory results, most notably in California. These high stakes transitions require the introduction of largely untested regulatory structures. Suitable laboratories that can be used to test regulatory structures before they are applied to real systems are needed. Agent-based models can provide such electronic laboratories or ''e-laboratories.'' To better understand the requirements of an electricity market e-laboratory, a live electricity market simulation was created. This experience helped to shape the development of the Electricity Market Complex Adaptive Systems (EMCAS) model. To explore EMCAS' potential as an e-laboratory, several variations of the live simulation were created. These variations probed the possible effects of changing power plant outages and price setting rules on electricity market prices.

  18. Agent-based modeling to simulate the dengue spread

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chengbin; Tao, Haiyan; Ye, Zhiwei

    2008-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel method ABM in simulating the unique process for the dengue spread. Dengue is an acute infectious disease with a long history of over 200 years. Unlike the diseases that can be transmitted directly from person to person, dengue spreads through a must vector of mosquitoes. There is still no any special effective medicine and vaccine for dengue up till now. The best way to prevent dengue spread is to take precautions beforehand. Thus, it is crucial to detect and study the dynamic process of dengue spread that closely relates to human-environment interactions where Agent-Based Modeling (ABM) effectively works. The model attempts to simulate the dengue spread in a more realistic way in the bottom-up way, and to overcome the limitation of ABM, namely overlooking the influence of geographic and environmental factors. Considering the influence of environment, Aedes aegypti ecology and other epidemiological characteristics of dengue spread, ABM can be regarded as a useful way to simulate the whole process so as to disclose the essence of the evolution of dengue spread.

  19. Agent-Based Knowledge Discovery for Modeling and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Haack, Jereme N.; Cowell, Andrew J.; Marshall, Eric J.; Fligg, Alan K.; Gregory, Michelle L.; McGrath, Liam R.

    2009-09-15

    This paper describes an approach to using agent technology to extend the automated discovery mechanism of the Knowledge Encapsulation Framework (KEF). KEF is a suite of tools to enable the linking of knowledge inputs (relevant, domain-specific evidence) to modeling and simulation projects, as well as other domains that require an effective collaborative workspace for knowledge-based tasks. This framework can be used to capture evidence (e.g., trusted material such as journal articles and government reports), discover new evidence (covering both trusted and social media), enable discussions surrounding domain-specific topics and provide automatically generated semantic annotations for improved corpus investigation. The current KEF implementation is presented within a semantic wiki environment, providing a simple but powerful collaborative space for team members to review, annotate, discuss and align evidence with their modeling frameworks. The novelty in this approach lies in the combination of automatically tagged and user-vetted resources, which increases user trust in the environment, leading to ease of adoption for the collaborative environment.

  20. Lessons for neurotoxicology from selected model compounds: SGOMSEC joint report.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, D C; Evangelista de Duffard, A M; Duffard, R; Iregren, A; Satoh, H; Watanabe, C

    1996-01-01

    The ability to identify potential neurotoxicants depends upon the characteristics of our test instruments. The neurotoxic properties of lead, methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organic solvents would all have been detected at some dose level by tests in current use, provided that the doses were high enough and administered at an appropriate time such as during gestation. The adequacy of animal studies, particularly rodent studies, to predict intake levels at which human health can be protected is disappointing, however. It is unlikely that the use of advanced behavioral methodology would alleviate the apparent lack of sensitivity of the rodent model for many agents. PMID:8860323

  1. Comparing large-scale computational approaches to epidemic modeling: Agent-based versus structured metapopulation models

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years large-scale computational models for the realistic simulation of epidemic outbreaks have been used with increased frequency. Methodologies adapt to the scale of interest and range from very detailed agent-based models to spatially-structured metapopulation models. One major issue thus concerns to what extent the geotemporal spreading pattern found by different modeling approaches may differ and depend on the different approximations and assumptions used. Methods We provide for the first time a side-by-side comparison of the results obtained with a stochastic agent-based model and a structured metapopulation stochastic model for the progression of a baseline pandemic event in Italy, a large and geographically heterogeneous European country. The agent-based model is based on the explicit representation of the Italian population through highly detailed data on the socio-demographic structure. The metapopulation simulations use the GLobal Epidemic and Mobility (GLEaM) model, based on high-resolution census data worldwide, and integrating airline travel flow data with short-range human mobility patterns at the global scale. The model also considers age structure data for Italy. GLEaM and the agent-based models are synchronized in their initial conditions by using the same disease parameterization, and by defining the same importation of infected cases from international travels. Results The results obtained show that both models provide epidemic patterns that are in very good agreement at the granularity levels accessible by both approaches, with differences in peak timing on the order of a few days. The relative difference of the epidemic size depends on the basic reproductive ratio, R0, and on the fact that the metapopulation model consistently yields a larger incidence than the agent-based model, as expected due to the differences in the structure in the intra-population contact pattern of the approaches. The age breakdown analysis shows

  2. Agent-based modeling of hyporheic dissolved organic carbon transport and transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrielsen, P. J.; Wilson, J. L.; Pullin, M.

    2011-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a complex suite of organic compounds present in natural ecosystems, and is particularly studied in river and stream systems. The hyporheic zone (HZ), a region of surface water-shallow groundwater exchange, has been identified as a hotspot of DOC processing and is generally regarded as a net sink of organic matter. More recent studies into stream DOC have shifted to examining DOC quality rather than bulk quantity. DOC quality variability has been linked to hydrologic and climatic variability, both focuses of current climate change research. A new agent-based model in the NetLogo modeling environment couples hydrologic transport with chemical and biological transformation of DOC to simulate changing DOC quality in hyporheic flow. A pore-scale model implements a Lattice Boltzmann fluid dynamic model and surficial interactions to simulate sorption and microbial uptake. Upscaled to a stream meander scale, this model displays spatial variation and evolution of DOC quality. Model output metrics are correlated to field sample analytical results from a hyporheic meander of the East Fork Jemez River, Sandoval Co., NM.

  3. TECHNICAL JUSTIFICATION FOR CHOOSING PROPANE AS A CALIBRATION AGENT FOR TOTAL FLAMMABLE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) DETERMINATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    DOUGLAS, J.G.

    2006-07-06

    This document presents the technical justification for choosing and using propane as a calibration standard for estimating total flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in an air matrix. A propane-in-nitrogen standard was selected based on a number of criteria: (1) has an analytical response similar to the VOCs of interest, (2) can be made with known accuracy and traceability, (3) is available with good purity, (4) has a matrix similar to the sample matrix, (5) is stable during storage and use, (6) is relatively non-hazardous, and (7) is a recognized standard for similar analytical applications. The Waste Retrieval Project (WRP) desires a fast, reliable, and inexpensive method for screening the flammable VOC content in the vapor-phase headspace of waste containers. Table 1 lists the flammable VOCs of interest to the WRP. The current method used to determine the VOC content of a container is to sample the container's headspace and submit the sample for gas chromatography--mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The driver for the VOC measurement requirement is safety: potentially flammable atmospheres in the waste containers must be allowed to diffuse prior to processing the container. The proposed flammable VOC screening method is to inject an aliquot of the headspace sample into an argon-doped pulsed-discharge helium ionization detector (Ar-PDHID) contained within a gas chromatograph. No actual chromatography is performed; the sample is transferred directly from a sample loop to the detector through a short, inert transfer line. The peak area resulting from the injected sample is proportional to the flammable VOC content of the sample. However, because the Ar-PDHID has different response factors for different flammable VOCs, a fundamental assumption must be made that the agent used to calibrate the detector is representative of the flammable VOCs of interest that may be in the headspace samples. At worst, we desire that calibration with the selected calibrating

  4. Excellent approach to modeling urban expansion by fuzzy cellular automata: agent base model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajavigodellou, Yousef; Alesheikh, Ali A.; Mohammed, Abdulrazak A. S.; Chapi, Kamran

    2014-09-01

    Recently, the interaction between humans and their environment is the one of important challenges in the world. Landuse/ cover change (LUCC) is a complex process that includes actors and factors at different social and spatial levels. The complexity and dynamics of urban systems make the applicable practice of urban modeling very difficult. With the increased computational power and the greater availability of spatial data, micro-simulation such as the agent based and cellular automata simulation methods, has been developed by geographers, planners, and scholars, and it has shown great potential for representing and simulating the complexity of the dynamic processes involved in urban growth and land use change. This paper presents Fuzzy Cellular Automata in Geospatial Information System and remote Sensing to simulated and predicted urban expansion pattern. These FCA-based dynamic spatial urban models provide an improved ability to forecast and assess future urban growth and to create planning scenarios, allowing us to explore the potential impacts of simulations that correspond to urban planning and management policies. A fuzzy inference guided cellular automata approach. Semantic or linguistic knowledge on Land use change is expressed as fuzzy rules, based on which fuzzy inference is applied to determine the urban development potential for each pixel. The model integrates an ABM (agent-based model) and FCA (Fuzzy Cellular Automata) to investigate a complex decision-making process and future urban dynamic processes. Based on this model rapid development and green land protection under the influences of the behaviors and decision modes of regional authority agents, real estate developer agents, resident agents and non- resident agents and their interactions have been applied to predict the future development patterns of the Erbil metropolitan region.

  5. Tax evasion dynamics and nonequilibrium Zaklan model with heterogeneous agents on square lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we use the version of the nonequilibrium Zaklan model via agent-based Monte-Carlo simulations to study the problem of the fluctuations of the tax evasion on a heterogeneous agents community of honest and tax evaders citizens. The time evolution of this system is performed by a nonequilibrium model known as majority-vote model, but with a different probability for each agent to disobey the majority vote of its neighbors.

  6. Model for compound formation during ion-beam mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Desimoni, J.; Traverse, A. )

    1993-11-01

    We propose an ion-beam-mixing model that accounts for compound formation at a boundary between two materials during ion irradiation. It is based on Fick's law together with a chemical driving force in order to simulate the chemical reaction at the boundary. The behavior of the squared thickness of the mixed layer, [ital X][sup 2], with the irradiation fluence, [Phi], has been found in several mixing experiments to be either quadratic ([ital X][sup 2][alpha][Phi][sup 2]) or linear ([ital X][sup 2][alpha][Phi]), a result which is qualitatively reproduced. Depending on the fluence range, compound formation or diffusion is the limiting process of mixing kinetics. A criterion is established in terms of the ratio of the diffusion coefficient [ital D] due to irradiation to the chemical reaction rate squared which allows us to predict quadratic or linear behavior. When diffusion is the limiting process, [ital D] is enhanced by a factor which accounts for the formation of a compound in the mixed layer. Good agreement is found between the calculated mixing rates and the data taken from mixing experiments in metal/Si bilayers.

  7. Demeter, persephone, and the search for emergence in agent-based models.

    SciTech Connect

    North, M. J.; Howe, T. R.; Collier, N. T.; Vos, J. R.; Decision and Information Sciences; Univ. of Chicago; PantaRei Corp.; Univ. of Illinois

    2006-01-01

    In Greek mythology, the earth goddess Demeter was unable to find her daughter Persephone after Persephone was abducted by Hades, the god of the underworld. Demeter is said to have embarked on a long and frustrating, but ultimately successful, search to find her daughter. Unfortunately, long and frustrating searches are not confined to Greek mythology. In modern times, agent-based modelers often face similar troubles when searching for agents that are to be to be connected to one another and when seeking appropriate target agents while defining agent behaviors. The result is a 'search for emergence' in that many emergent or potentially emergent behaviors in agent-based models of complex adaptive systems either implicitly or explicitly require search functions. This paper considers a new nested querying approach to simplifying such agent-based modeling and multi-agent simulation search problems.

  8. A COMPOUND MODEL FOR THE ORIGIN OF EARTH'S WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Izidoro, A.; Winter, O. C.; De Souza Torres, K.; Haghighipour, N.

    2013-04-10

    One of the most important subjects of debate in the formation of the solar system is the origin of Earth's water. Comets have long been considered as the most likely source of the delivery of water to Earth. However, elemental and isotopic arguments suggest a very small contribution from these objects. Other sources have also been proposed, among which local adsorption of water vapor onto dust grains in the primordial nebula and delivery through planetesimals and planetary embryos have become more prominent. However, no sole source of water provides a satisfactory explanation for Earth's water as a whole. In view of that, using numerical simulations, we have developed a compound model incorporating both the principal endogenous and exogenous theories, and investigating their implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery. Comets are also considered in the final analysis, as it is likely that at least some of Earth's water has cometary origin. We analyze our results comparing two different water distribution models, and complement our study using the D/H ratio, finding possible relative contributions from each source and focusing on planets formed in the habitable zone. We find that the compound model plays an important role by showing greater advantage in the amount and time of water delivery in Earth-like planets.

  9. Hydrocracking with new solid acid catalysts: Model compounds studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, R.K.; Diehl, J.W.; Olson, E.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Two new solid acid catalysts have been prepared by supporting zinc chloride on silica gel and acid-exchanged montmorillonite. The acid properties of these catalysts were determined by Hammett indicator method which showed that highly Bronsted acidic sites were present. SEM/EDS studies indicated a uniform distribution of silicon, zinc, and chlorine in the silica gel-zinc chloride catalyst. The activities of these catalysts in the hydrocracking of bibenzyl, polybenzyl, alkylbenzenes, and other heteroatom substituted aromatics were investigated. Their results with model compounds account for the effectiveness of these solid acid catalysts for conversion of coals to lower molecular weight materials.

  10. The Agent-based Approach: A New Direction for Computational Models of Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlesinger, Matthew; Parisi, Domenico

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the concepts of online and offline sampling and highlights the role of online sampling in agent-based models of learning and development. Compares the strengths of each approach for modeling particular developmental phenomena and research questions. Describes a recent agent-based model of infant causal perception. Discusses limitations…

  11. Reactive transport modelling of organic complexing agents in cement stabilized low and intermediate level waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schenck, Henrik; Källström, Klas

    The Swedish final repository for short-lived radioactive waste (SFR 1) is located at Forsmark in Sweden. It holds low and intermediate-level operational waste from the Swedish nuclear power plants, as well as industrial, research-related, and medical waste. A variety of low molecular weight organic compounds are present in the waste or in its matrix. Such compounds can also be formed by chemical degradation of organic macromolecules. These organics can ligate to metal atoms forming stable complexes and also adsorb to the surface of cement, thereby influencing the net release of radionuclides from the repository. This motivates the study of the concentration distribution of complexing agents in the repository as a function of time. The following paper reports the results of mass transport modelling, describing the transport of complexing agents through the cementitous matrix in the rock vault for intermediate-level waste in the SFR 1 repository. Nitrilotriacetate (NTA) and isosaccharinate (ISA) have been investigated, where the former is considered to be non-sorbing and non-reacting, while the latter is produced from cellulose degradation and adsorbs strongly to cement. The 3D model considers advection, diffusion, and sorption of solvated species in cement pore water over a time period of 20,000 years. The model accounts for the spatial distribution of the flow field in the repository structure and also considers changing groundwater flow during the investigated time period. It is found that 99% of the NTA is removed after approximately 4000 years, while 90% of the ISA is retained in the rock vault after 20,000 years. The maximum pore water concentration of ISA is found to be 8.6 mol/m3 after approximately 2300 years, based on the degradation of the deposited amounts of cellulose. Over the investigated time scale, the ligands retained in the repository can redistribute across several waste compartments where the organic compounds were not originally deposited. In

  12. Agent-Based Modeling of Chronic Diseases: A Narrative Review and Future Research Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Mark A.; Siscovick, David S.; Zhang, Donglan; Pagán, José A.

    2016-01-01

    The United States is experiencing an epidemic of chronic disease. As the US population ages, health care providers and policy makers urgently need decision models that provide systematic, credible prediction regarding the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases to improve population health management and medical decision-making. Agent-based modeling is a promising systems science approach that can model complex interactions and processes related to chronic health conditions, such as adaptive behaviors, feedback loops, and contextual effects. This article introduces agent-based modeling by providing a narrative review of agent-based models of chronic disease and identifying the characteristics of various chronic health conditions that must be taken into account to build effective clinical- and policy-relevant models. We also identify barriers to adopting agent-based models to study chronic diseases. Finally, we discuss future research directions of agent-based modeling applied to problems related to specific chronic health conditions. PMID:27236380

  13. Agent-Based Modeling of Chronic Diseases: A Narrative Review and Future Research Directions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Lawley, Mark A; Siscovick, David S; Zhang, Donglan; Pagán, José A

    2016-01-01

    The United States is experiencing an epidemic of chronic disease. As the US population ages, health care providers and policy makers urgently need decision models that provide systematic, credible prediction regarding the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases to improve population health management and medical decision-making. Agent-based modeling is a promising systems science approach that can model complex interactions and processes related to chronic health conditions, such as adaptive behaviors, feedback loops, and contextual effects. This article introduces agent-based modeling by providing a narrative review of agent-based models of chronic disease and identifying the characteristics of various chronic health conditions that must be taken into account to build effective clinical- and policy-relevant models. We also identify barriers to adopting agent-based models to study chronic diseases. Finally, we discuss future research directions of agent-based modeling applied to problems related to specific chronic health conditions. PMID:27236380

  14. Zebrafish as a model for acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting organophosphorus agent exposure and oxime reactivation.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Jeffrey A; Dao, Thuy L; Kan, Robert K; Shih, Tsung-Ming

    2016-06-01

    The current research progression efforts for investigating novel treatments for exposure to organophosphorus (OP) compounds that inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), including pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs), rely solely on in vitro cell assays and in vivo rodent models. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a popular, well-established vertebrate model in biomedical research that offers high-throughput capabilities and genetic manipulation not readily available with rodents. A number of research studies have investigated the effects of subacute developmental exposure to OP pesticides in zebrafish, observing detrimental effects on gross morphology, neuronal development, and behavior. Few studies, however, have utilized this model to evaluate treatments, such as oxime reactivators, anticholinergics, or anticonvulsants, following acute exposure. Preliminary work has investigated the effects of CWNA exposure. The results clearly demonstrated relative toxicity and oxime efficacy similar to that reported for the rodent model. This review surveys the current literature utilizing zebrafish as a model for OP exposure and highlights its potential use as a high-throughput system for evaluating AChE reactivator antidotal treatments to acute pesticide and CWNA exposure. PMID:27123828

  15. Comparing large-scale computational approaches to epidemic modeling: agent based versus structured metapopulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, Bruno; Ajelli, Marco; Balcan, Duygu; Colizza, Vittoria; Hu, Hao; Ramasco, José; Merler, Stefano; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2010-03-01

    We provide for the first time a side by side comparison of the results obtained with a stochastic agent based model and a structured metapopulation stochastic model for the evolution of a baseline pandemic event in Italy. The Agent Based model is based on the explicit representation of the Italian population through highly detailed data on the socio-demographic structure. The metapopulation simulations use the GLobal Epidemic and Mobility (GLEaM) model, based on high resolution census data worldwide, and integrating airline travel flow data with short range human mobility patterns at the global scale. Both models provide epidemic patterns that are in very good agreement at the granularity levels accessible by both approaches, with differences in peak timing of the order of few days. The age breakdown analysis shows that similar attack rates are obtained for the younger age classes.

  16. The effect of bulking agents on the chemical stability of acid-sensitive compounds in freeze-dried formulations: sucrose inversion study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Enxian; Ewing, Susan; Gatlin, Larry; Suryanarayanan, Raj; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2009-09-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate the impact of amorphous bulking agents on the chemical stability of freeze-dried materials. Polyvinylpyrrolidone and dextran of different molecular weights and lactose were used as bulking agents, and sucrose was used as an example of an acid-sensitive compound. Lyophiles containing bulking agent and sucrose at 10:1 (w/w) ratio, citrate buffer, and optionally bromophenol blue (pH indicator) were tested by X-ray powder diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and Karl Fischer titrimetry. Diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectroscopy was used to obtain the concentration ratio of the deprotonated (In(2-)) to the protonated (HIn(-)) indicator species, from which the Hammett acidity function (H(2-)) was calculated. The extent of sucrose inversion in lyophiles stored at 60 degrees C was quantified by HPLC. The bulking agent had a major impact on both the apparent solid-state acidity (H(2-)) and the degradation rate, with the degradation rate constants value highest for dextran lyophiles (most "acidic", lower H(2-)) followed by lactose and polyvinylpyrrolidone lyophile (least "acidic", higher H(2-)). The Hammett acidity function can be used as an empirical solid-state acidity scale, to predict the rank-order stability of acid-sensitive compounds in lyophiles prepared with different bulking agents. PMID:19544366

  17. Molecular modeling toward selective inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase from the biological warfare agent Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Giacoppo, Juliana O S; Mancini, Daiana T; Guimarães, Ana P; Gonçalves, Arlan S; da Cunha, Elaine F F; França, Tanos C C; Ramalho, Teodorico C

    2015-02-16

    In the present work, we applied docking and molecular dynamics techniques to study 11 compounds inside the enzymes dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from the biological warfare agent Bacillus anthracis (BaDHFR) and Homo sapiens sapiens (HssDHFR). Six of these compounds were selected for a study with the mutant BaF96IDHFR. Our results corroborated with experimental data and allowed the proposition of a new molecule with potential activity and better selectivity for BaDHFR. PMID:24985033

  18. Model reduction for agent-based social simulation: coarse-graining a civil violence model.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yu; Fonoberov, Vladimir A; Fonoberova, Maria; Mezic, Igor; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2012-06-01

    Agent-based modeling (ABM) constitutes a powerful computational tool for the exploration of phenomena involving emergent dynamic behavior in the social sciences. This paper demonstrates a computer-assisted approach that bridges the significant gap between the single-agent microscopic level and the macroscopic (coarse-grained population) level, where fundamental questions must be rationally answered and policies guiding the emergent dynamics devised. Our approach will be illustrated through an agent-based model of civil violence. This spatiotemporally varying ABM incorporates interactions between a heterogeneous population of citizens [active (insurgent), inactive, or jailed] and a population of police officers. Detailed simulations exhibit an equilibrium punctuated by periods of social upheavals. We show how to effectively reduce the agent-based dynamics to a stochastic model with only two coarse-grained degrees of freedom: the number of jailed citizens and the number of active ones. The coarse-grained model captures the ABM dynamics while drastically reducing the computation time (by a factor of approximately 20). PMID:23005161

  19. Model reduction for agent-based social simulation: Coarse-graining a civil violence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yu; Fonoberov, Vladimir A.; Fonoberova, Maria; Mezic, Igor; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2012-06-01

    Agent-based modeling (ABM) constitutes a powerful computational tool for the exploration of phenomena involving emergent dynamic behavior in the social sciences. This paper demonstrates a computer-assisted approach that bridges the significant gap between the single-agent microscopic level and the macroscopic (coarse-grained population) level, where fundamental questions must be rationally answered and policies guiding the emergent dynamics devised. Our approach will be illustrated through an agent-based model of civil violence. This spatiotemporally varying ABM incorporates interactions between a heterogeneous population of citizens [active (insurgent), inactive, or jailed] and a population of police officers. Detailed simulations exhibit an equilibrium punctuated by periods of social upheavals. We show how to effectively reduce the agent-based dynamics to a stochastic model with only two coarse-grained degrees of freedom: the number of jailed citizens and the number of active ones. The coarse-grained model captures the ABM dynamics while drastically reducing the computation time (by a factor of approximately 20).

  20. Hydrometallation of model compounds of a cobalt-molybdenum catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    West, M.; Smith, M.C.; Petersen, E.E.

    1983-05-01

    One solution to corrosion and environmental problems is to remove sulfur from the fuel or feedstock before burning or processing by catalytic hydrosulfurization (HDS). Besides sulfur, heavy petroleum fractions and coal liquids contain high levels of trace metal compounds compared to traditional HDS feedstocks. In resids, these metals are mainly vanadium and nickel and in coal-liquids they are mostly titanium and iron. Under typical HDS conditions the organometallic compounds in these liquids also decompose and yield metal-free organics and metal sulfides. This hydrometallation (HDM) reaction is a double-edged sword. Since the sulfides are insoluble in the oil, the reaction effectively demetallizes the feedstock. This is desirable because, like sulfur, these metals pose environmental corrosion, and catalyst poisoning problems. The undesirable aspect of the reaction is that these insoluble metal sulfides collect in and around the HDS catalyst pellets, plugging pores and covering active surface sites thereby reducing both the HDS and the HDM catalytic activity. The deactivating effect of metal deposition on HDS and HDM is the focus of this study. Since the metal sulfides produced by HDM remain at the site of their reaction, the amount of metal at any point in the catalyst is a record of the reaction rate at that point. By carefully measuring the metal concentrations inside a series of cobalt-molybdenum-alumina catalyst pellets exposed for different lengths of time, demetallation rate profiles are measured within the pellets. There is no similar way to measure local HDS rates. Measurements of the global HDS rates, a knowledge of HDS kinetics, and measurements of the local HDM rates permit us to model the effect of metal deposits on catalyst activity. We have chosen to work with two model classes of compounds, metal naphthenates and metalloporphyrins.

  1. Sorption and Interfacial Rheology Study of Model Asphaltene Compounds.

    PubMed

    Pradilla, Diego; Simon, Sébastien; Sjöblom, Johan; Samaniuk, Joseph; Skrzypiec, Marta; Vermant, Jan

    2016-03-29

    The sorption and rheological properties of an acidic polyaromatic compound (C5PeC11), which can be used to further our understanding of the behavior of asphaltenes, are determined experimentally. The results show that C5PeC11 exhibits the type of pH-dependent surface activity and interfacial shear rheology observed in C6-asphaltenes with a decrease in the interfacial tension concomitant with the elastic modulus when the pH increases. Surface pressure-area (Π-A) isotherms show evidence of aggregation behavior and π-π stacking at both the air/water and oil/water interfaces. Similarly, interactions between adsorbed C5PeC11 compounds are evidenced through desorption experiments at the oil/water interface. Contrary to indigenous asphaltenes, adsorption is reversible, but desorption is slower than for noninteracting species. The reversibility enables us to create layers reproducibly, whereas the presence of interactions between the compounds enables us to mimic the key aspects of interfacial activity in asphaltenes. Shear and dilatational rheology show that C5PeC11 forms a predominantly elastic film both at the liquid/air and the liquid/liquid interfaces. Furthermore, a soft glassy rheology model (SGR) fits the data obtained at the liquid/liquid interface. However, it is shown that the effective noise temperature determined from the SGR model for C5PeC11 is higher than for indigenous asphaltenes measured under similar conditions. Finally, from a colloidal and rheological standpoint, the results highlight the importance of adequately addressing the distinction between the material functions and true elasticity extracted from a shear measurement and the apparent elasticity measured in dilatational-pendant drop setups. PMID:26949974

  2. Assimilating chemical compound with a regional chemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Yang, S.; Liang, M.; Hsu, S.; Tseng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    To constrain the source and sink of the chemical compounds at surface during model simulation, chemical compound assimilation with Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) has been implemented for the WRF-ChemT model. In this study, a two-tier system is applied to assimilating the meteorological and chemical variables in an OSSE framework. The unobserved surface flux is estimated according to the observations in the chemical component. A long-term nature run with total constant emission of 5.3×108 g/s is assumed to be the truth state in the OSSE. The simulated observations are obtained from the truth state by adding random errors. In order to generate the initial CO2 ensembles with similar spatial distribution as truth state without other prior information, the initial perturbation fields of CO2 are randomly chosen from three long-term runs with different emissions. The results indicate that in the constant emission case, the system can successfully estimate the unobserved chemical forcing and improve the distribution of the chemical compound. Under the scenario of diurnal forcing induced by human activities, the problem in estimating surface flux becomes more complex and difficult. A set of experiments with different initial chemical states suggest that the estimation of flux is sensitive to the quality of initial CO2 and CO2 surface flux. Strategies are designed to retrieve the time-varying information. The results show that with time-varying information and reliable initial ensembles, the estimation of surface flux have been significantly improved. Couple assimilation with meteorological and chemical components Surface flux estimation

  3. Synthesis of model compounds for coal liquefaction research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    Coal liquefaction investigations required the availability of model compounds for mechanistic investigations. Towards this end, IITRI was funded to develop an approach for the synthesis of one of the target compound. This study was carried out in several phases as outlined here. Initial synthetic investigations on obtaining 2-tetrolol was carried out using high pressure and temperature reduction with Raney nickel catalyst. The next step consisted in incorporation of a hydroxymethyelene group at the C-3 position. This was successfully carried out utilizing 2-tetrolol, formaldehyde, and calcium oxide. An alternate improved method was developed using 3-carboxyl-2-naphthol. This required less time, gave a cheer product in higher yield. Efforts at the introduction of a chloromethylene group only yielded polymeric material or starting material in spite of protection the phenolic group by various groups. They synthesis of 3, 5-dimethyl-6- bromobenzyl chloride was successfully carried out by performing the Blank reaction of 2, 4-dimethyl bromobenzene. The product was characterized by GC/MS. Purification was not possible, as it was a complex mixture. Efforts at converting it to the acetate followed by separation to was not feasible. Unlike in the case of 2- hydroxyteralol, hydroxymetylation by established procedure yielded only the starting materials. Commercially available 4-methoxy-1- maphthaldehyde was protected as the ethylene acetal. The Wittig reagent 3-chlorobenzyl phosphonium bromide was prepared and condensed with 4-methoxy-1-napthaldehyde successfully and proved that the overall synthetic approach was proceeding in the desired direction. All the necessary intermediates have been synthesized,and we have demonstrated using model compounds, that the synthetic objective can be attained.

  4. Aquatic pathways model to predict the fate of phenolic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Aaberg, R.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Mellinger, P.J.

    1983-04-01

    Organic materials released from energy-related activities could affect human health and the environment. To better assess possible impacts, we developed a model to predict the fate of spills or discharges of pollutants into flowing or static bodies of fresh water. A computer code, Aquatic Pathways Model (APM), was written to implement the model. The computer programs use compartmental analysis to simulate aquatic ecosystems. The APM estimates the concentrations of chemicals in fish tissue, water and sediment, and is therefore useful for assessing exposure to humans through aquatic pathways. The APM will consider any aquatic pathway for which the user has transport data. Additionally, APM will estimate transport rates from physical and chemical properties of chemicals between several key compartments. The major pathways considered are biodegradation, fish and sediment uptake, photolysis, and evaporation. The model has been implemented with parameters for distribution of phenols, an important class of compounds found in the water-soluble fractions of coal liquids. Current modeling efforts show that, in comparison with many pesticides and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the lighter phenolics (the cresols) are not persistent in the environment. The properties of heavier molecular weight phenolics (indanols, naphthols) are not well enough understood at this time to make similar judgements. For the twelve phenolics studied, biodegradation appears to be the major pathway for elimination from aquatic environments. A pond system simulation (using APM) of a spill of solvent refined coal (SRC-II) materials indicates that phenol, cresols, and other single cyclic phenolics are degraded to 16 to 25 percent of their original concentrations within 30 hours. Adsorption of these compounds into sediments and accumulation by fish was minor.

  5. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  6. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  7. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use... GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  8. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  9. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  10. Axenically cultured amastigote forms as an in vitro model for investigation of antileishmanial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Sereno, D; Lemesre, J L

    1997-01-01

    Using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide microassay, previously described as a means of quantifying Leishmania amazonensis in vitro at the amastigote stage (D. Sereno and J. L. Lemesre, Parisitol. Res., in press), we have compared the activities of seven drugs, including those currently used to treat leishmaniasis, against axenically grown amastigote and promastigote forms of three Leishmania species (L. amazonensis, L. mexicana, and L. infantum, responsible for diffuse cutaneous, cutaneous, and visceral leishmaniasis, respectively). The ability of axenically cultured amastigote organisms to be used in an investigation of antileishmanial agents was first evaluated. We have confirmed the toxicities of sodium stibogluconate (Pentostam), pentamidine, and amphotericin B to active and dividing populations of axenically cultured amastigotes. The toxicity of potassium antimonyl tartrate trihydrate, which is generally higher than that of Pentostam, seemed to indicate that pentavalent antimony can be metabolized in vivo to compounds, possibly trivalent in nature, which are more active against the amastigote organisms. When the drug susceptibilities of parasites at both stages were compared, great variations were found for all the drugs studied. These major differences, which show the specific chemosusceptibility of the parasite at the mammalian stage, demonstrate the potential of using cultured amastigotes instead of promastigotes in a drug-screening procedure for early detection. This in vitro model may help in the isolation of active compounds, particularly those with low-grade activities, against the mammalian stage of the parasite. PMID:9145854

  11. Application of the underscreened Kondo lattice model to neptunium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Christopher; da Rosa Simoes, Acirete S.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Coqublin, B.

    2012-12-01

    The coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order has been observed in many uranium and neptunium compounds such as UTe or Np2PdGa3. This coexistence can be described within the underscreened Anderson lattice model with two f-electrons and S = 1 spins on each site. After performing the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation on this model, we have obtained an effective Hamiltonian with a f-band term in addition to the Kondo interaction for S = 1 spins. The results indicate a coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order, with different relative values of the Kondo TK and Curie TC temperatures. We emphasize here especially the case TK < TC where there is a Kondo behavior below TC and a clear decrease of the magnetization below TK. Such a behavior has been observed in the magnetization curves of NpNiSi2 at low temperatures.

  12. A global model of natural volatile organic compound emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Alex; Hewitt, C. Nicholas; Erickson, David; Fall, Ray; Geron, Chris; Graedel, Tom; Harley, Peter; Klinger, Lee; Lerdau, Manuel; McKay, W. A.; Pierce, Tom; Scholes, Bob; Steinbrecher, Rainer; Tallamraju, Raja; Taylor, John; Zimmerman, Pat

    1995-05-01

    Numerical assessments of global air quality and potential changes in atmospheric chemical constituents require estimates of the surface fluxes of a variety of trace gas species. We have developed a global model to estimate emissions of volatile organic compounds from natural sources (NVOC). Methane is not considered here and has been reviewed in detail elsewhere. The model has a highly resolved spatial grid (0.5°×0.5° latitude/longitude) and generates hourly average emission estimates. Chemical species are grouped into four categories: isoprene, monoterpenes, other reactive VOC (ORVOC), and other VOC (OVOC). NVOC emissions from oceans are estimated as a function of geophysical variables from a general circulation model and ocean color satellite data. Emissions from plant foliage are estimated from ecosystem specific biomass and emission factors and algorithms describing light and temperature dependence of NVOC emissions. Foliar density estimates are based on climatic variables and satellite data. Temporal variations in the model are driven by monthly estimates of biomass and temperature and hourly light estimates. The annual global VOC flux is estimated to be 1150 Tg C, composed of 44% isoprene, 11% monoterpenes, 22.5% other reactive VOC, and 22.5% other VOC. Large uncertainties exist for each of these estimates and particularly for compounds other than isoprene and monoterpenes. Tropical woodlands (rain forest, seasonal, drought-deciduous, and savanna) contribute about half of all global natural VOC emissions. Croplands, shrublands and other woodlands contribute 10-20% apiece. Isoprene emissions calculated for temperate regions are as much as a factor of 5 higher than previous estimates.

  13. Synthesis and antiviral activity of a series of novel N-phenylbenzamide and N-phenylacetophenone compounds as anti-HCV and anti-EV71 agents

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi; Wang, Huiqiang; Li, Yanping; Peng, Zonggen; Li, Yuhuan; Li, Zhuorong

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel N-phenylbenzamide and N-phenylacetophenone compounds were synthesized and evaluated for their antiviral activity against HCV and EV71 (strain SZ-98). The biological results showed that three compounds (23, 25 and 41) exhibited considerable anti-HCV activity (IC50=0.57–7.12 μmol/L) and several compounds (23, 28, 29, 30, 31 and 42) displayed potent activity against EV71 with the IC50 values lower than 5.00 μmol/L. The potency of compound 23 (IC50=0.57 μmol/L) was superior to that of reported compounds IMB-1f (IC50=1.90 μmol/L) and IMB-1g (IC50=1.00 μmol/L) as anti-HCV agents, and compound 29 possessed the highest anti-EV71 activity, comparable to the comparator drug pirodavir. The efficacy in vivo and antiviral mechanism of these compounds warrant further investigations. PMID:26579447

  14. Novel compound, organic cation transporter 3 detection agent and organic cation transporter 3 activity inhibitor, WO2015002150 A1: a patent evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Wang, Li; Pan, Xiaolei; Qi, Hualin

    2016-08-01

    Increasing pharmacological studies have demonstrated that organic cation transporter 3 (OCT3) plays an important role in controlling the extracellular concentrations of released monoamine neurotransmitter, suggesting that OCT3 might be a promising target in the treatment of depression. As a consequence, compounds showing inhibitory effects on the function of OCT3 have the potential for depression treatment. The current patent WO2015002150 A1 described the synthesis of 59 novel guanidine derivatives. All investigated compounds exhibited significant inhibitory effects (41.9-88.2%) on human OCT3 activity at 30 µM, using human OCT3-transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cell. Concentration-response curves (IC50 values) were determined for seven compounds with higher inhibition potency from the initial screening. IC50 values ranged from 1.9 to 24 µM. In addition, the concentration of these compound in aqueous solution with artificial membranes containing human OCT3 protein was measured. The concentration of compound 6 (SR-2045) was significantly reduced in the presence of human OCT3. Therefore, these compounds have the potential to be further developed as novel antidepressant and human OCT3 detection agent. Future investigations are needed to study the pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of these compounds and potential interaction with other transporters. PMID:27097290

  15. Animal Models That Best Reproduce the Clinical Manifestations of Human Intoxication with Organophosphorus Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Edna F. R.; Aracava, Yasco; DeTolla, Louis J.; Beecham, E. Jeffrey; Basinger, G. William; Wakayama, Edgar J.

    2014-01-01

    The translational capacity of data generated in preclinical toxicological studies is contingent upon several factors, including the appropriateness of the animal model. The primary objectives of this article are: 1) to analyze the natural history of acute and delayed signs and symptoms that develop following an acute exposure of humans to organophosphorus (OP) compounds, with an emphasis on nerve agents; 2) to identify animal models of the clinical manifestations of human exposure to OPs; and 3) to review the mechanisms that contribute to the immediate and delayed OP neurotoxicity. As discussed in this study, clinical manifestations of an acute exposure of humans to OP compounds can be faithfully reproduced in rodents and nonhuman primates. These manifestations include an acute cholinergic crisis in addition to signs of neurotoxicity that develop long after the OP exposure, particularly chronic neurologic deficits consisting of anxiety-related behavior and cognitive deficits, structural brain damage, and increased slow electroencephalographic frequencies. Because guinea pigs and nonhuman primates, like humans, have low levels of circulating carboxylesterases—the enzymes that metabolize and inactivate OP compounds—they stand out as appropriate animal models for studies of OP intoxication. These are critical points for the development of safe and effective therapeutic interventions against OP poisoning because approval of such therapies by the Food and Drug Administration is likely to rely on the Animal Efficacy Rule, which allows exclusive use of animal data as evidence of the effectiveness of a drug against pathologic conditions that cannot be ethically or feasibly tested in humans. PMID:24907067

  16. Persuasion Model and Its Evaluation Based on Positive Change Degree of Agent Emotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinghua, Wu; Wenguang, Lu; Hailiang, Meng

    For it can meet needs of negotiation among organizations take place in different time and place, and for it can make its course more rationality and result more ideal, persuasion based on agent can improve cooperation among organizations well. Integrated emotion change in agent persuasion can further bring agent advantage of artificial intelligence into play. Emotion of agent persuasion is classified, and the concept of positive change degree is given. Based on this, persuasion model based on positive change degree of agent emotion is constructed, which is explained clearly through an example. Finally, the method of relative evaluation is given, which is also verified through a calculation example.

  17. Compounded progesterone and the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use.

    PubMed

    Spark, M Joy; Willis, Jon; Iacono, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Compounded progesterone (P₄) is a product that, from a clinical experience-based perspective, effectively relieves a range of symptoms. In contrast, from a conventional evidence-based medicine perspective, P₄ is ineffective. As P₄ is not a product prescribed by conventional medicine, it is unlikely to be prescribed by family doctors, which increases the barriers to utilization. Utilization of medicines is influenced by many contextual and individual characteristics. The Behavioral Model of Health Services Use provides a multidimensional framework to conceptualize utilization of health services including medicine use. The 4 main components of this model are: contextual characteristics, individual characteristics, health behaviors and outcomes. This paper reports on the application of The Behavioral Model of Health Services Use to medicines and shows how it can be applied to the use of P₄. The model enables some of the positive reinforcement that contributes to women continuing to use P₄ to be explained. The Behavioral Model of Health Services Use was found to offer the potential to identify and then address issues with access to prescription medicines. PMID:24055136

  18. Formal specification and analysis of intelligent agents for model-based medicine usage management.

    PubMed

    Hoogendoorn, Mark; Klein, Michel C A; Memon, Zulfiqar A; Treur, Jan

    2013-06-01

    A model-based agent system model for medicine usage management is presented and formally analysed. The model incorporates an intelligent ambient agent model that has an explicit representation of a dynamical system model to estimate the medicine level in the patient's body by simulation, is able to analyse whether the patient intends to take the medicine too early or too late, and can take measures to prevent this. PMID:23566391

  19. Minority persistence in agent based model using information and emotional arousal as control variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobkowicz, Pawel

    2013-07-01

    We present detailed analysis of the behavior of an agent based model of opinion formation, using a discrete variant of cusp catastrophe behavior of single agents. The agent opinion about a particular issue is determined by its information about the issue and its emotional arousal. It is possible that for agitated agents the same information would lead to different opinions. This results in a nontrivial individual opinion dynamics. The agents communicate via messages, which allows direct application of the model to ICT based communities. We study the dependence of the composition of an agent society on the range of interactions and the rate of emotional arousal. Despite the minimal number of adjustable parameters, the model reproduces several phenomena observed in real societies, for example nearly perfectly balanced results of some highly contested elections or the fact that minorities seldom perceive themselves to be a minority.

  20. Lapse of time effects on tax evasion in an agent-based econophysics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibold, Götz; Pickhardt, Michael

    2013-05-01

    We investigate an inhomogeneous Ising model in the context of tax evasion dynamics where different types of agents are parameterized via local temperatures and magnetic fields. In particular, we analyze the impact of lapse of time effects (i.e. backauditing) and endogenously determined penalty rates on tax compliance. Both features contribute to a microfoundation of agent-based econophysics models of tax evasion.

  1. Modeling Dispersion of Chemical-Biological Agents in Three Dimensional Living Space

    SciTech Connect

    William S. Winters

    2002-02-01

    This report documents a series of calculations designed to demonstrate Sandia's capability in modeling the dispersal of chemical and biological agents in complex three-dimensional spaces. The transport of particles representing biological agents is modeled in a single room and in several connected rooms. The influence of particle size, particle weight and injection method are studied.

  2. Construction of a microscopic agent-based model for firms' dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyetomi, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Yoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Kaizoji, Taisei; Soma, Wataru

    2005-07-01

    A workable microscopic model for firms' dynamics has been constructed. The model consists of firm agents and a bank agent dynamics of which are described by balance sheets. The size distribution of firms and the temporal evolution of the bank show critical dependence on whether or not firms use perfect information on their financial conditions to draw up next production plans.

  3. Hybrid evolutionary computing model for mobile agents of wireless Internet multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2001-03-01

    The ecosystem is used as an evolutionary paradigm of natural laws for the distributed information retrieval via mobile agents to allow the computational load to be added to server nodes of wireless networks, while reducing the traffic on communication links. Based on the Food Web model, a set of computational rules of natural balance form the outer stage to control the evolution of mobile agents providing multimedia services with a wireless Internet protocol WIP. The evolutionary model shows how mobile agents should behave with the WIP, in particular, how mobile agents can cooperate, compete and learn from each other, based on an underlying competition for radio network resources to establish the wireless connections to support the quality of service QoS of user requests. Mobile agents are also allowed to clone themselves, propagate and communicate with other agents. A two-layer model is proposed for agent evolution: the outer layer is based on the law of natural balancing, the inner layer is based on a discrete version of a Kohonen self-organizing feature map SOFM to distribute network resources to meet QoS requirements. The former is embedded in the higher OSI layers of the WIP, while the latter is used in the resource management procedures of Layer 2 and 3 of the protocol. Algorithms for the distributed computation of mobile agent evolutionary behavior are developed by adding a learning state to the agent evolution state diagram. When an agent is in an indeterminate state, it can communicate to other agents. Computing models can be replicated from other agents. Then the agents transitions to the mutating state to wait for a new information-retrieval goal. When a wireless terminal or station lacks a network resource, an agent in the suspending state can change its policy to submit to the environment before it transitions to the searching state. The agents learn the facts of agent state information entered into an external database. In the cloning process, two

  4. Simulating tissue mechanics with agent-based models: concepts, perspectives and some novel results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Liedekerke, P.; Palm, M. M.; Jagiella, N.; Drasdo, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present an overview of agent-based models that are used to simulate mechanical and physiological phenomena in cells and tissues, and we discuss underlying concepts, limitations, and future perspectives of these models. As the interest in cell and tissue mechanics increase, agent-based models are becoming more common the modeling community. We overview the physical aspects, complexity, shortcomings, and capabilities of the major agent-based model categories: lattice-based models (cellular automata, lattice gas cellular automata, cellular Potts models), off-lattice models (center-based models, deformable cell models, vertex models), and hybrid discrete-continuum models. In this way, we hope to assist future researchers in choosing a model for the phenomenon they want to model and understand. The article also contains some novel results.

  5. High-temperature pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, J.H.; Owens, W.H.

    1991-01-01

    The degradation of the carboxylic acid group has been examined with respect to potential pretreatment strategies for fossil fuel conversion processes. In one potential pretreatment strategy involving cation exchange of the carboxylic acid group, a series of benzoic acid and stearic acid salts have been chosen to model the tight'' carboxylic acids of immature fossil fuel feedstocks and have been pyrolyzed with an entrained flow reactor. Our preliminary results indicate that Group I and II salts yield primarily the parent acid. Benzoate salts also yield small amounts of benzene while the stearic acid salts give no other detectable products. In two alternative treatment strategies, esterification and anhydride preparation have also been accomplished with these compounds being subjected to the entrained flow reactor conditions. The benzoate esters give a number of products, such as benzaldehyde, benzene, and low MW gases. The formation of these compounds is extremely dependent on pyrolysis conditions and alkoxy chain length. A xenon flashlamp and an entrained flow reactor have been used to heat organic substrates to varying temperatures using different heating rates. Ultrarapid flashlamp pyrolysis (heating rate>10{sup 50}C/s) has been performed. Since the ultrarapid pyrolysis products differ from those observed with traditional heating techniques and differ from the products formed photochemically, the flashlamp pyrolysis products are attributed to high temperature thermal activation.

  6. An approach to accidents modeling based on compounds road environments.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana; Neves, Jose

    2013-04-01

    The most common approach to study the influence of certain road features on accidents has been the consideration of uniform road segments characterized by a unique feature. However, when an accident is related to the road infrastructure, its cause is usually not a single characteristic but rather a complex combination of several characteristics. The main objective of this paper is to describe a methodology developed in order to consider the road as a complete environment by using compound road environments, overcoming the limitations inherented in considering only uniform road segments. The methodology consists of: dividing a sample of roads into segments; grouping them into quite homogeneous road environments using cluster analysis; and identifying the influence of skid resistance and texture depth on road accidents in each environment by using generalized linear models. The application of this methodology is demonstrated for eight roads. Based on real data from accidents and road characteristics, three compound road environments were established where the pavement surface properties significantly influence the occurrence of accidents. Results have showed clearly that road environments where braking maneuvers are more common or those with small radii of curvature and high speeds require higher skid resistance and texture depth as an important contribution to the accident prevention. PMID:23376544

  7. Brief introductory guide to agent-based modeling and an illustration from urban health research.

    PubMed

    Auchincloss, Amy H; Garcia, Leandro Martin Totaro

    2015-11-01

    There is growing interest among urban health researchers in addressing complex problems using conceptual and computation models from the field of complex systems. Agent-based modeling (ABM) is one computational modeling tool that has received a lot of interest. However, many researchers remain unfamiliar with developing and carrying out an ABM, hindering the understanding and application of it. This paper first presents a brief introductory guide to carrying out a simple agent-based model. Then, the method is illustrated by discussing a previously developed agent-based model, which explored inequalities in diet in the context of urban residential segregation. PMID:26648364

  8. Phaeobacter inhibens as biocontrol agent against Vibrio vulnificus in oyster models.

    PubMed

    Porsby, Cisse Hedegaard; Gram, Lone

    2016-08-01

    Molluscan shellfish can cause food borne diseases and here we investigated if addition of Vibrio-antagonising bacteria could reduce Vibrio vulnificus in model oyster systems and prevent its establishment in live animals. Phaeobacter inhibens, which produces an antibacterial compound, tropodithietic acid (TDA), inhibited V. vulnificus as did pure TDA (MIC of 1-3.9 μM). P. inhibens DSM 17395 (at 10(6) cfu/ml) eradicated 10(5) cfu/ml V. vulnificus CMCP6 (a rifampicin resistant variant) from a co-culture oyster model system (oyster juice) whereas the pathogen grew to 10(7) cfu/ml when co-cultured with a TDA negative Phaeobacter mutant. P. inhibens grew well in oyster juice to 10(8) CFU/ml and sterile filtered samples from these cultures were inhibitory to Vibrio spp. P. inhibens established itself in live European flat oysters (Ostrea edulis) and remained at 10(5) cfu/g for five days. However, the presence of P. inhibens could not prevent subsequently added V. vulnificus from entering the live animals, likely because of too low levels of the biocontrol strain. Whilst the oyster model studies provided indication that P. inhibens DSM 17395 could be a good candidate as biocontrol agent against V. vulnificus further optimization is need in the actual animal rearing situation. PMID:27052703

  9. SIRT2- and NRF2-Targeting Thiazole-Containing Compound with Therapeutic Activity in Huntington's Disease Models.

    PubMed

    Quinti, Luisa; Casale, Malcolm; Moniot, Sébastien; Pais, Teresa F; Van Kanegan, Michael J; Kaltenbach, Linda S; Pallos, Judit; Lim, Ryan G; Naidu, Sharadha Dayalan; Runne, Heike; Meisel, Lisa; Rauf, Nazifa Abdul; Leyfer, Dmitriy; Maxwell, Michele M; Saiah, Eddine; Landers, John E; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Abagyan, Ruben; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Steegborn, Clemens; Marsh, J Lawrence; Lo, Donald C; Thompson, Leslie M; Kazantsev, Aleksey G

    2016-07-21

    There are currently no disease-modifying therapies for the neurodegenerative disorder Huntington's disease (HD). This study identified novel thiazole-containing inhibitors of the deacetylase sirtuin-2 (SIRT2) with neuroprotective activity in ex vivo brain slice and Drosophila models of HD. A systems biology approach revealed an additional SIRT2-independent property of the lead-compound, MIND4, as an inducer of cytoprotective NRF2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-derived factor 2) activity. Structure-activity relationship studies further identified a potent NRF2 activator (MIND4-17) lacking SIRT2 inhibitory activity. MIND compounds induced NRF2 activation responses in neuronal and non-neuronal cells and reduced production of reactive oxygen species and nitrogen intermediates. These drug-like thiazole-containing compounds represent an exciting opportunity for development of multi-targeted agents with potentially synergistic therapeutic benefits in HD and related disorders. PMID:27427231

  10. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Fukayama, M Y; Tan, H; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1986-01-01

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), common disinfecting and bleaching chemicals used in the food industry, are potent oxidizing and chlorinating agents. Unfortunately, little is known about the nature of the reactions of chlorine with organic food constituents. This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (Cl2[g]), aqueous chlorine, and ClO2 with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the potential toxicity of the reaction products. Fatty acids and their methyl esters react with chlorine with the degree of incorporation corresponding to their degree of unsaturation. Aqueous chlorine oxidizes and chlorinates lipids and amino acids much more readily than ClO2. Several amino acids are highly susceptible to oxidation and chlorination by chlorine compounds. Reactions of chlorine and ClO2 with several food products, including flour and shrimp, have also been characterized. In one model system, 99% of Cl2(g) either reacted with components of flour or was consumed by oxidation/chlorination reactions. The lipids extracted from the chlorinated flour contained significant amounts of chlorine. Exposure of shrimp to hypochlorous acid (HOCl) solution resulted in significant incorporation of chlorine into the edible portion. Although significant quantities of chlorine can be incorporated into specific model compounds and food products, the health risks associated with exposure to chlorinated organic products are unknown. Preliminary studies using the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay indicate that the reaction products from mixtures of aqueous chlorine and various lipids or tryptophan are nonmutagenic. Nevertheless, additional studies are warranted, so that the toxicological significance of these reaction products can be understood more fully. PMID:3545804

  11. Emergent Societal Effects of Crimino-Social Forces in an Animat Agent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scogings, Chris J.; Hawick, Ken A.

    Societal behaviour can be studied at a causal level by perturbing a stable multi-agent model with new microscopic behaviours and observing the statistical response over an ensemble of simulated model systems. We report on the effects of introducing criminal and law-enforcing behaviours into a large scale animat agent model and describe the complex spatial agent patterns and population changes that result. Our well-established predator-prey substrate model provides a background framework against which these new microscopic behaviours can be trialled and investigated. We describe some quantitative results and some surprising conclusions concerning the overall societal health when individually anti-social behaviour is introduced.

  12. Cyclopentadienyl-ruthenium(II) and iron(II) organometallic compounds with carbohydrate derivative ligands as good colorectal anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Florindo, Pedro R; Pereira, Diane M; Borralho, Pedro M; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Piedade, M F M; Fernandes, Ana C

    2015-05-28

    New ruthenium(II) and iron(II) organometallic compounds of general formula [(η(5)-C5H5)M(PP)Lc][PF6], bearing carbohydrate derivative ligands (Lc), were prepared and fully characterized and the crystal structures of five of those compounds were determined by X-ray diffraction studies. Cell viability of colon cancer HCT116 cell line was determined for a total of 23 organometallic compounds and SAR's data analysis within this library showed an interesting dependency of the cytotoxic activity on the carbohydrate moiety, linker, phosphane coligands, and metal center. More importantly, two compounds, 14Ru and 18Ru, matched oxaliplatin IC50 (0.45 μM), the standard metallodrug used in CC chemotherapeutics, and our leading compound 14Ru was shown to be significantly more cytotoxic than oxaliplatin to HCT116 cells, triggering higher levels of caspase-3 and -7 activity and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25923600

  13. B-tree search reinforcement learning for model based intelligent agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuvaneswari, S.; Vignashwaran, R.

    2013-03-01

    Agents trained by learning techniques provide a powerful approximation of active solutions for naive approaches. In this study using B - Trees implying reinforced learning the data search for information retrieval is moderated to achieve accuracy with minimum search time. The impact of variables and tactics applied in training are determined using reinforcement learning. Agents based on these techniques perform satisfactory baseline and act as finite agents based on the predetermined model against competitors from the course.

  14. Development of pretreatment compounds against nerve-gas agents. Annual report (Final), 16 May 88-30 Sep 90

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, F.I.; Abraham, P.

    1990-09-30

    The U. S. Army Medical Research and Development Command is interested in research directed toward the development of countermeasures to chemical warfare (CW) agents such as the nerve gas poison soman. Soman and other nerve gas poisons are extremely potent cholinesterase inhibitors. This inhibition leads to a buildup of excess acetylcholine resulting in over-stimulation of both the peripheral and central nervous system and can lead to death. Standard therapy for organophosphate nerve agent poisoning is based on co-administration of an anticholinergic agent such as atropine to antagonize the effects of accumulated acetylcholine and a cholinesterase reactivator such as 2-PAM to dephosphorylate the inhibited enzyme. However, since many problems remain in the treatment of organophosphate nerve agent poisoning, there is considerable interest and need to develop new pretreatment and treatment drugs, particularly for soman poisoning.

  15. Spectroscopic and structural investigation on intermediates species structurally associated to the tricyclic bisguanidine compound and to the toxic agent, saxitoxin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Davide; Tsuchiya, Shigeki; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Brandán, Silvia Antonia

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, we have studied the structural, topological and spectroscopic properties of five cyclic and of open chain species derived from tricyclic bisguanidine compound in gas and aqueous phases combining the DFT calculations with the experimental infrared and 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-visible spectra. These species are members of the saxitoxin family and they were recently synthesized by Tsuchiya et al. (Chemistry. A European Journal, 21 (2015) 7835-7840). Here, the self consistent reaction force (SCRF) calculations were employed in aqueous medium to study the solvation energies by using the polarized continuum (PCM) and solvation (SM) models. All the calculations were performed with the 6-31G* and 6-311++G** basis sets. The atomic charges, electrostatic potentials, bond order, stabilization energy, topological properties suggest the structural connection between the cyclic cationic and saxitoxin species while the electrophilicity and nucleophilicity indexes could be one of the explanations for the Nav blocking activities of these species. The complete vibrational assignments for all the species are reported. The predicted spectra present a reasonable concordance with the corresponding experimental ones.

  16. Polyphenols: well beyond the antioxidant capacity: gallic acid and related compounds as neuroprotective agents: you are what you eat!

    PubMed

    Daglia, Maria; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Nabavi, Seyed F; Talas, Zeliha S; Nabavi, Seyed M

    2014-01-01

    Gallic acid (3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid) is a phenolic acid widely distributed in many different families of higher plants, both in free state, and as a part of more complex molecules, such as ester derivatives or polymers. In nature, gallic acid and its derivatives are present in nearly every part of the plant, such as bark, wood, leaf, fruit, root and seed. They are present in different concentrations in common foodstuffs such as blueberry, blackberry, strawberry, plums, grapes, mango, cashew nut, hazelnut, walnut, tea, wine and so on. After consumption, about 70% of gallic acid is adsorbed and then excreted in the urine as 4-O-methylgallic acid. Differently, the ester derivatives of gallic acid, such as catechin gallate ester or gallotannins, are hydrolyzed to gallic acid before being metabolized to methylated derivatives. Gallic acid is a well known antioxidant compounds which has neuroprotective actions in different models of neurodegeneration, neurotoxicity and oxidative stress. In this review, we discuss about the neuroprotective actions of gallic acid and derivatives and their potential mechanisms of action. PMID:24938889

  17. Going beyond the unitary curve: incorporating richer cognition into agent-based water resources models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, B. E.

    2008-12-01

    The increased availability and understanding of agent-based modeling technology and techniques provides a unique opportunity for water resources modelers, allowing them to go beyond traditional behavioral approaches from neoclassical economics, and add rich cognition to social-hydrological models. Agent-based models provide for an individual focus, and the easier and more realistic incorporation of learning, memory and other mechanisms for increased cognitive sophistication. We are in an age of global change impacting complex water resources systems, and social responses are increasingly recognized as fundamentally adaptive and emergent. In consideration of this, water resources models and modelers need to better address social dynamics in a manner beyond the capabilities of neoclassical economics theory and practice. However, going beyond the unitary curve requires unique levels of engagement with stakeholders, both to elicit the richer knowledge necessary for structuring and parameterizing agent-based models, but also to make sure such models are appropriately used. With the aim of encouraging epistemological and methodological convergence in the agent-based modeling of water resources, we have developed a water resources-specific cognitive model and an associated collaborative modeling process. Our cognitive model emphasizes efficiency in architecture and operation, and capacity to adapt to different application contexts. We describe a current application of this cognitive model and modeling process in the Arkansas Basin of Colorado. In particular, we highlight the potential benefits of, and challenges to, using more sophisticated cognitive models in agent-based water resources models.

  18. SPARK: A Framework for Multi-Scale Agent-Based Biomedical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Solovyev, Alexey; Mikheev, Maxim; Zhou, Leming; Dutta-Moscato, Joyeeta; Ziraldo, Cordelia; An, Gary; Vodovotz, Yoram; Mi, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Multi-scale modeling of complex biological systems remains a central challenge in the systems biology community. A method of dynamic knowledge representation known as agent-based modeling enables the study of higher level behavior emerging from discrete events performed by individual components. With the advancement of computer technology, agent-based modeling has emerged as an innovative technique to model the complexities of systems biology. In this work, the authors describe SPARK (Simple Platform for Agent-based Representation of Knowledge), a framework for agent-based modeling specifically designed for systems-level biomedical model development. SPARK is a stand-alone application written in Java. It provides a user-friendly interface, and a simple programming language for developing Agent-Based Models (ABMs). SPARK has the following features specialized for modeling biomedical systems: 1) continuous space that can simulate real physical space; 2) flexible agent size and shape that can represent the relative proportions of various cell types; 3) multiple spaces that can concurrently simulate and visualize multiple scales in biomedical models; 4) a convenient graphical user interface. Existing ABMs of diabetic foot ulcers and acute inflammation were implemented in SPARK. Models of identical complexity were run in both NetLogo and SPARK; the SPARK-based models ran two to three times faster. PMID:24163721

  19. In vitro toxicity assessment of silver nanoparticles in the presence of phenolic compounds--preventive agents against the harmful effect?

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Alina; Bazes, Alexandra; Schneider, Yves-Jacques

    2014-08-01

    The increasing commercial use of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) will inevitably lead to elevated silver exposure and thus to potential human health complications. In this study the acute toxicity of Ag-NPs <20 nm alone and upon co-administration with food matrix component phenolic compounds (PCs) on the cell-based models of the gastrointestinal tract was investigated. An improved co-culture model of Caco-2 and RajiB cells was applied for more precise in vitro simulation of the gastrointestinal tract. The involvement of two major factors contributing to the toxicity of Ag-NPs, i.e. the release of Ag(+) and the induction of oxidative stress, was investigated. Ag-NPs were cytotoxic for Caco-2 cells with an EC50 of ca. 40 µg/ml. Ag-NPs led to oxidative stress starting from ca. 45 µg/ml. The epithelial barrier integrity disruption by Ag-NPs on Caco-2 cell mono- and co-cultures was established by decreased transepithelial electrical resistances and increased passages of Lucifer Yellow, a paracellular marker. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that Ag-NPs affect occludin and zonula occludens 1 distributions, suggesting the opening of tight junctions. Ag(+), corresponding to the release from Ag-NPs, demonstrated a partial contribution in the toxic parameters, induced by Ag-NPs. Two PCs, quercetin and kaempferol, partially protected the Caco-2 cells from Ag-NP-induced toxicity and maintained the epithelial barrier integrity, disrupted by NPs. No protective effect was observed for resveratrol. The protective effect could be beneficial and decrease the potential toxicity of ingested Ag-NPs. However, the precise mechanisms of barrier-integrity-destabilising action of Ag-NPs/Ag(+) and protective effect of PCs still require further elucidation. PMID:23738887

  20. Consentaneous Agent-Based and Stochastic Model of the Financial Markets

    PubMed Central

    Gontis, Vygintas; Kononovicius, Aleksejus

    2014-01-01

    We are looking for the agent-based treatment of the financial markets considering necessity to build bridges between microscopic, agent based, and macroscopic, phenomenological modeling. The acknowledgment that agent-based modeling framework, which may provide qualitative and quantitative understanding of the financial markets, is very ambiguous emphasizes the exceptional value of well defined analytically tractable agent systems. Herding as one of the behavior peculiarities considered in the behavioral finance is the main property of the agent interactions we deal with in this contribution. Looking for the consentaneous agent-based and macroscopic approach we combine two origins of the noise: exogenous one, related to the information flow, and endogenous one, arising form the complex stochastic dynamics of agents. As a result we propose a three state agent-based herding model of the financial markets. From this agent-based model we derive a set of stochastic differential equations, which describes underlying macroscopic dynamics of agent population and log price in the financial markets. The obtained solution is then subjected to the exogenous noise, which shapes instantaneous return fluctuations. We test both Gaussian and q-Gaussian noise as a source of the short term fluctuations. The resulting model of the return in the financial markets with the same set of parameters reproduces empirical probability and spectral densities of absolute return observed in New York, Warsaw and NASDAQ OMX Vilnius Stock Exchanges. Our result confirms the prevalent idea in behavioral finance that herding interactions may be dominant over agent rationality and contribute towards bubble formation. PMID:25029364

  1. Oxidations of alkenes and lignin model compounds in aqueous dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Weiming.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to develop methods to oxidize water-immiscible alkenes and lignin model compounds with polymer colloid supported transition metal catalysts. The oxidations of organic compounds were carried out in aqueous phase with several water-soluble oxidants and dioxygen. Cationic polymer latexes were prepared by the emulsion copolymerization of vinylbenzyl chloride, divinylbenzene, and vinyl octadecyl ether, or styrene, or n-decyl methacrylate, and the subsequent quaternization of copolymers with trimethylamine. The latex particles were 44 nm to 71 nm in diameter. The latex bound Mn porphyrin catalysts were formed with MnTSPP [TSPP = meso-tetrakis(2,6-dichloro-3-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin], which catalyzed the oxidation of cyclohexene, cycloocetene, allylbenzene, and 1-octene by sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and potassium peroxymonosulfate (KHSO[sub 5]). The latex bound porphyrin catalysts showed higher activity than MnTSPP in solution. Oxidations of 3,4-dimethoxybenzyl alcohol (DMBA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxytoluene (HMT), and 3,4-dimethoxytoluene (DMT) were performed with either dioxygen or hydrogen peroxide and CoPcTS (PcTS = tetrasulfonatophthalocyanine), FePcTS, CuPcTS, NiPcTS, FeTCPP [TCPP = meso-tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)porphyrin], and MnTSPP. CoPcTS catalyzed the autoxidation of DMBA and HMT at 70-85[degrees]C and pH [ge] 8. All catalysts were active for the oxidation of DMBA, HMT, and DMT with H[sub 2]O[sub 2]. Aqueous solutions of KHSO[sub 5] oxidized water-immiscible alkenes at room temperature in the absence of organic solvent. The acidic pH [le] 1.7 solutions of commercial 2KHSO[sub 5][center dot]K[sub 2]SO[sub 4] in water produced diols from all reactive alkenes except cyclooctene. Adjustment of initial pH to [ge]6.7 with NaHCO[sub 3] enabled selective epoxidations.

  2. Designing Adaptive Artificial Agents for an Economic Production and Conflict Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani-M, Behrooz; Parris, Brett W.

    Production and conflict models have been used over the past 30 years to represent the effects of unproductive resource allocation in economics. Their major applications are in modelling the assignment of property rights, rent-seeking and defense economics. This paper describes the process of designing an agent used in a production and conflict model. Using the capabilities of an agent-based approach to economic modelling, we have enriched a simple decision-maker of the kind used in classic general equilibrium economic models, to build an adaptive and interactive agent which uses its own attributes, its neighbors' parameters and information from its environment to make resource allocation decisions. Our model presents emergent and adaptive behaviors than cannot be captured using classic production and conflict agents. Some possible extensions for future applications are also recommended.

  3. Mechanistic Study of the Acid Degradation of Lignin Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major constituent of biomass, which remains underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in understanding the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Two model dimers with a b-O-4 aryl ether linkage (2-phenoxy-1-phenethanol and 2-phenoxy-1-phenyl-1,3 propanediol) and model dimmers with an a-O-4 aryl ether linkage were synthesized and deconstructed in H2SO4. The major products of the acidolysis of the b-O-4 compounds consisted of phenol and two aldehydes, phenylacetaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. To confirm proposed mechanisms several possible intermediates were studied under similar acidolysis conditions. Although the resonance time for cleavage was on the order several hours, we have shown that the cleavage of the aryl ether linkage affords phenol and aldehydes. We would next like to utilize our mechanism of aryl ether cleavage in actual lignin.

  4. Linking agent-based models and stochastic models of financial markets.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ling; Li, Baowen; Podobnik, Boris; Preis, Tobias; Stanley, H Eugene

    2012-05-29

    It is well-known that financial asset returns exhibit fat-tailed distributions and long-term memory. These empirical features are the main objectives of modeling efforts using (i) stochastic processes to quantitatively reproduce these features and (ii) agent-based simulations to understand the underlying microscopic interactions. After reviewing selected empirical and theoretical evidence documenting the behavior of traders, we construct an agent-based model to quantitatively demonstrate that "fat" tails in return distributions arise when traders share similar technical trading strategies and decisions. Extending our behavioral model to a stochastic model, we derive and explain a set of quantitative scaling relations of long-term memory from the empirical behavior of individual market participants. Our analysis provides a behavioral interpretation of the long-term memory of absolute and squared price returns: They are directly linked to the way investors evaluate their investments by applying technical strategies at different investment horizons, and this quantitative relationship is in agreement with empirical findings. Our approach provides a possible behavioral explanation for stochastic models for financial systems in general and provides a method to parameterize such models from market data rather than from statistical fitting. PMID:22586086

  5. Linking agent-based models and stochastic models of financial markets

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ling; Li, Baowen; Podobnik, Boris; Preis, Tobias; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2012-01-01

    It is well-known that financial asset returns exhibit fat-tailed distributions and long-term memory. These empirical features are the main objectives of modeling efforts using (i) stochastic processes to quantitatively reproduce these features and (ii) agent-based simulations to understand the underlying microscopic interactions. After reviewing selected empirical and theoretical evidence documenting the behavior of traders, we construct an agent-based model to quantitatively demonstrate that “fat” tails in return distributions arise when traders share similar technical trading strategies and decisions. Extending our behavioral model to a stochastic model, we derive and explain a set of quantitative scaling relations of long-term memory from the empirical behavior of individual market participants. Our analysis provides a behavioral interpretation of the long-term memory of absolute and squared price returns: They are directly linked to the way investors evaluate their investments by applying technical strategies at different investment horizons, and this quantitative relationship is in agreement with empirical findings. Our approach provides a possible behavioral explanation for stochastic models for financial systems in general and provides a method to parameterize such models from market data rather than from statistical fitting. PMID:22586086

  6. Agent-based model for rural-urban migration: A dynamic consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Ning; Ma, Hai-Ying; Khan, M. Junaid

    2015-10-01

    This paper develops a dynamic agent-based model for rural-urban migration, based on the previous relevant works. The model conforms to the typical dynamic linear multi-agent systems model concerned extensively in systems science, in which the communication network is formulated as a digraph. Simulations reveal that consensus of certain variable could be harmful to the overall stability and should be avoided.

  7. Learning Natural Selection in 4th Grade with Multi-Agent-Based Computational Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickes, Amanda Catherine; Sengupta, Pratim

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate how elementary school students develop multi-level explanations of population dynamics in a simple predator-prey ecosystem, through scaffolded interactions with a multi-agent-based computational model (MABM). The term "agent" in an MABM indicates individual computational objects or actors (e.g., cars), and these…

  8. Modeling Peer Assessment as Agent Negotiation in a Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, K. Robert; Lan, Chung Hsien

    2006-01-01

    This work presents a novel method for modeling collaborative learning as multi-issue agent negotiation using fuzzy constraints. Agent negotiation is an iterative process, through which, the proposed method aggregates student marks to reduce personal bias. In the framework, students define individual fuzzy membership functions based on their…

  9. The Model Repository (MREP) of the Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study (MIDAS)

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, Phillip C.; Roberts, D.; Bakalov, V. D.; Bikmal, S.; Cantor, S.; Costandine, T.; Ganapathi, L.; Golla, B. J.; Grubbs, G.; Hollingsworth, C.; Li, S.; Qin, Y.; Savage, B.; Simoni, D.; Solano, E.; Wagener, D.

    2009-01-01

    The model repository (MREP) is a relational database management system (RDBMS) developed under the auspices of the Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study (MIDAS. The purpose of the MREP is to organize and catalog the models, results, and suggestions for using MIDAS and to store them in a way to allow users to run models from an access-controlled disease model repository. The model repository contains source and object code of disease models developed by infectious disease modelers and tested in a production environment. Different versions of models used to describe various aspects of the same disease are housed in the repository. Models are linked to their developers and different versions of the codes are tied to Subversion, a version control tool. An additional element of the MREP will be to house, manage, and control access to a disease model results warehouse, which consists of output generated by the models contained in the MREP. The results tables and files are linked to the version of the model and the input parameters that collectively generated the results. The results tables are warehoused in a relational database that permits them to be easily identified, categorized, and downloaded. PMID:18632331

  10. Real-time point-of-care measurement of impaired renal function in a rat acute injury model employing exogenous fluorescent tracer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorshow, Richard B.; Fitch, Richard M.; Galen, Karen P.; Wojdyla, Jolette K.; Poreddy, Amruta R.; Freskos, John N.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan; Shieh, Jeng-Jong; Demirjian, Sevag G.

    2013-02-01

    Renal function assessment is needed for the detection of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is now widely accepted as the best indicator of renal function, and current clinical guidelines advocate its use in the staging of kidney disease. The optimum measure of GFR is by the use of exogenous tracer agents. However current clinically employed agents lack sensitivity or are cumbersome to use. An exogenous GFR fluorescent tracer agent, whose elimination rate could be monitored noninvasively through skin would provide a substantial improvement over currently available methods. We developed a series of novel aminopyrazine analogs for use as exogenous fluorescent GFR tracer agents that emit light in the visible region for monitoring GFR noninvasively over skin. In rats, these compounds are eliminated by the kidney with urine recovery greater than 90% of injected dose, are not broken down or metabolized in vivo, are not secreted by the renal tubules, and have clearance values similar to a GFR reference compound, iothalamate. In addition, biological half-life of these compounds measured in rats by noninvasive optical methods correlated with plasma derived methods. In this study, we show that this noninvasive methodology with our novel fluorescent tracer agents can detect impaired renal function. A 5/6th nephrectomy rat model is employed.

  11. Synthesis, molecular modeling, and biological evaluation of novel chiral thiosemicarbazone derivatives as potent anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Taşdemir, Demet; Karaküçük-İyidoğan, Ayşegül; Ulaşli, Mustafa; Taşkin-Tok, Tuğba; Oruç-Emre, Emİne Elçİn; Bayram, Hasan

    2015-02-01

    A series of new chiral thiosemicarbazones derived from homochiral amines in both enantiomeric forms were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro antiproliferative activity against A549 (human alveolar adenocarcinoma), MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (human cervical adenocarcinoma), and HGC-27 (human stomach carcinoma) cell lines. Some of compounds showed inhibitory activities on the growth of cancer cell lines. Especially, compound exhibited the most potent activity (IC50 4.6 μM) against HGC-27 as compared with the reference compound, sindaxel (IC50 10.3 μM), and could be used as a lead compound to search new chiral thiosemicarbazone derivatives as antiproliferative agents. PMID:25399965

  12. Theory of agent-based market models with controlled levels of greed and anxiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, P.; Coolen, A. C. C.

    2010-01-01

    We use generating functional analysis to study minority-game-type market models with generalized strategy valuation updates that control the psychology of agents' actions. The agents' choice between trend-following and contrarian trading, and their vigor in each, depends on the overall state of the market. Even in 'fake history' models, the theory now involves an effective overall bid process (coupled to the effective agent process) which can exhibit profound remanence effects and new phase transitions. For some models the bid process can be solved directly, others require Maxwell-construction-type approximations.

  13. Agent Based Modeling of Collaboration and Work Practices Onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquisti, Alessandro; Sierhuis, Maarten; Clancey, William J.; Bradshaw, Jeffrey M.; Shaffo, Mike (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The International Space Station is one the most complex projects ever, with numerous interdependent constraints affecting productivity and crew safety. This requires planning years before crew expeditions, and the use of sophisticated scheduling tools. Human work practices, however, are difficult to study and represent within traditional planning tools. We present an agent-based model and simulation of the activities and work practices of astronauts onboard the ISS based on an agent-oriented approach. The model represents 'a day in the life' of the ISS crew and is developed in Brahms, an agent-oriented, activity-based language used to model knowledge in situated action and learning in human activities.

  14. Embodied Agents, E-SQ and Stickiness: Improving Existing Cognitive and Affective Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Diesbach, Pablo Brice

    This paper synthesizes results from two previous studies of embodied virtual agents on commercial websites. We analyze and criticize the proposed models and discuss the limits of the experimental findings. Results from other important research in the literature are integrated. We also integrate concepts from profound, more business-related, analysis that deepens on the mechanisms of rhetoric in marketing and communication, and the possible role of E-SQ in man-agent interaction. We finally suggest a refined model for the impacts of these agents on web site users, and limits of the improved model are commented.

  15. Modeling the transport of chemical warfare agents and simulants in polymeric substrates for reactive decontamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearl, Thomas; Mantooth, Brent; Varady, Mark; Willis, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Chemical warfare agent simulants are often used for environmental testing in place of highly toxic agents. This work sets the foundation for modeling decontamination of absorbing polymeric materials with the focus on determining relationships between agents and simulants. The correlations of agents to simulants must consider the three way interactions in the chemical-material-decontaminant system where transport and reaction occur in polymer materials. To this end, diffusion modeling of the subsurface transport of simulants and live chemical warfare agents was conducted for various polymer systems (e.g., paint coatings) with and without reaction pathways with applied decontamination. The models utilized 1D and 2D finite difference diffusion and reaction models to simulate absorption and reaction in the polymers, and subsequent flux of the chemicals out of the polymers. Experimental data including vapor flux measurements and dynamic contact angle measurements were used to determine model input parameters. Through modeling, an understanding of the relationship of simulant to live chemical warfare agent was established, focusing on vapor emission of agents and simulants from materials.

  16. Emulating a System Dynamics Model with Agent-Based Models: A Methodological Case Study in Simulation of Diabetes Progression

    SciTech Connect

    Schryver, Jack; Nutaro, James; Shankar, Mallikarjun

    2015-10-30

    An agent-based simulation model hierarchy emulating disease states and behaviors critical to progression of diabetes type 2 was designed and implemented in the DEVS framework. The models are translations of basic elements of an established system dynamics model of diabetes. In this model hierarchy, which mimics diabetes progression over an aggregated U.S. population, was dis-aggregated and reconstructed bottom-up at the individual (agent) level. Four levels of model complexity were defined in order to systematically evaluate which parameters are needed to mimic outputs of the system dynamics model. Moreover, the four estimated models attempted to replicate stock counts representing disease states in the system dynamics model, while estimating impacts of an elderliness factor, obesity factor and health-related behavioral parameters. Health-related behavior was modeled as a simple realization of the Theory of Planned Behavior, a joint function of individual attitude and diffusion of social norms that spread over each agent s social network. Although the most complex agent-based simulation model contained 31 adjustable parameters, all models were considerably less complex than the system dynamics model which required numerous time series inputs to make its predictions. In all three elaborations of the baseline model provided significantly improved fits to the output of the system dynamics model. The performances of the baseline agent-based model and its extensions illustrate a promising approach to translate complex system dynamics models into agent-based model alternatives that are both conceptually simpler and capable of capturing main effects of complex local agent-agent interactions.

  17. Emulating a System Dynamics Model with Agent-Based Models: A Methodological Case Study in Simulation of Diabetes Progression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schryver, Jack; Nutaro, James; Shankar, Mallikarjun

    2015-10-30

    An agent-based simulation model hierarchy emulating disease states and behaviors critical to progression of diabetes type 2 was designed and implemented in the DEVS framework. The models are translations of basic elements of an established system dynamics model of diabetes. In this model hierarchy, which mimics diabetes progression over an aggregated U.S. population, was dis-aggregated and reconstructed bottom-up at the individual (agent) level. Four levels of model complexity were defined in order to systematically evaluate which parameters are needed to mimic outputs of the system dynamics model. Moreover, the four estimated models attempted to replicate stock counts representing disease statesmore » in the system dynamics model, while estimating impacts of an elderliness factor, obesity factor and health-related behavioral parameters. Health-related behavior was modeled as a simple realization of the Theory of Planned Behavior, a joint function of individual attitude and diffusion of social norms that spread over each agent s social network. Although the most complex agent-based simulation model contained 31 adjustable parameters, all models were considerably less complex than the system dynamics model which required numerous time series inputs to make its predictions. In all three elaborations of the baseline model provided significantly improved fits to the output of the system dynamics model. The performances of the baseline agent-based model and its extensions illustrate a promising approach to translate complex system dynamics models into agent-based model alternatives that are both conceptually simpler and capable of capturing main effects of complex local agent-agent interactions.« less

  18. Emergence of a snake-like structure in mobile distributed agents: an exploratory agent-based modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Muaz A

    2014-01-01

    The body structure of snakes is composed of numerous natural components thereby making it resilient, flexible, adaptive, and dynamic. In contrast, current computer animations as well as physical implementations of snake-like autonomous structures are typically designed to use either a single or a relatively smaller number of components. As a result, not only these artificial structures are constrained by the dimensions of the constituent components but often also require relatively more computationally intensive algorithms to model and animate. Still, these animations often lack life-like resilience and adaptation. This paper presents a solution to the problem of modeling snake-like structures by proposing an agent-based, self-organizing algorithm resulting in an emergent and surprisingly resilient dynamic structure involving a minimal of interagent communication. Extensive simulation experiments demonstrate the effectiveness as well as resilience of the proposed approach. The ideas originating from the proposed algorithm can not only be used for developing self-organizing animations but can also have practical applications such as in the form of complex, autonomous, evolvable robots with self-organizing, mobile components with minimal individual computational capabilities. The work also demonstrates the utility of exploratory agent-based modeling (EABM) in the engineering of artificial life-like complex adaptive systems. PMID:24701135

  19. Pattern-Oriented Modeling of Agent-Based Complex Systems: Lessons from Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Volker; Revilla, Eloy; Berger, Uta; Jeltsch, Florian; Mooij, Wolf M.; Railsback, Steven F.; Thulke, Hans-Hermann; Weiner, Jacob; Wiegand, Thorsten; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2005-11-01

    Agent-based complex systems are dynamic networks of many interacting agents; examples include ecosystems, financial markets, and cities. The search for general principles underlying the internal organization of such systems often uses bottom-up simulation models such as cellular automata and agent-based models. No general framework for designing, testing, and analyzing bottom-up models has yet been established, but recent advances in ecological modeling have come together in a general strategy we call pattern-oriented modeling. This strategy provides a unifying framework for decoding the internal organization of agent-based complex systems and may lead toward unifying algorithmic theories of the relation between adaptive behavior and system complexity.

  20. Pattern-oriented modeling of agent-based complex systems: Lessons from ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimm, Volker; Revilla, Eloy; Berger, Uta; Jeltsch, Florian; Mooij, Wolf M.; Railsback, Steven F.; Thulke, Hans-Hermann; Weiner, Jacob; Wiegand, Thorsten; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2005-01-01

    Agent-based complex systems are dynamic networks of many interacting agents; examples include ecosystems, financial markets, and cities. The search for general principles underlying the internal organization of such systems often uses bottom-up simulation models such as cellular automata and agent-based models. No general framework for designing, testing, and analyzing bottom-up models has yet been established, but recent advances in ecological modeling have come together in a general strategy we call pattern-oriented modeling. This strategy provides a unifying framework for decoding the internal organization of agent-based complex systems and may lead toward unifying algorithmic theories of the relation between adaptive behavior and system complexity.

  1. Pattern-oriented modeling of agent-based complex systems: lessons from ecology.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Volker; Revilla, Eloy; Berger, Uta; Jeltsch, Florian; Mooij, Wolf M; Railsback, Steven F; Thulke, Hans-Hermann; Weiner, Jacob; Wiegand, Thorsten; DeAngelis, Donald L

    2005-11-11

    Agent-based complex systems are dynamic networks of many interacting agents; examples include ecosystems, financial markets, and cities. The search for general principles underlying the internal organization of such systems often uses bottom-up simulation models such as cellular automata and agent-based models. No general framework for designing, testing, and analyzing bottom-up models has yet been established, but recent advances in ecological modeling have come together in a general strategy we call pattern-oriented modeling. This strategy provides a unifying framework for decoding the internal organization of agent-based complex systems and may lead toward unifying algorithmic theories of the relation between adaptive behavior and system complexity. PMID:16284171

  2. Combining Bayesian Networks and Agent Based Modeling to develop a decision-support model in Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nong, Bao Anh; Ertsen, Maurits; Schoups, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Complexity and uncertainty in natural resources management have been focus themes in recent years. Within these debates, with the aim to define an approach feasible for water management practice, we are developing an integrated conceptual modeling framework for simulating decision-making processes of citizens, in our case in the Day river area, Vietnam. The model combines Bayesian Networks (BNs) and Agent-Based Modeling (ABM). BNs are able to combine both qualitative data from consultants / experts / stakeholders, and quantitative data from observations on different phenomena or outcomes from other models. Further strengths of BNs are that the relationship between variables in the system is presented in a graphical interface, and that components of uncertainty are explicitly related to their probabilistic dependencies. A disadvantage is that BNs cannot easily identify the feedback of agents in the system once changes appear. Hence, ABM was adopted to represent the reaction among stakeholders under changes. The modeling framework is developed as an attempt to gain better understanding about citizen's behavior and factors influencing their decisions in order to reduce uncertainty in the implementation of water management policy.

  3. Catalytic and stoichiometric bromination of aromatic compounds in aqueous trifluoroacetic acid in the presence of nitrogen-containing oxidizing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Cheprakov, A.V.; Makhon'kov, D.I.; Rodkin, M.A.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1988-07-10

    The mono- and polybromination of benzene, halogenobenzenes, toluene, p-xylene, anisole, biphenyl, benzotrifluoride, benzoic acid, p-nitro- and p-carboxytoluene, p-methoxybenzonitrile, tetralin, and naphthalene were studied in trifluoroacetic acid and its aqueous solutions in systems containing stoichiometric amounts of bromine or alkali-metal bromide and stoichiometric or catalytic (in the presence of oxygen or air) amounts of nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent (nitrogen(IV) oxide, alkali-metal nitrate or nitrite). It is suggested that the brominating agent under the investigated conditions is nitryl bromide NO/sub 2/Br. Under the conditions of catalytic bromination anthracene is oxidized to anthraquinone with a preparative yield.

  4. Curing chemistry of phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers: Model compounds, carbon-13 labeling and cure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Christopher Chad

    1998-11-01

    Phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers (PETI) are currently considered the state-of-the-art high performance resins for aerospace applications. The processing of these resins is more facile because of their low molecular weight, but PETI's cure to form a tough, solvent-resistant material. However, the final cure structure was a complete mystery. Hence, the present study was set forth with three essential goals. The determination of the final structure of the crosslinked polymer is of obvious importance. Second, the crosslinking mechanism and controlling factors is also of interest. Lastly, the final structure of the crosslinked polymers was correlated with mechanical and thermal properties, thereby helping to establish the structure-processing-properties relationships for PETI resins. These goals were accomplished by using a combination of synthesis of model compounds synthesis and proposed cure products, sp{13}C labeling of the ethynyl endgroup in PETI's, monitoring of the thermal cure using solid state sp{13}C NMR and ESR and molecular modeling techniques. Phenylethynyl endcapping agents, 4-(phenylethynyl)phthalic anhydride (PEPA) and 3-(phenylethynyl)aniline (3PEA), were synthesized via the palladium-catalyzed coupling of phenylacetylene with 4-bromophthalic anhydride or 3-iodonitrobenzene followed by reduction to 3PEA, respectively. Isolated yields of 41 and 86% for 3PEA and PEPA were obtained, respectively. Model compounds were synthesized from 3PEA and PEPA by reacting with them the appropriate aniline or phthalic anhydride derivative. Model compounds included N-pentafluorophenyl-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/F5An), N-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/F3CAn), N-lbrack 3-(phenylethynyl)phenylrbrack\\ phthalimide (3PEA/PA), N-phenyl-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/An), N-(4-phenoxyphenyl)4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/POAn), and N-(1-naphthyl)-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/Anaph). Proposed cure products such as

  5. High performance computing for three-dimensional agent-based molecular models.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, G; Pérez-Pérez, M; Fdez-Riverola, F; Lourenço, A

    2016-07-01

    Agent-based simulations are increasingly popular in exploring and understanding cellular systems, but the natural complexity of these systems and the desire to grasp different modelling levels demand cost-effective simulation strategies and tools. In this context, the present paper introduces novel sequential and distributed approaches for the three-dimensional agent-based simulation of individual molecules in cellular events. These approaches are able to describe the dimensions and position of the molecules with high accuracy and thus, study the critical effect of spatial distribution on cellular events. Moreover, two of the approaches allow multi-thread high performance simulations, distributing the three-dimensional model in a platform independent and computationally efficient way. Evaluation addressed the reproduction of molecular scenarios and different scalability aspects of agent creation and agent interaction. The three approaches simulate common biophysical and biochemical laws faithfully. The distributed approaches show improved performance when dealing with large agent populations while the sequential approach is better suited for small to medium size agent populations. Overall, the main new contribution of the approaches is the ability to simulate three-dimensional agent-based models at the molecular level with reduced implementation effort and moderate-level computational capacity. Since these approaches have a generic design, they have the major potential of being used in any event-driven agent-based tool. PMID:27372059

  6. Bis-Acridines as Lead Antiparasitic Agents: Structure-Activity Analysis of a Discrete Compound Library In Vitro▿

    PubMed Central

    Caffrey, Conor R.; Steverding, Dietmar; Swenerton, Ryan K.; Kelly, Ben; Walshe, Deirdre; Debnath, Anjan; Zhou, Yuan-Min; Doyle, Patricia S.; Fafarman, Aaron T.; Zorn, Julie A.; Land, Kirkwood M.; Beauchene, Jessica; Schreiber, Kimberly; Moll, Heidrun; Ponte-Sucre, Alicia; Schirmeister, Tanja; Saravanamuthu, Ahilan; Fairlamb, Alan H.; Cohen, Fred E.; McKerrow, James H.; Weisman, Jennifer L.; May, Barnaby C. H.

    2007-01-01

    Parasitic diseases are of enormous public health significance in developing countries—a situation compounded by the toxicity of and resistance to many current chemotherapeutics. We investigated a focused library of 18 structurally diverse bis-acridine compounds for in vitro bioactivity against seven protozoan and one helminth parasite species and compared the bioactivities and the cytotoxicities of these compounds toward various mammalian cell lines. Structure-activity relationships demonstrated the influence of both the bis-acridine linker structure and the terminal acridine heterocycle on potency and cytotoxicity. The bioactivity of polyamine-linked acridines required a minimum linker length of approximately 10 Å. Increasing linker length resulted in bioactivity against most parasites but also cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells. N alkylation, but less so N acylation, of the polyamine linker ameliorated cytotoxicity while retaining bioactivity with 50% effective concentration (EC50) values similar to or better than those measured for standard drugs. Substitution of the polyamine for either an alkyl or a polyether linker maintained bioactivity and further alleviated cytotoxicity. Polyamine-linked compounds in which the terminal acridine heterocycle had been replaced with an aza-acridine also maintained acceptable therapeutic indices. The most potent compounds recorded low- to mid-nanomolar EC50 values against Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei; otherwise, low-micromolar potencies were measured. Importantly, the bioactivity of the library was independent of P. falciparum resistance to chloroquine. Compound bioactivity was a function of neither the potential to bis-intercalate DNA nor the inhibition of trypanothione reductase, an important drug target in trypanosomatid parasites. Our approach illustrates the usefulness of screening focused compound libraries against multiple parasite targets. Some of the bis-acridines identified here may represent

  7. Generation of aroma compounds in a fermented sausage meat model system by Debaryomyces hansenii strains.

    PubMed

    Cano-García, Liliana; Rivera-Jiménez, Silvia; Belloch, Carmela; Flores, Mónica

    2014-05-15

    The ability of seven Debaryomyces hansenii strains to generate aroma compounds in a fermented sausage model system was evaluated. The presence of the yeast, in the inoculated models, was confirmed by PCR amplification of M13 minisatellite. Volatile compounds production was analysed using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Forty volatile compounds were detected, quantified and their odour activity values (OAVs) calculated. All volatile compounds increased during time in the inoculated models although significant differences were found amongst them. Ester and sulphur production was strongly dependent on the strain inoculated. D. hansenii P2 and M6 strains were the highest producers of sulphur compounds where dimethyl disulphide and dimethyl trisulfide were the most prominent aroma components identified by their OAVs whereas, M4 showed the highest OAVs for ester compounds followed by the P2 strain. The meat model system has been useful to show the real ability of yeast strains to produce aroma compounds. PMID:24423545

  8. Solubilities of biologically active phenolic compounds: measurements and modeling.

    PubMed

    Queimada, António J; Mota, Fátima L; Pinho, Simão P; Macedo, Eugénia A

    2009-03-19

    Aqueous solubilities of natural phenolic compounds from different families (hydroxyphenyl, polyphenol, hydroxybenzoic, and phenylpropenoic) were experimentally obtained. Measurements were performed on tyrosol and ellagic, protocatechuic, syringic, and o-coumaric acids, at five different temperatures (from 288.2 to 323.2 K), using the standard shake-flask method, followed by compositional analysis using UV spectrophotometry. To verify the accuracy of the spectrophotometric method, some data points were measured by gravimetry, and in general, the values obtained with the two methods are in good agreement (deviations lower than 11%). To adequately understand the solubilization process, melting properties of the pure phenolics were obtained by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and apparent acid dissociation constants were measured by potentiometry titration. The aqueous solubilities followed the expected general exponential trend. The melting temperatures did not follow the same solubility tendency, and for tyrosol and ellagic acid, not only the size and extent of hydrogen bonding, but also the energy associated with their crystal structures, determine the solubility. For these binary systems, acid dissociation is not important. Approaches for modeling the measured data were evaluated. These included an excess Gibbs energy equation, the modified UNIQUAC model, and the cubic-plus-association (CPA) equation of state. Particularly for the CPA approach, a new methodology that explicitly takes into account the number and nature of the associating sites and the prediction of the pure-component parameters from molecular structure is proposed. The results indicate that these are appropriate tools for representing the water solubilities of these molecules. PMID:19243119

  9. Modeling the Information Age Combat Model: An Agent-Based Simulation of Network Centric Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deller, Sean; Rabadi, Ghaith A.; Bell, Michael I.; Bowling, Shannon R.; Tolk, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The Information Age Combat Model (IACM) was introduced by Cares in 2005 to contribute to the development of an understanding of the influence of connectivity on force effectiveness that can eventually lead to quantitative prediction and guidelines for design and employment. The structure of the IACM makes it clear that the Perron-Frobenius Eigenvalue is a quantifiable metric with which to measure the organization of a networked force. The results of recent experiments presented in Deller, et aI., (2009) indicate that the value of the Perron-Frobenius Eigenvalue is a significant measurement of the performance of an Information Age combat force. This was accomplished through the innovative use of an agent-based simulation to model the IACM and represents an initial contribution towards a new generation of combat models that are net-centric instead of using the current platform-centric approach. This paper describes the intent, challenges, design, and initial results of this agent-based simulation model.

  10. Source apportionment modeling of volatile organic compounds in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankow, J.F.; Asher, W.E.; Zogorski, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    It often is of interest to understand the relative importance of the different sources contributing to the concentration cw of a contaminant in a stream; the portions related to sources 1, 2, 3, etc. are denoted cw,1, cw,2, cw,3, etc. Like c w, 'he fractions ??1, = cw,1/c w, ??2 = cw,2/cw, ??3 = cw,3/cw, etc. depend on location and time. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can undergo absorption from the atmosphere into stream water or loss from stream water to the atmosphere, causing complexities affecting the source apportionment (SA) of VOCs in streams. Two SA rules are elaborated. Rule 1: VOC entering a stream across the air/water interface exclusively is assigned to the atmospheric portion of cw. Rule 2: VOC loss by volatilization, flow loss to groundwater, in-stream degradation, etc. is distributed over cw,1 cw,2, c w,3, etc. in proportion to their corresponding ?? values. How the two SA rules are applied, as well as the nature of the SA output for a given case, will depend on whether transport across the air/water interface is handled using the net flux F convention or using the individual fluxes J convention. Four hypothetical stream cases involving acetone, methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), benzene, chloroform, and perchloroethylene (PCE) are considered. Acetone and MTBE are sufficiently water soluble from air for a domestic atmospheric source to be capable of yielding cw values approaching the common water quality guideline range of 1 to 10 ??g/L. For most other VOCs, such levels cause net outgassing (F > 0). When F > 0 in a given section of stream, in the net flux convention, all of the ??j, for the compound remain unchanged over that section while cw decreases. A characteristic time ??d can be calculated to predict when there will be differences between SA results obtained by the net flux convention versus the individual fluxes convention. Source apportionment modeling provides the framework necessary for comparing different strategies for mitigating

  11. Combination of Genistein and Cisplatin with Two Designed Monofunctional Platinum Agents in Human Ovarian Tumour Models.

    PubMed

    Arzuman, Laila; Beale, Philip; Proschogo, Nick; Yu, Jun Q; Huq, Fazlul

    2015-11-01

    A great amount of research effort has been directed at platinum compounds that bind with DNA differently from cisplatin with the idea that the difference may translate into an altered spectrum of activity. Recently research has also been directed at applying combinations of platinum agents with tumour-active phytochemicals with the aim of providing a means of overcoming platinum resistance in ovarian cancer. Herein we report the synthesis of monofunctional platinum tris(3-hydroxypyridine)chloroplatinum(II) chloride (coded as LH1) and tris(imidazole)chloroplatinum(II) chloride (coded as LH2), and their activity alone and in combination with genistein and cisplatin against human ovarian A2780, cisplatin-resistant A2780(cisR) and picoplatin-resistant A2780(ZD0473R) cancer cell lines. Although both LH1 and LH2 were found to be less active than cisplatin against the tumour models, they produced synergistic outcomes in combination with genistein. Both the level of cellular accumulation of Pt and of Pt-DNA binding resulting from the combination were greater in the A2780(cisR) cell line than in the parental A2780 cell line, irrespective of the sequence of administration. Absence of association between activity of LH1 and LH2 and the level of Pt-DNA binding indicates that the cell death induced by LH1 and LH2 may not be limited to the effect of their binding with DNA. PMID:26504026

  12. Development of a whole-organism model to screen new compounds for sun protection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Hsin; Wen, Chi-Chung; Yang, Zhi-Shiang; Cheng, Chien-Chung; Tsai, Jen-Ning; Ku, Chia-Chen; Wu, Hsin-Ju; Chen, Yau-Hung

    2009-01-01

    We used zebrafish as a whole-organism model to screen new compounds for sun protection activity. First of all, we designed a series of UVB exposure experiments and recorded the phenotypic changes of zebrafish embryos. Results showed that 100 mJ/cm(2) of UVB given six times separated by 30 min intervals is the best condition. Fin malformation (reduced and/or absent fin) phenotypes are the most evident consequences after exposure to UVB. Each fin was affected by UVB, including pelvic, ventral, caudal, and dorsal fin, but pelvic fin seemed to be the most sensitive target after UVB exposure. We furthermore carried out "prevention" and "treatment" experiments using green tea extract and/or (-)-epigallocatechin (EGCG) to test this whole-organism model by observing the morphological changes of all fins (especially pelvic fin) after UVB exposure. Effects of UVB, green tea extract and EGCG on fin development were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier analysis, log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results showed that a zebrafish pelvic fin in the UVB + green tea (treatment) group is 5.51 (range from 2.39 to 14.90) times, one in the UVB + green tea (prevention) group is 7.04 (range from 3.11 to 18.92) times, and one in the 25 ppm of EGCG (prevention) group is 22.19 (range from 9.40 to 61.50) times more likely to return to normal fin than one in the UVB only group. On the basis of these observations, we believe this model is effective for screening the higher stability and lower toxicity of new compounds, such as small chemicals which are derivative from EGCG or other dietary agents for sun protection. PMID:19005726

  13. Agent-based modeling: Methods and techniques for simulating human systems

    PubMed Central

    Bonabeau, Eric

    2002-01-01

    Agent-based modeling is a powerful simulation modeling technique that has seen a number of applications in the last few years, including applications to real-world business problems. After the basic principles of agent-based simulation are briefly introduced, its four areas of application are discussed by using real-world applications: flow simulation, organizational simulation, market simulation, and diffusion simulation. For each category, one or several business applications are described and analyzed. PMID:12011407

  14. Multiscale modeling of nerve agent hydrolysis mechanisms: a tale of two Nobel Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Martin J.; Wymore, Troy W.

    2014-10-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems, whereas the 2013 Peace Prize was given to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons for their efforts to eliminate chemical warfare agents. This review relates the two by introducing the field of multiscale modeling and highlighting its application to the study of the biological mechanisms by which selected chemical weapon agents exert their effects at an atomic level.

  15. Learning Activity Models for Multiple Agents in a Smart Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, Aaron; Cook, Diane J.

    With the introduction of more complex intelligent environment systems, the possibilities for customizing system behavior have increased dramatically. Significant headway has been made in tracking individuals through spaces using wireless devices [1, 18, 26] and in recognizing activities within the space based on video data (see chapter by Brubaker et al. and [6, 8, 23]), motion sensor data [9, 25], wearable sensors [13] or other sources of information [14, 15, 22]. However, much of the theory and most of the algorithms are designed to handle one individual in the space at a time. Resident tracking, activity recognition, event prediction, and behavior automation becomes significantly more difficult for multi-agent situations, when there are multiple residents in the environment.

  16. Behavioral networks as a model for intelligent agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, Nancy E.

    1990-01-01

    On-going work at NASA Langley Research Center in the development and demonstration of a paradigm called behavioral networks as an architecture for intelligent agents is described. This work focuses on the need to identify a methodology for smoothly integrating the characteristics of low-level robotic behavior, including actuation and sensing, with intelligent activities such as planning, scheduling, and learning. This work assumes that all these needs can be met within a single methodology, and attempts to formalize this methodology in a connectionist architecture called behavioral networks. Behavioral networks are networks of task processes arranged in a task decomposition hierarchy. These processes are connected by both command/feedback data flow, and by the forward and reverse propagation of weights which measure the dynamic utility of actions and beliefs.

  17. Agent-Based Multicellular Modeling for Predictive Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological modeling is a rapidly growing field that has benefited significantly from recent technological advances, expanding traditional methods with greater computing power, parameter-determination algorithms, and the development of novel computational approaches to modeling bi...

  18. Perspectives on Zebrafish Models of Hallucinogenic Drugs and Related Psychotropic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Among different classes of psychotropic drugs, hallucinogenic agents exert one of the most prominent effects on human and animal behaviors, markedly altering sensory, motor, affective, and cognitive responses. The growing clinical and preclinical interest in psychedelic, dissociative, and deliriant hallucinogens necessitates novel translational, sensitive, and high-throughput in vivo models and screens. Primate and rodent models have been traditionally used to study cellular mechanisms and neural circuits of hallucinogenic drugs’ action. The utility of zebrafish (Danio rerio) in neuroscience research is rapidly growing due to their high physiological and genetic homology to humans, ease of genetic manipulation, robust behaviors, and cost effectiveness. Possessing a fully characterized genome, both adult and larval zebrafish are currently widely used for in vivo screening of various psychotropic compounds, including hallucinogens and related drugs. Recognizing the growing importance of hallucinogens in biological psychiatry, here we discuss hallucinogenic-induced phenotypes in zebrafish and evaluate their potential as efficient preclinical models of drug-induced states in humans. PMID:23883191

  19. Modeling and analysis of an agent-based model for Chinese stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Xia; Wang, Rui; Hu, Sen

    2013-11-01

    We constructed an agent-based stock market model which concisely describe investors' heterogeneity and adaptability by introducing price sensitivity and feedback time. Under different parameters, the peak and fat-tail property of return distribution is produced and the obtained statistic values coincide with empirical results: the center peak exponents range from -0.787 to -0.661, and the tail exponents range from -4.29 to -2.37. Besides, long-term correlation in volatility is examined by DFA1 method, and the obtained exponent α is 0.803, which also coincides with the exponent of 0.78 found in real market.

  20. A generalized quantum-inspired decision making model for intelligent agent.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuhuang; Loo, Chu Kiong

    2014-01-01

    A novel decision making for intelligent agent using quantum-inspired approach is proposed. A formal, generalized solution to the problem is given. Mathematically, the proposed model is capable of modeling higher dimensional decision problems than previous researches. Four experiments are conducted, and both empirical experiments results and proposed model's experiment results are given for each experiment. Experiments showed that the results of proposed model agree with empirical results perfectly. The proposed model provides a new direction for researcher to resolve cognitive basis in designing intelligent agent. PMID:24778580

  1. An agent-based computational model for tuberculosis spreading on age-structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graciani Rodrigues, C. C.; Espíndola, Aquino L.; Penna, T. J. P.

    2015-06-01

    In this work we present an agent-based computational model to study the spreading of the tuberculosis (TB) disease on age-structured populations. The model proposed is a merge of two previous models: an agent-based computational model for the spreading of tuberculosis and a bit-string model for biological aging. The combination of TB with the population aging, reproduces the coexistence of health states, as seen in real populations. In addition, the universal exponential behavior of mortalities curves is still preserved. Finally, the population distribution as function of age shows the prevalence of TB mostly in elders, for high efficacy treatments.

  2. The epitheliome: agent-based modelling of the social behaviour of cells.

    PubMed

    Walker, D C; Southgate, J; Hill, G; Holcombe, M; Hose, D R; Wood, S M; Mac Neil, S; Smallwood, R H

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new computational modelling paradigm for predicting the emergent behaviour resulting from the interaction of cells in epithelial tissue. As proof-of-concept, an agent-based model, in which there is a one-to-one correspondence between biological cells and software agents, has been coupled to a simple physical model. Behaviour of the computational model is compared with the growth characteristics of epithelial cells in monolayer culture, using growth media with low and physiological calcium concentrations. Results show a qualitative fit between the growth characteristics produced by the simulation and the in vitro cell models. PMID:15351133

  3. An Agent-Oriented Service Model for a Personal Information Manager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmy, Tarek; Bahrani, Ali; Bradshaw, Jeffrey M.

    Developing a reusable model of high quality requires consideration of the full development life cycle of an agent-based system. In this paper, we discuss an approach based on the Gaia methodology for describing and designing a service model for a personal information manager based on the agent-oriented paradigm. The proposed model is shown to be complete, scalable, independent of specific development frameworks, and supportive of a high degree of autonomous behavior. The extensibility of the model is shown by elaborating the original model to support speech recognition and calendar scheduling based on user preferences and learning from history.

  4. In vitro human skin penetration model for organophosphorus compounds with different physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Thors, L; Koch, B; Koch, M; Hägglund, L; Bucht, A

    2016-04-01

    A flow-through diffusion cell was validated for in vitro human epidermal penetration studies of organophosphorus compounds (OPCs) applied by infinite dosing. By testing OPCs with similar molecular weight but different physicochemical properties, it was shown that hydrophilic and lipophilic properties are major determinants for the penetration rate. Lipophilic OPCs displayed maximum cumulative penetration in the 20-75% agent concentration range whereas the hydrophilic OPCs displayed maximum cumulative penetration at 10 or 20% agent concentration. Low penetration was observed for all agents at 1% agent concentration or when applied as neat agents. The impact of the receptor solution composition was evaluated by comparing the penetration using receptor solutions of different ratios of ethanol and water. For diluted OPCs, a high concentration of ethanol in the receptor solution significantly increased the penetration compared to lower concentrations. When OPCs were applied as neat agents, the composition of the receptor solution only affected the penetration for one of four tested compounds. In conclusion, the flow-through diffusion cell was useful for examining the penetration of OPCs through the epidermal membrane. It was also demonstrated that the penetration rates of OPCs are strongly influenced by dilution in water and the receptor fluid composition. PMID:26778740

  5. Antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Ryder, N S

    1999-12-01

    At this year's ICAAC Meeting, new data on approximately 20 different antifungal agents were presented, while no new agents were disclosed. Drugs in late development include the triazoles, voriconazole (Pfizer Ltd) and Sch-56592 (Schering-Plough Corp), and the echinocandins, caspofungin (Merck & Co Inc) and FK-463 (Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co Ltd). In contrast to previous years, presentations on these and earlier developmental compounds were relatively modest in scope, with few significant new data. Little new information appeared on the most recent novel class of agents, the sordarins (Glaxo Wellcome plc). Early clinical results were presented for FK-463, showing acceptable tolerability and dose-dependent efficacy in AIDS-associated esophageal candidiasis. A new liposomal formulation of nystatin (Nyotran; Aronex Pharmaceuticals Inc) was shown to be equivalent to conventional amphotericin B in empiric therapy of presumed fungal infection in neutropenic patients, but with reduced toxicity. Intravenous itraconazole (Janssen Pharmaceutica NV) was an effective prophylactic therapy in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, while oral itraconazole was discussed as a treatment for fungal infection in heart and liver transplant patients. The allylamine compound, terbinafine (Novartis AG), showed good clinical efficacy against fungal mycetoma, a serious tropical infection. A major highlight was the first presentation of inhibitors of fungal efflux pumps as a strategy for overcoming resistance. MC-510027 (milbemycin alpha-9; Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) and its derivatives, potentiated the antifungal activity of triazoles and terbinafine in a number of Candida spp. Another pump inhibitor, MC-005172 (Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) showed in vivo potentiation of fluconazole in a mouse kidney infection model. Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc also presented inhibitors of bacterial efflux pumps. PMID:16113946

  6. Use of organic fluorochemical compounds with oleophobic and hydrophobic groups in asphaltenic crude oils as viscosity reducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Karydas, A.

    1988-09-06

    This patent describes a method of reducing the viscosity of asphaltenic crude oils comprising incorporating into the crude oil an effective viscosity reducing amount of an oil soluble organic compound and about 1 to about 80 weight percent based on the weight of the total composition of an asphaltenic oil compatible low viscosity diluent.

  7. A compound produced by Fruigivorous Tephritidae (Diptera) larvae promotes oviposition behavior by the biological control agent Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tephritid fruit fly parasitoids use fruit-derived chemical cues and the vibrations that result from larval movements to locate hosts sequestered inside fruit. However, compounds produced by the larvae themselves have not been previously described nor their significance to parasitoid foraging determi...

  8. Agent-Based Model Approach to Complex Phenomena in Real Economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyetomi, H.; Aoyama, H.; Fujiwara, Y.; Ikeda, Y.; Souma, W.

    An agent-based model for firms' dynamics is developed. The model consists of firm agents with identical characteristic parameters and a bank agent. Dynamics of those agents are described by their balance sheets. Each firm tries to maximize its expected profit with possible risks in market. Infinite growth of a firm directed by the ``profit maximization" principle is suppressed by a concept of ``going concern". Possibility of bankruptcy of firms is also introduced by incorporating a retardation effect of information on firms' decision. The firms, mutually interacting through the monopolistic bank, become heterogeneous in the course of temporal evolution. Statistical properties of firms' dynamics obtained by simulations based on the model are discussed in light of observations in the real economy.

  9. Microbial extraction of sulfur from model coal organosulfur compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, R.F.; Ward, B.; Lepo, J.E.

    1991-12-31

    Several hundred bacterial cultures isolated from a variety of natural sites were screened for their ability to desulfurize the model coal organosulfur compounds, dibenzothiophene (DBT) and DBT-sulfone. A sulfur-stress assay, in which DBT-sulfone was the only bioavailable source of sulfur, was used to screen and select for organisms that selectively desulfurized the organic-sulfur substrate. Only two new isolates, UMX9 and UMX3, and strain IGTS-8, a Rhodococcus rhodochrous provided by the Institute for Gas Technology (Chicago, USA.) as a reference culture, would grow on DBT or DBT-sulfone as a sole source of sulfur. Under sulfur-stress conditions, a desulfurized product identified as 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2-phenylphenol) was detected only for UMX9 and IGTS-8. Biodesulfurization activity for all three organisms occurred only for growing cultures, and was depressed by free sulfate, although more so for UMX3 and IGTS-8 than for UMX9. None of the three cultures exhibited good growth on DBT, DBT-sulfone, or 2-phenylphenol as sole sources of carbon. Taxonomic studies revealed UMX3 to be similar to IGTS-8, whereas UMX9 only exhibited Rhodococcus-like features. Comparative tests for carbohydrate utilization revealed that only UMX9 would grow on glucose, and that only IGTS-8 would grow on L-arabinose. Assays of biodesulfurization activity as a function of temperature or pH revealed further differences between UMX9 and UMX3/IGTS-8. Under optimized assay conditions for each organism, UMX9 exhibited up to 30% greater biodesulfurization activity than did IGTS-8 and UMX3, which were similar in activity.

  10. An extensible simulation environment and movement metrics for testing walking behavior in agent-based models

    SciTech Connect

    Paul M. Torrens; Atsushi Nara; Xun Li; Haojie Zhu; William A. Griffin; Scott B. Brown

    2012-01-01

    Human movement is a significant ingredient of many social, environmental, and technical systems, yet the importance of movement is often discounted in considering systems complexity. Movement is commonly abstracted in agent-based modeling (which is perhaps the methodological vehicle for modeling complex systems), despite the influence of movement upon information exchange and adaptation in a system. In particular, agent-based models of urban pedestrians often treat movement in proxy form at the expense of faithfully treating movement behavior with realistic agency. There exists little consensus about which method is appropriate for representing movement in agent-based schemes. In this paper, we examine popularly-used methods to drive movement in agent-based models, first by introducing a methodology that can flexibly handle many representations of movement at many different scales and second, introducing a suite of tools to benchmark agent movement between models and against real-world trajectory data. We find that most popular movement schemes do a relatively poor job of representing movement, but that some schemes may well be 'good enough' for some applications. We also discuss potential avenues for improving the representation of movement in agent-based frameworks.

  11. First Chemical Feature Based Pharmacophore Modeling of Potent Retinoidal Retinoic Acid Metabolism Blocking Agents (RAMBAs): Identification of Novel RAMBA Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Purushottamachar, Puranik; Patel, Jyoti B.; Gediya, Lalji K; Clement, Omoshile O.; Njar, Vincent C. O.

    2011-01-01

    The first three-dimensional (3D) pharmacophore model was developed for potent retinoidal retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs) with IC50 values ranging from 0.0009 to 5.84 nM. The seven common chemical features in these RAMBAs as deduced by the Catalyst/HipHop program include five hydrophobic groups (hydrophobes), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) and one ring aromatic group. Using the pharmacophore model as a 3D search query against NCI and Maybridge conformational Catalyst formatted databases; we retrieved several compounds with different structures (scaffolds) as hits. Twenty one retrieved hits were tested for RAMBA activity at 100 nM concentration. The most potent of these compounds, NCI10308597 and HTS01914 showed inhibitory potencies less (54.7% and 53.2%, respectively, at 100 nM) than those of our best previously reported RAMBAs VN/12-1 and VN/14-1 (90% and 86%, respectively, at 100 nM). Docking studies using a CYP26A1 homology model revealed that our most potent RAMBAs showed similar binding to the one observed for a series of RAMBAs reported previously by others. Our data shows the potential of our pharmacophore model in identifying structurally diverse and potent RAMBAs. Further refinement of the model and searches of other robust databases is currently in progress with a view to identifying and optimizing new leads. PMID:22130607

  12. Pain expressiveness and altruistic behavior: an exploration using agent-based modeling.

    PubMed

    de C Williams, Amanda C; Gallagher, Elizabeth; Fidalgo, Antonio R; Bentley, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Predictions which invoke evolutionary mechanisms are hard to test. Agent-based modeling in artificial life offers a way to simulate behaviors and interactions in specific physical or social environments over many generations. The outcomes have implications for understanding adaptive value of behaviors in context. Pain-related behavior in animals is communicated to other animals that might protect or help, or might exploit or predate. An agent-based model simulated the effects of displaying or not displaying pain (expresser/nonexpresser strategies) when injured and of helping, ignoring, or exploiting another in pain (altruistic/nonaltruistic/selfish strategies). Agents modeled in MATLAB interacted at random while foraging (gaining energy); random injury interrupted foraging for a fixed time unless help from an altruistic agent, who paid an energy cost, speeded recovery. Environmental and social conditions also varied, and each model ran for 10,000 iterations. Findings were meaningful in that, in general, contingencies that evident from experimental work with a variety of mammals, over a few interactions, were replicated in the agent-based model after selection pressure over many generations. More energy-demanding expression of pain reduced its frequency in successive generations, and increasing injury frequency resulted in fewer expressers and altruists. Allowing exploitation of injured agents decreased expression of pain to near zero, but altruists remained. Decreasing costs or increasing benefits of helping hardly changed its frequency, whereas increasing interaction rate between injured agents and helpers diminished the benefits to both. Agent-based modeling allows simulation of complex behaviors and environmental pressures over evolutionary time. PMID:26655734

  13. Pain expressiveness and altruistic behavior: an exploration using agent-based modeling

    PubMed Central

    de C Williams, Amanda C.; Gallagher, Elizabeth; Fidalgo, Antonio R.; Bentley, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Predictions which invoke evolutionary mechanisms are hard to test. Agent-based modeling in artificial life offers a way to simulate behaviors and interactions in specific physical or social environments over many generations. The outcomes have implications for understanding adaptive value of behaviors in context. Pain-related behavior in animals is communicated to other animals that might protect or help, or might exploit or predate. An agent-based model simulated the effects of displaying or not displaying pain (expresser/nonexpresser strategies) when injured and of helping, ignoring, or exploiting another in pain (altruistic/nonaltruistic/selfish strategies). Agents modeled in MATLAB interacted at random while foraging (gaining energy); random injury interrupted foraging for a fixed time unless help from an altruistic agent, who paid an energy cost, speeded recovery. Environmental and social conditions also varied, and each model ran for 10,000 iterations. Findings were meaningful in that, in general, contingencies that evident from experimental work with a variety of mammals, over a few interactions, were replicated in the agent-based model after selection pressure over many generations. More energy-demanding expression of pain reduced its frequency in successive generations, and increasing injury frequency resulted in fewer expressers and altruists. Allowing exploitation of injured agents decreased expression of pain to near zero, but altruists remained. Decreasing costs or increasing benefits of helping hardly changed its frequency, whereas increasing interaction rate between injured agents and helpers diminished the benefits to both. Agent-based modeling allows simulation of complex behaviors and environmental pressures over evolutionary time. PMID:26655734

  14. An Agent-Based Model of Signal Transduction in Bacterial Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jameson; Parker, Miles; Bourret, Robert B.; Giddings, Morgan C.

    2010-01-01

    We report the application of agent-based modeling to examine the signal transduction network and receptor arrays for chemotaxis in Escherichia coli, which are responsible for regulating swimming behavior in response to environmental stimuli. Agent-based modeling is a stochastic and bottom-up approach, where individual components of the modeled system are explicitly represented, and bulk properties emerge from their movement and interactions. We present the Chemoscape model: a collection of agents representing both fixed membrane-embedded and mobile cytoplasmic proteins, each governed by a set of rules representing knowledge or hypotheses about their function. When the agents were placed in a simulated cellular space and then allowed to move and interact stochastically, the model exhibited many properties similar to the biological system including adaptation, high signal gain, and wide dynamic range. We found the agent based modeling approach to be both powerful and intuitive for testing hypotheses about biological properties such as self-assembly, the non-linear dynamics that occur through cooperative protein interactions, and non-uniform distributions of proteins in the cell. We applied the model to explore the role of receptor type, geometry and cooperativity in the signal gain and dynamic range of the chemotactic response to environmental stimuli. The model provided substantial qualitative evidence that the dynamic range of chemotactic response can be traced to both the heterogeneity of receptor types present, and the modulation of their cooperativity by their methylation state. PMID:20485527

  15. Formal Modeling of Multi-Agent Systems using the Pi-Calculus and Epistemic Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorie, Toinette; Esterline, Albert

    1998-01-01

    Multi-agent systems have become important recently in computer science, especially in artificial intelligence (AI). We allow a broad sense of agent, but require at least that an agent has some measure of autonomy and interacts with other agents via some kind of agent communication language. We are concerned in this paper with formal modeling of multi-agent systems, with emphasis on communication. We propose for this purpose to use the pi-calculus, an extension of the process algebra CCS. Although the literature on the pi-calculus refers to agents, the term is used there in the sense of a process in general. It is our contention, however, that viewing agents in the AI sense as agents in the pi-calculus sense affords significant formal insight. One formalism that has been applied to agents in the AI sense is epistemic logic, the logic of knowledge. The success of epistemic logic in computer science in general has come in large part from its ability to handle concepts of knowledge that apply to groups. We maintain that the pi-calculus affords a natural yet rigorous means by which groups that are significant to epistemic logic may be identified, encapsulated, structured into hierarchies, and restructured in a principled way. This paper is organized as follows: Section 2 introduces the pi-calculus; Section 3 takes a scenario from the classical paper on agent-oriented programming [Sh93] and translates it into a very simple subset of the n-calculus; Section 4 then shows how more sophisticated features of the pi-calculus may bc brought into play; Section 5 discusses how the pi-calculus may be used to define groups for epistemic logic; and Section 6 is the conclusion.

  16. Essential requirement of cytochrome c release for caspase activation by procaspase-activating compound defined by cellular models

    PubMed Central

    Seervi, M; Joseph, J; Sobhan, P K; Bhavya, B C; Santhoshkumar, T R

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c (cyt. c) release and caspase activation are often impaired in tumors with Bcl-2 overexpression or Bax and Bak-defective status. Direct triggering of cell death downstream of Bax and Bak is an attractive strategy to kill such cancers. Small molecule compounds capable of direct caspase activation appear to be the best mode for killing such tumors. However, there is no precise model to screen such compounds. The currently employed cell-free systems possess the inherent drawback of lacking cellular contents and organelles that operate in integrating cell death signaling. We have developed highly refined cell-based approaches to validate direct caspase activation in cancer cells. Using this approach, we show that PAC-1 (first procaspase-activating compound), the first direct activator of procaspases identified in a cell-free system, in fact requires mitochondrial cyt. c release for triggering caspase activation similar to other antitumor agents. It can induce significant caspase activation and cell death in the absence of Bax and Bak, and in cells overexpressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. This study for the first time defines precise criteria for the validation of direct caspase-activating compounds using specialized cellular models that is expected to accelerate the discovery of potential direct caspase activators. PMID:21900958

  17. Homology modelling and virtual screening of P-protein in a quest for novel antimelanogenic agent and in vitro assessments.

    PubMed

    Morya, Vivek K; Dung, Nguyen H; Singh, Birendra K; Lee, Hyang-Bok; Kim, Eun-ki

    2014-11-01

    An adequate knowledge on molecular mechanism of melanogenesis provides an opportunity to find the novel molecular targets for the discovery and development of new cosmetics. Among various genes, the OCA2 is being essential for proper melanin synthesis, and mutation or deletion of this gene leads to oculocutaneous albinism type 2. Thus, for this study, the product of this gene, that is P-protein, was targeted in quest for novel inhibitors as antimelanogenic agents. Based on pattern search of amino acid sequence and homology analysis, the protein structure was modelled. The role of this protein has been predicted as a tyrosine transporter of melanosomes. Thus, the molecular library was generated on the basis of tyrosine transporter inhibitor. Based on the dock score, 20 molecules have been considered as putative inhibitors for P-protein. Among these compounds, five molecules (compound #1, #4, #8, #13 and #17) were found to be quite effective as antimelanogenic without having any toxicity. Further investigations to establish the mechanism of action, the indirect methods such as tyrosinase assay, analysis for eumelanin and pheomelanins and investigation of mRNA levels were being carried out. The results from the studies offered a new lead in antimelanogenic therapy and may be very useful for further optimization work in developing them as novel depigmenting agents. PMID:25236473

  18. Measurement of the uptake of a 14C-labelled fluorescent whitening agent by fish from water and through a model food chain.

    PubMed

    Feron, J P; Hitz, H R

    1975-01-01

    A laboratory technique is described which simulates the uptake of a fluorescent whitening agent by fish directly from the water and indirectly through a model food chain. The use of radioactive labelled material enables the direct and indirect uptake and possible accumulation of the compounds to be measured quantitatively. The results are expressed as concentration factors. Between ecological and toxicological data a safety relationship is established. PMID:1064532

  19. Phenolic compounds and biological effects of edible Rumex scutatus and Pseudosempervivum sempervivum: potential sources of natural agents with health benefits.

    PubMed

    Savran, Ahmet; Zengin, Gokhan; Aktumsek, Abdurrahman; Mocan, Andrei; Glamoćlija, Jasmina; Ćirić, Ana; Soković, Marina

    2016-07-13

    The present study outlines a chemical characterization and further effects beneficial to health of edible Rumex scutatus and Pseudosempervivum sempervivum, in addition to presenting the antioxidant, enzyme inhibitory effects and antimicrobial properties of different extracts. The phenolic compounds composition of the extracts was assessed by RP-HPLC-DAD, outlining benzoic acid and rutin as major constituents in P. sempervivum and rutin and hesperidin in R. scutatus. Moreover, further biological effects were tested on key enzymes involved in diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's disease and skin melanogenesis revealing an important tyrosinase inhibitory effect of Pseudosempervivum water extract. Moreover, both species possessed antimicrobial properties towards bacteria and fungi relevant to public health. Accordingly, we find that R. scutatus and P. sempervivum can be considered as novel functional foods because they are rich sources of biologically active compounds that provide health benefits. PMID:27364042

  20. Characterization of initial cure reactions in propargyl and nadic end capped model compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    Imide model compounds containing propargyl and nadic groups were studied to obtain a fundamental understanding of the reaction of these groups attached to imide oligomers. The initial cure reactions were examined by a variety of characterization techniques including high pressure liquid chromatography, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analyses, and mass spectroscopy. The initial step in the cure of propargyl end capped model compounds probably involved the formation of a new terminal acetylenic group. Configurational changes involving endo/exo isomerism was found in the nadimide model compounds. Nadimide compounds heated in air and in nitrogen appeared to cure by different mechanisms.

  1. Phenotypic assays to identify agents that induce reactive gliosis: a counter-screen to prioritize compounds for preclinical animal studies.

    PubMed

    Beckerman, Samuel R; Jimenez, Joaquin E; Shi, Yan; Al-Ali, Hassan; Bixby, John L; Lemmon, Vance P

    2015-09-01

    Astrocyte phenotypes change in a process called reactive gliosis after traumatic central nervous system (CNS) injury. Astrogliosis is characterized by expansion of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) cytoskeleton, adoption of stellate morphologies, and differential expression of some extracellular matrix molecules. The astrocytic response immediately after injury is beneficial, but in the chronic injury phase, reactive astrocytes produce inhibitory factors (i.e., chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans [CSPGs]) that limit the regrowth of injured axons. There are no drugs that promote axon regeneration or functional recovery after CNS trauma in humans. To develop novel therapeutics for the injured CNS, we screened various libraries in a phenotypic assay to identify compounds that promote neurite outgrowth. However, the effects these compounds have on astrocytes are unknown. Specifically, we were interested in whether compounds could alter astrocytes in a manner that mimics the glial reaction to injury. To test this hypothesis, we developed cell-based phenotypic bioassays to measure changes in (1) GFAP morphology/localization and (2) CSPG expression/immunoreactivity from primary astrocyte cultures. These assays were optimized for six-point dose-response experiments in 96-well plates. The GFAP morphology assay is suitable for counter-screening with a Z-factor of 0.44±0.03 (mean±standard error of the mean; N=3 biological replicates). The CSPG assay is reproducible and informative, but does not satisfy common metrics for a "screenable" assay. As proof of principle, we tested a small set of hit compounds from our neurite outgrowth bioassay and identified one that can enhance axon growth without exacerbating the deleterious characteristics of reactive gliosis. PMID:26230074

  2. Reduced weight decontamination formulation utilizing a solid peracid compound for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.

    2011-09-20

    A reduced weight decontamination formulation that utilizes a solid peracid compound (sodium borate peracetate) and a cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride) that can be packaged with all water removed. This reduces the packaged weight of the decontamination formulation by .about.80% (as compared to the "all-liquid" DF-200 formulation) and significantly lowers the logistics burden on the warfighter. Water (freshwater or saltwater) is added to the new decontamination formulation at the time of use from a local source.

  3. Using Agent Base Models to Optimize Large Scale Network for Large System Inventories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shameldin, Ramez Ahmed; Bowling, Shannon R.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to use Agent Base Models (ABM) to optimize large scale network handling capabilities for large system inventories and to implement strategies for the purpose of reducing capital expenses. The models used in this paper either use computational algorithms or procedure implementations developed by Matlab to simulate agent based models in a principal programming language and mathematical theory using clusters, these clusters work as a high performance computational performance to run the program in parallel computational. In both cases, a model is defined as compilation of a set of structures and processes assumed to underlie the behavior of a network system.

  4. Diffusion and Aggregation in an Agent Based Model of Stock Market Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castiglione, Filippo

    We describe a new model to simulate the dynamic interactions between market price and the decisions of two different kind of traders. They possess spatial mobility allowing to group together to form coalitions. Each coalition follows a strategy chosen from a proportional voting ``dominated'' by a leader's decision. The interplay of both kind of agents gives rise to complex price dynamics that is consistent with the main stylized facts of financial time series. The present model incorporates many features of other known models and is meant to be the first step toward the construction of an agent-based model that uses more realistic markets rules, strategies, and information structures.

  5. An Agent-Based Model for Studying Child Maltreatment and Child Maltreatment Prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaolin; Puddy, Richard W.

    This paper presents an agent-based model that simulates the dynamics of child maltreatment and child maltreatment prevention. The developed model follows the principles of complex systems science and explicitly models a community and its families with multi-level factors and interconnections across the social ecology. This makes it possible to experiment how different factors and prevention strategies can affect the rate of child maltreatment. We present the background of this work and give an overview of the agent-based model and show some simulation results.

  6. Synthesis and Regioselective Reaction of Some Unsymmetrical Heterocyclic Chalcone Derivatives and Spiro Heterocyclic Compounds as Antibacterial Agents.

    PubMed

    El-Hashash, Maher A; Rizk, Sameh A; Atta-Allah, Saad R

    2015-01-01

    A number of novel heterocyclic chalcone derivatives can be synthesized by thermal and microwave tools. Treatment of 4-(4-Acetylamino- and/or 4-bromo-phenyl)-4-oxobut-2-enoic acids with hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium were afforded oxirane derivatives 2. Reaction of the epoxide 2 with 2-amino-5-aryl-1,3,4-thiadiazole derivatives yielded chalcone of imidazo[2,1-b]thiadiazole derivative 4 via two thermal routes. In one pot reaction of 4-bromoacetophenone, diethyloxalate, and 2-amino-5-aryl-1,3,4-thiadiazole derivatives in MW irradiation (W 250 and T 150 °C) under eco-friendly conditions afforded an unsuitable yield of the desired chalcone 4d. The chalcone derivatives 4 were used as a key starting material to synthesize some new spiroheterocyclic compounds via Michael and aza-Michael adducts. The chalcone 4f was similar to the aryl-oxo-vinylamide derivatives for the inhibition of tyrosine kinase and cancer cell growth. The electron-withdrawing substituents, such as halogens, and 2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole moeity decreasing the electron density, thereby decreasing the energy of HOMO, and the presence of imidazothiadiazole moiety should improve the antibacterial activity. Thus, the newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for their anti-bacterial activity against (ATCC 25923), (ATCC 10987), (ATCC 274,) and (SM514). The structure of the newly synthesized compounds was confirmed by elemental analysis and spectroscopic data. PMID:26690393

  7. Understanding Group/Party Affiliation Using Social Networks and Agent-Based Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Kenyth

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of group affiliation and group dispersion is a concept that is most often studied in order for political candidates to better understand the most efficient way to conduct their campaigns. While political campaigning in the United States is a very hot topic that most politicians analyze and study, the concept of group/party affiliation presents its own area of study that producers very interesting results. One tool for examining party affiliation on a large scale is agent-based modeling (ABM), a paradigm in the modeling and simulation (M&S) field perfectly suited for aggregating individual behaviors to observe large swaths of a population. For this study agent based modeling was used in order to look at a community of agents and determine what factors can affect the group/party affiliation patterns that are present. In the agent-based model that was used for this experiment many factors were present but two main factors were used to determine the results. The results of this study show that it is possible to use agent-based modeling to explore group/party affiliation and construct a model that can mimic real world events. More importantly, the model in the study allows for the results found in a smaller community to be translated into larger experiments to determine if the results will remain present on a much larger scale.

  8. An Agent-Based Model of New Venture Creation: Conceptual Design for Simulating Entrepreneurship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provance, Mike; Collins, Andrew; Carayannis, Elias

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing debate over the means by which regions can foster the growth of entrepreneurial activity in order to stimulate recovery and growth of their economies. On one side, agglomeration theory suggests the regions grow because of strong clusters that foster knowledge spillover locally; on the other side, the entrepreneurial action camp argues that innovative business models are generated by entrepreneurs with unique market perspectives who draw on knowledge from more distant domains. We will show you the design for a novel agent-based model of new venture creation that will demonstrate the relationship between agglomeration and action. The primary focus of this model is information exchange as the medium for these agent interactions. Our modeling and simulation study proposes to reveal interesting relationships in these perspectives, offer a foundation on which these disparate theories from economics and sociology can find common ground, and expand the use of agent-based modeling into entrepreneurship research.

  9. Architectural considerations for agent-based national scale policy models : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Backus, George A.; Strip, David R.

    2007-09-01

    The need to anticipate the consequences of policy decisions becomes ever more important as the magnitude of the potential consequences grows. The multiplicity of connections between the components of society and the economy makes intuitive assessments extremely unreliable. Agent-based modeling has the potential to be a powerful tool in modeling policy impacts. The direct mapping between agents and elements of society and the economy simplify the mapping of real world functions into the world of computation assessment. Our modeling initiative is motivated by the desire to facilitate informed public debate on alternative policies for how we, as a nation, provide healthcare to our population. We explore the implications of this motivation on the design and implementation of a model. We discuss the choice of an agent-based modeling approach and contrast it to micro-simulation and systems dynamics approaches.

  10. Integrating adaptive behaviour in large-scale flood risk assessments: an Agent-Based Modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haer, Toon; Aerts, Jeroen

    2015-04-01

    Between 1998 and 2009, Europe suffered over 213 major damaging floods, causing 1126 deaths, displacing around half a million people. In this period, floods caused at least 52 billion euro in insured economic losses making floods the most costly natural hazard faced in Europe. In many low-lying areas, the main strategy to cope with floods is to reduce the risk of the hazard through flood defence structures, like dikes and levees. However, it is suggested that part of the responsibility for flood protection needs to shift to households and businesses in areas at risk, and that governments and insurers can effectively stimulate the implementation of individual protective measures. However, adaptive behaviour towards flood risk reduction and the interaction between the government, insurers, and individuals has hardly been studied in large-scale flood risk assessments. In this study, an European Agent-Based Model is developed including agent representatives for the administrative stakeholders of European Member states, insurers and reinsurers markets, and individuals following complex behaviour models. The Agent-Based Modelling approach allows for an in-depth analysis of the interaction between heterogeneous autonomous agents and the resulting (non-)adaptive behaviour. Existing flood damage models are part of the European Agent-Based Model to allow for a dynamic response of both the agents and the environment to changing flood risk and protective efforts. By following an Agent-Based Modelling approach this study is a first contribution to overcome the limitations of traditional large-scale flood risk models in which the influence of individual adaptive behaviour towards flood risk reduction is often lacking.

  11. A spatial web/agent-based model to support stakeholders' negotiation regarding land development.

    PubMed

    Pooyandeh, Majeed; Marceau, Danielle J

    2013-11-15

    Decision making in land management can be greatly enhanced if the perspectives of concerned stakeholders are taken into consideration. This often implies negotiation in order to reach an agreement based on the examination of multiple alternatives. This paper describes a spatial web/agent-based modeling system that was developed to support the negotiation process of stakeholders regarding land development in southern Alberta, Canada. This system integrates a fuzzy analytic hierarchy procedure within an agent-based model in an interactive visualization environment provided through a web interface to facilitate the learning and negotiation of the stakeholders. In the pre-negotiation phase, the stakeholders compare their evaluation criteria using linguistic expressions. Due to the uncertainty and fuzzy nature of such comparisons, a fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process is then used to prioritize the criteria. The negotiation starts by a development plan being submitted by a user (stakeholder) through the web interface. An agent called the proposer, which represents the proposer of the plan, receives this plan and starts negotiating with all other agents. The negotiation is conducted in a step-wise manner where the agents change their attitudes by assigning a new set of weights to their criteria. If an agreement is not achieved, a new location for development is proposed by the proposer agent. This process is repeated until a location is found that satisfies all agents to a certain predefined degree. To evaluate the performance of the model, the negotiation was simulated with four agents, one of which being the proposer agent, using two hypothetical development plans. The first plan was selected randomly; the other one was chosen in an area that is of high importance to one of the agents. While the agents managed to achieve an agreement about the location of the land development after three rounds of negotiation in the first scenario, seven rounds were required in the second

  12. A new model for international relationship based on multi-agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Defu; Huang, Gang; Su, Xisheng

    2011-12-01

    Analysis and simulate international relationship by using high-tech cluster of information technology is important and meaningful to the modern research of strategic work and the strategic decision-making. This paper use Multi-Agents system to model the international relationship with macrocosmic level and microcosmic level. For the microcosmic level shows activities and the rules of correlative activities of countries, propose a reinforcement learning algorithm to improve cooperative efficiency among agents, which based on common goal and joint rewards to insure agents to learn cooperative behavior. A prototype and an experiment were given.

  13. The Estimate of the Optimum Number of Retail Stores of Small Market Areas Using Agent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Takuya; Hibino, Takayuki; Abe, Takehiko; Kimura, Haruhiko

    At present, the conditions of the location and the optimal arrangements for retail stores of small market areas are examined with the several surveys. The surveys are important because the proceeds are influenced largely with the selection of the location. However, costs, time and experience are necessary in the surveys. For this reason, this research is intended for the retail stores of small market areas which expend a great deal of money for the surveys. The retail stores of small market areas in this paper are convenience stores. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the optimum number of convenience stores by computer simulation. We adopted the agent model. We constructed an agent model that had the customer agent, the shop agent and the landscape with the kind of necessary minimum parameters. And, we were able to make the simulation environment that reflected the real world. As a result, we could estimate the optimum number of convenience stores by simulations.

  14. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND MODEL (VERSION 1.8) (FOR MICROCOMPUTERS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Future emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and costs of their control can be estimated by applying growth factors, emission constraints, control cost functions, and capacity retirement rates to the base line estimates of VOC emissions and industrial VOC source capacity...

  15. SORPTION PROPERTIES OF MODEL COMPOUNDS ON C18 ADSORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bonded silica adsorbent Bondapak-C18 was evaluated for removing organic matter from secondary sewage effluents and from solutions of pure organic compounds. The adsorbent is hydrophobic and its behavior with water samples may be erratic unless first wet with a solvent. Howeve...

  16. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photochemical smog is a major air pollution problem and a significant cause of premature death in the U.S. Smog forms in the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are emitted primarily from industry and motor vehicles in the U.S. However, dairy farms may be an important source in so...

  17. MICROBIAL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES AND EXPOSURE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the results from a study that examined microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) emissions from six fungi and one bacterial species (Streptomyces spp.) commonly found in indoor environments. Data are presented on peak emission rates from inoculated agar plate...

  18. Tutoring and Multi-Agent Systems: Modeling from Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennane, Abdellah

    2010-01-01

    Tutoring systems become complex and are offering varieties of pedagogical software as course modules, exercises, simulators, systems online or offline, for single user or multi-user. This complexity motivates new forms and approaches to the design and the modelling. Studies and research in this field introduce emergent concepts that allow the…

  19. Reverse engineering a social agent-based hidden markov model--visage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Ching Justin; Goldberg, Mark; Magdon-Ismail, Malik; Wallace, William A

    2008-12-01

    We present a machine learning approach to discover the agent dynamics that drives the evolution of the social groups in a community. We set up the problem by introducing an agent-based hidden Markov model for the agent dynamics: an agent's actions are determined by micro-laws. Nonetheless, We learn the agent dynamics from the observed communications without knowing state transitions. Our approach is to identify the appropriate micro-laws corresponding to an identification of the appropriate parameters in the model. The model identification problem is then formulated as a mixed optimization problem. To solve the problem, we develop a multistage learning process for determining the group structure, the group evolution, and the micro-laws of a community based on the observed set of communications among actors, without knowing the semantic contents. Finally, to test the quality of our approximations and the feasibility of the approach, we present the results of extensive experiments on synthetic data as well as the results on real communities, such as Enron email and Movie newsgroups. Insight into agent dynamics helps us understand the driving forces behind social evolution. PMID:19145665

  20. Flash vacuum pyrolysis of methoxy-substituted lignin model compounds.

    PubMed

    Britt, P F; Buchanan, A C; Cooney, M J; Martineau, D R

    2000-03-10

    The flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of methoxy-substituted beta-O-4 lignin model compounds has been studied at 500 degrees C to provide mechanistic insight into the primary reaction pathways that occur under conditions of fast pyrolysis. FVP of PhCH(2)CH(2)OPh (PPE), a model of the dominant beta-O-4 linkage in lignin, proceeds by C-O and C-C cleavage, in a 37:1 ratio, to produce styrene plus phenol as the dominant products and minor amounts of toluene, bibenzyl, and benzaldehyde. From the deuterium isotope effect in the FVP of PhCD(2)CH(2)OPh, it was shown that C-O cleavage occurs by homolysis and by 1,2-elimination in a ratio of 1.4:1, respectively. Methoxy substituents enhance the homolysis of the beta-O-4 linkage, relative to PPE, in o-CH(3)O-C(6)H(4)OCH(2)CH(2)Ph (o-CH(3)O-PPE) and (o-CH(3)O)(2)-C(6)H(3)OCH(2)CH(2)Ph ((o-CH(3)O)(2)-PPE) by a factor of 7.4 and 21, respectively. The methoxy-substituted phenoxy radicals undergo a complex series of reactions, which are dominated by 1,5-, 1,6-, and 1,4-intramolecular hydrogen abstraction, rearrangement, and beta-scission reactions. In the FVP of o-CH(3)O-PPE, the dominant product, salicylaldehyde, forms from the methoxyphenoxy radical by a 1,5-hydrogen shift to form 2-hydroxyphenoxymethyl radical, 1,2-phenyl shift, and beta-scission of a hydrogen atom. The 2-hydroxyphenoxymethyl radical can also cleave to form formaldehyde and phenol in which the ratio of 1, 2-phenyl shift to beta-scission is ca. 4:1. In the FVP of o-CH(3)O-PPE and (o-CH(3)O)(2)-PPE, products (ca. 20 mol %) are also formed by C-O homolysis of the methoxy group. The resulting phenoxy radicals undergo 1,5- and 1,6-hydrogen shifts in a ratio of ca. 2:1 to the aliphatic or benzylic carbon, respectively, of the phenethyl chain. In the FVP of (o-CH(3)O)(2)-PPE, o-cresol was the dominant product. It was formed by decomposition of 2-hydroxy-3-hydroxymethylbenzaldehyde and 2-hydroxybenzyl alcohol, which are formed from a complex series of reactions from the 2

  1. Toward Agent-Based Models of the Development And Evolution of Business Relations and Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Ian F.; Marks, Robert E.; Young, Louise

    Firms achieve competitive advantage in part through the development of cooperative relations with other firms and organisations. We describe a program of research designed to map and model the development of cooperative inter-firm relations, including the processes and paths by which firms may evolve from adversarial to more cooperative relations. Narrative-event-history methods will be used to develop stylised histories of the emergence of business relations in various contexts and to identify relevant causal mechanisms to be included in the agent-based models of relationship and network evolution. The relationship histories will provide the means of assuring the agent-based models developed.

  2. Structural estimation of a principal-agent model: moral hazard in medical insurance.

    PubMed

    Vera-Hernández, Marcos

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of principal-agent models in the development of modern economic theory, there are few estimations of these models. I recover the estimates of a principal-agent model and obtain an approximation to the optimal contract. The results show that out-of-pocket payments follow a concave profile with respect to costs of treatment. I estimate the welfare loss due to moral hazard, taking into account income effects. I also propose a new measure of moral hazard based on the conditional correlation between contractible and noncontractible variables. PMID:15025029

  3. Agent-Based Modeling of Cancer Stem Cell Driven Solid Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Macklin, Paul; Enderling, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tumor growth has become an invaluable tool to simulate complex cell-cell interactions and emerging population-level dynamics. Agent-based models are commonly used to describe the behavior and interaction of individual cells in different environments. Behavioral rules can be informed and calibrated by in vitro assays, and emerging population-level dynamics may be validated with both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Here, we describe the design and implementation of a lattice-based agent-based model of cancer stem cell driven tumor growth. PMID:27044046

  4. Reserve osmosis removal of organic compounds. 2. Opportunity poisons and nerve agent hydrolysates. Technical report, June 1990-December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, W.D.; Sincero, A.P.; Schmidt, M.O.

    1995-03-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) rejection of acetic acid, fluoro-, chloro- and bromoacetic acids and hydrazine was investigated in a pilot scale (3 gpm) test unit; RO rejection of methylphosphonic acid and ethyl,-isopropyl and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acids (nerve agent hydrolysates) was investigated in a bench scale (6 L/hr) test unit. Rejection of acetic acid derivatives was found to be pH and pKa dependent; molecular weight was not a factor for total acids, but rejection was inversely related to molecular weight for free (undissociated) acids. Rejection of all methylphosphonates exceeded 99 percent at pH 3 to 10 and was not pH dependent. Rejection of hydrazine sulfate (a surrogate for UDMH) was no better than 90 percent at pH 7.

  5. Reverse osmosis removal of organic compounds II. Opportunity poisons and nerve agent hydrolysates. Technical report, June 1990-December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, W.D.; Sincero, A.P.; Schmidt, M.O.

    1995-03-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) rejection of acetic acid, fluoro-, chloro- and bromoacetic acids and hydrazine was investigated in a pilot scale (3 gpm) test unit; RO rejection of methylphosphonic acid and ethyl, isopropyl and pinacolyl methylphosphonic acids (nerve agent hydrolysates) was investigated in a bench scale (6 L/hr) test unit. Rejection of acetic acid derivatives was found to be pH and pKa dependent; molecular weight was not a factor for total acids, but rejection was inversely related to molecular weight for free (undissociated) acids. Rejection of all methylphosphonates exceeded 99 percent at pH 3 to 10 and was not pH dependent. Rejection of hydrazine sulfate (a surrogate for UDMH) was no better than 90 percent at pH 7.

  6. A Novel Application of Agent-based Modeling: Projecting Water Access and Availability Using a Coupled Hydrologic Agent-based Model in the Nzoia Basin, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, A.; Pricope, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    Projections indicate that increasing population density, food production, and urbanization in conjunction with changing climate conditions will place stress on water resource availability. As a result, a holistic understanding of current and future water resource distribution is necessary for creating strategies to identify the most sustainable means of accessing this resource. Currently, most water resource management strategies rely on the application of global climate predictions to physically based hydrologic models to understand potential changes in water availability. However, the need to focus on understanding community-level social behaviors that determine individual water usage is becoming increasingly evident, as predictions derived only from hydrologic models cannot accurately represent the coevolution of basin hydrology and human water and land usage. Models that are better equipped to represent the complexity and heterogeneity of human systems and satellite-derived products in place of or in conjunction with historic data significantly improve preexisting hydrologic model accuracy and application outcomes. We used a novel agent-based sociotechnical model that combines the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and Agent Analyst and applied it in the Nzoia Basin, an area in western Kenya that is becoming rapidly urbanized and industrialized. Informed by a combination of satellite-derived products and over 150 household surveys, the combined sociotechnical model provided unique insight into how populations self-organize and make decisions based on water availability. In addition, the model depicted how population organization and current management alter water availability currently and in the future.

  7. Anti-Tumor Effect of a Novel Soluble Recombinant Human Endostatin: Administered as a Single Agent or in Combination with Chemotherapy Agents in Mouse Tumor Models

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenhong; Dai, Wei; Jiang, Yongping

    2014-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis has become an attractive target in cancer treatment. Endostatin is one of the potent anti-angiogenesis agents. Its recombinant form expressed in the yeast system is currently under clinical trials. Endostatin suppresses tumor formation through the inhibition of blood vessel growth. It is anticipated that combined therapy using endostatin and cytotoxic compounds may exert an additive effect. In the present study, we expressed and purified recombinant human endostatin (rhEndostatin) that contained 3 additional amino acid residues (arginine, glycine, and serine) at the amino-terminus and 6 histidine residues in its carboxyl terminus. The recombinant protein was expressed in E. Coli and refolded into a soluble form in a large scale purification process. The protein exhibited a potent anti-tumor activity in bioassays. Furthermore, rhEndostatin showed an additive effect with chemotherapy agents including cyclophosphamide (CTX) and cisplatin (DDP). Methods rhEndostatin cDNA was cloned into PQE vector and expressed in E. Coli. The protein was refolded through dialysis with an optimized protocol. To establish tumor models, nude mice were subcutaneously injected with human cancer cells (lung carcinoma A549, hepatocellular carcinoma QGY-7703, or breast cancer Bcap37). rhEndostatin and/or DDP was administered peritumorally to evaluate the rate of growth inhibition of A549 tumors. For the tumor metastasis model, mice were injected intravenously with mouse melanoma B16 cells. One day after tumor cell injection, a single dose of rhEndostatin, or in combination with CTX, was administered intravenously or at a site close to the tumor. Results rhEndostatin reduced the growth of A549, QGY-7703, and Bcap37 xenograft tumors in a dose dependent manner. When it was administered peritumorally, rhEndostatin exhibited a more potent inhibitory activity. Furthermore, rhEndostatin displayed an additive effect with CTX or DDP on the inhibition of metastasis of B16 tumors

  8. Discrete K-valued Logic for Multi-parametrical Modeling of a Robotic Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovsky, A. Yu.

    K-valued Allen-Givone algebra is potentially a good tool for multi-parametric modeling of robotic and multi-agent systems, because a multiple-valued truth table can be directly applied for the accumulation of expert knowledge and the reconstruction of switching functions. The computational cost for their minimization will limit the real information capacity of such a model.

  9. A new distributed computing model of mobile spatial information service grid based on mobile agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Gen; Liu, Miao-long

    2009-10-01

    A new distributed computing model of mobile spatial information service is studied based on grid computing environment. Key technologies are presented in the model, including mobile agent (MA) distributed computing, grid computing, spatial data model, location based service (LBS), global positioning system (GPS), code division multiple access (CDMA), transfer control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP), and user datagram protocol (UDP). In order to deal with the narrow bandwidth and instability of the wireless internet, distributed organization of tremendous spatial data, limited processing speed and low memory of mobile devices, a new mobile agent based mobile spatial information service grid (MSISG) architecture is further proposed that has good load balance, high processing efficiency, less network communication and thus suitable for mobile distributed computing environment. It can provide applications of spatial information distributed computing and mobile service. The theories and technologies architecture of MSISG are built originally from the base, including spatial information mobile agent model, distributed grid geographic information system (GIS) server model, mobile agent server model and mobile GIS client model. An application system for MSISG is therefore developed authorship by visual c++ and embedded visual c++. A field test is carried out through this system in Shanghai, and the results show that the proposed model and methods are feasible and adaptable for mobile spatial information service.

  10. A new distributed computing model of mobile spatial information service grid based on mobile agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Gen; Liu, Miao-long

    2008-10-01

    A new distributed computing model of mobile spatial information service is studied based on grid computing environment. Key technologies are presented in the model, including mobile agent (MA) distributed computing, grid computing, spatial data model, location based service (LBS), global positioning system (GPS), code division multiple access (CDMA), transfer control protocol/internet protocol (TCP/IP), and user datagram protocol (UDP). In order to deal with the narrow bandwidth and instability of the wireless internet, distributed organization of tremendous spatial data, limited processing speed and low memory of mobile devices, a new mobile agent based mobile spatial information service grid (MSISG) architecture is further proposed that has good load balance, high processing efficiency, less network communication and thus suitable for mobile distributed computing environment. It can provide applications of spatial information distributed computing and mobile service. The theories and technologies architecture of MSISG are built originally from the base, including spatial information mobile agent model, distributed grid geographic information system (GIS) server model, mobile agent server model and mobile GIS client model. An application system for MSISG is therefore developed authorship by visual c++ and embedded visual c++. A field test is carried out through this system in Shanghai, and the results show that the proposed model and methods are feasible and adaptable for mobile spatial information service.

  11. Change-Agent-for-Equity (CAFE) Model: A Framework for School Counselor Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Erin C. M.; Ockerman, Melissa S.; Chen-Hayes, Stuart F.

    2013-01-01

    Significant recent influences in the profession have provided clear direction about what school counseling programs should look like but have not explicitly defined the professional identity necessary to enact these programs. A Change-Agent-for-Equity (CAFE) Model draws from the American School Counselor Association National Model (2003, 2005,…

  12. A Model of Rapid Radicalization Behavior Using Agent-Based Modeling and Quorum Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Noah; Drucker, Nick; Campbell, Kenyth

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of radicalization, especially rapid radicalization, has become increasingly important to US policy in the past several years. Traditionally, radicalization is considered a slow process, but recent social and political events demonstrate that the process can occur quickly. Examining this rapid process, in real time, is impossible. However, recreating an event using modeling and simulation (M&S) allows researchers to study some of the complex dynamics associated with rapid radicalization. We propose to adapt the biological mechanism of quorum sensing as a tool to explore, or possibly explain, rapid radicalization. Due to the complex nature of quorum sensing, M&S allows us to examine events that we could not otherwise examine in real time. For this study, we employ Agent Based Modeling (ABM), an M&S paradigm suited to modeling group behavior. The result of this study was the successful creation of rapid radicalization using quorum sensing. The Battle of Mogadishu was the inspiration for this model and provided the testing conditions used to explore quorum sensing and the ideas behind rapid radicalization. The final product has wider applicability however, using quorum sensing as a possible tool for examining other catalytic rapid radicalization events.

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a novel class of curcumin analogs as anti-inflammatory agents for prevention and treatment of sepsis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengguang; Zhang, Yali; Zou, Peng; Wang, Jian; He, Wenfei; Shi, Dengjian; Li, Huameng; Liang, Guang; Yang, Shulin

    2015-01-01

    A novel class of asymmetric mono-carbonyl analogs of curcumin (AMACs) were synthesized and screened for anti-inflammatory activity. These analogs are chemically stable as characterized by UV absorption spectra. In vitro, compounds 3f, 3m, 4b, and 4d markedly inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values in low micromolar range. In vivo, compound 3f demonstrated potent preventive and therapeutic effects on LPS-induced sepsis in mouse model. Compound 3f downregulated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 MAPK and suppressed IκBα degradation, which suggests that the possible anti-inflammatory mechanism of compound 3f may be through downregulating nuclear factor kappa binding (NF-κB) and ERK pathways. Also, we solved the crystal structure of compound 3e to confirm the asymmetrical structure. The quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis reveals that the electron-withdrawing substituents on aromatic ring of lead structures could improve activity. These active AMACs represent a new class of anti-inflammatory agents with improved stability, bioavailability, and potency compared to curcumin. Our results suggest that 3f may be further developed as a potential agent for prevention and treatment of sepsis or other inflammation-related diseases. PMID:25834403

  14. Experiments and Modeling of High Altitude Chemical Agent Release

    SciTech Connect

    Nakafuji, G.; Greenman, R.; Theofanous, T.

    2002-07-08

    Using ASCA data, we find, contrary to other researchers using ROSAT data, that the X-ray spectra of the VY Scl stars TT Ari and KR Aur are poorly fit by an absorbed blackbody model but are well fit by an absorbed thermal plasma model. The different conclusions about the nature of the X-ray spectrum of KR Aur may be due to differences in the accretion rate, since this Star was in a high optical state during the ROSAT observation, but in an intermediate optical state during the ASCA observation. TT Ari, on the other hand, was in a high optical state during both observations, so directly contradicts the hypothesis that the X-ray spectra of VY Sol stars in their high optical states are blackbodies. Instead, based on theoretical expectations and the ASCA, Chandra, and XMM spectra of other nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables, we believe that the X-ray spectra of VY Sol stars in their low and high optical states are due to hot thermal plasma in the boundary layer between the accretion disk and the surface of the white dwarf, and appeal to the acquisition of Chandra and XMM grating spectra to test this prediction.

  15. Development of anti-viral agents using molecular modeling and virtual screening techniques.

    PubMed

    Kirchmair, Johannes; Distinto, Simona; Liedl, Klaus Roman; Markt, Patrick; Rollinger, Judith Maria; Schuster, Daniela; Spitzer, Gudrun Maria; Wolber, Gerhard

    2011-02-01

    Computational chemistry has always played a key role in anti-viral drug development. The challenges and the quickly rising public interest when a virus is becoming a threat has significantly influenced computational drug discovery. The most obvious example is anti-AIDS research, where HIV protease and reverse transcriptase have triggered enormous efforts in developing and improving computational methods. Methods applied to anti-viral research include (i) ligand-based approaches that rely on known active compounds to extrapolate biological activity, such as machine learning techniques or classical QSAR, (ii) structure-based methods that rely on an experimentally determined 3D structure of the targets, such as molecular docking or molecular dynamics, and (iii) universal approaches that can be applied in a structure- or ligand-based way, such as 3D QSAR or 3D pharmacophore elucidation. In this review we summarize these molecular modeling approaches as they were applied to fight anti-viral diseases and highlight their importance for anti-viral research. We discuss the role of computational chemistry in the development of small molecules as agents against HIV integrase, HIV-1 protease, HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, the influenza virus M2 channel protein, influenza virus neuraminidase, the SARS coronavirus main proteinase and spike protein, thymidine kinases of herpes viruses, hepatitis c virus proteins and other flaviviruses as well as human rhinovirus coat protein and proteases, and other picornaviridae. We highlight how computational approaches have helped in discovering anti-viral activities of natural products and give an overview on polypharmacology approaches that help to optimize drugs against several viruses or help to optimize the metabolic profile of and anti-viral drug. PMID:21303343

  16. Misfit layer compounds and ferecrystals: Model systems for thermoelectric nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, Devin R.; Moore, Daniel B.; Bauers, Sage R.; Falmbigl, Matthias; Johnson, David C.

    2015-04-22

    A basic summary of thermoelectric principles is presented in a historical context, following the evolution of the field from initial discovery to modern day high-zT materials. A specific focus is placed on nanocomposite materials as a means to solve the challenges presented by the contradictory material requirements necessary for efficient thermal energy harvest. Misfit layer compounds are highlighted as an example of a highly ordered anisotropic nanocomposite system. Their layered structure provides the opportunity to use multiple constituents for improved thermoelectric performance, through both enhanced phonon scattering at interfaces and through electronic interactions between the constituents. Recently, a class of metastable, turbostratically-disordered misfit layer compounds has been synthesized using a kinetically controlled approach with low reaction temperatures. The kinetically stabilized structures can be prepared with a variety of constituent ratios and layering schemes, providing an avenue to systematically understand structure-function relationships not possible in the thermodynamic compounds. We summarize the work that has been done to date on these materials. The observed turbostratic disorder has been shown to result in extremely low cross plane thermal conductivity and in plane thermal conductivities that are also very small, suggesting the structural motif could be attractive as thermoelectric materials if the power factor could be improved. The first 10 compounds in the [(PbSe)1+δ]m(TiSe₂)n family (m, n ≤ 3) are reported as a case study. As n increases, the magnitude of the Seebeck coefficient is significantly increased without a simultaneous decrease in the in-plane electrical conductivity, resulting in an improved thermoelectric power factor.

  17. Misfit layer compounds and ferecrystals: Model systems for thermoelectric nanocomposites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Merrill, Devin R.; Moore, Daniel B.; Bauers, Sage R.; Falmbigl, Matthias; Johnson, David C.

    2015-04-22

    A basic summary of thermoelectric principles is presented in a historical context, following the evolution of the field from initial discovery to modern day high-zT materials. A specific focus is placed on nanocomposite materials as a means to solve the challenges presented by the contradictory material requirements necessary for efficient thermal energy harvest. Misfit layer compounds are highlighted as an example of a highly ordered anisotropic nanocomposite system. Their layered structure provides the opportunity to use multiple constituents for improved thermoelectric performance, through both enhanced phonon scattering at interfaces and through electronic interactions between the constituents. Recently, a class ofmore » metastable, turbostratically-disordered misfit layer compounds has been synthesized using a kinetically controlled approach with low reaction temperatures. The kinetically stabilized structures can be prepared with a variety of constituent ratios and layering schemes, providing an avenue to systematically understand structure-function relationships not possible in the thermodynamic compounds. We summarize the work that has been done to date on these materials. The observed turbostratic disorder has been shown to result in extremely low cross plane thermal conductivity and in plane thermal conductivities that are also very small, suggesting the structural motif could be attractive as thermoelectric materials if the power factor could be improved. The first 10 compounds in the [(PbSe)1+δ]m(TiSe₂)n family (m, n ≤ 3) are reported as a case study. As n increases, the magnitude of the Seebeck coefficient is significantly increased without a simultaneous decrease in the in-plane electrical conductivity, resulting in an improved thermoelectric power factor.« less

  18. Modeling the transport of cryoprotective agents in articular cartilage for cryopreservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torqabeh, Alireza Abazari

    Loading vitrifiable concentrations of cryoprotective agents is an important step for cryopreservation of biological tissues by vitrification for research and transplantation purposes. This may be done by immersing the tissue in a cryoprotective agent (CPA) solution, and increasing the concentration, continuously or in multiple steps, and simultaneously decreasing the temperature to decrease the toxicity effects of the cryoprotective agent on the tissue cellular system. During cryoprotective agent loading, osmotic water movement from the tissue to the surrounding solution, and the resultant tissue shrinkage and stress-strain in the tissue matrix as well as on the cellular system can significantly alter the outcome of the cryopreservation protocol. In this thesis, a biomechanical model for articular cartilage is developed to account for the transport of the cryoprotective agent, the nonideal-nondilute properties of the vitrifiable solutions, the osmotic water movement and the resultant tissue shrinkage and stress-strain in the tissue matrix, and the osmotic volume change of the chondrocytes, during cryoprotective agent loading in the cartilage matrix. Four essential transport parameters needed for the model were specified, the values of which were obtained uniquely by fitting the model to experimental data from porcine articular cartilage. Then, it was shown that using real nonuniform initial distributions of water and fixed charges in cartilage, measured separately in this thesis using MRI, in the model can significantly affect the model predictions. The model predictions for dimethyl sulfoxide diffusion in porcine articular cartilage were verified by comparing to spatially and temporally resolved measurements of dimethyl sulfoxide concentration in porcine articular cartilage using a spectral MRI technique, developed for this purpose and novel to the field of cryobiology. It was demonstrated in this thesis that the developed mathematical model provides a novel tool

  19. S-(2-((2 prime -carbamoylethyl)amino)ethyl) phosphorothioate and related compounds as potential antiradiation agents

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, F.I.; Gopinathan, M.B.; Philip, A. )

    1990-09-01

    A reinvestigation of the radiation protection activity of S-(2-((2{prime}-carbamylethyl)amino)ethyl) lithium hydrogen phosphorothioate (4a) revealed that this compound possessed good (70% protection at a dose of 600 mg/kg) activity. The thione and imino bioisosteres of 4, S-(2-(2{prime}-thiocarbamylethylamino)ethyl) lithium hydrogen phosphorothioate (13a) and S-(2-(2{prime}-amidinoethylamino)ethyl) phosphorothioic acid (18b) showed 100% protection at doses of 300 and 150 mg/kg, respectively. The N-methyl (4b) and tert-butyl (4c) analogues of amide 4a, the N-methyl (13b) analogue of the thioamide 13a, the N-methyl (18a) analogue of amidine (18b), and the cyclic amidine S-(2-((2{prime}-(4,5-dihydroimidozoyl)ethyl)amino)ethyl) lithium hydrogen phosphorothioate (21) all showed 80% protection at the highest dose tested.

  20. g-BDI: A Graded Intensional Agent Model for Practical Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casali, Ana; Godo, Lluís; Sierra, Carles

    In intentional agents, actions are derived from the mental attitudes and their relationships. In particular, preferences (positive desires) and restrictions (negative desires) are important proactive attitudes which guide agents to intentions and eventually to actions. In this paper we overview recent developments about a multi-context based agent architecture g-BDI to represent and reasoning about gradual notions of desires and intentions, including sound and complete logical formalizations. We also show that the framework is expressive enough to describe how desires, together with other information, can lead agents to intentions and finally to actions. As a case-study, we will also describe the design and implementation of recommender system on tourism as well as the results of some experiments concerning the flexibility and performance of the g-BDI model.

  1. Application of the AHP method in modeling the trust and reputation of software agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zytniewski, Mariusz; Klementa, Marek; Skorupka, Dariusz; Stanek, Stanislaw; Duchaczek, Artur

    2016-06-01

    Given the unique characteristics of cyberspace and, in particular, the number of inherent security threats, communication between software agents becomes a highly complex issue and a major challenge that, on the one hand, needs to be continuously monitored and, on the other, awaits new solutions addressing its vulnerabilities. An approach that has recently come into view mimics mechanisms typical of social systems and is based on trust and reputation that assist agents in deciding which other agents to interact with. The paper offers an enhancement to existing trust and reputation models, involving the application of the AHP method that is widely used for decision support in social systems, notably for risks analysis. To this end, it is proposed to expand the underlying conceptual basis by including such notions as self-trust and social trust, and to apply these to software agents. The discussion is concluded with an account of an experiment aimed at testing the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  2. Evolution of a predictive internal model in an embodied and situated agent.

    PubMed

    Gigliotta, Onofrio; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Nolfi, Stefano; Nolfi, Sefano

    2011-12-01

    We show how simulated robots evolved for the ability to display a context-dependent periodic behavior can spontaneously develop an internal model and rely on it to fulfill their task when sensory stimulation is temporarily unavailable. The analysis of some of the best evolved agents indicates that their internal model operates by anticipating sensory stimuli. More precisely, it anticipates functional properties of the next sensory state rather than the exact state that sensors will assume. The characteristics of the states that are anticipated and of the sensorimotor rules that determine how the agents react to the experienced states, however, ensure that they produce very similar behaviour during normal and blind phases in which sensory stimulation is available or is self-generated by the agent, respectively. Agents' internal models also ensure an effective transition during the phases in which agents' internal dynamics is decoupled and re-coupled with the sensorimotor flow. Our results suggest that internal models might have arisen for behavioral reasons and successively exapted for other cognitive functions. Moreover, the obtained results suggest that self-generated internal states should not necessarily match in detail the corresponding sensory states and might rather encode more abstract and motor-oriented information. PMID:21604186

  3. Agent-based modeling of lane discipline in heterogeneous traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailisan, Damian N.; Lim, May T.

    2016-09-01

    Designating lanes for different vehicle types is ideal road safety-wise. Practical considerations, however, require road sharing. Using a modified Nagel-Schreckenberg cellular automata model for two vehicle types (cars and motorcycles), we analyzed the interplay of lane discipline, lane changing, and vehicle density. In the absence of lane changing, the transition between free flow and congested states occurs at a higher vehicle (road occupation) density when the ratio of cars to motorcycles is increased. When lane changing is allowed, the smaller motorcycles tend to fill in unused spaces, until the point when the wider cars effectively block their way at high vehicle densities. When the condition of lane discipline is not imposed, i.e. staying wholly within lane boundaries is not required, further improvement in throughput becomes possible at the cost of required driver attentiveness.

  4. An agent-based hydroeconomic model to evaluate water policies in Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, J.; Gorelick, S.

    2014-12-01

    Modern water systems can be characterized by a complex network of institutional and private actors that represent competing sectors and interests. Identifying solutions to enhance water security in such systems calls for analysis that can adequately account for this level of complexity and interaction. Our work focuses on the development of a hierarchical, multi-agent, hydroeconomic model that attempts to realistically represent complex interactions between hydrologic and multi-faceted human systems. The model is applied to Jordan, one of the most water-poor countries in the world. In recent years, the water crisis in Jordan has escalated due to an ongoing drought and influx of refugees from regional conflicts. We adopt a modular approach in which biophysical modules simulate natural and engineering phenomena, and human modules represent behavior at multiple scales of decision making. The human modules employ agent-based modeling, in which agents act as autonomous decision makers at the transboundary, state, organizational, and user levels. A systematic nomenclature and conceptual framework is used to characterize model agents and modules. Concepts from the Unified Modeling Language (UML) are adopted to promote clear conceptualization of model classes and process sequencing, establishing a foundation for full deployment of the integrated model in a scalable object-oriented programming environment. Although the framework is applied to the Jordanian water context, it is generalizable to other regional human-natural freshwater supply systems.

  5. An agent-based interaction model for Chinese personal income distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yijiang; Deng, Weibing; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2015-10-01

    The personal income distribution in China was studied by employing the data from China Household Income Projects (CHIP) between 1990 and 2002. It was observed that the low and middle income regions could be described by the log-normal law, while the large income region could be well fitted by the power law. To characterize these empirical findings, a stochastic interactive model with mean-field approach was discussed, and the analytic result shows that the wealth distribution is of the Pareto type. Then we explored the agent-based model on networks, in which the exchange of wealth among agents depends on their connectivity. Numerical results suggest that the wealth of agents would largely rely on their connectivity, and the Pareto index of the simulated wealth distributions is comparable to those of the empirical data. The Pareto behavior of the tails of the empirical wealth distributions is consistent with that of the 'mean-field' model, as well as numerical simulations.

  6. Maintenance service contract model for heavy equipment in mining industry using principal agent theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakpahan, Eka K. A.; Iskandar, Bermawi P.

    2015-12-01

    Mining industry is characterized by a high operational revenue, and hence high availability of heavy equipment used in mining industry is a critical factor to ensure the revenue target. To maintain high avaliability of the heavy equipment, the equipment's owner hires an agent to perform maintenance action. Contract is then used to control the relationship between the two parties involved. The traditional contracts such as fixed price, cost plus or penalty based contract studied is unable to push agent's performance to exceed target, and this in turn would lead to a sub-optimal result (revenue). This research deals with designing maintenance contract compensation schemes. The scheme should induce agent to select the highest possible maintenance effort level, thereby pushing agent's performance and achieve maximum utility for both parties involved. Principal agent theory is used as a modeling approach due to its ability to simultaneously modeled owner and agent decision making process. Compensation schemes considered in this research includes fixed price, cost sharing and revenue sharing. The optimal decision is obtained using a numerical method. The results show that if both parties are risk neutral, then there are infinite combination of fixed price, cost sharing and revenue sharing produced the same optimal solution. The combination of fixed price and cost sharing contract results in the optimal solution when the agent is risk averse, while the optimal combination of fixed price and revenue sharing contract is obtained when agent is risk averse. When both parties are risk averse, the optimal compensation scheme is a combination of fixed price, cost sharing and revenue sharing.

  7. Comparing administered and market-based water allocation systems using an agent-based modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Cai, X.; Wang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    It also has been well recognized that market-based systems can have significant advantages over administered systems for water allocation. However there are not many successful water markets around the world yet and administered systems exist commonly in water allocation management practice. This paradox has been under discussion for decades and still calls for attention for both research and practice. This paper explores some insights for the paradox and tries to address why market systems have not been widely implemented for water allocation. Adopting the theory of agent-based system we develop a consistent analytical model to interpret both systems. First we derive some theorems based on the analytical model, with respect to the necessary conditions for economic efficiency of water allocation. Following that the agent-based model is used to illustrate the coherence and difference between administered and market-based systems. The two systems are compared from three aspects: 1) the driving forces acting on the system state, 2) system efficiency, and 3) equity. Regarding economic efficiency, penalty on the violation of water use permits (or rights) under an administered system can lead to system-wide economic efficiency, as well as being acceptable by some agents, which follows the theory of the so-call rational violation. Ideal equity will be realized if penalty equals incentive with an administered system and if transaction costs are zero with a market system. The performances of both agents and the over system are explained with an administered system and market system, respectively. The performances of agents are subject to different mechanisms of interactions between agents under the two systems. The system emergency (i.e., system benefit, equilibrium market price, etc), resulting from the performance at the agent level, reflects the different mechanism of the two systems, the “invisible hand” with the market system and administrative measures (penalty

  8. Extended duration local anesthetic agent in a rat paw model.

    PubMed

    Ickowicz, D E; Golovanevski, L; Domb, A J; Weiniger, C F

    2014-07-01

    Encapsulated local anesthetics extend postoperative analgesic effect following site-directed nerve injection; potentially reducing postoperative complications. Our study aim was to investigate efficacy of our improved extended duration formulation - 15% bupivacaine in poly(DL-lactic acid co castor oil) 3:7 synthesized by ring opening polymerization. In vitro, around 70% of bupivacaine was released from the p(DLLA-CO) 3:7 after 10 days. A single injection of the optimal formulation of 15% bupivacaine-polymer or plain (0.5%) bupivacaine (control), was injected via a 22G needle beside the sciatic nerve of Sprague-Dawley rats under anesthesia; followed (in some animals) by a 1cm longitudinal incision through the skin and fascia of the paw area. Behavioral tests for sensory and motor block assessment were done using Hargreave's hot plate score, von Frey filaments and rearing count. The 15% bupivacaine formulation significantly prolonged sensory block duration up to at least 48 h. Following surgery, motor block was observed for 48 h following administration of bupivacaine-polymer formulation and rearing was reduced (returning to baseline after 48 h). No significant differences in mechanical nociceptive response were observed. The optimized bupivacaine-polymer formulation prolonged duration of local anesthesia effect in our animal model up to at least 48 h. PMID:24726301

  9. Development of Mechanistic Reasoning and Multilevel Explanations of Ecology in Third Grade Using Agent-Based Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickes, Amanda Catherine; Sengupta, Pratim; Farris, Amy Voss; Satabdi, Basu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a third-grade ecology learning environment that integrates two forms of modeling--embodied modeling and agent-based modeling (ABMs)--through the generation of mathematical representations that are common to both forms of modeling. The term "agent" in the context of ABMs indicates individual computational objects…

  10. Genetic Algorithms for Agent-Based Infrastructure Interdependency Modeling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    May Permann

    2007-03-01

    Today’s society relies greatly upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, electric power, telecommunication, and financial networks. This paper describes initial research combining agent-based infrastructure modeling software and genetic algorithms (GAs) to help optimize infrastructure protection and restoration decisions. This research proposes to apply GAs to the problem of infrastructure modeling and analysis in order to determine the optimum assets to restore or protect from attack or other disaster. This research is just commencing and therefore the focus of this paper is the integration of a GA optimization method with a simulation through the simulation’s agents.

  11. Agent-based simulation of building evacuation using a grid graph-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Lin, H.; Hu, M.; Che, W.

    2014-02-01

    Shifting from macroscope models to microscope models, the agent-based approach has been widely used to model crowd evacuation as more attentions are paid on individualized behaviour. Since indoor evacuation behaviour is closely related to spatial features of the building, effective representation of indoor space is essential for the simulation of building evacuation. The traditional cell-based representation has limitations in reflecting spatial structure and is not suitable for topology analysis. Aiming at incorporating powerful topology analysis functions of GIS to facilitate agent-based simulation of building evacuation, we used a grid graph-based model in this study to represent the indoor space. Such model allows us to establish an evacuation network at a micro level. Potential escape routes from each node thus could be analysed through GIS functions of network analysis considering both the spatial structure and route capacity. This would better support agent-based modelling of evacuees' behaviour including route choice and local movements. As a case study, we conducted a simulation of emergency evacuation from the second floor of an official building using Agent Analyst as the simulation platform. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method, as well as the potential of GIS in visualizing and analysing simulation results.

  12. The S=1 Underscreened Anderson Lattice model for Uranium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Simões, A. S. R.; Iglesias, J. R.; Lacroix, C.; Perkins, N. B.; Coqblin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic properties of uranium and neptunium compounds showing coexistence of the Kondo effect and ferromagnetic order are investigated within the degenerate Anderson Lattice Hamiltonian, describing a 5f2 electronic configuration with S = 1 spins. Through the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, both an exchange Kondo interaction for the S = 1 f-spins and an effective f-band term are obtained, allowing to describe the coexistence of Kondo effect and ferromagnetic ordering and a weak delocalization of the 5f-electrons. We calculate the Kondo and Curie temperatures and we can account for the pressure dependence of the Curie temperature of UTe.

  13. Synthesis of model compounds for coal liquefaction research

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Asaro, M.; Bottaro, J.

    1990-11-02

    The objectives of this project are to develop feasible synthetic routes to produce (1) 4(4{prime}- hydroxy- 5{prime},6{prime},7{prime},8{prime}- tetrahydro-1{prime}- naphthylmethyl)- 6-methyl dibenzothiophene, and (2) a 1-hydroxy naphthalene- dibenzothiophene polymer. These compounds are thought to be representative of sulfur containing molecules in coal. The program is divided into three tasks, the first of which is a project work plan that we have already submitted. Our experimental work during this quarter concentrated on Task 2: Synthesis of 4(4{prime}- hydroxy- 5{prime},6{prime},7{prime},8{prime}- tetrahydro-1{prime}- naphthylmethyl)- 6-methyldibenzothiophene. 11 refs.

  14. Evaluation of Costs for Procuring Reserve Capacity under Deregulated Power System using Multi-Agent Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Kita, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Eiichi; Hasegawa, Jun

    In this paper, we assume 2 models for securing reserve capacity. One is “Commitment-based Security Model” and the other is “Reserve Market-based Security Model”. In Commitment-based security model, ISO commits procurement of reserve energy to a particular generation company. Meanwhile, in Reserve market-based security model, ISO procures reserve energy through reserve market. The main object of this research is to investigate which model will be preferable for the viewpoint of consumer's cost. To compare these models, two things are considered in this paper. One is bidding behavior of agents which bids to energy market and reserve market. To consider this, Q-Learning of multi-agent model is used. Also, the Unit Commitment (UC) is considered to calculate generation cost. This is to calculate the cost for securing reserve power more precisely.

  15. Tricyclic Compounds Containing Non-enolizable Cyano Enones. A Novel Class of Highly Potent Anti-inflammatory and Cytoprotective Agents=

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Tadashi; Yoshizawa, Hidenori; Sundararajan, Chitra; David, Emilie; Lajoie, Marc J.; Favaloro, Frank G.; Janosik, Tomasz; Su, Xiaobo; Honda, Yukiko; Roebuck, Bill D.; Gribble, Gordon W.

    2011-01-01

    Forty-four novel tricycles containing non-enolizable cyano enones (TCEs) were designed and synthesized on the basis of a semisynthetic pentacyclic triterpenoid, bardoxolone methyl, which is currently being developed in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of severe chronic kidney disease in diabetic patients. Most of the TCEs having two different kinds of non-enolizable cyano enones in rings A and C are highly potent suppressors of induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase stimulated with interferon-γ, and highly potent inducers of the cytoprotective enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1. Among these compounds, (±)-(4bS,8aR,10aS)-10a-ethynyl-4b,8,8-trimethyl-3,7-dioxo-3,4b,7,8,8a,9,10,10a-octahydrophenanthrene-2,6-dicarbonitrile ((±)-31) is the most potent in these bioassays in our pool of drug candidates including semisynthetic triterpenoids and synthetic tricycles. These facts strongly suggest that an essential factor for potency is not a triterpenoid skeleton, but the cyano enone functionality. Notably, TCE 31 reduces hepatic tumorigenesis induced with aflatoxin in rats. Further preclinical studies and detailed mechanism studies on 31 are in progress. PMID:21361338

  16. A compound produced by fruigivorous Tephritidae (Diptera) larvae promotes oviposition behavior by the biological control agent Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Stuhl, Charles; Sivinski, John; Teal, Peter; Paranhos, Beatriz; Aluja, Martin

    2011-06-01

    Tephritid fruit fly parasitoids use fruit-derived chemical cues and the vibrations that result from larval movements to locate hosts sequestered inside fruit. However, compounds produced by the larvae themselves have not been previously described nor their significance to parasitoid foraging determined. We collected the volatiles from four species of tropical and subtropical Tephritidae: Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel, Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett, and Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), representing two subfamilies (Dacinae and Trypetinae). Para-ethylacetophenone, an analog of a known tephritid parasitoid attractant, was a major constituent of all four, and was not associated with larvae of another acalypterate fly, Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, or with the calypterate Musca domestica L. It also was present in volatiles from whole, A. suspensa infested fruits of Eugenia uniflora (L.). Para-ethylacetophenone was not necessarily produced as a direct consequence of fruit consumption because it also was detected from larvae that developed in two artificial diets and in spent diets subsequent to larval development. Sensillae on both the antennae and ovipositor of the opiine braconid fruit fly parasitoid, Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead) responded to the para-ethylacetophenone in larval volatiles and as a synthetic. Although a potential cue to foraging parasitoids, para-ethylacetophenone showed no long range (>1m) attractiveness to the adult female parasitoid, but did stimulate ovipositor-insertion and oviposition into both a natural (fruit) and an artificial (parafilm) substrate. Thus it may prove useful in colonizing and mass-rearing opine fruit fly parasitoids. PMID:22251652

  17. A spatially-distributed computational model to quantify behaviour of contrast agents in MR perfusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, A.N.; Lee, J.; Michler, C.; Chabiniok, R.; Hyde, E.; Nordsletten, D.; Smith, N.P.

    2014-01-01

    Contrast agent enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging provides an early, non-invasive indication of defects in the coronary circulation. However, the large variation of contrast agent properties, physiological state and imaging protocols means that optimisation of image acquisition is difficult to achieve. This situation motivates the development of a computational framework that, in turn, enables the efficient mapping of this parameter space to provide valuable information for optimisation of perfusion imaging in the clinical context. For this purpose a single-compartment porous medium model of capillary blood flow is developed which is coupled with a scalar transport model, to characterise the behaviour of both blood-pool and freely-diffusive contrast agents characterised by their ability to diffuse through the capillary wall into the extra-cellular space. A parameter space study is performed on the nondimensionalised equations using a 2D model for both healthy and diseased myocardium, examining the sensitivity of system behaviour to Peclet number, Damköhler number (Da), diffusivity ratio and fluid porosity. Assuming a linear MR signal response model, sample concentration time series data are calculated, and the sensitivity of clinically-relevant properties of these signals to the model parameters is quantified. Both upslope and peak values display significant non-monotonic behaviour with regard to the Damköhler number, with these properties showing a high degree of sensitivity in the parameter range relevant to contrast agents currently in use. However, the results suggest that signal upslope is the more robust and discerning metric for perfusion quantification, in particular for correlating with perfusion defect size. Finally, the results were examined in the context of nonlinear signal response, flow quantification via Fermi deconvolution and perfusion reserve index, which demonstrated that there is no single best set of contrast agent parameters

  18. Multi-scale analysis of a household level agent-based model of landcover change.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tom P; Kelley, Hugh

    2004-08-01

    Scale issues have significant implications for the analysis of social and biophysical processes in complex systems. These same scale implications are likewise considerations for the design and application of models of landcover change. Scale issues have wide-ranging effects from the representativeness of data used to validate models to aggregation errors introduced in the model structure. This paper presents an analysis of how scale issues affect an agent-based model (ABM) of landcover change developed for a research area in the Midwest, USA. The research presented here explores how scale factors affect the design and application of agent-based landcover change models. The ABM is composed of a series of heterogeneous agents who make landuse decisions on a portfolio of cells in a raster-based programming environment. The model is calibrated using measures of fit derived from both spatial composition and spatial pattern metrics from multi-temporal landcover data interpreted from historical aerial photography. A model calibration process is used to find a best-fit set of parameter weights assigned to agents' preferences for different landuses (agriculture, pasture, timber production, and non-harvested forest). Previous research using this model has shown how a heterogeneous set of agents with differing preferences for a portfolio of landuses produces the best fit to landcover changes observed in the study area. The scale dependence of the model is explored by varying the resolution of the input data used to calibrate the model (observed landcover), ancillary datasets that affect land suitability (topography), and the resolution of the model landscape on which agents make decisions. To explore the impact of these scale relationships the model is run with input datasets constructed at the following spatial resolutions: 60, 90, 120, 150, 240, 300 and 480 m. The results show that the distribution of landuse-preference weights differs as a function of scale. In addition

  19. Mutagenicity of oxaspiro compounds with Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Sinsheimer, J E; Chakraborty, P K; Messerly, E A; Gaddamidi, V

    1989-10-01

    The spiro attachment of an epoxide group to a tetrahydropyran ring in the trichothecene mycotoxins has prompted this study of the mutagenicity and alkylation rates of the trichothecene, anguidine, and 5 related model oxaspiro compounds. While the model compounds were weak alkylating agents of 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)pyridine as a test nucleophile, anguidine lacks such activity. Also, while mutagenicity was not established for anguidine in Salmonella TA100, 3 of the oxaspiro compounds were weakly mutagenic and 2 compounds were toxic to the bacteria. The toxicity and mutagenicity of the model compounds are more related to their polarity than to their alkylation rates. PMID:2677708

  20. Aggregation of asphaltene model compounds using a porphyrin tethered to a carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Matthias; Lechner, Marc P; Stryker, Jeffrey M; Tykwinski, Rik R

    2015-07-01

    A Ni(II) porphyrin functionalized with an alkyl carboxylic acid (3) has been synthesized to model the chemical behavior of the heaviest portion of petroleum, the asphaltenes. Specifically, porphyrin 3 is used in spectroscopic studies to probe aggregation with a second asphaltene model compound containing basic nitrogen (4), designed to mimic asphaltene behavior. NMR spectroscopy documents self-association of the porphyrin and aggregation with the second model compound in solution, and a Job's plot suggests a 1 : 2 stoichiometry for compounds 3 and 4. PMID:26024486

  1. Deep eutectic solvents as novel extraction media for phenolic compounds from model oil.

    PubMed

    Gu, Tongnian; Zhang, Mingliang; Tan, Ting; Chen, Jia; Li, Zhan; Zhang, Qinghua; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2014-10-11

    Deep eutectic solvents (DES) as a new kind of green solvent were used for the first time to excellently extract phenolic compounds from model oil. It was also proved that DES could be used to extract other polar compounds from non-polar or weakly-polar solvents by liquid-phase microextraction. PMID:25144155

  2. ESTIMATING TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION OF A SEMI-VOLATILE COMPOUND WITH A REGIONAL PHOTOCHEMICAL MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    To simulate the fate of compounds that are considered semi-volatile and toxic, we have modified a model for regional particulate matter. Our changes introduce a semi-volatile compound into the atmosphere as gaseous emissions from an area source. Once emitted, the gas can transf...

  3. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND MODEL-QUALITY ASSURANCE AND SENSITIVITY TESTING (VERSION 1.8)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes test runs of the Volatile Organic Compound Model (VOCM), Version 1.8. VOCM predicts future emission levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by projecting uncontrolled base year emissions into the future. These projected emissions are then reduced by const...

  4. Cucurbit[7]uril inclusion complexation as a supramolecular strategy for color stabilization of anthocyanin model compounds.

    PubMed

    Held, Barbara; Tang, Hao; Natarajan, Palani; da Silva, Cassio Pacheco; de Oliveira Silva, Volnir; Bohne, Cornelia; Quina, Frank H

    2016-06-01

    Host-guest complexation with cucurbit[7]uril of anthocyanin model compounds in which acid-base equilibria are blocked resulted in essentially complete stabilization of their color. The color protection is a thermodynamic effect and establishes a strategy to stabilize these colored compounds at pH values of interest for practical applications. PMID:27123548

  5. An agent-based modeling approach for determining corn stover removal rate and transboundary effects.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jianbang; Langeveld, J W A; Smith, C T

    2014-02-01

    Bioenergy production involves different agents with potentially different objectives, and an agent's decision often has transboundary impacts on other agents along the bioenergy value chain. Understanding and estimating the transboundary impacts is essential to portraying the interactions among the different agents and in the search for the optimal configuration of the bioenergy value chain. We develop an agent-based model to mimic the decision making by feedstock producers and feedstock-to-biofuel conversion plant operators and propose multipliers (i.e., ratios of economic values accruing to different segments and associated agents in the value chain) for assessing the transboundary impacts. Our approach is generic and thus applicable to a variety of bioenergy production systems at different sites and geographic scales. We apply it to the case of producing ethanol using corn stover in Iowa, USA. The results from the case study indicate that stover removal rate is site specific and varies considerably with soil type, as well as other factors, such as stover price and harvesting cost. In addition, ethanol production using corn stover in the study region would have strong positive ripple effects, with the values of multipliers varying with greenhouse gas price and national energy security premium. The relatively high multiplier values suggest that a large portion of the value associated with corn stover ethanol production would accrue to the downstream end of the value chain instead of stover producers. PMID:24276896

  6. An Agent-Based Modeling Approach for Determining Corn Stover Removal Rate and Transboundary Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jianbang; Langeveld, J. W. A.; Smith, C. T.

    2014-02-01

    Bioenergy production involves different agents with potentially different objectives, and an agent's decision often has transboundary impacts on other agents along the bioenergy value chain. Understanding and estimating the transboundary impacts is essential to portraying the interactions among the different agents and in the search for the optimal configuration of the bioenergy value chain. We develop an agent-based model to mimic the decision making by feedstock producers and feedstock-to-biofuel conversion plant operators and propose multipliers (i.e., ratios of economic values accruing to different segments and associated agents in the value chain) for assessing the transboundary impacts. Our approach is generic and thus applicable to a variety of bioenergy production systems at different sites and geographic scales. We apply it to the case of producing ethanol using corn stover in Iowa, USA. The results from the case study indicate that stover removal rate is site specific and varies considerably with soil type, as well as other factors, such as stover price and harvesting cost. In addition, ethanol production using corn stover in the study region would have strong positive ripple effects, with the values of multipliers varying with greenhouse gas price and national energy security premium. The relatively high multiplier values suggest that a large portion of the value associated with corn stover ethanol production would accrue to the downstream end of the value chain instead of stover producers.

  7. Statistical mechanics of competitive resource allocation using agent-based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Anirban; Challet, Damien; Chatterjee, Arnab; Marsili, Matteo; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2015-01-01

    Demand outstrips available resources in most situations, which gives rise to competition, interaction and learning. In this article, we review a broad spectrum of multi-agent models of competition (El Farol Bar problem, Minority Game, Kolkata Paise Restaurant problem, Stable marriage problem, Parking space problem and others) and the methods used to understand them analytically. We emphasize the power of concepts and tools from statistical mechanics to understand and explain fully collective phenomena such as phase transitions and long memory, and the mapping between agent heterogeneity and physical disorder. As these methods can be applied to any large-scale model of competitive resource allocation made up of heterogeneous adaptive agent with non-linear interaction, they provide a prospective unifying paradigm for many scientific disciplines.

  8. Mesoscopic effects in an agent-based bargaining model in regular lattices.

    PubMed

    Poza, David J; Santos, José I; Galán, José M; López-Paredes, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    The effect of spatial structure has been proved very relevant in repeated games. In this work we propose an agent based model where a fixed finite population of tagged agents play iteratively the Nash demand game in a regular lattice. The model extends the multiagent bargaining model by Axtell, Epstein and Young modifying the assumption of global interaction. Each agent is endowed with a memory and plays the best reply against the opponent's most frequent demand. We focus our analysis on the transient dynamics of the system, studying by computer simulation the set of states in which the system spends a considerable fraction of the time. The results show that all the possible persistent regimes in the global interaction model can also be observed in this spatial version. We also find that the mesoscopic properties of the interaction networks that the spatial distribution induces in the model have a significant impact on the diffusion of strategies, and can lead to new persistent regimes different from those found in previous research. In particular, community structure in the intratype interaction networks may cause that communities reach different persistent regimes as a consequence of the hindering diffusion effect of fluctuating agents at their borders. PMID:21408019

  9. Minimal agent based model for financial markets II. Statistical properties of the linear and multiplicative dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfi, V.; Cristelli, M.; Pietronero, L.; Zaccaria, A.

    2009-02-01

    We present a detailed study of the statistical properties of the Agent Based Model introduced in paper I [Eur. Phys. J. B, DOI: 10.1140/epjb/e2009-00028-4] and of its generalization to the multiplicative dynamics. The aim of the model is to consider the minimal elements for the understanding of the origin of the stylized facts and their self-organization. The key elements are fundamentalist agents, chartist agents, herding dynamics and price behavior. The first two elements correspond to the competition between stability and instability tendencies in the market. The herding behavior governs the possibility of the agents to change strategy and it is a crucial element of this class of models. We consider a linear approximation for the price dynamics which permits a simple interpretation of the model dynamics and, for many properties, it is possible to derive analytical results. The generalized non linear dynamics results to be extremely more sensible to the parameter space and much more difficult to analyze and control. The main results for the nature and self-organization of the stylized facts are, however, very similar in the two cases. The main peculiarity of the non linear dynamics is an enhancement of the fluctuations and a more marked evidence of the stylized facts. We will also discuss some modifications of the model to introduce more realistic elements with respect to the real markets.

  10. Mesoscopic Effects in an Agent-Based Bargaining Model in Regular Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Poza, David J.; Santos, José I.; Galán, José M.; López-Paredes, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    The effect of spatial structure has been proved very relevant in repeated games. In this work we propose an agent based model where a fixed finite population of tagged agents play iteratively the Nash demand game in a regular lattice. The model extends the multiagent bargaining model by Axtell, Epstein and Young [1] modifying the assumption of global interaction. Each agent is endowed with a memory and plays the best reply against the opponent's most frequent demand. We focus our analysis on the transient dynamics of the system, studying by computer simulation the set of states in which the system spends a considerable fraction of the time. The results show that all the possible persistent regimes in the global interaction model can also be observed in this spatial version. We also find that the mesoscopic properties of the interaction networks that the spatial distribution induces in the model have a significant impact on the diffusion of strategies, and can lead to new persistent regimes different from those found in previous research. In particular, community structure in the intratype interaction networks may cause that communities reach different persistent regimes as a consequence of the hindering diffusion effect of fluctuating agents at their borders. PMID:21408019

  11. Improving Trust and Reputation Modeling in E-Commerce Using Agent Lifetime and Transaction Count

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Catherine; Tran, Thomas T.

    Effective and reliable trust and reputation modeling systems are central to the success of decentralized e-commerce systems where autonomous agents are relied upon to conduct commercial transactions. However, the subjective and social-based qualities that are inherent to trust and reputation introduce many complexities into the development of a reliable model. Existing research has successfully demonstrated how trust systems can be decentralized and has illustrated the importance of sharing trust information, or rather, modeling reputation. Still, few models have provided a solution for developing an initial set of advisors from whom to solicit reputation rankings, or have taken into account all of the social criteria used to determine trustworthiness. To meet these objectives, we propose the use of two new parameters in trust and reputation modeling: agent lifetime and total transaction count. We describe a model that employs these parameters to calculate an agent’s seniority, then apply this information when selecting agents for soliciting and ranking reputation information. Experiments using this model are described. The results are then presented and discussed to evaluate the effect of using these parameters in reputation modeling. We also discuss the value of our particular model in contrast with related work and conclude with directions for future research.

  12. Exploring complex dynamics in multi agent-based intelligent systems: Theoretical and experimental approaches using the Multi Agent-based Behavioral Economic Landscape (MABEL) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandridis, Konstantinos T.

    This dissertation adopts a holistic and detailed approach to modeling spatially explicit agent-based artificial intelligent systems, using the Multi Agent-based Behavioral Economic Landscape (MABEL) model. The research questions that addresses stem from the need to understand and analyze the real-world patterns and dynamics of land use change from a coupled human-environmental systems perspective. Describes the systemic, mathematical, statistical, socio-economic and spatial dynamics of the MABEL modeling framework, and provides a wide array of cross-disciplinary modeling applications within the research, decision-making and policy domains. Establishes the symbolic properties of the MABEL model as a Markov decision process, analyzes the decision-theoretic utility and optimization attributes of agents towards comprising statistically and spatially optimal policies and actions, and explores the probabilogic character of the agents' decision-making and inference mechanisms via the use of Bayesian belief and decision networks. Develops and describes a Monte Carlo methodology for experimental replications of agent's decisions regarding complex spatial parcel acquisition and learning. Recognizes the gap on spatially-explicit accuracy assessment techniques for complex spatial models, and proposes an ensemble of statistical tools designed to address this problem. Advanced information assessment techniques such as the Receiver-Operator Characteristic curve, the impurity entropy and Gini functions, and the Bayesian classification functions are proposed. The theoretical foundation for modular Bayesian inference in spatially-explicit multi-agent artificial intelligent systems, and the ensembles of cognitive and scenario assessment modular tools build for the MABEL model are provided. Emphasizes the modularity and robustness as valuable qualitative modeling attributes, and examines the role of robust intelligent modeling as a tool for improving policy-decisions related to land

  13. Comparing stochastic differential equations and agent-based modelling and simulation for early-stage cancer.

    PubMed

    Figueredo, Grazziela P; Siebers, Peer-Olaf; Owen, Markus R; Reps, Jenna; Aickelin, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    There is great potential to be explored regarding the use of agent-based modelling and simulation as an alternative paradigm to investigate early-stage cancer interactions with the immune system. It does not suffer from some limitations of ordinary differential equation models, such as the lack of stochasticity, representation of individual behaviours rather than aggregates and individual memory. In this paper we investigate the potential contribution of agent-based modelling and simulation when contrasted with stochastic versions of ODE models using early-stage cancer examples. We seek answers to the following questions: (1) Does this new stochastic formulation produce similar results to the agent-based version? (2) Can these methods be used interchangeably? (3) Do agent-based models outcomes reveal any benefit when compared to the Gillespie results? To answer these research questions we investigate three well-established mathematical models describing interactions between tumour cells and immune elements. These case studies were re-conceptualised under an agent-based perspective and also converted to the Gillespie algorithm formulation. Our interest in this work, therefore, is to establish a methodological discussion regarding the usability of different simulation approaches, rather than provide further biological insights into the investigated case studies. Our results show that it is possible to obtain equivalent models that implement the same mechanisms; however, the incapacity of the Gillespie algorithm to retain individual memory of past events affects the similarity of some results. Furthermore, the emergent behaviour of ABMS produces extra patters of behaviour in the system, which was not obtained by the Gillespie algorithm. PMID:24752131

  14. Study of the attractor structure of an agent-based sociological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpanaro, André M.; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2011-03-01

    The Sznajd model is a sociophysics model that is based in the Potts model, and used for describing opinion propagation in a society. It employs an agent-based approach and interaction rules favouring pairs of agreeing agents. It has been successfully employed in modeling some properties and scale features of both proportional and majority elections (see for instance the works of A. T. Bernardes and R. N. Costa Filho), but its stationary states are always consensus states. In order to explain more complicated behaviours, we have modified the bounded confidence idea (introduced before in other opinion models, like the Deffuant model), with the introduction of prejudices and biases (we called this modification confidence rules), and have adapted it to the discrete Sznajd model. This generalized Sznajd model is able to reproduce almost all of the previous versions of the Sznajd model, by using appropriate choices of parameters. We solved the attractor structure of the resulting model in a mean-field approach and made Monte Carlo simulations in a Barabási-Albert network. These simulations show great similarities with the mean-field, for the tested cases of 3 and 4 opinions. The dynamical systems approach that we devised allows for a deeper understanding of the potential of the Sznajd model as an opinion propagation model and can be easily extended to other models, like the voter model. Our modification of the bounded confidence rule can also be readily applied to other opinion propagation models.

  15. A conceptual and computational model of moral decision making in human and artificial agents.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Wendell; Franklin, Stan; Allen, Colin

    2010-07-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in general, comprehensive models of human cognition. Such models aim to explain higher-order cognitive faculties, such as deliberation and planning. Given a computational representation, the validity of these models can be tested in computer simulations such as software agents or embodied robots. The push to implement computational models of this kind has created the field of artificial general intelligence (AGI). Moral decision making is arguably one of the most challenging tasks for computational approaches to higher-order cognition. The need for increasingly autonomous artificial agents to factor moral considerations into their choices and actions has given rise to another new field of inquiry variously known as Machine Morality, Machine Ethics, Roboethics, or Friendly AI. In this study, we discuss how LIDA, an AGI model of human cognition, can be adapted to model both affective and rational features of moral decision making. Using the LIDA model, we will demonstrate how moral decisions can be made in many domains using the same mechanisms that enable general decision making. Comprehensive models of human cognition typically aim for compatibility with recent research in the cognitive and neural sciences. Global workspace theory, proposed by the neuropsychologist Bernard Baars (1988), is a highly regarded model of human cognition that is currently being computationally instantiated in several software implementations. LIDA (Franklin, Baars, Ramamurthy, & Ventura, 2005) is one such computational implementation. LIDA is both a set of computational tools and an underlying model of human cognition, which provides mechanisms that are capable of explaining how an agent's selection of its next action arises from bottom-up collection of sensory data and top-down processes for making sense of its current situation. We will describe how the LIDA model helps integrate emotions into the human decision-making process, and we

  16. Agent autonomy approach to probabilistic physics-of-failure modeling of complex dynamic systems with interacting failure mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromek, Katherine Emily

    A novel computational and inference framework of the physics-of-failure (PoF) reliability modeling for complex dynamic systems has been established in this research. The PoF-based reliability models are used to perform a real time simulation of system failure processes, so that the system level reliability modeling would constitute inferences from checking the status of component level reliability at any given time. The "agent autonomy" concept is applied as a solution method for the system-level probabilistic PoF-based (i.e. PPoF-based) modeling. This concept originated from artificial intelligence (AI) as a leading intelligent computational inference in modeling of multi agents systems (MAS). The concept of agent autonomy in the context of reliability modeling was first proposed by M. Azarkhail [1], where a fundamentally new idea of system representation by autonomous intelligent agents for the purpose of reliability modeling was introduced. Contribution of the current work lies in the further development of the agent anatomy concept, particularly the refined agent classification within the scope of the PoF-based system reliability modeling, new approaches to the learning and the autonomy properties of the intelligent agents, and modeling interacting failure mechanisms within the dynamic engineering system. The autonomous property of intelligent agents is defined as agent's ability to self-activate, deactivate or completely redefine their role in the analysis. This property of agents and the ability to model interacting failure mechanisms of the system elements makes the agent autonomy fundamentally different from all existing methods of probabilistic PoF-based reliability modeling. 1. Azarkhail, M., "Agent Autonomy Approach to Physics-Based Reliability Modeling of Structures and Mechanical Systems", PhD thesis, University of Maryland, College Park, 2007.

  17. Numerical Modeling of 3-D Dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agent Microbubbles Using the Boundary Integral Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvisi, Michael; Manmi, Kawa; Wang, Qianxi

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are microbubbles stabilized with a shell typically of lipid, polymer, or protein and are emerging as a unique tool for noninvasive therapies ranging from gene delivery to tumor ablation. The nonspherical dynamics of contrast agents are thought to play an important role in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, for example, causing the emission of subharmonic frequency components and enhancing the uptake of therapeutic agents across cell membranes and tissue interfaces. A three-dimensional model for nonspherical contrast agent dynamics based on the boundary integral method is presented. The effects of the encapsulating shell are approximated by adapting Hoff's model for thin-shell, spherical contrast agents to the nonspherical case. A high-quality mesh of the bubble surface is maintained by implementing a hybrid approach of the Lagrangian method and elastic mesh technique. Numerical analyses for the dynamics of UCAs in an infinite liquid and near a rigid wall are performed in parameter regimes of clinical relevance. The results show that the presence of a coating significantly reduces the oscillation amplitude and period, increases the ultrasound pressure amplitude required to incite jetting, and reduces the jet width and velocity.

  18. Synthesis of model compounds for coal liquefaction research

    SciTech Connect

    Asaro, M.F.; Bottaro, J.C.; Hirschon, A.S.

    1991-05-01

    The objective of this project are to develop feasible synthetic routes to produce (1) 4(4{prime}-hydroxy-5{prime},6{prime},7{prime},8{prime}-tetrahydro-1{prime}-naphthylmethyl)-6-methyldibenzothiophene, and (2) a 1-hydroxynaphthalene-dibenzothiophene polymer. These compounds are thought to be representative of sulfur containing molecules in coal. The program is divided into three tasks, the first of which is a project work plan that we have already submitted. Tasks 2 and 3 are as follows: Synthesis of 4(4-hydroxy-5{prime},6{prime},7{prime},8{prime}-tetrahydro-1{prime}-naphthylmethyl)-6-methyldibenzothiophene and synthesis of 1-hydroxynaphthalene-dibenzothiophene polymer linked by methylene bonds. 14 refs.

  19. Enhancement of the Microbial Dehalogenation of a Model Chlorinated Compound

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Stuart N.; Alexander, Martin

    1981-01-01

    A number of chlorinated aromatic and aliphatic compounds were dehalogenated when incubated with sewage. Preincubating the sewage with nonchlorinated organic substrates enhanced the subsequent dehalogenation of the chlorinated chemicals. Dehalogenation of 4-chloro-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid (CDBA) in lake water occurred as a result of microbial growth both in the light in the absence of added nutrients and in the dark in the presence of acetate. No organism able to use CDBA as a carbon source was isolated. Axenic bacterial cultures and a nonaxenic Chlamydomonas culture released chloride from CDBA. The metabolism of CDBA by the latter culture, a process that was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, yielded a product that was identified as α-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. This product of an apparent cometabolic transformation was mineralized by a strain of Streptomyces, thus suggesting that certain cometabolic products may not accumulate because they are carbon sources for other species. PMID:16345899

  20. Energetics of hydrogen bonding in proteins: a model compound study.

    PubMed Central

    Habermann, S. M.; Murphy, K. P.

    1996-01-01

    Differences in the energetics of amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds in proteins have been explored from the effect of hydroxyl groups on the structure and dissolution energetics of a series of crystalline cyclic dipeptides. The calorimetrically determined energetics are interpreted in light of the crystal structures of the studied compounds. Our results indicate that the amide-amide and amide-hydroxyl hydrogen bonds both provide considerable enthalpic stability, but that the amide-amide hydrogen bond is about twice that of the amide-hydroxyl. Additionally, the interaction of the hydroxyl group with water is seen most readily in its contributions to entropy and heat capacity changes. Surprisingly, the hydroxyl group shows weakly hydrophobic behavior in terms of these contributions. These results can be used to understand the effects of mutations on the stability of globular proteins. PMID:8819156

  1. Numerical Problems and Agent-Based Models for a Mass Transfer Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murthi, Manohar; Shea, Lonnie D.; Snurr, Randall Q.

    2009-01-01

    Problems requiring numerical solutions of differential equations or the use of agent-based modeling are presented for use in a course on mass transfer. These problems were solved using the popular technical computing language MATLABTM. Students were introduced to MATLAB via a problem with an analytical solution. A more complex problem to which no…

  2. Analogue-based approaches in anti-cancer compound modelling: the relevance of QSAR models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background QSAR is among the most extensively used computational methodology for analogue-based design. The application of various descriptor classes like quantum chemical, molecular mechanics, conceptual density functional theory (DFT)- and docking-based descriptors for predicting anti-cancer activity is well known. Although in vitro assay for anti-cancer activity is available against many different cell lines, most of the computational studies are carried out targeting insufficient number of cell lines. Hence, statistically robust and extensive QSAR studies against 29 different cancer cell lines and its comparative account, has been carried out. Results The predictive models were built for 266 compounds with experimental data against 29 different cancer cell lines, employing independent and least number of descriptors. Robust statistical analysis shows a high correlation, cross-validation coefficient values, and provides a range of QSAR equations. Comparative performance of each class of descriptors was carried out and the effect of number of descriptors (1-10) on statistical parameters was tested. Charge-based descriptors were found in 20 out of 39 models (approx. 50%), valency-based descriptor in 14 (approx. 36%) and bond order-based descriptor in 11 (approx. 28%) in comparison to other descriptors. The use of conceptual DFT descriptors does not improve the statistical quality of the models in most cases. Conclusion Analysis is done with various models where the number of descriptors is increased from 1 to 10; it is interesting to note that in most cases 3 descriptor-based models are adequate. The study reveals that quantum chemical descriptors are the most important class of descriptors in modelling these series of compounds followed by electrostatic, constitutional, geometrical, topological and conceptual DFT descriptors. Cell lines in nasopharyngeal (2) cancer average R2 = 0.90 followed by cell lines in melanoma cancer (4) with average R2 = 0.81 gave the

  3. Synthesis, molecular modeling and biological evaluation of dithiocarbamates as novel antitubulin agents.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong; Ma, Gao-Yuan; Yang, Ying; Cheng, Kui; Zheng, Qing-Zhong; Mao, Wen-Jun; Shi, Lei; Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2010-06-15

    A series of novel dithiocarbamate compounds with the chalcone scaffold have been designed and synthesized, and their biological activities were also evaluated as potential antiproliferation and antitubulin polymerization inhibitors. Compound 2n showed the most potent biological activity in vitro, which inhibited the growth of MCF-7 cells with IC(50) of 0.04+/-0.01 microM and the polymerization of tubulin with IC(50) of 6.8+/-0.6 microM. To understand the tubulin-inhibitor interaction and the selectivity of the most active compound towards tubulin, molecular modeling studies were performed to dock compound 2n into the colchicine binding site, which suggested probable inhibition mechanism. PMID:20493717

  4. Indoor Residence Times of Semivolatile Organic Compounds: Model Estimation and Field Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Indoor residence times of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are a major and mostly unavailable input for residential exposure assessment. We calculated residence times for a suite of SVOCs using a fugacity model applied to residential environments. Residence times depend on...

  5. Identifying developmental vascular disruptor compounds using a predictive signature and alternative toxicity models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying Developmental Vascular Disruptor Compounds Using a Predictive Signature and Alternative Toxicity Models Presenting Author: Tamara Tal Affiliation: U.S. EPA/ORD/ISTD, RTP, NC, USA Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide...

  6. Strategic directions for agent-based modeling: avoiding the YAAWN syndrome

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, David; Evans, Tom; Manson, Steven; Metcalf, Sara; Ligmann-Zielinska, Arika; Bone, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In this short communication, we examine how agent-based modeling has become common in land change science and is increasingly used to develop case studies for particular times and places. There is a danger that the research community is missing a prime opportunity to learn broader lessons from the use of agent-based modeling (ABM), or at the very least not sharing these lessons more widely. How do we find an appropriate balance between empirically rich, realistic models and simpler theoretically grounded models? What are appropriate and effective approaches to model evaluation in light of uncertainties not only in model parameters but also in model structure? How can we best explore hybrid model structures that enable us to better understand the dynamics of the systems under study, recognizing that no single approach is best suited to this task? Under what circumstances – in terms of model complexity, model evaluation, and model structure – can ABMs be used most effectively to lead to new insight for stakeholders? We explore these questions in the hope of helping the growing community of land change scientists using models in their research to move from ‘yet another model’ to doing better science with models. PMID:27158257

  7. Curing chemistry of phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers: Model compounds, carbon-13 labeling and cure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Christopher Chad

    1998-11-01

    Phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers (PETI) are currently considered the state-of-the-art high performance resins for aerospace applications. The processing of these resins is more facile because of their low molecular weight, but PETI's cure to form a tough, solvent-resistant material. However, the final cure structure was a complete mystery. Hence, the present study was set forth with three essential goals. The determination of the final structure of the crosslinked polymer is of obvious importance. Second, the crosslinking mechanism and controlling factors is also of interest. Lastly, the final structure of the crosslinked polymers was correlated with mechanical and thermal properties, thereby helping to establish the structure-processing-properties relationships for PETI resins. These goals were accomplished by using a combination of synthesis of model compounds synthesis and proposed cure products, sp{13}C labeling of the ethynyl endgroup in PETI's, monitoring of the thermal cure using solid state sp{13}C NMR and ESR and molecular modeling techniques. Phenylethynyl endcapping agents, 4-(phenylethynyl)phthalic anhydride (PEPA) and 3-(phenylethynyl)aniline (3PEA), were synthesized via the palladium-catalyzed coupling of phenylacetylene with 4-bromophthalic anhydride or 3-iodonitrobenzene followed by reduction to 3PEA, respectively. Isolated yields of 41 and 86% for 3PEA and PEPA were obtained, respectively. Model compounds were synthesized from 3PEA and PEPA by reacting with them the appropriate aniline or phthalic anhydride derivative. Model compounds included N-pentafluorophenyl-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/F5An), N-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/F3CAn), N-lbrack 3-(phenylethynyl)phenylrbrack\\ phthalimide (3PEA/PA), N-phenyl-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/An), N-(4-phenoxyphenyl)4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/POAn), and N-(1-naphthyl)-4-(phenylethynyl)phthalimide (PEPA/Anaph). Proposed cure products such as

  8. Evaluation of Galleria mellonella larvae as an in vivo model for assessing the relative toxicity of food preservative agents.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Ronan; Duggan, Orla; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    Larvae of Galleria mellonella are widely used for evaluating the virulence of microbial pathogens and for measuring the efficacy of anti-microbial agents and produce results comparable to those that can be obtained using mammals. In this work, the suitability of using G. mellonella larvae to measure the relative toxicity of a variety of food preservatives was evaluated. The response of larvae to eight commonly used food preservatives (potassium nitrate, potassium nitrite, potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate, sodium nitrate, sodium chloride, sodium nitrite and sodium acetate) administered by feeding or by intra-haemocoel injection was measured. A significant correlation between the LD50 (R (2) = 0.8766, p = 0.0006) and LD80 (R (2) = 0.7629, p = 0.0046) values obtained due to oral or intra-haemocoel administration of compounds was established. The response of HEp-2 cells to the food preservatives was determined, and a significant correlation (R (2) = 0.7217, p = 0.0076) between the LD50 values of the compounds administered by feeding in larvae with the IC50 values of the compounds in HEp-2 cells was established. A strong correlation between the LD50 values of the eight food preservatives in G. mellonella larvae and rats (R (2) = 0.6506, p = 0.0156) was demonstrated. The results presented here indicate that G. mellonella larvae may be used as a model to evaluate the relative toxicity of food preservatives, and the results show a strong positive correlation to those obtained using established cell culture and mammalian models. PMID:27122324

  9. Behavioural breaks in the heterogeneous agent model: The impact of herding, overconfidence, and market sentiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukacka, Jiri; Barunik, Jozef

    2013-12-01

    The main aim of this work is to incorporate selected findings from behavioural finance into a Heterogeneous Agent Model using the Brock and Hommes (1998) [34] framework. Behavioural patterns are injected into an asset pricing framework through the so-called ‘Break Point Date’, which allows us to examine their direct impact. In particular, we analyse the dynamics of the model around the behavioural break. Price behaviour of 30 Dow Jones Industrial Average constituents covering five particularly turbulent US stock market periods reveals interesting patterns in this aspect. To replicate it, we apply numerical analysis using the Heterogeneous Agent Model extended with the selected findings from behavioural finance: herding, overconfidence, and market sentiment. We show that these behavioural breaks can be well modelled via the Heterogeneous Agent Model framework and they extend the original model considerably. Various modifications lead to significantly different results and model with behavioural breaks is also able to partially replicate price behaviour found in the data during turbulent stock market periods.

  10. Modelling and measuring the irrational behaviour of agents in financial markets: Discovering the psychological soliton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhesi, Gurjeet; Ausloos, Marcel

    2016-07-01

    Following a Geometrical Brownian Motion extension into an Irrational Fractional Brownian Motion model, we re-examine agent behaviour reacting to time dependent news on the log-returns thereby modifying a financial market evolution. We specifically discuss the role of financial news or economic information positive or negative feedback of such irrational (or contrarian) agents upon the price evolution. We observe a kink-like effect reminiscent of soliton behaviour, suggesting how analysts' forecasts errors induce stock prices to adjust accordingly, thereby proposing a measure of the irrational force in a market.

  11. Is the Person-Situation Debate Important for Agent-Based Modeling and Vice-Versa?

    PubMed Central

    Sznajd-Weron, Katarzyna; Szwabiński, Janusz; Weron, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    Background Agent-based models (ABM) are believed to be a very powerful tool in the social sciences, sometimes even treated as a substitute for social experiments. When building an ABM we have to define the agents and the rules governing the artificial society. Given the complexity and our limited understanding of the human nature, we face the problem of assuming that either personal traits, the situation or both have impact on the social behavior of agents. However, as the long-standing person-situation debate in psychology shows, there is no consensus as to the underlying psychological mechanism and the important question that arises is whether the modeling assumptions we make will have a substantial influence on the simulated behavior of the system as a whole or not. Methodology/Principal Findings Studying two variants of the same agent-based model of opinion formation, we show that the decision to choose either personal traits or the situation as the primary factor driving social interactions is of critical importance. Using Monte Carlo simulations (for Barabasi-Albert networks) and analytic calculations (for a complete graph) we provide evidence that assuming a person-specific response to social influence at the microscopic level generally leads to a completely different and less realistic aggregate or macroscopic behavior than an assumption of a situation-specific response; a result that has been reported by social psychologists for a range of experimental setups, but has been downplayed or ignored in the opinion dynamics literature. Significance This sensitivity to modeling assumptions has far reaching consequences also beyond opinion dynamics, since agent-based models are becoming a popular tool among economists and policy makers and are often used as substitutes of real social experiments. PMID:25369531

  12. Agent-based modeling: a new approach for theory building in social psychology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Eliot R; Conrey, Frederica R

    2007-02-01

    Most social and psychological phenomena occur not as the result of isolated decisions by individuals but rather as the result of repeated interactions between multiple individuals over time. Yet the theory-building and modeling techniques most commonly used in social psychology are less than ideal for understanding such dynamic and interactive processes. This article describes an alternative approach to theory building, agent-based modeling (ABM), which involves simulation of large numbers of autonomous agents that interact with each other and with a simulated environment and the observation of emergent patterns from their interactions. The authors believe that the ABM approach is better able than prevailing approaches in the field, variable-based modeling (VBM) techniques such as causal modeling, to capture types of complex, dynamic, interactive processes so important in the social world. The article elaborates several important contrasts between ABM and VBM and offers specific recommendations for learning more and applying the ABM approach. PMID:18453457

  13. Invited commentary: Agent-based models for causal inference—reweighting data and theory in epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Hernán, Miguel A

    2015-01-15

    The relative weights of empirical facts (data) and assumptions (theory) in causal inference vary across disciplines. Typically, disciplines that ask more complex questions tend to better tolerate a greater role of theory and modeling in causal inference. As epidemiologists move toward increasingly complex questions, Marshall and Galea (Am J Epidemiol. 2015;181(2):92-99) support a reweighting of data and theory in epidemiologic research via the use of agent-based modeling. The parametric g-formula can be viewed as an intermediate step between traditional epidemiologic methods and agent-based modeling and therefore is a method that can ease the transition toward epidemiologic methods that rely heavily on modeling. PMID:25480820

  14. Bridging the gap: From computational agent-based models to analytical tractability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, Louise; Lafuerza, Luis F.; McKane, Alan J.; Edmonds, Bruce

    2014-03-01

    In order to investigate complex inter-dependent systems such as those found in the biological and social sciences, one is often left trying to examine complicated, descriptive models. To aid in understanding these it would be helpful to develop tools for examining how these relate to simpler models with understandable and analysable mechanisms. We describe a way of analysing the formation of a social network in a complex computational model that represents voting patterns in a population of agents who may live, work and form friendships together. Once the network is formed, we examine the spread of ``intention to vote'' and compare our findings with those found in the descriptive, agent-based model.

  15. Fluctuation complexity of agent-based financial time series model by stochastic Potts system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Weijia; Wang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    Financial market is a complex evolved dynamic system with high volatilities and noises, and the modeling and analyzing of financial time series are regarded as the rather challenging tasks in financial research. In this work, by applying the Potts dynamic system, a random agent-based financial time series model is developed in an attempt to uncover the empirical laws in finance, where the Potts model is introduced to imitate the trading interactions among the investing agents. Based on the computer simulation in conjunction with the statistical analysis and the nonlinear analysis, we present numerical research to investigate the fluctuation behaviors of the proposed time series model. Furthermore, in order to get a robust conclusion, we consider the daily returns of Shanghai Composite Index and Shenzhen Component Index, and the comparison analysis of return behaviors between the simulation data and the actual data is exhibited.

  16. Mouse Models for Efficacy Testing of Agents against Radiation Carcinogenesis—A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rivina, Leena; Schiestl, Robert

    2012-01-01

    As the number of cancer survivors treated with radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is constantly increasing, so is concern about radiation-induced cancers. This increases the need for therapeutic and mitigating agents against secondary neoplasias. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro assessment, but also a set of reliable animal models of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The laboratory mouse (Mus musculus) remains one of the best animal model systems for cancer research due to its molecular and physiological similarities to man, small size, ease of breeding in captivity and a fully sequenced genome. This work reviews relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models and methodologies of induction of radiation-induced leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast, and lung cancer in these models. Where available, the associated molecular pathologies are also included. PMID:23271302

  17. Dynamics of bloggers’ communities: Bipartite networks from empirical data and agent-based modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrović, Marija; Tadić, Bosiljka

    2012-11-01

    We present an analysis of the empirical data and the agent-based modeling of the emotional behavior of users on the Web portals where the user interaction is mediated by posted comments, like Blogs and Diggs. We consider the dataset of discussion-driven popular Diggs, in which all comments are screened by machine-learning emotion detection in the text, to determine positive and negative valence (attractiveness and aversiveness) of each comment. By mapping the data onto a suitable bipartite network, we perform an analysis of the network topology and the related time-series of the emotional comments. The agent-based model is then introduced to simulate the dynamics and to capture the emergence of the emotional behaviors and communities. The agents are linked to posts on a bipartite network, whose structure evolves through their actions on the posts. The emotional states (arousal and valence) of each agent fluctuate in time, subject to the current contents of the posts to which the agent is exposed. By an agent’s action on a post its current emotions are transferred to the post. The model rules and the key parameters are inferred from the considered empirical data to ensure their realistic values and mutual consistency. The model assumes that the emotional arousal over posts drives the agent’s action. The simulations are preformed for the case of constant flux of agents and the results are analyzed in full analogy with the empirical data. The main conclusions are that the emotion-driven dynamics leads to long-range temporal correlations and emergent networks with community structure, that are comparable with the ones in the empirical system of popular posts. In view of pure emotion-driven agents actions, this type of comparisons provide a quantitative measure for the role of emotions in the dynamics on real blogs. Furthermore, the model reveals the underlying mechanisms which relate the post popularity with the emotion dynamics and the prevalence of negative

  18. Measured versus Modeled Partitioning of Several Hundred Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds Using SV-TAG with in-situ Derivatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, J.; Isaacman, G. A.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Hu, W.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Edgerton, E. S.; Baumann, K.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Most organic aerosol is secondary, formed by oxidation of primary gas-phase chemicals whose products condense into particles. While gas-particle partitioning is known to depend in part on the volatility of a compound, the process is poorly understood and largely unconstrained by compound-specific measurements. We directly measured gas-to-particle partitioning of over 250 semi-volatile organic compounds during the SOAS campaign in rural Alabama in the summer of 2013, and compare to a partitioning model based on their calculated vapor pressures and chemical properties. All data were collected using an SVTAG (Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph) which uses two parallel cells to collect gas- and particle-phase organic compounds with volatilities lower than tridecane. By using an activated carbon denuder to remove all gas-phase compounds from one channel, gas-particle partitioning is directly measured on an hourly timescale. Derivatization with MSTFA, a silylating agent, allows analysis of highly oxygenated compounds that have not previously been analyzed by in-situ GC methods. Internal standards are used to correct all compounds for instrument variability in order to remove instrument biases between sampling channels, and compounds lacking temporal variability are not reported so as to exclude any internal contaminant compounds. Chemical characteristics of each compound (i.e. number of derivatized hydroxyl groups) were inferred from their mass spectra using a model we built from data in an available NIST mass spectral database. Based on chromatographic retention time and chemical characteristics we model the vapor pressures of measured compounds to within the error of current structure-activity models (i.e. SIMPOL). Measured partitioning for all observed compounds is compared to partitioning predicted from their estimated vapor pressures. While current models adequately describe the partitioning of some compounds, a large fraction of observed

  19. Exploring the cooperative regimes in an agent-based model: indirect reciprocity vs. selfish incentives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, H.

    2003-08-01

    The self-organization in cooperative regimes in a simple mean-field version of a model based on “selfish” agents which play the Prisoner's Dilemma (PD) game is studied. The agents have no memory and use strategies not based on direct reciprocity nor “tags”. Two variables are assigned to each agent k at time t, measuring its capital C( k; t) and its probability of cooperation p( k; t). At each time step t a pair of agents interact by playing the PD game. These two agents update their probability of cooperation p( k; t) as follows: they compare the profits they made in this interaction δC( k; t) with an estimator ε( k; t) and, if δC( k; t)⩾ ε( k; t), agent i increases its p( k; t) while if δC( k; t)< ε( k; t) the agent decreases p( k; t). The 4!=24 different cases produced by permuting the four Prisoner's Dilemma canonical payoffs 3, 0, 1, and 5-corresponding, respectively, to R (reward), S (sucker's payoff), T (temptation to defect) and P (punishment)-are analyzed. It turns out that for all these 24 possibilities, after a transient, the system self-organizes into a stationary state with average equilibrium probability of cooperation p¯∞= constant>0 . Depending on the payoff matrix, there are different equilibrium states characterized by their average probability of cooperation and average equilibrium per capita income ( p¯∞, δC¯∞) .

  20. Towards Symbolic Model Checking for Multi-Agent Systems via OBDDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raimondi, Franco; Lomunscio, Alessio

    2004-01-01

    We present an algorithm for model checking temporal-epistemic properties of multi-agent systems, expressed in the formalism of interpreted systems. We first introduce a technique for the translation of interpreted systems into boolean formulae, and then present a model-checking algorithm based on this translation. The algorithm is based on OBDD's, as they offer a compact and efficient representation for boolean formulae.

  1. Investigation of membrane fouling in ultrafiltration using model organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kweon, J H; Lawler, D F

    2005-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is known to be the worst foulant in the membrane processes, but the complexities of NOM make it difficult to determine its effects on membrane fouling. Therefore, simple organic compounds (surrogates for NOM) were used in this research to investigate the fouling mechanisms in ultrafiltration. Previous research on NOM components in membrane processes indicated that polysaccharides formed an important part of the fouling cake. Three polysaccharides (dextran, alginic acid, and polygalacturonic acid) and a smaller carbohydrate (tannic acid) were evaluated for their removal in softening (the treatment process in the City of Austin). Two polysaccharides (dextran and alginic acid) were selected and further investigated for their effects on membrane fouling. The two raw organic waters (4 mg/L C) showed quite different patterns of flux decline indicating different fouling mechanisms. Softening pretreatment was effective to reduce flux decline of both waters. The SEM images of the fouled membrane clearly showed the shapes of deposited foulants. The high resolution results of the XPS spectra showed substantially different spectra of carbon, C(1s), in the membrane fouled by two raw organic waters. The XPS was beneficial in determining the relative composition of each fouling material on the membrane surface. PMID:16003967

  2. Agent-Based Modeling of the Immune System: NetLogo, a Promising Framework

    PubMed Central

    Chiacchio, Ferdinando; Russo, Giulia; Pappalardo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Several components that interact with each other to evolve a complex, and, in some cases, unexpected behavior, represents one of the main and fascinating features of the mammalian immune system. Agent-based modeling and cellular automata belong to a class of discrete mathematical approaches in which entities (agents) sense local information and undertake actions over time according to predefined rules. The strength of this approach is characterized by the appearance of a global behavior that emerges from interactions among agents. This behavior is unpredictable, as it does not follow linear rules. There are a lot of works that investigates the immune system with agent-based modeling and cellular automata. They have shown the ability to see clearly and intuitively into the nature of immunological processes. NetLogo is a multiagent programming language and modeling environment for simulating complex phenomena. It is designed for both research and education and is used across a wide range of disciplines and education levels. In this paper, we summarize NetLogo applications to immunology and, particularly, how this framework can help in the development and formulation of hypotheses that might drive further experimental investigations of disease mechanisms. PMID:24864263

  3. Agent-based modeling of the immune system: NetLogo, a promising framework.

    PubMed

    Chiacchio, Ferdinando; Pennisi, Marzio; Russo, Giulia; Motta, Santo; Pappalardo, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Several components that interact with each other to evolve a complex, and, in some cases, unexpected behavior, represents one of the main and fascinating features of the mammalian immune system. Agent-based modeling and cellular automata belong to a class of discrete mathematical approaches in which entities (agents) sense local information and undertake actions over time according to predefined rules. The strength of this approach is characterized by the appearance of a global behavior that emerges from interactions among agents. This behavior is unpredictable, as it does not follow linear rules. There are a lot of works that investigates the immune system with agent-based modeling and cellular automata. They have shown the ability to see clearly and intuitively into the nature of immunological processes. NetLogo is a multiagent programming language and modeling environment for simulating complex phenomena. It is designed for both research and education and is used across a wide range of disciplines and education levels. In this paper, we summarize NetLogo applications to immunology and, particularly, how this framework can help in the development and formulation of hypotheses that might drive further experimental investigations of disease mechanisms. PMID:24864263

  4. Building v/s Exploring Models: Comparing Learning of Evolutionary Processes through Agent-based Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagh, Aditi

    Two strands of work motivate the three studies in this dissertation. Evolutionary change can be viewed as a computational complex system in which a small set of rules operating at the individual level result in different population level outcomes under different conditions. Extensive research has documented students' difficulties with learning about evolutionary change (Rosengren et al., 2012), particularly in terms of levels slippage (Wilensky & Resnick, 1999). Second, though building and using computational models is becoming increasingly common in K-12 science education, we know little about how these two modalities compare. This dissertation adopts agent-based modeling as a representational system to compare these modalities in the conceptual context of micro-evolutionary processes. Drawing on interviews, Study 1 examines middle-school students' productive ways of reasoning about micro-evolutionary processes to find that the specific framing of traits plays a key role in whether slippage explanations are cued. Study 2, which was conducted in 2 schools with about 150 students, forms the crux of the dissertation. It compares learning processes and outcomes when students build their own models or explore a pre-built model. Analysis of Camtasia videos of student pairs reveals that builders' and explorers' ways of accessing rules, and sense-making of observed trends are of a different character. Builders notice rules through available blocks-based primitives, often bypassing their enactment while explorers attend to rules primarily through the enactment. Moreover, builders' sense-making of observed trends is more rule-driven while explorers' is more enactment-driven. Pre and posttests reveal that builders manifest a greater facility with accessing rules, providing explanations manifesting targeted assembly. Explorers use rules to construct explanations manifesting non-targeted assembly. Interviews reveal varying degrees of shifts away from slippage in both

  5. Re-Examining of Moffitt’s Theory of Delinquency through Agent Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Leaw, Jia Ning; Ang, Rebecca P.; Huan, Vivien S.; Chan, Wei Teng; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2015-01-01

    Moffitt’s theory of delinquency suggests that at-risk youths can be divided into two groups, the adolescence- limited group and the life-course-persistent group, predetermined at a young age, and social interactions between these two groups become important during the adolescent years. We built an agent-based model based on the microscopic interactions Moffitt described: (i) a maturity gap that dictates (ii) the cost and reward of antisocial behavior, and (iii) agents imitating the antisocial behaviors of others more successful than themselves, to find indeed the two groups emerging in our simulations. Moreover, through an intervention simulation where we moved selected agents from one social network to another, we also found that the social network plays an important role in shaping the life course outcome. PMID:26062022

  6. A Cross-Cultural Multi-agent Model of Opportunism in Trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofstede, Gert Jan; Jonker, Catholijn M.; Verwaart, Tim

    According to transaction cost economics, contracts are always incomplete and offer opportunities to defect. Some level of trust is a sine qua non for trade. If the seller is better informed about product quality than the buyer, the buyer has to rely on information the seller provides or has to check the information by testing the product or tracing the supply chain processes, thus incurring extra transaction cost. An opportunistic seller who assumes the buyer to trust, may deliver a lower quality product than agreed upon. In human decisions to deceive and to show trust or distrust, issues like mutual expectations, shame, self-esteem, personality, and reputation are involved. These factors depend in part on traders' cultural background. This paper proposes an agent model of deceit and trust and describes a multi-agent simulation where trading agents are differentiated according to Hofstede's dimensions of national culture. Simulations of USA and Dutch trading situations are compared.

  7. An Integrated Model in E-Government Based on Semantic Web, Web Service and Intelligent Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongtao; Su, Fangli

    One urgent problem in E-government service is to improve service efficiency through breaking information islands while constructing integrated service systems. Web Service provides a set of standards for the provision of functionality over the Web, and Web Service descriptions are pure syntactic instead of semantic content. Semantic Web provides interoperability from syntactic level to semantic one not only for human users but also for software agents. Semantic Web and Intelligent Agent are highly complementary, and the existing technologies have made their unification quite feasible, which brings about a good opportunity to the development of E-government. Based on Semantic Web and Intelligent Agent technologies an integrated service model of E-government is suggested in this paper.

  8. Computational framework for modeling the dynamic evolution of large-scale multi-agent organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Alina; Reynolds, Robert G.

    2002-07-01

    A multi-agent system model of the origins of an archaic state is developed. Agent interaction is mediated by a collection of rules. The rules are mined from a related large-scale data base using two different techniques. One technique uses decision trees while the other uses rough sets. The latter was used since the data collection techniques were associated with a certain degree of uncertainty. The generation of the rough set rules was guided by Genetic Algorithms. Since the rules mediate agent interaction, the rule set with fewer rules and conditionals to check will make scaling up the simulation easier to do. The results suggest that explicitly dealing with uncertainty in rule formation can produce simpler rules than ignoring that uncertainty in situations where uncertainty is a factor in the measurement process.

  9. Re-Examining of Moffitt's Theory of Delinquency through Agent Based Modeling.

    PubMed

    Leaw, Jia Ning; Ang, Rebecca P; Huan, Vivien S; Chan, Wei Teng; Cheong, Siew Ann

    2015-01-01

    Moffitt's theory of delinquency suggests that at-risk youths can be divided into two groups, the adolescence- limited group and the life-course-persistent group, predetermined at a young age, and social interactions between these two groups become important during the adolescent years. We built an agent-based model based on the microscopic interactions Moffitt described: (i) a maturity gap that dictates (ii) the cost and reward of antisocial behavior, and (iii) agents imitating the antisocial behaviors of others more successful than themselves, to find indeed the two groups emerging in our simulations. Moreover, through an intervention simulation where we moved selected agents from one social network to another, we also found that the social network plays an important role in shaping the life course outcome. PMID:26062022

  10. Leading compounds for the validation of animal models of psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Micale, Vincenzo; Kucerova, Jana; Sulcova, Alexandra

    2013-10-01

    Modelling of complex psychiatric disorders, e.g., depression and schizophrenia, in animals is a major challenge, since they are characterized by certain disturbances in functions that are absolutely unique to humans. Furthermore, we still have not identified the genetic and neurobiological mechanisms, nor do we know precisely the circuits in the brain that function abnormally in mood and psychotic disorders. Consequently, the pharmacological treatments used are mostly variations on a theme that was started more than 50 years ago. Thus, progress in novel drug development with improved therapeutic efficacy would benefit greatly from improved animal models. Here, we review the available animal models of depression and schizophrenia and focus on the way that they respond to various types of potential candidate molecules, such as novel antidepressant or antipsychotic drugs, as an index of predictive validity. We conclude that the generation of convincing and useful animal models of mental illnesses could be a bridge to success in drug discovery. PMID:23942897

  11. A modeling approach for compounds affecting body composition.

    PubMed

    Gennemark, Peter; Jansson-Löfmark, Rasmus; Hyberg, Gina; Wigstrand, Maria; Kakol-Palm, Dorota; Håkansson, Pernilla; Hovdal, Daniel; Brodin, Peter; Fritsch-Fredin, Maria; Antonsson, Madeleine; Ploj, Karolina; Gabrielsson, Johan

    2013-12-01

    Body composition and body mass are pivotal clinical endpoints in studies of welfare diseases. We present a combined effort of established and new mathematical models based on rigorous monitoring of energy intake (EI) and body mass in mice. Specifically, we parameterize a mechanistic turnover model based on the law of energy conservation coupled to a drug mechanism model. Key model variables are fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM), governed by EI and energy expenditure (EE). An empirical Forbes curve relating FFM to FM was derived experimentally for female C57BL/6 mice. The Forbes curve differs from a previously reported curve for male C57BL/6 mice, and we thoroughly analyse how the choice of Forbes curve impacts model predictions. The drug mechanism function acts on EI or EE, or both. Drug mechanism parameters (two to three parameters) and system parameters (up to six free parameters) could be estimated with good precision (coefficients of variation typically <20 % and not greater than 40 % in our analyses). Model simulations were done to predict the EE and FM change at different drug provocations in mice. In addition, we simulated body mass and FM changes at different drug provocations using a similar model for man. Surprisingly, model simulations indicate that an increase in EI (e.g. 10 %) was more efficient than an equal lowering of EI. Also, the relative change in body mass and FM is greater in man than in mouse at the same relative change in either EI or EE. We acknowledge that this assumes the same drug mechanism impact across the two species. A set of recommendations regarding the Forbes curve, vehicle control groups, dual action on EI and loss, and translational aspects are discussed. This quantitative approach significantly improves data interpretation, disease system understanding, safety assessment and translation across species. PMID:24158456

  12. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling of new tetrahydroacridine derivatives as potential multifunctional agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bajda, Marek; Jończyk, Jakub; Malawska, Barbara; Czarnecka, Kamila; Girek, Małgorzata; Olszewska, Paulina; Sikora, Joanna; Mikiciuk-Olasik, Elżbieta; Skibiński, Robert; Gumieniczek, Anna; Szymański, Paweł

    2015-09-01

    A novel series of 9-amino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroacridine derivatives with 4-dimethylaminobenzoic acid moiety was synthesized and tested towards inhibition of cholinesterases and amyloid β aggregation. Target compounds were designed as dual binding site cholinesterase inhibitors able to bind to both the catalytic and the peripheral site of the enzyme and therefore potentially endowed with other properties. The obtained derivatives were very potent inhibitors of both cholinesterases (EeAChE, EqBChE) with IC50 values ranging from sub-nanomolar to nanomolar range, and the inhibitory potency of the most promising agents was higher than that of the reference drugs (rivastigmine and tacrine). The kinetic studies of the most active compound 3a revealed competitive type of AChE inhibition. Moreover, all target compounds were more potent inhibitors of human AChE than tacrine with the most active compound 3b (IC50 = 19 nM). Compound 3a was also tested and displayed inhibitory potency against AChE-induced Aβ 1-42 aggregation (80.6% and 91.3% at 50 μM and 100 μM screening concentration, respectively). Moreover, cytotoxicity assay performed on A549 cells did not indicate toxicity of this agent. Compound 3a is a promising candidate for further development of novel multi-functional agents in the therapy of AD. PMID:26242241

  13. Modeling and predicting competitive sorption of organic compounds in soil

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Isabel R.; Young, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Binary systems consisting of 1,2-dichlorobenzene (12DCB) + competitor were investigated over a range of concentrations of competitor in three natural sorbents with distinct characteristics. Two models, the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) and the Potential theory (Polanyi based multi-solute model), widely used in the prediction of multi-solute sorption equilibrium from single solute data were used to simulate competitive sorption in our systems. The goal was to determine which multi-solute model best represented the experimentally obtained multi-solute data in natural sorbents of varied properties. Results suggested that for the sorbents and sorbates studied the IAST model provided much better results. On average the IAST model provided lower errors (23%) than the Potential model (45%). The effect of competitor structure on the degree of competition was also investigated to identify any relationships between competition and structure using molecular descriptors. The competitors chlorobenzene, naphthalene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene all showed very similar degrees of competition, while benzene, phenanthrene and pyrene were the least effective competitors towards 12DCB across all sorbents. Different sorption sites or sorption mechanisms might be involved in the sorption of these molecules leading to a lack of competitive behavior. A significant relationship between competitor structure and the degree of competition was observed at environmentally relevant sorbed competitor concentrations for the soil containing the highest fraction of hard carbon (Forbes). PMID:21061392

  14. A three-state kinetic agent-based model to analyze tax evasion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crokidakis, Nuno

    2014-11-01

    In this work we study the problem of tax evasion on a fully-connected population. For this purpose, we consider that the agents may be in three different states, namely honest tax payers, tax evaders and undecided, that are individuals in an intermediate class among honests and evaders. Every individual can change his/her state following a kinetic exchange opinion dynamics, where the agents interact by pairs with competitive negative (with probability q) and positive (with probability 1-q) couplings, representing agreement/disagreement between pairs of agents. In addition, we consider the punishment rules of the Zaklan econophysics model, for which there is a probability pa of an audit each agent is subject to in every period and a length of time k detected tax evaders remain honest. Our results suggest that below the critical point qc=1/4 of the opinion dynamics the compliance is high, and the punishment rules have a small effect in the population. On the other hand, for q>qc the tax evasion can be considerably reduced by the enforcement mechanism. We also discuss the impact of the presence of the undecided agents in the evolution of the system.

  15. An agent-based model of group decision making in baboons.

    PubMed

    Sellers, W I; Hill, R A; Logan, B S

    2007-09-29

    We present an agent-based model of the key activities of a troop of chacma baboons (Papio hamadryas ursinus) based on the data collected at De Hoop Nature Reserve in South Africa. We analyse the predictions of the model in terms of how well it is able to duplicate the observed activity patterns of the animals and the relationship between the parameters that control the agent's decision procedure and the model's predictions. At the current stage of model development, we are able to show that across a wide range of decision parameter values, the baboons are able to achieve their energetic and social time requirements. The simulation results also show that decisions concerning movement (group action selection) have the greatest influence on the outcomes. Those cases where the model's predictions fail to agree with the observed activity patterns have highlighted key elements that were missing from the field data, and that would need to be collected in subsequent fieldwork. Based on our experience, we believe group decision making is a fertile field for future research, and agent-based modelling offers considerable scope for understanding group action selection. PMID:17428770

  16. Dynamical systems approach to the study of a sociophysics agent-based model

    SciTech Connect

    Timpanaro, Andre M.; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2011-03-24

    The Sznajd model is a Potts-like model that has been studied in the context of sociophysics [1,2](where spins are interpreted as opinions). In a recent work [3], we generalized the Sznajd model to include assymetric interactions between the spins (interpreted as biases towards opinions) and used dynamical systems techniques to tackle its mean-field version, given by the flow: {eta}{sub {sigma}} = {Sigma}{sub {sigma}}'{sup M} = 1{eta}{sub {sigma}}{eta}{sigma}'({eta}{sub {sigma}}{rho}{sigma}'{yields}{sigma}-{sigma}'{rho}{sigma}{yields}{sigma}').Where hs is the proportion of agents with opinion (spin){sigma}', M is the number of opinions and {sigma}'{yields}{sigma}' is the probability weight for an agent with opinion {sigma} being convinced by another agent with opinion {sigma}'. We made Monte Carlo simulations of the model in a complex network (using Barabasi-Albert networks [4]) and they displayed the same attractors than the mean-field. Using linear stability analysis, we were able to determine the mean-field attractor structure analytically and to show that it has connections with well known graph theory problems (maximal independent sets and positive fluxes in directed graphs). Our dynamical systems approach is quite simple and can be used also in other models, like the voter model.

  17. Dynamical systems approach to the study of a sociophysics agent-based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timpanaro, André M.; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2011-03-01

    The Sznajd model is a Potts-like model that has been studied in the context of sociophysics [1,2] (where spins are interpreted as opinions). In a recent work [3], we generalized the Sznajd model to include assymetric interactions between the spins (interpreted as biases towards opinions) and used dynamical systems techniques to tackle its mean-field version, given by the flow: ησ = ∑ σ' = 1Mησησ'(ησρσ'→σ-σ'ρσ→σ'). Where hs is the proportion of agents with opinion (spin) σ', M is the number of opinions and σ'→σ' is the probability weight for an agent with opinion σ being convinced by another agent with opinion σ'. We made Monte Carlo simulations of the model in a complex network (using Barabási-Albert networks [4]) and they displayed the same attractors than the mean-field. Using linear stability analysis, we were able to determine the mean-field attractor structure analytically and to show that it has connections with well known graph theory problems (maximal independent sets and positive fluxes in directed graphs). Our dynamical systems approach is quite simple and can be used also in other models, like the voter model.

  18. An Agent-Based Model of Farmer Decision Making in Jordan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selby, Philip; Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Harou, Julien; Klassert, Christian; Yoon, Jim

    2016-04-01

    We describe an agent based hydro-economic model of groundwater irrigated agriculture in the Jordan Highlands. The model employs a Multi-Agent-Simulation (MAS) framework and is designed to evaluate direct and indirect outcomes of climate change scenarios and policy interventions on farmer decision making, including annual land use, groundwater use for irrigation, and water sales to a water tanker market. Land use and water use decisions are simulated for groups of farms grouped by location and their behavioural and economic similarities. Decreasing groundwater levels, and the associated increase in pumping costs, are important drivers for change within Jordan'S agricultural sector. We describe how this is considered by coupling of agricultural and groundwater models. The agricultural production model employs Positive Mathematical Programming (PMP), a method for calibrating agricultural production functions to observed planted areas. PMP has successfully been used with disaggregate models for policy analysis. We adapt the PMP approach to allow explicit evaluation of the impact of pumping costs, groundwater purchase fees and a water tanker market. The work demonstrates the applicability of agent-based agricultural decision making assessment in the Jordan Highlands and its integration with agricultural model calibration methods. The proposed approach is designed and implemented with software such that it could be used to evaluate a variety of physical and human influences on decision making in agricultural water management.

  19. A mathematical model for predicting controlled release of bioactive agents from composite fiber structures.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Meital; Sofer, Moran

    2007-03-01

    A mathematical model for predicting bioactive agent release profiles from core/shell fiber structures was developed and studied. These new composite fibers, which combine good mechanical properties with desired protein release profiles, are designed for use in tissue regeneration and other biomedical applications. These fibers are composed of an inner dense polymeric core surrounded by a porous bioresorbable shell, which encapsulates the bioactive agent molecules. The model is based on Fick's second law of diffusion, and on two major assumptions: (a) first-order degradation kinetics of the porous shell, and (b) a nonconstant diffusion coefficient for the bioactive agent, which increases with time because of degradation of the host polymer. Three factors are evaluated and included in this model: a porosity factor, a tortuosity factor, and a polymer concentration factor. Our study indicates that the model correlates well with in vitro release results, exhibiting a mean error of less than 2.2% for most studied cases. In this study, the model was used for predicting protein release profiles from fibers with shells of various initial molecular weights and for predicting the release of proteins with various molecular weights. This new model exhibits a potential for simulating fibrous systems for a wide variety of biomedical applications. PMID:17072845

  20. Multinomial and Compound Multinomial Error Models for Tests with Complex Item Scoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Won-Chan

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces a multinomial error model, which models an examinee's test scores obtained over repeated measurements of an assessment that consists of polytomously scored items. A compound multinomial error model is also introduced for situations in which items are stratified according to content categories and/or prespecified numbers of…

  1. Modeling emissions of volatile organic compounds from silage storages and feed lanes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An initial volatile organic compound (VOC) emission model for silage sources, developed using experimental data from previous studies, was incorporated into the Integrated Farm System Model (IFSM), a whole-farm simulation model used to assess the performance, environmental impacts, and economics of ...

  2. Synthesis of a naphthalene-hydroxynaphthalene polymer model compound. Final report, June 13, 1990--September 12, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-02

    The objective of this project was the synthesis of one pound of a new naphthalene-hydroxynaphthalene polymer model compound for use in coal combustion studies. Since this compound was an unreported compound, this effort also required the development of a synthetic route to this compound (including routes to the unique and unreported intermediates leading to its synthesis).

  3. Reinforcement Learning Multi-Agent Modeling of Decision-Making Agents for the Study of Transboundary Surface Water Conflicts with Application to the Syr Darya River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegels, N.; Siegfried, T.; Pereira Cardenal, S. J.; Jensen, R. A.; Bauer-Gottwein, P.

    2008-12-01

    In most economics--driven approaches to optimizing water use at the river basin scale, the system is modelled deterministically with the goal of maximizing overall benefits. However, actual operation and allocation decisions must be made under hydrologic and economic uncertainty. In addition, river basins often cross political boundaries, and different states may not be motivated to cooperate so as to maximize basin- scale benefits. Even within states, competing agents such as irrigation districts, municipal water agencies, and large industrial users may not have incentives to cooperate to realize efficiency gains identified in basin- level studies. More traditional simulation--optimization approaches assume pre-commitment by individual agents and stakeholders and unconditional compliance on each side. While this can help determine attainable gains and tradeoffs from efficient management, such hardwired policies do not account for dynamic feedback between agents themselves or between agents and their environments (e.g. due to climate change etc.). In reality however, we are dealing with an out-of-equilibrium multi-agent system, where there is neither global knowledge nor global control, but rather continuous strategic interaction between decision making agents. Based on the theory of stochastic games, we present a computational framework that allows for studying the dynamic feedback between decision--making agents themselves and an inherently uncertain environment in a spatially and temporally distributed manner. Agents with decision-making control over water allocation such as countries, irrigation districts, and municipalities are represented by reinforcement learning agents and coupled to a detailed hydrologic--economic model. This approach emphasizes learning by agents from their continuous interaction with other agents and the environment. It provides a convenient framework for the solution of the problem of dynamic decision-making in a mixed cooperative / non

  4. Coumarins as Potential Antioxidant Agents Complemented with Suggested Mechanisms and Approved by Molecular Modeling Studies.

    PubMed

    Al-Majedy, Yasameen K; Al-Duhaidahawi, Dunya L; Al-Azawi, Khalida F; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2016-01-01

    Syntheses of coumarins, which are a structurally interesting antioxidant activity, was done in this article. The modification of 7-hydroxycoumarin by different reaction steps was done to yield target compounds. Molecular structures were characterized by different spectroscopical techniques (Fourier transformation infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance). Antioxidant activities were performed by using various in vitro spectrophometric assays against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). All compounds exhibited high efficiency as antioxidants compared to ascorbic acid. The highest efficiency scavenging activity was found for compound 3 (91.0 ± 5.0), followed by compounds 2 and 4 (88.0 ± 2.00; and 87.0 ± 3.00). Ascorbic acid C was used as a standard drug with a percentage inhibition of 91.00 ± 1.5. The mechanism of the synthesized compounds as antioxidants was also studied. Hartree-Fock-based quantum chemical studies have been carried out with the basis set to 3-21G, in order to obtain information about the three-dimensional (3D) geometries, electronic structure, molecular modeling, and electronic levels, namely HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital) and LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital), to understand the antioxidant activity for the synthesized compounds. PMID:26805811

  5. Graceful Failure and Societal Resilience Analysis Via Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schopf, P. S.; Cioffi-Revilla, C.; Rogers, J. D.; Bassett, J.; Hailegiorgis, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Agent-based social modeling is opening up new methodologies for the study of societal response to weather and climate hazards, and providing measures of resiliency that can be studied in many contexts, particularly in coupled human and natural-technological systems (CHANTS). Since CHANTS are complex adaptive systems, societal resiliency may or may not occur, depending on dynamics that lack closed form solutions. Agent-based modeling has been shown to provide a viable theoretical and methodological approach for analyzing and understanding disasters and societal resiliency in CHANTS. Our approach advances the science of societal resilience through computational modeling and simulation methods that complement earlier statistical and mathematical approaches. We present three case studies of social dynamics modeling that demonstrate the use of these agent based models. In Central Asia, we exmaine mutltiple ensemble simulations with varying climate statistics to see how droughts and zuds affect populations, transmission of wealth across generations, and the overall structure of the social system. In Eastern Africa, we explore how successive episodes of drought events affect the adaptive capacity of rural households. Human displacement, mainly, rural to urban migration, and livelihood transition particularly from pastoral to farming are observed as rural households interacting dynamically with the biophysical environment and continually adjust their behavior to accommodate changes in climate. In the far north case we demonstrate one of the first successful attempts to model the complete climate-permafrost-infrastructure-societal interaction network as a complex adaptive system/CHANTS implemented as a ``federated'' agent-based model using evolutionary computation. Analysis of population changes resulting from extreme weather across these and other cases provides evidence for the emergence of new steady states and shifting patterns of resilience.

  6. Chalcogen bonding interactions between reducible sulfur and selenium compounds and models of zinc finger proteins.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Patricia B; Bayse, Craig A

    2016-04-01

    Reducible sulfur and selenium (r-S/Se) compounds, defined as sulfur and selenium compounds not in the lowest -2 oxidation state (e.g., -1 to +6), release Zn(2+) from zinc-sulfur proteins such as zinc fingers (ZFs) and metallothionein. A series of density functional theory calculations was performed on donor-acceptor complexes between r-S/Se compounds and models of the Cys2His2, Cys3His and Cys4 ZF sites. These S⋯S/Se chalcogen bonding interactions consist of the donation of electron density from a S lone pair on the ZF model to a S/Se-X antibonding molecular orbital of the r-S/Se compound. The strength of the interaction was shown to be dependent upon the Lewis basicity of the ZF model (Cys4>Cys3His>Cys2His2) and the Lewis acidity of the r-S/Se compound as measured by the energy of the S/Se-X antibonding orbital. Interactions with the softer r-Se compounds were stronger than the r-S compounds, consistent with the greater reactivity of the former with ZF proteins. PMID:26877152

  7. Quantitative structure-(chromatographic) retention relationship models for dissociating compounds.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Łukasz; Wiczling, Paweł

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to develop mathematical models relating the hydrophobicity and dissociation constant of an analyte with its structure, which would be useful in predicting analyte retention times in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. For that purpose a large and diverse group of 115 drugs was used to build three QSRR models combining retention-related parameters (logkw-chromatographic measure of hydrophobicity, S-slope factor from Snyder-Soczewinski equation, and pKa) with structural descriptors calculated by means of molecular modeling for both dissociated and nondissociated forms of analytes. Lasso, Stepwise and PLS regressions were used to build statistical models. Moreover a simple QSRR equations based on lipophilicity and dissociation constant parameters calculated in the ACD/Labs software were proposed and compared with quantum chemistry-based QSRR equations. The obtained relationships were further used to predict chromatographic retention times. The predictive performances of the obtained models were assessed using 10-fold cross-validation and external validation. The QSRR equations developed were simple and were characterized by satisfactory predictive performance. Application of quantum chemistry-based and ACD-based descriptors leads to similar accuracy of retention times' prediction. PMID:26960942

  8. Modeling of Intermetallic Compounds Growth Between Dissimilar Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li; Wang, Yin; Prangnell, Philip; Robson, Joseph

    2015-09-01

    A model has been developed to predict growth kinetics of the intermetallic phases (IMCs) formed in a reactive diffusion couple between two metals for the case where multiple IMC phases are observed. The model explicitly accounts for the effect of grain boundary diffusion through the IMC layer, and can thus be used to explore the effect of IMC grain size on the thickening of the reaction layer. The model has been applied to the industrially important case of aluminum to magnesium alloy diffusion couples in which several different IMC phases are possible. It is demonstrated that there is a transition from grain boundary-dominated diffusion to lattice-dominated diffusion at a critical grain size, which is different for each IMC phase. The varying contribution of grain boundary diffusion to the overall thickening kinetics with changing grain size helps explain the large scatter in thickening kinetics reported for diffusion couples produced under different conditions.

  9. Modeling the oxidation of phenolic compounds by hydrogen peroxide photolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianqi; Cheng, Long; Ma, Lin; Meng, Fanchao; Arnold, Robert G; Sáez, A Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide UV photolysis is among the most widely used advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for the destruction of trace organics in waters destined for reuse. Previous kinetic models of hydrogen peroxide photolysis focus on the dynamics of hydroxyl radical production and consumption, as well as the reaction of the target organic with hydroxyl radicals. However, the rate of target destruction may also be affected by radical scavenging by reaction products. In this work, we build a predictive kinetic model for the destruction of p-cresol by hydrogen peroxide photolysis based on a complete reaction mechanism that includes reactions of intermediates with hydroxyl radicals. The results show that development of a predictive kinetic model to evaluate process performance requires consideration of the complete reaction mechanism, including reactions of intermediates with hydroxyl radicals. PMID:27448315

  10. A model of carbon compounds in the stratosphere and mesosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Sims, J. S.; Turco, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    A photochemical model with vertical transport is employed to compute profiles of CO, CH4, CH3, CH2, CHO, CH2O, CH3O, CH3O2, and CH4O2 from 10- to 90-km altitude. The upper boundary condition is taken as diffusive equilibrium at 120 km, and the lower boundary condition as chemical equilibrium or a flux condition at 10 km. The results are in reasonable agreement with observations and with the results of other model studies.

  11. The multi-agent Parrondo’s model based on the network evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Ye; Xie, Neng-gang; Wang, Lu; Cen, Yu-wan

    2013-11-01

    A multi-agent Parrondo’s model is proposed in the paper. The model includes link A based on the rewiring mechanism (the network evolution) + game B (dependent on the spatial neighbors). Moreover, to produce the paradoxical effect and analyze the “agitating” effect of the network evolution, the dynamic processes of the network evolution + game B are studied. The simulation results and the theoretical analysis both show that the network evolution can make game B which is losing produce the winning paradoxical effect. Furthermore, we obtain the parameter space where the strong or weak Parrondo’s paradox occurs. Each size of the region of the parameter space is larger than the one in the available multi-agent Parrondo’s model of game A + game B. This result shows that the “agitating” effect of rewiring based on the network evolution is better than that of the zero-sum game between individuals.

  12. Performance Evaluation of an Intelligent Agents Based Model within Irregular WSN Topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Alberto Piedrahita; Cañola, Alcides Montoya; Carranza, Demetrio Ovalle

    There are many approaches proposed by the scientific community for the implementation and development of Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN). These approaches correspond to different areas of science, such as Electronics, Communications, Computing, Ubiquity, and Quality of Service among others. However, all are subject to the same constraints, because of the nature of WSN devices. The most common constraints of a WSN are the energy consumption, the network nodes organization, the sensor network's task reprogramming, the reliability in the data transmission, the resource optimization (memory and processing), etc. In the Artificial Intelligence Area is has proposed an Distributed System Approach with Mobile Intelligent Agents. An Integration Model of Mobile Intelligent Agents within Wireless Sensor Network solves some of the constraints presented above on WSŃs topologies. However, the model only was tested on the square topologies. In this way, the aim of this paper is to evaluate the performance of this model in irregular topologies.

  13. Supercomputer Assisted Generation of Machine Learning Agents for the Calibration of Building Energy Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyal, Jibonananda; New, Joshua Ryan; Edwards, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Building Energy Modeling (BEM) is an approach to model the energy usage in buildings for design and retrot pur- poses. EnergyPlus is the agship Department of Energy software that performs BEM for dierent types of buildings. The input to EnergyPlus can often extend in the order of a few thousand parameters which have to be calibrated manu- ally by an expert for realistic energy modeling. This makes it challenging and expensive thereby making building en- ergy modeling unfeasible for smaller projects. In this paper, we describe the \\Autotune" research which employs machine learning algorithms to generate agents for the dierent kinds of standard reference buildings in the U.S. building stock. The parametric space and the variety of building locations and types make this a challenging computational problem necessitating the use of supercomputers. Millions of En- ergyPlus simulations are run on supercomputers which are subsequently used to train machine learning algorithms to generate agents. These agents, once created, can then run in a fraction of the time thereby allowing cost-eective cali- bration of building models.

  14. Agent-based Model for the Coupled Human-Climate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvoleff, A.; Werner, B.

    2006-12-01

    Integrated assessment models have been used to predict the outcome of coupled economic growth, resource use, greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, both for scientific and policy purposes. These models generally have employed significant simplifications that suppress nonlinearities and the possibility of multiple equilibria in both their economic (DeCanio, 2005) and climate (Schneider and Kuntz-Duriseti, 2002) components. As one step toward exploring general features of the nonlinear dynamics of the coupled system, we have developed a series of variations on the well studied RICE and DICE models, which employ different forms of agent-based market dynamics and "climate surprises." Markets are introduced through the replacement of the production function of the DICE/RICE models with an agent-based market modeling the interactions of producers, policymakers, and consumer agents. Technological change and population growth are treated endogenously. Climate surprises are representations of positive (for example, ice sheet collapse) or negative (for example, increased aerosols from desertification) feedbacks that are turned on with probability depending on warming. Initial results point toward the possibility of large amplitude instabilities in the coupled human-climate system owing to the mismatch between short outlook market dynamics and long term climate responses. Implications for predictability of future climate will be discussed. Supported by the Andrew W Mellon Foundation and the UC Academic Senate.

  15. Solubility Prediction of Active Pharmaceutical Compounds with the UNIFAC Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouar, Abderrahim; Benmessaoud, Ibtissem; Koutchoukali, Ouahiba; Koutchoukali, Mohamed Salah

    2016-03-01

    The crystallization from solution of an active pharmaceutical ingredient requires the knowledge of the solubility in the entire temperature range investigated during the process. However, during the development of a new active ingredient, these data are missing. Its experimental determination is possible, but tedious. UNIFAC Group contribution method Fredenslund et al. (Vapor-liquid equilibria using UNIFAC: a group contribution method, 1977; AIChE J 21:1086, 1975) can be used to predict this physical property. Several modifications on this model have been proposed since its development in 1977, modified UNIFAC of Dortmund Weidlich et al. (Ind Eng Chem Res 26:1372, 1987), Gmehling et al. (Ind Eng Chem Res 32:178, 1993), Pharma-modified UNIFAC Diedrichs et al. (Evaluation und Erweiterung thermodynamischer Modelle zur Vorhersage von Wirkstofflöslichkeiten, PhD Thesis, 2010), KT-UNIFAC Kang et al. (Ind Eng Chem Res 41:3260, 2002), ldots In this study, we used UNIFAC model by considering the linear temperature dependence of interaction parameters as in Pharma-modified UNIFAC and structural groups as defined by KT-UNIFAC first-order model. More than 100 binary datasets were involved in the estimation of interaction parameters. These new parameters were then used to calculate activity coefficient and solubility of some molecules in various solvents at different temperatures. The model gives better results than those from the original UNIFAC and shows good agreement between the experimental solubility and the calculated one.

  16. A few bad apples: a model of disease influenced agent behaviour in a heterogeneous contact environment.

    PubMed

    Enright, Jessica; Kao, Rowland R

    2015-01-01

    For diseases that infect humans or livestock, transmission dynamics are at least partially dependent on human activity and therefore human behaviour. However, the impact of human behaviour on disease transmission is relatively understudied, especially in the context of heterogeneous contact structures such as described by a social network. Here, we use a strategic game, coupled with a simple disease model, to investigate how strategic agent choices impact the spread of disease over a contact network. Using beliefs that are based on disease status and that build up over time, agents choose actions that stochastically determine disease spread on the network. An agent's disease status is therefore a function of both his own and his neighbours actions. The effect of disease on agents is modelled by a heterogeneous payoff structure. We find that the combination of network shape and distribution of payoffs has a non-trivial impact on disease prevalence, even if the mean payoff remains the same. An important scenario occurs when a small percentage (called noncooperators) have little incentive to avoid disease. For diseases that are easily acquired when taking a risk, then even when good behavior can lead to disease eradication, a small increase in the percentage of noncooperators (less than 5%) can yield a large (up to 25%) increase in prevalence. PMID:25734661

  17. Guizhi Fuling Wan as a Novel Agent for Intravesical Treatment for Bladder Cancer in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chi-Chen; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Chia-Bin; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yen; Wu, Jiann-Der; Tseng, Ling-Huei; Hwang, Dennis W; Chen, Syue-Yi; Wu, Shu-Fen; Chan, Michael W Y; Hsu, Cheng-Da

    2016-01-01

    Alternative intravesical agents are required to overcome the side effects currently associated with the treatment of bladder cancer. This study used an orthotopic bladder cancer mouse model to evaluate Guizhi Fuling Wan (GFW) as an intravesical agent. The effects of GFW were compared with those of mitomycin-C (Mito-C) and bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG). We began by evaluating the response of the mouse bladder cancer cell line MB49 to GFW treatment, with regard to cell viability, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. MB49 cells were subsequently implanted into the urothelial walls of the bladder in female C57BL/6 mice. The success of the model was confirmed by the appearance of hematuria and tumor growth in the bladder. Intravesical chemotherapy was administered in accordance with a published protocol. In vitro data revealed that GFW arrested MB49 cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase, resulting in the suppression of cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. One possible mechanism underlying these effects is an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels leading to the activation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)/checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) and ATM/P53 pathways, thereby mediating cell cycle progression and apoptosis, respectively. This mouse model demonstrates the effectiveness of GFW in the tumor growth, with results comparable to those achieved by using BCG and Mito-C. Furthermore, GFW was shown to cause only mild hematuria. The low toxicity of the compound was confirmed by a complete lack of lesions on bladder tissue, even after 10 consecutive treatments using high concentrations of GFW. These results demonstrate the potential of GFW for the intravesical therapy of bladder cancer. PMID:26837068

  18. Computational Models of the Representation of Bangla Compound Words in the Mental Lexicon.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Tirthankar; Sinha, Manjira; Basu, Anupam

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we aim to model the organization and processing of Bangla compound words in the mental lexicon. Our objective is to determine whether the mental lexicon access a Bangla compound word as a whole or decomposes the whole word into its constituent morphemes and then recognize them accordingly. To address this issue, we adopted two different strategies. First, we conduct a cross-modal priming experiment over a number of native speakers. Analysis of reaction time (RT) and error rates indicates that in general, Bangla compound words are accessed via partial decomposition process. That is some word follows full-listing mode of representation and some words follow the decomposition route of representation. Next, based on the collected RT data we have developed a computational model that can explain the processing phenomena of the access and representation of Bangla compound words. In order to achieve this, we first explored the individual roles of head word position, morphological complexity, orthographic transparency and semantic compositionality between the constituents and the whole compound word. Accordingly, we have developed a complexity based model by combining these features together. To a large extent we have successfully explained the possible processing phenomena of most of the Bangla compound words. Our proposed model shows an accuracy of around 83 %. PMID:25998189

  19. Global emissions and models of photochemically active compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Atherton, C.S.; Graedel, T.E.

    1993-05-20

    Anthropogenic emissions from industrial activity, fossil fuel combustion, and biomass burning are now known to be large enough (relative to natural sources) to perturb the chemistry of vast regions of the troposphere. A goal of the IGAC Global Emissions Inventory Activity (GEIA) is to provide authoritative and reliable emissions inventories on a 1{degree} {times} 1{degree} grid. When combined with atmospheric photochemical models, these high quality emissions inventories may be used to predict the concentrations of major photochemical products. Comparison of model results with measurements of pertinent species allows us to understand whether there are major shortcomings in our understanding of tropospheric photochemistry, the budgets and transport of trace species, and their effects in the atmosphere. Through this activity, we are building the capability to make confident predictions of the future consequences of anthropogenic emissions. This paper compares IGAC recommended emissions inventories for reactive nitrogen and sulfur dioxide to those that have been in use previously. We also present results from the three-dimensional LLNL atmospheric chemistry model that show how emissions of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides might potentially affect tropospheric ozone and OH concentrations and how emissions of anthropogenic sulfur increase sulfate aerosol loadings.

  20. Determination of significant variables in compound wear using a statistical model

    SciTech Connect

    Pumwa, J.; Griffin, R.B.; Smith, C.M.

    1997-07-01

    This paper will report on a study of dry compound wear of normalized 1018 steel on A2 tool steel. Compound wear is a combination of sliding and impact wear. The compound wear machine consisted of an A2 tool steel wear plate that could be rotated, and an indentor head that held the 1018 carbon steel wear pins. The variables in the system were the rpm of the wear plate, the force with which the indentor strikes the wear plate, and the frequency with which the indentor strikes the wear plate. A statistically designed experiment was used to analyze the effects of the different variables on the compound wear process. The model developed showed that wear could be reasonably well predicted using a defined variable that was called the workrate. The paper will discuss the results of the modeling and the metallurgical changes that occurred at the indentor interface, with the wear plate, during the wear process.