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Sample records for agent orange registry

  1. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  2. 77 FR 69548 - Proposed Information Collection (Agent Orange Registry Code Sheet); Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... required to organize and update the information contained in AOR to be able to notify Vietnam era veterans who served in the Republic of Vietnam of any increased health risks resulting from exposure to dioxin... VA that is similar to the Persian Gulf War Veterans Health Registry. Registry examination is...

  3. Dioxin, agent orange

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: dioxin, a prevalent problem; nobody wanted dioxin; agent organe and Vietnam; what we know about and may learn about agent orange and Veterans' health; agent organe and birth defects; dioxin in Missouri; 2, 4, 5-T: the U.S.' disappearing herbicide; Seveso: high-level environmental exposure; the nitro explosion; industrial exposures to dioxin; company behavior in the face of dioxin exposures; dioxin and specific cancers; animal tests of dioxin toxicity; dioxin decions; the present and the future.

  4. AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... for survivors' benefits . Research on AL amyloidosis and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... to the compounds of interest found in the herbicide Agent Orange and AL amyloidosis." VA made a ...

  5. Does Agent Orange cause birth defects?

    PubMed

    Friedman, J M

    1984-04-01

    Large quantities of the defoliant, Agent Orange, were sprayed in Vietnam during the war. Agent Orange was composed of two herbicides: 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T, the latter contaminated by small amounts of a highly toxic dioxin (TCDD). The constituents of Agent Orange are capable of producing gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations, at least in some experimental circumstances. TCDD and 2,4,5-T are teratogenic in mice and perhaps in other mammals, but the teratogenicity of these chemicals has not been convincingly demonstrated in humans. There is currently no scientific evidence which indicates that men who were previously exposed to Agent Orange are at increased risk of having children with birth defects, but available data are inadequate to assess this possibility critically. PMID:6377557

  6. Does Agent Orange cause birth defects?

    PubMed

    Friedman, J M

    1984-04-01

    Large quantities of the defoliant, Agent Orange, were sprayed in Vietnam during the war. Agent Orange was composed of two herbicides: 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T, the latter contaminated by small amounts of a highly toxic dioxin (TCDD). The constituents of Agent Orange are capable of producing gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations, at least in some experimental circumstances. TCDD and 2,4,5-T are teratogenic in mice and perhaps in other mammals, but the teratogenicity of these chemicals has not been convincingly demonstrated in humans. There is currently no scientific evidence which indicates that men who were previously exposed to Agent Orange are at increased risk of having children with birth defects, but available data are inadequate to assess this possibility critically.

  7. Porphyria Cutanea Tarda and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors' benefits . Research on porphyria cutanea tarda and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... on " Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam " that there was sufficient evidence ...

  8. Soft Tissue Sarcomas and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors' benefits . Research on soft tissue sarcoma and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (formally known as ... report " Veterans and Agent Orange: Health Effects of Herbicides Used in Vietnam " and other updates that there ...

  9. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... registry health exam . Research on peripheral neuropathy and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... acute or subacute onset may be associated with herbicide exposure. Based on this evidence, VA presumed an ...

  10. Multiple medical problems following agent orange exposure.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, J L; Islam, A; Akhter, S; Dembinski, W; Kulaylat, M; Ambrus, C M

    2004-01-01

    A patient exposed to agent orange and a gunshot wound during the Vietnam War has developed multiple medical problems including nocardiosis, onychomycosis (Trichophyton rubrum), multiple thromboembolic episodes, hemochromatosis, diabetes mellitus type 2, diabetic neuropathy, activated protein C resistance (without Leyden V 1st mutation), degree A-V block, lung cancer (metastatic adenocarcinoma), carpal tunnel syndrome and arthritis. PMID:18084883

  11. Agent Orange: management of patients exposed in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Anne; Fessele, Kristen

    2003-01-01

    Since the Vietnam War ended in 1975, numerous studies have been conducted to determine if an association exists between Agent Orange exposure and certain disabling conditions specifically cancer. Although a definite causal relationship has not yet been established, sufficient data associate Agent Orange with certain conditions. Because of their advancing age similar to other baby boomers, Vietnam veterans are at a higher risk of developing malignancies. However, their exposure to Agent Orange also may increase their risk for cancer and other associated diseases. This article examines the latest findings of scientific research sponsored by the Department of Veterans Affairs and discusses the importance of well-informed oncology nurses when providing care for patients with cancer exposed to Agent Orange. PMID:12793339

  12. Are Vietnamese food exports contaminated with dioxin from Agent Orange?

    PubMed

    Schecter, Arnold; Pavuk, Marian; Malisch, Rainer; Ryan, John Jake

    2003-08-01

    In this study the levels of dioxins and dioxinlike compounds, dibenzofurans, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in food exported from Vietnam to the United States. In the past, some Vietnamese fish was found to be contaminated with dioxin, 2,3,7,8-TCDD, or TCDD, from Agent Orange. U.S. commercial catfish farmers recently claimed that exported Vietnamese food, especially catfish, was contaminated with dioxin from Agent Orange and was thus a matter of concern to the U.S. Congress. In 2001, twenty-two exported Vietnamese food samples (mostly fish) were purchased in the United States and Laos to evaluate possible contamination with dioxin from Agent Orange. Dioxin, dibenzofuran, and coplanar PCB congeners were measured by high-resolution gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry by laboratories in Germany and Canada certified for dioxin analysis by the World Health Organization (WHO). In the current study, only low levels of dioxins and dioxinlike compounds were present in all exported Vietnamese food analyzed, despite recent findings of elevated levels of one dioxin, 2,3,7,8-TCDD, from Agent Orange exposure in some Vietnamese individuals, presumably due to food consumption. It appears unlikely that exported Vietnamese food is, in general, contaminated with large amounts of dioxin (TCDD) from Agent Orange or other sources. Further food sampling from areas of heavy Agent Orange spraying in Vietnam is warranted to map out where the source of TCDD contamination of food may be originating. PMID:12857631

  13. Agent Orange exposure and attributed health effects in Vietnam veterans.

    PubMed

    Young, Alvin L; Cecil, Paul F

    2011-07-01

    Serum dioxin studies of Vietnam (VN) veterans, military historical records of tactical herbicide use in Vietnam, and the compelling evidence of the photodegradation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other aspects of environmental fate and low bioavailability of TCDD are consistent with few, if any, ground troop veterans being exposed to Agent Orange. That conclusion, however, is contrary to the presumption by the Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) that military service in Vietnam anytime from January 9, 1962 to May 7, 1975 is a proxy for exposure to Agent Orange. The DVA assumption is inconsistent with the scientific principles governing determinations of disease causation. The DVA has nonetheless awarded Agent Orange-related benefits and compensation to an increasing number of VN veterans based on the presumption of exposure and the published findings of the Institute of Medicine that there is sufficient evidence of a "statistical association" (a less stringent standard than "causal relationship") between exposure to tactical herbicides or TCDD and 15 different human diseases. A fairer and more valid approach for VN veterans would have been to enact a program of "Vietnam experience" benefits for those seriously ill, rather than benefits based on the dubious premise of injuries caused by Agent Orange. PMID:21916327

  14. Urologic cancer risks for veterans exposed to Agent Orange.

    PubMed

    Hoenemeyer, Lori A

    2013-01-01

    Agent Orange, an herbicide widely used during the Vietnam War, has been linked to various health risks, including urologic malignancy. Exposed veterans are at risk for prostate cancer and may be entitled to compensation if diagnosed with prostate cancer. Current research studies are aimed at mitigating prostate dysplasia and prostate cancer PMID:23734554

  15. Impact of Agent Orange exposure among Korean Vietnam veterans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung-Soon; Lim, Hyun-Sul; Cho, Sung-Il; Cheong, Hae-Kwan; Lim, Min-Kyung

    2003-07-01

    In order to determine whether Agent Orange exposure was associated with increased frequency of medical problems, we conducted a cross-sectional epidemiologic study of Korean veterans during 1995-1996. 1,224 Vietnam and 154 non-Vietnam veterans were included in the study. Exposure to Agent Orange was assessed by structured in-depth interview on the participants' history of service in Vietnam. Health outcomes were assessed by a standardized comprehensive clinical investigation by a group of clinical specialists. The differences in the prevalence of various medical diagnoses were assessed by Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel chi-square tests comparing the exposure levels of Vietnam veterans, adjusting for age. Multiple logistic regression was performed to estimate the effect of "service in Vietnam" adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol, body mass index, education, and marital status. Vietnam veterans had an increased frequency of eczema (odds ratio [OR] = 6.54), radiculopathy (OR = 3.98), diabetes (OR = 2.69), peripheral neuropathy (OR = 2.39), and hypertension (OR = 2.29), compared to non-Vietnam veterans, adjusting for potential confounders. In addition, higher levels of exposure among Vietnam veterans were associated with increased frequency of ischemic heart disease (p < 0.01), valvular heart disease (p < 0.01), and retinopathy (p < 0.01). We conclude that exposure to Agent Orange is associated with various health impacts in Korean Vietnam veterans. PMID:12916744

  16. The legacy of Agent Orange: empirical evidence from central Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Michael G

    2005-03-01

    This paper seeks to provide a socio-economic impact assessment for Vietnamese victims of the principal US military herbicide, Agent Orange, used during the Vietnam War in the period 1961-71. The study is based on a field survey of 30 affected and 30 unaffected households in Quang Tri province. With this assessment, the paper attempts to address the broader issues of compensation currently available to victims. The coverage and composition of current benefits are deemed inadequate as an effective redress. In view of this, revision of current compensation, the mobilization of an international donor fund and spurred non-governmental support is strongly recommended. PMID:15589674

  17. Skin diseases associated with Agent Orange and other organochlorine exposures.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Andrew T; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Keller, Richard A; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Organochlorine exposure is an important cause of cutaneous and systemic toxicity. Exposure has been associated with industrial accidents, intentional poisoning, and the use of defoliants, such as Agent Orange in the Vietnam War. Although long-term health effects are systematically reviewed by the Institute of Medicine, skin diseases are not comprehensively assessed. This represents an important practice gap as patients can present with cutaneous findings. This article provides a systematic review of the cutaneous manifestations of known mass organochlorine exposures in military and industrial settings with the goal of providing clinically useful recommendations for dermatologists seeing patients inquiring about organochlorine effects. Patients with a new diagnosis of chloracne, porphyria cutanea tarda, cutaneous lymphomas (non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and soft-tissue sarcomas including dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and leiomyosarcomas should be screened for a history of Vietnam service or industrial exposure. Inconclusive evidence exists for an increased risk of other skin diseases in Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange including benign fatty tumors, melanomas, nonmelanoma skin cancers, milia, eczema, dyschromias, disturbance of skin sensation, and rashes not otherwise specified. Affected veterans should be informed of the uncertain data in those cases. Referral to Department of Veterans Affairs for disability assessment is indicated for conditions with established associations. PMID:26210237

  18. Skin diseases associated with Agent Orange and other organochlorine exposures.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Andrew T; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Keller, Richard A; Elston, Dirk M

    2016-01-01

    Organochlorine exposure is an important cause of cutaneous and systemic toxicity. Exposure has been associated with industrial accidents, intentional poisoning, and the use of defoliants, such as Agent Orange in the Vietnam War. Although long-term health effects are systematically reviewed by the Institute of Medicine, skin diseases are not comprehensively assessed. This represents an important practice gap as patients can present with cutaneous findings. This article provides a systematic review of the cutaneous manifestations of known mass organochlorine exposures in military and industrial settings with the goal of providing clinically useful recommendations for dermatologists seeing patients inquiring about organochlorine effects. Patients with a new diagnosis of chloracne, porphyria cutanea tarda, cutaneous lymphomas (non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and soft-tissue sarcomas including dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans and leiomyosarcomas should be screened for a history of Vietnam service or industrial exposure. Inconclusive evidence exists for an increased risk of other skin diseases in Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange including benign fatty tumors, melanomas, nonmelanoma skin cancers, milia, eczema, dyschromias, disturbance of skin sensation, and rashes not otherwise specified. Affected veterans should be informed of the uncertain data in those cases. Referral to Department of Veterans Affairs for disability assessment is indicated for conditions with established associations.

  19. Clinicopathological features of mycosis fungoides in patients exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Soo; Jang, Jun Gyu; Han, Sang Hwa; Park, Jong Bin; Kang, Dong Young; Kim, Sang Tae; Suh, Kee Suck

    2013-08-01

    There are no reports on the clinicopathological features of mycosis fungoides (MF) among veterans exposed to Agent Orange, one of the herbicides used during the Vietnam War. To evaluate the clinical, histopathological and genotypic findings of Vietnam War veterans with MF and a positive history of exposure to Agent Orange, we performed a comparative clinicopathological study between MF patients with a history of Agent Orange exposure and those without a history of Agent Orange exposure. Twelve Vietnam War veterans with MF were identified. The mean interval from Agent Orange exposure to diagnosis was 24.5 years (range, 9-35). Skin lesions were significantly present on exposed and unexposed areas. Most patients (75%) experienced pruritus (mean visual analog scale score of 6.7). MF was manifested by plaques in 10 patients and by lichenification in five. Histopathological features of most cases were consistent with MF. Biopsy specimens also demonstrated irregular acanthosis (66.7%). In the comparative study, MF patients with a history of Agent Orange exposure differed significantly from those without exposure to Agent Orange in demographic and clinical characteristics. In addition, patients with exposure had an increased tendency for lesions in the exposed area. Notably, our patients showed a higher frequency (33.3%) of mycosis fungoides palmaris et plantaris than in previous studies. Histologically, irregular acanthosis was more frequently observed than ordinary MF. Our results indicate that dermatologists should pay close attention to these clinicopathological differences. Careful assessment of history of exposure to defoliants is warranted in some cases suspicious for MF.

  20. Clinicopathological features of mycosis fungoides in patients exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Soo; Jang, Jun Gyu; Han, Sang Hwa; Park, Jong Bin; Kang, Dong Young; Kim, Sang Tae; Suh, Kee Suck

    2013-08-01

    There are no reports on the clinicopathological features of mycosis fungoides (MF) among veterans exposed to Agent Orange, one of the herbicides used during the Vietnam War. To evaluate the clinical, histopathological and genotypic findings of Vietnam War veterans with MF and a positive history of exposure to Agent Orange, we performed a comparative clinicopathological study between MF patients with a history of Agent Orange exposure and those without a history of Agent Orange exposure. Twelve Vietnam War veterans with MF were identified. The mean interval from Agent Orange exposure to diagnosis was 24.5 years (range, 9-35). Skin lesions were significantly present on exposed and unexposed areas. Most patients (75%) experienced pruritus (mean visual analog scale score of 6.7). MF was manifested by plaques in 10 patients and by lichenification in five. Histopathological features of most cases were consistent with MF. Biopsy specimens also demonstrated irregular acanthosis (66.7%). In the comparative study, MF patients with a history of Agent Orange exposure differed significantly from those without exposure to Agent Orange in demographic and clinical characteristics. In addition, patients with exposure had an increased tendency for lesions in the exposed area. Notably, our patients showed a higher frequency (33.3%) of mycosis fungoides palmaris et plantaris than in previous studies. Histologically, irregular acanthosis was more frequently observed than ordinary MF. Our results indicate that dermatologists should pay close attention to these clinicopathological differences. Careful assessment of history of exposure to defoliants is warranted in some cases suspicious for MF. PMID:23724870

  1. A critical review of the epidemiology of Agent Orange/TCDD and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ellen T; Boffetta, Paolo; Adami, Hans-Olov; Cole, Philip; Mandel, Jack S

    2014-10-01

    To inform risk assessment and regulatory decision-making, the relationship between 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and prostate cancer requires clarification. This article systematically and critically reviews the epidemiologic evidence on the association between exposure to TCDD or Agent Orange, a TCDD-contaminated herbicide used during the Vietnam War, and prostate cancer risk. Articles evaluated include 11 studies of three cohorts, four case-control or cross-sectional studies, and three case-only studies of military veterans with information on estimated Agent Orange or TCDD exposure; 13 studies of seven cohorts, one case-control study, and eight proportionate morbidity or mortality studies of Vietnam veterans without information on Agent Orange exposure; 11 cohort studies of workers with occupational exposure to TCDD; and two studies of one community cohort with environmental exposure to TCDD. The most informative studies, including those of Vietnam veterans involved in Agent Orange spraying or other handling, herbicide manufacturing or spraying workers with occupational TCDD exposure, and community members exposed to TCDD through an industrial accident, consistently reported no significant increase in prostate cancer incidence or mortality. Only some potentially confounded studies of Vietnam veterans compared with the general population, studies with unreliable estimates of Agent Orange exposure, and analyses of selected subgroups of Vietnam veterans reported positive associations. Overall, epidemiologic research offers no consistent or convincing evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to Agent Orange or TCDD and prostate cancer. More accurate exposure assessment is needed in large epidemiologic studies to rule out a causal association more conclusively. PMID:25064616

  2. A critical review of the epidemiology of Agent Orange/TCDD and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ellen T; Boffetta, Paolo; Adami, Hans-Olov; Cole, Philip; Mandel, Jack S

    2014-10-01

    To inform risk assessment and regulatory decision-making, the relationship between 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and prostate cancer requires clarification. This article systematically and critically reviews the epidemiologic evidence on the association between exposure to TCDD or Agent Orange, a TCDD-contaminated herbicide used during the Vietnam War, and prostate cancer risk. Articles evaluated include 11 studies of three cohorts, four case-control or cross-sectional studies, and three case-only studies of military veterans with information on estimated Agent Orange or TCDD exposure; 13 studies of seven cohorts, one case-control study, and eight proportionate morbidity or mortality studies of Vietnam veterans without information on Agent Orange exposure; 11 cohort studies of workers with occupational exposure to TCDD; and two studies of one community cohort with environmental exposure to TCDD. The most informative studies, including those of Vietnam veterans involved in Agent Orange spraying or other handling, herbicide manufacturing or spraying workers with occupational TCDD exposure, and community members exposed to TCDD through an industrial accident, consistently reported no significant increase in prostate cancer incidence or mortality. Only some potentially confounded studies of Vietnam veterans compared with the general population, studies with unreliable estimates of Agent Orange exposure, and analyses of selected subgroups of Vietnam veterans reported positive associations. Overall, epidemiologic research offers no consistent or convincing evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to Agent Orange or TCDD and prostate cancer. More accurate exposure assessment is needed in large epidemiologic studies to rule out a causal association more conclusively.

  3. Impact of chemical warfare with agent orange on women's reproductive lives in Vietnam: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Le, T N; Johansson, A

    2001-11-01

    During the American war in Vietnam, huge quantities of the highly toxic herbicide dioxin ('Agent Orange'), were sprayed over large areas of central and south Vietnam. In addition to polluting the environment and causing cancers and other diseases in those directly exposed to it, dioxin has caused high rates of pregnancy loss, congenital birth defects and other health problems in their children. This paper reports the findings of a pilot study in the year 2000 among 30 Vietnamese women whose husbands and/or who themselves were exposed to Agent Orange. The aim was to develop research in order to explore the impact of chemical warfare on people's lives. Using the reproductive lifeline and semi-structured interviews, information was gathered on both partners' periods of exposure to Agent Orange, pregnancy outcomes, perceived health problems of children and experiences of living with handicapped children. The women had had a high number of miscarriages and premature births. About two-thirds of their children had congenital malformations or developed disabilities within the first years of life. Most of the families were poor, aggravated by impaired health in the men, the burden of caring for disabled children, and feelings of guilt and inferiority. The plight of 'Agent Orange families' is special and should be placed in its historical and political context.

  4. Agent Orange Exposure and Prevalence of Self-reported Diseases in Korean Vietnam Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Sang-Wook; Ohrr, Heechoul; Yi, Jee-Jeon

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Agent Orange exposure and self-reported diseases in Korean Vietnam veterans. Methods A postal survey of 114 562 Vietnam veterans was conducted. The perceived exposure to Agent Orange was assessed by a 6-item questionnaire. Two proximity-based Agent Orange exposure indices were constructed using division/brigade-level and battalion/company-level unit information. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for age and other confounders were calculated using a logistic regression model. Results The prevalence of all self-reported diseases showed monotonically increasing trends as the levels of perceived self-reported exposure increased. The ORs for colon cancer (OR, 1.13), leukemia (OR, 1.56), hypertension (OR, 1.03), peripheral vasculopathy (OR, 1.07), enterocolitis (OR, 1.07), peripheral neuropathy (OR, 1.07), multiple nerve palsy (OR, 1.14), multiple sclerosis (OR, 1.24), skin diseases (OR, 1.05), psychotic diseases (OR, 1.07) and lipidemia (OR, 1.05) were significantly elevated for the high exposure group in the division/brigade-level proximity-based exposure analysis, compared to the low exposure group. The ORs for cerebral infarction (OR, 1.08), chronic bronchitis (OR, 1.05), multiple nerve palsy (OR, 1.07), multiple sclerosis (OR, 1.16), skin diseases (OR, 1.05), and lipidemia (OR, 1.05) were significantly elevated for the high exposure group in the battalion/company-level analysis. Conclusions Korean Vietnam veterans with high exposure to Agent Orange experienced a higher prevalence of several self-reported chronic diseases compared to those with low exposure by proximity-based exposure assessment. The strong positive associations between perceived self-reported exposure and all self-reported diseases should be evaluated with discretion because the likelihood of reporting diseases was directly related to the perceived intensity of Agent Orange exposure. PMID:24137524

  5. Agent Orange exposure and disease prevalence in Korean Vietnam veterans: the Korean veterans health study.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sang-Wook; Hong, Jae-Seok; Ohrr, Heechoul; Yi, Jee-Jeon

    2014-08-01

    Between 1961 and 1971, military herbicides were used by the United States and allied forces for military purposes. Agent Orange, the most-used herbicide, was a mixture of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and contained an impurity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Many Korean Vietnam veterans were exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Agent Orange exposure and the prevalence of diseases of the endocrine, nervous, circulatory, respiratory, and digestive systems. The Agent Orange exposure was assessed by a geographic information system-based model. A total of 111,726 Korean Vietnam veterans were analyzed for prevalence using the Korea National Health Insurance claims data from January 2000 to September 2005. After adjusting for covariates, the high exposure group had modestly elevated odds ratios (ORs) for endocrine diseases combined and neurologic diseases combined. The adjusted ORs were significantly higher in the high exposure group than in the low exposure group for hypothyroidism (OR=1.13), autoimmune thyroiditis (OR=1.93), diabetes mellitus (OR=1.04), other endocrine gland disorders including pituitary gland disorders (OR=1.43), amyloidosis (OR=3.02), systemic atrophies affecting the nervous system including spinal muscular atrophy (OR=1.27), Alzheimer disease (OR=1.64), peripheral polyneuropathies (OR=1.09), angina pectoris (OR=1.04), stroke (OR=1.09), chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) including chronic bronchitis (OR=1.05) and bronchiectasis (OR=1.16), asthma (OR=1.04), peptic ulcer (OR=1.03), and liver cirrhosis (OR=1.08). In conclusion, Agent Orange exposure increased the prevalence of endocrine disorders, especially in the thyroid and pituitary gland; various neurologic diseases; COPD; and liver cirrhosis. Overall, this study suggests that Agent Orange/2,4-D/TCDD exposure several decades earlier may increase morbidity

  6. Agent Orange exposure and disease prevalence in Korean Vietnam veterans: the Korean veterans health study.

    PubMed

    Yi, Sang-Wook; Hong, Jae-Seok; Ohrr, Heechoul; Yi, Jee-Jeon

    2014-08-01

    Between 1961 and 1971, military herbicides were used by the United States and allied forces for military purposes. Agent Orange, the most-used herbicide, was a mixture of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and contained an impurity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Many Korean Vietnam veterans were exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between Agent Orange exposure and the prevalence of diseases of the endocrine, nervous, circulatory, respiratory, and digestive systems. The Agent Orange exposure was assessed by a geographic information system-based model. A total of 111,726 Korean Vietnam veterans were analyzed for prevalence using the Korea National Health Insurance claims data from January 2000 to September 2005. After adjusting for covariates, the high exposure group had modestly elevated odds ratios (ORs) for endocrine diseases combined and neurologic diseases combined. The adjusted ORs were significantly higher in the high exposure group than in the low exposure group for hypothyroidism (OR=1.13), autoimmune thyroiditis (OR=1.93), diabetes mellitus (OR=1.04), other endocrine gland disorders including pituitary gland disorders (OR=1.43), amyloidosis (OR=3.02), systemic atrophies affecting the nervous system including spinal muscular atrophy (OR=1.27), Alzheimer disease (OR=1.64), peripheral polyneuropathies (OR=1.09), angina pectoris (OR=1.04), stroke (OR=1.09), chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) including chronic bronchitis (OR=1.05) and bronchiectasis (OR=1.16), asthma (OR=1.04), peptic ulcer (OR=1.03), and liver cirrhosis (OR=1.08). In conclusion, Agent Orange exposure increased the prevalence of endocrine disorders, especially in the thyroid and pituitary gland; various neurologic diseases; COPD; and liver cirrhosis. Overall, this study suggests that Agent Orange/2,4-D/TCDD exposure several decades earlier may increase morbidity

  7. Agent Orange footprint still visible in rural areas of central Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Banout, Jan; Urban, Ondrej; Musil, Vojtech; Szakova, Jirina; Balik, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Levels of polychlorinated dioxins/furans (PCDD/PCDF) in selected environmental samples (soils, sediments, fish, and farm animals) were analyzed from the area of Phong My commune (Thua Thien-Hue province, Vietnam). This area was affected by Agent Orange spraying during the Vietnam war (1968-1971). Whereas PCDD/PCDF content in soil and sediment samples is relatively low and ranges between 0.05 and 5.1 pg WHO-TEQ/g for soils and between 0.7 and 6.4 pg WHO-TEQ/g for sediments, the PCDD/PCDF content in poultry muscle and liver in most cases exceeded the maximum permissible limit of dioxin content per unit fat mass. In some cases of soil and sediments samples, 2,3,7,8-TCDD represented more than 90% of the total PCDD/PCDF, which indicates Agent Orange as the main source.

  8. Science versus policy in establishing equitable Agent Orange disability compensation policy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Mark A

    2011-07-01

    This article makes the case that current Agent Orange compensation policy for Vietnam War veterans is based neither wholly upon scientific findings about Agent Orange health effects nor on pure public health policy considerations. Rather, it is the logical culmination of decades of experience among policy makers and public health scientists trying to establish clear-cut, equitable, and scientifically defensible compensation policy in the face of limited relevant science and poor or nonexistent exposure data-all within the broader context of Veterans Affairs disability compensation policies, and a deep-seated commitment to support the men and women who served their country during the Vietnam War. Finally, attempts to update current policy will benefit from an understanding of this background. PMID:21916328

  9. Agent Orange footprint still visible in rural areas of central Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Banout, Jan; Urban, Ondrej; Musil, Vojtech; Szakova, Jirina; Balik, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Levels of polychlorinated dioxins/furans (PCDD/PCDF) in selected environmental samples (soils, sediments, fish, and farm animals) were analyzed from the area of Phong My commune (Thua Thien-Hue province, Vietnam). This area was affected by Agent Orange spraying during the Vietnam war (1968-1971). Whereas PCDD/PCDF content in soil and sediment samples is relatively low and ranges between 0.05 and 5.1 pg WHO-TEQ/g for soils and between 0.7 and 6.4 pg WHO-TEQ/g for sediments, the PCDD/PCDF content in poultry muscle and liver in most cases exceeded the maximum permissible limit of dioxin content per unit fat mass. In some cases of soil and sediments samples, 2,3,7,8-TCDD represented more than 90% of the total PCDD/PCDF, which indicates Agent Orange as the main source. PMID:24639878

  10. Science versus policy in establishing equitable Agent Orange disability compensation policy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Mark A

    2011-07-01

    This article makes the case that current Agent Orange compensation policy for Vietnam War veterans is based neither wholly upon scientific findings about Agent Orange health effects nor on pure public health policy considerations. Rather, it is the logical culmination of decades of experience among policy makers and public health scientists trying to establish clear-cut, equitable, and scientifically defensible compensation policy in the face of limited relevant science and poor or nonexistent exposure data-all within the broader context of Veterans Affairs disability compensation policies, and a deep-seated commitment to support the men and women who served their country during the Vietnam War. Finally, attempts to update current policy will benefit from an understanding of this background.

  11. Agent Orange Footprint Still Visible in Rural Areas of Central Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Szakova, Jirina; Balik, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Levels of polychlorinated dioxins/furans (PCDD/PCDF) in selected environmental samples (soils, sediments, fish, and farm animals) were analyzed from the area of Phong My commune (Thua Thien-Hue province, Vietnam). This area was affected by Agent Orange spraying during the Vietnam war (1968–1971). Whereas PCDD/PCDF content in soil and sediment samples is relatively low and ranges between 0.05 and 5.1 pg WHO-TEQ/g for soils and between 0.7 and 6.4 pg WHO-TEQ/g for sediments, the PCDD/PCDF content in poultry muscle and liver in most cases exceeded the maximum permissible limit of dioxin content per unit fat mass. In some cases of soil and sediments samples, 2,3,7,8-TCDD represented more than 90% of the total PCDD/PCDF, which indicates Agent Orange as the main source. PMID:24639878

  12. Immunotoxicological effects of Agent Orange exposure to the Vietnam War Korean veterans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung-Ah; Kim, Eun-Mi; Park, Yeong-Chul; Yu, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Seung-Kwon; Jeon, Seong-Hoon; Park, Kui-Lea; Hur, Sook-Jin; Heo, Yong

    2003-07-01

    Immunomodulatory effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) demonstrated using animals are thymic atrophy, downregulation of cytotoxic T or B lymphocyte differentiation or activation, whereas human immunotoxicities have not been investigated well. This study was undertaken to evaluate overall immunologic spectrum of the Vietnam War Korean veterans exposed to Agent Orange contaminated with TCDD. Quantity of red blood cells, hemoglobin and hematocrit in the veterans suffered from chronic diseases associated with Agent Orange exposure (Veterans-patient group) were decreased in comparison with those of the veterans without the diseases and the age-matched healthy controls, but no differences in leukocyte populations. Plasma IgG levels were lowered in the veterans than the controls, owing to significant decrease in the IgG1 levels. Increase in the IgE levels was observed in the plasma from the veterans. Alteration of T cell-mediated immunity was also resulted from activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with polyclonal T cell activators. Production of IFNgamma, a major cytokine mediating host resistance against infection or tumoregenesis, was lowered in the veterans-patient group. However, production of IL-4 and IL-10, representative cytokines involved with hypersensitivity induction, was enhanced in the patient group. Overall, this study suggests that military service in Vietnam and/or Agent Orange exposure disturbs immune-homeostasis resulting in dysregulation of B and T cell activities. PMID:12916745

  13. Immunotoxicological effects of Agent Orange exposure to the Vietnam War Korean veterans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung-Ah; Kim, Eun-Mi; Park, Yeong-Chul; Yu, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Seung-Kwon; Jeon, Seong-Hoon; Park, Kui-Lea; Hur, Sook-Jin; Heo, Yong

    2003-07-01

    Immunomodulatory effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) demonstrated using animals are thymic atrophy, downregulation of cytotoxic T or B lymphocyte differentiation or activation, whereas human immunotoxicities have not been investigated well. This study was undertaken to evaluate overall immunologic spectrum of the Vietnam War Korean veterans exposed to Agent Orange contaminated with TCDD. Quantity of red blood cells, hemoglobin and hematocrit in the veterans suffered from chronic diseases associated with Agent Orange exposure (Veterans-patient group) were decreased in comparison with those of the veterans without the diseases and the age-matched healthy controls, but no differences in leukocyte populations. Plasma IgG levels were lowered in the veterans than the controls, owing to significant decrease in the IgG1 levels. Increase in the IgE levels was observed in the plasma from the veterans. Alteration of T cell-mediated immunity was also resulted from activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with polyclonal T cell activators. Production of IFNgamma, a major cytokine mediating host resistance against infection or tumoregenesis, was lowered in the veterans-patient group. However, production of IL-4 and IL-10, representative cytokines involved with hypersensitivity induction, was enhanced in the patient group. Overall, this study suggests that military service in Vietnam and/or Agent Orange exposure disturbs immune-homeostasis resulting in dysregulation of B and T cell activities.

  14. 78 FR 6853 - Agency Information Collection (Agent Orange Registry Code Sheet) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    .... The PRA submission describes the nature of the information collection and its expected cost and burden....Regulations.gov ; or to VA's OMB Desk Officer, OMB Human Resources and Housing Branch, New Executive...

  15. Dioxin reservoirs in southern Viet Nam--a legacy of Agent Orange.

    PubMed

    Dwernychuk, L Wayne; Cau, Hoang Dinh; Hatfield, Christopher T; Boivin, Thomas G; Hung, Tran Manh; Dung, Phung Tri; Thai, Nguyen Dinh

    2002-04-01

    In the isolated Aluoi Valley of central Viet Nam, very high levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were measured in soil, fish fat, duck fat, pooled human blood and breast milk samples collected from A So village between 1996 and 1999. The village was situated on a former military base occupied by US Special Forces between 1963 and 1966. TCDD was a contaminant of the herbicide "Agent Orange", aerially sprayed in the valley between 1965 and 1970, and stored at the A So base. Measured levels were lower near the sites of two other former US bases in the valley which had been occupied for shorter periods of time. In areas where Agent Orange had been applied by low-flying aircraft, levels of TCDD in soil, food and human samples were elevated, but lower than those near the three former US bases. We confirm the apparent food chain transfer of TCDD from contaminated soil to cultured fish pond sediments to fish and duck tissues, then to humans as measured in whole blood and breast milk. We theorize that the Aluoi Valley is a microcosm of southern Viet Nam, where numerous reservoirs of TCDD exist in the soil of former military installations south of the former demilitarized zone. Large quantities of Agent Orange were stored at many sites, used in ground and aerial applications, and spilled. TCDD, through various forms of soil disturbance, can be mobilized from these reservoirs after decades below the surface, and subsequently, introduced into the human food chain.

  16. Dioxin reservoirs in southern Viet Nam--a legacy of Agent Orange.

    PubMed

    Dwernychuk, L Wayne; Cau, Hoang Dinh; Hatfield, Christopher T; Boivin, Thomas G; Hung, Tran Manh; Dung, Phung Tri; Thai, Nguyen Dinh

    2002-04-01

    In the isolated Aluoi Valley of central Viet Nam, very high levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were measured in soil, fish fat, duck fat, pooled human blood and breast milk samples collected from A So village between 1996 and 1999. The village was situated on a former military base occupied by US Special Forces between 1963 and 1966. TCDD was a contaminant of the herbicide "Agent Orange", aerially sprayed in the valley between 1965 and 1970, and stored at the A So base. Measured levels were lower near the sites of two other former US bases in the valley which had been occupied for shorter periods of time. In areas where Agent Orange had been applied by low-flying aircraft, levels of TCDD in soil, food and human samples were elevated, but lower than those near the three former US bases. We confirm the apparent food chain transfer of TCDD from contaminated soil to cultured fish pond sediments to fish and duck tissues, then to humans as measured in whole blood and breast milk. We theorize that the Aluoi Valley is a microcosm of southern Viet Nam, where numerous reservoirs of TCDD exist in the soil of former military installations south of the former demilitarized zone. Large quantities of Agent Orange were stored at many sites, used in ground and aerial applications, and spilled. TCDD, through various forms of soil disturbance, can be mobilized from these reservoirs after decades below the surface, and subsequently, introduced into the human food chain. PMID:11993628

  17. Agent Orange Exposure and 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin (TCDD) in Human Milk.

    PubMed

    Scialli, Anthony R; Watkins, Deborah K; Ginevan, Michael E

    2015-06-01

    Agent Orange was sprayed in parts of southern Vietnam during the U.S.-Vietnam war and was a mixture of two chlorophenoxy herbicides. The mixture was contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). TCDD and other dioxins and furans are measurable in the milk of Vietnamese women. We explored whether the TCDD in milk from these women was from Agent Orange and whether lactational exposure can be a mode of transgenerational effects of TCDD from Agent Orange. A review of the world's literature on milk concentrations of polychlorinated compounds showed the presence of TCDD and other dioxins and furans in all countries that have been assessed. The congener profile of these chemicals, that is, the proportion of different congeners in the sample, can be used to assess the source of milk contamination. Measurements in most countries, including contemporary measurements in Vietnam, are consistent with non-Agent Orange exposure sources, including industrial activities and incineration of waste. Models and supporting human data suggest that TCDD from breastfeeding does not persist in a child past adolescence and that the adult body burden of TCDD is independent of whether the individual was breast- or bottle-fed as a child. These findings suggest that exposure to Agent Orange in Vietnam did not result in persistent transgenerational exposure through human milk.

  18. Dioxin, dibenzofuran, and coplanar PCB levels in Laotian blood and milk from agent orange-sprayed and nonsprayed areas, 2001.

    PubMed

    Schecter, Arnold; Pavuk, Marian; Päpke, Olaf; Ryan, John Jake

    2003-11-14

    Agent Orange, a phenoxyherbicide contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), was used by American military forces during the United States-Vietnam war between 1962 and 1971 primarily as a defoliant to destroy forests where enemy troops might find cover. Agent Orange was used mainly in Vietnam, but also to a lesser extent in Laos and Cambodia. In Laos, there have been no prior studies of TCDD contamination from Agent Orange, despite known defoliation and documented records of Agent Orange spraying. This article presents findings of TCDD in human blood and milk from two geographic areas in Laos: Vientiane, a nonsprayed area, and Sepone, an Agent Orange-sprayed area. German and Canadian laboratories used high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure 7 dioxin, 10 dibenzofuran, and 4 non-ortho or coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls in Laotian blood and milk samples. Most subjects tested in this Laos Ministry of Health Study showed low dioxin and dibenzofuran levels, consistent with what would be expected in a primarily rural nonindustrial country. These findings are consistent with relatively low dioxin and dibenzofuran levels recently found in food from these same areas. The chemically and toxicologically related non-ortho PCBs were measured but were found at low levels compared to specimens from other countries, presumably because of less industrialization and industrial pollution in Laos. PMID:14555402

  19. Dioxin, dibenzofuran, and coplanar PCB levels in Laotian blood and milk from agent orange-sprayed and nonsprayed areas, 2001.

    PubMed

    Schecter, Arnold; Pavuk, Marian; Päpke, Olaf; Ryan, John Jake

    2003-11-14

    Agent Orange, a phenoxyherbicide contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), was used by American military forces during the United States-Vietnam war between 1962 and 1971 primarily as a defoliant to destroy forests where enemy troops might find cover. Agent Orange was used mainly in Vietnam, but also to a lesser extent in Laos and Cambodia. In Laos, there have been no prior studies of TCDD contamination from Agent Orange, despite known defoliation and documented records of Agent Orange spraying. This article presents findings of TCDD in human blood and milk from two geographic areas in Laos: Vientiane, a nonsprayed area, and Sepone, an Agent Orange-sprayed area. German and Canadian laboratories used high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure 7 dioxin, 10 dibenzofuran, and 4 non-ortho or coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls in Laotian blood and milk samples. Most subjects tested in this Laos Ministry of Health Study showed low dioxin and dibenzofuran levels, consistent with what would be expected in a primarily rural nonindustrial country. These findings are consistent with relatively low dioxin and dibenzofuran levels recently found in food from these same areas. The chemically and toxicologically related non-ortho PCBs were measured but were found at low levels compared to specimens from other countries, presumably because of less industrialization and industrial pollution in Laos.

  20. Agent Orange Exposure and 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-Dioxin (TCDD) in Human Milk.

    PubMed

    Scialli, Anthony R; Watkins, Deborah K; Ginevan, Michael E

    2015-06-01

    Agent Orange was sprayed in parts of southern Vietnam during the U.S.-Vietnam war and was a mixture of two chlorophenoxy herbicides. The mixture was contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). TCDD and other dioxins and furans are measurable in the milk of Vietnamese women. We explored whether the TCDD in milk from these women was from Agent Orange and whether lactational exposure can be a mode of transgenerational effects of TCDD from Agent Orange. A review of the world's literature on milk concentrations of polychlorinated compounds showed the presence of TCDD and other dioxins and furans in all countries that have been assessed. The congener profile of these chemicals, that is, the proportion of different congeners in the sample, can be used to assess the source of milk contamination. Measurements in most countries, including contemporary measurements in Vietnam, are consistent with non-Agent Orange exposure sources, including industrial activities and incineration of waste. Models and supporting human data suggest that TCDD from breastfeeding does not persist in a child past adolescence and that the adult body burden of TCDD is independent of whether the individual was breast- or bottle-fed as a child. These findings suggest that exposure to Agent Orange in Vietnam did not result in persistent transgenerational exposure through human milk. PMID:26195119

  1. Desmoplastic small round-cell tumor: an adult with previous exposure to agent orange.

    PubMed

    Baz, Walid; El-Soueidi, Raymond; Nakhl, Fadi; Aoun, Nelly; Chin, Nena; Dhar, Meeko

    2010-06-01

    Desmoplastic small round-cell tumor is an uncommon, highly aggressive tumor with a predilection for pediatric age groups and young adults. It is very unusual in the elderly population. Although Agent Orange has been associated with soft-tissue sarcoma, an association with desmoplastic small round-cell tumor has not been reported. A 52-year-old male presented with abdominal distention, dyspnea, and a 9 kg weight loss. Prior history was significant for hepatitis C and diabetes. He was a Vietnam veteran and he admitted being exposed to Agent Orange. On physical examination, the abdomen was distended and tense. Computed tomography scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis demonstrated extensive mediastinal and retroperitoneal adenopathy, diffuse omental masses and extensive pleural, intra-abdominal and pelvic ascites. Omental core needle biopsy was consistent with desmoplastic small round-cell tumor based on morphology and immunohistochemistry. He responded poorly to chemotherapy with high-dose cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and vincristine and died 5 months after presentation secondary to neutropenic sepsis despite G-CSF support and antibiotics. PMID:20382635

  2. The extent and patterns of usage of Agent Orange and other herbicides in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Stellman, Jeanne Mager; Stellman, Steven D; Christian, Richard; Weber, Tracy; Tomasallo, Carrie

    2003-04-17

    Herbicides including Agent Orange were sprayed by United States forces for military purposes during the Vietnam War (1961-1971) at a rate more than an order of magnitude greater than for similar domestic weed control. In 1974, the US National Academy of Sciences published estimates of the extent and distribution of herbicides sprayed. Here we present revised estimates, developed using more-complete data. The spray inventory is expanded by more than seven million litres, in particular with heavily dioxin-contaminated herbicides. Estimates for the amount of dioxin sprayed are almost doubled. Hamlet census data reveal that millions of Vietnamese were likely to have been sprayed upon directly. Our identification of specific military herbicide targets has led to a more coherent understanding of spraying. Common errors in earlier interpretations of the spray data are also discussed. PMID:12700752

  3. The Effects of Glucose Therapy Agents-Apple Juice, Orange Juice, and Cola-on Enteral Tube Flow and Patency.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Daphna J; Montreuil, Jasmine; Santoro, Andrea L; Zettas, Antonia; Lowe, Julia

    2016-06-01

    To develop evidence-based hypoglycemia treatment protocols in patients receiving total enteral nutrition, this study determined the effect on enteral tube flow of glucose therapy agents: apple juice, orange juice, and cola, and it also examined the effects of tube type and feed type with these glucose therapy agents. For this study, 12 gastrostomy tubes (6 polyethylene and 6 silicone) were set at 50 mL/h. Each feeding set was filled with Isosource HN with fibre or Novasource Renal. Each tube was irrigated with 1 glucose therapy agent, providing approximately 20 g of carbohydrate every 4 h. Flow-rate measurements were collected at 2 h intervals. The results showed that the glucose therapy agent choice affected flow rates: apple juice and cola had higher average flow rates than orange juice (P = 0.01). A significant difference was found between tube type and enteral formula: polyethylene tubes had higher average flow rates than silicone tubes (P < 0.0001), and Isosource HN with fibre had higher flow rates than Novasource Renal (P = 0.01). We concluded that apple juice and cola have less tube clogging potential than orange juice, and thus may be considered as primary treatment options for hypoglycemia in enterally fed patients. Polyethylene tubes and Isosource HN with fibre were less likely to clog than silicone tubes and Novasource Renal.

  4. The impact of Agent Orange exposure on presentation and prognosis of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baumann Kreuziger, Lisa M; Tarchand, Gobind; Morrison, Vicki A

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to Agent Orange (AO) and the contaminating chemical 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) has been associated with the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Of the 195 veterans diagnosed with CLL from 2001 to 2010 in a retrospective cohort from the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 33 (17%) were exposed to AO. Prognostic factors including Rai stage, lymphocyte doubling time and cytogenetics did not differ between exposed and unexposed patients. Exposed patients were younger at diagnosis (61 vs. 72 years, p < 0.0001) and time to CLL treatment was shorter (9.6 vs. 30.2 months, p = 0.02). Overall survival did not differ between exposed and unexposed patients on Kaplan-Meier analysis, but when adjusted for age, AO exposure had a hazard ratio of death of 1.8 compared to non-exposure (95% confidence interval 0.7-4.5, p = 0.24). The high estimate of the mortality hazard combined with the relatively low numbers in the exposure group suggests that further examination in a larger patient population is warranted. PMID:23573826

  5. Exposure to TCDD from base perimeter application of Agent Orange in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Ross, John H; Hewitt, Andrew; Armitage, James; Solomon, Keith; Watkins, Deborah K; Ginevan, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Using recognized methods routinely employed by pesticide regulatory agencies, the exposures of military personnel that were mixer/loader/applicators (M/L/A) of Agent Orange (AO) for perimeter foliage at bases during the Vietnam War were estimated. From the fraction of TCDD in AO, absorbed dosage of the manufacturing contaminant was estimated. Dermal exposure estimated from spray drift to residents of the bases was calculated using internationally recognized software that accounted for proximity, foliar density of application site, droplet size and wind speed among other factors, and produced estimates of deposition. Those that directly handled AO generally had much higher exposures than those further from the areas of use. The differences in exposure potential varied by M/L/A activity, but were typically orders of magnitude greater than bystanders. However, even the most-exposed M/L/A involved in perimeter application had lifetime exposures comparable to persons living in the U.S. at the time, i.e., ~1.3 to 5 pg TCDD/kg bodyweight. PMID:25531592

  6. Exposure to TCDD from base perimeter application of Agent Orange in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Ross, John H; Hewitt, Andrew; Armitage, James; Solomon, Keith; Watkins, Deborah K; Ginevan, Michael E

    2015-04-01

    Using recognized methods routinely employed by pesticide regulatory agencies, the exposures of military personnel that were mixer/loader/applicators (M/L/A) of Agent Orange (AO) for perimeter foliage at bases during the Vietnam War were estimated. From the fraction of TCDD in AO, absorbed dosage of the manufacturing contaminant was estimated. Dermal exposure estimated from spray drift to residents of the bases was calculated using internationally recognized software that accounted for proximity, foliar density of application site, droplet size and wind speed among other factors, and produced estimates of deposition. Those that directly handled AO generally had much higher exposures than those further from the areas of use. The differences in exposure potential varied by M/L/A activity, but were typically orders of magnitude greater than bystanders. However, even the most-exposed M/L/A involved in perimeter application had lifetime exposures comparable to persons living in the U.S. at the time, i.e., ~1.3 to 5 pg TCDD/kg bodyweight.

  7. The impact of Agent Orange exposure on presentation and prognosis of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baumann Kreuziger, Lisa M; Tarchand, Gobind; Morrison, Vicki A

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to Agent Orange (AO) and the contaminating chemical 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) has been associated with the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Of the 195 veterans diagnosed with CLL from 2001 to 2010 in a retrospective cohort from the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 33 (17%) were exposed to AO. Prognostic factors including Rai stage, lymphocyte doubling time and cytogenetics did not differ between exposed and unexposed patients. Exposed patients were younger at diagnosis (61 vs. 72 years, p < 0.0001) and time to CLL treatment was shorter (9.6 vs. 30.2 months, p = 0.02). Overall survival did not differ between exposed and unexposed patients on Kaplan-Meier analysis, but when adjusted for age, AO exposure had a hazard ratio of death of 1.8 compared to non-exposure (95% confidence interval 0.7-4.5, p = 0.24). The high estimate of the mortality hazard combined with the relatively low numbers in the exposure group suggests that further examination in a larger patient population is warranted.

  8. Optimization of isolation of cellulose from orange peel using sodium hydroxide and chelating agents.

    PubMed

    Bicu, Ioan; Mustata, Fanica

    2013-10-15

    Response surface methodology was used to optimize cellulose recovery from orange peel using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) as isolation reagent, and to minimize its ash content using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as chelating agent. The independent variables were NaOH charge, EDTA charge and cooking time. Other two constant parameters were cooking temperature (98 °C) and liquid-to-solid ratio (7.5). The dependent variables were cellulose yield and ash content. A second-order polynomial model was used for plotting response surfaces and for determining optimum cooking conditions. The analysis of coefficient values for independent variables in the regression equation showed that NaOH and EDTA charges were major factors influencing the cellulose yield and ash content, respectively. Optimum conditions were defined by: NaOH charge 38.2%, EDTA charge 9.56%, and cooking time 317 min. The predicted cellulose yield was 24.06% and ash content 0.69%. A good agreement between the experimental values and the predicted was observed.

  9. External Qi therapy to treat symptoms of Agent Orange Sequelae in Korean combat veterans of the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Woo, Won-Hong; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Hong, Sung-Soo; Kim, Hye-Jung; Moon, Sun-Rock

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of Qi therapy as a non-pharmacological treatment for various symptoms presented by Korean combat veterans of the Vietnam War with Agent Orange Sequelae. Nine subjects volunteered to receive 30 minutes of Qi therapy, twice per day for 7 days. There was marked improvement in 89% of the patients with impaired physical activity, 86% of those with psychological disorder, 78% of those with heavy drug use, and 67% of those with fatigue, indigestion and high blood glucose levels. This data suggests that Qi therapy combined with conventional treatment has positive effects in reducing and managing the pain, psychosomatic disorders, and substance abuse in patients with Agent Orange Sequelae. We cannot completely discount the possible influence of the placebo effect, and more objective, clinical measures are needed to study the long-term effects of Qi therapy.

  10. External Qi therapy to treat symptoms of Agent Orange Sequelae in Korean combat veterans of the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Woo, Won-Hong; Lim, Hyun-Ja; Hong, Sung-Soo; Kim, Hye-Jung; Moon, Sun-Rock

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of Qi therapy as a non-pharmacological treatment for various symptoms presented by Korean combat veterans of the Vietnam War with Agent Orange Sequelae. Nine subjects volunteered to receive 30 minutes of Qi therapy, twice per day for 7 days. There was marked improvement in 89% of the patients with impaired physical activity, 86% of those with psychological disorder, 78% of those with heavy drug use, and 67% of those with fatigue, indigestion and high blood glucose levels. This data suggests that Qi therapy combined with conventional treatment has positive effects in reducing and managing the pain, psychosomatic disorders, and substance abuse in patients with Agent Orange Sequelae. We cannot completely discount the possible influence of the placebo effect, and more objective, clinical measures are needed to study the long-term effects of Qi therapy. PMID:15344429

  11. Dioxins and dibenzofurans in blood and adipose tissue of Agent Orange-exposed Vietnam veterans and matched controls

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, P.C.; Gochfeld, M.; Nygren, M.; Hansson, M.; Rappe, C.; Velez, H.; Ghent-Guenther, T.; Wilson, W.P.

    1988-03-18

    Vietnam veterans who were heavily exposed to Agent Orange exceeded matched control subjects in both blood and adipose tissue levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) but not in the levels of the 12 other 2,3,7,8-substituted dioxins and dibenzofurans that were detected. Since only TCDD among these compounds was present in Agent Orange but all are present in the population of the industrialized world, it is likely that the elevated TCDD levels arose from wartime exposure. The high correlation (r = +.89) of blood with adipose tissue level suggests that there may be a mobile equilibrium between them and that blood measurement could replace adipose tissue measurement of TCDD levels, making the collection of human data less invasive.

  12. Transport and bioaccumulation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans at the Bien Hoa Agent Orange hotspot in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Van Thuong, Nguyen; Hung, Nguyen Xuan; Mo, Nguyen Thi; Thang, Nguyen Manh; Huy, Pham Quang; Van Binh, Hoang; Nam, Vu Duc; Van Thuy, Nguyen; Son, Le Ke; Minh, Nguyen Hung

    2015-10-01

    The Bien Hoa airbase (south of Vietnam) is known as one of the Agent Orange hotspots which have been seriously contaminated by Agent Orange/dioxin during the Vietnam War. Hundreds of samples including soil, sediment and fish were collected at the Bien Hoa Agent Orange hotspot for assessment of the environmental contamination caused by dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). The toxicity equivalency quotient (TEQ) concentration of PCDD/Fs in soil and sediment varied from 7.6 to 962,000 and 17 to 4860 pg/g dry wt, respectively, implying very high contamination of PCDD/Fs in several areas. PCDD/F levels in fish ranged between 1.8 and 288 pg/g TEQ wet wt and was generally higher than advisory guidelines for food consumption. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (2,3,7,8-TCDD) contributed 66-99 % of TEQ for most of the samples, suggesting 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) from Agent Orange as the major source of the contamination. The vertical transport of PCDD/Fs was observed in soil column with high TEQ levels above 1000 pg/g dry wt (Vietnamese limit for necessary remediation activities- TCVN 8183:2009 (2009)) even at a depth of 1.8 m. The vertical transport of PCDD/Fs has probably mainly taken place during the "Ranch Hand" defoliant spray activities due to the leaks and spills of phenoxy herbicides and solvents. The congener patterns suggest that transports of PCDD/Fs by weathering processes have led to their redistribution in the low-land areas. Also, an estimate for the total volume of contaminated soil requiring remediation to meet Vietnamese regulatory limits is provided.

  13. Transport and bioaccumulation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans at the Bien Hoa Agent Orange hotspot in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Van Thuong, Nguyen; Hung, Nguyen Xuan; Mo, Nguyen Thi; Thang, Nguyen Manh; Huy, Pham Quang; Van Binh, Hoang; Nam, Vu Duc; Van Thuy, Nguyen; Son, Le Ke; Minh, Nguyen Hung

    2015-10-01

    The Bien Hoa airbase (south of Vietnam) is known as one of the Agent Orange hotspots which have been seriously contaminated by Agent Orange/dioxin during the Vietnam War. Hundreds of samples including soil, sediment and fish were collected at the Bien Hoa Agent Orange hotspot for assessment of the environmental contamination caused by dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). The toxicity equivalency quotient (TEQ) concentration of PCDD/Fs in soil and sediment varied from 7.6 to 962,000 and 17 to 4860 pg/g dry wt, respectively, implying very high contamination of PCDD/Fs in several areas. PCDD/F levels in fish ranged between 1.8 and 288 pg/g TEQ wet wt and was generally higher than advisory guidelines for food consumption. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (2,3,7,8-TCDD) contributed 66-99 % of TEQ for most of the samples, suggesting 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) from Agent Orange as the major source of the contamination. The vertical transport of PCDD/Fs was observed in soil column with high TEQ levels above 1000 pg/g dry wt (Vietnamese limit for necessary remediation activities- TCVN 8183:2009 (2009)) even at a depth of 1.8 m. The vertical transport of PCDD/Fs has probably mainly taken place during the "Ranch Hand" defoliant spray activities due to the leaks and spills of phenoxy herbicides and solvents. The congener patterns suggest that transports of PCDD/Fs by weathering processes have led to their redistribution in the low-land areas. Also, an estimate for the total volume of contaminated soil requiring remediation to meet Vietnamese regulatory limits is provided. PMID:25510612

  14. Clinical Outcome of Veterans with Acute Coronary Syndrome Who Had Been Exposed to Agent Orange

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Bum; Moon, Se Gwon; Kim, Hee Jong; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Hwang, Sun Ho; Kim, Wan

    2012-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), one of the components of Agent Orange, has been reported to be a deadly poison despite its presence at extremely small doses. TCDD is reported to cause various kinds of cancers and other harmful effects on humans. However, a correlation between exposure to TCDD and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is not yet proven. Thus, we examined the correlation between exposure to TCDD and ACS through an analysis of coronary angiograms from veterans of the Vietnam War. Two hundred fifty-one consecutive men undergoing coronary angiograms owing to ACS between April 2004 and May 2009 at Gwangju Veterans Hospital were analyzed. Included subjects were between 50 and 70 years of age. The patients were divided into two groups: 121 patients who had been exposed to TCDD (Group I) and 130 patients who had not been exposed to TCDD (Group II). Clinical and coronary angiographic findings were evaluated. Baseline clinical characteristics, inflammatory markers, and echocardiographic parameters were not significantly different between the two groups. The incidence of hypertension (71.1% vs. 60.0%, p=0.039) and hyperlipidemia (27.3% vs. 16.9%, p=0.038) was higher in Group I than in Group II. Total occlusion, stent length, stent use, and coronary lesion characteristics were not significantly different between the two groups. The rate of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) had no relationship with exposure to TCDD. Exposure to TCDD might not affect severity or the rate of MACE in persons with ACS. PMID:22570815

  15. Paternal exposure to Agent Orange and spina bifida: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Anh Duc; Taylor, Richard; Roberts, Christine L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to conduct a meta-analysis of published and unpublished studies that examine the association between Agent Orange (AO) exposure and the risk of spina bifida. Relevant studies were identified through a computerized literature search of Medline and Embase from 1966 to 2008; a review of the reference list of retrieved articles and conference proceedings; and by contacting researchers for unpublished studies. Both fixed-effects and random-effects models were used to pool the results of individual studies. The Cochrane Q test and index of heterogeneity (I(2)) were used to evaluate heterogeneity, and a funnel plot and Egger's test were used to evaluate publication bias. Seven studies, including two Vietnamese and five non-Vietnamese studies, involving 330 cases and 134,884 non-cases were included in the meta-analysis. The overall relative risk (RR) for spina bifida associated with paternal exposure to AO was 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.48-2.74), with no statistical evidence of heterogeneity across studies. Non-Vietnamese studies showed a slightly higher summary RR (RR = 2.22; 95% CI: 1.38-3.56) than Vietnamese studies (RR = 1.92 95% CI: 1.29-2.86). When analyzed separately, the overall association was statistically significant for the three case-control studies (Summary Odds Ratio = 2.25, 95% CI: 1.31-3.86) and the cross sectional study (RR = 1.97, 95% CI: 1.31-2.96), but not for the three cohort studies (RR: 2.11; 95% CI: 0.78-5.73). Paternal exposure to AO appears to be associated with a statistically increased risk of spina bifida. PMID:19894129

  16. Natural selection for 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid mineralizing bacteria in agent orange contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Rice, J F; Menn, F M; Hay, A G; Sanseverino, J; Sayler, G S

    2005-12-01

    Agent Orange contaminated soils were utilized in direct enrichment culture studies to isolate 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) mineralizing bacteria. Two bacterial cultures able to grow at the expense of 2,4,5-T and/or 2,4-D were isolated. The 2,4,5-T degrading culture was a mixed culture containing two bacteria, Burkholderia species strain JR7B2 and Burkholderia species strain JR7B3. JR7B3 was able to metabolize 2,4,5-T as the sole source of carbon and energy, and demonstrated the ability to affect metabolism of 2,4-D to a lesser degree. Strain JR7B3 was able to mineralize 2,4,5-T in pure culture and utilized 2,4,5-T in the presence of 0.01% yeast extract. Subsequent characterization of the 2,4-D degrading culture showed that one bacterium, Burkholderia species strain JRB1, was able to utilize 2,4-D as a sole carbon and energy source in pure culture. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments utilizing known genetic sequences from other 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T degrading bacteria demonstrated that these organisms contain gene sequences similar to tfdA, B, C, E, and R (Strain JRB1) and the tftA, C, and E genes (Strain JR7B3). Expression analysis confirmed that tftA, C, and E and tfdA, B, and C were transcribed during 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D dependent growth, respectively. The results indicate a strong selective pressure for 2,4,5-T utilizing strains under field condition. PMID:15865343

  17. Clinical outcome of veterans with acute coronary syndrome who had been exposed to agent orange.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Bum; Kang, Won Yu; Moon, Se Gwon; Kim, Hee Jong; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Yeon Hwa; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Hwang, Sun Ho; Kim, Wan

    2012-04-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), one of the components of Agent Orange, has been reported to be a deadly poison despite its presence at extremely small doses. TCDD is reported to cause various kinds of cancers and other harmful effects on humans. However, a correlation between exposure to TCDD and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is not yet proven. Thus, we examined the correlation between exposure to TCDD and ACS through an analysis of coronary angiograms from veterans of the Vietnam War. Two hundred fifty-one consecutive men undergoing coronary angiograms owing to ACS between April 2004 and May 2009 at Gwangju Veterans Hospital were analyzed. Included subjects were between 50 and 70 years of age. The patients were divided into two groups: 121 patients who had been exposed to TCDD (Group I) and 130 patients who had not been exposed to TCDD (Group II). Clinical and coronary angiographic findings were evaluated. Baseline clinical characteristics, inflammatory markers, and echocardiographic parameters were not significantly different between the two groups. The incidence of hypertension (71.1% vs. 60.0%, p=0.039) and hyperlipidemia (27.3% vs. 16.9%, p=0.038) was higher in Group I than in Group II. Total occlusion, stent length, stent use, and coronary lesion characteristics were not significantly different between the two groups. The rate of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) had no relationship with exposure to TCDD. Exposure to TCDD might not affect severity or the rate of MACE in persons with ACS. PMID:22570815

  18. Natural selection for 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid mineralizing bacteria in agent orange contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Rice, J F; Menn, F M; Hay, A G; Sanseverino, J; Sayler, G S

    2005-12-01

    Agent Orange contaminated soils were utilized in direct enrichment culture studies to isolate 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) mineralizing bacteria. Two bacterial cultures able to grow at the expense of 2,4,5-T and/or 2,4-D were isolated. The 2,4,5-T degrading culture was a mixed culture containing two bacteria, Burkholderia species strain JR7B2 and Burkholderia species strain JR7B3. JR7B3 was able to metabolize 2,4,5-T as the sole source of carbon and energy, and demonstrated the ability to affect metabolism of 2,4-D to a lesser degree. Strain JR7B3 was able to mineralize 2,4,5-T in pure culture and utilized 2,4,5-T in the presence of 0.01% yeast extract. Subsequent characterization of the 2,4-D degrading culture showed that one bacterium, Burkholderia species strain JRB1, was able to utilize 2,4-D as a sole carbon and energy source in pure culture. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments utilizing known genetic sequences from other 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T degrading bacteria demonstrated that these organisms contain gene sequences similar to tfdA, B, C, E, and R (Strain JRB1) and the tftA, C, and E genes (Strain JR7B3). Expression analysis confirmed that tftA, C, and E and tfdA, B, and C were transcribed during 2,4,5-T and 2,4-D dependent growth, respectively. The results indicate a strong selective pressure for 2,4,5-T utilizing strains under field condition.

  19. Dioxin, dibenzofuran, and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels in food from Agent Orange-sprayed and nonsprayed areas of Laos.

    PubMed

    Schecter, Arnold; Pavuk, Marian; Malisch, Rainer; Ryan, John Jake

    2003-11-28

    During the Vietnam War, a phenoxy-herbicide mixture called Agent Orange, which was contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin, or TCDD, was used primarily for destruction of forest and other foliage in order to prevent enemy troop movement and protect American and allied troops and military bases in the south of Vietnam. Smaller areas of Laos and Cambodia were also sprayed with Agent Orange between 1962 and 1971 from fixed-wing aircraft. In 2001, 28 food samples consisting of meat, fish, and dairy products were collected in sprayed and nonsprayed areas of Laos and analyzed for dioxins, dioxinlike dibenzofurans, and selected polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners by high-resolution gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry at laboratories in Germany and Canada. Low levels of dioxin and other dioxinlike substances were found in Laotian food, similar to levels present in recent exported Vietnamese food to United States. Vietnam is geographically adjacent to Laos. Total dioxin toxic equivalent (TEQ) levels were similar in samples from sprayed and non-sprayed areas, ranging from 0.009 to 0.851 pg/g or parts per trillion (ppt) in sprayed Sepone, and from 0.022 to 0.537 pg/g or ppt wet weight in non sprayed Vientiane. However, the Laotian fish samples from the Agent Orange-sprayed area had, on average, a higher proportion of total TEQ from TCDD (31.7% vs. 9.4%) compared to the nonsprayed area. Some other food items, duck eggs and pork liver from Sepone, also had severalfold higher TCDD levels than similar food samples from Vientiane, 0.029 vs. 0.011 pg/g and 0.070 vs. 0.004 pg/g wet weight, respectively. There were no substantial differences in levels of dibenzofuran and PCB congeners. In general, elevated TCDD levels were not found in Laotian food samples. It is possible that dioxin-contaminated areas, or "hot spots," exist in Laos as they do in Vietnam, although they have not yet been identified. PMID:14710598

  20. Specter orange.

    PubMed

    Scott-Clark, Cathy; Levy, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    Nearly 30 years after the Vietnam War, a chemical weapon used by U.S. troops is still exacting a hideous toll on each new generation in Vietnam. The dioxin (TCCD) that contaminated the herbicide Agent Orange is one of the most toxic molecules known to science. The contaminant persists in the soil. The United States has done nothing to combat the medical and environmental catastrophe that is overwhelming the country. PMID:15346687

  1. Modification of carotenoid levels by abscission agents and expression of carotenoid biosynthetic genes in 'valencia' sweet orange.

    PubMed

    Alferez, Fernando; Pozo, Luis V; Rouseff, Russell R; Burns, Jacqueline K

    2013-03-27

    The effect of 5-chloro-3-methyl-4-nitro-1H-pyrazole (CMNP) and ethephon on peel color, flavedo carotenoid gene expression, and carotenoid accumulation was investigated in mature 'Valencia' orange ( Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) fruit flavedo at three maturation stages. Abscission agent application altered peel color. CMNP was more effective than ethephon in promoting green-to-red (a) and blue-to-yellow (b) color at the middle and late maturation stages and total carotenoid changes at all maturation stages. Altered flow of carotenoid precursors during maturation due to abscission agents was suggested by changes in phytoene desaturase (Pds) and ζ-carotene desaturase (Zds) gene expression. However, each abscission agent affected downstream expression differentially. Ethephon application increased β-carotene hydroxilase (β-Chx) transcript accumulation 12-fold as maturation advanced from the early to middle and late stages. CMNP markedly increased β- and ε-lycopene cyclase (Lcy) transcript accumulation 45- and 15-fold, respectively, at midmaturation. Patterns of carotenoid accumulation in flavedo were supported in part by gene expression changes. CMNP caused greater accumulation of total flavedo carotenoids at all maturation stages when compared with ethephon or controls. In general, CMNP treatment increased total red carotenoids more than ethephon or the control but decreased total yellow carotenoids at each maturation stage. In control fruit flavedo, total red carotenoids increased and yellow carotenoids decreased as maturation progressed. Trends in total red carotenoids during maturation were consistent with measured a values. Changes in carotenoid accumulation and expression patterns in flavedo suggest that regulation of carotenoid accumulation is under transcriptional, translational, and post-translational control.

  2. Is exposure to Agent Orange a risk factor for hepatocellular cancer?—A single-center retrospective study in the U.S. veteran population

    PubMed Central

    Hazratjee, Nyla; Opris, Dan; Agrawal, Sangeeta; Markert, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Background Approximately 15% to 35% of those with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) related cirrhosis will develop hepatocellular cancer (HCC). With this burden increasing across the globe, identification of risk factors for HCC has become imperative. Exposure to Agent Orange has been implicated as a possible risk factor for liver cancer in a study from the Republic of Korea. However, there has been no study in U.S. veterans with CHC and cirrhosis that has evaluated exposure to Agent Orange as a risk factor for HCC. We conducted a retrospective study of U.S. military veterans diagnosed with CHC and cirrhosis over a period of 14 years to evaluate potential risk factors for HCC including exposure to Agent Orange. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 390 patients with confirmed CHC-related cirrhosis between 2000 and 2013 and identified patients with HCC. We compared demographic, laboratory, and other clinical characteristics of patients with and without HCC. Results The mean age of the cohort was 51 years (SD =7.5), with the majority being male (98.5%). Seventy-nine of 390 (20.2%) patients developed HCC, diagnosed on average 8 (SD =4.8) years after diagnosis of CHC. Nearly half (49.4%) were Childs A, 40.5% were Childs B, and 10.1% were Childs C. HCC patients were more likely to be African American than non-HCC patients (40.5% vs. 25.4%, P=0.009) and to be addicted to alcohol (86.1% vs. 74.3%, P=0.027). A trend toward significance was seen in the HCC group for exposure to Agent Orange (16.5% vs. 10.0%, P=0.10) and smoking addiction (88.6% vs. 80.7%, P=0.10). Consequently, race, alcohol addiction, Agent Orange exposure, and smoking addiction were included in the multivariable logistic regression (MLR) analysis. Alcohol addiction [odds ratio (OR) =2.17; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07–4.43] and African American race (OR =2.07; 95% CI, 1.22–3.51) were found to be the only two definitive independent risk factors for HCC in our sample. Conclusions African American race and

  3. Handler, bystander and reentry exposure to TCDD from application of Agent Orange by C-123 aircraft during the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Ross, John H; Hewitt, Andrew; Armitage, James; Solomon, Keith; Watkins, Deborah K; Ginevan, Michael E

    2015-02-01

    Using validated models and methods routinely employed by pesticide regulatory agencies, the absorbed dosages of Agent Orange (AO) herbicide contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were estimated for mixer/loaders, applicators, and individuals in the vicinity of applications of AO by C-123 aircraft during the Vietnam War. Resulting dosages of TCDD were then transformed to estimates of adipose residues, and compared to population biomonitoring of known mixer/loaders and applicators as well as ground troops in Vietnam and civilians in the U.S. Results demonstrate that mixer/loaders and applicators had the greatest exposures and their measured residues of TCDD in adipose were consistent with the estimated exposures. Further, the potentially exposed ground troops, including those who could have been directly sprayed during aerial defoliation, had measured adipose residues that were consistent with those in civilian U.S. populations with no defined source of exposure exposures and both of those cohorts had orders of magnitude less exposure than the mixer/loaders or applicators. Despite the availability of validated exposure modeling methods for decades, the quantitative TCDD dose estimates presented here are the first of their kind for the Vietnam conflict.

  4. Predictors for dioxin accumulation in residents living in Da Nang and Bien Hoa, Vietnam, many years after Agent Orange use.

    PubMed

    Pham, Diem T; Nguyen, Hang M; Boivin, Thomas G; Zajacova, Anna; Huzurbazar, Snehalata V; Bergman, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Agent Orange (AO) was the main defoliant used by the US in Vietnam from 1961 to 1971; AO was contaminated with dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, or TCDD). Three major dioxin “hot spots” remain from previous AO storage and use at former US bases at Bien Hoa, Da Nang, and Phu Cat, posing potential health risks for Vietnamese living on or near these hot spots. We evaluated potential risk factors contributing to serum TCDD levels in Vietnamese residents at and near contaminated sites in Da Nang and Bien Hoa, Vietnam. We used multiple linear regression to analyze possible associations of blood dioxin concentrations with demographic, socioeconomic, lifestyle, and dietary risk factors for residents living on or near these hot spots. For the Da Nang study, fish farming on the site, living on property flooded from monsoon rains, and age were among the factors showing significant positive associations with serum TCDD concentrations. For the Bien Hoa study, fish farmers working at this site and their immediate family members had significantly higher serum TCDD concentrations. Our results suggest that water-related activities, especially fish-farming, at the hot spots increased the risk of exposure to dioxin. PMID:25463251

  5. Predictors for dioxin accumulation in residents living in Da Nang and Bien Hoa, Vietnam, many years after Agent Orange use.

    PubMed

    Pham, Diem T; Nguyen, Hang M; Boivin, Thomas G; Zajacova, Anna; Huzurbazar, Snehalata V; Bergman, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Agent Orange (AO) was the main defoliant used by the US in Vietnam from 1961 to 1971; AO was contaminated with dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, or TCDD). Three major dioxin “hot spots” remain from previous AO storage and use at former US bases at Bien Hoa, Da Nang, and Phu Cat, posing potential health risks for Vietnamese living on or near these hot spots. We evaluated potential risk factors contributing to serum TCDD levels in Vietnamese residents at and near contaminated sites in Da Nang and Bien Hoa, Vietnam. We used multiple linear regression to analyze possible associations of blood dioxin concentrations with demographic, socioeconomic, lifestyle, and dietary risk factors for residents living on or near these hot spots. For the Da Nang study, fish farming on the site, living on property flooded from monsoon rains, and age were among the factors showing significant positive associations with serum TCDD concentrations. For the Bien Hoa study, fish farmers working at this site and their immediate family members had significantly higher serum TCDD concentrations. Our results suggest that water-related activities, especially fish-farming, at the hot spots increased the risk of exposure to dioxin.

  6. Handler, bystander and reentry exposure to TCDD from application of Agent Orange by C-123 aircraft during the Vietnam War.

    PubMed

    Ross, John H; Hewitt, Andrew; Armitage, James; Solomon, Keith; Watkins, Deborah K; Ginevan, Michael E

    2015-02-01

    Using validated models and methods routinely employed by pesticide regulatory agencies, the absorbed dosages of Agent Orange (AO) herbicide contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) were estimated for mixer/loaders, applicators, and individuals in the vicinity of applications of AO by C-123 aircraft during the Vietnam War. Resulting dosages of TCDD were then transformed to estimates of adipose residues, and compared to population biomonitoring of known mixer/loaders and applicators as well as ground troops in Vietnam and civilians in the U.S. Results demonstrate that mixer/loaders and applicators had the greatest exposures and their measured residues of TCDD in adipose were consistent with the estimated exposures. Further, the potentially exposed ground troops, including those who could have been directly sprayed during aerial defoliation, had measured adipose residues that were consistent with those in civilian U.S. populations with no defined source of exposure exposures and both of those cohorts had orders of magnitude less exposure than the mixer/loaders or applicators. Despite the availability of validated exposure modeling methods for decades, the quantitative TCDD dose estimates presented here are the first of their kind for the Vietnam conflict. PMID:25461054

  7. JBEI Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Timothy

    2008-12-01

    The JBEI Registry is a software to store and manage to a database of biological parts. It is intended to be used as a web service that is accessed via a web browser. It is also capable of running as a desktop program for a single user. The registry software stores, indexes, categories, and allows users to enter, search, retrieve, and contruct biological constructs in silico. It is also able to communicate with other Registries for data sharing and exchange.

  8. Carcinogenicity and teratogenicity vs. psychogenicity: Psychological characteristics associated with self-reported Agent Orange exposure among Vietnam combat veterans who seek treatment for substance abuse

    SciTech Connect

    Robinowitz, R.; Roberts, W.R.; Dolan, M.P.; Patterson, E.T.; Charles, H.L.; Atkins, H.G.; Penk, W.E. )

    1989-09-01

    This study asked, What are the psychological characteristics of Vietnam combat veterans who claim Agent Orange exposure when compared with combat-experienced cohorts who do not report such contamination The question was researched among 153 heroin addicts, polydrug abusers, and chronic alcoholics who were seeking treatment: 58 reported moderate to high defoliant exposure while in combat; 95 reported minimal to no exposure while in Vietnam. The null hypothesis was accepted for measures of childhood and present family social climate, premilitary backgrounds, reasons for seeking treatment, patterns and types of illicit drug and alcohol use, interpersonal problems, intellectual functioning, and short-term memory. The null hypothesis was rejected for personality differences, however, those who self-reported high Agent Orange exposure scored significantly higher on MMPI scales F, Hypochondriasis, Depression, Paranoia, Psychasthenia, Schizophrenia, Mania, and Social interoversion. The results suggest that clinicians carefully assess attributional processing of those who report traumatic experience.

  9. Carcinogenicity and teratogenicity vs. psychogenicity: psychological characteristics associated with self-reported Agent Orange exposure among Vietnam combat veterans who seek treatment for substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Robinowitz, R; Roberts, W R; Dolan, M P; Patterson, E T; Charles, H L; Atkins, H G; Penk, W E

    1989-09-01

    This study asked, "What are the psychological characteristics of Vietnam combat veterans who claim Agent Orange exposure when compared with combat-experienced cohorts who do not report such contamination?" The question was researched among 153 heroin addicts, polydrug abusers, and chronic alcoholics who were seeking treatment: 58 reported moderate to high defoliant exposure while in combat; 95 reported minimal to no exposure while in Vietnam. The null hypothesis was accepted for measures of childhood and present family social climate, premilitary backgrounds, reasons for seeking treatment, patterns and types of illicit drug and alcohol use, interpersonal problems, intellectual functioning, and short-term memory. The null hypothesis was rejected for personality differences, however, those who self-reported high Agent Orange exposure scored significantly higher on MMPI scales F, Hypochondriasis, Depression, Paranoia, Psychasthenia, Schizophrenia, Mania, and Social interoversion. The results suggest that clinicians carefully assess attributional processing of those who report traumatic experience. PMID:2808727

  10. Carcinogenicity and teratogenicity vs. psychogenicity: psychological characteristics associated with self-reported Agent Orange exposure among Vietnam combat veterans who seek treatment for substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Robinowitz, R; Roberts, W R; Dolan, M P; Patterson, E T; Charles, H L; Atkins, H G; Penk, W E

    1989-09-01

    This study asked, "What are the psychological characteristics of Vietnam combat veterans who claim Agent Orange exposure when compared with combat-experienced cohorts who do not report such contamination?" The question was researched among 153 heroin addicts, polydrug abusers, and chronic alcoholics who were seeking treatment: 58 reported moderate to high defoliant exposure while in combat; 95 reported minimal to no exposure while in Vietnam. The null hypothesis was accepted for measures of childhood and present family social climate, premilitary backgrounds, reasons for seeking treatment, patterns and types of illicit drug and alcohol use, interpersonal problems, intellectual functioning, and short-term memory. The null hypothesis was rejected for personality differences, however, those who self-reported high Agent Orange exposure scored significantly higher on MMPI scales F, Hypochondriasis, Depression, Paranoia, Psychasthenia, Schizophrenia, Mania, and Social interoversion. The results suggest that clinicians carefully assess attributional processing of those who report traumatic experience.

  11. Use of Anticoagulants and Antiplatelet Agents in Stable Outpatients with Coronary Artery Disease and Atrial Fibrillation. International CLARIFY Registry

    PubMed Central

    Fauchier, Laurent; Greenlaw, Nicola; Ferrari, Roberto; Ford, Ian; Fox, Kim M.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tendera, Michal; Steg, Ph. Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Background Few data are available regarding the use of antithrombotic strategies in coronary artery disease patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) in everyday practice. We sought to describe the prevalence of AF and its antithrombotic management in a contemporary population of patients with stable coronary artery disease. Methods and Findings CLARIFY is an international, prospective, longitudinal registry of outpatients with stable coronary artery disease, defined as prior (≥12 months) myocardial infarction, revascularization procedure, coronary stenosis >50%, or chest pain associated with evidence of myocardial ischemia. Overall, 33,428 patients were screened, of whom 32,954 had data available for analysis at baseline; of these 2,229 (6.7%) had a history of AF. Median (interquartile range) CHA2DS2-VASc score was 4 (3, 5). Oral anticoagulation alone was used in 25.7%, antiplatelet therapy alone in 52.8% (single 41.8%, dual 11.0%), and both in 21.5%. OAC use was independently associated with permanent AF (p<0.001), CHA2DS2-VASc score (p=0.006), pacemaker (p<0.001), stroke (p=0.04), absence of angina (p=0.004), decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (p<0.001), increased waist circumference (p=0.005), and longer history of coronary artery disease (p=0.008). History of percutaneous coronary intervention (p=0.004) and no/partial reimbursement for cardiovascular medication (p=0.01, p<0.001, respectively) were associated with reduced oral anticoagulant use. Conclusions In this contemporary cohort of patients with stable coronary artery disease and AF, most of whom are theoretical candidates for anticoagulation, oral anticoagulants were used in only 47.2%. Half of the patients received antiplatelet therapy alone and one-fifth received both antiplatelets and oral anticoagulants. Efforts are needed to improve adherence to guidelines in these patients. Trial Registration ISRCTN registry of clinical trials: ISRCTN43070564. PMID:25915904

  12. Agent Orange. Update.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, L G

    1983-12-01

    Review of the available literature on dioxin over the last several years is reported. There has been considerable writing on the subject, but extraction of true scientific data from emotionalism and sensationalism remains difficult. We must continue to remain alert to potential hazards stemming from this herbicidal chemical and await more definitive and conclusive studies than have been published to date. PMID:6364790

  13. JBEI Registry

    2008-12-01

    The JBEI Registry is a software to store and manage to a database of biological parts. It is intended to be used as a web service that is accessed via a web browser. It is also capable of running as a desktop program for a single user. The registry software stores, indexes, categories, and allows users to enter, search, retrieve, and contruct biological constructs in silico. It is also able to communicate with other Registriesmore » for data sharing and exchange.« less

  14. Insulin sensitivity following agent orange exposure in Vietnam veterans with high blood levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin.

    PubMed

    Kern, Philip A; Said, Sufyan; Jackson, William G; Michalek, Joel E

    2004-09-01

    Our objective was to determine whether insulin sensitivity was related to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange. Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for spraying Agent Orange and other herbicides in Vietnam from 1962 to 1971, and comparison veterans who did not spray herbicides were included. We measured insulin sensitivity (S(I)) using a frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test in a matched study of 29 matched pairs of veterans and a quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) based on fasting glucose and insulin in 71 matched pairs. No group differences were found with regard to the mean values of S(I), QUICKI, TNFalpha, adiponectin, and two measures of insulin secretion. However, S(I) and QUICKI decreased significantly with regard to TCDD (P = 0.01 and 0.02). A corresponding pattern (although not significant) was found for blood levels of TNFalpha and adiponectin. These data suggest that high blood TCDD levels may promote an insulin-resistant state, but the magnitude of this effect appeared to be small, such that an 18-fold increase in blood TCDD due to increased exposure resulted in only a 10% change in S(I) in the 29 matched pairs. PMID:15356078

  15. Comparison of serum levels of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin with indirect estimates of Agent Orange exposure among Vietnam veterans. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The report tests the validity of several indirect methods for estimating the exposure of ground troops to Agent Orange in Vietnam during 1966-69. The study identified a sample of U.S. Army Vietnam veterans of that era and asked them to have blood drawn so that the level of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin (TCDD) in serum could be measured. These veterans were selected from among those who served in 65 combat battalions in III Corps, a heavily sprayed part of Vietnam around Saigon. The men selected had all served only one tour in Vietnam and had been discharged with a pay grade of E1-E5, after having spent, on the average, over 300 days in Vietnam. The sample was chosen after the veterans had been stratified on likelihood of exposure (time and space proximity to recorded sprays) according to military records. For comparison, a sample of non-Vietnam U.S. Army veterans of the same era was also examined. The results show no meaningful association between TCDD levels and indirect estimate of Agent Orange exposure in Vietnam, with or without adjustment for other characteristics of the veterans, including age, race, body mass index, and self-reported civilian occupational and home herbicide exposure.

  16. Identification of a Mycobacterium sp. as the causative agent of orange nodular lesions in the Atlantic sea scallop Placopecten magellanicus.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Catherine; Huntsberger, Carl; Markey, Kathryn; Inglis, Susan; Smolowitz, Roxanna

    2016-03-30

    The Atlantic sea scallop Placopecten magellanicus is an economically important species in the offshore fisheries on the east coast of the USA. Recently, animals collected from waters ranging from Massachusetts to Maryland have shown variably sized (up to 1 cm in diameter) orange nodular foci, predominantly in the adductor muscle tissue, but also in other organs. Histological evaluation of the nodular lesions showed rod-shaped bacteria that stain acid-fast positive and Gram-positive. PCR methodology was employed to identify the causative organism of the nodules as a Mycobacterium sp. using analysis of the partial 16S gene and the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region. Based upon genotypic findings, the causative bacterium fits well into the genus Mycobacterium.

  17. Dioxin Registry report for Thompson Chemical Company, St. Louis, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, D.A.; Fingerhut, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    An industrial hygiene survey was conducted at the Thompson Chemical Company, St. Louis, Missouri. The company manufactured sodium-2,4,5-trichlorophenate (NaTCP), 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic-acid (2,4,5-T), and esters and amines of 2,4,5-T from 1949 through 1970. The company manufactured Agent-Orange for the Air Force from 1967 until 1969. The facility, its processes, its workforce, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (1746016) (TCDD) analytical results for these products were examined. As this firm filed for bankruptcy in 1970, there was only limited data available. The facility employed about 12 persons year round and about double this number during the busy season and during the Agent-Orange contract. Almost no information was available about the production processes. Nine persons developed chloracne after an accident and fire in the NaTCP process. Few personnel records were available. The authors conclude that workers employed from 1949 through 1970 are suitable for inclusion into the Dioxin Registry. There is not enough information available to construct a TCDD exposure matrix for this site.

  18. Serum 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Levels and Their Association With Age, Body Mass Index, Smoking, Military Record-based Variables, and Estimated Exposure to Agent Orange in Korean Vietnam Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Sang-Wook; Ohrr, Heechoul; Won, Jong-Uk; Song, Jae-Seok

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the levels of serum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and evaluate their association with age, body mass index, smoking, military record-based variables, and estimated exposure to Agent Orange in Korean Vietnam veterans. Methods Serum levels of TCDD were analyzed in 102 Vietnam veterans. Information on age, body mass index, and smoking status were obtained from a self-reported questionnaire. The perceived exposure was assessed by a 6-item questionnaire. Two proximity-based exposures were constructed by division/brigade level and battalion/company level unit information using the Stellman exposure opportunity index model. Results The mean and median of serum TCDD levels was 1.2 parts per trillion (ppt) and 0.9 ppt, respectively. Only 2 Vietnam veterans had elevated levels of TCDD (>10 ppt). The levels of TCDD did not tend to increase with the likelihood of exposure to Agent Orange, as estimated from either proximity-based exposure or perceived self-reported exposure. The serum TCDD levels were not significantly different according to military unit, year of first deployment, duration of deployment, military rank, age, body mass index, and smoking status. Conclusions The average serum TCDD levels in the Korean Vietnam veterans were lower than those reported for other occupationally or environmentally exposed groups and US Vietnam veterans, and their use as an objective marker of Agent Orange exposure may have some limitations. The unit of deployment, duration of deployment, year of first deployment, military rank, perceived self-reported exposure, and proximity-based exposure to Agent Orange were not associated with TCDD levels in Korean Vietnam veterans. Age, body mass index and smoking also were not associated with TCDD levels. PMID:24137525

  19. Exposure opportunity models for Agent Orange, dioxin, and other military herbicides used in Vietnam, 1961-1971.

    PubMed

    Stellman, Steven D; Stellman, Jeanne M

    2004-07-01

    Nearly 19.5 million gallons of herbicides were sprayed on the Republic of Vietnam between 1961 and 1971 for military purposes. Amounts of spray and patterns of applications are available in an electronic file called HERBS that contains records of 9141 defoliation missions, including detailed coordinates of US Air Force Ranch Hand aircraft flight paths, along with chemical agent and gallonage sprayed. Two classes of models for use in epidemiological and environmental studies that utilize the HERBS data for estimating relative exposure opportunity indices are presented: a discrete "hits" model that counts instances of proximity in time and space to known herbicide applications, and a continuous exposure opportunity index, E4, that takes into account type and amount of herbicide sprayed, distance from spray application, and time interval when exposure may have occurred. Both direct spraying and indirect exposure to herbicide (or dioxin) that may have remained in the local environment are considered, using a conservative first-order model for environmental disappearance. A correction factor for dermal versus respiratory routes of entry has been incorporated. E4 has a log-normal distribution that spans six orders of magnitude, thus providing a substantial amount of discrimination between sprayed and unsprayed areas. The models improve on earlier ones by making full use of the geometry of the HERBS spray flight paths of Ranch Hand aircraft. To the extent possible so many decades after the War, the models have been qualitatively validated by comparison with recent dioxin soil and biota samples from heavily contaminated areas of Vietnam, and quantitatively validated against adipose dioxin obtained in epidemiological studies of Vietnamese. These models are incorporated within a geographic information system (GIS) that may be used, as one would expect, to identify locations such as hamlets, villages, and military installations sprayed by herbicide. In a novel application

  20. Exposure opportunity models for Agent Orange, dioxin, and other military herbicides used in Vietnam, 1961-1971.

    PubMed

    Stellman, Steven D; Stellman, Jeanne M

    2004-07-01

    Nearly 19.5 million gallons of herbicides were sprayed on the Republic of Vietnam between 1961 and 1971 for military purposes. Amounts of spray and patterns of applications are available in an electronic file called HERBS that contains records of 9141 defoliation missions, including detailed coordinates of US Air Force Ranch Hand aircraft flight paths, along with chemical agent and gallonage sprayed. Two classes of models for use in epidemiological and environmental studies that utilize the HERBS data for estimating relative exposure opportunity indices are presented: a discrete "hits" model that counts instances of proximity in time and space to known herbicide applications, and a continuous exposure opportunity index, E4, that takes into account type and amount of herbicide sprayed, distance from spray application, and time interval when exposure may have occurred. Both direct spraying and indirect exposure to herbicide (or dioxin) that may have remained in the local environment are considered, using a conservative first-order model for environmental disappearance. A correction factor for dermal versus respiratory routes of entry has been incorporated. E4 has a log-normal distribution that spans six orders of magnitude, thus providing a substantial amount of discrimination between sprayed and unsprayed areas. The models improve on earlier ones by making full use of the geometry of the HERBS spray flight paths of Ranch Hand aircraft. To the extent possible so many decades after the War, the models have been qualitatively validated by comparison with recent dioxin soil and biota samples from heavily contaminated areas of Vietnam, and quantitatively validated against adipose dioxin obtained in epidemiological studies of Vietnamese. These models are incorporated within a geographic information system (GIS) that may be used, as one would expect, to identify locations such as hamlets, villages, and military installations sprayed by herbicide. In a novel application

  1. Potent Inhibition of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Causative Agent of White-Nose Syndrome in Bats, by Cold-Pressed, Terpeneless, Valencia Orange Oil

    PubMed Central

    Boire, Nicholas; Zhang, Sean; Khuvis, Joshua; Lee, Rick; Rivers, Jennifer; Crandall, Philip; Keel, M. Kevin; Parrish, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The causative agent of White-nose Syndrome (WNS), Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has been shown to be fatal to several species of bats in North America. To date, no compounds or chemical control measures have been developed which eliminates the growth of the fungus in the environment or in affected animals. In the current study, we evaluated the activity of cold-pressed, terpeneless orange oil (CPT) against multiple isolates of P. destructans in vitro. For all assays, a modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay was used. Standardized spore suspensions were prepared, adjusted to a specific optical density, and used to plate fungal lawns. Plates were incubated at either 15°C or 4°C for up to 6 months and checked at regular intervals for growth. Once controls had grown, zones of inhibition were measured (mm) on test plates and compared to those obtained using current antifungal drugs. All P. destructans isolates were completely inhibited by 100% CPT (10 μL) at 1 month of incubation regardless of temperature (4°C and 15°C). Complete inhibition persisted up to 6 months following a single exposure at this concentration. Of the standard antifungals, only amphotericin B demonstrated any activity, resulting in zone diameters ranging from 58 mm to 74 mm. CPT, at the highest concentration tested (100%), had no significant effect against a variety of other environmental organisms including various filamentous fungi, bacteria and aerobic actinomycetes. Given that CPT is relatively non-toxic, the possibility exists that the all-natural, mixture could be used as an environmental pre-treatment to eradicate P. destructans from bat habitats. Additional studies are needed to assess any undesirable effects of CPT on bat behavior and health and overall impacts on other members of the interconnected ecosystem(s). PMID:26849057

  2. Environmental fate and dietary exposures of humans to TCDD as a result of the spraying of Agent Orange in upland forests of Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Armitage, James M; Ginevan, Michael E; Hewitt, Andrew; Ross, John H; Watkins, Deborah K; Solomon, Keith R

    2015-02-15

    The fate and transport of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-p-dibenzodioxin (TCDD) released into the environment of South Vietnam (SVN) as a consequence of the aerial application of the herbicidal defoliant Agent Orange (AO) were simulated for a generic upland forest scenario and followed over a 50-year period (1965, 1968 and 1970 onwards). Modeled concentrations of TCDD in the environment were then used as inputs to a human exposure model, which focused on long-term exposures via the food chain. Intake rates and body burdens of TCDD were estimated for adult males over the course of the simulation period and compared to available biomonitoring data. One of the most important factors determining the magnitude of the simulated human exposure to TCDD was the fraction of the chemical deposited directly to soil (where it was assumed to have a degradation half-life of 10 or 15years) relative to the fraction assumed to remain on/in the forest canopy following the spray application (where it was assumed to have a degradation half-life of ≤48h). The simulated body burdens under the various scenarios considered were broadly consistent with the biomonitoring data from SVN collected in the mid-1980s to late 1990s. Taken together, the modeling results and empirical data suggest that highly elevated exposures to TCDD (i.e., body burdens in the several 100s of pg/g lipid range and greater) were not common among people inhabiting upland forest locations in SVN sprayed with AO and that peak and average body burdens were broadly similar to those of the general population of the U.S. in the 1970s and early 1980s. The model-based assessment is consistent with the 'hot spot' hypothesis i.e., potential exposures to TCDD linked to activities conducted on or near former bases where AO was stored are greater than potential exposures in areas subjected to aerial spraying. PMID:25433383

  3. Environmental fate and dietary exposures of humans to TCDD as a result of the spraying of Agent Orange in upland forests of Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Armitage, James M; Ginevan, Michael E; Hewitt, Andrew; Ross, John H; Watkins, Deborah K; Solomon, Keith R

    2015-02-15

    The fate and transport of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-p-dibenzodioxin (TCDD) released into the environment of South Vietnam (SVN) as a consequence of the aerial application of the herbicidal defoliant Agent Orange (AO) were simulated for a generic upland forest scenario and followed over a 50-year period (1965, 1968 and 1970 onwards). Modeled concentrations of TCDD in the environment were then used as inputs to a human exposure model, which focused on long-term exposures via the food chain. Intake rates and body burdens of TCDD were estimated for adult males over the course of the simulation period and compared to available biomonitoring data. One of the most important factors determining the magnitude of the simulated human exposure to TCDD was the fraction of the chemical deposited directly to soil (where it was assumed to have a degradation half-life of 10 or 15years) relative to the fraction assumed to remain on/in the forest canopy following the spray application (where it was assumed to have a degradation half-life of ≤48h). The simulated body burdens under the various scenarios considered were broadly consistent with the biomonitoring data from SVN collected in the mid-1980s to late 1990s. Taken together, the modeling results and empirical data suggest that highly elevated exposures to TCDD (i.e., body burdens in the several 100s of pg/g lipid range and greater) were not common among people inhabiting upland forest locations in SVN sprayed with AO and that peak and average body burdens were broadly similar to those of the general population of the U.S. in the 1970s and early 1980s. The model-based assessment is consistent with the 'hot spot' hypothesis i.e., potential exposures to TCDD linked to activities conducted on or near former bases where AO was stored are greater than potential exposures in areas subjected to aerial spraying.

  4. Exposure to Agent Orange is a significant predictor of prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based recurrence and a rapid PSA doubling time after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sagar R.; Freedland, Stephen J.; Aronson, William J.; Kane, Christopher J.; Presti, Joseph C.; Amling, Christopher L.; Terris, Martha K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate and report the clinicopathological characteristics and outcomes after radical prostatectomy (RP) in patients with prostate cancer and previous exposure to Agent Orange (AO), particularly in relationship to race. PATIENTS AND METHODS In 1495 veterans who had undergone RP the clinicopathological characteristics, biochemical progression rates, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) doubling time (DT) after recurrence between AO-exposed and unexposed men were compared using logistic and linear regression and Cox proportional hazards analyses, and stratified by race. RESULTS The 206 (14%) men with AO exposure were more likely to be black (P = 0.001), younger (P < 0.001), treated more recently (P < 0.001), have a higher body mass index (P = 0.001), have clinical stage T1 disease (P < 0.001), and have lower preoperative PSA levels (P = 0.001). After adjusting for several clinical characteristics, AO exposure was not significantly related to adverse pathological features but was significantly associated with biochemical progression risk (relative risk 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.15–2.09, P = 0.004) and shorter PSADT (P < 0.001) after recurrence (8.2 vs 18.6 months). When stratified by race, these associations were present and similar in both races, with no significant interaction between race and AO exposure for predicting biochemical recurrence or mean adjusted PSADT (P interaction >0.20). CONCLUSIONS Patients with AO exposure and treated with RP were more likely to be black, present with lower risk features, have an increased risk of biochemical progression, and shorter PSADT after recurrence. When stratified by race, the association between AO exposure and poor outcomes was present in both races. These findings suggest that among selected men who choose RP, AO exposure might be associated with more aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:19298411

  5. Potent Inhibition of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Causative Agent of White-Nose Syndrome in Bats, by Cold-Pressed, Terpeneless, Valencia Orange Oil.

    PubMed

    Boire, Nicholas; Zhang, Sean; Khuvis, Joshua; Lee, Rick; Rivers, Jennifer; Crandall, Philip; Keel, M Kevin; Parrish, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The causative agent of White-nose Syndrome (WNS), Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has been shown to be fatal to several species of bats in North America. To date, no compounds or chemical control measures have been developed which eliminates the growth of the fungus in the environment or in affected animals. In the current study, we evaluated the activity of cold-pressed, terpeneless orange oil (CPT) against multiple isolates of P. destructans in vitro. For all assays, a modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay was used. Standardized spore suspensions were prepared, adjusted to a specific optical density, and used to plate fungal lawns. Plates were incubated at either 15°C or 4°C for up to 6 months and checked at regular intervals for growth. Once controls had grown, zones of inhibition were measured (mm) on test plates and compared to those obtained using current antifungal drugs. All P. destructans isolates were completely inhibited by 100% CPT (10 μL) at 1 month of incubation regardless of temperature (4°C and 15°C). Complete inhibition persisted up to 6 months following a single exposure at this concentration. Of the standard antifungals, only amphotericin B demonstrated any activity, resulting in zone diameters ranging from 58 mm to 74 mm. CPT, at the highest concentration tested (100%), had no significant effect against a variety of other environmental organisms including various filamentous fungi, bacteria and aerobic actinomycetes. Given that CPT is relatively non-toxic, the possibility exists that the all-natural, mixture could be used as an environmental pre-treatment to eradicate P. destructans from bat habitats. Additional studies are needed to assess any undesirable effects of CPT on bat behavior and health and overall impacts on other members of the interconnected ecosystem(s).

  6. Potent Inhibition of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Causative Agent of White-Nose Syndrome in Bats, by Cold-Pressed, Terpeneless, Valencia Orange Oil.

    PubMed

    Boire, Nicholas; Zhang, Sean; Khuvis, Joshua; Lee, Rick; Rivers, Jennifer; Crandall, Philip; Keel, M Kevin; Parrish, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The causative agent of White-nose Syndrome (WNS), Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has been shown to be fatal to several species of bats in North America. To date, no compounds or chemical control measures have been developed which eliminates the growth of the fungus in the environment or in affected animals. In the current study, we evaluated the activity of cold-pressed, terpeneless orange oil (CPT) against multiple isolates of P. destructans in vitro. For all assays, a modified Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion assay was used. Standardized spore suspensions were prepared, adjusted to a specific optical density, and used to plate fungal lawns. Plates were incubated at either 15°C or 4°C for up to 6 months and checked at regular intervals for growth. Once controls had grown, zones of inhibition were measured (mm) on test plates and compared to those obtained using current antifungal drugs. All P. destructans isolates were completely inhibited by 100% CPT (10 μL) at 1 month of incubation regardless of temperature (4°C and 15°C). Complete inhibition persisted up to 6 months following a single exposure at this concentration. Of the standard antifungals, only amphotericin B demonstrated any activity, resulting in zone diameters ranging from 58 mm to 74 mm. CPT, at the highest concentration tested (100%), had no significant effect against a variety of other environmental organisms including various filamentous fungi, bacteria and aerobic actinomycetes. Given that CPT is relatively non-toxic, the possibility exists that the all-natural, mixture could be used as an environmental pre-treatment to eradicate P. destructans from bat habitats. Additional studies are needed to assess any undesirable effects of CPT on bat behavior and health and overall impacts on other members of the interconnected ecosystem(s). PMID:26849057

  7. Registries in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, C

    2015-02-01

    The first nationwide orthopaedic registry was created in Sweden in 1975 to collect data on total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Since then, several countries have established registries, with varying degrees of success. Managing a registry requires time and money. Factors that contribute to successful registry management include the use of a single identifier for each patient to ensure full traceability of all procedures related to a given implant; a long-term funding source; a contemporary, rapid, Internet-based data collection method; and the collection of exhaustive data, at least for innovative implants. The effects of registries on practice patterns should be evaluated. The high cost of registries raises issues of independence and content ownership. Scandinavian countries have been maintaining orthopaedic registries for nearly four decades (since 1975). The first English-language orthopaedic registry was not created until 1998 (in New Zealand), and both the US and many European countries are still struggling to establish orthopaedic registries. To date, there are 11 registered nationwide registries on total knee and total hip replacement. The data they contain are often consistent, although contradictions occur in some cases due to major variations in cultural and market factors. The future of registries will depend on the willingness of health authorities and healthcare professionals to support the creation and maintenance of these tools. Surgeons feel that registries should serve merely to compare implants. Health authorities, in contrast, have a strong interest in practice patterns and healthcare institution performances. Striking a balance between these objectives should allow advances in registry development in the near future. PMID:25553603

  8. The virtual observatory registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Greene, G.; Le Sidaner, P.; Plante, R. L.

    2014-11-01

    In the Virtual Observatory (VO), the Registry provides the mechanism with which users and applications discover and select resources-typically, data and services-that are relevant for a particular scientific problem. Even though the VO adopted technologies in particular from the bibliographic community where available, building the Registry system involved a major standardisation effort, involving about a dozen interdependent standard texts. This paper discusses the server-side aspects of the standards and their application, as regards the functional components (registries), the resource records in both format and content, the exchange of resource records between registries (harvesting), as well as the creation and management of the identifiers used in the system based on the notion of authorities. Registry record authors, registry operators or even advanced users thus receive a big picture serving as a guideline through the body of relevant standard texts. To complete this picture, we also mention common usage patterns and open issues as appropriate.

  9. Second generation registry framework

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Information management systems are essential to capture data be it for public health and human disease, sustainable agriculture, or plant and animal biosecurity. In public health, the term patient registry is often used to describe information management systems that are used to record and track phenotypic data of patients. Appropriate design, implementation and deployment of patient registries enables rapid decision making and ongoing data mining ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes. A major bottleneck encountered is the static nature of these registries. That is, software developers are required to work with stakeholders to determine requirements, design the system, implement the required data fields and functionality for each patient registry. Additionally, software developer time is required for ongoing maintenance and customisation. It is desirable to deploy a sophisticated registry framework that can allow scientists and registry curators possessing standard computing skills to dynamically construct a complete patient registry from scratch and customise it for their specific needs with little or no need to engage a software developer at any stage. Results This paper introduces our second generation open source registry framework which builds on our previous rare disease registry framework (RDRF). This second generation RDRF is a new approach as it empowers registry administrators to construct one or more patient registries without software developer effort. New data elements for a diverse range of phenotypic and genotypic measurements can be defined at any time. Defined data elements can then be utilised in any of the created registries. Fine grained, multi-level user and workgroup access can be applied to each data element to ensure appropriate access and data privacy. We introduce the concept of derived data elements to assist the data element standards communities on how they might be best categorised. Conclusions We introduce the

  10. Stroke Trials Registry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials News About Neurology Image Library Search The Internet Stroke Center Trials Registry Clinical Trials Interventions Conditions ... UT Southwestern Medical Center. Copyright © 1997-2011 - The Internet Stroke Center. All rights reserved. The information contained ...

  11. [Hungarian Hypertension Registry].

    PubMed

    Kiss, István; Kékes, Ede

    2014-05-11

    Today, hypertension is considered endemic throughout the world. The number of individuals with high blood pressure and the increasing risk, morbidity and mortality caused by hypertension despite modern therapy do not decrease sufficiently. Hypertension has become a public health issue. Prevention and effective care require integrated datasets about many features, clinical presentation and therapy of patients with hypertension. The lack of this database in Hungary prompted the development of the registry which could help to provide population-based data for analysis. Data collection and processing was initiated by the Hungarian Society of Hypertension in 2002. Data recording into the Hungarian Hypertension Registry was performed four times (2002, 2005, 2007, 2011) and the registry currently contains data obtained from 108,473 patients. Analysis of these data indicates that 80% of the patients belong to the high or very high cardiovascular risk group. The registry provides data on cardiovascular risk of the hypertensive populations and the effectiveness of antihypertensive therapy in Hungary. Based on international experience and preliminary analysis of data from the Hungarian Hypertension Registry, establishment of hypertension registry may support the effectiveness of public health programs. A further step would be needed for proper data management control and the application of professional principles of evidence-based guidelines in the everyday practice.

  12. Psoriatic Arthritis Registries.

    PubMed

    Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Varisco, Valentina; Ditto, Maria Chiara; Benucci, Maurizio; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of new biological drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis has led to the creation of a number of registries in Europe and the United States. Most of them are sponsored by national rheumatology societies, and provide information that is useful in clinical practice concerning the clinical characteristics, efficacy, and safety of all licensed biological drugs. Their findings also help to improve our understanding of the quality of life and working ability of patients receiving biological drugs, and suggest methods for allocating resources. However, there are only a few registries for psoriatic arthritis, and efforts should be made to increase their number to obtain further reliable and useful data.

  13. Malaysian Twin Registry.

    PubMed

    Jahanfar, Shayesteh; Jaffar, Sharifah Halimah

    2013-02-01

    The National Malaysian Twin Registry was established in Royal College of Medicine, Perak, University Kuala Lumpur (UniKL) in June 2008 through a grant provided by UniKL. The general objective is to facilitate scientific research involving participation of twins and their family members in order to answer questions of health and wellbeing relevant to Malaysians. Recruitment is done via mass media, poster, and pamphlets. We now have 266 adult and 204 children twins registered. Several research projects including reproductive health study of twins and the role of co-bedding on growth and development of children are carried out. Registry holds annual activities for twins and seeks to provide health-related information for twins. We seek international collaboration.

  14. Determination of PCDD/Fs in breast milk of women living in the vicinities of Da Nang Agent Orange hot spot (Vietnam) and estimation of the infant's daily intake.

    PubMed

    Hue, N T M; Nam, V D; Thuong, N V; Huyen, N T; Phuong, N T H; Hung, N X; Tuan, N H; Son, L K; Minh, N H

    2014-09-01

    Seventeen toxic congeners of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) were determined in breast milks using the high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) method. Twenty seven breast milk samples were collected from primiparae who have lived over 5 years in wards namely Chinh Gian, An Khe, Khue Trung, and Hoa Thuan Tay which are located near the Da Nang Agent Orange hot spot (the AO/Dioxin hot spot). The samples were then analyzed for PCDD/F residues in order to assess the human exposure to dioxins from the AO/Dioxin hot spot, especially health risk to the breast-fed infants. The average TEQ levels in the four studied cohorts ranged from 8.1 to 26 pg/g lipid, with the highest level up to 51 pg TEQ/g lipid found in the An Khe ward. The TEQ level was correlated with geographical position and ranking in the order of Khue Trung, Hoa Thuan Tay, Chinh Gian and An Khe. The mean estimated PCDD/Fs infant's daily intake in the cohort of Khue Trung, Hoa Thuan Tay, Chinh Gian and An Khe was about 41, 122, 124, and 134 pg TEQ/kg bw/day, respectively, which are much higher than the tolerable daily intake proposed by the World Health Organization (4 pg TEQ/kg bw/day). PMID:24613651

  15. Determination of PCDD/Fs in breast milk of women living in the vicinities of Da Nang Agent Orange hot spot (Vietnam) and estimation of the infant's daily intake.

    PubMed

    Hue, N T M; Nam, V D; Thuong, N V; Huyen, N T; Phuong, N T H; Hung, N X; Tuan, N H; Son, L K; Minh, N H

    2014-09-01

    Seventeen toxic congeners of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) were determined in breast milks using the high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) method. Twenty seven breast milk samples were collected from primiparae who have lived over 5 years in wards namely Chinh Gian, An Khe, Khue Trung, and Hoa Thuan Tay which are located near the Da Nang Agent Orange hot spot (the AO/Dioxin hot spot). The samples were then analyzed for PCDD/F residues in order to assess the human exposure to dioxins from the AO/Dioxin hot spot, especially health risk to the breast-fed infants. The average TEQ levels in the four studied cohorts ranged from 8.1 to 26 pg/g lipid, with the highest level up to 51 pg TEQ/g lipid found in the An Khe ward. The TEQ level was correlated with geographical position and ranking in the order of Khue Trung, Hoa Thuan Tay, Chinh Gian and An Khe. The mean estimated PCDD/Fs infant's daily intake in the cohort of Khue Trung, Hoa Thuan Tay, Chinh Gian and An Khe was about 41, 122, 124, and 134 pg TEQ/kg bw/day, respectively, which are much higher than the tolerable daily intake proposed by the World Health Organization (4 pg TEQ/kg bw/day).

  16. Allergenicity of orange juice and orange seeds: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, S L; Ye, S T; Yu, Y

    1989-06-01

    Oranges are considered to be common allergenic fruits in China. They may induce severe food allergy in sensitive individuals. Allergic histories were analyzed in 26 orange-sensitive patients. Intradermal tests with extracts of orange juice and seeds were performed in 16 out of the 26 patients. P-K test was performed in one patient. The allergic history analysis suggested that clinical symptoms of some orange-allergic subjects were different from other fruit allergies but similar to nut and other oil plant seed allergies. The skin test and P-K test showed that the major allergenic components of orange reside in orange seeds instead of orange juice. Systemic reactions developed in 5 patients after intradermal tests with 1:20-200 (w/v) orange seed extracts. We considered that orange seed contains high potent allergens which may induce orange sensitivity due to careless chewing of orange seeds. PMID:2751771

  17. Distribution and quantification of Candidatus Liberibacter americanus, agent of huanglongbing disease of citrus in São Paulo State, Brasil, in leaves of an affected sweet orange tree as determined by PCR.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Diva C; Saillard, Colette; Couture, Carole; Martins, Elaine C; Wulff, Nelson A; Eveillard-Jagoueix, Sandrine; Yamamoto, Pedro T; Ayres, Antonio J; Bové, Joseph M

    2008-06-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB), an insect-transmitted disease of citrus, known for many years in Asia and Africa, has appeared in the state of São Paulo State (SSP), Brazil, in 2004, and the state of Florida, USA, in 2005. HLB endangers the very existence of citrus, as trees infected with the bacterial pathogen, irrevocably decline. In the absence of curative procedures, control of HLB is difficult and only based on prevention. Even though not available in culture, the HLB bacterium could be shown to be Gram-negative and to represent a new candidate genus, Candidatus Liberibacter, in the alpha subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Three Candidatus (Ca.) L. species occur: Ca. L. africanus in Africa, Ca. L. asiaticus in Asia, SSP, and Florida, and Ca. L. americanus in SSP. The liberibacters occur exclusively in the phloem sieve tubes. On affected trees, HLB symptoms are often seen on certain branches only, suggesting an uneven distribution of the Liberibacter. Occurrence of Ca. L. americanus, the major HLB agent in SSP, has been examined in 822 leaf samples from an affected sweet orange tree by two conventional PCR techniques and a newly developed real time (RTi) PCR, also used for quantification of the Liberibacter in the leaves. Even though RTi-PCR was able to detect as few as 10 liberibacters per gram of leaf tissue (l/g), no liberibacters could be detected in any of the many leaf samples from a symptomless branch, while in blotchy mottle leaves from symptomatic branches of the same tree, the Liberibacter titer reached values as high as 10(7)l/g. These results demonstrate the uneven distribution of the Liberibacter in HLB-affected trees.

  18. Iranian Joint Registry (Iranian National Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Aslani, Hamidreza; Nourbakhsh, Seyed Taghi; Lahiji, Farivar A.; Heydarian, Keykavoos; Jabalameli, Mahmood; Ghazavi, Mohammad Taghi; Tahmasebi, Mohammad Naghi; Fayyaz, Mahmoud Reza; Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Mohaddes, Maziar; Rajabpour, Mojtaba; Emami, Mohammad; Jazayeri, Seyyed Mohammad; Madadi, Firooz; Farahini, Hossein; Mirzatoloee, Fardin; Gharahdaghi, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimian, Mohammadreza; Mirvakili, Hossein; Bashti, Kaveh; Almasizadeh, Mohtasham; Abolghasemian, Mansour; Taheriazam, Afshin; Motififard, Mehdi; Yazdi, Hamidreza; Mobarakeh, Mahmood Karimi; Shayestehazar, Masoud; Moghtadae, Mehdi; Siavashi, Babak; Sajjadi, Mohammadreza M.; Rasi, Alireza Manafi; Chabok, Seyyed Kazem; Zafarani, Zohreh; Salehi, Shahin; Ahmadi, Monireh; Mohammadi, Amin; Shahsavand, Mohammad Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Periodic evaluation and monitoring the health and economic outcome of joint replacement surgery is a common and popular process under the territory of joint registries in many countries. In this article we introduce the methodology used for the foundation of the National Iranian Joint Registry (IJR) with a joint collaboration of the Social Security Organization (SSO) and academic research departments considering the requirements of the Iran’s Ministry of Health and Education. PMID:27200403

  19. Respiratory diseases registries in the national registry of rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Lara Gallego, Beatriz; Abaitua Borda, Ignacio; Galán Gil, Genaro; Castillo Villegas, Diego; Casanova Espinosa, Álvaro; Cano Jiménez, Esteban; Ojanguren Arranz, Iñigo; Posada de la Paz, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the general characteristics, objectives and organizational aspects of the registries of rare respiratory diseases included in the National Registry of Rare Diseases of the Research Institute for Rare Diseases (ISCIII), in order to publicize their existence and encourage the participation of professionals. Information is collected on the following conditions: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, idiopathic tracheal stenosis, adult pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, alveolar proteinosis, and sarcoidosis.

  20. Clinical results with acridine orange using a novel confocal laparoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanbakuchi, Anthony A.; Rouse, Andrew R.; Hatch, Kenneth D.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2009-02-01

    We previously reported on the development of a multi-spectral confocal laparoscope for clinical imaging. In this paper we present current results using the system to image ovaries with a new laparoscope design using the contrast agent acridine orange. This new laparoscope integrates computer controlled systems for focus, depth scans, and localized contrast agent delivery. Precise axial position control is accomplished with tiny stepper motors integrated inside the laparoscope handle. Ergonomic handle controls allow for data acquisition, deliver of contrast agents, and adjustment of imaging depth during procedures by the surgeon. We have approval to use acridine orange in our clinical trials to image ovaries in vivo during oophorectomies. We present in vivo results using both acridine orange and fluorescein as the topically administered contrast agent.

  1. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2012 experience.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current or evolving trends in poisoning and to develop a research tool in toxicology. ToxIC allows for extraction of data from medical records from multiple sites across a national and international network. All cases seen by medical toxicologists at participating institutions were entered into the database. Information characterizing patients entered in 2012 was tabulated and data from the previous years including 2010 and 2011 were included so that cumulative numbers and trends could be described as well. The current report includes data through December 31st, 2012. During 2012, 38 sites with 68 specific institutions contributed a total of 7,269 cases to the Registry. The total number of cases entered into the Registry at the end of 2012 was 17,681. Emergency departments remained the most common source of consultation in 2012, accounting for 61 % of cases. The most common reason for consultation was for pharmaceutical overdose, which occurred in 52 % of patients including intentional (41 %) and unintentional (11 %) exposures. The most common classes of agents were sedative-hypnotics (1,422 entries in 13 % of cases) non-opioid analgesics (1,295 entries in 12 % of cases), opioids (1,086 entries in 10 % of cases) and antidepressants (1,039 entries in 10 % of cases). N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was the most common antidote administered in 2012, as it was in previous years, followed by the opioid antagonist naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, physostigmine and flumazenil. Anti-crotalid Fab

  2. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2012 experience.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current or evolving trends in poisoning and to develop a research tool in toxicology. ToxIC allows for extraction of data from medical records from multiple sites across a national and international network. All cases seen by medical toxicologists at participating institutions were entered into the database. Information characterizing patients entered in 2012 was tabulated and data from the previous years including 2010 and 2011 were included so that cumulative numbers and trends could be described as well. The current report includes data through December 31st, 2012. During 2012, 38 sites with 68 specific institutions contributed a total of 7,269 cases to the Registry. The total number of cases entered into the Registry at the end of 2012 was 17,681. Emergency departments remained the most common source of consultation in 2012, accounting for 61 % of cases. The most common reason for consultation was for pharmaceutical overdose, which occurred in 52 % of patients including intentional (41 %) and unintentional (11 %) exposures. The most common classes of agents were sedative-hypnotics (1,422 entries in 13 % of cases) non-opioid analgesics (1,295 entries in 12 % of cases), opioids (1,086 entries in 10 % of cases) and antidepressants (1,039 entries in 10 % of cases). N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was the most common antidote administered in 2012, as it was in previous years, followed by the opioid antagonist naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, physostigmine and flumazenil. Anti-crotalid Fab

  3. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry-the 2015 Experience.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Lynn A; Rhyee, Sean H; Campleman, Sharan L; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Weigand, Timothy; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    The American College of Medical Toxicology established the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry in 2010. The Registry contains all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. The Registry has continued to grow since its inception, and as of December 31, 2015, contains 43,099 cases. This is the sixth annual report of the ToxIC Registry, summarizing the additional 8115 cases entered in 2015. Cases were identified by a query of the Registry for all cases entered between January 1 and December 31, 2015. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, race, gender), source of consultation, reason for consultation, agents and agent classes involved in exposures, signs, symptoms, clinical findings, fatalities, and treatment. By the end of 2015, there were 50 active sites, consisting of 101 separate health-care facilities; 51.2 % of cases involved females. Adults between the ages of 19 and 65 made up the majority (64.2 %) of Registry cases. Caucasian race was the most commonly reported (55.6 %); 9.6 % of cases were identified as Hispanic ethnicity. Inpatient and emergency department referrals were by far the most common referral sources (92.9 %). Intentional pharmaceutical exposures remained the most frequent reason for consultation, making up 52.3 % of cases. Of these intentional pharmaceutical exposures, 69 % represented an attempt at self-harm, and 85.6 % of these were a suicide attempt. Nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and antidepressant agents were the most commonly reported agent classes in 2015. Almost one-third of Registry cases involved a diagnosed toxidrome (32.8 %), with a sedative-hypnotic toxidrome being the most frequently described. Significant vital sign abnormalities were recorded in 25.3 % of cases. There were 98 fatalities reported in the Registry (1.2 %). Adverse drug reactions were reported in 4.3 % of cases. Toxicological treatment was given in 65.3 % of cases, with 33.0

  4. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry-the 2015 Experience.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Lynn A; Rhyee, Sean H; Campleman, Sharan L; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Weigand, Timothy; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    The American College of Medical Toxicology established the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry in 2010. The Registry contains all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. The Registry has continued to grow since its inception, and as of December 31, 2015, contains 43,099 cases. This is the sixth annual report of the ToxIC Registry, summarizing the additional 8115 cases entered in 2015. Cases were identified by a query of the Registry for all cases entered between January 1 and December 31, 2015. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, race, gender), source of consultation, reason for consultation, agents and agent classes involved in exposures, signs, symptoms, clinical findings, fatalities, and treatment. By the end of 2015, there were 50 active sites, consisting of 101 separate health-care facilities; 51.2 % of cases involved females. Adults between the ages of 19 and 65 made up the majority (64.2 %) of Registry cases. Caucasian race was the most commonly reported (55.6 %); 9.6 % of cases were identified as Hispanic ethnicity. Inpatient and emergency department referrals were by far the most common referral sources (92.9 %). Intentional pharmaceutical exposures remained the most frequent reason for consultation, making up 52.3 % of cases. Of these intentional pharmaceutical exposures, 69 % represented an attempt at self-harm, and 85.6 % of these were a suicide attempt. Nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and antidepressant agents were the most commonly reported agent classes in 2015. Almost one-third of Registry cases involved a diagnosed toxidrome (32.8 %), with a sedative-hypnotic toxidrome being the most frequently described. Significant vital sign abnormalities were recorded in 25.3 % of cases. There were 98 fatalities reported in the Registry (1.2 %). Adverse drug reactions were reported in 4.3 % of cases. Toxicological treatment was given in 65.3 % of cases, with 33.0

  5. Dioxin Registry Report: report prepared by review of documents received from Syntex (USA), Incorporated, Verona, Missouri and site visits, September 30-October 1, 1980; June 24, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, D.; Fingerhut, M.; Hearn, S.; Jones, J.; Honchar, P.

    1987-05-01

    Information and documents were reviewed which had been received from Syntex Agribusiness, for a facility in Verona, Missouri operated by Hoffman-Taff and the North Eastern Pharmaceutical and Chemical Company (NEPACCO), as part of the Dioxin Registry study. During this time period Hoffman-Taff produced 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic-acid-butyl-ester and NEPACCO produced hexachlorophene. Company records located at the Syntex facility in Springfield, Missouri made it possible to identify production workers and supervisors who were involved in making these compounds. Maintenance workers were also identified. These individuals have therefore been included in the Dioxin Registry. Compensation records for workers were obtained for the period 1968 to 1972 and all medical records were obtained for employees engaged in making these particular chemicals. In analyzing Agent-Orange prepared by Hoffman-Taff, it was found to contain less than 1.0 part per million 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Analysis of samples of NEPACCO's purified 2,4,5-trichlorophenol and hexachlorophene indicated that they contained 67 parts per billion and less than 20 parts per billion TCDD, respectively.

  6. Worldwide variability in deceased organ donation registries

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Amanda M; Li, Alvin Ho-Ting; Roels, Leo; Stewart, Bryan; Prakash, Versha; Beitel, Janice; Young, Kimberly; Shemie, Sam; Nickerson, Peter; Garg, Amit X

    2012-01-01

    The variability in deceased organ donation registries worldwide has received little attention. We considered all operating registries, where individual wishes about organ donation were recorded in a computerized database. We included registries which recorded an individual's decision to be a donor (donor registry), and registries which only recorded an individual's objection (non-donor registry). We collected information on 15 characteristics including history, design, use and number of registrants for 27 registries (68%). Most registries are nationally operated and government-owned. Registrations in five nations expire and require renewal. Some registries provide the option to make specific organ selections in the donation decision. Just over half of donor registries provide legally binding authorization to donation. In all national donor registries, except one, the proportion of adults (15+) registered is modest (<40%). These proportions can be even lower when only affirmative decisions are considered. One nation provides priority status on the transplant waiting list as an incentive to affirmative registration, while another nation makes registering a donation decision mandatory to obtain a driver's license. Registered objections in non-donor registries are rare (<0.5%). The variation in organ donor registries worldwide necessitates public discourse and quality improvement initiatives, to identify and support leading practices in registry use. PMID:22507140

  7. Registries Help Moms Measure Medication Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the case of the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry, which studies the effects of drugs for ... is taking. For example, the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry website lists more than 30 medications being ...

  8. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  9. Evaluation and implementation of public health registries.

    PubMed

    Solomon, D J; Henry, R C; Hogan, J G; Van Amburg, G H; Taylor, J

    1991-01-01

    A rapid proliferation of registries has occurred during the last 20 years. Given the long-term commitment of resources associated with registries and limited public health funding, proposals for new registries should be carefully considered before being funded. A registry is defined as a data base of identifiable persons containing a clearly defined set of health and demographic data collected for a specific public health purpose. Criteria for evaluating whether a registry is needed, feasible, or the most effective and efficient means of collecting a specific set of health data are presented. They include an evaluation of the stated purpose; a review of the function, duration, and scope of the registry; consideration of existing alternative data sources; an assessment of the practical feasibility of the registry; the likelihood of sufficient start-up and long-term funding; and an evaluation of the cost effectiveness of the registry. Creating a public health registry is a complex process. A range of technical and organizational skills is required for a registry to be successfully implemented. Eight requirements are identified as crucial for the successful development of a new registry. They include an implementation plan, adequate documentation, quality control procedures, case definition and case-finding (ascertainment) procedures, determination of data elements, data collection and processing procedures, data access policy, and a framework for dissemination of registry data and findings. PMID:1902306

  10. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded...

  11. 27 CFR 24.115 - Registry number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Registry number. 24.115... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Application § 24.115 Registry number. Upon approval of the application, the appropriate TTB officer will assign a registry number to the bonded...

  12. A renal registry for Africa: first steps

    PubMed Central

    Davids, M. Razeen; Eastwood, John B.; Selwood, Neville H.; Arogundade, Fatiu A.; Ashuntantang, Gloria; Benghanem Gharbi, Mohammed; Jarraya, Faiçal; MacPhee, Iain A.M.; McCulloch, Mignon; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Swanepoel, Charles R.; Adu, Dwomoa

    2016-01-01

    There is a dearth of data on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Several national renal registries have been established but have not been sustainable because of resource limitations. The African Association of Nephrology (AFRAN) and the African Paediatric Nephrology Association (AFPNA) recognize the importance of good registry data and plan to establish an African Renal Registry. This article reviews the elements needed for a successful renal registry and gives an overview of renal registries in developed and developing countries, with the emphasis on Africa. It then discusses the proposed African Renal Registry and the first steps towards its implementation. A registry requires a clear purpose, and agreement on inclusion and exclusion criteria, the dataset and the data dictionary. Ethical issues, data ownership and access, the dissemination of findings and funding must all be considered. Well-documented processes should guide data collection and ensure data quality. The ERA-EDTA Registry is the world's oldest renal registry. In Africa, registry data have been published mainly by North African countries, starting with Egypt and Tunisia in 1975. However, in recent years no African country has regularly reported national registry data. A shared renal registry would provide participating countries with a reliable technology platform and a common data dictionary to facilitate joint analyses and comparisons. In March 2015, AFRAN organized a registry workshop for African nephrologists and then took the decision to establish, for the first time, an African Renal Registry. In conclusion, African nephrologists have decided to establish a continental renal registry. This initiative could make a substantial impact on the practice of nephrology and the provision of services for adults and children with ESRD in many African countries. PMID:26798479

  13. A renal registry for Africa: first steps.

    PubMed

    Davids, M Razeen; Eastwood, John B; Selwood, Neville H; Arogundade, Fatiu A; Ashuntantang, Gloria; Benghanem Gharbi, Mohammed; Jarraya, Faiçal; MacPhee, Iain A M; McCulloch, Mignon; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Swanepoel, Charles R; Adu, Dwomoa

    2016-02-01

    There is a dearth of data on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in Africa. Several national renal registries have been established but have not been sustainable because of resource limitations. The African Association of Nephrology (AFRAN) and the African Paediatric Nephrology Association (AFPNA) recognize the importance of good registry data and plan to establish an African Renal Registry. This article reviews the elements needed for a successful renal registry and gives an overview of renal registries in developed and developing countries, with the emphasis on Africa. It then discusses the proposed African Renal Registry and the first steps towards its implementation. A registry requires a clear purpose, and agreement on inclusion and exclusion criteria, the dataset and the data dictionary. Ethical issues, data ownership and access, the dissemination of findings and funding must all be considered. Well-documented processes should guide data collection and ensure data quality. The ERA-EDTA Registry is the world's oldest renal registry. In Africa, registry data have been published mainly by North African countries, starting with Egypt and Tunisia in 1975. However, in recent years no African country has regularly reported national registry data. A shared renal registry would provide participating countries with a reliable technology platform and a common data dictionary to facilitate joint analyses and comparisons. In March 2015, AFRAN organized a registry workshop for African nephrologists and then took the decision to establish, for the first time, an African Renal Registry. In conclusion, African nephrologists have decided to establish a continental renal registry. This initiative could make a substantial impact on the practice of nephrology and the provision of services for adults and children with ESRD in many African countries.

  14. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008. PMID:19230248

  15. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008.

  16. The toxicology investigators consortium case registry-the 2013 experience.

    PubMed

    Rhyee, Sean H; Farrugia, Lynn; Wiegand, Timothy; Smith, Eric A; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    The Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry was established in 2010 by the American College of Medical Toxicology. The Registry includes all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. This report summarizes the Registry data for 2013. A query of the ToxIC Registry was carried out for the dates of January 1 through December 31, 2013. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, gender), source of consultation, reasons for consultation, agents involved in toxicological exposures, signs, symptoms and clinical findings, and treatment. A total of 8,598 cases were entered into the Registry in 2013. Females accounted for 49.2 % of cases, males for 47.7 %, and gender was not reported in 3.1 %. The majority of patients (63.4 %) were adults between the ages of 19 and 65 years. There were 93 fatalities (1.1 %). Most referrals for medical toxicology consultation originated from the emergency department (59.7 %) or inpatient services (16.7 %). Exposures to pharmaceutical products (intentional and unintentional) made up 50.0 % of cases. Illicit drug abuse (8.0 %) and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) (4.8 %) were the next most frequent reasons for consultation. Similar to past years, nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and opioids were the most commonly encountered agents. Symptoms or clinical findings were documented in 71.1 % of patients. Of all cases, 54.6 % required some form of medical treatment (antidotes, antivenom, chelation, specific types of supportive care). This report serves as a comprehensive survey of medical toxicology practice within participating institutions. Prior trends continued to apply this year and indicate analgesic (opioid and nonopioid), sedative-hypnotic/muscle relaxant agents, illicit drug use, and ADRs continue to be major toxicological problems. Cases requiring medical toxicology consultation in 2013 predominantly involved pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs. Reasons for these drug

  17. The toxicology investigators consortium case registry-the 2013 experience.

    PubMed

    Rhyee, Sean H; Farrugia, Lynn; Wiegand, Timothy; Smith, Eric A; Wax, Paul M; Brent, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    The Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC) Case Registry was established in 2010 by the American College of Medical Toxicology. The Registry includes all medical toxicology consultations performed at participating sites. This report summarizes the Registry data for 2013. A query of the ToxIC Registry was carried out for the dates of January 1 through December 31, 2013. Specific data reviewed for analysis included demographics (age, gender), source of consultation, reasons for consultation, agents involved in toxicological exposures, signs, symptoms and clinical findings, and treatment. A total of 8,598 cases were entered into the Registry in 2013. Females accounted for 49.2 % of cases, males for 47.7 %, and gender was not reported in 3.1 %. The majority of patients (63.4 %) were adults between the ages of 19 and 65 years. There were 93 fatalities (1.1 %). Most referrals for medical toxicology consultation originated from the emergency department (59.7 %) or inpatient services (16.7 %). Exposures to pharmaceutical products (intentional and unintentional) made up 50.0 % of cases. Illicit drug abuse (8.0 %) and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) (4.8 %) were the next most frequent reasons for consultation. Similar to past years, nonopioid analgesics, sedative-hypnotics, and opioids were the most commonly encountered agents. Symptoms or clinical findings were documented in 71.1 % of patients. Of all cases, 54.6 % required some form of medical treatment (antidotes, antivenom, chelation, specific types of supportive care). This report serves as a comprehensive survey of medical toxicology practice within participating institutions. Prior trends continued to apply this year and indicate analgesic (opioid and nonopioid), sedative-hypnotic/muscle relaxant agents, illicit drug use, and ADRs continue to be major toxicological problems. Cases requiring medical toxicology consultation in 2013 predominantly involved pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs. Reasons for these drug

  18. CIRSE Vascular Closure Device Registry

    SciTech Connect

    Reekers, Jim A.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, Stefan; Libicher, Martin; Atar, Eli; Trentmann, Jens; Goffette, Pierre; Borggrefe, Jan; Zelenak, Kamil; Hooijboer, Pieter; Belli, Anna-Maria

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Vascular closure devices are routinely used after many vascular interventional radiology procedures. However, there have been no major multicenter studies to assess the safety and effectiveness of the routine use of closure devices in interventional radiology. Methods: The CIRSE registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug started in January 2009 and ended in August 2009. A total of 1,107 patients were included in the registry. Results: Deployment success was 97.2%. Deployment failure specified to access type was 8.8% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 5.0-14.5] for antegrade access and 1.8% (95% CI 1.1-2.9) for retrograde access (P = 0.001). There was no difference in deployment failure related to local PVD at the access site. Calcification was a reason for deployment failure in only <0.5% of patients. Postdeployment bleeding occurred in 6.4%, and most these (51.5%) could be managed with light manual compression. During follow-up, other device-related complications were reported in 1.3%: seven false aneurysms, three hematoma >5.9 cm, and two vessel occlusions. Conclusion: The conclusion of this registry of closure devices with an anchor and a plug is that the use of this device in interventional radiology procedures is safe, with a low incidence of serious access site complications. There seems to be no difference in complications between antegrade and retrograde access and other parameters.

  19. Evaluation of institutional cancer registries in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cuervo, L G; Roca, S; Rodríguez, M N; Stein, J; Izquierdo, J; Trujillo, A; Mora, M

    1999-09-01

    The four primary objectives of this descriptive study were to: 1) design a quality-measurement instrument for institutional cancer registries (ICRs), 2) evaluate the existing ICRs in Colombia with the designed instrument, 3) categorize the different registries according to their quality and prioritize efforts that will efficiently promote better registries with the limited resources available, and 4) determine the institution with the greatest likelihood of successfully establishing Colombia's second population-based cancer registry. In 1990 the National Cancer Institute of Colombia developed 13 institution-based cancer registries in different Colombian cities in order to promote the collection of data from a large group of cancer diagnostic and treatment centers. During the first half of 1997, this evaluation reviewed 12 registries; one of the original 13 no longer existed. All of the Colombian institutions (hospitals) that maintain institution-based cancer registries were included in the study. At each institution, a brief survey was administered to the hospital director, the registry coordinator, and the registrar (data manager). Researchers investigated the institutions by looking at six domains that are in standard use internationally. Within each domain, questions were developed and selected through the Delphi method. Each domain and each question were assigned weights through a consensus process. In most cases, two interviewers went to each site to collect the information. The university hospitals in Cali, Pereira, and Medellín had substantially higher scores, reflecting a good level of performance. Four of the 12 institutions had almost no cancer registry work going on. Five of the 12 hospital directors considered that the information provided by the cancer registries influenced their administrative decisions. Three of the registries had patient survival data. Four of the institutions allocated specific resources to operate their cancer registries; in the

  20. [Current registry studies of acute ischemic stroke].

    PubMed

    Veltkamp, R; Jüttler, E; Pfefferkorn, T; Purrucker, J; Ringleb, P

    2012-10-01

    Study registries offer the opportunity to evaluate the effects of new therapies or to observe the consequences of new treatments in clinical practice. The SITS-MOST registry confirmed the validity of findings from randomized trials on intravenous thrombolysis concerning safety and efficacy in the clinical routine. Current study registries concerning new interventional thrombectomy techniques suggest a high recanalization rate; however, the clinical benefit can only be evaluated in randomized, controlled trials. Similarly, the experiences of the BASICS registry on basilar artery occlusion have led to the initiation of a controlled trial. The benefit of hemicraniectomy in malignant middle cerebral artery infarction has been demonstrated by the pooled analysis of three randomized trials. Numerous relevant aspects are currently documented in the DESTINY-R registry. Finally, the recently started RASUNOA registry examines diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke occurring during therapy with new oral anticoagulants.

  1. eXtended MetaData Registry

    2006-10-25

    The purpose of the eXtended MetaData Registry (XMDR) prototype is to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of constructing an extended metadata registry, i.e., one which encompasses richer classification support, facilities for including terminologies, and better support for formal specification of semantics. The prototype registry will also serve as a reference implementation for the revised versions of ISO 11179, Parts 2 and 3 to help guide production implementations.

  2. Implementation of an Interleukin-2 National Registry: an opportunity to improve cancer outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael K; Kaufman, Howard L; Daniels, Gregory A; McDermott, David F; Aung, Sandra; Lowder, James N; Morse, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Cancer registries have proven valuable with respect to validating therapeutic safety and drug efficacy, uncovering real-world implementation practices, and their evolution over time. Modern cancer therapeutics are approved as single agents oftentimes compared to the least active approved standard agent in randomized trials. However, the burgeoning diversity and number of drugs introduces a complexity that quickly outstrips the knowledge provided by these pivotal trials. This gap in information is particularly relevant when survival is the primary therapeutic endpoint. In addition, the inherent complexity of the immune response will make registries a particularly important tool in expeditiously understanding solid tumor immunotherapy and patient outcomes. PMID:25031835

  3. Growing Oranges. People on the Farm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC. Office of Governmental and Public Affairs.

    This booklet, one in a series about life on modern farms, describes the daily lives of three orange growers in Florida and one in California. Two of the Florida orange growers also have other jobs, one as manager of a citrus cooperative and the other as a citrus insurance salesman. The operations of orange groves, the care and picking of oranges,…

  4. Patient registries: utility, validity and inference.

    PubMed

    Richesson, Rachel; Vehik, Kendra

    2010-01-01

    Patient registries are essential tools for public health surveillance and research inquiry, and are a particularly important resource for understanding rare diseases. Registries provide consistent data for defined populations and can support the study of the distribution and determinants of various diseases. One advantage of registries is the ability to observe caseload and population characteristics over time, which might facilitate the evaluation of disease incidence, disease etiology, planning, operation and evaluation of services, evaluation of treatment patterns, and diagnostic classification. Any registry program must collect high quality data to be useful for its stated purpose. Registries can be developed for many different needs, and caution should be taken in interpreting registry data, which has inherent biases. We describe the methodological issues, limitations, and ideal features of registries to support various rare disease purposes. The future impact of registries on our understanding and interventions for rare diseases will depend upon technological and political solutions for global cooperation to achieve consistent data (via standards) and regulations for various registry applications.

  5. National Suicide Registry Malaysia (NSRM).

    PubMed

    Hayati, A N; Kamarul, A K

    2008-09-01

    To create a nationwide system to capture data on completed suicide in Malaysia i.e. the morbidity, geographic and temporal trends and the population at high risk of suicide. Data from this registry can later be used to stimulate and facilitate further research on suicide. This paper describes the rationale and processes involved in developing a national suicide registry in 2007. The diagnosis of suicide is based on the ICD-10 codes for fatal intentional self-harm (X60-X84). A case report form with an accompanying instruction manual had been prepared to ensure systematic and uniform data collection. State Forensic Pathologist's offices are responsible for data collection in their respective states, and in turn will submit the data to a central data management unit. Data collection began in July 2007 and currently in data cleaning process. Training for source data producers is ongoing. In 2008, the NSRM plans to involve university hospitals into its network as currently only Ministry of Health hospitals are involved. The NSRM will be launching its online application for case registration this year while an overview of results will be available via its public domain at www.nsrm.gov.my beginning 20 April 2008. To efficiently capture the data on suicide, a concerted effort between various agencies is needed. A lot of conceptual work and data base development remains to be done in order to position preventive efforts on a more solid foundation. PMID:19227674

  6. [Respiratory disease registries in Spain: fundamentals and organization].

    PubMed

    Lara, Beatriz; Morales, Pilar; Blanco, Ignacio; Vendrell, Montserrat; de Gracia Roldán, Javier; Monreal, Manel; Orriols, Ramón; Isidro, Isabel; Abú-Shams, Khalil; Escribano, Pilar; Villena, Victoria; Rodrigo, Teresa; Vidal Plà, Rafael; García-Yuste, Mariano; Miravitlles, Marc

    2011-08-01

    This present paper describes the general characteristics, objectives and organizational aspects of the respiratory disease registries in Spain with the aim to report their activities and increase their diffusion. The document compiles information on the following registries: the Spanish Registry of Patients with Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency, Spanish Registry of Bronchiectasis, International Registry of Thromboembolic Disease, Spanish Registry of Occupational Diseases, Spanish Registry of Pulmonary Artery Hypertension, Registry of Pleural Mesothelioma, Spanish Registry of Tuberculosis and Spanish Multi-center Study of Neuroendocrine Pulmonary Tumors. Our paper provides information on each of the registries cited. Each registry has compiled specific clinical information providing data in real situations, and completes the results obtained from clinical assays. Said information has been published both in national as well as international publications and has lead to the creation of various guidelines. Therefore, the activities of the professionals involved in the registries have spread the knowledge about the diseases studied, promoting the exchange of information among workgroups.

  7. 78 FR 19716 - International Consortium of Cardiovascular Registries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration International Consortium of Cardiovascular Registries AGENCY... of Cardiovascular Registries.'' The purpose of this meeting is to discuss the development of an international consortium of cardiovascular registries with a broad array of interested stakeholders. The...

  8. 14 CFR 47.19 - Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Registry. 47.19 Section 47.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION General § 47.19 Registry. Each application, request, notification, or other communication sent to the...

  9. [Local registries in general/family practice].

    PubMed

    Cindrić, Jasna

    2007-02-01

    Entering medical records into registries of all sorts has always been a part of everyday work of a general/family physician. There is a distinction between public/population registries on the one hand, and internal, local registries on the other hand. Local registries refer to the catchment population of a particular general/family practice. While keeping population-registries has become a routine with a high level of uniformity in collecting, delivering, recording, analyzing and controlling information, there are no recommendations or standards for keeping local registries, although their importance as well as indisputable necessity have been recognized. They are invaluable for providing an insight into the condition and history of a particular disease in a particular area, planning and taking preventive measures and activities, supervising therapy and medical treatment, as well as for statistical analyses and scientific studies. The most important registry in the field of general practice is the one called "List of health care under the supervision of chosen general/family physicians", which can serve as an index for any other individual record or record of diseases by name kept at a particular general/family practice. Although local registries have "evolved" from notebooks into modern informatic databases, the problem of up-to-dateness cannot be solved until the whole health care system has been connected for competent and authorized persons to be able to record changes of data where and when they take place.

  10. 50 CFR 600.1410 - Registry process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Registry process. 600.1410 Section 600.1410 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... United States § 600.1410 Registry process. (a) A person may register through the NMFS web site at...

  11. The importance of registries in cancer control.

    PubMed

    Leal, Yelda A; Fernández-Garrote, Leticia M; Mohar-Betancourt, Alejandro; Meneses-García, Abelardo

    2016-04-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, with 14.1 million new cases and 8.2 million deaths annually. A marked disparity exists between developed countries and developing countries, with 57% of new cases and 65% of deaths in 2012 occurring in developing countries. This global picture can only be obtained because of data obtained from population-based cancer registries, which allow cancer estimations for different geographic areas. Our objective is to perform a review of different types of registries and their role in the control of cancer. These types of registries are lacking in developing countries. In Central and South America, only 6% of the population is included in cancer registries versus 83% in North America. It is necessary to increase the coverage of cancer registries to obtain more reliable data that will more appropriately guide control programs. PMID:27557391

  12. Considerations Before Establishing an Environmental Health Registry

    PubMed Central

    Antao, Vinicius C.; Muravov, Oleg I.; Sapp, James; Larson, Theodore C.; Pallos, L. Laszlo; Sanchez, Marchelle E.; Williamson, G. David; Horton, D. Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Public health registries can provide valuable information when health consequences of environmental exposures are uncertain or will likely take long to develop. They can also aid research on diseases that may have environmental causes that are not completely well defined. We discuss factors to consider when deciding whether to create an environmental health registry. Those factors include public health significance, purpose and outcomes, duration and scope of data collection and availability of alternative data sources, timeliness, availability of funding and administrative capabilities, and whether the establishment of a registry can adequately address specific health concerns. We also discuss difficulties, limitations, and benefits of exposure and disease registries, based on the experience of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. PMID:26066912

  13. Acridine orange as a biosensitive photovoltaic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, Faranak; Bauld, Reg; Fanchini, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Acridine orange (AO), a biosensitive molecule that is customarily used for labeling nucleic acids including DNA and RNA, is here investigated as a cost effective, water soluble, and photoactive material for the fabrication of potentially biosensitive organic photovoltaics. The electronic energy levels of AO are determined using Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (KPFM) and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The effect of anticrystallization agents, as well as low-temperature annealing, on the work function of AO is investigated: amorphous AO films are shown to possess a significantly higher work function than microcrystalline AO films and the work function also increases by annealing. Photo-induced processes in AO films are investigated by considering the changes of the KPFM signal under illumination. We demonstrate that acridine orange is able to photogenerate electron-hole pairs at rates comparable to the most commonly used solar-grade photovoltaic materials, including polythiophenes. In addition, the effect of the morphology of different types of AO thin films spun from different solvents is studied in bilayer photovoltaic devices fabricated from stacks of AO and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester thin films.

  14. Evidence and practice in spine registries

    PubMed Central

    van Hooff, Miranda L; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Willems, Paul C; Wouters, Michel W J M; de Kleuver, Marinus; Peul, Wilco C; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Fritzell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose We performed a systematic review and a survey in order to (1) evaluate the evidence for the impact of spine registries on the quality of spine care, and with that, on patient-related outcomes, and (2) evaluate the methodology used to organize, analyze, and report the “quality of spine care” from spine registries. Methods To study the impact, the literature on all spinal disorders was searched. To study methodology, the search was restricted to degenerative spinal disorders. The risk of bias in the studies included was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Additionally, a survey among registry representatives was performed to acquire information about the methodology and practice of existing registries. Results 4,273 unique references up to May 2014 were identified, and 1,210 were eligible for screening and assessment. No studies on impact were identified, but 34 studies were identified to study the methodology. Half of these studies (17 of the 34) were judged to have a high risk of bias. The survey identified 25 spine registries, representing 14 countries. The organization of these registries, methods used, analytical approaches, and dissemination of results are presented. Interpretation We found a lack of evidence that registries have had an impact on the quality of spine care, regardless of whether intervention was non-surgical and/or surgical. To improve the quality of evidence published with registry data, we present several recommendations. Application of these recommendations could lead to registries showing trends, monitoring the quality of spine care given, and ultimately improving the value of the care given to patients with degenerative spinal disorders. PMID:25909475

  15. 15. September, 1968 GARDEN BETWEEN NATHANIEL WOODBURY HOUSE, 22 ORANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. September, 1968 GARDEN BETWEEN NATHANIEL WOODBURY HOUSE, 22 ORANGE STREET AND SETH FOLGER HOUSE, 26 ORANGE STREET - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  16. 11. August, 1970 ORANGE STREET SIDEWALK IN FRONT OF LEVI ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. August, 1970 ORANGE STREET SIDEWALK IN FRONT OF LEVI STARBUCK HOUSE (MASS-912), 14 ORANGE STREET - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  17. National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Jimenez Sheri Raborn, CPA; Tom Baker

    2008-03-31

    National Orange Show Photovoltaic Demonstration created a 400KW Photovoltaic self-generation plant at the National Orange Show Events Center (NOS). The NOS owns a 120-acre state fairground where it operates an events center and produces an annual citrus fair known as the Orange Show. The NOS governing board wanted to employ cost-saving programs for annual energy expenses. It is hoped the Photovoltaic program will result in overall savings for the NOS, help reduce the State's energy demands as relating to electrical power consumption, improve quality of life within the affected grid area as well as increase the energy efficiency of buildings at our venue. In addition, the potential to reduce operational expenses would have a tremendous effect on the ability of the NOS to service its community.

  18. Implementation of a Comprehensive Orthopaedic Registry System.

    PubMed

    Tokish, John M; Alexander, Thomas C

    2016-01-01

    Advances in information technology have allowed for improvements in the collection and analysis of large-scale outcomes data. These data can be used in the practice of orthopaedics for benchmarking, value analysis, and comparative effectiveness research. The implementation of registries within a busy surgical practice can be challenging, costly, and inefficient. Content, platform, and characteristics are the key elements required to successfully implement a patient-based orthopaedic outcomes data registry. Specific barriers to implementing registries are discussed, and solutions are proposed, to provide an example for optimal integration within clinical practices that may have varying goals.

  19. Registry of hemophilia and other bleeding disorders in Syria.

    PubMed

    Ali, T; Schved, J F

    2012-11-01

    Creating a national registry for bleeding disorders is a major step in establishing a National Hemophilia Care Program in all countries. Creating such a registry which would contain accurate and regularly updated data, including laboratory analysis confirmed by a reference laboratory established at the Syrian Hemophilia Society. Blood samples were drawn and analysed in the Society reference laboratory for the following screening tests: prothrombin time (PT), APTT and coagulation factor assays. Inhibitor detection and VWF RiCof were performed depending on the result of the screening tests. HBs Ag, anti-HCV, anti-HIV 1+2 and syphilis tests were also performed to detect transfusion transmitted agents (TTA). Diagnosis of the bleeding disorder type was confirmed for 760 of these cases. Among the 760 confirmed patients, 82.5% had haemophilia. Among these, 89.6%were haemophilia A; 10.4% were haemophilia B; 8.3% had VWD; 9.2% had other rare bleeding disorders as follows: 1.2% FVII deficiency, 0.7% FV deficiency, 1.8% F1 deficiency, 0.4% FX deficiency, 1.4% platelets dysfunctions (mainly Glanzmann Thrombasthenia) and 3.7% had combined FVIII and FV deficiency. Eighty (21.3%) cases of 375 screened for transfusion transmitted agents were positive for at least one infection: 0.5% were HBsAg positive, 19.7% were anti-HCV positive, 0.8% had combined HBsAg and anti-HCV positivity and 0.3% was anti-Syphilis positive. All patients were negative for HIV1 and HIV2. The preliminary data presented here follow known data on haemophilia A, haemophilia B and VWD disease. This registry will certainly help in improving haemophilia care in Syria.

  20. 75 FR 65629 - Modification of the Annual National Registry Fee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... INSTITUTIONS EXAMINATION COUNCIL Modification of the Annual National Registry Fee AGENCY: Appraisal... the annual National Registry fee to $40. SUMMARY: Under authority in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform... Registry fee (Registry fee) to $40 from the current $25 amount at its meeting on October 13, 2010. The...

  1. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  2. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  3. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  4. 20 CFR 655.34 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.34 Section 655... Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry. Upon acceptance of the... copy of the job order posted by the SWA on the Department's electronic job registry, including...

  5. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  6. 20 CFR 655.144 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.144 Section 655... Certification § 655.144 Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry... promptly place for public examination a copy of the job order on an electronic job registry maintained...

  7. 20 CFR 655.34 - Electronic job registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic job registry. 655.34 Section 655... Electronic job registry. (a) Location of and placement in the electronic job registry. Upon acceptance of the... copy of the job order posted by the SWA on the Department's electronic job registry, including...

  8. The Italian registry of soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Clemente, C; Orazi, A; Rilke, F

    1988-01-01

    After a review of the incidence data on malignant soft-tissue tumors in Italy (Registro dei Tumori della Regione Lombardia, provincia di Varese), Europe (nine European Cancer Registries considered representative of various geographical areas) and extra-European countries (data of ten World Cancer Registries), the aim and the organization of the Italian Malignant Soft-Tissue Tumor Registry are described. The collection system is based on dedicated forms prepared for the computerization of all data. From 1.1.1985 to 31.3.1987, 207 cases of malignant and potentially malignant soft-tissue tumors entered the Registry, with exclusion of those sarcomas arising in viscera. The distribution, categorized by histologic type, sex and site, and the preliminary results on relapses and metastases are reported.

  9. [Hoogendoorn and the medical registry].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2012-01-01

    Dirk Hoogendoorn (1914-1990) was a solo general practitioner in the village of Wijhe (eastern part of the Netherlands) from 1941, during the time of the German occupation, until 1971. From the very beginning, he combined his practice with the recording of disease patterns. He first concentrated on infectious diseases, especially whooping cough, which was the subject of his doctoral thesis. He later set up registries in two regional hospitals. When his initiative expanded to a national organisation, he became its advisor. He nonetheless continued to produce statistics on a variety of disorders as well as on surgical procedures, even more so after his retirement. The subjects ranged from traffic accidents and tonsillectomies to the discrepancy between increased body height and the unchanging height of the tennis net, but he had the most affinity with the practice of obstetrics. He stirred up much emotion by showing that a decrease in perinatal mortality was proceeding slower in the Netherlands than in other European countries, especially by suggesting a causal relationship between this lag and the high rate of Dutch home deliveries. This debate has continued to this day. PMID:23075774

  10. Definition, epidemiology and registries of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Awdish, R; Cajigas, H

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a subcategory of pulmonary hypertension (PH) that comprises a group of disorders with similar pulmonary vascular pathology. Though PH is common, the estimated incidence of IPAH is 1-3 cases per million, making it a rare disease. The hemodynamic definition of PAH is a mean pulmonary artery pressure at rest >OR = 25 mm Hg in the presence of a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure registries. These registries have been indispensable in the characterization and mapping of the natural history of the disease. Equations and risk calculators derived from registries have given clinicians a basis for risk stratification and prognostication. The sequential accumulation of data since the registries began in the 1980s allows for comparisons to be made. Patients who are differentiated by treatment eras and environments can be contrasted. Variability among inclusion criteria similarly allows for comparisons of these subpopulations. This article provides an overview of available registries, highlights insights provided by each and discusses key issues around the interpretation and extrapolation of data from PAH registries. Registries have allowed us to appreciate the improvement in survival afforded by modern therapy and enhanced detection of this disease. Moving forward, a more global approach to registries is needed, as is enhanced collaboration and centralization.

  11. Purple is the new Orange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blood orange and Cara cara-like citrus varieties with purple or red fruit color, increased antioxidants and modified flavor could be the next generation of cultivars produced via genetic engineering. These varieties are being developed by enhancing the presence of anthocyanin and lycopene pigments...

  12. Use of registry employees can pose legal problems.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, S F

    1994-07-01

    In view of the potential legal liability to which a recipient entity can be exposed when using registry employees, some care must be taken in drafting registry contract services and in modulating the recipient entity's behavior towards the registry personnel. The following steps should generally be taken by health care establishments purchasing registry services to minimize such exposure: (1) Ensure that the registry treats its personnel as employees and complies with all applicable employment law obligations, including state and federal employment tax requirements, workers' compensation laws, and any state law wage and hour requirements in the recipient's state. (2) If using an out-of-state registry, make sure that the registry also has workers' compensation insurance in the recipient's state and complies with that state workers' compensation laws. (3) Make sure that termination decisions regarding registry employees are not made for reasons that violate any federal anti-discrimination laws. (4) Provide in the registry agreement for full indemnification by the registry to the recipient. (5) Ensure that the registry is solvent and has adequate insurance to honor its indemnification obligation. (6) Obtain a warranty from the registry that it carefully screens all of its employees before hiring them. (7) Expressly state in the registry agreement that the registry has the right to discipline and supervise the personnel it refers. (8) Do not reject registry personnel for reasons that would be improper with respect to the facility's own employees, e.g., race, sex, age, religion, disability, etc. PMID:10135140

  13. PCCR: Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Ketcham, Marsha A; Anderson, Michelle A; Whitcomb, David C; Lynch, Henry T; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sasson, Aaron R; Grizzle, William E; Haynatzki, Gleb; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Kinarsky, Leo; Brand, Randall E

    2011-01-01

    The Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry (PCCR) is a multi-institutional web-based system aimed to collect a variety of data on pancreatic cancer patients and high-risk subjects in a standard and efficient way. The PCCR was initiated by a group of experts in medical oncology, gastroenterology, genetics, pathology, epidemiology, nutrition, and computer science with the goal of facilitating rapid and uniform collection of critical information and biological samples to be used in developing diagnostic, prevention and treatment strategies against pancreatic cancer. The PCCR is a multi-tier web application that utilizes Java/JSP technology and has Oracle 10 g database as a back-end. The PCCR uses a "confederation model" that encourages participation of any interested center, irrespective of its size or location. The PCCR utilizes a standardized approach to data collection and reporting, and uses extensive validation procedures to prevent entering erroneous data. The PCCR controlled vocabulary is harmonized with the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) or Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED-CT). The PCCR questionnaire has accommodated standards accepted in cancer research and healthcare. Currently, seven cancer centers in the USA, as well as one center in Italy are participating in the PCCR. At present, the PCCR database contains data on more than 2,700 subjects (PC patients and individuals at high risk of getting this disease). The PCCR has been certified by the NCI Center for Biomedical Informatics and Information Technology as a cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG(®)) Bronze Compatible product. The PCCR provides a foundation for collaborative PC research. It has all the necessary prerequisites for subsequent evolution of the developed infrastructure from simply gathering PC-related data into a biomedical computing platform vital for successful PC studies, care and treatment. Studies utilizing data collected in the PCCR may engender new approaches

  14. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist use in men without a cancer registry diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yong-fang; Goodwin, James S; Shahinian, Vahakn B

    2008-01-01

    Background Use of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists has become popular for virtually all stages of prostate cancer. We hypothesized that some men receive these agents after only a limited work-up for their cancer. Such cases may be missed by tumor registries, leading to underestimates of the total extent of GnRH agonist use. Methods We used linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare data from 1993 through 2001 to identify GnRH agonist use in men with either a diagnosis of prostate cancer registered in SEER, or with a diagnosis of prostate cancer based only on Medicare claims (from the 5% control sample of Medicare beneficiaries residing in SEER areas without a registered diagnosis of cancer). The proportion of incident GnRH agonist users without a registry diagnosis of prostate cancer was calculated. Factors associated with lack of a registry diagnosis were examined in multivariable analyses. Results Of incident GnRH agonist users, 8.9% had no diagnosis of prostate cancer registered in SEER. In a multivariable logistic regression model, lack of a registry diagnosis of prostate cancer in GnRH agonist users was significantly more likely with increasing comorbidity, whereas it was less likely in men who had undergone either inpatient admission or procedures such as radical prostatectomy, prostate biopsy, or transurethral resection of the prostate. Conclusion Reliance solely on tumor registry data may underestimate the rate of GnRH agonist use in men with prostate cancer. PMID:18620606

  15. The Egyptian clinical trials' registry profile: Analysis of three trial registries (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry and clinicaltrials.gov).

    PubMed

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed A; Taha, Fatma M

    2016-01-01

    Registering clinical trials (CTs) in public domains enhances transparency, increases trust in research, improves participation and safeguards against publication bias. This work was done to study the profile of clinical research in Egypt in three CT registries with different scopes: the WHO International CT Registry Platform (ICTRP), the continental Pan-African CT Registry (PACTR) and the US clinicaltrials.gov (CTGR). In March 2014, ICTRP, PACTR and CTGR were searched for clinical studies conducted in Egypt. It was found that the number of studies conducted in Egypt (percentage) was 686 (0.30%) in ICTRP, 56 (11.3%) in PACTR and 548 (0.34%) in CTGR. Most studies were performed in universities and sponsored by university/organization, industry or individual researchers. Inclusion of adults from both genders predominated. The median number of participants per study in the three registries ranged between 63 and 155. The conditions researched differed among the three registries and study purpose was mostly treatment followed by prevention. Endpoints were mostly efficacy followed by safety. Observational:Interventional studies (i.e. clinical trials) represented 15.5%:84.5% in ICTRP, 0%:100% in PACTR and 16.4%:83.6% in CTGR. Most interventions were drugs or procedures. Observational studies were mostly prospective and cohort studies. Most CTs were phase 3 and tested drugs or procedures. Parallel group assignment and random allocation predominated. Blinding was implemented in many of trials and was mostly double-blind. We conclude that CTs from Egypt in trial registries are apparently low and do not accurately reflect clinical research conducted in Egypt or its potential. Development of an Egyptian CT registry is eagerly needed. Registering all Egyptian CTs in public domains is highly recommended. PMID:26843968

  16. ISHKS joint registry: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Pachore, Jawahir A; Vaidya, Shrinand V; Thakkar, Chandrasekhar J; Bhalodia, Haresh Kumar P; Wakankar, Hemant M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA) are the most widely practiced surgical options for arthritis all over the world and its application is rising in India. Indian Society of Hip and Knee Surgeons (ISHKS) has established a joints registry and has been collecting data for last 6 years. Materials & Methods: All members of ISHKS are encouraged to actively participate in the registry. A simple two page knee and hip form can be downloaded from the website www.ishks.com. The information collected includes patient demographics, indication for surgery, implant details and in case of revision arthroplasty: the details of implants removed and the cause of failure of primary arthroplasty. These forms are mailed to the central registry office and the data is fed in computerized registry. Data collection started in October 2006. Results: Joint registry is a very important initiative of ISHKS and till date, have data of 34,478 TKAs and 3604 THAs, contributed by 42 surgeons across India. Some important observations have emerged. Data of 34,478 TKAs was assessed: These included 8612 males (25%) and 25,866 females (75%). Average age was 64.4 years (Osteoarthritis range: 45 to 88 years; Rheumatoid arthritis range: 22 to 74 years). Average body mass index was 29.1 (Range: 18.1 to 42.9). The indication for TKA was osteoarthritis in 33,444 (97%) and rheumatoid arthritis in 759 (2.2%). Total of 3604 THA procedures were recorded. These included 2162 (60%) male patients and 1442 (40%) female patients. Average age was 52 years (Range 17 to 85 years) and average BMI was 25.8 (Range: 17.3 to 38.5). The indications for THA was AVN in 49%. Conclusion: The registry will become more meaningful in years to come. Active participation of all arthroplasty surgeons across India is vital for the success of the joints registry. PMID:24133312

  17. The Egyptian clinical trials’ registry profile: Analysis of three trial registries (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry and clinicaltrials.gov)

    PubMed Central

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed A.; Taha, Fatma M.

    2015-01-01

    Registering clinical trials (CTs) in public domains enhances transparency, increases trust in research, improves participation and safeguards against publication bias. This work was done to study the profile of clinical research in Egypt in three CT registries with different scopes: the WHO International CT Registry Platform (ICTRP), the continental Pan-African CT Registry (PACTR) and the US clinicaltrials.gov (CTGR). In March 2014, ICTRP, PACTR and CTGR were searched for clinical studies conducted in Egypt. It was found that the number of studies conducted in Egypt (percentage) was 686 (0.30%) in ICTRP, 56 (11.3%) in PACTR and 548 (0.34%) in CTGR. Most studies were performed in universities and sponsored by university/organization, industry or individual researchers. Inclusion of adults from both genders predominated. The median number of participants per study in the three registries ranged between 63 and 155. The conditions researched differed among the three registries and study purpose was mostly treatment followed by prevention. Endpoints were mostly efficacy followed by safety. Observational:Interventional studies (i.e. clinical trials) represented 15.5%:84.5% in ICTRP, 0%:100% in PACTR and 16.4%:83.6% in CTGR. Most interventions were drugs or procedures. Observational studies were mostly prospective and cohort studies. Most CTs were phase 3 and tested drugs or procedures. Parallel group assignment and random allocation predominated. Blinding was implemented in many of trials and was mostly double-blind. We conclude that CTs from Egypt in trial registries are apparently low and do not accurately reflect clinical research conducted in Egypt or its potential. Development of an Egyptian CT registry is eagerly needed. Registering all Egyptian CTs in public domains is highly recommended. PMID:26843968

  18. The Egyptian clinical trials' registry profile: Analysis of three trial registries (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Pan-African Clinical Trials Registry and clinicaltrials.gov).

    PubMed

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed A; Taha, Fatma M

    2016-01-01

    Registering clinical trials (CTs) in public domains enhances transparency, increases trust in research, improves participation and safeguards against publication bias. This work was done to study the profile of clinical research in Egypt in three CT registries with different scopes: the WHO International CT Registry Platform (ICTRP), the continental Pan-African CT Registry (PACTR) and the US clinicaltrials.gov (CTGR). In March 2014, ICTRP, PACTR and CTGR were searched for clinical studies conducted in Egypt. It was found that the number of studies conducted in Egypt (percentage) was 686 (0.30%) in ICTRP, 56 (11.3%) in PACTR and 548 (0.34%) in CTGR. Most studies were performed in universities and sponsored by university/organization, industry or individual researchers. Inclusion of adults from both genders predominated. The median number of participants per study in the three registries ranged between 63 and 155. The conditions researched differed among the three registries and study purpose was mostly treatment followed by prevention. Endpoints were mostly efficacy followed by safety. Observational:Interventional studies (i.e. clinical trials) represented 15.5%:84.5% in ICTRP, 0%:100% in PACTR and 16.4%:83.6% in CTGR. Most interventions were drugs or procedures. Observational studies were mostly prospective and cohort studies. Most CTs were phase 3 and tested drugs or procedures. Parallel group assignment and random allocation predominated. Blinding was implemented in many of trials and was mostly double-blind. We conclude that CTs from Egypt in trial registries are apparently low and do not accurately reflect clinical research conducted in Egypt or its potential. Development of an Egyptian CT registry is eagerly needed. Registering all Egyptian CTs in public domains is highly recommended.

  19. Alcoholic fermentation induces melatonin synthesis in orange juice.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pachón, M S; Medina, S; Herrero-Martín, G; Cerrillo, I; Berná, G; Escudero-López, B; Ferreres, F; Martín, F; García-Parrilla, M C; Gil-Izquierdo, A

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a molecule implicated in multiple biological functions. Its level decreases with age, and the intake of foods rich in melatonin has been considered an exogenous source of this important agent. Orange is a natural source of melatonin. Melatonin synthesis occurs during alcoholic fermentation of grapes, malt and pomegranate. The amino acid tryptophan is the precursor of all 5-methoxytryptamines. Indeed, melatonin appears in a shorter time in wines when tryptophan is added before fermentation. The aim of the study was to measure melatonin content during alcoholic fermentation of orange juice and to evaluate the role of the precursor tryptophan. Identification and quantification of melatonin during the alcoholic fermentation of orange juice was carried out by UHPLC-QqQ-MS/MS. Melatonin significantly increased throughout fermentation from day 0 (3.15 ng/mL) until day 15 (21.80 ng/mL) reaching larger amounts with respect to other foods. Melatonin isomer was also analysed, but its content remained stable ranging from 11.59 to 14.18 ng/mL. The enhancement of melatonin occurred mainly in the soluble fraction. Tryptophan levels significantly dropped from 13.80 mg/L (day 0) up to 3.19 mg/L (day 15) during fermentation. Melatonin was inversely and significantly correlated with tryptophan (r = 0.907). Therefore, the enhancement in melatonin could be due to both the occurrence of tryptophan and the new synthesis by yeast. In summary, the enhancement of melatonin in novel fermented orange beverage would improve the health benefits of orange juice by increasing this bioactive compound.

  20. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR).

    PubMed

    Aziz, A A; Salina, A A; Abdul Kadir, A B; Badiah, Y; Cheah, Y C; Nor Hayati, A; Ruzanna, Z Z; Sharifah Suziah, S M; Chee, K Y

    2008-09-01

    The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) collects information about patients with mental disorder in Malaysia. This information allows us to estimate the incidence of selected mental disorders, and to evaluate risk factors and treatment in the country. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) presented its first report in 2004, a year after its establishment. The report focused on schizophrenia as a pioneer project for the National Mental Health Registry. The development of the registry has progressed with data collected from government-based facilities, the academia and the private sector. The 2003-2005 report was recently published and distributed. Since then the registry has progressed to include suicides and other mental illnesses such as depression. The NMHR Report 2003-2005 provides detailed information about the profile of persons with Schizophrenia who presented for the first time to various psychiatry and mental health providers throughout Malaysia. More detailed description regarding pharmacotherapy is reported and few cross tabulations done in an effort to provide better understanding and more clinically meaningful reports. PMID:19227671

  1. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR).

    PubMed

    Aziz, A A; Salina, A A; Abdul Kadir, A B; Badiah, Y; Cheah, Y C; Nor Hayati, A; Ruzanna, Z Z; Sharifah Suziah, S M; Chee, K Y

    2008-09-01

    The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) collects information about patients with mental disorder in Malaysia. This information allows us to estimate the incidence of selected mental disorders, and to evaluate risk factors and treatment in the country. The National Mental Health Registry (NMHR) presented its first report in 2004, a year after its establishment. The report focused on schizophrenia as a pioneer project for the National Mental Health Registry. The development of the registry has progressed with data collected from government-based facilities, the academia and the private sector. The 2003-2005 report was recently published and distributed. Since then the registry has progressed to include suicides and other mental illnesses such as depression. The NMHR Report 2003-2005 provides detailed information about the profile of persons with Schizophrenia who presented for the first time to various psychiatry and mental health providers throughout Malaysia. More detailed description regarding pharmacotherapy is reported and few cross tabulations done in an effort to provide better understanding and more clinically meaningful reports.

  2. Vascular surgical data registries for small computers.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, J L; Rosenberg, N

    1984-08-01

    Recent designs for computer-based vascular surgical registries and clinical data bases have employed large centralized systems with formal programming and mass storage. Small computers, of the types created for office use or for word processing, now contain sufficient speed and memory storage capacity to allow construction of decentralized office-based registries. Using a standardized dictionary of terms and a method of data organization adapted to word processing, we have created a new vascular surgery data registry, "VASREG." Data files are organized without programming, and a limited number of powerful logical statements in English are used for sorting. The capacity is 25,000 records with current inexpensive memory technology. VASREG is adaptable to computers made by a variety of manufacturers, and interface programs are available for conversion of the word processor formated registry data into forms suitable for analysis by programs written in a standard programming language. This is a low-cost clinical data registry available to any physician. With a standardized dictionary, preparation of regional and national statistical summaries may be facilitated.

  3. [Considerations on limits and profits of registries].

    PubMed

    Addis, Antonio; Costa, Enrico; De Palma, Rossana; Magrini, Nicola; Marata, Anna Maria; Martelli, Luisa; Papini, Donato; Traversa, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    The article collects the summary of the discussion occurred in the setting of PRIER II, in the session dedicated to the taxonomy of registries. Shown below, some specific contributions by health professionals working at the regional departments, which deal with registries, as well as the contribution on the same subject by specialists working at some pharmaceutical companies. In particular, after the presentation summarized in the article by prof. Giuseppe Costa1, the contributions, respectively by a representative of the Emilia-Romagna Region, of a health and hospital service and by the PRIER II workgroup, are following. Finally, a collective work with all participants to the working group took place to focus on all the issues considered to be crucial in defining clinical registries. At the same discussion table, institutional representatives of the regulatory national and regional branch were also invited to take into consideration the points of view of all public and private registry users, in particular in their benefits, limits and purposes. Going through the discussion on a specific check list and deepening a number of statements identified by the working group, a list of key points, essential to characterize each clinical registry, was produced. PMID:26418504

  4. Systematic Review of Cerebral Palsy Registries/Surveillance Groups: Relationships between Registry Characteristics and Knowledge Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Donna S; Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Krosschell, Kristin J; Pavone, Larissa; Mutlu, Akmer; Dewald, Julius PA; Msall, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to provide a comprehensive summary of the body of research disseminated by Cerebral Palsy (CP) registries and surveillance programs from January 2009 through May 2014 in order to describe the influence their results have on our overall understanding of CP. Secondly, registries/surveillance programs and the work they produced were evaluated and grouped using standardized definitions and classification systems. Method A systematic review search in PubMed, CINAH and Embase for original articles published from 1 January 2009 to 20 May 2014 originating from or supported by population based CP registries and surveillance programs or population based national registries including CP were included. Articles were grouped by 2009 World CP Registry Congress aim, registry/surveillance program classification, geographical region, and the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF) domain. Registry variables were assessed using the ICF-CY classification. Results Literature searches returned 177 articles meeting inclusion criteria. The majority (69%) of registry/surveillance program productivity was related to contributions as a Resource for CP Research. Prevention (23%) and Surveillance (22%) articles were other areas of achievement, but fewer articles were published in the areas of Planning (17%) and Raising the Profile of CP (2%). There was a range of registry/surveillance program classifications contributing to this productivity, and representation from multiple areas of the globe, although most of the articles originated in Europe, Australia, and Canada. The domains of the ICF that were primarily covered included body structures and function at the early stages of life. Encouragingly, a variety of CP registry/surveillance program initiatives included additional ICF domains of participation and environmental and personal factors. Interpretation CP registries and surveillance programs, including novel non-traditional ones

  5. US Beryllium Case Registry through 1977

    SciTech Connect

    Sprince, N.L.; Kazemi, H.

    1980-02-01

    A synopsis of the cases reported to the Beryllium Case Registry between 1973 and 1977 is presented. As of 1973, there were 832 cases of beryllium disease entered into the Registry. In the five years since that report, 55 additional cases have been added, 40 men and 15 women. Exposures occured in the electronics and nuclear industries in the production and use of beryllium containing alloys and beryllium oxide ceramis. Pathological changes in the lung tissue are described. Cases continue to be reported in which the diagnosis was sarcoidosis until the history of beryllium exposure led to the finding of beryllium in the lung tissue or mediastinal lymph node biopsy. Data from the Registry support the fact that chronic beryllium disease is a continued occupational hazard.

  6. Irish National Joint Registry: a concept.

    PubMed

    Oduwole, K O; Codd, M B; Byrne, F; O'Byrne, J; Kenny, P J

    2008-12-01

    Despite the well-documented benefits, some countries have yet to agree on the establishment of a national joint register. A questionnaire study was undertaken to ascertain the opinions of the consultant orthopaedic surgeons and specialist registrars, regarding establishment of an Irish National Joint Register. The aim was to find out the possible reasons why a national joint register has not been established in Ireland. A 69% first response rate was recorded. Ninety-seven percent believe it is time to set up a registry and 81% say it should be made compulsory for unwilling surgeons and hospitals to participate. Despite the overwhelming support, privacy and liability issues were major concerns. Fifty-eight percent agree that access to registry report by general public can expose surgeons and hospitals to medico-legal implications. Legislation may be required to protect the integrity of a national joint replacement registry to ensure that the data are used as intended.

  7. 7 CFR 905.86 - Agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agents. 905.86 Section 905.86 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES, GRAPEFRUIT, TANGERINES, AND TANGELOS GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 905.86 Agents. The...

  8. 7 CFR 905.86 - Agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agents. 905.86 Section 905.86 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES, GRAPEFRUIT, TANGERINES, AND TANGELOS GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 905.86 Agents. The...

  9. 7 CFR 906.59 - Agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Agents. 906.59 Section 906.59 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 906.59 Agents. The...

  10. 7 CFR 906.59 - Agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agents. 906.59 Section 906.59 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 906.59 Agents. The...

  11. 7 CFR 905.86 - Agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agents. 905.86 Section 905.86 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES, GRAPEFRUIT, TANGERINES, AND TANGELOS GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 905.86 Agents. The...

  12. 7 CFR 905.86 - Agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Agents. 905.86 Section 905.86 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES, GRAPEFRUIT, TANGERINES, AND TANGELOS GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 905.86 Agents. The...

  13. 7 CFR 906.59 - Agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agents. 906.59 Section 906.59 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 906.59 Agents. The...

  14. 7 CFR 906.59 - Agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agents. 906.59 Section 906.59 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 906.59 Agents. The...

  15. 7 CFR 905.86 - Agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agents. 905.86 Section 905.86 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES, GRAPEFRUIT, TANGERINES, AND TANGELOS GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 905.86 Agents. The...

  16. 7 CFR 906.59 - Agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agents. 906.59 Section 906.59 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Miscellaneous Provisions § 906.59 Agents. The...

  17. The Nigerian Twin and Sibling Registry.

    PubMed

    Hur, Yoon-Mi; Kim, Jong Woo; Chung, Kee Wha; Shin, Joong Sik; Jeong, Hoe-Uk; Auta, Emmanuel

    2013-02-01

    Twin studies of Africans have been scarce although Africans have shown the highest twin birth rate in the world. As a parallel study of the South Korean Twin Registry, the Nigerian Twin and Sibling Registry (NTSR) was developed to understand causal influences on the development of cognitive abilities, personality, and mental health among Nigerians. Currently, 1,134 twins and 404 full- and half-siblings have been registered with NTSR. This article describes research background, goals, major recruitment strategies, measures, and future directions of the NTSR.

  18. Photoconversion in orange and red fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Gert-Jan; Hazelwood, Kristin L; Murphy, Christopher S; Davidson, Michael W; Piston, David W

    2009-05-01

    We found that photoconversion is fairly common among orange and red fluorescent proteins, as in a screen of 12 proteins, 8 exhibited photoconversion. Specifically, three red fluorescent proteins could be switched to a green state, and two orange variants could be photoconverted to a far-red state. The orange proteins are ideal for dual-probe highlighter applications, and they exhibited the most red-shifted excitation of all fluorescent proteins described to date.

  19. Efficacy of killer yeasts in the biological control of Penicillium digitatum on Tarocco orange fruits (Citrus sinensis).

    PubMed

    Platania, Claudia; Restuccia, Cristina; Muccilli, Serena; Cirvilleri, Gabriella

    2012-05-01

    Killer Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Wickerhamomyces anomalus yeast strains were tested as biocontrol agents against Penicillium digitatum, one the most important causes of postharvest decay in orange fruits. W. anomalus, grown on acidified medium, demonstrated micocinogenic activity against P. digitatum, as indicated by large inhibition halos and hyphal damage resulting from β-glucanase activity. Oranges that had been deliberately inoculated with pathogens were protected from decay by W. anomalus. Inoculation of oranges with W. anomalus strains BS 91 and BS 92 reduced disease severity to 1 and 4%, respectively, for up to 10 days in storage.

  20. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  3. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  4. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Enforcement Procedures § 493.1850 Laboratory... laboratories, including the following: (1) A list of laboratories that have been convicted, under Federal...

  5. [Cancer registry of laryngectomized persons in Croatia].

    PubMed

    Pavlić, Blazenka

    2014-03-01

    Cancer poses a major problem in the population of Croatia. Owing to Professor Zivko Kulcar, who founded Cancer Registry at the Institute of Public Health in 1959, statistical data on patients with malignant cancer, including information on the entire territory of the Republic of Croatia, are available. The Act on Official Statistics (Official Gazette 103/2003) and Annual Implementation Plan regulate data recording in Cancer Registry, which is performed by the County Public Health Institutes that control the volume and quality of registration, after which the information is forwarded to the Croatian National Public Health Institute. If information and statistical data are needed for public health or scientific research purposes, one should approach Cancer Registry, having previously filled out a form for aggregated or individual information. However, when requesting information about individuals having undergone laryngectomy, such information is not available. If information about individuals having undergone laryngectomy is needed, e.g., how many of such individuals there are out there, when, where and how they are treated, or their demographic characteristics, such information unfortunately is not available. Therefore, establishment of the registry of patients who have undergone laryngectomy is proposed, which would be maintained by nurses working at ENT departments. PMID:24979893

  6. Registries in systemic sclerosis: a worldwide experience.

    PubMed

    Galluccio, Felice; Walker, Ulrich A; Nihtyanova, Svetlana; Moinzadeh, Pia; Hunzelmann, Nicholas; Krieg, Thomas; Steen, Virginia; Baron, Murray; Sampaio-Barros, Percival; Kayser, Cristiane; Nash, Peter; Denton, Chris P; Tyndall, Alan; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco

    2011-01-01

    SSc is a multisystem disease characterized by an unpredictable course, high mortality and resistance to therapy. The complexity and severity of SSc is a growing burden on the health-care systems. As a result, researchers are seeking new therapeutic strategies for effectively managing these patients. Disease registries are used to support care management efforts for groups of patients with chronic diseases and are meaningful to capture and track key patient information to assist the physicians in managing patients. For these reasons, SSc surveys, research associations and consortiums are pivotal to conduct ongoing research and data collection to enhance disease knowledge and support research projects. Currently, there are several national SSc registries in the UK, Germany, USA, Canada, Brazil and Australia. There is also an international registry established by the European League Against Rheumatism scleroderma trial and research (EUSTAR) called minimal essential data set (MEDS) Online, which collects data from over 8000 patients from 92 centres worldwide, including 21 European centres and 9 centres outside Europe. By collecting, analysing and disseminating data on disease progression and patient responses to long-term disease management strategies, registries help to improve understanding of the disease and keep medical professionals up to date on the latest advances. PMID:21148153

  7. The Savant Syndrome Registry: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Treffert, Darold A; Rebedew, David L

    2015-08-01

    A registry has been established to document certain characteristics on a sizeable worldwide sample of individuals with savant syndrome, a rare but remarkable condition in which persons with developmental disabilities, brain injury, or brain disease have some spectacular "islands" of skill or ability that stand in jarring, marked contrast to overall handicap. Of the 319 savants included in the registry, 90% are congenital savants, while 10% are acquired savants. The registry includes individuals from 33 countries, with 70% from the United States or Canada. Sex distribution was 79% male vs. 21% female (4:1). This report summarizes the findings in the congenital savant syndrome category of the registry. Among the individuals with congenital savant syndrome, the most common underlying disability was Autistic Spectrum Disorder (75%); various other central nervous system (CNS) disorders were present in the other 25%. Fifty-five percent possessed a single special skill, while 45% had multiple skills. Music was the most frequent principal skill followed by art, memory, mathematics, calendar calculating, language, visual-spatial/mechanical, athletic, computer, extrasensory perception, and other skills.

  8. The Savant Syndrome Registry: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Treffert, Darold A; Rebedew, David L

    2015-08-01

    A registry has been established to document certain characteristics on a sizeable worldwide sample of individuals with savant syndrome, a rare but remarkable condition in which persons with developmental disabilities, brain injury, or brain disease have some spectacular "islands" of skill or ability that stand in jarring, marked contrast to overall handicap. Of the 319 savants included in the registry, 90% are congenital savants, while 10% are acquired savants. The registry includes individuals from 33 countries, with 70% from the United States or Canada. Sex distribution was 79% male vs. 21% female (4:1). This report summarizes the findings in the congenital savant syndrome category of the registry. Among the individuals with congenital savant syndrome, the most common underlying disability was Autistic Spectrum Disorder (75%); various other central nervous system (CNS) disorders were present in the other 25%. Fifty-five percent possessed a single special skill, while 45% had multiple skills. Music was the most frequent principal skill followed by art, memory, mathematics, calendar calculating, language, visual-spatial/mechanical, athletic, computer, extrasensory perception, and other skills. PMID:26436185

  9. Clinical Case Registries: Simultaneous Local and National Disease Registries for Population Quality Management

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Lisa I.; Gavrilov, Sergey; Loomis, Timothy P.; Halloran, James P.; Phillips, Barbara R.; Belperio, Pamela S.; Mole, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has a system-wide, patient-centric electronic medical record system (EMR) within which the authors developed the Clinical Case Registries (CCR) to support population-centric delivery and evaluation of VA medical care. To date, the authors have applied the CCR to populations with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Local components use diagnosis codes and laboratory test results to identify patients who may have HIV or HCV and support queries on local care delivery with customizable reports. For each patient in a local registry, key EMR data are transferred via HL7 messaging to a single national registry. From 128 local registry systems, over 60,000 and 320,000 veterans in VA care have been identified as having HIV and HCV, respectively, and entered in the national database. Local and national reports covering demographics, resource usage, quality of care metrics and medication safety issues have been generated. PMID:19717794

  10. 2. August, 1970 VIEW LOOKING SOUTH ON ORANGE STREET FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. August, 1970 VIEW LOOKING SOUTH ON ORANGE STREET FROM TOP OF UNITARIAN CHURCH - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  11. 10. August, 1970 EAST SIDE OF ORANGE STREET LOOKING NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. August, 1970 EAST SIDE OF ORANGE STREET LOOKING NORTH FOM IN FRONT OF THE LEVI STARBUCK HOUSE - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  12. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE GROVE AVENUE. ORANGE GROVE AVENUE BRIDGE IN REAR. LOOKING 278°W - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Orange Grove Avenue Bridge, Milepost 30.59, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  13. 16. August, 1970 #31 ORANGE STREET & GENERAL VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. August, 1970 #31 ORANGE STREET & GENERAL VIEW OF WEST SIDE OF STREET - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  14. 24. August, 1970 STONE ALLEY, LOOKING TOWARD ORANGE STREET FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. August, 1970 STONE ALLEY, LOOKING TOWARD ORANGE STREET FROM HALF-WAY POINT - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  15. 22. August, 1970 STONE ALLEY, VIEW TO ORANGE STREET FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. August, 1970 STONE ALLEY, VIEW TO ORANGE STREET FROM GARDNER HOUSES - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  16. 8. August, 1970 PUMP BEHIND PELEG COGGESHALL HOUSE, 10 ORANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. August, 1970 PUMP BEHIND PELEG COGGESHALL HOUSE, 10 ORANGE STREET (MASS-1063) - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  17. 7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. August, 1970 9 ORANGE STREET, ADJACENT TO UNITARIAN CHURCH (NOT IN STUDY AREA) - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  18. 6. September, 1968 LOOKING WEST ON ORANGE STREET, UNITARIAN CHURCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. September, 1968 LOOKING WEST ON ORANGE STREET, UNITARIAN CHURCH AT LEFT - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  19. Detection of oranges from a color image of an orange tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, Arthur R.; Gallagher, A.; Eriksson, J.

    1999-10-01

    The progress of robotic and machine vision technology has increased the demand for sophisticated methods for performing automatic harvesting of fruit. The harvesting of fruit, until recently, has been performed manually and is quite labor intensive. An automatic robot harvesting system that uses machine vision to locate and extract the fruit would free the agricultural industry from the ups and downs of the labor market. The environment in which robotic fruit harvesters must work presents many challenges due to the inherent variability from one location to the next. This paper takes a step towards this goal by outlining a machine vision algorithm that detects and accurately locates oranges from a color image of an orange tree. Previous work in this area has focused on differentiating the orange regions from the rest of the picture and not locating the actual oranges themselves. Failure to locate the oranges, however, leads to a reduced number of successful pick attempts. This paper presents a new approach for orange region segmentation in which the circumference of the individual oranges as well as partially occluded oranges are located. Accurately defining the circumference of each orange allows a robotic harvester to cut the stem of the orange by either scanning the top of the orange with a laser or by directing a robotic arm towards the stem to automatically cut it. A modified version of the K- means algorithm is used to initially segment the oranges from the canopy of the orange tree. Morphological processing is then used to locate occluded oranges and an iterative circle finding algorithm is used to define the circumference of the segmented oranges.

  20. 48 CFR 26.205 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Disaster or Emergency Assistance Activities 26.205 Disaster Response Registry. (a) Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry at www.ccr.gov...

  1. 48 CFR 26.205 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Disaster or Emergency Assistance Activities 26.205 Disaster Response Registry. (a) Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry via...

  2. 48 CFR 26.205 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Disaster or Emergency Assistance Activities 26.205 Disaster Response Registry. (a) Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry via...

  3. 48 CFR 4.1104 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS System for Award Management 4.1104 Disaster Response Registry. Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry via https://www.acquisition.gov when contracting for debris...

  4. 48 CFR 4.1104 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Central Contractor Registration 4.1104 Disaster Response Registry. Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry via https://www.acquisition.gov when contracting for...

  5. 48 CFR 4.1104 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS System for Award Management 4.1104 Disaster Response Registry. Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry via https://www.acquisition.gov when contracting for debris...

  6. 48 CFR 26.205 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Disaster or Emergency Assistance Activities 26.205 Disaster Response Registry. (a) Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry via...

  7. 48 CFR 4.1104 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Central Contractor Registration 4.1104 Disaster Response Registry. Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry at www.ccr.gov when contracting for debris...

  8. 48 CFR 26.205 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS OTHER SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS Disaster or Emergency Assistance Activities 26.205 Disaster Response Registry. (a) Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry at www.ccr.gov...

  9. 48 CFR 4.1104 - Disaster Response Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disaster Response Registry... ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Central Contractor Registration 4.1104 Disaster Response Registry. Contracting officers shall consult the Disaster Response Registry at www.ccr.gov when contracting for debris...

  10. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25... AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.25 Visual Arts Registry. (a) General. This section prescribes the procedures relating to the submission of Visual Arts Registry Statements by visual artists...

  11. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  12. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  13. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  14. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  15. 19 CFR 122.54 - Aircraft of foreign registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aircraft of foreign registry. 122.54 Section 122... THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS International Traffic Permit § 122.54 Aircraft of foreign registry. (a) Application. For any commercial aircraft of foreign registry arriving in the U.S.,...

  16. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors' benefits . Research on B-cell leukemias and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... sufficient evidence of an association between exposure to herbicides and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In 2003, VA recognized ...

  17. Biomethanization of orange peel waste.

    PubMed

    Martín, M A; Siles, J A; Chica, A F; Martín, A

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that orange peel waste is a potentially valuable resource that can be developed into high value products such as methane. Following a pre-treatment to extract D-limonene, the anaerobic digestion of orange peel waste was evaluated at laboratory and pilot scale under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. D-limonene removals of 70% were reached with pre-treatment. The results showed the convenience of thermophilic conditions for treating this waste as the methane production rate and biodegradability were higher than at mesophilic temperature. At pilot scale, a thermophilic continuously stirred-tank reactor working in semi-continuous mode was employed. The OLR was found to be in the range of 1.20-3.67 kg COD/m(3) d; the most appropriate range for working under stable conditions at SRT of 25 d. The methane yield coefficient was found to be 0.27-0.29 L(STP)CH(4)/g added COD and the biodegradability 84-90% under these conditions. However, acidification occurred at the highest OLR.

  18. 76 FR 5822 - Orange Juice From Brazil

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... juice from Brazil (71 FR 12183). The Commission is conducting a review to determine whether revocation... frozen concentrated orange juice for further manufacturing and NFC stands for conventional pasteurized... COMMISSION Orange Juice From Brazil AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION:...

  19. Trouble Brewing in Orange County. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Orange County will soon face enormous budgetary pressures from the growing deficits in public pensions, both at a state and local level. In this policy brief, the author estimates that Orange County faces a total $41.2 billion liability for retiree benefits that are underfunded--including $9.4 billion for the county pension system and an estimated…

  20. 7 CFR 29.1043 - Orange (F).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Orange (F). 29.1043 Section 29.1043 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1043 Orange (F). A reddish yellow....

  1. 7 CFR 29.1043 - Orange (F).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Orange (F). 29.1043 Section 29.1043 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1043 Orange (F). A reddish yellow....

  2. 7 CFR 29.1043 - Orange (F).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Orange (F). 29.1043 Section 29.1043 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1043 Orange (F). A reddish yellow....

  3. 7 CFR 29.1043 - Orange (F).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Orange (F). 29.1043 Section 29.1043 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1043 Orange (F). A reddish yellow....

  4. 7 CFR 29.1043 - Orange (F).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Orange (F). 29.1043 Section 29.1043 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1043 Orange (F). A reddish yellow....

  5. Ankylosing spondylitis clinical registries: principles, practices and possibilities.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Liron; Clegg, Daniel O; Inman, Robert D

    2013-06-01

    The need for a rigorously developed longitudinal registry of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) is clear and urgent. Like randomized controlled trials, registries rely on a prospective, systematic protocol-driven approach to data acquisition to assess outcomes for a prescribed cohort of patients. Registries seek to capture large numbers of patients across large geographic zones and can serve as a valuable resource for patient advocacy, patient education and support, incidence and prevalence, and broad demographic profiles. Building on 3 existing registries--the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Ankylosing Spondylitis, the Program to Understand the Longterm Outcomes of Spondyloarthritis (PULSAR) and the University Health Network Spondyloarthritis Program--these registries and the Spondylitis Association of America propose to form a combined registry of North American SpA patients. The combined registry would, ideally, complement ongoing clinical goals and improve patient care. PMID:23841118

  6. METADATA REGISTRY, ISO/IEC 11179

    SciTech Connect

    Pon, R K; Buttler, D J

    2008-01-03

    ISO/IEC-11179 is an international standard that documents the standardization and registration of metadata to make data understandable and shareable. This standardization and registration allows for easier locating, retrieving, and transmitting data from disparate databases. The standard defines the how metadata are conceptually modeled and how they are shared among parties, but does not define how data is physically represented as bits and bytes. The standard consists of six parts. Part 1 provides a high-level overview of the standard and defines the basic element of a metadata registry - a data element. Part 2 defines the procedures for registering classification schemes and classifying administered items in a metadata registry (MDR). Part 3 specifies the structure of an MDR. Part 4 specifies requirements and recommendations for constructing definitions for data and metadata. Part 5 defines how administered items are named and identified. Part 6 defines how administered items are registered and assigned an identifier.

  7. A statewide cancer registry: the Pennsylvania experience.

    PubMed

    Powell, R L; Dietrich, R J

    1990-12-01

    Pennsylvania has been successful in establishing a statewide cancer registry. The success of this registry results from the efforts of many different groups. The program has benefited from strong legislation making cancer a reportable disease and assigning the responsibility of reporting to hospitals. The PCR has implemented many initiatives to ensure that the cooperation of hospitals in operating the system is maintained, and that there is sufficient knowledge among hospital personnel to ensure complete casefinding. As the amount of statewide incidence data is increased over several years, the utility of these data for program planning and epidemiologic studies will increase greatly. The establishment and ongoing operation of the PCR ensure that cancer incidence data are available in providing answers to questions such as some of those asked following the accident at Three Mile Island. PMID:10108500

  8. [Implications of the REACH registry for neurologists].

    PubMed

    Roquer, Jaume

    2009-09-01

    Data from the REACH registry help to understand distinct problems affecting patients with arteriosclerotic disease. The arteriosclerotic burden evaluated by quantifying the number of diseased vascular territories is a marker of poor prognosis that increases the risk of recurrences, morbidity and mortality and death at 1 year. In cerebrovascular disease, it is important to highlight that patients with stroke are those with the highest rates of cerebral reinfarction and also show the highest combined rate of cardiovascular death or non-fatal myocardial infarction or stroke. Special care must be taken in patients who have had a transient ischemic attack since these patients accumulate a number of vascular risk factors. Data from the REACH registry suggest that preventive treatment and control of vascular risk factors could be improved, especially control of hypertension, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia. Consequently, preventive measures should be intensified in these patients to achieve adequate control of risk factors through encouraging healthy lifestyle habits, appropriate use of drugs and treatment adherence.

  9. The Lupus Family Registry and Repository

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Astrid; Sevier, Sydney; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Aberle, Teresa; Cooney, Carisa M.; Grether, Anya; James, Ellen; Ning, Jared; Tesiram, Joanne; Morrisey, Jean; Powe, Tiny; Drexel, Mark; Daniel, Wes; Namjou, Bahram; Ojwang, Joshua O.; Nguyen, Kim L.; Cavett, Joshua W.; Te, Jeannie L.; James, Judith A.; Scofield, R. Hal; Moser, Kathy; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; Carson, Craig W.; Quintero-del-Rio, Ana I.; Ballesteros, Maria del Carmen; Punaro, Marilynn G.; Karp, David R.; Wallace, Daniel J.; Weisman, Michael; Merrill, Joan T.; Rivera, Roberto; Petri, Michelle A.; Albert, Daniel A.; Espinoza, Luis R.; Utset, Tammy O.; Shaver, Timothy S.; Arthur, Eugene; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Bruner, Gail R.

    2011-01-01

    The Lupus Family Registry and Repository (LFRR) was established with the goal of assembling and distributing materials and data from families with one or more living members diagnosed with SLE, in order to address SLE genetics. In the present article, we describe the problems and solutions of the registry design and biometric data gathering; the protocols implemented to guarantee data quality and protection of participant privacy and consent; and the establishment of a local and international network of collaborators. At the same time, we illustrate how the LFRR has enabled progress in lupus genetics research, answering old scientific questions while laying out new challenges in the elucidation of the biologic mechanisms that underlie disease pathogenesis. Trained staff ascertain SLE cases, unaffected family members and population-based controls, proceeding in compliance with the relevant laws and standards; participant consent and privacy are central to the LFRR’s effort. Data, DNA, serum, plasma, peripheral blood and transformed B-cell lines are collected and stored, and subject to strict quality control and safety measures. Coded data and materials derived from the registry are available for approved scientific users. The LFRR has contributed to the discovery of most of the 37 genetic associations now known to contribute to lupus through 104 publications. The LFRR contains 2618 lupus cases from 1954 pedigrees that are being studied by 76 approved users and their collaborators. The registry includes difficult to obtain populations, such as multiplex pedigrees, minority patients and affected males, and constitutes the largest collection of lupus pedigrees in the world. The LFRR is a useful resource for the discovery and characterization of genetic associations in SLE. PMID:20864496

  10. An active registry for bioinformatics web services

    PubMed Central

    Pettifer, S.; Thorne, D.; McDermott, P.; Attwood, T.; Baran, J.; Bryne, J. C.; Hupponen, T.; Mowbray, D.; Vriend, G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The EMBRACE Registry is a web portal that collects and monitors web services according to test scripts provided by the their administrators. Users are able to search for, rank and annotate services, enabling them to select the most appropriate working service for inclusion in their bioinformatics analysis tasks. Availability and implementation: Web site implemented with PHP, Python, MySQL and Apache, with all major browsers supported. (www.embraceregistry.net) Contact: steve.pettifer@manchester.ac.uk PMID:19460889

  11. Characterization of Heterogeneity in Childhood Immunization Coverage in Central Florida Using Immunization Registry Data.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Logan, Grace E

    2016-07-01

    Despite high vaccine coverage in the United States in general, and in the State of Florida specifically, some children miss scheduled vaccines due to health system failures or vaccine refusal by their parents. Recent experiences with outbreaks in the United States suggest that geographic clustering of un(der)vaccinated populations represent a threat to the elimination status of some vaccine-preventable diseases. Immunization registries continue to expand and play an important role in efforts to track vaccine coverage and use. Using nearly 700,000 de-identified immunization records from the Florida Department of Health immunization information system (Florida SHOTS™) for children born during 2003-2014, we explored heterogeneity and potential clustering of un(der)vaccinated children in six counties in central Florida-Brevard, Lake, Orange, Oseola, Polk, and Seminole-that represent a high-risk area for importation due to family tourist attractions in the area. By zip code, we mapped the population density, the percent of children with religious exemptions, the percent of children on track or overdue for each vaccine series without and with exemptions, and the numbers of children with no recorded dose of each vaccine. Overall, we found some heterogeneity in coverage among the counties and zip codes, but relatively consistent and high coverage. We found that some children with an exemption in the system received the vaccines we analyzed, but exemption represents a clear risk factor for un(der)immunization. We identified many challenges associated with using immunization registry data for spatial analysis and potential opportunities to improve registries to better support future analyses.

  12. Mini-orange spectrometer at CIAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yun; Wu, Xiao-Guang; Li, Guang-Sheng; Li, Cong-Bo; He, Chuang-Ye; Chen, Qi-Ming; Zhong, Jian; Zhou, Wen-Kui; Deng, Li-Tao; Zhu, Bao-Ji

    2016-08-01

    A mini-orange spectrometer used for in-beam measurements of internal conversion electrons, consisting of a Si(Li) detector and different sets of SmO5 permanent magnets for filtering and transporting the conversion electrons to the Si(Li) detector, has been developed at the China Institute of Atomic Energy. The working principles and configuration of the mini-orange spectrometer are described. The performance of the setup is illustrated by measured singles conversion electron spectra using the mini-orange spectrometer. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11305269, 11375267, 11475072, 11405274, 11205068, 11175259)

  13. Innovative Interventional and Imaging Registries: Precision Medicine in Cerebrovascular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Precision medicine in cerebrovascular disorders may be greatly advanced by the use of innovative interventional and imaging-intensive registries. Registries have remained subsidiary to randomized controlled trials, yet vast opportunities exist to leverage big data in stroke. Summary This overview builds upon the rationale for innovative, imaging-intensive interventional registries as a pivotal step in realizing precision medicine for several cerebrovascular disorders. Such enhanced registries may serve as a model for expansion of our translational research pipeline to fully leverage the role of phase IV investigations. The scope and role of registries in precision medicine are considered, followed by a review on the history of stroke and interventional registries, data considerations, critiques or barriers to such initiatives, and the potential modernization of registry methods into efficient, searchable, imaging-intensive resources that simultaneously offer clinical, research and educational added value. Key Messages Recent advances in technology, informatics and endovascular stroke therapies converge to provide an exceptional opportunity for registries to catapult further progress. There is now a tremendous opportunity to deploy registries in acute stroke, intracranial atherosclerotic disease and carotid disease where other clinical trials leave questions unanswered. Unlike prior registries, imaging-intensive and modernized methods may leverage current technological capabilities around the world to efficiently address key objectives and provide added clinical, research and educational value. PMID:26600792

  14. 21 CFR 146.141 - Canned orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Canned orange juice. 146.141 Section 146.141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Beverages § 146.141 Canned orange juice. (a) Canned orange juice is the food prepared from orange juice...

  15. 21 CFR 146.141 - Canned orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Canned orange juice. 146.141 Section 146.141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Beverages § 146.141 Canned orange juice. (a) Canned orange juice is the food prepared from orange juice...

  16. 21 CFR 146.141 - Canned orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Canned orange juice. 146.141 Section 146.141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Beverages § 146.141 Canned orange juice. (a) Canned orange juice is the food prepared from orange juice...

  17. 21 CFR 146.141 - Canned orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Canned orange juice. 146.141 Section 146.141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Beverages § 146.141 Canned orange juice. (a) Canned orange juice is the food prepared from orange juice...

  18. 21 CFR 146.141 - Canned orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Canned orange juice. 146.141 Section 146.141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Beverages § 146.141 Canned orange juice. (a) Canned orange juice is the food prepared from orange juice...

  19. 21 CFR 146.145 - Orange juice from concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Orange juice from concentrate. 146.145 Section 146... Juices and Beverages § 146.145 Orange juice from concentrate. (a) Orange juice from concentrate is the food prepared by mixing water with frozen concentrated orange juice as defined in § 146.146 or...

  20. 21 CFR 146.140 - Pasteurized orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pasteurized orange juice. 146.140 Section 146.140... and Beverages § 146.140 Pasteurized orange juice. (a) Pasteurized orange juice is the food prepared from unfermented juice obtained from mature oranges as specified in § 146.135, to which may be...

  1. 21 CFR 146.140 - Pasteurized orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pasteurized orange juice. 146.140 Section 146.140... and Beverages § 146.140 Pasteurized orange juice. (a) Pasteurized orange juice is the food prepared from unfermented juice obtained from mature oranges as specified in § 146.135, to which may be...

  2. 21 CFR 146.145 - Orange juice from concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Orange juice from concentrate. 146.145 Section 146... Juices and Beverages § 146.145 Orange juice from concentrate. (a) Orange juice from concentrate is the food prepared by mixing water with frozen concentrated orange juice as defined in § 146.146 or...

  3. 21 CFR 146.145 - Orange juice from concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Orange juice from concentrate. 146.145 Section 146... Juices and Beverages § 146.145 Orange juice from concentrate. (a) Orange juice from concentrate is the food prepared by mixing water with frozen concentrated orange juice as defined in § 146.146 or...

  4. 21 CFR 146.140 - Pasteurized orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pasteurized orange juice. 146.140 Section 146.140... and Beverages § 146.140 Pasteurized orange juice. (a) Pasteurized orange juice is the food prepared from unfermented juice obtained from mature oranges as specified in § 146.135, to which may be...

  5. 21 CFR 146.145 - Orange juice from concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Orange juice from concentrate. 146.145 Section 146... Juices and Beverages § 146.145 Orange juice from concentrate. (a) Orange juice from concentrate is the food prepared by mixing water with frozen concentrated orange juice as defined in § 146.146 or...

  6. 21 CFR 146.140 - Pasteurized orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pasteurized orange juice. 146.140 Section 146.140... and Beverages § 146.140 Pasteurized orange juice. (a) Pasteurized orange juice is the food prepared from unfermented juice obtained from mature oranges as specified in § 146.135, to which may be...

  7. 12. July, 1970 EAST SIDE OF ORANGE STREET LOOKING SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. July, 1970 EAST SIDE OF ORANGE STREET LOOKING SOUTH FROM GARDEN (FORMER SITE OF COL. BRAYTON HOUSE) OF #16 TO #18, #20 AND #22 ORANGE STREET - Orange & Union Streets Neighborhood Study, 8-31 Orange Street, 9-21 Union Street & Stone Alley, Nantucket, Nantucket County, MA

  8. Arizona Alzheimer's Registry: Strategy and Outcomes of a Statewide Research Recruitment Registry

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, K.T.; Langbaum, J.B.; Holt, C.J.; Chen, W.; High, N.; Langlois, C.; Sabbagh, M.; Tariot, P.N.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Arizona Alzheimer's Consortium (AAC) created the Arizona Alzheimer's Registry, a screening and referral process for people interested in participating in Alzheimer's disease related research. The goals of the Registry were to increase awareness of Alzheimer's disease research and accelerate enrollment into AAC research studies. METHODS Participation was by open invitation to adults 18 and older. Those interested provided consent and completed a written questionnaire. A subset of Registrants underwent an initial telephone cognitive assessment. Referral to AAC sites was based on medical history, telephone cognitive assessment, and research interests. RESULTS A total of 1257 people consented and 1182 underwent an initial cognitive screening. Earned media (38.7%) was the most effective recruitment strategy. Participants had a mean age of 68.1 (SD 10.6), 97% were Caucasian, had 15.2 (SD 2.7) mean years of education, and 60% were female. 30% reported a family history of dementia and 70% normal cognition. Inter-rater agreement between self-reported memory status and the initial telephone cognitive assessment had a kappa of 0.31-0.43. 301 were referred to AAC sites. CONCLUSION IThe Registry created an infrastructure and process to screen and refer a high volume of eager Registrants. These methods were found to be effective at prescreening individuals for studies, which facilitated AAC research recruitment. The established infrastructure and experiences gained from the Registry have served as the prototype for the web-based Alzheimer's Prevention Registry, a national registry focusing on Alzheimer's disease prevention research. PMID:26491650

  9. Recent trends in population-based cancer registries in Japan: the Act on Promotion of Cancer Registries and drastic changes in the historical registry.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Tomohiro; Sobue, Tomotaka

    2015-02-01

    Cancer registration in Japan has a long history spanning over 60 years; the first population-based cancer registry was established in Miyagi prefecture in 1951. The progress made in the regional population-based cancer registries in terms of standardization and quality improvement during the 10 years of the third comprehensive strategy for cancer control was highlighted in the history of cancer registration in Japan. However, there were still weak points regarding local government-oriented cancer registries that remained, e.g., the reporting of cancer cases to the population-based cancer registries was not a mandatory task for medical institutions. After the Cancer Control Act in 2006, the Act on Promotion of Cancer Registries was finally enacted in Japan on December 6, 2013. According to that Act, hospital managers must report information on any primary cancer that was first diagnosed in their institutions from January 1, 2016 to the prefectural governors. Given the increasing number of cases and amount of information recorded, it would have been almost impossible to maintain our cancer registries using the same system, and changes were required to obtain reliable cancer statistics. This was particularly important in Japan, because the country is facing a hyper-aging society, with two to three million cancer patients requiring entry of detailed information. We appreciate the long history of the Japanese cancer registry, but it is necessary to make dramatic changes to bring the registry up to date and to be able to track the increasing amount of information.

  10. Registries as Tools for Clinical Excellence and the Development of the Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry.

    PubMed

    Weber LeBrun, Emily E

    2016-03-01

    Surgical device innovation has been less regulated than drug development, allowing integration of unproven techniques and materials into standard practice. Successful device registries gather information on patient outcomes and can provide postmarket surveillance of new technologies and allow comparison with currently established treatments or devices. The Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry was developed in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration, device manufacturers, and other stakeholders to serve as a platform for industry-sponsored postmarket device surveillance, investigator-initiated research, and quality and effectiveness benchmarking, all designed to improve the care of women with pelvic floor disorders. PMID:26880512

  11. Improvement of Biogas Production from Orange Peel Waste by Leaching of Limonene

    PubMed Central

    Wikandari, Rachma; Nguyen, Huong; Millati, Ria; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.

    2015-01-01

    Limonene is present in orange peel wastes and is known as an antimicrobial agent, which impedes biogas production when digesting the peels. In this work, pretreatment of the peels to remove limonene under mild condition was proposed by leaching of limonene using hexane as solvent. The pretreatments were carried out with homogenized or chopped orange peel at 20–40°C with orange peel waste and hexane ratio (w/v) ranging from 1 : 2 to 1 : 12 for 10 to 300 min. The pretreated peels were then digested in batch reactors for 33 days. The highest biogas production was achieved by treating chopped orange peel waste and hexane ratio of 12 : 1 at 20°C for 10 min corresponding to more than threefold increase of biogas production from 0.061 to 0.217 m3 methane/kg VS. The solvent recovery was 90% using vacuum filtration and needs further separation using evaporation. The hexane residue in the peel had a negative impact on biogas production as shown by 28.6% reduction of methane and lower methane production of pretreated orange peel waste in semicontinuous digestion system compared to that of untreated peel. PMID:25866787

  12. Improvement of biogas production from orange peel waste by leaching of limonene.

    PubMed

    Wikandari, Rachma; Nguyen, Huong; Millati, Ria; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2015-01-01

    Limonene is present in orange peel wastes and is known as an antimicrobial agent, which impedes biogas production when digesting the peels. In this work, pretreatment of the peels to remove limonene under mild condition was proposed by leaching of limonene using hexane as solvent. The pretreatments were carried out with homogenized or chopped orange peel at 20-40°C with orange peel waste and hexane ratio (w/v) ranging from 1 : 2 to 1 : 12 for 10 to 300 min. The pretreated peels were then digested in batch reactors for 33 days. The highest biogas production was achieved by treating chopped orange peel waste and hexane ratio of 12 : 1 at 20°C for 10 min corresponding to more than threefold increase of biogas production from 0.061 to 0.217 m(3) methane/kg VS. The solvent recovery was 90% using vacuum filtration and needs further separation using evaporation. The hexane residue in the peel had a negative impact on biogas production as shown by 28.6% reduction of methane and lower methane production of pretreated orange peel waste in semicontinuous digestion system compared to that of untreated peel.

  13. Improvement of biogas production from orange peel waste by leaching of limonene.

    PubMed

    Wikandari, Rachma; Nguyen, Huong; Millati, Ria; Niklasson, Claes; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2015-01-01

    Limonene is present in orange peel wastes and is known as an antimicrobial agent, which impedes biogas production when digesting the peels. In this work, pretreatment of the peels to remove limonene under mild condition was proposed by leaching of limonene using hexane as solvent. The pretreatments were carried out with homogenized or chopped orange peel at 20-40°C with orange peel waste and hexane ratio (w/v) ranging from 1 : 2 to 1 : 12 for 10 to 300 min. The pretreated peels were then digested in batch reactors for 33 days. The highest biogas production was achieved by treating chopped orange peel waste and hexane ratio of 12 : 1 at 20°C for 10 min corresponding to more than threefold increase of biogas production from 0.061 to 0.217 m(3) methane/kg VS. The solvent recovery was 90% using vacuum filtration and needs further separation using evaporation. The hexane residue in the peel had a negative impact on biogas production as shown by 28.6% reduction of methane and lower methane production of pretreated orange peel waste in semicontinuous digestion system compared to that of untreated peel. PMID:25866787

  14. 21 CFR 146.137 - Frozen orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen orange juice. 146.137 Section 146.137 Food... Beverages § 146.137 Frozen orange juice. (a) Frozen orange juice is orange juice as defined in § 146.135, except that it is frozen. (b) The name of the food is “Frozen orange juice”. Such name may be preceded...

  15. 21 CFR 146.137 - Frozen orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen orange juice. 146.137 Section 146.137 Food... Beverages § 146.137 Frozen orange juice. (a) Frozen orange juice is orange juice as defined in § 146.135, except that it is frozen. (b) The name of the food is “Frozen orange juice”. Such name may be preceded...

  16. 21 CFR 146.137 - Frozen orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen orange juice. 146.137 Section 146.137 Food... Beverages § 146.137 Frozen orange juice. (a) Frozen orange juice is orange juice as defined in § 146.135, except that it is frozen. (b) The name of the food is “Frozen orange juice”. Such name may be preceded...

  17. 21 CFR 146.137 - Frozen orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen orange juice. 146.137 Section 146.137 Food... Beverages § 146.137 Frozen orange juice. (a) Frozen orange juice is orange juice as defined in § 146.135, except that it is frozen. (b) The name of the food is “Frozen orange juice”. Such name may be preceded...

  18. 21 CFR 146.137 - Frozen orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen orange juice. 146.137 Section 146.137 Food... Beverages § 146.137 Frozen orange juice. (a) Frozen orange juice is orange juice as defined in § 146.135, except that it is frozen. (b) The name of the food is “Frozen orange juice”. Such name may be preceded...

  19. [Influence of registries on the quality of care].

    PubMed

    Stengel, D; Dreinhöfer, K; Kostuj, T

    2016-06-01

    Registries are a topic of lively debate amongst all stakeholders in healthcare, politics and economics. In general, registries are national or international (prospective) databases documenting the current state of diagnostic, therapeutic and long-term outcome variables of subjects with a distinct condition or health problem. The access to and handling of registry information is subject to strict legal, methodological and ethical principles and regulations before these data can be scientifically utilized and reentered into the routine daily practice. Because of the representativeness and reality of data, registries are widely regarded as the backbone of health systems and budgets.Currently there is only indirect evidence that registries influence outcomes and the quality of care. Recent statistical techniques may allow quasi-experimental modelling of observational information. In orthopedic and trauma surgery, current and upcoming registries should be wisely utilized to develop and evaluate innovations and to make informed decisions relevant to care. PMID:27164976

  20. An Update on the Florida State Twin Registry

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jeanette E.; Hart, Sara A.; Mikolajewski, Amy J.

    2012-01-01

    The Florida State Twin Registry began in 2002 through a pilot study of personality disorders and executive cognitive functioning in adult twins. Since 2006, the registry has grown substantially as part of the Learning Disability Research Center at Florida State University that recently began its second funding cycle through the National Institute of Child Health and Development. An update on the Florida State Twin Registry sample, focus, and measures is provided as well as future directions. PMID:23067863

  1. Antimatter, clockwork orange, laser divestment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmus, John F.

    2005-06-01

    In 1972 Ente Nazionale Idrocarburi sponsored a program to holographically record the images of Venetian sculptural treasures for archival purposes. At Laboratorio San Gregorio, where the initial holography took place, G. Musumeci and K. Hempel suggested an experiment to determine whether the concentrated beam from the ruby holographic laser could ablate black-patina crusts from decaying marble. Initial success of a laser-divestment test on a Palazzo Ducale capital launched a search for funding to enable a full-scale laser-conservation demonstration. Later, at a Caltech reunion one of the author's physics professors (Carl Anderson, the discoverer of mu mesons and the positron), noting the prominence of the Venice Film Festival suggested our approaching the motion picture industry. Many years earlier Anderson's Caltech classmate, Frank Capra, had supported the research that led to the discovery of cosmic-ray-generated antimatter on Pikes Peak. (After Caltech, Capra had become a director at Columbia Studios.) Anderson's chance comment led to an introduction to producer Jack Warner at a festival screening of his "A Clockwork Orange" in Asolo. He and his friends contributed US$5000 toward the laser conservation of a marble relief of "The Last Supper" in the Porta della Carta of Venice. This work was conducted in 1980 under the direction of Arch. G. Calcagno. In 1981 it was found that the granite veneer or the newly completed Warner Center Tower had been stained during transit from the quarry. The Venice laser successfully restored the veneer, thereby returning the Warner Brothers' favor.

  2. The International Takotsubo Registry: Rationale, Design, Objectives, and First Results.

    PubMed

    Ghadri, Jelena-R; Cammann, Victoria L; Templin, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Takotsubo syndrome (TTS) was first described in Japan in 1990. The clinical presentation is similar to that of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Cardiac enzymes are commonly elevated. A global initiative was launched and the InterTAK Registry was established to provide a systematic database. The major goals of the International Takotsubo Registry (InterTAK Registry) are to provide a comprehensive clinical characterization on natural history, treatment, and outcomes. We linked a biorepository to identify biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis and to investigate the genetic basis as well as disease-related factors. We focus on the rationale, objectives, design, and first results of the InterTAK Registry. PMID:27638029

  3. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    PubMed

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC. PMID:27168721

  4. The Sri Lankan Twin Registry: 2012 update.

    PubMed

    Sumathipala, Athula; Siribaddana, Sisira; Hotopf, Mathew; McGuffin, Peter; Glozier, Nick; Ball, Harriet; Kovas, Yulia; Rijsdijk, Fruhling; Yatawara, Lalani; Pariante, Carmine; Zavos, Helena; Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Pannala, Gayani; Jayaweera, Kaushalya; Adikari, Anushka; Gunewardane, Dinesha

    2013-02-01

    The Sri Lankan Twin Registry (SLTR), established in 1997, is a unique resource for twin and genetic research in a low- and middle-income country (LMIC). It comprises of a volunteer cohort of 14,120 twins (7,060 pairs) and 119 sets of triplets, and a population-based cohort of 19,040 (9,520 pairs) twins and 89 sets of triplets. Several studies have been conducted using this registry, including the Colombo Twin and Singleton Study (CoTaSS 1; 4,387 twins, 2,311 singletons), which have explored the prevalence and heritability of a range of psychiatric disorders as well as gene-environmental interplay. Currently, a follow-up study (CoTaSS 2) of the same cohort is underway, looking at the prevalence and interrelationship of key cardiovascular and metabolic risk markers (e.g., metabolic syndrome). A significant feature of CoTaSS 2 is the establishment of a biobank. Current SLTR work is extending beyond mental health and the interface between mental and physical health to new horizons, extending collaborations with the wider global twin research community. Ethics and governance have been given special emphasis in the initiative. Capacity building and public engagement are two crucial components. Establishment of a state-of-the-art genetic laboratory was a major accomplishment. SLTR is a classic showcase of successful North-South partnership in building a progressive research infrastructure in a LMIC. PMID:23302519

  5. Haematuria on the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Claudia; Rivera, Francisco; Moreno, Juan Antonio; López-Gómez, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a pathogenic role for glomerular haematuria among renal function. However, there is no data on the prevalence of haematuria from a large renal biopsy registry. We analysed the prevalence of gross (GH) and microscopic (mH) haematuria in 19,895 patients that underwent native renal biopsies from the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis. Haematuria's overall incidence was 63% (GH 8.6% and mH 55.1%), being more frequent in males (64.7% vs. 62.4%). GH was more prevalent in patients <18 years (21.3% vs. 7.7%). The commonest clinical presentation associated with GH was acute kidney injury (31.5%) and IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) (33.6%) was the most frequent histological finding. GH patients showed a significantly (p < 0.05) lower eGFR and proteinuria levels as compared with patients with mH and without haematuria. Moreover, mH was more prevalent in adults (56.3%). Nephrotic syndrome was the commonest clinical presentation in mH patients (32.2%) and IgAN (18.5%) the most frequent histological finding. In conclusion, haematuria, is a frequent urinalysis finding in patients underwent native renal biopsy. The most frequent histological finding in both GH and mH is IgAN. Whereas, GH is more frequent in young males with acute kidney injury, mH is commoner among adults with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26818712

  6. The Three Mile Island Population Registry.

    PubMed Central

    Goldhaber, M K; Tokuhata, G K; Digon, E; Caldwell, G G; Stein, G F; Lutz, G; Gur, D

    1983-01-01

    Shortly after the March 28, 1979, accident at the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear plant outside Harrisburg, Pa., the Pennsylvania Department of Health, in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Bureau of the Census, conducted a census of the 35,930 persons residing within 5 miles of the plant. With the help of 150 enumerators, demographic and health-related information was collected on each person to provide baseline data for future short- and long-term epidemiologic studies of the effects of the accident. Individual radiation doses were estimated on the basis of residential location and the amount of time each person spent in the 5-mile area during the 10 days after the accident. Health and behavioral resurveys of the population will be conducted approximately every 5 years. Population-mobility, morbidity, and mortality will be studied yearly by matching the TMI Population Registry with postal records, cancer registry records, and death certificate data. Because the radiation dose from TMI was extremely small, any increase in morbidity or mortality attributable to the accident would be so small as not to be measurable by present methods; however, adverse health effects as a result of psychological stress may occur. Also, a temporary increase in reporting of disease could occur because of increased surveillance and attention to health. PMID:6419276

  7. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR)

    PubMed Central

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B.; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC. PMID:27168721

  8. The Kaiser Permanente Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ake, Christopher F; Burke, Mary F; Singh, Anshuman; Yian, Edward H; Paxton, Elizabeth W; Navarro, Ronald A

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Shoulder arthroplasty is being performed in the United States with increasing frequency. We describe the medium-term findings from a large integrated healthcare system shoulder arthroplasty registry. Patients and methods Shoulder arthroplasty cases registered between January 2005 and June 2013 were included for analysis. The registry included patient characteristics, surgical information, implant data, attrition, and patient outcomes such as surgical site infections, venous thromboembolism, and revision procedures. Results During the study period, 6,336 primary cases were registered. Median follow-up time for all primaries was 3.3 years; 461 cases were lost to follow-up by ending of health plan membership. Primary cases were predominantly female (56%) and white (81%), with an average age of 70 years. The most common reason for surgery was osteoarthritis in 60% of cases, followed by acute fracture (17%) and rotator cuff tear arthropathy (15%). In elective shoulder arthroplasty procedures, 200 all-cause revisions (4%) were reported, with glenoid wear being the most common reason. Interpretation Most arthroplasties were elective procedures: over half performed for osteoarthritis. Glenoid wear was the most common reason for revision of primary shoulder arthroplasty in elective cases. PMID:25727949

  9. Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR).

    PubMed

    Shats, Oleg; Goldner, Whitney; Feng, Jianmin; Sherman, Alexander; Smith, Russell B; Sherman, Simon

    2016-01-01

    A multicenter, web-based Thyroid Cancer and Tumor Collaborative Registry (TCCR, http://tccr.unmc.edu) allows for the collection and management of various data on thyroid cancer (TC) and thyroid nodule (TN) patients. The TCCR is coupled with OpenSpecimen, an open-source biobank management system, to annotate biospecimens obtained from the TCCR subjects. The demographic, lifestyle, physical activity, dietary habits, family history, medical history, and quality of life data are provided and may be entered into the registry by subjects. Information on diagnosis, treatment, and outcome is entered by the clinical personnel. The TCCR uses advanced technical and organizational practices, such as (i) metadata-driven software architecture (design); (ii) modern standards and best practices for data sharing and interoperability (standardization); (iii) Agile methodology (project management); (iv) Software as a Service (SaaS) as a software distribution model (operation); and (v) the confederation principle as a business model (governance). This allowed us to create a secure, reliable, user-friendly, and self-sustainable system for TC and TN data collection and management that is compatible with various end-user devices and easily adaptable to a rapidly changing environment. Currently, the TCCR contains data on 2,261 subjects and data on more than 28,000 biospecimens. Data and biological samples collected by the TCCR are used in developing diagnostic, prevention, treatment, and survivorship strategies against TC.

  10. Haematuria on the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Claudia; Rivera, Francisco; Moreno, Juan Antonio; López-Gómez, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest a pathogenic role for glomerular haematuria among renal function. However, there is no data on the prevalence of haematuria from a large renal biopsy registry. We analysed the prevalence of gross (GH) and microscopic (mH) haematuria in 19,895 patients that underwent native renal biopsies from the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis. Haematuria’s overall incidence was 63% (GH 8.6% and mH 55.1%), being more frequent in males (64.7% vs. 62.4%). GH was more prevalent in patients <18 years (21.3% vs. 7.7%). The commonest clinical presentation associated with GH was acute kidney injury (31.5%) and IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) (33.6%) was the most frequent histological finding. GH patients showed a significantly (p < 0.05) lower eGFR and proteinuria levels as compared with patients with mH and without haematuria. Moreover, mH was more prevalent in adults (56.3%). Nephrotic syndrome was the commonest clinical presentation in mH patients (32.2%) and IgAN (18.5%) the most frequent histological finding. In conclusion, haematuria, is a frequent urinalysis finding in patients underwent native renal biopsy. The most frequent histological finding in both GH and mH is IgAN. Whereas, GH is more frequent in young males with acute kidney injury, mH is commoner among adults with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26818712

  11. Encouraging Health Information Management Graduates to Pursue Cancer Registry Careers.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The cancer registry profession has grown dramatically since its inception in 1926. Certified tumor registrars (CTRs) have become an integral part of the cancer care team by providing quality cancer data for research, statistical purposes, public health, and cancer control. In addition, CTRs have been found to be valuable in other cancer and health-related fields. Based on the need for high-quality, accurate data, the National Cancer Registrars Association (NCRA), the certification body for CTRs, has increased the educational requirement for eligibility for the CTR certification exam. This has resulted in fewer individuals who are able to meet the requirements for CTR certification. In addition, the existing cancer registry workforce is, on average, older than other allied health professions, and therefore will face an increasing number of retirements in the next few years. The high demand for CTRs, the decreased pool of CTR-eligible applicants, and the aging cancer registry workforce has resulted in an existing shortage that will only get worse as the population ages and the incidence of cancer increases. Health information management (HIM) students are well suited to pursuing further training in the cancer registry field and gaining the CTR credential. HIM students or new graduates have the needed skill set and education to pursue a cancer registry career. There are many avenues HIM educational programs can take to encourage students to pursue CTR certification and a cancer registry career. Including cancer registry functions in courses throughout the HIM curriculum, bringing in cancer registry speakers, encouraging networking, and promoting the cancer registry field and profession in general are just a few of the methods that HIM programs can use to raise awareness of and promote a cancer registry career to their students. Illinois State University has used these methods and has found them to be successful in encouraging a percentage of their graduates to pursue

  12. Physicochemical properties of modified citrus pectins extracted from orange pomace.

    PubMed

    Venzon, Simoni Spohr; Canteri, Maria Helene Giovanetti; Granato, Daniel; Junior, Bogdan Demczuk; Maciel, Giselle Maria; Stafussa, Ana Paula; Haminiuk, Charles Windson Isidoro

    2015-07-01

    Modified pectin is a polysaccharide rich in galacturonic acid altered by pH adjustment and thermal treatment used especially as an anti-cancer agent. The aim of this work was to study the physical and chemical properties of modified pectins extracted from orange pomace with citric and nitric acids. The galacturonic acid content, degree of esterification, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy profile, molecular weight, intrinsic viscosity, rheological properties and antioxidant activity of the pectins were evaluated. The modification process caused the de-esterification of pectins and a decrease of molecular weight due to removal of neutral sugars, maintaining the linear chain of galacturonic acid. Such changes also caused a significant increase in the in vitro antioxidant activity (p ≤ 0.05) and influenced the rheological properties of pectin, reducing its viscosity. This work showed that the modification of pectin from orange pomace with citric and nitric acids altered its structural and physical characteristics as well as its biological activity toward a free-radical.

  13. 76 FR 38619 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; National Saltwater Angler Registry and State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Saltwater Angler Registry and State Exemption Program AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric... currently approved collection. The National Saltwater Angler Registry Program (Registry Program) was established to implement recommendations included in the review of national saltwater angling data...

  14. 76 FR 28403 - National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... of a National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners (National Registry), 73 FR 73129. The National... medical examiners about FMCSA's physical qualification standards. See 73 FR 73132-33. However, the Agency... Certified Medical Examiners ACTION: Notice of availability of draft guidance; request for comments....

  15. The National Film Registry: Acquiring Our Film Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Roy A.

    The National Film Registry, which is primarily a designated list of films to be preserved by the Library of Congress, is also a valuable tool for selecting "films that are culturally, historically, and aesthetically significant." Following a brief discussion of the history and selection process of the National Film Registry, Southeast Missouri…

  16. 15 CFR 995.21 - Registry of data users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC Products § 995.21 Registry of data users. (a) CED or CEVAD shall maintain a registry of customers receiving...

  17. 15 CFR 995.21 - Registry of data users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC Products § 995.21 Registry of data users. (a) CED or CEVAD shall maintain a registry of customers receiving...

  18. 15 CFR 995.21 - Registry of data users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC Products § 995.21 Registry of data users. (a) CED or CEVAD shall maintain a registry of customers receiving...

  19. 15 CFR 995.21 - Registry of data users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC Products § 995.21 Registry of data users. (a) CED or CEVAD shall maintain a registry of customers receiving...

  20. 15 CFR 995.21 - Registry of data users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC Products § 995.21 Registry of data users. (a) CED or CEVAD shall maintain a registry of customers receiving...

  1. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... procedures. (f) Effect of recordation. The Copyright Office will record statements in the Visual Arts... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25... AND PROCEDURES GENERAL PROVISIONS § 201.25 Visual Arts Registry. (a) General. This section...

  2. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  3. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  4. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  5. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  6. 14 CFR 47.19 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 47.19 Section 47.19 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRCRAFT REGISTRATION General § 47.19 FAA Aircraft Registry. Each application, request, notification, or...

  7. 14 CFR 49.11 - FAA Aircraft Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false FAA Aircraft Registry. 49.11 Section 49.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.11 FAA Aircraft Registry. To be eligible for...

  8. 76 FR 37064 - National Saltwater Angler Registry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... INFORMATION: The final rule implementing the National Saltwater Angler Registry Program, 50 CFR part 600, subpart P, was published in the Federal Register on December 30, 2008 (73 FR 79705). The final rule... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA490 National Saltwater Angler Registry...

  9. 76 FR 4092 - National Saltwater Angler Registry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA131 National Saltwater Angler Registry Program... INFORMATION: The final rule implementing the National Saltwater Angler Registry Program, 50 CFR part...

  10. 76 FR 22082 - National Saltwater Angler Registry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA368 National Saltwater Angler Registry Program... INFORMATION: The final rule implementing the National Saltwater Angler Registry Program, 50 CFR part...

  11. 78 FR 49478 - National Saltwater Angler Registry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC403 National Saltwater Angler Registry Program... registration of anglers, spear fishers and for-hire fishing vessels to register under the National Saltwater... final rule implementing the National Saltwater Angler Registry Program, 50 CFR part 600, subpart P,...

  12. The GEOSS Component and Service Registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, L.; Bai, Y.; Shen, D.; Shao, Y.; Shrestha, R.; Wang, H.; Nebert, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Petabytes of Earth science data have been accumulated through space- and air-borne Earth observation programs during the last several decades. The data are valuable both scientifically and socioeconomically. The value of these data could be further increased significantly if the data from these programs can be easily discovered, accessed, integrated, and analyzed. The Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) is addressing this need. Coordinated by the Group on Earth Observations (or GEO), a voluntary partnership of 86 governments, the European Commission, and 61 intergovernmental, international, and regional organizations has been working on implementing GEOSS for a number of years. After four years of international collaboration, the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) has been established. GCI consists of the Standards and Interoperability Registry (SIR), the Component and Service Registry (CSR), the GEO clearinghouse, and the GEO Portal. The SIR maintains the list of the public standards recognized by the GEO. CSR provides a centralized registry for available Earth Observation resources. The GEO clearinghouse works as a single search facility for GEOSS-wide resources and the GEO Portal provides an integrated Web-based interfaces for users. Since January 2007, researchers at CSISS, GMU have collaborated with officials from the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) on designing, implementing, maintaining, and upgrading CSR. Currently CSR provides the following capabilities for data providers: user registration, resource registration, and service interface registration. The CSR clients can discover the resources registered in CSR through OGC Catalog for Web (CSW), UUDI, and other standard interfaces. During the resource registration process, providers may define detailed descriptive information for their resources, in particular, the targeted societal benefit area and sub-areas of focus, and the targeted critical Earth Observations. The service

  13. Cellulose extraction from orange peel using sulfite digestion reagents.

    PubMed

    Bicu, Ioan; Mustata, Fanica

    2011-11-01

    Orange peel (OP) was used as raw material for cellulose extraction. Two different pulping reagents were used, sodium sulfite and sodium metabisulfite. The effect of the main process parameters, sulfite agent dosage and reaction duration, on cellulose yield was investigated. A central composite rotatable design involving two variables at five levels and response surface methodology were used for the optimization of cellulose recovery. Other two invariable parameters were reaction temperature and hydromodulus. The optimum yields, referred to the weight of double extracted OP, were 40.4% and 45.2% for sodium sulfite and sodium metabisulfite digestions, respectively. The crude celluloses were bleached with hypochlorite and oxygen. The physicochemical characterization data of these cellulose materials indicate good levels of purity, low crystallinities, good whitenesses, good water retention and moderate molecular weights. According to these specific properties the recovered celluloses could be used as fillers, water absorbents, or as raw materials for cellulose derivatives.

  14. Symptom Patterns Among Gulf War Registry Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Hallman, William K.; Kipen, Howard M.; Diefenbach, Michael; Boyd, Kendal; Kang, Han; Leventhal, Howard; Wartenberg, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. We identify symptom patterns among veterans who believe they suffer from Gulf War–related illnesses and characterize groups of individuals with similar patterns. Methods. A mail survey was completed by 1161 veterans drawn from the Gulf War Health Registry. Results. An exploratory factor analysis revealed 4 symptom factors. A K-means cluster analysis revealed 2 groups: (1) veterans reporting good health and few moderate/severe symptoms, and (2) veterans reporting fair/poor health and endorsing an average of 37 symptoms, 75% as moderate/severe. Those in Cluster 2 were more likely to report having 1 or more of 24 medical conditions. Conclusions. These findings are consistent with previous investigations of symptom patterns in Gulf War veterans. This multisymptom illness may be more fully characterized by the extent, breadth, and severity of symptoms reported. PMID:12660208

  15. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    PubMed

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research.

  16. Publication bias: the case for an international registry of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Simes, R J

    1986-10-01

    A problem in evaluating different therapies from a review of clinical trials is that the published clinical trial literature may be biased in favor of positive or promising results. In this report, a model is proposed for reviewing clinical trial results which is free from publication bias based on the selection of trials registered in advance in a registry. The value of a registry is illustrated by comparing a review of published clinical trials located by a literature search with a review of registered trials contained in a cancer trials registry. Two therapeutic questions are examined: the survival impact of initial alkylating agent (AA) v combination chemotherapy (CC) in advanced ovarian cancer, and the survival impact of AA/prednisone v CC in multiple myeloma. In advanced ovarian cancer, a pooled analysis of published clinical trials demonstrates a significant survival advantage for combination chemotherapy (median survival ratio of CC to AA, 1.16; P = .02). However, no significant difference in survival is demonstrated based on a pooled analysis of registered trials (median survival ratio, 1.05; P = .25). For multiple myeloma, a pooled analysis of published trials also demonstrates a significant survival advantage for CC (median survival ratio, 1.26; P = 04), especially for poor risk patients (ratio, 1.66; P = .002). A pooled analysis of registered trials also shows a survival benefit for patients receiving combination chemotherapy (all patients, P = .06; poor risk, P = .03), but the estimated magnitude of the benefit is reduced (all patients: ratio, 1.11; poor risk: ratio, 1.22). These examples illustrate an approach to reviewing the clinical trial literature, which is free from publication bias, and demonstrate the value and importance of an international registry of all clinical trials.

  17. I RBH - First Brazilian Hypertension Registry

    PubMed Central

    Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga; de Souza, Weimar Kunz Sebba Barroso; Lopes, Renato Delascio; Brandão, Andréa Araújo; Malachias, Marcus V. Bolívar; Gomes, Marco Mota; Moreno Júnior, Heitor; Barbosa, Eduardo Costa Duarte; Póvoa, Rui Manoel dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Background: A registry assessing the care of hypertensive patients in daily clinical practice in public and private centers in various Brazilian regions has not been conducted to date. Such analysis is important to elucidate the effectiveness of this care. Objective: To document the current clinical practice for the treatment of hypertension with identification of the profile of requested tests, type of administered treatment, level of blood pressure (BP) control, and adherence to treatment. Methods: National, observational, prospective, and multicenter study that will include patients older than 18 years with hypertension for at least 4 weeks, following up in public and private centers and after signing a consent form. The study will exclude patients undergoing dialysis, hospitalized in the previous 30 days, with class III or IV heart failure, pregnant or nursing, with severe liver disease, stroke or acute myocardial infarction in the past 30 days, or with diseases with a survival prognosis < 1 year. Evaluations will be performed at baseline and after 1 year of follow-up. The parameters that will be evaluated include anthropometric data, lifestyle habits, BP levels, lipid profile, metabolic syndrome, and adherence to treatment. The primary outcomes will be hospitalization due to hypertensive crisis, cardiocirculatory events, and cardiovascular death, while secondary outcomes will be hospitalization for heart failure and requirement of dialysis. A subgroup analysis of 15% of the sample will include noninvasive central pressure evaluation at baseline and study end. The estimated sample size is 3,000 individuals for a prevalence of 5%, sample error of 2%, and 95% confidence interval. Results: The results will be presented after the final evaluation, which will occur at the end of a 1-year follow-up. Conclusion: The analysis of this registry will improve the knowledge and optimize the treatment of hypertension in Brazil, as a way of modifying the prognosis of

  18. The Twin Research Registry at SRI International.

    PubMed

    Krasnow, Ruth E; Jack, Lisa M; Lessov-Schlaggar, Christina N; Bergen, Andrew W; Swan, Gary E

    2013-02-01

    The Twin Research Registry (TRR) at SRI International is a community-based registry of twins established in 1995 by advertising in local media, mainly on radio stations and in newspapers. As of August 2012, there are 3,120 same- and opposite-sex twins enrolled; 86% are 18 years of age or older (mean age 44.9 years, SD 16.9 years) and 14% less than 18 years of age (mean age 8.9 years, SD 4.5); 67% are female, and 62% are self-reported monozygotic (MZ). More than 1,375 twins have participated in studies over the last 15 years in collaboration with the University of California Medical Center in San Francisco, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and the Stanford University School of Medicine. Each twin completes a registration form with basic demographic information either online at the TRR Web site or during a telephone interview. Contact is maintained with members by means of annual newsletters and birthday cards. The managers of the TRR protect the confidentiality of twin data with established policies; no information is given to other researchers without prior permission from the twins; and all methods and procedures are reviewed by an Institutional Review Board. Phenotypes studied thus far include those related to nicotine metabolism, mutagen sensitivity, pain response before and after administration of an opioid, and a variety of immunological responses to environmental exposures, including second-hand smoke and vaccination for seasonal influenza virus and Varicella zoster virus. Twins in the TRR have participated in studies of complex, clinically relevant phenotypes that would not be feasible to measure in larger samples. PMID:23084148

  19. Australian Twin Registry: 30 years of progress.

    PubMed

    Hopper, John L; Foley, Debra L; White, Paul A; Pollaers, Vincent

    2013-02-01

    The Australian Twin Registry (ATR) is a national volunteer resource of twin pairs and higher-order multiples willing to consider participating in health, medical, and scientific research. The vision of the ATR is 'to realize the full potential of research involving twins to improve the health and well-being of all Australians'. The ATR has been funded continuously by the National Health and Medical Council for more than 30 years. Its core functions entail the recruitment and retention of twin members, the maintenance of an up-to-date database containing members' contact details and baseline information, and the promotion and provision of open access to researchers from all institutes in Australia, and their collaborators, in a fair and equitable manner. The ATR is administered by The University of Melbourne, which acts as custodian. Since the late 1970s the ATR has enrolled more than 40,000 twin pairs of all zygosities and facilitated more than 500 studies that have produced at least 700 peer-reviewed publications from classical twin studies, co-twin control studies, within-pair comparisons, twin family studies, longitudinal twin studies, randomized controlled trials, and epigenetics studies, as well as studies of issues specific to twins. New initiatives include: a Health and Life Style Questionnaire; data collection, management, and archiving using a secure online software program (The Ark); and the International Network of Twin Registries. The ATR's expertise and 30 years of experience in providing services to national and international twin studies has made it an important resource for research across a broad range of disciplines.

  20. Orange proteomic fingerprinting: From fruit to commercial juices.

    PubMed

    Lerma-García, María Jesús; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Simó-Alfonso, Ernesto F; Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Fasoli, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    Combinatorial peptide ligand library technology, coupled to mass spectrometry, has been applied to extensively map the proteome of orange pulp and peel and, via this fingerprinting, to detect its presence in commercial orange juices and drinks. The native and denaturing extraction protocols have captured 1109 orange proteins, as identified by LC-MS/MS. This proteomic map has been searched in an orange concentrate, from a Spanish juice manufacturer, as well as in commercial orange juices and soft drinks. The presence of numerous orange proteins in commercial juices has demonstrated the genuineness of these products, prepared by using orange fruits as original ingredients. However, the low number of identified proteins in sparkling beverages has suggested that they were prepared with scarce amounts of fruit extract, thus imparting lower quality to the final products. These findings not only increase the knowledge of the orange proteome but also present a reliable analytical method to assess quality and genuineness of commercial products.

  1. Orange oil and its application to spark ignition engine

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, S.

    1982-12-01

    Orange oil can be extracted from the peel of citrus. In Japan the production of orange oil is about 2000 tons per year. No orange oil has been however used for any specific purpose. The main ingredient of orange oil consists of d-limonen. About 0.6-1.0% oil can be extracted from the peel of ''Unshu orange'', which is a kind of typical Japanese tangerine. Orange oil has 106-140 research octane number which is good for running the CFR engine. The flash point of orange oil measured by Pensky-Martens method was at 56/sup 0/C. For the use of orange oil only as fuel without blending, there was found to be some difficulty in engine startability under cold conditions.

  2. Glocal Clinical Registries: Pacemaker Registry Design and Implementation for Global and Local Integration – Methodology and Case Study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Kátia Regina; Costa, Roberto; Crevelari, Elizabeth Sartori; Lacerda, Marianna Sobral; de Moraes Albertini, Caio Marcos; Filho, Martino Martinelli; Santana, José Eduardo; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Barros, Jacson V.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to apply standard and interoperable solutions for implementing and managing medical registries as well as aggregate, reproduce, and access data sets from legacy formats and platforms to advanced standard formats and operating systems are crucial for both clinical healthcare and biomedical research settings. Purpose Our study describes a reproducible, highly scalable, standard framework for a device registry implementation addressing both local data quality components and global linking problems. Methods and Results We developed a device registry framework involving the following steps: (1) Data standards definition and representation of the research workflow, (2) Development of electronic case report forms using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), (3) Data collection according to the clinical research workflow and, (4) Data augmentation by enriching the registry database with local electronic health records, governmental database and linked open data collections, (5) Data quality control and (6) Data dissemination through the registry Web site. Our registry adopted all applicable standardized data elements proposed by American College Cardiology / American Heart Association Clinical Data Standards, as well as variables derived from cardiac devices randomized trials and Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium. Local interoperability was performed between REDCap and data derived from Electronic Health Record system. The original data set was also augmented by incorporating the reimbursed values paid by the Brazilian government during a hospitalization for pacemaker implantation. By linking our registry to the open data collection repository Linked Clinical Trials (LinkedCT) we found 130 clinical trials which are potentially correlated with our pacemaker registry. Conclusion This study demonstrates how standard and reproducible solutions can be applied in the implementation of medical registries to constitute a re-usable framework

  3. Epidemiology of Rett syndrome: a population-based registry.

    PubMed

    Kozinetz, C A; Skender, M L; MacNaughton, N; Almes, M J; Schultz, R J; Percy, A K; Glaze, D G

    1993-02-01

    The Texas Rett Syndrome Registry maintains the largest population-based registry of cases and potential cases of Rett syndrome in the world. The most precise estimate of the prevalence of Rett syndrome of 1 per 22800 (0.44/10000) females aged 2 through 18 years of age was generated from this Registry. In addition, the first prevalence figures for black and Hispanic female cases were estimated. Registry cases are actively ascertained from multiple sources. Registry staff identify presumptive cases from review of information provided to the Registry by the parent or guardian. Preliminary diagnostic evaluation includes standardized review of medical records and videotape of key behaviors. Diagnosis is confirmed at clinical evaluation. The active surveillance system is monitored with the two-source capture-recapture methodology and case ascertainment is projected. The 1990 prevalence estimate of Rett syndrome indicates that the syndrome occurs less frequently than previously estimated. Until a biologic marker for Rett syndrome is identified or a standard definition for an incident case of Rett syndrome is designated, the prevalence of Rett syndrome will remain a major investigative issue of its epidemiology, and the Registry will be an important, systematic mean to gather case material for clinical and laboratory studies providing the foundation for the development of preventive interventions.

  4. The Registry of Canadian Stroke Network : an evolving methodology.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiming; Kapral, Moira K; Richards, Janice; Robertson, Annette; Stamplecoski, Melissa; Silver, Frank L

    2011-06-01

    Stroke registries can provide information on evidence-based practices and interventions, which are critical for us to understand how stroke care is delivered and how outcomes are achieved. The Registry of Canadian Stroke Network (RCSN) was initiated in 2001 and has evolved over the past decade. In the first two years, we found it extremely difficult to obtain informed consent from the patient or surrogate which led to selection biases in the registry. Subsequently (2003 onwards), under the new health privacy legislation in Ontario, Canada, the RCSN was granted special status as a "prescribed registry" which allowed us to collect data on all consecutive patients at the regional stroke centres without consent. The stroke data was encrypted and all personal contact information had been removed, therefore we could no longer conduct follow- up interviews. To obtain patient outcomes after discharge, we linked the non-consent-based registry database to population-based administrative databases to obtain information on patient mortality, readmissions, socioeconomic status, medication use and other clinical information of interest. In addition, the registry methodology was modified to include a periodic population-based audit on a sample of all stroke patients from over 150 acute hospitals across the province, in addition to continuous data collection at the 12 registry hospitals in the province. The changes in the data collection methodology developed by the RCSN can be applied to other provinces and countries. PMID:21739386

  5. The Russian School Twin Registry (RSTR): project PROGRESS.

    PubMed

    Kovas, Yulia; Galajinsky, Eduard V; Boivin, Michel; Harold, Gordon T; Jones, Alice; Lemelin, Jean-Pascal; Luo, Yu; Petrill, Stephen A; Plomin, Robert; Tikhomirova, Tatiana; Zhou, Xinlin; Malykh, Sergey

    2013-02-01

    The Russian School Twin Registry (RSTR) was established in 2012, supported by a grant from the Government of the Russian Federation. The main aim of the registry is to contribute to Progress in Education through Gene-Environment Studies (PROGRESS). The formation of the registry is ongoing and it is expected that most schools in the Russian Federation (approximately 50,000 schools) will contribute data to the registry. With a total of 13.7 million students in Grades 1-11 (ages 7-18), the potential number of twin pairs exceeds 100,000. Apart from the large sample size and its representative nature, the RSTR has one unique feature: in collaboration with the International Advisory Committee to the Registry, genetically sensitive cross-cultural investigations are planned, aided by the use of the common assessment instruments. Other strengths of the registry include the assessment of a large sample of non-twin school children, including those studying in the same classes as the twins in the registry. It is hoped that the RSTR will provide an important research platform for national and international educationally relevant research.

  6. Orange rust: A new surgarcane disease in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Orange rust of sugarcane was observed approximately 5 miles east of Belle Glade, Florida on CP 80-1743 (a complex hybrid of Sacharum L. species) during the lsat week of June 2007. Orange rust pustules are cinnamon-orange in color, oval and smaller than the darker brown elongate rust pustules of the ...

  7. 21 CFR 146.153 - Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.153 Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. (a) Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing is the food that complies with the requirements of composition and...

  8. 21 CFR 146.151 - Orange juice for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Orange juice for manufacturing. 146.151 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.151 Orange juice for manufacturing. (a) Orange juice for manufacturing is the food prepared for further manufacturing use. It is prepared from unfermented juice...

  9. 21 CFR 146.151 - Orange juice for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Orange juice for manufacturing. 146.151 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.151 Orange juice for manufacturing. (a) Orange juice for manufacturing is the food prepared for further manufacturing use. It is prepared from unfermented juice...

  10. 21 CFR 146.153 - Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.153 Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. (a) Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing is the food that complies with the requirements of composition and...

  11. 21 CFR 146.151 - Orange juice for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Orange juice for manufacturing. 146.151 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.151 Orange juice for manufacturing. (a) Orange juice for manufacturing is the food prepared for further manufacturing use. It is prepared from unfermented juice...

  12. 21 CFR 146.153 - Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.153 Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. (a) Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing is the food that complies with the requirements of composition and...

  13. 21 CFR 146.153 - Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.153 Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. (a) Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing is the food that complies with the requirements of composition and...

  14. 21 CFR 146.151 - Orange juice for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Orange juice for manufacturing. 146.151 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.151 Orange juice for manufacturing. (a) Orange juice for manufacturing is the food prepared for further manufacturing use. It is prepared from unfermented juice...

  15. 21 CFR 146.153 - Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.153 Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing. (a) Concentrated orange juice for manufacturing is the food that complies with the requirements of composition and...

  16. 21 CFR 146.151 - Orange juice for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Orange juice for manufacturing. 146.151 Section... Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.151 Orange juice for manufacturing. (a) Orange juice for manufacturing is the food prepared for further manufacturing use. It is prepared from unfermented juice...

  17. 21 CFR 146.140 - Pasteurized orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pasteurized orange juice. 146.140 Section 146.140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... and Beverages § 146.140 Pasteurized orange juice. (a) Pasteurized orange juice is the food...

  18. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ARROYO SECO PARKWAY SOUTHBOUND LANES AND EXIT RAMP TO ORANGE GROVE AVENUE. ORANGE GROVE AVENUE BRIDGE IN REAR. NOTE IRRIGATION AND DRAINAGE FEATURES AT RIGHT. LOOKING 248°WSW - Arroyo Seco Parkway, Orange Grove Avenue Bridge, Milepost 30.59, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. 76 FR 52563 - Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ...) entitled Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX in the Federal Register (76 FR 103). We... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX... Events; Sabine River, Orange, TX. (a) Definitions. As used in this section ``Participant Vessel''...

  20. Influence of orange juice in the levels and in the genotoxicity of iron and copper.

    PubMed

    Franke, Silvia Isabel Rech; Prá, Daniel; Giulian, Raquel; Dias, Johnny Ferraz; Yoneama, Maria Lúcia; da Silva, Juliana; Erdtmann, Bernardo; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2006-03-01

    World consumption of natural juices is increasing as a consequence of the human search for a healthier life. The juice production industry, especially for orange juice, is expanding in several countries and particularly in Brazil. Despite scientific data reporting beneficial properties derived from juice consumption, some components of juices have been identified as mutagenic or carcinogenic. Carcinogenic or genotoxic effects may be mediated by the interaction of juice components with transition metals or by sub-products of juice auto-oxidation. In this study, the mutagenic potential of orange juice and two metallic agents used in dietary supplementation, FeSO(4) and CuSO(4), were investigated using the comet assay in mouse blood cells (in vivo). Both metal compounds were genotoxic for eukaryotic cells after 24h treatment at the doses used. Significant damage repair was observed after 48h of treatment with the same compounds. Orange juice had a modulating effect on the action of metallic sulfates. In the case of iron treatment, the presence of the orange juice had a preventive, but not restorative, effect. On the other hand, in the case of copper treatment, the effects were both preventive and restorative. PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) analysis indicated a positive correlation between DNA damage and the hepatic levels of iron and a negative correlation between whole blood copper and DNA damage. A negative correlation between hepatic iron and whole blood copper content was also seen in the treatment with both ferrous and cupric sulfates. PMID:16263202

  1. Dissipation of insect growth regulators in fresh orange and orange juice.

    PubMed

    Payá, P; Oliva, J; Cámara, M A; Barba, A

    2007-01-01

    It was studied the dissipation rates of fenoxycarb, Lufenuron, flufenoxuron and pyriproxyfen from their application on navelina orange crops to the production of orange juice. Supervised trials were carried out for the phytosanitary treatments under two situations, one according to Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) and the other one with Critical Agricultural Practices (CAP). Samples of both situations were transformed into orange juice according to the current industrial process. The analytical methodology included acetone and dichloromethane/petroleum ether extraction and aminopropyl-based cleanup. Method validation followed SANCO Guidelines. The final objective was the determination of the exposure to the residues in raw and processed orange when good and critical agricultural conditions are used in the field. PMID:18399437

  2. Orange County Outdoor School: Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orange County Dept. of Education, Santa Ana, CA.

    Divided into six sections, the guide provides helpful information for the teacher to prepare students to attend the Orange County Outdoor School. Pre-camp responsibilities section provides pre-camp preparation checklists for the principal, teacher, parents, school nurse, and outdoor specialist; a checklist for morning departure; discipline policy…

  3. Limonoid content of sour orange varieties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modern Citrus cultivars are thought to have arisen from three parents- the (pummelo), the mandarin, and citron. Taxological and genetic data support that sweet and sour oranges share a common parentage. However, as their name suggests the organoleptic properties of the fruit from these two familie...

  4. 21 CFR 74.250 - Orange B.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... principally the disodium salt of 1-(4-sulfophenyl)-3-ethylcarboxy-4-(4-sulfonaphthylazo)-5-hydro-xypyrazole. (2) The diluents in color additive mixtures for food use containing Orange B are limited to those... than 6.0 percent. Chlorides and sulfates (calculated as the sodium salts), not more than 7.0...

  5. Orange County Outdoor School: Cabin Leader's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orange County Dept. of Education, Santa Ana, CA.

    Presented in five sections, the manual furnishes cabin leaders (high school students) with background information concerning philosophy, teaching, objectives, daily schedule, and cabin leader responsibilities in the Orange County Outdoor School program. The welcome section contains the history of the Outdoor School, staff responsibilities,…

  6. Vitamin C Content of Commercial Orange Juices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Paul

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to confirm that newly purchased commercial orange juice contains sufficient ascorbic acid to meet government standards, and to establish the rate of aerial oxidation of this ascorbic acid when the juice is stored in a refrigerator. (MLH)

  7. Nuclear structure analysis using the Orange Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Regis, J.-M.; Pascovici, Gh.; Christen, S.; Meersschout, T.; Bernards, C.; Fransen, Ch.; Dewald, A.; Braun, N.; Heinze, S.; Thiel, S.; Jolie, J.; Materna, Th.

    2009-01-28

    Recently, an Orange spectrometer, a focusing iron-free magnetic spectrometer, has been installed at a beam line of the 10 MV Tandem accelerator of the IKP of the University of Cologne. The high efficiency of 15% of 4{pi} for the detection of conversion electrons and the energy resolution of 1% makes the Orange spectrometer a powerful instrument. From the conversion electron spectrum, transition multipolarities can be determined using the so called K to L ratio. In combination with an array of germanium and lanthanum bromide detectors, e{sup -}-{gamma}-coincidences can be performed to investigate the level scheme. Moreover, the very fast lanthanum bromide scintillator with an energy resolution of 3% allows e{sup -}-{gamma} lifetime measurements down to 0.3 ns. A second Orange spectrometer can be added to build the Double Orange Spectrometer for e{sup -}-e{sup -}-coincidences. It is indispensable for lifetime measurements of low intensity or nearby lying transitions as often occur in odd-A and odd-odd nuclei. The capabilities are illustrated with several examples.

  8. CNS Sites Cooperate to Detect Duplicate Subjects with a Clinical Trial Subject Registry

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Charles S.; Gevorgyan, Lilit; Shawkat, Adnan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To report the results of the first 1,132 subjects in a pilot project where local central nervous system trial sites collaborated in the use of a subject database to identify potential duplicate subjects. Method: Central nervous system sites in Los Angeles and Orange County, California, were contacted by the lead author to seek participation in the project. CTSdatabase, a central nervous system-focused trial subject registry, was utilized to track potential subjects at pre-screen. Subjects signed an institutional review board-approved authorization prior to participation, and site staff entered their identifiers by accessing a website. Sites were prompted to communicate with each other or with the database administrator when a match occurred between a newly entered subject and a subject already in the database. Results: Between October 30, 2011, and August 31, 2012, 1,132 subjects were entered at nine central nervous system sites. Subjects continue to be entered, and more sites are anticipated to begin participation by the time of publication. Initially, there were concerns at a few sites over patient acceptance, financial implications, and/or legal and privacy issues, but these were eventually overcome. Patient acceptance was estimated to be above 95 percent. Duplicate Subjects (those that matched several key identifiers with subjects at different sites) made up 7.78 percent of the sample and Certain Duplicates (matching identifiers with a greater than 1 in 10 million likelihood of occurring by chance in the general population) accounted for 3.45 percent of pre-screens entered into the database. Many of these certain duplicates were not consented for studies because of the information provided by the registry. Conclusion: The use of a clinical trial subject registry and cooperation between central nervous system trial sites can reduce the number of duplicate and professional subjects entering clinical trials. To be fully effective, a trial subject

  9. Study protocol of a multicenter registry of patients with rheumatoid arthritis starting biologic therapy in Japan: Tsurumai Biologics Communication Registry (TBCR) study.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Toshihisa; Kaneko, Atsushi; Hirano, Yuji; Ishikawa, Hisato; Miyake, Hiroyuki; Oguchi, Takeshi; Takagi, Hideki; Yabe, Yuichiro; Kato, Takefumi; Ito, Takayasu; Terabe, Kenya; Fukaya, Naoki; Kanayama, Yasuhide; Shioura, Tomone; Funahashi, Koji; Hayashi, Masatoshi; Kato, Daizo; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Fujibayashi, Takayoshi; Kojima, Masayo; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2012-06-01

    Biologic agents have proven to be effective against rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance (PMS) studies. However, limited follow-up periods and strict criteria for recruitment might lead to an underestimation of adverse events. To document the long-term course of patients with RA treated with biologics in clinical settings, we established the Tsurumai Biologics Communication Registry (TBCR). First, we retrospectively collected data of patients registered for any biologic PMS study or clinical trial at participating institutes. Thus far, thirteen institutes have joined the registry and 860 patients have been identified. Comparing baseline characteristics by age and initiation year of biologics, young patients had significantly less joint damage and dysfunction and a higher dose of concomitant methotrexate (MTX) compared to older patients. Older age and functional class were significantly related to the incidence of adverse events that resulted in discontinuation of the 1st biologic treatment. The TBCR is in its initial stages, and information on all patients newly starting biologic therapy at participating institutes is being collected prospectively. Differences in baseline characteristics by age and initiation year of biologics need to be carefully evaluated in order to report on drug-related survival and long-term prognosis, using follow-up data in the near future. PMID:21892671

  10. 76 FR 72424 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Information Program on the Genetic Testing Registry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-23

    ... Program on the Genetic Testing Registry AGENCY: National Institutes of Health (NIH), PHS, DHHS. ACTION... control number. Proposed Collection: Title: The Genetic Testing Registry; Type of Information Collection... developing a voluntary registry of genetic tests. The Genetic Testing Registry (GTR) will provide...

  11. [Information in Home Nutrition: the importance of the registries].

    PubMed

    Wanden-Berghe, C; Sanz-Valero, J; Culebras, J

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the registries is determined by its data. In order for a registry to meet its objectives quality in codification, transcription and analysis is essential. These premises applied to a home nutrition registry give an information able to meet all the researchers' targets. The NADYA Group registry of the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Spain tries to measure home artificial nutrition, its indications, methods and ways of administration and other variables. From their studies we may conclude that Parenteral Nutrition is underutilized at present, probably due to a lack of supporting structures able to meet all the needs of home patients. However, tube enteral nutrition is increasing, which represents a reduction in hospital costs and, more important represents an improvement of the patients quality of life and, in turn, also of their relatives.

  12. Iliac Arteries: How Registries Can Help Improve Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tapping, Charles Ross; Uberoi, Raman

    2014-01-01

    There are many publications reporting excellent short and long-term results with endovascular techniques. Patients included in trials are often highly selected and may not represent real world practice. Registries are important to interventional radiologists for several reasons; they reflect prevailing practice and can be used to establish real world standards of care and safety profiles. This information allows individuals and centers to evaluate their outcomes compared with national norms. The British Iliac Angioplasty and Stenting (BIAS) registry is an example of a mature registry that has been collecting data since 2000 and has been reporting outcomes since 2001. This article discusses the evidence to support both endovascular and surgical intervention for aortoiliac occlusive disease, the role of registries, and optimal techniques for aortoiliac intervention. PMID:25435659

  13. A Computer System for Processing Tumor Registry Data

    PubMed Central

    Leahey, Charles F.

    1981-01-01

    An interactive computer system for processing tumor registry data has been developed by the Washington, D.C. VA Medical Center Systems Development Group. The automated registry system replaces a manual registry, which had been implemented according to the guidelines established for Cancer Programs by the American College of Surgeons. A permanent on-line data base of patient data is maintained by a minicomputer at the medical center. A user oriented application program provides entry, edit, and retrieval of patient data in the following formats - Suspense, Master, Accession, and Follow-up registers, and in Abstract form. Data entered in any of the formats is stored in a common file, and is available as needed in any other format. The programs were written in the standard Mumps Language. Construction of the Tumor Registry application was greatly assisted by use of the File Manager, a data base file management package written in the standard Mumps language.

  14. Introduction to the 2006 UK Renal Registry report (chapter 2).

    PubMed

    Ansell, David; Will, Es; Tomson, Charlie

    2007-08-01

    The UK Renal Registry is part of the UK Renal Association and provides independent audit and analysis of renal replacement therapy in the UK. The Registry is funded directly by participating renal units through an annual fee per patient registered. The Registry is now collecting data on incidence and prevalence from 100% of UK renal units, with the five remaining non-linked sites in England providing summary data. Maintaining and enhancing Registry functionality will be an important touchstone for the Connecting for Health initiative. Collaboration with other formal agencies also promises an exciting prospect for future development. After a long proving period, the means, methods and roles have come together to complete an effective adjunct to clinical activity, planning, research and the performance of the renal community.

  15. The Cuban Twin Registry: initial findings and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Marcheco-Teruel, Beatriz; Cobas-Ruiz, Marcia; Cabrera-Cruz, Niviola; Lantigua-Cruz, Araceli; García-Castillo, Elsa; Lardoeyt-Ferrer, Roberto; Robaina-Jiménez, Zoe; Fuentes-Smith, Evelyn; Morales-Calatayud, Francisco; Lemus-Valdés, María Teresa; Portuondo-Sao, Miriam; Comas-Pérez, Lenier; Pérez-Crispí, Juan M; Díaz-De Villal Villa, Thais; Icart-Perera, Emelia; Jordán-Hernández, Aida; Lage-Castellanos, Agustín; Rabell-Piera, Sergio; Llibre-Rodríguez, Juan de Jesús; Valdés-Sosa, Pedro; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell

    2013-02-01

    The Cuban Twin Registry is a nation-wide, prospective, population-based twin registry comprising all zygosity types and ages. It was initiated in 2004 to study genetic and environmental contributions to complex diseases with high morbidity and mortality in the Cuban population. The database contains extensive information from 55,400 twin pairs enrolled in the period 2004-2006. Additionally, 2,600 new multiple births have been included from 2007 to date. In the past 4 years, more than 130 studies have been carried out using the registry with a classical genetic epidemiological approach in which concordance rates for monozygotic and dizygotic twins and heritability of various disease traits were estimated. This article summarizes the history, registry's methodology, recent research findings, and future directions of work. PMID:23228217

  16. The Canadian Registry for Pulmonary Fibrosis: Design and Rationale of a National Pulmonary Fibrosis Registry

    PubMed Central

    Ryerson, Christopher J.; Tan, Benjamin; Fell, Charlene D.; Manganas, Hélène; Shapera, Shane; Mittoo, Shikha; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen; To, Teresa; Gershon, Andrea; Fisher, Jolene H.; Johannson, Kerri A.; Hambly, Nathan; Khalil, Nasreen; Marras, Theodore K.; Morisset, Julie; Wilcox, Pearce G.; Halayko, Andrew J.; Khan, Mohammad Adil; Kolb, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background. The relative rarity and diversity of fibrotic interstitial lung disease (ILD) have made it challenging to study these diseases in single-centre cohorts. Here we describe formation of a multicentre Canadian registry that is needed to describe the outcomes of fibrotic ILD and to enable detailed healthcare utilization analyses that will be the cornerstone for future healthcare planning. Methods. The Canadian Registry for Pulmonary Fibrosis (CARE-PF) is a prospective cohort anticipated to consist of at least 2,800 patients with fibrotic ILD. CARE-PF will be used to (1) describe the natural history of fibrotic ILD, specifically determining the incidence and outcomes of acute exacerbations of ILD subtypes and (2) determine the impact of ILD and acute exacerbations of ILD on health services use and healthcare costs in the Canadian population. Consecutive patients with fibrotic ILD will be recruited from five Canadian ILD centres over a period of five years. Patients will be followed up as clinically indicated and will complete standardized questionnaires at each clinic visit. Prespecified outcomes and health services use will be measured based on self-report and linkage to provincial health administrative databases. Conclusion. CARE-PF will be among the largest prospective multicentre ILD registries in the world, providing detailed data on the natural history of fibrotic ILD and the healthcare resources used by these patients. As the largest and most comprehensive cohort of Canadian ILD patients, CARE-PF establishes a network for future clinical research and early phase clinical trials and provides a platform for translational and basic science research. PMID:27445528

  17. The National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry.

    PubMed

    Liau, Adrian; Havidich, Jeana E; Onega, Tracy; Dutton, Richard P

    2015-12-01

    The Anesthesia Quality Institute (AQI) was chartered in 2008 by the American Society of Anesthesiologists to develop the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry (NACOR). In this Technical Communication, we will describe how data enter NACOR, how they are authenticated, and how they are analyzed and reported. NACOR accepts case-level administrative, clinical, and quality capture data from voluntarily participating anesthesia practices and health care facilities in the United States. All data are transmitted to the AQI in summary electronic files generated by billing, quality capture, and electronic health care record software, typically on a monthly basis. All data elements are mapped to fields in the NACOR schema in accordance with a publicly available data dictionary. Incoming data are loaded into NACOR by AQI technologists and are subject to both manual and automated review to identify systematically missing elements, miscoding, and inadvertent corruption. Data are deidentified in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations. The database server of AQI, which houses the NACOR database, is protected by 2 firewalls within the American Society of Anesthesiologists' network infrastructure; this system has not been breached. The NACOR Participant User File, a deidentified case-level dataset of information from NACOR, is available to researchers at participating institutions. NACOR architecture and the nature of the Participant User File include both strengths and weaknesses. PMID:26579661

  18. The National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry.

    PubMed

    Liau, Adrian; Havidich, Jeana E; Onega, Tracy; Dutton, Richard P

    2015-12-01

    The Anesthesia Quality Institute (AQI) was chartered in 2008 by the American Society of Anesthesiologists to develop the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry (NACOR). In this Technical Communication, we will describe how data enter NACOR, how they are authenticated, and how they are analyzed and reported. NACOR accepts case-level administrative, clinical, and quality capture data from voluntarily participating anesthesia practices and health care facilities in the United States. All data are transmitted to the AQI in summary electronic files generated by billing, quality capture, and electronic health care record software, typically on a monthly basis. All data elements are mapped to fields in the NACOR schema in accordance with a publicly available data dictionary. Incoming data are loaded into NACOR by AQI technologists and are subject to both manual and automated review to identify systematically missing elements, miscoding, and inadvertent corruption. Data are deidentified in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act regulations. The database server of AQI, which houses the NACOR database, is protected by 2 firewalls within the American Society of Anesthesiologists' network infrastructure; this system has not been breached. The NACOR Participant User File, a deidentified case-level dataset of information from NACOR, is available to researchers at participating institutions. NACOR architecture and the nature of the Participant User File include both strengths and weaknesses.

  19. The use of the PMI/mannose selection system to recover transgenic sweet orange plants (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck).

    PubMed

    Boscariol, R L; Almeida, W A B; Derbyshire, M T V C; Mourão Filho, F A A; Mendes, B M J

    2003-09-01

    A new method for obtaining transgenic sweet orange plants was developed in which positive selection (Positech) based on the Escherichia coli phosphomannose-isomerase (PMI) gene as the selectable marker gene and mannose as the selective agent was used. Epicotyl segments from in vitro-germinated plants of Valencia, Hamlin, Natal and Pera sweet oranges were inoculated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA101-pNOV2116 and subsequently selected on medium supplemented with different concentrations of mannose or with a combination of mannose and sucrose as a carbon source. Genetic transformation was confirmed by PCR and Southern blot. The transgene expression was evaluated using a chlorophenol red assay and isoenzymes. The transformation efficiency rate ranged from 3% to 23.8%, depending on cultivar. This system provides an efficient manner for selecting transgenic sweet orange plants without using antibiotics or herbicides.

  20. Cancer registries in four provinces in Turkey: a case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The burden of cancer affects all countries; while high-income countries have the capacity and resources to establish comprehensive cancer control programs, low and middle-income countries have limited resources to develop such programs. This paper examines factors associated with the development of cancer registries in four provinces in Turkey. It looks at the progress made by these registries, the challenges they faced, and the lessons learned. Other countries with similar resources can benefit from the lessons identified in this case study. Methods A mix of qualitative case study methods including key informant interviews, document review and questionnaires was used. Results This case study showed that surveillance systems that accurately report current cancer-related data are essential components of a country’s comprehensive cancer control program. At the initial stages, Turkey established one cancer registry with international support, which was used as a model for other registries. The Ministry of Health recognized the value of the registry data and its contribution to the country’s cancer control program and is supporting sustainability of these registries as a result. Conclusions This study demonstrates how Turkey was able to use resources from multiple sources to enhance its population based cancer registry system in four provinces. With renewed international interest in non-communicable diseases and cancer following the 2011 UN high-level meeting on NCDs, low- and middle- income countries can benefit from Turkey’s experience. Other countries can utilize lessons learned from Turkey as they address cancer burden and establish their own registries. PMID:23110989

  1. Portuguese National Registry on Cardiac Electrophysiology, 2013 and 2014.

    PubMed

    Cavaco, Diogo; Morgado, Francisco; Bonhorst, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The authors present the results of the national registry of electrophysiology of the Portuguese Association for Arrhythmology, Pacing and Electrophysiology (APAPE) for 2013 and 2014. The registry is annual and voluntary, and data are collected retrospectively. Data for electrophysiological studies, ablations and cardioverter-defibrillator implantations for 2013 and 2014 are presented. Developments over the years and their implications are analyzed and discussed. PMID:27396627

  2. The cancer registry: a clinical repository of oncology data.

    PubMed

    Hoyler, S S

    1997-02-01

    Health care institutions need complete and accurate data to plan, monitor, and evaluate their oncology programs. Although financial and discharge data are available, clinical repositories generally are not. For oncology, the cancer registry database serves as a clinical repository. The data in the registry are complete, accurate, and readily available. They can be used to plan new services, evaluate existing programs, and monitor patient care. PMID:10165382

  3. Orange pectin mediated growth and stability of aqueous gold and silver nanocolloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigoghossian, Karina; dos Santos, Molíria V.; Barud, Hernane S.; da Silva, Robson R.; Rocha, Lucas A.; Caiut, José M. A.; de Assunção, Rosana M. N.; Spanhel, Lubomir; Poulain, Marcel; Messaddeq, Younes; Ribeiro, Sidney J. L.

    2015-06-01

    The role of orange based pectin in the nucleation and growth of silver and gold nanoparticles is addressed. Pectin is a complex polysaccharide found in fruits such as oranges, lemons, passion fruits or apples. It displays smooth and hairy chain regions containing hydroxyl-, ester-, carboxylate- and eventually amine groups that can act as surface ligands interacting under various pH conditions more or less efficiently with growing nanometals. Here, a high methoxy pectin (>50% esterified) was used as a stabilizer/reducing agent in the preparation of gold, silver and silver-gold nanoparticles. Commercial pectin (CP) and pectin extracted from orange bagasse (OP) were used. Optionally, trisodium citrate or oxalic acid we used to reduce AgNO3 and HAuCl4 in aqueous environment. Characterization methods included UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that under different pH conditions, pectin and reducing agents allow producing various nanostructures shapes (triangles, spheres, rods, octahedrons and decahedrons) often with high polydispersity and sizes ranging between 5 nm and 30 nm. In addition, depending on Ag/Au-ratio and pH, the surface plasmon bands can be continuously shifted between 410 nm and 600 nm. Finally, pectin seems to be a highly efficient stabilizer of the colloidal systems that show a remarkable stability and unchanged optical spectral response even after five years.

  4. [Presentation of the new Spanish home artificial nutrition registry].

    PubMed

    Cuerda, C; Parón, L; Planas, M; Gómez Candela, C; Moreno, J M

    2007-01-01

    The registries are databases including information about a treatment or a disease in a definite population. Concerning home artificial nutrition there are registries of patients in different European countries, USA and Japan, collecting data such as the prevalence, indication, follow-up and complications of these treatments. The Spanish group of Home Artificial Nutrition (HAN), NADYA, was established in 1992 with professionals devoted to the practise of artificial nutrition. Since then, one of its wills was the development of the Spanish registry of HAN. This is a voluntary registry accessible through the web page www.nadya-senpe.com. In 2005, this group decided to update the registry according to the Data Protection Law and including other improvements. Thank to the work of all the members of this group we have many data on the practise of HAN in our country. Since 1994, except the years 97-98, the annual registries of patients on home parenteral nutrition and home enteral nutrition have been published periodically, observing an increase in both, the number of patients and collaborating centres, presenting to us the actual practise of HAN in our country.

  5. Big data in organ transplantation: registries and administrative claims.

    PubMed

    Massie, A B; Kucirka, L M; Kuricka, L M; Segev, D L

    2014-08-01

    The field of organ transplantation benefits from large, comprehensive, transplant-specific national data sets available to researchers. In addition to the widely used Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)-based registries (the United Network for Organ Sharing and Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients data sets) and United States Renal Data System (USRDS) data sets, there are other publicly available national data sets, not specific to transplantation, which have historically been underutilized in the field of transplantation. Of particular interest are the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and State Inpatient Databases, produced by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The USRDS database provides extensive data relevant to studies of kidney transplantation. Linkage of publicly available data sets to external data sources such as private claims or pharmacy data provides further resources for registry-based research. Although these resources can transcend some limitations of OPTN-based registry data, they come with their own limitations, which must be understood to avoid biased inference. This review discusses different registry-based data sources available in the United States, as well as the proper design and conduct of registry-based research.

  6. Lessons learned from the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry (PCMR) Study Group.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, James D; Westphal, Joslyn A; Bansal, Neha; Czachor, Jason D; Razoky, Hiedy; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2015-08-01

    Cardiomyopathy is a rare disorder of the heart muscle, affecting 1.13 cases per 100,000 children, from birth to 18 years of age. Cardiomyopathy is the leading cause of heart transplantation in children over the age of 1. The Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry funded in 1994 by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute was established to examine the epidemiology of the disease in children below 18 years of age. More than 3500 children across the United States and Canada have been enrolled in the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry, which has followed-up these patients until death, heart transplantation, or loss to follow-up. The Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry has provided the most in-depth illustration of this disease regarding its aetiology, clinical course, associated risk factors, and patient outcomes. Data from the registry have helped in guiding the clinical management of cardiomyopathy in children under 18 years of age; however, questions still remain regarding the most clinically effective diagnostic and treatment approaches for these patients. Future directions of the registry include the use of next-generation whole-exome sequencing and cardiac biomarkers to identify aetiology-specific treatments and improve diagnostic strategies. This article provides a brief synopsis of the work carried out by the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry since its inception, including the current knowledge on the aetiologies, outcomes, and treatments of cardiomyopathy in children.

  7. The State of the Art in Biosynthesis of Anthocyanins and Its Regulation in Pigmented Sweet Oranges [(Citrus sinensis) L. Osbeck].

    PubMed

    Lo Piero, Angela Roberta

    2015-04-29

    Anthocyanins are water-soluble pigments belonging to the flavonoid compound family involved in nature in several aspects of plant development and defense. By bestowing much of the color and flavor on fruits and vegetables, they are components of the human diet and, thanks to their radical-scavenging properties, are not considered exclusively as food products but also as therapeutic agents. Several cultivars of red (or blood) oranges [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck], such as Tarocco, Moro, and Sanguinello, are characterized by the presence of anthocyanins in both the rind and fruit juice vesicles. The amount and composition of anthocyanins in the pigmented orange cultivar vary greatly depending on variety, maturity, region of cultivation, and many other environmental conditions. Most of the blood orange varieties require a wide day-night thermal range to maximize color formation. Therefore, the production of red oranges characterized by high anthocyanin levels is limited to a few regions and in particular to the Sicilian area around Mount Etna in Italy, where the characteristic climate conditions yield fruits of unique color intensity and quality. In this review, both the basic information and the most recent advances in red orange anthocyanins are reported, with intense attention given to their biosynthesis and regulation.

  8. Effect of calcium oxalate on the photocatalytic degradation of Orange II on ZnO surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassaid, S.; Ziane, B.; Badaoui, M.; Chaib, M.; Robert, D.

    2013-06-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of aqueous solution of Orange II, has been investigated in the presence of ZnO catalyst with calcium oxalate as sacrificial agent. This study demonstrated that the performance of ZnO photocatalyst can be improved by addition of calcium oxalate. Results show that adsorption is an important parameter controlling the degradation phenomena. Indeed, the added oxalate causes a drop in the pH medium, what causes a better adsorption of Orange II on the ZnO surface. The effect of calcium oxalate is to increase the concentration of superoxides (O{2/·-}) and hydroperoxides (HO2·) radicals, which are key intermediaries in the mechanism of photodegradation because of their powerful force of oxidation.

  9. Data available from birth and death registries and cancer registries in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, B.L. |; Houser, A.R.; Merrill, D.W.; Selvin, S. |

    1994-01-01

    In the United States, cancer registries have been compiling data for decades, and state vital statistics offices have been compiling birth and death data for nearly a century. Although this information has been well used for disease surveillance and various studies, it could be better exploited by making it more readily available, reducing the duplication of effort that occurs when researchers at the private, city, county, state, and federal levels work separately on their data collection and disease investigations. This report summarizes the nationwide availability of birth and death records and cancer registry data, with particular emphasis on subcounty geographic detail, such as zip code and census tract. Birth and death data are available at the county level for the entire United States from the National Center for Health Statistics. However, county level data are inadequate for small area studies of potential environmental hazards. Hazards of current interest to the Department of Energy (DOE) include DOE facilities, nuclear power plants, and sources of electromagnetic radiation such as broadcasting towers and power lines.

  10. Flora of the Orange Cliffs of Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, L.M.; Neely, E.E.; Tuhy, J.S.

    1987-04-30

    The Orange Cliffs area, an area rich in oil sands deposits and defined here as part of the Colorado Plateau floristic province, harbors approximately 209 species in 123 genera and 49 families. Because of the potential of exploitation of the oil sands deposits in the area, a species checklist was made and a discussion of physical and floristic aspects of the region is given here. The flora is compared statistically to the San Rafael Swell flora, which is also a subset of the Colorado Plateau. They define six vegetation types and three edaphic communities; these are described and mapped. Of eleven endemic plant species in the Orange Cliffs, three are local and rare. Sites for Astragalus nidularius, A. moencoppensis, and Xylorhiza glabriuscula var. linearifolia are discussed and mapped. 24 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  11. The global registry: hope for the future.

    PubMed

    Broumand, Behrooz

    2015-04-01

    In 2014, there is unanimous agreement that kidney transplant is the optimal treatment for most patients who have end-stage renal failure. Increasing organ shortage is the main obstacle that delays transplant and might even cause death while the patient is on the waiting list for kidney transplant. Many innovations have been proposed to increase the number of organs for transplant in different countries such as increasing awareness about organ donation, based on different cultures and religions. Support of religious and faith leaders exists for procurement of organs for transplant from patients with brain death or circulatory death. In the past decade, use of marginal and expandedcriteria deceased-donor transplant has been very helpful to expand the kidney donor pool. Dual kidney transplant is another procedure that may minimize the waiting list. The 1977 transport of kidneys from Minneapolis to Tehran helped change the life of a 15-year-old girl. At that time, we had the potential to change a life across 2 continents, even though our techniques were new. This should have provided the impetus to develop such a program. Presently, with progress in science, techniques, and organ shipment, it is our responsibility to reach across the globe to change the lives of many more young and adult patients waiting for kidney transplant. There are many countries in which kidneys from patients with brain or cardiac death are being discarded because of the unavailability of a transplant program in these countries, or because these countries have young transplant programs and very limited resources. If a global registry could be organized under the observation of the International Society of Nephrology and The Transplantation Society Sister Transplant Center Program, transplant teams would be able to use kidneys from patients with brain or cardiac death, with strict regulation of organ donation in accordance with World Health Organization guidelines. PMID:25894119

  12. The global registry: hope for the future.

    PubMed

    Broumand, Behrooz

    2015-04-01

    In 2014, there is unanimous agreement that kidney transplant is the optimal treatment for most patients who have end-stage renal failure. Increasing organ shortage is the main obstacle that delays transplant and might even cause death while the patient is on the waiting list for kidney transplant. Many innovations have been proposed to increase the number of organs for transplant in different countries such as increasing awareness about organ donation, based on different cultures and religions. Support of religious and faith leaders exists for procurement of organs for transplant from patients with brain death or circulatory death. In the past decade, use of marginal and expandedcriteria deceased-donor transplant has been very helpful to expand the kidney donor pool. Dual kidney transplant is another procedure that may minimize the waiting list. The 1977 transport of kidneys from Minneapolis to Tehran helped change the life of a 15-year-old girl. At that time, we had the potential to change a life across 2 continents, even though our techniques were new. This should have provided the impetus to develop such a program. Presently, with progress in science, techniques, and organ shipment, it is our responsibility to reach across the globe to change the lives of many more young and adult patients waiting for kidney transplant. There are many countries in which kidneys from patients with brain or cardiac death are being discarded because of the unavailability of a transplant program in these countries, or because these countries have young transplant programs and very limited resources. If a global registry could be organized under the observation of the International Society of Nephrology and The Transplantation Society Sister Transplant Center Program, transplant teams would be able to use kidneys from patients with brain or cardiac death, with strict regulation of organ donation in accordance with World Health Organization guidelines.

  13. Call Cultures in Orang-Utans?

    PubMed Central

    Wich, Serge A.; Nater, Alexander; Arora, Natasha; Bastian, Meredith L.; Meulman, Ellen; Morrogh-Bernard, Helen C.; Atmoko, S. Suci Utami; Pamungkas, Joko; Perwitasari-Farajallah, Dyah; Hardus, Madeleine E.; van Noordwijk, Maria; van Schaik, Carel P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies suggested great ape cultures, arguing that human cumulative culture presumably evolved from such a foundation. These focused on conspicuous behaviours, and showed rich geographic variation, which could not be attributed to known ecological or genetic differences. Although geographic variation within call types (accents) has previously been reported for orang-utans and other primate species, we examine geographic variation in the presence/absence of discrete call types (dialects). Because orang-utans have been shown to have geographic variation that is not completely explicable by genetic or ecological factors we hypothesized that this will be similar in the call domain and predict that discrete call type variation between populations will be found. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined long-term behavioural data from five orang-utan populations and collected fecal samples for genetic analyses. We show that there is geographic variation in the presence of discrete types of calls. In exactly the same behavioural context (nest building and infant retrieval), individuals in different wild populations customarily emit either qualitatively different calls or calls in some but not in others. By comparing patterns in call-type and genetic similarity, we suggest that the observed variation is not likely to be explained by genetic or ecological differences. Conclusion/Significance These results are consistent with the potential presence of ‘call cultures’ and suggest that wild orang-utans possess the ability to invent arbitrary calls, which spread through social learning. These findings differ substantially from those that have been reported for primates before. First, the results reported here are on dialect and not on accent. Second, this study presents cases of production learning whereas most primate studies on vocal learning were cases of contextual learning. We conclude with speculating on how these findings might assist in bridging

  14. Klebsiella pneumoniae in orange juice concentrate.

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, F A; Hazen, T C; López-Torres, A J; Rechani, P

    1985-01-01

    Fecal coliform-positive, capsule-forming Klebsiella pneumoniae cells were observed in high densities (10(4) to 10(8) CFU/100 ml) in two commercial batches of frozen orange juice concentrate at a cannery in Puerto Rico. Contamination of both lots was gross and included off colors and odors. Isolates of K. pneumoniae from these concentrates revealed growth at 4, 25, and 34 degrees C with generation times from 0.39 to 1.84 h. PMID:3893321

  15. Establishment of an Australian National Genetic Heart Disease Registry.

    PubMed

    Ingles, Jodie; McGaughran, Julie; Vohra, Jitendra; Weintraub, Robert G; Davis, Andrew; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2008-12-01

    A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry has recently been established, with the aim to enroll every family in Australia with a genetically determined cardiomyopathy or primary arrhythmic disorder. The Registry seeks to further our understanding of the impact and burden of disease in this population; increase awareness and provide education to health professionals and families; and establish a large cardiac genetic cohort as a resource for approved research studies. The Registry is currently recruiting families with inherited cardiomyopathies (e.g. hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) and primary arrhythmogenic disorders (e.g. long QT syndrome), with scope to expand this in the future. Affected individuals, as well as their first-degree (at-risk) family members are eligible to enroll. Participants are currently being recruited from cardiac genetics clinics in approved recruitment sites and hope to expand to other Australian centres including general cardiology practice in the future. A significant focus of the Registry is to improve understanding and create awareness of inherited heart diseases, which includes ensuring families are aware of genetic testing options and current clinical screening recommendations for at-risk family members. A Registry Advisory Committee has been established under the NHMRC Guidelines, and includes a representative from each major recruitment centre. This committee approves all decisions relating to the Registry including approval of research studies. A National Genetic Heart Disease Registry will provide a valuable resource to further our knowledge of the clinical and genetic aspects of these diseases. Since most of the current data about the prevalence, natural history and outcomes of genetic heart diseases has emanated from the United States and Europe, characterising these Australian populations will be of significant benefit, allowing for more informed and specific health care planning and resource provision.

  16. The European Cystic Fibrosis Society Patient Registry: valuable lessons learned on how to sustain a disease registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Disease registries have the invaluable potential to provide an insight into the natural history of the disease under investigation, to provide useful information (e.g. through health indicators) for planning health care services and to identify suitable groups of patients for clinical trials enrolment. However, the establishment and maintenance of disease registries is a burdensome initiative from economical and organisational points of view and experience sharing on registries management is important to avoid waste of resources. The aim of this paper is to discuss the problems embedded in the institution and management of an international disease registry to warn against common mistakes that can derail the best of intentions: we share the experience of the European Cystic Fibrosis Society Patient Registry, which collects data on almost 30,000 patients from 23 countries. Methods We discuss the major problems that researchers often encounter in the creation and management of disease registries: definition of the aims the registry has to reach, definition of the criteria for patients referral to the registry, definition of the information to record, set up of a data quality process, handling of missing data, maintenance of data confidentiality, regulation of data use and dissemination of research results. Results We give examples on how many crucial aspects were solved by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society Patient Registry regarding objectives, inclusion criteria and variables definition, data management, data quality controls, missing data handling, confidentiality maintenance, data use and results dissemination. Conclusions We suggest an extensive literature research and discussions in working groups with different stake holders, including patient representatives, on the objectives, inclusion criteria and the information to record. We propose to pilot the recording of few variables and test the applicability of their definition first. The use of a

  17. Evaluation of gemtuzumab ozogamycin associated sinusoidal obstructive syndrome: Findings from an academic pharmacovigilance program review and a pharmaceutical sponsored registry

    PubMed Central

    Magwood-Golston, Jametta S.; Kessler, Samuel; Bennett, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2000, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved gemtuzumab ozogamycin for monotherapy for older patients with relapsed AML. A 0.9% rate of hepatic sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) was noted in licensing trials. In 2001, FDA received reports of 14 GO-associated SOS cases from MD Anderson Cancer Center. A State of South Carolina/National Cancer Institute funded pharmacovigilance program and a manufacturer sponsored registry independently evaluated this concern. Methods The manufacturer’s registry and the academic program focused on risk factors and incidence of GO-associated SOS in routine clinical practice and clinical trial settings, respectively. Comparisons were made of findings and dissemination efforts from the two studies. Results Retrospective analysis of clinical trials by the academic initiative identified 99 cases of SOS among 221 GO-treated stem cell patients and 649 patients who did not undergo HSCTs. SOS rates were 3% when GO was administered at doses ≤6 mg/m2 as monotherapy or with non-hepatotoxic agents; 28% when administered with 6-thioguanine, a hepatotoxic agent; 15% when administered as monotherapy at doses at a dose of 9 mg/m2, and between 15% and 40% if a stem cell transplant (SCT) was performed within 3 months of GO administration. Death from SOS occurred in 33% of the cases. The manufacturer’s registry prospectively evaluated 482 GO-treated patients who received a mean dose of 7.8 mg/m2. Overall, 41% received concomitant chemotherapy, 18% had undergone prior SCT, 9.1% developed SOS, and death from SOS occurred in 60% of the SOS cases. Findings from each initiative were disseminated at national conferences and in peer-reviewed manuscripts beginning in 2003. Conclusion Retrospective review of clinical trials, case series, and FDA reports and prospective registries can provide important information on safety signals initially identified in licensing trials. PMID:27030962

  18. Japan Renal Biopsy Registry and Japan Kidney Disease Registry: Committee Report for 2009 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Saito, Takao; Kohda, Yukimasa; Nishi, Shinichi; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Iida, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Tamaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Hattori, Motoshi; Oka, Kazumasa; Kagami, Shoji; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Tetsuro; Hataya, Hiroshi; Fukasawa, Yuichiro; Fukatsu, Atsushi; Morozumi, Kunio; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Shimizu, Akira; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yuzawa, Yukio; Matsuo, Seiichi; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Joh, Kensuke; Nagata, Michio; Taguchi, Takashi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2013-04-01

    The Japan Renal Biopsy Registry (J-RBR) was started in 2007 and the Japan Kidney Disease Registry (J-KDR) was then started in 2009 by the Committee for Standardization of Renal Pathological Diagnosis and the Committee for the Kidney Disease Registry of the Japanese Society of Nephrology. The purpose of this report is to describe and summarize the registered data from 2009 and 2010. For the J-KDR, data were collected from 4,016 cases, including 3,336 (83.1 %) by the J-RBR and 680 (16.9 %) other cases from 59 centers in 2009, and from 4,681 cases including 4,106 J-RBR cases (87.7 %) and 575 other cases (12.3 %) from 94 centers in 2010, including the affiliate hospitals. In the J-RBR, 3,165 native kidneys (94.9 %) and 171 renal grafts (5.1 %) and 3,869 native kidneys (94.2 %) and 237 renal grafts (5.8 %) were registered in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Patients younger than 20 years of age comprised 12.1 % of the registered cases, and those 65 years and over comprised 24.5 % of the cases with native kidneys in 2009 and 2010. The most common clinical diagnosis was chronic nephritic syndrome (55.4 % and 50.0 % in 2009 and 2010, respectively), followed by nephrotic syndrome (22.4 % and 27.0 %); the most frequent pathological diagnosis as classified by the pathogenesis was IgA nephropathy (31.6 % and 30.4 %), followed by primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) (27.2 % and 28.1 %). Among the primary glomerular diseases (except IgA nephropathy) in the patients with nephrotic syndrome, membranous nephropathy was the most common histopathology in 2009 (40.3 %) and minor glomerular abnormalities (50.0 %) were the most common in 2010 in native kidneys in the J-RBR. Five new secondary and longitudinal research studies by the J-KDR were started in 2009 and one was started in 2010.

  19. Childhood Vesicoureteral Reflux Studies: Registries and Repositories Sources and Nosology

    PubMed Central

    Chesney, Russell W.; Patters, Andrea B.

    2012-01-01

    Despite several recent studies, the advisability of antimicrobial prophylaxis and certain imaging studies for urinary tract infections (UTIs) remains controversial. The role of vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) on the severity and re-infection rates for UTIs is also difficult to assess. Registries and repositories of data and biomaterials from clinical studies in children with VUR are valuable. Disease registries are collections of secondary data related to patients with a specific diagnosis, condition or procedure. Registries differ from indices in that they contain more extensive data. A research repository is an entity that receives, stores, processes and/or disseminates specimens (or other materials) as needed. It encompasses the physical location as well as the full range of activities associated with its operation. It may also be referred to as a biorepository. This report provides information about some current registries and repositories that include data and samples from children with VUR. It also describes the heterogeneous nature of the subjects, as some registries and repositories include only data or samples from patients with primary reflux while others also include those from patients with syndromic or secondary reflux. PMID:23044377

  20. The development of a nationwide registry of wheelchair users.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Shirley G; Kelleher, Annmarie; Teodorski, Emily; Collins, Diane M; Boninger, Michael; Cooper, Rory A

    2007-11-01

    This paper provides an overview of the development of a wheelchair users registry and subsequently describes a population of individuals who use wheelchairs. The characteristics of Americans who permanently use wheelchairs and scooters are currently unknown. As the result of developing a Registry of individuals who use wheeled mobility devices for systematic recruitment for research studies, this study provides a description of a nationwide sample of over 1000 individuals who used wheelchairs or scooters for their daily mobility. The Registry is predominantly Caucasian (83%), 63% male, with a mean age of 50 years. Some 54% used manual wheelchairs for an average of 16 years. When quality of wheelchairs was compared, results indicated those in more customizable manual wheelchairs were significantly more likely to be younger. Males were significantly more likely to receive more customizable, heavy duty power wheelchairs than females. The Wheelchair Users Registry provides an organized and systematic way to maintain contact with previous research participants. Expected to grow in size, the Registry may enable an even more diverse pool of subjects interested in participating in research studies.

  1. Nephrology registry gives specialty control of quality data.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Adam; Beckrich, Amy; Singer, Dale

    2015-11-01

    It is important for providers and practices to begin working with registry level data. Submitting data to a qualified clinical data registry currently satisfies Meaningful Use Stage II menu set items. In the future, with the rollout of MIPS and the increasing focus on sharing risk, registry data will be used as a benchmark for both publicly-reported performance (the physician compare program will be linked to provider-level QCDR data) and modifications to reimbursement. It is important to remember that PQRS data is the basis for the value based modifier now and MIPS- related quality data after 2018. The RPA has launched and is evolving a unique and versatile nephrology-specific data collection and analytics tool. In collaboration with the American Society of Diagnostic and Interventional Nephrology, vascular access measures will be added to the registry for 2016. The registry and the analytics platform is a tier of software operating above your practice management system and EHR and, if data can be obtained, it can span all the locations in which nephrologists provide care.

  2. Big Data in Organ Transplantation: Registries and Administrative Claims

    PubMed Central

    Massie, Allan B.; Kucirka, Lauren; Segev, Dorry L.

    2015-01-01

    The field of organ transplantation benefits from large, comprehensive, transplant-specific national datasets available to researchers. In addition to the widely-used OPTN-based registries (the UNOS and SRTR datasets) and USRDS datasets, there are other publicly available national datasets, not specific to transplantation, which have historically been underutilized in the field of transplantation. Of particular interest are the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) and State Inpatient Databases (SID), produced by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The United States Renal Data System (USRDS) database provides extensive data relevant to studies of kidney transplantation. Linkage of publicly available datasets to external data sources such as private claims or pharmacy data provides further resources for registry-based research. Although these resources can transcend some limitations of OPTN-based registry data, they come with their own limitations, which must be understood to avoid biased inference. This review discusses different registry-based data sources available in the United States, as well as the proper design and conduct of registry-based research. PMID:25040084

  3. Thiazole orange as fluorescent universal base in peptide nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Olaf; Seitz, Oliver

    2003-12-01

    Thiazole orange is shown to possess characteristics of a universal base while maintaining duplex stability. Its fluorescence properties allowed distinction between matched and single mismatched hybridisation.

  4. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  5. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry.

    PubMed

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Lévesque, Hervé; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The EACH2 registry, a multicenter, pan-European, Web-based database, reports current patient management. The aim was to assess the control of first bleeding episodes treated with a bypassing agent (rFVIIa or aPCC), FVIII, or DDAVP among 501 registered patients. Of 482 patients with one or more bleeding episodes, 144 (30%) received no treatment for bleeding; 31 were treated with symptomatic therapy only. Among 307 patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent, 174 (56.7%) received rFVIIa, 63 (20.5%) aPCC, 56 (18.2%) FVIII, and 14 (4.6%) DDAVP. Bleeding was controlled in 269 of 338 (79.6%) patients treated with a first-line hemostatic agent or ancillary therapy alone. Propensity score matching was applied to allow unbiased comparison between treatment groups. Bleeding control was significantly higher in patients treated with bypassing agents versus FVIII/DDAVP (93.3% vs 68.3%; P = .003). Bleeding control was similar between rFVIIa and aPCC (93.0%; P = 1). Thrombotic events were reported in 3.6% of treated patients with a similar incidence between rFVIIa (2.9%) and aPCC (4.8%).

  6. The NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research Patient Registry Standard: A Report from the University of New Mexico’s Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy Patient Registry

    PubMed Central

    Daneshvari, Shamsi; Youssof, Sarah; Kroth, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Patient registries remove barriers to performing research by assembling patient cohorts and data in a systematic, efficient, and proactive manner. Consequently, registries are a valuable strategy for facilitating research and scientific discovery. Registries for rare diseases are arguably even more valuable since there is difficulty in assembling cohorts of adequate size for study. Recently, the NIH Office of Rare Diseases Research created a rare disease registry Standard to facilitate research across multiple registries. We implemented the Standard for the Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy patient registry created at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center. We performed a data element analysis for each Common Data Element defined in the Standard. Problems included the use of previous HL7 versions, non-structured data types, and a recent update to the Standard. Overall, the Standard is an excellent first step toward standardizing patient registries to facilitate work on broader questions and promote novel interdisciplinary collaborations. PMID:24551336

  7. REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registry: An Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Doran M. Christensen, DO, REAC /TS Associate Director and Staff Physician Becky Murdock, REAC/TS Registry and Health Physics Technician

    2012-12-12

    Over the past four years, REAC/TS has presented a number of case reports from its Radiation Accident Registry. Victims of radiological or nuclear incidents must meet certain dose criteria for an incident to be categorized as an “accident” and be included in the registry. Although the greatest numbers of “accidents” in the United States that have been entered into the registry involve radiation devices, the greater percentage of serious accidents have involved sealed sources of one kind or another. But if one looks at the kinds of accident scenarios that have resulted in extreme consequence, i.e., death, the greater share of deaths has occurred in medical settings.

  8. Data management of an inflammatory bowel disease registry.

    PubMed

    Reed, J F; Moser, K A; Faust, L A; Mills, S

    1992-06-01

    The history and etiology of inflammatory bowel disease which is characterized by two major disease processes: ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, remain unknown. Research is focussing on seven major areas of genetic, environmental and physiologic factors that apparently relate to this disease. Based on this background, a population based Inflammatory Bowel Disease Registry was established in 1987 in the Lehigh Valley area of southeastern Pennsylvania. Consent forms, patient data forms and protocols for operation and implementation were developed, and databases were designed to accommodate demographic, basic history, follow-up and relative history data. The databases were correlated with an IBD registry ID number which both enabled relational analyses and ensured confidentiality of data information. The registry continues to grow, providing feedback for both continued medical research and supportive information for IBD patients and their physicians. PMID:1402437

  9. Data management of an inflammatory bowel disease registry.

    PubMed

    Reed, J F; Moser, K A; Faust, L A; Mills, S

    1992-06-01

    The history and etiology of inflammatory bowel disease which is characterized by two major disease processes: ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, remain unknown. Research is focussing on seven major areas of genetic, environmental and physiologic factors that apparently relate to this disease. Based on this background, a population based Inflammatory Bowel Disease Registry was established in 1987 in the Lehigh Valley area of southeastern Pennsylvania. Consent forms, patient data forms and protocols for operation and implementation were developed, and databases were designed to accommodate demographic, basic history, follow-up and relative history data. The databases were correlated with an IBD registry ID number which both enabled relational analyses and ensured confidentiality of data information. The registry continues to grow, providing feedback for both continued medical research and supportive information for IBD patients and their physicians.

  10. Exploring the Usefulness of Occupational Exposure Registries for Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Genesove, Leon; Moore, Kris; Del Bianco, Ann; Kramer, Desre

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The ongoing presence of asbestos in products used across workplaces in Canada reinforces the importance of occupational exposure surveillance. This study evaluates the usefulness of the Ontario Asbestos Workers Registry. Methods: The study includes 30,829 workers aged 15 to 80 years. Researchers reported on the data quality and analyzed the proportions of workers exposed by industry, and standardized rates by geographic areas and over time. Results: The incidence of exposure started to decrease around 1990; but about 2000 workers were still exposed annually until 2006. Results showed large geographical disparities. Unexpectedly, workers from industries other than construction reported exposure. Conclusions: The Ontario Asbestos Workers Registry is a useful but challenging source of information for the surveillance of asbestos exposure in Ontario. The registry could benefit from well-defined surveillance objectives, a clear exposure definition, systematic enforcement, regular data analyses, and results dissemination. PMID:25162835

  11. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Eresian Chenok, Kate; Bohm, Eric; Lübbeke, Anne; Denissen, Geke; Dunn, Jennifer; Lyman, Stephen; Franklin, Patricia; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Dawson, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Steering Committee established the Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group to convene, evaluate, and advise on best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs and to support the adoption and use of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty in registries worldwide. The 2 main types of PROMs include generic (general health) PROMs, which provide a measure of general health for any health state, and specific PROMs, which focus on specific symptoms, diseases, organs, body regions, or body functions. The establishment of a PROM instrument requires the fulfillment of methodological standards and rigorous testing to ensure that it is valid, reliable, responsive, and acceptable to the intended population. A survey of the 41 ISAR member registries showed that 8 registries administered a PROMs program that covered all elective hip or knee arthroplasty patients and 6 registries collected PROMs for sample populations; 1 other registry had planned but had not started collection of PROMs. The most common generic instruments used were the EuroQol 5 dimension health outcome survey (EQ-5D) and the Short Form 12 health survey (SF-12) or the similar Veterans RAND 12-item health survey (VR-12). The most common specific PROMs were the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Oxford Hip Score (OHS), the Oxford Knee Score (OKS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), and the University of California at Los Angeles Activity Score (UCLA). PMID:27168175

  12. Global comparisons for developing a national dementia registry in Cuba.

    PubMed

    González, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A review/analysis of current literature on exemplary multicenter registries of clinical dementias was conducted as a comparative basis for a proposed Cuban registry on cognitive impairment and dementia. The study of mental health disorders has been predominantly based on clinical concepts and criteria, and only in recent years a public health approach has been applied. Traditional epidemiological studies do not reveal patterns of cognitive impairment and behavioral disorders (particularly dementias) in routine clinical practice in a defined geographic area, which would provide essential information for long-term planning and allocation of health and social resources. Thus, multicenter clinical registries have become an important source of clinical and epidemiological data on dementias in recent decades. This article addresses the Cuban proposal for an automated national dementia registry, comparing it to others internationally. The registry would be housed in the Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute, and would include a duly protected surveillance network hosted on the Institute's website. Such a multicenter dementia registry based on epidemiological surveillance methods and limited to a defined area would provide new, valid, representative and current data on dementia occurrence patterns by subtype, flow of case identification and referral from primary care, as well as the main clinical features of patients at the time of their first contact with health services. This information would support development of health planning policies for implementation of programs aimed at improved distribution of social and health resources in the affected population, monitoring of the disorder's natural evolution and identification of preventive measures. The scientific benefits would be equally important: production of new knowledge, generation of hypotheses for clinical research projects, standardization of diagnostic criteria, and promotion of multicenter research in both

  13. Phenology of Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae) and associated parasitoids on two species of Citrus, kinnow mandarin and sweet orange, in Punjab Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shouket Zaman; Arif, Muhammad Jalal; Hoddle, Christina D; Hoddle, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    The population phenology of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, was monitored weekly for 110 wk on two species of Citrus, kinnow mandarin and sweet orange, at two different research sites in Faisalabad, Punjab Pakistan. Citrus flush growth patterns were monitored and natural enemy surveys were conducted weekly. Flush patterns were similar for kinnow and sweet orange. However, flush on sweet orange was consistently more heavily infested with Asian citrus psyllid than kinnow flush; densities of Asian citrus psyllid eggs, nymphs, and adults were higher on sweet orange when compared with kinnow. When measured in terms of mean cumulative insect or Asian citrus psyllid days, eggs, nymphs, and adults were significantly higher on sweet orange than kinnow. Two parasitoids were recorded attacking Asian citrus psyllid nymphs, Tamarixia radiata (Waterston) and Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Shafee, Alam and Agarwal). The dominant parasitoid species attacking Asian citrus psyllid nymphs on kinnow and sweet orange was T. radiata, with parasitism averaging 26%. D. aligarhensis parasitism averaged 17%. Generalist predators such as coccinellids and chrysopids were collected infrequently and were likely not important natural enemies at these study sites. Immature spiders, in particular, salticids and yellow sac spiders, were common and may be important predators of all Asian citrus psyllid life stages. Low year round Asian citrus psyllid densities on kinnow and possibly high summer temperatures, may, in part, contribute to the success of this cultivar in Punjab where Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the putative causative agent of huanglongbing, a debilitating citrus disease, is widespread and vectored by Asian citrus psyllid. PMID:25198345

  14. Phenology of Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae) and associated parasitoids on two species of Citrus, kinnow mandarin and sweet orange, in Punjab Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shouket Zaman; Arif, Muhammad Jalal; Hoddle, Christina D; Hoddle, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    The population phenology of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, was monitored weekly for 110 wk on two species of Citrus, kinnow mandarin and sweet orange, at two different research sites in Faisalabad, Punjab Pakistan. Citrus flush growth patterns were monitored and natural enemy surveys were conducted weekly. Flush patterns were similar for kinnow and sweet orange. However, flush on sweet orange was consistently more heavily infested with Asian citrus psyllid than kinnow flush; densities of Asian citrus psyllid eggs, nymphs, and adults were higher on sweet orange when compared with kinnow. When measured in terms of mean cumulative insect or Asian citrus psyllid days, eggs, nymphs, and adults were significantly higher on sweet orange than kinnow. Two parasitoids were recorded attacking Asian citrus psyllid nymphs, Tamarixia radiata (Waterston) and Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis (Shafee, Alam and Agarwal). The dominant parasitoid species attacking Asian citrus psyllid nymphs on kinnow and sweet orange was T. radiata, with parasitism averaging 26%. D. aligarhensis parasitism averaged 17%. Generalist predators such as coccinellids and chrysopids were collected infrequently and were likely not important natural enemies at these study sites. Immature spiders, in particular, salticids and yellow sac spiders, were common and may be important predators of all Asian citrus psyllid life stages. Low year round Asian citrus psyllid densities on kinnow and possibly high summer temperatures, may, in part, contribute to the success of this cultivar in Punjab where Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the putative causative agent of huanglongbing, a debilitating citrus disease, is widespread and vectored by Asian citrus psyllid.

  15. Asthma induced by sulphur dioxide, benzoate and tartrazine contained in orange drinks.

    PubMed

    Freedman, B J

    1977-09-01

    Of 272 patients with asthma, thirty (11%) gave a history of exacerbations occurring after ingestion, solutions of orange orange drinks. Fourteen of these were given provocation tests by drinking, on separate occasions of sulphur dioxide, sodium benzoate and tartrazine, which are present in all orange drinks. Eight reacted to sulphur dioxide with a fall in FEV1, four to sodium benzoate and one to tartrazine, and four did not react to any of these agents. Three of the benzoate patients were also sensitive to sulphur dioxide. The sulphur dioxide sensitive patients were predominantly young, with extrinsic asthma. The benzoate sensitive patients were predominantly middle-aged and the proportion with intrinsic asthma was higher. Prior inhalation of sodium cromoglycate by four patients inhibited the reaction to these substances. Sulphur dioxide has not previously been reported to cause exacerbations of asthma when ingested as a food preservative. It is used as a preservative in a wide range of acidic beverages and foods, and should be considered as possibly causal in patients suffering from apparently cryptogenic asthma, and asthma seemingly due to food allergy. PMID:412611

  16. Regulatory insight into the European human pluripotent stem cell registry.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Andreas; Stacey, Glyn; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Stachelscheid, Harald; Veiga, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The European pluripotent stem cell registry aims at listing qualified pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines that are available globally together with relevant information for each cell line. Specific emphasis is being put on documenting ethical procurement of the cells and providing evidence of pluripotency. The report discusses the tasks and challenges for a global PSC registry as an instrument to develop collaboration, to access cells from diverse resources and banks, and to implement standards, and as a means to follow up usage of cells and support adherence to regulatory and scientific standards and transparency for stakeholders. PMID:25457963

  17. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Oct. 1992 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS's reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry Data Base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  18. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Jan. 1993 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS's reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry Data Base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  19. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Jul. 1992 Revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) is presented. The listed MSDS's reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry Data Base maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  20. Regulatory insight into the European human pluripotent stem cell registry.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Andreas; Stacey, Glyn; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Stachelscheid, Harald; Veiga, Anna

    2014-12-01

    The European pluripotent stem cell registry aims at listing qualified pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines that are available globally together with relevant information for each cell line. Specific emphasis is being put on documenting ethical procurement of the cells and providing evidence of pluripotency. The report discusses the tasks and challenges for a global PSC registry as an instrument to develop collaboration, to access cells from diverse resources and banks, and to implement standards, and as a means to follow up usage of cells and support adherence to regulatory and scientific standards and transparency for stakeholders.

  1. DANBIO: a nationwide registry of biological therapies in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Hetland, M L

    2005-01-01

    Since the year 2000, Danish rheumatologists have been collecting data on a routine basis in the nationwide DANBIO registry, which includes all rheumatologic patients receiving biological drugs. Demographic data, markers of disease activity, current treatment, serious and non-serious adverse events and reasons for discontinuation are registered at each visit either on paper forms or on-line. By June 2005, approximately 3000 treatment courses (18,000 visits) were in the registry, corresponding to close to 90% of eligible patients. Rheumatoid arthritis was the most prevalent diagnosis (75%) followed by ankylosing spondylitis (11%) and psoriatic arthritis (7%). Infections occurred in 43% of the treatment series. PMID:16273809

  2. Blue, green, orange, and red upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Xie, Ping; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1998-01-01

    A laser for outputting visible light at the wavelengths of blue, green, orange and red light. This is accomplished through the doping of a substrate, such as an optical fiber or waveguide, with Pr.sup.3+ ions and Yb.sup.3+ ions. A light pump such as a diode laser is used to excite these ions into energy states which will produce lasing at the desired wavelengths. Tuning elements such as prisms and gratings can be employed to select desired wavelengths for output.

  3. Blue, green, orange, and red upconversion laser

    DOEpatents

    Xie, P.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1998-09-08

    A laser is disclosed for outputting visible light at the wavelengths of blue, green, orange and red light. This is accomplished through the doping of a substrate, such as an optical fiber or waveguide, with Pr{sup 3+} ions and Yb{sup 3+} ions. A light pump such as a diode laser is used to excite these ions into energy states which will produce lasing at the desired wavelengths. Tuning elements such as prisms and gratings can be employed to select desired wavelengths for output. 11 figs.

  4. Orange/Red Fluorescence of Active Caries by Retrospective Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Felix Gomez, Grace; Eckert, George J; Ferreira Zandona, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective clinical study determined the association of caries activity and orange/red fluorescence on quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) images of surfaces that progressed to cavitation, as determined by clinical visual examination. A random sample of QLF images from 565 children (5-13 years) previously enrolled in a longitudinal study was selected. Buccal, lingual and occlusal surface images obtained after professional brushing at baseline and every 4 months over a 4-year period were analyzed for red fluorescence. Surfaces that progressed (n = 224) to cavitation according to the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS 0/1/2/3/4 to 5/6 or filling), and surfaces that did not progress (n = 486) were included. QA2 image analysis software outputs the percentage increase of the red/green components as x0394;R and area of x0394;R (areax0394;R) at different thresholds. Mixed-model ANOVA was used to compare progressive and nonprogressive surfaces to account for correlations of red fluorescence (x0394;R and areax0394;R) between surfaces within a subject. The first analysis used the first observation for each surface or the first available visit if the surface was unerupted (baseline), while the second analysis used the last observation prior to cavitation for surfaces that progressed and the last observation for surfaces that did not progress (final). There was a significant (p < 0.05) association between red fluorescence and progression to cavitation at thresholds x0394;R0, x0394;R10, x0394;R20, x0394;R60, x0394;R70, x0394;R80, x0394;R90 and x0394;Rmax at baseline and for x0394;R0 and x0394;R10 at the final observation. Quantification of orange/red fluorescence may help to identify lesions that progress to cavitation. Future studies identifying microbiological factors causing orange/ red fluorescence and its caries activity are indicated. PMID:27160323

  5. A modular approach to disease registry design: successful adoption of an internet-based rare disease registry.

    PubMed

    Bellgard, Matthew I; Macgregor, Andrew; Janon, Fred; Harvey, Adam; O'Leary, Peter; Hunter, Adam; Dawkins, Hugh

    2012-10-01

    There is a need to develop Internet-based rare disease registries to support health care stakeholders to deliver improved quality patient outcomes. Such systems should be architected to enable multiple-level access by a range of user groups within a region or across regional/country borders in a secure and private way. However, this functionality is currently not available in many existing systems. A new approach to the design of an Internet-based architecture for disease registries has been developed for patients with clinical and genetic data in geographical disparate locations. The system addresses issues of multiple-level access by key stakeholders, security and privacy. The system has been successfully adopted for specific rare diseases in Australia and is open source. The results of this work demonstrate that it is feasible to design an open source Internet-based disease registry system in a scalable and customizable fashion and designed to facilitate interoperability with other systems.

  6. Re-using the DataCite Metadata Store as DOI registration proxy and IGSN registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J.; Ulbricht, D.

    2012-12-01

    -PMH. Transformation into the mandatory DataCite schema is done through XSLT stylesheet transformation. With its REST interface DOIDB integrates a number of independent automatic and semi-automatic data publishing systems at GFZ and provides a local summary of the dataset DOIs registered through GFZ as a publication agent. The web service of the IGSN registry is part of the registration structure of the IGSN e.V. Similar to the DOIDB, the IGSN registry inherits all characteristics from the DataCite software except for the metadata schema, which is completely different to the DataCite schema. Since the registry is on top of a 3 level metadata registration architecture, the IGSN Metadata Store holds only the handle, administrative data, and some metadata about the physical status of the sample. Both cases presented here introduce modifications to the DataCite MDS that enable to associate and enrich persistent identifiers of the handle system with own metadata. These metadata can be disseminated with OAI-PMH. Furthermore, the implementation as a proxy service allows to create local handle registries for institutions with a federated publishing structure which can be used to build catalogues of the registered objects and their metadata. [1] http://www.igsn.org [2] http://www.geosamples.org [3] http://github.com/datacite

  7. The Management of Iron Chelation Therapy: Preliminary Data from a National Registry of Thalassaemic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, Adriana; Mangiarini, Laura; Felisi, Mariagrazia; Bartoloni, Franco; Ciancio, Angela; Capra, Marcello; D'Ascola, Domenico; Cianciulli, Paolo; Filosa, Aldo

    2011-01-01

    Thalassaemia and other haemoglobinopathies constitute an important health problem in Mediterranean countries, placing a tremendous emotional, psychological, and economic burden on their National Health systems. The development of new chelators in the most recent years had a major impact on the treatment of thalassaemia and on the quality of life of thalassaemic patients. A new initiative was promoted by the Italian Ministry of Health, establishing a Registry for thalassaemic patients to serve as a tool for the development of cost-effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches and for the definition of guidelines supporting the most appropriate management of the iron-chelating therapy and a correct use of the available iron-chelating agents. This study represents the analysis of the preliminary data collected for the evaluation of current status of the iron chelation practice in the Italian thalassaemic population and describes how therapeutic interventions can widely differ in the different patients' age groups. PMID:21738864

  8. Messages from the Malaysian Diabetes Registries on Diabetes Care in Malaysian public healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Chew, Boon-How; Lee, Ping-Yein; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Ismail, Mastura; Shariff-Ghazali, Sazlina; Goh, Pik-Pin

    2016-10-01

    A persistent and increasing prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus has recently been reported in the National Health and Morbidity Survey 2015. This commentary recapitulates the relevant and valuable lessons in the Malaysian national diabetes registries to inform the healthcare stakeholders and policy makers on potential areas of clinical practice improvement and future researches. Under performance of the process measures and sub-optimal control of HbA1c, blood pressure and lipids profile were prevalent (<40% achieved treatment targets). Although these had improved slightly from 2009 to 2012, diabetes co-morbidities (hypertension and dyslipidaemia) and complications had also increased. Prevalence of insulin use had doubled, and lipid lowering agent use had increased about 50% in 2012 compared to 2009. We identified six clinical areas for urgent attention and improvement, and three potential areas for future research. PMID:27459893

  9. Messages from the Malaysian Diabetes Registries on Diabetes Care in Malaysian public healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Chew, Boon-How; Lee, Ping-Yein; Cheong, Ai-Theng; Ismail, Mastura; Shariff-Ghazali, Sazlina; Goh, Pik-Pin

    2016-10-01

    A persistent and increasing prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus has recently been reported in the National Health and Morbidity Survey 2015. This commentary recapitulates the relevant and valuable lessons in the Malaysian national diabetes registries to inform the healthcare stakeholders and policy makers on potential areas of clinical practice improvement and future researches. Under performance of the process measures and sub-optimal control of HbA1c, blood pressure and lipids profile were prevalent (<40% achieved treatment targets). Although these had improved slightly from 2009 to 2012, diabetes co-morbidities (hypertension and dyslipidaemia) and complications had also increased. Prevalence of insulin use had doubled, and lipid lowering agent use had increased about 50% in 2012 compared to 2009. We identified six clinical areas for urgent attention and improvement, and three potential areas for future research.

  10. A report of the Malaysian dialysis registry of the National Renal Registry, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y N; Lim, T O; Lee, D G; Wong, H S; Ong, L M; Shaariah, W; Rozina, G; Morad, Z

    2008-09-01

    The Malaysian National Renal Registry was set up in 1992 to collect data for patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT). We present here the report of the Malaysian dialysis registry. The objectives of this papar are: (1) To examine the overall provision of dialysis treatment in Malaysia and its trend from 1980 to 2006. (2) To assess the treatment rate according to the states in the country. (3) To describe the method, location and funding of dialysis. (4) To characterise the patients accepted for dialysis treatment. (5) To analyze the outcomes of the dialysis treatment. Data on patients receiving dialysis treatment were collected at initiation of dialysis, at the time of any significant outcome, as well as yearly. The number of dialysis patients increased from 59 in 1980 to almost 15,000 in 2006. The dialysis acceptance rate increased from 3 per million population in 1980 to 116 per million population in 2006, and the prevalence rate from 4 to 550 per million population over the same period. The economically advantaged states of Malaysia had much higher dialysis treatment rates compared to the less economically advanced states. Eighty to 90% of new dialysis patients were accepted into centre haemodialysis (HD), and the rest into the chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) programme. The government provided about half of the funding for dialysis treatment. Patients older than 55 years accounted for the largest proportion of new patients on dialysis since the 1990s. Diabetes mellitus has been the main cause of ESRD and accounted for more than 50% of new ESRD since 2002. Annual death rate averaged about 10% on HD and 15% on CAPD. The unadjusted 5-year patient survival on both HD and CAPD was about 80%. Fifty percent of dialysis patients reported very good median QoL index score. About 70% of dialysis patients were about to work full or part time. There has been a very rapid growth of dialysis provision in Malaysia particularly in the older age groups. ESRD

  11. 76 FR 57742 - National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices AGENCY: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice Regarding Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP):...

  12. The National Marrow Donor Program and Be The Match Registry | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marrow Transplants The National Marrow Donor Program and Be The Match Registry Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table ... the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) and its Be The Match Registry are nonprofit organizations dedicated to ...

  13. Spectrophotometric determination of zirconium with xylenol orange

    SciTech Connect

    Antepenko, R J

    1982-05-14

    High purity hydride forming metal films are used as hydrogen isotope occluders and function as electrodes in neutron generator tubes. This use of zirconium occluder films requires reliable analytical methods for routine determination of the zirconium film weight in a production environment. In this study, a spectrophotometric method was evaluated for the determination of zirconium films. The method is based upon the formation of a highly colored zirconium complex with xylenol orange in a dilute perchloric acid medium. Dilute hydrofluoric acid is used in this procedure to selectively dissolve the zirconium film off the substrate. A perchloric acid fuming step is used to remove hydrofluoric acid from the solution. The zirconium solutions are depolymerized before complex formation by heating in 2 N perchloric acid. The zirconium complex exhibits a maximum absorbance in 0.2 to 0.3 M perchloric acid at a wavelength of 531 nanometers. Beer's law is obeyed for zirconium concentrations through 2.1 parts per million. Molybdenum, at concentrations equal to zirconium, does not interfere with the xylenol orange method.

  14. Ultrastructural changes in sweet orange with symptoms of huanglongbing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus greening (Huanglongbing [HLB]) is one of the most destructive citrus diseases worldwide. To better understand the ultrastructural changes of sweet orange seedlings in response to infection, anatomical analyses of HLB-infected sweet orange were carried out by light and electron microscopy. A...

  15. 7 CFR 29.1044 - Orange Red (FR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Orange Red (FR). 29.1044 Section 29.1044 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1044 Orange Red (FR). A yellowish red....

  16. 7 CFR 29.1044 - Orange Red (FR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Orange Red (FR). 29.1044 Section 29.1044 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1044 Orange Red (FR). A yellowish red....

  17. 75 FR 41119 - Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX... River, Orange, Texas. This Special Local Regulation is intended to restrict vessels from portions of...

  18. 7 CFR 29.1044 - Orange Red (FR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Orange Red (FR). 29.1044 Section 29.1044 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1044 Orange Red (FR). A yellowish red....

  19. 7 CFR 29.1044 - Orange Red (FR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Orange Red (FR). 29.1044 Section 29.1044 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1044 Orange Red (FR). A yellowish red....

  20. 76 FR 30890 - Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX... River, Orange, Texas on September 24-25, 2011. This Special Local Regulation is intended to...

  1. 7 CFR 29.1044 - Orange Red (FR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Orange Red (FR). 29.1044 Section 29.1044 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1044 Orange Red (FR). A yellowish red....

  2. 75 FR 55968 - Special Local Regulations, Sabine River; Orange, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... (NPRM) entitled Special Local Regulations; Sabine River, Orange, TX in the Federal Register (75 FR 41119... published in 75 FR 41119. Regulatory Analyses We developed this rule after considering numerous statutes and... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations, Sabine River; Orange,...

  3. The draft genome of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis).

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ling-Ling; Ruan, Xiaoan; Chen, Dijun; Zhu, Andan; Chen, Chunli; Bertrand, Denis; Jiao, Wen-Biao; Hao, Bao-Hai; Lyon, Matthew P; Chen, Jiongjiong; Gao, Song; Xing, Feng; Lan, Hong; Chang, Ji-Wei; Ge, Xianhong; Lei, Yang; Hu, Qun; Miao, Yin; Wang, Lun; Xiao, Shixin; Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Zeng, Wenfang; Guo, Fei; Cao, Hongbo; Yang, Xiaoming; Xu, Xi-Wen; Cheng, Yun-Jiang; Xu, Juan; Liu, Ji-Hong; Luo, Oscar Junhong; Tang, Zhonghui; Guo, Wen-Wu; Kuang, Hanhui; Zhang, Hong-Yu; Roose, Mikeal L; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Ruan, Yijun

    2013-01-01

    Oranges are an important nutritional source for human health and have immense economic value. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the draft genome of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis). The assembled sequence covers 87.3% of the estimated orange genome, which is relatively compact, as 20% is composed of repetitive elements. We predicted 29,445 protein-coding genes, half of which are in the heterozygous state. With additional sequencing of two more citrus species and comparative analyses of seven citrus genomes, we present evidence to suggest that sweet orange originated from a backcross hybrid between pummelo and mandarin. Focused analysis on genes involved in vitamin C metabolism showed that GalUR, encoding the rate-limiting enzyme of the galacturonate pathway, is significantly upregulated in orange fruit, and the recent expansion of this gene family may provide a genomic basis. This draft genome represents a valuable resource for understanding and improving many important citrus traits in the future.

  4. Process produces accurate registry between circuit board prints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Tapes and quick-mount circles of contrasting colors aid in obtaining precise registry between the two circuits of two-sided printed circuit boards. The tapes and circles are mounted on opposite sides of transparent plastic film to define the conductive path and feed-through hole locations.

  5. 22 CFR 96.70 - Operation of the Complaint Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operation of the Complaint Registry. 96.70 Section 96.70 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF PERSONS UNDER THE INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION ACT OF 2000 (IAA) Oversight Through Review of Complaints § 96.70 Operation of the...

  6. 77 FR 24103 - National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... complete Privacy Act Statement, published in the Federal Register on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19476), or you...) to establish the National Registry (73 FR 73129). The public comment period for the NPRM closed on... CMV drivers (57 FR 33276; July 28, 1992). All medical examiners were required to be...

  7. 22 CFR 96.70 - Operation of the Complaint Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Operation of the Complaint Registry. 96.70 Section 96.70 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE LEGAL AND RELATED SERVICES ACCREDITATION OF AGENCIES AND APPROVAL OF PERSONS UNDER THE INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION ACT OF 2000 (IAA) Oversight Through Review of Complaints § 96.70 Operation of the...

  8. Toxic Substances Registry System Index of Material Safety Data Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The July 1997 revision of the Index of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) is presented. The MSDS lists toxic substances by manufacturer, trade name, stock number, and distributor. The index provides information on hazards, use, and chemical composition of materials stored at KSC.

  9. hPSCreg--the human pluripotent stem cell registry.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Stefanie; Lekschas, Fritz; Müller, Robert; Stachelscheid, Harald; Bittner, Marie-Sophie; Zhang, Weiping; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Veiga, Anna; Stacey, Glyn; Kurtz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human pluripotent stem cell registry (hPSCreg), accessible at http://hpscreg.eu, is a public registry and data portal for human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell lines (hESC and hiPSC). Since their first isolation the number of hESC lines has steadily increased to over 3000 and new iPSC lines are generated in a rapidly growing number of laboratories as a result of their potentially broad applicability in biomedicine and drug testing. Many of these lines are deposited in stem cell banks, which are globally established to store tens of thousands of lines from healthy and diseased donors. The Registry provides comprehensive and standardized biological and legal information as well as tools to search and compare information from multiple hPSC sources and hence addresses a translational research need. To facilitate unambiguous identification over different resources, hPSCreg automatically creates a unique standardized name for each cell line registered. In addition to biological information, hPSCreg stores extensive data about ethical standards regarding cell sourcing and conditions for application and privacy protection. hPSCreg is the first global registry that holds both, manually validated scientific and ethical information on hPSC lines, and provides access by means of a user-friendly, mobile-ready web application. PMID:26400179

  10. hPSCreg—the human pluripotent stem cell registry

    PubMed Central

    Seltmann, Stefanie; Lekschas, Fritz; Müller, Robert; Stachelscheid, Harald; Bittner, Marie-Sophie; Zhang, Weiping; Kidane, Luam; Seriola, Anna; Veiga, Anna; Stacey, Glyn; Kurtz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human pluripotent stem cell registry (hPSCreg), accessible at http://hpscreg.eu, is a public registry and data portal for human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell lines (hESC and hiPSC). Since their first isolation the number of hESC lines has steadily increased to over 3000 and new iPSC lines are generated in a rapidly growing number of laboratories as a result of their potentially broad applicability in biomedicine and drug testing. Many of these lines are deposited in stem cell banks, which are globally established to store tens of thousands of lines from healthy and diseased donors. The Registry provides comprehensive and standardized biological and legal information as well as tools to search and compare information from multiple hPSC sources and hence addresses a translational research need. To facilitate unambiguous identification over different resources, hPSCreg automatically creates a unique standardized name for each cell line registered. In addition to biological information, hPSCreg stores extensive data about ethical standards regarding cell sourcing and conditions for application and privacy protection. hPSCreg is the first global registry that holds both, manually validated scientific and ethical information on hPSC lines, and provides access by means of a user-friendly, mobile-ready web application. PMID:26400179

  11. Reporting Melanoma: A Nationwide Surveillance of State Cancer Registries.

    PubMed

    Raji, Kehinde O; Payne, Lauren; Chen, Suephy C

    2015-01-01

    The goal of our study was to determine current melanoma reporting methods available to dermatologists and dermatopathologists and quantify changes in reporting methods from 2012 to 2014. A cross-sectional study design was utilized consisting of website perusal of reporting procedures, followed up by telephone and email inquiry of reporting methods from every state cancer registry. This study was conducted over a six-month period from February to August 2014. A previous similar survey was conducted in 2012 over the same time frame and results were compared. Kansas state cancer registry provided no data. As of August 2014, 96% of 49 state cancer registries had electronic methods available to all designated reporters. Seven (14%) states required an electronic-only method of reporting melanoma cases. Eighty-six percent allowed hard copy pathology report submission. Compared to the 2012 survey, 2 additional states were found to have initiated electronic reporting methods by 2014. In conclusion, a variety of methods exist for reporting diagnosed melanoma cases. Although most state cancer registries were equipped for electronic transmission of cases for mandated reporters, a number of states were ill-equipped for electronic submission from outpatient dermatologists. There was a general trend towards electronic versus nonelectronic reporting from 2012 to 2014. PMID:26839706

  12. Clinical Cancer Registries - Are They Up for Health Services Research?

    PubMed

    Pobiruchin, Monika; Bochum, Sylvia; Martens, Uwe M; Schramm, Wendelin

    2016-01-01

    Clinical cancer registries are a valuable data source for health services research (HSR). HSR is in need of high quality routine care data for its evaluations. However, the secondary use of routine data - such as documented cancer cases in a disease registry - poses new challenges in terms of data quality, IT-management, documentation processes and data privacy. In the clinical cancer registry Heilbronn-Franken, real-world data from the Giessen Tumor Documentation System (GTDS) was utilized for analyses of patients' disease processes and guideline adherence in follow-up care. A process was developed to map disease state definitions to fields of the GTDS database and extract patients' disease progress information. Thus, the disease process of sub-cohorts could be compared to each other, e.g., comparison of disease free survival of HER2 (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)-positive and -negative women who were treated with Trastuzumab, a targeted therapy applied in breast cancer. In principle, such comparisons are feasible and of great value for HSR as they depict a routine care setting of a diverse patient cohort. Yet, local documentation practice, missing flow of information from external health care providers or small sub-cohorts impede the analyses of clinical cancer registries data bases and usage for HSR. PMID:27577380

  13. 27 CFR 18.23 - Registry of stills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Registry of stills. 18.23 Section 18.23 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Qualification §...

  14. 27 CFR 18.23 - Registry of stills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Registry of stills. 18.23 Section 18.23 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS PRODUCTION OF VOLATILE FRUIT-FLAVOR CONCENTRATE Qualification §...

  15. Retinoblastoma Registry report--Hospital Kuala Lumpur experience.

    PubMed

    Jamalia, R; Sunder, R; Alagaratnam, J; Goh, P P

    2010-06-01

    Retinoblastoma is a childhood ocular cancer. The aim of this paper is to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with retinoblastoma in a major paediatric ophthalmology center in the country. Retrospective information was collected through the retinoblastoma registry. Late presentation with advanced staging is a major problem.

  16. 46 CFR 11.807 - Experience requirements for registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Experience requirements for registry. 11.807 Section 11... REQUIREMENTS FOR OFFICER ENDORSEMENTS Registration of Staff Officers § 11.807 Experience requirements for... experience as follows: (1) Chief purser. Two years of service aboard vessels performing duties relating...

  17. The Ped-APS Registry: the antiphospholipid syndrome in childhood.

    PubMed

    Avcin, T; Cimaz, R; Rozman, B

    2009-09-01

    In recent years, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) has been increasingly recognised in various paediatric autoimmune and nonautoimmune diseases, but the relatively low prevalence and heterogeneity of APS in childhood made it very difficult to study in a systematic way. The project of an international registry of paediatric patients with APS (the Ped-APS Registry) was initiated in 2004 to foster and conduct multicentre, controlled studies with large number of paediatric APS patients. The Ped-APS Registry is organised as a collaborative project of the European Forum on Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Juvenile Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Working Group of the Paediatric Rheumatology European Society. Currently, it documents a standardised clinical, laboratory and therapeutic data of 133 children with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL)-related thrombosis from 14 countries. The priority projects for future research of the Ped-APS Registry include prospective enrollment of new patients with aPL-related thrombosis, assessment of differences between the paediatric and adult APS, evaluation of proinflammatory genotype as a risk factor for APS manifestations in childhood and evaluation of patients with isolated nonthrombotic aPL-related manifestations.

  18. Implementation and analysis of initial trauma registry in Iquitos, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Duron, Vincent; DeUgarte, Daniel; Bliss, David; Salazar, Ernesto; Casapia, Martin; Ford, Henri; Upperman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Peru, 11% of deaths are due to trauma. Iquitos is a large underserved Peruvian city isolated from central resources by its geography. Our objective was to implement a locally driven trauma registry to sustainably improve trauma healthcare in this region. Methods: All trauma patients presenting to the main regional referral hospital were included in the trauma registry. A pilot study retrospectively analyzed data from the first two months after implementation. Results: From March to April 2013, 572 trauma patients were entered into the database. Average age was 26.9 years. Ten percent of patients presented more than 24 hours after injury. Most common mechanisms of injury were falls (25.5%), motor vehicle collisions (23.3%), and blunt assault (10.5%). Interim analysis revealed that 99% of patients were entered into the database. However, documentation of vital signs was poor: 42% of patients had temperature, 26% had oxygen saturation documented. After reporting to registry staff, a significant increase in temperature (42 to 97%, P < 0.001) and oxygen saturation (26 to 92%, P < 0.001) documentation was observed. Conclusion: A trauma registry is possible to implement in a resource-poor setting. Future efforts will focus on analysis of data to enhance prevention and treatment of injuries in Iquitos. PMID:27766233

  19. 76 FR 14366 - National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 390 and 391 RIN 2126-AA97 National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, Transportation. ACTION... Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is making available for public comment a modification of...

  20. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25 Section 201.25 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT OFFICE... owners of buildings, or their duly authorized representatives, for recordation in the Copyright...

  1. 37 CFR 201.25 - Visual Arts Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Visual Arts Registry. 201.25 Section 201.25 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights U.S. COPYRIGHT OFFICE, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT... owners of buildings, or their duly authorized representatives, for recordation in the Copyright...

  2. 75 FR 72793 - National Saltwater Angler Registry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA050 National Saltwater Angler Registry Program... registration of anglers, spear fishers and for-hire fishing vessels to register under the National Saltwater...: Gordon.Colvin@noaa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The final rule implementing the National...

  3. BioSWR--semantic web services registry for bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Repchevsky, Dmitry; Gelpi, Josep Ll

    2014-01-01

    Despite of the variety of available Web services registries specially aimed at Life Sciences, their scope is usually restricted to a limited set of well-defined types of services. While dedicated registries are generally tied to a particular format, general-purpose ones are more adherent to standards and usually rely on Web Service Definition Language (WSDL). Although WSDL is quite flexible to support common Web services types, its lack of semantic expressiveness led to various initiatives to describe Web services via ontology languages. Nevertheless, WSDL 2.0 descriptions gained a standard representation based on Web Ontology Language (OWL). BioSWR is a novel Web services registry that provides standard Resource Description Framework (RDF) based Web services descriptions along with the traditional WSDL based ones. The registry provides Web-based interface for Web services registration, querying and annotation, and is also accessible programmatically via Representational State Transfer (REST) API or using a SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language. BioSWR server is located at http://inb.bsc.es/BioSWR/and its code is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/bioswr/under the LGPL license.

  4. The Murcia Twin Registry: a population-based registry of adult multiples in Spain.

    PubMed

    Ordoñana, Juan R; Rebollo-Mesa, Irene; Carrillo, Eduvigis; Colodro-Conde, Lucía; García-Palomo, Francisco J; González-Javier, Francisca; Sánchez-Romera, Juan F; Aznar Oviedo, José M; de Pancorbo, Marian M; Pérez-Riquelme, Francisco

    2013-02-01

    The Murcia Twin Registry (MTR) was created in 2006, under the auspices of the University of Murcia and the regional Health Authority, aiming to develop a research resource in Spain intended to stimulate current research and new investigation on the analysis of genetic factors related to health and health-related behaviors. The MTR development strategy was designed as a step-by-step process. Initially, it was focused on women's health but nowadays it includes males and opposite-sex twins. The database comprises 2,281 participants born between 1940 and 1966 in the region of Murcia, in Spain. There have been three waves of data collection and today the MTR databases include questionnaire and anthropometric data as well as biological samples. The current main areas of research interest are health and health-related behaviors, including lifestyle, health promotion, and quality of life. Future short-term development points to the completion of the biobank and continuing the collection of longitudinal data.

  5. Volatile and nonvolatile flavor chemical evaluation of USDA orange-mandarin hybrids for comparison to sweet orange and mandarin fruit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three citrus hybrids, containing 50-75% sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) genome in their pedigrees and similar to sweet orange in fruit size, color and taste, were tested for their potential to be classified as new “sweet orange” cultivars. 'Hamlin', ‘Midsweet’, and three other early to mid-season swe...

  6. 16 CFR 310.8 - Fee for access to the National Do Not Call Registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Registry under this Rule, 47 CFR 64.1200, or any other Federal regulation or law. Any person accessing the... Registry. 310.8 Section 310.8 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS TELEMARKETING SALES RULE § 310.8 Fee for access to the National Do Not Call Registry....

  7. Improving Diabetes Outcomes Using a Web-Based Registry and Interactive Education: A Multisite Collaborative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Robert W.; Fletcher, Jason; Kelly, Kim F.; Shea, Laura A.; Spence, Maureen M.; Sullivan, Janet N.; Cerniglia, Joan R.; Yang, YoonJung

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To support the adoption of guideline concordant care by primary care practices, the New York Diabetes Coalition (NYDC) promoted use of an electronic diabetes registry and developed an interactive educational module on using the registry and improving patient communication. The NYDC hypothesized that use of a registry with immediate…

  8. The Emerging Role of Adoption Reunion Registries: Adoptee and Birthparent Views.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Robert L.

    2002-01-01

    The State of Georgia Adoption Reunion Registry assists adoptees in searching for birthparents and biological siblings, and provides referral to support services. Responses to a mail-in survey of 45 adoptees and 46 birthparents, all users of the Georgia registry, indicated high levels of satisfaction with the registry's services. Birthparents…

  9. The Euro-VO Registry, Re-engineering the Back-end

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arviset, C.; Perdikeas, M.; Osuna, P.; Gonzalez, J.

    2015-09-01

    The Euro-VO Registry, located, developed and operated at ESAC, is one of the full searchable registries available worldwide, gathering information about all VO-compliant resources. The Euro-VO Registry serves as a registration point for European - and other countries- VO actors and data centres wishing to publish VO services. It harvests other registries to ensure its completeness so VO applications developers and VO users can use it to discover all VO resources, from Europe and from all other VO projects. The Euro-VO Registry provides as well a harvesting interface to other registries in the world to make sure the European VO services are also included in all other worldwide full registries. In particular, the new Euro-VO registry will be supporting the new RegTAP search interface for the relational registry allowing arbitrary ADQL queries against its contents over a compliant TAP service. The recently obsolete (for future developments) SOAP-based legacy search interface will also be supported for backwards compatibility purposes. Furthermore, in the context of the IVOA, some quality control and curation procedures for the registry resources are being defined. The Euro-VO Registry implements these procedures to ensure the high quality of the VO resources it references. This paper gives an overview of the recent development of the new Euro-VO Registry, together with its new curation facilities, both of which are being performed under a contract awarded to Neuropublic, under ESA special initiative to Greece.

  10. 78 FR 54956 - Agency Information Collection (Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard Self-Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard Self-Assessment....rennie@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW, Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard Self-Assessment Questionnaire.'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Open Burn Pit Registry Airborne Hazard...

  11. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway. PMID

  12. Inception of a national multidisciplinary registry for stereotactic radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Jason P; Kavanagh, Brian D; Asher, Anthony; Harbaugh, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) represents a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of ionizing high-dose radiation to treat a wide variety of disorders. Much of the radiosurgical literature is based upon retrospective single-center studies along with a few randomized controlled clinical trials. More timely and effective evidence is needed to enhance the consistency and quality of and clinical outcomes achieved with SRS. The authors summarize the creation and implementation of a national SRS registry. The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) through NeuroPoint Alliance, Inc., started a successful registry effort with its lumbar spine initiative. Following a similar approach, the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance collaborated with corporate partners and the American Society for Radiation Oncology to devise a data dictionary for an SRS registry. Through administrative and financial support from professional societies and corporate partners, a framework for implementation of the registry was created. Initial plans were devised for a 3-year effort encompassing 30 high-volume SRS centers across the country. Device-specific web-based data-extraction platforms were built by the corporate partners. Data uploaders were then used to port the data to a common repository managed by Quintiles, a national and international health care trials company. Audits of the data for completeness and veracity will be undertaken by Quintiles to ensure data fidelity. Data governance and analysis are overseen by an SRS board comprising equal numbers of representatives from the AANS and NeuroPoint Alliance. Over time, quality outcome assessments and post hoc research can be performed to advance the field of SRS. Stereotactic radiosurgery offers a high-technology approach to treating complex intracranial disorders. Improvements in the consistency and quality of care delivered to patients who undergo SRS should be afforded by the national registry effort that is underway.

  13. Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of industrial orange waste.

    PubMed

    Kaparaju, P L N; Rintala, J A

    2006-06-01

    Thermophilic anaerobic digestion of industrial orange waste (pulp and peel) with subsequent aerobic post-treatment of the digestate was evaluated. Methane production potential was first determined in batch assays and the effects of operational parameters such as hydraulic retention times (HRT) and organic loading rates (OLR) on process performance were studied through semi-continuous digestion. In batch assays, methane production potential of about 0.49 m(3) kg(-1) volatile solids (VS)(added waste) was achieved. In semi-continuous digestion, loading at 2.8 kgVS m(-3) d(-1) (2.9 kg total solids (TS) m(-3) d(-1)) and HRT of 26 d produced specific methane yields of 0.6 m(3) kg(-1) VS (added waste) (0.63 m(3) kg(-1) VS(added waste)). Operating at a higher OLR of 4.2 kgVS m(-3) d(-1) (4.4 kg TS m(-3) d(-1)) and 40 d HRT produced 0.5 m(3) of methane kg(-1) VS (added waste) (0.63-0.52 m(3) kg(-1) TS (added waste). Up to 70% of TS of industrial orange waste (11.6% TS) was methanised. Further increase in OLR to 5.6 kg VS m(-3) d(-1) (5.9 kg TS m(-3) d(-1); HRT of 20 d) resulted in an unstable and non-functional digester process shown directly through complete cessation of methanogenesis, drop in methane content, reduced pH and increase in volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations, especially acetate and soluble chemical oxygen demand. A pH adjustment (from an initial 3.2 to ca. 8) for the low pH orange waste was necessary and was found to be a crucial factor for stable digester operation as the process showed a tendency to be inhibited due to accumulation of VFAs and decrease in digester pH. Aerobic post-treatment of digestate resulted in removal of ammonia and VFAs. PMID:16865918

  14. Cohort Profile: The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Gatz, Margaret; Harris, Jennifer R; Kaprio, Jaakko; McGue, Matt; Smith, Nicholas L; Snieder, Harold; Spiro, Avron; Butler, David A

    2015-01-01

    The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry) is a comprehensive registry of White male twin pairs born in the USA between 1917 and 1927, both of the twins having served in the military. The purpose was medical research and ultimately improved clinical care. The cohort was assembled in the early 1960s with identification of approximately 16 000 twin pairs, review of service records, a brief mailed questionnaire assessing zygosity, and a health survey largely comparable to questionnaires used at that time with Scandinavian twin registries. Subsequent large-scale data collection occurred in 1974, 1985 and 1998, repeating the health survey and including information on education, employment history and earnings. Self-reported data have been supplemented with mortality, disability and medical data through record linkage. Potential collaborators should access the study website [http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Veterans/TwinsStudy.aspx] or e-mail the Medical Follow-up Agency at [Twins@nas.edu]. Questionnaire data are being prepared for future archiving with the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA) at the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), University of Michigan, MI. PMID:25183748

  15. Cohort Profile: The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry).

    PubMed

    Gatz, Margaret; Harris, Jennifer R; Kaprio, Jaakko; McGue, Matt; Smith, Nicholas L; Snieder, Harold; Spiro, Avron; Butler, David A

    2015-06-01

    The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry) is a comprehensive registry of White male twin pairs born in the USA between 1917 and 1927, both of the twins having served in the military. The purpose was medical research and ultimately improved clinical care. The cohort was assembled in the early 1960s with identification of approximately 16,000 twin pairs, review of service records, a brief mailed questionnaire assessing zygosity, and a health survey largely comparable to questionnaires used at that time with Scandinavian twin registries. Subsequent large-scale data collection occurred in 1974, 1985 and 1998, repeating the health survey and including information on education, employment history and earnings. Self-reported data have been supplemented with mortality, disability and medical data through record linkage. Potential collaborators should access the study website [http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Veterans/TwinsStudy.aspx] or e-mail the Medical Follow-up Agency at [Twins@nas.edu]. Questionnaire data are being prepared for future archiving with the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA) at the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), University of Michigan, MI. PMID:25183748

  16. Identification of sensory attributes that drive consumer liking of commercial orange juice products in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mina K; Lee, Young-Jin; Kwak, Han Sub; Kang, Myung-woo

    2013-09-01

    Orange juice is a well-accepted fruit juice, and its consumption increases steadily. Many studies have been conducted to understand the sensory characteristics of orange juice throughout its varying processing steps. Sensory language and consumer likings of food can be influenced by culture. The objective of this study is to evaluate the sensory characteristics of commercially available orange juices in Korea and identify drivers of liking for orange juices in Korea. A quantitative descriptive analysis was conducted using a trained panel (n = 10) to evaluate 7 orange juice samples in triplicates, followed by consumer acceptance tests (n = 103). Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were conducted for data analysis. The sensory characteristics of commercially available orange juice were documented and grouped: group 1 samples were characterized by high in natural citrus flavors such as orange peel, orange flesh, citrus fruit, and grape fruit, whereas group 2 samples were characterized by processed orange-like flavors such as over-ripe, cooked-orange, and yogurt. Regardless of orange flavor types, a high intensity of orange flavor in orange juice was identified as a driver of liking for orange juices in Korea. Three distinct clusters were segmented by varying sensory attributes that were evaluated by likes and dislikes. Overall, many similarities were noticed between Korean market segment and global orange juice market. By knowing the drivers of liking and understanding the distinct consumer clusters present in the Korean orange juice market, the orange juice industry could improve the strategic marketing of its products in Korea. PMID:23909609

  17. Identification of sensory attributes that drive consumer liking of commercial orange juice products in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mina K; Lee, Young-Jin; Kwak, Han Sub; Kang, Myung-woo

    2013-09-01

    Orange juice is a well-accepted fruit juice, and its consumption increases steadily. Many studies have been conducted to understand the sensory characteristics of orange juice throughout its varying processing steps. Sensory language and consumer likings of food can be influenced by culture. The objective of this study is to evaluate the sensory characteristics of commercially available orange juices in Korea and identify drivers of liking for orange juices in Korea. A quantitative descriptive analysis was conducted using a trained panel (n = 10) to evaluate 7 orange juice samples in triplicates, followed by consumer acceptance tests (n = 103). Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were conducted for data analysis. The sensory characteristics of commercially available orange juice were documented and grouped: group 1 samples were characterized by high in natural citrus flavors such as orange peel, orange flesh, citrus fruit, and grape fruit, whereas group 2 samples were characterized by processed orange-like flavors such as over-ripe, cooked-orange, and yogurt. Regardless of orange flavor types, a high intensity of orange flavor in orange juice was identified as a driver of liking for orange juices in Korea. Three distinct clusters were segmented by varying sensory attributes that were evaluated by likes and dislikes. Overall, many similarities were noticed between Korean market segment and global orange juice market. By knowing the drivers of liking and understanding the distinct consumer clusters present in the Korean orange juice market, the orange juice industry could improve the strategic marketing of its products in Korea.

  18. Solvent-Switching Gelation and Orange-Red Emission of Ultrasmall Copper Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinhua; Zhang, Qiang Matthew; Feng, Yong; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Shih, Kaimin

    2016-01-18

    By tuning the Cu⋅⋅⋅Cu and hydrogen-bonding interactions, the small cluster Cu3 L can be selectively synthesized to develop a stable and highly fluorescent material, as confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectroscopy. Further characterizations, including absorbance spectroscopy, XPS, and XRD demonstrate the formation of tiny Cu nanoclusters (NCs). In water, the as-prepared Cu NCs can exhibit high orange fluorescence via solution evaporation to eliminate hydrogen-bonding, and in dimethylformamide, a strong orange fluorescent gel is obtained by solvent induction to enhance the Cu⋅⋅⋅Cu and hydrogen-bonding interactions. More importantly, the Cu NCs in their substantial form exhibit nonlinear optical properties upon two-photon excitation. These results will shed light on Cu and related cluster applications in two-photon biological imaging, optical power limiting, and solar energy conversion. PMID:26584405

  19. Fluorescence spectroscopy applied to orange trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcassa, L. G.; Gasparoto, M. C. G.; Belasque, J., Jr.; Lins, E. C.; Dias Nunes, F.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2006-05-01

    In this work, we have applied laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate biological processes in orange trees (Citrus aurantium L.). We have chosen to investigate water stress and Citrus Canker, which is a disease caused by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri bacteria. The fluorescence spectroscopy was investigated by using as an excitation source a 442-nm 15-mW HeCd gas multimode discharge laser and a 532-nm 10-mW Nd3+:YAG laser. The stress manifestation was detected by the variation of fluorescence ratios of the leaves at different wavelengths. The fluorescence ratios present a significant variation, showing the possibility to observe water stress by fluorescence spectrum. The Citrus Canker’s contaminated leaves were discriminated from the healthy leaves using a more complex analysis of the fluorescence spectra. However, we were unable to discriminate it from another disease, and new fluorescence experiments are planned for the future.

  20. Oranges or "lemons"? Family farming and product quality in the Spanish orange industry, 1870-1960.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    In the early twentieth century California became a big exporter of some agricultural products that, until then, had only been grown on a large scale in the mediterranean basin. As a result, exports of those products diminished or stagnated in Mediterranean countries, with important repercussions on their economies. The Spanish orange industry, however, continued to expand, despite the fact that a substantial percentage of Spanish oranges came from farms owned by (often illiterate) small peasants who, in comparison to the California growers, used a great deal of labor, small amounts of capital, and little science. This paper shows that Spanish farmers were in fact capable of growing high-quality oranges at prices that were more competitive than those in California, although interested they often preferred to satisfy the strong demand for middling fruit from Great Britain because it was a more profitable business. This, combined with a deficient use of brand names, gave the Spanish citrus industry serious reputation problems by the 1930s, from which, however, it recovered quickly.

  1. Structural characterization of a thiazoline-containing chromophore in an orange fluorescent protein, monomeric Kusabira Orange.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Akihiro; Fukumura, Eiko; Karasawa, Satoshi; Mizuno, Hideaki; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu

    2008-11-01

    Monomeric Kusabira Orange (mKO) is a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like protein that emits orange light at a peak of 559 nm. We analyzed its X-ray structure at 1.65 A and found a novel three-ring chromophore that developed autocatalytically from a Cys65-Tyr66-Glu67 tripeptide in which the side chain of Cys65 formed the third 2-hydroxy-3-thiazoline ring. As a result, the chromophore contained the CNCOH group at the 2-position of the imidazolinone moiety such that the conjugated pi-electron system of the chromophore was more extended than that of GFP but less extended than that of the Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein (DsRed). Since a sulfur atom has potent nucleophilic character, the third 3-thiazoline ring is rapidly and completely cyclized. Furthermore, our structure reveals the presence of a pi-pi stacking interaction between His197 and the chromophore as well as a pi-cation interaction between Arg69 and the chromophore. These structural findings are sufficient to account for the orange emission, pH tolerance, and photostability of mKO.

  2. Oranges or "lemons"? Family farming and product quality in the Spanish orange industry, 1870-1960.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    In the early twentieth century California became a big exporter of some agricultural products that, until then, had only been grown on a large scale in the mediterranean basin. As a result, exports of those products diminished or stagnated in Mediterranean countries, with important repercussions on their economies. The Spanish orange industry, however, continued to expand, despite the fact that a substantial percentage of Spanish oranges came from farms owned by (often illiterate) small peasants who, in comparison to the California growers, used a great deal of labor, small amounts of capital, and little science. This paper shows that Spanish farmers were in fact capable of growing high-quality oranges at prices that were more competitive than those in California, although interested they often preferred to satisfy the strong demand for middling fruit from Great Britain because it was a more profitable business. This, combined with a deficient use of brand names, gave the Spanish citrus industry serious reputation problems by the 1930s, from which, however, it recovered quickly. PMID:20509234

  3. Apollo 17 "Orange soil" and meteorite impact on liquid lava

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roedder, E.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1973-01-01

    THE 'orange soil' from Shorty Crater differs greatly from ordinary lunar soils in that it consists of ???99% 10-300 ??m smooth shiny spherules and broken fragments of spherules of transparent orange glass, about 20% of which contain partly crystallized to opaque material. The remaining 1 % is chiefly crystalline basalt fragments. Although the colour of the individual orange spherule varies with thickness from yellow-orange to red-brown, all orange glass in our sample (74220, 70; 0.25 g) has a uniform index of refraction (??? 1.712). By contrast, other lunar soils contain spherules ranging from 1.50 to 1.75. The orange glass is also completely free of bubbles, to the limit of resolution of the light microscope, whereas bubbles are present in many other spherule samples. The spherules generally appear spherical in a normal microscope mount, but when viewed from two directions many are found to be oblate spheroids with axial ratios varying from near 1.00 to as low as 0.42 (Fig. 1a). Some have fissioned during free flight1 and all stages of the fission process are found, as described for the Apollo 11 samples. Only a few spherules seem to have been distorted by landing while still soft. One notable exception is the occurrence of small spherules of orange glass conforming and adhering to the surface of larger black spherules (Fig. 1b). ?? 1973 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. [Monitoring of pregnancies exposed to drugs in France: the experience of the registries of congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Doray, Bérénice

    2014-01-01

    Registries of congenital malformations were implemented in many industrialized countries following the drama of thalidomide. In 2013, four French registries of congenital malformations in France provide the systematic epidemiological surveillance of birth defects. All are part of international networks of registries, especially European surveillance of congenital anomalies (EUROCAT). If the development of prevention actions including prenatal diagnosis has gradually led the registries to play a key role of assessment on the impact of public health policies, one of the major roles of registries of congenital malformations remains early detection of clusters of malformations secondary to teratogenic effects.

  5. Developing registries of volunteers: key principles to manage issues regarding personal information protection.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, Emmanuelle; Leclerc, Dominic; Puymirat, Jack; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    2010-11-01

    Much biomedical research cannot be performed without recruiting human subjects. Increasingly, volunteer registries are being developed to assist researchers with this challenging task. Yet, volunteer registries raise confidentiality issues. Having recently developed a registry of volunteers, the authors searched for normative guidance on how to implement the principle of confidentiality. The authors found that the protection of confidentiality in registries are based on the 10 key elements which are elaborated in detail in the Canadian Standards Association Model Code. This paper describes how these 10 detailed key principles can be used during the developmental stages of volunteer registries.

  6. Geology, prospects in Orange basin offshore western South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Muntingh, A. Ltd., Parow )

    1993-01-25

    With the fast changing political situation in South Africa it has become possible for Soekor (Pty.) Ltd. To invite international companies to participate in oil and gas exploration in the South African part of the Orange basin. This paper reports on the Orange basin, which comprises a 130,000 sq km area off western South Africa that extends northwards into Namibia, represents a large frontier basin with known hydrocarbon accumulations and the potential for giant fields. Comprehensive seismic coverage and a recent deep-water seismic survey in the Orange basin indicate exciting opportunities in the form of shallow and deep-water plays.

  7. Need for a roadmap for development of a coordinated national registry programme.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, S; Best, R L; Evans, S M

    2015-11-01

    Clinical quality registries are an overlooked and under-funded arm of clinical research in Australia. Registries are databases for patients with a particular disease, or who undergo a procedure, or use a health resource. Registries, where properly funded and universally adopted, have provided substantial benefits to the quality of healthcare and, in some cases, have had demonstrable effect in reducing costs. There is a lack of a coordinated programme for both funding and development of registries in Australia. A coordinated effort is required to address key gaps in registry coverage and ensure registries comply with appropriate technical and operating principles, and target areas where registries can add value to the health system. This will ensure that Australia is competitive with its international peers in this dynamic environment.

  8. Characteristics and temporal trends in patient registries: focus on the life sciences industry, 1981–2012

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Karin; Sallum, Rachel H; Burns, Meghan D; Barr, Charles E; Beattie, Mary S; Pashos, Chris L; Luce, Bryan R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Patient registries are used to monitor safety, examine real-world effectiveness, and may potentially contribute to comparative effectiveness research. To our knowledge, life sciences industry (LSI)-sponsored registries have not been systematically categorized. This study represents a first step toward understanding such registries over time. Methods Studies described as registries were identified in the ClinicalTrials.gov database. Characteristics from these registry records were abstracted and analyzed. Results Of 1202 registries identified, approximately 47% reported LSI sponsorship. These 562 LSI registries varied in focus: medical devices (n = 193, 34%), specific drugs (n = 173, 31%), procedures (n = 29, 5%), or particular diseases (n = 139, 25%). Thirty-three registries (<6%) evaluated pregnancy outcomes. The most common therapeutic area was cardiovascular (n = 234, 42%); others included endocrinology, immunology, oncology, musculoskeletal disorders, and neurology. The two most often measured outcomes were clinical effectiveness and safety, each of which appeared in 363/562 (65%) of LSI registries. Other outcomes included real-world clinical practice patterns (n = 122, 22%), patient-reported outcomes (n = 106, 19%), disease epidemiology/natural history (n = 69, 12%), and economic outcomes (n = 30, 5%). The number of LSI registries and their geographic diversity has increased over time. Conclusions The LSI registries represent a substantial proportion of all patient registries documented in ClinicalTrials.gov. These prospective studies are growing in number and encompass diverse therapeutic areas and geographic regions. Most registries measure multiple outcomes and capture real-world data that may be unavailable through other study designs. This classification of LSI registries documents their use for studying heterogeneity of diseases, examining treatment patterns, measuring patient-reported outcomes, examining economic outcomes, and performing

  9. [Quality management in oncology supported by clinical cancer registries].

    PubMed

    Klinkhammer-Schalke, Monika; Gerken, Michael; Barlag, Hagen; Tillack, Anett

    2015-01-01

    Efforts in nationwide quality management for oncology have so far failed to comprehensively document all levels of care. New organizational structures such as population-based clinical cancer registries or certified organ cancer centers were supposed to solve this problem more sufficiently, but they have to be accompanied by valid trans-sectoral documentation and evaluation of clinical data. To measure feasibility and qualitative effectiveness of guideline implementation we approached this problem with a nationwide investigation from 2000 to 2011. The rate of neoadjuvant radio/chemotherapy in stage UICC II/III rectum cancer, cut-off point 80% for separating good from insufficient quality, was used as a quality indicator. The nationwide analysis indicates an increase from 45% to 70%, but only with the implementation strategy of CME. The combination of new structures, evidence-based quality indicators, organ cancer center and clinical cancer registries has shown good feasibility and seems promising.

  10. The International Quotidian Dialysis Registry: annual report 2006.

    PubMed

    Nesrallah, Gihad E; Suri, Rita S; Zoller, Rezso; Garg, Amit X; Moist, Louise M; Lindsay, Robert M

    2006-07-01

    Interest in short daily and nocturnal hemodialysis (HD) regimens continues to grow worldwide. Despite growing optimism that these therapies will afford better patient outcomes over conventional HD, the current literature has not been viewed as sufficiently compelling to affect widespread implementation in most jurisdictions. Before these therapies can gain wider acceptance, larger and more rigorous studies will likely be needed. In June 2004, the Quotidian Dialysis Registry, based at the Lawson Health Research Institute at the University of Western Ontario, Canada, began recruiting patients across North America. By using an Internet-based data entry platform, patients from various centers worldwide will eventually be recruited, and studied prospectively. This paper constitutes the second annual update on patient and center recruitment, patient and treatment characteristics, and future directions for the registry. PMID:16805881

  11. The use of databases and registries to enhance colonoscopy quality.

    PubMed

    Logan, Judith R; Lieberman, David A

    2010-10-01

    Administrative databases, registries, and clinical databases are designed for different purposes and therefore have different advantages and disadvantages in providing data for enhancing quality. Administrative databases provide the advantages of size, availability, and generalizability, but are subject to constraints inherent in the coding systems used and from data collection methods optimized for billing. Registries are designed for research and quality reporting but require significant investment from participants for secondary data collection and quality control. Electronic health records contain all of the data needed for quality research and measurement, but that data is too often locked in narrative text and unavailable for analysis. National mandates for electronic health record implementation and functionality will likely change this landscape in the near future. PMID:20889074

  12. A preventive registry for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Madlensky, L; Berk, T C; Bapat, B V; McLeod, R S; Couture, J; Baron, D; Hiruki, T; Redston, M; Cohen, Z; Gallinger, S

    1995-07-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a genetic disorder characterized by a strong family history of colorectal and extracolonic cancers, usually at a young age. This article presents a new provincial service for families with HNPCC. The Steve Atanas Stavro Familial Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry at Mount Sinai Hospital is accruing patients that meet a set of criteria establishing a putative diagnosis of HNPCC. The objectives of the Registry are to develop and assess patient pedigrees, to coordinate screening procedures for at-risk persons, to maintain a prospective database of patient information, to provide education and support for families and to contribute to research. To date, surgeons and patients are the most common referral sources, while oncologists and geneticists are the least common. The ultimate goal of the HNPCC service is the secondary prevention of cancer and a corresponding decrease in mortality for HNPCC family members. PMID:8853507

  13. 75 FR 38145 - Announcing the New National Electronic Job Registry for Use in the H-2A Temporary Agricultural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... Employment and Training Administration Announcing the New National Electronic Job Registry for Use in the H... that the National Electronic Job Registry (job registry) in which H-2A job orders will be posted and... the job registry, please contact the iCERT System Team, Office of Foreign Labor ] Certification...

  14. Using Registries to Identify Adverse Events in Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lionetti, Geraldina; Kimura, Yukiko; Schanberg, Laura E.; Beukelman, Timothy; Wallace, Carol A.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Winsor, Jane; Fox, Kathleen; Natter, Marc; Sundy, John S.; Brodsky, Eric; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Del Gaizo, Vincent; Iyasu, Solomon; Jahreis, Angelika; Meeker-O’Connell, Ann; Mittleman, Barbara B.; Murphy, Bernard M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Raymond, Sandra C.; Setoguchi, Soko; Siegel, Jeffrey N.; Sobel, Rachel E.; Solomon, Daniel; Southwood, Taunton R.; Vesely, Richard; White, Patience H.; Wulffraat, Nico M.; Sandborg, Christy I.

    2013-01-01

    The proven effectiveness of biologics and other immunomodulatory products in inflammatory rheumatic diseases has resulted in their widespread use as well as reports of potential short- and long-term complications such as infection and malignancy. These complications are especially worrisome in children who often have serial exposures to multiple immunomodulatory products. Post-marketing surveillance of immunomodulatory products in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus is currently based on product-specific registries and passive surveillance, which may not accurately reflect the safety risks for children owing to low numbers, poor long-term retention, and inadequate comparators. In collaboration with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), patient and family advocacy groups, biopharmaceutical industry representatives and other stakeholders, the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) and the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) have developed a novel pharmacosurveillance model (CARRA Consolidated Safety Registry [CoRe]) based on a multicenter longitudinal pediatric rheumatic diseases registry with over 8000 participants. The existing CARRA infrastructure provides access to much larger numbers of subjects than is feasible in single-product registries. Enrollment regardless of medication exposure allows more accurate detection and evaluation of safety signals. Flexibility built into the model allows the addition of specific data elements and safety outcomes, and designation of appropriate disease comparator groups relevant to each product, fulfilling post-marketing requirements and commitments. The proposed model can be applied to other pediatric and adult diseases, potentially transforming the paradigm of pharmacosurveillance in response to the growing public mandate for rigorous post-marketing safety monitoring. PMID:24144710

  15. Patient-reported outcome measures in arthroplasty registries

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Eric; Franklin, Patricia; Lyman, Stephen; Denissen, Geke; Dawson, Jill; Dunn, Jennifer; Eresian Chenok, Kate; Dunbar, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Garellick, Göran; Lübbeke, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract — The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries (ISAR) Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) Working Group have evaluated and recommended best practices in the selection, administration, and interpretation of PROMs for hip and knee arthroplasty registries. The 2 generic PROMs in common use are the Short Form health surveys (SF-36 or SF-12) and EuroQol 5-dimension (EQ-5D). The Working Group recommends that registries should choose specific PROMs that have been appropriately developed with good measurement properties for arthroplasty patients. The Working Group recommend the use of a 1-item pain question (“During the past 4 weeks, how would you describe the pain you usually have in your [right/left] [hip/knee]?”; response: none, very mild, mild, moderate, or severe) and a single-item satisfaction outcome (“How satisfied are you with your [right/left] [hip/knee] replacement?”; response: very unsatisfied, dissatisfied, neutral, satisfied, or very satisfied). Survey logistics include patient instructions, paper- and electronic-based data collection, reminders for follow-up, centralized as opposed to hospital-based follow-up, sample size, patient- or joint-specific evaluation, collection intervals, frequency of response, missing values, and factors in establishing a PROMs registry program. The Working Group recommends including age, sex, diagnosis at joint, general health status preoperatively, and joint pain and function score in case-mix adjustment models. Interpretation and statistical analysis should consider the absolute level of pain, function, and general health status as well as improvement, missing data, approaches to analysis and case-mix adjustment, minimal clinically important difference, and minimal detectable change. The Working Group recommends data collection immediately before and 1 year after surgery, a threshold of 60% for acceptable frequency of response, documentation of non-responders, and documentation of incomplete or

  16. Toxic Substances Registry System. Index of Material Safety Data Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The October 1994 revision of the KSC Toxic Substances Registry System (TSRS) Material Safety Data Sheets (MSD's) is presented. The listed MSD's which were submitted to the TSRS are maintained by the Base Operations Contractors of the Biomedical Operations and Research Office of KSC. The purpose of the index is to provide a means of accessing information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at KSC. Indices are provided for manufacturers, trademarks, and stock numbers.

  17. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) listed in this index reflect product inventories and associated MSDSs which have been submitted to the Toxic Substance Registry database maintained by the Base Operations Contractor at the Kennedy Space Center. The purpose of this index is to provide a means to access information on the hazards associated with the toxic and otherwise hazardous chemicals stored and used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  18. VTE Registry: What Can Be Learned from RIETE?

    PubMed

    Tzoran, Inna; Brenner, Benjamin; Papadakis, Manolis; Di Micco, Pierpaolo; Monreal, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    The Registro Informatizado de Enfermedad TromboEmbólica (RIETE Registry) is an ongoing, international, prospective registry of consecutive patients with acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) designed to gather and analyze data on treatment patterns and outcomes in patients with acute VTE. It started in Spain in 2001, and 6 years later the database was translated into English with the aim to expand the Registry to other countries. In contrast to randomized controlled trials, there is no imposed experimental intervention: the management is determined solely by physicians. Thus, it provides data on patients with VTE in a real-world situation with an unselected patient population. Data from RIETE are hypothesis-generating and provide feedback from real-world clinical situations. So far, we learned about the natural history of VTE in patients with relative or absolute contraindications to anticoagulant therapy. We also learned interesting aspects on the natural history of VTE, and we built a number of prognostic scores to identify VTE patients at low, moderate, or high risk for adverse outcome.

  19. Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry: Quality Data Now Available.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jessica C; Greer, Renee M; Wenke, Joseph C; Ficke, James R; Johnson, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    The Military Orthopaedic Trauma Registry (MOTR) orginally began as part of the Department of Defense Trauma Registry (DoDTR) and became a live registry in 2013. As a quality improvement process, this study examined MOTR data for 20 female amputees compared with DoDTR data. The DoDTR provided diagnosis and procedure codes as a list but no details. The MOTR provided additional data, including specific limb, fracture classifications, and associated injuries per limb. The MOTR allowed for construction of a treatment time line for each limb, including number and timing of debridements, antibiotics, and implant types. Orthopaedic-specific complications were also coded more frequently in the MOTR and clearly identified with a specific injury and treatment. During initial quality control checks, the MOTR provides a greater volume and granularity of detail for orthopaedic-specific injury and treatment information, indicating that the MOTR is on track to provide a valuable repository for data-driven orthopaedic management of combat injury. PMID:27518292

  20. Apheresis technologies and clinical applications: the 2007 International Apheresis Registry.

    PubMed

    Malchesky, Paul S; Koo, Anna P; Skibinski, Christine I; Hadsell, Angela T; Rybicki, Lisa A

    2010-02-01

    The developments in apheresis technologies and techniques and their clinical applications worldwide are technologically, sociologically, and economically motivated. As in the past apheresis surveys, the statistics have highlighted both the differences by geographic region in clinical practice and in the type of technologies utilized. While a national view of apheresis is very important, an international view may be more representative overall of this therapeutic modality than national results that are highly dependent on the local economics and the available technologies. These regional differences have provided a basis for scientific and clinical assessment of these apheresis technologies and their clinical outcomes, and have impacted the marketing and business developments of new technologies worldwide. The results of the International Apheresis Registry for 2007 report data from 20 centers on five continents. The survey collected data exclusively via a secure internet website on 1735 patients for a total of 6787 treatments. As with our prior registry for 2005, information on stem cell infusions was gathered. Information collected included patients demographics, medical history, treatment diagnoses, treatment specifics (type, methodology, access type, anticoagulants, drugs, and equipment usage), side effects, clinical response, and payment provider. As in prior International Apheresis Registries for 1983, 2000, 2002, and 2005, the survey results highlight the regional differences in apheresis usage and treatment methodologies indicating that an international overview of apheresis may be more representative of the impact of this therapeutic modality.

  1. Online registry for mutations in hereditary amyloidosis including nomenclature recommendations.

    PubMed

    Rowczenio, Dorota M; Noor, Islam; Gillmore, Julian D; Lachmann, Helen J; Whelan, Carol; Hawkins, Philip N; Obici, Laura; Westermark, Per; Grateau, Gilles; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D

    2014-09-01

    Hereditary systemic amyloidosis comprises a group of rare monogenic diseases inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. It is associated with mutations in genes encoding eight different proteins, including transthyretin, apolipoprotein AI, apolipoprotein AII, lysozyme, fibrinogen A α-chain, cystatin C, gelsolin and beta-2-microglobulin. With support from the EU FP6 EURAMY project we have designed an online registry of genes and mutations in hereditary amyloidosis including their associated clinical phenotypes, with a view to having a single free online portal for the collection and distribution of this information. Users can search the registry by either mutation, phenotype or authors who have published or submitted mutations. It provides a submission form for reporting newly identified mutations. We also wanted to introduce nomenclature which complies with recommendations set out by Human Genome Variation Society and HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee for description of new and known genetic variants. We hope this registry would be a useful and convenient tool for the medical and scientific community. PMID:25044787

  2. Apheresis technologies and clinical applications: the 2005 International Apheresis Registry.

    PubMed

    Malchesky, Paul S; Koo, Anna P; Roberson, Gerald A; Hadsell, Angela T; Rybicki, Lisa A

    2007-10-01

    The developments in apheresis technologies and techniques and their clinical applications worldwide are technologically, sociologically, and economically motivated. In past apheresis surveys the statistics have highlighted both the differences by geographic region in clinical practice and in the types of technologies utilized. While a national view of apheresis is very important, an international view may be more representative overall of this therapeutic modality than national results that are highly dependent on the local economics and the available technologies. These regional differences have provided a basis for scientific and clinical assessment of these apheresis technologies and their clinical outcomes, and have impacted the marketing and business developments of new technologies worldwide. The results of the International Apheresis Registry for 2005 reporting from 22 centers on 5 continents are presented. The survey collected data exclusively via a secure internet website on 1133 patients for a total of 6501 treatments. Unlike our prior registries, information on stem cell infusions was gathered. Information gathered included patient demographics, medical history, treatment diagnoses, treatment specifics (type, methodology, access type, anticoagulants, drugs, and equipment usage), side-effects, clinical response, and payment provider. As in the prior International Apheresis Registries for 1983, 2000, and 2002 the survey results highlight the regional differences in apheresis usage and treatment methodologies, indicating that an international overview of apheresis may be more representative of the impact of this therapeutic modality.

  3. The importance of rheumatology biologic registries in Latin America.

    PubMed

    de la Vega, Maria; da Silveira de Carvalho, Hellen M; Ventura Ríos, Lucio; Goycochea Robles, Maria V; Casado, Gustavo C

    2013-04-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by joint articular pain and disability. Although there is scarcity of data available on the incidence and prevalence of RA in Latin America, there is a growing recognition of this disease where chronic diseases are on the rise and infectious disease on the decline. RA is a substantial burden to patients, society, and the healthcare system. The heterogeneity identified within RA presents an opportunity for personalized medicine, especially in regions with such demographic diversity as that of Latin America. To understand the long-term effects of treatment for RA especially on safety, registries have been established, a number of which have been created in Latin America. Despite their weaknesses (e.g., lack of controls and randomization), registries have provided additional and complementary information on the use of biologics in clinical practice in Latin America and other regions. Although certain challenges remain in the implementation and maintenance of registries, they continue to provide real-life data to clinical practice contributing to improved patient care.

  4. Biological control of Penicillium italicum, P. digitatum and P. expansum by the predacious yeast Saccharomycopsis schoenii on oranges

    PubMed Central

    Pimenta, Raphael S.; Silva, Francisco L.; Silva, Juliana F.M.; Morais, Paula B.; Braga, Danúbia T; Rosa, Carlos A.; Corrêa Jr., Ary

    2008-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the ability of Saccharomycopsis schoenii Nadson and Krassiln (UWO-PS 80-91) as biocontrol agent against plant pathogenic filamentous fungi P. expansum Link (UFMG 01-2002), P. italicum Wehmer (LCP 61.1199), and P. digitatum (Pers.: Fr.) (LCP 984263, LCP 68175 and LCP 4354). S. schoenii was able to reduce disease severity in oranges inoculated with all fungi. Among the phytopathogens, P. digitatum LCP4354 was the most virulent whereas P. digitatum LCP 68175 was the most susceptible to predation. The yeast was able to survive for 21 days on the fruit surface and did not produce lesions on oranges. Production of antagonistic substances by S. schoenii was not detected using standard techniques. Our results point to the potential use of S. schoenii to control postharvest phytopathogens in fruits. PMID:24031185

  5. Instantaneous network RTK in Orange County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Y.

    2003-04-01

    The Orange County Real Time GPS Network (OCRTN) is an upgrade of a sub-network of SCIGN sites in southern California to low latency (1-2 sec), high-rate (1 Hz) data streaming, analysis, and dissemination. The project is a collaborative effort of the California Spatial Reference Center (CSRC) and the Orange County Public Resource and Facilities Division, with partners from the geophysical community, local and state government, and the private sector. Currently, ten sites are streaming 1 Hz raw data (Ashtech binary MBEN format) by means of dedicated, point-to-point radio modems to a network hub that translates the asynchronous serial data to TCP/IP and onto a PC workstation residing on a local area network. Software residing on the PC allows multiple clients to access the raw data simultaneously though TCP/IP. One of the clients is a Geodetics RTD server that receives and archives (1) the raw 1 Hz network data, (2) estimates of instantaneous positions and zenith tropospheric delays for quality control and detection of ground motion, and (3) RINEX data to decimated to 30 seconds. Data recovery is typically 99-100%. The server also produces 1 Hz RTCM data (messages 18, 19, 3 and 22) that are available by means of TCP/IP to RTK clients with wireless Internet modems. Coverage is excellent throughout the county. The server supports standard RTK users and is compatible with existing GPS instrumentation. Typical latency is 1-2 s, with initialization times of several seconds to minutes OCRTN site spacing is 10-15 km. In addition, the server supports “smart clients” who can retrieve data from the closest n sites (typically 3) and obtain an instantaneous network RTK position with 1-2 s latency. This mode currently requires a PDA running the RTD client software, and a wireless card. Since there is no initialization and re-initialization required this approach is well suited to support high-precision (centimeter-level) dynamic applications such as intelligent transportation

  6. TSOC-HFrEF Registry: A Registry of Hospitalized Patients with Decompensated Systolic Heart Failure: Description of Population and Management

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Chang, Hung-Yu; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Wu, Yen-Wen; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Hsu, Chih-Hsin; Wen, Ming-Shien; Voon, Wen-Chol; Lin, Wei-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Long; Chen, Shyh-Ming; Yang, Ning-I; Chang, Heng-Chia; Chang, Kuan-Cheng; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Lin, Jiunn-Lee; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Chan, Kuei-Chuan; Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Wang, Ji-Hung; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Tseng, Wei-Kung; Cherng, Wen-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure (HF) is a medical condition with a rapidly increasing incidence both in Taiwan and worldwide. The objective of the TSOC-HFrEF registry was to assess epidemiology, etiology, clinical management, and outcomes in a large sample of hospitalized patients presenting with acute decompensated systolic HF. Methods The TSOC-HFrEF registry was a prospective, multicenter, observational survey of patients presenting to 21 medical centers or teaching hospitals in Taiwan. Hospitalized patients with either acute new-onset HF or acute decompensation of chronic HFrEF were enrolled. Data including demographic characteristics, medical history, primary etiology of HF, precipitating factors for HF hospitalization, presenting symptoms and signs, diagnostic and treatment procedures, in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and discharge medications, were collected and analyzed. Results A total of 1509 patients were enrolled into the registry by the end of October 2014, with a mean age of 64 years (72% were male). Ischemic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy were diagnosed in 44% and 33% of patients, respectively. Coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes, and chronic renal insufficiency were the common comorbid conditions. Acute coronary syndrome, non-compliant to treatment, and concurrent infection were the major precipitating factors for acute decompensation. The median length of hospital stay was 8 days, and the in-hospital mortality rate was 2.4%. At discharge, 62% of patients were prescribed either angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers, 60% were prescribed beta-blockers, and 49% were prescribed mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. Conclusions The TSOC-HFrEF registry provided important insights into the current clinical characteristics and management of hospitalized decompensated systolic HF patients in Taiwan. One important observation was that adherence to guideline-directed medical therapy was suboptimal

  7. Rationale and Design of the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC) Registry

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although the management of thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) has improved significantly, patients presenting with aortic dissections, rupture or other acute complications of TAAs continue to suffer high rates of morbidity and mortality. Accumulating data have indicated that many TAAs are due to underlying gene mutations. A comprehensive approach to the study of TAAs resulting from genetic mutations is needed to translate this information into advances in treatment. Objective The National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC) was established to provide a biospecimen inventory and bioinformatics infrastructure to enable research to advance the clinical management of genetically-triggered TAAs and related complications. Methods The GenTAC Registry is a longitudinal observational cohort study enrolling patients with conditions related to genetically-induced TAAs from five regional clinical centers in the United States. Results Over 700 subjects with associated clinical histories, physical examinations, imaging data, and biospecimens have been enrolled in the Registry to date. Enrollment is expected to continue until September 2010. Total enrollment of nearly 3,000 subjects is expected. No interim analysis has yet been undertaken. Conclusions GenTAC has been established to facilitate studies by GenTAC investigators and others that will advance multiple scientific frontiers in thoracic aortic disease. Genotypic, proteomic, clinical, and imaging data will be integrated systematically with outcomes data to determine the optimal clinical management of patients suffering from genetically-induced TAAs. PMID:19185640

  8. Sunscreening Agents

    PubMed Central

    Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents. PMID:23320122

  9. The Signaling State of Orange Carotenoid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Maksimov, Eugene G.; Shirshin, Evgeny A.; Sluchanko, Nikolai N.; Zlenko, Dmitry V.; Parshina, Evgenia Y.; Tsoraev, Georgy V.; Klementiev, Konstantin E.; Budylin, Gleb S.; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Friedrich, Thomas; Fadeev, Victor V.; Paschenko, Vladimir Z.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Orange carotenoid protein (OCP) is the photoactive protein that is responsible for high light tolerance in cyanobacteria. We studied the kinetics of the OCP photocycle by monitoring changes in its absorption spectrum, intrinsic fluorescence, and fluorescence of the Nile red dye bound to OCP. It was demonstrated that all of these three methods provide the same kinetic parameters of the photocycle, namely, the kinetics of OCP relaxation in darkness was biexponential with a ratio of two components equal to 2:1 independently of temperature. Whereas the changes of the absorption spectrum of OCP characterize the geometry and environment of its chromophore, the intrinsic fluorescence of OCP reveals changes in its tertiary structure, and the fluorescence properties of Nile red indicate the exposure of hydrophobic surface areas of OCP to the solvent following the photocycle. The results of molecular-dynamics studies indicated the presence of two metastable conformations of 3′-hydroxyechinenone, which is consistent with characteristic changes in the Raman spectra. We conclude that rotation of the β-ionylidene ring in the C-terminal domain of OCP could be one of the first conformational rearrangements that occur during photoactivation. The obtained results suggest that the photoactivated form of OCP represents a molten globule-like state that is characterized by increased mobility of tertiary structure elements and solvent accessibility. PMID:26244741

  10. Hydrology of Lake Butler, Orange County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoot, James L.; Schiffer, Donna M.

    1984-01-01

    Lake Butler is one of the lakes that collectively make up the Butler chain of lakes in the headwaters of the Kissimmee River, Florida. The bottom configuration of the lake is typical of relict karst features formed during lower stages in sea level. The top of the Floridan aquifer is 50 to 100 feet below the land surface. The drainage area of Lake Butler is approximately 14.5 sq mi and is comprised of sub-basins of other lakes in the vicinity. Surface outflow from Lake Butler is generally southward to Cypress Creek, a tributary of the Kissimmee River. The extremes in lake stage for the period 1933-81 are 94.67 ft on June 23, 1981 and 101.78 ft on September 13, 1960. The median lake stage for this period was 99.28 ft above sea level. The quality of water in Lake Butler is excellent, based on studies of physical, chemical, and biological conditions by the Orange County Pollution Control Department. The lake water is slightly acidic and soft (48 mg/L hardness as calcium carbonate). Pesticides in water were below detection levels at two sites sampled in the lake, but were detected in the bottom sediments. (USGS)

  11. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1992-03-01

    In recent years, introduction of new and more effective agents has improved the overall therapy for parasitic infections. This field, however, is still plagued by numerous problems, including the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents (especially with malaria), unavailability of agents in the United States or lack of approval by the Food and Drug Administration, and major toxicities or lack of experience in pregnant women and children, which limits use in these groups of patients. Widespread resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and other agents has complicated the treatment and prophylaxis of this type of malaria. A combination of quinine and Fansidar is usually effective oral therapy for falciparum malaria; quinidine may be administered if intravenous therapy is needed. Mefloquine, which is currently recommended for prophylaxis against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, is also effective for single-dose oral treatment, although this regimen has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Metronidazole has been widely used for treatment of gastroenteritis due to Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia (not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the latter) and is considered safe and effective. A new macrolide, azithromycin, has been reported to be effective for cryptosporidiosis in experimental animals; currently, no effective therapy is available for human infections. Combinations of sulfonamides with other antifolates, trimethoprim or pyrimethamine, are recommended therapy for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia or toxoplasmosis, respectively. Therapies for the various types of leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are complex, often toxic, and often of limited efficacy. The benzimidazoles are effective for roundworm infections, although thiabendazole has severe toxic effects. The recent introduction of ivermectin has revolutionized the treatment and control of onchocerciasis. Another relatively new agent, praziquantel

  12. Use of Icodextrin 4% Solution in the Prevention of Adhesion Formation Following General Surgery: From the Multicentre ARIEL Registry

    PubMed Central

    Menzies, D; Pascual, M Hidalgo; Walz, MK; Duron, JJ; Tonelli, F; Crowe, A; Knight, A

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intra-abdominal adhesions occur in many patients following major abdominal surgery and represent a serious burden to patients and healthcare providers. The multicentre ARIEL (Adept® Registry for Clinical Evaluation) Registry was established to gather clinical experiences in the use of icodextrin 4% solution, an approved adhesion-reduction agent, during routine general surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS General surgeons from five European countries completed anonymised data collection forms for patients undergoing laparotomy or laparoscopy. Surgeons recorded patient demographics, use of icodextrin 4% solution and adverse events, and made subjective assessments of ease of use and patient acceptability with the agent. RESULTS The general surgery registry included 1738 patients (1469 laparotomies, 269 laparoscopies). Leakage of fluid from the surgical site did not appear to be affected by icodextrin 4% solution and was classified as ‘normal’ or ‘less than normal’ in most patients (laparotomies 86%, laparoscopies 88%). Overall, satisfaction with ease of use was rated as ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ by the majority of surgeons (laparotomies 77%, laparoscopies 86%). Patient acceptability was also good, with ratings of ‘as expected’ or ‘less than expected’ in most cases for both abdominal distension (laparotomies 90%, laparoscopies 91%) and abdominal discomfort (laparotomies 91%, laparoscopies 93%). Adverse events occurred in 30.6% of laparotomy patients and 16.7% of laparoscopy patients; the most common events were septic/infective events (4.2% and 3.4% in the laparotomy and laparoscopy groups, respectively). Anastomotic wound-healing problems were reported in 7.6% of patients in the subset of laparoscopy patients undergoing anastomotic procedures (n = 66). DISCUSSION Volumes of icodextrin 4% solution used as an irrigant and instillate were in line with recommendations. Surgeons considered the agent to be easy to use and acceptable to patients

  13. Bacterial community in Haemaphysalis ticks of domesticated animals from the Orang Asli communities in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Jing-Jing; Chen, Fezshin; Kho, Kai Ling; Ahmad Shanizza, Azzy Iyzati; Lim, Fang-Shiang; Tan, Kim-Kee; Chang, Li-Yen; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2016-07-01

    Ticks are vectors in the transmission of many important infectious diseases in human and animals. Ticks can be readily found in the semi-forested areas such as the settlements of the indigenous people in Malaysia, the Orang Asli. There is still minimal information available on the bacterial agents associated with ticks found in Malaysia. We performed a survey of the bacterial communities associated with ticks collected from domestic animals found in two Orang Asli villages in Malaysia. We collected 62 ticks, microscopically and molecularly identified as related to Haemaphysalis wellingtoni, Haemaphysalis hystricis and Haemaphysalis bispinosa. Bacterial 16s rRNA hypervariable region (V6) amplicon libraries prepared from the tick samples were sequenced on the Ion Torrent PGM platform. We detected a total of 392 possible bacterial genera after pooling and sequencing 20 samples, indicating a diverse bacterial community profile. Dominant taxa include the potential tick endosymbiont, Coxiella. Other dominant taxa include the tick-associated pathogen, Rickettsia, and environmental bacteria such as Bacillus, Mycobacterium, Sphingomonas and Pseudomonas. Other known tick-associated bacteria were also detected, including Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsiella and Wolbachia, albeit at very low abundance. Specific PCR was performed on selected samples to identify Rickettsia and Coxiella. Sequence of Rickettsia felis, which causes spotted fever in human and cats, was identified in one sample. Coxiella endosymbionts were detected in three samples. This study provides the baseline knowledge of the microbiome of ticks in Malaysia, focusing on tick-associated bacteria affecting the Orang Asli communities. The role of the herein found Coxiella and Rickettsia in tick physiology or disease transmission merits further investigation. PMID:27132518

  14. Bacterial community in Haemaphysalis ticks of domesticated animals from the Orang Asli communities in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Jing-Jing; Chen, Fezshin; Kho, Kai Ling; Ahmad Shanizza, Azzy Iyzati; Lim, Fang-Shiang; Tan, Kim-Kee; Chang, Li-Yen; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2016-07-01

    Ticks are vectors in the transmission of many important infectious diseases in human and animals. Ticks can be readily found in the semi-forested areas such as the settlements of the indigenous people in Malaysia, the Orang Asli. There is still minimal information available on the bacterial agents associated with ticks found in Malaysia. We performed a survey of the bacterial communities associated with ticks collected from domestic animals found in two Orang Asli villages in Malaysia. We collected 62 ticks, microscopically and molecularly identified as related to Haemaphysalis wellingtoni, Haemaphysalis hystricis and Haemaphysalis bispinosa. Bacterial 16s rRNA hypervariable region (V6) amplicon libraries prepared from the tick samples were sequenced on the Ion Torrent PGM platform. We detected a total of 392 possible bacterial genera after pooling and sequencing 20 samples, indicating a diverse bacterial community profile. Dominant taxa include the potential tick endosymbiont, Coxiella. Other dominant taxa include the tick-associated pathogen, Rickettsia, and environmental bacteria such as Bacillus, Mycobacterium, Sphingomonas and Pseudomonas. Other known tick-associated bacteria were also detected, including Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsiella and Wolbachia, albeit at very low abundance. Specific PCR was performed on selected samples to identify Rickettsia and Coxiella. Sequence of Rickettsia felis, which causes spotted fever in human and cats, was identified in one sample. Coxiella endosymbionts were detected in three samples. This study provides the baseline knowledge of the microbiome of ticks in Malaysia, focusing on tick-associated bacteria affecting the Orang Asli communities. The role of the herein found Coxiella and Rickettsia in tick physiology or disease transmission merits further investigation.

  15. Low temperature solution process-based defect-induced orange-red light emitting diode

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Pranab; Baek, Sung-Doo; Hoon Lee, Sang; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Jeong Lee, Su; Il Lee, Tae; Myoung, Jae-Min

    2015-01-01

    We report low-temperature solution-processed p-CuO nanorods (NRs)/n-ZnO NRs heterojunction light emitting diode (LED), exploiting the native point defects of ZnO NRs. ZnO NRs were synthesized at 90 °C by using hydrothermal method while CuO NRs were synthesized at 100 °C by using microwave reaction system. The electrical properties of newly synthesized CuO NRs revealed a promising p-type nature with a hole concentration of 9.64 × 1018 cm−3. The current-voltage characteristic of the heterojunction showed a significantly high rectification ratio of 105 at 4 V with a stable current flow. A broad orange-red emission was obtained from the forward biased LED with a major peak at 610 nm which was attributed to the electron transition from interstitial zinc to interstitial oxygen point defects in ZnO. A minor shoulder peak was also observed at 710 nm, corresponding to red emission which was ascribed to the transition from conduction band of ZnO to oxygen vacancies in ZnO lattice. This study demonstrates a significant progress toward oxide materials based, defect-induced light emitting device with low-cost, low-temperature methods. PMID:26648420

  16. Characterization and luminescence properties of Sr3Gd): Sm3+ orange-red phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zaifa; Xu, Denghui; Sun, Jiayue; Sun, Yumei; Du, Haiyan

    2015-10-01

    Reddish-orange emitting phosphors, Sr3Gd): Sm3+, were successfully synthesized by a conventional solid-state reaction. The crystal structure of the phosphors was characterized by x-ray diffraction. The excitation spectra and emission spectra were utilized to characterize the luminescence properties of the as-prepared phosphors. The results show that the phosphor consisted of some sharp emission peaks of Sm3+ ions centered at 564, 600, 647, and 707 nm, respectively. The critical distance of Sr3Gd0.93): 0.07Sm3+ was calculated to be 19.18 Å and the lifetime value of the sample was 1.63 ms. The band gap of Sr3Gd) was estimated to be about 2.74 eV from the diffuse reflection spectrum. The optimum doping concentration is 7 mol. % and the quenching occurs via dipole-dipole interaction according to Dexter's theory. The Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage value of Sr3Gd): Sm3+ phosphors presented that it has high color purity. These results indicated that the Sr3Gd): Sm3+ may be a promising reddish-orange emitting phosphor for cost-effective near ultraviolet white light-emitting diodes.

  17. Antidiabetic Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antidiabetic agents is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  18. Outdoor residential water use trends in Orange County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijoor, N. S.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Berg, J.; Baum-Haley, M.

    2012-12-01

    Irrigation is required to maintain outdoor landscapes in semi-arid climates, such as in Orange County, California. Landscape water use efficiency is a priority in Orange County, as nearly half the water supply is imported and the region is vulnerable to water shortages. The purpose of this research is to determine whether single family household residents adjust landscape irrigation based on climate or income in Orange County. Specifically, the goals were to (1) estimate the volume of single family residence (SFR) landscape irrigation applied (2) determine the depth (mm) of over- or under-irrigation compared to theoretical need (3) determine the climatic and socioeconomic controls on landscape irrigation. We plan to compare results from agencies with uniform vs. allocation-based rate structures. A research partnership was established between six water retail agencies in Orange County: Huntington Beach Water District, El Toro Water District, Irvine Ranch Water District, East Orange County Water District, City of San Juan Capistrano, and Laguna Beach County Water District. These agencies represent a wide range of climatic and economic conditions and contributed between 3 and 13 years of SFR water use data on a monthly/bimonthly basis. Household water use, climate, and socioeconomic factors were mapped using Arcview GIS. Air temperature (California Irrigation Management Information System), precipitation (Orange County Cooperative Observer System), landscape size, and income (US Census) were evaluated as possible controls on SFR water use. Findings indicate that landscape water use may constitute the majority of household water use. We found over-irrigation relative to plant water demand in areas of Orange County. Domestic landscape water use may depend on climate and/or income. Results suggest a high potential for residential water savings with improved landscape irrigation efficiency. This information would be useful for improving or developing water use efficiency

  19. A comprehensive stroke center patient registry: advantages, limitations, and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Siegler, James E.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Dorsey, Adrianne M.; Monlezun, Dominique J.; George, Alex J.; Shaban, Amir; Bockholt, H. Jeremy; Albright, Karen C.; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of a medical data registry allows institutions to effectively manage information for many different investigations related to the registry, as well as evaluate patient's trends over time, with the ultimate goal of recognizing trends that may improve outcomes in a particular patient population. Methods The purpose of this article is to illustrate our experience with a stroke patient registry at a comprehensive stroke center and highlight advantages, disadvantages, and lessons learned in the process of designing, implementing, and maintaining a stroke registry. We detail the process of stroke registry methodology, common data element (CDE) definitions, the generation of manuscripts from a registry, and the limitations. Advantages The largest advantage of a registry is the ability to prospectively add patients, while allowing investigators to go back and collect information retrospectively if needed. The continuous addition of new patients increases the sample size of studies from year to year, and it also allows reflection on clinical practices from previous years and the ability to investigate trends in patient management over time. Limitations The greatest limitation in this registry pertains to our single-entry technique where multiple sites of data entry and transfer may generate errors within the registry. Lessons Learned To reduce the potential for errors and maximize the accuracy and efficiency of the registry, we invest significant time in training competent registry users and project leaders. With effective training and transition of leadership positions, which are continuous and evolving processes, we have attempted to optimize our clinical research registry for knowledge gain and quality improvement at our center. PMID:26913217

  20. Assessment of acquired hemophilia patient demographics in the United States: the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society Registry

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Craig M.; Ma, Alice D.; Al-Mondhiry, Hamid A.B.; Gut, Robert Z.; Cooper, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Society (HTRS) Registry was used to monitor the postapproval use of recombinant factor VIIa. The objective of this manuscript is to provide key insights on the demographics of patients with acquired hemophilia in the HTRS Registry. Acquired hemophilia patient registration in HTRS captured age; sex; comorbidities and predisposing conditions; first bleeding location; laboratory parameters; exposure to blood products, factor, and bypassing agents; and initiation of immune suppression/tolerance therapy. Overall, 166 patients with acquired hemophilia were registered in HTRS (83 women, 73 men, median age 70 years); the majority were non-Hispanic whites (61.4%). The most common comorbidities were autoimmune disease (28.4%) and malignancy (14.5%). The most common first site of bleeding was subcutaneous (27.1%); this was more common in whites (29.1%) than blacks (12.5%) and in non-Hispanics (26.4%) than Hispanics (11.8%). Blood product exposure was reported for 33.1% of patients; the most commonly reported product was packed red blood cells (28%). Of the 57 patients with outcome data available for immune tolerance therapy, 26 patients (46%) reported successful treatment, 13 reported unsuccessful treatment (23%), and 18 (32%) were receiving active treatment at the time of registration. The HTRS Registry final analysis provides the only current comprehensive look at acquired hemophilia in the US population, including details on underlying autoimmune diseases and malignancies. Pertinent to recognition and diagnosis of the disease, subcutaneous bleeding as a presenting bleeding symptom was more common in white and non-Hispanic individuals. PMID:27467981

  1. Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry: Study Design and Outcome Measures.

    PubMed

    Weber LeBrun, Emily; Adam, Rony A; Barber, Matthew D; Boyles, Sarah Hamilton; Iglesia, Cheryl B; Lukacz, Emily S; Moalli, Pamela; Moen, Michael D; Richter, Holly E; Subak, Leslee L; Sung, Vivian W; Visco, Anthony G; Bradley, Catherine S

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders affect up to 24% of adult women in the United States, and many patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) choose to undergo surgical repair to improve their quality of life. While a variety of surgical repair approaches and techniques are utilized, including mesh augmentation, there is limited comparative effectiveness and safety outcome data guiding best practice. In conjunction with device manufacturers, federal regulatory organizations, and professional societies, the American Urogynecologic Society developed the Pelvic Floor Disorders Registry (PFDR) designed to improve the quality of POP surgery by facilitating quality improvement and research on POP treatments. The PFDR will serve as a resource for surgeons interested in benchmarking and outcomes data and as a data repository for Food and Drug Administration-mandated POP surgical device studies. Provider-reported clinical data and patient-reported outcomes will be collected prospectively at baseline and for up to 3 years after treatment. All data elements including measures of success, adverse events, and surgeon characteristics were identified and defined within the context of the anticipated multifunctionality of the registry, and with collaboration from multiple stakeholders. The PFDR will provide a platform to collect high-quality, standardized patient-level data from a variety of nonsurgical (pessary) and surgical treatments of POP and other pelvic floor disorders. Data from this registry may be used to evaluate short- and longer-term treatment outcomes, patient-reported outcomes, and complications, as well as to identify factors associated with treatment success and failure with the overall goal of improving the quality of care for women with these conditions.

  2. Malignancies in Swedish persons with haemophilia: a longitudinal registry study.

    PubMed

    Lövdahl, Susanna; Henriksson, Karin M; Baghaei, Fariba; Holmström, Margareta; Berntorp, Erik; Astermark, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate, over time, the incidence of and mortality due to malignant diseases among persons with haemophilia, compared to matched controls. Persons with haemophilia A or B were enrolled via registries at each haemophilia centre, as well as from the National Patient Registry, and were compared to five sex and age-matched controls per patient. Data from the national Cancer Registry were linked to the study participants. A total of 1431 persons with haemophilia and 7150 matched controls were enrolled. Between the years 1972 and 2008, 164 malignancies were reported. The most common type of cancer among patients was prostate cancer, followed by haematologic malignancies, including lymphoma and leukaemia, which were significantly more frequent in patients [n = 35 (2.4%) vs. n = 60 (0.8%); P < 0.001]. Malignancies in bladder and other urinary organs were also significantly different [n = 21 (1.5%) vs. n = 46 (0.6%); P < 0.01]. The overall incidence rate ratio of malignancies per 1000 person-years compared to the controls was 1.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1, 1.6]. In subgroup analysis, the corresponding incidence rate ratios per 1000 person-years for persons with severe haemophilia was 1.7 (95% CI 0.9, 3.1) and that for mild/moderate haemophilia 1.1 (95% CI 0.8, 1.5). Swedish persons with haemophilia had a significantly higher incidence of malignant diseases than controls. These were primarily haematologic malignancies and cancer in urinary organs, and the difference independent of any co-infections with HIV and/or viral hepatitis. The findings indicate the importance of further studies and close follow-up of malignancies in persons with haemophilia.

  3. Baseline Characteristics of the Korean Registry of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wook-Jin; Park, Yong Bum; Jeon, Chan Hong; Jung, Jo Won; Ko, Kwang-Phil; Choi, Sung Jae; Seo, Hye Sun; Lee, Jae Seung; Jung, Hae Ok

    2015-10-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding of the pathobiology and targeted treatments of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), epidemiologic data from large populations have been limited to western countries. The aim of the Korean Registry of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (KORPAH) was to examine the epidemiology and prognosis of Korean patients with PAH. KORPAH was designed as a nationwide, multicenter, prospective data collection using an internet webserver from September 2008 to December 2011. A total of 625 patients were enrolled. The patients' mean age was 47.6 ± 15.7 yr, and 503 (80.5%) were women. The diagnostic methods included right heart catheterization (n = 249, 39.8%) and Doppler echocardiography (n = 376, 60.2%). The etiologies, in order of frequency, were connective tissue disease (CTD), congenital heart disease, and idiopathic PAH (IPAH) (49.8%, 25.4%, and 23.2%, respectively). Patients with WHO functional class III or IV at diagnosis were 43.4%. In total, 380 (60.8%) patients received a single PAH-specific treatment at the time of enrollment, but only 72 (18.9%) patients received combination therapy. Incident cases during the registry represented 297 patients; therefore, the incidence rate of PAH was 1.9 patients/yr/million people. The 1st-, 2nd-, and 3rd-yr estimated survival rates were 90.8%, 87.8%, and 84.4%, respectively. Although Korean PAH patients exhibited similar age, gender, and survival rate compared with western registries, they showed relatively more CTD-PAH in the etiology and also systemic lupus erythematosus among CTD-PAH. The data suggest that earlier diagnosis and more specialized therapies should be needed to improve the survival of PAH patients.

  4. Malignancies in Swedish persons with haemophilia: a longitudinal registry study.

    PubMed

    Lövdahl, Susanna; Henriksson, Karin M; Baghaei, Fariba; Holmström, Margareta; Berntorp, Erik; Astermark, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate, over time, the incidence of and mortality due to malignant diseases among persons with haemophilia, compared to matched controls. Persons with haemophilia A or B were enrolled via registries at each haemophilia centre, as well as from the National Patient Registry, and were compared to five sex and age-matched controls per patient. Data from the national Cancer Registry were linked to the study participants. A total of 1431 persons with haemophilia and 7150 matched controls were enrolled. Between the years 1972 and 2008, 164 malignancies were reported. The most common type of cancer among patients was prostate cancer, followed by haematologic malignancies, including lymphoma and leukaemia, which were significantly more frequent in patients [n = 35 (2.4%) vs. n = 60 (0.8%); P < 0.001]. Malignancies in bladder and other urinary organs were also significantly different [n = 21 (1.5%) vs. n = 46 (0.6%); P < 0.01]. The overall incidence rate ratio of malignancies per 1000 person-years compared to the controls was 1.3 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1, 1.6]. In subgroup analysis, the corresponding incidence rate ratios per 1000 person-years for persons with severe haemophilia was 1.7 (95% CI 0.9, 3.1) and that for mild/moderate haemophilia 1.1 (95% CI 0.8, 1.5). Swedish persons with haemophilia had a significantly higher incidence of malignant diseases than controls. These were primarily haematologic malignancies and cancer in urinary organs, and the difference independent of any co-infections with HIV and/or viral hepatitis. The findings indicate the importance of further studies and close follow-up of malignancies in persons with haemophilia. PMID:26974329

  5. Global polar geospatial registry centre system and its realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jie; Wang, Wei; Chen, Nengcheng; Chen, Zeqiang; Chen, Jiaying

    2008-12-01

    Antarctica plays a key role in many scientific questions, of which those related to global climate change are probably the most prominent examples. There are many researches on Antarctic are carried out at present, and some special institutes sponsored by public and private communities are responsible for antarctica data management and maintenance. Antarctic Spatial Data Infrastructure (AntSDI) [1]sponsored by SCAR's Standing Committee on Antarctic Geographic Information (SC-AGI) is the one responsible for Antarctica spatial data maintenance and sharing by means of OGC standard and specification. Antarctica Spatial Data Infrastructure (AntSDI) has already collected huge volumes of geospatial data and offer an opening geospatial information service. In order to management and use Geospatial data efficiently, and enable most of the users can access to Geospatical data and service at will, we firstly must registry data and service into one or more registry center, then we should construct a building system which can supply users a uniform interface to access data and service in registry center and user also can add their own data and service to system and become part of system's capability. in this paper we present GeoAnt, a prototype interoperable AntSDI building system. GeoAnt is a three-tier standard-based open geospatial web service system which fully automates data discovery, access, and integration steps of the geospatial information discovery process under the interoperable service framework. The paper discusses the system architecture, the individual components of the system and the use of the system in the international project- Grove Mountains GIService Portal (GMGP).

  6. An attempt of postharvest orange fruit rot control using essential oils from Mediterranean plants.

    PubMed

    Camele, Ippolito; De Feo, Vincenzo; Altieri, Luciana; Mancini, Emilia; De Martino, Laura; Luigi Rana, Gian

    2010-12-01

    Twelve essential oils from Mediterranean aromatic plants were tested at different doses against four fungi known as causal agents of post-harvest orange fruit rot: Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium italicum, Phytophthora citrophthora, and Rhizopus stolonifer. Essential oils were obtained from Hyssopus officinalis, Lavandula angustifolia, Majorana hortensis, Melissa officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Origanum vulgare, Salvia officinalis, and Thymus vulgaris (Family Lamiaceae), Verbena officinalis (Family Verbenaceae), and Pimpinella anisum, Foeniculum vulgare, and Carum carvi (Family Apiaceae). Because preliminary in vitro experiments showed that only the oils from V. officinalis, T. vulgaris, and O. vulgare exhibited some fungistatic activity against the above-named fungi, these three essential oils were used in successive in vivo tests carried out to protect healthy "Washington navel" orange fruits from artificial infection by the same micromycetes. The essential oil of T. vulgaris, at a 2,000 ppm dose, controlled fruit rot by B. cinerea, P. citrophthora, and R. stolonifer but was ineffective against P. italicum. Essential oils of V. officinalis and O. vulgare inhibited infection by the first two fungi and only by P. citrophthora, respectively. This finding represents an important result, with the goal of using the essential oils as natural preservatives for food products, due to their positive effect on their safety and shelf life.

  7. An attempt of postharvest orange fruit rot control using essential oils from Mediterranean plants.

    PubMed

    Camele, Ippolito; De Feo, Vincenzo; Altieri, Luciana; Mancini, Emilia; De Martino, Laura; Luigi Rana, Gian

    2010-12-01

    Twelve essential oils from Mediterranean aromatic plants were tested at different doses against four fungi known as causal agents of post-harvest orange fruit rot: Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium italicum, Phytophthora citrophthora, and Rhizopus stolonifer. Essential oils were obtained from Hyssopus officinalis, Lavandula angustifolia, Majorana hortensis, Melissa officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Origanum vulgare, Salvia officinalis, and Thymus vulgaris (Family Lamiaceae), Verbena officinalis (Family Verbenaceae), and Pimpinella anisum, Foeniculum vulgare, and Carum carvi (Family Apiaceae). Because preliminary in vitro experiments showed that only the oils from V. officinalis, T. vulgaris, and O. vulgare exhibited some fungistatic activity against the above-named fungi, these three essential oils were used in successive in vivo tests carried out to protect healthy "Washington navel" orange fruits from artificial infection by the same micromycetes. The essential oil of T. vulgaris, at a 2,000 ppm dose, controlled fruit rot by B. cinerea, P. citrophthora, and R. stolonifer but was ineffective against P. italicum. Essential oils of V. officinalis and O. vulgare inhibited infection by the first two fungi and only by P. citrophthora, respectively. This finding represents an important result, with the goal of using the essential oils as natural preservatives for food products, due to their positive effect on their safety and shelf life. PMID:20874226

  8. Information Management in Cancer Registries: Evaluating the Needs for Cancer Data Collection and Cancer Research.

    PubMed

    Zachary, Iris; Boren, Suzanne A; Simoes, Eduardo; Jackson-Thompson, Jeannette; Davis, J Wade; Hicks, Lanis

    2015-01-01

    Cancer registry data collection involves, at a minimum, collecting data on demographics, tumor characteristics, and treatment. A common, identified, and standardized set of data elements is needed to share data quickly and efficiently with consumers of this data. This project highlights the fact that, there is a need to develop common data elements; Surveys were developed for central cancer registries (CCRs) and cancer researchers (CRs) at NCI-designated Cancer Centers, in order to understand data needs. Survey questions were developed based on the project focus, an evaluation of the research registries and database responses, and systematic review of the literature. Questions covered the following topics: 1) Research, 2) Data collection, 3) Database/ repository, 4) Use of data, 5) Additional data items, 6) Data requests, 7) New data fields, and 8) Cancer registry data set. A review of the surveys indicates that all cancer registries' data are used for public health surveillance, and 96% of the registries indicate the data are also used for research. Data are available online in interactive tables from over 50% of CRs and 87% of CCRs. Some other survey responses indicate that CCR treatment data are not complete for example treatment data, however cancer researchers are interested in treatment variables from CCRs. Cancer registries have many data available for review, but need to examine what data are needed and used by different entities. Cancer Registries can further enhance usage through collaborations and partnerships to connect common interests in the data by making registries visible and accessible. PMID:26392844

  9. The potential and limitations of data from population-based state cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, J N; Schoenbach, V J

    2000-05-01

    Cancer incidence varies markedly among states because of population heterogeneity regarding risk, genetic, and demographic factors. Population-based cancer registries are essential to monitoring cancer trends and control. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, through the National Program of Cancer Registries, are helping state registries generate more and better data nationwide. The National Program of Cancer Registries has supported the enhancement of 36 registries and the creation of 13 new registries in 45 states, 3 territories, and the District of Columbia, providing national standards for completeness, timeliness, and quality; financial support; and technical assistance. Users must be aware of diverse issues that influence collection and interpretation of cancer registry data, such as multiple cancer diagnoses, duplicate reports, reporting delays, misclassification of race/ethnicity, and pitfalls in estimations of cancer incidence rates. Attention to these issues and intense use of the available data for cancer surveillance will enable maximum societal benefit from the emerging network of population-based state cancer registries.

  10. The potential and limitations of data from population-based state cancer registries.

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, J N; Schoenbach, V J

    2000-01-01

    Cancer incidence varies markedly among states because of population heterogeneity regarding risk, genetic, and demographic factors. Population-based cancer registries are essential to monitoring cancer trends and control. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, through the National Program of Cancer Registries, are helping state registries generate more and better data nationwide. The National Program of Cancer Registries has supported the enhancement of 36 registries and the creation of 13 new registries in 45 states, 3 territories, and the District of Columbia, providing national standards for completeness, timeliness, and quality; financial support; and technical assistance. Users must be aware of diverse issues that influence collection and interpretation of cancer registry data, such as multiple cancer diagnoses, duplicate reports, reporting delays, misclassification of race/ethnicity, and pitfalls in estimations of cancer incidence rates. Attention to these issues and intense use of the available data for cancer surveillance will enable maximum societal benefit from the emerging network of population-based state cancer registries. PMID:10800415

  11. PARENT joint action: increasing the added value of patient registries in a cross-border setting.

    PubMed

    Meglič, Matic; Doupi, Persephone; Pristaš, Ivan; Skalkidis, Yannis; Zaletel, Metka; Orel, Andrej

    2013-01-01

    Patient registries are poorly interoperable and as a result data exchange or aggregation across organizations, regions and countries for secondary purposes (i.e. research and public health) is difficult to perform. PARENT Joint Action aims to provide EU Member States with a set of guidelines, recommendations and tools to support setting-up, management and governance of interoperable patient registries, thus helping EU Member States to drive down cost and interoperability risks of patient registries as well as improving secondary us-age of registry data in a cross-border setting. PMID:23920935

  12. Hereditary cancer registries improve the care of patients with a genetic predisposition to cancer: contributions from the Dutch Lynch syndrome registry.

    PubMed

    Vasen, Hans F A; Velthuizen, Mary E; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Menko, Fred H; Nagengast, Fokke M; Cats, Annemieke; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Breuning, Martijn H; Roukema, Anne J; van Leeuwen-Cornelisse, Inge; de Vos Tot Nederveen Cappel, Wouter H; Wijnen, Juul T

    2016-07-01

    The Dutch Hereditary Cancer Registry was established in 1985 with the support of the Ministry of Health (VWS). The aims of the registry are: (1) to promote the identification of families with hereditary cancer, (2) to encourage the participation in surveillance programs of individuals at high risk, (3) to ensure the continuity of lifelong surveillance examinations, and (4) to promote research, in particular the improvement of surveillance protocols. During its early days the registry provided assistance with family investigations and the collection of medical data, and recommended surveillance when a family fulfilled specific diagnostic criteria. Since 2000 the registry has focused on family follow-up, and ensuring the quality of surveillance programs and appropriate clinical management. Since its founding, the registry has identified over 10,000 high-risk individuals with a diverse array of hereditary cancer syndromes. All were encouraged to participate in prevention programmes. The registry has published a number of studies that evaluated the outcome of surveillance protocols for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Lynch syndrome, as well as in familial colorectal cancer. In 2006, evaluation of the effect of registration and colonoscopic surveillance on the mortality rate associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) showed that the policy led to a substantial decrease in the mortality rate associated with CRC. Following discovery of MMR gene defects, the first predictive model that could select families for genetic testing was published by the Leiden group. In addition, over the years the registry has produced many cancer risk studies that have helped to develop appropriate surveillance protocols. Hereditary cancer registries in general, and the Lynch syndrome registry in particular, play an important role in improving the clinical management of affected families. PMID:26973060

  13. The Global Network Maternal Newborn Health Registry: a multi-national, community-based registry of pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The Global Network for Women's and Children's Health Research (Global Network) supports and conducts clinical trials in resource-limited countries by pairing foreign and U.S. investigators, with the goal of evaluating low-cost, sustainable interventions to improve the health of women and children. Accurate reporting of births, stillbirths, neonatal deaths, maternal mortality, and measures of obstetric and neonatal care is critical to efforts to discover strategies for improving pregnancy outcomes in resource-limited settings. Because most of the sites in the Global Network have weak registration within their health care systems, the Global Network developed the Maternal Newborn Health Registry (MNHR), a prospective, population-based registry of pregnancies at the Global Network sites to provide precise data on health outcomes and measures of care. Methods Pregnant women are enrolled in the MNHR if they reside in or receive healthcare in designated groups of communities within sites in the Global Network. For each woman, demographic, health characteristics and major outcomes of pregnancy are recorded. Data are recorded at enrollment, the time of delivery and at 42 days postpartum. Results From 2010 through 2013 Global Network sites were located in Argentina, Guatemala, Belgaum and Nagpur, India, Pakistan, Kenya, and Zambia. During this period, 283,496 pregnant women were enrolled in the MNHR; this number represented 98.8% of all eligible women. Delivery data were collected for 98.8% of women and 42-day follow-up data for 98.4% of those enrolled. In this supplement, there are a series of manuscripts that use data gathered through the MNHR to report outcomes of these pregnancies. Conclusions Developing public policy and improving public health in countries with poor perinatal outcomes is, in part, dependent upon understanding the outcome of every pregnancy. Because the worst pregnancy outcomes typically occur in countries with limited health registration

  14. [Food-induced anaphylaxis - data from the anaphylaxis registry].

    PubMed

    Worm, Margitta; Grünhagen, Josefine; Dölle, Sabine

    2016-07-01

    Anaphylactic reactions due to food occur in the context of food allergy and, together with venom and drugs, are the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions. In small children the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions according to data from the anaphylaxis registry are hen's egg and milk, whereas in school children peanut and hazelnut are frequent elicitors of allergic reactions. Other frequent elicitors of anaphylactic reactions in childhood are wheat and soy. In adults the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions due to food, based on data from the anaphylaxis registry, are wheat, soy, celery, shellfish and hazelnut. Rare elicitors of food-induced anaphylaxis in German-speaking countries are mustard and cabbage. However, the panel of rare elicitors of food-induced anaphylaxis show regional differences. As of March 2015, 17 cases of fatal anaphylaxis were registered and among these seven were food-induced. Co-factors can either trigger the elicitation of a severe allergic reaction or affect its severity. Among such co-factors are physical activity, the intake of certain drugs, and psychological stress. The data on the role of cofactors is sparse. The management of food-induced anaphylaxis includes acute management according to current guidelines, but also long-term management, which should include educational measures regarding treatment but also information about the food allergen in daily life.

  15. [Food-induced anaphylaxis - data from the anaphylaxis registry].

    PubMed

    Worm, Margitta; Grünhagen, Josefine; Dölle, Sabine

    2016-07-01

    Anaphylactic reactions due to food occur in the context of food allergy and, together with venom and drugs, are the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions. In small children the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions according to data from the anaphylaxis registry are hen's egg and milk, whereas in school children peanut and hazelnut are frequent elicitors of allergic reactions. Other frequent elicitors of anaphylactic reactions in childhood are wheat and soy. In adults the most frequent elicitors of severe allergic reactions due to food, based on data from the anaphylaxis registry, are wheat, soy, celery, shellfish and hazelnut. Rare elicitors of food-induced anaphylaxis in German-speaking countries are mustard and cabbage. However, the panel of rare elicitors of food-induced anaphylaxis show regional differences. As of March 2015, 17 cases of fatal anaphylaxis were registered and among these seven were food-induced. Co-factors can either trigger the elicitation of a severe allergic reaction or affect its severity. Among such co-factors are physical activity, the intake of certain drugs, and psychological stress. The data on the role of cofactors is sparse. The management of food-induced anaphylaxis includes acute management according to current guidelines, but also long-term management, which should include educational measures regarding treatment but also information about the food allergen in daily life. PMID:27255298

  16. [The contribution of cancer registries in environmental health studies].

    PubMed

    Comba, P; Fazzo, L; Fusco, M; Benedetti, M; Pirastu, R; Ricci, P

    2011-01-01

    Cancer incidence is an outcome of interest in studies assessing the health impact of polluted sites, for which an example is represented by SENTIERI Project. Incidence data are characterized by better diagnostic quality and are not influenced by survival factors, furthermore they allow the investigation of high-survival neoplasms (i.e. childhood cancer) and rare malignancies. Furthermore, the study of incidence is more informative than mortality for non-lethal tumours, therefore it represents an advancement in respect to the study of mortality completed in SENTIERI Project. In the last decade in Italy some environmental epidemiology studies used cancer register data, for example the Biancavilla (Sicily) investigation on fluoro-edenite related mesothelioma and the study in an area of Naples Province where hazardous waste was extensively dumped. In this frame, ISS planned some collaborative studies with Siracusa, Mantua and Ferrara cancer Registries, where three major polluted sites are located. Following these pilot studies an ISS-AIRTUM (Italian Association of Cancer Registries) collaborative study has been planned. For a description of SENTIERI, refer to the 2010 supplement of Epidemiology & Prevention, devoted to the Project.

  17. Towards data integration automation for the French rare disease registry

    PubMed Central

    Maaroufi, Meriem; Choquet, Rémy; Landais, Paul; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Building a medical registry upon an existing infrastructure and rooted practices is not an easy task. It is the case for the BNDMR project, the French rare disease registry, that aims to collect administrative and medical data of rare disease patients seen in different hospitals. To avoid duplicating data entry for health professionals, the project plans to deploy connectors with the existing systems to automatically retrieve data. Given the data heterogeneity and the large number of source systems, the automation of connectors creation is required. In this context, we propose a methodology that optimizes the use of existing alignment approaches in the data integration processes. The generated mappings are formalized in exploitable mapping expressions. Following this methodology, a process has been experimented on specific data types of a source system: Boolean and predefined lists. As a result, effectiveness of the used alignment approach has been enhanced and more good mappings have been detected. Nonetheless, further improvements could be done to deal with the semantic issue and process other data types. PMID:26958224

  18. Towards data integration automation for the French rare disease registry.

    PubMed

    Maaroufi, Meriem; Choquet, Rémy; Landais, Paul; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Building a medical registry upon an existing infrastructure and rooted practices is not an easy task. It is the case for the BNDMR project, the French rare disease registry, that aims to collect administrative and medical data of rare disease patients seen in different hospitals. To avoid duplicating data entry for health professionals, the project plans to deploy connectors with the existing systems to automatically retrieve data. Given the data heterogeneity and the large number of source systems, the automation of connectors creation is required. In this context, we propose a methodology that optimizes the use of existing alignment approaches in the data integration processes. The generated mappings are formalized in exploitable mapping expressions. Following this methodology, a process has been experimented on specific data types of a source system: Boolean and predefined lists. As a result, effectiveness of the used alignment approach has been enhanced and more good mappings have been detected. Nonetheless, further improvements could be done to deal with the semantic issue and process other data types. PMID:26958224

  19. Toxic substances registry system: Index of material safety data sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS's) listed in this index reflect product inventories and associated MSDS's which were submitted to the Toxic Substances Registry database maintained by the Base Operations Contractor at the Kennedy Space Center. The purpose of this index is to provide KSC government, contractor, and tenant organizations a means to access information on the hazards associated with these chemicals. The Toxic Substance Registry Service (TSRS) was established to manage information dealing with the storage and use of toxic and otherwise hazardous materials at KSC. As a part of this service, the BOC Environmental Health Services maintains a central repository of MSDS's which were provided to TSRS. The data on the TSRS are obtained from NASA, contractor, and tenant organizations who use or store hazardous materials at KSC. It is the responsibility of these organizations to conduct inventories, obtain MSDS's, distribute Hazard Communication information to their employees, and otherwise implement compliance with appropriate Federal, State, and NASA Hazard Communication and Worker Right-to-Know regulations and policies.

  20. The International Quotidian Dialysis Registry: annual report 2005.

    PubMed

    Nesrallah, Gihad; Garg, Amit X; Moist, Louise M; Suri, Rita S; Lindsay, Robert M

    2005-07-01

    The International Quotidian Dialysis Registry was designed to collect data describing treatments, characteristics, and outcomes of patients treated with quotidian hemodialysis (HD) worldwide. In July 2004, North American centers were first invited to enroll patients. By March 1, 2005, a total of 70 nocturnal and 8 short-daily HD patients from three Canadian and two US centers were enrolled. As recruitment continues, projected enrollment for 2005 may exceed 200 patients from North America alone. Preliminary analyses indicate that the current registry cohort is younger (mean age, 49.5 +/- 1.6 years) and carries a lower burden of comorbidity than the overall North American HD population. The low event rate expected in this cohort underlines the need for a large sample size if an appropriately powered survival study is to be undertaken. Increasing recruitment in the United States by including HD centers owned or managed by large dialysis organizations, and beginning overseas collaborations to include Australia, New Zealand, Europe, and South America will be the primary areas of focus for 2005.