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Sample records for agent nitrogen mustard

  1. Synthesis and alkylation activity of a nitrogen mustard agent to penetrate the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Bartzatt, Ronald L

    2004-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard agents are widely used for the clinical treatment of cancers. A nitrogen mustard (N-mustard) agent was synthesized utilizing nicotinic acid as the carrier of the alkylating substituent (-OCH2CH2N(CH2CH2Cl)2) that forms an ester group (R-C(O)-OR) on a heterocyclic ring. The N-mustard agent is a solid at room temperature and is stable for more than 6 weeks when stored at -10 degrees C. To determine the kinetics of alkylation activity a nucleophilic primary amine compound (4-chloroaniline) was placed in aqueous solution with the mustard agent at physiological pH 7.4 (pH of blood) and 37 degrees C. The alkylation reaction was found to be second-order with rate equation: rate = k2[N-mustard][Nu], where Nu = nucleophile and k2 = 0.0415 L/(mol x min). Pharmacological descriptors calculated showed values indicating a strong potential of penetrating the blood-brain barrier. The partition coefficient (Log P) of the mustard agent is 1.95 compared with 0.58 for nicotinic acid. Values of descriptors such as dipole, polar surface area, Log BB, molar refractivity, parachor, and violations of Rule of 5 were found to be 5.057 Debye, 42.44 A2, 0.662, 72.7 cm3, 607.7 cm3, and 0.0 for the N-mustard agent. Value of polar surface area for the mustard agent (42.44 A2) predicts that >90% of any amount present in the intestinal tract will be absorbed.

  2. Evaluation of protective ointments used against dermal effects of nitrogen mustard, a vesicant warfare agent.

    PubMed

    Kenar, Levent; Karayilanoğlu, Turan; Yuksel, Altan; Gunhan, Omer; Kose, Songul; Kurt, Bulent

    2005-01-01

    Mustard, a vesicant warfare agent, has cytotoxic, mutagenic, and cytostatic effects via alkylation of DNA and inhibition of DNA replication. Since symptoms appear following a latent period, it can cause some subacute and chronic effects to occur and delay in the treatment. Therefore, the main approach should be the use of protective preparation to reduce the skin toxicity. Thus, this study was conducted in guinea pigs (350-400 g) shaved in areas of 10 x 10 cm. Mechlorethamine HCl (100 mg), a nitrogen mustard derivative, in ethanol was applied by spraying on hairless regions where previously prepared pharmaceutical topical formulations were medicated before. The experimental regions of the animals were kept preserved from environmental factors. Forty-eight hours after the application of the protective ointments and mechlorethamine consecutively, skin-damaging effects were macroscopically evaluated in terms of erythema formation, ulceration, necrosis, and inflammation occurrences. Then, punch biopsy was performed from these damaged sites for histopathological evaluation. Although numerous topical formulations were prepared and tested for protection, according to microscopic examination of the pathologic sections, tissue specimen treated with the ointment containing the mixture of zinc oxide, zinc chloride, dimethylpolysiloxane in a base of petroleum jelly was determined as being the most effective protective against skin injury caused by the vesicant agent.

  3. Melatonin alleviates lung damage induced by the chemical warfare agent nitrogen mustard.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Muharrem; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Reiter, Russel J; Yaren, Hakan; Oter, Sükrü; Kurt, Bülent; Topal, Turgut

    2007-09-10

    The cytotoxic mechanism of mustards has not been fully elucidated; recently, we reported that reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide [produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)] and peroxynitrite are involved in the pathogenesis and responsible for mustard-induced toxicity. Melatonin, a potent antioxidant molecule, acts as an iNOS inhibitor and a peroxynitrite scavenger. Using the prototypic nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine/HN2) as a model and based on its known cytotoxic mechanisms, the present study was performed to test melatonin for its capability in protecting the lungs of injured male Wistar rats. Lung mustard toxicity was induced via an intratracheally injection of HN2 (0.5mg/kg) dissolved in saline (100microl). Control animals were injected the same amount of saline only. Melatonin was administered intraperitoneally with two different doses (20mg/kg or 40mg/kg) beginning 1h before HN2 application and continued every 12h for six replications. Forty-eight hours after the last melatonin injection, the animals were sacrificed and their lungs were taken for further assay, i.e., malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and iNOS activity. Additionally their urine was collected for nitrite-nitrate (NO(x)) analysis. HN2 injection caused increased iNOS activity and MDA levels in lung tissue and NO(x) values in urine; lung GPx activity was significantly depressed. Melatonin restored all of these oxidative and nitrosative stress markers in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, the results of study provide evidence that melatonin may have the ability to reduce mustard-induced toxicity in the lungs.

  4. DRDE-07 and its analogues as promising cytoprotectants to nitrogen mustard (HN-2)--an alkylating anticancer and chemical warfare agent.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj; Vijayaraghavan, R; Gautam, Anshoo

    2009-08-10

    Nitrogen mustard (HN-2), also known as mechlorethamine, is an alkylating anticancer agent as well as blister inducing chemical warfare agent. We evaluated the cytoprotective efficacy of amifostine, DRDE-07 and their analogues, and other antidotes of mustard agents against HN-2. Administration of 1 LD(50) of HN-2 (20mg/kg) percutaneously, decreased WBC count from 24h onwards. Liver glutathione (GSH) level decreased prominently and the maximum depletion was observed on 7th day post-HN-2 administration. Oxidised glutathione (GSSG) level increased significantly at 24h post-administration and subsequently showed a progressive decrease. Hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) level and percent DNA damage increased progressively following HN-2 administration. The spleen weight decreased progressively and reached a minimum on 3-4 days with subsequent increase. The antidotes were administered repeatedly for 4 and 8 days after percutaneous administration of single sublethal dose (0.5 and 0.25 LD(50)) of HN-2. Treatment with DRDE-07, DRDE-30 and DRDE-35 significantly protected the changes in spleen weight, WBC count, GSH, GSSG, MDA and DNA damage following HN-2 administration (0.5 and 0.25 LD(50)). There was no alteration in the transaminases (AST and ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, neither with HN-2 nor with antidotes. The present study shows that HN-2 is highly toxic by percutaneous route and DRDE-07, DRDE-30 and DRDE-35 can partially protect it.

  5. Nitrogen mustard hydrochloride-induced acute respiratory failure and myelosuppression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAOJUAN; ZHANG, ZHIDAN; CHEN, SONG; ZHAO, DONGMEI; ZHANG, FANGXIAO; HU, ZIWEI; XIAO, FENG; MA, XIAOCHUN

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen mustards are chemical agents that are similar to sulfur mustards, with similar toxicities. The present study describes a case of nitrogen mustard-induced acute respiratory failure and myelosuppression in a 33-year-old man. The patient, who was accidentally exposed to nitrogen mustard hydrochloride in a pharmaceutical factory, exhibited severe inhalation injury and respiratory symptoms. Laboratory tests revealed reduced white blood cell counts and lowered platelet levels during the first 6 days after the skin exposure to nitrogen mustard. Following treatment with mechanical ventilation, immunity-enhancing agents and nutritional supplements for 1 month, the patient successfully recovered and was released from hospital. PMID:26622480

  6. Nitrogen and sulphur mustard induced histopathological observations in mouse visceral organs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj; Pant, S C; Pant, J C; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2010-11-01

    Nitrogen mustards (HN) and sulphur mustard (SM) are potent alkylating blister inducing chemical warfare agents. Single 1.0 LD50 dose produced a progressive fall in body weight from second day onwards in all groups of mustard agents exposed animals. Histological examination of spleen, liver skin and kidney revealed significant histopathological lesions in nitrogen mustards and sulphur mustard. These lesions include granulovascular degeneration with perinuclear clumping of the cytoplasm of hepatocytes and renal parenchymal cells. Renal lesions were characterized by congestion and hemorrhage. The maximum toxic manifestation were noted in spleen and skin of HN-3 exposed mice while sulphur mustard reported maximum toxicity in liver and kidneys. The study suggests both nitrogen mustards and sulphur mustard to be extremely toxic by percutaneous route based on histopathological observation and can contributed to earlier reported free radical generation by these toxicants.

  7. Design and synthesis of novel hydroxyanthraquinone nitrogen mustard derivatives as potential anticancer agents via a bioisostere approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li-Ming; Ma, Feng-Yan; Jin, Hai-Shan; Zheng, Shilong; Zhong, Qiu; Wang, Guangdi

    2016-01-01

    A series of hydroxyanthraquinones having an alkylating N-mustard pharmacophore at 1′-position were synthesized via a bioisostere approach to evaluate their cytotoxicity against four tumor cell lines (MDA-MB-231, HeLa, MCF-7 and A549). These compounds displayed significant in vitro cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, reflecting the excellent selectivity for the human breast cancer. Among them, compound 5k was the most cytotoxic with IC50 value of 0.263 nM and is more potent than DXR (IC50 = 0.294 nM) in inhibiting the growth of MCF-7 cells. The excellent cytotoxicity and good selectivity of compound 5k suggest that it could be a promising lead for further design and development of anticancer agents, especially for breast cancer. PMID:26291039

  8. Wipe selection for the analysis of surface materials containing chemical warfare agent nitrogen mustard degradation products by ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Willison, Stuart A

    2012-12-28

    Degradation products arising from nitrogen mustard chemical warfare agent were deposited on common urban surfaces and determined via surface wiping, wipe extraction, and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry detection. Wipes investigated included cotton gauze, glass fiber filter, non-woven polyester fiber and filter paper, and surfaces included several porous (vinyl tile, painted drywall, wood) and mostly non-porous (laminate, galvanized steel, glass) surfaces. Wipe extracts were analyzed by ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC–MS/MS) and compared with high performance liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC–MS/MS) results. An evaluation of both techniques suggests UPLC–MS/MS provides a quick and sensitive analysis of targeted degradation products in addition to being nearly four times faster than a single HPLC run, allowing for greater throughput during a wide-spread release concerning large-scale contamination and subsequent remediation events. Based on the overall performance of all tested wipes, filter paper wipes were selected over other wipes because they did not contain interferences or native species (TEA and DEA) associated with the target analytes, resulting in high percent recoveries and low background levels during sample analysis. Other wipes, including cotton gauze, would require a pre-cleaning step due to the presence of large quantities of native species or interferences of the targeted analytes. Percent recoveries obtained from a laminate surface were 47–99% for all nitrogen mustard degradation products. The resulting detection limits achieved from wipes were 0.2 ng/cm(2) for triethanolamine (TEA), 0.03 ng/cm(2) for N-ethyldiethanolamine (EDEA), 0.1 ng/cm(2) for N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), and 0.1 ng/cm(2) for diethanolamine (DEA).

  9. Toward hypoxia-selective DNA-alkylating agents built by grafting nitrogen mustards onto the bioreductively activated, hypoxia-selective DNA-oxidizing agent 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide (tirapazamine).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kevin M; Parsons, Zachary D; Barnes, Charles L; Gates, Kent S

    2014-08-15

    Tirapazamine (3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide) is a heterocyclic di-N-oxide that undergoes enzymatic deoxygenation selectively in the oxygen-poor (hypoxic) cells found in solid tumors to generate a mono-N-oxide metabolite. This work explored the idea that the electronic changes resulting from the metabolic deoxygenation of tirapazamine analogues might be exploited to activate a DNA-alkylating species selectively in hypoxic tissue. Toward this end, tirapazamine analogues bearing nitrogen mustard units were prepared. In the case of the tirapazamine analogue 18a bearing a nitrogen mustard unit at the 6-position, it was found that removal of the 4-oxide from the parent di-N-oxide to generate the mono-N-oxide analogue 17a did indeed cause a substantial increase in reactivity of the mustard unit, as measured by hydrolysis rates and DNA-alkylation yields. Hammett sigma values were measured to quantitatively assess the magnitude of the electronic changes induced by metabolic deoxygenation of the 3-amino-1,2,4-benzotriazine 1,4-dioxide heterocycle. The results provide evidence that the 1,2,4-benzotiazine 1,4-dioxide unit can serve as an oxygen-sensing prodrug platform for the selective unmasking of bioactive agents in hypoxic cells.

  10. Mustard: a potential agent of chemical warfare and terrorism.

    PubMed

    Saladi, R N; Smith, E; Persaud, A N

    2006-01-01

    As one of the most important vesicant agents, the destructive properties of mustards on the skin, eyes and respiratory system, combined with a lack of antidote, makes them effective weapons. Such weapons are inexpensive, easily obtainable and frequently stockpiled. Sulphur mustard (mustard gas) has been used as a chemical warfare agent in at least 10 conflicts. In this article, the use of mustard as a potential agent of chemical warfare and terrorism is outlined. The dose-dependent effects of acute sulphur mustard exposure on the skin, eyes, and respiratory system are described, as well as the possible extents of injuries, the mechanisms of action and the long-term complications. Prevention and management of mustard exposure are briefly discussed. The need for awareness and preparedness in the dermatological community regarding mustard exposure is emphasized.

  11. THE EFFECT OF NITROGEN MUSTARDS ON ENZYMES AND TISSUE METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Barron, E. S. Guzman; Bartlett, Grant R.; Miller, Zelma Baker; Meyer, Joe; Seegmiller, J. E.

    1948-01-01

    Nitrogen mustards at a concentration forty times the minimum lethal dose inhibited the respiration of all tissues studied but affected anaerobic glycolysis very little. The inhibiting effect increased with time. The respiration of lymphoid tissue was extremely sensitive to nitrogen mustard, as concentrations below the LD50 definitely inhibited the respiration of rabbit lymph nodes. In tissue slices nitrogen mustards inhibited the oxidation of pyruvate and of l-amino acids and the utilization of NH3. A number of synthesis reactions were also inhibited, such as the synthesis of carbohydrate, of creatine, and of urea. When added to growing seeds, nitrogen mustards inhibited their growth. In rats given lethal doses of nitrogen mustards there were found complete inhibition of choline oxidation and strong inhibition of pyruvate oxidation by the kidney and partial inhibition of urea synthesis by the liver. Inhibition of bone marrow respiration by nitrogen mustards was prevented by the addition of choline, and of dimethylaminoethanol plus methionine The possible mechanism of nitrogen mustard intoxication is discussed. PMID:18858641

  12. A New Cross-Link for an Old Cross-Linking Drug: The Nitrogen Mustard Anticancer Agent Mechlorethamine Generates Cross-Links Derived from Abasic Sites in Addition to the Expected Drug-Bridged Cross-Links.

    PubMed

    Nejad, Maryam Imani; Johnson, Kevin M; Price, Nathan E; Gates, Kent S

    2016-12-20

    Nitrogen mustard anticancer drugs generate highly reactive aziridinium ions that alkylate DNA. Monoadducts arising from reaction with position N7 of guanine residues are the major DNA adducts generated by these agents. Interstrand cross-links in which the drug bridges position N7 of two guanine residues are formed in low yields relative to those of the monoadducts but are generally thought to be central to medicinal activity. The N7-alkylguanine residues generated by nitrogen mustards are depurinated to yield abasic (Ap) sites in duplex DNA. Here, we show that Ap sites generated by the nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine lead to interstrand cross-links of a type not previously associated with this drug. Gel electrophoretic data were consistent with early evolution of the expected drug-bridged cross-links, followed by the appearance of Ap-derived cross-links. The evidence is further consistent with a reaction pathway involving alkylation of a guanine residue in a 5'-GT sequence, followed by depurination to generate the Ap site, and cross-link formation via reaction of the Ap aldehyde residue with the opposing adenine residue at this site [Price, N. E., Johnson, K. M., Wang, J., Fekry, M. I., Wang, Y., and Gates, K. S. (2014) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 3483-3490]. The monofunctional DNA-alkylating agents 2-chloro-N,N-diethylethanamine 5, (2-chloroethyl)ethylsulfide 6, and natural product leinamycin similarly were found to induce the formation of Ap-derived cross-links in duplex DNA. This work provides the first characterization of Ap-derived cross-links at sequences in which a cytosine residue is located directly opposing the Ap site. Cross-linking processes of this type could be relevant in medicine and biology because Ap sites with directly opposing cytosine residues occur frequently in genomic DNA via spontaneous or enzymatic depurination of guanine and N7-alkylguanine residues.

  13. Mustard gas or sulfur mustard: an old chemical agent as a new terrorist threat.

    PubMed

    Wattana, Monica; Bey, Tareg

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is a member of the vesicant class of chemical warfare agents that causes blistering to the skin and mucous membranes. There is no specific antidote, and treatment consists of systematically alleviating symptoms. Historically, sulfur mustard was used extensively in inter-governmental conflicts within the trenches of Belgium and France during World War I and during the Iran-Iraq conflict. Longitudinal studies of exposed victims show that sulfur mustard causes long-term effects leading to high morbidity. Given that only a small amount of sulfur mustard is necessary to potentially cause an enormous number of casualties, disaster-planning protocol necessitates the education and training of first-line healthcare responders in the recognition, decontamination, triage, and treatment of sulfur mustard-exposed victims in a large-scale scenario.

  14. Covalent sequestration of the nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine by metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Antoine, M; Fabris, D; Fenselau, C

    1998-09-01

    The research reported here demonstrates covalent binding to the metal-binding protein metallothionein (MT) by the therapeutic nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine. The most surprising aspect of this interaction is the selectivity of the alkylating agent for specific residues of MT. A combination of MS and proteolytic and enzymatic methods was used to deduce specific locations of mechlorethamine alkylation. These experiments indicated that alkylation occurs predominantly in the carboxyl domain of MT, with one molecule of mechlorethamine covalently cross-linking two cysteine residues. Electrospray MS revealed the retention of all seven metal ions in the cross-linked MT/mechlorethamine adducts, highlighting the uniqueness of this protein. Computerized docking experiments supported the hypothesis that selective binding precedes selective alkylation, and the structure of the drug indicates the minimal structural requirements for this binding. These results support the idea that MT overexpressed in tumor cells contributes to the inactivation of anticancer drugs.

  15. A preliminary report on zinc-induced resistance to nitrogen mustard toxicity in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shackelford, M.E.; Tobey, R.A.

    1988-12-01

    Previous studies with cultured human normal fibroblasts indicated that treatment of cells with zinc before exposure to alkylating agents enhanced cell survival by seven- to nine-fold. To establish whether a similar zinc-induced protective response could be elicited in vivo, a set of preliminary experiments was carried out in which Balb/cJ mice were treated with zinc chloride (2 mg/kg body weight) or saline by intraperitoneal (ip) injection at 48, 36, 24, and 12 h before ip administration of 4 mg/kg of the alkylating agent nitrogen mustard. Of the animals that received saline before nitrogen mustard, 57% were killed compared with only 20% in the group treated with zinc before administration of the alkylating agent. These results (which almost certainly were achieved with less than optimal induction conditions) provide evidence for the existence, in vivo, of a zinc-inducible process that reduces alkylating agent lethality. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Comparison of toxicity of selected mustard agents by percutaneous and subcutaneous routes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj; Vijayaraghavan, R; Ganesan, K

    2008-12-01

    Comparative toxicity of nitrogen mustards (HN-1, HN-2 and HN-3) and sulphur mustard was carried out in mice. Based on LD50, the toxicity pattern was HN-2 < HN-1 < HN-3 < sulphur mustard by percutaneous route whereas, by subcutaneous route the toxicity pattern was sulphur mustard < HN-3 < HN-2 < HN-1. Single dose of 1 LD50 of nitrogen mustards and sulphur mustard was administered percutaneously and various oxidative stress parameters were also evaluated. The weight loss was more in HN-2 on day 3 and in sulphur mustard on day 7. There was a drastic fall of WBC count on day 3 in all groups with a recovery in nitrogen mustard groups on day 7. The RBC count and haemoglobin content showed a significant increase on day 7 in sulphur mustard group. The plasma enzymes (ALT, AST and ALP) showed an increase in all groups on day 3 and day 7. The hepatic GSH and GSSG contents were reduced and MDA content increased in all groups, with a further change in sulphur mustard on 7 day. Extensive DNA fragmentation was observed in all the nitrogen mustard groups compared to sulphur mustard group, on day 3. However, on the day 7 the DNA fragmentation was same in all groups. This study showed that the nitrogen mustards and sulphur mustard were extremely toxic by percutaneous route and caused oxidative stress. Sulphur mustard was more toxic by the percutaneous route and the effects were delayed and progressive.

  17. Myeloperoxidase deficiency attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced skin injuries

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Orlicky, David J.; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic mechanisms of skin injuries, following the acute inflammatory response induced by vesicating agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM) exposure, are poorly understood. Neutrophils which accumulate at the site of injury, abundantly express myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme protein that is implicated in oxidant-related antimicrobial and cytotoxic responses. Our previous studies have shown that exposure to SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) or NM results in an inflammatory response including increased neutrophilic infiltration and MPO activity. To further define the role of neutrophil-derived MPO in NM-induced skin injury, here we used a genetic approach and examined the effect of NM exposure (12 h and 24 h) on previously established injury endpoints in C57BL/6J wild type (WT) and B6.129X1-MPOtm1Lus/J mice (MPO KO), homozygous null for MPO gene. NM exposure caused a significant increase in skin bi-fold thickness, epidermal thickness, microvesication, DNA damage and apoptosis in WT mice compared to MPO KO mice. MPO KO mice showed relatively insignificant effect. Similarly, NM-induced increases in the expression of inflammatory and proteolytic mediators, including COX-2, iNOS and MMP-9 in WT mice, while having a significantly lower effect in MPO KO mice. Collectively, these results show that MPO, which generates microbicidal oxidants, plays an important role in NM-induced skin injuries. This suggests the development of mechanism-based treatments against NM- and SM-induced skin injuries that inhibit MPO activity and attenuate MPO-derived oxidants. PMID:24631667

  18. Mechanism by which caffeine potentiates lethality of nitrogen mustard.

    PubMed Central

    Lau, C C; Pardee, A B

    1982-01-01

    Caffeine is synergistic with many DNA-damaging agents in increasing lethality to mammalian cells. The mechanism is not well understood. Our results show that caffeine potentiates the lethality of the nitrogen mustard 2-chloro-N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-methylethanamine (HN2) by inducing damaged cells to undergo mitosis before properly repairing lesions in their DNA. Treatment with low doses of HN2 (0.5 microM for 1 hr) caused little lethality in baby hamster kidney cells (90% survival). These cells were arrested in G2 shortly after treatment with HN2 as shown by flow microfluorimetry and autoradiography. After an arrest of 6 hr, HN2-treated cells began to move into mitosis and from then on behaved like normal cells. Repair synthesis was shown to continue during the G2 arrest by using synchronized cells pulse labeled with [3H]thymidine after HN2 treatment and autoradiography. Caffeine (2mM) increased the lethality of HN2 by 5- to 10-fold. It prevented the G2 arrest. Caffeine did not prevent these HN2-treated cells from entering or completing S phase but rather allowed them to divide without finishing the repair processes and as a consequence caused nuclear fragmentation after mitosis. Caffeine-induced nuclear fragmentation and enhanced lethality were proportional, as shown with dose--response curves and time dependence. In addition, both lethality and nuclear fragmentation were abolished by low doses of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. Images PMID:6953438

  19. Mustard vesicating agent-induced toxicity in the skin tissue and silibinin as a potential countermeasure.

    PubMed

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to the vesicating agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM) causes severe skin injury with delayed blistering. Depending upon the dose and time of their exposure, edema and erythema develop into blisters, ulceration, necrosis, desquamation, and pigmentation changes, which persist weeks and even years after exposure. Research advances have generated data that have started to explain the probable mechanism of action of vesicant-induced skin toxicity; however, despite these advances, effective and targeted therapies are still deficient. This review highlights studies on two SM analogs, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) and NM, and CEES- and NM-induced skin injury mouse models that have substantially added to the knowledge on the complex pathways involved in mustard vesicating agent-induced skin injury. Furthermore, employing these mouse models, studies under the National Institutes of Health Countermeasures Against Chemical Threats program have identified the flavanone silibinin as a novel therapeutic intervention with the potential to be developed as an effective countermeasure against skin injury following exposure to mustard vesicating agents.

  20. Sensitivity of mitomycin C and nitrogen mustard crosslinks to extreme alkaline conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenert, D.C.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1984-09-17

    DNA-DNA crosslinks in cells treated with mitomycin C, nitrogen mustard, or decarbamoyl mitomycin C were measured in alkaline isopycnic gradients as a function of pH. Crosslinks from cells treated with mitomycin C and nitrogen mustard, which react with DNA purines, could be detected at pH 12.5 but not at pH 14. No crosslinks from cells treated with decarbamoyl mitomycin C were detected at either pH. Previous studies with cells exposed to psoralen derivatives plus 360 nm light, which produce DNA-DNA crosslinks with pyrimidines, demonstrated stable crosslinks at pH 14. These studies indicate that DNA-DNA crosslinks involving DNA purines are much less stable at high pH than those involving pyrimidines, and that methods involving exposure to extreme alkaline conditions may give inaccurate information for some agents. 25 references, 1 figure.

  1. Aromatic nitrogen mustard-based prodrugs: activity, selectivity, and the mechanism of DNA cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenbing; Han, Yanyan; Peng, Xiaohua

    2014-06-10

    Three novel H2O2-activated aromatic nitrogen mustard prodrugs (6-8) are reported. These compounds contain a DNA alkylating agent connected to a H2O2-responsive trigger by different electron-withdrawing linkers so that they are inactive towards DNA but can be triggered by H2O2 to release active species. The activity and selectivity of these compounds towards DNA were investigated by measuring DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) formation in the presence or absence of H2O2. An electron-withdrawing linker unit, such as a quaternary ammonia salt (6), a carboxyamide (7), and a carbonate group (8), is sufficient to deactivate the aromatic nitrogen mustard resulting in less than 1.5 % cross-linking formation. However, H2O2 can restore the activity of the effectors by converting a withdrawing group to a donating group, therefore increasing the cross-linking efficiency (>20 %). The stability and reaction sites of the ICL products were determined, which revealed that alkylation induced by 7 and 8 not only occurred at the purine sites but also at the pyrimidine site. For the first time, we isolated and characterized the monomer adducts formed between the canonical nucleosides and the aromatic nitrogen mustard (15) which supported that nitrogen mustards reacted with dG, dA, and dC. The activation mechanism was studied by NMR spectroscopic analysis. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that compound 7 with a carboxyamide linker dramatically inhibited the growth of various cancer cells with a GI50 of less than 1 μM, whereas compound 6 with a charged linker did not show any obvious toxicity in all cell lines tested. These data indicated that a neutral carboxyamide linker is preferable for developing nitrogen mustard prodrugs. Our results showed that 7 is a potent anticancer prodrug that can serve as a model compound for further development. We believe these novel aromatic nitrogen mustards will inspire further and effective applications.

  2. Application of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to on-line solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the analysis of degradation products of V-class nerve agents and nitrogen mustard.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Avik; Kumar, Ajeet; Purohit, Ajay K; Dubey, Devendra K

    2010-04-23

    The detection and identification of the degradation products of nitrogen mustard and nerve agent VX by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to on-line solid-phase extraction-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HPLC-UV-SPE-NMR) were demonstrated. The analytes selected for the study were N,N-dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE), N,N-diethylaminoethanol (DEAE), N,N-diisopropylaminoethanol (DIAE) and triethanolamine (TEA). Offline solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by derivatization was applied to eliminate the interferents and make the analytes amenable for UV detection. Thereafter, chromatographically separated derivatives were trapped on on-line SPE cartridges. They were subsequently eluted and 1H NMR and COSY spectra were obtained. The overall detection limits of the LC-UV-SPE-NMR method for the mentioned analytes were found to be 18, 23, 25, and 32 mg/L respectively. Applicability of the method to real samples was demonstrated by the analysis of samples provided during the 22nd OPCW official proficiency test. The method gave reproducible NMR spectra devoid of intense background signals.

  3. Comparative toxic effect of nitrogen mustards (HN-1, HN-2, and HN-3) and sulfur mustard on hematological and biochemical variables and their protection by DRDE-07 and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj; Vijayaraghavan, R; Agrawal, Om Prakash

    2010-07-01

    The chemical warfare agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustards (HN-1, HN-2, and HN-3) are highly reactive vesicants. The study was planned to investigate the protective efficacy of amifostine, DRDE-07 and their analogues, and few conventional antidotes (30 minutes pretreatment) against dermally applied SM and nitrogen mustards in preventing hematological and biochemical changes in mice. Mustard agents (1.0 median lethal dose [LD(50)]) induced a significant decrease in the body weight and spleen weight. A significant decrease in the white blood cell (WBC) count and an increase in serum transaminases and alkaline phosphatases (ALPs) were observed. A significant decrease in reduced (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and an increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were also observed. All the mustard agents increased DNA fragmentation. The effects of SM were significantly ameliorated by DRDE-07 analogues, and with nitrogen mustards the protection was partial. Overall, DRDE-30 (propyl analogue) followed by DRDE-35 (butyl analogue) are favored as safer and better compounds.

  4. Eruptive cherry angiomas associated with vitiligo: provoked by topical nitrogen mustard?

    PubMed

    Ma, Hui-Jun; Zhao, Guang; Shi, Fei; Wang, Yi-Xia

    2006-12-01

    We report a 27-year-old man who had suffered with vitiligo for 7 years and with eruptive cherry angiomas within or around the repigmented vitiliginous skin for 2 years. After continual therapy for vitiligo with topical nitrogen mustard in a concentration of 0.001% for 5 years, multiple cherry angiomas erupted within or around the repigmented vitiliginous plaques. The discontinue therapy with nitrogen mustard stopped the appearance of new cherry angiomas. The presence of eruptive cherry angiomas was evident and was confirmed by histopathology. We suggest that the chronic chemical stimuli caused by topical nitrogen mustard might result in the formation of eruptive cherry angiomas.

  5. A Literature Review on the Mechanism of Action of Sulphur and Nitrogen Mustard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    skin, Papirmeister et al (1984 a;b) used human skin gmaf onto congenitally athymic nude mice. Papirmeister at al (1984a) exposed the grafts to both...resistance to chlomethylnitroeoizreas, nitrogen mustard and cis-Diam minedichloroplatinumafl) in human glial-derived ceil lines. Cancer Research 47...N,N-Dimethylamiloride. Cancer Research, 48, 2454-2457. 28. Doppler, W., Hof mann, J., Oberhuber, Maly, K. and Grunicke, H. (1985). Nitrogen Mustard

  6. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Anil K.; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J.; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2 mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. - Highlights: • Silibinin treatment attenuated nitrogen mustard (NM)-induced skin injury. • Silibinin affects pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation and vesication. • The efficacy of silibinin could also be associated with oxidative stress. • These results support testing and optimization of

  7. NIST-Traceable NMR Method to Determine Quantitative Weight Percentage Purity of Nitrogen Mustard HN-1 Feedstock Samples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    ECBC-TR-1251 NIST-TRACEABLE NMR METHOD TO DETERMINE QUANTITATIVE WEIGHT PERCENTAGE PURITY OF NITROGEN MUSTARD HN-1 FEEDSTOCK SAMPLES David J...Determine Quantitative Weight Percentage Purity of Nitrogen Mustard HN-1 Feedstock Samples 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911SR-10-D-0004 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...using NMR with proton detection is described to determine the weight percent purity of feedstock samples of nitrogen mustard , HN-1. 15. SUBJECT

  8. A choline oxidase amperometric bioassay for the detection of mustard agents based on screen-printed electrodes modified with Prussian Blue nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Arduini, Fabiana; Scognamiglio, Viviana; Covaia, Corrado; Amine, Aziz; Moscone, Danila; Palleschi, Giuseppe

    2015-02-13

    In this work a novel bioassay for mustard agent detection was proposed. The bioassay is based on the capability of these compounds to inhibit the enzyme choline oxidase. The enzymatic activity, which is correlated to the mustard agents, was electrochemically monitored measuring the enzymatic product, hydrogen peroxide, by means of a screen-printed electrode modified with Prussian Blue nanoparticles. Prussian Blue nanoparticles are able to electrocatalyse the hydrogen peroxide concentration reduction at low applied potential (-50 mV vs. Ag/AgCl), thus allowing the detection of the mustard agents with no electrochemical interferences. The suitability of this novel bioassay was tested with the nitrogen mustard simulant bis(2-chloroethyl)amine and the sulfur mustard simulants 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide. The bioassay proposed in this work allowed the detection of mustard agent simulants with good sensitivity and fast response, which are excellent premises for the development of a miniaturised sensor well suited for an alarm system in case of terrorist attacks.

  9. Functional and inflammatory alterations in the lung following exposure of rats to nitrogen mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel, Kinal J.; Shen, Jianliang; Reimer, David; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard is a vesicant that causes damage to the respiratory tract. In these studies, we characterized the acute effects of nitrogen mustard on lung structure, inflammatory mediator expression, and pulmonary function, with the goal of identifying mediators potentially involved in toxicity. Treatment of rats (male Wistar, 200-225 g) with nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine hydrochloride, i.t., 0.25 mg/kg) resulted in marked histological changes in the respiratory tract, including necrotizing bronchiolitis, thickening of alveolar septa, and inflammation which was evident within 24 h. This was associated with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, confirming injury to alveolar epithelial regions of the lung. Nitrogen mustard administration also resulted in increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, pro-inflammatory proteins implicated in lung injury, in alveolar macrophages and alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Expression of connective tissue growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9, mediators regulating extracellular matrix turnover was also increased, suggesting that pathways leading to chronic lung disease are initiated early in the pathogenic process. Following nitrogen mustard exposure, alterations in lung mechanics and function were also observed. These included decreases in baseline static compliance, end-tidal volume and airway resistance, and a pronounced loss of methacholine responsiveness in resistance, tissue damping and elastance. Taken together, these data demonstrate that nitrogen mustard induces rapid structural and inflammatory changes in the lung which are associated with altered lung functioning. Understanding the nature of the injury induced by nitrogen mustard and related analogs may aid in the development of efficacious therapies for treatment of pulmonary injury resulting from exposure to vesicants.

  10. Surface decontamination for blister agents Lewisite, sulfur mustard and agent yellow, a Lewisite and sulfur mustard mixture.

    PubMed

    Stone, Harry; See, David; Smiley, Autumn; Ellingson, Anthony; Schimmoeller, Jessica; Oudejans, Lukas

    2016-08-15

    Sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L) are blister agents that have a high potential for terrorist use; Agent Yellow (HL) is the eutectic mixture of HD and L. Bench-scale testing was used to determine the residual amount of these chemical warfare agents remaining on three building materials (wood, metal and glass) after application of various decontaminants (household bleach, full strength and dilute; hydrogen peroxide 3% solution; and EasyDECON(®) DF200). All decontaminants reduced the amount of L recovered from coupons. Application of dilute bleach showed little or no difference compared to natural attenuation in the amount of HD recovered from coupons. Full-strength bleach was the most effective of four decontaminants at reducing the amount of HD from coupons. Hydrogen peroxide (3% solution) and DF200 did decrease the amount of HD recovered from coupons more than natural attenuation (except DF200 against HD on metal), but substantial amounts of HD remained on some materials. Toxic HD by-products were generated by hydrogen peroxide treatment. The effectiveness of decontaminants was found to depend on agent, material, and decontaminant. Increased decontaminant reaction time (60min rather than 30min) did not significantly increase effectiveness.

  11. DNA-directed alkylating agents. 1. Structure-activity relationships for acridine-linked aniline mustards: consequences of varying the reactivity of the mustard.

    PubMed

    Gourdie, T A; Valu, K K; Gravatt, G L; Boritzki, T J; Baguley, B C; Wakelin, L P; Wilson, W R; Woodgate, P D; Denny, W A

    1990-04-01

    A series of DNA-targeted aniline mustards have been prepared, and their chemical reactivity and in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity have been evaluated and compared with that of the corresponding simple aniline mustards. The alkylating groups were anchored to the DNA-intercalating 9-aminoacridine chromophore by an alkyl chain of fixed length attached at the mustard 4-position through a link group X, while the corresponding simple mustards possessed an electronically identical small group at this position. The link group was varied to provide a series of compounds of similar geometry but widely differing mustard reactivity. Variation in biological activity should then largely be a consequence of this varying reactivity. Rates of mustard hydrolysis in the two series related only to the electronic properties of the link group, with attachment of the intercalating chromophore having no effect. The cytotoxicities of the simple mustards correlated well with group electronic properties (with a 200-300-fold range in IC50S). The corresponding DNA-targeted mustards were much more potent (up to 100-fold), but their IC50 values varied much less with linker group electronic properties. Most of the DNA-targeted mustards showed in vivo antitumor activity, being both more active and more dose-potent than either the corresponding untargeted mustards and chlorambucil. These results show that targeting alkylating agents to DNA by attachment to DNA-affinic units may be a useful strategy.

  12. DNA-directed alkylating agents. 6. Synthesis and antitumor activity of DNA minor groove-targeted aniline mustard analogues of pibenzimol (Hoechst 33258)

    PubMed

    Gravatt, G L; Baguley, B C; Wilson, W R; Denny, W A

    1994-12-09

    A series of nitrogen mustard analogues of the DNA minor groove binding fluorophore pibenzimol (Hoechst 33258) have been synthesized and evaluated for antitumor activity. Conventional construction of the bisbenzimidazole ring system from the piperazinyl terminus, via two consecutive Pinner-type reactions, gave low yields of products contaminated with the 2-methyl analogue which proved difficult to separate. An alternative synthesis was developed, involving construction of the bisbenzimidazole from the mustard terminus, via Cu(2+)-promoted oxidative coupling of the mustard aldehydes with 3,4-diaminobenzonitrile to form the monobenzimidazoles, followed by a Pinner-type reaction and condensation with 4-(1-methyl-4-piperazinyl)-o-phenylenediamine. This process gives higher yields and pure products. The mustard analogues showed high hypersensitivity factors (IC50AA8/IC50 UV4), typical of DNA alkylating agents. There was a large increase in cytotoxicity (85-fold) across the homologous series which cannot be explained entirely by changes in mustard reactivity and may be related to altering orientation of the mustard with respect to the DNA resulting in different patterns of alkylation. Pibenzimol itself (which has been evaluated clinically as an anticancer drug) was inactive against P388 in vivo using a single-dose protocol, but the short-chain mustard homologues were highly effective, eliciting a proportion of long-term survivors.

  13. DNA-directed alkylating agents. 4. 4-anilinoquinoline-based minor groove directed aniline mustards.

    PubMed

    Gravatt, G L; Baguley, B C; Wilson, W R; Denny, W A

    1991-05-01

    A series of 4-anilinoquinoline-linked aniline mustards of widely varying mustard reactivity were prepared and evaluated for their antitumor activity. The compounds were designed as minor grove binding agents, where the aniline mustard ring is itself part of the DNA-binding ligand. While there was a general trend for cytotoxicity to correlate with mustard reactivity, this was much less pronounced than with untargeted mustards. The compounds were much more cytotoxic than the parent diols, and were also at least 10-fold more cytotoxic than the corresponding aniline mustards themselves. Comparative cell line studies suggested that the mechanism of cytotoxicity varied with mustard reactivity. The most reactive mustards cross-linked DNA, while cell killing by the less reactive compounds appeared to be by the formation of bulky monoadducts. The compounds were active but not particularly dose-potent against P388 leukemia in vivo. The modest potency may be related to their poor aqueous solubility, since the more soluble methyl quaternary salts were equally active at much lower doses.

  14. Effect of ionic strength and cationic DNA affinity binders on the DNA sequence selective alkylation of guanine N7-positions by nitrogen mustards

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.A.; Forrow, S.M.; Souhami, R.L. )

    1990-03-27

    Large variations in alkylation intensities exist among guanines in a DNA sequence following treatment with chemotherapeutic alkylating agents such as nitrogen mustards, and the substituent attached to the reactive group can impose a distinct sequence preference for reaction. In order to understand further the structural and electrostatic factors which determine the sequence selectivity of alkylation reactions, the effect of increase ionic strength, the intercalator ethidium bromide, AT-specific minor groove binders distamycin A and netropsin, and the polyamine spermine on guanine N7-alkylation by L-phenylalanine mustard (L-Pam), uracil mustard (UM), and quinacrine mustard (QM) was investigated with a modification of the guanine-specific chemical cleavage technique for DNA sequencing. The result differed with both the nitrogen mustard and the cationic agent used. The effect, which resulted in both enhancement and suppression of alkylation sites, was most striking in the case of netropsin and distamycin A, which differed from each other. DNA footprinting indicated that selective binding to AT sequences in the minor groove of DNA can have long-range effects on the alkylation pattern of DNA in the major groove.

  15. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-05-15

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51%reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants.

  16. Flavanone silibinin treatment attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced toxic effects in mouse skin

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Kumar, Dileep; Orlicky, David J; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no effective antidote to prevent skin injuries by sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM), which are vesicating agents with potential relevance to chemical warfare, terrorist attacks, or industrial/laboratory accidents. Our earlier report has demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of silibinin, a natural flavanone, in reversing monofunctional alkylating SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide-induced toxic effects in mouse skin. To translate this effect to a bifunctional alkylating vesicant, herein, efficacy studies were carried out with NM. Topical application of silibinin (1 or 2 mg) 30 min after NM exposure on the dorsal skin of male SKH-1 hairless mice significantly decreased NM-induced toxic lesions at 24, 72 or 120 h post-exposure. Specifically, silibinin treatment resulted in dose-dependent reduction of NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, dead and denuded epidermis, parakeratosis and microvesication. Higher silibinin dose also caused a 79% and 51% reversal in NM-induced increases in myeloperoxidase activity and COX-2 levels, respectively. Furthermore, silibinin completely prevented NM-induced H2A.X phosphorylation, indicating reversal of DNA damage which could be an oxidative DNA damage as evidenced by high levels of 8-oxodG in NM-exposed mouse skin that was significantly reversed by silibinin. Together, these findings suggest that attenuation of NM-induced skin injury by silibinin is due to its effects on the pathways associated with DNA damage, inflammation, vesication and oxidative stress. In conclusion, results presented here support the optimization of silibinin as an effective treatment of skin injury by vesicants. PMID:25791923

  17. [Fate and balance of bulk blending controlled release fertilizer nitrogen under continuous cropping of mustard].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pan-Pan; Fan, Xiao-Lin

    2012-10-01

    Under the conditions of applying water soluble fertilizer and its bulk blending with controlled release fertilizer (BB-CRF), and by using micro-lysimeter, this paper quantitatively studied the nitrogen (N) uptake by mustard, the soil N losses from N2O emission, leaching and others, and the N residual in soil in three rotations of continuously cropped mustard. In the treatment of BB-CRF with 25% of controlled release nitrogen, the N uptake by mustard increased with rotations, and the yield by the end of the experiment was significantly higher than that in the treatment of water soluble fertilizer. The cumulated N2O emission loss and the N leaching loss were obviously higher in treatment water soluble fertilizer than in treatment BB-CRF. NO3(-)-N was the primary form of N in the leachate. In relative to water soluble fertilizer, BB-CRF altered the fates of fertilizer nitrogen, i.e., the N uptake by mustard and the N residual in soil increased by 75.4% and 76.0%, and the N leaching loss and other apparent N losses decreased by 27.1% and 66.3%, respectively. The application of BB-CRF could be an effective way to reduce the various losses of fertilizer N while increase the fertilizer N use efficiency, and the controlled release fertilizer is the environmentally friendly fertilizer with the property of high N use efficiency.

  18. Sulfur and nitrogen mustards induce characteristic poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation responses in HaCaT keratinocytes with distinctive cellular consequences.

    PubMed

    Mangerich, Aswin; Debiak, Malgorzata; Birtel, Matthias; Ponath, Viviane; Balszuweit, Frank; Lex, Kirsten; Martello, Rita; Burckhardt-Boer, Waltraud; Strobelt, Romano; Siegert, Markus; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Bürkle, Alexander

    2016-02-26

    Mustard agents are potent DNA alkylating agents with mutagenic, cytotoxic and vesicant properties. They include bi-functional agents, such as sulfur mustard (SM) or nitrogen mustard (mustine, HN2), as well as mono-functional agents, such as "half mustard" (CEES). Whereas SM has been used as a chemical warfare agent, several nitrogen mustard derivatives, such as chlorambucil and cyclophosphamide, are being used as established chemotherapeutics. Upon induction of specific forms of genotoxic stimuli, several poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize the nucleic acid-like biopolymer poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) by using NAD(+) as a substrate. Previously, it was shown that SM triggers cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl) ation (PARylation), but so far this phenomenon is poorly characterized. In view of the protective effects of PARP inhibitors, the latter have been proposed as a treatment option of SM-exposed victims. In an accompanying article (Debiak et al., 2016), we have provided an optimized protocol for the analysis of the CEES-induced PARylation response in HaCaT keratinocytes, which forms an experimental basis to further analyze mustard-induced PARylation and its functional consequences, in general. Thus, in the present study, we performed a comprehensive characterization of the PARylation response in HaCaT cells after treatment with four different mustard agents, i.e., SM, CEES, HN2, and chlorambucil, on a qualitative, quantitative and functional level. In particular, we recorded substance-specific as well as dose- and time-dependent PARylation responses using independent bioanalytical methods based on single-cell immuno-fluorescence microscopy and quantitative isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Furthermore, we analyzed if and how PARylation contributes to mustard-induced toxicity by treating HaCaT cells with CEES, SM, and HN2 in combination with the clinically relevant PARP inhibitor ABT888. As evaluated by a novel immunofluorescence-based protocol for the detection of

  19. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Subchronic Toxicity of Sulfur Mustard (HD) In Rats Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sasser, L. B.; Miller, R. A.; Kalkwarf, D, R.; Buschbom, R. L.; Cushing, J. A.

    1989-06-30

    Occupational health standards have not been established for sulfur mustard [bis(2- chlorethyl)-sulfide], a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic properties. Seventytwo Sprague-Dawley rats of each sex, 6-7 weeks old, were divided into six groups (12/group/ sex) and gavaged with either 0, 0.003 , 0.01 , 0.03 , 0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg of sulfur mustard in sesame oil 5 days/week for 13 weeks. No dose-related mortality was observed. A significant decrease (P ( 0.05) in body weight was observed in both sexes of rats only in the 0.3 mg/kg group. Hematological evaluations and clinical chemistry measurements found no consistent treatment-related effects at the doses studied. The only treatment-related lesion associated with gavage exposure upon histopathologic evaluation was epithelial hyperplasia of the forestomach of both sexes at 0.3 mg/kg and males at 0.1 mg/kg. The hyperplastic change was minimal and characterized by cellular disorganization of the basilar layer, an apparent increase in mitotic activity of the basilar epithelial cells, and thickening of the epithelial layer due to the apparent increase in cellularity. The estimated NOEL for HD in this 90-day study is 0.1 mg/kg/day when administered orally.

  20. Evidence of VX nerve agent use from contaminated white mustard plants.

    PubMed

    Gravett, Matthew R; Hopkins, Farrha B; Self, Adam J; Webb, Andrew J; Timperley, Christopher M; Baker, Matthew J

    2014-08-08

    The Chemical Weapons Convention prohibits the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons by Member States. Verification of compliance and investigations into allegations of use require accurate detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and their degradation products. Detection of CWAs such as organophosphorus nerve agents in the environment relies mainly upon the analysis of soil. We now present a method for the detection of the nerve agent VX and its hydrolysis products by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry of ethanol extracts of contaminated white mustard plants (Sinapis alba) which retained the compounds of interest for up to 45 days. VX is hydrolysed by the plants to ethyl methylphosphonic acid and then to methylphosphonic acid. The utility of white mustard as a nerve agent detector and remediator of nerve agent-polluted sites is discussed. The work described will help deter the employment of VX in conflict.

  1. Evidence of VX nerve agent use from contaminated white mustard plants

    PubMed Central

    Gravett, Matthew R.; Hopkins, Farrha B.; Self, Adam J.; Webb, Andrew J.; Timperley, Christopher M.; Baker, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    The Chemical Weapons Convention prohibits the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons by Member States. Verification of compliance and investigations into allegations of use require accurate detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and their degradation products. Detection of CWAs such as organophosphorus nerve agents in the environment relies mainly upon the analysis of soil. We now present a method for the detection of the nerve agent VX and its hydrolysis products by gas chromatography and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry of ethanol extracts of contaminated white mustard plants (Sinapis alba) which retained the compounds of interest for up to 45 days. VX is hydrolysed by the plants to ethyl methylphosphonic acid and then to methylphosphonic acid. The utility of white mustard as a nerve agent detector and remediator of nerve agent-polluted sites is discussed. The work described will help deter the employment of VX in conflict. PMID:25104906

  2. Determination of nitrogen mustard hydrolysis products in rat urine samples using GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Kenar, Levent; Alp, Orkun

    2011-05-01

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method was developed, validated and demonstrated by measuring the levels of nitrogen mustard hydrolysis products in the urine collected from dosed rats. The recovery values for trimethylsilyl derivatives of EDEA and MDEA are between 82-95% and 88-112%, respectively. In vivo studies performed by using three different doses (0.5 mg/kg, 1.0 mg/kg, and 2.0 mg/kg) of HN2 base of nitrogen mustard. MDEA concentrations were between 43.1-232.2 ng/mL. The limit of detection (S/N = 3) values are 2.5 ng/mL and 1.6 ng/mL for EDEA and MDEA, respectively, and the precision of the method in terms of RSD is between 5-8%.

  3. Teratology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Effects of Sulfur Mustard in Rats and Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P. L.; Rommereim, R. L.; Burton, F. G.; Buschbom, R. L.; Sasser, L . B.

    1987-09-30

    Sulfur mustard (HD) was administered to rats and rabbits by intragastric intubation. Rats were dosed daily from 6 through 15 days of gestation (dg) with 0. 0.5, 1.0 or 2.0 mg of HD/kg; rabbits were dosed with 0, 0.4, 0.6 or 0.8 mg/kg on 6 through 19 dg. Maternal animals were weighed periodically and, at necropsy, were examined for gross lesions of major organs and reproductive performance; live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, internal and skeletal defects. In rats, reductions in body weights were observed in maternal animals and their female fetuses at the lowest administered dose (0.5 mg/kg), but the incidence of fetal malformations was not increased. In rabbits the highest administered dose (0.8 mg/kg) induced maternal mortality and depressed body weight measures but did not affect fetal development. These results suggest that orally administered HD is not teratogenic in rats and rabbits since fetal effects were observed only at dose levels that induced frank maternal toxicity. Estimations of dose ranges for "no observable effects levels" in rats and rabbits, respectively, were: < 0.5 and < 0.4 mg/kg in maternal animals and < 0.5 and > 0.8 mg/kg in their fetuses.

  4. Development of a liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring procedure for concurrent verification of exposure to different forms of mustard agents.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Thong-Hiang; Ho, Mer-Lin; Loke, Weng-Keong

    2008-01-01

    A novel liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring (LC-MRM) procedure has been developed for retrospective diagnosis of exposure to different forms of mustard agents. This concise method is able to validate prior exposure to nitrogen mustards (HN-1, HN-2, and HN-3) or sulfur mustard (HD) in a single run, which significantly reduces analysis time compared to separate runs to screen for different mustards' biomarkers based on tandem mass spectrometry. Belonging to one of the more toxic classes of chemical warfare agents, these potent vesicants bind covalently to the cysteine-34 residue of human serum albumin. This results in the formation of stable adducts whose identities were confirmed by a de novo sequencing bioinformatics software package. Our developed technique tracks these albumin-derived adduct biomarkers in blood samples which persist in vitro following exposure, enabling a detection limit of 200 nM of HN-1, 100 nM of HN-2, 200 nM of HN-3, or 50 nM of HD in human blood. The CWA-adducts formed in blood samples can be conveniently and sensitively analyzed by this MRM technique to allow rapid and reliable screening.

  5. Attenuation of Nitrogen Mustard-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Fibrosis by Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antibody.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Verissimo, Vivianne L; Cervelli, Jessica A; Vayas, Kinal N; Hall, LeRoy; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes acute injury to the lung that progresses to fibrosis. This is accompanied by a prominent infiltration of macrophages into the lung and upregulation of proinflammatory/profibrotic cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α. In these studies, we analyzed the ability of anti-TNFα antibody to mitigate NM-induced lung injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. Treatment of rats with anti-TNFα antibody (15 mg/kg, iv, every 9 days) beginning 30 min after intratracheal administration of NM (0.125 mg/kg) reduced progressive histopathologic alterations in the lung including perivascular and peribronchial edema, macrophage/monocyte infiltration, interstitial thickening, bronchiolization of alveolar walls, fibrin deposition, emphysema, and fibrosis. NM-induced damage to the alveolar-epithelial barrier, measured by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and cell content, was also reduced by anti-TNFα antibody, along with expression of the oxidative stress marker, heme oxygenase-1. Whereas the accumulation of proinflammatory/cytotoxic M1 macrophages in the lung in response to NM was suppressed by anti-TNFα antibody, anti-inflammatory/profibrotic M2 macrophages were increased or unchanged. Treatment of rats with anti-TNFα antibody also reduced NM-induced increases in expression of the profibrotic mediator, transforming growth factor-β. This was associated with a reduction in NM-induced collagen deposition in the lung. These data suggest that inhibiting TNFα may represent an efficacious approach to mitigating lung injury induced by mustards.

  6. Characterization of Distinct Macrophage Subpopulations during Nitrogen Mustard-Induced Lung Injury and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Venosa, Alessandro; Malaviya, Rama; Choi, Hyejeong; Gow, Andrew J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is an alkylating agent known to cause extensive pulmonary injury progressing to fibrosis. This is accompanied by a persistent macrophage inflammatory response. In these studies, we characterized the phenotype of macrophages accumulating in the lung over time following NM exposure. Treatment of rats with NM (0.125 mg/kg, intratracheally) resulted in an increase in CD11b(+) macrophages in histologic sections. These cells consisted of inducible nitric oxide synthase(+) (iNOS) proinflammatory M1 macrophages, and CD68(+), CD163(+), CD206(+), YM-1(+), and arginase-II(+)antiinflammatory M2 macrophages. Although M1 macrophages were prominent 1-3 days after NM, M2 macrophages were most notable at 28 days. At this time, they were enlarged and vacuolated, consistent with a profibrotic phenotype. Flow cytometric analysis of isolated lung macrophages identified three phenotypically distinct subpopulations: mature CD11b(-), CD43(-), and CD68(+) resident macrophages, which decreased in numbers after NM; and two infiltrating (CD11b(+)) macrophage subsets: immature CD43(+) M1 macrophages and mature CD43(-) M2 macrophages, which increased sequentially. Time-related increases in M1 (iNOS, IL-12α, COX-2, TNF-α, matrix metalloproteinase-9, matrix metalloproteinase-10) and M2 (IL-10, pentraxin-2, connective tissue growth factor, ApoE) genes, as well as chemokines/chemokine receptors associated with trafficking of M1 (CCR2, CCR5, CCL2, CCL5) and M2 (CX3CR1, fractalkine) macrophages to sites of injury, were also noted in macrophages isolated from the lung after NM. The appearance of M1 and M2 macrophages in the lung correlated with NM-induced acute injury and the development of fibrosis, suggesting a potential role of these macrophage subpopulations in the pathogenic response to NM.

  7. Pentoxifylline attenuates nitrogen mustard-induced acute lung injury, oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sunil, Vasanthi R; Vayas, Kinal N; Cervelli, Jessica A; Malaviya, Rama; Hall, LeRoy; Massa, Christopher B; Gow, Andrew J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic alkylating agent that causes damage to the respiratory tract. Evidence suggests that macrophages and inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α contribute to pulmonary injury. Pentoxifylline is a TNFα inhibitor known to suppress inflammation. In these studies, we analyzed the ability of pentoxifylline to mitigate NM-induced lung injury and inflammation. Exposure of male Wistar rats (150-174 g; 8-10 weeks) to NM (0.125 mg/kg, i.t.) resulted in severe histopathological changes in the lung within 3d of exposure, along with increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell number and protein, indicating inflammation and alveolar-epithelial barrier dysfunction. This was associated with increases in oxidative stress proteins including lipocalin (Lcn)2 and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in the lung, along with pro-inflammatory/cytotoxic (COX-2(+) and MMP-9(+)), and anti-inflammatory/wound repair (CD163+ and Gal-3(+)) macrophages. Treatment of rats with pentoxifylline (46.7 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 3d beginning 15 min after NM significantly reduced NM-induced lung injury, inflammation, and oxidative stress, as measured histologically and by decreases in BAL cell and protein content, and levels of HO-1 and Lcn2. Macrophages expressing COX-2 and MMP-9 also decreased after pentoxifylline, while CD163+ and Gal-3(+) macrophages increased. This was correlated with persistent upregulation of markers of wound repair including pro-surfactant protein-C and proliferating nuclear cell antigen by Type II cells. NM-induced lung injury and inflammation were associated with alterations in the elastic properties of the lung, however these were largely unaltered by pentoxifylline. These data suggest that pentoxifylline may be useful in treating acute lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress induced by vesicants.

  8. Protection and potentiation of nitrogen mustard cytotoxicity by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Valeriote, F.; Tolen, S.

    1982-11-01

    The radioprotective agent WR-2721 was examined for its effects on modifying the cytotoxicity of HN2 against normal and tumor cells in the AKR mouse. Quantitation was carried out by the spleen colony assay for both normal hematopoietic stem cells and AKR leukemia cells. Protection from drug toxicity and normal cell cytotoxicity was noted. Potentiation of cytotoxicity to AKR leukemia was found.

  9. Protective and Therapeutic Agents for War Gases: Therapeutic Agents for Mustard and Nitrogen Mustards 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1946-01-10

    amount of product), made strongly alkaline with concentrated ammonia while cooling In ice, and filtered. The crude free base thus obtained was...SK Step III. Isolation of Crude ^-Amlno-3-mercaptobenzolc Acid (NDR-602^ (N.B. S2Q1-12S^ A caustic hydrolysate containing O.652 mole of...porcelain evaporating dish and dried under vacuum over P20c for two to three days. The crude faintly greenish solid contained large amounts of

  10. Nrf2 Regulates the Sensitivity of Mouse Keratinocytes to Nitrogen Mustard via Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 1 (Mrp1)

    PubMed Central

    Udasin, Ronald G.; Wen, Xia; Bircsak, Kristin M.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Shakarjian, Michael P.; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Sulfur mustard and nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine, HN2) are potent vesicants developed as chemical warfare agents. These electrophilic, bifunctional alkylating agents cause skin injury, including inflammation, edema, and blistering. HN2 covalently modifies macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, and proteins or is scavenged by glutathione, forming adducts that can contribute to toxicity. Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (Mrp1/MRP1) is a transmembrane ATPase known to efflux glutathione-conjugated electrophiles. In the present studies, we examined the effects of modulating Mrp1-mediated transport activity on the sensitivity of primary and PAM212 mouse keratinocytes to HN2. Primary keratinocytes, and to a lesser extent, PAM212 cells, express Mrp1 mRNA and protein and possess Mrp1 functional activity, as measured by calcein efflux. Sulforaphane, an activator of Nrf2, increased Mrp1 mRNA, protein, and functional activity in primary keratinocytes and PAM212 cells and decreased their sensitivity to HN2-induced growth inhibition (IC50 = 1.4 and 4.8 µM in primary keratinocytes and 1 and 13 µM in PAM212 cells, in the absence and presence of sulforaphane, respectively). The Mrp1 inhibitor, MK-571, reversed the effects of sulforaphane on HN2-induced growth inhibition in both primary keratinocytes and PAM212 cells. In primary keratinocytes from Nrf2−/− mice, sulforaphane had no impact on Mrp1 expression or activity, or on sensitivity to HN2, demonstrating that its effects depend on Nrf2. These data suggest that Mrp1-mediated efflux is important in regulating HN2-induced keratinocyte growth inhibition. Enhancing HN2 efflux from keratinocytes may represent a novel strategy for mitigating vesicant-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:26454883

  11. Mustards and Vesicants

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Robert A; Bast, Cheryl B

    2009-01-01

    Vesicants (sulfur mustards, lewisite, and nitrogen mustards) are chemicals that cause blistering of the skin. Developed as chemical warfare agents, their biological activity is complex and not fully understood. These vesicants in liquid or vapor form are capable of causing injury to most any tissue. Contact with the skin results in erythema and blistering. Exposure to vapors produces ocular and respiratory effects which occur at exposures below those causing dermal effects. Systemic and long-lasting effects may occur, especially following acute exposures that result in severe injury. Multi-organ involvement and fluid loss shock resulting in death may follow severe exposures. As alkylating agents, all of the mustards are known or potential carcinogens. The carcinogenic potential of lewisite in humans is equivocal. Toxicity data in animals are available for the vesicants although data on sulfur mustard and lewisite are more extensive than for the nitrogen mustards. Data from tests with human volunteers and occupational exposure information are also available. These data collectively have provided a basis for the development of exposure standards, guidelines, and criteria for use in emergency planning and emergency response, and remediation efforts. The mode of action of the vesicants is complex, not fully understood, and represents an ongoing area of investigation especially with respect to treatment of vesicant-induced injury. Prevention of exposure and decontamination are critical initial steps in eliminating or minimizing injury. With the exception of arsenic chelating antidotes (e.g., British anti-lewisite; BAL) for lewisite, no antidotes exist for the vesicant agents. Medical management currently focuses on palliative treatment of signs and symptoms.

  12. Nitrogen availability regulates proline and ethylene production and alleviates salinity stress in mustard (Brassica juncea).

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Noushina; Umar, Shahid; Khan, Nafees A

    2015-04-15

    Proline content and ethylene production have been shown to be involved in salt tolerance mechanisms in plants. To assess the role of nitrogen (N) in the protection of photosynthesis under salt stress, the effect of N (0, 5, 10, 20 mM) on proline and ethylene was studied in mustard (Brassica juncea). Sufficient N (10 mM) optimized proline production under non-saline conditions through an increase in proline-metabolizing enzymes, leading to osmotic balance and protection of photosynthesis through optimal ethylene production. Excess N (20 mM), in the absence of salt stress, inhibited photosynthesis and caused higher ethylene evolution but lower proline production compared to sufficient N. In contrast, under salt stress with an increased demand for N, excess N optimized ethylene production, which regulates the proline content resulting in recovered photosynthesis. The effect of excess N on photosynthesis under salt stress was further substantiated by the application of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor, 1-aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG), which inhibited proline production and photosynthesis. Without salt stress, AVG promoted photosynthesis in plants receiving excess N by inhibiting stress ethylene production. The results suggest that a regulatory interaction exists between ethylene, proline and N for salt tolerance. Nitrogen differentially regulates proline production and ethylene formation to alleviate the adverse effect of salinity on photosynthesis in mustard.

  13. Cutaneous Injury-Related Structural Changes and Their Progression following Topical Nitrogen Mustard Exposure in Hairless and Haired Mice

    PubMed Central

    Orlicky, David J.; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    To identify effective therapies against sulfur mustard (SM)-induced skin injuries, various animals have been used to assess the cutaneous pathology and related histopathological changes of SM injuries. However, these efforts to establish relevant skin injury endpoints for efficacy studies have been limited mainly due to the restricted assess of SM. Therefore, we employed the SM analog nitrogen mustard (NM), a primary vesicating and bifunctional alkylating agent, to establish relevant endpoints for efficient efficacy studies. Our published studies show that NM (3.2 mg) exposure for 12–120 h in both the hairless SKH-1 and haired C57BL/6 mice caused clinical sequelae of toxicity similar to SM exposure in humans. The NM-induced cutaneous pathology-related structural changes were further analyzed in this study and quantified morphometrically (as percent length or area of epidermis or dermis) of skin sections in mice showing these lesions. H&E stained skin sections of both hairless and haired mice showed that NM (12–120 h) exposure caused epidermal histopathological effects such as increased epidermal thickness, epidermal-dermal separation, necrotic/dead epidermis, epidermal denuding, scab formation, parakeratosis (24–120 h), hyperkeratosis (12–120 h), and acanthosis with hyperplasia (72–120 h). Similar NM exposure in both mice caused dermal changes including necrosis, edema, increase in inflammatory cells, and red blood cell extravasation. These NM-induced cutaneous histopathological features are comparable to the reported lesions from SM exposure in humans and animal models. This study advocates the usefulness of these histopathological parameters observed due to NM exposure in screening and optimization of rescue therapies against NM and SM skin injuries. PMID:24416404

  14. Cutaneous injury-related structural changes and their progression following topical nitrogen mustard exposure in hairless and haired mice.

    PubMed

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K; Orlicky, David J; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    To identify effective therapies against sulfur mustard (SM)-induced skin injuries, various animals have been used to assess the cutaneous pathology and related histopathological changes of SM injuries. However, these efforts to establish relevant skin injury endpoints for efficacy studies have been limited mainly due to the restricted assess of SM. Therefore, we employed the SM analog nitrogen mustard (NM), a primary vesicating and bifunctional alkylating agent, to establish relevant endpoints for efficient efficacy studies. Our published studies show that NM (3.2 mg) exposure for 12-120 h in both the hairless SKH-1 and haired C57BL/6 mice caused clinical sequelae of toxicity similar to SM exposure in humans. The NM-induced cutaneous pathology-related structural changes were further analyzed in this study and quantified morphometrically (as percent length or area of epidermis or dermis) of skin sections in mice showing these lesions. H&E stained skin sections of both hairless and haired mice showed that NM (12-120 h) exposure caused epidermal histopathological effects such as increased epidermal thickness, epidermal-dermal separation, necrotic/dead epidermis, epidermal denuding, scab formation, parakeratosis (24-120 h), hyperkeratosis (12-120 h), and acanthosis with hyperplasia (72-120 h). Similar NM exposure in both mice caused dermal changes including necrosis, edema, increase in inflammatory cells, and red blood cell extravasation. These NM-induced cutaneous histopathological features are comparable to the reported lesions from SM exposure in humans and animal models. This study advocates the usefulness of these histopathological parameters observed due to NM exposure in screening and optimization of rescue therapies against NM and SM skin injuries.

  15. Attenuation of Nitrogen Mustard-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Fibrosis by Anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Venosa, Alessandro; Verissimo, Vivianne L.; Cervelli, Jessica A.; Vayas, Kinal N.; Hall, LeRoy; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes acute injury to the lung that progresses to fibrosis. This is accompanied by a prominent infiltration of macrophages into the lung and upregulation of proinflammatory/profibrotic cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α. In these studies, we analyzed the ability of anti-TNFα antibody to mitigate NM-induced lung injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. Treatment of rats with anti-TNFα antibody (15 mg/kg, iv, every 9 days) beginning 30 min after intratracheal administration of NM (0.125 mg/kg) reduced progressive histopathologic alterations in the lung including perivascular and peribronchial edema, macrophage/monocyte infiltration, interstitial thickening, bronchiolization of alveolar walls, fibrin deposition, emphysema, and fibrosis. NM-induced damage to the alveolar-epithelial barrier, measured by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and cell content, was also reduced by anti-TNFα antibody, along with expression of the oxidative stress marker, heme oxygenase-1. Whereas the accumulation of proinflammatory/cytotoxic M1 macrophages in the lung in response to NM was suppressed by anti-TNFα antibody, anti-inflammatory/profibrotic M2 macrophages were increased or unchanged. Treatment of rats with anti-TNFα antibody also reduced NM-induced increases in expression of the profibrotic mediator, transforming growth factor-β. This was associated with a reduction in NM-induced collagen deposition in the lung. These data suggest that inhibiting TNFα may represent an efficacious approach to mitigating lung injury induced by mustards. PMID:26243812

  16. Absence of a p53 allele delays nitrogen mustard-induced early apoptosis and inflammation of murine skin.

    PubMed

    Inturi, Swetha; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K; Roy, Srirupa; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-09-15

    Bifunctional alkylating agent sulfur mustard (SM) and its analog nitrogen mustard (NM) cause DNA damage leading to cell death, and potentially activating inflammation. Transcription factor p53 plays a critical role in DNA damage by regulating cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Earlier studies by our laboratory demonstrated phosphorylation of p53 at Ser15 and an increase in total p53 in epidermal cells both in vitro and in vivo following NM exposure. To elucidate the role of p53 in NM-induced skin toxicity, we employed SKH-1 hairless mice harboring wild type (WT) or heterozygous p53 (p53+/-). Exposure to NM (3.2mg) caused a more profound increase in epidermal thickness and apoptotic cell death in WT relative to p53+/- mice at 24h. However, by 72h after exposure, there was a comparable increase in NM-induced epidermal cell death in both WT and p53+/- mice. Myeloperoxidase activity data showed that neutrophil infiltration was strongly enhanced in NM-exposed WT mice at 24h persisting through 72h of exposure. Conversely, robust NM-induced neutrophil infiltration (comparable to WT mice) was seen only at 72h after exposure in p53+/- mice. Similarly, NM-exposure strongly induced macrophage and mast cell infiltration in WT, but not p53+/- mice. Together, these data indicate that early apoptosis and inflammation induced by NM in mouse skin are p53-dependent. Thus, targeting this pathway could be a novel strategy for developing countermeasures against vesicants-induced skin injury.

  17. Activation of DNA damage repair pathways in response to nitrogen mustard-induced DNA damage and toxicity in skin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Inturi, Swetha; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM), a structural analog of chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM), forms adducts and crosslinks with DNA, RNA and proteins. Here we studied the mechanism of NM-induced skin toxicity in response to double strand breaks (DSBs) resulting in cell cycle arrest to facilitate DNA repair, as a model for developing countermeasures against vesicant-induced skin injuries. NM exposure of mouse epidermal JB6 cells decreased cell growth and caused S-phase arrest. Consistent with these biological outcomes, NM exposure also increased comet tail extent moment and the levels of DNA DSB repair molecules phospho H2A.X Ser139 and p53 Ser15 indicating NM-induced DNA DSBs. Since DNA DSB repair occurs via non homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) or homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathways, next we studied these two pathways and noted their activation as defined by an increase in phospho- and total DNA-PK levels, and the formation of Rad51 foci, respectively. To further analyze the role of these pathways in the cellular response to NM-induced cytotoxicity, NHEJ and HRR were inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7026 and Rad51 inhibitor BO2, respectively. Inhibition of NHEJ did not sensitize cells to NM-induced decrease in cell growth and cell cycle arrest. However, inhibition of the HRR pathway caused a significant increase in cell death, and prolonged G2M arrest following NM exposure. Together, our findings, indicating that HRR is the key pathway involved in the repair of NM-induced DNA DSBs, could be useful in developing new therapeutic strategies against vesicant-induced skin injury.

  18. Nitrogen Mustards

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC.gov . Specific Hazards Bioterrorism A-Z Anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) Arenaviruses Treatment & Infection Control Specimen Submission & Lab Testing Education & Training Related Bioterrorism Resources Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax) Botulism (Clostridium botulinum toxin) Brucella species ( ...

  19. Aquatic toxicity of nitrogen mustard to Ceriodaphina dubia, Daphnia magna, and Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Lan, Cheng-Hang; Lin, Tser-Sheng; Peng, Chiung-Yu

    2005-06-01

    Investigation of toxicity of mustard compounds to aquatic organisms has been limited although their effects on terrestrial mammal species have been well studied. In this study, the 48-h LC50 values of nitrogen mustard (HN2) are reported for two aquatic invertebrate species (Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia) and for one fish species (Pimephales promelas). Mean LC50 values to C. dubia, D. magna, and P. promela were 1.12, 2.52, and 98.86 mg/L, respectively. C. dubia was the species most sensitive to HN2. Seven-day lethal and sublethal tests with P. promelas and C. dubia were also conducted. In chronic tests, fathead minnow growth was significantly reduced by 2.50 mg/L HN2, while C. dubia reproduction was significantly affected by 7.81 mug/L HN2. These adverse effects on aquatic organisms caused by lower-level concentrations of HN2 indicate that a possible aquatic ecosystem disaster could occur either after a chemical spill or during chemical warfare.

  20. Screening hydrolysis products of sulfur mustard agents by high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Kroening, Karolin K; Richardson, Douglas D; Afton, Scott; Caruso, Joseph A

    2009-04-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD), bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, is one of a class of mustard agents which are chemical warfare agents. The main chemical warfare hydrolysis degradation products of sulfur mustards are: thiodiglycol, bis(2-hydroxyethylthio)methane, 1,2-bis(2-hydroxyethylthio)ethane, 1,3-bis(2-hydroxyethylthio)propane, and 1,4-bis(2-hydroxyethylthio)butane. The aim of this study is to identify these five hydrolysis degradation products utilizing reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for element-specific sulfur detection using a collision/reaction cell and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to confirm the identification. To date, this is the first study utilizing ICP-MS with (32)S element-specific detection for the analysis of vesicant chemical warfare agent degradation products.

  1. Use of mustard flour to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 in ground beef under nitrogen flushed packaging.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, D; Han, J H; Holley, R A

    2005-04-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the glucosinolates naturally present in non-deheated mustard flour could serve as a source of allyl and other isothiocyanates in sufficient quantity to kill Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated in ground beef at three different levels, during refrigerated storage of the meat under nitrogen. Mustard flour was mixed at 5%, 10% or 20% (w/w) with freshly ground beef, then the beef was inoculated with a cocktail of five strains of E. coli O157:H7 at either 3, 6 or < or =1.6 log10 cfu/g. The ground beef was formed into 100 g patties and each was placed in a bag of Nylon/EVOH/PE, which was back-flushed with 100% N2, heat-sealed and stored at 4 degrees C for < or =21 days. During storage, the allyl isothiocyanate (AIT) levels in package headspaces were determined by gas liquid chromatography. By 21 days, the levels present in treatments were not significantly different. After 21 days storage, there were 0.5, 3 and 5.4 log10 decreases in numbers of E. coli O157:H7 from the initial levels of 6 log10 cfu/g in meat containing 5%, 10% and 20% mustard flour, respectively. When inoculated at 3 log10 cfu/g, E. coli O157:H7 was reduced to undetectable levels after 18, 12 and 3 days with 5%, 10% and 20% mustard flour, respectively. When immunomagnetic separation (IMS) was used for E. coli recovery following its inoculation at < or =1.6 log10 cfu/g, 5% mustard did not completely eliminate the pathogen from ground beef stored for 6 days. The natural microflora of the ground beef which developed in vacuum packages was unaffected by the addition of 5% mustard flour but some inhibition was found at higher concentrations. Sensory evaluation of the cooked ground beef showed that there were no significant differences in the acceptability of meat treated with 5 or 10% mustard flour. However, panelists could distinguish untreated controls from mustard treatments, but considered the mustard-treated meat to be acceptable. These results showed that

  2. Nitrogen mustard up-regulates Bcl-2 and GSH and increases NTP and PCr in HT-29 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Boddie, A. W.; Constantinou, A.; Williams, C.; Reed, A.

    1998-01-01

    We hypothesized that unexplained increases in nucleoside triphosphates (NTP) observed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) after treatment of tumours by DNA-damaging agents were related to chemotherapy-induced up-regulation of the bcl-2 gene and DNA damage prevention and repair processes. To test this hypothesis, we treated HT-29 cells with 10(-4) M nitrogen mustard (HN2) and performed sequential perchloric acid extractions in replicate over 0-18 h. By reference to an internal standard (methylene diphosphonic acid), absolute changes in 31P-detectable high-energy phosphates in these extracts were determined and correlated with changes in bcl-2 protein levels, cell viability, cell cycle, apoptosis and total cellular glutathione (GSH) (an important defence against DNA damage from alkylating agents). After HN2 administration, bcl-2 protein levels in the HT-29 cell line rose at 2 h. Cell viability declined to 25% within 18 h, but apoptosis measured using fluorescence techniques remained in the 1-4% range. Increased cell division was noted at 4 h. Two high-energy interconvertible phosphates, NTP (P < or = 0.006) and phosphocreatine (PCr) (P < or = 0.0002), increased at 2 h concurrently with increased levels of bcl-2 protein and glutathione. This study demonstrates that bcl-2 and glutathione are up-regulated by HN2 and links this to a previously unexplained 31P MRS phenomenon: increased NTP after chemotherapy. Images Figure 6 PMID:9652754

  3. Nitrogen-Efficient and Nitrogen-Inefficient Indian Mustard Showed Differential Expression Pattern of Proteins in Response to Elevated CO2 and Low Nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Peerzada Y; Ganie, Arshid H; Khan, Ishrat; Qureshi, Mohammad I; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Sarwat, Maryam; Iqbal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are two essential elements that influence plant growth and development. The C and N metabolic pathways influence each other to affect gene expression, but little is known about which genes are regulated by interaction between C and N or the mechanisms by which the pathways interact. In the present investigation, proteome analysis of N-efficient and N-inefficient Indian mustard, grown under varied combinations of low-N, sufficient-N, ambient [CO2], and elevated [CO2] was carried out to identify proteins and the encoding genes of the interactions between C and N. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed 158 candidate protein spots. Among these, 72 spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins are related to various molecular processes including photosynthesis, energy metabolism, protein synthesis, transport and degradation, signal transduction, nitrogen metabolism and defense to oxidative, water and heat stresses. Identification of proteins like PII-like protein, cyclophilin, elongation factor-TU, oxygen-evolving enhancer protein and rubisco activase offers a peculiar overview of changes elicited by elevated [CO2], providing clues about how N-efficient cultivar of Indian mustard adapt to low N supply under elevated [CO2] conditions. This study provides new insights and novel information for a better understanding of adaptive responses to elevated [CO2] under N deficiency in Indian mustard.

  4. Nitrogen-Efficient and Nitrogen-Inefficient Indian Mustard Showed Differential Expression Pattern of Proteins in Response to Elevated CO2 and Low Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Peerzada Y.; Ganie, Arshid H.; Khan, Ishrat; Qureshi, Mohammad I.; Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Sarwat, Maryam; Iqbal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are two essential elements that influence plant growth and development. The C and N metabolic pathways influence each other to affect gene expression, but little is known about which genes are regulated by interaction between C and N or the mechanisms by which the pathways interact. In the present investigation, proteome analysis of N-efficient and N-inefficient Indian mustard, grown under varied combinations of low-N, sufficient-N, ambient [CO2], and elevated [CO2] was carried out to identify proteins and the encoding genes of the interactions between C and N. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed 158 candidate protein spots. Among these, 72 spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins are related to various molecular processes including photosynthesis, energy metabolism, protein synthesis, transport and degradation, signal transduction, nitrogen metabolism and defense to oxidative, water and heat stresses. Identification of proteins like PII-like protein, cyclophilin, elongation factor-TU, oxygen-evolving enhancer protein and rubisco activase offers a peculiar overview of changes elicited by elevated [CO2], providing clues about how N-efficient cultivar of Indian mustard adapt to low N supply under elevated [CO2] conditions. This study provides new insights and novel information for a better understanding of adaptive responses to elevated [CO2] under N deficiency in Indian mustard. PMID:27524987

  5. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Modified Dominant Lethal Study of Sulfur Mustard in Rats Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sasser, L. B.; Cushing, J. A.; Kalkwarf, D. R.; Buschbom, R. L.

    1989-05-01

    Occupational health standards have not been established for sulfur mustard (HD) [bis{2-chloroethyl)-sulfide) ' a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic properties. Little, however, is known about the mutagenic activity of HD in mammalian species and data regarding the dominant lethal effects of HD are ambiguous. The purpose of this study was to determine the dominant lethal effect in male and female rats orally exposed to HD. The study was conducted in two phases; a female dominant lethal phase and a male dominant lethal phase. Sprague-Dawley rats of each sex were administered 0.08, 0.20, or 0.50 mg/kg HD in sesame oil 5 days/week for 10 weeks. For the female phase, treated or untreated males were mated with treated females and their fetuses were evaluated at approximately 14 days after copulation. For the male dominant lethal phase, treated males cohabited with untreated femal (during 5 days of each week for 10 weeks) and females were sacrificed for fetal evaluation 14 days after the midweek of cohabitation during each of the 10 weeks. The appearance and behavior of the rats were unremarkable throughout the experiment and there were no treatment-related deaths. Growth rates were reduced in both female and male rats treated with 0.50 mg/kg HD. Indicators of reproductive performance did not demonstrate significant female dominant lethal effects, although significant male dominant lethal effects were observed at 2 and 3 week post-exposure. These effects included increases of early fetal resorptions and preimplantation losses and decreases of total live embryo implants. These effects were most consistently observed at a dose of 0.50 mg/kg, but frequently occurred at the lower doses. Although no treatment-related effects on male reproductive organ weights or sperm motility were found, a significant increase in the percentage of abnormal sperm was detected in males exposed to 0. 50 mg/kg HD. The timing of these effects is consistent with an effect during the

  6. Bullous pemphigoid. Occurrence in a patient with mycosis fungoides receiving PUVA and topical nitrogen mustard therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.W.; Ali, M.; Murray, J.C.; Hazra, T.A.

    1985-04-01

    A 57-year-old woman with mycosis fungoides developed blisters within cutaneous plaques while receiving PUVA therapy and topical nitrogen mustard. Direct and indirect immunofluorescence studies showed the findings of bullous pemphigoid. Her bullous disease was controlled after cessation of these therapies and institution of prednisone and methotrexate. During the 5 months following completion of a course of electron-beam therapy, she has been free of the cutaneous manifestations of both diseases. Previous instances of PUVA-related pemphigoid have occurred in psoriatics. The role of ultraviolet light in the induction of pemphigoid is discussed, particularly with regard to its possible interaction with the altered skin of psoriasis or mycosis fungoides. Some of the rare cases of bullous mycosis fungoides might actually have represented ultraviolet-unmasked bullous pemphigoid.

  7. Evaluation of risk assessment guideline levels for the chemical warfare agents mustard, GB, and VX.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Heidi M

    2002-06-01

    The U.S. Army has estimated acute lethality guideline levels for inhalation of the chemical warfare agents mustard, GB, and VX. These levels are expressed as dosages measured in milligram-minutes per cubic meter (mg-min/m(3)). The National Advisory Council has also proposed acute emergency guideline levels (AEGLs) for the agents. The AEGLs are threshold exposure limits for the general public for mild effects, serious adverse effects, and lethality. They are expressed as air concentrations (in units of mg/m(3)) and are applicable to emergency exposure periods ranging from 10 min to 8 h. The report discusses strengths and deficiencies in the levels, important parameters (i.e., exposure time, breathing rate) that need to be explicitly addressed in deriving the guideline levels, and possible impacts that could result from using AEGLs instead of guideline dosages in future assessments.

  8. Site Plan Safety Submission for Sampling, Monitoring and Decontamination of Mustard Agent, South Plant, Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    Mustard is an insidious vesicant or blistering agent and has been identified as carcinogenic , mutagenic, and teratogenic. The agent’s garlic-like odor...butyl rubber . " Nonstandard gloves will be used only in a manner which prohibits intentional contact and has low potential for unintentional contact... rubber impermeable protective clothing will burn and does not possess self-extinguishing properties. Therefore, contact with an SPSS Plan - South Plant

  9. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Mutagenicity of Sulfur Mustard in the Salmonella Histidine Reversion Assay Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D. L.; Sass, E. J.; Fritz, L. K.; Sasser, L. B.

    1989-07-31

    The mutagenic potential of bis 2-chloroethyl sulfide (HD} a bifunctional sulfur mustard was evaluated in the standard plate incorporation version and the preincubation modification of the Salmonella/microsomal assay with tester strains TA97, TA98, TA100 and TA102, with and without 59 activation. HD-induced point mutations in strain TA102 and frameshift mutations in TA97 but showed little or no mutagenicity against strains TA98 and TA100. Extensive HD-induced cell killing was observed with the excision repair deficient strains (TA100, TA98 and TA97) but not with strain TA102, which is wild-activation by Aroc1or induced rat liver microsomes (S9).

  10. Effect of nitroreduction on the alkylating reactivity and cytotoxicity of the 2,4-dinitrobenzamide-5-aziridine CB 1954 and the corresponding nitrogen mustard SN 23862: distinct mechanisms of bioreductive activation.

    PubMed

    Helsby, Nuala A; Wheeler, S James; Pruijn, Frederik B; Palmer, Brian D; Yang, Shangjin; Denny, William A; Wilson, William R

    2003-04-01

    The dinitrobenzamide aziridine CB 1954 (1) and its nitrogen mustard analogue SN 23862 (6) are prodrugs that are activated by enzymatic nitroreduction in tumors. Bioactivation of 1 is considered to be due to reduction of its 4-nitro group to the hydroxylamine and subsequent formation of the N-acetoxy derivative; this acts as a reactive center, in concert with the aziridine moiety, to provide a bifunctional DNA cross-linking agent (Knox model). It is currently unclear whether bioactivation of 6 occurs by the same mechanism or results from the electronic effects of nitroreduction on reactivity of the nitrogen mustard moiety. To discriminate between these mechanisms, we have synthesized the hydroxylamine and amine derivatives of 1 and 6, plus related compounds, and determined their alkylating reactivities in aqueous solution, using LC/MS to identify reaction pathways. The relationships between substituent electronic effects, reactivity, and cytotoxicity were determined using the UV4 cell line, which is defective in nucleotide excision repair (thus avoiding differences in repair kinetics). Alkylating reactivity correlated with the electron-donating character of the ortho or para substituent in the case of the mustards, with a less marked electronic effect for the aziridines. Importantly, there was a highly significant linear relationship between cytotoxic potency and alkylating reactivity in both the aziridine and the mustard series, with the notable exception of 4, the 4-hydroxylamine of 1, which was 300-fold more toxic than predicted by this relationship. This demonstrates that the high potency of 4 does not result from activation of the aziridine ring, supporting the Knox model. The single-step bioactivation of 6, to amino or hydroxylamine metabolites with similar potency to 4, is a potential advantage in the use of dinitrobenzamide mustards as prodrugs for activation by nitroreductases.

  11. Clinically-Relevant Cutaneous Lesions by Nitrogen Mustard: Useful Biomarkers of Vesicants Skin Injury in SKH-1 Hairless and C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K.; Inturi, Swetha; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    A paucity of clinically applicable biomarkers to screen therapies in laboratory is a limitation in the development of countermeasures against cutaneous injuries by chemical weapon, sulfur mustard (SM), and its analog nitrogen mustard (NM). Consequently, we assessed NM-caused progression of clinical cutaneous lesions; notably, skin injury with NM is comparable to SM. Exposure of SKH-1 hairless and C57BL/6 (haired) mice to NM (3.2 mg) for 12–120 h caused clinical sequelae of toxicity, including microblister formation, edema, erythema, altered pigmentation, wounding, xerosis and scaly dry skin. These toxic effects of NM were similar in both mouse strains, except that wounding and altered pigmentation at 12–24 h and appearance of dry skin at 24 and 72 h post-NM exposure were more pronounced in C57BL/6 compared to SKH-1 mice. Conversely, edema, erythema and microblister formation were more prominent in SKH-1 than C57BL/6 mice at 24–72 h after NM exposure. In addition, 40–60% mortality was observed following 120 h of NM exposure in the both mouse strains. Overall, these toxic effects of NM are comparable to those reported in humans and other animal species with SM, and thus represent clinically-relevant cutaneous injury endpoints in screening and optimization of therapies for skin injuries by vesicating agents. PMID:23826320

  12. Chlorambucil (nitrogen mustard) induced impairment of early vascular endothelial cell migration - effects of α-linolenic acid and N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Simons, Thilo; Ibrahim, Marwa; Morguet, Christian; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Kehe, Kai; Bloch, Wilhelm; Bölck, Birgit

    2014-08-05

    Alkylating agents (e.g. sulfur and nitrogen mustards) cause a variety of cell and tissue damage including wound healing disorder. Migration of endothelial cells is of utmost importance for effective wound healing. In this study we investigated the effects of chlorambucil (a nitrogen mustard) on early endothelial cells (EEC) with special focus on cell migration. Chlorambucil significantly inhibited migration of EEC in Boyden chamber and wound healing experiments. Cell migration is linked to cytoskeletal organization. We therefore investigated the distribution pattern of the Golgi apparatus as a marker of cell polarity. Cells are polarized under control conditions, whereas chlorambucil caused an encircling perinuclear position of the Golgi apparatus, indicating non-polarized cells. ROS are discussed to be involved in the pathophysiology of alkylating substances and are linked to cell migration and cell polarity. Therefore we investigated the influence of ROS-scavengers (α-linolenic acid (ALA) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC)) on the impaired EEC migration. Both substances, in particular ALA, improved EEC migration. Notably ALA restored cell polarity. Remarkably, investigations of ROS and RNS biomarkers (8-isoprostane and nitrotyrosine) did not reveal a significant increase after chlorambucil exposure when assessed 24h post exposure. A distinct breakdown of mitochondrial membrane potential (measured by TMRM) that recovered under ALA treatment was observed. In conclusion our results provide compelling evidence that the alkylating agent chlorambucil dramatically impairs directed cellular migration, which is accompanied by perturbations of cell polarity and mitochondrial membrane potential. ALA treatment was able to reconstitute cell polarity and to stabilize mitochondrial potential resulting in improved cell migration.

  13. Teratology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Effects of Sulfur Mustard in Rats and Rabbits - Part 2, Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P L; Rommereim, R L; Burton, F G; Buschbom, R L; Sasser, L B

    1987-09-30

    Sulfur mustard (HD) was administered to rats and rabbits by intragastric intubation. Rats were dosed daily from 6 through 15 days of gestation (dg) with o. 0.5, 1 .0 or 2.0 mg of HD/kg; rabbits were dosed with 0, 0.4, 0.6 or 0.8 mg/kg on 6 through 19 dg. Maternal animals were weighed periodically and, at necropsy, were examined for gross lesions of major organs and reproductive performance; live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, internal and skeletal defects. In rats, reductions in body weights were observed in maternal animals and their female fetuses at the lowest administered dose (0.5 mg/kg), but the incidence of fetal malformations was not increased. In rabbits the highest administered dose (0.8 mg/kg) induced maternal mortality and depressed body weight measures but did not affect fetal development These results suggest that orally administered HD is not teratogenic in rats • and rabbits since fetal effects were obs~rved only at dose levels that induced frank maternal toxicity. Estimations of dose ranges for •no observable effects levers· in rats and rabbits, respectively, were: < 0.5 and < 0.4 mg/kg in maternal animals and < 0.5 and > 0.8 mg/kg in their fetuses.

  14. Site Plan Safety Submission for Sampling, Monitoring, and Decontamination of Mustard Agent - South Plant, Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    of Hazard and Physiolo&ical Effects Mustard is an insidious vesicant or blistering agent and has been identified as carcinogenic , mutagenic, and...in laboratory operations involving solvents incompatible with butyl rubber . 0 Nonstandard gloves will be used only in a manner which prohibits...will be monitored before delivery to the laundry. Butyl rubber impermeable protective clothing will burn and does not possess self-extinguishing

  15. Plastic antibody for the recognition of chemical warfare agent sulphur mustard.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, M; Suryanarayana, M V S; Nigam, Anil Kumar; Pandey, Pratibha; Ganesan, K; Singh, Beer; Sekhar, K

    2006-06-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) known as plastic antibodies (PAs) represent a new class of materials possessing high selectivity and affinity for the target molecule. Since their discovery, PAs have attracted considerable interest from bio- and chemical laboratories to pharmaceutical institutes. PAs are becoming an important class of synthetic materials mimicking molecular recognition by natural receptors. In addition, they have been utilized as catalysts, sorbents for solid-phase extraction, stationary phase for liquid chromatography and mimics of enzymes. In this paper, first time we report the preparation and characterization of a PA for the recognition of blistering chemical warfare agent sulphur mustard (SM). The SM imprinted PA exhibited more surface area when compared to the control non-imprinted polymer (NIP). In addition, SEM image showed an ordered nano-pattern for the PA of SM that is entirely different from the image of NIP. The imprinting also enhanced SM rebinding ability to the PA when compared to the NIP with an imprinting efficiency (alpha) of 1.3.

  16. Decontamination of chemical warfare sulfur mustard agent simulant by ZnO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Meysam; Yekta, Sina; Ghaedi, Hamed

    2016-07-01

    In this study, zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have been surveyed to decontaminate the chloroethyl phenyl sulfide as a sulfur mustard agent simulant. Prior to the reaction, ZnO NPs were successfully prepared through sol-gel method in the absence and presence of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). PVA was utilized as a capping agent to control the agglomeration of the nanoparticles. The formation, morphology, elemental component, and crystalline size of nanoscale ZnO were certified and characterized by SEM/EDX, XRD, and FT-IR techniques. The decontamination (adsorption and destruction) was tracked by the GC-FID analysis, in which the effects of polarity of the media, such as isopropanol, acetone and n-hexane, reaction time intervals from 1 up to 18 h, and different temperatures, including 25, 35, 45, and 55 °C, on the catalytic/decontaminative capability of the surface of ZnO NPs/PVA were investigated and discussed, respectively. Results demonstrated that maximum decontamination (100 %) occurred in n-hexane solvent at 55 °C after 1 h. On the other hand, the obtained results for the acetone and isopropanol solvents were lower than expected. GC-MS chromatograms confirmed the formation of hydroxyl ethyl phenyl sulfide and phenyl vinyl sulfide as the destruction reaction products. Furthermore, these chromatograms proved the role of hydrolysis and elimination mechanisms on the catalyst considering its surface Bronsted and Lewis acid sites. A non-polar solvent aids material transfer to the reactive surface acid sites without blocking these sites.

  17. Use of Plackett-Burman design for rapid screening of nitrogen and carbon sources for the production of lipase in solid state fermentation by Yarrowia lipolytica from mustard oil cake (Brassica napus)

    PubMed Central

    Imandi, Sarat Babu; Karanam, Sita Kumari; Garapati, Hanumantha Rao

    2013-01-01

    Mustard oil cake (Brassica napus), the residue obtained after extraction of mustard oil from mustard oil seeds, was investigated for the production of lipase under solid state fermentation (SSF) using the marine yeast Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589. Process parameters such as incubation time, biomass concentration, initial moisture content, carbon source concentration and nitrogen source concentration of the medium were optimized. Screening of ten nitrogen and five carbon sources has been accomplished with the help of Plackett-Burman design. The highest lipase activity of 57.89 units per gram of dry fermented substrate (U/gds) was observed with the substrate of mustard oil cake in four days of fermentation. PMID:24516460

  18. Use of Plackett-Burman design for rapid screening of nitrogen and carbon sources for the production of lipase in solid state fermentation by Yarrowia lipolytica from mustard oil cake (Brassica napus).

    PubMed

    Imandi, Sarat Babu; Karanam, Sita Kumari; Garapati, Hanumantha Rao

    2013-01-01

    Mustard oil cake (Brassica napus), the residue obtained after extraction of mustard oil from mustard oil seeds, was investigated for the production of lipase under solid state fermentation (SSF) using the marine yeast Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589. Process parameters such as incubation time, biomass concentration, initial moisture content, carbon source concentration and nitrogen source concentration of the medium were optimized. Screening of ten nitrogen and five carbon sources has been accomplished with the help of Plackett-Burman design. The highest lipase activity of 57.89 units per gram of dry fermented substrate (U/gds) was observed with the substrate of mustard oil cake in four days of fermentation.

  19. Demographic models inform selection of biocontrol agents for garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata).

    PubMed

    Davis, Adam S; Landis, Douglas A; Nuzzo, Victoria; Blossey, Bernd; Gerber, Esther; Hinz, Hariet L

    2006-12-01

    Nonindigenous invasive plants pose a major threat to natural communities worldwide. Biological control of weeds via selected introduction of their natural enemies can affect control over large spatial areas but also risk nontarget effects. To maximize effectiveness while minimizing risk, weed biocontrol programs should introduce the minimum number of host-specific natural enemies necessary to control an invasive nonindigenous plant. We used elasticity analysis of a matrix model to help inform biocontrol agent selection for garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata (M. Bieb.) Cavara and Grande). The Eurasian biennial A. petiolata is considered one of the most problematic invaders of temperate forests in North America. Four weevil species in the genus Ceutorhynchus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are currently considered potential biocontrol agents. These species attack rosettes (C. scrobicollis), stems (C. roberti, C. alliariae), and seeds (C. constrictus) of A. petiolata. Elasticity analyses using A. petiolata demographic parameters from North America indicated that changes in the rosette-to-flowering-plant transition and changes in fecundity consistently had the greatest impact on population growth rate. These results suggest that attack by the rosette-feeder C. scrobicollis, which reduces overwintering survival, and seed or stem feeders that reduce seed output should be particularly effective. Model outcomes differed greatly as A. petiolata demographic parameters were varied within ranges observed in North America, indicating that successful control of A. petiolata populations may occur under some, but not all, conditions. Using these a priori analyses we predict: (1) rosette mortality and reduction of seed output will be the most important factors determining A. petiolata demography; (2) the root-crown feeder C. scrobicollis will have the most significant impact on A. petiolata demography; (3) releases of single control agents are unlikely to control A. petiolata across

  20. Histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of nitrogen mustard-induced cutaneous effects in SKH-1 hairless and C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K.; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Orlicky, David J.; White, Carl W.; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicant warfare agent which causes severe skin injuries. Currently, we lack effective antidotes against SM-induced skin injuries, in part due to lack of appropriate animal model(s) that can be used for efficacy studies in laboratory settings to identify effective therapies. Therefore, to develop a relevant mouse skin injury model, we examined the effects of nitrogen mustard (NM), a primary vesicant and a bifunctional alkylating agent that induces toxic effects comparable to SM. Specifically, we conducted histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of several applicable cutaneous pathological lesions following skin NM (3.2 mg) exposure for 12–120 h in SKH-1 and C57BL/6 mice. NM caused a significant increase in epidermal thickness, incidence of microvesication, cell proliferation, apoptotic cell death, inflammatory cells (neutrophils, macrophages and mast cells) and myleoperoxidase activity in the skin in both mouse strains. However, there was a more prominent NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, and macrophages and mast cell infiltration, in SKH-1 mice relative to what was seen in C57BL/6 mice. NM also caused collagen degradation and edema at early time points (12–24 h); however, at later time points (72 and 120 h), dense collagen staining was observed, indicating either water loss or start of integument repair in both mouse strains. This study provides quantitative measurement of NM-induced histopathological and immunohistochemical cutaneous lesions in both hairless and haired mouse strains that could serve as useful tools for screening and identification of effective therapies for treatment of skin injuries due to NM and SM. PMID:24373750

  1. Histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of nitrogen mustard-induced cutaneous effects in SKH-1 hairless and C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anil K; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Inturi, Swetha; Orlicky, David J; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-03-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicant warfare agent which causes severe skin injuries. Currently, we lack effective antidotes against SM-induced skin injuries, in part due to lack of appropriate animal model(s) that can be used for efficacy studies in laboratory settings to identify effective therapies. Therefore, to develop a relevant mouse skin injury model, we examined the effects of nitrogen mustard (NM), a primary vesicant and a bifunctional alkylating agent that induces toxic effects comparable to SM. Specifically, we conducted histopathological and immunohistochemical evaluation of several applicable cutaneous pathological lesions following skin NM (3.2mg) exposure for 12-120h in SKH-1 and C57BL/6 mice. NM caused a significant increase in epidermal thickness, incidence of microvesication, cell proliferation, apoptotic cell death, inflammatory cells (neutrophils, macrophages and mast cells) and myleoperoxidase activity in the skin of both mouse strains. However, there was a more prominent NM-induced increase in epidermal thickness, and macrophages and mast cell infiltration, in SKH-1 mice relative to what was seen in C57BL/6 mice. NM also caused collagen degradation and edema at early time points (12-24h); however, at later time points (72 and 120h), dense collagen staining was observed, indicating either water loss or start of integument repair in both the mouse strains. This study provides quantitative measurement of NM-induced histopathological and immunohistochemical cutaneous lesions in both hairless and haired mouse strains that could serve as useful tools for screening and identification of effective therapies for treatment of skin injuries due to NM and SM.

  2. Toxicology and pharmacology of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard - a review. Final technical report, 29 September 1994-31 January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Dacre, J.C.; Beers, R.; Goldman, M.

    1995-04-05

    Sulfur mustard is a poisonous chemical agent which exerts a local action on the eyes, skin and respiratory tissue with subsequent systemic action on the nervous, cardiac, and digestive and endocrine systems in man and laboratory animals causing lacrimation, malaise, anorexia, salivation, respiratory distress, vomiting, hyperexcitability, cardiac distress, and death. Sulfur mustard is a cell poison which causes disumption and impairment of a variety of cellular activities which are dependent upon a very specific integral relationship. These cytotoxic effects are manifested in widespread metabolic disturbances whose variable characteristics are observed in enzymatic deficiencies, vesicant action, abnormal mitotic activity and cell division, bone marrow disruption, disturbances in hematopoietic activity and systemic poisoning. Indeed, mustard gas readily combines with various components of the cell such as amino acids, amines and proteins. Sulfur mustard has been shown to be mainly a lung carcinogen in various test animal species; this effect is highly dependent of size of the dose and the route of exposure. In the human, there is evidence of cancers of the respiratory tract in men exposed to mustard gas. Mutagenicity of sulfur mustard, due to the strong alkylating activity, has been reported to occur in many different species of animals, plants, bacteria, and fungi. There is no strong evidence that sulfur mustard is a teratogen but much further research, with particular emphasis on maternal and fetal toxicity, is needed and recommended.

  3. Self-immolative nitrogen mustards prodrugs cleavable by carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2) showing large cytotoxicity differentials in GDEPT.

    PubMed

    Niculescu-Duvaz, Dan; Niculescu-Duvaz, Ion; Friedlos, Frank; Martin, Jan; Lehouritis, Panos; Marais, Richard; Springer, Caroline J

    2003-04-24

    Nineteen novel potential self-immolative prodrugs and their corresponding drugs have been synthesized for gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) with carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2) as the activating enzyme. The compounds are derived from o- and p-amino and p-methylamino aniline nitrogen mustards. Their aqueous stability, kinetics of drug release by CPG2, and cytotoxicity in the colon carcinoma cell line WiDr, expressing either surface-tethered CPG2 (stCPG2(Q)3) or control beta-galactosidase, are assessed. The effect of various structural features on stability, kinetics of activation, and biological activity is discussed. The p-methylamino prodrugs are the most stable compounds from this series, with the largest cytotoxicity differentials between CPG2-expressing and nonexpressing cells. The most potent compounds in all series are prodrugs of bis-iodo nitrogen mustards. 4-[N-[4'-Bis(2' '-iodoethyl)aminophenyl]-N'-methylcarbamoyloxymethyl]phenylcarbamoyl-l-glutamic acid, compound 39b, is 124-fold more cytotoxic to WiDr cells expressing CPG2 than to cells expressing beta-galactosidase. An additional six compounds show better cytotoxicity differential than the published N-[4-[(2-chloroethyl)(2-mesyloxyethyl)amino]benzoyl]-l-glutamic acid (CMDA) prodrug.

  4. Locus-specific microemulsion catalysts for sulfur mustard (HD) chemical warfare agent decontamination.

    PubMed

    Fallis, Ian A; Griffiths, Peter C; Cosgrove, Terence; Dreiss, Cecile A; Govan, Norman; Heenan, Richard K; Holden, Ian; Jenkins, Robert L; Mitchell, Stephen J; Notman, Stuart; Platts, Jamie A; Riches, James; Tatchell, Thomas

    2009-07-22

    The rates of catalytic oxidative decontamination of the chemical warfare agent (CWA) sulfur mustard (HD, bis(2-chlororethyl) sulfide) and a range (chloroethyl) sulfide simulants of variable lipophilicity have been examined using a hydrogen peroxide-based microemulsion system. SANS (small-angle neutron scattering), SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering), PGSE-NMR (pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR), fluorescence quenching, and electrospray mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) were implemented to examine the distribution of HD, its simulants, and their oxidation/hydrolysis products in a model oil-in-water microemulsion. These measurements not only present a means of interpreting decontamination rates but also a rationale for the design of oxidation catalysts for these toxic materials. Here we show that by localizing manganese-Schiff base catalysts at the oil droplet-water interface or within the droplet core, a range of (chloroethyl) sulfides, including HD, spanning some 7 orders of octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)), may be oxidized with equal efficacy using dilute (5 wt. % of aqueous phase) hydrogen peroxide as a noncorrosive, environmentally benign oxidant (e.g., t(1/2) (HD) approximately 18 s, (2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide, C(6)H(5)SCH(2)CH(2)Cl) approximately 15 s, (thiodiglycol, S(CH(2)CH(2)OH)(2)) approximately 19 s {20 degrees C}). Our observations demonstrate that by programming catalyst lipophilicity to colocalize catalyst and substrate, the inherent compartmentalization of the microemulsion can be exploited to achieve enhanced rates of reaction or to exert control over product selectivity. A combination of SANS, ESI-MS and fluorescence quenching measurements indicate that the enhanced catalytic activity is due to the locus of the catalyst and not a result of partial hydrolysis of the substrate.

  5. Aniline mustard analogues of the DNA-intercalating agent amsacrine: DNA interaction and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Fan, J Y; Valu, K K; Woodgate, P D; Baguley, B C; Denny, W A

    1997-04-01

    Two series of analogues of the clinical antileukemic drug and DNA-intercalating ligand amsacrine have been prepared, containing aniline mustard sidechains of varying reactivity, linked either at the 4-position of the intercalating acridine chromophore (type A) or at the 1'-position of the 9-anilino group (type B). DNase I footprinting assays showed that compounds of type B had stronger reversible binding to DNA than did compounds of type A. Compounds of each type showed similar patterns of alkylation-induced cleavage of DNA, and alkylate at the N7 of guanines in runs of guanines (similar to the pattern for untargeted mustards) as well as some adenines. Both classes of compounds crosslinked DNA, although those bearing relatively inactive mustards did so only at high drug/base pair ratios. However, while the patterns of DNA alkylation were broadly similar, the compounds were considerably more cytotoxic than analogous untargeted mustards. Comparison of their cytotoxicities in wild-type and DNA repair-deficient lines indicated this toxicity was due to DNA crosslinks (except for the least reactive SO2-linked mustards). The 4-linked analogues showed slightly higher in vivo antileukemic activity than the corresponding 1'-linked analogues.

  6. The application of ethephon (an ethylene releaser) increases growth, photosynthesis and nitrogen accumulation in mustard (Brassica juncea L.) under high nitrogen levels.

    PubMed

    Khan, N A; Mir, M R; Nazar, R; Singh, S

    2008-09-01

    Ethephon (2-chloroethyl phosphonic acid), an ethylene-releasing compound, influences growth and photosynthesis of mustard (Brassica juncea L. Czern & Coss.). We show the effect of nitrogen availability on ethylene evolution and how this affects growth, photosynthesis and nitrogen accumulation. Ethylene evolution in the control with low N (100 mg N kg(-1) soil) was two-times higher than with high N (200 mg N kg(-1) soil). The application of 100-400 microl x l(-1) ethephon post-flowering, i.e. 60 days after sowing, on plants receiving low or high N further increased ethylene evolution. Leaf area, relative growth rate (RGR), photosynthesis, leaf nitrate reductase (NR) activity and leaf N reached a maximum with application of 200 microl x l(-1) ethephon and high N. The results suggest that the application of ethephon influences growth, photosynthesis and N accumulation, depending on the amount of nitrogen in the soil.

  7. Report on possible routes to breakdown products of mustard gas

    SciTech Connect

    Luman, F.M.

    1983-10-18

    This paper suggests possible routes to the formation of decontamination and breakdown products of the chemical agent Mustard Gas (HD). The terminal decontamination products, CaSO4 and CO2, are harmless to the environment. Oxathiane is formed by hydrolysis and dehydration reactions. Dithiane is formed with the application of heat in a low oxygen or nitrogen environment. (Author).

  8. Attenuation of acute nitrogen mustard-induced lung injury, inflammation and fibrogenesis by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Venosa, Alessandro; Hall, LeRoy; Gow, Andrew J.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-12-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic vesicant known to cause damage to the respiratory tract. Injury is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In these studies we analyzed the effects of transient inhibition of iNOS using aminoguanidine (AG) on NM-induced pulmonary toxicity. Rats were treated intratracheally with 0.125 mg/kg NM or control. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 1 d–28 d later and lung injury, oxidative stress and fibrosis assessed. NM exposure resulted in progressive histopathological changes in the lung including multifocal lesions, perivascular and peribronchial edema, inflammatory cell accumulation, alveolar fibrin deposition, bronchiolization of alveolar septal walls, and fibrosis. This was correlated with trichrome staining and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) was also increased in the lung following NM exposure, along with levels of protein and inflammatory cells in BAL, consistent with oxidative stress and alveolar-epithelial injury. Both classically activated proinflammatory (iNOS{sup +} and cyclooxygenase-2{sup +}) and alternatively activated profibrotic (YM-1{sup +} and galectin-3{sup +}) macrophages appeared in the lung following NM administration; this was evident within 1 d, and persisted for 28 d. AG administration (50 mg/kg, 2 ×/day, 1 d–3 d) abrogated NM-induced injury, oxidative stress and inflammation at 1 d and 3 d post exposure, with no effects at 7 d or 28 d. These findings indicate that nitric oxide generated via iNOS contributes to acute NM-induced lung toxicity, however, transient inhibition of iNOS is not sufficient to protect against pulmonary fibrosis. -- Highlights: ► Nitrogen mustard (NM) induces acute lung injury and fibrosis. ► Pulmonary toxicity is associated with increased expression of iNOS. ► Transient inhibition of iNOS attenuates acute

  9. Plasma chromogranin A marks emesis and serotonin release associated with dacarbazine and nitrogen mustard but not with cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapies.

    PubMed Central

    Cubeddu, L. X.; O'Connor, D. T.; Hoffmann, I.; Parmer, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is present in high concentrations in enterochromaffin cells, where it is co-localised with serotonin in the storage granules. Plasma CgA has been reported to mark emesis and serotonin release associated with cisplatin treatment. However, it is not known whether plasma CgA could be an indicator of emesis and of serotonin release in patients receiving non-cisplatin chemotherapies. Therefore, in this study we evaluated, in cancer patients, the temporal relationships between the increases in plasma CgA and urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and the development of vomiting following dacarbazine, nitrogen mustard and cyclophosphamide treatments. Metoclopramide was used as antiemetic. With dacarbazine, nitrogen mustard and cyclophosphamide the median time to the onset of emesis was 2.3, 2.8 and 5.3 h and the duration of intense emesis was 3, 2 and 6 h respectively. Plasma CgA and urinary 5-HIAA increased after dacarbazine- and nitrogen mustard-based chemotherapies, with maximal increases between 4 and 6 h after initiation of drug infusion. The time course for the increases in plasma CgA paralleled that of urinary 5-HIAA and the period of intense emesis. A highly significant (P = 0.0009) positive correlation (r = 0.68) was found between the increases in plasma CgA and in urinary 5-HIAA. Cyclophosphamide treatment was not associated with increases in plasma CgA and in urinary 5-HIAA, despite inducing emesis; this indicates that the increases in CgA and 5-HIAA after dacarbazine and nitrogen mustard are not due to the act of vomiting per se. In summary, plasma CgA is a marker of serotonin release (most likely from enterochromaffin cells) after dacarbazine and nitrogen mustard-based chemotherapies, exocytosis being the most likely mechanism for the release of serotonin. Serotonin released from enterochromaffin cells seems to trigger the emetic response to dacarbazine and nitrogen mustard; however, cyclophosphamide may release serotonin from a

  10. Veterans at risk: The health effects of mustard gas and lewisite

    SciTech Connect

    Pechura, C.M.; Rall, D.P.

    1993-01-01

    So vivid were the memories of the first use of mustard gas (sulfur mustard) by the Germans in World War I that the United States government began to prepare for chemical warfare even before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941. This work was also spurred by the fury of war in Europe and reports of Japanese use of sulfur mustard against the Chinese. The US preparations included the establishment of war-related research programs organized by President Roosevelt under the White House Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD). Two groups under the OSRD became involved in secret testing programs concerned with mustard agents (Sulfur and nitrogen mustard) and Lewisite: The Committee on Medical Research; This group studied protective ointments and other treatments through the National Research Council's Committee on Treatment of Gas Casualties, and The National Defense Research Committee; This group studied protective clothing and gas masks through military units such as the Chemical Warfare Service.

  11. Detoxication of sulfur half-mustards by nucleophilic scavengers: robust activity of thiopurines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyun; Powell, K. Leslie; Thames, Howard D.; MacLeod, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is well known as an acutely toxic vesicant. It has been implicated as a carcinogen after chronic low-level exposure, and is known to form inter-strand crosslinks in DNA. Sulfur and nitrogen mustards are currently of interest as potential chemical threat agents for terrorists due to ease of synthesis. Sulfur mustard and monofunctional analogs (half-mustards, 2-[chloroethyl] alkyl sulfides) react as electrophiles, damaging cellular macromolecules, and thus are potentially subject to scavenging by nucleophilic agents. We have determined rate constants for the reaction of four purine derivatives that contain nucleophilic thiol moieties with several sulfur-half-mustards. Three of these compounds, 2,6-dithiopurine, 2,6-dithiouric acid, and 9-methyl-6-mercaptopurine, exhibit facile reaction with the electrophilic mustard compounds. At near neutral pH, these thiopurines are much better nucleophilic scavengers of mustard electrophiles than other low molecular weight thiols such as N-acetyl cysteine and glutathione. Progress curves calculated by numerical integration techniques indicate that equimolar concentrations of thiopurine provide significant reductions in the overall exposure to the episulfonium ions, which are the major reactive, electrophiles produced when sulfur mustards are dissolved in aqueous solution. PMID:20050632

  12. Detoxication of sulfur half-mustards by nucleophilic scavengers: robust activity of thiopurines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinyun; Powell, K Leslie; Thames, Howard D; MacLeod, Michael C

    2010-03-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) has been used in chemical warfare since World War I and is well known as an acutely toxic vesicant. It has been implicated as a carcinogen after chronic low-level exposure and is known to form interstrand cross-links in DNA. Sulfur and nitrogen mustards are currently of interest as potential chemical threat agents for terrorists because of ease of synthesis. Sulfur mustard and monofunctional analogues (half-mustards, 2-[chloroethyl] alkyl sulfides) react as electrophiles, damaging cellular macromolecules, and thus are potentially subject to scavenging by nucleophilic agents. We have determined rate constants for the reaction of four purine derivatives that contain nucleophilic thiol moieties with several sulfur-half-mustards. Three of these compounds, 2,6-dithiopurine, 2,6-dithiouric acid, and 9-methyl-6-mercaptopurine, exhibit facile reaction with the electrophilic mustard compounds. At near neutral pH, these thiopurines are much better nucleophilic scavengers of mustard electrophiles than other low molecular weight thiols such as N-acetyl cysteine and glutathione. Progress curves calculated by numerical integration techniques indicate that equimolar concentrations of thiopurine provide significant reductions in the overall exposure to the episulfonium ions, which are the major reactive, electrophiles produced when sulfur mustards are dissolved in aqueous solution.

  13. The modulation of the DNA-damaging effect of polycyclic aromatic agents by xanthines. Part I. Reduction of cytostatic effects of quinacrine mustard by caffeine.

    PubMed

    Kapuscinski, Jan; Ardelt, Barbara; Piosik, Jacek; Zdunek, Malgorzata; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2002-02-15

    Recently, accumulated statistical data indicate the protective effect of caffeine consumption against several types of cancer diseases. There are also reports about protective effect of caffeine and other xanthines against tumors induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. One of the explanations is based on biological activation of such carcinogens by cytochromes that are also known for metabolism of caffeine. However, there is also numerous data indicating reverse effect on cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs that inhibit the action of topoisomerase I (e.g. Camptothecin or Topotecan) and topoisomerase II inhibitors (e.g. Doxorubicin, Mitoxantrone or mAMSA). In this work we tested the hypothesis that the caffeine protective effect is the result of sequestering of aromatic mutagens by formation of stacking (pi-pi) complexes. As the models for the study we have chosen two well-known mutagens, that do not require metabolical activation: quinacrine mustard(QM, aromatic, heterocyclic nitrogen mustard) and mechlorethamine (NM2, aliphatic nitrogen mustard). The flow cytometry study of these agents' action on the cell cycle of HL-60 cells indicated that caffeine prevents the cytotoxic action of QM, but not that of NM2. The formations of stacking complexes of QM with caffeine were confirmed by light absorption, calorimetric measurements and by molecular modeling calculation. Using the statistical thermodynamics calculations we calculated the "neighborhood" association constant (K(AC)=59+/-2M(-1)) and enthalpy change (DeltaH(0')=-116cal mol(-1)); the favorable entropy change of complex formation (DeltaS(0')=7.72cal mol(-1)K(-1), due to release of several water molecules, associated with components in the process of complex formation). The Gibbs' free energy change of QM-CAF formation is DeltaG(0')=-2.41kcal mol(-1). We were unable to detect any interaction between NM2 and caffeine either by spectroscopic or calorimetric measurement. In order to establish, whether the

  14. Optimization of alkylating agent prodrugs derived from phenol and aniline mustards: a new clinical candidate prodrug (ZD2767) for antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT).

    PubMed

    Springer, C J; Dowell, R; Burke, P J; Hadley, E; Davis, D H; Blakey, D C; Melton, R G; Niculescu-Duvaz, I

    1995-12-22

    Sixteen novel potential prodrugs derived from phenol or aniline mustards and their 16 corresponding drugs with ring substitution and/or different alkylating functionalities were designed. The [[[4-]bis(2-bromoethyl)-(1a), [[[4-[bis(2-iodoethyl)-(1b), and [[[4-[(2-chloroethyl)-[2-(mesyloxy)ethyl]amino]phenyl]oxy] carbonyl]-L-glutamic acids (1c), their [[[2- and 3-substituted-4-[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl]oxy]carbonyl]-L- glutamic acids (1e-1), and the [[3-substituted-4-[bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl]carbamoyl]-L- glutamic acids (1o-r) were synthesized. They are bifunctional alkylating agents in which the activating effect of the phenolic hydroxyl or amino function is masked through an oxycarbonyl or a carbamoyl bond to a glutamic acid. These prodrugs were designed to be activated to their corresponding phenol and aniline nitrogen mustard drugs at a tumor site by prior administration of a monoclonal antibody conjugated to the bacterial enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2) in antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT). The synthesis of the analogous novel parent drugs (2a-r) is also described. The viability of a colorectal cell line (LoVo) was monitored with the potential prodrugs and the parent drugs. The differential in the cytotoxicity between the potential prodrugs and their corresponding active drugs ranged between 12 and > 195 fold. Compounds 1b-d,f,o exhibited substantial prodrug activity, since a cytotoxicity differential of > 100 was achieved compared to 2b-d,f,o respectively. The ability of the potential prodrugs to act as substrates for CPG2 was determined (kinetic parameters KM and kcat), and the chemical stability was measured for all the compounds. The unsubstituted phenols with different alkylating functionalities (1a-c) proved to have the highest ratio of the substrates kcat:KM. From these studies [[[4-[bis(2-iodoethyl)amino]phenyl]oxy]carbonyl]-L-glutamic acid (1b) emerges as a new ADEPT clinical trial candidate due to its physicochemical and

  15. Alleviation of mutagenic effects of polycyclic aromatic agents (quinacrine mustard, ICR-191 and ICR-170) by caffeine and pentoxifylline.

    PubMed

    Piosik, Jacek; Ulanowska, Katarzyna; Gwizdek-Wiśniewska, Anna; Czyz, Agata; Kapuściński, Jan; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2003-09-29

    Previous studies performed by others indicated that apart from its other biological effects, caffeine (CAF) may have a role in protection of organisms against cancer. However, biological mechanism of this phenomenon remained unknown. Recent studies suggested that caffeine can form stacking (pi-pi) complexes with polycyclic aromatic chemicals. Therefore, one might speculate that effective concentrations of polycyclic aromatic mutagens could be reduced in the presence of caffeine. Here we demonstrate that caffeine and another xanthine, pentoxifylline (PTX), effectively alleviate mutagenic action of polycyclic aromatic agents (exemplified by quinacrine mustard (QM), 2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-(3-(2-chloroethyl)aminopropylamino)acridine.2HCl (ICR-191) and 1,3,7-propanediamine-N-(2-chloroethyl)-N'-(6-chloro-2-methoxy-9-acridinyl)-N-ethyl.2HCl (ICR-170)), but not of aliphatic mutagens (exemplified by mechlorethamine), in the recently developed mutagenicity test based on bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Biophysical studies indicated that caffeine and pentoxifylline can form stacking complexes with the aromatic agents mentioned above. Molecular modeling also confirmed a possibility of stacking interactions between examined molecules.

  16. Development and Application of Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs) for Chemical Warfare Nerve and Sulfur Mustard Agents.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Annetta Paule; Opresko, Dennis M; Young, Robert A; Hauschild, Veronique

    2006-01-01

    Acute exposure guideline levels (AEGLs) have been developed for the chemical warfare agents GB, GA, GD, GF, VX, and sulfur mustard. These AEGLs were approved by the National Advisory Committee for Acute Exposure Guideline Levels for Hazardous Substances after Federal Register publication and comment, and judged as scientifically valid by the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology Subcommittee on AEGLs. AEGLs represent general public exposure limits for durations ranging from 10 min to 8 h, and for three levels of severity (AEGL-1, AEGL-2, AEGL-3). Mild effects are possible at concentrations greater than AEGL-1, while life-threatening effects are expected at concentrations greater than AEGL-3. AEGLs can be applied to various civilian and national defense purposes, including evacuation and shelter-in-place protocols, reentry levels, protective clothing specifications, and analytical monitoring requirements. This report documents development and derivation of AEGL values for six key chemical warfare agents, and makes recommendations for their application to various potential exposure scenarios.

  17. Understanding evaporation characteristics of a drop of distilled sulfur mustard (HD) chemical agent from stainless steel and aluminum substrates.

    PubMed

    Jung, H; Lee, H W

    2014-05-30

    We report herein the evaporation rates and mechanism of a drop of distilled sulfur mustard (HD) agent from stainless steel and aluminum substrates. For systematic analysis, we used a laboratory-sized wind tunnel, thermal desorption (TD) connected to gas chromatograph/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and drop shape analysis (DSA). We found that the evaporation rates of HD from stainless steel and aluminum increased with temperature. The rates were also linearly proportional to drop size. The time-dependent contact angle measurement showed that the evaporation of the drop of HD proceeded only by constant contact area mechanism from stainless steel surface. On the other hand, the evaporation of HD from aluminum proceeded by a combined mechanism of constant contact area mode and constant contact angle mode. Our experimental data sets and analysis could be used to predict vapor and contact hazard persistence of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in the air and on exterior surfaces with chemical releases, which assists the military decision influencing personnel safety and decontamination of the site upon a chemical attack event.

  18. Highly potent analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing D-phenylalanine nitrogen mustard in position 6

    SciTech Connect

    Bajusz, S.; Janaky, T.; Csernus, V.J.; Bokser, L.; Fekete, M.; Srkalovic, G.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V. )

    1989-08-01

    The nitrogen mustard derivatives of 4-phenylbutyric acid and L-phenylalanine, called chlorambucil (Chl) and melphalan (Mel), respectively, have been incorporated into several peptide hormones, including luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). The alkylating analogues of LH-RH were prepared by linking Chl, as an N-acyl moiety, to the complete amino acid sequence of agonistic and antagonistic analogues. These compounds, in particular the antagonistic analogues, showed much lower potency than their congeners carrying other acyl groups. To obtain highly potent alkylating analogues of LH-RH, the D enantiomer of Mel was incorporated into position 6 of the native hormone and some of its antagonistic analogues. Of the peptides prepared, (D-Mel{sup 6})LH-RH (SB-05) and (Ac-D-Nal(2){sup 1},D-Phe(pCl){sup 2},D-Pal(3){sup 3},Arg{sup 5},D-Mel{sup 6},D-Ala{sup 10})LH-RH (SB-86, where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine and Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine) possessed the expected high agonistic and antagonistic activities, respectively, and also showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of rat pituitary cells, human breast cancer cells, human prostate cancer cells, and rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumor cells. These two analogues exerted cytotoxic effects on human and rat mammary cancer cells in vitro. Thus these two D-Mel{sup 6} analogues seem to be particularly suitable for the study of how alkylating analogues of LH-RH could interfere with intracellular events in certain cancer cells.

  19. Determination of nitrogen mustard hydrolysis products, ethanolamines by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatization.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Isaac; Seto, Yasuo

    2006-07-28

    A method for determining N-ethyldiethanolamine (EDEA), N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and triethanolamine (TEA), hydrolysis products of nitrogen mustards, in water, urine and blood samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) after derivatization by tert-butyldimethylsilylation (TBDMS) is described. The sample solution was evaporated to dryness, and reacted with N-methyl-N-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) at 60 degrees C for 1h. The TBDMS derivatives were separated on a DB-5 column and detected by electron-ionization MS. The quantitation of EDEA, MDEA and TEA was performed by measuring the respective peak areas on the extracted ion chromatograms of m/z 216, m/z 202 and m/z 346, respectively, using nonadecane (C19), the peak area of which was measured at m/z 268, as an internal standard. When the water sample was initially analyzed, considerable loss of EDEA, MDEA and TEA occurred by evaporation. The addition of hydrochloric acid (HCl) to the water sample (final 1 mM), however, permitted quantitative recoveries to be achieved (88%, 88% and 79% for EDEA-(TBDMS)2, MDEA-(TBDMS)2 and TEA-(TBDMS)3, respectively). The limits of detections (LODs, scan mode, S/N = 3) were 2.5, 2.5 and 10 ng/ml for EDEA, MDEA and TEA, respectively. Ethanolamines could be also determined in urine samples (volume 0.1 ml), with reasonable recoveries of 72-100% by the addition of HCl (final 1 mM). For the analysis of serum samples, the sample was precipitated by the addition of perchloric acid (final 3.2%), and the resulting supernatant was neutralized with potassium carbonate, and then acidified by the addition of HCl. The recovery of TBDMS derivatives of ethanolamines was found to rather low (7-31%).

  20. Highly potent analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing D-phenylalanine nitrogen mustard in position 6.

    PubMed Central

    Bajusz, S; Janaky, T; Csernus, V J; Bokser, L; Fekete, M; Srkalovic, G; Redding, T W; Schally, A V

    1989-01-01

    The nitrogen mustard derivatives of 4-phenylbutyric acid and L-phenylalanine, called chlorambucil (Chl) and melphalan (Mel), respectively, have been incorporated into several peptide hormones, including luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). The alkylating analogues of LH-RH were prepared by linking Chl, as an N-acyl moiety, to the complete amino acid sequence of agonistic and antagonistic analogues. These compounds, in particular the antagonistic analogues, showed much lower potency than their congeners carrying other acyl groups. To obtain highly potent alkylating analogues of LH-RH, the D enantiomer of Mel was incorporated into position 6 of the native hormone and some of its antagonistic analogues. Of the peptides prepared, [D-Mel6]LH-RH (SB-05) and [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(pCl)2,D-Pal(3)3,Arg5,D-Mel6,D-Ala10++ +]LH-RH [SB-86, where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine and Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine] possessed the expected high agonistic and antagonistic activities, respectively, and also showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of rat pituitary cells, human breast cancer cells, human prostate cancer cells, and rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumor cells. These two analogues exerted cytotoxic effects on human and rat mammary cancer cells in vitro. Thus these two D-Mel6 analogues seem to be particularly suitable for the study of how alkylating analogues of LH-RH could interfere with intracellular events in certain cancer cells. PMID:2548207

  1. Desorption of bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, mustard agent, from the surface of hardened cement paste (HCP) wafers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hairong; Zhou, Xuezhi; Guan, Yingqiang; Zhou, Liming; Wang, Xinming; Yan, Huijuan

    2013-05-01

    The decontamination of surfaces exposed to chemical warfare agents is an interesting scientific topic. The desorption behavior of bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (sulfur mustard, HD) from the surface of the HD-contaminated hardened cement paste (HCP) was investigated under different weather conditions, which should provide scientific reference data for protection and decontamination projects involving HD-contaminated HCP in different conditions. The desorption of HD from the surface of HCP wafers was studied, and the effects of the purge air flow rate, water content, sorption temperature, and substrate age were investigated. HD desorption was detected from the surface of HD-contaminated HCP, but the desorption velocity was relatively slow. The desorption quantity remained within an order of magnitude throughout a time span of 36h (25°C at 200mL/min of purge air), and the amount of HD that was desorbed from each square meter of HCP surface was approximately 1.1g (25°C at 200mL/min of purge air), which was approximately 5.5 percent of the total HD that was initially applied. A higher flow rate of the purge air, increased water content, and longer substrate age of HCP all increased the HD desorption. In contrast, increased temperatures suppressed HD desorption.

  2. The generation of 4-hydroxynonenal, an electrophilic lipid peroxidation end product, in rabbit cornea organ cultures treated with UVB light and nitrogen mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Ruijin; Po, Iris; Mishin, Vladimir; Black, Adrienne T.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Gordon, Marion K.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2013-10-15

    The cornea is highly sensitive to oxidative stress, a process that can lead to lipid peroxidation. Ultraviolet light B (UVB) and nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine) are corneal toxicants known to induce oxidative stress. Using a rabbit air-lifted corneal organ culture model, the oxidative stress responses to these toxicants in the corneal epithelium was characterized. Treatment of the cornea with UVB (0.5 J/cm{sup 2}) or nitrogen mustard (100 nmol) resulted in the generation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a reactive lipid peroxidation end product. This was associated with increased expression of the antioxidant, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In human corneal epithelial cells in culture, addition of 4-HNE or 9-nitrooleic acid, a reactive nitrolipid formed during nitrosative stress, caused a time-dependent induction of HO-1 mRNA and protein; maximal responses were evident after 10 h with 30 μM 4-HNE or 6 h with 10 μM 9-nitrooleic acid. 4-HNE and 9-nitrooleic acid were also found to activate Erk1/2, JNK and p38 MAP kinases, as well as phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3)/Akt. Inhibition of p38 blocked 4-HNE- and 9-nitrooleic acid-induced HO-1 expression. Inhibition of Erk1/2, and to a lesser extent, JNK and PI3K/Akt, suppressed only 4-HNE-induced HO-1, while inhibition of JNK and PI3K/Akt, but not Erk1/2, partly reduced 9-nitrooleic acid-induced HO-1. These data indicate that the actions of 4-HNE and 9-nitrooleic acid on corneal epithelial cells are distinct. The sensitivity of corneal epithelial cells to oxidative stress may be an important mechanism mediating tissue injury induced by UVB or nitrogen mustard. - Highlights: • UVB or nitrogen mustard causes rabbit corneal epithelial injury. • 4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) was formed and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was increased. • 4-HNE induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression in human corneal epithelial cells. • The induction of HO-1 by 4-HNE was through MAP kinase activation.

  3. Development of Reactive Topical Skin Protectants against Sulfur Mustard and Nerve Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    that they corrode metals, paint and wood. Thus, new materials or adsorbents offering rapid kinetics yet suitable from a safety and cost standpoint... methanol solution. Upon autoclave treatment, the solution is converted to a gel-like metal-hydroxide solution. After the hypercritical drying step, a high...temperature dehydration step is required. This is done under a vacuum, but can also be accomplished by a fast flow of hot nitrogen gas. Conversely

  4. Development of reactive topical skin protectants against sulfur mustard and nerve agents.

    PubMed

    Koper, O; Lucas, E; Klabunde, K J

    1999-12-01

    The potential for highly reactive nanoparticles (RNP) to absorb destructively, i.e. to neutralize highly toxic substances such as the warfare agents GA, GB, HD and VX, has been demonstrated in the laboratory. Reactive nanoparticles represent a new class of nanoscale particles of metals and metal oxides that differ from other nanoparticles in reactivity and crystalline morphology. The potential for incorporating RNP into a protective barrier skin cream also has been demonstrated. Preliminary studies indicate that RNP are physically and chemically compatible with a base cream provided by the Army Medical Research Office and, importantly, remain reactive with chemical agents while promising to be compatible with skin contact.

  5. The synthesis and biological evaluation of new DNA-directed alkylating agents, phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates containing a urea linker.

    PubMed

    Marvania, Bhavin; Kakadiya, Rajesh; Christian, Wilson; Chen, Tai-Lin; Wu, Ming-Hsi; Suman, Sharda; Tala, Kiran; Lee, Te-Chang; Shah, Anamik; Su, Tsann-Long

    2014-08-18

    We synthesized a series of phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates to study their antitumorigenic effects. These agents were prepared by the condensation of 4-[N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)amino]phenyl isocyanate with 6-amino-4-methylamino or 4-anilinoquinolines. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed that the C2-methylquinoline derivatives (18a-o) were generally more cytotoxic than the C2-phenylquinoline conjugates (23a-d) in inhibiting the cell growth of various human tumor cell lines in vitro. However, the methylamino or aniline substituents at C4 of quinoline did not influence the cytotoxic effects. The title conjugates were capable of inducing DNA cross-linking and promoting cell-cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. This study demonstrates that phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinoline conjugates are generally more potent than phenyl N-mustard-4-anilinoquinazoline conjugates against the cell growth of various tumor cell-lines.

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of DNA-targeted spatially separated bis(aniline mustards) as potential alkylating agents with enhanced DNA cross-linking capability.

    PubMed

    Gourdie, T A; Prakash, A S; Wakelin, L P; Woodgate, P D; Denny, W A

    1991-01-01

    DNA-targeted separated bis-mustards were synthesized by attaching aniline mono-mustards at the 4- and 9-positions of the DNA-intercalating ligand 9-aminoacridine-4-carboxamide, with the intention of improving the low cross-link to monoadduct ratio found with most alkylating agents. The geometry of these compounds requires that, when the acridine binds to DNA by intercalation, one alkylating moiety is delivered to each DNA groove. Gel electrophoretic studies show that only one arm of these compounds (probably that attached to the 9-position) alkylates DNA, such alkylation occurring specifically in the major groove at the N7 of guanines. Cell-line studies confirm that the mode of cytotoxicity of these compounds (unlike that of untargeted aniline bis-mustards of comparable reactivity) is due to bulky DNA monoadduct formation. It is concluded that more information is required about the exact orientation of the initial monoadducts before ligands with specific DNA cross-linking ability can be designed.

  7. Hair analysis as a useful procedure for detection of vapour exposure to chemical warfare agents: simulation of sulphur mustard with methyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Spiandore, Marie; Piram, Anne; Lacoste, Alexandre; Josse, Denis; Doumenq, Pierre

    2014-06-01

    Chemical warfare agents (CWA) are highly toxic compounds which have been produced to kill or hurt people during conflicts or terrorist attacks. Despite the fact that their use is strictly prohibited according to international convention, populations' exposure still recently occurred. Development of markers of exposure to CWA is necessary to distinguish exposed victims from unexposed ones. We present the first study of hair usage as passive sampler to assess contamination by chemicals in vapour form. This work presents more particularly the hair adsorption capacity for methyl salicylate used as a surrogate of the vesicant sulphur mustard. Chemical vapours toxicity through the respiratory route has historically been defined through Haber's law's concentration-time (Ct) product, and vapour exposure of hair to methyl salicylate was conducted with various times or doses of exposure in the range of incapacitating and lethal Ct products corresponding to sulphur mustard. Following exposure, extraction of methyl salicylate from hair was conducted by simple soaking in dichloromethane. Methyl salicylate could be detected on hair for vapour concentration corresponding to about one fifth of the sulphur mustard concentration that would kill 50% of exposed individuals (LCt50). The amount of methyl salicylate recovered from hair increased with time or dose of exposure. It showed a good correlation with the concentration-time product, suggesting that hair could be used like a passive sampler to assess vapour exposure to chemical compounds. It introduces great perspectives concerning the use of hair as a marker of exposure to CWA.

  8. A glass capillary based microfluidic electromembrane extraction of basic degradation products of nitrogen mustard and VX from water.

    PubMed

    Tak, Vijay; Kabra, Ankur; Pardasani, Deepak; Goud, D Raghavender; Jain, Rajeev; Dubey, D K

    2015-12-24

    In this work, a glass capillary based microfluidic electromembrane extraction (μ-EME) was demonstrated for the first time. The device was made by connecting an auxillary borosilicate glass tubing (O.D. 3mm, I.D. 2mm) perpendicular to main borosilicate glass capillary just below one end of the capillary (O.D. 8mm, I.D. 1.2mm). It generated the distorted T-shaped device with inlet '1' and inlet '2' for the introduction of sample and acceptor solutions, respectively. At one end of this device (inlet '2'), a microsyringe containing acceptor solution along with hollow fiber (O.D. 1000μm) was introduced. This configuration creates the micro-channel between inner wall of glass capillary and outer surface of hollow fiber. Sample solution was pumped into the system through another end of glass capillary (inlet '1'), with a micro-syringe pump. The sample was in direct contact with the supported liquid membrane (SLM), consisted of 20% (w/w) di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate in 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether immobilized in the pores of the hollow fiber. In the lumen of the hollow fiber, the acceptor phase was present. The driving force for extraction was direct current (DC) electrical potential sustained over the SLM. Highly polar (logP=-2.5 to 1.4) basic degradation products of nitrogen mustard and VX were selected as model analytes. The influence of chemical composition of SLM, extraction time, voltage and pH of donor and acceptor phase were investigated. The model analytes were extracted from 10μL of pure water with recoveries ranging from 15.7 to 99.7% just after 3min of operation time. Under optimized conditions, good limits of detection (2-50ngmL(-1)), linearity (from 5-1000 to 100-1000ngmL(-1)), and repeatability (RSDs below 11.9%, n=3) were achieved. Applicability of the proposed μ-EME was proved by recovering triethanolamine (31.3%) from 10μL of five times diluted original water sample provided by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons during 28th official

  9. Chemical genetics analysis of an aniline mustard anticancer agent reveals complex I of the electron transport chain as a target.

    PubMed

    Fedeles, Bogdan I; Zhu, Angela Y; Young, Kellie S; Hillier, Shawn M; Proffitt, Kyle D; Essigmann, John M; Croy, Robert G

    2011-09-30

    The antitumor agent 11β (CAS 865070-37-7), consisting of a DNA-damaging aniline mustard linked to an androgen receptor (AR) ligand, is known to form covalent DNA adducts and to induce apoptosis potently in AR-positive prostate cancer cells in vitro; it also strongly prevents growth of LNCaP xenografts in mice. The present study describes the unexpectedly strong activity of 11β against the AR-negative HeLa cells, both in cell culture and tumor xenografts, and uncovers a new mechanism of action that likely explains this activity. Cellular fractionation experiments indicated that mitochondria are the major intracellular sink for 11β; flow cytometry studies showed that 11β exposure rapidly induced oxidative stress, mitochondria being an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, 11β inhibited oxygen consumption both in intact HeLa cells and in isolated mitochondria. Specifically, 11β blocked uncoupled oxygen consumption when mitochondria were incubated with complex I substrates, but it had no effect on oxygen consumption driven by substrates acting downstream of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Moreover, 11β enhanced ROS generation in isolated mitochondria, suggesting that complex I inhibition is responsible for ROS production. At the cellular level, the presence of antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine or vitamin E) significantly reduced the toxicity of 11β, implicating ROS production as an important contributor to cytotoxicity. Collectively, our findings establish complex I inhibition and ROS generation as a new mechanism of action for 11β, which supplements conventional DNA adduct formation to promote cancer cell death.

  10. DNA-directed alkylating ligands as potential antitumor agents: sequence specificity of alkylation by intercalating aniline mustards.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A S; Denny, W A; Gourdie, T A; Valu, K K; Woodgate, P D; Wakelin, L P

    1990-10-23

    The sequence preferences for alkylation of a series of novel parasubstituted aniline mustards linked to the DNA-intercalating chromophore 9-aminoacridine by an alkyl chain of variable length were studied by using procedures analogous to Maxam-Gilbert reactions. The compounds alkylate DNA at both guanine and adenine sites. For mustards linked to the acridine by a short alkyl chain through a para O- or S-link group, 5'-GT sequences are the most preferred sites at which N7-guanine alkylation occurs. For analogues with longer chain lengths, the preference of 5'-GT sequences diminishes in favor of N7-adenine alkylation at the complementary 5'-AC sequence. Magnesium ions are shown to selectively inhibit alkylation at the N7 of adenine (in the major groove) by these compounds but not the alkylation at the N3 of adenine (in the minor groove) by the antitumor antibiotic CC-1065. Effects of chromophore variation were also studied by using aniline mustards linked to quinazoline and sterically hindered tert-butyl-9-aminoacridine chromophores. The results demonstrate that in this series of DNA-directed mustards the noncovalent interactions of the carrier chromophores with DNA significantly modify the sequence selectivity of alkylation by the mustard. Relationships between the DNA alkylation patterns of these compounds and their biological activities are discussed.

  11. Attempted use of zinc in vivo to protect against nitrogen mustard toxicity in tumor-free and in L1210 leukemia-bearing B6D2F sub 1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shackelford, M.E.; Tobey, R.A.

    1989-12-01

    The use of alkylating agents in treating cancer is limited by their toxicity to both normal and tumor tissue. Early in vitro and in vivo studies had indicated that zinc could be effective in mitigating this toxicity to normal tissue. The present studies were done to determine the capability of zinc to induce in living tissue a protective response to an alkylating agent, without also contributing to mortality. Tumor-free and leukemia-bearing B6D2F{sub 1} mice were treated with zinc before administration of the alkylating agent nitrogen mustard (HN{sub 2}). Protocols for administration route and frequency and chemical formulation of the zinc were varied. The effect of a phytate-free diet was studied. Two parameters were used to judge the effectiveness of zinc in protecting animals from the toxicity of HN{sub 2}: the number of tumor-free mice who survived and any increase in the median life span of the tumor-bearing mice. Zinc provided a limited degree of protection against HN{sub 2} toxicity in tumor-free mice, but in tumor-bearing animals, the protective response elicited with the protocols examined was too small to provide a significant therapeutic benefit. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Organic Chemical Attribution Signatures for the Sourcing of a Mustard Agent and Its Starting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Carlos G.; Bronk, Krys; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-05-17

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) are being investigated for the sourcing of chemical warfare (CW) agents and their starting materials that may be implicated in chemical attacks or CW proliferation. The work reported here demonstrates for the first time trace impurities produced during the synthesis of tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3) that point to specific reagent stocks used in the synthesis of this CW agent. Thirty batches of HN3 were synthesized using different combinations of commercial stocks of triethanolamine (TEA), thionyl chloride, chloroform, and acetone. The HN3 batches and reagent stocks were then analyzed for impurities by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Reaction-produced impurities indicative of specific TEA and chloroform stocks were exclusively discovered in HN3 batches made with those reagent stocks. In addition, some reagent impurities were found in the HN3 batches that were presumably not altered during synthesis and believed to be indicative of reagent type regardless of stock. Supervised classification using partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) on the impurity profiles of chloroform samples from seven stocks resulted in an average classification error by cross-validation of 2.4%. A classification error of zero was obtained using the seven-stock PLSDA model on a validation set of samples from an arbitrarily selected chloroform stock. In a separate analysis, all samples from two of seven chloroform stocks that were purposely not modeled had their samples matched to a chloroform stock rather than assigned a “no class” classification.

  13. Organic Chemical Attribution Signatures for the Sourcing of a Mustard Agent and Its Starting Materials.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Carlos G; Bronk, Krys; Dockendorff, Brian P; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2016-05-17

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) are being investigated for the sourcing of chemical warfare (CW) agents and their starting materials that may be implicated in chemical attacks or CW proliferation. The work reported here demonstrates for the first time trace impurities from the synthesis of tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3) that point to the reagent and the specific reagent stocks used in the synthesis of this CW agent. Thirty batches of HN3 were synthesized using different combinations of commercial stocks of triethanolamine (TEA), thionyl chloride, chloroform, and acetone. The HN3 batches and reagent stocks were then analyzed for impurities by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. All the reagent stocks had impurity profiles that differentiated them from one another. This was demonstrated by building classification models with partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) and obtaining average stock classification errors of 2.4, 2.8, 2.8, and 11% by cross-validation for chloroform (7 stocks), thionyl chloride (3 stocks), acetone (7 stocks), and TEA (3 stocks), respectively, and 0% for a validation set of chloroform samples. In addition, some reagent impurities indicative of reagent type were found in the HN3 batches that were originally present in the reagent stocks and presumably not altered during synthesis. More intriguing, impurities in HN3 batches that were apparently produced by side reactions of impurities unique to specific TEA and chloroform stocks, and thus indicative of their use, were observed.

  14. Comparison of latex body paint with wetted gauze wipes for sampling the chemical warfare agents VX and sulfur mustard from common indoor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hernon-Kenny, Laura A; Behringer, Deborah L; Crenshaw, Michael D

    2016-05-01

    Comparison of solvent-wetted gauze with body paint, a peelable surface sampling media, for the sampling of the chemical warfare agents VX and sulfur mustard from nine surfaces was performed. The nine surfaces sampled are those typical of interior public venues and include smooth, rough, porous, and non-porous surfaces. Overall, solvent-wetted gauze (wipes) performed better for the recovery of VX from non-porous surfaces while body paint (BP) performed better for the porous surfaces. The average percent VX recoveries using wipes and BP, respectively, are: finished wood flooring, 86.2%, 71.4%; escalator handrail, 47.3%, 26.7%; stainless steel, 80.5%, 56.1%; glazed ceramic tile, 81.8%, 44.9%; ceiling tile, 1.77%, 13.1%; painted drywall 7.83%, 21.1%; smooth cement, 0.64%, 10.3%; upholstery fabric, 24.6%, 23.1%; unfinished wood flooring, 9.37%, 13.1%. Solvent-wetted gauze performed better for the recovery of sulfur mustard from three of the relatively non-porous surfaces while body paint performed better for the more porous surfaces. The average percent sulfur mustard recoveries using wipes and BP, respectively, are: finished wood flooring, 30.2%, 2.97%; escalator handrail, 4.40%, 4.09%; stainless steel, 21.2%, 3.30%; glazed ceramic tile, 49.7%, 16.7%; ceiling tile, 0.33%, 11.1%; painted drywall 2.05%, 10.6%; smooth cement, 1.20%, 35.2%; upholstery fabric, 7.63%, 6.03%; unfinished wood flooring, 0.90%, 1.74%.

  15. Enhanced detectability of fluorinated derivatives of N,N-dialkylamino alcohols and precursors of nitrogen mustards by gas chromatography coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis for verification of chemical weapons convention.

    PubMed

    Garg, Prabhat; Purohit, Ajay; Tak, Vijay K; Dubey, D K

    2009-11-06

    N,N-Dialkylamino alcohols, N-methyldiethanolamine, N-ethyldiethanolamine and triethanolamine are the precursors of VX type nerve agents and three different nitrogen mustards respectively. Their detection and identification is of paramount importance for verification analysis of chemical weapons convention. GC-FTIR is used as complimentary technique to GC-MS analysis for identification of these analytes. One constraint of GC-FTIR, its low sensitivity, was overcome by converting the analytes to their fluorinated derivatives. Owing to high absorptivity in IR region, these derivatives facilitated their detection by GC-FTIR analysis. Derivatizing reagents having trimethylsilyl, trifluoroacyl and heptafluorobutyryl groups on imidazole moiety were screened. Derivatives formed there were analyzed by GC-FTIR quantitatively. Of these reagents studied, heptafluorobutyrylimidazole (HFBI) produced the greatest increase in sensitivity by GC-FTIR detection. 60-125 folds of sensitivity enhancement were observed for the analytes by HFBI derivatization. Absorbance due to various functional groups responsible for enhanced sensitivity were compared by determining their corresponding relative molar extinction coefficients ( [Formula: see text] ) considering uniform optical path length. The RSDs for intraday repeatability and interday reproducibility for various derivatives were 0.2-1.1% and 0.3-1.8%. Limit of detection (LOD) was achieved up to 10-15ng and applicability of the method was tested with unknown samples obtained in international proficiency tests.

  16. Neutralization and biodegradation of sulfur mustard. Final report, October 1995-June 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, S.P.; Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.; Earley, J.T.; Irvine, R.L.

    1997-02-01

    The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard was hydrolyzed to products that were biologically mineralized in sequencing batch reactors seeded with activated sludge. Greater than 90% carbon removal was achieved using laboratory scale bioreactors processing hydrolyzed munitions grade sulfur mustard obtained directly from the U.S. Chemical Stockpile. The bioreactor effluent was nontoxic and contained no detectable sulfur mustard or priority pollutants. The sulfur mustard hydrolysis biodegradation process has potential application to the congressionally mandated disposal of sulfur mustard stockpiles.

  17. A combined DNA-affinic molecule and N-mustard alkylating agent has an anti-cancer effect and induces autophagy in oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wen-Liang; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Lee, Tsung-Heng; Su, Tsann-Long; Chien, Yueh; Chen, Yi-Wei; Huang, Pin-I; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Tu, Pang-Hsien; Kao, Shou-Yen; Lo, Jeng-Fan

    2012-01-01

    Although surgery or the combination of chemotherapy and radiation are reported to improve the quality of life and reduce symptoms in patients with oral cancer, the prognosis of oral cancer remains generally poor. DNA alkylating agents, such as N-mustard, play an important role in cancer drug development. BO-1051 is a new 9-anilinoacridine N-mustard-derivative anti-cancer drug that can effectively target a variety of cancer cell lines and inhibit tumorigenesis in vivo. However, the underlying mechanism of BO-1051-mediated tumor suppression remains undetermined. In the present study, BO-1051 suppressed cell viability with a low IC(50) in oral cancer cells, but not in normal gingival fibroblasts. Cell cycle analysis revealed that the tumor suppression by BO-1051 was accompanied by cell cycle arrest and downregulation of stemness genes. The enhanced conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and the formation of acidic vesicular organelles indicated that BO-1501 induced autophagy. The expression of checkpoint kinases was upregulated as demonstrated with Western blot analysis, showing that BO-1051 could induce DNA damage and participate in DNA repair mechanisms. Furthermore, BO-1051 treatment alone exhibited a moderate tumor suppressive effect against xenograft tumor growth in immunocompromised mice. Importantly, the combination of BO-1051 and radiation led to a potent inhibition on xenograft tumorigenesis. Collectively, our findings demonstrated that BO-1051 exhibited a cytotoxic effect via cell cycle arrest and the induction of autophagy. Thus, the combination of BO-1051 and radiotherapy may be a feasible therapeutic strategy against oral cancer in the future.

  18. Sulfur Mustard Toxicity Following Dermal Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Paromov, Victor; Suntres, Zacharias; Smith, Milton; Stone, William L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Sulfur mustard (bis-2-(chloroethyl) sulfide) is a chemical warfare agent (military code: HD) causing extensive skin injury. The mechanisms underlying HD-induced skin damage are not fully elucidated. This review will critically evaluate the evidence showing that oxidative stress is an important factor in HD skin toxicity. Oxidative stress results when the production of reactive oxygen (ROS) and/or reactive nitrogen oxide species (RNOS) exceeds the capacity of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Methods: This review will discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of HD skin toxicity in both in vivo and in vitro model systems with emphasis on the limitations of the various model systems. Evidence supporting the therapeutic potential of antioxidants and antioxidant liposomes will be evaluated. Antioxidant liposomes are effective vehicles for delivering both lipophilic (incorporated into the lipid bilayers) and water-soluble (encapsulated in the aqueous inner-spaces) antioxidants to skin. The molecular mechanisms interconnecting oxidative stress to HD skin toxicity are also detailed. Results: DNA repair and inflammation, in association with oxidative stress, induce intracellular events leading to apoptosis or to a programmable form of necrosis. The free radical, nitric oxide (NO), is of considerable interest with respect to the mechanisms of HD toxicity. NO signaling pathways are important in modulating inflammation, cell death, and wound healing in skin cells. Conclusions: Potential future directions are summarized with emphasis on a systems biology approach to studying sulfur mustard toxicity to skin as well as the newly emerging area of redox proteomics. PMID:18091984

  19. High-throughput sample preparation and simultaneous column regeneration liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for determination of nitrogen mustard metabolites in human urine.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Muntha K; Mills, Grier; Nixon, Christopher; Wyatt, Shane A; Croley, Timothy R

    2011-08-15

    Nitrogen mustards (NMs) are known to have DNA alkylation and strong vesicant properties. Their availability to terrorist organizations makes them a potential choice for chemical attacks on civilian populations. After an exposure, it is difficult to measure NMs directly because of their rapid metabolism in the human body. Therefore to determine an individual's level of exposure to NMs, it is necessary to analyze for NM metabolites being excreted by the body. The metabolites of NMs are generated by a hydrolysis reaction, and are easily detectable by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This work is focused on the development of a high-throughput assay for the quantitation of N-ethyldiethanolamine (EDEA) and N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) metabolites of bis (2-chloroethyl) ethylethanamine (HN1) and bis (2-chloroethyl) methylethanamine (HN2), respectively. The method uses automated 96-well plate sample preparation of human urine samples and a 2-position 10-port switching valve to allow for simultaneous regeneration of the liquid chromatography (LC) columns. Using this method, over 18 h was saved through the reduction of sample preparation and analysis time when compared to a conventional method for 96 samples. The validated method provided excellent accuracy for both EDEA (100.9%) and MDEA (100.6%) with precision better than 5.27% for each analyte.

  20. Thiazole-based nitrogen mustards: Design, synthesis, spectroscopic studies, DFT calculation, molecular docking, and antiproliferative activity against selected human cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łączkowski, Krzysztof Z.; Świtalska, Marta; Baranowska-Łączkowska, Angelika; Plech, Tomasz; Paneth, Agata; Misiura, Konrad; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Czaplińska, Barbara; Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Malarz, Katarzyna; Musioł, Robert; Grela, Izabela

    2016-09-01

    Synthesis, characterization and investigation of antiproliferative activity of ten thiazole-based nitrogen mustard against human cancer cells lines (MV4-11, A549, MCF-7 and HCT116) and normal mouse fibroblast (BALB/3T3) is presented. The structures of novel compounds were determined using 1H and 13C NMR, FAB(+)-MS, and elemental analyses. Among the derivatives, 5b, 5c, 5e, 5f and 5i were found to exhibit high activity against human leukaemia MV4-11 cells with IC50 values of 2.17-4.26 μg/ml. The cytotoxic activity of compound 5c and 5f against BALB/3T3 cells is up to 20 times lower than against cancer cell lines. Our results also show that compounds 5e and 5i have very strong activity against MCF-7 and HCT116 with IC50 values of 3.02-4.13 μg/ml. Moreover, spectroscopic characterization and cellular localization for selected compound were performed. In order to identify potential drug targets we perform computer simulations with DNA-binding site of hTopoI and hTopoII and quantum chemical calculation of interaction and binding energies in complexes of the five most active compounds with guanine.

  1. NIST-Traceable NMR Method to Determine Quantitative Weight Percentage Purity of Nitrogen Mustard HN-3 Feedstock Samples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Analyte (agent) Area of Standard ( TEP ) Wt. Of Standard Sample Weight Found Z 1.5380 80.9512 53.5569 16.4000 38.4500 1.5110 1.5880 85.9070...Area of Analyte (agent) Area of Standard ( TEP ) Wt. Of Standard Sample Weight Found Z 1.4360 84.9107 56.0931 15.9800 35.9000 1.4745 1.5956...agent) Area of Standard ( TEP ) Wt. Of Standard Sample Weight Found Z 1.6268 98.8407 55.1482 14.7000 40.6700 1.6060 1.4780 85.2285 58.9585

  2. The Toxicity of Inhaled Sulphur Mustard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    BLANK UK UNCLASSIFIED Dstl/TR60201 Page 1 of 92 UK UNCLASSIFIED 1 Introduction The use of sulphur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulphide ; HD) as a... sulphide ; HD) as a chemical warfare (CW) agent remains of concern to the Armed Forces. Since its first use in World War 1 (WW1; Prentiss, 1937) HD has...Methyl- salicylate (MS); Minute Volume; Model Development; Pig; Porcine; Sulphur Mustard (HD) • Vapor; Bis(2-chloroethyl) sulphide INTRODUCTION Sulphur

  3. Mustard vesicant-induced lung injury: Advances in therapy.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Barry; Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R; Venosa, Alessandro; Heck, Diane E; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-08-15

    Most mortality and morbidity following exposure to vesicants such as sulfur mustard is due to pulmonary toxicity. Acute injury is characterized by epithelial detachment and necrosis in the pharynx, trachea and bronchioles, while long-term consequences include fibrosis and, in some instances, cancer. Current therapies to treat mustard poisoning are primarily palliative and do not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. New knowledge about vesicant-induced pulmonary disease pathogenesis has led to the identification of potentially efficacious strategies to reduce injury by targeting inflammatory cells and mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, proteases and proinflammatory/cytotoxic cytokines. Therapeutics under investigation include corticosteroids, N-acetyl cysteine, which has both mucolytic and antioxidant properties, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, liposomes containing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and/or tocopherols, protease inhibitors, and cytokine antagonists such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody and pentoxifylline. Antifibrotic and fibrinolytic treatments may also prove beneficial in ameliorating airway obstruction and lung remodeling. More speculative approaches include inhibitors of transient receptor potential channels, which regulate pulmonary epithelial cell membrane permeability, non-coding RNAs and mesenchymal stem cells. As mustards represent high priority chemical threat agents, identification of effective therapeutics for mitigating toxicity is highly significant.

  4. DNA-directed alkylating agents. 3. Structure-activity relationships for acridine-linked aniline mustards: consequences of varying the length of the linker chain.

    PubMed

    Valu, K K; Gourdie, T A; Boritzki, T J; Gravatt, G L; Baguley, B C; Wilson, W R; Wakelin, L P; Woodgate, P D; Denny, W A

    1990-11-01

    Four series of acridine-linked aniline mustards have been prepared and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxicity, in vivo antitumor activity, and DNA cross-linking ability. The anilines were attached to the DNA-intercalating acridine chromophores by link groups (-O-, -CH2-, -S-, and -SO2-) of widely varying electronic properties, providing four series of widely differing mustard reactivity where the alkyl chain linking the acridine and mustard moieties was varied from two to five carbons. Relationships were sought between chain length and biological properties. Within each series, increasing the chain length did not alter the reactivity of the alkylating moiety but did appear to position it differently on the DNA, since cross-linking ability (measured by agarose gel assay) altered with chain length, being maximal with the C4 analogue. The in vivo antitumor activities of the compounds depended to some extent on the reactivity of the mustard, with the least reactive SO2 compounds being inactive. However, DNA-targeting did appear to allow the use of less reactive mustards, since the S-linked acridine mustards showed significant activity whereas the parent S-mustard did not. Within each active series, the most active compound was the C4 homologue, suggesting some relationship between activity and extent of DNA alkylation.

  5. Integrated application of some compatible biocontrol agents along with mustard oil seed cake and furadan on Meloidogyne incognita infecting tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Bijoy Kumar; Pandey, Rajesh Kumar; Rathour, Kabindra Singh; Bhattacharya, Chaitali; Singh, Lokendra

    2006-11-01

    Experiments were carried out to study the effect of two fungal bioagents along with mustard oil cake and furadan against root knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita infecting tomato under greenhouse condition. Bioagents viz., Paecilomyces lilacinus and Trichoderma viride alone or in combination with mustard cake and furadan promoted plant growth, reduced number of galls/plant, egg masses/root system and eggs/egg mass. The fungal bioagents along with mustard cake and nematicide showed least nematodes reproduction factor as compared to untreated infested soil.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of chlorambucil/DNA adducts. A structural basis for the 5'-GNC interstrand DNA crosslink formed by nitrogen mustards.

    PubMed

    Remias, M G; Lee, C S; Haworth, I S

    1995-02-01

    The alkylation of DNA by chlorambucil has been studied using a computational approach. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the fully solvated non-covalent complex, two monoadducts and a crosslinked diadduct of chlorambucil with the d(CGG3G2CGC).-d(GCG1CCCG) duplex, in which the N7 atoms of G1, G2 and G3 are potential alkylation sites. The results provide a structural basis for the preference of nitrogen mustards to crosslink DNA duplexes at a 5'-GNC site (a 1,3 crosslink, G1-G3) rather than at a 5'-GC sites (a 1,2 crosslink, G1-G2). In the non-covalent complex simulation the drug reoriented from a non-interstrand crosslinking location to a position favorable for G1-G3 diadduct formation. It proved possible to construct a G1-G3 diadduct from a structure from the non-covalent simulation, and continue the molecular dynamics calculation without further disruption of the DNA structure. A crosslinked diadduct developed with four BII conformations on the 3' side of each alkylated guanine and of their respective complementary cytosine. In the first monoadduct simulation the starting point was the same DNA conformation used in the crosslinked diadduct simulation with alkylation at G1. In this simulation the DNA deformation was reduced, with the helix returning to a more canonical form. A second monoadduct simulation was started from a canonical DNA conformation alkylated at G3. Here, no significant motion towards a potential crosslinking conformation occurred. Collectively, the results suggest that crosslink formation is dependent upon the drug orientation prior to alkylation and the required deformation of the DNA to permit 1,3 crosslinking can largely be achieved in the non-covalent complex.

  7. Evaporation Rates of Chemical Warfare Agents Using 5-CM Wind Tunnels I. CASARM Sulfur Mustard (HD) from Glass

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    1.5 in. diameter circle) with the droplet of agent on it was placed on the piston and inserted into the wind tunnel. The humidified , temperature...n/i m’. extraction time ( ultrasonicate ): n/a min concentration of agent in extraction liquid nit ug nil. recovered mass: ny’ii mg Remarks drop

  8. Comparative toxicity of mono- and bifunctional alkylating homologues of sulphur mustard in human skin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Thomas W; McNeely, Karin; Louis, Kristen; Lecavalier, Pierre; Song, Yanfeng; Villanueva, Mercy; Clewley, Robin

    2017-03-08

    Sulphur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulphide; agent H) is a vesicant chemical warfare (CW) agent whose mechanism of action is not known with any certainty and for which there are no effective antidotes. It has a pronounced latent period before signs and symptoms of poisoning appear which it shares with the nitrogen mustards, and that differentiates it from other classes of vesicant agents. Sulphur mustard, the sulphur mustard CW agents Q (1,2-bis(2-chloroethylthio) ethane) and T (1,1 bis(2-chloroethylthioethyl) ether), the H partial hydrolysis product hemi-sulphur mustard (2-chloroethyl 2-hydroxyethyl sulphide; HSM), and the commercially available 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (CEES) were characterized with respect to their toxicity in first passage cultures of proliferating human skin keratinocytes, the target cell of H-induced skin vesication. Agents H and T were equitoxic and half as toxic as agent Q. Hemi-sulphur mustard and CEES were approximately six times and seventeen times, respectively less cytotoxic than H. 2-Chloroethyl ethyl sulphide was only slightly less toxic in confluent cultures compared to actively proliferating cells. In contrast, the toxicity of H, Q, T and HSM significantly decreased as the cultures became confluent, paralleling the decreasing sensitivity of skin keratinocytes to H as they leave the basement membrane of the skin. The toxicity of CEES was maximal by 24h. In contrast, the maximal toxicity of the other four agents occurred at 48h, mirroring the latent period observed for these agents in vivo. The markedly different characteristics of toxicity between CEES and the other four test compounds indicate that it is likely that different mechanisms of action are operative between them. Caution should therefore be taken when interpreting the results of studies utilizing CEES as a simulant for the mechanistic study of H, or in the elucidation of medical countermeasures against this CW agent. It is also notable that the toxicity

  9. Effects of Exposure to Sulfur Mustard on Speech Aerodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heydari, Fatemeh; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating agent with highly cytotoxic properties even at low exposure. It was used widely against both military and civilian population by Iraqi forces in the Iraq-Iran war (1983-1988). Although various aspects of mustard gas effects on patients with chemical injury have been relatively well characterized, its effects on…

  10. Therapeutic potential of a non-steroidal bifunctional anti-inflammatory and anti-cholinergic agent against skin injury induced by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Hahn, Rita A.; Gordon, Marion K.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Heck, Diane E.; Heindel, Ned D.; Young, Sherri C.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2014-10-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM) is a highly reactive bifunctional alkylating agent inducing edema, inflammation, and the formation of fluid-filled blisters in the skin. Medical countermeasures against SM-induced cutaneous injury have yet to be established. In the present studies, we tested a novel, bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH 4338) designed to target cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), an enzyme that generates inflammatory eicosanoids, and acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme mediating activation of cholinergic inflammatory pathways in a model of SM-induced skin injury. Adult SKH-1 hairless male mice were exposed to SM using a dorsal skin vapor cup model. NDH 4338 was applied topically to the skin 24, 48, and 72 h post-SM exposure. After 96 h, SM was found to induce skin injury characterized by edema, epidermal hyperplasia, loss of the differentiation marker, keratin 10 (K10), upregulation of the skin wound marker keratin 6 (K6), disruption of the basement membrane anchoring protein laminin 322, and increased expression of epidermal COX2. NDH 4338 post-treatment reduced SM-induced dermal edema and enhanced skin re-epithelialization. This was associated with a reduction in COX2 expression, increased K10 expression in the suprabasal epidermis, and reduced expression of K6. NDH 4338 also restored basement membrane integrity, as evidenced by continuous expression of laminin 332 at the dermal–epidermal junction. Taken together, these data indicate that a bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug stimulates repair of SM induced skin injury and may be useful as a medical countermeasure. - Highlights: • Bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH4338) tested on SM exposed mouse skin • The prodrug NDH4338 was designed to target COX2 and acetylcholinesterase. • The application of NDH4338 improved cutaneous wound repair after SM induced injury. • NDH4338 treatment demonstrated a reduction in COX2 expression on SM injured skin. • Changes of skin repair

  11. Therapeutic potential of a non-steroidal bifunctional anti-inflammatory and anti-cholinergic agent against skin injury induced by sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D; Hahn, Rita A; Gordon, Marion K; Joseph, Laurie B; Heck, Diane E; Heindel, Ned D; Young, Sherri C; Sinko, Patrick J; Casillas, Robert P; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L; Gerecke, Donald R

    2014-10-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM) is a highly reactive bifunctional alkylating agent inducing edema, inflammation, and the formation of fluid-filled blisters in the skin. Medical countermeasures against SM-induced cutaneous injury have yet to be established. In the present studies, we tested a novel, bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH 4338) designed to target cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), an enzyme that generates inflammatory eicosanoids, and acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme mediating activation of cholinergic inflammatory pathways in a model of SM-induced skin injury. Adult SKH-1 hairless male mice were exposed to SM using a dorsal skin vapor cup model. NDH 4338 was applied topically to the skin 24, 48, and 72 h post-SM exposure. After 96 h, SM was found to induce skin injury characterized by edema, epidermal hyperplasia, loss of the differentiation marker, keratin 10 (K10), upregulation of the skin wound marker keratin 6 (K6), disruption of the basement membrane anchoring protein laminin 322, and increased expression of epidermal COX2. NDH 4338 post-treatment reduced SM-induced dermal edema and enhanced skin re-epithelialization. This was associated with a reduction in COX2 expression, increased K10 expression in the suprabasal epidermis, and reduced expression of K6. NDH 4338 also restored basement membrane integrity, as evidenced by continuous expression of laminin 332 at the dermal-epidermal junction. Taken together, these data indicate that a bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug stimulates repair of SM induced skin injury and may be useful as a medical countermeasure.

  12. Therapeutic Potential of a Non-Steroidal Bifunctional Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Cholinergic Agent against Skin Injury Induced by Sulfur Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Hahn, Rita A.; Gordon, Marion K.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Heck, Diane E.; Heindel, Ned D.; Young, Sherri C.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM) is a highly reactive bifunctional alkylating agent inducing edema, inflammation, and the formation of fluid-filled blisters in the skin. Medical countermeasures against SM-induced cutaneous injury have yet to be established. In the present studies, we tested a novel, bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH 4338) designed to target cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), an enzyme that generates inflammatory eicosanoids, and acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme mediating activation of cholinergic inflammatory pathways in a model of SM-induced skin injury. Adult SKH-1 hairless male mice were exposed to SM using a dorsal skin vapor cup model. NDH 4338 was applied topically to the skin 24, 48, and 72 hr post-SM exposure. After 96 hr, SM was found to induce skin injury characterized by edema, epidermal hyperplasia, loss of the differentiation marker, keratin 10 (K10), upregulation of the skin wound marker keratin 6 (K6), disruption of the basement membrane anchoring protein laminin 322, and increased expression of epidermal COX2. NDH 4338 post-treatment reduced SM-induced dermal edema and enhanced skin re-epithelialization. This was associated with a reduction in COX2 expression, increased K10 expression in the suprabasal epidermis, and reduced expression of K6. NDH 4338 also restored basement membrane integrity, as evidenced by continuous expression of laminin 332 at the dermalepidermal junction. Taken together, these data indicate that a bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug stimulates repair of SM induced skin injury and may be useful as a medical countermeasure. PMID:25127551

  13. Characterization of Nitrogen Mustard Formamidopyrimidine Adduct Formation of bis-(2-Chloroethyl)ethylamine with Calf Thymus DNA and a Human Mammary Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Gruppi, Francesca; Hejazi, Leila; Christov, Plamen P.; Krishnamachari, Sesha; Turesky, Robert J.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.

    2015-01-01

    A robust, quantitative ultraperformance liquid chromatography ion trap multistage scanning mass spectrometric (UPLC/MS3) method was established to characterize and measure five deoxyguanosine (dG) adducts formed by reaction of the chemotherapeutic nitrogen mustard (NM) bis-(2-chloroethyl)ethylamine with calf thymus (CT) DNA. In addition to the known N7-guanine (NM-G) adduct and its crosslink (G-NM-G), the ring-opened formamidopyrimidine (FapyG) mono-adduct (NM-FapyG) and cross-links in which one (FapyG-NM-G) or both (FapyG-NM-FapyG) guanines underwent ring-opening to FapyG units were identified. Authentic standards of all adducts were synthesized and characterized by NMR and mass spectrometry. These adducts were quantified in CT DNA treated with NM (1 μM) as their deglycosylated bases. A two-stage neutral thermal hydrolysis was developed to mitigate the artifactual formation of ring-opened FapyG adducts involving hydrolysis of the cationic adduct at 37 °C, followed by hydrolysis of the FapyG adducts at 95 °C. The limit of quantification values ranged between 0.3 and 1.6 adducts per 107 DNA bases, when the equivalent of 5 μg DNA hydrolysate was assayed on column. The principal adduct formed was the G-NM-G cross-link, followed by the NM-G mono-adduct; the FapyG-NM-FapyG adduct was at the limit of detection. The NM-FapyG adducts formed in CT DNA at a level of ~20% that of the NM-G adduct. NM-FapyG has not been previously quanitified and the FapyG-NM-G and FapyG-NM-FapyG adducts have not be previously characterized. Our validated analytical method was then applied to measure DNA adduct formation in the MDA-MB-231 mammary tumor cell line exposed to NM (100 μM) for 24 h. The major adduct formed was NM-G (970 adducts per 107 bases), followed by G-NM-G (240 adducts per 107 bases) and NM-FapyG (180 adducts per 107 bases), and lastly the FapyG-NM-G cross-link adduct (6.0 adducts per 107 bases). These lesions are expected to contribute to the NM-mediated toxicity and

  14. Evaluation of Molecular Markers and Analytical Methods Documenting the Occurrence of Mustard Gas and Arsenical Warfare Agents in Soil.

    PubMed

    Sassolini, Alessandro; Brinchi, Giampaolo; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Dionisi, Simone; Dominici, Carola; Fantozzi, Luca; Onofri, Giorgio; Piazza, Rosario; Guidotti, Maurizio

    2016-09-01

    The chemicals warfare agents (CWAs) are an extremely toxic class of molecules widely produced in many industrialized countries for decades, these compounds frequently contained arsenic. The plants where the CWAs have been produced or the plants where they have been demilitarized after the Second World War with unacceptable techniques can represent a serious environmental problem. CWAs standards are difficult to find on market so in present work an environmental assessment method based on markers has been proposed. Triphenylarsine, phenylarsine oxide and thiodiglycol have been selected as markers. Three reliable analytical methods based on gaschromatography and mass detection have been proposed and tested for quantitative analysis of markers. Methods performance have been evaluated testing uncertainty, linearity, recovery and detection limits and also comparing detection limits with exposure limits of reference CWAs. Proposed assessment methods have been applied to a case study of a former industrial plant sited in an area characterized by a high background of mineral arsenic.

  15. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Two-Generation Reproduction Study of Lewisite in Rats Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sasser, L. B.; Cushing, J. A.; Kalkwarf, D. R.; Mellick, P. W.; Buschbom, R. L.

    1989-07-15

    Occupational health standards have not been established for Lewisite [bis(2-chlorethyl)arsine], a potent toxic vesicant which reacts with the sulfhydryl groups of proteins through its arsenic group. The purposes of this study were to determine the reproductive consequences and dose~response of continuing Lewisite exposure of parental males and females and their offspring in a 42-week two-generation study. Solutions of Lewisite were prepared for administration by diluting the neat agent with sesame oil. Rats were administered Lewisite (0, 0.10, 0.25 or 0.60 mg/kg/day for 5 days a week) via intragastric intubation prior to mating, during mating and after mating until the birth of their offspring. The dams continued to receive Lewisite during lactation. At weaning, male and female offspring of each group were selected to continue on the study; rece1v1ng Lewisite during adolescence, mating and throughout gestation. Again, the dams continued to receive Lewisite until weaning of the offspring. Lewisite had no adverse effect on reproduction performance, fertility or reproductive organ weights of male or female rats through two consecutive generations. No adverse effect to offspring were attributed to Lewisite exposure. Minor changes in growth was the only maternal effect observed. Lewisite exposure of parental rats caused no gross or microscopic lesions in testes, epididymis, prostrate, seminal vesicles, ovaries, uterus or vagina. Severe inflammation of the lung was observed at necropsy in cases in which Lewisite gained access to the respiratory system from accidental dosing or reflux and aspiration; this usually caused early death of the animal. The NOEL for reproductive effects in this study was greater than 0.60 mg/kg/day.

  16. TNF-alpha expression patterns as potential molecular biomarker for human skin cells exposed to vesicant chemical warfare agents: sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L).

    PubMed

    Arroyo, C M; Burman, D L; Kahler, D W; Nelson, M R; Corun, C M; Guzman, J J; Smith, M A; Purcell, E D; Hackley, B E; Soni, S-D; Broomfield, C A

    2004-11-01

    Studies were conducted to examine the effect of two vesicant chemical warfare agents (VCWA), one of them an arsenical, on cytokine gene expression in normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK) cells. We tested 2,2'-dichlorethylsulfide (sulfur mustard, military designation HD) and 2,chlorovinyldichloroarsine (Lewisite, military designation L), which have significant differences in their chemical, physical, and toxicological properties. Human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (hTNF-alpha) cytokine was detected by using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, a protein multiplex immunoassay, Luminex100, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The messenger RNA expression of hTNF-alpha was determined to provide a semi-quantitative analysis. HD-stimulated NHEK induced secretion of hTNF-alpha in a dose-dependent manner. Dose response effect of Lewisite decreased hTNF-alpha levels. Time-response data indicated that the maximum response for HD occurred at 24 h with an associated cytotoxic concentration of 10(-4) mol/L. NHEK cells stimulated with 10(-4) mol/L HD for 24 h at 37 degrees C increased detectable levels of hTNF-alpha from 5 to 28 ng/ml at an index of cell viability between 85 to 93% as detected by Luminex100. Our results indicated that the increased levels of hTNF-alpha by HD are dependent on the primary cultures, cell densities, and chemical properties of the stimulation. Lewisite under the same conditions as HD caused a reduction of hTNF-alpha from control levels of 1.5 ng/ml to 0.3 ng/ml after stimulation (10(-4) mol/L), with an index of cell viability of reverse similar 34%. We analyzed the transcriptional of hTNF-alpha gene and found that HD (10(-6) to 10(-4) mol/L) activates hTNF-alpha gene in cultured NHEK and that L at 10(-6) to 10(-4) mol/L markedly reduces hTNF-alpha gene. We conclude that the pro-inflammatory mediator, hTNF-alpha, could be a potential biomarker for differentiating between exposure of HD or L.

  17. Identification of the major lesion from the reaction of an acridine-targeted aniline mustard with DNA as an adenine N1 adduct.

    PubMed

    Boritzki, T J; Palmer, B D; Coddington, J M; Denny, W A

    1994-01-01

    DNA adducts of two acridine-linked aniline half-mustards have been isolated and identified. The compound where the half-mustard is attached to the DNA-targeting acridine moiety by a short linker chain alkylates both double- and single-stranded DNA exclusively at guanine N7, as do the majority of known aromatic and aliphatic nitrogen mustards. The longer-chain analogue, also containing a more reactive half-mustard, shows a strikingly different pattern, alkylating double-stranded DNA to yield primarily (> 90%) the adenine N1 adduct, together with < 10% of the adenine N3 adduct and only trace amounts of the guanine N7 adduct. In the presence of MgCl2 (which is known not to inhibit the interaction of drugs at minor groove sites), the adenine N3 adduct is the major product. The latter compound is the first known aniline mustard (and apparently the first known alkylating agent of any type) to preferentially alkylate adenine at the N1 position in duplex DNA. These results are consistent with previous work [Prakash et al. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9799-9807], which showed that the preferred site of DNA alkylation by the corresponding long-chain acridine-linked aniline bis-mustards in general was at major groove sites of adenines and identifies the major site of alkylation as adenine N1 and not N7. This selectivity for adenine N1 alkylation is suggested to result from a preference for the acridine mustard side chain of these compounds to project into the major groove following intercalation of the acridine, coupled with structural distortion of the DNA helix to make the N1 positions of adenines adjacent to the intercalation sites more accessible.

  18. Cutaneous challenge with chemical warfare agents in the SKH-1 hairless mouse (II): effects of some currently used skin decontaminants (RSDL and Fuller's earth) against liquid sulphur mustard and VX exposure.

    PubMed

    Taysse, L; Dorandeu, F; Daulon, S; Foquin, A; Perrier, N; Lallement, G; Breton, P

    2011-06-01

    Using the hairless mouse screening model presented in the companion paper(1) the aim of this study was to assess two skin decontaminating systems: Fuller's earth (FE) and Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion (RSDL) against two extremely toxic chemical warfare agents that represent a special percutaneous hazard, sulphur mustard (SM) and O-ethyl-S-(2[di-isopropylamino]ethyl)methyl-phosphonothioate (VX). Five minutes after being exposed on the back to either 2 µL of neat sulphur mustard or 50 µg.kg(-1) of diluted VX, mice were decontaminated. Both systems were able to reduce blisters 3 days after SM exposure. However, RSDL was found to be more efficient than FE in reducing the necrosis of the epidermis and erosion. In the case of VX exposure, RSDL, whatever the ratio of decontaminant to toxicant used (RSDL 10, 20, 50), was not able to sufficiently prevent the inhibition of plasma cholinesterases taken as a surrogate marker of exposure and toxicity. Only FE reduced significantly the ChE inhibition. Some of these observations are different from our previous results obtained in domestic swine and these changes are thus discussed in the perspective of using SKH-1 hairless mice for the initial in vivo screening of decontaminants.

  19. DOXYCYCLINE HYDROGELS WITH REVERSIBLE DISULFIDE CROSSLINKS FOR DERMAL WOUND HEALING OF MUSTARD INJURIES

    PubMed Central

    Anumolu, SivaNaga S; Menjoge, Anupa R.; Deshmukh, Manjeet; Gerecke, Donald; Stein, Stanley; Laskin, Jeffrey; Sinko, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Doxycycline hydrogels containing reversible disulfide crosslinks were investigated for a dermal wound healing application. Nitrogen mustard (NM) was used as a surrogate to mimic the vesicant effects of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard. An 8-arm-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymer containing multiple thiol (-SH) groups was crosslinked using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 hydrogel) or 8-arm-S-thiopyridyl (S-TP hydrogel) to form a hydrogel in situ. Formulation additives (glycerin, PVP and PEG 600) were found to promote dermal hydrogel retention for up to 24 h. Hydrogels demonstrated high mechanical strength and a low degree of swelling (<1.5%). Doxycycline release from the hydrogels was biphasic and sustained for up to 10-days in vitro. Doxycycline (8.5 mg/cm3) permeability through NM-exposed skin was elevated as compared to non vesicant-treated controls at 24, 72 and 168 h post exposure with peak permeability at 72 h. The decrease in doxycycline permeability at 168 h correlates to epidermal reepithelialization and wound healing. Histology studies of skin showed that doxycycline-loaded (0.25% w/v) hydrogels provided improved wound healing response on NM-exposed skin as compared to untreated skin and skin treated with placebo hydrogels in a SKH-1 mouse model. In conclusion, PEG-based doxycycline hydrogels are promising for dermal wound healing application of mustard injuries. PMID:20950853

  20. Doxycycline hydrogels with reversible disulfide crosslinks for dermal wound healing of mustard injuries.

    PubMed

    Anumolu, SivaNaga S; Menjoge, Anupa R; Deshmukh, Manjeet; Gerecke, Donald; Stein, Stanley; Laskin, Jeffrey; Sinko, Patrick J

    2011-02-01

    Doxycycline hydrogels containing reversible disulfide crosslinks were investigated for a dermal wound healing application. Nitrogen mustard (NM) was used as a surrogate to mimic the vesicant effects of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard. An 8-arm-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) polymer containing multiple thiol (-SH) groups was crosslinked using hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2) hydrogel) or 8-arm-S-thiopyridyl (S-TP hydrogel) to form a hydrogel in situ. Formulation additives (glycerin, PVP and PEG 600) were found to promote dermal hydrogel retention for up to 24 h. Hydrogels demonstrated high mechanical strength and a low degree of swelling (< 1.5%). Doxycycline release from the hydrogels was biphasic and sustained for up to 10-days in vitro. Doxycycline (8.5 mg/cm(3)) permeability through NM-exposed skin was elevated as compared to non vesicant-treated controls at 24, 72 and 168 h post-exposure with peak permeability at 72 h. The decrease in doxycycline permeability at 168 h correlates to epidermal re-epithelialization and wound healing. Histology studies of skin showed that doxycycline loaded (0.25% w/v) hydrogels provided improved wound healing response on NM-exposed skin as compared to untreated skin and skin treated with placebo hydrogels in an SKH-1 mouse model. In conclusion, PEG-based doxycycline hydrogels are promising for dermal wound healing application of mustard injuries.

  1. Various concentrations of erucic acid in mustard oil and mustard.

    PubMed

    Wendlinger, Christine; Hammann, Simon; Vetter, Walter

    2014-06-15

    Erucic acid is a typical constituent of mustard or rape. Foodstuff with a high content of erucic acid is considered undesirable for human consumption because it has been linked to myocardial lipidosis and heart lesions in laboratory rats. As a result, several countries have restricted its presence in oils and fats. In this study, the erucic acid content in several mustard oils and prepared mustard samples from Germany and Australia was determined. Seven of nine mustard oil samples exceeded the permitted maximum levels established for erucic acid (range: 0.3-50.8%, limit: 5%). The erucic acid content in mustard samples (n=15) varied from 14% to 33% in the lipids. Two servings (i.e. 20 g) of the mustards with the highest erucic acid content already surpassed the tolerable daily intake established by Food Standards Australia New Zealand. However, a careful selection of mustard cultivars could lower the nutritional intake of erucic acid.

  2. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Graham, John S.; Chilcott, Robert P.; Rice, Paul; Milner, Stephen M.; Hurst, Charles G.; Maliner, Beverly I.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating chemical warfare agent that primarily affects the eyes, skin, and airways. Sulfur mustard injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in significant cosmetic and/or functional deficits. Historically, blister aspiration and/or deroofing (epidermal removal), physical debridement, irrigation, topical antibiotics, and sterile dressings have been the main courses of action in the medical management of cutaneous sulfur mustard injuries. Current treatment strategy consists of symptomatic management and is designed to relieve symptoms, prevent infections, and promote healing. There are currently no standardized or optimized methods of casualty management that prevent or minimize deficits and provide for speedy wound healing. Several laboratories are actively searching for improved therapies for cutaneous vesicant injury, with the aim of returning damaged skin to optimal appearance and normal function in the shortest time. Improved treatment will result in a better cosmetic and functional outcome for the patient, and will enable the casualty to return to normal activities sooner. This editorial gives brief overviews of sulfur mustard use, its toxicity, concepts for medical countermeasures, current treatments, and strategies for the development of improved therapies. PMID:16921406

  3. Determination and prevention of cytotoxic effects induced in human lymphocytes by the alkylating agent 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, HD). (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, H.L.; Johnson, J.B.

    1992-12-31

    2,2`-Dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard), HD, 1,1`thiobis(2-chloroethane) is a potent vesicant which can cause severe lesions to skin, lung, and eyes. There is no convenient in vitro or in vivo method(s) to objectively measure the damage induced by HD; therefore, a simple in vitro method was developed using human peripheral lymphocytes to study HD-induced cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity of HD was measured using dye exclusion as an indicator of human lymphocyte viability. Exposure to HD resulted in both a time- and a concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect on human lymphocytes. Using this in vitro assay, the effectiveness of various therapeutics (niacin, niacinamide, and 3-aminobenzamide) in preventing HD-induced cytotoxicity was studied. Niacinamide and 3-aminobenzamide prevented the cytotoxic effects of HD for up to 2 days.

  4. Putative roles of inflammation in the dermatopathology or sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, F.M.; Broomfield, C.A.

    1993-12-31

    Sulfur mustard (2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide), a radiomimetic agent with mutagenic (Cappizzi et al., 1973; Fox and Scott, 1983), cytotoxic (Wheeler, 1962; Papirmeister and Davison, 1965), and vesicant (Anslow and Houck, 1946; Renshaw, 1946) properties, is also a chemical-warfare blistering agent with no known antidote. Sulfur mustard predominantly effects exposed epithelial tissues of the skin, the eye, and the respiratory tract, although higher doses can produce systemic toxicity (reviewed by Papirmeister et al., 1991). The severity of sulfur mustard toxicity is dose dependent, causing irritation, edema, necrosis and ulceration; characteristic symptoms are unique to the site of exposure, e.g., vesication, conjunctivitis, bronchopneumonia (reviewed by Papirmeister et al., 1991). The basic histopathology of mustard-induced cutaneous lesions has been reviewed by Papirmeister et al. (1985, 1991) and includes degeneration of epidermal cells, especially in the basal layer, followed by the formation of vesicles (and, in man, bullae) that have been variously characterized as intraepidermal or subcorneal but that appear in most cases to result from cleavage at the dermal-epidermal junction. However, despite general agreement concerning the morphologic changes caused by mustard and despite more than 50 years of research, the pathogenesis of mustard injury is still incompletely understood.

  5. Modified immunoslotblot assay to detect hemi and sulfur mustard DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Kehe, Kai; Schrettl, Verena; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2013-12-05

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is an old chemical warfare agent causing blisters (vesicant). Skin toxicity is thought to be partly caused by SM induced DNA damage. SM and the hemi mustard 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) are bi- and monofunctional DNA alkylating agents, respectively. Both chemicals react especially with N7 guanine. The most abundant adducts are 7-hydroxyethylthioethylguanine for SM (61%) and 7-ethyl thioethylguanine for CEES. Thus, DNA alkylation should serve as a biomarker of SM exposure. A specific monoclonal antibody (2F8) was previously developed to detect SM and CEES adducts at N7 position by means of immunoslotblot (ISB) technique (van der Schans et al. (2004) [16]). Nitrogen mustards (HN-1, HN-2, HN-3) are alkylating agents with structural similarities, which can form DNA adducts with N7 guanine. The aim of the presented work was to modify the van der Schans protocol for use in a field laboratory and to test the cross reactivity of the 2F8 antibody against nitrogen mustards. Briefly, human keratinocytes were exposed to SM and CEES (0-300μM, 60min) or HN-1, HN-2, HN-3 (120min). After exposure, cells were scraped and DNA was isolated and normalized. 1μg DNA was transferred to a nitrocellulose membrane using a slotblot technique. After incubation with 2F8 antibody, the DNA adducts were visualized with chromogen staining (3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB), SeramunGrün). Blots were photographed and signal intensity was quantified. In general, DAB was superior to SeramunGrün stain. A staining was seen from 30nM to 300μM of SM or CEES, respectively. However, statistically significant DNA adducts were detected after CEES and SM exposure above 30μM which is below the vesicant threshold. No signal was observed after HN-1, HN-2, HN-3 exposure. The total hands-on time to complete the assay was about 36h. Further studies are necessary to validate SM or CEES exposure in blister roofs of exposed patients.

  6. Shrubby Reed-Mustard Habitat: Parent Material, Soil, and Landscape Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, L. S.; Boettinger, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Shrubby reed-mustard (Glaucocarpum suffrutescens, a.k.a. Schoenocrambe suffrutescens, Glaucocarpum suffrutescens, or Hesperidanthus suffrutescens) is an endangered perennial shrub endemic to the southern Uinta Basin in northeast Utah. Only seven populations of shrubby reed-mustard have been identified. The arid area where the plant grows is rich in natural gas and oil deposits, as well as oil shale. Oil wells already dot the landscape, and there is significant concern that further development of these resources will threaten the continued existence of shrubby reed-mustard. Determination of the parent material, soil and landscape characteristics associated with shrubby reed-mustard habitat is imperative to facilitate conservation management. Shrubby reed-mustard grows where little else does and, based on field observations and remotely sensed spectral data, appears to occur in a particular type of strata. Our objective is to identify the physical and chemical characteristics of shrubby reed-mustard's environment. Site characteristics such as parent material and associated vegetation have been identified and documented. Soil properties such as water-soluble and total leachable elements, particle-size distribution, organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, total nitrogen, and available phosphorus and potassium are being determined. During the course of this investigation, soils within four shrubby reed-mustard habitat areas were sampled. Soils from non-shrubby reed-mustard areas adjacent to the four shrubby reed-mustard populations were also sampled. Soil samples were collected from a total of twenty-five shrubby reed-mustard soil pits and twenty-four non-shrubby reed-mustard soil pits. The soil horizons of each pedon were delineated, and samples were collected from each horizon. Field data indicate that shrubby reed-mustard occurs exclusively in shale-derived, shallow soils on bedrock-controlled uplands. Although there is some overlap of plant species on both types

  7. Molecular biological basis for the response of poly(ADP-rib) polymerase and NAD metabolism to DNA damage caused by mustard alkylating agents. Midterm report

    SciTech Connect

    Smulson, M.E.

    1996-07-01

    During the course of this contract, we have performed a variety of experiments to provide a strategy to modulate the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), in cultured keratinocytes. This enzyme modifies a variety of nuclear proteins utilizing NAD. DNA is required for the catalytic activity of the enzyme and the activity is dependent upon the presence of strand breaks in this DNA. It has been hypothesized that human skin exposed to mustards may develop blisters due to a generalized lowering of NAD in exposed skin cells. During the contract period, we have established a stably transfected human keratinocyte cell line which expresses antisense transcripts to PARP mRNA when these keratinocyte were grafted onto nude mice they formed histologically normal human skin. Accordingly, a model system has been developed in which the levels of PARP can be selectively manipulated in human keratinocytes in reconstituted epidermis as well. We also showed that PARP was proteolytically cleaved at the onset of spontaneous apoptosis following proteolytic conversion of CPP32b to its active form, termed `apopain`. Having characterized the events associated with apoptosis, we determined, during the last period, whether any or all of these features could be observed following exposure of keratinocytes to SM.

  8. Preclinical investigation of the pharmacokinetics, metabolism, and protein and red blood cell binding of DRDE-07: a prophylactic agent against sulphur mustard.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pankaj; Vijayaraghavan, Rajagopalan

    2014-10-01

    DRDE-07, a newly synthesized amifostine analog currently under clinical investigation in a phase I trial, is a potent antidote against sulfur mustard toxicity. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of DRDE-07 in female Swiss Albino mice after a single oral dose of 400 or 600 mg/kg. The physicochemical properties of DRDE-07, including solubility, pK a, Log P, plasma protein binding and plasma/blood partitioning, were determined to support the pharmacokinetic characterization. DRDE-07 concentration was determined by an HPLC-UV method. The profile of plasma concentration versus time was analyzed using a non-compartmental model. Plasma protein binding was assessed using ultrafiltration. DRDE-07 appeared rapidly in plasma after oral administration with peak plasma levels (C max) observed in less than 15 min. There was a rapid decline in the plasma levels followed by a smaller second peak about 90 min after dosing. The plasma protein binding of DRDE-07 was found to be less than 25% at all concentrations studied. Plasma clearance of DRDE-07 is expected to be ~1.5 fold higher than the blood clearance of DRDE-07. The probable metabolite of DRDE-07 was identified as phenyl-S-ethyl amine.

  9. A chick model for the mechanisms of mustard gas neurobehavioral teratogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wormser, Uri; Izrael, Michal; Van der Zee, Eddy A; Brodsky, Berta; Yanai, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The chemical warfare blistering agent, sulfur mustard (SM), is a powerful mutagen and carcinogen. Due to its similarity to the related chemotherapy agents nitrogen mustard (mechlorethamine), it is expected to act as a developmental neurotoxicant. The present study was designed to establish a chick model for the mechanisms of SM on neurobehavioral teratogenicity, free of confounds related to mammalian maternal effects. Chicken eggs were injected with SM at a dose range of 0.0017-17.0 microg/kg of egg, which is below the threshold for dysmorphology, on incubation days (ID) 2 and 7, and then tests were conducted posthatching. Exposure to SM elicited significant deficits in the intermedial part of the hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV)-related imprinting behavior. Parallel decreases were found in the level of membrane PKCgamma in the IMHV, while eliciting no net change in cytosolic PKCgamma. The chick, thus, provides a suitable model for the rapid evaluation of SM behavioral teratogenicity and elucidation of the mechanisms underlying behavioral anomalies. The results obtained, using a model that controls for confounding maternal effects, may be replicated in the mammalian model and provide the groundwork for studies designed to offset or reverse the SM-induced neurobehavioral defects in both avian and mammals.

  10. Molecular biology basis for the response of poly(ADP-rib) polymerase and NAD metabolism to dna damage caused by mustard alkylating agents. Final report, 30 April 1990-30 July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smulson, M.E.

    1994-08-30

    During the course of this contract, we have performed a variety of experiments whose intent has been to provide a strategy to modulate the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) in cultured keratinocytes. During this study, human keratinocyte lines were stably transfected with the cDNA for human PADPRP in the antisense orientation under an inducible promoter. Induction of this antisense RNA by dexamethasone in cultured cells selectively lowered levels of PADPRP in RNA, protein, and enzyme activity. Induction of antisense RNA led to a reduction in the levels of PADPRP in individual cell nuclei, as well as the loss of the ability of cells to synthesize and modify proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) polymer in response to an alkylating agent. When keratinocyte clones containing the antisense construct or empty vector alone were grafted onto nude mice they formed histologically normal human skin. The PADPRP antisense construct was also inducible in vivo by the topical application of dexamethasone to the reconstituted epidermis. In addition, poly(ADP-ribose) polymer could be induced and detected in vivo following the topical application of a sulfur mustard to the grafted transfected skin layers. Accordingly, a model system has been developed in which the levels of PADPRP can be selectively manipulated in human keratinocytes in cell culture, and potentially in reconstituted epidermis as well.

  11. The sources, fate, and toxicity of chemical warfare agent degradation products.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, N B; Talmage, S S; Griffin, G D; Waters, L C; Watson, A P; King, J F; Hauschild, V

    1999-01-01

    We include in this review an assessment of the formation, environmental fate, and mammalian and ecotoxicity of CW agent degradation products relevant to environmental and occupational health. These parent CW agents include several vesicants: sulfur mustards [undistilled sulfur mustard (H), sulfur mustard (HD), and an HD/agent T mixture (HT)]; nitrogen mustards [ethylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN1), methylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN2), tris(2-chloroethyl)amine (HN3)], and Lewisite; four nerve agents (O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), tabun (GA), sarin (GB), and soman (GD)); and the blood agent cyanogen chloride. The degradation processes considered here include hydrolysis, microbial degradation, oxidation, and photolysis. We also briefly address decontamination but not combustion processes. Because CW agents are generally not considered very persistent, certain degradation products of significant persistence, even those that are not particularly toxic, may indicate previous CW agent presence or that degradation has occurred. Of those products for which there are data on both environmental fate and toxicity, only a few are both environmentally persistent and highly toxic. Major degradation products estimated to be of significant persistence (weeks to years) include thiodiglycol for HD; Lewisite oxide for Lewisite; and ethyl methyl phosphonic acid, methyl phosphonic acid, and possibly S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioic acid (EA 2192) for VX. Methyl phosphonic acid is also the ultimate hydrolysis product of both GB and GD. The GB product, isopropyl methylphosphonic acid, and a closely related contaminant of GB, diisopropyl methylphosphonate, are also persistent. Of all of these compounds, only Lewisite oxide and EA 2192 possess high mammalian toxicity. Unlike other CW agents, sulfur mustard agents (e.g., HD) are somewhat persistent; therefore, sites or conditions involving potential HD contamination should include an

  12. Mustard gas: clinical, toxicological, and mutagenic aspects based on modern experience.

    PubMed

    Aasted, A; Darre, E; Wulf, H C

    1987-10-01

    Based on a study of the literature and our own experience treating fisherman poisoned by mustard gas, this article outlines the clinical effects, and toxicological and mutagenic properties of the agent. Mustards are very persistent chemical agents that easily penetrate clothing. Mustard gas usually causes clinical symptoms after the liquid penetrates the skin or the vapor is inhaled. Skin lesions are similar to first- or second-degree burns and usually heal spontaneously in 4 to 6 weeks. Eye symptoms are photophobia and reduced vision. Following inhalation of the agent, pulmonary edema and long-term dyspnea may be seen. As mustard gas is an alkylating substance, it is conceivable that the risk of developing cancer may be increased, as observed in people who were involved with the production of mustard gas and in animals exposed to the gas. Also, transient significantly increased sister chromatid exchange rates have been found in fishermen exposed to mustard gas. Patients exposed to mustard gas must be treated immediately after exposure. Treatment should consist of cleaning of the exposed skin and clothes with an antigas powder and water and soap. The skin lesions should be treated as burns. Eye lesions and respiratory problems should be treated symptomatically.

  13. Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.].

    PubMed

    Gasic, Ksenija; Korban, Schuyler S

    2006-01-01

    All economically important Brassica species have been successfully transformed using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Although different tissues have been used as explants, hypocotyls remain the most desirable explants for Brassica tissue culture owing to their amenability to regeneration. Young explants excised from 3- to 4-d-old seedlings have exhibited optimal regeneration potential; the addition of adjuvants such as silver nitrate to the selection medium is necessary to achieve high efficiency of transformation. This chapter describes an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation protocol for Indian mustard based on inoculation of hypocotyls. The selectable marker gene used encodes for neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII), and the selection agent is kanamycin.

  14. Cytometric analysis of DNA changes induced by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.J.; Sanders, K.M.; Ruddle, S.E.; Gross, C.L.

    1993-05-13

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating agent which causes severe, potentially debilitating blisters following cutaneous exposure. Its mechanism of pathogenesis is unknown and no antidote exists to prevent its pathology. The biochemical basis of sulfur mustard's vesicating activity has been hypothesized to be a cascade of events beginning with alkylation of DNA. Using human cells in culture, we have assessed the effects of sulfur mustard on cell cycle activity using flow cytometry with propidium iodide. Two distinct patterns emerged, a Gl/S interface block at concentrations equivalent to vesicating doses (>50-micronM) and a G2 block at 10-fold lower concentrations. In addition, noticeable increases in amount of dye uptake were observed at 4 and 24 hours after sulfur mustard exposure. These increases are believed to be related to DNA repair activities and can be prevented by treatment of the cells with niacinamide, which inhibits DNA repair. Other drugs which provide alternate alkylating sites or inhibit cell cycle progression were shown to lower the cytotoxicity of sulfur mustard and to protect against its direct DNA damaging effects.

  15. 38 CFR 3.316 - Claims based on chronic effects of exposure to mustard gas and Lewisite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., scar formation, or the following cancers: Nasopharyngeal; laryngeal; lung (except mesothelioma); or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. (2) Full-body exposure to nitrogen or sulfur mustard or...

  16. 38 CFR 3.316 - Claims based on chronic effects of exposure to mustard gas and Lewisite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., scar formation, or the following cancers: Nasopharyngeal; laryngeal; lung (except mesothelioma); or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. (2) Full-body exposure to nitrogen or sulfur mustard or...

  17. 38 CFR 3.316 - Claims based on chronic effects of exposure to mustard gas and Lewisite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., scar formation, or the following cancers: Nasopharyngeal; laryngeal; lung (except mesothelioma); or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. (2) Full-body exposure to nitrogen or sulfur mustard or...

  18. The activation of phosphoramide mustard anticancer drugs from ab initio simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allesch, Markus; Schwegler, Eric; Colvin, Mike; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2007-03-01

    The nitrogen mustard based DNA alkylating agents were the first nonhormonal drugs to be used effectively in the treatment of cancer and remain one of the most important drugs for the chemotherapeutic management of many common malignancies today. An understanding of the activation of these compounds is, in itself, of scientific interest, but also critical in designing improved analogs of greater selectivity and efficacy. We have investigated the activation pathways of one of the most active metabolites, phosphoramide mustard (PM), and its methylated ester (PMME). In particular, we have examined the activation barrier and reaction free energy for the intramolecular cyclization reaction using first principles molecular dynamics simulations with explicit and continuum solvation models. Structural, dynamical and electronic properties along the reaction path have been computed mainly to address the question why de-esterification is required to activate these drugs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy at the University of California/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract no. W-7405-Eng-48.

  19. Teratology studies of lewisite and sulfur mustard agents: effects of lewisite in rats and rabbits. Final report, 15 May 1983-28 February 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Hackett, P.L.; Sasser, L.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Cushing, J.A.; Buschbom, R.L.

    1987-12-31

    Lewisite, which is a prototype of one of two categories of vesicant war gases, functions by reacting with the sulfhydryl groups of proteins through its arsenic group. Since no information concerning the potential teratogenicity or developmental toxicity of lewisite was available, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, (PNL), under contract with USABRDL, conducted studies to evaluate maternal toxicity, intrauterine mortality, and developmental toxicity in rats and rabbits following the administration of this agent by intragastric intubation.

  20. Thioredoxin Cross-Linking by Nitrogen Mustard in Lung Epithelial Cells: Formation of Multimeric Thioredoxin/Thioredoxin Reductase Complexes and Inhibition of Disulfide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Jan, Yi-Hua; Heck, Diane E; Casillas, Robert P; Laskin, Debra L; Laskin, Jeffrey D

    2015-11-16

    The thioredoxin (Trx) system, which consists of Trx and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), is a major cellular disulfide reduction system important in antioxidant defense. TrxR is a target of mechlorethamine (methylbis(2-chloroethyl)amine; HN2), a bifunctional alkylating agent that covalently binds to selenocysteine/cysteine residues in the redox centers of the enzyme, leading to inactivation and toxicity. Mammalian Trx contains two catalytic cysteines; herein, we determined if HN2 also targets Trx. HN2 caused a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of purified Trx and Trx in A549 lung epithelial cells. Three Trx cross-linked protein complexes were identified in both cytosolic and nuclear fractions of HN2-treated cells. LC-MS/MS of these complexes identified both Trx and TrxR, indicating that HN2 cross-linked TrxR and Trx. This is supported by our findings of a significant decrease of Trx/TrxR complexes in cytosolic TrxR knockdown cells after HN2 treatment. Using purified recombinant enzymes, the formation of protein cross-links and enzyme inhibition were found to be redox status-dependent; reduced Trx was more sensitive to HN2 inactivation than the oxidized enzyme, and Trx/TrxR cross-links were only observed using reduced enzyme. These data suggest that HN2 directly targets catalytic cysteine residues in Trx resulting in enzyme inactivation and protein complex formation. LC-MS/MS confirmed that HN2 directly alkylated cysteine residues on Trx, including Cys32 and Cys35 in the redox center of the enzyme. Inhibition of the Trx system by HN2 can disrupt cellular thiol-disulfide balance, contributing to vesicant-induced lung toxicity.

  1. Mustard Gas: Its Pre-World War I History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchovic, Ronald J.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2007-06-01

    Mustard gas is perhaps the best-known chemical warfare agent and is commonly associated with World War I, both in its first use in warfare and its first synthesis. Although the former is correct, the latter is not. We review here the history of the repeated synthesis of mustard gas by 19th century European chemists. The techniques developed by these chemists were the ones relied upon by both the Central Powers and the Allies to manufacture this agent during World War I. Further, a historical review of mustard gas synthesis highlights the increasing sophistication of the chemical sciences. In particular, during the latter half of the 19th century, the concepts of atomic mass, chemical periodicity, and chemical structure underwent a rapid development that culminated in the application of quantum mechanics to chemistry in the 20th century. A comparison is made of the molecular formula for mustard gas from the 19th century with that of the 21st century, demonstrating that the concept of atomic mass has undergone significant refinement over this period of time.

  2. Differences in nitrogen metabolism between Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii, the two etiologic agents of cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Ngamskulrungroj, Popchai; Chang, Yun; Roh, Jamin; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J

    2012-01-01

    Two members of the Cryptococcus neoformans-gattii species complex, the etiologic agents of cryptococcosis, can be differentiated by biological, biochemical, serological and molecular typing techniques. Based on their differences in carbon and nitrogen utilization patterns, cost effective and very specific diagnostic tests using D-proline and canvanine-glycine-bromthymol blue (CGB) media have been formulated and are widely used for identification of the two species. However, these methods have yet to be tested for strains with confirmed molecular types to assess the degree of specificity for each molecular type in the two species. We collected global isolates of every major molecular type available and tested their patterns of nitrogen utilization. We confirmed specificity of the CGB test to be 100% regardless of molecular type while the D-proline test yielded 8-38% false negative results in three of the four C. gattii molecular types, VGI-VGIII. The utilization pattern of a new set of amino acids: D-alanine, L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine, showed species specificity comparable to that of D-proline. We discovered that the transcription factor Gat1 (Are1) regulates the utilization of nitrogen differently between C. neoformans and C. gattii strains. Unlike in C. neoformans, expression of the genes encoding glycine decarboxylase complex in C. gatti was only partially suppressed by nitrogen catabolite repression in the presence of ammonium. GAT1 in C. neoformans controlled the induction of three of the four genes encoding the glycine decarboxylase complex when glycine was used as the sole nitrogen source while in C. gattii its regulation of these genes was less stringent. Moreover, while virulence of C. neoformans strains in mice was not affected by Gat1, the transcription factor positively influenced the virulence of C. gattii strain.

  3. Reactions of sulphur mustard and sarin on V 1.02 O 2.98 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mahato, T H; Prasad, G K; Singh, Beer; Srivastava, A R; Ganesan, K; Acharya, J; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2009-07-30

    Reactions of sulphur mustard and sarin were studied on the surface of V(1.02)O(2.98) nanotubes by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques. The V(1.02)O(2.98) nanotube samples were made by using hydrothermal method and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffractometry and thermogravimetry. Later, they were exposed to sulphur mustard and sarin separately at ambient temperature (30+/-2 degrees C). The data explored the formation of sulphoxide of sulphur mustard, thiodiglycol for sulphur mustard and isopropyl methyl phosphonic acid for sarin on V(1.02)O(2.98) nanotubes illustrating the role of oxidation and hydrolysis reactions in the decontamination.

  4. Mustard catch crop enhances denitrification in shallow groundwater beneath a spring barley field.

    PubMed

    Jahangir, M M R; Minet, E P; Johnston, P; Premrov, A; Coxon, C E; Hackett, R; Richards, K G

    2014-05-01

    Over-winter green cover crops have been reported to increase dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in groundwater, which can be used as an energy source for denitrifiers. This study investigates the impact of a mustard catch crop on in situ denitrification and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from an aquifer overlain by arable land. Denitrification rates and N2O-N/(N2O-N+N2-N) mole fractions were measured in situ with a push-pull method in shallow groundwater under a spring barley system in experimental plots with and without a mustard cover crop. The results suggest that a mustard cover crop could substantially enhance reduction of groundwater nitrate NO3--N via denitrification without significantly increasing N2O emissions. Mean total denitrification (TDN) rates below mustard cover crop and no cover crop were 7.61 and 0.002 μg kg(-1) d(-1), respectively. Estimated N2O-N/(N2O-N+N2-N) ratios, being 0.001 and 1.0 below mustard cover crop and no cover crop respectively, indicate that denitrification below mustard cover crop reduces N2O to N2, unlike the plot with no cover crop. The observed enhanced denitrification under the mustard cover crop may result from the higher groundwater DOC under mustard cover crop (1.53 mg L(-1)) than no cover crop (0.90 mg L(-1)) being added by the root exudates and root masses of mustard. This study gives insights into the missing piece in agricultural nitrogen (N) balance and groundwater derived N2O emissions under arable land and thus helps minimise the uncertainty in agricultural N and N2O-N balances.

  5. Ion mobility spectrometric analysis of vaporous chemical warfare agents by the instrument with corona discharge ionization ammonia dopant ambient temperature operation.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takafumi; Kishi, Shintaro; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Tachikawa, Masumi; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Nakagawa, Takao; Kitagawa, Nobuyoshi; Tokita, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Soichiro; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-03-20

    The ion mobility behavior of nineteen chemical warfare agents (7 nerve gases, 5 blister agents, 2 lachrymators, 2 blood agents, 3 choking agents) and related compounds including simulants (8 agents) and organic solvents (39) was comparably investigated by the ion mobility spectrometry instrument utilizing weak electric field linear drift tube with corona discharge ionization, ammonia doping, purified inner air drift flow circulation operated at ambient temperature and pressure. Three alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates, tabun, and four organophosphorus simulants gave the intense characteristic positive monomer-derived ion peaks and small dimer-derived ion peaks, and the later ion peaks were increased with the vapor concentrations. VX, RVX and tabun gave both characteristic positive monomer-derived ions and degradation product ions. Nitrogen mustards gave the intense characteristic positive ion peaks, and in addition distinctive negative ion peak appeared from HN3. Mustard gas, lewisite 1, o-chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile and 2-mercaptoethanol gave the characteristic negative ion peaks. Methylphosphonyl difluoride, 2-chloroacetophenone and 1,4-thioxane gave the characteristic ion peaks both in the positive and negative ion mode. 2-Chloroethylethylsulfide and allylisothiocyanate gave weak ion peaks. The marker ion peaks derived from two blood agents and three choking agents were very close to the reactant ion peak in negative ion mode and the respective reduced ion mobility was fluctuated. The reduced ion mobility of the CWA monomer-derived peaks were positively correlated with molecular masses among structurally similar agents such as G-type nerve gases and organophosphorus simulants; V-type nerve gases and nitrogen mustards. The slope values of the calibration plots of the peak heights of the characteristic marker ions versus the vapor concentrations are related to the detection sensitivity, and within chemical warfare agents examined the slope values for sarin, soman

  6. Silibinin as a potential therapeutic for sulfur mustard injuries.

    PubMed

    Balszuweit, Frank; John, Harald; Schmidt, Annette; Kehe, Kai; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2013-12-05

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicating chemical warfare agent causing skin blistering, ulceration, impaired wound healing, prolonged hospitalization and permanent lesions. Silibinin, the lead compound from Silybum marianum, has also been discussed as a potential antidote to SM poisoning. However, its efficacy has been demonstrated only with regard to nitrogen mustards. Moreover, there are no data on the efficacy of the water-soluble prodrug silibinin-bis-succinat (silibinin-BS). We investigated the effect of SIL-BS treatment against SM toxicity in HaCaT cells with regard to potential reduction of necrosis, apoptosis and inflammation including dose-dependency of any protective effects. We also demonstrated the biotransformation of the prodrug into free silibinin. HaCaT cells were exposed to SM (30, 100, and 300μM) for 30min and treated thereafter with SIL-BS (10, 50, and 100μM) for 24h. Necrosis and apoptosis were quantified using the ToxiLight BioAssay and the nucleosome ELISA (CDDE). Pro-inflammatory interleukins-6 and -8 were determined by ELISA. HaCaT cells, incubated with silibinin-BS were lysed and investigated by LC-ESI MS/MS. LC-ESI MS/MS results suggest that SIL-BS is absorbed by HaCaT cells and biotransformed into free silibinin. SIL-BS dose-dependently reduced SM cytotoxicity, even after 300μM exposure. Doses of 50-100μM silibinin-BS were required for significant protection. Apoptosis and interleukin production remained largely unchanged by 10-50μM silibinin-BS but increased after 100μM treatment. Observed reductions of SM cytotoxicity by post-exposure treatment with SIL-BS suggest this as a promising approach for treatment of SM injuries. While 100μM SIL-BS is most effective to reduce necrosis, 50μM may be safer to avoid pro-inflammatory effects. Pro-apoptotic effects after high doses of SIL-BS are in agreement with findings in literature and might even be useful to eliminate cells irreversibly damaged by SM. Further investigations will focus on the

  7. Assay techniques for detection of exposure to sulfur mustard, cholinesterase inhibitors, sarin, soman, GF, and cyanide. Technical bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This technical bulletin provides analytical techniques to identify toxic chemical agents in urine or blood samples. It is intended to provide the clinician with laboratory tests to detect exposure to sulfur mustard, cholinesterase inhibitors, sarin, soman, GF, and cyanide.

  8. Effect of sulfur mustard exposure on protease activity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, F.M.; Broomfield, C.A.; Smith, W.J.

    1991-12-31

    Sulfur mustard is a chemical warfare blistering agent for which neither the mechanism of action nor an antidote is known. Papirmeister et al. (1985) have postulated a biochemical hypothesis for mustard-induced cutaneous injury involving a sequelae of DNA alkylation, metabolic disruption and activation of protease. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes in cell cultures were employed as an in vitro model for alkylating agent toxicity. A chromogenic peptide substrate assay was used for detection of protease in lymphocytes treated with sulfur mustard or chloroethyl sulfide. Exposure of human peripheral blood lymphocytes from normal donors to these alkylating agents resulted in an increase in cell associated protease activity. This increase in protease activity may contribute to the pathology or act as an indicator to predict methods of therapeutic intervention for sulfur mustard toxicity.

  9. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  10. Serum Metabolomic Profiling of Sulphur Mustard-Exposed Individuals Using (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Zahra; Ghanei, Mostafa; Panahi, Yunus; Arjmand, Mohammad; Sadeghi, Sedigheh; Mirkhani, Fatemeh; Parvin, Shahram; Salehi, Maryam; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Vahabi, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    Sulphur mustard is an alkylating agent that reacts with different cellular components, causing acute and delayed complications that may remain for decades after exposure. This study aimed to identify differentially expressed metabolites between mustard-exposed individuals suffering from chronic complications compared with unexposed individuals as the control group. Serum samples were obtained from 15 mustard-exposed individuals and 15 apparently healthy unexposed individuals. Metabolomic profiling was performed using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and analyses were carried out using Chenomex and MATLAB softwares. Metabolites were identified using Human Metabolome Database, and the main metabolic pathways were identified using MetaboAnalyst software. Chemometric analysis of serum samples identified 11 differentially expressed metabolites between mustard-exposed and unexposed groups. The main pathways that were influenced by sulphur mustard exposure were related to vitamin B6 (down-regulation), bile acid (up-regulation) and tryptophan (down-regulation) metabolism. Metabolism of vitamin B6, bile acids and tryptophan are the most severely impaired pathways in individuals suffering from chronic mustard-induced complications. These findings may find implications in the monitoring of exposed patients and identification of new therapeutic approaches.

  11. Inhibition of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella by combinations of oriental mustard, malic acid, and EDTA.

    PubMed

    Olaimat, Amin N; Holley, Richard A

    2014-04-01

    The antimicrobial activities of oriental mustard extract alone or combined with malic acid and EDTA were investigated against Salmonella spp. or Listeria monocytogenes at different temperatures. Five strain Salmonella or L. monocytogenes cocktails were separately inoculated in Brain Heart Infusion broth containing 0.5% (w/v) aqueous oriental mustard extract and incubated at 4 °C to 21 °C for 21 d. For inhibitor combination tests, Salmonella Typhimurium 02:8423 and L. monocytogenes 2-243 were individually inoculated in Mueller Hinton broth containing the mustard extract with either or both 0.2% (w/v) malic acid and 0.2% (w/v) EDTA and incubated at 10 °C or 21 °C for 10 to 14 d. Mustard extract inhibited growth of the L. monocytogenes cocktail at 4 °C up to 21 d (2.3 log10 CFU/mL inhibition) or at 10 °C for 7 d (2.4 log10 CFU/mL inhibition). Salmonella spp. viability was slightly, but significantly reduced by mustard extract at 4 °C by 21 d. Although hydrolysis of sinigrin in mustard extract by both pathogens was 2 to 6 times higher at 21 °C than at 4 °C to 10 °C, mustard was not inhibitory at 21 °C, perhaps because of the instability of its hydrolysis product (allyl isothiocyanate). At 21 °C, additive inhibitory effects of mustard extract with EDTA or malic acid led to undetectable levels of S. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes by 7 d and 10 d, respectively. At 10 °C, S. Typhimurium was similarly susceptible, but combinations of antimicrobials were not more inhibitory to L. monocytogenes than the individual agents.

  12. Capsaicinoids, Chloropicrin and Sulfur Mustard: Possibilities for Exposure Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Pesonen, Maija; Vähäkangas, Kirsi; Halme, Mia; Vanninen, Paula; Seulanto, Heikki; Hemmilä, Matti; Pasanen, Markku; Kuitunen, Tapio

    2010-01-01

    Incapacitating and irritating agents produce temporary disability persisting for hours to days after the exposure. One can be exposed to these agents occupationally in industrial or other working environments. Also general public can be exposed in special circumstances, like industrial accidents or riots. Incapacitating and irritating agents discussed in this review are chloropicrin and capsaicinoids. In addition, we include sulfur mustard, which is an old chemical warfare agent and known to cause severe long-lasting injuries or even death. Chloropicrin that was used as a warfare agent in the World War I is currently used mainly as a pesticide. Capsaicinoids, components of hot pepper plants, are used by police and other law enforcement personnel as riot control agents. Toxicity of these chemicals is associated particularly with the respiratory tract, eyes, and skin. Their acute effects are relatively well known but the knowledge of putative long-term effects is almost non-existent. Also, mechanisms of effects at cellular level are not fully understood. There is a need for further research to get better idea of health risks, particularly of long-term and low-level exposures to these chemicals. For this, exposure biomarkers are essential. Validated exposure biomarkers for capsaicinoids, chloropicrin, and sulfur mustard do not exist so far. Metabolites and macromolecular adducts have been suggested biomarkers for sulfur mustard and these can already be measured qualitatively, but quantitative biomarkers await further development and validation. The purpose of this review is, based on the existing mechanistic and toxicokinetic information, to shed light on the possibilities for developing biomarkers for exposure biomonitoring of these compounds. It is also of interest to find ideas for early effect biomarkers considering the need for studies on subchronic and chronic toxicity. PMID:21833179

  13. A review on delayed toxic effects of sulfur mustard in Iranian veterans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Iranian soldiers were attacked with chemical bombs, rockets and artillery shells 387 times during the 8-years war by Iraq (1980–1988). More than 1,000 tons of sulfur mustard gas was used in the battlefields by the Iraqis against Iranian people. A high rate of morbidities occurred as the result of these attacks. This study aimed to evaluate the delayed toxic effects of sulfur mustard gas on Iranian victims. During a systematic search, a total of 193 (109 more relevant to the main aim) articles on sulfur mustard gas were reviewed using known international and national databases. No special evaluation was conducted on the quality of the articles and their publication in accredited journals was considered sufficient. High rate of morbidities as the result of chemical attacks by sulfur mustard among Iranian people occurred. Iranian researchers found a numerous late complications among the victims which we be listed as wide range of respiratory, ocular, dermatological, psychological, hematological, immunological, gastrointestinal and endocrine complications, all influenced the quality of life of exposed victims. The mortality rate due to this agent was 3%. Although, mortality rate induced by sulfur mustard among Iranian people was low, variety and chronicity of toxic effects and complications of this chemical agent were dramatic. PMID:23351810

  14. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 26 plants in 16 states in the United States. Of the total ammonia production capacity, 55% was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas. US producers operated at 66% of their rated capacity. In descending order, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, Agrium and PCS Nitrogen accounted for 81% of the US ammonia production capacity.

  15. A bridging water anchors the tethered 5-(3-aminopropyl)-2'-deoxyuridine amine in the DNA major groove proximate to the N+2 C.G base pair: implications for formation of interstrand 5'-GNC-3' cross-links by nitrogen mustards.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Li, Feng; Ganguly, Manjori; Marky, Luis A; Gold, Barry; Egli, Martin; Stone, Michael P

    2008-07-08

    Site-specific insertion of 5-(3-aminopropyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (Z3dU) and 7-deaza-dG into the Dickerson-Drew dodecamers 5'-d(C (1)G (2)C (3)G (4)A (5)A (6)T (7)T (8)C (9) Z (10)C (11)G (12))-3'.5'-d(C (13)G (14)C (15)G (16)A (17)A (18)T (19)T (20)C (21) Z (22)C (23)G (24))-3' (named DDD (Z10)) and 5'-d(C (1)G (2)C (3)G (4)A (5)A (6)T (7) X (8)C (9) Z (10)C (11)G (12))-3'.5'-d(C (13)G (14)C (15)G (16)A (17)A (18)T (19) X (20)C (21) Z (22)C (23)G (24))-3' (named DDD (2+Z10)) (X = Z3dU; Z = 7-deaza-dG) suggests a mechanism underlying the formation of interstrand N+2 DNA cross-links by nitrogen mustards, e.g., melphalan and mechlorethamine. Analysis of the DDD (2+Z10) duplex reveals that the tethered cations at base pairs A (5).X (20) and X (8).A (17) extend within the major groove in the 3'-direction, toward conserved Mg (2+) binding sites located adjacent to N+2 base pairs C (3).Z (22) and Z (10).C (15). Bridging waters located between the tethered amines and either Z (10) or Z (22) O (6) stabilize the tethered cations and allow interactions with the N + 2 base pairs without DNA bending. Incorporation of 7-deaza-dG into the DDD (2+Z10) duplex weakens but does not eliminate electrostatic interactions between tethered amines and Z (10) O (6) and Z (22) O (6). The results suggest a mechanism by which tethered N7-dG aziridinium ions, the active species involved in formation of interstrand 5'-GNC-3' cross-links by nitrogen mustards, modify the electrostatics of the major groove and position the aziridinium ions proximate to the major groove edge of the N+2 C.G base pair, facilitating interstrand cross-linking.

  16. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 12 companies at 27 plants in 15 states in the United States during 2011. Sixty-one percent of total U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2011, U.S. producers operated at about 84 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Four companies — CF Industries Holdings Inc.; Koch Nitrogen Co.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 77 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity.

  17. Sequence selectivity, cross-linking efficiency and cytotoxicity of DNA-targeted 4-anilinoquinoline aniline mustards.

    PubMed

    McClean, S; Costelloe, C; Denny, W A; Searcey, M; Wakelin, L P

    1999-06-01

    We have investigated the sequence selectivity, DNA binding site characteristics, interstrand cross-linking ability and cytotoxicity of four 4-anilinoquinoline aniline mustards related to the AT-selective minor groove-binding bisquaternary ammonium heterocycles. The compounds studied include two full mustards that differ in alkylating power, a half mustard and a quaternary anilinoquinolinium bismustard. We have also compared their cytotoxicity with their precursor diols and their toxicity and cross-linking ability with the classical alkylating agents melphalan and chlorambucil. We find that the anilinoquinoline aniline mustards weakly and non-specifically alkylate guanines in the major groove and that they bind strongly to AT-rich sequences in the minor groove, where they alkylate both adenines and guanines at the N3 position. The most preferred sites are classical minor groove binder AT-tracts to which all four ligands bind equally well. The remaining sites are AT-rich, but include GC base pairs, to which the ligands bind with preferences depending on their structure. The full mustards alkylate at the 3' ends of the binding site in an orientation that depends on the spatial disposition of the purines within the two strands. Generally speaking guanines are found to be much less reactive than adenines. The anilinoquinoline aniline mustards are interstrand cross-linking agents that are 60- to 100-fold more effective than melphalan, with the quaternary compound being the most efficacious. However, the type of binding site at which the cross-links occur is not clear, since distamycin challenge fails to antagonize them fully. The full mustards are 20- to 50-fold more cytotoxic than their diol precursors, are more cytotoxic than the half mustard and are 20- to 30-fold more active than melphalan and chlorambucil. The quaternary ligand is the most potent. Given the evidence to hand, it appears that antitumour activity correlates with capacity to cause interstrand cross

  18. Natural occurrence of bisphenol F in mustard

    PubMed Central

    Zoller, Otmar; Brüschweiler, Beat J.; Magnin, Roxane; Reinhard, Hans; Rhyn, Peter; Rupp, Heinz; Zeltner, Silvia; Felleisen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bisphenol F (BPF) was found in mustard up to a concentration of around 8 mg kg−1. Contamination of the raw products or caused by the packaging could be ruled out. Also, the fact that only the 4,4ʹ-isomer of BPF was detected spoke against contamination from epoxy resin or other sources where technical BPF is used. Only mild mustard made of the seeds of Sinapis alba contained BPF. In all probability BPF is a reaction product from the breakdown of the glucosinolate glucosinalbin with 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol as an important intermediate. Hot mustard made only from brown mustard seeds (Brassica juncea) or black mustard seeds (Brassica nigra) contained no BPF. BPF is structurally very similar to bisphenol A and has a similar weak estrogenic activity. The consumption of a portion of 20 g of mustard can lead to an intake of 100–200 µg of BPF. According to a preliminary risk assessment, the risk of BPF in mustard for the health of consumers is considered to be low, but available toxicological data are insufficient for a conclusive evaluation. It is a new and surprising finding that BPF is a natural food ingredient and that this is the main uptake route. This insight sheds new light on the risk linked to the family of bisphenols. PMID:26555822

  19. The Mexican poppy poisons the Indian mustard facts and figures.

    PubMed

    Thatte, U; Dahanukar, S

    1999-03-01

    Argemone seeds are mixed with mustard seeds either accidentally or purposefully, and, ingestion of this contaminated oil can lead to often fatal "epidemic dropsy". The liver, heart, kidney and lungs are the major target organs of the toxins (the alkaloids, sanguinarine and dihydrosanguinarine) and damage is mostly caused by free radical (singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical) to the cell membranes. Treatment at present is mainly symptomatic but therapy with anti-secretory agents for glaucoma and anti-oxidants/free radical scavengers for systemic manifestations appear to be logical.

  20. Differences in sequence selectivity of DNA alkylation by isomeric intercalating aniline mustards.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A S; Denny, W A; Wakelin, L P

    1990-01-01

    Two DNA-targeted mustard derivatives, N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)-4-(5-[9-acridinylamino]-pentamido)aniline and 4-(9-[acridinylamino]butyl 4-(N,N-bis[2-chloroethyl]-aminobenzamide, which are isomeric compounds where the mustard is linked to the DNA-binding 9-aminoacridine moiety by either a -CONH- or a -NHCO- group, show significant differences in the sequence selectivity of their alkylation of DNA. The CONH isomer is a more efficient alxylating agent than the NHCO compound by an order of magnitude, consistent with the larger electron release of the CONH group to the aniline ring. However, the pattern of alkylation by the two compounds is also very different, with the CONH isomer preferring alkylation of guanines adjacent to 3'- or 5'-adenines and cytosines (for example those in sequences 5'-CGC, 5'-AGC, 5'-CGG and 5'-AGA) while the isomeric NHCO compound shows preference for guanines in runs of Gs. In addition, both isomers alkylate 3'-adenines in runs of adenines. Both compounds also show completely different patterns of alkylation to their untargeted mustard counterparts, since 4-MeCONH-aniline mustard alkylates all guanines and adenines in runs of adenines, while 4-Me2NCO-aniline mustard fails to alkylate DNA at all. These differences in alkylation patterns between the CONH- and its isomeric NHCO- compounds and their relationships between the alkylation patterns of the isomers and their biological activities are discussed.

  1. Effect of mustard gas exposure on incidence of lung cancer: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Doi, Mihoko; Hattori, Noboru; Yokoyama, Akihito; Onari, Yojiro; Kanehara, Masashi; Masuda, Kenji; Tonda, Tetsuji; Ohtaki, Megu; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2011-03-15

    Sulfur mustard, an agent used in chemical warfare, is an alkylating substance with carcinogenic potential. However, the precise long-term carcinogenic effects of mustard gas are unclear. Since 1952, the authors have conducted health surveys of former workers who were employed from 1929 to 1945 in a poisonous gas factory in Okuno-jima, Hiroshima, Japan. This prospective study was undertaken from 1952 to 2005 to examine the incidence of lung cancer among the workers who were exposed to mustard gas (n=480), lewisite (n=55), and/or diphenylcyanarsine (n=178), as well as the incidence among unexposed workers (n=969). The stochastic relation between exposure and lung cancer was explored on the basis of multistage carcinogenesis by using an accelerated hazard model with a transformed age scale. Mustard gas exposure was found to transform the age scale for developing lung cancer. One year of exposure in subjects ≤18 or >18 years old at first exposure shifted the age scale down by 4.9 years and 3.3 years, respectively. On the basis of the long-term follow-up of former workers in the poisonous gas factory, the authors concluded that sulfur mustard decreased the age at which people were at risk of developing lung cancer and that the effect declined with aging.

  2. Microarray gene expression analysis of the human airway in patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Ali; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohamad Reza

    2014-08-01

    There is much data about the acute effects of sulfur mustard gas on humans, animals and cells. But less is known regarding the molecular basics of chronic complications in humans. Basically, mustard gas, as an alkylating agent, causes several chronic problems in the eyes, skin and more importantly in the pulmonary system which is the main cause of death. Although recent proteomic research has been carried out on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum, but high-throughput transcriptomics have not yet been applied to chronic airway remodeling. This is the first cDNA-microarray report on the chronic human mustard lung disease, 25 years after exposure during the Iran-Iraq war. Microarray transcriptional profiling indicated that a total of 122 genes were significantly dysregulated in tissues located in the airway of patients. These genes are associated with the extracellular matrix components, apoptosis, stress response, inflammation and mucus secretion.

  3. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P M.; Kleimeyer, J; Rowland, Brad; Gardner, Patrick J.

    2003-04-21

    Quantitative high resolution (0.1 cm -1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L).

  4. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 15 companies at 25 plants in 16 states in the United States during 2006. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas because of their large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2006, U.S. producers operated at about 72 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies, Koch Nitrogen, Terra Industries, CF Industries, PCS Nitro-gen, and Agrium, in descending order, accounted for 79 percent U.S. ammonia production capacity. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  5. Nitrogen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  6. Arsenic and Old Mustard: Chemical Problems of Old Arsenical and 'Mustard' Munitions (Joseph F. Bunnett and Marian Mikotajczyk, Eds.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Benjamin

    1999-10-01

    What do Knute Rockne, Notre Dame's famed football coach, and Lewisite, a chemical warfare agent dubbed "the dew of death", have in common? Both owe their discovery to Father Julius Arthur Nieuwland.1 Rockne's legacy lives on in the Fighting Irish and their tradition of excellence on the gridiron. Lewisite, together with other arsenical- and mustard-type chemical warfare agents, provide a legacy that lives on, too, but with less cheerful consequences. The book Arsenic and Old Mustard: Chemical Problems of Old Arsenical and 'Mustard' Munitions makes clear the challenges faced in dealing with those consequences. This book documents the proceedings of a workshop devoted to arsenical- and mustard-type chemical warfare agents and their associated munitions. The workshop, held in Poland in 1996, included nine lectures, eight posters, and three discussion groups; and the contents of all these are presented. Major support for the workshop came from the Scientific Affairs Division of NATO as part of on ongoing series of meetings, cooperative research projects, and related efforts dealing with problems leftover from the Cold War and, in the case of the arsenicals and mustards, from conflicts dating to World War I. These problems can be seen in contemporary accounts, including a January 1999 news report that the U.S. Department of Defense intends to survey Washington, DC, areas near both American University and the Catholic University of America (CUA), site of the original synthesis of Lewisite, for chemical warfare agents and other materials disposed at the end of World War I.2 The first nine chapters of the book present the workshop's lectures. Of these, readers interested in chemical weapon destruction might find especially useful the first chapter, in which Ron Mansley of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons presents a scholarly overview covering historical aspects of the arsenicals and mustards; their production and use; prospective destruction

  7. Quenching action of monofunctional sulfur mustard on chlorophyll fluorescence: towards an ultrasensitive biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simerjit; Singh, Minni; Flora, Swaran Jeet Singh

    2013-11-01

    An ultrasensitive fluorimetric biosensor for the detection of chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) was developed using its monofunctional analogue. SM is a vesicant and a potent chemical threat owing to its direct toxic effects on eyes, lungs, skin and DNA. This work investigates the quenching action of the analyte on chlorophyll fluorescence as elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies suggesting the electrophilic attack of carbonium ion on nitrogens of the porphyrin moiety of chlorophyll. The properties of immobilisation matrix were optimised and scanning electron microscope observations confirmed improvement in pore size of sol-gels by addition of 32 % (v/v) glycerol, a feature enabling enhanced sensitivity towards the analyte. Chlorophyll embedded sol-gel was treated with increasing concentrations of monofunctional SM and the corresponding drop in maximum fluorescence intensity as measured by emission at 673 nm was observed, which varied linearly and had a detection limit of 7.68 × 10(-16) M. The biosensor was found to be 6 orders of magnitude more sensitive than the glass microfibre-based disc biosensor previously reported by us.

  8. Molecular Strategies Against Sulfur Mustard Toxicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    meiosis . Our current understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression involves basically two classes of molecular mechanisms: histone...Molecular Strategies Against Sulfur Mustard Toxicity 30 - 4 RTO-MP-HFM-182 meiosis . Our current understanding of epigenetic gene regulation

  9. The Toxicity of Inhaled Sulphur Mustard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    acetyl -L- cysteine (Mucomyst™; NAC ), in ameliorating inhaled HD-induced lung injury was then assessed in the established model. This work was conducted...J and Sciuto AM. N- acetyl -L- cysteine ( NAC ) Protects Against Inhaled Sulfur Mustard (HD) Poisoning in the Large Swine. Clinical Toxicology, 2012...2012. N- acetyl -L- cysteine ( NAC ) Protects against inhaled sulfur mustard (HD) poisoning in the large swine. Clinical Toxicology; in preparation

  10. Keratinocyte Spray Technology for the Improved Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    of allogeneic keratinocytes in suspension will improve epidermal wound healing of vesicating burns induced by the chemical warfare agent sulfur...improve epidermal wound healing of vesicating burns induced by the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (bis (2-chloroethyl) sulfide; HD). The...experiment is being conducted in two Phases. Phase I is a dose ranging study to determine the dose regimen needed to induce a deep dermal/full thickness

  11. History and perspectives of bioanalytical methods for chemical warfare agent detection.

    PubMed

    Black, Robin M

    2010-05-15

    This paper provides a short historical overview of the development of bioanalytical methods for chemical warfare (CW) agents and their biological markers of exposure, with a more detailed overview of methods for organophosphorus nerve agents. Bioanalytical methods for unchanged CW agents are used primarily for toxicokinetic/toxicodynamic studies. An important aspect of nerve agent toxicokinetics is the different biological activity and detoxification pathways for enantiomers. CW agents have a relatively short lifetime in the human body, and are hydrolysed, metabolised, or adducted to nucleophilic sites on macromolecules such as proteins and DNA. These provide biological markers of exposure. In the past two decades, metabolites, protein adducts of nerve agents, vesicants and phosgene, and DNA adducts of sulfur and nitrogen mustards, have been identified and characterized. Sensitive analytical methods have been developed for their detection, based mainly on mass spectrometry combined with gas or liquid chromatography. Biological markers for sarin, VX and sulfur mustard have been validated in cases of accidental and deliberate human exposures. The concern for terrorist use of CW agents has stimulated the development of higher throughput analytical methods in support of homeland security.

  12. Storage studies on mustard oil blends.

    PubMed

    Chugh, Bhawna; Dhawan, Kamal

    2014-04-01

    Mustard oil blends were investigated for fatty acid composition and oxidative stability during storage for 3 months at room temperature (15 °C to 35 °C). The blends were prepared using raw mustard oil with selected refined vegetable oils namely; palm, safflower, soybean, rice bran, sunflower and sesame oil (raw). The fatty acid compositions of all these blends were studied using GLC. The developed blends were found to obey the ideal fatty acid ratio as laid down by health agencies i.e. 1:2:1:: SFA:MUFA:PUFA. The oxidative stability of blends was studied by measuring peroxide value (PV), Kries and Thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test. Blends MPSu (mustard oil, palm oil and sunflower oil), MPT (mustard oil, palm oil and sesame oil) and MPGr (mustard oil, palm oil and groundnut oil) were more stable than other blends during storage. The presence of mustard oil in all blends might make them a healthier option for many consumers as it is a rich source of ω-3 fatty acids and has anti-carcinogenic properties.

  13. Evaluation of miR-9 and miR-143 expression in urine specimens of sulfur mustard exposed patients.

    PubMed

    Khafaei, Mostafa; Samie, Shahram; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Alvanegh, Akbar Ghorbani; Mirzaei, Behnaz; Chavoshei, Somaye; Dorraj, Ghamar Soltan; Esmailnejad, Mostafa; Tavallaie, Mahmood; Nourani, Mohammadreza

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) or mustard gas is a chemical alkylating agent that causes blisters in the skin (blister gas), burns the eyes and causes lung injury. Some major cellular pathways are involved in the damage caused by mustard gas such as NF-κb signaling, TGF-β signaling, WNT pathway, inflammation, DNA repair and apoptosis. MicroRNAs are non-coding small RNAs (19-25 nucleotides) that are involved in the regulation of gene expression and are found in two forms, extracellular and intracellular. Changes in the levels of extracellular microRNAs are directly associated with many diseases, it is thus common to study the level of extracellular microRNAs as a biomarker to determine the pathophysiologic status. In this study, 32 mustard gas injured patients and 32healthy subjects participated. Comparative evaluation of miR-9 and miR-143 expression in urine samples was performed by Real Time PCR and Graph Pad software. The Mann Whitney t-test analysis of data showed that the expression level of miR-143 and miR-9 had a significant decrease in sulfur mustard individuals with the respective p-value of 0.0480 and 0.0272 compared to normal samples, with an imbalance of several above mentioned pathways. It seems that reducing the expression level of these genes has a very important role in the pathogenicity of mustard gas injured patients.

  14. Multiphoton imaging the disruptive nature of sulfur mustard lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert J.; Braue, Catherine R.; Dillman, James F.

    2005-03-01

    Sulfur mustard [bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide] is a vesicating agent first used as a weapon of war in WWI. It causes debilitating blisters at the epidermal-dermal junction and involves molecules that are also disrupted by junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) and other blistering skin diseases. Despite its recurring use in global conflicts, there is still no completely effective treatment. We have shown by imaging human keratinocytes in cell culture and in intact epidermal tissues that the basal cells of skin contain well-organized molecules (keratins K5/K14, α6β4 integrin, laminin 5 and α3β1 integrin) that are early targets of sulfur mustard. Disruption and collapse of these molecules is coincident with nuclear displacement, loss of functional asymmetry, and loss of polarized mobility. The progression of this pathology precedes basal cell detachment by 8-24 h, a time equivalent to the "clinical latent phase" that defines the extant period between agent exposure and vesication. Our images indicate that disruption of adhesion-complex molecules also impairs cytoskeletal proteins and the integration of structures required for signal transduction and tissue repair. We have recently developed an optical system to test this hypothesis, i.e., to determine whether and how the early disruption of target molecules alters signal transduction. This environmentally controlled on-line system provides a nexus for real-time correlation of imaged lesions with DNA microarray analysis, and for using multiphoton microscopy to facilitate development of more effective treatment strategies.

  15. Degradation of sulfur mustard on KF/Al2O3 supports: insights into the products and the reactions mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zafrani, Yossi; Goldvaser, Michael; Dagan, Shai; Feldberg, Liron; Mizrahi, Dana; Waysbort, Daniel; Gershonov, Eytan; Columbus, Ishay

    2009-11-06

    The degradation of the warfare agent sulfur mustard (HD) adsorbed onto KF/Al(2)O(3) sorbents is described. These processes were explored by MAS NMR, using (13)C-labeled sulfur mustard (HD*) and LC-MS techniques. Our study on the detoxification of this blister agent showed the formation of nontoxic substitution and less-toxic elimination products (t(1/2) = 3.5-355 h). Interestingly, the reaction rates were found to be affected by MAS conditions, i.e., by a centrifugation effect. The products and the mechanisms of these processes are discussed.

  16. Buffering agents-assisted synthesis of nitrogen-doped graphene with oxygen-rich functional groups for enhanced electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Yan, Qiuyun; Zhang, Shanshan; Lu, Luhua; Xie, Bingqiao; Xie, Ting; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Yucheng; Zhang, Yuxing; Liu, Dong

    2016-11-01

    In this work, designed growth of two type of N-doped graphene nanosheets has been investigated using NH4H2PO4 and (NH4)2HPO4 as buffering agents, respectively, in a mild hydrothermal process. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization indicates that the graphene nanosheets grown using NH4H2PO4 (NGC) have lower nitrogen but higher oxygen content than those using (NH4)2HPO4 (NGL). Electrochemical measurements in three-electrode systems show that both type of the graphene products exhibit superior electrochemical performance (383 and 356 F g-1 at 1 A g-1). While the specific capacitance of NGC is steadily higher than that of NGL under all investigated current densities, the capacitance attenuation of NGL is 4.80% from 500 to 10000 cycles showing more durable in cyclicity than that of NGC (8.81%). The two-electrode supercapacitor devices for NGC and NGL exhibit high energy density of 12.21 Wh kg-1 and 9.28 Wh kg-1 at 0.25 A g-1. The difference in electrochemical behaviors between NGC and NGL electrodes can be attributed to the different contribution of nitrogen and oxygenic groups. The buffer agents assisted synthesis procedure coupled with the reasonable capacitance performance suggests an alternative way in the designed functionalization of graphene for developing high performance supercapacitors.

  17. Kinetics of the degradation of sulfur mustard on ambient and moist concrete.

    PubMed

    Brevett, Carol A S; Sumpter, Kenneth B; Nickol, Robert G

    2009-02-15

    The rate of degradation of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, was measured on ambient and moist concrete using (13)C Solid State Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SSMAS NMR). Three samples of concrete made by the same formulation, but differing in age and alkalinity were used. The sulfur mustard eventually degraded to thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane via the intermediate sulfonium ions CH-TG, H-TG, H-2TG and O(CH(2)CH(2))(2)S(+)CH(2)CH(2)OH on all of the concrete samples, and in addition formed 8-31% vinyl moieties on the newer, more alkaline concrete samples. This is the first observation of the formation of O(CH(2)CH(2))(2)S(+)CH(2)CH(2)OH on a solid substrate. The addition of 2-chloroethanol to concrete on which mustard had fully degraded to thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane resulted in the formation of O(CH(2)CH(2))(2)S(+)CH(2)CH(2)OH, thus demonstrating the reversibility of sulfur mustard degradation pathways. The sulfur mustard degradation half-lives on ambient concrete at 22 degrees C ranged from 3.5 to 54 weeks. When the substrates were moistened, the degradation half-lives at 22 degrees C ranged from 75 to 350h. The degradation of sulfur mustard occurred more quickly at elevated temperatures and with added water. The non-volatile toxic sulfonium ions persisted for months to years on concrete at 22 degrees C and weeks to months on concrete at 35 degrees C, before decomposing to the relatively non-toxic compounds thiodiglycol and 1,4-oxathiane.

  18. Mustard Gas: Its Pre-World War I History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchovic, Ronald J.; Vilensky, Joel A.

    2007-01-01

    The Meyer-Clarke synthetic method was used in the German process for large scale production of mustard gas during World War I, which clearly shows the historical connection of synthesis of mustard gas.

  19. A Bridging Water Anchors the Tethered 5-(3-Aminopropyl)-2′-deoxyuridine Amine in the DNA Major Groove Proximate to the N+2 C·G Base Pair: Implications for Formation of Interstrand 5′-GNC-3′ Cross-Links by Nitrogen Mustards

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Feng; Li, Feng; Ganguly, Manjori; Marky, Luis A.; Gold, Barry; Egli, Martin; Stone, Michael P.

    2008-11-14

    Site-specific insertion of t-(3-aminopropyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (Z3dU) and 7-deaza-dG into the Dickerson-Drew dodecamers 5'-d(C{sup 1}G{sup 2}C{sup 3}G{sup 4}A{sup 5}A{sup 6}T{sup 7}T{sup 8}C{sup 9}{und Z}{sup 10}C{sup 11}G{sup 12})-3'{center_dot}5'-d (C{sup 13}G{sup 14}C{sup 15}G{sup 16}A{sup 17}A{sup 18}T{sup 19}T{sup 20}C{sup 21}{und Z}{sup 22}C{sup 23}G{sup 24})-3' (named DDD{sup Z10}) and 5'-d(C{sup 1}G{sup 2}C{sup 3}G{sup 4}A{sup 5}A{sup 6}T{sup 7}{und X}{sup 20}C{sup 21}{und Z}{sup 22}C{sup 23}G{sup 24})-3' (named DDD{sup 2+Z10}) (X = 73dU; Z = 7-deaza-dG) suggests a mechanism underlying the formation of interstrand N+2 DNA cross-links by nitrogen mustards, e.g., melphalan and mechlorethamine. Analysis of the DDD{sup 2+Z10} duplex reveals that the tethered cations at base pairs A{sup 5}{center_dot}X{sup 20} and X{sup 8}{center_dot}A{sup 17} extend within the major groove in the 3'-direction, toward conserved Mg{sup 2+} binding sites located adjacent to N+2 base pairs C{sup 3}{center_dot}Z{sup 22} and Z{sup 10}{center_dot}C{sup 15}. Bridging waters located between the tethered amines and either Z{sup 10} or Z{sup 22} O{sup 6} stabilize the tethered cations and allow interactions with the N + 2 base pairs without DNA bending. Incorporation of 7-deaza-dG into the DDD{sup 2+Z10} duplex weakens but does not eliminate electrostatic interactions between tethered amines and Z{sup 10} O{sup 6} and Z{sup 22} O{sup 6}. The results suggest a mechanism by which tethered N7-dG aziridinium ions, the active species involved in formation of interstrand 5'-GNC-3' cross-links by nitrogen mustards, modify the electrostatics of the major groove and position the aziridinium ions proximate to the major groove edge of the N+2 C{center_dot}G base pair, facilitating interstrand cross-linking.

  20. Mustard gas surrogate, 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide (2-CEES), induces centrosome amplification and aneuploidy in human and mouse cells : 2-CEES induces centrosome amplification and chromosome instability.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Richard A; Behrens, Elizabeth; Zinn, Ashtyn; Duncheon, Christian; Lamkin, Thomas J

    2014-08-01

    Mustard gas is a simple molecule with a deadly past. First used as a chemical weapon in World War I, its simple formulation has raised concerns over its use by terrorist organizations and unstable governments. Mustard gas is a powerful vesicant and alkylating agent that causes painful blisters on epithelial surfaces and increases the incidence of cancer in those exposed. The mechanism of mustard gas toxicity and tumorigenesis is not well understood but is thought to be mediated by its ability to induce oxidative stress and DNA damage. Interestingly, several proteins that have been shown to either be targets of mustard gas or mediate mustard gas toxicity have also been shown to regulate centrosome duplication. Centrosomes are small nonmembrane-bound organelles that direct the segregation of chromosomes during mitosis through the formation of the bipolar mitotic spindle. Cells with more or less than two centrosomes during mitosis can segregate their chromosomes unequally, resulting in chromosome instability, a common phenotype of cancer cells. In our studies, we show that subtoxic levels of 2-chloroethyl ethylsulfide (2-CEES), a mustard gas analog, induce centrosome amplification and chromosome instability in cells, which may hasten the mutation rate necessary for tumorigenesis. These data may explain why those exposed to mustard gas exhibit higher incidences of cancer than unexposed individuals of the same cohort.

  1. Free radical production from the interaction of 2-chloroethyl vesicants (mustard gas) with pyridine nucleotide-driven flavoprotein electron transport systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brimfield, A.A. Mancebo, A.M.; Mason, R.P.; Jiang, J.J.; Siraki, A.G.; Novak, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    The biochemical sequelae to chloroethyl mustard exposure correspond very well to toxic processes initiated by free radicals. Additionally, mustard solutions contain spontaneously formed cyclic onium ions which produce carbon free radicals when reduced electrochemically. Therefore, we hypothesized that the onium ions of sulfur or nitrogen mustards might produce carbon free radicals upon being reduced enzymatically, and that these radicals might constitute a metabolic activation. We set out to document radical production using an in vitro metabolic system and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Our system consisted of NADPH, one of several pyridine nucleotide-driven flavoprotein reductases, cytochrome c as a terminal electron acceptor, various sulfur or nitrogen mustards and the spin trap {alpha}-[4-pyridyl-1-oxide]-N-tert-butylnitrone in buffer. Reactions were started by adding the reductase to the other materials, vortexing and immediately transferring the mixture to a 10 mm EPR flat cell. Repeated scans on a Bruker ESP 300E EPR spectrometer produced a triplet of doublets with hyperfine splitting constants of a{sub N} = 15.483 G and a{sub H} = 2.512 G. The outcome supported our hypothesis that carbon-centered free radicals are produced when mustard-related onium ions are enzymatically reduced. The EPR results varied little with the chloroethyl compound used or with porcine or human cytochrome P450 reductase, the reductase domain of rat brain neuronal nitric oxide synthase or rat liver thioredoxin reductase. Our results offer new insight into the basis for mustard-induced vesication and the outcome of exposure to different mustards. The free radical model provides an explanation for similarities in the lesions arising from mustard exposure and energy-based lesions such as those from heat, ultraviolet and nuclear radiation as well as damage across tissue types such as skin, eyes or airway epithelium.

  2. Mesoporous titanium-manganese dioxide for sulphur mustard and soman decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Stengl, Vaclav; Bludska, Jana; Oplustil, Frantisek; Nemec, Tomas

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} New nano-dispersive materials for warfare agents decontamination. {yields} 95% decontamination activities for sulphur mustard. {yields} New materials base on titanium and manganese oxides. -- Abstract: Titanium(IV)-manganese(IV) nano-dispersed oxides were prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of potassium permanganate and titanium(IV) oxo-sulphate with 2-chloroacetamide. Synthesised samples were characterised using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulphur mustard (HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulphide) and soman (GD or (3,3'-dimethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate). Mn{sup 4+} content affects the decontamination activity; with increasing Mn{sup 4+} content the activity increases for sulphur mustard and decreases for soman. The best decontamination activities for sulphur mustard and soman were observed for samples TiMn{sub 3}7 with 18.6 wt.% Mn and TiMn{sub 5} with 2.1 wt.% Mn, respectively.

  3. Chemical warfare agent and high explosive identification by spectroscopy of neutron-induced gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, A.J.; Cole, J.D.; Gehrke, R.J.; Greenwood, R.C. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on a non-destructive assay method to identify chemical warfare (CW) agents and high explosive (HE) munitions which was tested with actual chemical agents and explosives at the Tooele Army Depot, Tooele, Utah, from 22 April 1991 through 3 May 1991. The assay method exploits the gamma radiation produced by neutron interactions inside a container or munition to identify the elemental composition of its contents. The characteristic gamma-ray signatures of the chemical elements chlorine, phosphorus, and sulfur were observed form the CW agent containers and munitions, in sufficient detail to enable us to reliably discern agents GB (sarin), HD (mustard gas), and VX from one another, and from HE-filled munitions. By detecting of the presence of nitrogen, the key indictor of explosive compounds, and the absence of elements Cl, P, and S, HE shells were also clearly identified.

  4. Determination of carbon/nitrogen ratio and heavy metals in bulking agents used for sewage composting.

    PubMed

    Alidadi, H; Najafpoor, A A; Parvaresh, A

    2007-11-15

    Improving the soil quality with organic matter and N, P and K contents are some of sewage sludge benefits. Adjusting carbonaceous materials such as plant wastes to dewatered sludge compost results in increasing the moisture content and improving C/N ratio. This study was conduced for three months in 2005, in Laboratory of Chemistry of Water and Wastewater in the School of Public Health of Isfahan University of Medical Science, to determine the C/N ratio and heavy metals concentration of bulking agents in sawdust, leaves, rice hulls and dewatered sewage sludge. Dewatered sludge was collected from Isfahan sewage treatment plant. Sawdust was collected from sawmills. Leaves were collected from municipality of Isfahan and rice hull from rice mills, then in samples determined C/N ratio and heavy metal according to standard methods. The results showed that concentrations of chromium and cadmium in the mixture of dewatered sewage sludge and bulking agents were lower them those of the standard level. Means of cobalt (115.44 mg kg(-1)), nickel (57.44 mg kg(-1)) and zinc (273.48 mg kg(-1)) concentrations were maximum in dewatered sludge but mean concentration of cobalt (25.66 mg kg(-1)) in rice hull samples and mean zinc (8.99 mg kg(-1)) and nickel (5.106 mg kg(-1)) concentrations in sawdust samples were minimum. The optimal conditions sewage sludge composting, each kilogram of sludge needs 350 g of saw dust, 470 g of leaves and 388 g of rice hull. Amount of heavy metals present in the bulking agents is lower than the amount mentioned for the compost.

  5. Adsorption-desorption studies of indigocarmine from industrial effluents by using deoiled mustard and its comparison with charcoal.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod K; Jain, Rajeev; Malathi, S; Nayak, Arunima

    2010-08-15

    Deoiled mustard obtained from local oil mills has been used as an inexpensive and effective adsorbent for the removal of indigocarmine dye from industrial effluents. The influence of various factors on the adsorption capacity has been studied by batch experiments. The adsorption studies validate both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. Thermodynamic parameters such as DeltaG degrees, DeltaH degrees, and DeltaS degrees for the adsorption process were calculated, which indicated the feasibility of the adsorption process. Desorption profiles revealed that a significant portion (85%) could be desorbed from deoiled mustard by using 30% glycerol as eluting agent.

  6. Retinoic acid conjugates as potential antitumor agents: synthesis and biological activity of conjugates with Ara-A, Ara-C, 3(2H)-furanone, and aniline mustard moieties.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, S; Simoni, D; Ferroni, R; Bazzanini, R; Vertuani, S; Hatse, S; Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1997-11-07

    In a dual targeting approach, to explore the ability of tretinoin (all-trans-retinoic acid) to behave as a covalent carrier for cytotoxic entities, conjugates of retinoic acid with a few representative molecules, being important examples of antitumor pharmacophores (i.e., nucleoside analogues and alkylating agents), have been synthesized and tested for their cytostatic and differentiating activity. All compounds were stable to in vitro hydrolysis in human plasma and more lipophilic than the parent compounds, thus consenting enhanced uptake into the cells. Among the nucleoside analogues the Ara-C derivatives 3 and 6 and the Ara-A derivative 7 proved the most cytostatic (IC50 < 0.32 microgram/mL) resulting from 25- to > 144-fold more active (Ara-A derivatives) or at least as equally active (Ara-C derivatives) as compared to the parent nucleosides. Compound 3, endowed with a highly lipophilic silyl moiety at the 3' and 5' positions, showed the highest differentiating activity (54% and 44% differentiated HL-60 cells at 0.2 and 0.05 microgram/mL respectively). With regard to the retinoic acid conjugates of alkylating agents, compound 10 was the most cytostatic agent (IC50 < 0.32 microgram/mL) and the most potent differentiating agent (33-34% at 0.32 and 0.08 microgram/mL). These structures may also be regarded as analogs of either retinoic acid or the cytotoxic compound.

  7. Sulfur mustard gas exposure: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Goverman, J; Montecino, R; Ibrahim, A; Sarhane, K A; Tompkins, R G; Fagan, S P

    2014-09-30

    This report describes a case of burn injury following exposure to sulfur mustard, a chemical agent used in war. A review of the diagnostic characteristics, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic measures used to treat this uncommon, yet extremely toxic, entity is presented. The aim of this report is to highlight the importance of considering this diagnosis in any war victim, especially during these unfortunate times of rising terrorist activities.

  8. Sulfur mustard gas exposure: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Goverman, J.; Montecino, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Sarhane, K.A.; Tompkins, R.G.; Fagan, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This report describes a case of burn injury following exposure to sulfur mustard, a chemical agent used in war. A review of the diagnostic characteristics, clinical manifestations, and therapeutic measures used to treat this uncommon, yet extremely toxic, entity is presented. The aim of this report is to highlight the importance of considering this diagnosis in any war victim, especially during these unfortunate times of rising terrorist activities. PMID:26170794

  9. Domestic Preparedness Program: Phase 2 Sarin (GB) and Distilled Sulfur Mustard (HD) Vapor Challenge Testing of Commercial Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus Facepieces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    GB Mustard HD Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus Sarin Chemical Agent Breakthrough SCBA Agent Challenge Testing ...emergency escape breathing apparatus. 3. CHEMICAL AGENT TESTING 3.1 Chemical Agent Testing Equipment. 3.1.1 Vapor Generator. The GB and HD vapors were... agent seeped inside the other two within 4 min. For all three tests , the North Model 821 resisted HD for 60 min and GB for 25, 28, and 32 min.

  10. Induction and repair of DNA cross-links induced by sulfur mustard in the A-549 cell line followed by a comet assay.

    PubMed

    Jost, Petr; Svobodova, Hana; Stetina, Rudolf

    2015-07-25

    Sulfur mustard is a highly toxic chemical warfare agent with devastating impact on intoxicated tissues. DNA cross-links are probably the most toxic DNA lesions induced in the cell by sulfur mustard. The comet assay is a very sensitive method for measuring DNA damage. In the present study using the A-549 lung cell line, the comet assay protocol was optimized for indirect detection of DNA cross-links induced by sulfur mustard. The method is based on the additional treatment of the assayed cells containing cross-links with the chemical mutagen, styrene oxide. Alkali-labile adducts of styrene oxide cause DNA breaks leading to the formation of comets. A significant dose-dependent reduction of DNA migration of the comet's tail was found after exposing cells to sulfur mustard, indicative of the amount of sulfur mustard induced cross-links. The remarkable decrease of % tail DNA could be observed as early as 5min following exposure to sulfur mustard and the maximal effect was found after 30min, when DNA migration was reduced to the minimum. Sulfur mustard preincubated in culture medium without cells lost its ability to induce cross-links and had a half-life of about 15min. Pre-incubation longer than 30min does not lead to a significant increase in cross-links when applied to cells. However, the amount of cross-links is decreased during further incubation due to repair. The current modification of the comet assay provides a useful tool for detecting DNA cross-links induced by sulfur mustard and could be used for detection of other DNA cross-linking agents such as chemotherapeutic drugs.

  11. Biochemical manipulation of intracellular glutathione levels influences cytotoxicity to isolated human lymphocytes by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, C.L.; Innace, J.K.; Hovatter, R.C.; Meier, H.L.; Smith, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    Glutathione (GSH) is the major nonprotein thiol that can protect cells from damage due to electrophilic alkylating agents by forming conjugates with the agent. Sulfur mustard (HD) is an electrophilic alkylating agent that has potent mutagenic, carcinogenic, cytotoxic, and vesicant properties. Compounds that elevate or reduce intracellular levels of GSH may produce changes in cytotoxicity induced by sulfur mustard. Pretreatment of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) for 72 hr with 1 mM buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), which reduces intracellular GSH content to approximately 26% of control, appears to sensitize these in vitro cells to the cytotoxic effects of 10 AM HD but not to higher HD concentrations. Pretreatment of PBL for 48 hr with 10 mM N-acetyl cysteine (NA C), which elevates intracellular glutathione levels to 122% of control, appears to partially protect these in vitro cells from the cytotoxic effects of 10 LAIHD but not to higher HD concentrations. Augmentation of intracellular levels of glutathione may provide partial protection against cytotoxicity of sulfur mustard.

  12. Mass spectral studies on vinylic degradation products of sulfur mustards under gas chromatography/mass spectrometry conditions.

    PubMed

    Sai Sachin, L; Karthikraj, R; Kalyan Kumar, K; Sony, T; Prasada Raju, N; Prabhakar, S

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustards are a class of vesicant chemical warfare agents that rapidly degrade in environmental samples. The most feasible degradation products of sulfur mustards are chloroethyl vinylic compounds and divinylic compounds, which are formed by the elimination of one and two HCl molecules from sulfur mustards, respectively. The detection and characterization of these degradation products in environmental samples are an important proof for the verification of sulfur mustard usage. In this study, we synthesized a set of sulfur mustard degradation products, i.e., divinylic compounds (1-7) and chloroethyl vinylic compounds (8-14), and characterized using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) under electron ionization (EI) and chemical ionization (CI) (methane) conditions. The EI mass spectra of the studied compounds mainly included the fragment ions that resulted from homolytic cleavages with or without hydrogen migrations. The divinylic compounds (1-7) showed [M-SH](+) ions, whereas the chloroethylvinyl compounds (8-14) showed [M-Cl](+) and [M-CH2CH2Cl](+) ions. Methane/CI mass spectra showed [M+H](+) ions and provided molecular weight information. The GC retention index (RI) values were also calculated for the studied compounds. The EI and CI mass spectral data together with RI values are extremely useful for off-site analysis for the verification of the chemical weapons convention and also to participate in official Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons proficiency tests.

  13. Rapid monitoring of sulfur mustard degradation in solution by headspace solid-phase microextraction sampling and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Creek, Jo-Anne M; McAnoy, Andrew M; Brinkworth, Craig S

    2010-12-15

    A method using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis has been developed to gain insight into the degradation of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard in solution. Specifically, the described approach simplifies the sample preparation for GC/MS analysis to provide a rapid determination of changes in sulfur mustard abundance. These results were found to be consistent with those obtained using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) GC/MS. The utility of the described approach was further demonstrated by the investigation of the degradation process in a complex matrix with surfactant added to assist solvation of sulfur mustard. A more rapid reduction in sulfur mustard abundance was observed using the HS-SPME approach with surfactant present and was similar to results from LLE experiments. Significantly, this study demonstrates that HS-SPME can simplify the sample preparation for GC/MS analysis to monitor changes in sulfur mustard abundance in solution more rapidly, and with less solvent and reagent usage than LLE.

  14. Kojic acid reduces the cytotoxic effects of sulfur mustard on cultures containing human melanoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smith, C N; Lindsay, C D

    2001-01-01

    In vivo experiments have shown that melanocytes are more sensitive than keratinocytes to the cytotoxic effects of sulfur mustard when it is applied topically to pig skin.1 It has been hypothesized that this is caused by the uncoupling of the melanogenic pathway by depletion of cellular glutathione, resulting in the uncontrolled production of cytotoxic quinone free-radical species by tyrosinase.2. In the present study, the feasibility of blocking the melanogenic pathway as a means of reducing the cytotoxicity of sulfur mustard was evaluated using kojic acid. Kojic acid is a topically applied depigmenting agent that exerts its effect by acting as a slow-binding, competitive inhibitor of tyrosinase.3 Preincubation of G361 pigmented melanoma cells and mixed cultures of G361 cells and SVK keratinocytes with 2.5 mM kojic acid resulted in significant increases in the viability of these cultures as determined by neutral red (NR) and gentian violet (GV) dye binding assays for up to 48 h following exposure to 50 microM sulfur mustard. The highest levels of protection were seen in the G361 cultures, with a 26.8% increase in culture viability (NR assay) compared with the sulfur-mustard-only controls at 24 h. Preincubation of SVK cells alone with kojic acid resulted in lower increases in viability (2.5% at 24 h by the NR assay). Inhibition of the melanogenic pathway reduces the sensitivity of cultures containing pigment cells to sulfur mustard.

  15. Medical Management of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Three of the four sites on each animal were xposed to undiluted liquid sulfur mustard for 8min to produce superficial dermal njuries. The fourth site...previously xposed to HD. If the primary aim of using this technology on a atient is to address hyperpigmentation by applying autologous elanocytes (along with

  16. Use of acid whey and mustard seed to replace nitrites during cooked sausage production.

    PubMed

    Wójciak, Karolina M; Karwowska, Małgorzata; Dolatowski, Zbigniew J

    2014-02-01

    The aim was to determine the effects of sea salt, acid whey, native and autoclaved mustard seed on the physico-chemical properties, especially colour formation, microbial stability and sensory evaluation of non-nitrite cooked sausage during chilling storage. The cooked pork sausages were divided into 4 groups (group I--control sausages with curing salt (2.8%) and water (5%) added; group II--sausages with sea salt (2.8%) and acid whey (5%) added; group III--sausages with sea salt (2.8%), acid whey (5%) and mustard seed (1%) added; group IV--sausages with sea salt (2.8%), acid whey (5%) and autoclaved mustard seed (1%) added). Instrumental colour (L*, a*, b*), oxygenation index (ΔR), 650/570 nm ratio, heme iron, pH value and water activity (aw) were determined 1 day after production and after 10, 20 and 30 days of refrigerated storage (4 °C). Sensory analysis was conducted immediately after production (day 1). Microbial analysis (lactic acid bacteria, total viable count, Clostridium spp.) was determinated at the end of storage (30 days). The autoclaved mustard with acid whey can be used at 1.0% (w/w) of model cooked sausages with beneficial effect on physico-chemical and sensory qualities of no-nitrite sausage. This product can be stored at refrigeration temperature for up to 30 days, in vacuum, with good acceptability. The colour, visual appearance and overall quality of samples with autoclaved mustard seed and acid whey were similar to the control with curing agent.

  17. EPA Science Matters Newsletter: Chemical Warfare Agent Analytical Standards Facilitate Lab Testing (Published November 2013)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about the EPA chemists' efforts to develop methods for detecting extremely low concentrations of nerve agents, such as sarin, VX, soman and cyclohexyl sarin, and the blister agent sulfur mustard.

  18. Soil biotransformation of thiodiglycol, the hydrolysis product of mustard gas: understanding the factors governing remediation of mustard gas contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Muir, Robert; McFarlane, Neil R; Soilleux, Richard J; Yu, Xiaohong; Thompson, Ian P; Jackman, Simon A

    2013-02-01

    Thiodiglycol (TDG) is both the precursor for chemical synthesis of mustard gas and the product of mustard gas hydrolysis. TDG can also react with intermediates of mustard gas degradation to form more toxic and/or persistent aggregates, or reverse the pathway of mustard gas degradation. The persistence of TDG have been observed in soils and in the groundwater at sites contaminated by mustard gas 60 years ago. The biotransformation of TDG has been demonstrated in three soils not previously exposed to the chemical. TDG biotransformation occurred via the oxidative pathway with an optimum rate at pH 8.25. In contrast with bacteria isolated from historically contaminated soil, which could degrade TDG individually, a consortium of three bacterial strains isolated from the soil never contaminated by mustard gas was able to grow on TDG in minimal medium and in hydrolysate derived from an historical mustard gas bomb. Exposure to TDG had little impacts on the soil microbial physiology or on community structure. Therefore, the persistency of TDG in soils historically contaminated by mustard gas might be attributed to the toxicity of mustard gas to microorganisms and the impact to soil chemistry during the hydrolysis. TDG biodegradation may form part of a remediation strategy for mustard gas contaminated sites, and may be enhanced by pH adjustment and aeration.

  19. Agents.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2002-01-01

    Although health care is inherently an economic activity, it is inadequately described as a market process. An alternative, grounded in organizational economic theory, is to view professionals and many others as agents, contracted to advance the best interests of their principals (patients). This view untangles some of the ethical conflicts in dentistry. It also helps identify major controllable costs in dentistry and suggests that dentists can act as a group to increase or decrease agency costs, primarily by controlling the bad actors who damage the value of all dentists.

  20. Structural, optical and electronic characteristics of N-doped graphene nanosheets synthesized using urea as reducing agent and nitrogen precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamoli, Pankaj; Das, Malay K.; Kar, Kamal K.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, nitrogen (N)-doped graphene nanosheets (NGns) have been synthesized by solvothermal method using urea both as the green precursor of N and as the reducing agent for graphene oxide (GO). As synthesized NGns have been characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV–visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS). The Raman D to G band intensity ratio (I D /I G ), being a measure of defects in the honeycomb lattice, is used as an indicator for the formation of NGns. For GO:urea weight ratio of 1:5, high C to O atomic ratio (C/O) of ~8.75 with an N-content as high as ~8.3 at.% and high I D /I G ratio of 1.55 have been observed, which confirm the removal of oxygen functionalities from GO to form NGns. Further, transparent conducting films (TCFs) of the synthesized NGns have been fabricated by spray coating. Thermal graphitization of the TCFs has been performed to enhance their optical and electrical properties. When annealed at 900 °C for 1 h in vacuum, the film shows a best performance in terms of sheet resistance and transmittance values of ~1.63 kΩ □‑1 and ~68.21%, respectively.

  1. [Resorcinol-spectrophotometric method for the determination of fructose in mustard leaf's amylose].

    PubMed

    Hasenqimeng; He, Feng-ga

    2002-06-01

    A method using seliwanoff reaction is proposed for the determination of fructose in the amylose of mustard leaves. Fructose reacts with resorcinol forming a red compound with a maximum absorption at 473 nm. The calibration curve is linear over the range of 0-83 micrograms.mL-1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9998. The content of fructose in the amylose of mustard leaves is found to be 11.41%. Quantitative analysis used for the fructose of syrup include such as volumetric analysis, then layer chromatography, polarimetry, high pressure liquid chromatography and spectrophotometric analysis. According to different color-developing agents, spectrophotometric analysis may be classified as carbazole method, ammonium molybdate way and resorcinol way etc. reported by foreign papers is hard to operate and colored complex is unstable.

  2. NMR- and GC/MS-based metabolomics of sulfur mustard exposed individuals: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nobakht, B Fatemeh; Aliannejad, Rasoul; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Arefi Oskouie, Afsaneh; Naseri, Mohammad Taghi; Parastar, Hadi; Aliakbarzadeh, Ghazaleh; Fathi, Fariba; Taheri, Salman

    2016-09-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent and its effects on cells and tissues are varied and complex. Due to limitations in the diagnostics of sulfur mustard exposed individuals (SMEIs) by noninvasive approaches, there is a great necessity to develop novel techniques and biomarkers for this condition. We present here the first nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) metabolic profiling of serum from and healthy controls to identify novel biomarkers in blood serum for better diagnostics. Of note, SMEIs were exposed to SM 30 years ago and that differences between two groups could still be found. Pathways in which differences between SMEIs and healthy controls are observed are related to lipid metabolism, ketogenesis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and amino acid metabolism.

  3. 7 CFR 201.56-3 - Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., Chinese cabbage, cauliflower, collards, garden cress, upland cress, water cress, kale, Chinese kale, Siberian kale, kohlrabi, mustard, pakchoi, radish, rape, rutabaga, and turnip. (a) General description....

  4. 7 CFR 201.56-3 - Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., Chinese cabbage, cauliflower, collards, garden cress, upland cress, water cress, kale, Chinese kale, Siberian kale, kohlrabi, mustard, pakchoi, radish, rape, rutabaga, and turnip. (a) General description....

  5. 7 CFR 201.56-3 - Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., Chinese cabbage, cauliflower, collards, garden cress, upland cress, water cress, kale, Chinese kale, Siberian kale, kohlrabi, mustard, pakchoi, radish, rape, rutabaga, and turnip. (a) General description....

  6. 7 CFR 201.56-3 - Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., Chinese cabbage, cauliflower, collards, garden cress, upland cress, water cress, kale, Chinese kale, Siberian kale, kohlrabi, mustard, pakchoi, radish, rape, rutabaga, and turnip. (a) General description....

  7. Putting Some Mustard into Economic Growth

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    On September 27, 2012, the University of Toronto launched the Fraser Mustard Institute for Human Development – an appropriate recognition of an extraordinary individual. Fraser was a keen student of the science of human development and, most particularly, of early child development (ECD). He was also a powerful and tireless advocate for translating science into action. His institute must do both. Action is needed also because 25% of Canadians lack the competencies to function effectively in a modern economy. Other countries do much better. Facing a low-growth future, we cannot afford to waste this untapped potential. Although Prime Minister Harper's personal ideology has no place for ECD, the Mustard Institute can help keep the flame alive. PMID:23968611

  8. Putting some mustard into economic growth.

    PubMed

    Evans, Robert G

    2012-11-01

    On September 27, 2012, the University of Toronto launched the Fraser Mustard Institute for Human Development - an appropriate recognition of an extraordinary individual. Fraser was a keen student of the science of human development and, most particularly, of early child development (ECD). He was also a powerful and tireless advocate for translating science into action. His institute must do both. Action is needed also because 25% of Canadians lack the competencies to function effectively in a modern economy. Other countries do much better. Facing a low-growth future, we cannot afford to waste this untapped potential. Although Prime Minister Harper's personal ideology has no place for ECD, the Mustard Institute can help keep the flame alive.

  9. Gene expression profile of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in lung tissue of patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbpour, Eisa; Ghanei, Mostafa; Qazvini, Ali; Vahedi, Ensieh; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent that targets several organs, especially lung tissue. Although pathological effects of SM on mustard lung have been widely considered, molecular and cellular mechanisms for these pathologies are poorly understood. We investigated changes in expression of genes related to oxidative stress (OS) and antioxidant defense caused by SM in lung tissue of patients. We performed gene expression profiling of OS and antioxidant defense in lung tissue samples from healthy controls (n=5) and SM-exposed patients (n=6). Changes in gene expression were measured using a 96-well RT(2) Profiler ™PCR Array: Human Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense, which arrayed 84 genes functionally involved in cellular OS response. 47 (55.95%) genes were found to be significantly upregulated in patients with mustard lung compared with controls (p<0.05), whereas 7 (8.33%) genes were significantly downregulated (p<0.05). Among the most upregulated genes were OS responsive-1 (OXSR1), forkhead box M1 (FOXM1), and glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPX2), while metallothionein-3 (MT3) and glutathione reductase (GSR) were the most downregulated genes. Expression of hypoxia-induced genes (CYGB and MB), antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing genes were significantly altered, suggesting an increased oxidative damage in mustard lungs. Mustard lungs were characterized by hypoxia, massive production of ROS, OS, disruption of epithelial cells, surfactant dysfunction, as well as increased risk of lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis. Oxidative stress induced by ROS is the major mechanism for direct effect of SM exposure on respiratory system. Antioxidant treatment may improve the main features of mustard lungs.

  10. Teratology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents. Effects of Sulfur Mustard in Rats and Rabbits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-21

    fetuses had incomplete closure of the sagittal suture, one accompanied by spina bifida and one with forelimb flexure. TABLE 27. Fetal Measures (Mean...Gross observations (fetuses/litters): Forelimb flexure Incomplete closure of sagittal suture Spina bifida 0 0 0 1/1 0 0 0 0 0 2/1d 5/1

  11. Ocular Effects of Sulfur Mustard and Therapeutic Approaches: A Review.

    PubMed

    Panahi, Yunes; Rajaee, Seyyed Mahdi; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-01-20

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a strong blistering, highly reactive, lipophilic chemical war agent that causes injury in different organs including the skin, eyes and respiratory tract. The Eyes are especially susceptible to the consequences of SM poisoning because of the aqueous and mucosal nature of conjunctiva and cornea. DNA alkylation and depletion of glutathione, are the most important mechanisms of SM action in the eye injuries. Acute clinical symptoms are including decrease in visual acuity, dryness, photophobia, blepharospasm, conjunctivitis and complaints of foreign body sensation and soreness that gradually progress to severe ocular pain. Corneal abrasions, ulcerations, vesication and perforations are common corneal consequences in SM injured victims. Appearance of chronic symptoms has been reported as chronic inflammation of the corneal and conjunctival vasculature, ischemia, lipid and cholesterol deposition, scarring in cornea, corneal thinning, opacification and perforation of the cornea, limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD) and neovascularization. Different medical and surgical protocols have been documented in the management of SM-induced ocular injuries, including preservative-free artificial tears, topical steroids and antibiotic, mydriatic, antiglaucoma drops, therapeutic contact lenses, dark glasses and punctal plugs/cauterization, N-acetylcysteine, tarsorrhaphy, amniotic membrane transplantation, stem cell transplantation and corneal transplantation. New drugs such as resolvin E1, topical form of essential fatty acids, thymosin β4, 43 amino-acid polypeptides, topical form of curcumin, newly formulated artificial tears, diquafosol, rebamipide, tretinoin and oral uridineseems to be beneficial in the management of ocular lesion associated with sulfur mustard poisoning. Further studies are needed to approve these drugs in SM victims. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Neutralization and Biodegradation of Sulfur Mustard.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-02-01

    obtained from activated sludge (Back River Wastewater Treatment Plant, Baltimore, MD). Initial mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) levels were...BIODEGRADATION OF SULFUR MUSTARD Steven P. Harvey Linda L. Szafraniec William T. Beaudry RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE James T. Earley SBR TECHNOLOGIES, INC... SBR Technologies, Inc.); and Irvine, Robert L. (University of Notre Dame) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  13. Miniaturized low-cost ion mobility spectrometer for fast detection of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Stefan; Barth, Sebastian; Baether, Wolfgang K M; Ringer, Joachim

    2008-09-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a well-known method for detecting hazardous compounds in air. Typical applications are the detection of chemical warfare agents, highly toxic industrial compounds, explosives, and drugs of abuse. Detection limits in the low part per billion range, fast response times, and simple instrumentation make this technique more and more popular. In particular, there is an increasing demand for miniaturized low-cost IMS for hand-held devices and air monitoring of public areas by sensor networks. In this paper, we present a miniaturized aspiration condenser type ion mobility spectrometer for fast detection of chemical warfare agents. The device is easy to manufacture and allows single substance identification down to low part per billion-level concentrations within seconds. The improved separation power results from ion focusing by means of geometric constraints and fluid dynamics. A simple pattern recognition algorithm is used for the identification of trained substances in air. The device was tested at the German Armed Forces Scientific Institute for Protection Technologies-NBC-Protection. Different chemical warfare agents, such as sarin, tabun, soman, US-VX, sulfur mustard, nitrogen mustard, and lewisite were tested. The results are presented here.

  14. Detection and monitoring of early airway injury effects of half-mustard (2-chloroethylethylsulfide) exposure using high-resolution optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuter, Kelly A.; Mahon, Sari B.; Mukai, David S.; Su, Jianping; Jung, Woong-Gyu; Narula, Navneet; Guo, Shuguang; Wakida, Nicole; Raub, Chris; Berns, Michael W.; George, Steven C.; Chen, Zhongping; Brenner, Matthew

    2009-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive, high-resolution imaging technology capable of delivering real-time, near-histologic images of tissues. Mustard gas is a vesicant-blistering agent that can cause severe and lethal damage to airway and lungs. The ability to detect and assess airway injury in the clinical setting of mustard exposure is currently limited. The purpose of this study is to assess the ability to detect and monitor progression of half-mustard [2-chloroethylethylsulfide (CEES)] airway injuries with OCT techniques. A ventilated rabbit mustard exposure airway injury model is developed. A flexible fiber optic OCT probe is introduced into the distal trachea to image airway epithelium and mucosa in vivo. Progression of airway injury is observed over eight hours with OCT using a prototype time-domain superluminescent diode OCT system. OCT tracheal images from CEES exposed animals are compared to control rabbits for airway mucosal thickening and other changes. OCT detects the early occurrence and progression of dramatic changes in the experimental group after exposure to CEES. Histology and immunofluorescence staining confirms this finding. OCT has the potential to be a high resolution imaging modality capable of detecting, assessing, and monitoring treatment for airway injury following mustard vesicant agent exposures.

  15. 7 CFR 201.56-3 - Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae). 201.56-3 Section 201.56-3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL...-3 Mustard family, Brassicaceae (Cruciferae). Kinds of seed: Broccoli, brussels sprouts,...

  16. Hematological profile of the euthymic hairless guinea pig following sulfur mustard vesicant exposure.

    PubMed

    Gold, M B; Scharf, B A

    1995-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (HD) is a potent vesicating agent of military importance, with known radiomimetic properties. The euthymic hairless guinea pig (EHGP) (Cavia porcellus) is emerging as the animal model of choice for cutaneous HD study. With elucidation of the systemic effects, we may better utilize this animal for all HD toxicity work. To this end, studies were conducted to determine the definitive median lethal dose (MLD) of subcutaneously applied sulfur mustard (HD) in the EHGP, and to correlate the induced hematological changes. Eight groups of two animals each were dosed at 0.3 log intervals from an extrapolated expected dose, deriving a tentative mean around which five groups of six animals each were dosed at 0.1 log intervals, resulting in a definitive MLD of 48.17 mg kg(-1). Sulfur mustard was then administered to seven groups of six animals each at a dose of 30 mg kg(-1) and hematology performed. Significant leukocyte count suppression was found to occur on days 4, 5 and 6, following a leukocyte elevation on day 1 after exposure. Serum potassium levels were found to be elevated all 7 days after HD exposure. Establishing the MLD for subcutaneously applied HD and the pattern of induced leukocyte suppression allows for more definitive evaluation of successful toxicity counter-measures.

  17. Temporal and spatial features of the formation of DNA adducts in sulfur mustard-exposed skin

    SciTech Connect

    Batal, Mohamed; Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Wartelle, Julien; Emorine, Sandy; Bertoni, Marine; Bérard, Izabel; and others

    2013-12-15

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that targets skin where it induces large blisters. DNA alkylation is a critical step to explain SM-induced cutaneous symptoms. We determined the kinetics of formation of main SM–DNA adducts and compare it with the development of the SM-induced pathogenesis in skin. SKH-1 mice were exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM and treated skin was biopsied between 6 h and 21 days. Formation of SM DNA adducts was dose-dependent with a maximum immediately after exposure. However, adducts were persistent and still detectable 21 days post-exposure. The time-dependent formation of DNA adducts was also found to be correlated with the appearance of apoptotic cells. This temporal correlation suggests that these two early events are responsible for the severity of the damage to the skin. Besides, SM–DNA adducts were also detected in areas located next to contaminated zone, thus suggesting that SM diffuses in skin. Altogether, this work provides for the first time a clear picture of SM-induced genotoxicity using DNA adducts as a marker. - Highlights: • Sulfur mustard adducts are formed in DNA after skin exposure. • DNA damage formation is an early event in the pathological process of skin burn. • The amount of SM–DNA adducts is maximal at the earliest time point investigated. • Adducts are still detected 3 weeks after exposure. • Sulfur mustard diffuses in skin especially when large doses are applied.

  18. Mesoporous iron–manganese oxides for sulphur mustard and soman degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Štengl, Václav; Grygar, Tomáš Matys; Bludská, Jana; Opluštil, František; Němec, Tomáš

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► New nanodispersive materials based on Fe and Mn oxides for degradations of warfare agents. ► The best activities for the degradation of sulphur mustard (97.9% in 64 min) and soman (97.9% in 64 min). ► One pot synthesis with friendly transformed to industrial conditions. -- Abstract: Substituted iron(III)–manganese(III, IV) oxides, ammonio-jarosite and birnessite, were prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of potassium permanganate and iron(III) sulphate with 2-chloroacetamide and urea, respectively. Synthesised oxides were characterised using Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett–Joiner–Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity against sulphur mustard (HD) and soman (GD). When ammonio-jarosite formation is suppressed by adding urea to the reaction mixture, the reaction products are mixtures of goethite, schwertmannite and ferrihydrite, and their degradation activity against soman considerably increases. The best activities for the degradation of sulphur mustard (97.9% in 64 min) and soman (97.9% in 64 min) were observed for FeMn{sub 7}5 with 32.6 wt.% Fe (36.8 wt.% Mn) and FeMn{sub 3}7U with 60.8 wt.% Fe (10.1 wt.% Mn) samples, respectively.

  19. Sulfur Mustard Induces Immune Sensitization in Hairless Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Neerad C.; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; March, Thomas; Weber, Waylon; Benson, Janet; Jaramillo, Richard; Seagrave, Jean-Clare; Schultz, Gregory; Grotendorst, Gary; Sopori, Mohan

    2009-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM, bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide) is a well known chemical warfare agent that may cause long-term debilitating injury. Because of the ease of production and storage, it has a strong potential for chemical terrorism; however, the mechanism by which SM causes chronic tissue damage is essentially unknown. SM is a potent protein alkylating agent, and we tested the possibility that SM modifies cellular antigens, leading to an immunological response to “altered self” and a potential long-term injury. To that end, in this communication, we show that dermal exposure of euthymic hairless guinea pigs induced infiltration of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells into the SM-exposed skin and strong upregulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-8) in distal tissues such as the lung and the lymph nodes. Moreover, we present evidence for the first time that SM induces a specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response that is associated with splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and proliferation of cells in these tissues. These results clearly suggest that dermal exposure to SM leads to immune activation, infiltration of T cells into the SM-exposed skin, delayed-type hypersensitivity response, and molecular imprints of inflammation in tissues distal from the site of SM exposure. These immunological responses may contribute to the long-term sequelae of SM toxicity. PMID:19887117

  20. Sulfur mustard induces immune sensitization in hairless guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Neerad C; Rir-sima-ah, Jules; March, Thomas; Weber, Waylon; Benson, Janet; Jaramillo, Richard; Seagrave, Jean-Clare; Schultz, Gregory; Grotendorst, Gary; Sopori, Mohan

    2010-02-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM, bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide) is a well known chemical warfare agent that may cause long-term debilitating injury. Because of the ease of production and storage, it has a strong potential for chemical terrorism; however, the mechanism by which SM causes chronic tissue damage is essentially unknown. SM is a potent protein alkylating agent, and we tested the possibility that SM modifies cellular antigens, leading to an immunological response to "altered self" and a potential long-term injury. To that end, in this communication, we show that dermal exposure of euthymic hairless guinea pigs induced infiltration of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells into the SM-exposed skin and strong upregulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and IL-8) in distal tissues such as the lung and the lymph nodes. Moreover, we present evidence for the first time that SM induces a specific delayed-type hypersensitivity response that is associated with splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and proliferation of cells in these tissues. These results clearly suggest that dermal exposure to SM leads to immune activation, infiltration of T cells into the SM-exposed skin, delayed-type hypersensitivity response, and molecular imprints of inflammation in tissues distal from the site of SM exposure. These immunological responses may contribute to the long-term sequelae of SM toxicity.

  1. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, E.L.; Boulware, S.; Fields, T.; McIvor, E.; Powell, K.L.; DiGiovanni, J.; Vasquez, K.M.; MacLeod, M.C.

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas. -- Highlights: ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of glutathione in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane induces increased levels of GSTA4 in mouse skin. ► Sulforaphane, applied after CEES-treatment, completely abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► The therapeutic effect may suggest a long biological half-life for CEES in vivo.

  2. Sulforaphane induces phase II detoxication enzymes in mouse skin and prevents mutagenesis induced by a mustard gas analog.

    PubMed

    Abel, E L; Boulware, S; Fields, T; McIvor, E; Powell, K L; DiGiovanni, J; Vasquez, K M; MacLeod, M C

    2013-02-01

    Mustard gas, used in chemical warfare since 1917, is a mutagenic and carcinogenic agent that produces severe dermal lesions for which there are no effective therapeutics; it is currently seen as a potential terrorist threat to civilian populations. Sulforaphane, found in cruciferous vegetables, is known to induce enzymes that detoxify compounds such as the sulfur mustards that react through electrophilic intermediates. Here, we observe that a single topical treatment with sulforaphane induces mouse epidermal levels of the regulatory subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, and also increases epidermal levels of reduced glutathione. Furthermore, a glutathione S-transferase, GSTA4, is also induced in mouse skin by sulforaphane. In an in vivo model in which mice are given a single mutagenic application of the sulfur mustard analog 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), we now show that therapeutic treatment with sulforaphane abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin, measured four days after exposure. Sulforaphane, a natural product currently in clinical trials, shows promise as an effective therapeutic against mustard gas.

  3. Mechanisms of Cadmium Mobility and Accumulation in Indian Mustard.

    PubMed Central

    Salt, D. E.; Prince, R. C.; Pickering, I. J.; Raskin, I.

    1995-01-01

    Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.), a high biomass crop plant, accumulated substantial amounts of cadmium, with bioaccumulation coefficients (concentration of Cd in dry plant tissue/concentration in solution) of up to 1100 in shoots and 6700 in roots at nonphytotoxic concentrations of Cd (0.1 [mu]g/mL) in solution. This was associated with a rapid accumulation of phytochelatins in the root, where the majority of the Cd was coordinated with sulfur ligands, probably as a Cd-S4 complex, as demonstrated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In contrast, Cd moving in the xylem sap was coordinated predominantly with oxygen or nitrogen ligands. Cd concentrations in the xylem sap and the rate of Cd accumulation in the leaves displayed similar saturation kinetics, suggesting that the process of Cd transport from solution through the root and into the xylem is mediated by a saturable transport system(s). However, Cd translocation to the shoot appeared to be driven by transpiration, since ABA dramatically reduced Cd accumulation in leaves. Within leaves, Cd was preferentially accumulated in trichomes on the leaf surface, and this may be a possible detoxification mechanism. PMID:12228679

  4. Gas chromatographic determination of pesticide residues in white mustard.

    PubMed

    Słowik-Borowiec, Magdalena; Szpyrka, Ewa; Walorczyk, Stanisław

    2015-04-15

    A new analytical method employing gas chromatography coupled to electron capture and nitrogen phosphorus detection (GC-ECD/NPD) has been developed and validated for the screening and quantification of 51 pesticides in a matrix of high chlorophyll content - white mustard (Sinapis alba L.). For preparation of the sample extract, the citrate buffered QuEChERS procedure was followed. However certain changes were made to adapt the method to our needs and available laboratory resources. The sample size was reduced to 5 g, 10 mL water was added and exchange of solvent before GC analysis was done. The samples spiked with the target pesticides at the concentration level 0.01 mg/kg and a higher level (depending on the compound) yielded average recoveries in the range of 70-120% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) 0-19% except for HCB, S-metolachlor and teflubenzuron, and displayed very good linearity (R(2)>0.99) for nearly all the analytes. Limit of quantification was 0.01 mg/kg for the majority of the analytes. The expanded measurement uncertainties were estimated employing a "top-down" empirical model as being between 6% and 32% and yielding an average value of 18% (coverage factor k=2, confidence level 95%).

  5. ADAM17 Inhibitors Attenuate Corneal Epithelial Detachment Induced by Mustard Exposure

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis-Rodrigues, Andrea; Chang, Yoke-Chen; A. Hahn, Rita; P. Po, Iris; Zhou, Peihong; Lacey, C. Jeffrey; Pillai, Abhilash; C. Young, Sherri; A. Flowers II, Robert; A. Gallo, Michael; D. Laskin, Jeffrey; R. Gerecke, Donald; K. H. Svoboda, Kathy; D. Heindel, Ned; Gordon, Marion K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Sulfur mustard, nitrogen mustard (NM), and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide all cause corneal injury with epithelial–stromal separation, differing only by degree. Injury can resolve in a few weeks or develop into chronic corneal problems. These vesicants induce microbullae at the epithelial–stromal junction, which is partially caused by cleavage of transmembranous hemidesmosomal collagen XVII, a component anchoring the epithelium to the stroma. ADAM17 is an enzyme involved in wound healing and is able to cleave collagen XVII. The activity of ADAM17 was inhibited in vesicant-exposed corneas by four different hydroxamates, to evaluate their therapeutic potential when applied 2 hours after exposure, thereby allowing ADAM17 to perform its early steps in wound healing. Methods Rabbit corneal organ cultures exposed to NM for 2 hours were washed, then incubated at 37°C for 22 hours, with or without one of the four hydroxamates (dose range, 0.3–100 nmol in 20 μL, applied four times). Corneas were analyzed by light and immunofluorescence microscopy, and ADAM17 activity assays. Results Nitrogen mustard–induced corneal injury showed significant activation of ADAM17 levels accompanying epithelial–stromal detachment. Corneas treated with hydroxamates starting 2 hours post exposure showed a dose-dependent ADAM17 activity inhibition up to concentrations of 3 nmol. Of the four hydroxamates, NDH4417 (N-octyl-N-hydroxy-2-[4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl] acetamide) was most effective for inhibiting ADAM17 and retaining epithelial–stromal attachment. Conclusions Mustard exposure leads to corneal epithelial sloughing caused, in part, by the activation of ADAM17 at the epithelial–stromal junction. Select hydroxamate compounds applied 2 hours after NM exposure mitigated epithelial–stromal separation. PMID:27058125

  6. Cleanout and Decontamination of a Mustard Agent Ton Container.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    HD TCs using pressurized hot water and steam. ERDEC has successfully decontaminated two HD TCs in an ERDEC Toxic Test Chamber to a 3X condition using...this process. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Ton Containers HD Decontamination Alternative Technology Program 143 3X Condition Heel Hot Water ...the interior of the TC with pressurized hot water . The demonstration was designed to confirm the results of the first HD TC Cleanout Demonstration, and

  7. Using Metal Complex Ion-Molecule Reactions in a Miniature Rectilinear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer to Detect Chemical Warfare Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graichen, Adam M.; Vachet, Richard W.

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n]y+ complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n]2+ complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations.

  8. Using metal complex ion-molecule reactions in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer to detect chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Graichen, Adam M; Vachet, Richard W

    2013-06-01

    The gas-phase reactions of a series of coordinatively unsaturated [Ni(L)n](y+) complexes, where L is a nitrogen-containing ligand, with chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants in a miniature rectilinear ion trap mass spectrometer were investigated as part of a new approach to detect CWAs. Results show that upon entering the vacuum system via a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane introduction, low concentrations of several CWA simulants, including dipropyl sulfide (simulant for mustard gas), acetonitrile (simulant for the nerve agent tabun), and diethyl phosphite (simulant for nerve agents sarin, soman, tabun, and VX), can react with metal complex ions generated by electrospray ionization (ESI), thereby providing a sensitive means of detecting these compounds. The [Ni(L)n](2+) complexes are found to be particularly reactive with the simulants of mustard gas and tabun, allowing their detection at low parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. These detection limits are well below reported exposure limits for these CWAs, which indicates the applicability of this new approach, and are about two orders of magnitude lower than electron ionization detection limits on the same mass spectrometer. The use of coordinatively unsaturated metal complexes as reagent ions offers the possibility of further tuning the ion-molecule chemistry so that desired compounds can be detected selectively or at even lower concentrations.

  9. Models of invasion and establishment of African Mustard (Brassica tournefortii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, Kristin H.; Gowan, Timothy A.; Miller, David M.; Brooks, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduced exotic plants can drive ecosystem change. We studied invasion and establishment ofBrassica tournefortii (African mustard), a noxious weed, in the Chemehuevi Valley, western Sonoran Desert, California. We used long-term data sets of photographs, transects for biomass of annual plants, and densities of African mustard collected at irregular intervals between 1979 and 2009. We suggest that African mustard may have been present in low numbers along the main route of travel, a highway, in the late 1970s; invaded the valley along a major axial valley ephemeral stream channel and the highway; and by 2009, colonized 22 km into the eastern part of the valley. We developed predictive models for invasibility and establishment of African mustard. Both during the initial invasion and after establishment, significant predictor variables of African mustard densities were surficial geology, proximity to the highway and axial valley ephemeral stream channel, and number of small ephemeral stream channels. The axial valley ephemeral stream channel was the most vulnerable of the variables to invasions. Overall, African mustard rapidly colonized and quickly became established in naturally disturbed areas, such as stream channels, where geological surfaces were young and soils were weakly developed. Older geological surfaces (e.g., desert pavements with soils 140,000 to 300,000 years old) were less vulnerable. Microhabitats also influenced densities of African mustard, with densities higher under shrubs than in the interspaces. As African mustard became established, the proportional biomass of native winter annual plants declined. Early control is important because African mustard can colonize and become well established across a valley in 20 yr.

  10. Silibinin, dexamethasone, and doxycycline as potential therapeutic agents for treating vesicant-inflicted ocular injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K.; Inturi, Swetha; Ammar, David A.; Agarwal, Chapla; Tyagi, Puneet; Kompella, Uday B.; Enzenauer, Robert W.; Petrash, J. Mark; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2012-10-01

    There are no effective and approved therapies against devastating ocular injuries caused by vesicating chemical agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM). Herein, studies were carried out in rabbit corneal cultures to establish relevant ocular injury biomarkers with NM for screening potential efficacious agents in laboratory settings. NM (100 nmol) exposure of the corneas for 2 h (cultured for 24 h), showed increases in epithelial thickness, ulceration, apoptotic cell death, epithelial detachment microbullae formation, and the levels of VEGF, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Employing these biomarkers, efficacy studies were performed with agent treatments 2 h and every 4 h thereafter, for 24 h following NM exposure. Three agents were evaluated, including prescription drugs dexamethasone (0.1%; anti-inflammatory steroid) and doxycycline (100 nmol; antibiotic and MMP inhibitor) that have been studied earlier for treating vesicant-induced eye injuries. We also examined silibinin (100 μg), a non-toxic natural flavanone found to be effective in treating SM analog-induced skin injuries in our earlier studies. Treatments of doxycycline + dexamethasone, and silibinin were more effective than doxycycline or dexamethasone alone in reversing NM-induced epithelial thickening, microbullae formation, apoptotic cell death, and MMP-9 elevation. However, dexamethasone and silibinin alone were more effective in reversing NM-induced VEGF levels. Doxycycline, dexamethasone and silibinin were all effective in reversing NM-induced COX-2 levels. Apart from therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline and dexamethasone, these results show strong multifunctional efficacy of silibinin in reversing NM-induced ocular injuries, which could help develop effective and safe therapeutics against ocular injuries by vesicants. -- Highlights: ► Established injury biomarkers in rabbit corneal culture with nitrogen mustard (NM) ► This NM model is a cost effective

  11. Plasma concentrations of 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide and phosphoramide mustard in patients repeatedly given high doses of cyclophosphamide in preparation for bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sladek, N E; Doeden, D; Powers, J F; Krivit, W

    1984-10-01

    Plasma half-life and area under the curve (AUC) values for cyclophosphamide were determined in patients given this agent iv at doses of 50-60 mg/kg/infusion. Apparent plasma half-life and AUC values for the metabolites 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide and phosphoramide mustard were also determined in some of these patients. Disappearance from the plasma of the parent compound as well as that of the metabolites was approximately first-order. Plasma half-life values for cyclophosphamide ranged from 45 to 480 mins; AUC values ranged from 10 to 188 mM X min. As expected, AUC values for cyclophosphamide increased approximately linearly with an increase in its plasma half-life. Apparent plasma half-life values for 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide and phosphoramide mustard increased approximately linearly with an increase in plasma half-life values for cyclophosphamide; the slopes of these relationships were 1.35 and 1.97, respectively, but did not quite extrapolate to zero. AUC values for 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide and phosphoramide mustard remained approximately constant at about 5 and 15 mM X min, respectively, over the relatively wide range of plasma half-life and AUC values obtained for cyclophosphamide. On the basis of these observations we suggest that (a) changes in the rate of cyclophosphamide hydroxylation, effected by whatever means, will not alter the systemic therapeutic and toxic responses to a given dose of cyclophosphamide, given that the cytotoxic effects of this agent are directly proportional to AUC values of 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide and/or phosphoramide mustard, and (b) in most cases, 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide, and not phosphoramide mustard, is likely to be the circulating metabolite of therapeutic importance in humans since the AUC values for phosphoramide mustard exceeded those for 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide by only a factor of 3 and tumor and bone marrow cells proliferating in culture are generally substantially (8-25-fold) more sensitive to 4

  12. Assessment of sulfur mustard interaction with basement membrane components

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Peters, B.P.; Monteiro-Rivier, N.A.

    1995-08-01

    Bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, RD) is a bifunctional alkylating agent which causes severe vesication characterized by slow wound healing. Our previous studies have shown that the vesicant RD disrupts the epidermal-dermal junction at the lamina lucida of the basement membrane. The purpose of this study was to examine whether RD directly modifies basement membrane components (BMCs), and to evaluate the effect of RD on the cell adhesive activity of BMCs. EHS laminin was incubated with (14C)HRD, and extracted by gel filtration. Analysis of the (14C)HRD-conjugated laminin fraction by a reduced sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylaminde gel electrophoresis (SD S-PAGE) revealed the incorporation of radioactivity into both laminin subunits and a laminin trimer resistant to dissociation in reduced SDS-PAGE sample buffer, suggesting direct alkylation and cross-linking of EHS laminin by (14C)HD. Normal human foreskin epidermal keratinocytes were biosynthetically labeled with (35S)cysteine. (35S)-labeled laminin isoforms, Ae.Ble.B2e. laminin and K.Ble.B2e. laminin (using the nomenclature of Engel), fibronectin, and heparan sulfate proteoglycan were isolated by irnmunoprecipitation from the cell culture medium, treated with RD or ethanol as control, and then analyzed by SDS-PAGE.

  13. The Mustard Consortium’s Elucidation of the Pathophysiology of Sulfur Mustard and Antidote Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    to the use of CEES. Rat spleen , kidney, and liver that had been exposed to SM (in vivo) were sent to Doctors Stone and Crawford. Dr. Stone’s...expression for potentially several chemical weapons. A protocol is being developed for the isolation of mRNA from blood, spleen , and lung. It is... spleen and lung samples from rats exposed to CEES or mustard gas. In total, tissues from 58 rats have been analyzed for tocopherols (alpha- and gamma

  14. Degradation of VX and sulfur mustard by enzymatic haloperoxidation.

    PubMed

    Amitai, G; Adani, R; Hershkovitz, M; Bel, P; Rabinovitz, I; Meshulam, H

    2003-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase (CPO) isolated from Caldariomyces fumago (20 U ml(-1)) together with urea hydrogenperoxide (UPER, 0.5 mM) and sodium chloride as co-substrate (NaCl, 0.5 M) caused rapid breakdown of VX (10 microM) (t((1/2)) = 8 s, 25 C, 50 mM tartarate, pH 2.75). Glucose oxidase (GOX, Aspergillus niger) and glucose were used as an alternative source for H(2)O(2). A mixture of GOX (20 U ml(-1)), glucose (GLU 0.45 M), CPO (20 U ml(-1)) and NaCl (0.5 M) caused a 3.8-fold slower degradation of VX (10 microM) (t((1/2)) = 30 s, 25 C, 50 mM tartarate, pH 2.75). The concentrations of H(2)O(2) and chlorine produced by this enzyme/substrate mixture depended mainly on the GLU concentration. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) together with UPER (1 mM) and sodium iodide (NaI, 0.05 M) caused progressive degradation of VX that was more than 400-fold slower than with CPO (20 U ml(-1)), UPER (0.5 mM) and NaCl (0.5 M) (t((1/2)) = 55 min, 25 C, pH 8). Skin decontamination of VX by CPO was tested in pig-ear skin in vitro. The chemical agent VX (0.01 M, 100 microl) was degraded by 98% within 3 h of skin diffusion when a mixture of UPER/NaCl/CPO was applied 60 min prior to VX application. A mixture of UPER/NaCl without CPO also caused significant VX degradation (94%) during skin diffusion whereas it did not cause any VX degradation in solution. Degradation of VX in skin, obtained without exogenous CPO, may indicate involvement of endogenous intradermal haloperoxidase-like enzyme. Reagent UPER (1 mM) did not cause any degradation of VX in solution or during its skin diffusion. Furthermore, a mixture of CPO, UPER and NaCl caused rapid degradation of sulfur mustard (HD). Sulfur mustard (50 microM) incubated in the presence of CPO (4 U ml(-1)), UPER (0.05 M) and NaCl (0.5 M) at pH 2.75 and 30 C was oxidized by 97% and 99% within 5 and 10 min, respectively. The oxidation products HD sulfoxide, HD sulfone and HD sulfoxidevinyl were identified by GC/MS in the enzymatic chloroperoxidation mixture.

  15. DNA damage in internal organs after cutaneous exposure to sulphur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Batal, Mohamed; Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Wartelle, Julien; Bérard, Izabel

    2014-07-01

    Sulphur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that attacks mainly skin, eye and lungs. Due to its lipophilic properties, SM is also able to diffuse through the skin and reach internal organs. DNA represents one of the most critical molecular targets of this powerful alkylating agent which modifies DNA structure by forming monoadducts and biadducts. These DNA lesions are involved in the acute toxicity of SM as well as its long-term carcinogenicity. In the present work we studied the formation and persistence of guanine and adenine monoadducts and guanine biadducts in the DNA of brain, lungs, kidneys, spleen, and liver of SKH-1 mice cutaneously exposed to 2, 6 and 60 mg/kg of SM. SM-DNA adducts were detected in all studied organs, except in liver at the two lowest doses. Brain and lungs were the organs with the highest level of SM-DNA adducts, followed by kidney, spleen and liver. Monitoring the level of adducts for three weeks after cutaneous exposure showed that the lifetime of adducts were not the same in all organs, lungs being the organ with the longest persistence. Diffusion from skin to internal organs was much more efficient at the highest compared to the lowest dose investigated as the result of the loss of the skin barrier function. These data provide novel information on the distribution of SM in tissues following cutaneous exposures and indicate that brain is an important target. - Highlights: • Sulphur mustard reaches internal organs after skin exposure • Adducts are detected in the DNA of internal organs • Brain is the organ with the highest level of DNA damage • The barrier function of skin is lost at high dose of sulphur mustard • DNA adducts persist in organs for 2 or 3 weeks.

  16. FTIR-ATR evaluation of topical skin protectants useful for sulfur mustard and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braue, Ernest H., Jr.; Litchfield, Marty R.; Bangledorf, Catherine R.; Rieder, Robert G.

    1992-03-01

    The US Army has a need to develop topical protectants that can decrease the effects of cutaneous exposure to chemical warfare (CW) agents. Such materials would enhance a soldier's ability to carry out the mission in a chemically hostile environment, would lessen the burden on medical personnel, and may allow the casualties to return to duty in a shorter period of time than might otherwise be possible. In a preliminary report (E. H. Braue, Jr. and M. G. Pannella, Applied Spectrosc., 44, 1061 (1990)), we described a unique analytical method using FT-IR spectroscopy and the horizontal attenuated total reflectance (ATR) accessory for evaluating the effectiveness of topical skin protectants (TSPs) against penetration by chemical agents. We now describe the application of this method to the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (HD).

  17. Release of allyl isothiocyanate from mustard seed meal powder.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ruyan; Lim, Loong-Tak

    2014-01-01

    Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) is a wide-spectrum antimicrobial compound found in mustard seeds, produced when their tissues are disrupted. The formation of AITC in mustard seed is mediated by the myrosinase enzyme which catalyzes the release of volatile AITC from a glucosinolate-sinigrin. Since water is a substrate in the reaction, humidity from the air can be used to activate the release of AITC from mustard seed. In this study, defatted and partially defatted mustard seed meals were ground into powders with particle size ranging from 5 to 300 μm. The mustard seed meal powder (MSMP) samples were enclosed within hermetically sealed glass jars wherein the headspace air was adjusted to 85% or 100% relative humidity at 5, 20, or 35 °C. Data from gas chromatography analysis showed that AITC release rate and amount increased with increasing relative humidity and temperature. Moreover, the release rate can be manipulated by particle size and lipid content of the MSMP samples. The amount of AITC released ranged from 2 to 17 mg/g MSMP within 24 h under the experimental conditions tested. In view of the antimicrobial properties of AITC, the mustard meal powder may be used as a natural antimicrobial material for extending the shelf life of food products.

  18. Ionic dependence of sulphur mustard cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Thomas W. Nelson, Peggy; Bjarnason, Stephen; Vair, Cory; Shei Yimin; Tenn, Catherine; Lecavalier, Pierre; Burczyk, Andrew

    2010-09-15

    The effect of ionic environment on sulphur mustard (bis 2-chloroethyl sulphide; HD) toxicity was examined in CHO-K1 cells. Cultures were treated with HD in different ionic environments at constant osmolar conditions (320 mOsM, pH 7.4). The cultures were refed with fresh culture medium 1 h after HD exposure, and viability was assessed. Little toxicity was apparent when HD exposures were carried out in ion-free sucrose buffer compared to LC{sub 50} values of {approx} 100-150 {mu}M when the cultures were treated with HD in culture medium. Addition of NaCl to the buffer increased HD toxicity in a salt concentration-dependent manner to values similar to those obtained in culture medium. HD toxicity was dependent on both cationic and anionic species with anionic environment playing a much larger role in determining toxicity. Substitution of NaI for NaCl in the treatment buffers increased HD toxicity by over 1000%. The activity of the sodium hydrogen exchanger (NHE) in recovering from cytosolic acidification in salt-free and in different chloride salts did not correlate with the HD-induced toxicity in these buffers. However, the inhibition by HD of intracellular pH regulation correlated with its toxicity in NaCl, NaI and sucrose buffers. Analytical chemical studies and the toxicity of the iodine mustard derivative ruled out the role of chemical reactions yielding differentially toxic species as being responsible for the differences in HD toxicity observed. This work demonstrates that the early events that HD sets into motion to cause toxicity are dependent on ionic environment, possibly due to intracellular pH deregulation.

  19. Teratogenic Effects of Sulfur Mustard on Mice Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Sanjarmoosavi, Nasrin; Sanjarmoosavi, Naser; Shahsavan, Marziyeh; Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sulfur Mustard (SM) has been used as a chemical warfare agent, in the World War I and more recently during Iraq-Iran war in early 1980s’. Its biological poisoning effect could be local or systemic and its effect depends on environmental conditions, exposed organs, and the extent and duration of exposure. It is considered as a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic, carcinogenic effects; although a few studies have been performed on its teratogenicity so far. Materials and Methods Mice were administered with SM intraperitoneally with a dose of 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg in different periods of their gestation (gestational age of 11, 13 and 14 weeks). Control mice groups were included. Between 5 and 9 mice were used in each group. Dams underwent cesarean section on day 19 of their gestation. External examination was performed on the animals investigating craniofacial and septal defects and limb malformations such as adactyly and syndactyly. All data were analyzed by Chi-Square test and Fisher's exact test. The P- value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results Craniofacial and septal defects as well as the limb malformations were the most common types of birth defects, displaying an extremely complex biomedical problem. Conclusion This study confirms a significant correlation between SM exposure and its teratogenic effect. We postulated that the malformations could be caused by an uncontrolled migration of neural crest cells, causing developmental disorders. In addition to environmental factors, modifying genes could play an important role in the pathogenesis of the defects. PMID:23493485

  20. Epigenetic: A missing paradigm in cellular and molecular pathways of sulfur mustard lung: a prospective and comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Imani, Saber; Panahi, Yunes; Salimian, Jafar; Fu, Junjiang; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM, bis- (2-chloroethyl) sulphide) is a chemical warfare agent that causes DNA alkylation, protein modification and membrane damage. SM can trigger several molecular pathways involved in inflammation and oxidative stress, which cause cell necrosis and apoptosis, and loss of cells integrity and function. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a growing research topic and is addressed by DNA methylation, histone modification, chromatin remodeling, and noncoding RNAs expression. It seems SM can induce the epigenetic modifications that are translated into change in gene expression. Classification of epigenetic modifications long after exposure to SM would clarify its mechanism and paves a better strategy for the treatment of SM-affected patients. In this study, we review the key aberrant epigenetic modifications that have important roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and compared with mustard lung. PMID:26557960

  1. Protection of human upper respiratory tract cell lines against sulphur mustard toxicity by hexamethylenetetramine (HMT).

    PubMed

    Andrew, D J; Lindsay, C D

    1998-07-01

    1. Sulphur mustard ('mustard gas', HD) is a highly toxic chemical warfare agent which affects the skin and respiratory tract. The primary targets of inhaled HD are the epithelia of the upper respiratory tract. Hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) has been shown to protect human lung cells against HD toxicity and has also been shown to be effective in vivo against the chemical warfare agent phosgene. The ability of HMT to protect against the toxicity of HD was investigated in the human upper respiratory tract cell lines BEAS-2B and RPMI 2650. 2. HD was highly toxic to both cell lines, with LC50 values of 15-30 microM. HMT, at a concentration of 10 mM, was shown to protect the cell lines against the toxic effects of 20 microM and 40 microM HD. Results demonstrated that it was necessary for HMT to be in situ at the time of exposure to HD for effective cytoprotection. No protection was seen when cells were treated with HMT following exposure to HD, or where HMT was removed prior to HD exposure. 3. Results suggest that HMT may be effective prophylaxis for exposure to HD by inhalation.

  2. Surface Decontamination of Blister Agents Lewisite, Sulfur ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Journal Article Sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L) are blister agents that have a high potential for terrorist use. Agent Yellow (HL) is the eutectic mixture of HD and L. Bench-scale testing was used to determine the residual amount of these chemical warfare agents remaining on three building materials coupons (wood, metal and glass) after application of various decontaminants (household bleach, full strength and dilute; hydrogen peroxide 3 % solution; and EasyDECON® DF200).

  3. Comparison of cake compositions, pepsin digestibility and amino acids concentration of proteins isolated from black mustard and yellow mustard cakes.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Ashish Kumar; Saha, Dipti; Begum, Hasina; Zaman, Asaduz; Rahman, Md Mashiar

    2015-01-01

    As a byproduct of oil production, black and yellow mustard cakes protein are considered as potential source of plant protein for feed applications to poultry, fish and swine industries. The protein contents in black and yellow mustard cakes were 38.17% and 28.80% and their pepsin digestibility was 80.33% and 77.43%, respectively. The proteins were extracted at different pH and maximum proteins (89.13% of 38.17% and 87.76% of 28.80% respectively) isolated from black and yellow mustard cakes at pH 12. The purity of isolated proteins of black and yellow mustard cakes was 89.83% and 91.12% respectively and their pepsin digestibility was 89.67% and 90.17% respectively which assigned the absence of antinutritional compounds. It was found that essential amino acids isoleucine, lysine, methionine, threonine and tryptophan and non essential amino acids arginine and tyrosine were present in greater concentration in black mustard cake protein whereas other amino acids were higher in yellow mustard cake protein.

  4. Identification of chemical warfare agents from vapor samples using a field-portable capillary gas chromatography/membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry instrument with Tri-Bed concentrator.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hisayuki; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagoya, Tomoki; Ikeda, Toru; Kurimata, Naoko; Unoke, Shohei; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-08-07

    A field-portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (Hapsite ER system) was evaluated for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in the vapor phase. The system consisted of Tri-Bed concentrator gas sampler (trapping time: 3s(-1)min), a nonpolar low thermal-mass capillary gas chromatography column capable of raising temperatures up to 200°C, a hydrophobic membrane-interfaced electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer evacuated by a non-evaporative getter pump for data acquisition, and a personal computer for data analysis. Sample vapors containing as little as 22μg sarin (GB), 100μg soman (GD), 210μg tabun (GA), 55μg cyclohexylsarin (GF), 4.8μg sulfur mustard, 390μg nitrogen mustard 1, 140μg of nitrogen mustard 2, 130μg nitrogen mustard 3, 120μg of 2-chloroacetophenone and 990μg of chloropicrin per cubic meter could be confirmed after Tri-Bed micro-concentration (for 1min) and automated AMDIS search within 12min. Using manual deconvolution by background subtraction of neighboring regions on the extracted ion chromatograms, the above-mentioned CWAs could be confirmed at lower concentration levels. The memory effects were also examined and we found that blister agents showed significantly more carry-over than nerve agents. Gasoline vapor was found to interfere with the detection of GB and GD, raising the concentration limits for confirmation in the presence of gasoline by both AMDIS search and manual deconvolution; however, GA and GF were not subject to interference by gasoline. Lewisite 1, and o-chlorobenzylidene malononitrile could also be confirmed by gas chromatography, but it was hard to quantify them. Vapors of phosgene, chlorine, and cyanogen chloride could be confirmed by direct mass spectrometric detection at concentration levels higher than 2, 140, and 10mg/m(3) respectively, by bypassing the micro-concentration trap and gas chromatographic separation.

  5. Composting of cow dung and crop residues using termite mounds as bulking agent.

    PubMed

    Karak, Tanmoy; Sonar, Indira; Paul, Ranjit K; Das, Sampa; Boruah, R K; Dutta, Amrit K; Das, Dilip K

    2014-10-01

    The present study reports the suitability of termite mounds as a bulking agent for composting with crop residues and cow dung in pit method. Use of 50 kg termite mound with the crop residues (stover of ground nut: 361.65 kg; soybean: 354.59 kg; potato: 357.67 kg and mustard: 373.19 kg) and cow dung (84.90 kg) formed a good quality compost within 70 days of composting having nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium as 20.19, 3.78 and 32.77 g kg(-1) respectively with a bulk density of 0.85 g cm(-3). Other physico-chemical and germination parameters of the compost were within Indian standard, which had been confirmed by the application of multivariate analysis of variance and multivariate contrast analysis. Principal component analysis was applied in order to gain insight into the characteristic variables. Four composting treatments formed two different groups when hierarchical cluster analysis was applied.

  6. Mustard seed meal for management of root-knot nematode and weeds in tomato production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mustard seed meals of indian mustard [InM (Brassica juncea)] and yellow mustard [YeM (Sinapis alba)], alone and combined, were tested for effects on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants and for suppression of southern root-knot nematode [RKN (Meloidogyne incognita)] and weed populations. In the gree...

  7. Pacific Northwest Condiment Yellow Mustard (Sinapis alba L.) Grower Guide: 2000-2002

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.; Davis, J. B.; Esser, A.

    2005-07-01

    This report is a grower guide for yellow mustard. Yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.), synonymous with white mustard, is a spring annual crop and well adapted to hot, dry growing conditions. It has shown potential as an alternative crop in rotations with small grain cereals and has fewer limitations compared to other traditional alternative crops.

  8. [Mustard gas bombs found astray in the Faxaflói bay. Mustard gas: usage and poisonings].

    PubMed

    Kristinsson, Jakop; Jóhannesson, Thorkell

    2009-05-01

    The finding in 1972 of two World War II mustard gas artillery shells in crushed shell sediment dredged in the Faxaflói Bay and transported as raw material for cement production at Akranes (Western Iceland) is reported. One of the shells was wedged in a stone crusher in the raw material processing line and was ruptured. As a result dark fluid with a garlic like smell seeped out from the metal canister. The attending employees believed the metal object to be inert and tried to cut it out with a blow torch. This resulted in the explosion of the shell charge and in the exposure of four employees to mustard gas. All suffered burns on their hands and two of them in the eyes also. The second shell was detonated in the open at a distance from the factory. Emphasis is given to the fact that instant, or at least as soon as possible, cleansing and washing is the most efficient measure to be taken against the debilitating effects of mustard gas. It is also pointed out that the active principle in mustard gas (dichlorodiethyl sulphide) can easily be synthesized and none of the precursor substances are subjected to any restrictions of use. The authors conclude that mustard gas bombs may still be found in the arsenals of some military powers in spite of an international convention that prohibits the production, stockpiling and the use of chemical weapons. Terrorist groups have also seemingly tried to aquire mustard gas bombs and other chemical weapons. Therefore cases of mustard gas poisoning might still occur.

  9. Silibinin, Dexamethasone, and Doxycycline as Potential Therapeutic Agents for Treating Vesicant-Inflicted Ocular Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Tewari-Singh, Neera; Jain, Anil K; Inturi, Swetha; Ammar, David A; Agarwal, Chapla; Tyagi, Puneet; Kompella, Uday B; Enzenauer, Robert W; Petrash, J Mark; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    There are no effective and approved therapies against devastating ocular injuries caused by vesicating chemical agents sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM). Herein, studies were carried out in rabbit corneal cultures to establish relevant ocular injury biomarkers with NM for screening potential efficacious agents in laboratory settings. NM (100 nmol) exposure of the corneas for 2 h (cultured for 24 h), showed increases in epithelial thickness, ulceration, apoptotic cell death, epithelial detachment microbullae formation, and the levels of VEGF, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Employing these biomarkers, efficacy studies were performed with agent treatments 2 h and every 4 h thereafter, for 24 h following NM exposure. Three agents were evaluated, including prescription drugs dexamethasone (0.1%; anti-inflammatory steroid) and doxycycline (100 nmol; antibiotic and MMP inhibitor) that have been studied earlier for treating vesicant-induced eye injuries. We also examined silibinin (100 µg), a non-toxic natural flavanone found to be effective in treating SM analog-induced skin injuries in our earlier studies. Treatments of doxycycline + dexamethasone, and silibinin were more effective than doxycycline or dexamethasone alone in reversing NM-induced epithelial thickening, microbullae formation, apoptotic cell death, and MMP-9 elevation. However, dexamethasone and silibinin alone were more effective in reversing NM-induced VEGF levels. Doxycycline, dexamethasone and silibinin were all effective in reversing NM-induced COX-2 levels. Apart from therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline and dexamethasone, these results show strong multifunctional efficacy of silibinin in reversing NM-induced ocular injuries, which could help develop effective and safe therapeutics against ocular injuries by vesicants. PMID:22841772

  10. Fate of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals in landfills.

    PubMed

    Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Barlaz, Morton A; Knappe, Detlef R U; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2006-07-01

    One component of preparedness for a chemical attack is planning for the disposal of contaminated debris. To assess the feasibility of contaminated debris disposal in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, the fate of selected chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) in MSW landfills was predicted with a mathematical model. Five blister agents [sulfur mustard (HD), nitrogen mustard (HN-2), lewisite (L), ethyldichloroarsine (ED), and phosgene oxime (CX)], eight nerve agents [tabun (GA), sarin (GB), soman (GD), GE, GF, VX, VG, and VM], one riot-control agent [CS], and two TICs [furan and carbon disulfide] were studied. The effects of both infiltration (climate) and contaminant biodegradability on fate predictions were assessed. Model results showed that hydrolysis and gas-phase advection were the principal fate pathways for CWAs and TICs, respectively. Apart from CX and the TICs, none of the investigated compounds was predicted to persist in a landfill for more than 5 years. Climate had little impact on CWA/TIC fate, and biodegradability was only important for compounds with long hydrolysis half-lives. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to assess the influence of uncertainty in model input parameters on CWA/TIC fate predictions. Correlation analyses showed that uncertainty in hydrolysis rate constants was the primary contributor to variance of CWA fate predictions, while uncertainty in the Henry's Law constant and landfill gas-production rate accounted for most of the variance of TIC fate predictions. CWA hydrolysates were more persistent than the parent CWAs, but limited information is available on abiotic or biotic transformation rates for these chemicals.

  11. Historical perspective on effects and treatment of sulfur mustard injuries.

    PubMed

    Graham, John S; Schoneboom, Bruce A

    2013-12-05

    Sulfur mustard (2,2'-dichlorodiethyl sulfide; SM) is a potent vesicating chemical warfare agent that poses a continuing threat to both military and civilian populations. Significant SM injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in long-term complications affecting the skin, eyes, and lungs. This report summarizes initial and ongoing (chronic) clinical findings from SM casualties from the Iran-Iraq War (1980-1988), with an emphasis on cutaneous injury. In addition, we describe the cutaneous manifestations and treatment of several men recently and accidentally exposed to SM in the United States. Common, chronic cutaneous problems being reported in the Iranian casualties include pruritis (the primary complaint), burning, pain, redness, desquamation, hyperpigmentation, hypopigmentation, erythematous papular rash, xerosis, multiple cherry angiomas, atrophy, dermal scarring, hypertrophy, and sensitivity to mechanical injury with recurrent blistering and ulceration. Chronic ocular problems include keratitis, photophobia, persistent tearing, sensation of foreign body, corneal thinning and ulceration, vasculitis of the cornea and conjunctiva, and limbal stem cell deficiency. Chronic pulmonary problems include decreases in lung function, bronchitis with hyper-reactive airways, bronchiolitis, bronchiectasis, stenosis of the trachea and other large airways, emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, decreased total lung capacity, and increased incidences of lung cancer, pulmonary infections, and tuberculosis. There are currently no standardized or optimized methods of casualty management; current treatment strategy consists of symptomatic management and is designed to relieve symptoms, prevent infections, and promote healing. New strategies are needed to provide for optimal and rapid healing, with the goals of (a) returning damaged tissue to optimal appearance and normal function in the shortest period of time, and (b) ameliorating chronic

  12. Inflammatory effects of inhaled sulfur mustard in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Cervelli, Jessica; Anderson, Dana R.; Holmes, Wesley W.; Conti, Michele L.; Gordon, Ronald E.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2010-10-15

    Inhalation of sulfur mustard (SM), a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes severe lung damage, is a significant threat to both military and civilian populations. The mechanisms mediating its cytotoxic effects are unknown and were investigated in the present studies. Male rats Crl:CD(SD) were anesthetized, and then intratracheally intubated and exposed to 0.7-1.4 mg/kg SM by vapor inhalation. Animals were euthanized 6, 24, 48 h or 7 days post-exposure and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue collected. Exposure of rats to SM resulted in rapid pulmonary toxicity, including focal ulceration and detachment of the trachea and bronchial epithelia from underlying mucosa, thickening of alveolar septal walls and increased numbers of inflammatory cells in the tissue. There was also evidence of autophagy and apoptosis in the tissue. This was correlated with increased BAL protein content, a marker of injury to the alveolar epithelial lining. SM exposure also resulted in increased expression of markers of inflammation including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF{alpha}), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), each of which has been implicated in pulmonary toxicity. Whereas COX-2, TNF{alpha} and iNOS were mainly localized in alveolar regions, MMP-9 was prominent in bronchial epithelium. In contrast, expression of the anti-oxidant hemeoxygenase, and the anti-inflammatory collectin, surfactant protein-D, decreased in the lung after SM exposure. These data demonstrate that SM-induced oxidative stress and injury are associated with the generation of cytotoxic inflammatory proteins which may contribute to the pathogenic response to this vesicant.

  13. Sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH).

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Weber, Jana; Balszuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Schmidt, Annette

    2013-12-05

    Sulfur Mustard (SM) is a vesicant chemical warfare agent, which is acutely toxic to a variety of organ systems including skin, eyes, respiratory system and bone marrow. The underlying molecular pathomechanism was mainly attributed to the alkylating properties of SM. However, recent studies have revealed that cellular responses to SM exposure are of more complex nature and include increased protein expression and protein modifications that can be used as biomarkers. In order to confirm already known biomarkers, to detect potential new ones and to further elucidate the pathomechanism of SM, we conducted large-scale proteomic experiments based on a human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) exposed to SM. Surprisingly, our analysis identified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as one of the up-regulated proteins after exposure of HaCaT cells to SM. In this paper we demonstrate the sulfur mustard induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH in HaCaT cells by 2D gel-electrophoresis (2D GE), immunocytochemistry (ICC), Western Blot (WB) and a combination thereof. 2D GE in combination with MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis identified GAPDH as an up-regulated protein after SM exposure. Immunocytochemistry revealed a distinct nuclear translocation of GAPDH after exposure to 300μM SM. This finding was confirmed by fractionated WB analysis. 2D GE and subsequent immunoblot staining of GAPDH demonstrated two different spot locations of GAPH (pI 7.0 and pI 8.5) that are related to cytosolic or nuclear GAPDH respectively. After exposure to 300μM SM a significant increase of nuclear GAPDH at pI 8.5 occurred. Nuclear GAPDH has been associated with apoptosis, detection of structural DNA alterations, DNA repair and regulation of genomic integrity and telomere structure. The results of our study add new aspects to the pathophysiology of sulfur mustard toxicity, yet further studies will be necessary to reveal the specific function of nuclear GAPDH in the pathomechanism of sulfur mustard.

  14. Long-term effects of mustard gas on respiratory system of Iranian veterans after Iraq-Iran war: a review.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Seyed-Mansour; Ghanei, Mostafa; Salamati, Payman; Safiabadi, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    To review long-term respiratory effects of mustard gas on Iranian veterans having undergone Iraq-Iran war. Electronic databases of Scopus, Medline, ISI, IranMedex, and Irandoc sites were searched. We accepted articles published in scientific journals as a quality criterion.The main pathogenic factors are free radical mediators. Prevalence of pulmonary involvement is approximately 42.5%. The most common complaints are cough and dyspnea. Major respiratory complications are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, and asthma. Spirometry results can reveal restrictive and obstructive pulmonary disease. Plain chest X-ray does not help in about 50% of lung diseases. High-resolution CT of the lung is the best modality for diagnostic assessment of parenchymal lung and bronchi. There is no definite curative treatment for mustard lung. The effective treatment regimens consist of oxygen administration, use of vaporized moist air, respiratory physiotherapy, administration of mucolytic agents, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, and long-acting beta-2 agonists, antioxidants, surfactant, magnesium ions, therapeutic bronchoscopy, laser therapy, placement of respiratory stents, early tracheostomy in laryngospasm, and ultimately lung transplantation. High-resolution CT of the lung is the most accurate modality for the evaluation of the lung parenchyma and bronchi. The treatment efficacy of patients exposed to mustard gas depends on patient conditions (acute or chronic, upper or lower respiratory tract involvement). There are various treatment protocols, but unfortunately none of them is definitely curable.

  15. Phytotoxicity of mercury in Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.).

    PubMed

    Shiyab, Safwan; Chen, Jian; Han, Fengxiang X; Monts, David L; Matta, Frank B; Gu, Mengmeng; Su, Yi

    2009-02-01

    This study investigated the phytotoxicity of mercury to Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.). Two common cultivars (Florida Broad Leaf and Long-standing) were grown hydroponically in a mercury-spiked solution. Mercury exhibited a significant phytotoxicity in these two cultivars of Indian mustard at elevated concentrations (>or=2 mg L(-1)). Mercury uptake induced a significant reduction in both biomass and leaf relative water content. Microscopy studies indicated that elevated mercury concentrations in plants significantly changed leaf cellular structure: thickly stained areas surrounding the vascular bundles; decreases in the number of palisade and spongy parenchyma cells; and reduced cell size and clotted depositions. The palisade chloroplasts exhibited decreases in their amounts and starch grains as well as a loss of spindle shape. However, due to high accumulation of mercury in plants, especially in the roots, Indian mustard might be a potential candidate plant for phytofiltration of contaminated water and phytostabilization of mercury-contaminated soils.

  16. Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase is Involved in the Repair of DNA Damage Due to Sulfur Mustard by a Mechanism Other Than DNA Ligase I Activation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-16

    agents including sulfur mustard (SM). We observed concurrent activation of PARP and DNA ligase in SM-exposed human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK...Previous reports from other laboratories suggested that DNA ligase activation could be due to its modification by PARP. In humans, there are three distinct...DNA ligases, I, II and IV of which DNA ligase I participates in DNA replication and repair. By metabolically labeling HEK using 3H-adenosine

  17. Medical defense against blistering chemical warfare agents. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.J.; Dunn, M.A.

    1991-08-01

    First used in World War I, chemical blistering agents present a serious medical threat that has stimulated renewed interest in the light of extensive use in recent conflicts. Current medical management cannot yet prevent or minimize injury from the principal agent of concern--sulfur mustard. Research directed at this goal depends on defining effective intervention in the metabolic alterations induced by exposure to sulfur mustard. Chemicals capable of inducing blisters, known as blistering or vesicating agents, have been widely known for more than 150 years. They were extensively used in chemical warfare during World War I, well before the development of the more deadly nerve agents 25 years later.

  18. Covalent DNA-Protein Cross-Linking by Phosphoramide Mustard and Nornitrogen Mustard in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Groehler, Arnold; Villalta, Peter W; Campbell, Colin; Tretyakova, Natalia

    2016-02-15

    N,N-Bis-(2-chloroethyl)-phosphorodiamidic acid (phosphoramide mustard, PM) and N,N-bis-(2-chloroethyl)-amine (nornitrogen mustard, NOR) are the two biologically active metabolites of cyclophosphamide, a DNA alkylating drug commonly used to treat lymphomas, breast cancer, certain brain cancers, and autoimmune diseases. PM and NOR are reactive bis-electrophiles capable of cross-linking cellular biomolecules to form covalent DNA-DNA and DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs). In the present work, a mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach was employed to characterize PM- and NOR-mediated DNA-protein cross-linking in human cells. Following treatment of human fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080) with cytotoxic concentrations of PM, over 130 proteins were found to be covalently trapped to DNA, including those involved in transcriptional regulation, RNA splicing/processing, chromatin organization, and protein transport. HPLC-ESI(+)-MS/MS analysis of proteolytic digests of DPC-containing DNA from NOR-treated cells revealed a concentration-dependent formation of N-[2-[cysteinyl]ethyl]-N-[2-(guan-7-yl)ethyl]amine (Cys-NOR-N7G) conjugates, confirming that it cross-links cysteine thiols of proteins to the N7 position of guanines in DNA. Cys-NOR-N7G adduct numbers were higher in NER-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells (XPA) as compared with repair proficient cells. Furthermore, both XPA and FANCD2 deficient cells were sensitized to PM treatment as compared to that of wild type cells, suggesting that Fanconi anemia and nucleotide excision repair pathways are involved in the removal of cyclophosphamide-induced DNA damage.

  19. Effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on growth and biological efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus subtilis against Rhizoctonia solani, the causal agent of bean damping-off.

    PubMed

    Peighamy-Ashnaei, S; Sharifi-Tehrani, A; Ahmadzadeh, M; Behboudi, K

    2007-01-01

    One of the most important environmental factors that regulate the growth and antagonistic efficacy of biocontrol agents is the medium. The aim of this paper was to find the nitrogen and carbon sources that provide maximum biomass production of strains P-5 and P-6 (Pseudomonas fluorescens), B-3 and B-16 (Bacillus subtilis) and minimum cost of media, whilst maintaining biocontrol efficacy. All of the strains were grown in seven liquid media (pH=6.9) including: sucrose + yeast extract, molasses of sugar beet + yeast extract in 2:1 and 1:1 w/w ratios, molasses of sugar beet + urea, nutrient broth, molasses and malt extract, at an initial inoculation of 1 x 10(5) CFU ml(-1). Cells from over night cultures used to inoculate soil at 1 x 10(9) CFU cm(-3) soil. At the same time, fungal inoculum (infected millet seed with Rhizoctonia solani) was added to soil at the rate of 2 g kg(-1) soil. Results indicated that growth of P-6, B-3 and B-16 in molasses + yeast extract (1:1 w/w) medium was significantly higher than in the other media. Molasses + yeast extract (1:1 and 2:1 w/w) media supported rapid growth and high cell yields in P-5. In greenhouse condition, results indicated that the influence of the media on the biocontrol efficacy of P-5, P-6, B-3 and B-16 was the same and Pseudomonas fluorescens P-5 in molasses and malt extract media reduced the severity of disease up to 72.8 percent. On the other hand, there were observed significant differences on bean growth after one month in greenhouse. P-5 in molasses + yeast extract (1:1 w/w) medium had the most effects on bean growth promotion. In this study molasses media showed good yield efficacy in all of the strains. The high sucrose concentration in molasses justifies the high biomass in all of the strains. Also, the low cost of molasses allows its concentration to be increased in media. On the other hand, yeast extract was the best organic nitrogen source for antagonist bacteria but it is expensive for an industrial process

  20. Onion and weed response to mustard (Sinapis alba) seed meal

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control in organic onion production is often difficult and expensive, requiring numerous cultivations and extensive hand-weeding. Onion safety and weed control with mustard seed meal (MSM) derived from Sinapis alba was evaluated in greenhouse and field trials. MSM applied at 110, 220, and 440 g...

  1. Pulmonary complications of mustard gas exposure: a study on cadavers.

    PubMed

    Taghaddosinejad, Fakhreddin; Fayyaz, Amir Farshid; Behnoush, Behnam

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard gas is one of the chemical warfare gases that roughly about 45000 soldiers continue to suffer long-lasting consequences of exposure during the Iran-Iraq war between 1980 and 1988. According to the common pulmonary lesions due to this gas exposure, we studied gross and microscopic pulmonary lesions in cadavers and also assessed the main causes of mortality caused by mustard gas exposure. A case-series study was performed on hospital record files of 100 cadavers that were exposed with documented sulfur mustard gas during the Iran-Iraq war from 1979 to 1988 and autopsied in legal medicine organization In Tehran between 2005 and 2007 and gross and microscopic pathological findings of autopsied organs such as hematological, pulmonary, hepatic, and renal changes were evaluated. All cases were male with the mean age of 43 years. The time interval between the gas exposure and death was almost 20years. The most frequent pulmonary complication was chronic bronchitis in 81% of autopsied cadavers. Other pulmonary findings were progressive pulmonary fibrosis (9%), pulmonary infections and tuberculosis (29%), malignant cellular infiltration (4%), and aspergilloma (1%). According to the chronic progressive lesions caused by mustard gas exposure such as pulmonary lesions and also its high mortality rate, suitable programming for protection of the gas exposed persons and prohibiting chemical warfare are recommended.

  2. 14. SOUTH PLANT MUSTARD FILLING BUILDING (BUILDING 728) AND WAREHOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. SOUTH PLANT MUSTARD FILLING BUILDING (BUILDING 728) AND WAREHOUSE (BUILDING 729) FROM CHEMICAL STORAGE TANK. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  3. 87. EAST SECTION OF SOUTH PLANT, SHOWING MUSTARD FILLING BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    87. EAST SECTION OF SOUTH PLANT, SHOWING MUSTARD FILLING BUILDING (BUILDING 728) AT LEFT AND INCINERATOR/PRECIPITATOR (BUILDING 724) AT CENTER, FROM CHEMICAL STORAGE TANK. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Bounded by Ninety-sixth Avenue & Fifty-sixth Avenue, Buckley Road, Quebec Street & Colorado Highway 2, Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  4. Prospects for Classical Biological Control of Saharan Mustard (Brassica tournefortii)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saharan mustard (Brassica tournefortii) is a winter annual plant that is native to the Mediterranean Basin and is becoming highly invasive in the Sonoran and Mojave Deserts and adjacent areas and has spread great distances along highways from its original infestation. It is becoming a serious probl...

  5. Mustard oil-induced cutaneous inflammation in the pig.

    PubMed

    Jancsó, G; Pierau, F K; Sann, H

    1993-05-01

    Recent findings indicate that chemical stimulation of the porcine skin with capsaicin evokes a flare response similar to that observed in man. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether chemical stimulation of cutaneous capsaicin-sensitive nerve endings with mustard oil produces neurogenic inflammatory reactions in the pig. The application of mustard oil onto the abdominal skin of domestic pigs resulted in a pronounced flare response. After a previous intravenous injection of a solution of Evans blue, the skin area in contact with the irritant turned dark blue, indicating a marked extravasation of albumin. Quantitative estimation of the dye content of the skin supported this conclusion. The technique of vascular labelling revealed a delicate network of small subepidermal blood vessels in histological preparations after the application of mustard oil following a previous intravenous injection of colloidal silver. Labelled blood vessels were not noted outside the treated area. The present results show that mustard oil produces a strong cutaneous inflammatory response in the pig, and suggest that the porcine skin provides a valuable model for study of the significance of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves in vascular and other cutaneous reactions.

  6. Final report : multicomponent forensic signature development : interactions with common textiles; mustard precursors and simulants.

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus, III

    2010-02-01

    2-Chloroethyl phenyl sulfide (CEPS), a surrogate compound of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, was examined using thermal desorption coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD/GC-MS) and multivariate analysis. This work describes a novel method of producing multiway data using a stepped thermal desorption. Various multivariate analysis schemes were employed to analyze the data. These methods may be able to discern different sources of CEPS. In addition, CEPS was applied to cotton, nylon, polyester, and silk swatches. These swatches were placed in controlled humidity chambers maintained at 23%, 56%, and 85% relative humidity. At regular intervals, samples were removed from each test swatch, and the samples analyzed using TD/GC-MS. The results were compared across fabric substrate and humidity.

  7. Effects of native herbs and light on garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) invasion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips-Mao, Laura; Larson, Diane L.; Jordan, Nicholas R.

    2014-01-01

    The degree to which invasive species drive or respond to environmental change has important implications for conservation and invasion management. Often characterized as a driver of change in North American woodlands, the invasive herb garlic mustard may instead respond to declines in native plant cover and diversity. We tested effects of native herb cover, richness, and light availability on garlic mustard invasion in a Minnesota oak woodland. We planted 50 garlic mustard seeds into plots previously planted with 0 to 10 native herb species. We measured garlic mustard seedling establishment, survival to rosette and adult stages, and average (per plant) and total (per plot) biomass and silique production. With the use of structural equation models, we analyzed direct, indirect, and net effects of native cover, richness, and light on successive garlic mustard life stages. Native plant cover had a significant negative effect on all life stages. Species richness had a significant positive effect on native cover, resulting in indirect negative effects on all garlic mustard stages, and net negative effects on adult numbers, total biomass, and silique production. Light had a strong negative effect on garlic mustard seedling establishment and a positive effect on native herb cover, resulting in significant negative net effects on garlic mustard rosette and adult numbers. However, light's net effect on total garlic mustard biomass and silique production was positive; reproductive output was high even in low-light/high-cover conditions. Combined effects of cover, richness, and light suggest that native herbs provide biotic resistance to invasion by responding to increased light availability and suppressing garlic mustard responses, although this resistance may be overwhelmed by high propagule pressure. Garlic mustard invasion may occur, in part, in response to native plant decline. Restoring native herbs and controlling garlic mustard seed production may effectively reduce

  8. Petroleum-collecting and dispersing complexes based on oleic acid and nitrogenous compounds as surface-active agents for removing thin petroleum films from water surface.

    PubMed

    Asadov, Ziyafaddin H; Tantawy, Ahmed H; Zarbaliyeva, Ilhama A; Rahimov, Ravan A

    2012-01-01

    Petroleum-collecting and dispersing complexes were synthesized on the basis of oleic acid and nitrogen-containing compounds. Surface-active properties (interfacial tension) of the obtained complexes were investigated by stalagmometric method. Petroleum-collecting and dispersing properties of the oleic acid complexes in diluted (5% wt. water or alcoholic solution) and undiluted form have been studied in waters of varying salinity (distilled, fresh and sea waters). Some of physico-chemical indices of the prepared compounds such as solubility, acid and amine numbers as well as electrical conductivity have been determined. The ability of oleic acid complex with ethylenediamine as petro-collecting and dispersing agent towards different types of petroleum has been studied. The influence of thickness and "age" of the petroleum slick on collecting and dispersing capacity of this complex has been clarified. Surface properties studied included critical micelle concentration (CMC), maximum surface excess (Γ(max)), and minimum surface area (A(min)). Free energies of micellization (ΔG°(mic)) and adsorption (ΔG°(ads)) were calculated.

  9. Ge4+ doped TiO2 for stoichiometric degradation of warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Stengl, Václav; Grygar, Tomáš Matys; Opluštil, František; Němec, Tomáš

    2012-08-15

    Germanium doped TiO(2) was prepared by homogeneous hydrolysis of aqueous solutions of GeCl(4) and TiOSO(4) with urea. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, EDS analysis, specific surface area (BET) and porosity determination (BJH). Ge(4+) doping increases surface area and content of amorphous phase in prepared samples. These oxides were used in an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with chemical warfare agent, sulphur mustard, soman and agent VX. Ge(4+) doping worsens sulphur mustard degradation and improves soman and agent VX degradation. The best degree of removal (degradation), 100% of soman, 99% of agent VX and 95% of sulphur mustard, is achieved with sample with 2 wt.% of germanium.

  10. Competitive Interactions of Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) and Damesrocket (Hesperis matronalis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Pavlovic, Noel B.; Adams, Jean V.

    2012-01-01

    Competitive interactions between native plants and nonnative, invasive plant species have been extensively studied; however, within degraded landscapes, the effect of interspecific interactions among invasive plants is less explored. We investigated a competitive interaction between two sympatric, invasive mustard species that have similar life history strategies and growth forms: garlic mustard and damesrocket. Greenhouse experiments using a full range of reciprocal density ratios were conducted to investigate interspecific competition. Garlic mustard had a negative effect on the final biomass, number of leaves, and relative growth rate in height of damesrocket. Survival of damesrocket was not negatively affected by interspecific competition with garlic mustard; however, garlic mustard showed higher mortality because of intraspecific competition. These results indicated that although garlic mustard has been observed to be the dominant species in this landscape, it may not completely outcompete damesrocket in all situations. Studies of invasive species in competition are important in degraded landscapes because this is the common situation in many natural areas.

  11. Compatibility and Decontamination of High-Density Polyethylene Exposed to Sulfur Mustard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    COMPATIBILITY AND DECONTAMINATION OF HIGH-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE EXPOSED TO SULFUR MUSTARD ECBC-TR-1235...Decontamination of High-Density Polyethylene Exposed to Sulfur Mustard 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...study to determine the compatability of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) with liquid mustard (HD) material and decontamination of HDPE when exposed

  12. Sensory evaluation of dry-fermented sausage containing ground deodorized yellow mustard.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuliu; Aliani, Michel; Holley, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    Ground deodorized yellow mustard is used as a binder and meat protein substitute in cooked processed meat products. Recent studies have shown that it has the potential to be used in uncooked processed meat products because of its natural antimicrobial properties. In the present study, ground deodorized yellow mustard was added to uncooked dry-fermented sausage during manufacture at 1% to 4% (w/w) and analyzed for its effects on starter cultures, physico-chemical properties, and consumer acceptability. Mustard had a nondose-dependent inhibitory effect on the Staphylococcus starter culture, had no effect on water activity or instrumental texture, and tended to accelerate sausage pH reduction. At 3% and 4% mustard, consumer scores on all sensory attributes as well as overall acceptability were significantly lower. The appearance and color of 3% and 4% mustard-treated sausages were liked slightly, whereas flavor, texture, and overall acceptability scores were reduced. The control without mustard and 1% mustard-treated sausages had similar sensory properties and were the most acceptable, while 2% mustard-treated sausages were given "like moderately" and "like slightly" descriptors. Sensory results mean that at concentrations necessary for mandated regulatory control of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in dry sausages, mustard may have a negative effect on consumer acceptance.

  13. Potent antitumor 9-anilinoacridines and acridines bearing an alkylating N-mustard residue on the acridine chromophore: synthesis and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Su, Tsann-Long; Lin, Yi-Wen; Chou, Ting-Chao; Zhang, Xiuguo; Bacherikov, Valeriy A; Chen, Ching-Huang; Liu, Leroy F; Tsai, Tsong-Jen

    2006-06-15

    A series of 9-anilinoacridine and acridine derivatives bearing an alkylating N-mustard residue at C4 of the acridine chromophore were synthesized. The N-mustard pharmacophore was linked to the C4 of the acridine ring with an O-ethyl (O-C(2)), O-propyl (O-C(3)), or O-butyl (O-C(4)) spacer. It revealed that all newly synthesized compounds were very potent cytotoxic agents against human leukemia and various solid tumors in vitro. These agents did not exhibit cross-resistance against vinblastine-resistant (CCRF-CEM/VBL) or taxol-resistant (CCRF-CEM/taxol) cells. It also showed that these agents were DNA cross-linking agents rather than topoisomerase II inhibitors. Of these agents, compounds 27a and 27c were shown to have potent antitumor activity in nude mice bearing the human breast carcinoma MX-1 xenograft. The therapeutic efficacies of these two agents are comparable to that of taxol.

  14. Investigating Prevalence and Pattern of Long-term Cardiovascular Disorders in Sulphur Mustard-exposed Victims and Determining Proper Biomarkers for Early Defining, Monitoring and Analysis of Patients' Feedback on Therapy.

    PubMed

    Darvishi, Behrad; Panahi, Yunes; Ghanei, Mostafa; Farahmand, Leila

    2017-02-01

    Among the most readily existing chemical warfare agents, sulphur mustard (SM), also known as mustard gas, is the most commonly used agent owing to its ease of synthesis and stockpiling. Unprotected exposure mostly results in debilitation rather than lethal injuries, leaving an exposed victim incapacitated for days to even months. Although acute toxicity of sulphur mustard has been fairly established, the long-term post-exposure effects either chronic or short-term but significant are still evolving. A total of 30,000 Iranian victims of the Iran-Iraq imposed war have now - after 30 years - formed the key population demonstrating long-term effects from sulphur mustard exposure. Recent studies have shown that the prevalence of several long-term cardiovascular disorders (CVDs) has significantly increased among SM-exposed victims including coronary artery disorders (CAD), coronary artery ectasia (CAE), congestive heart failure (CHF) and myocardium abnormalities. The more important point is the lack of a determinant biomarker for early screening, recognizing, treating, monitoring and estimating exposed victims' response to applied therapy. Additionally, unidentified risk factors significantly decrease the chance of a successful therapy and result in undesired failure of a comprehensive therapeutic strategy. In this MiniReview, we examined the literature in detail to evaluate relevant reports considering long-term cardiovascular complications of SM, detecting possible risk factors and determining possible preventing events.

  15. Absorption and degradation of metalaxyl in mustard plant (Brassica juncea).

    PubMed

    Mehta, N; Saharan, G S; Kathpal, T S

    1997-07-01

    Absorption and degradation of metalaxyl were studied in mustard (Brassica juncea) plants after application as a seed dresser, a foliar spray, and a combination of both under subtropical conditions in India. Results indicated that absorption of metalaxyl increased up to 30 days when it was applied as a seed dresser; thereafter, it started declining and was not detectable after 60 days of sowing. The maximum residues (average, 9.03 ppm) of metalaxyl were found after 1 day of spraying. The dissipation of metalaxyl after initial deposits on mustard plants was almost complete after 15 days of spraying. The safe waiting period of metalaxyl was calculated to be 62 and 8 days for seed dresser and foliar application, respectively. The seeds raised through treatments under study were completely free from any detectable amount of metalaxyl residues.

  16. Microbial responses to mustard gas dumped in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Medvedeva, Nadezda; Polyak, Yulia; Kankaanpää, Harri; Zaytseva, Tatyana

    2009-08-01

    Microbiological studies were carried out on chemical weapon dump sites in the Baltic Sea. The effect of mustard gas hydrolysis products (MGHPs) on marine microbiota and the ability of microorganisms to degrade MGHPs were studied. Many stations at the dump sites demonstrated reduced microbial diversity, and increased growth of species able to use mustard gas hydrolysis products as sole source of carbon. Significant amounts of MGHP-degrading bacteria were revealed in the near-bottom water. The MGHP-degrading microorganisms identified as Achromobacter sp., Pseudomonas sp., and Arthrobacter sp. were isolated. These microorganisms were capable of utilizing the major product of hydrolysis, thiodiglycol, as the sole source of carbon and energy. The bacteria were capable of metabolizing MGHPs at a low temperature. The metabolic pathway for thiodiglycol degradation was proposed. The results suggest the potential for MGHPs biodegradation by naturally occurring populations of near-bottom-water and sediment microorganisms.

  17. Late Hematologic Complications of Mustard Gas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    700 male controls were selected from Isfahanian men referring to the Isfahan Thalassemia Prevention and Research Center for roitine premarriage check...ups and thalassemia carrier screening. None had experienced contact with any chemical warfare agents. Blood Tests: Blood samples of both groups were

  18. Mechanisms Mediating the Vesicant Actions of Sulfur Mustard after Cutaneous Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Shakarjian, Michael P.; Heck, Diane E.; Gray, Joshua P.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Gordon, Marion K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Heindel, Ned D.; Gerecke, Donald R.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM), a chemical weapon first employed during World War I, targets the skin, eyes, and lung. It remains a significant military and civilian threat. The characteristic response of human skin to SM involves erythema of delayed onset, followed by edema with inflammatory cell infiltration, the appearance of large blisters in the affected area, and a prolonged healing period. Several in vivo and in vitro models have been established to understand the pathology and investigate the mechanism of action of this vesicating agent in the skin. SM is a bifunctional alkylating agent which reacts with many targets including lipids, proteins, and DNA, forming both intra- and intermolecular cross-links. Despite the relatively nonselective chemical reactivity of this agent, basal keratinocytes are more sensitive, and blistering involves detachment of these cells from their basement membrane adherence zones. The sequence and manner in which these cells die and detach is still unresolved. Much has been discovered over the past two decades with respect to the mechanisms of SM-induced cytotoxicity and the intracellular and extracellular targets of this vesicant. In this review, the effects of SM exposure on the skin are described, as well as potential mechanisms mediating its actions. Successful therapy for SM poisoning will depend on following new mechanistic leads to develop drugs that target one or more of its sites of action. PMID:19833738

  19. Chronic health effects of sulphur mustard exposure with special reference to Iranian veterans

    PubMed Central

    Balali-Mood, M; Mousavi, SH; Balali-Mood, B

    2008-01-01

    The widespread use of sulphur mustard (SM) as an incapacitating chemical warfare agent in the past century has proved its long-lasting toxic effects. It may also be used as a chemical terrorist agent. Therefore, all health professionals should have sufficient knowledge and be prepared for any such chemical attack. SM exerts direct toxic effects on the eyes, skin, and respiratory tissue, with subsequent systemic action on the nervous, immunological, haematological, digestive, and reproductive systems. SM is an alkylating agent that affects DNA synthesis, and, thus, delayed complications have been seen since the First World War. Cases of malignancies in the target organs, particularly in haematopoietic, respiratory, and digestive systems, have been reported. Important delayed respiratory complications include chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, frequent bronchopneumonia, and pulmonary fibrosis, all of which tend to deteriorate with time. Severe dry skin, delayed keratitis, and reduction of natural killer cells with subsequent increased risk of infections and malignancies are also among the most distressing long-term consequences of SM intoxication. However, despite a lot of research over the past decades on Iranian veterans, there are still major gaps in the SM literature. Immunological and neurological dysfunction, as well as the relationship between SM exposure and mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and teratogenicity are important fields that require further studies, particularly on Iranian veterans with chronic health effects of SM poisoning. There is also a paucity of information on the medical management of acute and delayed toxic effects of SM poisoning—a subject that greatly challenges health care specialists. PMID:22460216

  20. The protective effect of Nigella sativa on lung injury of sulfur mustard-exposed Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Boskabady Mohammad; Nasim, Vahedi; Sediqa, Amery

    2008-05-01

    The lung is one of the most exposable organs to chemical warfare agents such as sulfur mustard (SM) gas. Airway hyperresponsiveness and lung inflammation are reported in chemical warfare victims. There is no definite treatment for respiratory disorders induced by SM exposure. However, the protective effect of Nigella sativa on inflammatory process was shown. In the present study, the protective effect of Nigella sativa on tracheal responsiveness and lung inflammation of SM exposed guinea pigs was examined. Guinea pigs were exposed to diluent's solution (ethanol, control group), 100 mg/m(3) inhaled sulfur mustard (SME group), and SME treated with Nigella sativa, 0.08 g daily (SME+N), n = 6 for each group. Tracheal responsiveness (TR) to methacholine, total white blood cell (WBC) count of lung lavage, and differential WBC were done 14 days post exposure. The weigh of animal were measured at the beginning, middle (day 7), and the end (day 14) of the study. The TR of SM-exposed guinea pigs was significantly (P < .001) and WBC nonsignificantly higher than those of controls. In SME guinea pigs, there was a weight loss but in the case of SME+N guinea pigs, no obvious weight change thought the study was seen. The eosinophl, monocyte, and lympocytes in SME animals were significantly changed compared to control group (P < .001 for all cases). Monocyte, lymphocyte, and neutrophil number were decreased in SME+N group compared to SME animals, which was significant only for neutrophil (P < .05). These results showed a preventive effect of Nigella sativa on TR of SM-exposed guinea pigs.

  1. Systemic venous atrium stimulation in transvenous pacing after mustard procedure

    PubMed Central

    Puntrello, Calogero; Lucà, Fabiana; Rubino, Gaspare; Rao, Carmelo Massimiliano; Gelsomino, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a young woman corrected with a Mustard procedure undergoing successful transvenous double chamber pacemaker implantation with the atrial lead placed in the systemic venous channel. The case presented demonstrates that, when the systemic venous atrium is separate from the left atrial appendage, the lead can be easily and safely placed in the systemic venous left atrium gaining satisfactory sensing and pacing thresholds despite consisting partially of pericardial tissue. PMID:25276305

  2. Effect of LED lamping on the chlorophylls of leaf mustard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shiqiang; Zhu, Liang; Zhao, Fuli; Yang, Bowen; Chen, Zuxin; Cai, Ruhai; Chen, Jiansheng

    The absorption coefficients of chloroplast of leaf mustard were measured by a spectrophotometer. The leaves were collected from seven treatments with different lighting. The chlorophyll content was calculated following Arnon equation. LEDs for filling the light source can increase the conduction of plants. Compared with other treatments, Chlorophyll in the leaves got an higher concentration under the lamping of red LEDS to blue LEDS for 7:1 .

  3. Graphene oxide as sensitive layer in Love-wave surface acoustic wave sensors for the detection of chemical warfare agent simulants.

    PubMed

    Sayago, Isabel; Matatagui, Daniel; Fernández, María Jesús; Fontecha, José Luis; Jurewicz, Izabela; Garriga, Rosa; Muñoz, Edgar

    2016-02-01

    A Love-wave device with graphene oxide (GO) as sensitive layer has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulants. Sensitive films were fabricated by airbrushing GO dispersions onto Love-wave devices. The resulting Love-wave sensors detected very low CWA simulant concentrations in synthetic air at room temperature (as low as 0.2 ppm for dimethyl-methylphosphonate, DMMP, a simulant of sarin nerve gas, and 0.75 ppm for dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether, DPGME, a simulant of nitrogen mustard). High responses to DMMP and DPGME were obtained with sensitivities of 3087 and 760 Hz/ppm respectively. Very low limit of detection (LOD) values (9 and 40 ppb for DMMP and DPGME, respectively) were calculated from the achieved experimental data. The sensor exhibited outstanding sensitivity, good linearity and repeatability to all simulants tested. The detection mechanism is here explained in terms of hydrogen bonding formation between the tested CWA simulants and GO.

  4. Verification, Dosimetry and Biomonitoring of Mustard Gas Exposure via Immunochemical Detection of Mustard Gas Adducts to DNA and Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    of supernatants of hybridomas fox specific antibody activity . Mono- and di-adducts at the N7-position of guanosine-5-phosphate were svthesized for use...antibody activity could be developed and optimized, in which single-stranded calf-thymus DNA exposed to 10 pM mustard gas was used as coating...Figure 11: Chemical shift isuignments and coupling constants for the hydrogen (400 MHz:. a) and carbon atoms (100.6 MHz; b) of t4-(2

  5. The Scarlet Letter of Alkylation: A Mini Review of Selective Alkylating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Oronsky, Bryan T; Reid, Tony; Knox, Susan J; Scicinski, Jan J

    2012-01-01

    If there were a stigma scale for chemotherapy, alkylating agents would be ranked at the top of the list. The chemical term alkylation is associated with nonselective toxicity, an association that dates back to the use of nitrogen mustards during World War I as chemical warfare agents. That this stigma persists and extends to compounds that, through selectivity, attempt to “tame” the indiscriminate destructive potential of alkylation is the subject of this review. Selective alkylation, as it is referred to herein, constitutes an extremely nascent and dynamic field in oncology. The pharmacodynamic response to this selective strategy depends on a delicate kinetic balance between specificity and the rate and extent of binding. Three representative compounds are presented: RRx-001, 3-bromopyruvate, and TH-302. The main impetus for the development of these compounds has been the avoidance of the serious complications of traditional alkylating agents; therefore, it is the thesis of this review that they should not experience stigma by association. PMID:22937173

  6. Suppression of bacterial blight on mustard greens with host plant resistance and Acibenzolar-S-Methyl

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial blight, caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, attacks the leaves of most brassica vegetables, including mustard greens (Brassica juncea). ‘Carolina Broadleaf,’ a new mustard cultivar, is resistant to bacterial blight. Acibenzolar-S-methyl (trade name Actigard) has been used to m...

  7. Activity of quinone alkylating agents in quinone-resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Begleiter, A; Leith, M K

    1990-05-15

    The role of the quinone group in the antitumor activity of quinone alkylating agents, such as mitomycin C and 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,5-bis(carboethoxyamino)-1,4-benzoquinone, is still uncertain. The quinone group may contribute to antitumor activity by inducing DNA strand breaks through the formation of free radicals and/or by influencing the alkylating activity of the quinone alkylators. The cytotoxic activity and DNA damage produced by the model quinone alkylating agents, benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard, were compared in L5178Y murine lymphoblasts sensitive and resistant to the model quinone antitumor agent, hydrolyzed benzoquinone mustard. The resistant cell lines, L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10, have increased concentrations of glutathione and elevated catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, and DT-diaphorase activity. L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells were 7.4- and 8.5-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone mustard and 1.7- and 4.3-fold less sensitive to benzoquinone dimustard, respectively, compared with sensitive cells, but showed no resistance to the non-quinone alkylating agent, aniline mustard. The formation of DNA double strand breaks by benzoquinone mustard was reduced by 2- and 8-fold in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, while double strand break formation by benzoquinone dimustard was reduced only in the L5178Y/HBM10 cells. The number of DNA-DNA cross-links produced by benzoquinone mustard was 3- and 6-fold lower, and the number produced by benzoquinone dimustard was 35% and 2-fold lower in L5178Y/HBM2 and L5178Y/HBM10 cells, respectively, compared with L5178Y parental cells. In contrast, cross-linking by aniline mustard was unchanged in sensitive and resistant cells. Dicoumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase, increased the cytotoxic activity of both benzoquinone mustard and benzoquinone dimustard in L5178Y/HBM10 cells. This study provides evidence that elevated DT-diaphorase activity in the resistant cells

  8. Mus308 Mutants of Drosophila Exhibit Hypersensitivity to DNA Cross-Linking Agents and Are Defective in a Deoxyribonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, J. B.; Sakaguchi, K.; Harris, P. V.

    1990-01-01

    Mutagen-sensitive strains that identify 16 different Drosophila genes have been screened for alterations in DNA metabolic enzymes. A characteristic defect in an acid-active deoxyribonuclease was observed in strains carrying the six available mutant alleles of the mus308 gene. Since that enzyme is detected at normal levels in a mutant strain that is deficient in the previously identified enzymes DNase 1 and DNase 2, it represents a new Drosophila nuclease that is designated Nuclease 3. The mus308 mutants were originally distinguished from all other mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila because they exhibit hypersensitivity to the DNA cross-linking agent nitrogen mustard without expressing a concurrent sensitivity to the monofunctional agent methyl methanesulfonate. Further observations of hypersensitivity to the mutagens trimethylpsoralen, diepoxybutane and cis-platinum now establish a more general sensitivity of these mutants to agents capable of generating DNA cross-links. In spite of the hypersensitivity of the mus308 mutants to DNA cross-linking agents, the initial incision step of DNA cross-link repair is normal in mus308 cells as assayed by the alkaline elution procedure. The Drosophila mus308 mutants show promise of providing a useful model for analogous defects in other organisms including man. PMID:2397884

  9. Toxicity of vesicant agents scheduled for destruction by the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A P; Griffin, G D

    1992-01-01

    The vesicant agents of the unitary chemical munitions stockpile include various formulations of sulfur mustard [bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide; agents H, HD, and HT] and small quantities of the organic arsenical Lewisite [dichloro(2-chlorovinyl) arsine; agent L]. These agents can be dispersed in liquid, aerosol, or vapor form and are capable of producing severe chemical burns upon direct contact with tissue. Moist tissues such as the eyes, respiratory tract, and axillary areas are particularly affected. Available data summarizing acute dose response in humans and laboratory animals are summarized. Vesicant agents are also capable of generating delayed effects such as chronic bronchitis, carcinogenesis, or keratitis/keratopathy of the eye under appropriate conditions of exposure and dose. These effects may not become manifest until years following exposure. Risk analysis derived from carcinogenesis data indicates that sulfur mustard possesses a carcinogenic potency similar to that of benzo[a]pyrene. Because mustard agents are alkylating compounds, they destroy individual cells by reaction with cellular proteins, enzymes, RNA, and DNA. Once begun, tissue reaction is irreversible. Mustard agents are mutagenic; data for cellular and laboratory animal assays are presented. Reproductive effects have not been demonstrated in the offspring of laboratory rats. Acute Lewisite exposure has been implicated in cases of Bowen's disease, an intraepidermal squamous cell carcinoma. Lewisite is not known to generate reproductive or teratogenic effects. PMID:1486858

  10. Toxicity of vesicant agents scheduled for destruction by the chemical stockpile disposal program

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Griffin, G.D. )

    1992-11-01

    The vesicant agents of the unitary chemical munitions stockpile include various formulations of sulfur mustard [bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide; agents H, HD, and HT] and small quantities of the organic arsenical Lewisite [dichloro(2-chlorovinyl)arsine; agent L]. These agents can be dispersed in liquid, aerosol, or vapor form and are capable of producing severe chemical burns upon direct contact with tissue. Moist tissues such as the eyes, respiratory tract, and axillary areas are particularly affected. Available data summarizing acute dose response in humans and laboratory animals are summarized. Vesicant agents are also capable of generating delayed effects such as chronic bronchitis, carcinogenesis, or keratitis/keratopathy of the eye under appropriate conditions of exposure and dose. These effects may not become manifest until years following exposure. Risk analysis derived from carcinogenesis data indicates that sulfur mustard possesses a carcinogenic potency similar to that of benzo[a]pyrene. Because mustard agents are alkylating compounds, they destroy individual cells by reaction with cellular proteins, enzymes, RNA, and DNA. Once begun, tissue reaction is irreversible. Mustard agents are mutagenic; data for cellular and laboratory animal assays are presented. Reproductive effects have not been demonstrated in the offspring of laboratory rats. Acute Lewisite exposure has been implicated in cases of Bowen's disease, an intraepidermal squamous cell carcinoma. Lewisite is not known to generate reproductive or teratogenic effects. 112 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  11. 2,6-Dithiopurine blocks toxicity and mutagenesis in human skin cells exposed to sulfur mustard analogs, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Powell, K. Leslie; Boulware, Stephen; Thames, Howard; Vasquez, Karen M.; MacLeod, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) is a well known chemical warfare agent that induces debilitating cutaneous toxicity in exposed individuals. It is also known to be carcinogenic and mutagenic due to its ability to damage DNA via electrophilic attack. We previously showed that a nucleophilic scavenger, 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), reacts chemically with several electrophilic carcinogens, blocking DNA damage in vitro and in vivo and abolishing tumor formation in a two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis model. To assess the potential of DTP as an antagonist of sulfur mustard, we have utilized monofunctional chemical analogs of sulfur mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide (CEMS), to induce toxicity and mutagenesis in a cell line, NCTC2544, derived from a human skin tumor. We show that DTP blocks cytotoxicity in CEMS- and CEES-treated cells when present at approximately equimolar concentration. A related thiopurine, 9-methyl-6-mercaptopurine, is similarly effective. Correlated with this, we find that DTP is transported into these cells, and that adducts between DTP and CEES are found intracellularly. Using a shuttle vector-based mutagenesis system, which allows enumeration of mutations induced in the skin cells by a blue/white colony screen, we find that DTP completely abolishes mutagenesis induced by CEMS and CEES in the human cells. PMID:20050631

  12. 2,6-Dithiopurine blocks toxicity and mutagenesis in human skin cells exposed to sulfur mustard analogues, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide.

    PubMed

    Powell, K Leslie; Boulware, Stephen; Thames, Howard; Vasquez, Karen M; MacLeod, Michael C

    2010-03-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) is a well-known chemical warfare agent that induces debilitating cutaneous toxicity in exposed individuals. It is also known to be carcinogenic and mutagenic because of its ability to damage DNA via electrophilic attack. We previously showed that a nucleophilic scavenger, 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), reacts chemically with several electrophilic carcinogens, blocking DNA damage in vitro and in vivo and abolishing tumor formation in a two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis model. To assess the potential of DTP as an antagonist of sulfur mustard, we have utilized monofunctional chemical analogues of sulfur mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) and 2-chloroethyl methyl sulfide (CEMS), to induce toxicity and mutagenesis in a cell line, NCTC2544, derived from a human skin tumor. We show that DTP blocks cytotoxicity in CEMS- and CEES-treated cells when present at approximately equimolar concentration. A related thiopurine, 9-methyl-6-mercaptopurine, is similarly effective. Correlated with this, we find that DTP is transported into these cells and that adducts between DTP and CEES are found intracellularly. Using a shuttle vector-based mutagenesis system, which allows enumeration of mutations induced in the skin cells by a blue/white colony screen, we find that DTP completely abolishes the mutagenesis induced by CEMS and CEES in human cells.

  13. The effect of alkylating agents on male rat fertility

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, H.; Fox, B. W.; Craig, A. W.

    1959-01-01

    The effects of tumour inhibitory doses of tretamine (triethylenemelamine), busulphan, and melphalan on the fertility of male rats have been examined. The aromatic nitrogen mustard, melphalan, was inactive, but busulphan has a highly selective action on spermatogenesis which contrasts strikingly with that of tretamine. The main action of tretamine was exerted upon spermatocytes or spermatids, but, with increasing dose, the effects spread to involve a wide range of spermatogenic cells including mature sperm, so that infertility could be induced very rapidly. Busulphan, however, interfered with the development of spermatogonia for several weeks, although other germinal cells were unaffected and continued to develop into mature spermatozoa. This accounted for the continuation of normal fertility for 7 weeks after a dose, before sterility suddenly developed. The antifertility activity of tretamine could be simulated by a variety of other ethyleneimino compounds, potency being greatest in trifunctional and least in monofunctional compounds. The latter were, however, very destructive to the seminiferous epithelium with increasing dose. In the rat, there appeared to be no definite relationship between the ability of alkylating substances to interfere with the activity of normal and pathological proliferating tissues, as represented by the germinal epithelium, haematopoietic, and tumour tissue. Although carcinogenicity was a biological property of alkylating agents, other chemical types of carcinogen did not interfere with fertility. ImagesFIG. 2aFIG. 2bFIG. 2c PMID:13662565

  14. Development of an antibody that binds sulfur mustard. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Lieske, C.N.; Klopcic, R.S.; Gross, C.L.; Clark, J.H.; Dolzine, T.W.

    1992-12-31

    An antibody that binds bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard) was developed. The immunizing antigen was prepared from the hapten 4-(2-chloroethyl)benzoic acid covalently bound to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). The antibody was monitored by a solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The test antigen consisted of a second hapten, 8-chlorocaprylic acid, covalently bound to bovine serum albumin (BSA). The test antigen was absorbed to the wells of 96-well plates. The immunizing and test antigens contain a common chloroethyl moiety. Thiodiglycol, the principal hydrolysis product of sulfur mustard, does not react with the antibody. This antibody, because of its specificity, has the potential to be a valuable tool for mustard research and forensic detection. Sulfur mustard, sulfur mustard antibody, antibody inhibition haptens.

  15. Photoassisted and photocatalytic degradation of sulfur mustard using TiO2 nanoparticles and polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Mohammad Taghi; Sarabadani, Mansour; Ashrafi, Davood; Saeidian, Hamdollah; Babri, Mehran

    2013-02-01

    The decomposition of highly toxic chemical warfare agent, sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide or HD), has been studied by homogeneous photolysis and heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation on titania nanoparticles. Direct photolysis degradation of HD with irradiation system was investigated. The photocatalytic degradation of HD was investigated in the presence of TiO(2) nanoparticles and polyoxometalates embedded in titania nanoparticles in liquid phase at room temperature (33 ± 2 °C). Degradation products during the treatment were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Whereas apparent first-order kinetics of ultraviolet (UV) photolysis were slow (0.0091 min(-1)), the highest degradation rate is obtained in the presence of TiO(2) nanoparticles as nanophotocatalyst. Simultaneous photolysis and photocatalysis under the full UV radiation leads to HD complete destruction in 3 h. No degradation products observed in the presence of nanophotocatalyst without irradiation in 3 h. It was found that up to 90 % of agent was decomposed under of UV irradiation without TiO(2), in 6 h. The decontamination mechanisms are often quite complex and multiple mechanisms can be operable such as hydrolysis, oxidation, and elimination. By simultaneously carrying out photolysis and photocatalysis in hexane, we have succeeded in achieving faster HD decontamination after 90 min with low catalyst loading. TiO(2) nanoparticles proved to be a superior photocatalyst under UV irradiation for HD decontamination.

  16. DNA damage in internal organs after cutaneous exposure to sulphur mustard.

    PubMed

    Batal, Mohamed; Boudry, Isabelle; Mouret, Stéphane; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Wartelle, Julien; Bérard, Izabel; Douki, Thierry

    2014-07-01

    Sulphur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that attacks mainly skin, eye and lungs. Due to its lipophilic properties, SM is also able to diffuse through the skin and reach internal organs. DNA represents one of the most critical molecular targets of this powerful alkylating agent which modifies DNA structure by forming monoadducts and biadducts. These DNA lesions are involved in the acute toxicity of SM as well as its long-term carcinogenicity. In the present work we studied the formation and persistence of guanine and adenine monoadducts and guanine biadducts in the DNA of brain, lungs, kidneys, spleen, and liver of SKH-1 mice cutaneously exposed to 2, 6 and 60mg/kg of SM. SM-DNA adducts were detected in all studied organs, except in liver at the two lowest doses. Brain and lungs were the organs with the highest level of SM-DNA adducts, followed by kidney, spleen and liver. Monitoring the level of adducts for three weeks after cutaneous exposure showed that the lifetime of adducts were not the same in all organs, lungs being the organ with the longest persistence. Diffusion from skin to internal organs was much more efficient at the highest compared to the lowest dose investigated as the result of the loss of the skin barrier function. These data provide novel information on the distribution of SM in tissues following cutaneous exposures and indicate that brain is an important target.

  17. Topical sulfur mustard induces changes in prostaglandins and interleukin-1 alpha in isolated perfused porcine skin

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Riviere, J.E.; Monteiro-Rivier, N.A.

    1995-12-01

    Su1fur mustard BIS(2-CHLOROETHYL) SULFIDE, HD is an alkylating agent that causes severe cutaneous injury. The isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF) is an in vitro model that has been utilized in cutaneous toxicity research. The objective of this study was to characterize the local IPPSF inflammatory response after topical exposure to 5.0 and 10.0 mg/ml of I (n = 5/treatment, n = 5/control). Biochemical markers of viability CUMULATIVE GLUCOSE UTILIZATION (CGU), vascular resistance (VR), morphological parameters, and venous flux of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), prostaglandin F2% (PGF2%, and interleukin la (IL la)) were determined. HD caused a dose-related response in the formation of gross blisters, and epidermal-dermal separation. Decreases in CGU and an increase in VR were seen in all HD-treated IPPsFs. Increase of both PGE2 and PGF2a was observed only in 5.0 mg/ml HD treatment, which showed the greatest increase in VR, while the 10.0 mg/nil concentration of HD enhanced the release of IL-1a. These results suggest that HD is a potent dermal toxic agent that induces alterations in glucose metabolism and vascular resistance, which resulted in dose-specific patterns of PGE2, PGF2a and IL-la release.

  18. Thiodiglycol, the hydrolysis product of sulfur mustard: Analysis of in vitro biotransformation by mammalian alcohol dehydrogenases using nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Brimfield, A.A.; Hodgson, Ernest

    2006-06-15

    Thiodiglycol (2,2'-bis-hydroxyethylsulfide, TDG), the hydrolysis product of the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard, has been implicated in the toxicity of sulfur mustard through the inhibition of protein phosphatases in mouse liver cytosol. The absence of any inhibitory activity when TDG was present in assays of pure enzymes, however, led us to investigate the possibility for metabolic activation of TDG to inhibitory compound(s) by cytosolic enzymes. We have successfully shown that mammalian alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) rapidly oxidize TDG in vitro, but the classic spectrophotometric techniques for following this reaction provided no information on the identity of TDG intermediates and products. The use of proton NMR to monitor the oxidative reaction with structural confirmation by independent synthesis allowed us to establish the ultimate product, 2-hydroxyethylthioacetic acid, and to identify an intermediate equilibrium mixture consisting of 2-hydroxyethylthioacetaldehyde, 2-hydroxyethylthioacetaldehyde hydrate and the cyclic 1,4-oxathian-2-ol. The intermediate nature of this mixture was determined spectrophotometrically when it was shown to drive the production of NADH when added to ADH and NAD.

  19. Biosynthesis and urinary excretion of methyl sulfonium derivatives of the sulfur mustard analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, and other thioethers

    SciTech Connect

    Mozier, N.M.; Hoffman, J.L. )

    1990-12-01

    Thioether methyltransferase was previously shown to catalyze the S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methylation of diemthyl selenide, dimethyl telluride, and various thioethers to produce the corresponding methyl onium ions. In this paper we show that the following thioethers are also substrates for this enzyme in vitro: 2-hydroxyethyl ethyl sulfide, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, thiodiglycol, t-butyl sulfide, and isopropyl sulfide. To demonstrate thioether methylation in vivo, mice were injected with (methyl-{sup 3}H)methionine plus different thioethers, and extracts of lungs, livers, kidneys, and urine were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography for the presence of ({sup 3}H)methyl sulfonium ions. The following thioethers were tested, and all were found to be methylated in vivo: dimethyl sulfide, diethyl sulfide, methyl n-propyl sulfide, tetrahydrothiophene, 2-(methylthio)ethylamine, 2-hydroxyethyl ethyl sulfide, and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide. This supports our hypothesis that the physiological role of thioether methyltransferase is to methylate seleno-, telluro-, and thioethers to more water-soluble onium ions suitable for urinary excretion. Conversion of the mustard gas analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, to the methyl sulfonium derivative represents a newly discovered mechanism for biochemical detoxification of sulfur mustards, as this conversion blocks formation of the reactive episulfonium ion that is the ultimate alkylating agent for this class of compounds.

  20. Long-term effects of sulfur mustard on civilians’ mental health 20 years after exposure (The Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sulfur mustard (SM) is an alkylating agent that induces short and long term toxicity on various organs. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term psychological symptoms among samples of exposed to sulfur mustard gas compared with unexposed civilians 20 years after exposure. Methods This historical cohort study was conducted on 495 civilians of Sardasht and Rabat in two age matched groups, including 367 sulfur mustard exposed participants from Sardasht and 128 unexposed subjects from Rabat. Psychological symptoms was assessed using the Symptom Check List-90 Revised (SCL-90-R) including measures of somatization, obsessive-compulsive, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism providing three global distress indices namely: Global Severity Index (GSI), Positive Symptom Total (PST) and Positive Symptom Distress Index (PSDI). Comparison was made between exposed and unexposed civilians. Results There were significant differences in somatization (P = 0.002), obsessive-compulsive (P = 0.031), depression (P = 0.007), anxiety (P = 0.042), and hostility (P = 0.002), between the exposed and unexposed groups. In addition there were significant differences between two groups concerning the GSI (P = 0.045) and the PSDI (P < 0.001). The differences between two groups in other subscales were not significant. Conclusions The findings from this study showed that civilians who exposed to sulfur mustard gas were suffering from a number of psychological symptoms even 20 years after exposure. Providing mental health services and more resource allocation for this community are highly recommended. PMID:23618038

  1. Consumer acceptability and sensory profile of cooked broccoli with mustard seeds added to improve chemoprotective properties.

    PubMed

    Ghawi, Sameer Khalil; Shen, Yuchi; Niranjan, Keshavan; Methven, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    Broccoli, a rich source of glucosinolates, is a commonly consumed vegetable of the Brassica family. Hydrolysis products of glucosinolates, isothiocyanates, have been associated with health benefits and contribute to the flavor of Brassica. However, boiling broccoli causes the myrosinase enzyme needed for hydrolysis to denature. In order to ensure hydrolysis, broccoli must either be mildly cooked or active sources of myrosinase, such as mustard seed powder, can be added postcooking. In this study, samples of broccoli were prepared in 6 different ways; standard boiling, standard boiling followed by the addition of mustard seeds, sous vide cooking at low temperature (70 °C) and sous vide cooking at higher temperature (100 °C) and sous vide cooking at higher temperature followed by the addition of mustard seeds at 2 different concentrations. The majority of consumers disliked the mildly cooked broccoli samples (70 °C, 12 min, sous vide) which had a hard and stringy texture. The highest mean consumer liking was for standard boiled samples (100 °C, 7 min). Addition of 1% mustard seed powder developed sensory attributes, such as pungency, burning sensation, mustard odor, and flavor. One cluster of consumers (32%) found mustard seeds to be a good complement to cooked broccoli; however, the majority disliked the mustard-derived sensory attributes. Where the mustard seeds were partially processed, doubling the addition to 2% led to only the same level of mustard and pungent flavors as 1% unprocessed seeds, and mean consumer liking remained unaltered. This suggests that optimization of the addition level of partially processed mustard seeds may be a route to enhance bioactivity of cooked broccoli without compromising consumer acceptability.

  2. Translation of Toxicity Data into CW Agent Toxicity Estimates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    dosage defined by vapor concentration (C) multiplied by exposure time (T) CTXX -- Lethal or Effective Concentration-Time to XX% exposed Dependence of...kg, young healthy adult males Agents addressed: GA (tabun), GB (sarin), GD (soman), GF (cyclosarin), VX and HD (mustard) Routes of exposure ...use with CW agent exposure scenarios involving healthy adult males Evidence exists that in some mammalian species (ex. rodents) that a significant

  3. Mutagenicity and antimutagenicity studies of DRDE-07 and its analogs against sulfur mustard in the in vitro Ames Salmonella/microsome assay.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Vinod; Pathak, Uma; Meshram, Ghansham Pundilikji

    2014-10-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM), a chemical warfare agent, is classified as a class I human carcinogen by IARC. No effective antidote against this agent is available. The synthetic aminothiol, amifostine, earlier known as WR-2721, has been extensively used as a chemical radioprotector for normal tissues in cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy. SM is a radiomimetic agent; this prompted us to evaluate the protective efficacy of amifostine and three of its analogs, DRDE-07 [S-2(2-aminoethylamino) ethyl phenyl sulphide], DRDE-30 [S-2(2-aminoethyl amino) ethyl propyl sulphide] and DRDE-35 [S-2(2-aminoethyl amino) ethyl butyl sulphide], against sulfur mustard-induced mutagenicity in the Ames Salmonella/microsome assay. The antidotes were also evaluated for possible mutagenic activity. DRDE-07 was mutagenic in strain TA104 in the absence of S9; DRDE-30 was mutagenic in strain TA100; amifostine and DRDE-35 did not show mutagenic activity in any of the five tester strains used. SM is mutagenic in strains TA97a and TA102, with or without S9 activation. In the antimutagenicity studies, DRDE-07 and DRDE-35 showed promising antimutagenic activity against SM in the absence of S9, in comparison to amifostine. DRDE-07 and DRDE-35 are promising protective agents against SM-induced mutagenicity.

  4. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P. M.; Kleimeyer, J.; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, moderately high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of nitrogen broadened (1 atm N2) vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, Nitrogen Mustard (HN3), Sulfur Mustard (HD), and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White Cell1 of 5.6 meter optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer’s law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at Dugway proving Grounds (DPG).

  5. Verification, Dosimetry and Biomonitoring of Mustard Gas Exposure via Immunochemical Detection of Mustard Gas Adducts to DNA and Proteins.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    thrombocytes and lipids was removed, and the lymphocytes forming a broad band half-way down and the granulocytes banding just above the erythrocytes...on ice. The amount of WBC was counted in a counting-chamber by light microscopy . The cells were irradiated with 0 or 4 Gy 60 Co gamma rays...antibodies against ss- ct-DNA treated with mustard gas were counted by light- microscopy and diluted in HAT-medium to a concentration of 50, 10 and 5

  6. Verification, Dosimetry, and Biomonitoring of Mustard Gas Exposure via Immunochemical Detection of Mustard Gas Adducts to DNA and Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    specificity 4- for DNA adducts of mustard gas. With this serum a method for the screening of supernatants of hybridomas for specific antibody activity ...11: Chemical shift assignments and coupling constants for tl-e 1’tdrogen (400 MHz; a) and carbon atoms (100.6 MHz; b) of N7-(2’-hydroxyethylthioethyl...subsequent hydrolysis. 113 Figure 14: Chemical shift assignments and coupling constants for the hydrogen (400 MHz; a) and carbon atoms (100.6 Miz; b) of di-(2

  7. Thermal and pressure stability of myrosinase enzymes from black mustard (Brassica nigra L. W.D.J. Koch. var. nigra), brown mustard (Brassica juncea L. Czern. var. juncea) and yellow mustard (Sinapsis alba L. subsp. maire) seeds.

    PubMed

    Okunade, Olukayode Adediran; Ghawi, Sameer Khalil; Methven, Lisa; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2015-11-15

    This study investigates the effects of temperature and pressure on inactivation of myrosinase extracted from black, brown and yellow mustard seeds. Brown mustard had higher myrosinase activity (2.75 un/mL) than black (1.50 un/mL) and yellow mustard (0.63 un/mL). The extent of enzyme inactivation increased with pressure (600-800 MPa) and temperature (30-70° C) for all the mustard seeds. However, at combinations of lower pressures (200-400 MPa) and high temperatures (60-80 °C), there was less inactivation. For example, application of 300 MPa and 70 °C for 10 min retained 20%, 80% and 65% activity in yellow, black and brown mustard, respectively, whereas the corresponding activity retentions when applying only heat (70° C, 10 min) were 0%, 59% and 35%. Thus, application of moderate pressures (200-400 MPa) can potentially be used to retain myrosinase activity needed for subsequent glucosinolate hydrolysis.

  8. In-vitro fermentation characteristics and methane reduction potential of mustard cake (Brassica juncea L.)

    PubMed Central

    Durge, S. M.; Tripathi, M. K.; Dutta, N.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To assess the effect of mustard cake (Brassica juncea L.) levels in concentrate mixtures and in composite feed mixtures (CFMs) on in-vitro fermentation characteristics and methane production. Materials and Methods: Five concentrate mixtures were prepared with containing 30% oil cake, where linseed cake was replaced by mustard cake at the rate of 0%, 7.5%, 15.0%, 22.5%, and 30% in concentrate mixture. Mustard cake contained glucosinolate 72.58 µmol/g oil free dry matter (DM) and contents in diet were 0, 5.4, 10.9, 16.3, and 21.8 µmol/g of concentrate mixture, respectively. Concentrate mixture containing 15.0% mustard cake was found to produced minimum methane which was then used for the preparation of CFM containing 0%, 25%, 50%, and 75% levels with gram straw. Result: Increased levels of mustard cake in concentrate mixtures had a linear decrease (p<0.05) in the total gas production, and the 15% inclusion showed lowest methane concentration (quadratic, p<0.01). The degradability of DM and organic matter (OM) of concentrate mixtures did not change, however, pH and NH3-N concentrations of the fermentation medium showed linear (p<0.05) reductions with increased mustard cake levels. Increased levels of 15% mustard cake containing concentrate mixture in CFMs exhibited a trend (p=0.052) of increased gas production, whereas methane concentration in total gas, methane produced and degradability of DM and OM were also displayed a linear increase (p<0.05). However, the pH, NH3-N, and total volatile fatty acid levels decreased linearly (p<0.05) with increased levels of concentrate in CFMs. Conclusion: Reduction in methane production was evidenced with the inclusion of mustard cake in concentrate mixture at 15% level, and the CFMs with 25% concentrate, which contained 15% mustard cake, exhibited an improved fermentation and reduced methane production. PMID:27847426

  9. Bilateral chylothorax complicating Mustard repair of transposition of the great vessels.

    PubMed

    Copeland, J G; Shaut, C

    1982-10-01

    Less than 60 cases of bilateral chylothorax have been previously reported, and only two of these involve complicated Mustard procedures. We describe herein a patient in whom severe bilateral chylothorax developed three weeks after Mustard repair of D transposition. Complete reversal of this condition was obtained with revision of the constricted interatrial baffle and ligation of the thoracic duct. This cases is compared clinically with previously reported instances of chylothorax, and the role of played by obstruction of the superior vena cava after a Mustard procedure for transposition of the great vessels is emphasized.

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Inducible DNA Cross-Linking Agents and Their Effect on Cancer Cells and Normal Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reducing host toxicity is one of the main challenges of cancer chemotherapy. Many tumor cells contain high levels of ROS that make them distinctively different from normal cells. We report a series of ROS-activated aromatic nitrogen mustards that selectively kill chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) over normal lymphocytes. These agents showed powerful DNA cross-linking abilities when coupled with H2O2, one of the most common ROS in cancer cells, whereas little DNA cross-linking was detected without H2O2. Consistent with chemistry observation, in vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that these agents induced 40–80% apoptosis in primary leukemic lymphocytes isolated from CLL patients but less than 25% cell death to normal lymphocytes from healthy donors. The IC50 for the most potent compound (2) was ∼5 μM in CLL cells, while the IC50 was not achieved in normal lymphocytes. Collectively, these data provide utility and selectivity of these agents that will inspire further and effective applications. PMID:24801734

  11. Induction of neuronal damage in guinea pig brain by intratracheal infusion of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog.

    PubMed

    Gadsden-Gray, Jessica; Mukherjee, Shyamali; Ogunkua, Olugbemiga; Das, Salil K

    2012-01-01

    Intratracheal infusion of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a mustard gas analog and a chemical warfare agent is known to cause massive damage to lung. The purpose of this study was to determine whether intratracheal CEES infusion causes neuronal damage. Histological, immunohistochemical, and Western blot studies indicated that CEES treatment caused dose-dependent increases in blood cell aggregation, microglial cell number, microglial activation, and brain inflammation. In addition, an increased expression of α-synuclein and a decreased expression of the dopamine transporter were observed. The results indicate that intratracheal CEES infusion is associated with changes in brain morphology mediated by an increase in α-synuclein expression, leading to neurotoxicity in a guinea pig model. These changes may be mediated by oxidative stress. Furthermore, the present study indicates for the first time that intratracheal infusion of a single dose of CEES can cause neuroinflammation, which may lead to neurological disorders in later part of life.

  12. Characterizing harmful advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and ribosylated aggregates of yellow mustard seed phytocystatin: Effects of different monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Azaj; Shamsi, Anas; Bano, Bilqees

    2017-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are at the core of variety of diseases ranging from diabetes to renal failure and hence gaining wide consideration. This study was aimed at characterizing the AGEs of phytocystatin isolated from mustard seeds (YMP) when incubated with different monosaccharides (glucose, ribose and mannose) using fluorescence, ultraviolet, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and microscopy. Ribose was found to be the most potent glycating agent as evident by AGEs specific fluorescence and absorbance. YMP exists as a molten globule like structure on day 24 as depicted by high ANS fluorescence and altered intrinsic fluorescence. Glycated YMP as AGEs and ribose induced aggregates were observed at day 28 and 32 respectively. In our study we have also examined the anti-aggregative potential of polyphenol, resveratrol. Our results suggested the anti-aggregative behavior of resveratrol as it prevented the in vitro aggregation of YMP, although further studies are required to decode the mechanism by which resveratrol prevents the aggregation.

  13. Effect of nitrogen fertilization on growth of Arundo donax and on rearing of a biological control agent, the shoot gall-forming wasp Tetramesa romana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen augmentation often leads to increased feeding and/or reproduction by herbivorous insects, but little is known about the effects on insects that gall grasses. The shoot tip-galling wasp Tetramesa romana has been released for biological control of the giant grass arundo (Arundo donax) in the...

  14. Comparative Proteomic Study Reveals the Molecular Aspects of Delayed Ocular Symptoms Induced by Sulfur Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Pashandi, Zaiddodine; Saraygord-Afshari, Neda; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Naderi, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent which produces ocular, respiratory, and skin damages. Eyes are the most sensitive organ to SM due to high intrinsic metabolic and rapid turnover rate of corneal epithelium and aqueous-mucous interfaces of the cornea and conjunctiva. Here we investigate underlying molecular mechanism of SM exposure delayed effects which is still a controversial issue after about 30 years. Materials and Methods. Following ethical approval, we have analyzed serum proteome of ten severe SM exposed male patients with delayed eye symptoms with two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The western blotting was used to confirm the proteins that have been identified. Results. We have identified thirteen proteins including albumin, haptoglobin, and keratin isoforms as well as immunoglobulin kappa chain which showed upregulation while transferrin and alpha 1 antitrypsin revealed downregulation in these patients in comparison with healthy control group. Conclusions. Our results elevated participation of free iron circulatory imbalance and local matrix-metalloproteinase activity in development of delayed ocular symptoms induced by SM. It demonstrates that SM induced systemic toxicity leads to some serum protein changes that continually and gradually exacerbate the ocular surface injuries. PMID:25685557

  15. Dermal and ocular exposure systems for the development of models of sulfur mustard-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Weber, Waylon M; Kracko, Dean A; Lehman, Mericka R; Cox, Christopher E; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Grotendorst, Gary R; McDonald, Jacob D

    2011-09-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical threat agent for which the effects have no current treatment. Due to the ease of synthesis and dispersal of this material, the need to develop therapeutics is evident. The present article details the techniques used to develop SM laboratory exposure systems for the development of animal models of ocular and dermal injury. These models are critical to enable evaluation of SM injury and therapeutics against that injury. Iterative trials were conducted to optimize dermal and ocular injury models in guinea pigs and rabbits respectively. The goal was a homogeneous and diffuse ocular and dermal injury that compares to the human injury. Dermal exposures were conducted by either a flow-past or static vapor cup system. Ocular exposures were conducted by a static exposure system. Ocular and dermal exposures were conducted with vaporized SM. Vapor concentrations increased with time in the dermal and ocular exposure systems but were stable with varying amounts of applied SM. A dermal deposition estimation study was also conducted. Deposited volumes increased with exposure time.

  16. Inhalation Exposure Systems for the Development of Rodent Models of Sulfur Mustard-Induced Pulmonary Injury

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Waylon M.; Kracko, Dean A.; Lehman, Mericka R.; Irvin, Clinton M.; Blair, Lee F.; White, Richard K.; Benson, Janet M.; Grotendorst, Gary R.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; McDonald, Jacob D.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical threat agent for which its effects have no current treatment. Due to the ease of synthesis and dispersal of this material, the need to develop therapeutics is evident. The present manuscript details the techniques used to develop SM laboratory exposure systems for the development of animal models of pulmonary injury. These models are critical for evaluating SM injury and developing therapeutics against that injury. Iterative trials were conducted to optimize a lung injury model. The resulting pathology was used as a guide, with a goal of effecting homogeneous and diffuse lung injury comparable to that of human injury. Inhalation exposures were conducted by either nose-only inhalation or intubated inhalation. The exposures were conducted to either directly vaporized SM or SM that was nebulized from an ethanol solution. Inhalation of SM by nose-only inhalation resulted in severe nasal epithelial degeneration and minimal lung injury. The reactivity of SM did not permit it to transit past the upper airways to promote lower airway injury. Intratracheal inhalation of SM vapors at a concentration of 5400 mg · min/m3 resulted in homogeneous lung injury with no nasal degeneration. PMID:20025432

  17. The immunostatus of natural killer cells in people exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Ghotbi, Ladan; Hassan, Zuhair

    2002-06-01

    Sulfur mustard (2,2-dichloroethyl sulfide, SM) has been documented as an alkylating agent. It has been widely used as a chemical weapon during the last two decades. Despite extensive worldwide research, no effective therapy has yet been devised for the treatment of patients exposed to SM. A severe suppression of the immune system still remains as the major cause of opportunistic infections, septicemia and death in such patients. The aim of this study was to determine the possible effect of SM on natural killer (NK) cells in patients suffering from SM injuries. Patients were classified into three groups: mild, moderate and severe. Blood sample obtained from each patient was examined using flowcytometric technique. Results showed that the percentage of NK cells (CD45+/CD56+) is significantly lower in severe patients than that of the control group (P<0.05). It was also observed that the activity of NK cells (CD56+/CD25+) in severe alkylating group is noticeably higher compared with the control group (P<0.1).

  18. Sulfur Mustard Research—Strategies for the Development of Improved Medical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kehe, Kai; Balszuweit, Frank; Emmler, Judith; Kreppel, Helmut; Jochum, Marianne; Thiermann, Horst

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Sulfur mustard (SM) is a bifunctional alkylating substance being used as chemical warfare agent (vesicant). It is still regarded as a significant threat in chemical warfare and terrorism. Exposure to SM produces cutaneous blisters, respiratory and gastrointestinal tract injury, eye lesions, and bone marrow depression. Victims of World War I as well as those of the Iran-Iraq war have suffered from devastating chronic health impairment. Even decades after exposure, severe long-term effects like chronic obstructive lung disease, lung fibrosis, recurrent corneal ulcer disease, chronic conjunctivitis, abnormal pigmentation of the skin, and different forms of cancer have been diagnosed. Methods: This review briefly summarizes the scientific literature and own results concerning detection, organ toxicity of SM, its proposed toxicodynamic actions, and strategies for the development of improved medical therapy. Results: Despite extensive research efforts during the last century, efficient antidotes against SM have not yet been generated because its mechanism of action is not fully understood. However, deeper insights into these mechanisms gained in the last decade and promising developments of new drugs now offer new chances to minimize SM-induced organ damage and late effects. Conclusion: Polymerase inhibitors, anti-inflammatory drugs, antioxidants, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and probably regulators of DNA damage repair are identified as promising approaches to improve treatment. PMID:18615149

  19. Inhalation exposure systems for the development of rodent models of sulfur mustard-induced pulmonary injury.

    PubMed

    Weber, Waylon M; Kracko, Dean A; Lehman, Mericka R; Irvin, Clinton M; Blair, Lee F; White, Richard K; Benson, Janet M; Grotendorst, Gary R; Cheng, Yung-Sung; McDonald, Jacob D

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical threat agent for which its effects have no current treatment. Due to the ease of synthesis and dispersal of this material, the need to develop therapeutics is evident. The present manuscript details the techniques used to develop SM laboratory exposure systems for the development of animal models of pulmonary injury. These models are critical for evaluating SM injury and developing therapeutics against that injury. Iterative trials were conducted to optimize a lung injury model. The resulting pathology was used as a guide, with a goal of effecting homogeneous and diffuse lung injury comparable to that of human injury. Inhalation exposures were conducted by either nose-only inhalation or intubated inhalation. The exposures were conducted to either directly vaporized SM or SM that was nebulized from an ethanol solution. Inhalation of SM by nose-only inhalation resulted in severe nasal epithelial degeneration and minimal lung injury. The reactivity of SM did not permit it to transit past the upper airways to promote lower airway injury. Intratracheal inhalation of SM vapors at a concentration of 5400 mg x min/m(3) resulted in homogeneous lung injury with no nasal degeneration.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of water-soluble carbon nanotubes from mustard soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Prashant; Muthukumaran, Devarajan; Dash, Subhashis; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa; Sarkar, Sabyasachi

    2005-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) has been synthesized by pyrolysing mustard oil using an oil lamp. It was made water-soluble (wsCNT) through oxidative treatment by dilute nitric acid and was characterized by SEM, AFM, XRD, Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. The synthesized wsCNT showed the presence of several junctions and defects in it. The presence of curved graphene structure (sp^{2}) with frequent sp^{3} hybridized carbon is found to be responsible for the observed defects. These defects along with the presence of di- and tri-podal junctions showed interesting magnetic properties of carbon radicals formed by spin frustration. This trapped carbon radical showed ESR signal in aqueous solution and was very stable even under drastic treatment by strong oxidizing or reducing agents. Oxidative acid treatment of CNT introduced several carboxylic acid group functionalities in wsCNT along with the nicking of the CNT at different lengths with varied molecular weight. To evaluate molecular weights of these wsCNTs, an innovative method like gel electrophoresis using high molecular weight DNA as marker was introduced.

  1. Evaluation of candidate decontaminants against percutaneous sulfur mustard and thickened soman challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.A.; Hobson, D.W.; Menton, R.G.; Olson, C.T.; Korte, D.W.

    1993-05-13

    Studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of candidate skin decontaminants relative to a standard control decontaminant, XE-555 resin, against percutaneous sulfur mustard (HD) or thickened soman (TGD) challenge. Male, New Zealand White rabbits were used as the model system with lesion area as the end point for HD exposures and erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition as the endpoint for TGD exposure. Initial studies were performed to establish assay parameters for, and to validate the use of, AChE inhibition as an endpoint for assessing candidate decontaminant efficacy against nerve agent exposures. XE-555 resin was concurrently evaluated with each candidate decontaminant for both assay control and comparative purpose. Decontamination was initiated at 1, 3, or 5 min after HD exposures and 2 min after TGD exposures. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (USAMRICD) compounds 1513, 1514, 1515, 1516, and 1517 were evaluated against HD and against TGD. Results from these studies demonstrated the utility of AChE inhibition for evaluating skin decontaminants. None of the candidate decontaminants evaluated was more effective than the standard control decontaminant against HD or TGD exposures.

  2. Imaging sulfur mustard lesions in human epidermal tissues and keratinocytes by confocal and multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert; Madren-Whalley, Janna S.

    2002-06-01

    Topical exposure to sulfur mustard (HD), a known theat agent, produces persistent and debilitating cutaneous blisters. The blisters occur at the dermal-epidermal junction following a dose-dependent latent period of 8-24 h, however, the primary lesions causing vesication remain uncertain. Immunofluorescent images reveal that a 5-min exposure to 400 (mu) M HD disrupts molecules that are also disrupted by epidermolysis bullosa-type blistering diseases of the skin. Using keratinocyte cultures and fluorochomes conjugated to two different keratin-14 (K14) antibodies (clones CKB1 and LL002), results have shown a statistically significant (p<0.1) 1-h decrease of 29.2% in expression of the CKB1 epitope, a nearly complete loss of CKB1 expression within 2 h, and progressive cytoskeletal (K14) collapse without loss in expression of the LL002 epitope. With human epidermal tissues, multi-photon images of (alpha) 6 integrin and laminin 5 showed disruptive changes in the cell-surface organization and integrity of these adhesion molecules. At 1 H postexposure, analyses showed a statistically significant (p<0.1) decrease of 27.3% in (alpha) 6 integrin emissions, and a 32% decrease in laminin 5 volume. Multi-photon imaging indicates that molecules essential for epidermal-dermal attachment are early targets in the alkylating events leading to HD-induced vesication.

  3. Skin decontamination of mustards and organophosphates: comparative efficiency of RSDL and Fuller's earth in domestic swine.

    PubMed

    Taysse, L; Daulon, S; Delamanche, S; Bellier, B; Breton, P

    2007-02-01

    Research in skin decontamination and therapy of chemical warfare agents has been a difficult problem due to the simultaneous requirement of rapid action and non-aggressive behaviour. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of two decontaminating systems: the Canadian Reactive Skin Decontaminant Lotion (RSDL) and the Fuller's Earth (FE). The experiment was conducted with domestic swine, as a good model for extrapolation to human skin. RSDL and FE were tested against sulphur mustard (SM), a powerful vesicant, and VX, a potent and persistent cholinesterase inhibitor. When used 5 min after contamination, the results clearly showed that both systems were active against SM (10.1 mg/cm(2)) and VX (0.06 mg/cm(2)). The potency of the RSDL/sponge was statistically better than FE against skin injury induced by SM, observed 3 days post-exposure. RSDL was rather more efficient than FE in reducing the formation of perinuclear vacuoles and inflammation processes in the epidermis and dermis. Against a severe inhibition (67%) of plasmatic cholinesterases induced by VX poisoning, the potencies of the RSDL/sponge and FE were similar. Both systems completely prevented cholinesterase inhibition, which indirectly indicates a prevention of toxic absorption through the skin.

  4. Enhanced Accumulation of Copper and Lead in Amaranth (Amaranthus paniculatus), Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea) and Sunflower (Helianthus annuus)

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Motior M.; Azirun, Sofian M.; Boyce, Amru N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Soil contamination by copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) is a widespread environmental problem. For phytoextraction to be successful and viable in environmental remediation, strategies that can improve plant uptake must be identified. In the present study we investigated the use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer as an efficient way to enhance accumulation of Cu and Pb from contaminated industrial soils into amaranth, Indian mustard and sunflower. Methods/Principal Findings Plants were grown in a greenhouse and fertilized with N fertilizer at rates of 0, 190 and 380 mg kg−1 soil. Shoots, roots and total accumulation of Cu and Pb, transfer factor (TF), translocation index were assessed to evaluate the transport and translocation ability of tested plants. Addition of N fertilizer acidified the industrial soil and caused the pH to decrease to 5.5 from an initial pH of 6.9. Industrial soil amended with N fertilizer resulted in the highest accumulation of Pb and Cu (for Pb 10.1–15.5 mg kg−1, for Cu 11.6–16.8 mg kg−1) in the shoots, which was two to four folds higher relative to the concentration in roots in all the three plants used. Sunflower removed significantly higher Pb (50–54%) and Cu (34–38%) followed by amaranth and Indian mustard from industrial soils with the application of N fertilizer. The TF was <1 while the shoot and root concentration (SC/RC) ratios of Pb and Cu were between 1.3–4.3 and 1.8–3.8, respectively, regardless of plant species. Conclusions Sunflower is the best plant species to carry out phytoextraction of Pb and Cu. In contrast, Pb and Cu removal by Indian mustard and amaranth shows great potential as quick and short duration vegetable crops. The results suggest that the application of N fertilizer in contaminated industrial soil is an effective amendment for the phytoextraction of Pb and Cu from contaminated industrial soils. PMID:23667546

  5. Estimated Chemical Warfare Agent Surface Clearance Goals for Remediation Pre-Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Dolislager, Frederick; Bansleben, Dr. Donald; Watson, Annetta Paule

    2010-01-01

    Health-based surface clearance goals, in units of mg/cm2, have been developed for the persistent chemical warfare agents sulfur mustard (HD) and nerve agent VX as well as their principal degradation products. Selection of model parameters and critical receptor (toddler child) allow calculation of surface residue estimates protective for the toddler child, the general population and adult employees of a facilty that has undergone chemical warfare agent attack.

  6. Synthesis of spiro[isobenzofuran-1(3H),4'-piperidines] as potential central nervous system agents. 2. Compounds containing a heteroatom attached to nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Klioze, S S; Bauer, V J; Geyer, H M

    1977-04-01

    The synthesis and antitetrabenazine activity of a series of N-heteroatom derivatives of 3-phenylspiro[isobenzofuran-1,4'-piperidines] are reported. Optimal antitetrabenazine activity is associated with compounds containing a sterically unhindered, basic nitrogen. Hydroxylamines 6, 11, 12, and 13 possess the most significant activity with ED50's of 1.4, 3.5, 4.7, and 4.0, respectively.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Sulfur Mustard Vesicant-Induced Cell Death: Early and Late Cell Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    Mechanisms of Sulfur Mustard Vesicant-Induced Cell Death : Early and late cell responses 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...It possess mutagenic, carcinogenic, cytotoxic, vesicating effects, and results in cell death . However, the biomedical mechanism of cell death induced... cell death via apoptosis: • In early stage, It induces JNK activity and then triggers apoptosis pathway. • In late stage, sulphur mustard attacks the

  8. Effects of phosphoramide mustard and acrolein, cytotoxic metabolites of cyclophosphamide, on mouse limb development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hales, B F

    1989-07-01

    Phosphoramide mustard and acrolein are toxic and reactive metabolites of the widely used anticancer drug and known teratogen cyclophosphamide. To study the mechanism(s) involved and to determine which of the active metabolites of cyclophosphamide is responsible for the production of limb malformations, the effects of exposure of cultured limb buds to phosphoramide mustard and acrolein were investigated. Fore- and hindlimbs were excised from ICR mice on day 12 of gestation and cultured in roller bottles for 6 days. Limbs were exposed to either phosphoramide mustard or acrolein (10 or 50 micrograms/ml) for the first 20 hours of the culture period. Exposure to phosphoramide mustard produced limb reduction malformations in both the fore- and hindlimbs; total limb bone area was greatly reduced, while the relative contribution of the paw to this area in forelimbs was increased. There was a fourfold reduction in both DNA and RNA; protein content was reduced only by one-half. Alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly decreased in fore- and hindlimbs exposed to phosphoramide mustard, whereas creatine phosphokinase activity was only reduced in hindlimbs in the limbs exposed to the higher concentration of phosphoramide mustard. Exposure to acrolein also produced malformed limbs with a mangled appearance; however, total limb bone area and the relative contribution of the long bones versus paw structures were not altered. Acrolein exposure had little effect on growth parameters such as DNA (decreased only in hindlimbs exposed to 50 micrograms/ml), RNA (increased in hindlimbs exposed to 50 micrograms/ml), or protein content. Alkaline phosphatase and creatine phosphokinase activities were not altered in acrolein-exposed fore- or hindlimbs. Thus, phosphoramide mustard and acrolein have dramatically different effects on developing limbs in vitro; this observation may indicate that they have different targets and/or mechanisms of action as teratogens in the limb. The effects

  9. Mustard gas exposure in Iran–Iraq war – A scientometric study

    PubMed Central

    Nokhodian, Zary; ZareFarashbandi, Firoozeh; Shoaei, Parisa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Iranian victims of sulfur mustard attack are now more than 20 years post-exposure and form a valuable cohort for studying the chronic effects of an exposure to sulfur mustard. Articles on sulfur mustard exposure in Iran–Iraq war were reviewed using three known international databases such as Scopus, Medline, and ISI. The objectives of the study were measurement of the author-wise distribution, year-wise distribution, subject area wise, and assessment of highly cited articles. Materials and Methods: We searched three known international databases, Scopus, Medline, and the international statistical institute (ISI), for articles related to mustard gas exposure in Iran–Iraq war, published between 1988 and 2012. The results were analyzed using scientometric methods. Results: During the 24 years under examination, about 90 papers were published in the field of mustard gas in Iran–Iraq war. Original article was the most used document type forming 51.4% of all the publications. The number of articles devoted to mustard gas and Iran–Iraq war research increased more than 10-fold, from 1 in 1988 to 11 in 2011. Most of the published articles (45.7%) included clinical and paraclinical investigations of sulfur mustard in Iranian victims. The most highly productive author was Ghanei who occupied the first rank in the number of publications with 20 papers. The affiliation of most of the researchers was Baqiyatallah Medical Sciences University (research center of chemical injuries and dermatology department) in Iran. Conclusion: This article has highlighted the quantitative share of Iran in articles on sulfur mustard and lays the groundwork for further research on various aspects of related problems. PMID:26430683

  10. Salivary levels of secretary IgA, C5a and alpha 1-antitrypsin in sulfur mustard exposed patients 20 years after the exposure, Sardasht-Iran Cohort Study (SICS).

    PubMed

    Yarmohammadi, Mohammad Ebrahim; Hassan, Zuhair Mohammad; Mostafaie, Ali; Ebtekar, Massoumeh; Yaraee, Roya; Pourfarzam, Shahryar; Jalali-Nadoushan, Mohammadreza; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat; Vaez-Mahdavi, Mohammad-Reza; Soroush, Mohammad-Reza; Khamesipour, Ali; Faghihzadeh, Elham; Sharifnia, Zarin; Naghizadeh, Mohammad-Mehdi; Ghazanfari, Tooba

    2013-11-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a strong toxic agent that causes acute and chronic health effects on a myriad of organs following exposure. Although the primary targets of inhaled mustard gas are the epithelia of the upper respiratory tract, the lower respiratory tract is the focus of the current study, and upper tract complications remain obscure. To our knowledge there is no study addressing the secretory IgA (S-IgA), C5a, alpha 1 antitrypsin (A1AT) in the saliva of SM-exposed victims. In this study, as many as 500 volunteers, including 372 SM-exposed cases and 128 control volunteers were recruited. A 3 ml sample of saliva was collected from each volunteer, and the level of secretory IgA, C5a, and alpha 1 antitrypsin in the samples were compared between the two groups. The SM-exposed group showed a significantly higher amount of salivary alpha 1 antitrypsin and secretary IgA compared to the control group (p<.006 and p<.018 respectively). The two groups showed no significant difference (p=0.192) in the level of C5a. The results also showed that the level of salivary A1AT is more than that of IgA in severely injured cases. The findings presented here provide valuable insight for both researchers and practitioners dealing with victims of the chemical warfare agent, sulfur mustard. This research indicates that certain branches of the inflammatory processes mandate serious attention in therapeutic interventions.

  11. Delayed neurological complications of sulphur mustard and tabun poisoning in 43 Iranian veterans.

    PubMed

    Darchini-Maragheh, Emadodin; Nemati-Karimooy, Habibollah; Hasanabadi, Hosein; Balali-Mood, Mahdi

    2012-12-01

    Delayed neurotoxic complications of chemical warfare agents (CWA), such as sulphur mustard (SM) and tabun, in human beings have not been reported in detail. We thus aimed to investigate possible neurotoxic complications of these agents in Iranian veterans 22-27 years after exposure. After co-ordination with the veteran foundation and obtaining the approval of the medical research ethics committee, 43 Iranian veterans with late complications of CWA exposure during the Iran-Iraq conflict were studied after obtaining signed written informed consent. Demographic and clinical findings were recorded on pre-designed forms. Neurological examination was performed by a neurologist. Routine biochemical tests were performed for all the patients. Electromyography (EMG), nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and electroencephalography (EEG) were carried out as clinically indicated. The majority of the patients (38) had been exposed to SM and only five patients to tabun. Hyperaesthesia was the most objective finding (72.1%). Fatigue (93%), paraesthesia (88.3%) and headache (83.7%) were the most common subjective findings in the patients. Sensory nerve impairments, including paraesthesia (88.3%), hyperaesthesia (72.1%) and hypoesthesia (11.6%), were the most common observed clinical complications. EMG and NCV were impaired in seven patients (16.3%) who were all SM-exposed patients but did not show any significant correlation with organ complications. EEG was negative even in the seized patients. Cholesterol, LDL and triglyceride levels were significantly above the normal ranges. Late neurological complications of CWA, particularly SM poisoning, are considerable even after three decades of exposure and require medical attention.

  12. An evidence-based review of the genotoxic and reproductive effects of sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlullah; Niaz, Kamal; Ismail Hassan, Fatima; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent which is cytotoxic in nature, and at the molecular level, SM acts as DNA alkylating agent leading to genotoxic and reproductive effects. Mostly, the exposed areas of the body are the main targets for SM; however, it also adversely affects various tissues of the body and ultimately exhibits long-term complications including genotoxic and reproductive effects, even in the next generations. The effect of SM on reproductive system is the reason behind male infertility. The chronic genotoxic and reproductive complications of SM have been observed in the next generation, such as reproductive hormones disturbances, testicular atrophy, deficiency of sperm cells, retarded growth of sperm and male infertility. SM exerts toxic effects through various mechanisms causing reproductive dysfunction. The key mechanisms include DNA alkylation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) depletion. However, the exact molecular mechanism of such long-term effects of SM is still unclear. In general, DNA damage, cell death and defects in the cell membrane are frequently observed in SM-exposed individuals. SM can activate various cellular and molecular mechanisms related to oxidative stress (OS) and inflammatory responses throughout the reproductive system, which can cause decreased spermatogenesis and impaired sperm quality via damage to tissue function and structure. Moreover, the toxic effects of SM on the reproductive system as well as the occurrence of male infertility among exposed war troopers in the late exposure phase is still uncertain. The chronic effects of SM exposure in parents can cause congenital defects in their children. In this review, we aimed to investigate chronic genotoxic and reproductive effects of SM and their molecular mechanisms in the next generations.

  13. Advanced treatment technique for swine wastewater using two agents: Thermally polymerized amorphous silica and hydrated lime for color and phosphorus removal and sulfur for nitrogen removal.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Teruaki; Kurose, Yohei; Tanaka, Yasuo

    2017-04-12

    The efficacy of advanced treatment of swine wastewater using thermally polymerized, modified amorphous silica and hydrated lime (M-CSH-lime) for color and phosphorus removal and sulfur for nitrogen removal was examined with a demonstration-scale treatment plant. The color removal rate was approximately 78% at M-CSH-lime addition rates of > 0.055 wt/v%. The PO43--P removal rate exceeded 99.9% with > 0.023 wt/v%. pH of the effluent from the M-CSH-lime reactor increased with the addition rate till a maximum value of 12.7, which was effective in disinfection. The recovered M-CSH-lime would be suitable as a phosphorus fertilizer because the total P2 O5 content was approximately 10%. The nitrogen oxide (NOx-N) removal rate by sulfur denitrification increased to approximately 80% when the NOx-N loading rate was around 0.1 kg-N/ton-S/day. It was suggested that the combination of the two processes would be effective in the advanced treatment of swine wastewater.

  14. Nitrogen and sulphur relations in effecting yield and quality of cereals and oilseed crops.

    PubMed

    Nad, B K; Purakayastha, T J; Singh, D V

    2001-12-11

    Nitrogen and sulphur, both vital structural elements, are especially needed for the synthesis of proteins and oils. Investigations revealed the required application of sulphur is one half to one third the amount of nitrogen, and the ratio becomes narrower in mustard (Brassica juncea L.), followed by wheat and rice. The efficiency of an increased level of nitrogen required a proportionately higher amount of sulphur. A critical investigation on the effective utilization of applied vis-à-vis absorbed nitrogen in wheat and mustard envisaged accumulation of NO3-N in vegetative parts when sulphur remained proportionately low. Application of sulphur hastened the chemical reduction of absorbed NO3- for its effective utilization. The effect was more pronounced in mustard than in wheat. Easily available forms of sulphur, like ammonium sulphate and gypsum, as compared to pyrite or elemental sulphur, maintained adequate N to S ratio in rice, resulting in a reduction in the percent of unfilled grain, a major consideration in rice yield. A narrow N to S ratio, with both at higher levels, increased the oil content but raised the saponification value of the oil, a measure of free fatty acids. Whereas, a proportionately narrow N to S ratio at moderate dose resulted in adequately higher seed and oil yield with relatively low saponification value, associated with increased iodine value of the oil, indicating respectively low free fatty acids and higher proportion of unsaturated fatty acids, an index for better quality of the oil.

  15. Potassium Ferrate: A Novel Chemical Warfare Agent Decontaminant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-16

    soda . The specific reaction stoichiometry will depend on the type of CWA involved, other oxidizable materials present, etc. In use, excess ferrate...2,2-dichloroethyl ether, Sarin, Soman, mustard and V-nerve agents. The reaction times were as good as or better than commonly accepted...oxidation and hydrolysis reaction (unbalanced) involved in general terms is as follows (written for the CWA Sarin reaction with ferrate), FeO4= + (CH3

  16. Comparison of fixation and processing methods for hairless guinea pig skin following sulfur mustard exposure. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, M.A.; Braue Jr, E.H.

    1992-12-31

    Ten anesthetized hairless guinea pigs Crl:IAF(HA)BR were exposed to 10 pi of neat sulfur mustard (HD) in a vapor cup on their skin for 7 min. At 24 h postexposure, the guinea pigs were euthanatized and skin sections taken for histologic evaluation. The skin was fixed using either 10% neutral buffered formalin (NBF), McDowell Trump fixative (4CF-IG), Zenker`s formol-saline (Helly`s fluid), or Zenker`s fluid. Fixed skin sections were cut in half: one half was embedded in paraffin and the other half in plastic (glycol methacrylate). Paraffin-embedded tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin; plastic-embedded tissue was stained with Lee`s methylene blue basic fuchsin. Skin was also frozen unfixed, sectioned by cryostat, and stained with pinacyanole. HD-exposed skin was evaluated histologically for the presence of epidermal and follicular necrosis, microblister formation, epidermitis, and intracellular edema to determine the optimal fixation and embedding method for lesion preservation. The percentage of histologic sections with lesions varied little between fixatives and was similar for both paraffin and plastic embedding material. Plastic-embedded sections were thinner, allowing better histologic evaluation, but were more difficult to stain. Plastic embedding material did not infiltrate tissue fixed in Zenker`s fluid or Zenker`s formol-saline. Frozen tissue sections were prepared in the least processing time and lesion preservation was comparable to fixed tissue. It was concluded that standard histologic processing using formalin fixation and paraffin embedding is adequate for routine histopathological evaluation of HD skin lesions in the hairless guinea pig.... Sulfur mustard, Vesicating agents, Pathology, Hairless guinea pig model, Fixation.

  17. Pretreatment of isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with l-oxothiazolidine 4-carboxylate reduces sulfur mustard cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, C.L.; Smith, W.J.

    1993-05-13

    Despite 70 years of research, there appears to be no satisfactory prophylaxis or treatment for the vesicant chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (HD). Attempts to modify cytotoxicity of HD are now focusing on the use of intracellular 'scavengers' to interact with sulfur mustard before it can react with critical targets within the cell. Glutathione (GSH) is known to react readily with HD and is involved in the major metabolic pathway to HD detoxification. Glutathione level within the cell was raised 40-60% over control values by pretreatment of quiescent human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) with 10 mM L-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate (OTC), a masked cysteine precursor. This increase in glutathione level was not toxic to the cells as judged by trypan blue dye exclusion and reached a maximum level in 48 hrs. PBL pretreated with 10 mM OTC for 48 hrs were harvested, washed, and exposed to 10, 50, or 100 uM HD. After an additional 48 hrs of incubation at 37 deg C, cytotoxicity was measured by propidium iodide dye uptake using flow cytometry. Pretreatment with OTC led to a 20% decrease in cytotoxicity with 10 uM HD, an 11% decrease in cytotoxicity with 50 uM HD, and an 8% decrease in cytotoxicity with 100 uM HD. Cytotoxicity of HD was not influenced by addition of 10 mM OTC 2 hrs after HD exposure. These results suggest that biochemical manipulation of intracellular GSH level may provide an important pretreatment regimen to reduce the cytotoxicity of HD.

  18. Small molecule signaling agents: the integrated chemistry and biochemistry of nitrogen oxides, oxides of carbon, dioxygen, hydrogen sulfide, and their derived species.

    PubMed

    Fukuto, Jon M; Carrington, Samantha J; Tantillo, Dean J; Harrison, Jason G; Ignarro, Louis J; Freeman, Bruce A; Chen, Andrew; Wink, David A

    2012-04-16

    Several small molecule species formally known primarily as toxic gases have, over the past 20 years, been shown to be endogenously generated signaling molecules. The biological signaling associated with the small molecules NO, CO, H₂S (and the nonendogenously generated O₂), and their derived species have become a topic of extreme interest. It has become increasingly clear that these small molecule signaling agents form an integrated signaling web that affects/regulates numerous physiological processes. The chemical interactions between these species and each other or biological targets is an important factor in their roles as signaling agents. Thus, a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of these molecules is essential to understanding their biological/physiological utility. This review focuses on this chemistry and attempts to establish the chemical basis for their signaling functions.

  19. Affinity labelling and identification of the high-affinity choline carrier from synaptic membranes of Torpedo electromotor nerve terminals with [3H]choline mustard.

    PubMed

    Rylett, R J

    1988-12-01

    The physiological mechanisms regulating activity of the sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline transporter and the molecular events in the translocation process remain unclear; the protein has not been purified or characterized biochemically. In the present study, [3H]choline mustard aziridinium ion [( 3H]ChM Az), a nitrogen mustard analogue of choline, bound irreversibly to presynaptic plasma membranes from Torpedo electric organ in a hemicholinium-sensitive, and sodium-, time-, and temperature-dependent manner. Specific binding of this ligand was greatest when it was incubated with membranes in the presence of sodium at 30 degrees C. Separation of the 3H-labelled membrane proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that most of the radiolabel was associated with a polypeptide of apparent molecular mass of approximately 42,000 daltons; labelling of this species was abolished in membranes incubated with ligand in the presence of HC-3. Two other 3H-labelled polypeptides were detected, with apparent molecular masses of approximately 58,000 and 90,000 daltons; radiolabelling of the former was also HC-3 sensitive. [3H]ChM Az may be a useful affinity ligand in the purification of the choline carrier from cholinergic neurons.

  20. Ultraviolet Raman scattering from persistent chemical warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullander, Fredrik; Wästerby, Pär.; Landström, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Laser induced Raman scattering at excitation wavelengths in the middle ultraviolet was examined using a pulsed tunable laser based spectrometer system. Droplets of chemical warfare agents, with a volume of 2 μl, were placed on a silicon surface and irradiated with sequences of laser pulses. The Raman scattering from V-series nerve agents, Tabun (GA) and Mustard gas (HD) was studied with the aim of finding the optimum parameters and the requirements for a detection system. A particular emphasis was put on V-agents that have been previously shown to yield relatively weak Raman scattering in this excitation band.

  1. IMS software developments for the detection of chemical warfare agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klepel, ST.; Graefenhain, U.; Lippe, R.; Stach, J.; Starrock, V.

    1995-01-01

    Interference compounds like gasoline, diesel, burning wood or fuel, etc. are presented in common battlefield situations. These compounds can cause detectors to respond as a false positive or interfere with the detector's ability to respond to target compounds such as chemical warfare agents. To ensure proper response of the ion mobility spectrometer to chemical warfare agents, two special software packages were developed and incorporated into the Bruker RAID-1. The programs suppress interferring signals caused by car exhaust or smoke gases resulting from burning materials and correct the influence of variable sample gas humidity which is important for detection and quantification of blister agents like mustard gas or lewisite.

  2. Quantitative infrared spectra of vapor phase chemical agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, Pamela M.; Kleimeyer, James; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White cell of 5.6 m optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer's law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at the Dugway Proving Ground (DPG).

  3. Reactions of DNA bases with the anti-cancer nitrogen mustard mechlorethamine: A quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, P. K.; Mishra, P. C.; Suhai, S.

    2007-12-01

    Reactions of the aziridinium ion of mechlorethamine (AZ+1) at the N7, N3 and O6 sites of guanine, N7, N3 and N1 sites of adenine, O2 and N3 sites of cytosine, and O2 and O4 sites of thymine were studied using density functional theory (B3LYP) and the MP2 method in gas phase and aqueous media. The calculations explain the mechanism of alkylation of the DNA bases and show that the reactions of the AZ+1 ion would be most likely to occur at the N7 site of guanine and the N3 site of adenine while it would be much less likely to occur at the carbonyl oxygen sites of the DNA bases.

  4. Measurement of Nitrogen Mustard Degredation Products by Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Microchip Electrophoresis with Contactless Conductivity Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential risk of human exposure from an accidental or intentional release of CWAs into a civilian population continues to drive the need for screening and monitoring techniques for these compounds. In particular, rapid and reliable methods for detecting CWAs such as the nitr...

  5. Stress Protein Synthesis in Human Keratinocytes Treated with Sodium Arsenite, Phenyldichloroarsine, and Nitrogen Mustard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    increased way analysis of variance. If a significant difference oc- almost 3-fold. At 250 AM, sodium arsenite curred , then Dunnett’s t test was used...considerable cell loss oc- 50 jAM. curred at the higher concentrations of each compound and no formazan reaction prod- DISCUSSION uct was detectable. It is

  6. Rapid screening of N-oxides of chemical warfare agents degradation products by ESI-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, L; Karthikraj, R; Lakshmi, V V S; Raju, N Prasada; Prabhakar, S

    2014-08-01

    Rapid detection and identification of chemical warfare agents and related precursors/degradation products in various environmental matrices is of paramount importance for verification of standards set by the chemical weapons convention (CWC). Nitrogen mustards, N,N-dialkylaminoethyl-2-chlorides, N,N-dialkylaminoethanols, N-alkyldiethanolamines, and triethanolamine, which are listed CWC scheduled chemicals, are prone to undergo N-oxidation in environmental matrices or during decontamination process. Thus, screening of the oxidized products of these compounds is also an important task in the verification process because the presence of these products reveals alleged use of nitrogen mustards or precursors of VX compounds. The N-oxides of aminoethanols and aminoethylchlorides easily produce [M + H](+) ions under electrospray ionization conditions, and their collision-induced dissociation spectra include a specific neutral loss of 48 u (OH + CH2OH) and 66 u (OH + CH2Cl), respectively. Based on this specific fragmentation, a rapid screening method was developed for screening of the N-oxides by applying neutral loss scan technique. The method was validated and the applicability of the method was demonstrated by analyzing positive and negative samples. The method was useful in the detection of N-oxides of aminoethanols and aminoethylchlorides in environmental matrices at trace levels (LOD, up to 500 ppb), even in the presence of complex masking agents, without the use of time-consuming sample preparation methods and chromatographic steps. This method is advantageous for the off-site verification program and also for participation in official proficiency tests conducted by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the Netherlands. The structure of N-oxides can be confirmed by the MS/MS experiments on the detected peaks. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method was developed for the separation of isomeric N-oxides of aminoethanols and

  7. Synergism of activated carbon and undoped and nitrogen-doped TiO2 in the photocatalytic degradation of the chemical warfare agents soman, VX, and yperite.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Bogdan; Neaţu, Stefan; Pârvulescu, Vasile I; Somoghi, Vasile; Petrea, Nicoleta; Epure, Gabriel; Alvaro, Mercedes; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2009-01-01

    Efficient photocatalytic decomposition of chemical warfare agents is a process that may find application in emergency situations or for the controlled destruction of chemical warfare stockpiles. A series of heterogeneous photocatalysts comprising TiO2-activated carbon or N-TiO2-activated carbon composites exhibit excellent photocatalytic activity to effect the complete decomposition of yperite, soman, and VX in high concentrations. The remarkable photocatalytic activity arises from the synergism between adsorption on active carbon and photoactivity by titania. Nitridation makes the composite also active under visible-light irradiation.

  8. Mechanistic study of IR-780 dye as a potential tumor targeting and drug delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Erlong; Luo, Shenglin; Tan, Xu; Shi, Chunmeng

    2014-01-01

    IR-780 iodide, a near-infrared fluorescent heptamethine dye, has been recently characterized to exhibit preferential accumulation property in the mitochondria of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the possible mechanisms for its tumor selective activity and its potential as a drug delivery carrier. Results showed that the energy-dependent uptake of IR-780 iodide into the mitochondria of tumor cells was affected by glycolysis and plasma membrane potential. Moreover, OATP1B3 subtype of organic anion transporter peptides (OATPs) may play a dominant role in the transportation of IR-780 iodide into tumor cells, while cellular endocytosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and the ATP-binding cassette transporters did not show significant influence to its accumulation. We further evaluated the potential of IR-780 iodide as a drug delivery carrier by covalent conjugation of IR-780 with nitrogen mustard (IR-780NM). In vivo imaging showed that IR-780NM remained the tumor targeting property, indicating that IR-780 iodide could be potentially applied as a drug delivery agent for cancer targeted imaging and therapy.

  9. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine inhibits sulfur mustard-induced and TRPA1-dependent calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Stenger, Bernhard; Popp, Tanja; John, Harald; Siegert, Markus; Tsoutsoulopoulos, Amelie; Schmidt, Annette; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2016-10-13

    Transient receptor potential family channels (TRPs) have been identified as relevant targets in many pharmacological as well as toxicological studies. TRP channels are ubiquitously expressed in different tissues and act among others as sensors for different external stimuli, such as mechanical stress or noxious impacts. Recent studies suggest that one member of this family, the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 cation channel (TRPA1), is involved in pain, itch, and various diseases, suggesting TRPA1 as a potential therapeutic target. As a nociceptor, TRPA1 is mainly activated by noxious or electrophilic compounds, including alkylating substances. Previous studies already revealed an impact of 2-chloroethyl-ethyl sulfide on the ion channel TRPA1. In this study, we demonstrate that sulfur mustard (bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM) activates the human TRPA1 (hTRPA1) in a dose-dependent manner measured by the increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Besides that, SM-induced toxicity was attenuated by antioxidants. However, very little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) prevents SM-induced hTRPA1-activation. HEK293-A1-E cells, overexpressing hTRPA1, show a distinct increase in [Ca(2+)]i immediately after SM exposure, whereas this increase is reduced in cells pretreated with NAC in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, glutathione, although being highly related to NAC, did not show an effect on hTRPA1 channel activity. Taken together, our results provide evidence that SM-dependent activation of hTRPA1 can be diminished by NAC treatment, suggesting a direct interaction of NAC and the hTRPA1 cation channel. Our previous studies already showed a correlation of hTRPA1-activation with cell damage after exposure to alkylating agents. Therefore, NAC might be a feasible approach mitigating hTRPA1-related dysregulations after exposure to SM.

  10. Evaluation of wound-healing formulation against sulphur mustard-induced skin injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Lomash, V; Jadhav, S E; Ahmed, F; Vijayaraghavan, R; Pant, S C

    2012-06-01

    Sulphur mustard (SM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes cutaneous blisters in human and animals. Remedies to SM-induced dermatotoxicity are still in experimental stage. Due to inevitable requirement of a wound-healing formulation against SM-induced skin lesions, efficacy of formulations including povidone iodine, Aloe vera gel, betaine or framycetin sulphate was evaluated in present study. SM was applied percutaneously (5 mg/kg) once on back region of Swiss albino mice; and after 24 hours, DRDE/WH-02 (Defence Research and Development Establishment/ Wound Healant- 02, containing polyvinylpyrrolidone [PVP], A. vera gel and betaine), Ovadine, Soframycin or A. vera gel were applied topically, daily for 3 or 7 days in different groups. Skin sections were subjected to histopathology, histomorphologic grading, tissue leukocytosis, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay and immunohistochemistry of inflammatory-reparative biomarkers. DRDE/WH-02 treated mice received highest score on the basis of histomorphologic scale and lowest number of TUNEL-positive cells compared to other groups. DRDE/WH-02 showed better wound healing as evidenced by widespread re-epithelialization, homogenous fibroplasias well supported by the expression of transforming growth factor-α, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and fibroblast growth factor. Upregulation of interleukin 6 in DRDE/WH-02-treated mice skin resulted in increased tissue leukocytosis and an early removal of tissue debris that initiated reparative process at faster rate compared to other groups. In conclusion, DRDE/WH-02 provided better healing effect and can be recommended as an effective wound healant against SM-induced skin injury.

  11. Medical documentation, bioanalytical evidence of an accidental human exposure to sulfur mustard and general therapy recommendations.

    PubMed

    Steinritz, Dirk; Striepling, Enno; Rudolf, Klaus-Dieter; Schröder-Kraft, Claudia; Püschel, Klaus; Hullard-Pulstinger, Andreas; Koller, Marianne; Thiermann, Horst; Gandor, Felix; Gawlik, Michael; John, Harald

    2016-02-26

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent (CWA) that was first used in World War I and in several military conflicts afterwards. The threat by SM is still present even today due to remaining stockpiles, old and abandoned remainders all over the world as well as to its ease of synthesis. CWA are banned by the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) interdicting their development, production, transport, stockpiling and use and are subjected to controlled destruction. The present case report describes an accidental exposure of three workers that occurred during the destruction of SM. All exposed workers presented a characteristic SM-related clinical picture that started about 4h after exposure with erythema and feeling of tension of the skin at the upper part of the body. Later on, superficial blister and a burning phenomenon of the affected skin areas developed. Similar symptoms occurred in all three patients differing severity. One patient presented sustained skin affections at the gluteal region while another patient came up with affections of the axilla and genital region. Fortunately, full recovery was observed on day 56 after exposure except some little pigmentation changes that were evident even on day 154 in two of the patients. SM-exposure was verified for all three patients using bioanalytical GC MS and LC MS/MS based methods applied to urine and plasma. Urinary biotransformation products of the β-lyase pathway were detected until 5 days after poisoning whereas albumin-SM adducts could be found until day 29 underlining the beneficial role of adduct detection for post-exposure verification. In addition, we provide general recommendations for management and therapy in case of SM poisoning.

  12. Pretreatment of human epidermal keratinocytes in vitro with ethacrynic Acid reduces sulfur mustard cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gross, Clark L; Nipwoda, Mary T; Nealley, Eric W; Smith, William J

    2004-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent, profoundly cytotoxic, and a powerful vesicant. SM reacts quite extensively with glutathione (GSH) and forms GSH conjugates, which are presumably excreted through the mercapturic acid pathway in mammals. It is unknown whether any enzymes, such as the glutathione-S-transferases (GST), are involved in this detoxification of SM by the formation of conjugates. A prototypic inhibitor (ethacrynic acid, EAA) and a prototypic inducer (Oltipraz, OLT) of GSH-S-transferase, have been used as pretreatment compounds in human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) to investigate the effect of enzyme levels on cytotoxicity following SM challenge from 50 muM to 300 muM. Pretreatment of HEK for 24 h with EAA doubled survival against 200 muM SM (36% viability in non-pretreated cells vs. 81% in EAA-pretreated cells) and quadrupled survival (17% viability in non-pretreated controls vs. 71% in EAA-pretreated cells), while OLT pretreatment had no effect on cytotoxicity at either SM dose. The role of GST in SM cytotoxicity could not be tested because of the lack of an effect on modulation of GST activities by these 2 drugs. Cellular levels of GSH were increased 250-300% over control values using EAA pretreatment, while OLT pretreatment did not lead to any increase in GSH. Pretreatment of HEK with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a known depleter of glutathione levels, reduced glutathione levels and increased cytotoxicity. This large increase in GSH appears to be solely responsible for the enhanced survivability of EAA-pretreated HEK.

  13. Involvement of a volatile metabolite during phosphoramide mustard-induced ovotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Jill A.; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Devine, Patrick J.; Keating, Aileen F.

    2014-05-15

    The finite ovarian follicle reserve can be negatively impacted by exposure to chemicals including the anti-neoplastic agent, cyclophosphamide (CPA). CPA requires bioactivation to phosphoramide mustard (PM) to elicit its therapeutic effects however; in addition to being the tumor-targeting metabolite, PM is also ovotoxic. In addition, PM can break down to a cytotoxic, volatile metabolite, chloroethylaziridine (CEZ). The aim of this study was initially to characterize PM-induced ovotoxicity in growing follicles. Using PND4 Fisher 344 rats, ovaries were cultured for 4 days before being exposed once to PM (10 or 30 μM). Following eight additional days in culture, relative to control (1% DMSO), PM had no impact on primordial, small primary or large primary follicle number, but both PM concentrations induced secondary follicle depletion (P < 0.05). Interestingly, a reduction in follicle number in the control-treated ovaries was observed. Thus, the involvement of a volatile, cytotoxic PM metabolite (VC) in PM-induced ovotoxicity was explored in cultured rat ovaries, with control ovaries physically separated from PM-treated ovaries during culture. Direct PM (60 μM) exposure destroyed all stage follicles after 4 days (P < 0.05). VC from nearby wells depleted primordial follicles after 4 days (P < 0.05), temporarily reduced secondary follicle number after 2 days, and did not impact other stage follicles at any other time point. VC was determined to spontaneously liberate from PM, which could contribute to degradation of PM during storage. Taken together, this study demonstrates that PM and VC are ovotoxicants, with different follicular targets, and that the VC may be a major player during PM-induced ovotoxicity observed in cancer survivors. - Highlights: • PM depletes all stage ovarian follicles in a temporal pattern. • A volatile ovotoxic compound is liberated from PM. • The volatile metabolite depletes primordial follicles.

  14. Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) Glucosinolate Content Varies Across a Natural Light Gradient.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lauren M

    2015-05-01

    Garlic mustard is a well-known invader of deciduous forests of North America, yet the influence of environmental factors on garlic mustard allelochemical production is not well understood. Three experiments were conducted to detect interactions between one garlic mustard allelochemical (glucosinolate) production and light availability. First, to detect patterns of glucosinolate production across a natural light gradient, leaves and roots of mature plants and first-year rosettes were sampled in patches ranging from 100 to 2 % of full sun within an Indiana forest. Second, to determine whether genetic variation drives observed correlations between glucosinolate content and light, seed collected across light gradients within six sites was grown in a common garden and glucosinolate production was measured. Finally, to understand whether local adaptation occurred in garlic mustard's response to light, seed collected from defined light environments across six sites was grown under four light treatments. Results of the field sampling showed that mature plants' root glucosinolate content was elevated in high compared to low light. In the common garden experiment, however, there was no correlation between light availability at seed origin and constitutive glucosinolate content. Additionally, in the common light treatments, there was no evidence for local adaptation to light environment. Overall, the results indicate that plasticity in response to light, not genetic variation among plants growing in different light environments, generates correlations between glucosinolate content and light in the field. Since mature garlic mustard populations in high light may exhibit increased glucosinolate content, it makes them potential targets for management.

  15. Characterization of Lung Fibroblasts More than Two Decades after Mustard Gas Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pirzad Jahromi, Gila; Ghanei, Mostafa; Hosseini, Seyed Kazem; Shamsaei, Alireza; Gholipourmalekabadi, Mazaher; Koochaki, Ameneh; Karkuki Osguei, Nushin; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In patients with short-term exposure to the sulfur mustard gas, the delayed cellular effects on lungs have not been well understood yet. The lung pathology shows a dominant feature consistent with obliterative bronchiolitis, in which fibroblasts play a central role. This study aims to characterize alterations to lung fibroblasts, at the cellular level, in patients with delayed respiratory complications after short-term exposure to the sulfur mustard gas. Methods Fibroblasts were isolated from the transbronchial biopsies of patients with documented history of exposure to single high-dose sulfur mustard during 1985–7 and compared with the fibroblasts of control subjects. Results Compared with controls, patients’ fibroblasts were thinner and shorter, and showed a higher population doubling level, migration capacity and number of filopodia. Sulfur mustard decreased the in vitro viability of fibroblasts and increased their sensitivity to induction of apoptosis, but did not change the rate of spontaneous apoptosis. In addition, higher expression of alpha smooth muscle actin showed that the lung's microenvironment in these patients is permissive for myofibroblastic differentiation. Conclusions These findings suggest that in patients under the study, the delayed pulmonary complications of sulfur mustard should be considered as a unique pathology, which might need a specific management by manipulation of cellular components. PMID:26679937

  16. Possible protein phosphatase inhibition by bis(hydroxyethyl) sulfide, a hydrolysis product of mustard gas

    SciTech Connect

    Brimfield, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, the natural vesicant cantharidin was shown to bind exclusively to and inhibit protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mouse tissue extracts (Li and Casida (1992) Proc. Nati. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 11867-11870). To explore the generality of this effect in vesicant action, we measured the protein serinelthreonine phosphatase activity in mouse liver cytosol (in the form of the okadaic acid inhibitable increment of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (p-NPP) phosphatase activity) in the presence of aqueous sulfur mustard or its hydrolysis product, bis(hydroxyethyl)sulfide (TDG). Sulfur mustard inhibited p-NPP hydrolysis. However, inhibition correlated with the time elapsed between thawing and the addition of mustard to the enzyme preparation, not with concentration. TDG exhibited a direct, concentration-related inhibition of p-NPP hydrolysis between 30 and 300 1LM. We conclude that sulfur mustard also has an inhibitory effect on protein serinelthreonine phosphatases. However, the inhibition is an effect of its non-alkykating hydrolysis product TDG, not of sulfur mustard itself.

  17. 40 CFR 180.1167 - Allyl isothiocyanate as a component of food grade oil of mustard; exemption from the requirement...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... used as a component of food grade oil of mustard, in or on all raw agricultural commodities, when... food grade oil of mustard; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1167 Section 180.1167... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1167 Allyl...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1167 - Allyl isothiocyanate as a component of food grade oil of mustard; exemption from the requirement...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... used as a component of food grade oil of mustard, in or on all raw agricultural commodities, when... food grade oil of mustard; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1167 Section 180.1167... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1167 Allyl...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1167 - Allyl isothiocyanate as a component of food grade oil of mustard; exemption from the requirement...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... used as a component of food grade oil of mustard, in or on all raw agricultural commodities, when... food grade oil of mustard; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1167 Section 180.1167... EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1167 Allyl...

  20. Inhibition of sulfur mustard-increased protease activity by niacinamide, N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dexamethasone

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, F.M.; Broomfield, C.A.; Smith, W.J.

    1991-03-11

    The pathologic mechanism of sulfur mustard-induced skin vesication is as yet undefined. Papirmeister et al. have postulated a biochemical mechanism for sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous injury involving sequelae of DNA alkylation, metabolic disruption resulting in NAD+ depletion and activation of protease. The authors have utilized a chromogenic peptide substrate assay to establish that human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed 24 hr previously to sulfur mustard exhibited an increase in proteolytic activity. Doses of compounds known to alter the biochemical events associated with sulfur mustard exposure or reduce protease activity were tested in this system for their ability to block the sulfur mustard-induced protease activity. Treatment with niacinamide 1 hr after or with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or dexamethasone 24 hr prior to sulfur mustard exposure resulted in a decrease of 39%, 33% and 42% respectively of sulfur mustard-increased protease activity. These data suggest that therapeutic intervention into the biochemical pathways that culminate in protease activation might serve as an approach to treatment of sulfur mustard-induced pathology.

  1. ‘Carolina Broadleaf’ mustard green (Brassica juncea L.) resistant to the bacterial leaf blight pathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A leafy-green mustard (Brassica juncea L.) cultivar designated ‘Carolina Broadleaf’ has been released by the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in 2015. This released cultivar is a narrow-based population of leafy-green mustard derived from a U.S. plant introduction (PI)...

  2. First report of bacterial leaf blight on mustard greens (Brassica juncea) caused by pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2010, a brassica leafy greens grower in Sunflower County, Mississippi, observed scattered outbreaks of a leaf blight disease on mustard greens (Brassica juncea) in a 180-hectare field. A severe outbreak of leaf blight occurred on mustard greens and turnip greens (Brassica rapa) in the same field...

  3. Inhibition of inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by a mustard gas analog in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Qui, Min; Paromov, Victor M; Yang, Hongsong; Smith, Milton; Stone, William L

    2006-01-01

    Background 2-Chloroethyl ethyl sulphide (CEES) is a sulphur vesicating agent and an analogue of the chemical warfare agent 2,2'-dichlorodiethyl sulphide, or sulphur mustard gas (HD). Both CEES and HD are alkylating agents that influence cellular thiols and are highly toxic. In a previous publication, we reported that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) enhances the cytotoxicity of CEES in murine RAW264.7 macrophages. In the present investigation, we studied the influence of CEES on nitric oxide (NO) production in LPS stimulated RAW264.7 cells since NO signalling affects inflammation, cell death, and wound healing. Murine macrophages stimulated with LPS produce NO almost exclusively via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity. We suggest that the influence of CEES or HD on the cellular production of NO could play an important role in the pathophysiological responses of tissues to these toxicants. In particular, it is known that macrophage generated NO synthesised by iNOS plays a critical role in wound healing. Results We initially confirmed that in LPS stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages NO is exclusively generated by the iNOS form of nitric oxide synthase. CEES treatment inhibited the synthesis of NO (after 24 hours) in viable LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages as measured by either nitrite secretion into the culture medium or the intracellular conversion of 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA) or dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA). Western blots showed that CEES transiently decreased the expression of iNOS protein; however, treatment of active iNOS with CEES in vitro did not inhibit its enzymatic activity Conclusion CEES inhibits NO production in LPS stimulated macrophages by decreasing iNOS protein expression. Decreased iNOS expression is likely the result of CEES induced alteration in the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway. Since NO can act as an antioxidant, the CEES induced down-regulation of iNOS in LPS-stimulated macrophages could elevate

  4. Application of Quantitative Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Chemical Warfare Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    sarin, the V-series nerve agent VX and the vesicant agent sulphur mustard (Figure 1).* Figure 1. The chemical structure of the CWAs investigated...diisopropyl methylphosphonic acid (DIMP; 6.6wt%), which is a byproduct formed during synthesis.‡ Finally, the purity of VX (Figure 6) was determined to...Denotes GB resonances. DIMP = O,O-diisopropyl methylphosphonic acid . internal standard internal standard * ** solvent * *** * Figure 6. Example

  5. Diagnosis of Exposure to Chemical Warfare Agents: A Comprehensive Literature Survey 1990-2005

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    overview is presented of methods currently available for biomonitoring of exposure to CWA. Most CW agents are reactive electrophiles . They react with...1993). 2.2.1.2 Metabolism Sulphur mustard possesses two electrophilic carbon atoms and its chemistry and metabolism are dominated by their...possesses an electron-rich sulphur atom that reacts with electrophilic species such as oxidising agents; it participates in formation of the episulphonium ion

  6. Multiphoton imaging: a view to understanding sulfur mustard lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werrlein, Robert J. S.; Madren-Whalley, Janna S.

    2003-07-01

    It is well known that topical exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) produces persistent, incapacitating blisters of the skin. However, the primary lesions effecting epidermal-dermal separation and disabling of mechanisms for cutaneous repair remain uncertain. Immunofluorescent staining plus multiphoton imaging of human epidermal tissues and keratinocytes exposed to SM (400 μM x 5 min)have revealed that SM disrupts adhesion-complex molecules which are also disrupted by epidermolysis bullosa-type blistering diseases of the skin. Images of keratin-14 showed early, progressive, postexposure collapse of the K5/K14 cytoskeleton that resulted in ventral displacement of the nuclei beneath its collapsing filaments. This effectively corrupted the dynamic filament assemblies that link basal-cell nuclei to the extracellular matrix via α6β4-integrin and laminin-5. At 1 h postexposure, there was disruption in the surface organization of α6β4 integrins, associated displacement of laminin-5 anchoring sites and a concomitant loss of functional asymmetry. Accordingly, our multiphoton images are providing compelling evidence that SM induces prevesicating lesions that disrupt the receptor-ligand organization and cytoskeletal systems required for maintaining dermal-epidermal attachment, signal transduction, and polarized mobility.

  7. Reduction and Coordination of Arsenic in Indian Mustard1

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Ingrid J.; Prince, Roger C.; George, Martin J.; Smith, Robert D.; George, Graham N.; Salt, David E.

    2000-01-01

    The bioaccumulation of arsenic by plants may provide a means of removing this element from contaminated soils and waters. However, to optimize this process it is important to understand the biological mechanisms involved. Using a combination of techniques, including x-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have established the biochemical fate of arsenic taken up by Indian mustard (Brassica juncea). After arsenate uptake by the roots, possibly via the phosphate transport mechanism, a small fraction is exported to the shoot via the xylem as the oxyanions arsenate and arsenite. Once in the shoot, the arsenic is stored as an AsIII-tris-thiolate complex. The majority of the arsenic remains in the roots as an AsIII-tris-thiolate complex, which is indistinguishable from that found in the shoots and from AsIII-tris-glutathione. The thiolate donors are thus probably either glutathione or phytochelatins. The addition of the dithiol arsenic chelator dimercaptosuccinate to the hydroponic culture medium caused a 5-fold-increased arsenic level in the leaves, although the total arsenic accumulation was only marginally increased. This suggests that the addition of dimercaptosuccinate to arsenic-contaminated soils may provide a way to promote arsenic bioaccumulation in plant shoots, a process that will be essential for the development of an efficient phytoremediation strategy for this element. PMID:10759512

  8. Impact of topical application of sulfur mustard on mice skin and distant organs DNA repair enzyme signature.

    PubMed

    Sauvaigo, Sylvie; Sarrazy, Fanny; Batal, Mohamed; Caillat, Sylvain; Pitiot, Benoit; Mouret, Stéphane; Cléry-Barraud, Cécile; Boudry, Isabelle; Douki, Thierry

    2016-01-22

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that, upon topical application, damages skin and reaches internal organs through diffusion in blood. Two major toxic consequences of SM exposure are inflammation, associated with oxidative stress, and the formation of alkylated DNA bases. In the present study, we investigated the impact of exposure to SM on DNA repair, using two different functional DNA repair assays which provide information on several Base Excision Repair (BER) and Excision/Synthesis Repair (ESR) activities. BER activities were reduced in all organs as early as 4h after exposure, with the exception of the defense systems against 8-oxo-guanine and hypoxanthine which were stimulated. Interestingly, the resulting BER intermediates could activate inflammation signals, aggravating the inflammation triggered by SM exposure and leading to increased oxidative stress. ESR activities were found to be mostly inhibited in skin, brain and kidneys. In contrast, in the lung there was a general increase in ESR activities. In summary, exposure to SM leads to a significant decrease in DNA repair in most organs, concomitant with the formation of DNA damage. These synergistic genotoxic effects are likely to participate in the high toxicity of this alkylating agent. Lungs, possibly better equipped with repair enzymes to handle exogenous exposure, are the exception.

  9. Indicators: Nitrogen

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Nitrogen, like phosphorus, is a critical nutrient required for all life. Nitrogen can occur in rivers and streams, lakes, and coastal waters in several forms including ammonia (NH3), nitrates (NO3), and nitrites (NO2).

  10. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Subchronic Toxicity Study of Lewisite in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-31

    buffered formalin (NBF). To standardize the degree of distension of pulmonary alveoli with fixative, the lungs were fixed by inserting a blunted needle into...the thickness of the mucosa, submucosa and muscular layers of the stomach and involved the serosa. Epithelial hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis of the

  11. Teratology Studies of Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Effects of Lewisite in Rats and Rabbits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-31

    DOSE RANGE AND TERATOLOGY STUDIES OF LEWISITE IN RATS AND RABBITS Quality Assurance Statement Listed below are the phases and/or procedures included in...5 FOREWORD ............. ............................... 7 LIST OF FIGURES ........ ............................ .... 10 LIST OF...GLOSSARY .. ........ ............... ......... 61 PERSONNEL LIST . .. .............. .............. 62 DISTRIBUTION LIST

  12. Development of Protective Agent Against Sulfur Mustard-Induced Skin Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    conversion to hydroxyl radicals by horseradish peroxidase. The formed radical can be monitored by luminescence in the presence of luminol . Luminescence...assay The reaction mixture contained 0.2ml cells (106/ml) suspended in Hank’s balanced salt solution (HBSS), luminol (100gM) and horseradish peroxidase

  13. Safety evaluation of genetically modified mustard (V4) seeds in terms of allergenicity: comparison with native crop.

    PubMed

    Misra, Amita; Kumar, Sandeep; Verma, Alok Kumar; Chanana, Nidhi P; Das, Mukul; Dhawan, Vibha; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2012-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) mustard line (V4) with increased carotenoid content was compared with native mustard to find the difference in allergenic potential, if any. Simulated gastric fluid (SGF) digestibility of crude protein extract from GM as well as its native counterpart mustard crop was envisaged to understand the intended or unintended changes in GM crop along with IgE immunoblotting. BALB/c mice were used as model for allergenicity studies for monitoring total and specific IgE, specific IgG1, histamine level, histopathology, and systemic anaphylaxis score. Allergenicity of mustard was checked in humans by clinical history, skin prick test and IgE levels. Similar results were evident by significant increase in total IgE, specific IgE, IgG1, histamine levels, in GM and native mustard in comparison to control group. Prominent anaphylactic symptoms (score 2: 60%; score 3: 20%; score 4: 20% in native mustard and score 2: 40%; score 3: 40%; score 4: 20% in GM mustard) and eruptive histopathological changes were observed in both GM and native mustard when compared with controls. One protein of approximately 16 kDa was found stable up to 1 h in both GM as well as non GM mustard. IgE immunoblotting detected three protein components of approximately 29, 24 and 16 kDa in both GM and non GM varieties. Collectively, our data demonstrate substantially equivalent allergic responses against GM as well as its native counterpart. Therefore, the GM mustard may be as safe as its native counterpart with reference to allergenic responses.

  14. Survival of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in retail mustard.

    PubMed

    Mayerhauser, C M

    2001-06-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 survival in acid foods such as unpasteurized apple cider and fermented sausage is well documented. Researchers have determined that E. coli O157:H7 can survive in refrigerated acid foods for weeks. The potential of acid foods to serve as a vector of E. coli O157:H7 foodborne illness prompted this study to determine the fate of this organism in retail mustard containing acetic acid when stored at room and refrigerated temperatures. Various retail brands of dijon, yellow, and deli style mustard, pH ranging from 3.17 to 3.63, were inoculated individually with three test strains of E. coli O157:H7. Samples were inoculated with approximately 1.0 x 10(6) CFU/g, incubated at room (25+/-2.5 degrees C) and refrigerated (5+/-3 degrees C) temperatures, and assayed for surviving test strains at predetermined time intervals. An aliquot was appropriately diluted and plated using sorbitol MacConkey agar (SMAC). When the test strain was not recoverable by direct plating, the sample was assayed by enrichment in modified tryptic soy broth and recovered using SMAC. Growth of E. coli O157:H7 test strains was inhibited in all retail mustard styles. E. coli O157:H7 was not detected in dijon style mustard beyond 3 h at room and 2 days at refrigerated temperatures. Survival in yellow and deli style mustard was not detected beyond 1 h. Overall, test strain survival was greater at refrigerated than room temperature. Retail mustard demonstrated the ability to eliminate effectively any chance contamination by this organism within hours to days, suggesting that these products are not a likely factor in E. coli O157:H7 foodborne illness.

  15. Validation and comparison of two commercial ELISA kits and three in-house developed real-time PCR assays for the detection of potentially allergenic mustard in food.

    PubMed

    Palle-Reisch, Monika; Hochegger, Rupert; Štumr, Stepan; Korycanova, Kveta; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2015-05-01

    The study compares the applicability of two commercial mustard ELISA kits (Mustard ELISA Kit-specific and Mustard ELISA Kit-total) and three in-house developed real-time PCR assays (singleplex assay for white mustard, singleplex assay for black/brown mustard and duplex assay for the detection of white, black and brown mustard). Analyses of raw and brewed model sausages containing white and black/brown mustard in the range from 1 to 50 ppm indicate that both ELISAs and the three real-time PCR assays allow the detection of traces of mustard in raw and in brewed sausages. The ELISAs were found to be more sensitive than the real-time PCR assays. When the ELISAs and real-time PCR assays were applied to the analysis of 15 commercial foodstuffs differing in their labelling concerning mustard, in one sample mustard was detected with both ELISAs and the three real-time PCR assays although mustard was not indicated on the food ingredient list.

  16. Development and validation of a duplex real-time PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of three mustard species (Sinapis alba, Brassica nigra and Brassica juncea) in food.

    PubMed

    Palle-Reisch, Monika; Cichna-Markl, Margit; Hochegger, Rupert

    2014-06-15

    The paper presents a duplex real-time PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of three potentially allergenic mustard species commonly used in food: white mustard (Sinapis alba), black mustard (Brassica nigra) and brown mustard (Brassica juncea). White mustard is detected in the "green" and black/brown mustard in the "yellow" channel. The duplex real-time PCR assay does not show cross-reactivity with other Brassicaceae species including broccoli, cauliflower, radish and rapeseed. Low cross-reactivities (difference in the Ct value ⩾ 11.91 compared with the positive control) were obtained with cumin, fenugreek, ginger, rye and turmeric. When applying 500 ng DNA per PCR tube, the duplex real-time PCR assay allowed the detection of white, black and brown mustard in brewed model sausages down to a concentration of 5mg/kg in 10 out of 10 replicates. The duplex real-time PCR assay was applied to verify correct labelling of commercial foodstuffs.

  17. Characterization of chemical agent transport in paints.

    PubMed

    Willis, Matthew P; Gordon, Wesley; Lalain, Teri; Mantooth, Brent

    2013-09-15

    A combination of vacuum-based vapor emission measurements with a mass transport model was employed to determine the interaction of chemical warfare agents with various materials, including transport parameters of agents in paints. Accurate determination of mass transport parameters enables the simulation of the chemical agent distribution in a material for decontaminant performance modeling. The evaluation was performed with the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide (distilled mustard, known as the chemical warfare blister agent HD) and O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX), an organophosphate nerve agent, deposited on to two different types of polyurethane paint coatings. The results demonstrated alignment between the experimentally measured vapor emission flux and the predicted vapor flux. Mass transport modeling demonstrated rapid transport of VX into the coatings; VX penetrated through the aliphatic polyurethane-based coating (100 μm) within approximately 107 min. By comparison, while HD was more soluble in the coatings, the penetration depth in the coatings was approximately 2× lower than VX. Applications of mass transport parameters include the ability to predict agent uptake, and subsequent long-term vapor emission or contact transfer where the agent could present exposure risks. Additionally, these parameters and model enable the ability to perform decontamination modeling to predict how decontaminants remove agent from these materials.

  18. Apoptotic Cell Death in Rat Lung Following Mustard Gas Inhalation.

    PubMed

    Andres, Devon Katherine; Keyser, Brian M; Melber, Ashley A; Benton, Betty Jean; Hamilton, Tracey A; Kniffin, Denise M; Martens, Magaret E; Ray, Radharaman

    2017-03-30

    To investigate apoptosis as a mechanism of sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation injury in animals, we studied different caspases (caspase-8, -9, -3 and -6) in the lungs from a ventilated rat SM aerosol inhalation model. SM activated all four caspases in cells obtained from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as early as 6 hr after exposure. Caspase-8, which is known to initiate the extrinsic Fas-mediated pathway of apoptosis, was increased 5-fold between 6 to 24 hr, decreasing to the unexposed-control level at 48 hr. The initiator, caspase-9, in the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis as well as the executioner caspases, caspase-3 and -6, all peaked (p<0.01) at 24 hr; caspase-3 and -6 remained elevated, but caspase-9 decreased to unexposed-control level at 48 hr. To study further the Fas pathway, we examined soluble as well as membrane-bound Fas ligand (sFas-L, mFas-L, respectively) and Fas receptor (Fas-R) in both BALF cells and BALF. SFas-L increased significantly at 24 hr after SM exposure in both BALF cells (p<0.01) and BALF (p<0.05). However, mFas-L increased only in BALF cells between 24 to 48 hr (p<0.1, <0.001, respectively). Fas-R increased only in BALF cells by 6 hr (p<0.01) after SM exposure. Apoptosis in SM-inhaled rat lung specimens was also confirmed by both immunohistochemical staining using cleaved caspse-3 and -9 antibodies and TUNEL staining as early as 6 hr in the proximal trachea and bronchi, but not before 48 hr in distal airways. These findings suggest pathogenic mechanisms at the cellular and molecular levels and logical therapeutic target(s) for SM inhalation injury in animals.

  19. The fate of the chemical warfare agent during DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Della A; Hulst, Albert G; de Reuver, Leo P J; van Krimpen, Simon H; van Baar, Ben M L

    2007-11-01

    Forensic laboratories do not have the infrastructure to process or store contaminated DNA samples that have been recovered from a crime scene contaminated with chemical or biological warfare agents. Previous research has shown that DNA profiles can be recovered from blood exposed to several chemical warfare agents after the agent has been removed. The fate of four toxic agents, sulfur mustard, sodium 2-fluoroacetate, sarin, and diazinon, in a lysis buffer used in Promega DNA IQ extraction protocol was studied to determine if extraction would render the samples safe. Two independent analytical methods were used per agent, selected from GC-MS, 1H NMR, 19F NMR, (31)P NMR, or LC-ES MS. The methods were validated before use. Determinations were carried out in a semi-quantitative way, by direct comparison to standards. Agent levels in the elution buffer were found to be below the detectable limits for mustard, sarin, sodium 2-fluoroacetate or low (<0.02 mg/mL) for diazinon. Therefore, once extracted these DNA samples could be safely processed in a forensic laboratory.

  20. Organic matrix based slow release fertilizer enhances plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vinod K; Singh, Rana P

    2011-09-01

    Field experiments were conducted to study the effect of organic matrix based slow release fertilizers (SRFs) on plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield of Brassica juncea L. cv, pusa bold. The agro-waste materials like cow dung, clay soil, neem leaves and rice bran were mixed together in 2:2:1:1 ratio and used as organic matrix for the immobilization of chemical fertilizer nutrients with commercial grade saresh (Acacia gum, 15% solution) as binder. Different fertilizer treatments were organic matrix based slow release fertilizers, SRF-I (542.0 kg ha(-1)); SRF-II (736.5 kg ha(-1)) and chemical fertilizer combinations, boron (3 kg ha(-1))+sulphur (15 kg ha(-1))+nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1)) and boron (3 kg ha(-1)) + sulphur (15 kg ha(-1))+nitrogen (80 kg ha(-1))+phosphorus (15 kg ha(-1))+potassium (100 kg ha(-1)). Organic matrix based SRF-II released ammonium up to 50-d in wetsoil under laboratory conditions which showed maximum retention of the nutrients. Avery significant increase in plant growth, nitrate assimilation and seed yield was recorded in organic matrix based SRF-II applied plants. The maximum percent increase in biomass production was observed with organic matrix based SRF-II (increase of 65.8% in root fresh weight, 38.0% in root dry weight, 45.9% in leaf fresh weight plant(-1) and 27.5 % in leaf dry weight plant(-1) in 60-d old plants). It also increased the acquisition and assimilation of nitrate from the plant's rhizosphere which was evident by 45.6% increase in nitrate, 27.5% in nitrite and 11.7% in nitrate reductase activity (NRA) in leaves of 45-d old plants over control. The organic matrix based SRF-II significantly increased the seed yield by 28% in Indian mustard. Cost analysis revealed thatthis formulation is cost effective as it is based on agro waste materials.

  1. Speciation and bioaccessibility of lead and cadmium in soil treated with metal-enriched Indian mustard leaves.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanshan; Fu, Jin; Chen, Xiaochen

    2011-01-01

    Indian mustard (Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.) has shown good potential for the phytoremediation of soil contaminated with heavy metals. However, there is little information about the speciation and bioaccessibility of heavy metals in soil during the decomposition of metal-rich Indian mustard leaves. Incubation experiments (1-, 3-, and 6-month) were carried out in Beijing and Hunan soil with metal-rich Indian mustard leaves addition (1% and 3%) and the effects of mustard leaves addition on the speciation and bioaccessibility of heavy metals were studied. The results showed that the addition of mustard leaves led to significant increases in pH and DOC in the Hunan soil. Both 1% and 3% of mustard leaf amendment caused the percentage of the exchangeable (F1), precipitated with carbonates (F2), bound to Fe/Mn oxides (F3) and bound to organic matter (F4) fractions of Pb and Cd to increase dramatically, while the percentage of the residual fraction (F5) of Cd and Pb significantly dropped in both Beijing and Hunan soils. Mustard leaf addition caused the bioaccessibility of Pb to decrease in the gastric phase, whereas the values increased in the small intestinal phase. The Cd bioaccessibility increased with mustard leaf addition in both the gastric and small intestinal phases. In conclusion, the metal-enriched mustard leaves addition induces Pb and Cd concentrations and their mobility increasing in the Beijing and Hunan soils. Therefore, heavy metal risk in metal-enriched plant leaves should be considered in phytoremediation system in which heavy metal might be brought back to soil and changed over time.

  2. Evaluation of mustard plants and other products to control sweetpotato whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major insect pest of vegetables and horticultural crops in the southeast US is the sweetpotato whitefly.Scientists at the USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Center for Veterinary Entomology, Gainesaville, Florida, evaluated the effect of giant red mustard plants and commercial products to control ...

  3. Glucosinolate content and nematicidal activity of Brazilian wild mustard tissues against Meloidogyne incognita in tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wild mustard (Brassica juncea L.), an invasive weed of winter crops in Brazil, was evaluated for glucosinolate content of its plant tissues and nematicidal activity of its dry leaf meal (LM), whole seed meal (WSM) and hexane defatted seed meal (DSM) against Meloidogyne incognita on tomato plants...

  4. A preliminary investigation of Giant red mustard (Brassica juncea) as a deterrent of silverleaf whitefly oviposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different pairs of plants planted in a single pot were tested in the greenhouse for oviposition preference by the silverleaf whitefly (Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring [Homoptera: Aleyrodidae]). Treatments consisted of the following in single pots: 2 giant red mustard plants (Brassica juncea ...

  5. Effectiveness of Defatted Mustard Meals Used to Control Fungus Gnats: 2000-2002

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffrey, J. P.; Morra, M. J.

    2005-07-01

    Our objective is to develop a pesticidal product from mustard meals that can be used to control insect pests. We have focused our efforts on fungus gnats. This report details our current progress in developing a pesticidal product that can be used to control this plant pest.

  6. Efficacy of white mustard and soybean meal as a bioherbicide in organic broccoli and spinach production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed control in organic cropping systems generally rely on mechanical or physical methods because of the lack of reliable organically accepted herbicides. Among the several potential bioherbicides being explored, white mustard (Sinapis alba) seed meal is among those bioherbicides that have been sho...

  7. [Toxic mustard plaster dematitis and phototoxic dematitis after application of bergamot oil].

    PubMed

    Weisenseel, P; Woitalla, S

    2005-12-15

    Two cases that illustrate the risks attendant on the therapeutic use of natural medications by laypersons are reported. In the first case, the application of a mustard plaster triggered toxic dermatitis. In the second case, a session in a solarium after the external application of bergamot oil resulted in a phototoxic reaction.

  8. [Relationship between tumorous stem mustard yield and soil fertility in Fuling, Southwest China].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huan; Qin, Song; Wang, Zheng-Yin; Li, Hui-He; Lü, Hui-Feng

    2013-12-01

    By combining field investigation and indoor chemical analysis, the relationship between tumorous stem mustard yield and soil fertility factors was investigated in the main planting areas of tumorous stem mustard in Fuling, Southwest China. The results showed that available Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn in the soil were rich (3034, 260, 11.2, 26.1, 1.15 and 1.50 mg x kg(-1), respectively), available P was moderate (19.3 mg x kg(-1)), and organic matter, available N, available K and available S were deficient (9.05 g x kg(-1), 89.2 mg x kg(-1), 106 mg x kg(-1) and 27.0 mg x kg(-1), respectively). The yield of tumorous stem mustard was significantly positively correlated with soil pH and available Ca, whilst significantly (P < 0.01) negatively correlated with available Fe. The influence order of soil fertility factors on the yield of tumorous stem mustard was available Mn > available Cu > pH > available Fe > available K > available Ca > available Mg > available S > available N > available Zn > organic matter > available P. The linear equation (Y = 31636 + 3.63X(6)) of soil available Ca and the yield, was established by stepwise regression analysis.

  9. Mustard seed meal amendments for suppression of Meloidogyne incognita on tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mustard seed meal is applied to soil as a fertilizer and for suppressing weeds and pathogens. Brassica juncea (Bj) ‘Pacific Gold’ and Sinapis alba (Sa) ‘IdaGold’ seed meals were tested for suppression of Meloidogyne incognita on tomato ‘BHN 444’. In greenhouse trials these treatments (all 0.25% weig...

  10. Spinach and mustard greens response to soil type, sulfur addition and lithium level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between Dec. 2006 and Feb 2007 to evaluate the effect of soil type, added sulfur and lithium level on the growth and leaf nutrients, particularly biofortified levels of Li and S, in spinach and mustard gree...

  11. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries: Strategies for the Development of Improved Therapies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-05

    of much greater potency that would likely be very efficacious if used early in the lesion development stage, such as betamethasone dipropionate ...Hunt Valley, MD. pp. 1179- 1186. 108. Miller TL, Graham JS, Hayes TL, Reid FM. Stability of sulfur mustard in vehicles suitable for cutaneous

  12. Mustard gas and American race-based human experimentation in World War II.

    PubMed

    Smith, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    This essay examines the risks of racialized science as revealed in the American mustard gas experiments of World War II. In a climate of contested beliefs over the existence and meanings of racial differences, medical researchers examined the bodies of Japanese American, African American, and Puerto Rican soldiers for evidence of how they differed from whites.

  13. 2,6-Dithiopurine, a nucleophilic scavenger, protects against mutagenesis in mouse skin treated in vivo with 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog

    SciTech Connect

    Boulware, Stephen; Fields, Tammy; McIvor, Elizabeth; Powell, K. Leslie; Abel, Erika L.; Vasquez, Karen M.; MacLeod, Michael C.

    2012-09-01

    Sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, SM] is a well-known DNA-damaging agent that has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is a weapon that could potentially be used in a terrorist attack on a civilian population. Dermal exposure to high concentrations of SM produces severe, long-lasting burns. Topical exposure to high concentrations of 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM, also produces severe skin lesions in mice. Utilizing a genetically engineered mouse strain, Big Blue, that allows measurement of mutation frequencies in mouse tissues, we now show that topical treatment with much lower concentrations of CEES induces significant dose- and time-dependent increases in mutation frequency in mouse skin; the mutagenic exposures produce minimal toxicity as determined by standard histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for cytokeratin 6 and the DNA-damage induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γ-H2AX). We attempted to develop a therapeutic that would inhibit the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin. We observe that multi-dose, topical treatment with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a known chemical scavenger of CEES, beginning 1 h post-exposure to CEES, completely abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency. These findings suggest the possibility that DTP, previously shown to be non-toxic in mice, may be useful as a therapeutic agent in accidental or malicious human exposures to SM. -- Highlights: ► 200 mM 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES) induces mutations in mouse skin. ► This dose of CEES is not overtly toxic, as assayed by histopathology. ► 2,6-Dithiopurine (DTP), applied after CEES-treatment, abolishes CEES-mutagenesis. ► This supports the idea that sulfur mustards exhibit long biological half-lives.

  14. pH-dependent toxicity of sulphur mustard in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Thomas W. . E-mail: Thomas.Sawyer@drdc-rddc.gc.ca; Vair, Cory; Nelson, Peggy; Shei Yimin; Bjarnason, Stephen; Tenn, Catherine; McWilliams, Michael; Villanueva, Mercy; Burczyk, Andrew

    2007-06-15

    The dependence of sulphur mustard (HD) toxicity on intracellular (pH{sub i}) and extracellular pH was examined in CHO-K1 cells. HD produced an immediate and significant concentration-dependent decline in cytosolic pH, and also inhibited the mechanisms responsible for restoring pH{sub i} to physiological values. The concentration-response of HD-induced cytosolic acidification, closely paralleled the acidification of the extracellular buffer through HD hydrolysis. A viability study was carried out in order to assess the importance of HD-induced cytosolic acidification. Cultures were exposed to HD for 1 h in media that were adjusted through a pH range (pH 5.0-10), and the 24 h LC{sub 50} values were assessed using the viability indicator dye alamarBlue{sup TM}. The toxicity of HD was found to be dependent on extracellular pH, with a greater than eight-fold increase in LD{sub 50} obtained in cultures treated with HD at pH 9.5, compared to those treated at pH 5.0. Assays of apoptotic cell death, including morphology, soluble DNA, caspase-3 activity and TUNEL also showed that as pH was increased, much greater HD concentrations were required to cause cell death. The modest decline in HD half-life measured in buffers of increasing pH, did not account for the protective effects of basic pH. The early event(s) that HD initiates to eventually culminate in cell death are not known. However, based on the data obtained in this study, we propose that HD causes an extracellular acidification through chemical hydrolysis and that this, in both a concentration and temporally related fashion, results in cytosolic acidification. Furthermore, HD also acts to poison the antiporter systems responsible for maintaining physiological pH{sub i}, so that the cells are unable to recover from this insult. It is this irreversible decline in pH{sub i} that initiates the cascade of events that results in HD-induced cell death.

  15. Efficacy of scalp hair decontamination following exposure to vapours of sulphur mustard simulants 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide and methyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Spiandore, Marie; Piram, Anne; Lacoste, Alexandre; Prevost, Philippe; Maloni, Pascal; Torre, Franck; Asia, Laurence; Josse, Denis; Doumenq, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Chemical warfare agents are an actual threat and victims' decontamination is a main concern when mass exposure occurs. Skin decontamination with current protocols has been widely documented, as well as surface decontamination. However, considering hair ability to trap chemicals in vapour phase, we investigated hair decontamination after exposure to sulphur mustard simulants methyl salicylate and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide. Four decontamination protocols were tested on hair, combining showering and emergency decontamination (use of Fuller's earth or Reactive Skin Decontamination Lotion RSDL(®)). Both simulants were recovered from hair after treatment, but contents were significantly reduced (42-85% content allowance). Showering alone was the least efficient protocol. Concerning 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulphide, protocols did not display significant differences in decontamination efficacy. For MeS, use of emergency decontaminants significantly increased showering efficacy (10-20% rise), underlining their usefulness before thorough decontamination. Our results highlighted the need to extensively decontaminate hair after chemical exposure. Residual amounts after decontamination are challenging, as their release from hair could lead to health issues.

  16. Zinc oxide nanocubes as a destructive nanoadsorbent for the neutralization chemistry of 2-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide: A sulfur mustard simulant.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Armin; Dastafkan, Kamran

    2016-09-15

    Zinc oxide nanocubes were surveyed for their destructive turn-over to decontaminate 2-chloro ethyl phenyl sulfide, a sulfur mustard simulant. Prior to the reaction, nanocubes were prepared through sol-gel method using monoethanolamine, diethylene glycol, and anhydrous citric acid as the stabilizing, cross linking/structure directing agents, respectively. The formation of nanoscale ZnO, the cubic morphology, crystalline structure, and chemical-adsorptive characteristics were certified by FESEM-EDS, TEM-SAED, XRD, FTIR, BET-BJH, H2-TPR, and ESR techniques. Adsorption and destruction reactions were tracked by GC-FID analysis in which the effects of polarity of the media, reaction time, and temperature on the destructive capability of the surface of nanocubes were investigated and discussed. Results demonstrated that maximum neutralization occurred in n-heptane solvent after 1/2h at 55°C. Kinetic study construed that the neutralization reaction followed the pseudo-second order model with a squared correlation coefficient and rate constant of 0.9904 and 0.00004gmg(-1)s(-1), respectively. Furthermore, GC-MS measurement confirmed the formation of 2-hydroxy ethyl phenyl sulfide (2-HEPS) and phenyl vinyl sulfide (PVS) as neutralization products that together with Bronsted and Lewis acid/base approaches exemplify the role of hydrolysis and elimination mechanisms on the surface of zinc oxide nanocubes.

  17. Preactivated oxazaphosphorines designed for isophosphoramide mustard delivery as bulk form or nanoassemblies: synthesis and proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Skarbek, Charles; Lesueur, Lea L; Chapuis, Hubert; Deroussent, Alain; Pioche Durieu, Catherine; Daville, Aurore; Caron, Joachim; Rivard, Michael; Martens, Thierry; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Le Cam, Eric; Vassal, Gilles; Couvreur, Patrick; Desmaele, Didier; Paci, Angelo

    2015-01-22

    Oxazaphosphorines are alkylating agents used in routine clinical practices for treatment of cancer for many years. They are antitumor prodrugs that require cytochrome P450 bioactivation leading to 4-hydroxy derivatives. In the case of ifosfamide (IFO), the bioactivation produces two toxic metabolites: acrolein, a urotoxic compound, concomitantly generated with the isophosphoramide mustard; and chloroacetaldehyde, a neurotoxic and nephrotoxic compound, arising from the oxidation of the side chains. To improve the therapeutic index of IFO, we have designed preactivated IFO derivatives with the covalent binding of several O- and S-alkyl moieties including polyisoprenoid groups at the C-4 position of the oxazaphosphorine ring to avoid cytochrome bioactivation favoring the release of the active entity and limiting the chloroacetaldehyde release. Thanks to the grafted terpene moieties, some of these new conjugates demonstrated spontaneous self-assembling properties into nanoassemblies when dispersed in water. The cytotoxic activities on a panel of human tumor cell lines of these novel oxazaphosphorines, in bulk form or as nanoassemblies, and the release of 4-hydroxy-IFO from these preactivated IFO analogues in plasma are reported.

  18. Protective effect of ethanolic and water extracts of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) against the toxic effects of mustard gas.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, R; Gautam, Anshoo; Kumar, Om; Pant, S C; Sharma, Manoj; Singh, Seema; Kumar, H T Satish; Singh, Anand Kumar; Nivsarkar, Manisha; Kaushik, M P; Sawhney, R C; Chaurasia, O P; Prasad, G B K S

    2006-10-01

    Ethanolic extract of H. rhamnoides L. leaf (HL-EOH), water and ethanolic extract of H. rhamnoides fruit (HF-W and HF-EOH), and H. rhamnoides flavone from fruit (HR-flavone) were evaluated against percutaneously administered sulphur mustard (SM), a chemical warfare agent. The animals administered with SM (9.7, 19.3 and 38.7 mg/kg) died at various days depending upon the dose and there was a significant reduction in the body weight. The H. rhamnoides extracts (1 g/kg; 3 doses; po) significantly protected the lethality, with a protective index of 2.4, 1.7, 1.7 and 2.2 for HL-EOH, HF-W, HF-EOH and HR-flavone respectively. Reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutalthione (GSSG) levels were reduced, and malondialdehyde (MDA) was elevated after percutaneous administration of SM. Oral administration of HL-EOH and HR-flavone significantly protected the body weight loss. Recovery in the levels of GSH, GSSG and MDA were also observed following oral administration of HL-EOH and HR-flavone. All the extracts were non-toxic and the LD50 was more than 5 g/kg. The present study shows that percutaneous administration of SM induces oxidative stress and ethanolic extract of leaf of H. rhamnoides and H. rhamnoides flavone from fruit can significantly protect it.

  19. The effect of vitamin E on pathological changes in kidney and liver of sulphur mustard-exposed guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Tabatabayee, Abbas; Amiri, Sediqa; Vahedi, Nasim

    2012-04-01

    Sulphur mustard (SM) gas is a poisonous chemical agent causing various systemic action in laboratory animals. There is no definite treatment for disorders induced by SM. In this study, the effect of vitamin E alone and in combination with dexamethasone on the pathological changes in the kidney and liver of SM-exposed (SME) guinea pigs was examined. Guinea pigs were divided into five groups (n = 5 in each). These groups were exposed to ethanol (control group), 100 mg/m(3) inhaled SM (SME group), SME treated with vitamin E, 600 mg/kg (SME + E), SME treated with dexamethasone, 5 mg/kg (SME + D), and SME treated with both drugs (SME + E + D), respectively. Pathological evaluation of the kidneys and livers was done 14 days post exposure. There were statistically significant pathological changes in the liver and kidney of SME group compared to control animals (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). Treatment of SME animals with vitamin E, dexamethasone and their combination caused statistically significant improvement in the pathological changes in the livers and kidneys (p < 0.05 to p < 0.001). These results showed a preventive effect of vitamin E on pathological changes in the liver and more prominently in the kidneys of SME guinea pigs.

  20. Antiasthmatic effects of onion extracts--detection of benzyl- and other isothiocyanates (mustard oils) as antiasthmatic compounds of plant origin.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, W; Adam, O; Weber, J; Ziegeltrum, T

    1984-12-15

    Previous studies showed the inhibitory effects of crude ethanolic onion extracts (COE) on allergic skin reactions in man as well as on allergen-induced bronchial asthma in man and guinea-pigs. Work is in progress in order to identify both the mode of action of COE and the active substance(s). The present study describes asthma-protective effects of isothiocyanates. Groups of at least 5 guinea-pigs sensitized to ovalbumin were challenged twice (time 0 and 10 min) by the inhalation of ovalbumin 30 min after oral treatment with increasing doses of the agent tested or control solutions. Bronchial obstruction (BO) was measured by whole body plethysmography. Chloroform extracts of onions showed similar protective effects on BO as COE. The water-soluble fraction of COE was inactive. Benzyl-isothiocyanate (BITC) was identified as one component of onion lipids by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. BITC inhibited BO in a dose-dependent fashion: 150 mg/kg: 89%; 75 mg/kg: 76%; 30 mg/kg: 66%; 15 mg/kg: 49%. Ethyl-isothiocyanate and allyl-isothiocyanate showed similar effects; p-hydroxy-benzyl-isothiocyanate, a very unstable mustard oil, was ineffective. Additional experiments showed no antagonistic effects of COE on histamine- or acetylcholine-induced BO. The antiasthmatic effects of onions and - perhaps - other plants may be mediated at least in part by isothiocyanates.

  1. Nitrogen Index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need to improve the management of nitrogen inputs to agricultural systems because they increase the potential for losses of reactive nitrogen to the environment, resulting in negative impacts to water and air resources. There is a need to reduce nitrate leaching, emissions of N2O from agr...

  2. Toxicology Studies on Lewisite and Sulfur Mustard Agents: Genetic Toxicity of Sulfur Mustard (HD) in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jostes, Jr., R. F.; Sasser, L. B.; Rausch, R. J.

    1989-05-01

    The cytotoxic, clastogenic and mutagenic effects of sulfur nustard in Chinese hamster ovary cells are described in this reoort. The cytotoxicity data indicate that micromolar amounts of HC are highly toxic in microrolar amounts. Chromosone aberration frequencies increased in a dose-dependent manner over a dose range of 0. 5 to 1.0 {micro}m and SCE increased in a dose-dependent fashion in the dose range of 0.0625 to 0.25 {micro}M. Mutation induction at the HGPRT locus was sporadic, but the majority of the exoosures resulted in mutation frequencies which were 1.2 to 4.3 fold higher than the spontaneous frequencies.

  3. Serum cytokine profiles of Khorasan veterans 23 years after sulfur mustard exposure.

    PubMed

    Riahi-Zanjani, Bamdad; Balali-Mood, Mahdi; Mousavi, Seyed-Reza; Karimi, Gholamreza; Sadeghi, Mahmood; Shirmast, Elham; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud

    2014-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is an incapacitating chemical warfare agent that was used against Iranian soldiers during the period from 1983 to 1988. We have investigated serum cytokines profiles of Khorasan veterans who were exposed to SM >23 years earlier. Forty-four male Iranian veterans who had >40% disabilities due to delayed complications of SM poisoning and had disabilities were investigated. A total of 30 healthy male volunteers (relatives of the veterans) were selected as the control group. Cytokine levels were measured in the serum of case and control subjects using commercial ELISA kits. Hematologic parameters (white/red blood cell counts, hemoglobin levels, immune cell differentials) were also performed on blood samples from the study subjects. The results indicated that serum levels of ICAM-1 were significantly higher in the samples from SM-exposed veterans (772.8 [± 15.1] ng/ml [p=0.014] vs. control values of 710.2 [± 20.0] ng/ml). On the other hand, serum IL-1β, IL-8 levels and TNFα, were significantly lower for the veterans than the controls (IL-1β: 3.8 [± 0.1] vs. 4.3 [± 0.2] pg/ml, p=0.037; IL-8: 21.0 [± 6.1] vs. 84.6 [± 20.3] pg/ml, p=0.002; TNFα: 4.5 [± 0.1] vs. 5.5 [± 0.1] pg/ml, p=0.027). Levels of other assayed cytokines, e.g., IL-2, -4, -5, -6, -10, and -12, IFNγ, TNFβ, and sVCAM-1 were not significantly different between the study populations. None of the assayed hematologic parameters appeared to differ as well. It seems possible that dysfunctions could have been induced in the innate immune functions of the SM-exposed veterans as a result of these changes in cytokine expression and that these, in turn, may have contributed to the increased incidence of a myriad of diseases that have been documented in these veterans, including cancers. Future studies must focus on examining the significance of these changes in circulating cytokines and their potential contribution to the development of different diseases in veterans exposed to SM.

  4. Protection of A549 cells against the toxic effects of sulphur mustard by hexamethylenetetramine.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, C D; Hambrook, J L

    1997-02-01

    The A549 cell line was used as a model of the deep lung to study the toxicity and mechanism of action of sulphur mustard (HD), using the neutral red (NR) dye retention and gentian violet (GV) assays as indices of cell viability. It was found that exposure to concentrations in excess of 40 microM HD resulted in a rapid onset of toxicity. Exposure to 1000 microM HD reduced viability in A549 cell cultures to 61% after 2 h (control cultures = 100%), whereas exposure to 40 microM HD did not result in deleterious effects until 26 h at which point viability fell to only 84% (NR assay). Agarose gel electrophoresis of cell cultures exposed to 40 and 1000 microM HD and harvested at 4.5, 19 and 43 h after exposure to HD, indicated that cell death was due to necrosis, despite the observation that at the higher concentration of HD cells displayed many of the features common to cells undergoing apoptotic death. The ability of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) to protect A549 cells against the effects of an LC50 challenge dose of HD was assessed using the GV and NR assays. It was found that HMT (15 mM) could protect cells against the effects of HD though HMT had to be present at the time of HD challenge. Cultures treated with HD only were 49% viable at 48 h after HD challenge, compared to 101% for protected cultures (NR assay) and 58% and 91% for unprotected and protected cultures respectively using the GV assay. Morphological observations of GV and NR stained cultures confirmed these findings. HMT concentrations of 2.5 to 25 mM were used. Maximal protection against the toxic effects of HD (LC50) was found at 10 to 25 mM HMT. Over this concentration range, HMT did not exert any toxic effects on A549 cells. Pretreatment of A549 cultures with HMT followed by its removal prior to HD challenge had no protective effect. Similarly, treating cultures with HD followed by addition of HMT did not increase the viability of the cultures, even if the HMT was added immediately after HD exposure

  5. Optimization for Reduced-Fat / Low-NaCl Meat Emulsion Systems with Sea Mustard (Undaria pinnatifida) and Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheon-Jei; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Young-Boong; Jeon, Ki-Hong; Choi, Yun-Sang

    2015-01-01

    The effects of reducing fat levels from 30% to 20% and salt concentrations from 1.5% to 1.0% by partially substituting incorporated phosphate and sea mustard were investigated based on physicochemical properties of reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion systems. Cooking loss and emulsion stability, hardness, springiness, and cohesiveness for reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion systems with 20% pork back fat and 1.2% sodium chloride samples with incorporation of phosphate and sea mustard were similar to the control with 30% pork back fat and 1.5% sodium chloride. Results showed that reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion system samples containing phosphate and sea mustard had higher apparent viscosity. The results of this study show that the incorporation of phosphate and sea mustard in the formulation will successfully reduce fat and salt in the final meat products.

  6. Optimization for Reduced-Fat / Low-NaCl Meat Emulsion Systems with Sea Mustard (Undaria pinnatifida) and Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Cheon-Jei; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Jeong, Tae-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The effects of reducing fat levels from 30% to 20% and salt concentrations from 1.5% to 1.0% by partially substituting incorporated phosphate and sea mustard were investigated based on physicochemical properties of reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion systems. Cooking loss and emulsion stability, hardness, springiness, and cohesiveness for reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion systems with 20% pork back fat and 1.2% sodium chloride samples with incorporation of phosphate and sea mustard were similar to the control with 30% pork back fat and 1.5% sodium chloride. Results showed that reduced-fat / low-NaCl meat emulsion system samples containing phosphate and sea mustard had higher apparent viscosity. The results of this study show that the incorporation of phosphate and sea mustard in the formulation will successfully reduce fat and salt in the final meat products. PMID:26761874

  7. Protocol for determination of chemical warfare agent simulant movement through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.; Buchanan, M.V.; Merriweather, R.; Ilgner, R.H.; Gayle, T.M.; Moneyhun, J.H.; Watson, A.P.

    1992-07-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of chemical warfare agent during any phase of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), a (small) potential exists for contamination of buildings and materials used in their construction. Guidelines for unrestricted access to potentially agent-contaminated private and public property are presently undefined due to uncertainties regarding the adequacy of decontaminating porous surfaces such as wood, masonry and gypsum wall board. Persistent agents such as VX or mustard are particularly problematic. The report which follows documents a measurement protocol developed in a scoping investigation characterizing the permeation of chemical warfare agent simulants [diisopropylmethyl phosphonate (DIMP) for warfare agent GB, dimethylmethyl phosphonate (DMMP) for warfare agent VX and chlorethylethyl sulfide (CEES) for warfare agent sulfur mustard] through several, common porous, construction materials. The ``porous media`` selected for examination were wood, brick, cinder block, and gypsum wall board. Simulants were tested rather than actual warfare agents because of their low toxicity, commercial availability, and the lack of surety capability at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The present work is considered a protocol for confirmation testing with ``live`` agents.

  8. Protocol for determination of chemical warfare agent simulant movement through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.; Buchanan, M.V.; Merriweather, R.; Ilgner, R.H.; Gayle, T.M.; Moneyhun, J.H.; Watson, A.P.

    1992-07-01

    In the event of an unplanned release of chemical warfare agent during any phase of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), a (small) potential exists for contamination of buildings and materials used in their construction. Guidelines for unrestricted access to potentially agent-contaminated private and public property are presently undefined due to uncertainties regarding the adequacy of decontaminating porous surfaces such as wood, masonry and gypsum wall board. Persistent agents such as VX or mustard are particularly problematic. The report which follows documents a measurement protocol developed in a scoping investigation characterizing the permeation of chemical warfare agent simulants (diisopropylmethyl phosphonate (DIMP) for warfare agent GB, dimethylmethyl phosphonate (DMMP) for warfare agent VX and chlorethylethyl sulfide (CEES) for warfare agent sulfur mustard) through several, common porous, construction materials. The porous media'' selected for examination were wood, brick, cinder block, and gypsum wall board. Simulants were tested rather than actual warfare agents because of their low toxicity, commercial availability, and the lack of surety capability at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The present work is considered a protocol for confirmation testing with live'' agents.

  9. The Mixture of Salvianolic Acids from Salvia miltiorrhiza and Total Flavonoids from Anemarrhena asphodeloides Attenuate Sulfur Mustard-Induced Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzhong; Chen, Linlin; Wu, Hongyuan; Lu, Yiming; Hu, Zhenlin; Lu, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Chai, Yifeng; Zhang, Junping

    2015-10-15

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a vesicating chemical warfare agent used in numerous military conflicts and remains a potential chemical threat to the present day. Exposure to SM causes the depletion of cellular antioxidant thiols, mainly glutathione (GSH), which may lead to a series of SM-associated toxic responses. MSTF is the mixture of salvianolic acids (SA) of Salvia miltiorrhiza and total flavonoids (TFA) of Anemarrhena asphodeloides. SA is the main water-soluble phenolic compound in Salvia miltiorrhiza. TFA mainly includes mangiferin, isomangiferin and neomangiferin. SA and TFA possess diverse activities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammation activities. In this study, we mainly investigated the therapeutic effects of MSTF on SM toxicity in Sprague Dawley rats. Treatment with MSTF 1 h after subcutaneous injection with 3.5 mg/kg (equivalent to 0.7 LD50) SM significantly increased the survival levels of rats and attenuated the SM-induced morphological changes in the testis, small intestine and liver tissues. Treatment with MSTF at doses of 60 and 120 mg/kg caused a significant (p<0.05) reversal in SM-induced GSH depletion. Gene expression profiles revealed that treatment with MSTF had a dramatic effect on gene expression changes caused by SM. Treatment with MSTF prevented SM-induced differential expression of 93.8% (973 genes) of 1037 genes. Pathway enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly involved in a total of 36 pathways, such as the MAPK signaling pathway, pathways in cancer, antigen processing and presentation. These data suggest that MSTF attenuates SM-induced injury by increasing GSH and targeting multiple pathways, including the MAPK signaling pathway, as well as antigen processing and presentation. These results suggest that MSTF has the potential to be used as a potential therapeutic agent against SM injuries.

  10. Nucleophilic selectivity as a determinant of carcinogenic potency (TD50) in rodents: a comparison of mono- and bi-functional alkylating agents and vinyl chloride metabolites.

    PubMed

    Barbin, A; Bartsch, H

    1989-11-01

    Using published data, the carcinogenic potency (TD50) in rodents of a series of monofunctional alkylating agents, bifunctional antitumor drugs and the vinyl chloride (VC) metabolites chloroethylene oxide (CEO) and chloroacetaldehyde (CAA) was compared to their nucleophilic selectivity (Swain and Scott's constant s or initial ratio of 7-/O6-alkylguanine in DNA). A positive correlation between the log of TD50 estimates and the s values for a series of 14, mostly monofunctional, alkylating agents was observed. This linear relationship also included 2 bifunctional chloroethylnitrosoureas, although their carcinogenic potency was compared to their initial 7-/O6-alkylguanine ratio rather than their s values (n = 16, r = 0.91, p less than 0.005). In addition, the carcinogenic potency of 2 alkyl sulfates, which is not yet known accurately, may correlate with their nucleophilic selectivity through the same relationship. By contrast, 2 methyl halides and 5 bifunctional antitumor drugs (nitrogen mustards and azyridinyl derivatives) did not follow this linear relationship: at similar nucleophilic selectivity, they were more potent carcinogens than the above 18 alkylating agents; this may hold true for CEO and CAA too, although further carcinogenicity experiments are needed to calculate their precise TD50 values. The possible molecular mechanisms involved in tumor induction by these agents are discussed on the basis of these findings. Comparison of the estimated TD50 for CEO, CAA and VC in rodents confirms that CEO is the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of VC and suggests that only a very small proportion of metabolically generated CEO is available for DNA alkylation in vivo.

  11. Bacterial community structure in simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and organic matter removal process treating saline mustard tuber wastewater as revealed by 16S rRNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiale; Gong, Benzhou; Huang, Wei; Wang, Yingmu; Zhou, Jian

    2017-03-01

    A simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and organic matter removal (SNDOR) process in sequencing batch biofilm reactor (SBBR) was established to treat saline mustard tuber wastewater (MTWW) in this study. An average COD removal efficiency of 86.48% and total nitrogen removal efficiency of 86.48% were achieved at 30gNaClL(-1) during 100days' operation. The underlying mechanisms were investigated by PacBio SMRT DNA sequencing (V1-V9) to analyze the microbial community structures and its variation from low salinity at 10gNaClL(-1) to high salinity at 30gNaClL(-1). Results showed elevated salinity did not affect biological performance but reduced microbial diversity in SBBR, and halophilic bacteria gradually predominated by succession. Despite of high C/N, autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) Nitrosomonas and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) Candidatus Nitrososphaera both contributed to ammonium oxidation. As salinity increasing, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were significantly inhibited, partial nitrification and denitrification (PND) process gradually contributed to nitrogen removal.

  12. Bioinoculants: A sustainable approach to maximize the yield of Ethiopian mustard (Brassica carinata L.) under low input of chemical fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Nosheen, Asia; Bano, Asghari; Ullah, Faizan

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to find out the effect of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR; Azospirillum brasilense and Azotobacter vinelandii) either alone or in combination with different doses of nitrogen and phosphate fertilizers on growth, seed yield, and oil quality of Brassica carinata (L.) cv. Peela Raya. PGPR were applied as seed inoculation at 10(6) cells/mL(-1) so that the number of bacterial cells per seed was 2.6 × 10(5) cells/seed. The chemical fertilizers, namely, urea and diammonium phosphate (DAP) were applied in different doses (full dose (urea 160 kg ha(-1) + DAP 180 kg ha(-1)), half dose (urea 80 kg ha(-1) + DAP 90 kg ha(-1)), and quarter dose (urea 40 kg ha(-1) + DAP 45 kg ha(-1)). The chemical fertilizers at full and half dose significantly increased the chlorophyll, carotenoids, and protein content of leaves and the seed yield (in kilogram per hectare) but had no effect on the oil content of seed. The erucic acid (C22:1) content present in the seed was increased. Azospirillum performed better than Azotobacter and its effect was at par with full dose of chemical fertilizers (CFF) for pigments and protein content of leaves when inoculated in the presence of half dose of chemical fertilizers (SPH). The seed yield and seed size were greater. Supplementing Azospirillum with SPH assisted Azospirillum to augment the growth and yield, reduced the erucic acid (C22:1) and glucosinolates contents, and increased the unsaturation in seed oil. It is inferred that A. brasilense could be applied as an efficient bioinoculant for enhancing the growth, seed yield, and oil quality of Ethiopian mustard at low fertilizer costs and sustainable ways.

  13. The decay of chemical weapons agents under environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.R.; Haas, J.S.; Eagle, R.J.

    1993-04-09

    The rate and mechanism of decay of chemical agents in the environment was studied via live agent field trials at the chemical and Biological Defence Establishment, Porton Down, UK. The plan was to deposit the agents GD (Soman), VX, and H (sulfur mustard) on separate l-m{sup 2} plots on three successive days; i.e., Tuesday through Thursday. The depositions were to be made so as to give an areal concentration of 10 g/m{sup 2}. Four felt pads of approximately 25 cm{sup 2} each were placed at the corners of each of the test plots. These were subsequently extracted and analyzed by CBDE to determine the actual agent concentration. Samples for LLNL (two different types of soil, disks of silicone rubber gasket material, and short cylinders of concrete were to be contaminated and analyzed. Results are described.

  14. DNA-directed aniline mustards based on 9-aminoacridine: interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, C J; Denny, W A; Fan, J Y; Gamage, R S

    1992-11-30

    A series of 4-substituted aniline mustards ArNH(CH2)nOpC6H4N(CH2CH2Cl)2, where Ar is an acridine and n varies from 2 to 5, interact with DNA. Scatchard analysis shows the compounds bind tightly, with a binding site size similar to that of 9-aminoacridine. The rate of hydrolysis of the mustards, measured by HPLC, is essentially constant across the series. With increasing length of the polymethylene linker, non-covalent binding becomes less strong, but the rate of DNA alkylation increases. Viscometric helix extension measurements and electrophoretic analyses using closed circular supercoiled DNA show that all the compounds are DNA intercalating ligands. Despite these similarities, the compounds are known to have quite different patterns of DNA alkylation, switching from guanine to adenine alkylation as the chain length is extended.

  15. Reliable screening technique for evaluation of wild crucifers against mustard aphid Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.).

    PubMed

    Singh, S P; Kumar, Sandeep; Singh, Y P; Singh, Ram

    2014-12-01

    Wild crucifers namely Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica fruticulosa, B. rugosa, B. spinescens, B. tournefortii, Camelina sativa, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Crambe abysinnica, Cronopus didymus, Diplotaxis assurgens, D. gomez-campoi, D. muralis, D. siettiana, D. tenuisiliqua, Enatharocarpus lyratus, Lepidium sativum and Sinapis alba along with five cultivated Brassica species including B. rapa (BSH-1), B. juncea (Rohini), B. napus (GSC-6), B. carinata (DLSC-2) and Eruca sativa (T-27) were screened against mustard aphid Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.) with a standardized technique under definite level of aphid pressure developed using specially designed cages. Observations have revealed that B. fruticulosa, B. spinescens, Camelina sativa, Crambe abysinnica and Lepidium sativum were resistant to mustard aphid L. erysimi with aphid infestation index (AII) ≤ 1. Capsella bursa-pastoris was highly susceptible to bean aphid, Aphis fabae during its vegetative stage (with 100% mortality). Other genotypes were found in the range of 'susceptible' to 'highly susceptible' with AII ranging 3-5.

  16. Sulfur Mustard Exposure and Non-Ischemic Central Retinal Vein Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Shoeibi, Nasser; Balali-Mood, Mahdi; Abrishami, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    A 41-year-old man was referred with a complaint of visual loss in his left eye and his best corrected visual acuity was 20/80. Slit lamp examination showed arborizing conjunctival vessels and dry eye. Fundus examination and fluorescein angiography revealed a non-ischemic central retinal vein occlusion. Cardiovascular, rheumatologic, and hematologic work up showed no abnormal findings. An ascertained history of exposure to sulfur mustard during the Iran-Iraq war was documented in his medical history. Four sessions of intravitreal bevacizumab injections were done as needed. After two-year follow-up, visual acuity in his left eye improved to 20/25 and macular edema was resolved without any need for further interventions. We conclude that sulfur mustard gas exposure may be considered as a predisposing factor for central retinal vein occlusion, as was found in our patient (an Iranian war veteran) by excluding all yet known etiologies and predisposing factors. PMID:26722147

  17. Intermediate outcome after Mustard and Senning procedures: A study by the Congenital Heart Surgeons Society.

    PubMed

    Wells, Winfield J.; Blackstone, Eugene

    2000-01-01

    Although atrial switch is rarely performed today except as part of a "double switch" operation, there continues to be interest in the long-term outcome of the procedure because of the many Mustard and Senning survivors who are in follow-up. In contrast to most other reported series on atrial switch, this study by the Congenital Heart Surgeons Society (CHSS) is a prospective multiinstitutional study of patients encountered in a relatively short time frame during the late 1980s. Between 1985 to 1989, 20 centers with surgeons belonging to the CHSS prospectively registered patients <15 days of age presenting with simple or complex transposition of the great arteries (TGA). The patients were assigned to protocol groups based on intent to treat (arterial switch, Mustard, or Senning). Data were abstracted in the Data and Analysis Center, which in most cases, conducted the annual follow-up. Among the 281 patients who had an atrial switch, there were 108 Mustard and 173 Senning procedures. For the combined atrial switch population, the survival at 1 month, 5 years and 10 years was 90%, 85%, and 84%, respectively. Results for the Mustard were better than for the Senning with survival at 1 month, 5 years, and 10 years being 96% versus 86%, 95% versus 80%, 93% versus 78%; (P <.001) for Mustard versus Senning. While the major mortality risk occurred in the first postoperative month for both groups, thereafter, the late rate of death from 1 to 10 years after operation was 0.78%/year Senning versus 0.23%/year Mustard (P <.05). TGA/ventricular septal defect (VSD), lower weight, younger age, cardiac positional anomalies, and procedures on the left ventricle (LV) outflow all correlated significantly with poor outcome. There were 19 reoperations including 2 for right ventricle (RV) failure, 12 for pathway obstruction, and 5 for baffle leak with a 36% overall mortality. Freedom from any pathway obstruction at 10 years was 95%. A permanent pacemaker was required in 21 patients with the

  18. Characterization of Distinct Macrophage Subpopulations during Nitrogen Mustard–Induced Lung Injury and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Venosa, Alessandro; Malaviya, Rama; Choi, Hyejeong; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is an alkylating agent known to cause extensive pulmonary injury progressing to fibrosis. This is accompanied by a persistent macrophage inflammatory response. In these studies, we characterized the phenotype of macrophages accumulating in the lung over time following NM exposure. Treatment of rats with NM (0.125 mg/kg, intratracheally) resulted in an increase in CD11b+ macrophages in histologic sections. These cells consisted of inducible nitric oxide synthase+ (iNOS) proinflammatory M1 macrophages, and CD68+, CD163+, CD206+, YM-1+, and arginase-II+antiinflammatory M2 macrophages. Although M1 macrophages were prominent 1–3 days after NM, M2 macrophages were most notable at 28 days. At this time, they were enlarged and vacuolated, consistent with a profibrotic phenotype. Flow cytometric analysis of isolated lung macrophages identified three phenotypically distinct subpopulations: mature CD11b−, CD43−, and CD68+ resident macrophages, which decreased in numbers after NM; and two infiltrating (CD11b+) macrophage subsets: immature CD43+ M1 macrophages and mature CD43− M2 macrophages, which increased sequentially. Time-related increases in M1 (iNOS, IL-12α, COX-2, TNF-α, matrix metalloproteinase-9, matrix metalloproteinase-10) and M2 (IL-10, pentraxin-2, connective tissue growth factor, ApoE) genes, as well as chemokines/chemokine receptors associated with trafficking of M1 (CCR2, CCR5, CCL2, CCL5) and M2 (CX3CR1, fractalkine) macrophages to sites of injury, were also noted in macrophages isolated from the lung after NM. The appearance of M1 and M2 macrophages in the lung correlated with NM-induced acute injury and the development of fibrosis, suggesting a potential role of these macrophage subpopulations in the pathogenic response to NM. PMID:26273949

  19. Delineation of G-Quadruplex Alkylation Sites Mediated by 3,6-Bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium iodide)carbazole-Aniline Mustard Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Han; Hu, Tsung-Hao; Huang, Tzu-Chiao; Chen, Ying-Lan; Chen, Yet-Ran; Cheng, Chien-Chung; Chen, Chao-Tsen

    2015-11-23

    A new G-quadruplex (G-4)-directing alkylating agent BMVC-C3M was designed and synthesized to integrate 3,6-bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium iodide)carbazole (BMVC) with aniline mustard. Various telomeric G-4 structures (hybrid-2 type and antiparallel) and an oncogene promoter, c-MYC (parallel), were constructed to react with BMVC-C3M, yielding 35 % alkylation yield toward G-4 DNA over other DNA categories (<6 %) and high specificity under competition conditions. Analysis of the intact alkylation adducts by electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) revealed the stepwise DNA alkylation mechanism of aniline mustard for the first time. Furthermore, the monoalkylation sites and intrastrand cross-linking sites were determined and found to be dependent on G-4 topology based on the results of footprinting analysis in combination with mass spectroscopic techniques and in silico modeling. The results indicated that BMVC-C3M preferentially alkylated at A15 (H26), G12 (H24), and G2 (c-MYC), respectively, as monoalkylated adducts and formed A15-C3M-A21 (H26), G12-C3M-G4 (H24), and G2-C3M-G4/G17 (c-MYC), respectively, as cross-linked dialkylated adducts. Collectively, the stability and site-selective cross-linking capacity of BMVC-C3M provides a credible tool for the structural and functional characterization of G-4 DNAs in biological systems.

  20. Intervention of Sulfur Mustard Toxicity by Downregulation of Cell Proliferation and Metabolic Rates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    attenuating the apop- totic response due to HD.7 We reported that BAPTA AM does not affect the activation of DNA ligase (a DNA repair enzyme) in HD...R. DNA ligase activation fol- lowing sulfur mustard exposure in cultured human epi- dermal keratinocytes. In Vitro Mol. Toxicol. 1998; 11: 45-53. Published in 2000 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. J. Appl. Toxicol. 20, S87-S91 (2000)

  1. Pretreatment of Human Epidermal Keratinocytes In Vitro With Ethacrynic Acid Reduces Sulfur Mustard Cytotoxicity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the...display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES...Ethacrynic Acid Reduces 5b. GRANT NUMBER Sulfur Mustard Toxicity 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Gross, CL, Nipwoda, MT, Nealley

  2. Architectural and Biochemical Expressions of Mustard Gas Keratopathy: Preclinical Indicators and Pathogenic Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-10

    Nanoscale topography of the basement membrane underlying the corneal epithelium of the rhesus macaque. Cell Tissue Res 299: 39–46. 28. Pal-Ghosh S...with associated secondary pathologies, collectively referred to as mustard gas keratopathy (MGK). MGK involves a progressive corneal degeneration...resulting in chronic ocular discomfort and impaired vision for which clinical interventions have typically had poor outcomes. Using a rabbit corneal vapor

  3. Effects of Prednisolone Acetate on Ocular Sulfur Mustard Injury in a Rabbit Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    perforations can be a potential risk. Steriods can greatly potentiate the effects of collagenase activity, resulting in severe destruction (melting...for mustard-induced ocular injury. Steriods are often used in combination but the effects ofjust the steroids alone have only been studied in a...of animals, it seemed likely that the steriod did have a contributing role particularly in corneas that were thinning and attempting to regenerate

  4. Progression of Ocular Sulfur Mustard Injury: Development of a Model System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    8923 ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Issue: Thymosins in Health and Disease Progression of ocular sulfur mustard injury: development of a...Control corneas have hemidesmosomal- attachments, characteris- tic desmosomal adhesions, and a well-articulated epithelial-stromal architecture (Fig. 3A... desmosomal attachments (white arrow), and a well- articulated epithelial-stromal boundary. (Panel B) One week after exposure, a basal epithelial cell layer

  5. Baseline Serum Clinical Chemistry Values in African Green Monkeys Before and After Sulfur Mustard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    COVERED (From - To) March 2001 to June 2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Baseline Serum Clinical Chemistry Values in African...models and can serve as an index for future HD AGM studies. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Sulfur mustard, African Green monkey, clinical chemistry , serum 16...Pathology Branch for necropsy histopathology review and clinical chemistry assistance. We also thank Steve Tucker and Dr. John McDonough, Ph.D., for

  6. Production of medium chain fatty acid rich mustard oil using packed bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Avery; Roy, Susmita; Mukherjee, Sohini; Ghosh, Mahua

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study was done on the production of different medium chain fatty acid (MCFA) rich mustard oil using a stirred tank batchreactor (STBR) and packed bed bio reactor (PBBR) using three commercially available immobilised lipases viz. Thermomyces lanuginosus, Candida antarctica and Rhizomucor meihe. Three different MCFAs capric, caprylic and lauric acids were incorporated in the mustard oil. Reaction parameters, such as substrate molar ratio, reaction temperature and enzyme concentration were standardized in the STBR and maintained in the PBBR. To provide equal time of residence between the substrate and enzyme in both the reactors for the same amount of substrates, the substrate flow rate in the PBBR was maintainedat 0.27 ml/min. Gas liquid chromatography was used to monitor the incorporation of MCFA in mustard oil. The study showed that the PBBR was more efficient than the STBR in the synthesis of structured lipids with less migration of acyl groups. The physico-chemical parameters of the product along with fatty acid composition in all positions and sn-2 positions were also determined.

  7. GLC analysis of Indian rapeseed-mustard to study the variability of fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, N; Agnihotri, A

    2000-12-01

    Rapeseed-mustard is one of the most economically important oilseed crops in India. Speciality oils having high amounts of a specific fatty acid are of immense importance for both nutritional and industrial purposes. Oil high in oleic acid has demand in commercial food-service applications due to a long shelf-life and cholesterol-reducing properties. Both linoleic and linolenic acids are essential fatty acids; however, less than 3% linolenic acid is preferred for oil stability. High erucic acid content is beneficial for the polymer industry, whereas low erucic acid is recommended for food purposes. Therefore, it is important to undertake systematic characterization of the available gene pool for its variable fatty acid profile to be utilized for specific purposes. In the present study the Indian rapeseed-mustard germplasm and some newly developed low-erucic-acid strains were analysed by GLC to study the fatty acid composition in these lines. The GLC analysis revealed that the rapeseed-mustard varieties being commonly grown in India are characterized by high erucic acid content (30-51%) in the oil with low levels of oleic acid (13-23%). However, from among the recently developed low-erucic-acid strains, several lines were identified with comparatively high oleic acid (60-70%), moderate to high linoleic acid (13-40%) and low linolenic acid (< 10%) contents. Work is in progress at TERI (New Delhi, India) to utilize these lines for development of strains with particular fatty acid compositions for specific purposes.

  8. Solid-Phase Extraction of Sulfur Mustard Metabolites Using an Activated Carbon Fiber Sorbent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Yong Han

    2016-01-01

    A novel solid-phase extraction method using activated carbon fiber (ACF) was developed and validated. ACF has a vast network of pores of varying sizes and microporous structures that result in rapid adsorption and selective extraction of sulfur mustard metabolites according to the pH of eluting solvents. ACF could not only selectively extract thiodiglycol and 1-methylsulfinyl-2-[2-(methylthio)-ethylsulfonyl]ethane eluting a 9:1 ratio of dichloromethane to acetone, and 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethane] and 1,1'-sulfonylbis- [2-S-(N-acetylcysteinyl)ethane] eluting 3% hydrogen chloride in methanol, but could also eliminate most interference without loss of analytes during the loading and washing steps. A sample preparation method has been optimized for the extraction of sulfur mustard metabolites from human urine using an ACF sorbent. The newly developed extraction method was applied to the trace analysis of metabolites of sulfur mustard in human urine matrices in a confidence-building exercise for the analysis of biomedical samples provided by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.

  9. Complexes of different nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligands with SbCl3 and PhSbCl2 as potential antileishmanial agents against Sb(III)-sensitive and -resistant parasites.

    PubMed

    Lizarazo-Jaimes, Edgar H; Reis, Priscila G; Bezerra, Filipe M; Rodrigues, Bernardo L; Monte-Neto, Rubens L; Melo, Maria N; Frézard, Frédéric; Demicheli, Cynthia

    2014-03-01

    Novel trivalent antimony complexes with the nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligand 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq) have been synthesized by the reaction with SbCl3 or PhSbCl2. The crystal structures of [Sb(phen)Cl3] and [PhSb(phen)Cl2]CH3COOH were determined and shown to adopt a distorted square pyramid geometry with a five-coordinated Sb center. Surprisingly, all the complexes, the ligands and PhSbCl2 showed very high antileishmanial activities, with IC50 in the nanomolar range against Sb(III)-sensitive and -resistant Leishmania infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi) and Leishmania amazonensis strains. These compounds were much more active against these Leishmania strains than the old trivalent drug potassium antimonyl tartrate. [PhSb(phen)Cl2]CH3COOH complex was found to be the most active compound and the lack of cross-resistance of PhSbCl2 suggests that the transport pathways of this compound across the cell membrane differ from those responsible for the resistance of Leishmania to Sb(OH)3. In the case of the complexes with PhSbCl2, our data supports the model that both ligand and metal contributed to the overall activity of the complex. Furthermore, among the complexes with SbCl3, only bipy showed an improved activity upon complexation. Cytotoxicity evaluations of these compounds against murine peritoneal macrophages showed high selective indexes in the range of 7-70 for [Sb(phen)Cl3], [Sb(bipy)Cl3] and [Sb(dpq)Cl3] complexes, being much more selective than potassium antimonyl tartrate. In conclusion, this study presents a set of new antileishmanial agents including one of the most active Sb-based compounds ever reported, which can contribute to the development of new chemotherapeutic strategies against leishmaniasis including Sb-resistant cases.

  10. Arctic mustard flower color polymorphism controlled by petal-specific downregulation at the threshold of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Dick, Cynthia A; Buenrostro, Jason; Butler, Timothy; Carlson, Matthew L; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Whittall, Justen B

    2011-04-07

    Intra- and interspecific variation in flower color is a hallmark of angiosperm diversity. The evolutionary forces underlying the variety of flower colors can be nearly as diverse as the colors themselves. In addition to pollinator preferences, non-pollinator agents of selection can have a major influence on the evolution of flower color polymorphisms, especially when the pigments in question are also expressed in vegetative tissues. In such cases, identifying the target(s) of selection starts with determining the biochemical and molecular basis for the flower color variation and examining any pleiotropic effects manifested in vegetative tissues. Herein, we describe a widespread purple-white flower color polymorphism in the mustard Parrya nudicaulis spanning Alaska. The frequency of white-flowered individuals increases with increasing growing-season temperature, consistent with the role of anthocyanin pigments in stress tolerance. White petals fail to produce the stress responsive flavonoid intermediates in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway (ABP), suggesting an early pathway blockage. Petal cDNA sequences did not reveal blockages in any of the eight enzyme-coding genes in white-flowered individuals, nor any color differentiating SNPs. A qRT-PCR analysis of white petals identified a 24-fold reduction in chalcone synthase (CHS) at the threshold of the ABP, but no change in CHS expression in leaves and sepals. This arctic species has avoided the deleterious effects associated with the loss of flavonoid intermediates in vegetative tissues by decoupling CHS expression in petals and leaves, yet the correlation of flower color and climate suggests that the loss of flavonoids in the petals alone may affect the tolerance of white-flowered individuals to colder environments.

  11. Sulfur mustard-induced increase in intracellular free calcium level and arachidonic acid release from cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Legere, R.H.; Majerus, B.J.; Petrali, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanism of action of the alkylating agent bis-(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM) was studied using the in thai vitro mouse neuroblastoma-rat glioma hybrid NG 108-1 S clonal p cell line model. Following 0.3 mM SM exposure, cell viability remained high (>80% of untreated control) up to 9 hr and then declined steadily to about 40% of control after 20-24 hr. During the early period of SM exposure, when there was no significant cell viability loss, the following effects were observed. The cellular glutathione level decreased 20% after 1 hr and 34% after 6 hr. Between 2 and 6 hr, there was a time-dependent increase (about 10 to 30%) in intracellular free calcium (Ca2+), which was localized to the limiting membrane of swollen endoplasmic reticula and mitochondria, to euchromatin areas of the nucleus, and to areas of the cytosol and plasma membrane. Moreover,there was also a time-dependent increase in the release of isotopically labeled arachidonic acid ((3H)AA) from cellular membranes. Increase in (3H)AA release was 28% at 3 hr and about 60-80% between 6 and 9 hr. This increase in I3HIAA release was inhibited by quinacrine (20 uM), which is a phospholipase (PLA2) inhibitor. At 16 hr after SM exposure, there was a large increase (about 200% of control) in I3HIAA release, which was coincident with a 50% loss of cell viability. These results suggest a Ca2+-mediated toxic mechanism of SM via PLA2 activation and arachidonate release.

  12. Differential gene expression profiling of mouse skin after sulfur mustard exposure: Extended time response and inhibitor effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gerecke, Donald R. Chen Minjun; Isukapalli, Sastry S.; Gordon, Marion K.; Chang, Y.-C.; Tong Weida; Androulakis, Ioannis P.; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2009-01-15

    Sulfur mustard (HD, SM), is a chemical warfare agent that within hours causes extensive blistering at the dermal-epidermal junction of skin. To better understand the progression of SM-induced blistering, gene expression profiling for mouse skin was performed after a single high dose of SM exposure. Punch biopsies of mouse ears were collected at both early and late time periods following SM exposure (previous studies only considered early time periods). The biopsies were examined for pathological disturbances and the samples further assayed for gene expression profiling using the Affymetrix microarray analysis system. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis of the differently expressed genes, performed with ArrayTrack showed clear separation of the various groups. Pathway analysis employing the KEGG library and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) indicated that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and hematopoietic cell lineage are common pathways affected at different time points. Gene ontology analysis identified the most significantly altered biological processes as the immune response, inflammatory response, and chemotaxis; these findings are consistent with other reported results for shorter time periods. Selected genes were chosen for RT-PCR verification and showed correlations in the general trends for the microarrays. Interleukin 1 beta was checked for biological analysis to confirm the presence of protein correlated to the corresponding microarray data. The impact of a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor I, against SM exposure was assessed. These results can help in understanding the molecular mechanism of SM-induced blistering, as well as to test the efficacy of different inhibitors.

  13. Phosphoramide mustard exposure induces DNA adduct formation and the DNA damage repair response in rat ovarian granulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ganesan, Shanthi Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-02-01

    Phosphoramide mustard (PM), the ovotoxic metabolite of the anti-cancer agent cyclophosphamide (CPA), destroys rapidly dividing cells by forming NOR-G-OH, NOR-G and G-NOR-G adducts with DNA, potentially leading to DNA damage. A previous study demonstrated that PM induces ovarian DNA damage in rat ovaries. To investigate whether PM induces DNA adduct formation, DNA damage and induction of the DNA repair response, rat spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) were treated with vehicle control (1% DMSO) or PM (3 or 6 μM) for 24 or 48 h. Cell viability was reduced (P < 0.05) after 48 h of exposure to 3 or 6 μM PM. The NOR-G-OH DNA adduct was detected after 24 h of 6 μM PM exposure, while the more cytotoxic G-NOR-G DNA adduct was formed after 48 h by exposure to both PM concentrations. Phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA double stranded break occurrence, was also increased by PM exposure, coincident with DNA adduct formation. Additionally, induction of genes (Atm, Parp1, Prkdc, Xrcc6, and Brca1) and proteins (ATM, γH2AX, PARP-1, PRKDC, XRCC6, and BRCA1) involved in DNA repair were observed in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. These data support that PM induces DNA adduct formation in ovarian granulosa cells, induces DNA damage and elicits the ovarian DNA repair response. - Highlights: • PM forms ovarian DNA adducts. • DNA damage marker γH2AX increased by PM exposure. • PM induces ovarian DNA double strand break repair.

  14. [Determination of isothiocyanates and related compounds in mustard extract and horseradish extract used as natural food additives].

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Yoko; Hirata, Keiko; Suzuki, Kumi; Iida, Kenji; Ueta, Tadahiko; Kamata, Kunihiro

    2002-02-01

    Amounts of isothiocyanates and related compounds in a mustard extract and a horseradish extract for food additive use were determined by GC, after confirmation of the identity of GC peaks by GC/MS. Amounts of allyl isothiocyanate, which included that of allyl thiocyanate, because most of the allyl thiocyanate detected in the sample was assumed to have been formed from allyl isothiocyanate during GC analysis, were 97.6% and 85.4%, in the mustard extract and the horseradish extract, respectively. Total amounts of the identified isothiocyanates in the mustard extract and the horseradish extract were 98.5% and 95.4%, respectively. Allyl cyanide, a degradation product of allyl isothiocyanate, was found in the mustard extract and the horseradish extract at the levels of 0.57% and 1.73%, respectively. beta-Phenylethyl cyanide, a possible degradation product of beta-phenylethyl isothiocyanate, and allyl sulfides were found in the horseradish extract, at the levels of 0.13% and 0.46%, respectively. Allylamine, which is another degradation product of allyl isothiocyanate, was determined after acetylation, and was found in the mustard extract and the horseradish extract at the levels of 8 micrograms/g and 67 micrograms/g, respectively.

  15. Childhood physical abnormalities following paternal exposure to sulfur mustard gas in Iran: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mustard gas, a known chemical weapon, was used during the Iran-Iraq war of 1980-1988. We aimed to determine if exposure to mustard gas among men was significantly associated with abnormalities and disorders among progenies. Methods Using a case-control design, we identified all progenies of Sardasht men (exposed group, n = 498), who were born at least nine months after the exposure, compared to age-matched controls in Rabat, a nearby city (non-exposed group, n = 689). We conducted a thorough medical history, physical examination, and appropriate paraclinical studies to detect any physical abnormality and/or disorder. Given the presence of correlated data, we applied Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) multivariable models to determine associations. Results The overall frequency of detected physical abnormalities and disorders was significantly higher in the exposed group (19% vs. 11%, Odds Ratio [OR] 1.93, 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.37-2.72, P = 0.0002). This was consistent across sexes. Congenital anomalies (OR 3.54, 95% CI, 1.58-7.93, P = 0.002) and asthma (OR, 3.12, 95% CI, 1.43-6.80, P = 0.004) were most commonly associated with exposure. No single abnormality was associated with paternal exposure to mustard gas. Conclusion Our study demonstrates a generational effect of exposure to mustard gas. The lasting effects of mustard gas exposure in parents effects fertility and may impact child health and development in the long-term. PMID:20630096

  16. Characterization of a new oriental-mustard (Brassica juncea) allergen, Bra j IE: detection of an allergenic epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Monsalve, R I; Gonzalez de la Peña, M A; Menendez-Arias, L; Lopez-Otin, C; Villalba, M; Rodriguez, R

    1993-01-01

    Bra j IE, a major allergen from oriental-mustard (Brassica juncea) seeds, has been isolated and characterized. Its primary structure has been elucidated. This protein is composed of two chains (37 and 92 amino acids) linked by disulphide bridges. The amino acid sequence obtained is closely related to that previously determined for Sin a I, an allergen isolated from yellow mustard (Sinapis alba). A common epitope has been detected in the large chain of both Bra j IE and Sin a I by means of electroblotting and immunodetection with 2B3, which is a monoclonal antibody raised against the yellow-mustard allergen. A histidine residue of the large chain of both mustard allergens has been found to be essential for the recognition by 2B3 antibody. A synthetic multiantigenic peptide containing this His was recognized by 2B3 as well as by sera of mustard-hypersensitive individuals. Therefore this antigenic determinant must be involved in the allergenicity of these proteins. Images Figure 3 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:7688955

  17. Nitrogen dioxide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide ; CASRN 10102 - 44 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  18. Next Generation Non-particulate Dry Nonwoven Pad for Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Ramkumar, S S; Love, A; Sata, U R; Koester, C J; Smith, W J; Keating, G A; Hobbs, L; Cox, S B; Lagna, W M; Kendall, R J

    2008-05-01

    New, non-particulate decontamination materials promise to reduce both military and civilian casualties by enabling individuals to decontaminate themselves and their equipment within minutes of exposure to chemical warfare agents or other toxic materials. One of the most promising new materials has been developed using a needlepunching nonwoven process to construct a novel and non-particulate composite fabric of multiple layers, including an inner layer of activated carbon fabric, which is well-suited for the decontamination of both personnel and equipment. This paper describes the development of a composite nonwoven pad and compares efficacy test results for this pad with results from testing other decontamination systems. The efficacy of the dry nonwoven fabric pad was demonstrated specifically for decontamination of the chemical warfare blister agent bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (H or sulfur mustard). GC/MS results indicate that the composite fabric was capable of significantly reducing the vapor hazard from mustard liquid absorbed into the nonwoven dry fabric pad. The mustard adsorption efficiency of the nonwoven pad was significantly higher than particulate activated carbon (p=0.041) and was similar to the currently fielded US military M291 kit (p=0.952). The nonwoven pad has several advantages over other materials, especially its non-particulate, yet flexible, construction. This composite fabric was also shown to be chemically compatible with potential toxic and hazardous liquids, which span a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic chemicals, including a concentrated acid, an organic solvent and a mild oxidant, bleach.

  19. Development and validation of a triplex real-time PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of three mustard species and three celery varieties in food.

    PubMed

    Palle-Reisch, Monika; Hochegger, Rupert; Cichna-Markl, Margit

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents a triplex real-time PCR assay allowing the simultaneous detection of three mustard species (white, black and brown mustard) and three celery varieties (celery roots, celery stalks and leaf celery) in foodstuffs. The triplex assay does not show cross-reactivity with other Brassicaceae. Low cross-reactivities were observed with fenugreek, cumin, ginger, caraway, turmeric, lovage and rye, the ΔCt values were, however, ⩾ 12 compared to positive controls. The triplex assay allows the detection of traces of DNA of the allergenic components in spite of an excess of the other DNA templates. Analysis of extracts from model sausages containing defined concentrations of mustard and celery showed that the triplex assay is applicable to both raw and processed foods. It was found to allow the detection of 1 ppm black/brown mustard and 50 ppm white mustard and celery in raw and brewed sausages with a probability ⩾ 95%.

  20. 2,6-Dithiopurine, a nucleophilic scavenger, protects against mutagenesis in mouse skin treated in vivo with 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide, a mustard gas analog.

    PubMed

    Boulware, Stephen; Fields, Tammy; McIvor, Elizabeth; Powell, K Leslie; Abel, Erika L; Vasquez, Karen M; MacLeod, Michael C

    2012-09-01

    Sulfur mustard [bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide, SM] is a well-known DNA-damaging agent that has been used in chemical warfare since World War I, and is a weapon that could potentially be used in a terrorist attack on a civilian population. Dermal exposure to high concentrations of SM produces severe, long-lasting burns. Topical exposure to high concentrations of 2-(chloroethyl) ethyl sulfide (CEES), a monofunctional analog of SM, also produces severe skin lesions in mice. Utilizing a genetically engineered mouse strain, Big Blue, that allows measurement of mutation frequencies in mouse tissues, we now show that topical treatment with much lower concentrations of CEES induces significant dose- and time-dependent increases in mutation frequency in mouse skin; the mutagenic exposures produce minimal toxicity as determined by standard histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis for cytokeratin 6 and the DNA-damage induced phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γ-H2AX). We attempted to develop a therapeutic that would inhibit the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency in the skin. We observe that multi-dose, topical treatment with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a known chemical scavenger of CEES, beginning 1h post-exposure to CEES, completely abolishes the CEES-induced increase in mutation frequency. These findings suggest the possibility that DTP, previously shown to be non-toxic in mice, may be useful as a therapeutic agent in accidental or malicious human exposures to SM.

  1. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... Orange Parkinson’s Awareness Month Were you exposed to herbicides during service and have Parkinson’s disease? You may ...

  2. Limitations and challenges in treatment of acute chemical warfare agent poisoning.

    PubMed

    Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz; Kehe, Kai

    2013-12-05

    Recent news from Syria on a possible use of chemical warfare agents made the headlines. Furthermore, the motivation of terrorists to cause maximal harm shifts these agents into the public focus. For incidents with mass casualties appropriate medical countermeasures must be available. At present, the most important threats arise from nerve agents and sulfur mustard. At first, self-protection and protection of medical units from contamination is of utmost importance. Volatile nerve agent exposure, e.g. sarin, results in fast development of cholinergic crisis. Immediate clinical diagnosis can be confirmed on-site by assessment of acetylcholinesterase activity. Treatment with autoinjectors that are filled with 2mg atropine and an oxime (at present obidoxime, pralidoxime, TMB-4 or HI-6) are not effective against all nerve agents. A more aggressive atropinisation has to be considered and more effective oximes (if possible with a broad spectrum or a combination of different oximes) as well as alternative strategies to cope with high acetylcholine levels at synaptic sites should be developed. A further gap exists for the treatment of patients with sustained cholinergic crisis that has to be expected after exposure to persistent nerve agents, e.g. VX. The requirement for long-lasting artificial ventilation can be reduced with an oxime therapy that is optimized by using the cholinesterase status for guidance or by measures (e.g. scavengers) that are able to reduce the poison load substantially in the patients. For sulfur mustard poisoning no specific antidote is available until now. Symptomatic measures as used for treatment of burns are recommended together with surgical or laser debridement. Thus, huge amounts of resources are expected to be consumed as wound healing is impaired. Possible depots of sulfur mustard in tissues may aggravate the situation. More basic knowledge is necessary to improve substantially therapeutic options. The use of stem cells may provide a new

  3. Comparison of Mustard Oil and Ghee Consumption on the History of Coronary Heart Disease in Urban Population of India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Hanjabam Barun; Vyas, Soniya; Kumar, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is one of the leading causes of mortality in India, due to high consumption of mustard oil and ghee among urban population. Aim To find out the relationship of mustard oil and ghee consumption on CHD history. Materials and Methods By a random cross-sectional, house-to-house survey in North India, 137 people aged between 40-80 years (70 males and 67 females) were selected by dietary history of Mustard Oil (MO) and Ghee consumption (G), but having no other CHD precipitating factor. Using food frequency questionnaire, the study population was divided into two groups based on the amount of MO and G consumption; Group A (n = 75): MO >1L/month, but G <0.5Kg/month and Group B (n = 62): MO =0.2 to 0.5L/month but G >1.25Kg/month. Serum lipid profile estimation and resting ECGs recording were done from all the subjects. Results There was no statistical significant difference in CHD history between the two groups. Mustard Oil had positive correlation with CHD history. CHD was higher by 50.9% in Group A and was independent of gender. However, the odds of CHD history were higher among males by 32.2% irrespective of the groups. Conclusion The results demonstrated that CHD history was associated with higher relative consumption of mustard oil than ghee and CHD is positively correlated with increase mustard oil intake, blood level of TG, TC, LDL, VLDL, TC/HDL and LDL/HDL ratio. PMID:27891367

  4. Chemical Warfare Agent Degradation and Decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Talmage, Sylvia Smith; Watson, Annetta Paule; Hauschild, Veronique; Munro, Nancy B; King, J.

    2007-02-01

    The decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA) from structures, environmental media, and even personnel has become an area of particular interest in recent years due to increased homeland security concerns. In addition to terrorist attacks, scenarios such as accidental releases of CWA from U.S. stockpile sites or from historic, buried munitions are also subjects for response planning. To facilitate rapid identification of practical and effective decontamination approaches, this paper reviews pathways of CWA degradation by natural means as well as those resulting from deliberately applied solutions and technologies; these pathways and technologies are compared and contrasted. We then review various technologies, both traditional and recent, with some emphasis on decontamination materials used for surfaces that are difficult to clean. Discussion is limited to the major threat CWA, namely sulfur mustard (HD, bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), VX (O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate), and the G-series nerve agents. The principal G-agents are GA (tabun, ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate), GB (sarin, isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate), and GD (soman, pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate). The chemical decontamination pathways of each agent are outlined, with some discussion of intermediate and final degradation product toxicity. In all cases, and regardless of the CWA degradation pathway chosen for decontamination, it will be necessary to collect and analyze pertinent environmental samples during the treatment phase to confirm attainment of clearance levels.

  5. Nitrogen narcosis and alcohol consumption--a scuba diving fatality.

    PubMed

    Michalodimitrakis, E; Patsalis, A

    1987-07-01

    Nitrogen narcosis can cause death among experienced scuba divers. Nitrogen under pressure affects the brain by acting as an anesthetic agent. Furthermore, the consumption of ethanol along with diving will cause the symptoms of nitrogen narcosis to occur at depths less than 30 m. Our case deals with an experienced diver who drank alcoholic beverages before diving and developed symptoms of nitrogen narcosis at a shallow depth. These two conditions contributed to his death by drowning.

  6. Anaerobic toxicity and biodegradability of hydrolysis products of chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Sklyar, V I; Mosolova, T P; Kucherenko, I A; Degtyarova, N N; Varfolomeyev, S D; Kalyuzhnyi, S V

    1999-08-01

    The toxicity and biodegradability of the main hydrolysis products of chemical warfare agents were investigated under methanogenic conditions. Among the tested substances, only MPhA does not have any toxic effect with regard to the aceticlastic methanogenic activity. The toxicity of other compounds varied between moderate (TDG, mercaptoethanol) to strong (ethanolamine, diisobutyl ester of MPhA). Biodegradability tests showed that all the products of chemical detoxification of mustard gas (ethanolamine, ethylene glycol, TDG, mercaptoethanol) can be biomineralized under methanogenic conditions. On the contrary, phosphorus-containing compounds from the chemical detoxification of nerve warfare agents (Sarin, Soman, Vx-gases) are quite persistent under these conditions.

  7. Inhalation and Percutaneous Toxicokinetics of Sulfur Mustard and Its Adducts in Hairless Guinea Pigs and Marmosets. Efficacy of Naval Scavengers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    very rapid distribution phase and a very slow elimination phase. The concentration of sulfur mustard in tissues (lung, spleen , liver, and bone marrow...tissue, and spleen . The respiratory tract was isolated from animals that were nose-only exposed to 1 LCt50 of sulfur mustard in 5 min, at 4 h after...detected in spleen , bone marrow and small intestine, while rather low concentrations of N7-HETE-gua were measured in the lung at 10 min and 48 h after

  8. [The implantation of a sequential endocavitary pacemaker in a patient with transposition of the great vessels after the Mustard correction].

    PubMed

    Padró, J M; Montiel, J; Ruyra, X; Subirana, M; Arís, A; Caralps, J M

    1993-08-01

    A 31-year-old male patient, underwent Mustard operation in childhood for complete transposition of the great arteries. He required a sequential (DDD-mode) pacemaker due to a complete symptomatic auriculoventricular block, 25 years after the operation. Wires were inserted through the left cephalic vein and placed in the systemic atrium and ventricle, achieving correct sensing and stimulating thresholds. Atrial rhythm disturbances, specially sinus node dysfunction, are frequent after Mustard's operation and increase through the years following the surgical procedure. Atrioventricular conduction disturbances are rare. Treatment by endocavitary pacemaker implies a correct knowledge of the special anatomy in this congenital disease and its surgical correction.

  9. Thermal requirement of indian mustard (Brassica juncea) at different phonological stages under late sown condition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manoj Pratap; Lallu; Singh, N B

    2014-01-01

    Indian mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern & Coss.] is a long day plant, which requires fairly cool climatic condition during growth and development for obtaining better seed yield. Various workers have correlated crop growth and development with energy requirement parameters, such as growing degree days (GDD), photo-thermal unit (PTU), helios thermal unit (HTU), photo-thermal index (PTI) and heat use efficiency (HUE). Therefore, GDD requirement for different phenological stages of 22 newly developed Indian mustard varieties was studies during winter (rabi) seasons of 2009-10 and 2010-11 at student instructional farm of C.S. Azad University of Agriculture and Technology, Kanpur, (Utter Pradesh). Study revealed that RH-8814, NRCDR-02 and BPR-549-9 recorded higher GDD (1703.0, 1662.9 and 1648.0), PTU (19129.8, 18694.2 and 18379.8), HTU (11397.7, 11072.2 and 10876.0), PTI (13.25, 13.14 and 13.08) and HUE (4.11, 3.84 and 3.71) at physiological maturity, while higher HUE was recorded (9.62, 8.99 and 8.91 kg ha(-1) degrees-day) at days after sowing (DAS) to 50 % flowering. On the basis of study mustard genotypes RH-8814, NRCDR-02 and BPR-549-9 were identified as most heat-tolerant, as they maintained higher values for energy related parameters. Seed yield was highly positively correlated with GDD (r = 0.61, 0.65 and 0.75), PTU (r = 0.66, 0.64 and 0.74), HTU(r = 0.79, 0.68 and 0.73) at the above these three phenological stages, while negatively correlated with PTI at anthesis and at maturity. Hence, these parents could be used in crossing programme for achieving further improvement.

  10. Environmental Assessment. Proposed Sahara Mustard Control on the Barry M. Goldwater Range - East

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    dateable) artifacts. Radiocarbon dates , obtained from thermal features indicates that BMGR- 00-D-01 dates to AD 1400-1600 and BMGR-00-D-02 dates to AD...failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 19 JUL 2012 2...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Proposed Sahara Mustard Control on the Barry M. Goldwater Range - Easy

  11. Study on evaporation characteristics of a sessile drop of sulfur mustard on glass.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyunsook; Myung, Sung Min; Park, Myung Kyu; Lee, Hae Wan; Ryu, Sam Gon

    2012-05-01

    The evaporation characteristics (evaporation rates and process) of a sessile drop of sulfur mustard on glass has been studied using a laboratory-sized wind tunnel, gas chromatograph mass spectrometry, and drop shape analysis. It showed that the evaporation rates of the droplet increased with temperature and air flow. The effect of temperature on the rates was more pronounced at lower air flow. Air flow was less effective at lower temperature. The contact angle of the droplet was initially observed as θ = 19.5° ± 0.7 and decreased linearly with time until it switched to a constant mode.

  12. Effect of Sulfur Mustard on Mast Cells in Hairless Guinea Pig Skin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-13

    AD-P008 756 EFFECT OF SULFUR MUSTARD ON MAST CELLS IN HAIRLESS GUINEA PIG SKIN JOHN S. GRAHAM, MARK A . BRYANT and ERNEST H. BRAUE U.S. Army Medical...with their granules of vasoactive histamine, mast cells might be expected to play a role in HD-induced injury. Changes in mast cells exposed to low...histopathology 94-07918 Best Available Copy C0t PONENT PART NOTICE THIS PAPER IS A CCWPOWENT PART OF THE FOLLOWING COIPILATION REPORT: TITLE: Proceedins of the

  13. DNA minor groove targeted alkylating agents based on bisbenzimidazole carriers: synthesis, cytotoxicity and sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation.

    PubMed

    Smaill, J B; Fan, J Y; Denny, W A

    1998-12-01

    A series of bisbenzimidazoles bearing a variety of alkylating agents [ortho- and meta-mustards, imidazolebis(hydroxymethyl), imidazolebis(methylcarbamate) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl)], appended by a propyl linker chain, were prepared and investigated for sequence-specificity of DNA alkylation and their cytotoxicity. Previous work has shown that, for para-aniline mustards, a propyl linker is optimal for cytotoxicity. Alkaline cleavage assays using a variety of different labelled oligonucleotides showed that the preferred sequences for adenine alkylation were 5'-TTTANANAANN and 5'-ATTANANAANN (underlined bases show the drug alkylation sites), with AT-rich sequences required on both the 5' and 3' sides of the alkylated adenine. The different aniline mustards showed little variation in alkylation pattern and similar efficiencies of DNA cross-link formation despite the changes in orientation and positioning of the mustard, suggesting that the propyl linker has some flexibility. The imidazole- and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators showed no DNA strand cleavage following base treatment, indicating that no guanine or adenine N3 or N7 adducts were formed. Using the PCR-based polymerase stop assay, these alkylators showed PCR blocks at 5'-C*G sites (the * nucleotide indicates the blocked site), particularly at 5'-TAC*GA 5'-AGC*GGA, and 5'-AGCC*GGT sequences, caused by guanine 2-NH2 lesions on the opposite strand. Only the (more reactive) imidazolebis(methylcarbamoyl) and pyrrolebis(hydroxymethyl) alkylators demonstrated interstrand cross-linking ability. All of the bifunctional mustards showed large (approximately 100-fold) increases in cytotoxicity over chlorambucil, with the corresponding monofunctional mustards being 20- to 60-fold less cytotoxic. These results suggest that in the mustards the propyl linker provides sufficient flexibility to achieve delivery of the alkylator to favoured (adenine N3) sites in the minor groove, regardless of its exact geometry with

  14. [Chemical treatment and decomposition technique of the chemical warfare agents containing arsenicals].

    PubMed

    Kaise, Toshikazu; Kinoshita, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    The old Japanese army developed several chemical warfare agents on Ohkuno Island in Seto inland sea, Hiroshima Japan, during the period between 1919 and 1944. These chemical agents including yperite (mustard; irritating agent), lewisite (irritating agent), diphenylchloroarsine (DA; vomiting agent), diphenylcyanoarsine (DC; vomiting agent) and other poisonous gases were manufactured to be used in China. After World War II, the old Japanese army abandoned or dumped these agents into seas inside or outside of Japan and interior of China. Rather than being used for terrorism, these chemical warfare agents containing arsenicals may cause injury to some workers at the digging site of abandoned chemical weapons. Moreover, the leakage of chemical agents or an explosion of the bomb may result in environmental pollution, as a result, it is highly possible to cause serious health damage to the residents. There are still many abandoned or dumped warfare agents in Japan and China, therefore chemical agents containing arsenic are needed to be treated with alkaline for decomposition or to decompose with oxidizing agent. Presently, a large quantity of chemical agents and the contaminated soil are processed by combustion, and industrial waste is treated with sulfur compounds as the insoluble sulfur arsenic complex. This report describes the methods for the disposal of these organic arsenic agents that have been implemented until present and examines the future prospects.

  15. Semiquantitative analysis of 3-butenyl isothiocyanate to monitor an off-flavor in mustard seeds and glycosinolates screening for origin identification.

    PubMed

    Frank, Nancy; Dubois, Mathieu; Goldmann, Till; Tarres, Adrienne; Schuster, Elke; Robert, Fabien

    2010-03-24

    The present paper describes the development of an analytical method for the semiquantitative analysis of 3-butenyl isothiocyanate in mustard seeds, this compound being linked to an undesirable (at least for the European palate) off-flavor. 3-Butenyl isothiocyanate is one of the enzymatic degradation products of gluconapin, a member of the glucosinolate family of compounds. A headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method has been developed for the rapid analysis of 3-butenyl isothiocyanate in mustard seeds. The cross-check of this HS-GC-MS method has been made on the basis of the analysis of the native gluconapin using liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS). Both techniques gave comparable results. The HS-GC-MS method was kept as the method of choice as it is rapid and solvent-free. Because yellow mustard seeds do not normally contain gluconapin, its presence in such seeds above the limit of detection was already considered as a criterion for potentially problematic mustard batches. However, "organoleptically" acceptable brown mustard seeds already contained measurable amounts of gluconapin and had to be differentiated from mustard seeds containing nonacceptable levels of gluconapin, as it is typically the case for brown mustard originating from the Indian subcontinent. Thus, a 3-butenyl isothiocyanate content "cut point" has been established to discriminate between batches. This limit could then be applied for the acceptance or rejection of mustard seed batches. In addition, LC-TOF-MS screening of mustard seeds from different geographic origins showed the heterogeneity of the glucosinolate profile and the difficulty to find good origin markers.

  16. Overexpressing both ATP sulfurylase and selenocysteine methyltransferase enhances selenium phytoremediation traits in Indian mustard.

    PubMed

    LeDuc, Danika L; AbdelSamie, Manal; Móntes-Bayon, Maria; Wu, Carol P; Reisinger, Sarah J; Terry, Norman

    2006-11-01

    A major goal of our selenium (Se) phytoremediation research is to use genetic engineering to develop fast-growing plants with an increased ability to tolerate, accumulate, and volatilize Se. To this end we incorporated a gene (encoding selenocysteine methyltransferase, SMT) from the Se hyperaccumulator, Astragalus bisulcatus, into Indian mustard (LeDuc, D.L., Tarun, A.S., Montes-Bayón, M., Meija, J., Malit, M.F., Wu, C.P., AbdelSamie, M., Chiang, C.-Y., Tagmount, A., deSouza, M., Neuhierl, B., Böck, A., Caruso, J., Terry, N., 2004. Overexpression of selenocysteine methyltransferase in Arabidopsis and Indian mustard increases selenium tolerance and accumulation Plant Physiol. 135, 377-383.). The resulting transgenic plants successfully enhanced Se phytoremediation in that the plants tolerated and accumulated Se from selenite significantly better than wild type. However, the advantage conferred by the SMT enzyme was much less when Se was supplied as selenate. In order to enhance the phytoremediation of selenate, we developed double transgenic plants that overexpressed the gene encoding ATP sulfurylase (APS) in addition to SMT, i.e., APSxSMT. The results showed that there was a substantial improvement in Se accumulation from selenate (4 to 9 times increase) in transgenic plants overexpressing both APS and SMT.

  17. Alkylation of nucleic acids by DNA-targeted 4-anilinoquinolinium aniline mustards: kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, C J; Denny, W A; Fan, J Y

    1991-01-01

    The rate of constant for hydrolysis of a series of 4-substituted aniline mustards Ar-X-pC6H4-N(CH2CH2Cl)2, where Ar is 4-anilinoquinolinium and X = O, CH2, CONH and CO, have been measured in water and 0.02 M imidazole buffer at 37 degrees C and in 50% aqueous acetone at 66 degrees C. The equilibrium binding constants of the compounds and their hydrolysis products to nucleic acids of differing base composition have been determined at varying ionic strengths, and the results are consistent with the compounds binding as expected in the DNA minor groove. The alkylating reactivity of the mustards towards these nucleic acids has been measured in water at 37 degrees C and in 0.01 M HEPES buffer over a range of temperatures from 25 degrees C to 60 degrees C. Evaluation of the thermodynamic parameters for these kinetic and equilibrium studies suggests that the interaction with nucleic acids is via an internal SN2 mechanism involving an aziridinium ion.

  18. Kinetics of the conjugation of aniline mustards with glutathione and thiosulfate.

    PubMed

    Gamcsik, M P; Millis, K K; Hamill, T G

    1997-06-06

    The rates of the non-enzymatic conjugation of the substituted aniline mustards, melphalan, chlorambucil and p-(N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl))toluidine with glutathione and thiosulfate were determined using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using this method, the disappearance of drug and the formation of both the mono-thioether and bis-thioether conjugates can be monitored directly. For glutathione conjugation, the rate constants for the formation of the first and second aziridinium intermediates were similar. With thiosulfate conjugation, the rate constant for the formation of the first aziridinium intermediate is greater than the rate constant for the formation of the second aziridinium. This demonstrates that the type of nucleophile has a significant influence on the overall alkylating activity of these bifunctional mustards. The bisthioether adduct formed from the reaction between p-(N,N-bis([2-13C]-2-chloroethyl))toluidine and glutathione and thiosulfate can be identified and scrambling of the 13C label in the product provides strong evidence that the alkylation must occur through an aziridinium intermediate.

  19. Effect of sulfur mustard on mast cells in hairless guinea pig skin

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, J.S.; Bryant, M.A.; Braue, E.H.

    1993-05-13

    The skin of 24 anesthetized hairless guinea pigs was exposed to saturated sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide; HD) for 5 and 7 minutes using 14-mm diameter vapor cups. Animals were euthanatized 24 hours after exposure and skin specimens taken for morphometric evaluation of granulated mast cells with an image analysis system (IAS). Tissue specimens were processed in paraffin, sectioned at 5 microns and stained with Unna's stain for mast cells. The number of granulated mast cells and the area occupied by mast cell granules was determined. There were significantly fewer mast cells (p < 0.05) in either HD exposure group than in sham-exposed animals, with significantly fewer mast cells in the 7-minute than the 5-minute HD group. There were also significantly smaller areas occupied by granules in either HD exposure group than in sham-exposed animals. HD-induced lesions in the hairless guinea pig have shown signs of an inflammatory response, and with their granules of vasoactive histamine, mast cells might be expected to play a role in HD-induced injury. Changes in mast cells exposed to low sulfur mustard levels, as detected by an IAS, may serve as an early marker for cutaneous damage, which might not be as easily determined with routine light microscopy.

  20. Cancer Events After Acute or Chronic Exposure to Sulfur Mustard: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Seyed Mansour; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Salamati, Payman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sulfur mustard (SM) has been considered as a carcinogen in the laboratory studies. However, its carcinogenic effects on human beings were not well discussed. The main purpose of our study is to assess carcinogenesis of SM following acute and/or chronic exposures in human beings. Methods: The valid scientific English and Persian databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, IranMedex, and Irandoc were searched and the collected papers reviewed. The used keywords were in two languages: English and Persian. The inclusion criteria were the published original articles indexed in above-mentioned databases. Eleven full-texts out of 296 articles were found relevant and then assessed. Results: Studies on the workers of the SM factories during the World Wars showed that the long-term chronic exposure to mustards can cause a variety of cancers in the organs such as oral cavity, larynx, lung, and skin. Respiratory system was the most important affected system. Acute single exposure to SM was assumed as the carcinogenic inducer in the lung and blood and for few cancers including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusions: SM is a proven carcinogen in chronic situations although data are not enough to strongly conclude in acute exposure. PMID:27280012

  1. Influence of biofilm density on anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor treating mustard tuber wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hongxiang; Kang, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Considering the characteristics of high salinity, high concentration of organic matter, and high biodegradability, a new and efficient anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR) was chosen as an anaerobic pretreatment unit to treat most organic compounds in mustard tuber wastewater. By changing the biofilm density of the reactor, the test was carried out to find out the influence of biofilm density on effluent COD, the content of the sludge dehydrogenase, and gas production rate. Results showed that under the condition of 30 °C, draining ratio of 1/3, and 2 days of hydraulic retention time, COD removal rate increased from 71.5 to 90.5 % when the biofilm density increased from 15 to 50 %; however, COD removal rate increased from 90.5 to 91.3 % when the biofilm density increased from 50 to 70 %. According to the influence of biofilm density on effluent COD, the content of the sludge dehydrogenase, and gas production rate, ASBBR should take 50 % biofilm density in mustard wastewater treatment. At the same time, these design parameters can be used to guide practical engineering.

  2. Ethylene Potentiates Sulfur-Mediated Reversal of Cadmium Inhibited Photosynthetic Responses in Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nafees A.; Asgher, Mohd; Per, Tasir S.; Masood, Asim; Fatma, Mehar; Khan, M. I. R.

    2016-01-01

    The potential of exogenous ethylene and sulfur (S) in reversal of cadmium (Cd)-inhibited photosynthetic and growth responses in mustard (Brassica juncea L. cv. Pusa Jai Kisan) were studied. Plants grown with 50 μM Cd showed increased superoxide and H2O2 accumulation and lipid peroxidation together with increased activity of 1-aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) and ethylene production and inhibition of photosynthesis and growth. Application of 1 mM SO42- or 200 μL L-1 ethephon (ethylene source) influenced photosynthetic and growth performance equally in presence or absence of Cd. However, their combined application synergistically improved photosynthetic performance more in presence of Cd and reduced oxidative stress (lower superoxide and H2O2 accumulation) by decreasing ethylene and glucose sensitivity with the increase in cysteine and methionineand a non-proteinogenic thiol (reduced glutathione; GSH) contents. The central role of ethylene in potentiating S-mediated reversal of Cd-induced oxidative stress was evident with the use of ethylene action inhibitor, norbornadiene (NBD). The application of NBD resulted in decreased thiol production and photosynthetic responses. This suggests that ethylene promotes the effects of S in reversal of adverse effects of Cd, and thus, ethylene modulation may be considered as potential tool to substantiate the S effects in reversal of Cd inhibited photosynthesis and growth in mustard. PMID:27853462

  3. Chemical composition, antimicrobial property and microencapsulation of Mustard (Sinapis alba) seed essential oil by complex coacervation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Zhao, Su-Qing; Zhang, Jun; Huang, Gui-Ying; Chen, Lan-Ying; Zhao, Feng-Yi

    2014-12-15

    In this study, the essential oil from mustard seed was isolated by simultaneous steam distillation and extraction (SDE) and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Fourteen components were identified in the mustard seed essential oil with allyl isothiocyanate being the main component (71.06%). The essential oil has a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity with inhibition zones and MIC values in the range of 9.68-15.57 mm and 128-512 μg/mL respectively. The essential oil was subsequently encapsulated in complex coacervation microcapsules with genipin, a natural water-soluble cross-linker. The optimum parameters for the hardening effectiveness of the genipin-hardened essential oil microcapsules were 8h at 40°C and pH 10.0 with a genipin concentration of 0.075 g/g gelatin. The genipin-hardened microcapsules had a particle size of mainly 5-10 μm and strong chemistry stability which is potential for its application in food preservation.

  4. Effects of lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented mustard on lowering cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu Chen; Chang, Chen Kai; Chan, Shu Chang; Shieh, Jiunn Shiuh; Chiu, Chih Kwang; Duh, Pin-Der

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the ability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains isolated from fermented mustard to lower the cholesterol in vitro. Methods The ability of 50 LAB strains isolated from fermented mustard on lowering cholesterol in vitro was determined by modified o-phtshalaldehyde method. The LAB isolates were analyzed for their resistance to acid and bile salt. Strains with lowering cholesterol activity, were determined adherence to Caco-2 cells. Results Strain B0007, B0006 and B0022 assimilated more cholesterol than BCRC10474 and BCRC 17010. The isolated strains showed tolerance to pH 3.0 for 3 h despite variations in the degree of viability and bile-tolerant strains, with more than 108 CFU/mL after incubation for 24 h at 1% oxigall in MRS. In addition, strain B0007 and B0022 identified as Lactobacillus plantarum with 16S rDNA sequences were able to adhere to the Caco-2 cell lines. Conclusions These strains B0007 and B0022 may be potential functional sources for cholesterol-lowering activities as well as adhering to Caco-2 cell lines. PMID:25183271

  5. Nanoencapsulation Enhances the Post-Emergence Herbicidal Activity of Atrazine against Mustard Plants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Halley Caixeta; Stolf-Moreira, Renata; Martinez, Cláudia Bueno Reis; Grillo, Renato; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules have been recently developed as a modified release system for atrazine, an herbicide that can have harmful effects in the environment. Here, the post-emergence herbicidal activity of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine was evaluated using mustard (Brassica juncea) as target plant species model. Characterization of atrazine-loaded PCL nanocapsules by nanoparticle tracking analysis indicated a concentration of 7.5 x 10(12) particles mL(-1) and an average size distribution of 240.7 nm. The treatment of mustard plants with nanocapsules carrying atrazine at 1 mg mL(-1) resulted in a decrease of net photosynthesis and PSII maximum quantum yield, and an increase of leaf lipid peroxidation, leading to shoot growth inhibition and the development of severe symptoms. Time course analysis until 72 h after treatments showed that nanoencapsulation of atrazine enhanced the herbicidal activity in comparison with a commercial atrazine formulation. In contrast to the commercial formulation, ten-fold dilution of the atrazine-containing nanocapsules did not compromise the herbicidal activity. No effects were observed when plants were treated with nanocapsules without herbicide compared to control leaves sprayed with water. Overall, these results demonstrated that atrazine-containing PCL nanocapsules provide very effective post-emergence herbicidal activity. More importantly, the use of nanoencapsulated atrazine enables the application of lower dosages of the herbicide, without any loss of efficiency, which could provide environmental benefits.

  6. Nanoencapsulation Enhances the Post-Emergence Herbicidal Activity of Atrazine against Mustard Plants

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Halley Caixeta; Stolf-Moreira, Renata; Martinez, Cláudia Bueno Reis; Grillo, Renato; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes

    2015-01-01

    Poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanocapsules have been recently developed as a modified release system for atrazine, an herbicide that can have harmful effects in the environment. Here, the post-emergence herbicidal activity of PCL nanocapsules containing atrazine was evaluated using mustard (Brassica juncea) as target plant species model. Characterization of atrazine-loaded PCL nanocapsules by nanoparticle tracking analysis indicated a concentration of 7.5 x 1012 particles mL-1 and an average size distribution of 240.7 nm. The treatment of mustard plants with nanocapsules carrying atrazine at 1 mg mL-1 resulted in a decrease of net photosynthesis and PSII maximum quantum yield, and an increase of leaf lipid peroxidation, leading to shoot growth inhibition and the development of severe symptoms. Time course analysis until 72 h after treatments showed that nanoencapsulation of atrazine enhanced the herbicidal activity in comparison with a commercial atrazine formulation. In contrast to the commercial formulation, ten-fold dilution of the atrazine-containing nanocapsules did not compromise the herbicidal activity. No effects were observed when plants were treated with nanocapsules without herbicide compared to control leaves sprayed with water. Overall, these results demonstrated that atrazine-containing PCL nanocapsules provide very effective post-emergence herbicidal activity. More importantly, the use of nanoencapsulated atrazine enables the application of lower dosages of the herbicide, without any loss of efficiency, which could provide environmental benefits. PMID:26186597

  7. The EDTA Amendment in Phytoextraction of (134)Cs From Soil by Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea).

    PubMed

    Tjahaja, Poppy Intan; Sukmabuana, Putu; Roosmini, Dwina

    2015-01-01

    Soil contamination with radiocaesium is a significant problem at any countries when a nuclear accident occurred. Recently, phytoextraction technique is developed to remediate the contaminated environment. However, the application is limited by the availability of the contaminant for root uptake. Therefore, a green house trial experiment of soil amendment with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) has been conducted to examine (134)Cs availability for root uptake. Two groups of Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) were cultivated in (134)Cs contaminated soil. The soil in the first group was treated with EDTA amendment, while the other was not. Plant growth was observed gravimetrically and the (134)Cs concentration in soil as well as plants were determined using gamma spectrometry. The plant uptake capacity was determined as transfer factor (Fv), and the Fv values of 0.22 ± 0.0786 and 0.12 ± 0.039 were obtained for the soil treated with and without EDTA amendment, respectively. The phytoextraction efficiency of the plant cultivated in (134)Cs contaminated soil both with and without EDTA amendment was low. The EDTA amendment to the soil seems to enhance the (134)Cs availability for root uptake of Indian mustard and can still be considered to assist the field phytoremediation of contaminated soil.

  8. Rhizosphere Bacteria Enhance Selenium Accumulation and Volatilization by Indian Mustard1

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Mark P.; Chu, Dara; Zhao, May; Zayed, Adel M.; Ruzin, Steven E.; Schichnes, Denise; Terry, Norman

    1999-01-01

    Indian mustard (Brassica juncea L.) accumulates high tissue Se concentrations and volatilizes Se in relatively nontoxic forms, such as dimethylselenide. This study showed that the presence of bacteria in the rhizosphere of Indian mustard was necessary to achieve the best rates of plant Se accumulation and volatilization of selenate. Experiments with the antibiotic ampicillin showed that bacteria facilitated 35% of plant Se volatilization and 70% of plant tissue accumulation. These results were confirmed by inoculating axenic plants with rhizosphere bacteria. Compared with axenic controls, plants inoculated with rhizosphere bacteria had 5-fold higher Se concentrations in roots (the site of volatilization) and 4-fold higher rates of Se volatilization. Plants with bacteria contained a heat-labile compound in their root exudate; when this compound was added to the rhizosphere of axenic plants, Se accumulation in plant tissues increased. Plants with bacteria had an increased root surface area compared with axenic plants; the increased area was unlikely to have caused their increased tissue Se accumulation because they did not accumulate more Se when supplied with selenite or selenomethionine. Rhizosphere bacteria also possibly increased plant Se volatilization because they enabled plants to overcome a rate-limiting step in the Se volatilization pathway, i.e. Se accumulation in plant tissues. PMID:9952452

  9. Nonfluoroscopic Imaging as Guidance for Radiofrequency Ablation of Atrioventricular Nodal Reentrant Tachycardia after Mustard Repair

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Dinh Q.; Sobczak, Henrik; Brandts, Bodo

    2017-01-01

    Most tachycardias in the pulmonary venous atrium are inaccessible by direct means and require either a retrograde approach or a transseptal approach for ablation. We present a case in which successful radiofrequency ablation of common atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia was accomplished via a retrograde transaortic approach guided by nonfluoroscopic mapping with use of the NavX™ mapping system. The patient was a 49-year-old woman who at the age of 4 years had undergone Mustard repair for complete dextrotransposition of the great arteries. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the ascending aorta, right ventricle, systemic venous atrium, left ventricle, and superior vena cava–inferior vena cava baffle complex were created, and the left-sided His bundle was marked. After a failed attempt at ablation from the systemic venous side, we eliminated the atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia by ablation from the pulmonary venous side. This case is, to our knowledge, the first report of successful radiofrequency ablation of common atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia after Mustard repair for this congenital cardiac malformation in which ablation was guided by 3-dimensional nonfluoroscopic imaging. This imaging technique enabled accurate anatomic location of the ablation catheters in relation to the His bundle marked from the systemic venous side. PMID:28265215

  10. Growth response modulation by putrescine in Indian mustard Brassica juncea L. under multiple stress.

    PubMed

    Lakra, Nita; Tomar, Pushpa C; Mishra, S N

    2016-04-01

    Plants, in general, are put to various kinds of stress, biotic and abiotic, both natural and manmade. Infestation by insect pests and diseases, and extreme conditions such as salinity, temperature, etc., as well as heavy metal contamination affect their growth performance. Here, we studied the impact of salinity and heavy metal pollution on the growth performance of Indian Mustard Brassica juncea L. and its amelioration by the diamine, putrescine, a known media supplement. We evaluated the putrescine (Put) modulation potential on multiple stress effect in 7-day old Indian mustard. The germination, seedlings length and photosynthetic pigments decline under salinity and metal (Cd/Pb) stress condition, alone or in combination, were checked by putrescine. The stress induced increase in root-shoot ratio, RNA and total amino acids content, as well as Na⁺/K⁺ ratio in leaf tissues were also comparatively less. The increased endogenous Cd/Pb accumulation in plants exposed to either metal further elevated under salinity was also found decelerated. However, the multiple stressed seedlings showed increase in glutathione content, which was further elevated with putrescine application. The increase in protein contents in leaf under single or combined stresses in the presence of putrescine could be a qualitative change. The differential changes in parameters examined here resulted in improved growth (> 10%) suggests stress mitigation by the putrescine up to an extent.

  11. Phenolic component profiles of mustard greens, yu choy, and 15 other brassica vegetables.

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Ze; Harnly, James M

    2010-06-09

    A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) profiling method was used to characterize the phenolic components of 17 leafy vegetables from Brassica species other than Brassica oleracea. The vegetables studied were mustard green, baby mustard green, gai choy, baby gai choy, yu choy, yu choy tip, bok choy, bok choy tip, baby bok choy, bok choy sum, Taiwan bok choy, Shanghai bok choy, baby Shanghai bok choy, rapini broccoli, turnip green, napa, and baby napa. This work led to the tentative identification of 71 phenolic compounds consisting of kaempferol 3-O-diglucoside-7-O-glucoside derivatives, isorhamnetin 3-O-glucoside-7-O-glucoside hydroxycinnamoyl gentiobioses, hydroxycinnamoylmalic acids, and hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids. Ten of the compounds, 3-O-diacyltriglucoside-7-O-glucosides of kaempferol and quercetin, had not been previously reported. The phenolic component profiles of these vegetables were significantly different than those of the leafy vegetables from B. oleracea. This is the first comparative study of these leafy vegetables. Ten of the vegetables had never been previously studied by LC-MS.

  12. Phenolic Component Profiles of Mustard Greens, Yu Choy, and 15 Other Brassica Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Long-Ze; Harnly, James M

    2013-01-01

    A liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) profiling method was used to characterize the phenolic components of 17 leafy vegetables from Brassica species other than Brassica oleracea. The vegetables studied were mustard green, baby mustard green, gai choy, baby gai choy, yu choy, yu choy tip, bok choy, bok choy tip, baby bok choy, bok choy sum, Taiwan bok choy, Shanghai bok choy, baby Shanghai bok choy, rapini broccoli, turnip green, napa, and baby napa. This work led to the tentative identification of 71 phenolic compounds consisting of kaempferol 3-O-diglucoside-7-O-glucoside derivatives, isorhamnetin 3-O-glucoside-7-O-glucoside hydroxycinnamoyl gentiobioses, hydroxycinnamoylmalic acids, and hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids. Ten of the compounds, 3-O-diacyltriglucoside-7-O-glucosides of kaempferol and quercetin, had not been previously reported. The phenolic component profiles of these vegetables were significantly different than those of the leafy vegetables from B. oleracea. This is the first comparative study of these leafy vegetables. Ten of the vegetables had never been previously studied by LC-MS. PMID:20465307

  13. Evaluation of the vesicating properties of neutralized chemical agent identification sets. Final report, November 1995-August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Olajos, E.J.; Salem, H.; Gieseking, J.K.

    1997-08-01

    Vesication and skin irritation studies were conducted in hairless guinea-pigs to determine the vesicant and skin irritation potential of Chemical Agent Identification Sets (CAIS). Guinea-pigs were topically dosed with `test article` NEAT HD, 10% agent/chloroform solutions, or product solutions (wastestreams) and evaluated for skin-damaging effects (gross and light microscopic). Product solutions from the chemical neutralization of neat sulfur mustard resulted in microvesicle formation (vesication). All agent-dosed (agent/chloroform solutions or HD) sites exhibited microblisters, as well as other histopathologic lesions of the skin. Wastestreams from the neutalization of agent (agent/chloroform; agent on charcoal) were devoid of microvesicant activity. Dermal irritant effects (erythema and edema) were consistent with the skin-injurious activity associated with the neutralizing reagent 1,3-dichloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DCDMH).

  14. Sensitive monitoring of volatile chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry with counter-flow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Tsuge, Koichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Iura, Kazumitsu; Itoi, Teruo; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Koji; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Waki, Izumi; Ezawa, Naoya; Tanimoto, Hiroyuki; Honjo, Shigeru; Fukano, Masumi; Okada, Hidehiro

    2013-03-05

    A new method for sensitively and selectively detecting chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in air was developed using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (MS). Four volatile and highly toxic CWAs were examined, including the nerve gases sarin and tabun, and the blister agents mustard gas (HD) and Lewisite 1 (L1). Soft ionization was performed using corona discharge to form reactant ions, and the ions were sent in the direction opposite to the airflow by an electric field to eliminate the interfering neutral molecules such as ozone and nitrogen oxide. This resulted in efficient ionization of the target CWAs, especially in the negative ionization mode. Quadrupole MS (QMS) and ion trap tandem MS (ITMS) instruments were developed and investigated, which were movable on the building floor. For sarin, tabun, and HD, the protonated molecular ions and their fragment ions were observed in the positive ion mode. For L1, the chloride adduct ions of L1 hydrolysis products were observed in negative ion mode. The limit of detection (LOD) values in real-time or for a 1 s measurement monitoring the characteristic ions were between 1 and 8 μg/m(3) in QMS instrument. Collision-induced fragmentation patterns for the CWAs were observed in an ITMS instrument, and optimized combinations of the parent and daughter ion pairs were selected to achieve real-time detection with LOD values of around 1 μg/m(3). This is a first demonstration of sensitive and specific real-time detection of both positively and negatively ionizable CWAs by MS instruments used for field monitoring.

  15. Identification of a glutathione S-transferase associated with microsomes of tumor cells resistant to nitrogen mustards.

    PubMed

    Clapper, M L; Tew, K D

    1989-06-15

    Walker 256 rat mammary carcinoma cells resistant to chlorambucil (WR) exhibited an approximate 4-fold increase in glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as compared to the sensitive parent cell line (WS). WR cells maintained without biannual exposure to chlorambucil (WRr) reverted to the sensitive phenotype and possessed GST levels equivalent to WS. Mitochondria, microsomes and cytosol were isolated from WS, WR and WRr cell lines and analyzed for their GST composition. GST activity in each subcellular compartment of resistant cells was increased over the sensitive cells. Antibodies raised against total rat liver cytosolic GST crossreacted in resistant cells with two microsomal proteins (25.7 kD and 29 kD). The 29 kD protein was not detected in microsomal fractions from either WS or WRr and this protein was found to be dissimilar from cytosolic GST subunits in its isoelectric point (pI 6.7) and migration on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. In addition, the 29 kD microsome-associated GST from WR cells was immunologically distinct from a 14 kD GST subunit previously identified in rat liver microsomes. These data implicate the induction of a specific microsomal GST subunit in WR cells following drug selection and suggest its potential involvement in the establishment of cellular resistance to chlorambucil.

  16. A structural basis for a phosphoramide mustard-induced DNA interstrand cross-link at 5'-d(GAC).

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Q; Barsky, D; Colvin, M E; Melius, C F; Ludeman, S M; Moravek, J F; Colvin, O M; Bigner, D D; Modrich, P; Friedman, H S

    1995-01-01

    Phosphoramide mustard-induced DNA interstrand cross-links were studied both in vitro and by computer simulation. The local determinants for the formation of phosphoramide mustard-induced DNA interstrand cross-links were defined by using different pairs of synthetic oligonucleotide duplexes, each of which contained a single potentially cross-linkable site. Phosphoramide mustard was found to cross-link dG to dG at a 5'-d(GAC)-3'. The structural basis for the formation of this 1,3 cross-link was studied by molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry. Molecular dynamics indicated that the geometrical proximity of the binding sites also favored a 1,3 dG-to-dG linkage over a 1,2 dG-to-dG linkage in a 5'-d(GCC)-3' sequence. While the enthalpies of 1,2 and 1,3 mustard cross-linked DNA were found to be very close, a 1,3 structure was more flexible and may therefore be in a considerably higher entropic state. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8618865

  17. Evaluation of Protease Inhibitors and an Antioxidant for Treatment of Sulfur Mustard-Induced Toxic Lung Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    development of chronic obstructive pulmonary dis- ase (mustard lung), bronchiectasis, asthma , andfibrosis (Emadand ezaian, 1997). Although not fully...inhibitor pre- vents cigarette smoke-induced emphysema in the mouse. COPD 2 (3), 303– 310. utnam, J.B., Royston, D. (Eds.), 2003. Evaluating the Role

  18. First report of natural occurrence of Turnip vein-clearing virus in garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During 2011-2013 plants of the invasive weed species Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard) were observed with virus-like disease symptoms in three separate locations in Ramsey and Anoka counties, Minnesota. Symptoms consisted of conspicuous mosaic, leaf deformation and stunting. Numerous virus-like pa...

  19. Use of Se-enriched mustard and canola seed meals as potential bioherbicides and green fertilizers in strawberry production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New plant-based products can be produced from seed harvested from Brassica species used for phytomanaging selenium (Se) in the westside of central California. We tested Se-enriched seed meals produced from canola (Brassica napus) and mustard (Sinapis alba) plants as potential bio-herbicides and as g...

  20. 38 CFR 3.316 - Claims based on chronic effects of exposure to mustard gas and Lewisite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... effects of exposure to mustard gas and Lewisite. 3.316 Section 3.316 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... Compensation Ratings and Evaluations; Service Connection § 3.316 Claims based on chronic effects of exposure to... establishes a nonservice-related supervening condition or event as the cause of the claimed condition (See §...