Science.gov

Sample records for agents foam plastics

  1. Foam injection molding of thermoplastic elastomers: Blowing agents, foaming process and characterization of structural foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ries, S.; Spoerrer, A.; Altstaedt, V.

    2014-05-01

    Polymer foams play an important role caused by the steadily increasing demand to light weight design. In case of soft polymers, like thermoplastic elastomers (TPE), the haptic feeling of the surface is affected by the inner foam structure. Foam injection molding of TPEs leads to so called structural foam, consisting of two compact skin layers and a cellular core. The properties of soft structural foams like soft-touch, elastic and plastic behavior are affected by the resulting foam structure, e.g. thickness of the compact skins and the foam core or density. This inner structure can considerably be influenced by different processing parameters and the chosen blowing agent. This paper is focused on the selection and characterization of suitable blowing agents for foam injection molding of a TPE-blend. The aim was a high density reduction and a decent inner structure. Therefore DSC and TGA measurements were performed on different blowing agents to find out which one is appropriate for the used TPE. Moreover a new analyzing method for the description of processing characteristics by temperature dependent expansion measurements was developed. After choosing suitable blowing agents structural foams were molded with different types of blowing agents and combinations and with the breathing mold technology in order to get lower densities. The foam structure was analyzed to show the influence of the different blowing agents and combinations. Finally compression tests were performed to estimate the influence of the used blowing agent and the density reduction on the compression modulus.

  2. Replacements For Ozone-Depleting Foaming Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, Elana; Sharpe, Jon B.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorinated ethers used in place of chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Replacement necessary because CFC's and HCFC's found to contribute to depletion of ozone from upper atmosphere, and manufacture and use of them by law phased out in near future. Two fluorinated ethers do not have ozone-depletion potential and used in existing foam-producing equipment, designed to handle liquid blowing agents soluble in chemical ingredients that mixed to make foam. Any polyurethane-based foams and several cellular plastics blown with these fluorinated ethers used in processes as diverse as small batch pours, large sprays, or double-band lamination to make insulation for private homes, commercial buildings, shipping containers, and storage tanks. Fluorinated ethers proved useful as replacements for CFC refrigerants and solvents.

  3. Biodegradable foam plastics based on castor oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong Juan; Rong, Min Zhi; Zhang, Ming Qiu; Hu, Jing; Chen, Hui Wen; Czigány, Tibor

    2008-02-01

    In this work, a simple but effective approach was proposed for preparing biodegradable plastic foams with a high content of castor oil. First of all, castor oil reacted with maleic anhydride to produce maleated castor oil (MACO) without the aid of any catalyst. Then plastic foams were synthesized through free radical initiated copolymerization between MACO and diluent monomer styrene. With changes in MACO/St ratio and species of curing initiator, mechanical properties of MACO foams can be easily adjusted. In this way, biofoams with comparable compressive stress at 25% strain as commercial polyurethane (PU) foams were prepared, while the content of castor oil can be as high as 61 wt %. The soil burial tests further proved that the castor oil based foams kept the biodegradability of renewable resources despite the fact that some petrol-based components were introduced. PMID:18163578

  4. Biodegradable foam plastics based on castor oil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong Juan; Rong, Min Zhi; Zhang, Ming Qiu; Hu, Jing; Chen, Hui Wen; Czigány, Tibor

    2008-02-01

    In this work, a simple but effective approach was proposed for preparing biodegradable plastic foams with a high content of castor oil. First of all, castor oil reacted with maleic anhydride to produce maleated castor oil (MACO) without the aid of any catalyst. Then plastic foams were synthesized through free radical initiated copolymerization between MACO and diluent monomer styrene. With changes in MACO/St ratio and species of curing initiator, mechanical properties of MACO foams can be easily adjusted. In this way, biofoams with comparable compressive stress at 25% strain as commercial polyurethane (PU) foams were prepared, while the content of castor oil can be as high as 61 wt %. The soil burial tests further proved that the castor oil based foams kept the biodegradability of renewable resources despite the fact that some petrol-based components were introduced.

  5. THIRD-GENERATION FOAM BLOWING AGENTS FOR FOAM INSULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of third-generation blowing agents for foam insulation. (NOTE: the search for third-generation foam blowing agents has led to the realization that, as the number of potential substitutes increases, new concerns, such as their potential to act a...

  6. Organic reactants rapidly produce plastic foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Look, G. F.

    1965-01-01

    Adding trichlorofluoromethane to polyether resin accelerates the reaction between the resin and toluene diisocyanate. This accelerated reaction instantaneously produces a plastic foam of low density and uniform porosity needed to provide buoyancy for flotation recovery of instrument packages dropped into the sea from spacecraft.

  7. Blowing Agents for Fabrication of Polyimide Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, J.; Sorathia, U. A. K.; Lee, R.

    1982-01-01

    Polyimide resin can be foamed by agent generated within matrix of powder precursor. Blowing agent is mixture of water and methanol that are byproducts of condensation/polymerization reaction in resin. Expansion of these two compounds produces cellular foam structure that is flexible and resilient but that tends to have very-fine cellular structure. More open structure with lower density can be attained by modifying mechanism of foam formation. Foams have applications as fillers for seat cushions, wall panels, floor sheets, and thermal and acoustical insulation.

  8. Plastic Foam Withstands Greater Temperatures And Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, John A.; Macarthur, Doug

    1993-01-01

    Improved plastic foam suitable for use in foam-core laminated composite parts and in tooling for making fiber/matrix-composite parts. Stronger at high temperatures, more thermally and dimensionally stable, machinable, resistant to chemical degradation, and less expensive. Compatible with variety of matrix resins. Made of polyisocyanurate blown with carbon dioxide and has density of 12 to 15 pounds per cubic feet. Does not contibute to depletion of ozone from atmosphere. Improved foam used in cores of composite panels in such diverse products as aircraft, automobiles, railroad cars, boats, and sporting equipment like surfboards, skis, and skateboards. Also used in thermally stable flotation devices in submersible vehicles. Machined into mandrels upon which filaments wound to make shells.

  9. Compact assembly generates plastic foam, inflates flotation bag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Device for generating plastic foam consists of an elastomeric bag and two containers with liquid resin and a liquid catalyst. When the walls of the containers are ruptured the liquids come into contact producing foam which inflates the elastomeric bag.

  10. Development of polyimide foams with blowing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method of preparing a polyimide foam which includes the steps of: preparing, foaming, and curing a precursor containing at least one alkyl ester of 3,3'4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid; a meta- or para-substituted aromatic diamine; a heterocyclic diamine; an aliphatic diamine; and a solid blowing agent. The blowing agent is added to said precursor in a concentration which is sufficient to effect at least one of the following attributes of the foam: cell size, proportion of open cells, cell density, and indentation load deflection.

  11. The elastic-plastic behaviour of foam under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petel, O. E.; Ouellet, S.; Higgins, A. J.; Frost, D. L.

    2013-02-01

    An experimental investigation of the elastic-plastic nature of shock wave propagation in foams was undertaken. The study involved experimental blast wave and shock tube loading of three foams, two polyurethane open-cell foams and a low-density polyethylene closed-cell foam. Evidence of precursor waves was observed in all three foam samples under various compressive wave loadings. Experiments with an impermeable membrane are used to determine if the precursor wave in an open-cell foam is a result of gas filtration or an elastic response of the foam. The differences between quasi-static and shock compression of foams is discussed in terms of their compressive strain histories and the implications for the energy absorption capacity of foam in both loading scenarios. Through a comparison of shock tube and blast wave loading techniques, suggestions are made concerning the accurate measurements of the principal shock Hugoniot in foams.

  12. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from foam plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.; Casey, C. J.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-three samples of flexible foams and twelve samples of rigid foams were evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the USF toxicity screening test method. Polychloroprene among the flexible foams, and polystyrene among the rigid foams, appeared to exhibit the least toxicity under these particular test conditions.

  13. 46 CFR 160.010-5 - Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. 160.010-5... Vessels § 160.010-5 Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. (a) Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy must have a plastic foam body with an external protective covering. The body may be reinforced...

  14. 46 CFR 160.010-5 - Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. 160.010-5... Vessels § 160.010-5 Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. (a) Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy must have a plastic foam body with an external protective covering. The body may be reinforced...

  15. 46 CFR 160.010-5 - Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. 160.010-5... Vessels § 160.010-5 Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. (a) Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy must have a plastic foam body with an external protective covering. The body may be reinforced...

  16. Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) Model for Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Lu, Wei-Yang; Scherzinger, William M.; Hinnerichs, Terry D.; Lo, Chi S.

    2015-06-01

    Numerous experiments were performed to characterize the mechanical response of several different rigid polyurethane foams (FR3712, PMDI10, PMDI20, and TufFoam35) to large deformation. In these experiments, the effects of load path, loading rate, and temperature were investigated. Results from these experiments indicated that rigid polyurethane foams exhibit significant volumetric and deviatoric plasticity when they are compressed. Rigid polyurethane foams were also found to be very strain-rate and temperature dependent. These foams are also rather brittle and crack when loaded to small strains in tension or to larger strains in compression. Thus, a new Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) model was developed and implemented into SIERRA with the name Foam Damage to describe the mechanical response of these foams to large deformation at a variety of temperatures and strain rates. This report includes a description of recent experiments and experimental findings. Next, development of a UCPD model for rigid, polyurethane foams is described. Selection of material parameters for a variety of rigid polyurethane foams is then discussed and finite element simulations with the new UCPD model are compared with experimental results to show behavior that can be captured with this model.

  17. Fire-Resistant, Plastic-Foam Airducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tacawy, Souzane H.; Trabold, Edward L.

    1988-01-01

    Polyimide-foam airducts low in cost and light in weight. Relatively safe in fires because they resist spread of flames and generate little smoke. Polyimide-foam ducts less expensive to manufacture. Suitable for heating and air-conditioning in airplanes, ships, trains, and buildings.

  18. 21 CFR 178.3010 - Adjuvant substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... foamed plastics. 178.3010 Section 178.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics. The following substances may be safely used as adjuvants in the manufacture of foamed plastics intended for use in contact with food, subject to...

  19. 24 CFR 3280.207 - Requirements for foam plastic thermal insulating materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Requirements for foam plastic... SAFETY STANDARDS Fire Safety § 3280.207 Requirements for foam plastic thermal insulating materials. (a) General. Foam plastic thermal insulating materials shall not be used within the cavity of walls...

  20. 24 CFR 3280.207 - Requirements for foam plastic thermal insulating materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Requirements for foam plastic... SAFETY STANDARDS Fire Safety § 3280.207 Requirements for foam plastic thermal insulating materials. (a) General. Foam plastic thermal insulating materials shall not be used within the cavity of walls...

  1. 21 CFR 178.3010 - Adjuvant substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... foamed plastics. 178.3010 Section 178.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics. The following substances may be safely used as adjuvants in the manufacture of foamed plastics intended for use in contact with food, subject to...

  2. 21 CFR 178.3010 - Adjuvant substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... foamed plastics. 178.3010 Section 178.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics. The following substances may be safely used as adjuvants in the manufacture of foamed plastics intended for use in contact with food, subject to...

  3. 21 CFR 178.3010 - Adjuvant substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... foamed plastics. 178.3010 Section 178.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics. The following substances may be safely used as adjuvants in the manufacture of foamed plastics intended for use in contact with food, subject to...

  4. 24 CFR 3280.207 - Requirements for foam plastic thermal insulating materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Requirements for foam plastic... SAFETY STANDARDS Fire Safety § 3280.207 Requirements for foam plastic thermal insulating materials. (a) General. Foam plastic thermal insulating materials shall not be used within the cavity of walls...

  5. Development of extrusion processing technology for manufacture of fine-celled plastic/wood-fiber composite foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, Ghaus Muhammad

    The main benefits of incorporating wood-fibers in plastics are the increased stiffness and lowered cost of the resulting composites. However, these improvements are usually accompanied by loss in the ductility and impact resistance of the composites. These shortcomings can be significantly improved by effectively foaming and incorporating a fine-cell structure in the composites. This thesis presents the development of the processing methodology for the manufacture of fine-celled plastic/wood-fiber composite (PWC) foams and focuses on the elucidation of the fundamental foaming mechanisms and the related issues involved. The volatiles evolved from the wood-fiber during extrusion processing play a dominant role in the foaming process, and can lead to gross deterioration of cell structure unless proper strategies are adopted to limit their contribution to foaming. Thermal analysis of wood-fibers (from pine wood) revealed that apart from moisture, a substantial part of the volatile emissions were evolved from the 'extractives', and hence can contribute to the foaming process as a blowing agent. A tandem extrusion system was developed which could effectively control the volatile wood-fiber emissions, and produce fine-celled PWC foams having the desired density and cell morphology. A series of critical experiments were performed to develop a suitable methodology for controlling the foam density and cell morphology. Fundamental foaming mechanisms for different foaming conditions are proposed.

  6. Epoxy foams using multiple resins and curing agents

    DOEpatents

    Russick, Edward M.; Rand, Peter B.

    2000-01-01

    An epoxy foam comprising a plurality of resins, a plurality of curing agents, at least one blowing agent, at least one surfactant and optionally at least one filler and the process for making. Preferred is an epoxy foam comprising two resins of different reactivities, two curing agents, a blowing agent, a surfactant, and a filler. According to the present invention, an epoxy foam is prepared with tailorable reactivity, exotherm, and pore size by a process of admixing a plurality of resins with a plurality of curing agents, a surfactant and blowing agent, whereby a foamable mixture is formed and heating said foamable mixture at a temperature greater than the boiling temperature of the blowing agent whereby said mixture is foamed and cured.

  7. Polypropylenes foam consisting of thermally expandable microcapsule as blowing agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeoung, Sun Kyung; Hwang, Ye Jin; Lee, Hyun Wook; Kwak, Sung Bok; Han, In-Soo; Ha, Jin Uk

    2016-03-01

    The structure of thermally expandable microcapsule (TEMs) is consisted of a thermoplastic shell which is filled with liquid hydrocarbon at core. The shell of TEMs becomes soft when the temperature is higher than boiling temperature of liquid hydrocarbon. The shell of TEMs is expanded under the high temperature because the inner pressure of TEMs is increased by vaporization of hydrocarbon core. Therefore, the TEMs are applicable for blowing agents and light weight fillers. In this research, we fabricated the polypropylene (PP) foam by using the TEMs and chemical blowing agents and compared to their physical properties. The density of the specimen was decreased when the contents of chemical blowing agents and TEMs were increased. In addition, the mechanical properties (i.e. tensile strength and impact strength) of specimens were deteriorated with increasing amount of chemical blowing agents and TEMs. However, PP foam produced with TEMs showed higher impact strength than the one with the chemical blowing agent. In order to clarify the dependence of impact strength of PP foam as the blowing agent, the morphology difference of the PP foams was investigated. Expanding properties of PP foams produced with TEMs was changed with TEMs content of PP foams. Processing conditions also influenced the mechanical properties of PP foam containing TEMs.

  8. Foaming agents for use in drilling for oil and gas

    SciTech Connect

    Green, H.A.; Prodo, K.W.; Weinstein, M.

    1984-01-10

    Foaming agents are disclosed for use in oil and gas production comprising n-octyl dimethylamine oxide, n-decyl dimethylamine oxide, branched decyl dimethylamine oxide, and mixtures thereof. All generate copious quantities of stable foam even in the presence of brine and hydrocarbons.

  9. High strain rate loading of polymeric foams and solid plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Richard D.; Chang, Peter C.; Fourney, William L.

    2000-04-01

    The split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) provided a technique to determine the high strain rate response for low density foams and solid ABS and polypropylene plastics. These materials are used in the interior safety panels of automobiles and crash test dummies. Because the foams have a very low impedance, polycarbonate bars were used to acquire the strain rate data in the 100 to 1600 l/s range. An aluminum SPHB setup was used to obtain the solid plastics data which covered strain rates of 1000 to 4000 l/s. The curves for peak strain rate versus peak stress for the foams over the test range studied indicates only a slight strain rate dependence. Peak strain rate versus peak stress curves for polypropylene shows a strain rate dependence up to about 1500 l/s. At that rate the solid poly propylene indicates no strain rate dependence. The ABS plastics are strain rate dependent up to 3500 l/s and then are independent at larger strain rates.

  10. Production and Compressive Characterization of Aluminium MMC Foam Manufactured Using Dual Foaming Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidar, S.; Ansary, S.; Rahman, A.

    2016-02-01

    Aluminium foams, produced by melting Aluminium alloy (LM6) containing blowing agent(s) and vigorous stirring. TiH2 is a known agent for this. As TiH2 begins to decompose into Ti and gaseous H2 when heated above about 465°C, large volumes of hydrogen gas are rapidly produced, creating bubbles that leads to a closed cell foam. A novel Strategy to enhance the mechanical properties of Al-MMC foams is discussed here, and it is demonstrated that titanium hydride (TiH2) in the form of 10-15 μm diameter particles can be pre-treated by selective oxidation to produce more uniform foams having better compressive properties (yield strength and energy absorption). It is found that the mechanical properties of the foams and the uniformity of cell size distribution is improved when the foam is blown with an optimized mixture of CaCO3 and pretreated TiH2. In order to define the relationship of mechanical properties with relative density of this material, correlations which uniquely defines the compressive behaviour of this modified Al- MMC foam has been developed.

  11. The effect of pressurized carbon dioxide as a temporary plasticizer and foaming agent on the hot stage extrusion process and extrudate properties of solid dispersions of itraconazole with PVP-VA 64.

    PubMed

    Verreck, Geert; Decorte, Annelies; Heymans, Koen; Adriaensen, Jef; Cleeren, Dirk; Jacobs, Adri; Liu, Dehua; Tomasko, David; Arien, Albertina; Peeters, Jef; Rombaut, Patrick; Van den Mooter, Guy; Brewster, Marcus E

    2005-11-01

    The aim of the current research project was to explore the possibilities of combining pressurized carbon dioxide with hot stage extrusion during manufacturing of solid dispersions of itraconazole and polyvinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate 64 (PVP-VA 64) and to evaluate the ability of the pressurized gas to act as a temporary plasticizer as well as to produce a foamed extrudate. Pressurized carbon dioxide was injected into a Leistritz Micro 18 intermeshing co-rotating twin-screw melt extruder using an ISCO 260D syringe pump. The physicochemical characteristics of the extrudates with and without injection of carbon dioxide were evaluated with reference to the morphology of the solid dispersion and dissolution behaviour and particle properties. Carbon dioxide acted as plasticizer for itraconazole/PVP-VA 64, reducing the processing temperature during the hot stage extrusion process. Amorphous dispersions were obtained and the solid dispersion was not influenced by the carbon dioxide. Release of itraconazole from the solid dispersion could be controlled as a function of processing temperature and pressure. The macroscopic morphology changed to a foam-like structure due to expansion of the carbon dioxide at the extrusion die. This resulted in increased specific surface area, porosity, hygroscopicity and improved milling efficiency.

  12. In-situ aging of roof systems containing polyisocyanurate roof insulation foamed with alternative blowing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Desjarlais, A.O.; Christian, J.E.; Graves, R.S.

    1993-10-01

    Experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) foam roof insulations with permeable facers were installed in roofing systems and continuously monitored for thermal performance for four years. The foams were produced using a specific formulation that represented current technology in 1989 and were blown with CFC-11, HCFC-123, and HCFC-141b. These foams were installed in roof systems comprised of loosely-laid insulation boards covered by either a loosely-laid single ply white or black membrane. The in-situ testing was carried out on an outdoor test facility, the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA). Additional specimens of these foams were aged in the laboratory and periodically evaluated using laboratory measurement equipment. This paper summarizes the in-situ data compiled to date, compares these data with the laboratory results, and examines whether the proposed laboratory procedure for accelerating the aging of foams by the slicing and scaling method accurately predicts the aging characteristics of these materials installed in roof systems. These experiments are part of a joint industry/government project established to evaluate the technical viability of alternative HCFC blowing agents for rigid closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam roof insulations. Members of the project are the US Department of Energy (DOE)/Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Society of the Plastics Industry-Polyurethane Division (SPI), the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA), and the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA).

  13. Aging of polyurethane insulation foamed with second- and third-generation blowing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.; Gabbard, W.A.; Weaver, F.J.

    1998-05-01

    Results are presented on two studies of the effect of aging on the apparent thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam insulation for refrigerators. Both studies are cooperative projects between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Appliance Research Consortium. The first study has been ongoing for four years and involves evaluation of second generation blowing agents: HCFC-141b and HCFC-142/22 blend with CFC-11 for comparison. The second study has recently started and involves third generation blowing agents: HFC-134a, HFC-245fa. and cyclopentane with HCFC-141b for comparison. Both studies consist of periodic thermal measurements on panels made with solid steel and/or plastic skins and a core of foam to simulate refrigerator walls, and measurements on thin slices with cut faces to characterize the core foam. Laboratory data are presented on four years of aging of panels containing second generation blowing agents. Preliminary data are presented for the third generation blowing agents. The data on panels are compared with predictions of computer models of foam aging.

  14. 46 CFR 26.30-1 - Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests. 26.30-1 Section 26.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vest § 26.30-1 Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests. (a) Buoyant work vests carried under...

  15. 46 CFR 26.30-1 - Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests. 26.30-1 Section 26.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vest § 26.30-1 Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests. (a) Buoyant work vests carried under...

  16. 24 CFR 3280.207 - Requirements for foam plastic thermal insulating materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Product Safety Commission requirements in 16 CFR parts 1209 and 1404. (2) Other loose-fill insulation that... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Requirements for foam plastic... SAFETY STANDARDS Fire Safety § 3280.207 Requirements for foam plastic thermal insulating materials....

  17. 46 CFR 26.30-1 - Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests. 26.30-1 Section 26.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vest § 26.30-1 Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests. (a) Buoyant work vests carried under...

  18. 46 CFR 26.30-1 - Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests. 26.30-1 Section 26.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vest § 26.30-1 Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests. (a) Buoyant work vests carried under...

  19. 46 CFR 26.30-1 - Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests. 26.30-1 Section 26.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY UNINSPECTED VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vest § 26.30-1 Approved unicellular plastic foam work vests. (a) Buoyant work vests carried under...

  20. 24 CFR 3280.207 - Requirements for foam plastic thermal insulating materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... thermal insulating materials. 3280.207 Section 3280.207 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating... SAFETY STANDARDS Fire Safety § 3280.207 Requirements for foam plastic thermal insulating materials. (a) General. Foam plastic thermal insulating materials shall not be used within the cavity of walls...

  1. The effect of plastic rearrangements on the flow of two-dimensional wet foam.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zefeng; Wang, Shuzhong; Lv, Mingming; Wang, Zhiguo; Luo, Xiangrong

    2015-04-21

    The effect of the elementary plastic events on the flow behavior of the two-dimensional wet foam is investigated by quasistatic simulation on the bubble scale. The position where the plastic event occurs is traced by recording the coordinate at which two bubbles separate in the simulation. A localized shear band is found, and the width of this band increases with the increase of foam quality. From the displacement fields of these bubbles, it shows that the T1 plastic events can give rise to an increase in local bubble displacements due to the separation between these bubbles. The average relative pressure as well as normal stress difference of bubbles increases with the flow of foam in the initial elastic domain and then decreases as the elastic domain turns into the plastic domain. In the plastic domain, the plastic events rearrange the local structure of foam, which leads to decreasing both the average pressure and the normal stress difference. Additionally, the wall slip of foam is discussed in the simulation as well. The width of the localized shear band is narrower under the slip boundary condition. Meanwhile, the plastic events occurring between the first and second layers of bubbles change the pulling force of the films near the wall and cause an instantaneous increase in the slip velocity.

  2. Effectiveness of Septisol Antiseptic Foam as a Surgical Scrub Agent

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, Norman E.; Gravens, Daniel L.

    1973-01-01

    Septisol antiseptic foam (0.23% hexachlorophene in a 46% ethyl alcohol base) is a new surgical scrub agent for both primary and re-entry use that is designed to minimize the harsh effects to the skin of the conventional scrub while retaining effective antibacterial properties. A preliminary surgical scrub study of 1-week duration yielded an immediate reduction in resident flora of 92% from an average single scrub coupled with a residual bacteriostatic effect from repeated use that gave a plateau at 57% of the pretest resident population level. A separate study demonstrated complete elimination of both gram-positive and gram-negative transients from the skin with a single application of the product. In an 8-week surgical scrub study, equal effectiveness was shown between Septisol antiseptic foam and a standard 3% hexachlorophene detergent. However, Septisol antiseptic foam offers considerable advantage in minimizing the harsh effects to the skin of the conventional surgical scrub and results in a substantially lower hemic level of hexachlorophene in the user than that obtained with 3% hexachlorophene detergent. Sampling was conducted by the fingerprint impression plate technique of Gale. PMID:4584593

  3. Radiation-induced grafting of chlorinated PVC for preparation of plastic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, K.; Tannert, F.

    1999-06-01

    Graft products of chlorinated PVC with styrene were prepared by a radiation-grafting method using 60Co- γ-ray source. The aim was the preparation of foamed plastics by applying the traditional polystyrene foaming method. Two types of chlorinated PVC (PVCC) were used: radiation-chlorinated PVC, made by the fluidized-bed chlorination process, and solution-chlorinated PVC. Both of the PVCC types were grafted with styrene without any difficulty. The required particle size for an effective foaming was obtained by extrusion and granulation of the grafted powder. The foaming processes are quite different: graft products on the basis of solution-chlorinated PVC lead to plastic foams with a density lower than 0.1 g/cm 3 whereas those prepared from solid-chlorinated PVC result in foams with much higher density (Friese, K, Tannert, F, 1990. Proceedings of the 7th Tihany Symposium on Radiation Chemistry, p. 367). Solid-chlorinated PVC is foamable with pentane, after compounding it with polymeric modifiers. Grafting of granules on the basis of such compounds increases the content of pentane, as well as the foaming rate. The foamed graft polymers are non-inflammable and self-extinguishing.

  4. The performance of lightweight plastic foams developed for fire safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fish, R. H.

    1971-01-01

    The use of a low density, polyurethane based foam to suppress a fire and to provide protection for the structure of an aircraft or spacecraft is discussed. The mechanism by which foams provide protection from heat and create a nonflammable surface is described. Various materials and their application to specific types of structures are examined.

  5. 21 CFR 178.3010 - Adjuvant substances used in the manufacture of foamed plastics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... foamed plastics. 178.3010 Section 178.3010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3010 Adjuvant substances used in the manufacture of...

  6. 46 CFR 160.010-5 - Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. 160.010-5 Section 160.010-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Buoyant Apparatus for...

  7. 46 CFR 160.010-5 - Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. 160.010-5 Section 160.010-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) EQUIPMENT, CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Buoyant Apparatus for...

  8. Response of Polypmeric Foams and ABS Plastics to High Strain Rate Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Richard; Chang, Peter; Fourney, William

    1999-06-01

    The split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) technique was utilized to obtain high strain rate response data for low-density foams and solid ABS and polypropylene plastics. General Motors provided the materials for this study. These materials are used in the interior panels of automobiles. Because the foams have a very low impedance, polycarbonate bars were used to acquire the strain rate data in the 100 to 1600 per second range. An aluminum SHPB was used to obtain the solid plastics data that covered strain rates of 1000 to 4000 pre second. The experimental data indicate that the foams over the test range are only slightly strain rate dependent while the polypropylene appears to be strain rate independent above 1000 per second and the ABS plastics are strain rate independent above 3000 per second. The projectile length was varied to provide a wide range of induced strains ranging from 10 to 70 per cent for the foams and up to 20 per cent for the plastic materials.

  9. Effect of blowing agents on the oxidation resistance of carbon foams prepared from molten sucrose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narasimman, R.; Prabhakaran, K.

    2013-06-01

    We have prepared low density carbon foams from molten sucrose using aluminium nitrate and boric acid blowing agents. A comparative study of the oxidation resistance of the carbon foams prepared using the two blowing agents are reported in the present paper. Oxidation of the carbon foams was evaluated under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions in air atmosphere using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). We have observed that the alumina produced from the aluminium nitrate blowing agent acts as a catalyst whereas the boron produced from boric acid inhibits the oxidation of the carbon foams. The oxidation resistance of carbon foams increases with boron concentration. The oxidation onset temperature for the carbon foams prepared using boric acid blowing agent was nearly 60°C higher than that prepared using aluminium nitrate blowing agent. Carbon foams prepared using aluminium nitrate blowing agent undergoes complete oxidation at temperature less than 700°C. Whereas that prepared using boric acid blowing agent leave ˜ 50 wt.% residue at 900°C. Further evidence is provided by the kinetic analysis of the TGA using Coats-Redfern (CR) equation.

  10. 46 CFR 35.40-10 - Steam, foam, carbon dioxide, or clean agent fire smothering apparatus-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steam, foam, carbon dioxide, or clean agent fire... TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-10 Steam, foam, carbon dioxide, or clean agent fire smothering apparatus—TB/ALL. Each steam, foam, carbon dioxide, or clean...

  11. 46 CFR 35.40-10 - Steam, foam, carbon dioxide, or clean agent fire smothering apparatus-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steam, foam, carbon dioxide, or clean agent fire... TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-10 Steam, foam, carbon dioxide, or clean agent fire smothering apparatus—TB/ALL. Each steam, foam, carbon dioxide, or clean...

  12. 46 CFR 35.40-10 - Steam, foam, carbon dioxide, or clean agent fire smothering apparatus-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steam, foam, carbon dioxide, or clean agent fire... TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-10 Steam, foam, carbon dioxide, or clean agent fire smothering apparatus—TB/ALL. Each steam, foam, carbon dioxide, or clean...

  13. Assessments of low emission asphalt mixtures produced using combinations of foaming agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Hasan, Mohd Rosli

    The asphalt foaming techniques have been used over the last couple of decades as an alternative to the traditional method of preparing asphalt mixtures. Based on positive feedback from the industry, this study was initiated to explore and evaluate the performance of the Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA) mixture produced through a foaming process using physical and chemical foaming agents, which are ethanol and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), respectively. The success of this project may lead to new theories and provide an environmentally friendly technique to produce asphalt mixtures. This may advance the understanding of the foaming process and improve the performance of WMA to support sustainable development. Theoretically, ethanol can function in the same manner as water but requires less energy to foam due to its lower boiling point, 78°C. During the asphalt foaming process, numerous bubbles were generated by the vaporized ethanol, which significantly increased the volume of the asphalt binder, hence the coating potential of aggregates improves. The sodium bicarbonate was incorporated to enhance the quantity of bubbles and its stability. Therefore, understanding foaming agents, their solubility, chemical reactions, chemical function groups and rheological properties of the foamed binder are essential to help control the foam structure and final properties of the foamed WMA mixture. In order to understand the overall performance of newly developed foaming WMA, this material was evaluated for moisture susceptibility, rutting potential, and resistance to fracture and thermal cracking. The coatability, workability and compactability of foamed asphalt mixtures during production were also evaluated. Based on the results, it was found that the newly proposed foaming WMA has high potential to promote sustainable development by lowering the energy consumption and impacts on the environment. The ethanol is efficient in lowering the viscosity of asphalt binders, enhancing the

  14. Biot theory and acoustical properties of high porosity fibrous materials and plastic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, J.; Aknine, A.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental values of acoustic wave propagation constant and characteristic impedance in fibrous materials, and normal absorption for two plastic foams, were compared to theoretical predictions obtained with Biot's theory. The best agreement was observed for fibrous materials between Biot's theory and Delany and Bazley experiments for a nearly zero mass coupling parameter. For foams, the lambda/4 structure resonance effect on absorption was calculated by using four-pole modelling of the medium. A significant mass coupling parameter is then necessary for obtaining agreement between the behavior of the measured absorption coefficients and the theoretical predictions. It is shown how the formalism used for predicting foams absorption coefficients may be used for studying the acoustic behavior of multi-layered media.

  15. The generation of transition radiation by relativistic particles in plastic foam radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, T. A.; Mueller, D.; Cherry, M. L.; Hartmann, G.

    1975-01-01

    The design of large area transition radiation detectors for highly relativistic particles can be greatly simplified if plastic foam radiators are employed. Using electron beams with energies 1-9 GeV at the Cornell synchrotron, we have studied the properties of a large variety of transition radiators consisting of commercially available foam materials. In most cases, a measurable transition radiation signal has been observed, but only a few materials have been found to be suitable for practical purposes. The observed radiation yield is in these cases very similar to that of equivalent multifoil radiators. A detailed discussion is given of the particle detection efficiency that can be obtained with high yield foam radiators.

  16. High Strain Rate Characterization of Plastics and Foams Using Polymeric Split Hopkinson Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawas, Omar; Brar, N. S.

    1997-07-01

    High strain rate and high/low temperature response of engineered plastics and foams is relevant and important for the design and development of fighter aircraft canopies, submarine interiors and automobile exterior and interior systems. The mechanical impedance of conventional split Hopkinson bar materials (aluminum or steel) is extremely large compared to those of plastic or foam specimens. To overcome this difficulty of impedance mismatch we have developed the Polymeric Split Hopkinson Bar (PSHB). A viscoelastic model for cast acrylic bar material, which relates stresses and strains as well as particle velocity and strain, is developed to account for the wave dispersion along the bar. The model is verified by comparing the stress strain data on 1100 aluminum and polycarbonate specimens obtained using PSHB and conventional aluminum SHB. Stress-strain data at a strain rate of 103/s on low strength polyurethane foam (density = 0.57 g/cm3) following this technique show that the foam has a recoverable compressive strain of 0.4 at a stress of 2.9 MPa. High strain rate (2x102-2x103/s) data on polycarbonate, generic elastomer, and styrofoam will also be presented.

  17. Equation of state data experiments for plastic foams using smoothed laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Michel; Benuzzi, Alessandra; Philippe, Franck; Batani, Dimitri; Hall, Tom; Grandjouan, Nicolas; Nazarov, Wigen

    1999-08-01

    The importance of foams in laser produced plasmas has been recently pointed out in both Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and astrophysics laboratory dedicated experiments. In this paper, Equation of State (EOS) data measurements of plastic porous materials have been experimentally determined using ns laser pulses smoothed with Phase Zone Plates (PZP). Foams of density in the range 20-400 mg/cm3 and thickness about 20 μm were used. A new original scheme for the targets has been designed which allowed, for the first time with laser, EOS data to be obtained for pressures ranging from 0.1 to 2.5 Mbars. Results are discussed and compared with available models.

  18. Efficacy of liquid and foam decontamination technologies for chemical warfare agents on indoor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Love, Adam H; Bailey, Christopher G; Hanna, M Leslie; Hok, Saphon; Vu, Alex K; Reutter, Dennis J; Raber, Ellen

    2011-11-30

    Bench-scale testing was used to evaluate the efficacy of four decontamination formulations on typical indoor surfaces following exposure to the liquid chemical warfare agents sarin (GB), soman (GD), sulfur mustard (HD), and VX. Residual surface contamination on coupons was periodically measured for up to 24h after applying one of four selected decontamination technologies [0.5% bleach solution with trisodium phosphate, Allen Vanguard Surface Decontamination Foam (SDF™), U.S. military Decon Green™, and Modec Inc. and EnviroFoam Technologies Sandia Decontamination Foam (DF-200)]. All decontamination technologies tested, except for the bleach solution, performed well on nonporous and nonpermeable glass and stainless-steel surfaces. However, chemical agent residual contamination typically remained on porous and permeable surfaces, especially for the more persistent agents, HD and VX. Solvent-based Decon Green™ performed better than aqueous-based bleach or foams on polymeric surfaces, possibly because the solvent is able to penetrate the polymer matrix. Bleach and foams out-performed Decon Green for penetrating the highly polar concrete surface. Results suggest that the different characteristics needed for an ideal and universal decontamination technology may be incompatible in a single formulation and a strategy for decontaminating a complex facility will require a range of technologies. PMID:21944706

  19. Efficacy of liquid and foam decontamination technologies for chemical warfare agents on indoor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Love, Adam H; Bailey, Christopher G; Hanna, M Leslie; Hok, Saphon; Vu, Alex K; Reutter, Dennis J; Raber, Ellen

    2011-11-30

    Bench-scale testing was used to evaluate the efficacy of four decontamination formulations on typical indoor surfaces following exposure to the liquid chemical warfare agents sarin (GB), soman (GD), sulfur mustard (HD), and VX. Residual surface contamination on coupons was periodically measured for up to 24h after applying one of four selected decontamination technologies [0.5% bleach solution with trisodium phosphate, Allen Vanguard Surface Decontamination Foam (SDF™), U.S. military Decon Green™, and Modec Inc. and EnviroFoam Technologies Sandia Decontamination Foam (DF-200)]. All decontamination technologies tested, except for the bleach solution, performed well on nonporous and nonpermeable glass and stainless-steel surfaces. However, chemical agent residual contamination typically remained on porous and permeable surfaces, especially for the more persistent agents, HD and VX. Solvent-based Decon Green™ performed better than aqueous-based bleach or foams on polymeric surfaces, possibly because the solvent is able to penetrate the polymer matrix. Bleach and foams out-performed Decon Green for penetrating the highly polar concrete surface. Results suggest that the different characteristics needed for an ideal and universal decontamination technology may be incompatible in a single formulation and a strategy for decontaminating a complex facility will require a range of technologies.

  20. Electrolyte for an aluminum air-battery comprising an anti-foaming agent and corrosion exhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Niksa, M.J.; Niksa, A.J.; Noscal, J.M.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes an electrolyte for an aluminium-air battery. It comprises a caustic or saline solution; an anti-foaming agent in an amount effective to reduce the entrapment of hydrogen bubbles in the solution, the hydrogen bubbles being formed at the battery anode; and a corrosion inhibiting amount of a corrosion inhibitor.

  1. Fly ash-based geopolymer lightweight concrete using foaming agent.

    PubMed

    Al Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Yahya, Zarina; Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our investigation on the possibility of producing foam concrete by using a geopolymer system. Class C fly ash was mixed with an alkaline activator solution (a mixture of sodium silicate and NaOH), and foam was added to the geopolymeric mixture to produce lightweight concrete. The NaOH solution was prepared by dilute NaOH pellets with distilled water. The reactives were mixed to produce a homogeneous mixture, which was placed into a 50 mm mold and cured at two different curing temperatures (60 °C and room temperature), for 24 hours. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 1, 7, and 28. The water absorption, porosity, chemical composition, microstructure, XRD and FTIR analyses were studied. The results showed that the sample which was cured at 60 °C (LW2) produced the maximum compressive strength for all tests, (11.03 MPa, 17.59 MPa, and 18.19 MPa) for days 1, 7, and 28, respectively. Also, the water absorption and porosity of LW2 were reduced by 6.78% and 1.22% after 28 days, respectively. The SEM showed that the LW2 sample had a denser matrix than LW1. This was because LW2 was heat cured, which caused the geopolymerization rate to increase, producing a denser matrix. However for LW1, microcracks were present on the surface, which reduced the compressive strength and increased water absorption and porosity.

  2. Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) blowing agents for foam insulation of launch vehicle cryogenic propellant tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, L. ); Bzik, J.W. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on two polyurethane spray-on foam insulations (SOFI) that were evaluated with five hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) blowing agents each (HCFC-141b, HCFC-123, and three blends). Foams were evaluated by measuring bond and flatwise tension strengths at four temperatures, compression at ambient temperature, and substrate strain compatibility at liquid helium temperature. Additionally, foams were characterized for density, closed-cell content, oxygen index, and ablation under radiant heating. Compression strengths of RDB-1-152 (polyether polyol) exceeded those of SS-1825 SOFI (polyester/polyether blend). Highest compression and tensile strengths were for foams sprayed with HCFC-141b and strengths decreased with increasing HCFC-123 content in the blowing agent. No foam failures occurred adhesively at the aluminum substrate, but a high incidence of premature failures occurred in the knitline between successive spray layers. Process optimization studies will be conducted with the two best SOFI systems, RDB-1-152/HCFC-141b and RDB-1-152/30% HCFC-123; 70 % HCFC-141b.

  3. Foam injection moulding of a TPO/TPC-blend and the effect of different nucleating agents on the resulting foam structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, J.; Spoerrer, A.; Altstaedt, V.

    2014-05-01

    The manufacturing of car interior parts with a soft touch surface is possible in a one-step injection moulding process, in which an injection moulded carrier is overmoulded with a compatible foamed thermoplastic elastomer (TPE). In contrast to the complex conventional process the structural foaming of the TPE component allows a saving of one material component as it combines a compact skin and a foamed core. Furthermore the manufacturing process can be achieved on a two component injection moulding machine which offers a much higher economic efficiency. One approach to reach an adhesion between a reinforced PP carrier and the foamed TPE component including good surface resistance is the use of an olefinic-/polyester-based TPE blend (TPO/TPC-blend). This paper is going to show the possibility to process a TPO/TPC-blend system by foam injection moulding with MuCell® and how the resulting foam structure can be influenced by various nucleating agents. For this purpose particles which differ in type, form and size were added in various concentrations to the TPE-blend. Before the structure elucidation of the foamed samples the particle dispersion and their effects on the polymers rheological properties were investigated. Finally abrasion tests were performed to investigate the influence of the particles on the performance characteristics of the foamed blend system. The results showed that the foam structure as well as the surface quality of the foamed TPO/TPC-blend can be improved with the use of suitable nucleating agents. Furthermore the abrasion properties can be advanced with appropriate additives in the right dosage.

  4. Fly Ash-based Geopolymer Lightweight Concrete Using Foaming Agent

    PubMed Central

    Al Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Yahya, Zarina; Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our investigation on the possibility of producing foam concrete by using a geopolymer system. Class C fly ash was mixed with an alkaline activator solution (a mixture of sodium silicate and NaOH), and foam was added to the geopolymeric mixture to produce lightweight concrete. The NaOH solution was prepared by dilute NaOH pellets with distilled water. The reactives were mixed to produce a homogeneous mixture, which was placed into a 50 mm mold and cured at two different curing temperatures (60 °C and room temperature), for 24 hours. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 1, 7, and 28. The water absorption, porosity, chemical composition, microstructure, XRD and FTIR analyses were studied. The results showed that the sample which was cured at 60 °C (LW2) produced the maximum compressive strength for all tests, (11.03 MPa, 17.59 MPa, and 18.19 MPa) for days 1, 7, and 28, respectively. Also, the water absorption and porosity of LW2 were reduced by 6.78% and 1.22% after 28 days, respectively. The SEM showed that the LW2 sample had a denser matrix than LW1. This was because LW2 was heat cured, which caused the geopolymerization rate to increase, producing a denser matrix. However for LW1, microcracks were present on the surface, which reduced the compressive strength and increased water absorption and porosity. PMID:22837687

  5. Fly ash-based geopolymer lightweight concrete using foaming agent.

    PubMed

    Al Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa; Hussin, Kamarudin; Bnhussain, Mohamed; Ismail, Khairul Nizar; Yahya, Zarina; Razak, Rafiza Abdul

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our investigation on the possibility of producing foam concrete by using a geopolymer system. Class C fly ash was mixed with an alkaline activator solution (a mixture of sodium silicate and NaOH), and foam was added to the geopolymeric mixture to produce lightweight concrete. The NaOH solution was prepared by dilute NaOH pellets with distilled water. The reactives were mixed to produce a homogeneous mixture, which was placed into a 50 mm mold and cured at two different curing temperatures (60 °C and room temperature), for 24 hours. After the curing process, the strengths of the samples were tested on days 1, 7, and 28. The water absorption, porosity, chemical composition, microstructure, XRD and FTIR analyses were studied. The results showed that the sample which was cured at 60 °C (LW2) produced the maximum compressive strength for all tests, (11.03 MPa, 17.59 MPa, and 18.19 MPa) for days 1, 7, and 28, respectively. Also, the water absorption and porosity of LW2 were reduced by 6.78% and 1.22% after 28 days, respectively. The SEM showed that the LW2 sample had a denser matrix than LW1. This was because LW2 was heat cured, which caused the geopolymerization rate to increase, producing a denser matrix. However for LW1, microcracks were present on the surface, which reduced the compressive strength and increased water absorption and porosity. PMID:22837687

  6. Modeling the effect of formulation on the properties of extruded corn flour-based foamed plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julson, James Lawrence

    The effects of formulation on resiliency, unit density and thermal conductivity of an extruded corn flour-based foamed plastic were studied. A central composite design was used to establish the levels of corn flour, water, sodium bicarbonate, soy protein and polystyrene used to develop the individual models. Three separate multiple regression models were developed to predict resiliency, unit density and thermal conductivity as functions of formulation ingredient levels. The models were used to isolate the formulations that produced the minimum unit density, maximum resiliency and minimum thermal conductivity. These optimal formulations were extruded using a commercial scale extruder. The results produced extrudates those resiliency, unit density and thermal conductivity were 89.9%, 0.041 g/cmsp3 and 0.045 W/(m{*}C), respectively. The unit density and thermal conductivity were within the range of commercial rigid cellular polystyrene. The resiliency was 5% less than commercial polystyrene loose-fill. A foamed sheet product was also successfully extruded using, the formulations developed. A computer based data acquisition and control system, used with the thermal probe, was developed to measure thermal conductivity of the extrudates. Errors due to short test times and differences in thermal mass of the probe and sample were determined. A multiple regression equation was developed to allow convenient calculation of those values required to assess the error associated with short test times and differences in thermal mass. A method to calculate the error was developed and used to correct the measured thermal conductivity values.

  7. Size selective isocyanate aerosols personal air sampling using porous plastic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanh Huynh, Cong; Duc, Trinh Vu

    2009-02-01

    As part of a European project (SMT4-CT96-2137), various European institutions specialized in occupational hygiene (BGIA, HSL, IOM, INRS, IST, Ambiente e Lavoro) have established a program of scientific collaboration to develop one or more prototypes of European personal samplers for the collection of simultaneous three dust fractions: inhalable, thoracic and respirable. These samplers based on existing sampling heads (IOM, GSP and cassettes) use Polyurethane Plastic Foam (PUF) according to their porosity to support sampling and separator size of the particles. In this study, the authors present an original application of size selective personal air sampling using chemical impregnated PUF to perform isocyanate aerosols capturing and derivatizing in industrial spray-painting shops.

  8. High Temperature Structural Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S.; Baillif, Faye F.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Marchello, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The Aerospace Industry is experiencing growing demand for high performance polymer foam. The X-33 program needs structural foam insulation capable of retaining its strength over a wide range of environmental conditions. The High Speed Research Program has a need for low density core splice and potting materials. This paper reviews the state of the art in foam materials and describes experimental work to fabricate low density, high shear strength foam which can withstand temperatures from -220 C to 220 C. Commercially available polymer foams exhibit a wide range of physical properties. Some with densities as low as 0.066 g/cc are capable of co-curing at temperatures as high as 182 C. Rohacell foams can be resin transfer molded at temperatures up to 180 C. They have moduli of elasticity of 0.19 MPa, tensile strengths of 3.7 Mpa and compressive strengths of 3.6 MPa. The Rohacell foams cannot withstand liquid hydrogen temperatures, however Imi-Tech markets Solimide (trademark) foams which withstand temperatures from -250 C to 200 C, but they do not have the required structural integrity. The research activity at NASA Langley Research Center focuses on using chemical blowing agents to produce polyimide thermoplastic foams capable of meeting the above performance requirements. The combination of blowing agents that decompose at the minimum melt viscosity temperature together with plasticizers to lower the viscosity has been used to produce foams by both extrusion and oven heating. The foams produced exhibit good environmental stability while maintaining structural properties.

  9. Foam For Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Like nature's honeycomb, foam is a structure of many-sided cells, apparently solid but actually only three percent material and 97 percent air. Foam is made by a heat-producing chemical reaction which expands a plastic material in a manner somewhat akin to the heat-induced rising of a loaf of bread. The resulting structure of interconnected cells is flexible yet strong and extremely versatile in applicati6n. Foam can, for example, be a sound absorber in one form, while in another it allows sound to pass through it. It can be a very soft powder puff material and at the same time a highly abrasive scrubber. A sampling of foam uses includes stereo speaker grilles, applying postage meter ink, filtering lawnmower carburetor air; deadening noise in trucks and tractors, applying cosmetics, releasing fabric softener and antistatic agents in home clothes dryers, painting, filtering factory heating and ventilating systems, shining shoes, polishing cars, sponge-mopping floors, acting as pre-operative surgical scrubbers-the list is virtually limitless. The process by which foam is made produces "windows," thin plastic membranes connecting the cell walls. Windowed foam is used in many applications but for certain others-filtering, for example-it is desirable to have a completely open network. Scott Paper Company's Foam Division, Chester, Pennsylvania, improved a patented method of "removing the windows," to create an open structure that affords special utility in filtering applications. NASA technology contributed to Scott's improvement.

  10. Aging of polyurethane foam insulation in simulated refrigerator panels -- Initial results with third-generation blowing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.; Gabbard, W.A.; Weaver, F.J.

    1998-11-01

    Laboratory data are presented on the effect of constant-temperature aging on the apparent thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam insulation for refrigerators and freezers. The foam specimens were blown with HCFC-141b and with three of its potential replacements -- HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, and cyclopentane. Specimens were aged at constant temperatures of 90 F, 40 F, and {minus}10 F. Thermal conductivity measurements were made on two types of specimens: full-thickness simulated refrigerator panels containing foam enclosed between solid plastic sheets, and thin slices of core foam cut from similar panels. Results are presented for about 250 days of aging for the core-foam specimens and for the first six months of aging for the full-thickness panels.

  11. Aging of Polyurethane Foam Insulation in Simulated Refrigerator Panels--One-Year Results with Third-Generation Blowing Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Gabbard, W.A.; Weaver, F.J.; Wilkes, K.E.

    1999-09-27

    Laboratory data are presented on the effect of constant-temperature aging on the apparent thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam insulation for refrigerators and freezers. The foam specimens were blown with HCFC-141b and with three of its potential replacements--HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, and cyclopentane. Specimens were aged at constant temperatures of 90 F, 40 F, and {minus}10 F. Thermal conductivity measurements were made on two types of specimens: full-thickness simulated refrigerator panels containing foam enclosed between solid plastic sheets, and thin slices of core foam cut from similar panels. Results are presented for the first year of a multi-year study for the full-thickness panels and for about 1-1/2 years of aging for the core-foam specimens.

  12. Evaluation of HFC 245ca and HFC 236ea as foam blowing agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, Jon; Macarthur, Doug; Kollie, Tom; Graves, Ron; Liu, Matthew; Hendriks, Robert V.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) 141b has been selected as the interim blowing agent for use in urethane insulations on NASA's Space Shuttle External Tank. Due to the expected limited commercial lifetime of this material, research efforts at the NASA Thermal Protection Systems Materials Research Laboratory at the Marshall Space Flight Center are now being devoted to the identification and development of alternatives with zero ozone depletion potential. Physical blowing agents identified to date have included hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, hydrofluoroethers, and more predominantly, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). The majority of the HFC evaluations in industry have focused on the more readily available, low boiling candidates such as HFC 134a. Higher boiling HFC candidates that could be handled at ambient conditions and use current processing equipment would be more desirable. This paper will describe results from a research program of two such candidate HFC's performed as a cooperative effort between Martin Marietta Manned Space Systems, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. The purpose of this effort was to perform a cursory evaluation of the developmental HFC's 245ca and 236ea as blowing agents in urethane based insulations. These two materials were selected from screening tests of 37 C2, C3, and C4 isomers based on physical properties, atmospheric lifetime, flammability, estimated toxicity, difficulty of synthesis, suitability for dual use as a refrigerant, and other factors. Solubility of the two materials in typical foam components was tested, pour foaming trials were performed, and preliminary data were gathered regarding foam insulation performance.

  13. Chemical characterization and ecotoxicity of three soil foaming agents used in mechanized tunneling.

    PubMed

    Baderna, Diego; Lomazzi, Eleonora; Passoni, Alice; Pogliaghi, Alberto; Petoumenou, Maria Ifigeneia; Bagnati, Renzo; Lodi, Marco; Viarengo, Aldo; Sforzini, Susanna; Benfenati, Emilio; Fanelli, Roberto

    2015-10-15

    The construction of tunnels and rocks with mechanized drills produces several tons of rocky debris that are today recycled as construction material or as soil replacement for covering rocky areas. The lack of accurate information about the environmental impact of these excavated rocks and foaming agents added during the excavation process has aroused increasing concern for ecosystems and human health. The present study proposes an integrated approach to the assessment of the potential environmental impact of three foaming agents containing different anionic surfactants and other polymers currently on the market and used in tunnel boring machines. The strategy includes chemical characterization with high resolution mass spectrometry techniques to identify the components of each product, the use of in silico tools to perform a similarity comparison among these compounds and some pollutants already listed in regulatory frameworks to identify possible threshold concentrations of contamination, and the application of a battery of ecotoxicological assays to investigate the impact of each foaming mixture on model organisms of soil (higher plants and Eisenia andrei) and water communities (Daphnia magna). The study identified eleven compounds not listed on the material safety data sheets for which we have identified possible concentrations of contamination based on existing regulatory references. The bioassays allowed us to determine the no effect concentrations (NOAECs) of the three mixtures, which were subsequently used as threshold concentration for the product in its entirety. The technical mixtures used in this study have a different degree of toxicity and the predicted environmental concentrations based on the conditions of use are lower than the NOAEC for soils but higher than the NOAEC for water, posing a potential risk to the waters due to the levels of foaming agents in the muck.

  14. Foam injection molding of poly(lactic acid) with physical blowing agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantani, R.; Sorrentino, A.; Volpe, V.; Titomanlio, G.

    2014-05-01

    Foam injection molding uses environmental friendly blowing agents under high pressure and temperature to produce parts having a cellular core and a compact solid skin (the so-called "structural foam"). The addition of a supercritical gas reduces the part weight and at the same time improves some physical properties of the material through the promotion of a faster crystallization; it also leads to the reduction of both the viscosity and the glass transition temperature of the polymer melt, which therefore can be injection molded adopting lower temperatures and pressures. These aspects are of extreme interest for biodegradable polymers, which often present a very narrow processing window, with the suitable processing temperatures close to the degradation conditions. In this work, foam injection molding was carried out by an instrumented molding machine, able to measure the pressure evolution in different positions along the flow-path. The material adopted was a biodegradable polymer, namely the Poly(lactic acid), PLA. The effect of a physical blowing agent (PBA) on the viscosity was measured. The density reduction and the morphology of parts obtained by different molding conditions was assessed.

  15. Influence of aluminium nitride as a foaming agent on the preparation of foam glass-ceramics from high-titanium blast furnace slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Huan; Feng, Ke-qin; Wang, Hai-bo; Chen, Chang-hong; Zhou, Hong-ling

    2016-05-01

    To effectively reuse high-titanium blast furnace slag (TS), foam glass-ceramics were successfully prepared by powder sintering at 1000°C. TS and waste glass were used as the main raw materials, aluminium nitride (AlN) as the foaming agent, and borax as the fluxing agent. The influence of the amount of AlN added (1wt%-5wt%) on the crystalline phases, microstructure, and properties of the produced foam glass-ceramics was studied. The results showed that the main crystal phases were perovskite, diopside, and augite. With increasing AlN content, a transformation from diopside to augite occurred and the crystallinity of the pyroxene phases slightly decreased. Initially, the average pore size and porosity of the foam glass-ceramics increased and subsequently decreased; similarly, their bulk density and compressive strength decreased and subsequently increased. The optimal properties were obtained when the foam glass-ceramics were prepared by adding 4wt% AlN.

  16. Extrusion foaming of thermoplastic cellulose acetate from renewable resources using a two-component physical blowing agent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Windeck, C.; Hendriks, S.; Zepnik, S.; Wodke, T.

    2014-05-01

    Thermoplastic cellulose acetate (CA) is a bio-based polymer with optical, mechanical and thermal properties comparable to those of polystyrene (PS). The substitution of the predominant petrol-based PS in applications like foamed food trays can lead to a more sustainable economic practice. However, CA is also suitable for more durable applications as the biodegradability rate can be controlled by adjusting the degree of substitutions. The extrusion foaming of CA still has to overcome certain challenges. CA is highly hydrophilic and can suffer from hydrolytic degradation if not dried properly. Therefore, the influence of residual moisture on the melt viscosity is rather high. Beyond, the surface quality of foam CA sheets is below those of PS due to the particular foaming behaviour. This paper presents results of a recent study on extrusion foamed CA, using a two-component physical blowing agent system compromising HFO 1234ze as blowing agent and organic solvents as co-propellant. Samples with different co-propellants are processed on a laboratory single screw extruder at IKV. Morphology and surface topography are investigated with respect to the blowing agent composition and the die pressure. In addition, relationships between foam density, foam morphology and the propellants are analysed. The choice of the co-propellant has a significant influence on melt-strength, foaming behaviour and the possible blow-up ratio of the sheet. Furthermore, a positive influence of the co-propellant on the surface quality can be observed. In addition, the focus is laid on the effect of external contact cooling of the foamed sheets after the die exit.

  17. Aging of Polyurethane Foam Insulation in Simulated Refrigerator Panels--Three-Year Results with Third-Generation Blowing Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.

    2001-05-29

    Laboratory data are presented on the effect of constant-temperature aging on the apparent thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam insulation for refrigerators and freezers. The foam specimens were blown with HCFC-141b and with three of its potential replacements--HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, and cyclopentane. Specimens were aged at constant temperatures of 90 F, 40 F, and -10 F. Thermal conductivity measurements were made on two types of specimens: full-thickness simulated refrigerator panels containing foam enclosed between solid plastic sheets, and thin slices of core foam cut from similar panels. Results are presented for the first three years of a multi-year aging study. Preliminary comparisons of measured data with predictions of a mathematical aging model are presented.

  18. In vitro mutagenicity testing. II. Silastic 386 Foam Elastomer, Irganox 1010, mixture of Sylgard 184 with Encapsulating Resin and Curing Agent, and dimethylbenzanthracene. [Ames test

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.Y.; Smith, D.M.

    1980-02-01

    Four materials, Silastic 386 Foam Elastomer, Irganox 1010, Sylgard 184 with Encapsulating Resin and Curing Agent, and 7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA), were tested for in vitro mutagenicity by the Ames Salmonella assay method. Silastic 386 Foam Elastomer, Irganox 1010, and Sylgard 184 Encapsulating Resin with Curing Agent were not mutagenic; the mutagenicity of DMBA was corroborated.

  19. Hot foam for weed control-Do alkyl polyglucoside surfactants used as foaming agents affect the mobility of organic contaminants in soil?

    PubMed

    Cederlund, H; Börjesson, E

    2016-08-15

    Use of alkyl polyglucosides (APGs) as a foaming agent during hot water weed control may influence the environmental fate of organic contaminants in soil. We studied the effects of the APG-based foaming agent NCC Spuma (C8-C10) on leaching of diuron, glyphosate, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sand columns. We also examined how APG concentration affected the apparent water solubility and adsorption of the herbicides and of the PAHs acenaphthene, acenaphthylene and fluorene. Application of APGs at the recommended concentration of 0.3% did not significantly affect leaching of any of the compounds studied. However, at a concentration of 1.5%, leaching of both diuron and glyphosate was significantly increased. The increased leaching corresponded to an increase in apparent water solubility of diuron and a decrease in glyphosate adsorption to the sand. However, APG addition did not significantly affect the mobility of PAHs even though their apparent water solubility was increased. These results suggest that application of APG-based foam during hot water weed control does not significantly affect the mobility of organic contaminants in soil if used according to recommendations. Moreover, they suggest that APGs could be useful for soil bioremediation purposes if higher concentrations are used.

  20. Hot foam for weed control-Do alkyl polyglucoside surfactants used as foaming agents affect the mobility of organic contaminants in soil?

    PubMed

    Cederlund, H; Börjesson, E

    2016-08-15

    Use of alkyl polyglucosides (APGs) as a foaming agent during hot water weed control may influence the environmental fate of organic contaminants in soil. We studied the effects of the APG-based foaming agent NCC Spuma (C8-C10) on leaching of diuron, glyphosate, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sand columns. We also examined how APG concentration affected the apparent water solubility and adsorption of the herbicides and of the PAHs acenaphthene, acenaphthylene and fluorene. Application of APGs at the recommended concentration of 0.3% did not significantly affect leaching of any of the compounds studied. However, at a concentration of 1.5%, leaching of both diuron and glyphosate was significantly increased. The increased leaching corresponded to an increase in apparent water solubility of diuron and a decrease in glyphosate adsorption to the sand. However, APG addition did not significantly affect the mobility of PAHs even though their apparent water solubility was increased. These results suggest that application of APG-based foam during hot water weed control does not significantly affect the mobility of organic contaminants in soil if used according to recommendations. Moreover, they suggest that APGs could be useful for soil bioremediation purposes if higher concentrations are used. PMID:27149400

  1. Shock velocity and temperature measurements of plastic foams compressed by smoothed laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, Michel; Benuzzi-Mounaix, Alessandra; Batani, Dimitri; Hall, Tom; Nazarov, Wigen

    2005-01-01

    The importance of foams in laser produced plasmas has been recently pointed out in both inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysics laboratory dedicated experiments. In this paper, measurements of shock velocity using velocity interferometer for any reflector and of temperature in porous materials are presented. Reflectivity from the rear side of the target was measured using a probe beam and only foams of density higher than 800 mg/cm{sup 3} gave valuable data. Results are discussed and compared with available models.

  2. In-situ and thin-specimen aging of experimental polyisocyanurate roof insulation foamed with alternative blowing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J.E.; Courville, G.E.; Graves, R.S.; Linkous, R.L.; McElroy, D.L.; Weaver, F.J.; Yarbrough, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports apparent thermal conductivity (k) values from field and laboratory aging tests on a set of industry-produced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminated boardstock foamed with hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as alternatives to chlorofluorocarbon (CFC). The PIR boards were blown with five gases: CFC-11, HCFC-123, HCFC-14lb, and 50/50 and 65/35 blends of HCFC-123/HCFC-14lb. The k-values were determined from 0 to 50{degree}C (30 to 120{degree}F) using techniques that meet ASTM C 114 (Thin Heater Apparatus) and ASTM C 518 (Heat Flow Meter Apparatus). Results on laminate boards with facers provide an independent laboratory check on the increase in k observed for field exposure in the ORNL Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA). The observed laboratory increase in k was between 8% and 11% for a 240 day field exposure in the RTRA. A thin-specimen aging procedure established the long-term thermal resistance of gas-filled foams. Thin specimens were planed from the industry-produced boardstock foams and aged at 24 and 65{degree}C (75{degree}F and 150{degree}F) for up to 300 days. An exponential dependency of k with the quantity (diffusion coefficient X time){sup {1/2}}/ thickness, provide effective diffusion coefficients for air components into the foams and blowing agent out of the foams. The foams blown with alternative blowing agents exhibited k-values 3 to 16% (average 9.4%) above CFC-11 foams under similar conditions. Field exposures were conducted on specimens under single ply EPDM membranes in the RTRA for over 400 days. Hourly averages of panel temperature and heat flux were analyzed to obtain K as a function of mean temperature on a week by week basis. The relative performance of test specimens of HCFC-14B under a black and under a white membrane is reported. 29 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  3. Exploratory development of foams from liquid crystal polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. S.

    1985-01-01

    Two types of liquid crystal polymer (LCP) compositions were studied and evaluated as structural foam materials. One is a copolymer of 6-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, terephthalic acid, and p-acetoxyacetanilide (designed HNA/TA/AAA), and the other is a copolymer of p-hydroxybenzoic acid and 6-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid (designated HBA/HNA). Experimental results showed that the extruded HNA/TA/AA foams have better mechanical quality and appearance than HBA/HNA foams. Heat treatment improved foam tensile strength and break elongation, but reduced their modulus. The injection molding results indicated that nitrogen foaming agents with a low-pressure process gave better void distribution in the injection molded LCP foams than those made by the conventional injection-molding machine and chemical blowing agents. However, in comparing LCP foams with other conventional plastic foams, HBA/HNA foams have better mechanical properties than foamed ABS and PS, but are comparable to PBT and inferior to polycarbonate foams, especially in heat-deflection temperature and impact resistance energy. These deficiencies are due to LCP molecules not having been fully oriented during the Union-Carbide low-pressure foaming process.

  4. Comparisons of the effects of a foam pad, mung bean bag, and plastic bead bag on postural stability disturbance in healthy young adults

    PubMed Central

    Siriphorn, Akkradate; Chamonchant, Dannaovarat; Boonyong, Sujitra

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of unstable support surfaces, i.e. foam pad, mung bean bag, and plastic bead bag, on postural stability disturbance. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-two healthy young adults (11 male and 11 female; aged 21.09 ± 1.44 years; BMI 20.40 ± 1.40 kg/m2) participated in the study. The Balance Master™ was used to evaluate the limit of stability and the unilateral stance performance. Each participant was assessed while standing on the following surfaces: 1) a firm surface, 2) a foam pad, 3) a mung bean bag, and 4) a plastic bead bag. The order of surfaces was randomly assigned. [Results] The mung bean bag and plastic bead bag showed greater disturbances in limit of stability and unilateral stance than the foam pad. There was no significant difference in postural stability disturbance between the mung bean bag and plastic bead bag. [Conclusion] These results suggested that both the mung bean bag and plastic bead bag could be used as a low-cost tool for balance assessment instead of a foam pad in healthy young adults. PMID:27065085

  5. Aging of polyurethane foam insulation in simulated refrigerator walls

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.; Yarbrough, D.W.; Weaver, F.J.

    1997-10-01

    Laboratory data are presented on the thermal conductivity of polyurethane foam insulation in composite test panels that simulate refrigerator walls. The test panels consisted of a steel skin, an ABS plastic liner, and a polyurethane foam core. Foam cores were produced with three different blowing agents (CFC-11, HCFC-141b, and a HCFC-142/22 blend). Periodic thermal measurements have been made on these panels over a three and one half year period in an effort to detect aging processes. Data obtained on foam encased in the panels were compared with measurements on thin foam slices that were removed from similar panels. The data show that the encapsulation of the foam in the solid boundary materials greatly reduces the aging rate. The plan is presented for a follow-on project that is being conducted on the aging of foams blown with HCFC-141b, HFC-134a, HFC-245fa, and cyclopentane.

  6. Processing Characteristics and Properties of the Cellular Products Made by Using Special Foaming Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, Tomasz; Dulebova, Ludmila

    2012-12-01

    The paper describes the manufacturing process of extruded products by the cellular extrusion method, and presents specifications of the blowing agents used in the extrusion process as well as process conditions. The process of cellular extrusion of thermoplastic materials is aimed at obtaining cellular shapes and coats with reduced density, presenting no hollows on the surface of extruder product and displaying minimal contraction under concurrent maintenance of properties similar to properties of products extruded by means of the conventional method. In order to obtain cellular structure, the properties of extruded product are modified by applying suitable plastic or inserting auxiliary agents.

  7. A Novel Foam Contrast Agent Suitable for Fluoroscopic Interventional Procedure: Comparative Study of Physical Properties and Experimental Intervention in Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jin Ho; Park, Hong Suk; Seo, Soowon; Choo, In Wook; Do, Young Soo; Choo, Sung Wook; Shin, Sung Wook; Park, Kwang Bo; Cho, Sung Ki; Hyun, Dongho; Lim, Sooyoun

    2015-01-01

    In fluoroscopic contrast study for interventional procedure, liquid contrast agent may be diluted in body fluid, losing its contrast effect. We developed a novel contrast agent of “foam state” to maintain contrast effect for enough time and performed a comparative study of physical properties and its usefulness in experimental intervention in animal model. The mean size of microbubble of foam contrast was 13.8 ± 3.6 µm. The viscosity was 201.0 ± 0.624 cP (centipoise) and the specific gravity was 0.616. The foam decayed slowly and it had 97.5 minutes of half-life. In terms of the sustainability in a slow flow environment, foam contrast washed out much more slowly than a conventional contrast. In experimental colonic stent placement, foam contrast revealed significantly better results than conventional contrast in procedure time, total amount of contrast usage, and the number of injections (p < 0.05). Our foam contrast has high viscosity and low specific gravity and maintains foam state for a sufficient time. Foam contrast with these properties was useful in experimental intervention in animal model. We anticipate that foam contrast may be applied to various kinds of interventional procedures. PMID:26366422

  8. A Novel Foam Contrast Agent Suitable for Fluoroscopic Interventional Procedure: Comparative Study of Physical Properties and Experimental Intervention in Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jin Ho; Park, Hong Suk; Seo, Soowon; Choo, In Wook; Do, Young Soo; Choo, Sung Wook; Shin, Sung Wook; Park, Kwang Bo; Cho, Sung Ki; Hyun, Dongho; Lim, Sooyoun

    2015-01-01

    In fluoroscopic contrast study for interventional procedure, liquid contrast agent may be diluted in body fluid, losing its contrast effect. We developed a novel contrast agent of "foam state" to maintain contrast effect for enough time and performed a comparative study of physical properties and its usefulness in experimental intervention in animal model. The mean size of microbubble of foam contrast was 13.8 ± 3.6 µm. The viscosity was 201.0 ± 0.624 cP (centipoise) and the specific gravity was 0.616. The foam decayed slowly and it had 97.5 minutes of half-life. In terms of the sustainability in a slow flow environment, foam contrast washed out much more slowly than a conventional contrast. In experimental colonic stent placement, foam contrast revealed significantly better results than conventional contrast in procedure time, total amount of contrast usage, and the number of injections (p < 0.05). Our foam contrast has high viscosity and low specific gravity and maintains foam state for a sufficient time. Foam contrast with these properties was useful in experimental intervention in animal model. We anticipate that foam contrast may be applied to various kinds of interventional procedures. PMID:26366422

  9. Headgroup interactions and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of a chelating surfactant, different foaming agents, and divalent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Svanedal, Ida; Boija, Susanne; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Håkan

    2014-06-10

    The correlation between interaction parameters and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of chelating surfactant metal complexes and different foaming agents was investigated. We have recently shown that chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) forms strong coordination complexes with divalent metal ions, and this can be utilized in ion flotation. Interaction parameters for mixed micelles and mixed monolayer formation for Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes with the chelating surfactant 4-C12-DTPA and different foaming agents were calculated by Rubingh's regular solution theory. Parameters for the calculations were extracted from surface tension measurements and NMR diffusometry. The effects of metal ion coordination on the interactions between 4-C12-DTPA and the foaming agents could be linked to a previously established difference in coordination chemistry between the examined metal ions. As can be expected from mixtures of amphoteric surfactants, the interactions were strongly pH-dependent. Strong correlation was found between interaction parameter β(σ) for mixed monolayer formation and the phase-transfer efficiency of Ni(2+) complexes with 4-C12-DTPA during flotation in a customized flotation cell. In a mixture of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), the significant difference in conditional stability constants (log K) between the metal complexes was utilized to selectively recover the metal complex with the highest log K (Cu(2+)) by ion flotation. Flotation experiments in an excess concentration of metal ions confirmed the coordination of more than one metal ion to the headgroup of 4-C12-DTPA.

  10. Headgroup interactions and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of a chelating surfactant, different foaming agents, and divalent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Svanedal, Ida; Boija, Susanne; Norgren, Magnus; Edlund, Håkan

    2014-06-10

    The correlation between interaction parameters and ion flotation efficiency in mixtures of chelating surfactant metal complexes and different foaming agents was investigated. We have recently shown that chelating surfactant 2-dodecyldiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (4-C12-DTPA) forms strong coordination complexes with divalent metal ions, and this can be utilized in ion flotation. Interaction parameters for mixed micelles and mixed monolayer formation for Mg(2+) and Ni(2+) complexes with the chelating surfactant 4-C12-DTPA and different foaming agents were calculated by Rubingh's regular solution theory. Parameters for the calculations were extracted from surface tension measurements and NMR diffusometry. The effects of metal ion coordination on the interactions between 4-C12-DTPA and the foaming agents could be linked to a previously established difference in coordination chemistry between the examined metal ions. As can be expected from mixtures of amphoteric surfactants, the interactions were strongly pH-dependent. Strong correlation was found between interaction parameter β(σ) for mixed monolayer formation and the phase-transfer efficiency of Ni(2+) complexes with 4-C12-DTPA during flotation in a customized flotation cell. In a mixture of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), the significant difference in conditional stability constants (log K) between the metal complexes was utilized to selectively recover the metal complex with the highest log K (Cu(2+)) by ion flotation. Flotation experiments in an excess concentration of metal ions confirmed the coordination of more than one metal ion to the headgroup of 4-C12-DTPA. PMID:24824327

  11. Foam suppression in overloaded manure-based biogas reactors using antifoaming agents.

    PubMed

    Kougias, P G; Boe, K; Tsapekos, P; Angelidaki, I

    2014-02-01

    Foam control is an imperative need in biogas plants, as foaming is a major operational problem. In the present study, the effect of oils (rapeseed oil, oleic acid, and octanoic acid) and tributylphosphate on foam reduction and process performance in batch and continuous manure-based biogas reactors was investigated. The compounds were tested in dosages of 0.05%, 0.1% and 0.5% v/vfeed. The results showed that rapeseed oil was most efficient to suppress foam at the dosage of 0.05% and 0.1% v/vfeed, while octanoic acid was most efficient to suppress foam at dosage of 0.5% v/vfeed. Moreover, the addition of rapeseed oil also increased methane yield. In contrast, tributylphosphate, which was very efficient antifoam, was found to be inhibitory to the biogas process.

  12. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, F. E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Schneider, A. E-mail: anja.schneider@ict.fraunhofer.de; Elsner, P.

    2014-05-15

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO{sub 2} balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength)

  13. Biopolymer foams - Relationship between material characteristics and foaming behavior of cellulose based foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, F.; Schneider, A.; Elsner, P.

    2014-05-01

    Biopolymers are becoming increasingly important to both industry and consumers. With regard to waste management, CO2 balance and the conservation of petrochemical resources, increasing efforts are being made to replace standard plastics with bio-based polymers. Nowadays biopolymers can be built for example of cellulose, lactic acid, starch, lignin or bio mass. The paper will present material properties of selected cellulose based polymers (cellulose propionate [CP], cellulose acetate butyrate [CAB]) and corresponding processing conditions for particle foams as well as characterization of produced parts. Special focus is given to the raw material properties by analyzing thermal behavior (differential scanning calorimetry), melt strength (Rheotens test) and molecular weight distribution (gel-permeation chromatography). These results will be correlated with the foaming behavior in a continuous extrusion process with physical blowing agents and underwater pelletizer. Process set-up regarding particle foam technology, including extrusion foaming and pre-foaming, will be shown. The characteristics of the resulting foam beads will be analyzed regarding part density, cell morphology and geometry. The molded parts will be tested on thermal conductivity as well as compression behavior (E-modulus, compression strength).

  14. Polystyrene foams for thermal insulation. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Asociation database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of polystyrene foam as a thermal insulator. References discuss applications in railroad tracks, masonry walls, foundations for shallow buildings, and commercial roofing. Use as a vibration medium is referenced. Topics include designing with foam and self-extinguishing foams. (Contains a minimum of 77 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. Synergistic effects of nucleating agents and plasticizers on the crystallization behavior of poly(lactic acid).

    PubMed

    Shi, Xuetao; Zhang, Guangcheng; Phuong, Thanh Vu; Lazzeri, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The synergistic effect of nucleating agents and plasticizers on the thermal and mechanical performance of PLA nanocomposites was investigated with the objective of increasing the crystallinity and balancing the stiffness and toughness of PLA mechanical properties. Calcium carbonate, halloysite nanotubes, talc and LAK (sulfates) were compared with each other as heterogeneous nucleating agents. Both the DSC isothermal and non-isothermal studies indicated that talc and LAK were the more effective nucleating agents among the selected fillers. Poly(D-lactic acid) (PDLA) acted also as a nucleating agent due to the formation of the PLA stereocomplex. The half crystallization time was reduced by the addition of talc to about 2 min from 37.5 min of pure PLA by the isothermal crystallization study. The dynamic mechanical thermal study (DMTA) indicated that nanofillers acted as both reinforcement fillers and nucleating agents in relation to the higher storage modulus. The plasticized PLA studied by DMTA indicated a decreasing glass transition temperature with the increasing of the PEG content. The addition of nanofiller increased the Young's modulus. PEG had the plasticization effect of increasing the break deformation, while sharply decreasing the stiffness and strength of PLA. The synergistic effect of nanofillers and plasticizer achieved the balance between stiffness and toughness with well-controlled crystallization. PMID:25608041

  16. Small cell foams containing a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer as a nucleating agent

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrand, David M.; Tomalia, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    A small cell foam having a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer is described. This modified dense star polymer or dendrimer has a highly branched interior of one monomeric composition and an exterior structure of a different monomeric composition capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell and a particle diameter of from about 5 to about 1,000 nm with a matrix polymer.

  17. Small cell foams containing a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer as a nucleating agent

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrand, D.M.; Tomalia, D.A.

    1995-02-28

    A small cell foam having a modified dense star polymer or dendrimer is described. This modified dense star polymer or dendrimer has a highly branched interior of one monomeric composition and an exterior structure of a different monomeric composition capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell and a particle diameter of from about 5 to about 1,000 nm with a matrix polymer.

  18. Genomic plasticity of the causative agent of melioidosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Holden, Matthew T G; Titball, Richard W; Peacock, Sharon J; Cerdeño-Tárraga, Ana M; Atkins, Timothy; Crossman, Lisa C; Pitt, Tyrone; Churcher, Carol; Mungall, Karen; Bentley, Stephen D; Sebaihia, Mohammed; Thomson, Nicholas R; Bason, Nathalie; Beacham, Ifor R; Brooks, Karen; Brown, Katherine A; Brown, Nat F; Challis, Greg L; Cherevach, Inna; Chillingworth, Tracy; Cronin, Ann; Crossett, Ben; Davis, Paul; DeShazer, David; Feltwell, Theresa; Fraser, Audrey; Hance, Zahra; Hauser, Heidi; Holroyd, Simon; Jagels, Kay; Keith, Karen E; Maddison, Mark; Moule, Sharon; Price, Claire; Quail, Michael A; Rabbinowitsch, Ester; Rutherford, Kim; Sanders, Mandy; Simmonds, Mark; Songsivilai, Sirirurg; Stevens, Kim; Tumapa, Sarinna; Vesaratchavest, Monkgol; Whitehead, Sally; Yeats, Corin; Barrell, Bart G; Oyston, Petra C F; Parkhill, Julian

    2004-09-28

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a recognized biothreat agent and the causative agent of melioidosis. This Gram-negative bacterium exists as a soil saprophyte in melioidosis-endemic areas of the world and accounts for 20% of community-acquired septicaemias in northeastern Thailand where half of those affected die. Here we report the complete genome of B. pseudomallei, which is composed of two chromosomes of 4.07 megabase pairs and 3.17 megabase pairs, showing significant functional partitioning of genes between them. The large chromosome encodes many of the core functions associated with central metabolism and cell growth, whereas the small chromosome carries more accessory functions associated with adaptation and survival in different niches. Genomic comparisons with closely and more distantly related bacteria revealed a greater level of gene order conservation and a greater number of orthologous genes on the large chromosome, suggesting that the two replicons have distinct evolutionary origins. A striking feature of the genome was the presence of 16 genomic islands (GIs) that together made up 6.1% of the genome. Further analysis revealed these islands to be variably present in a collection of invasive and soil isolates but entirely absent from the clonally related organism B. mallei. We propose that variable horizontal gene acquisition by B. pseudomallei is an important feature of recent genetic evolution and that this has resulted in a genetically diverse pathogenic species.

  19. MASS TRANSFER COEFFICIENTS FOR A NON-NEWTONIAN FLUID AND WATER WITH AND WITHOUT ANTI-FOAM AGENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.

    2009-09-09

    Mass transfer rates were measured in a large scale system, which consisted of an 8.4 meter tall by 0.76 meter diameter column containing one of three fluids: water with an anti-foam agent, water without an anti-foam agent, and AZ101 simulant, which simulated a non-Newtonian nuclear waste. The testing contributed to the evaluation of large scale mass transfer of hydrogen in nuclear waste tanks. Due to its radioactivity, the waste was chemically simulated, and due to flammability concerns oxygen was used in lieu of hydrogen. Different liquids were used to better understand the mass transfer processes, where each of the fluids was saturated with oxygen, and the oxygen was then removed from solution as air bubbled up, or sparged, through the solution from the bottom of the column. Air sparging was supplied by a single tube which was co-axial to the column, the decrease in oxygen concentration was recorded, and oxygen measurements were then used to determine the mass transfer coefficients to describe the rate of oxygen transfer from solution. Superficial, average, sparging velocities of 2, 5, and 10 mm/second were applied to each of the liquids at three different column fill levels, and mass transfer coefficient test results are presented here for combinations of superficial velocities and fluid levels.

  20. Temper Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Fabricated by Expanded Rubber & Plastics Corporation, Temper Foam provides better impact protection for airplane passengers and enhances passenger comfort on long flights because it distributes body weight and pressure evenly over the entire contact area. Called a "memory foam" it matches the contour of the body pressing against it and returns to its original shape once the pressure is removed. As a shock absorber, a three-inch foam pad has the ability to absorb the impact of a 10-foot fall by an adult. Applications include seat cushioning for transportation vehicles, padding for furniture and a variety of athletic equipment medical applications including wheelchair padding, artificial limb socket lining, finger splint and hand padding for burn patients, special mattresses for the bedridden and dental stools. Production and sales rights are owned by Temper Foam, Inc. Material is manufactured under license by the Dewey and Almy Division of Grace Chemical Corporation. Distributors of the product are Kees Goebel Medical Specialties, Inc. and Alimed, Inc. They sell Temper Foam in bulk to the fabricators who trim it to shapes required by their customers.

  1. Foam Micromechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Neilsen, M.K.; Reinelt, D.A.; Warren, W.E.

    1998-11-03

    Foam evokes many different images: waves breaking at the seashore, the head on a pint of Guinness, an elegant dessert, shaving, the comfortable cushion on which you may be seated... From the mundane to the high tech, foams, emulsions, and cellular solids encompass a broad range of materials and applications. Soap suds, mayonnaise, and foamed polymers provide practical motivation and only hint at the variety of materials at issue. Typical of mukiphase materiaIs, the rheoIogy or mechanical behavior of foams is more complicated than that of the constituent phases alone, which may be gas, liquid, or solid. For example, a soap froth exhibits a static shear modulus-a hallmark of an elastic solid-even though it is composed primarily of two Newtonian fluids (water and air), which have no shear modulus. This apparent paradox is easily resolved. Soap froth contains a small amount of surfactant that stabilizes the delicate network of thin liq- uid films against rupture. The soap-film network deforms in response to a macroscopic strain; this increases interracial area and the corresponding sur- face energy, and provides the strain energy of classical elasticity theory [1]. This physical mechanism is easily imagined but very challenging to quantify for a realistic three-dimensional soap froth in view of its complex geome- try. Foam micromechanics addresses the connection between constituent properties, cell-level structure, and macroscopic mechanical behavior. This article is a survey of micromechanics applied to gas-liquid foams, liquid-liquid emulsions, and cellular solids. We will focus on static response where the foam deformation is very slow and rate-dependent phenomena such as viscous flow can be neglected. This includes nonlinear elasticity when deformations are large but reversible. We will also discuss elastic- plastic behavior, which involves yield phenomena. Foam structures based on polyhedra packed to fill space provide a unify- ing geometrical theme. Because a two

  2. Counteracting foaming caused by lipids or proteins in biogas reactors using rapeseed oil or oleic acid as antifoaming agents.

    PubMed

    Kougias, P G; Boe, K; Einarsdottir, E S; Angelidaki, I

    2015-08-01

    Foaming is one of the major operational problems in biogas plants, and dealing with foaming incidents is still based on empirical practices. Various types of antifoams are used arbitrarily to combat foaming in biogas plants, but without any scientific support this action can lead to serious deterioration of the methanogenic process. Many commercial antifoams are derivatives of fatty acids or oils. However, it is well known that lipids can induce foaming in manure based biogas plants. This study aimed to elucidate the effect of rapeseed oil and oleic acid on foam reduction and process performance in biogas reactors fed with protein or lipid rich substrates. The results showed that both antifoams efficiently suppressed foaming. Moreover rapeseed oil resulted in stimulation of the biogas production. Finally, it was reckoned that the chemical structure of lipids, and more specifically their carboxylic ends, is responsible for their foam promoting or foam counteracting behaviour. Thus, it was concluded that the fatty acids and oils could suppress foaming, while salt of fatty acids could generate foam.

  3. Location of buried plastic pipes using multi-agent support based on GPR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala-Cabrera, David; Herrera, Manuel; Izquierdo, Joaquín; Pérez-García, Rafael

    2011-12-01

    This work focuses on the generation of tools to aid inspection and identify buried plastic pipes in water supply systems (WSS). In our study we use ground penetrating system (GPR) images as a non-destructive method of obtaining information without altering the system conditions and the environmental characteristics. A viability study for extracting features, and an approach to the above-mentioned application based on multi-agent systems are addressed in this paper. Firstly, we use intensive matrix manipulation of the GPR output for preprocessing the images. As a result, two matrices are produced that classify initial data based on the original radargram of the wave amplitude parameter. Then the plastic pipe characteristics that offer an enhanced likelihood of location are defined. This procedure is evaluated through two case-studies. One study corresponds to a simple case (one pipe) and the other corresponds to various pipes (made of different materials). Both cases were developed under controlled laboratory conditions. The obtained results are promising, and we show that automatic plastic pipe location has been achieved. The main contributions of the procedures proposed in this work are: firstly, highly skilled GPR prospection operators become unnecessary for plastic pipe location using GPR images; and secondly, we have opened a route to further classification that makes use of other methodologies.

  4. Correlation of chain length compatibility and surface properties of mixed foaming agents with fluid displacement efficiency and effective air mobility in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M.K.; Bringham, W.E.; Shah, D.O.

    1984-05-01

    The effects of chain length compatibility and surface properties of mixed foaming agents on fluid displacement efficiency and effective air mobility in porous media were investigated. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (C/sub 12/H/sub 25/SO/sub 4/Na) and various alkyl alcohols (e.g., C/sub 8/OH,C/sub 10/OH,C/sub 12/OH,C/sub 14/OH, and C/sub 16/OH) were used as mixed foaming agents. It was observed that the surface properties of surfactant solutions and flow behavior of foams through porous media were influenced by the chain length compatibility of the surfactant molecules. The increase in the length of porous media improved fluid displacement efficiency while breakthrough time per unit length decreased slightly with increase in the length of porous media. For mixed surfactant systems, a minimum in surface tension, a maximum in surface viscosity, a minimum in bubble size, a maximum in breakthrough time, a maximum in fluid displacement efficiency, and a minimum in effective air mobility were observed when the two components of the surfactant system had the same chain length. These results indicate that the surface properties of foaming solutions and molecular packing at interfaces exhibit a striking correlation with breakthrough time, fluid displacement efficiency, and effective air mobility in porous media.

  5. Gas Generation and Hold-Up in Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Process Streams Containing Anti-Foam Agent (AFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Arm, Stuart T.; Poloski, Adam P.; Stewart, Charles W.; Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2007-06-29

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and vitrify defense wastes stored at the DOE Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Some of the WTP process streams are slurries that exhibit non-Newtonian rheological behavior. Such streams can accumulate hazardous quantities of thermally and radiolytically generated flammable gases. Experiments were performed in a bubble column to measure gas hold-up under various conditions to better understand flammable gas behavior in WTP processes. The two non-Newtonian slurries tested were kaolin-bentonite clay and a chemical surrogate of pretreated high-level waste (HLW) from Hanford Tank AZ-101. The addition of solutes, whether a salt or anti-foaming agent (AFA) decrease the bubble coalescence rate leading to smaller bubbles, lower bubble rise velocity and higher gas holdup. Gas holdup decreased with increasing yield stress and consistency. The impact of AFA on gas holdup in kaolin-bentonite clay was less than in simulated HLW, presumably because the AFA adsorbed onto the clay particles, rendering it unavailable to retard coalescence.

  6. 46 CFR 108.473 - Foam system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Foam system components. 108.473 Section 108.473 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.473 Foam system components. (a) Each foam agent, each tank for a foam agent, each discharge outlet, each control, and each valve for...

  7. 46 CFR 108.473 - Foam system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Foam system components. 108.473 Section 108.473 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.473 Foam system components. (a) Each foam agent, each tank for a foam agent, each discharge outlet, each control, and each valve for...

  8. 46 CFR 108.473 - Foam system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Foam system components. 108.473 Section 108.473 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.473 Foam system components. (a) Each foam agent, each tank for a foam agent, each discharge outlet, each control, and each valve for...

  9. 46 CFR 108.473 - Foam system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foam system components. 108.473 Section 108.473 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.473 Foam system components. (a) Each foam agent, each tank for a foam agent, each discharge outlet, each control, and each valve for...

  10. 46 CFR 108.473 - Foam system components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Foam system components. 108.473 Section 108.473 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.473 Foam system components. (a) Each foam agent, each tank for a foam agent, each discharge outlet, each control, and each valve for...

  11. Dry-heating makes hen egg white lysozyme an efficient foaming agent and enables its bulk aggregation.

    PubMed

    Desfougères, Yann; Lechevalier, Valérie; Pezennec, Stéphane; Artzner, Franck; Nau, Françoise

    2008-07-01

    Dry-heating is considered to be one of the most promising approaches to improving the functionality of food proteins. It has been shown that even if only minor structural modifications occur during dry-heating, the foaming properties of proteins are highly improved. With the recent results obtained in the field of foam stabilization by nanoparticles or protein aggregates in mind, a study was undertaken on the impact of dry-heating of lysozyme, used as a model protein, on its foaming properties. This work highlighted the fact that dry-heated hen egg white lysozyme simultaneously exhibited enhanced foaming properties and aggregation capacity. Although the conditions that favored bulk aggregation (high ionic strength, pH, treatment duration, and protein concentration) also favored foaming properties, the large bulk aggregates were not essential to obtain the best functionality. It is envisaged that heat-treated lysozyme may self-associate at the air/water interface, stabilizing air bubbles.

  12. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Juan M. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A fully imidized, solvent-free polyimide foam having excellent mechanical, acoustic, thermal, and flame resistant properties is produced. A first solution is provided, which includes one or more aromatic dianhydrides or derivatives of aromatic dianhydrides, and may include one or more aromatic diamines, dissolved in one or more polar solvents, along with an effective amount of one or more blowing agents. This first solution may also advantageously include effective amounts respectively of one or mores catalysts, one or more surfactants, and one or more fire retardants. A second solution is also provided which includes one or more isocyanates. The first and second solutions are rapidly and thoroughly mixed to produce an admixture, which is allowed to foam?in an open container, or in a closed mold?under ambient conditions to completion produce a foamed product. This foamed product is then cured by high frequency electromagnetic radiation, thermal energy, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, the process is adapted for spraying or extrusion.

  13. Polyimide Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Juan M. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A fully imidized, solvent-free polyimide foam having excellent mechanical, acoustic, thermal, and flame resistant properties is produced. A first solution is provided, which includes one or more aromatic dianhydrides or derivatives of aromatic dianhydrides, and may include one or more aromatic diamines, dissolved in one or more polar solvents, along with an effective amount of one or more blowing agents. This first solution may also advantageously include effective amounts respectively of one or mores catalysts, one or more surfactants, and one or more fire retardants. A second solution is also provided which includes one or more isocyanates. The first and second solutions are rapidly and thoroughly mixed to produce an admixture, which is allowed to foam-in an open container, or in a closed mold-under ambient conditions to completion produce a foamed product. This foamed product is then cured by high frequency electromagnetic radiation, thermal energy, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, the process is adapted for spraying or extrusion.

  14. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Juan M. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor); Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A fully imidized, solvent-free polyimide foam having excellent mechanical, acoustic, thermal, and flame resistant properties is produced. A first solution is provided, which includes one or more aromatic dianhydrides or derivatives of aromatic dianhydrides, and may include one or more aromatic diamines, dissolved in one or more polar solvents, along with an effective amount of one or more blowing agents. This first solution may also advantageously include effective amounts respectively of one or mores catalysts, one or more surfactants, and one or more fire retardants. A second solution is also provided which includes one or more isocyanates. The first and second solutions are rapidly and thoroughly mixed to produce an admixture, which is allowed to foam--in an open container, or in a closed mold--under ambient conditions to completion produce a foamed product. This foamed product is then cured by high frequency electromagnetic radiation, thermal energy, or a combination thereof. Alternatively, the process is adapted for spraying or extrusion.

  15. Density and temperature characterization of long-scale length, near-critical density controlled plasma produced from ultra-low density plastic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. N.; Iwawaki, T.; Morita, K.; Antici, P.; Baton, S. D.; Filippi, F.; Habara, H.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Nicolaï, P.; Nazarov, W.; Rousseaux, C.; Starodubstev, M.; Tanaka, K. A.; Fuchs, J.

    2016-02-01

    The ability to produce long-scale length (i.e. millimeter scale-length), homogeneous plasmas is of interest in studying a wide range of fundamental plasma processes. We present here a validated experimental platform to create and diagnose uniform plasmas with a density close or above the critical density. The target consists of a polyimide tube filled with an ultra low-density plastic foam where it was heated by x-rays, produced by a long pulse laser irradiating a copper foil placed at one end of the tube. The density and temperature of the ionized foam was retrieved by using x-ray radiography and proton radiography was used to verify the uniformity of the plasma. Plasma temperatures of 5-10 eV and densities around 1021 cm-3 are measured. This well-characterized platform of uniform density and temperature plasma is of interest for experiments using large-scale laser platforms conducting High Energy Density Physics investigations.

  16. Density and temperature characterization of long-scale length, near-critical density controlled plasma produced from ultra-low density plastic foam.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; Iwawaki, T; Morita, K; Antici, P; Baton, S D; Filippi, F; Habara, H; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nicolaï, P; Nazarov, W; Rousseaux, C; Starodubstev, M; Tanaka, K A; Fuchs, J

    2016-02-29

    The ability to produce long-scale length (i.e. millimeter scale-length), homogeneous plasmas is of interest in studying a wide range of fundamental plasma processes. We present here a validated experimental platform to create and diagnose uniform plasmas with a density close or above the critical density. The target consists of a polyimide tube filled with an ultra low-density plastic foam where it was heated by x-rays, produced by a long pulse laser irradiating a copper foil placed at one end of the tube. The density and temperature of the ionized foam was retrieved by using x-ray radiography and proton radiography was used to verify the uniformity of the plasma. Plasma temperatures of 5-10 eV and densities around 10(21) cm(-3) are measured. This well-characterized platform of uniform density and temperature plasma is of interest for experiments using large-scale laser platforms conducting High Energy Density Physics investigations.

  17. Density and temperature characterization of long-scale length, near-critical density controlled plasma produced from ultra-low density plastic foam

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. N.; Iwawaki, T.; Morita, K.; Antici, P.; Baton, S. D.; Filippi, F.; Habara, H.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Nicolaï , P.; Nazarov, W.; Rousseaux, C.; Starodubstev, M.; Tanaka, K. A.; Fuchs, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to produce long-scale length (i.e. millimeter scale-length), homogeneous plasmas is of interest in studying a wide range of fundamental plasma processes. We present here a validated experimental platform to create and diagnose uniform plasmas with a density close or above the critical density. The target consists of a polyimide tube filled with an ultra low-density plastic foam where it was heated by x-rays, produced by a long pulse laser irradiating a copper foil placed at one end of the tube. The density and temperature of the ionized foam was retrieved by using x-ray radiography and proton radiography was used to verify the uniformity of the plasma. Plasma temperatures of 5–10 eV and densities around 1021 cm−3 are measured. This well-characterized platform of uniform density and temperature plasma is of interest for experiments using large-scale laser platforms conducting High Energy Density Physics investigations. PMID:26923471

  18. Density and temperature characterization of long-scale length, near-critical density controlled plasma produced from ultra-low density plastic foam.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; Iwawaki, T; Morita, K; Antici, P; Baton, S D; Filippi, F; Habara, H; Nakatsutsumi, M; Nicolaï, P; Nazarov, W; Rousseaux, C; Starodubstev, M; Tanaka, K A; Fuchs, J

    2016-01-01

    The ability to produce long-scale length (i.e. millimeter scale-length), homogeneous plasmas is of interest in studying a wide range of fundamental plasma processes. We present here a validated experimental platform to create and diagnose uniform plasmas with a density close or above the critical density. The target consists of a polyimide tube filled with an ultra low-density plastic foam where it was heated by x-rays, produced by a long pulse laser irradiating a copper foil placed at one end of the tube. The density and temperature of the ionized foam was retrieved by using x-ray radiography and proton radiography was used to verify the uniformity of the plasma. Plasma temperatures of 5-10 eV and densities around 10(21) cm(-3) are measured. This well-characterized platform of uniform density and temperature plasma is of interest for experiments using large-scale laser platforms conducting High Energy Density Physics investigations. PMID:26923471

  19. Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-01-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL

  20. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOEpatents

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  1. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Charles B.

    1985-01-01

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 .ANG.. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  2. Rigid zeolite containing polyurethane foams

    DOEpatents

    Frost, C.B.

    1984-05-18

    A closed cell rigid polyurethane foam has been prepared which contains up to about 60% by weight of molecular sieves capable of sorbing molecules with effective critical diameters of up to about 10 A. The molecular sieve component of the foam can be preloaded with catalysts or with reactive compounds that can be released upon activation of the foam to control and complete crosslinking after the foam is formed. The foam can also be loaded with water or other flame-retarding agents, after completion. Up to about 50% of the weight of the isocyanate component of the foam can be replaced by polyimide resin precursors for incorporation into the final polymeric network.

  3. Foam Dispenser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    William G. Simpson, a NASA/Marshall employee, invented and patented a foam mixing dispensing device. He is supplying his Simpson mixer to a number of foam applications where it is used to apply foam for insulation purposes.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis study of the TiH{sub 2} foaming agent

    SciTech Connect

    Mandrino, Djordje; Paulin, Irena; Skapin, Sreco D.

    2012-10-15

    The decomposition of commercially available TiH{sub 2} was investigated while performing different thermal treatments. TiH{sub 2} powder, which is widely used as a foaming agent, was heat treated at 450 Degree-Sign C for various times, from 15 min to 120 min. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the surfaces at different magnifications were obtained and interpreted. A Bragg-Brentano X-ray diffractometer was used to measure the X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra on all five samples. A close examination of the diffraction spectra showed that for an as-received sample and samples undergoing the longest thermal treatment (1 and 2 h) these spectra can be explained as deriving from cubic TiH{sub 1.924}, while for the other two samples they can be explained as deriving from tetragonal TiH{sub 1.924}. A constant-unit-cell-volume phase transition between the cubic and tetragonal phases in TiH{sub 2-y}-type compounds had been described in the literature. The unit-cell parameters obtained from measured spectra confirm that within the measurement uncertainty the unit-cell volume is indeed constant in all five samples. Thermo-gravimetry (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) measurements were performed on all the samples, showing that the intensity of the dehydrogenation depends on the previous treatment of the TiH{sub 2}. After the thermal analysis XRD of the samples was performed again and the material was found to exhibit a Ti-like unit cell, but slightly enlarged due to the unreleased hydrogen. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiH{sub 2} samples were cubic or tetragonal TiH{sub 1.924} Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Onset of the hydrogen release temperature increases with the pre-treatment time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal dehydrogenation for the as-prepared TiH{sub 2} is a three-step process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer After thermal analysis 2 residual hydrogen TiH{sub x} phases, close to {alpha}Ti, appeared.

  5. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  6. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  7. Application of a recyclable plastic bulking agent for sewage sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Bin; Ma, Chuang; Gao, Ding; Chen, Tong-Bin; Zheng, Guo-Di; Chen, Jun; Pan, Tian-Hao

    2014-01-01

    A recyclable plastic bulking agent (RPBA) that can be screened and reused was developed to improve sludge composting and to reduce costs. Two RPBAs were developed: RPBA35 (35 mm in diameter) and RPBA50 (50mm in diameter). The objective was to study the influence of size and quantity of RPBA on temperature, oxygen content, water removal during sludge composting, and phytotoxicity of the compost. RPBAs of both sizes improved the temperature, oxygen supply, and water removal compared with the treatment with no RPBA, and obtained phytotoxic-free compost. RPBA50 more effectively removed water than RPBA35. Oxygen diffusion rate in the composting pile containing RPBA50 was higher than in the treatment with no RPBA. When the RPBA50: sludge mixture ratio was above 1:1.5, the period over which the temperature exceeded 55 °C was insufficient to meet the harmless treatment requirement. The water evaporation rate was highest at a ratio of 1:2. PMID:24315937

  8. Application of a recyclable plastic bulking agent for sewage sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Bin; Ma, Chuang; Gao, Ding; Chen, Tong-Bin; Zheng, Guo-Di; Chen, Jun; Pan, Tian-Hao

    2014-01-01

    A recyclable plastic bulking agent (RPBA) that can be screened and reused was developed to improve sludge composting and to reduce costs. Two RPBAs were developed: RPBA35 (35 mm in diameter) and RPBA50 (50mm in diameter). The objective was to study the influence of size and quantity of RPBA on temperature, oxygen content, water removal during sludge composting, and phytotoxicity of the compost. RPBAs of both sizes improved the temperature, oxygen supply, and water removal compared with the treatment with no RPBA, and obtained phytotoxic-free compost. RPBA50 more effectively removed water than RPBA35. Oxygen diffusion rate in the composting pile containing RPBA50 was higher than in the treatment with no RPBA. When the RPBA50: sludge mixture ratio was above 1:1.5, the period over which the temperature exceeded 55 °C was insufficient to meet the harmless treatment requirement. The water evaporation rate was highest at a ratio of 1:2.

  9. Plastic antibody for the recognition of chemical warfare agent sulphur mustard.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, M; Suryanarayana, M V S; Nigam, Anil Kumar; Pandey, Pratibha; Ganesan, K; Singh, Beer; Sekhar, K

    2006-06-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) known as plastic antibodies (PAs) represent a new class of materials possessing high selectivity and affinity for the target molecule. Since their discovery, PAs have attracted considerable interest from bio- and chemical laboratories to pharmaceutical institutes. PAs are becoming an important class of synthetic materials mimicking molecular recognition by natural receptors. In addition, they have been utilized as catalysts, sorbents for solid-phase extraction, stationary phase for liquid chromatography and mimics of enzymes. In this paper, first time we report the preparation and characterization of a PA for the recognition of blistering chemical warfare agent sulphur mustard (SM). The SM imprinted PA exhibited more surface area when compared to the control non-imprinted polymer (NIP). In addition, SEM image showed an ordered nano-pattern for the PA of SM that is entirely different from the image of NIP. The imprinting also enhanced SM rebinding ability to the PA when compared to the NIP with an imprinting efficiency (alpha) of 1.3.

  10. Effect of CNT as a Nucleating Agent on Cell Morphology and Thermal Insulation Property of the Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    PubMed

    Ahn, WonSool; Lee, Joon-Man

    2015-11-01

    The effects of MWCNT on the cell sizes, cell uniformities, thermal conductivities, bulk densities, foaming kinetics, and compressive mechanical properties of the rigid PUFs were investigated. To obtain the better uniform dispersed state of MWCNT, grease-type master batch of MWCNT/surfactant was prepared by three-roll mill. Average cell size of the PUF samples decreased from 185.1 for the neat PUF to 162.9 μm for the sample of 0.01 phr of MWCNT concentration. Cell uniformity was also enhanced showing the standard cell-size deviation of 61.7 and 35.2, respectively. While the thermal conductivity of the neat PUF was 0.0222 W/m(o)K, that of the sample with 0.01 phr of MWCNT showed 0.0204 W/m(o)K, resulting 8.2% reduction of the thermal conductivity. Bulk density of the PUF samples was observed as nearly the same values as 30.0 ± 1.0 g/cm3 regardless of MWCNT. Temperature profiles during foaming process showed that an indirect indication of the nucleation effect of MWCNT for the PUF foaming system, showing faster and higher temperature rising with time. The compressive yield stress is nearly the same as 0.030 x 10(5) Pa regardless of MWCNT.

  11. Starch/fiber/poly(lactic acid) foam and compressed foam composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Composites of starch, fiber, and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were made using a foam substrate formed by dehydrating starch or starch/fiber gels. PLA was infiltrated into the dry foam to provide better moisture resistance. Foam composites were compressed into plastics using force ranging from 4-76MPa. Te...

  12. Rheological study of foam fracturing fluids using nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Reidenbach, V.G.; Harris, P.C.; Lee, Y.N.; Lord, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    A practical mathematical model based on experimental data is presented for calculation of rheological properties of N/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ foam stimulation fluids. The laminar flow model is a yield pseudoplastic type, with viscosity dependent on foam quality, yield point, base liquid consistency index (K'), and flow behavior index (n'). Turbulent foam fluid data were analyzed with API RP39 procedures but were modified to include variable density effects of foam fluids. Water-based apparent viscosities compare closely to Mitchell's Bingham plastic model at high shear rates. The yield pseudoplastic model also includes viscous effects of gelling agents and measurement at much lower shear rates. Comparison of predicted pipe friction was made to actual field wellhead pressures with good agreement.

  13. Extrusion foaming of semi-crystalline PLA and PLA/thermoplastic starch blends.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Mihaela; Huneault, Michel A; Favis, Basil D; Li, Hongbo

    2007-07-01

    Low density open-cell foams were obtained from polylactic acid (PLA) and from blends of PLA with thermoplastic starch (TPS) using CO(2) as a blowing agent. Two unexpected features were found. First, a 2D cavitation process in the fractured cell walls was unveiled. Elliptical cavities with dimensions in the 100-300 nm range were aligned perpendicular to large cell cracks clearly exhibiting 2D crazing prior to macroscopic cell rupture. Secondly, a significant crystallization rate increase associated with the CO(2) foaming of PLA was discovered. While the PLA used in this study crystallized very slowly in isothermal crystallization, the PLA foams exhibited up to 15% crystallinity, providing evidence that CO(2) plasticization and the biaxial stretching upon foam expansion provided conditions that could increase the crystallization rate by several orders of magnitude.

  14. Springback Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A decade ago, NASA's Ames Research Center developed a new foam material for protective padding of airplane seats. Now known as Temper Foam, the material has become one of the most widely-used spinoffs. Latest application is a line of Temper Foam cushioning produced by Edmont-Wilson, Coshocton, Ohio for office and medical furniture. The example pictured is the Classic Dental Stool, manufactured by Dentsply International, Inc., York, Pennsylvania, one of four models which use Edmont-Wilson Temper Foam. Temper Foam is an open-cell, flameresistant foam with unique qualities.

  15. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  16. Blend and surface-assisted foaming of polymers with supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siripurapu, Srinivas

    This thesis involves development of novel micro- and nanocellular foamed polymers using judicious polymer processing strategies with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2). Apart from serving as a processing aid in the form of a transient plasticizer, scCO2 is a powerful blowing agent to manufacture foamed plastics. It is also a viable replacement for the harmful chemical blowing agents such as chlorofluorocarbons, hydrofluorochlorocarbons and perfluorocarbons that are still prevalent in the foaming industry. This thesis focuses on improving our fundamental understanding of polymer foaming with scCO2 to create novel materials that cannot be synthesized otherwise using traditional foaming technologies. In particular, we aim at creating new polymer foaming paradigms via either judicious polymer blending or introduction of surfaces to the polymer matrix. Novel experimental apparatus, utilizing both a continuous extrusion process and a batch process, have been designed and constructed to study various foaming applications with scCO2. We show that microcellular foams (foams with pores on the order of 10 mum) containing semicrystalline polymers can be generated continuously by blending with a compatible amorphous polymer. Blends of miscible poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)---poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blends yield vastly improved microcellular morphologies compared to PVDF alone. We find that blend miscibility, viscosity reduction facilitated by scCO2 and reduction or elimination of crystalline melting point of the polymer blend are key factors in producing these materials. The latter part of this dissertation investigates the feasibility of a scCO2-based foaming procedure to generate micro and nanoporous thin polymer films. Our experimental findings reveal that controlling scCO2 diffusion from film surfaces is the critical factor towards realizing uniform porosity in polymer films. We use a combination of physical constrains on film surfaces and introduction of

  17. Microcellular foams via phase separation

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    A study of wide variety of processes for making plastic foams shows that phase separation processes for polymers from solutions offers the most viable methods for obtaining rigid plastic foams which met the physical requirements for fusion target designs. Four general phase separation methods have been shown to give polymer foams with densities less than 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ and cell sizes of 30..mu..m or less. These methods involve the utilization of non-solvent, chemical or thermal cooling processes to achieve a controlled phase separation wherein either two distinct phases are obtained where the polymer phase is a continuous phase or two bicontinuous phases are obtained where both the polymer and solvent are interpenetrating, continuous, labyrinthine phases. Subsequent removal of the solvent gives the final foam structure.

  18. Foaming volume and foam stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Sydney

    1947-01-01

    A method of measuring foaming volume is described and investigated to establish the critical factors in its operation. Data on foaming volumes and foam stabilities are given for a series of hydrocarbons and for a range of concentrations of aqueous ethylene-glycol solutions. It is shown that the amount of foam formed depends on the machinery of its production as well as on properties of the liquid, whereas the stability of the foam produced, within specified mechanical limitations, is primarily a function of the liquid.

  19. Eco-Evo-Devo: developmental symbiosis and developmental plasticity as evolutionary agents.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Scott F; Bosch, Thomas C G; Ledón-Rettig, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    The integration of research from developmental biology and ecology into evolutionary theory has given rise to a relatively new field, ecological evolutionary developmental biology (Eco-Evo-Devo). This field integrates and organizes concepts such as developmental symbiosis, developmental plasticity, genetic accommodation, extragenic inheritance and niche construction. This Review highlights the roles that developmental symbiosis and developmental plasticity have in evolution. Developmental symbiosis can generate particular organs, can produce selectable genetic variation for the entire animal, can provide mechanisms for reproductive isolation, and may have facilitated evolutionary transitions. Developmental plasticity is crucial for generating novel phenotypes, facilitating evolutionary transitions and altered ecosystem dynamics, and promoting adaptive variation through genetic accommodation and niche construction. In emphasizing such non-genomic mechanisms of selectable and heritable variation, Eco-Evo-Devo presents a new layer of evolutionary synthesis.

  20. Aromatic Polyimide Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A mechanically undensified aromatic polyimide foam is made from an aromatic polyimide precursor solid residuum and has the following combination of properties: a density according to ASTM D-3574A of about 0.5 pounds/cu.ft to about 20 pounds/cu.ft; a compression strength according to ASTM D-3574C of about 1.5 psi to about 1500 psi; and a limiting oxygen index according to ASTM D-2863 of about 35% oxygen to about 75% oxygen at atmospheric pressure. The aromatic polyimide foam has no appreciable solid inorganic contaminants which are residues of inorganic blowing agents. The aromatic polyimide which constitutes the aromatic polyimide foam has a glass transition temperature (Tg) by differential scanning calorimetry of about 235 C to about 400 C; and a thermal stability of 0 to about 1% weight loss at 204 C as determined by thermogravinietric analysis (TGA). The aromatic polyimide foam has utility as foam insulation and as structural foam, for example, for aeronautical, aerospace and maritime applications.

  1. Rigid molecular foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Mitchell, M.A.; Aspen, P.G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Organic analogues to inorganic zeolites would be a significant step forward in engineered porous materials and would provide advantages in range, selectivity, tailorability, and processing. Rigid molecular foams or {open_quotes}organic zeolites{close_quotes} would not be crystalline materials and could be tailored over a broader range of pore sizes and volumes. A novel process for preparing hypercrosslinked polymeric foams has been developed via a Friedel-Crafts polycondensation reaction. A series of rigid hypercrosslinked foams have been prepared using simple rigid polyaromatic hydrocarbons including benzene, biphenyl, m-terphenyl, diphenylmethane, and polystyrene, with dichloroxylene (DCX) as the pore size. After drying the foams are robust and rigid. Densities of the resulting foams can range from 0.15 g/cc to 0.75 g/cc. Nitrogen adsorption studies have shown that by judiciously selecting monomers and the crosslinking agent along with the level of crosslinking and the cure time of the resulting gel, the pore size, pore size distribution, and the total surface area of the foam can be tailored. Surface areas range from 160 to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g with pore sizes ranging from 6 {angstrom} to 2,000 {angstrom}.

  2. Composite foams

    SciTech Connect

    Nyitray, A.M.; Williams, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Composite foams have been prepared which incorporate the best attributes of two materials. Polystyrene emulsion foams have the advantages that they can be prepared easily over a wide range of densities (.015 g/cc to 0.20 g/cc) and are easy to handle and machine; however, the small cell sizes needed for good wicking of the DT liquid fuel are difficult to achieve. On the other hand, Si aerogel and resole foams have the desired small cell size (<0.1 ..mu..m), but the materials are mechanically weak making them difficult to handle and machine. Using a backfilling process, we have been able to make binary composite foams in which the cells of the polystyrene emulsion foam have been filled with aerogel or resole foam. These materials have the small cell sizes needed for good wicking of the liquid DT fuel and are rugged and easy to machine. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Crosslinked polyethylene foams, via EB radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, E. C. L.; Lugão, A. B.; Andrade E. Silva, L. G.

    1998-06-01

    Polyethylene foams, produced by radio-induced crosslinking, show a smooth and homogeneous surface, when compared to chemical crosslinking method using peroxide as crosslinking agent. This process fosters excellent adhesive and printability properties. Besides that, closed cells, intrinsic to theses foams, imparts opitmum mechanical, shocks and insulation resistance, indicating these foams to some markets segments as: automotive and transport; buoyancy, flotation and marine: building and insulation: packaging: domestic sports and leisure goods. We were in search of an ideal foam, by adding 5 to 15% of blowing agent in LDPE. A series of preliminary trials defined 203° C as the right blowing agent decomposition temperature. At a 22.7 kGy/dose ratio, the lowest dose for providing an efficient foam was 30 kGy, for a formulation comprising 10% of azodicarbonamide in LDPE, within a 10 minutes foaming time.

  4. Flexible and rigid foams technical options report. Technical progress on protecting the ozone layer

    SciTech Connect

    1989-06-30

    The report describes the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the production of foam plastics and foam plastic products and discusses alternatives to reduce CFC use. The plastic foams which are made with CFCs are; polyurethane; phenolic; polyolefin (polyethylene and polypropylene); and extruded polystyrene. In this report, a chapter is devoted to each of the four types of foam made with CFCs. Each chapter discusses the types and applications of the foam, its production process, the use of CFCs in its production process, and alternatives for reducing CFC use in the manufacture of the foam.

  5. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Copolymide foams derived from a diester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, an aromatic diamine, and a heterocyclic diamine. A molar concentration of the heterocyclic diamine approaching but not exceeding 0.42 is employed. This results in a flexible foam with a homogeneous cellular structure and a reduced compression set loss.

  6. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Copolyimide foams derived from a diester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, an aromatic diamine, and a heterocyclic diamine. A molar concentration of the heterocyclic diamine approaching but not exceeding 0.42 is employed. This results in a flexible foam with a homogeneous cellular structure and a reduced compression set loss.

  7. Polyimide foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, John (Inventor); Lee, Raymond (Inventor); Sorathia, Usman A. K. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Copolyimide foams derived from a diester of 3,3',4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid, an aromatic diamine, and a heterocyclic diamine. A molar concentration of the heterocyclic diamine approaching but not exceeding 0.42 is employed. This results in a flexible foam with a homogeneous cellular structure and a reduced compression set loss.

  8. Composite foams

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Jr., Joel M.; Nyitray, Alice M.; Wilkerson, Mark H.

    1990-01-01

    Composite foams are provided comprising a first rigid, microcellular, open-celled organic polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 1 micron to about 30 microns, said first foam containing a second polymer having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 or a second polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 0.01 microns to about 1.0 micron within the open cells of said first foam.

  9. Composite foams

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Jr., Joel M.; Nyitray, Alice M.; Wilkerson, Mark H.

    1991-01-01

    Composite foams are provided comprising a first rigid, microcellular, open-celled organic polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 1 micron to about 30 microns, said first foam containing a second polymer having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 or a second polymer foam having a density of from about 0.015 g/cm.sup.3 to about 0.20 g/cm.sup.3 and a pore size of from about 0.01 microns to about 1.0 micron within the open cells of said first foam.

  10. Carbon foams from different coals

    SciTech Connect

    Montserrat Calvo; Roberto Garcia; Sabino R. Moinelo

    2008-09-15

    Carbon foams were obtained from several bituminous coals with different plasticity and volatile matter content by a two-stage thermal process. The first stage, a controlled carbonization treatment under pressure at 450-500 {sup o}C, is responsible for the final textural properties of the foam. In the second stage, the carbonization product was baked at 1100{sup o}C. The foams produced display a macroporous texture with fluidity, volatile matter content, and maceral composition of the precursor coals, having an influence on the apparent density and the pore size of the resultant porous products. Coals with low fluidity, volatile matter content, and liptinite content give rise to foams with lower pore size and lower apparent density. In the case of high fluidity coals, their foams display an increase of flexural strength with the increasing relative density. In general, the carbon foams obtained in this study display good electrical properties (electrical resistivity comparable to that of commercial foams). 27 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Foams for pharmaceutical and cosmetic application.

    PubMed

    Arzhavitina, A; Steckel, H

    2010-07-15

    Foaming of cleaning agents in the household is an effect which is not connected with the quality of cleaning process. Foam development of some cosmetic formulations such as hair mousse or shaving foam has its functionality. Foam formation during application of a foam bath or shampoo is only a cosmetic attribute. In the pharmacy, foams represent new vehicles for drug delivery. The European Pharmacopoeia comprises a monograph called "Medicated Foams" and the interest for the development of these alternative vehicles is steadily growing. Depending on the way of pharmaceutical application we can define between rectal, vaginal and topical foams. Foams for dermal drug delivery have some advantages compared to the traditional vehicles for treatment of topical disorders such as ointment, creams, lotions, gels or solutions. Vaginal and rectal foam vehicles also feature some application benefits compared to the standard vehicles such as suppositories, creams and ointments. There are only a few foam formulations commercially available so far. Moreover, only few publications describing these vehicles have appeared in the recent years, predominantly patents. It is the intention of this article to review available literature, to summarize recent development and to highlight the potential of foam vehicles.

  12. Implications of Rheumatic Disease and Biological Response-Modifying Agents in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tsai, David M; Borah, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    The preoperative evaluation for any reconstructive or aesthetic procedure requires a detailed history of existing medical conditions and current home medications. The prevalence of rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout, and psoriasis is high, but the impact of these chronic illnesses on surgical outcome and the side effects of the powerful medications used for treatment are often underappreciated. In this review, the authors highlight key perioperative considerations specific to rheumatologic diseases and their associated pharmacologic therapies. In particular, the authors discuss the perioperative management of biological response-modifying agents, which have largely become the new standard of therapy for many rheumatic diseases. The literature reveals three key perioperative concerns with biological therapy for rheumatic disease: infection, wound healing delays, and disease flare. However, data on specific perioperative complications are lacking, and it remains controversial whether withholding biological therapy before surgery is of benefit. The risk of these adverse events is influenced by several factors: age, sex, class of biological agent, duration of exposure, dosage, onset and severity of disease, and type of surgical procedure. Overall, it remains best to develop an individualized plan. In younger patients with recent onset of biological therapy, it is reasonable to withhold therapy based on 3 to 5 half-lives of the specific agent. In older patients with a substantial history of rheumatic disease, the decision to discontinue therapy must be weighed and decided carefully in conjunction with the rheumatologist. PMID:26595025

  13. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam

    DOEpatents

    Mead, Judith W.; Montoya, Orelio J.; Rand, Peter B.; Willan, Vernon O.

    1984-01-01

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO.sub.2 in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  14. Pressure-Induced Foaming of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Moreno, Francisco; Mukherjee, Manas; Jiménez, Catalina; Banhart, John

    2015-05-01

    Pressure-induced foaming (PIF) of metals is a foaming technique in which blowing agent free compacted metal powders are foamed. The method consists of heating hot-compacted metallic precursors to above their melting temperature under gas overpressure and foaming them by pressure release. This study focuses on PIF of Al99.7 and AlSi7 alloys under both air or Ar and overpressures up to 9 bar. In situ x-ray radioscopy allows us to follow the foaming process and to perform quantitative analyses of expansion, foam morphology, and coalescence rate. Mass spectrometry helps to identify hydrogen as the foaming gas. Adsorbates on the former powder particles are found to be the primary gas source. Various advantages of this new method are identified and discussed.

  15. Forming foam structures with carbon foam substrates

    DOEpatents

    Landingham, Richard L.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Coronado, Paul R.; Baumann, Theodore F.

    2012-11-06

    The invention provides foams of desired cell sizes formed from metal or ceramic materials that coat the surfaces of carbon foams which are subsequently removed. For example, metal is located over a sol-gel foam monolith. The metal is melted to produce a metal/sol-gel composition. The sol-gel foam monolith is removed, leaving a metal foam.

  16. Foam patterns

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

    2013-11-26

    A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

  17. Rheology of Foam Near the Order-Disorder Phase Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, R. Glynn; McDaniel, J. Gregory

    1999-01-01

    Foams are extremely important in a variety of industrial applications. Foams are widely used in fire-fighting applications, and are especially effective in fighting flammable liquid fires. In fact the Fire Suppression System aboard the Space Shuttle utilizes cylinders of Halon foam, which, when fired, force a rapidly expanding foam into the convoluted spaces behind instrument panels. Foams are critical in the process of enhanced oil recovery, due to their surface-active and highly viscous nature. They are also used as drilling fluids in underpressurized geologic formations. They are used as transport agents, and as trapping agents. They are also used as separation agents, where ore refinement is accomplished by froth flotation of the typically lighter and hydrophobic contaminants. The goal of the proposed investigation is the determination of the mechanical and rheological properties of foams, utilizing the microgravity environment to explore foam rheology for foams which cannot exist, or only exist for a short time, in 1g.

  18. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, L.A.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Arm, S.T.; Guzman-Leong, C.E.; Jagoda, L.K.; Stewart, C.W.; Wells, B.E.; Yokuda, S.T.

    2008-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Previous testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was as much as 10 times higher than in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a 1/4-scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas generation rates. Results from the 1/4-scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, holdup in the chemical waste simulant with AFA was not so greatly increased compared to gas holdup in clay without AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions. (authors)

  19. Large-Scale Testing of Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Holdup in Process Vessels in the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - 8280

    SciTech Connect

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Arm, Stuart T.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-06-03

    The Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will vitrify the radioactive wastes stored in underground tanks. These wastes generate and retain hydrogen and other flammable gases that create safety concerns for the vitrification process tanks in the WTP. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the WTP process streams. Prior testing in a bubble column and a small-scale impeller-mixed vessel indicated that gas holdup in a high-level waste chemical simulant with AFA was up to 10 times that in clay simulant without AFA. This raised a concern that major modifications to the WTP design or qualification of an alternative AFA might be required to satisfy plant safety criteria. However, because the mixing and gas generation mechanisms in the small-scale tests differed from those expected in WTP process vessels, additional tests were performed in a large-scale prototypic mixing system with in situ gas generation. This paper presents the results of this test program. The tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in a ¼-scale model of the lag storage process vessel using pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Holdup and release of gas bubbles generated by hydrogen peroxide decomposition were evaluated in waste simulants containing an AFA over a range of Bingham yield stresses and gas gen geration rates. Results from the ¼-scale test stand showed that, contrary to the small-scale impeller-mixed tests, gas holdup in clay without AFA is comparable to that in the chemical waste simulant with AFA. The test stand, simulants, scaling and data-analysis methods, and results are described in relation to previous tests and anticipated WTP operating conditions.

  20. European emissions of HFC-365mfc, a chlorine-free substitute for the foam blowing agents HCFC-141b and CFC-11.

    PubMed

    Stemmler, Konrad; Folini, Doris; Ubl, Sandy; Vollmer, Martin K; Reimann, Stefan; O'Doherty, Simon; Greally, Brian R; Simmonds, Peter G; Manning, Alistair J

    2007-02-15

    HFC-365mfc (1,1,1,3,3-pentafluorobutane) is an industrial chemical used for polyurethane foam blowing. From early 2003, HFC-365mfc has been commercially produced as a substitute for HCFC-141b, whose use in Europe has been banned since January 2004. We describe the first detection of HFC-365mfc in the atmosphere and report on a 2 year long record at the high Alpine station of Jungfraujoch (Switzerland) and the Atlantic coast station of Mace Head (Ireland). The measurements at Jungfraujoch are used to estimate the central European emissions of HFC-365mfc, HCFC-141b, and CFC-11. For HFC-365mfc, we estimate the central European emissions (Germany, France, Italy, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Belgium, and Luxembourg) in 2003 and 2004 as 400-500 tonnes year(-1). These emissions are about one-third lower on a per capita basis than what we estimate from the Mace Head measurements for the total of Europe. The estimated emissions of HCFC-141b for central Europe are higher (i.e., 7.2-3.5 ktonnes year(-1)) with a decreasing trend in the period from 2000 to 2004. Residual emissions of CFC-11 are estimated at 2.4-4.7 ktonnes year(-1) in the same time period. The Po Valley (northern Italy) appears to be a main source region for HFC-365mfc and for the former blowing agents HCFC-141b and CFC-11. In 2004, the emissions of HFC-365mfc arose from a wider region of Europe, which we attribute to an increased penetration of HFC-365mfc into the European market. PMID:17593712

  1. Foam Microrheology

    SciTech Connect

    KRAYNIK,ANDREW M.; LOEWENBERG,MICHAEL; REINELT,DOUGLAS A.

    1999-09-01

    The microrheology of liquid foams is discussed for two different regimes: static equilibrium where the capillary number Ca is zero, and the viscous regime where viscosity and surface tension are important and Ca is finite. The Surface Evolver is used to calculate the equilibrium structure of wet Kelvin foams and dry soap froths with random structure, i.e., topological disorder. The distributions of polyhedra and faces are compared with the experimental data of Matzke. Simple shearing flow of a random foam under quasistatic conditions is also described. Viscous phenomena are explored in the context of uniform expansion of 2D and 3D foams at low Reynolds number. Boundary integral methods are used to calculate the influence of Ca on the evolution of foam microstructure, which includes bubble shape and the distribution of liquid between films, Plateau borders, and (in 3D) the nodes where Plateau borders meet. The micromechanical point of view guides the development of structure-property-processing relationships for foams.

  2. A constitutive theory for rigid polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.; Krieg, R.D.; Schreyer, H.L.

    1992-12-31

    Rigid, closed-cell, polyurethane foam consists of interconnected polyurethane plates which form cells. When this foam is compressed, it exhibits an initial elastic regime which is followed by a plateau regime in which the load required to compress the foam remains nearly constant. In the plateau regime, cell walls are damaged and large permanent volume changes are generated. As additional load is applied, cell walls are compressed against neighboring cell walls, and the stiffness of the foam increases and approaches a value equal to that of solid polyurethane. When the foam is loaded in tension, the cell walls are damaged and the foam fractures. A constitutive theory for rigid polyurethane foam has been developed. This theory is based on a decomposition of the foam into two parts: a skeleton and a nonlinear elastic continuum in parallel. The skeleton accounts for the foam behavior in the elastic and plateau regimes and is described using a coupled plasticity with continuum damage theory. The nonlinear elastic continuum accounts for the lock-up of the foam due to internal gas pressure and cell wall interactions. This new constitutive theory has been implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes. Numerical simulations performed using the new constitutive theory are presented.

  3. Bio-based Polymer Foam from Soyoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnaillie, Laetitia M.; Wool, Richard P.

    2006-03-01

    The growing bio-based polymeric foam industry is presently lead by plant oil-based polyols for polyurethanes and starch foams. We developed a new resilient, thermosetting foam system with a bio-based content higher than 80%. The acrylated epoxidized soybean oil and its fatty acid monomers is foamed with pressurized carbon dioxide and cured with free-radical initiators. The foam structure and pore dynamics are highly dependent on the temperature, viscosity and extent of reaction. Low-temperature cure hinds the destructive pore coalescence and the application of a controlled vacuum results in foams with lower densities ˜ 0.1 g/cc, but larger cells. We analyze the physics of foam formation and stability, as well as the structure and mechanical properties of the cured foam using rigidity percolation theory. The parameters studied include temperature, vacuum applied, and cross-link density. Additives bring additional improvements: nucleating agents and surfactants help produce foams with a high concentration of small cells and low bulk density. Hard and soft thermosetting foams with a bio content superior to 80% are successfully produced and tested. Potential applications include foam-core composites for hurricane-resistant housing, structural reinforcement for windmill blades, and tissue scaffolds.

  4. Continuous microcellular foaming of polylactic acid/natural fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Acosta, Carlos A.

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA), a biodegradable thermoplastic derived from renewable resources, stands out as a substitute to petroleum-based plastics. In spite of its excellent properties, commercial applications are limited because PLA is more expensive and more brittle than traditional petroleum-based resins. PLA can be blended with cellulosic fibers to reduce material cost. However, the lowered cost comes at the expense of flexibility and impact strength, which can be enhanced through the production of microcellular structures in the composite. Microcellular foaming uses inert gases (e.g., carbon dioxide) as physical blowing agents to make cellular structures with bubble sizes of less than 10 microm and cell-population densities (number of bubbles per unit volume) greater than 109 cells/cm³. These unique characteristics result in a significant increase in toughness and elongation at break (ductility) compared with unfoamed parts because the presence of small bubbles can blunt the crack-tips increasing the energy needed to propagate the crack. Microcellular foams have been produced through a two step batch process. First, large amounts of gas are dissolved in the solid plastic under high pressure (sorption process) to form a single-phase solution. Second, a thermodynamic instability (sudden drop in solubility) triggers cell nucleation and growth as the gas diffuses out of the plastic. Batch production of microcellular PLA has addressed some of the drawbacks of PLA. Unfortunately, the batch foaming process is not likely to be implemented in the industrial production of foams because it is not cost-effective. This study investigated the continuous microcellular foaming process of PLA and PLA/wood-fiber composites. The effects of the processing temperature and material compositions on the melt viscosity, pressure drop rate, and cell-population density were examined in order to understand the nucleation mechanisms in neat and filled PLA foams. The results indicated that

  5. Effects of the Cognition-Enhancing Agent ABT-239 on Fetal Ethanol-Induced Deficits in Dentate Gyrus Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Varaschin, Rafael K.; Akers, Katherine G.; Rosenberg, Martina J.; Hamilton, Derek A.

    2010-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure causes deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and learning. At present, there are no clinically effective pharmacotherapeutic interventions for these deficits. In this study, we examined whether the cognition-enhancing agent 4-(2-{2-[(2R)-2-methylpyrrolidinyl]ethyl}-benzofuran-5-yl) benzonitrile (ABT-239), a histamine H3 receptor antagonist, could ameliorate fetal ethanol-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) deficits. Long-Evans rat dams consumed a mean of 2.82 g/kg ethanol during a 4-h period each day. This voluntary drinking pattern produced a mean peak serum ethanol level of 84 mg/dl. Maternal weight gain, offspring litter size, and birth weights were not different between ethanol-consuming and control groups. A stimulating electrode was implanted in the entorhinal cortical perforant path, and a recording electrode was implanted in the dorsal dentate gyrus of urethane-anesthetized adult male offspring. Baseline input/output responses were not affected either by prenatal ethanol exposure or by 1 mg/kg ABT-239 administered 2 h before data collection. No differences were observed between prenatal treatment groups when a 10-tetanus train protocol was used to elicit LTP. However, LTP elicited by 3 tetanizing trains was markedly impaired by prenatal ethanol exposure compared with control. This fetal ethanol-induced LTP deficit was reversed by ABT-239. In contrast, ABT-239 did not enhance LTP in control offspring using the 3-tetanus train protocol. These results suggest that histamine H3 receptor antagonists may have utility for treating fetal ethanol-associated synaptic plasticity and learning deficits. Furthermore, the differential effect of ABT-239 in fetal alcohol offspring compared with controls raises questions about the impact of fetal ethanol exposure on histaminergic modulation of excitatory neurotransmission in affected offspring. PMID:20308329

  6. Foam drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    Transient drainage from a column of persistent foam has been analyzed theoretically. Gravity-driven flow was assumed to occur through an interconnected network of Plateau borders that define the edges of foam cells taken to be regular pentagonal dodecahedrons. A small liquid volume fraction and monodisperse cell size distribution were assumed. In the basic model, it is assumed that all liquid is contained in Plateau borders that are bounded by rigid gas-liquid interfaces. The predicted half life, the time required for one half of the liquid to drain from the foam, is inversely proportional to the square of the cell diameter, illustrating the importance of foam structure in drainage. Liquid hold up in the films separating adjacent cells, nonuniform initial liquid volume fraction distribution and interfacial mobility are explored. Border suction due to reduced pressure in the Plateau borders provides a mechanism for film drainage. Simultaneous film drainage and flow through the Plateau borders are analyzed. Sufficient conditions for neglecting film drainage kinetics are obtained. The results indicate that improved foam stability is related to small cells, liquid hold up in the films and slow film drainage kinetics.

  7. Evaluation of aqueous-foam surfactants for geothermal drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, P.B.; Montoya, O.J.

    1983-07-01

    Aqueous foams are potentially useful drilling and cleanout fluids for geothermal applications. Successful use of foams requires surfactants (foaming agents) that can survive in the high-temperature geothermal environment. In this study, solutions of aqueous-foam-forming surfactants have been exposed to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) and 310/sup 0/C (590/sup 0/F) in various chemical environments to determine if they can survive and make foams after exposure. Comparison of foams before and after exposure and the change in solution pH were used to evaluate their performance. Controlled liquid-volume-fraction foams, made in a packed-bed foam generator, were used for all tests. These tests have shown that many commercially available surfactants can survive short high-temperature cycles in mild acids, mild bases, and salt solutions as evidenced by their ability to make foams after exposure to high temperatures.

  8. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2004-12-21

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  9. Activated, coal-based carbon foam

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Darren Kenneth; Plucinski, Janusz Wladyslaw

    2009-06-09

    An ablation resistant, monolithic, activated, carbon foam produced by the activation of a coal-based carbon foam through the action of carbon dioxide, ozone or some similar oxidative agent that pits and/or partially oxidizes the carbon foam skeleton, thereby significantly increasing its overall surface area and concurrently increasing its filtering ability. Such activated carbon foams are suitable for application in virtually all areas where particulate or gel form activated carbon materials have been used. Such an activated carbon foam can be fabricated, i.e. sawed, machined and otherwise shaped to fit virtually any required filtering location by simple insertion and without the need for handling the "dirty" and friable particulate activated carbon foam materials of the prior art.

  10. Interfacial phenomena in foam flooding process for heavy oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, M.K.; Shah, D.O.

    1983-08-01

    The ability of pure and commercial foaming agents to generate in situ foams and their effects on air mobility, breakthrough time, fluid recovery and oil displacement efficiency have been studied. These parameters were correlated with the interfacial properties of foaming agents. A striking decrease in the air mobility was observed with increasing temperature as well as pressure which in turn increased the effectiveness of foams to displace additional fluid. It was observed that the chain length compatibility and molecular packing at the air-liquid interface strikingly influenced the interfacial properties of foaming agents, microscopic characteristics and behavior of foams. From the studies on mixed surfactant systems, a minimum in surface tension, a maximum in surface viscosity, a minimum in bubble size and a maximum in heavy oil displacement efficiency in a porous medium were observed when both the components of the foaming system had equal chain length.

  11. Foam failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staicu, Adrian Daniel; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2004-11-01

    We create finger-like patterns by forcing air into 2D aqueous foams in a Hele-Shaw rectangular channel. For moderate values of the gas flow rate, zipper-shaped patterns advance steadily through mono-disperse foam, occupying a constant fraction λt of the channel width. The small-scale foam structure is simultaneously recorded using high-speed imaging, giving us direct access to the dynamics of individual Plateau borders. We establish that the advance of the tip region is similar to that of a crack in a ductile solid, an idea confirmed by the strong localization of the elastic stress. An energy budget shows that dissipative effects (particularly viscous friction of the Plateau borders against the channel plates) dominate elastic storage of energy. In the limit where λt becomes comparable to the cell size, viscous dissipation is insufficient to balance the energy input from the supply of air. The system then exhibits a transition to the analog of a brittle crack, where bursting soap-films play the role of broken atomic bonds. The brittle crack speed is comparable to that of waves in foam.

  12. Current applications of foams formed from mixed surfactant-polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Bureiko, Andrei; Trybala, Anna; Kovalchuk, Nina; Starov, Victor

    2015-08-01

    Foams cannot be generated without the use of special foaming agents, as pure liquids do not foam. The most common foaming agents are surfactants, however often for foam stability one active agent is not enough, it is necessary to add other component to increase foam lifetime. Foams on everyday use are mostly made from mixture of different components. Properly chosen combinations of two active ingredients lead to a faster foam formation and increased foam stability. During the last decade polymers (mainly polyelectrolytes and proteins) have become frequently used additives to foaming solutions. Mixtures of surfactants and polymers often demonstrate different foaming properties in comparison to surfactant only or polymer only solutions. The nature of surfactant-polymer interactions is complicated and prediction of resulting foaming properties of such formulations is not straightforward. Properties and foaming of surfactant-polymer mixtures are discussed as well as current applications of foams and foaming agents as foams are widely used in cosmetics, pharmaceutics, medicine and the food industry.

  13. Penetration Analysis of Aluminum Alloy Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nianmei; Yang, Guitong

    Aluminum alloy foam offers a unique combination of good characteristics, for example, low density, high strength and energy absorption. During penetration, the foam materials exhibit significant nonlinear deformation. The penetration of aluminum alloy foam struck transversely by cone-nosed projectiles has been theoretically investigated. The dynamic cavity-expansion model is used to study the penetration resistance of the projectiles, which can be taken as two parts. One is due to the elasto-plastic deformation of the aluminum alloy foam materials. The other is dynamic resistance force coming from the energy of the projectiles. The penetration resistance expression is derived and applied to analyze the penetration depth of cone-nosed projectiles into the aluminum alloy foam target. The effect of initial velocity, the geometry of the projectiles on the penetration depth is investigated.

  14. Radiation crosslinked thermoplastics natural rubber (TPNR) foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazali, Z.; Johnson, A. F.; Dahlan, K. Z.

    1999-06-01

    Thermoplastic natural rubber is gaining wider interest and like other thermoplastic elastomers, offers the processibility of thermoplastic as well as functional performances and properties of conventional thermoset rubbers. This paper describes an evaluation made of the suitability of foaming blends of natural rubber and EVA using chemical blowing agents. Crosslinking was achieved by exposing the TPNR to electron beam irradiation (EB) at 20, 30, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 150 and 200 kGy doses. The relationships between foam density and concentration of blowing agent as well as foaming parameters such as time and temperature were evaluated.

  15. Experimental demonstration of laser imprint reduction using underdense foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, B.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Casner, A.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Michel, D. T.; Riazuelo, G.; Borisenko, N.; Breil, J.; Fujioka, S.; Grech, M.; Orekhov, A.; Seka, W.; Sunahara, A.; Froula, D. H.; Goncharov, V.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2016-04-01

    Reducing the detrimental effect of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability on the target performance is a critical challenge. In this purpose, the use of targets coated with low density foams is a promising approach to reduce the laser imprint. This article presents results of ablative RT instability growth measurements, performed on the OMEGA laser facility in direct-drive for plastic foils coated with underdense foams. The laser beam smoothing is explained by the parametric instabilities developing in the foam and reducing the laser imprint on the plastic (CH) foil. The initial perturbation pre-imposed by the means of a specific phase plate was shown to be smoothed using different foam characteristics. Numerical simulations of the laser beam smoothing in the foam and of the RT growth are performed with a suite of paraxial electromagnetic and radiation hydrodynamic codes. They confirmed the foam smoothing effect in the experimental conditions.

  16. Foam Cushioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    One innovation developed by a contractor at Ames Research Center was an open cell polymeric foam material with unusual properties. Intended as padding for aircraft seats the material offered better impact protection against accidents, and also enhanced passenger comfort because it distributed body weight evenly over the entire contact area. Called a slow springback foam, it flows to match the contour of the body pressing against it, and returns to its original shape once the pressure is removed. It has many applications including aircraft cushions and padding, dental stools, and athletic equipment. Now it's used by Dynamic Systems, Inc. for medical applications such as wheel chairs for severely disabled people which allow them to sit for 3-8 hours where they used to be uncomfortable in 15-30 minutes.

  17. Continuous production of microcellular foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiangmin

    Continuous production of microcellular foams, characterized by cell size smaller than 10 mum and cell density larger than 109 cells/cm 3, was studied using supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) as the foaming agent. Microcellular foams of polystyrene and polystyrene nanocomposites were successfully produced on a two-stage single screw extruder. The contraction flow in the extrusion die was simulated with the FLUENT fluid dynamics computational code to predict profiles of pressure, temperature, viscosity, and velocity. The nucleation onset was determined based on the pressure profile and equilibrium solubility. It was shown that a high CO 2 concentration or a high foaming temperature induces an earlier nucleation near the die entrance. The pressure profile and the position of nucleation onset were correlated to cell nucleation and growth, which helps understand the effects of operating conditions on cell structure. To perform the simulation, viscosity and solubility of the CO2/polystyrene system were characterized. Sanchez-Lacombe equation of state was applied to represent the phase equilibrium. Effects of temperature, pressure, and CO 2 content on the shear viscosity were explained using the free volume theory. Systematic experiments were performed to verify effects of three key operating conditions: CO2 content, pressure drop or pressure drop rate, and foaming temperature, on the foam cell structure. Experimental results were compared with simulations to gain insight into the foaming process. Studies exhibit that a higher pressure drop or pressure drop rate results in smaller cells and greater cell density. Below the CO2 solubility, cell size decreases and cell density increases with an increase of CO2 concentration. A high CO2 concentration favors producing open cell foams. Die temperature affects both cell size and cell structure (open or closed). Combining nano-clay compounding with supercritical CO2 foaming provides a new technique for the design and control of

  18. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  19. High-temperature rheological study of foam fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, P.C.; Reidenbach, V.G.

    1984-09-01

    Nitrogen foam properties were measured up to 300/sup 0/F in a high temperature and pressure recirculating loop viscometer. Foam fluids did not thin as rapidly as gel fluids under similar conditions. Therefore, foams offer inherent advantages for high temperature stimulation work. Higher gelling agent concentrations do not improve dynamic foam stability. Rather, high temperature dynamic stability is dependent upon surfactant type and concentration. Mathematical equations have been developed to describe foam rheological behavior from 75 to 300/sup 0/F, 0 to 80 quality, containing 0 to 80 lb HPG/Mgal in the aqueous phase. Basic physical properties were previously outlined which determined foam rheological behavior at 75/sup 0/F. Foams were classified as yield pseudoplastic type fluids. This paper extends the previous work from 75 to 300/sup 0/F, and covers a broader range of external liquid phase compositions applicable to foam stimulation work.

  20. Aqueous foam toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Aqueous foams are aggregates of bubbles mechanically generated by passing air or other gases through a net, screen, or other porous medium that is wetted by an aqueous solution of surface-active foaming agents (surfactants). Aqueous foams are important in modem fire-fighting technology, as well as for military uses for area denial and riot or crowd control. An aqueous foam is currently being developed and evaluated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a Less-Than-Lethal Weapon for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of the aqueous foam developed for the NIJ and to determine whether there are any significant adverse health effects associated with completely immersing individuals without protective equipment in the foam. The toxicity of the aqueous foam formulation developed for NIJ is determined by evaluating the toxicity of the individual components of the foam. The foam is made from a 2--5% solution of Steol CA-330 surfactant in water generated at expansion ratios ranging from 500:1 to 1000:1. SteoI CA-330 is a 35% ammonium laureth sulfate in water and is produced by Stepan Chemical Company and containing trace amounts (<0.1%) of 1,4-dioxane. The results of this study indicate that Steol CA-330 is a non-toxic, mildly irritating, surfactant that is used extensively in the cosmetics industry for hair care and bath products. Inhalation or dermal exposure to this material in aqueous foam is not expected to produce significant irritation or systemic toxicity to exposed individuals, even after prolonged exposure. The amount of 1,4-dioxane in the surfactant, and subsequently in the foam, is negligible and therefore, the toxicity associated with dioxane exposure is not significant. In general, immersion in similar aqueous foams has not resulted in acute, immediately life-threatening effects, or chronic, long-term, non-reversible effects following exposure.

  1. Understanding about How Different Foaming Gases Effect the Interfacial Array Behaviors of Surfactants and the Foam Properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yange; Qi, Xiaoqing; Sun, Haoyang; Zhao, Hui; Li, Ying

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the detailed behaviors of all the molecules, especially the interfacial array behaviors of surfactants and diffusion behaviors of gas molecules, in foam systems with different gases (N2, O2, and CO2) being used as foaming agents were investigated by combining molecular dynamics simulation and experimental approaches for the purpose of interpreting how the molecular behaviors effect the properties of the foam and find out the key factors which fundamentally determine the foam stability. Sodium dodecyl sulfate SDS was used as the foam stabilizer. The foam decay and the drainage process were determined by Foamscan. A texture analyzer (TA) was utilized to measure the stiffness and viscoelasticity of the foam films. The experimental results agreed very well with the simulation results by which how the different gas components affect the interfacial behaviors of surfactant molecules and thereby bring influence on foam properties was described.

  2. Quantum Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-10-24

    The laws of quantum mechanics and relativity are quite perplexing however it is when the two theories are merged that things get really confusing. This combined theory predicts that empty space isn’t empty at all – it’s a seething and bubbling cauldron of matter and antimatter particles springing into existence before disappearing back into nothingness. Scientists call this complicated state of affairs “quantum foam.” In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln discusses this mind-bending idea and sketches some of the experiments that have convinced scientists that this crazy prediction is actually true.

  3. Foam sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Alder, Glen; Lees, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Foam sclerotherapy is a minimally invasive treatment for lower limb varicose veins. Current evidence indicates that its efficacy may not be as high as surgery or endovenous ablation. The minimally invasive nature of the treatment however means that it has a wide application, and it can be particularly useful in patients who are not suitable for other types of treatment. NICE guidelines recommend its use as a second line after endovenous ablation. Complication rates are low and most of these are of little clinical consequence. PMID:26556698

  4. Polystyrene Foam EOS as a Function of Porosity and Fill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulford, Roberta; Swift, Damian

    2009-06-01

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam, Differences between air-filled, nitrogen-blown, and CO2-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with plastic products during decomposition. Results differ somewhat from the conventional EOS, which are generated from values for plastic extrapolated to low densities.

  5. High temperature adhesive silicone foam composition, foam generating system and method of generating foam. [For access denial

    DOEpatents

    Mead, J.W.; Montoya, O.J.; Rand, P.B.; Willan, V.O.

    1983-12-21

    Access to a space is impeded by generation of a sticky foam from a silicone polymer and a low boiling solvent such as a halogenated hydrocarbon. In a preferred aspect, the formulation is polydimethylsiloxane gel mixed with F502 Freon as a solvent and blowing agent, and pressurized with CO/sub 2/ in a vessel to about 250 PSI, whereby when the vessel is opened, a sticky and solvent resistant foam is deployed. The foam is deployable, over a wide range of temperatures, adhering to wet surfaces as well as dry, is stable over long periods of time and does not propagate flame or lose adhesive properties during an externally supported burn.

  6. Discontinuous jamming transition in driven foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennin, Michael

    2007-03-01

    Aqueous foam (gas bubbles with liquid walls) is a surprising substance. Every molecule in foam is in a fluid state, either liquid or gas. Yet, the entire foam holds its shape as a solid would. In fact, when subjected to an applied strain at a slow enough strain rate, the initial response of the foam is the same as an elastic solid. On the other hand, under sufficiently large stress or strain, the foam can flow in a fashion similar to a fluid. This is similar to plastic flow that occurs in many ``molecular'' solids. In this talk, we will focus on experimental studies of the transition from solid behavior to flowing behavior, with an emphasis on to what degree this ``jamming'' transition is analogous to a ``real'' phase transition. We will focus on recent results using a model, two-dimensional foam: bubble rafts. Bubble rafts are a single layer of bubbles on the surface of water. By focusing on a two-dimensional system, it is relatively easy to track individual bubbles and gain insight into the connection between bubble dynamics (the mesoscopic scale) and the response of the entire foam (macroscopic scale). We will focus on recent measurements of a discontinuous transition from solid to fluid like behavior in the bubble raft.

  7. Atmospheric Degradation Initiated by OH Radicals of the Potential Foam Expansion Agent, CF3(CF2)2CH═CH2 (HFC-1447fz): Kinetics and Formation of Gaseous Products and Secondary Organic Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Elena; González, Sergio; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Chen, Hui; Ballesteros, Bernabé; Daële, Véronique; Albaladejo, José; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2016-02-01

    The assessment of the atmospheric impact of the potential foam expansion agent, CF3(CF2)2CH═CH2 (HFC-1447fz), requires the knowledge of its degradation routes, oxidation products, and radiative properties. In this paper, the gas-phase reactivity of HFC-1447fz with OH radicals is presented as a function of temperature, obtaining kOH (T = 263-358 K) = (7.4 ± 0.4) × 10(-13)exp{(161 ± 16)/T} (cm(3)·molecule(-1)·s(-1)) (uncertainties: ±2σ). The formation of gaseous oxidation products and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) from the OH + HFC-1447fz reaction was investigated in the presence of NOx at 298 K. CF3(CF2)2CHO was observed at low- and high-NOx conditions. Evidence of SOA formation (ultrafine particles in the range 10-100 nm) is reported with yields ranging from 0.12 to 1.79%. In addition, the absolute UV (190-368 nm) and IR (500-4000 cm(-1)) absorption cross-sections of HFC-1447fz were determined at room temperature. No appreciable absorption in the solar actinic region (λ > 290 nm) was observed, leaving the removal by OH radicals as the main atmospheric loss process for HFC-1447fz. The major contribution of the atmospheric loss of HFC-1447fz is due to OH reaction (84%), followed by ozone (10%) and chlorine atoms (6%). Correction of the instantaneous radiative efficiency (0.36 W m(-2)·ppbv(-1)) with the relatively short lifetime of HFC-1447fz (ca. 8 days) implies that its global warming potential at a time horizon of 100 year is negligible (0.19) compared to that of HCFC-141b (782) and to that of modern foam-expansion blowing agents (148, 882, and 804 for HFC-152a, HFC-245fa and HFC-365mfc, respectively).

  8. Atmospheric Degradation Initiated by OH Radicals of the Potential Foam Expansion Agent, CF3(CF2)2CH═CH2 (HFC-1447fz): Kinetics and Formation of Gaseous Products and Secondary Organic Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Elena; González, Sergio; Cazaunau, Mathieu; Chen, Hui; Ballesteros, Bernabé; Daële, Véronique; Albaladejo, José; Mellouki, Abdelwahid

    2016-02-01

    The assessment of the atmospheric impact of the potential foam expansion agent, CF3(CF2)2CH═CH2 (HFC-1447fz), requires the knowledge of its degradation routes, oxidation products, and radiative properties. In this paper, the gas-phase reactivity of HFC-1447fz with OH radicals is presented as a function of temperature, obtaining kOH (T = 263-358 K) = (7.4 ± 0.4) × 10(-13)exp{(161 ± 16)/T} (cm(3)·molecule(-1)·s(-1)) (uncertainties: ±2σ). The formation of gaseous oxidation products and secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) from the OH + HFC-1447fz reaction was investigated in the presence of NOx at 298 K. CF3(CF2)2CHO was observed at low- and high-NOx conditions. Evidence of SOA formation (ultrafine particles in the range 10-100 nm) is reported with yields ranging from 0.12 to 1.79%. In addition, the absolute UV (190-368 nm) and IR (500-4000 cm(-1)) absorption cross-sections of HFC-1447fz were determined at room temperature. No appreciable absorption in the solar actinic region (λ > 290 nm) was observed, leaving the removal by OH radicals as the main atmospheric loss process for HFC-1447fz. The major contribution of the atmospheric loss of HFC-1447fz is due to OH reaction (84%), followed by ozone (10%) and chlorine atoms (6%). Correction of the instantaneous radiative efficiency (0.36 W m(-2)·ppbv(-1)) with the relatively short lifetime of HFC-1447fz (ca. 8 days) implies that its global warming potential at a time horizon of 100 year is negligible (0.19) compared to that of HCFC-141b (782) and to that of modern foam-expansion blowing agents (148, 882, and 804 for HFC-152a, HFC-245fa and HFC-365mfc, respectively). PMID:26704369

  9. Selective extraction of calcium on tri-n-butyl phosphate plasticized selective extraction of calcium on tri-n-butyl phosphate plasticized polyurethane foam for its spectrophotometric determination in glass and ceramics.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Jayanta K; Kundu, Dipali

    2005-12-01

    The present paper describes the application of a solid phase extraction system in order to separate traces of calcium from glass and ceramics for its spectrophotometric determination. The method is based on the extraction of calcium from sodium hydroxide solution by tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) loaded polyurethane foam (PUF), followed by its elution in hydrochloric acid. The spectrophotometric measurement of the absorbance of calcium complex with calconcarboxylic acid (2-hydroxy-1-(2-hydroxy-4-sulfo-1-naphthylazo)-3-naphthoic acid) takes place at pH 12. The following parameters were studied: effects of sodium hydroxide concentration and temperature on the extraction of calcium, time of equilibration for quantitative calcium extraction, effect of TBP concentration, effect of hydrochloric acid concentration for quantitative elution of calcium from PUF, effect of pH and concentration of calconcarboxylic acid for quantitative formation of the complex with calcium, effect of acetone on the stability of calcium-calconcarboxylic acid complex and influence of diverse ions on calcium sorption by TBP-loaded PUF. The results show that calcium traces can be separated onto TBP-loaded PUF from 0.25 mol L(-1) NaOH at 30 +/- 5 degrees C within 30 min. PUF was loaded with TBP in CCl4 (40% v/v). Elution of calcium was done in 1.0 mol l(-1) HCl. The calcium formed a complex with calconcarboxylic acid at pH 12 and absorbance was measured at 560 nm in acetone-water medium. Molar absorptivity was found to be 1.082 x 10(4) l mol(-1) cm(-1). The method obeys Beer's law from 0.10 to 5.0 microg ml(-1) Ca. The validity of the method was established by its successful application in NIST standard reference materials. The method proposed was applied to determine calcium in glass and ceramic materials. The results of the proposed method are comparable with the results of ICP-AES analysis and they are found to be in good agreement.

  10. Silica Foams for Fire Prevention and Firefighting.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander V; Kuprin, D S; Abduragimov, I M; Kuprin, G N; Serebriyakov, Evgeniy; Vinogradov, Vladimir V

    2016-01-13

    We report the new development of fire-extinguishing agents employing the latest technology of fighting and preventing fires. The in situ technology of fighting fires and explosions involves using large-scale ultrafast-gelated foams, which possess new properties and unique characteristics, in particular, exceptional thermal stability, mechanical durability, and full biocompatibility. We provide a detailed description of the physicochemical processes of silica foam formation at the molecular level and functional comparison with current fire-extinguishing and fire-fighting agents. The new method allows to produce controllable gelation silica hybrid foams in the range from 2 to 30 s up to 100 Pa·s viscosity. Chemical structure and hierarchical morphology obtained by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images develop thermal insulation capabilities of the foams, reaching a specific heat value of more than 2.5 kJ/(kg·°C). The produced foam consists of organized silica nanoparticles as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis with a narrow particle size distribution of ∼10-20 nm. As a result of fire-extinguishing tests, it is shown that the extinguishing efficiency exhibited by silica-based sol-gel foams is almost 50 times higher than that for ordinary water and 15 times better than that for state-of-the-art firefighting agent aqueous film forming foam. The biodegradation index determined by the time of the induction period was only 3 d, while even for conventional foaming agents this index is several times higher.

  11. Research on air sprays and unique foam application methods. Phase II report. Laboratory investigation of foam systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of air sprays and foam systems for dust control on longwall double-drum shearer faces. Laboratory testing has been conducted using foam systems and promising results have been obtained. Upon Bureau approval, underground testing will be scheduled to assess the effectiveness of foam systems under actual operating conditions. Laboratory testing of air sprays is being conducted at present. This report presents the results of the laboratory testing of foam systems. Specifically, the results obtained on the evaluation of selected foaming agents are presented, the feasibility investigation of flushing foam through the shearer-drum are demonstrated, and conceptual layout of the foam system on the shearer is discussed. The laboratory investigation of the selected foaming agents reveal that the Onyx Microfoam, Onyx Maprosyl and DeTer Microfoam foaming agents have higher expansion ratios compared to the others tested. Flushing foam through the shearer drum is entirely feasible and could be a viable technique for dust suppression on longwall faces.

  12. Quantum Foam

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The laws of quantum mechanics and relativity are quite perplexing however it is when the two theories are merged that things get really confusing. This combined theory predicts that empty space isn’t empty at all – it’s a seething and bubbling cauldron of matter and antimatter particles springing into existence before disappearing back into nothingness. Scientists call this complicated state of affairs “quantum foam.” In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln discusses this mind-bending idea and sketches some of the experiments that have convinced scientists that this crazy prediction is actually true.

  13. Pipelining particulate solid material as stable foam slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Fitch, J.L.

    1980-04-29

    A method of transporting particulate solid material through a pipeline in the form of a stable foam slurry is described. A pumpable slurry is formed of the particulate solid material in a stable foam carrier medium and the slurry is flowed through the pipeline to a receiving point. A method of transporting particulate solid materials through a pipeline is described wherein a pumpable slurry is formed of the particulate solid material. The particulate material is present in the stable foam in an amount of at least 20% by volume based on the total volume of the stable foam slurry. The particulate solid material may be coal particles, other forms of particulate carbonaceous material, such as coke, lignite and pitch, ores, and still other particulate material which is insoluble in the stable foam. The foam may be formed from a liquid, usually water, gas, and a foam stabilizing agent, such as a soap or a surfactant. 4 claims.

  14. Morphologies, Processing and Properties of Ceramic Foams from Pre-Ceramic Foams from Pre-Ceramic Polymer Routes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Simoes, Conan R.; Venkatapathy, Ethiras (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The current research is focused on processing ceramic foams that have potential as a thermal protection material. Ceramic foams with different architectures were formed from the pyrolysis of pre-ceramic polymers at 1200 C in different atmospheres. In some systems a sacrificial polyurethane was used as the blowing agent. We have also processed foams using sacrificial fillers to introduce controlled cell sizes. Each sacrificial filler or blowing agent leads to a unique morphology. The effect of different fillers on foam morphologies will be presented. The presentation will also focus on characterization of these foams in terms of mechanical and thermal properties. Foams processed using these approaches having bulk densities ranging from 0.15 to 0.9 g per cubic centimeter and a cell sizes from 5 to 500 micrometers. Compression strengths ranged from 2 to 7 MPa for these materials.

  15. Al-TiH2 Composite Foams Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasada Rao, A. K.; Oh, Y. S.; Ain, W. Q.; A, Azhari; Basri, S. N.; Kim, N. J.

    2016-02-01

    The work presented here in describes the synthesis of aluminum based titanium-hydride particulate composite by casting method and its foaming behavior of magnesium alloy. Results obtained indicate that the Al-10TiH2 composite can be synthesized successfully by casting method. Further, results also reveal that closed-cell magnesium alloy foam can be synthesized by using Al-10TiH2 composite as a foaming agent.

  16. Pitch based foam with particulate

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2001-01-01

    A thermally conductive, pitch based foam composite having a particulate content. The particulate alters the mechanical characteristics of the foam without severely degrading the foam thermal conductivity. The composite is formed by mixing the particulate with pitch prior to foaming.

  17. Mitigation of shock waves in a cylindrical tunnel by foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fondaw, Grant W.

    1993-03-01

    The effectiveness of foam linings in mitigating shock waves in tunnels is investigated. A polyurethane foam liner of varying density, crush strength, and thickness was modeled inside a 1 meter radius tunnel and an explosion of 1.25 kg of plastic explosive was simulated. Using CTH, an Eulerian-Lagrangian hydrodynamics code from Sandia National Laboratories, the overpressures were computed and compared graphically to determine the effect of varying each foam parameter. The walls of the tunnel consisted of a perfectly reflecting boundary, and in some cases, a foam liner. Low density foam provided the most shock attenuation, with a 20 cm thick layer of 90% void 0.1265 g/cm(sup 3) foam reducing the shock overpressure by 70% at 50 meters. The effects of foam thickness on the shock pressure varied with the distance from the explosion. The thicker foams raised the initial pressure near the explosion due to constriction of the tunnel area. However, the thicker layers reduced the shock faster. Varying the crush strength of the foam from 1 atm to 3 atm overpressure did not affect its ability to mitigate shock propagation in the tunnel. The results strongly suggest that foam can mitigate shock waves significantly.

  18. 33 CFR 183.552 - Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plastic encased fuel tanks... § 183.552 Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation. (a) Each fuel tank encased in cellular plastic foam or in fiber reinforced plastic must have the connections, fittings, and labels accessible...

  19. 33 CFR 183.552 - Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Plastic encased fuel tanks... § 183.552 Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation. (a) Each fuel tank encased in cellular plastic foam or in fiber reinforced plastic must have the connections, fittings, and labels accessible...

  20. 33 CFR 183.552 - Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Plastic encased fuel tanks... § 183.552 Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation. (a) Each fuel tank encased in cellular plastic foam or in fiber reinforced plastic must have the connections, fittings, and labels accessible...

  1. 33 CFR 183.552 - Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Plastic encased fuel tanks... § 183.552 Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation. (a) Each fuel tank encased in cellular plastic foam or in fiber reinforced plastic must have the connections, fittings, and labels accessible...

  2. 33 CFR 183.552 - Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Plastic encased fuel tanks... § 183.552 Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation. (a) Each fuel tank encased in cellular plastic foam or in fiber reinforced plastic must have the connections, fittings, and labels accessible...

  3. Foam stimulation fluids: what they are, where they work

    SciTech Connect

    King, G.E.

    1982-07-01

    Discusses foams used successfully in fracturing and fracture acidizing jobs. While their popularity is increasing, they often require significant engineering expertise for successful application. Benefits such as low fluid volumes, excellent proppant support, and unmatched backflow potential make them a major component of modern treatment design. Foam is made in most cases at the surface by turbulent mixing of nitrogen gas and water and requires only a nitrogen pump truck, additions of foaming agent to the liquid, and a ''T'' in the treating line in addition to normal treating operations. In highly natural fractured formations (those which show large fluid loss from drilling or fracturing operations), foams and gas-dispersed systems will lose gas and liquid into the fracture system and virtually all the recovery energy will disappear prior to backflow. On a straight cost comparison, foamed fluids are slightly more expensive in shallow wells (2,0003,500 ft) and significantly more expensive in deeper wells. Some new-generation foams that are beginning to make inroads in well treating are the foamed hydrocarbons. Concludes that as increased use in deeper and hotter reservoirs puts more strain on the foam systems, more technology must be developed to assure application of a foam which meets the demand. Work needs to be done to further current information available in areas of foam stability (both in the tubing and in the formation), foam viscosity, and application of fluid loss control.

  4. Rheology of thermoplastic foam extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    A phenomenological model of flow in an extrusion die has been developed. The macroscopic effect of the phase change from a homogeneous polymer melt, that contains a blowing agent, to a foam can be described in terms of two dimensionless parameters, ..cap alpha.. and theta. ..cap alpha.. is defined as the ratio of the pressure gradient in the melt phase to the average pressure gradient in the foam phase. theta is the corresponding ratio of pressure differences in the melt and foam phases. The position at which the phase change initiates, the exit contribution to the Bagley ends pressure correction, and the true wall shear stress in the melt phase can be related to ..cap alpha.. and theta. The data of Han and Villamizar, who measured pressure distribution in a transparent extrusion die and directly observed the phase change, are used to calculated ..cap alpha.. and theta. The prediction of these parameters is discussed. The observation that product quality generally improves with increased extrusion rates may be related to the position at which the phase change from a homogeneous melt to a foam initiates. A mechanism which supports this connection is described.

  5. Flame-retardant polymeric foams: manufacturing, applications, and hazards. July 1984-August 1988 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for July 1984-August 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning flame-retardant compositions and additives used in the manufacture of polymeric foams. Latex, polyurethane, polyether, silicone rubber, phenol formaldehyde, polyisocyanurate, polystyrene, PVC, and polyphenylene ether are among the foam polymers discussed relative to tests performed to evaluate the toxicity of flame retardants in smoke and during manufacturing. Applications including public transportation, furniture, automotives, medical and building materials are discussed. (This updated bibliography contains 199 citations, 17 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  6. Refractory Ceramic Foams for Novel Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, M.

    2008-01-01

    Workers at NASA Ames Research center are endeavoring to develop durable, oxidation-resistant, foam thermal protection systems (TPSs) that would be suitable for covering large exterior spacecraft surfaces, would have low to moderate densities, and would have temperature capabilities comparable to those of carbon-based TPSs [reusable at 3,000 F (.1,650 C)] with application of suitable coatings. These foams may also be useful for repairing TPSs while in orbit. Moreover, on Earth as well as in outer space, these foams might be useful as catalyst supports and filters. Preceramic polymers are obvious candidates for use in making the foams in question. The use of these polymers offers advantages over processing routes followed in making conventional ceramics. Among the advantages are the ability to plastically form parts, the ability to form pyrolized ceramic materials at lower temperatures, and the ability to form high-purity microstructures having properties that can be tailored to satisfy requirements. Heretofore, preceramic polymers have been used mostly in the production of such low-dimensional products as fibers because the loss of volatiles during pyrolysis of the polymers leads to porosity and large shrinkage (in excess of 30 percent). In addition, efforts to form bulk structures from preceramic polymers have resulted in severe cracking during pyrolysis. However, because the foams in question would consist of networks of thin struts (in contradistinction to nonporous dense solids), these foams are ideal candidates for processing along a preceramic-polymer route.

  7. Fire retardant polyisocyanurate foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Parker, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    Fire retardant properties of low density polymer foam are increased. Foam has pendant nitrile groups which form thermally-stable heterocyclic structures at temperature below degradation temperature of urethane linkages.

  8. Polyurethane-Foam Maskant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodemeijer, R.

    1985-01-01

    Brown wax previously used to mask hardware replaced with polyurethane foam in electroplating and electroforming operations. Foam easier to apply and remove than wax and does not contaminate electrolytes.

  9. Modeling of skeletal members using polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Sena, J.M.F.; Weaver, R.W.

    1983-11-01

    At the request of the University of New Mexico's Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, members of the Plastic Section in the Process Development Division at SNLA undertook the special project of the Chaco Lady. The project consisted of polyurethane foam casting of a disinterred female skull considered to be approximately 1000 years old. Rubber latex molds, supplied by the UNM Anthropology Department, were used to produce the polymeric skull requested. The authors developed for the project a modified foaming process which will be used in future polyurethane castings of archaeological artifacts and contemporary skeletal members at the University.

  10. Method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer

    DOEpatents

    Duchane, David V.; Cash, David L.

    1986-01-01

    A method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer. A solid thermoplastic lymer is immersed in an immersant solution comprising a compatible carrier solvent and an infusant solution containing an incompatible liquid blowing agent for a time sufficient for the immersant solution to infuse into the polymer. The carrier solvent is then selectively extracted, preferably by a solvent exchange process in which the immersant solution is gradually diluted with and replaced by the infusant solution, so as to selectively leave behind the infusant solution permanently entrapped in the polymer. The polymer is then heated to volatilize the blowing agent and expand the polymer into a foamed state.

  11. Metallized polymeric foam material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, B. A.; Bilow, N.

    1974-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foams can be coated uniformly with thin film of metal by vapor deposition of aluminum or by sensitization of foam followed by electroless deposition of nickel or copper. Foam can be further processed to increase thickness of metal overcoat to impart rigidity or to provide inert surface with only modest increase in weight.

  12. Viscoelastic foam cushion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubokawa, C. C.; Yost, C.

    1977-01-01

    Foam is viscous and elastic with unusual and useful temperature, humidity, and compression responses. Applied weight and pressure distributed equally along entire interface with foam eliminates any pressure points. Flexible urethane foam is ideal for orthopedic and prosthetic devices, sports equipment, furniture, and crash protection.

  13. Rheological study of foam fracturing fluids using nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Reidenbach, V.G.; Harris, P.C.; Lee, Y.N.; Lord, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Foams are being used in a number of Petroleum Industry applications which exploit their high viscosity and low liquid content. Some of the earliest applications for foam dealt with its use as a displacing agent in porous media and as a drilling fluid. Following these early applications, foam was introduced as a well-bore circulating fluid for clean-out and workover applications. In the mid-1970s, nitrogen based foams became popular for both hydraulic fracturing and fracture acidizing stimulation treatments. In the latter 1970s and early 1980s foamed cementing became a viable service with foamed gravel packing close behind. Most recently, carbon dioxide foams have been found to be exhibiting their usefulness in hydraulic fracturing stimulation. This study proposes models to describe both laminar and turbulent non-Newtonian flow of nitrogen and carbon dioxide based foams. These experimentally derived models should provide a means for predicting foam flow behavior in a number of industry applications. 35 references.

  14. Rheological study of foam fracturing fluids using nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Reidenbach, V.G.; Harris, P.C.; Lee, Y.N.; Lord, D.L.

    1983-10-01

    Foams are being used in a number of petroleum industry applications which exploit their high viscosity and low liquid content. Some of the earliest applications for foam dealt with its use as a displacing agent in porous media and as a drilling fluid. Following these early applications, foam was introduced as a wellbore circulating fluid for clean-out and workover applications. In the mid-1970's, nitrogen based foams became popular for both hydraulic fracturing and fracture acidizing stimulation treatments. In the latter 1970's and early 1980's foamed cementing became a viable service with foamed gravel packing close behind. Most recently, carbon dioxide foams have been found to be exhibiting their usefulness in hydraulic fracturing stimulation. In this paper, the authors propose models to describe both laminar and turbulent non-Newtonian flow of nitrogen and carbon dioxide based foams. These experimentally derived models should provide a means for predicting foam flow behavior in a number of industry applications.

  15. Thermal conductivity and combustion properties of wheat gluten foams.

    PubMed

    Blomfeldt, Thomas O J; Nilsson, Fritjof; Holgate, Tim; Xu, Jianxiao; Johansson, Eva; Hedenqvist, Mikael S

    2012-03-01

    Freeze-dried wheat gluten foams were evaluated with respect to their thermal and fire-retardant properties, which are important for insulation applications. The thermal properties were assessed by differential scanning calorimetry, the laser flash method and a hot plate method. The unplasticised foam showed a similar specific heat capacity, a lower thermal diffusivity and a slightly higher thermal conductivity than conventional rigid polystyrene and polyurethane insulation foams. Interestingly, the thermal conductivity was similar to that of closed cell polyethylene and glass-wool insulation materials. Cone calorimetry showed that, compared to a polyurethane foam, both unplasticised and glycerol-plasticised foams had a significantly longer time to ignition, a lower effective heat of combustion and a higher char content. Overall, the unplasticised foam showed better fire-proof properties than the plasticized foam. The UL 94 test revealed that the unplasticised foam did not drip (form droplets of low viscous material) and, although the burning times varied, self-extinguished after flame removal. To conclude both the insulation and fire-retardant properties were very promising for the wheat gluten foam.

  16. Jet-noise reduction through liquid-base foam injection.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Burge, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made of the sound-absorbing properties of liquid-base foams and of their ability to reduce jet noise. Protein, detergent, and polymer foaming agents were used in water solutions. A method of foam generation was developed to permit systematic variation of the foam density. The investigation included measurements of sound-absorption coefficents for both plane normal incidence waves and diffuse sound fields. The intrinsic acoustic properties of foam, e.g., the characteristic impedance and the propagation constant, were also determined. The sound emitted by a 1-in.-diam cold nitrogen jet was measured for subsonic (300 m/sec) and supersonic (422 m/sec) jets, with and without foam injection. Noise reductions up to 10 PNdB were measured.

  17. Foam flooding reservoir simulation algorithm improvement and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yining; Wu, Xiaodong; Wang, Ruihe; Lai, Fengpeng; Zhang, Hanhan

    2014-05-01

    As one of the important enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technologies, Foam flooding is being used more and more widely in the oil field development. In order to describe and predict foam flooding, experts at domestic and abroad have established a number of mathematical models of foam flooding (mechanism, empirical and semi-empirical models). Empirical models require less data and apply conveniently, but the accuracy is not enough. The aggregate equilibrium model can describe foam generation, burst and coalescence by mechanism studying, but it is very difficult to accurately describe. The research considers the effects of critical water saturation, critical concentration of foaming agent and critical oil saturation on the sealing ability of foam and considers the effect of oil saturation on the resistance factor for obtaining the gas phase relative permeability and the results were amended by laboratory test, so the accuracy rate is higher. Through the reservoir development concepts simulation and field practical application, the calculation is more accurate and higher.

  18. Structural graphitic carbon foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kearns, K.M.; Anderson, H.J.

    1998-12-31

    Graphitic carbon foams are a unique material form with very high structural and thermal properties at a light weight. A process has been developed to produce microcellular, open-celled graphitic foams. The process includes heating a mesophase pitch preform above the pitch melting temperature in a pressurized reactor. At the appropriate time, the pressure is released, the gas nucleates bubbles, and these bubbles grow forming the pitch into the foam structure. The resultant foamed pitch is then stabilized in an oxygen environment. At this point a rigid structure exists with some mechanical integrity. The foam is then carbonized to 800 C followed by a graphitization to 2700 C. The shear action from the growing bubbles aligns the graphitic planes along the foam struts to provide the ideal structure for good mechanical properties. Some of these properties have been characterized for some of the foam materials. It is known that variations of the blowing temperature, blowing pressure and saturation time result in foams of variously sized with mostly open pores; however, the mechanism of bubble nucleation is not known. Therefore foams were blown with various gases to begin to determine the nucleation method. These gases are comprised of a variety of molecular weights as well as a range of various solubility levels. By examining the resultant structures of the foam, differences were noted to develop an explanation of the foaming mechanism.

  19. Similarity between humans and foams in aging dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Stewart, Peter S.

    2014-03-01

    Foams are cellular networks between two immiscible phases. Foams are initially unstable and finally evolve toward a state of lower energy through sequential coalescences of bubbles. In physics, foams are model systems for materials that minimize surface energy. We study coalescence dynamics of clean foams using numerical simulations with a network model. Initial clean foams consist of equally pressurized bubbles and a low fraction of liquid films without stabilizing agents. Aging of clean foams occurs with time as bubbles rapidly coalesce by film rupture and finally evolve toward a new quasi-equilibrium state. Here we find that foam aging is analogous to biological aging: the death rate of bubbles increases exponentially with time, which is similar to the Gompertz mortality law for biological populations. The coalescence evolution of foams is self-similar regardless of initial conditions. The population change of bubbles is well described by a Boltzmann sigmoidal function, indicating that the foam aging is a phase transition phenomenon. This result suggests that foams can be useful model systems for giving insights into biological aging. Suwon 440-746, South Korea.

  20. Rheological Properties of Liquid and Particle Stabilized Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özarmut, A. Ö.; Steeb, H.

    2015-04-01

    In Earth-Pressure-Balance (EPB) tunnelling the excavated ground is used as face support medium to prevent surface settlements. In general, the excavated ground (e.g. for cohesionless soils) does not exhibit suitable conditions to support the tunnelling face. This technical challenge can be solved by adding conditioning agents that are mainly foams. In order to physically understand the rheological properties of the (added) liquid foam and the foam-soil (foam-particle) mixture and to comprehend its influence on the soil, advanced rheological investigations are necessary. Therefore, rheological experiments such as flow curve tests have been performed to determine the effective yield stress. Since the morphology, i.e. the microstructure of the foam accounts for effective rheological properties, size, shape and distribution of the cells of the foam and particle-laden foam were characterized in detail applying imaging techniques. In order to perform the above mentioned experiments, polymer- stabilised shaving foam seems to be a good replacement of tunnelling foam and suitable for laboratory tests due to its time stability, characteristic length scales of the microstructure and accessibility. Glass beads (of different diameter and volume fractions, i.e. specific surface areas) are used to investigate the effective material behaviour of foam-particle mixtures. The experimental results are compared with yield stress models of modified Herschel-Bulkley- Papanastasiou type.

  1. Foam process models.

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, Harry K.; Noble, David R.; Baer, Thomas A.; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2008-09-01

    In this report, we summarize our work on developing a production level foam processing computational model suitable for predicting the self-expansion of foam in complex geometries. The model is based on a finite element representation of the equations of motion, with the movement of the free surface represented using the level set method, and has been implemented in SIERRA/ARIA. An empirically based time- and temperature-dependent density model is used to encapsulate the complex physics of foam nucleation and growth in a numerically tractable model. The change in density with time is at the heart of the foam self-expansion as it creates the motion of the foam. This continuum-level model uses an homogenized description of foam, which does not include the gas explicitly. Results from the model are compared to temperature-instrumented flow visualization experiments giving the location of the foam front as a function of time for our EFAR model system.

  2. Visualization of the Crystallization in Foam Extrusion Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabaei Naeini, Alireza

    In this study, crystal formation of polypropylene (PP) and poly lactic acid (PLA) in the presence of CO2 in foam extrusion process was investigated using a visualization chamber and a CCD camera. The role of pre-existing crystals on the foaming behavior of PP and PLA were studied by characterizing the foam morphology. Visualization results showed that crystals formed within the die before foaming and these crystals affect the cell nucleation behavior and expansion ratio of PP and PLA significantly. Due to the fast crystallization kinetics of PP, crystallinity should be optimum to achieve uniform cell structure with high cell density and high expansion ratio. In PLA, enhancement of crystallinity is crucial for getting foam with a high expansion ratio. It was also visualized that CO2 significantly suppresses the crystallization temperature in PP through the plasticization effect as well as its influence on flow induced crystallinity.

  3. Optimization of Design and Manufacturing Process of Metal Foam Filled Anti-Intrusion Bars

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Andrea; Mussi, Valerio; Strano, Matteo

    2011-05-04

    The role of an anti-intrusion bar for automotive use is to absorb the kinetic energy of the colliding bodies that is partially converted into internal work of the bodies involved in the crash. The aim of this paper is to investigate the performances of a new kind of anti-intrusion bars for automotive use, filled with metallic foams. The reason for using a cellular material as a filler deals with its capacity to absorb energy during plastic deformation, while being lightweight. The study is the evolution of a previous paper presented by the authors at Esaform 2010 and will present new results and findings. It is conducted by evaluating some key technical issues of the manufacturing problem and by conducting experimental and numerical analyses. The evaluation of materials and shapes of the closed sections to be filled is made in the perspective of a car manufacturer (production costs, weight reduction, space availability in a car door, etc.). Experimentally, foams are produced starting from an industrial aluminium precursor with a TiH{sub 2} blowing agent. Bars are tested in three point bending, in order to evaluate their performances in terms of force-displacement response and other specific performance parameters. In order to understand the role of interface between the inner surface of the tube and the external surface of the foam, different kinds of interface are tested.

  4. Optimization of Design and Manufacturing Process of Metal Foam Filled Anti-Intrusion Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, Andrea; Strano, Matteo; Mussi, Valerio

    2011-05-01

    The role of an anti-intrusion bar for automotive use is to absorb the kinetic energy of the colliding bodies that is partially converted into internal work of the bodies involved in the crash. The aim of this paper is to investigate the performances of a new kind of anti-intrusion bars for automotive use, filled with metallic foams. The reason for using a cellular material as a filler deals with its capacity to absorb energy during plastic deformation, while being lightweight. The study is the evolution of a previous paper presented by the authors at Esaform 2010 and will present new results and findings. It is conducted by evaluating some key technical issues of the manufacturing problem and by conducting experimental and numerical analyses. The evaluation of materials and shapes of the closed sections to be filled is made in the perspective of a car manufacturer (production costs, weight reduction, space availability in a car door, etc.). Experimentally, foams are produced starting from an industrial aluminium precursor with a TiH2 blowing agent. Bars are tested in three point bending, in order to evaluate their performances in terms of force-displacement response and other specific performance parameters. In order to understand the role of interface between the inner surface of the tube and the external surface of the foam, different kinds of interface are tested.

  5. Steam foam drive method for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, A.; Friedmann, F.

    1991-08-27

    This patent describes a process for the recovery of oil from a petroleum reservoir by improving steam sweep efficiency during steam-flooding, wherein a foaming agent is added to divert steam to unswept zones and the reservoir is penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production. It comprises injecting steam and a surfactant solution comprising the foaming agent into an injection well, while concurrently and separately injecting an additional amount of liquid water into the injection well to generate a foam and thereby increase the pressure at the injection well; and recovering oil from a production well.

  6. Formation of Foam-like Microstructural Carbon Material by Carbonization of Porous Coordination Polymers through a Ligand-Assisted Foaming Process.

    PubMed

    Kongpatpanich, Kanokwan; Horike, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Yu-Ichi; Ogiwara, Naoki; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-09-14

    Porous carbon material with a foam-like microstructure has been synthesized by direct carbonization of porous coordination polymer (PCP). In situ generation of foaming agents by chemical reactions of ligands in PCP during carbonization provides a simple way to create lightweight carbon material with a foam-like microstructure. Among several substituents investigated, the nitro group has been shown to be the key to obtain the unique foam-like microstructure, which is due to the fast kinetics of gas evolution during carbonization. Foam-like microstructural carbon materials showed higher pore volume and specific capacitance compared to a microporous carbon.

  7. Cell Structure Evolution of Aluminum Foams Under Reduced Pressure Foaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhuokun; Yu, Yang; Li, Min; Luo, Hongjie

    2016-09-01

    Ti-H particles are used to increase the gas content in aluminum melts for reduced pressure foaming. This paper reports on the RPF process of AlCa alloy by adding TiH2, but in smaller amounts compared to traditional process. TiH2 is completely decomposed by stirring the melt, following which reduced pressure is applied. TiH2 is not added as the blowing agent; instead, it is added for increasing the H2 concentration in the liquid AlCa melt. It is shown that pressure change induces further release of hydrogen from Ti phase. It is also found that foam collapse is caused by the fast bubble coalescing during pressure reducing procedure, and the instability of liquid film is related to the significant increase in critical thickness of film rupture. A combination of lower amounts of TiH2, coupled with reduced pressure, is another way of increasing hydrogen content in the liquid aluminum. A key benefit of this process is that it provides time to transfer the molten metal to a mold and then apply the reduced pressure to produce net shape foam parts.

  8. Stability of minoxidil in Espumil foam base.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Christine M; Sorenson, Bridget; Whaley, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Minoxidil is a drug used to stimulate hair growth and to slow balding. It is marketed under a number of trade names, including Rogaine, and is available in varying strength dose forms from a number of generic manufacturers. Minoxidil is available in oral and topical forms. In topical form, it can be applied by a metered-spray or rub-on applicator. A hydroalcoholic compounding vehicle can minimize greasiness, itching, burning, and contact dermatitis where low concentrations of ethanol and propylene glycol are present. Espumil Foam Base contains low concentrations of these ingredients and also can form a foam on topical application. Espumil's unique delivery by foam-activating packaging assures simple application to difficult-to-treat areas, and it vanishes quickly after application, keeping it in place and avoiding health skin areas. The objective of this study was to determine the stability of minoxidil in Espumil Foam Base. The studied sample was compounded into a 50-mg/mL solution and stored in a plastic foam-activating bottle at room temperature conditions. Three samples were assayed at each time point out to 90 days by a stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatography method. The method was validated for its specificity through forced-degradation studies. The beyond-use-date is at least 90 days, based on data collected when this formulation was stored at room temperature, protected from light. PMID:23696178

  9. Orbital foamed material extruder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    This invention is a process for producing foamed material in space comprising the steps of: rotating the material to simulate the force of gravity; heating the rotating material until it is molten; extruding the rotating, molten material; injecting gas into the extruded, rotating, molten material to produce molten foamed material; allowing the molten foamed material to cool to below melting temperature to produce the foamed material. The surface of the extruded foam may be heated to above melting temperature and allowed to cool to below melting temperature. The extruded foam may also be cut to predetermined length. The starting material may be metal or glass. Heating may be accomplished by electrical heating elements or by solar heating.

  10. Structure of random foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; van Swol, Frank B.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2004-06-01

    The Surface Evolver was used to compute the equilibrium microstructure of dry soap foams with random structure and a wide range of cell-size distributions. Topological and geometric properties of foams and individual cells were evaluated. The theory for isotropic Plateau polyhedra describes the dependence of cell geometric properties on their volume and number of faces. The surface area of all cells is about 10% greater than a sphere of equal volume; this leads to a simple but accurate theory for the surface free energy density of foam. A novel parameter based on the surface-volume mean bubble radius R32 is used to characterize foam polydispersity. The foam energy, total cell edge length, and average number of faces per cell all decrease with increasing polydispersity. Pentagonal faces are the most common in monodisperse foam but quadrilaterals take over in highly polydisperse structures.

  11. Continuous microcellular foaming of polyvinyl chloride and compatibilization of polyvinyl chloride and polylactide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Bhavesh

    This dissertation focuses on overcoming existing limitations of WPCs which prevent them from realizing their full market potential. These limitations include: (i) lack of a continuous extrusion process for microcellular foaming of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and its composites using supercritical fluids to reduce the high density of the WPCs, (ii) need for an efficient coupling agent for WPCs to overcome the poor compatibility between wood and plastic, and (iii) unproven use of wood as a filler for the biopolymer polylactide (PLA) to make "green" composites. These limitations were addressed through experimentation to develop a continuous extrusion process for microcellular foaming, and through surface modification of wood flour using natural coupling agents. The effects of wood flour, acrylic modifier and plasticizer content on the rheological properties of PVC based WPCs were studied using an extrusion capillary rheometer and a two-level factorial design. Wood flour content and acrylic modifier content were the major factors affecting the die swell ratio. Addition of plasticizer decreased the true viscosity of unfilled and filled PVC, irrespective of the acrylic modifier content. However, the addition of acrylic modifier significantly increased the viscosity of unfilled PVC but decreased the composite viscosity. Results of the rheological study were used to set baseline conditions for the continuous extrusion foaming of PVC WPCs using supercritical CO 2. Effects of material composition and processing conditions on the morphology of foamed samples were investigated. Foamed samples were produced using various material compositions and processing conditions, but steady-state conditions could not be obtained for PVC. Thus the relationships could not be determined. Incompatibility between wood flour and PVC was the focus of another study. The natural polymers chitin and chitosan were used as novel coupling agents to improve interfacial adhesion between the polymer matrix

  12. Repairing Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbin, J.; Buras, D.

    1986-01-01

    Large holes in polyurethane foam insulation repaired reliably by simple method. Little skill needed to apply method, used for overhead repairs as well as for those in other orientations. Plug positioned in hole to be filled and held in place with mounting fixture. Fresh liquid foam injected through plug to bond it in place. As foam cures and expands, it displaces plug outward. Protrusion later removed.

  13. High performance polymeric foams

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L.; Iannace, S.

    2008-08-28

    The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy.

  14. Fire-retardant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, J.

    1978-01-01

    Family of polyimide resins are being developed as foams with exceptional fire-retardant properties. Foams are potentially useful for seat cushions in aircraft and ground vehicles and for applications such as home furnishings and building-construction materials. Basic formulations can be modified with reinforcing fibers or fillers to produce celular materials for variety of applications. By selecting reactants, polymer structure can be modified to give foams with properties ranging from high resiliency and flexibility to brittleness and rigidity.

  15. Structural applications of metal foams considering material and geometrical uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Mohammadreza

    ; convergence of estimates of the Sobol' decomposition with sample size using various sampling schemes; the possibility of model reduction guided by the results of the Sobol' decomposition. For the rest of the study the different structural applications of metal foam is investigated. In the first application, it is shown that metal foams have the potential to serve as hysteric dampers in the braces of braced building frames. Using metal foams in the structural braces decreases different dynamic responses such as roof drift, base shear and maximum moment in the columns. Optimum metal foam strengths are different for different earthquakes. In order to use metal foam in the structural braces, metal foams need to have stable cyclic response which might be achievable for metal foams with high relative density. The second application is to improve strength and ductility of a steel tube by filling it with steel foam. Steel tube beams and columns are able to provide significant strength for structures. They have an efficient shape with large second moment of inertia which leads to light elements with high bending strength. Steel foams with high strength to weight ratio are used to fill the steel tube to improves its mechanical behavior. The linear eigenvalue and plastic collapse finite element (FE) analysis are performed on steel foam filled tube under pure compression and three point bending simulation. It is shown that foam improves the maximum strength and the ability of energy absorption of the steel tubes significantly. Different configurations with different volume of steel foam and composite behavior are investigated. It is demonstrated that there are some optimum configurations with more efficient behavior. If composite action between steel foam and steel increases, the strength of the element will improve due to the change of the failure mode from local buckling to yielding. Moreover, the Sobol' decomposition is used to investigate uncertainty in the strength and ductility of

  16. Optimization of HIPE Foams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Smith, M.E.; Sebring, R.J.; Nobile, A. Jr.

    2004-03-15

    High Internal Phase Emulsion (HIPE) polystyrene foams have been made at LANL for the past decade. It is a robust system that offers flexibility in tailoring density and the incorporation of halogens and metals. As target designs become more complex the demands placed on the foams are more stringent. Parts are machined from 30 mg/cm{sup 3} foams to thicknesses of 50 {mu}m. At three percent of full density these foams are to withstand extraction with ethanol to remove the wax utilized as a machining aid and not allow shrinkage or warpage. In order to accomplish this the formulation of the HIPE foam had to be modified. Recently some new processing issues have arisen. At low densities voids have become a problem. To determine a formulation that reduces void content and allows minimum shrinkage, experimental design was utilized. We also developed image analysis techniques that allow us to quantify the amount of voids in the system. These techniques also allow us to evaluate the surface finish of the foam. In order to machine these low density foams to the tolerance required with an optimum surface finish the foams are backfilled with Brij 78, an alcohol soluble wax. After the part is machined, the Brij is leached out. Recent batches of Brij have exhibited high shrinkage, which in turn affects the surface finish of the foam.

  17. Shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santo, Loredana

    2016-02-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymer (SMP) foam research are reviewed. The SMPs belong to a new class of smart polymers which can have interesting applications in microelectromechanical systems, actuators and biomedical devices. They can respond to specific external stimulus changing their configuration and then remember the original shape. In the form of foams, the shape memory behaviour can be enhanced because they generally have higher compressibility. Considering also the low weight, and recovery force, the SMP foams are expected to have great potential applications primarily in aerospace. This review highlights the recent progress in characterization, evaluation, and proposed applications of SMP foams mainly for aerospace applications.

  18. Slag foaming phenomena and its suppression techniques in BOF steelmaking process

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, J.J.; Min, D.J.; You, B.D.

    1996-12-31

    Some basic studies using the X-ray fluoroscopy technique were carried out to understand slag foaming phenomena in BOF process. The BOF slag in contact with hot metal showed a generation of very fine size CO bubbles at the slag-metal interface, and formed a stable foam. The lump iron ore added into BOF slag decomposed faster, but showed less foaming than sinter ore did. The anti-foaming agent and coke were added into foamed BOF slag to compare their effectiveness of foam suppression. At the same time, various attempts were made to control the excessive slag foaming during BOF operation. Practice modifications such as oxygen blowing pattern and ore addition, and the installation of the slopping control button were effective and significantly reduced slopping. The slopping detection system involving oxygen lance vibration measurements were on-line installed for prompt and accurate control of slag foaming in BOF converter.

  19. Sorption and vapor transmission properties of uncompressed and compressed microcellular starch foam.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Gregory M; Klamczynski, Artur P; Takeoka, Gary; Orts, William J; Wood, Delilah; Widmaier, Robert

    2002-11-20

    Microcellular starch foams (MCFs) are made by a solvent-exchange process and consist of a porous matrix with pores generally ranging from approximately 2 microm to submicrometer size. MCF may potentially be useful as a slow-release agent for volatile compounds because of its ability to sorb chemicals from the atmosphere and to absorb liquids into its porous structure, and because it can be compressed to form a starch plastic. MCF made of high-amylose corn and wheat starches was prepared with or without 2% (w/w) silicone oil (SO) or palmitic acid (PA). The MCF was loaded with 1% of various volatile compounds with vapor pressures ranging from 0.02 to 28 mm. The MCF depressed the vapor pressure from 0.37 to 37% compared to a control containing no MCF. Incorporating SO or PA in the matrix of the MCF had little effect on sorption of volatiles. Compressing MCF at 1.4, 6.9, and 69 MPa made a starch plastic with varying porosity. The vapor transmission rate of various volatile compounds through MCF was positively correlated to the vapor pressure of the test compound but was inversely proportional to the compression force used to form the starch plastic. The results indicate that uncompressed and compressed MCFs could be effective slow-release agents for a variety of volatile compounds, especially if used together. PMID:12428966

  20. Aktau Plastics Plant Explosives Material Report

    SciTech Connect

    CASE JR.,ROGER S.

    1999-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been cooperating with the Republic of Kazakhstanin Combined Threat Reduction (CTR) activities at the BN350 reactor located at the Mangyshlak Atomic Energy Complex (MAEC) in the city of Aktau, Kazakhstan since 1994. DOE contract personnel have been stationed at this facility for the last two years and DOE representatives regularly visit this location to oversee the continuing cooperative activities. Continued future cooperation is planned. A Russian news report in September 1999 indicated that 75 metric tons of organic peroxides stored at the Plastics Plant near Aktau were in danger of exploding and killing or injuring nearby residents. To ensure the health and safety of the personnel at the BN350 site, the DOE conducted a study to investigate the potential danger to the BN350 site posed by these materials at the Plastics Plant. The study conclusion was that while the organic peroxides do have hazards associated with them, the BN350 site is a safe distance from the Plastics Plant. Further, because the Plastics Plant and MAEC have cooperative fire-fighting agreements,and the Plastics Plant had exhausted its reserve of fire-fighting foam, there was the possibility of the Plastics Plant depleting the store of fire-fighting foam at the BN350 site. Subsequently, the DOE decided to purchase fire-fighting foam for the Plastics Plant to ensure the availability of free-fighting foam at the BN350 site.

  1. Rigid polyvinyl chloride/wood-flour composites and their foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengeloglu, Fatih

    The effects of impact modifier types (crosslinked vs. uncrosslinked) and addition levels on the mechanical properties of rigid PVC/wood-fiber composites were examined. With the proper choice of modifier type and concentration, the impact strength of rigid PVC/wood-fiber composites can be significantly improved without degrading the tensile properties. Foaming is an effective method for reducing the density and brittleness of polymers. The experimental results indicated that impact modification (crosslinked and uncrosslinked modifiers) accelerated the rate of gas loss during foaming process, which impeded the growth of nucleated cells. Consequently, impact modifiers are an unnecessary ingredient in the formulation of foamed neat rigid PVC and rigid PVC/wood-flour composites. Since the batch foaming process used to generate cellular foamed structures in the composites is not likely to be implemented in the industrial production of foams because it is not cost-effective, the manufacture of PVC/wood-flour composite foams in an extrusion process needs to be investigated. The foamability of rigid PVC/wood-flour composites using moisture present in the wood flour as the foaming agent was investigated using a central composite design (CCD) experiment. It was determined that wood flour moisture could be used effectively as the foaming agent in the production of rigid PVC/wood-flour composite foams. Finally, mechanical property characterizations of extrusion-foamed rigid PVC/wood-flour composites were done. Extrusion foaming reduced the density and the brittleness of the composites, but also caused a reduction in the tensile strength and modulus of the rigid PVC/wood-flour composites. This study suggested that depending on the application, the problems associated with the rigid PVC/wood-flour composite products; high density, brittleness and low impact resistance can be overcome by adopting impact modification and/or extrusion foaming. Since impact modification improves the

  2. Aqueous foams stabilised solely by nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langevin, Dominique

    2011-03-01

    Particles are being increasingly used to stabilise foams and emulsions, the corresponding emulsions being known as ``Pickering'' emulsions. One of the peculiarities of these systems is the absence of Ostwald ripening: since the bubbles or drops do not grow (coalescence seems also suppressed) both foams and emulsions are stable over extremely long periods of time (months). These features make particles very interesting surface active agents as compared to standard surfactants or polymers/proteins. The origin of the suppression of ripening can be traced to the unusual behaviour of the interfacial layers made by these particles. The layers are solid-like and the usual characterisation methods (surface tension, surface rheology) are not straightforward to use. In this presentation, we will illustrate these difficulties with experiments made with partially hydrophobic silica nanoparticles. We will also discuss the relevance of foam characterisations methods such as multiple light scattering and X-ray tomography.

  3. Chronicles of foam films.

    PubMed

    Gochev, G; Platikanov, D; Miller, R

    2016-07-01

    The history of the scientific research on foam films, traditionally known as soap films, dates back to as early as the late 17th century when Boyle and Hooke paid special attention to the colours of soap bubbles. Their inspiration was transferred to Newton, who began systematic study of the science of foam films. Over the next centuries, a number of scientists dealt with the open questions of the drainage, stability and thickness of foam films. The significant contributions of Plateau and Gibbs in the middle/late 19th century are particularly recognized. After the "colours" method of Newton, Reinold and Rücker as well as Johhonnot developed optical methods for measuring the thickness of the thinner "non-colour" films (first order black) that are still in use today. At the beginning of the 20th century, various aspects of the foam film science were elucidated by the works of Dewar and Perrin and later by Mysels. Undoubtedly, the introduction of the disjoining pressure by Derjaguin and the manifestation of the DLVO theory in describing the film stability are considered as milestones in the theoretical development of foam films. The study of foam films gained momentum with the introduction of the microscopic foam film methodology by Scheludko and Exerowa, which is widely used today. This historical perspective serves as a guide through the chronological development of knowledge on foam films achieved over several centuries.

  4. Micromodel foam flow study

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, K.T.; Radke, C.J.

    1990-10-01

    Foams are often utilized as part of enhanced oil recovery techniques. This report presents the results of a micromodel foam flow study. Micromodels are valuable tools in uncovering capillary phenomena responsible for lamellae generation and coalescence during foam flow in porous media. Among the mechanisms observed are snap-off, weeping-flow breakup, and lamella division and leave behind. Coalescence mechanisms include dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage and gas diffusion. These phenomena are sensitive to the mode of injection, the local capillary environment, and the geometry of the pore structure. An important consideration in presenting a tractable model of foam flow behavior is the ability to identify the pore-level mechanisms having the greatest impact on foam texture. The predominant mechanisms will vary depending upon the application for foam as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) fluid. Both simultaneous gas and surfactant injection and surfactant alternating with gas injection (SAG) have been used to create foam for mobility control in EOR projects. The model developed is based on simultaneous gas and surfactant injection during steady-state conditions into a Berea sandstone core. The lamellae generation and coalescence mechanisms included in this model are snap-off, lamella division, and dynamic capillary-pressure-induced lamella drainage. This simplified steady-state model serves as a foundation for developing more complete rate expressions and for extending the population balance to handle transient foam flow behavior. 70 refs., 30 figs.

  5. Chronicles of foam films.

    PubMed

    Gochev, G; Platikanov, D; Miller, R

    2016-07-01

    The history of the scientific research on foam films, traditionally known as soap films, dates back to as early as the late 17th century when Boyle and Hooke paid special attention to the colours of soap bubbles. Their inspiration was transferred to Newton, who began systematic study of the science of foam films. Over the next centuries, a number of scientists dealt with the open questions of the drainage, stability and thickness of foam films. The significant contributions of Plateau and Gibbs in the middle/late 19th century are particularly recognized. After the "colours" method of Newton, Reinold and Rücker as well as Johhonnot developed optical methods for measuring the thickness of the thinner "non-colour" films (first order black) that are still in use today. At the beginning of the 20th century, various aspects of the foam film science were elucidated by the works of Dewar and Perrin and later by Mysels. Undoubtedly, the introduction of the disjoining pressure by Derjaguin and the manifestation of the DLVO theory in describing the film stability are considered as milestones in the theoretical development of foam films. The study of foam films gained momentum with the introduction of the microscopic foam film methodology by Scheludko and Exerowa, which is widely used today. This historical perspective serves as a guide through the chronological development of knowledge on foam films achieved over several centuries. PMID:26361708

  6. Foam and gel methods for the decontamination of metallic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, Luis; Kaminski, Michael Donald

    2007-01-23

    Decontamination of nuclear facilities is necessary to reduce the radiation field during normal operations and decommissioning of complex equipment. In this invention, we discuss gel and foam based diphosphonic acid (HEDPA) chemical solutions that are unique in that these solutions can be applied at room temperature; provide protection to the base metal for continued applications of the equipment; and reduce the final waste form production to one step. The HEDPA gels and foams are formulated with benign chemicals, including various solvents, such as ionic liquids and reducing and complexing agents such as hydroxamic acids, and formaldehyde sulfoxylate. Gel and foam based HEDPA processes allow for decontamination of difficult to reach surfaces that are unmanageable with traditional aqueous process methods. Also, the gel and foam components are optimized to maximize the dissolution rate and assist in the chemical transformation of the gel and foam to a stable waste form.

  7. Foamed Bulk Metallic Glass (Foam) Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This soldering iron has an evacuated copper capsule at the tip that contains a pellet of Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Prior to flight, researchers sealed a pellet of bulk metallic glass mixed with microscopic gas-generating particles into the copper ampoule under vacuum. Once heated in space, such as in this photograph, the particles generated gas and the BMG becomes a viscous liquid. The released gas made the sample foam within the capsule where each microscopic particle formed a gas-filled pore within the foam. The inset image shows the oxidation of the sample after several minutes of applying heat. Although hidden within the brass sleeve, the sample retained the foam shape when cooled, because the viscosity increased during cooling until it was solid.

  8. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, T.E.; Spieker, D.A.

    1983-12-08

    A rigid, moldable polyurethane foam comprises about 2 to 10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  9. Electrically conductive rigid polyurethane foam

    DOEpatents

    Neet, Thomas E.; Spieker, David A.

    1985-03-19

    A rigid, polyurethane foam comprises about 2-10 weight percent, based on the total foam weight, of a carbon black which is CONDUCTEX CC-40-220 or CONDUCTEX SC, whereby the rigid polyurethane foam is electrically conductive and has essentially the same mechanical properties as the same foam without carbon black added.

  10. Toughening of phenolic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hongbin

    2003-06-01

    Phenolic foam has excellent FST performance with relatively low cost, and thus is an attractive material for many applications. However, it is extremely brittle and fragile, precluding it from load-bearing applications. In order to make it tougher and more viable for structural purposes, an effective approach has been proposed and investigated in this study. Composite phenolic foam with short fiber reinforcements resulted in significant improvement in mechanical performance while retaining FST properties comparable to conventional phenolic foam. For example, composite phenolic foam with aramid fibers exhibited a seven-fold increase in peel resistance together with a five-fold reduction in friability. In shear tests, aramid composite foam endured prolonged loading to high levels of strain, indicating the potential for use in structural applications. On the other hand, glass fiber-reinforced phenolic foam produced substantial improvement in the stiffness and strength relative to the unreinforced counterpart. In particular, the Young's modulus of the glass fiber composite foam was increased by as much as 100% relative to the plain phenolic foam in the foam rise direction. In addition, different mechanical behavior was observed for aramid and glass fiber-reinforced foams. In an attempt to understand the mechanical behavior of composite foam, a novel NDT technique, micro-CT, was used to acquire information on fiber length distribution (FLD) and fiber orientation distribution (FOD). Results from micro-CT measurements were compared with theoretical distribution models, achieving various degrees of agreement. Despite some limitations of current micro-CT technology, the realistic observation and measurement of cellular morphology and fiber distribution within composite foams portend future advances in modeling of reinforced polymer foam. To explain the discrepancy observed in shear stiffness between traditional shear test results and those by the short sandwich beam test, a

  11. Partial analysis of Insta-Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, L.W.

    1983-12-01

    Insta-Foam, used as a thermal insulator for the non-critical area of the external tank during the prelaunch phase to minimize icing, is a two-component system. Component A has polyisocyanates, blowing agents, and stabilizers. Component B has the polyols, catalysts, blowing agents, stabilizers and fire retardant. The blowing agents are Freon 11 and Freon 12, the stabilizers are silicone surfactants, the catalysts are tertiary amines, and the fire retardant is tri-(beta-chloro-isopropyl) phosphate (PCF). High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was quantitatively identified polyols and PFC.

  12. FOAM DENSITY SENSITIVITY STUDY FOR THE 9977 PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczyca, J; Tsu-Te Wu, T

    2008-05-02

    Two layers of insulation fill the volume of the 9977 package between the drum liner and the shell. One of these layers is composed of General Plastics FR-3716 polyurethane foam (also known as Last-A-Foam{reg_sign}), poured through fill holes in the drum bottom and foamed in place. There was concern that the density of the foam insulating layer may vary due to the manufacturing process and that variations in foam density would compromise the safety basis of the package. Thus, a structural finite element analysis was performed to investigate this concern. The investigation examined the effect of replacing the material properties for the FR-3716 polyurethane foam, which has a density equal to 16 lb{sub m}/ft{sup 3}, with material properties of similar foam with varying densities through finite element analysis of hypothetical accident conditions (HAC) pertaining to impact conditions. The results showed that the functional performance of the containment vessel (CV) was not compromised under the conditions investigated.

  13. High-temperature rheological study of foam fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, P.C.; Reidenbach, V.G.

    1987-05-01

    Two significant observations were made during measurement of N/sub 2/ foam properties at temperatures up to 300/sup 0/F (149/sup 0/C) in a high-temperature, high-pressure recirculating loop viscometer: foam fluids did not thin as rapidly as gel fluids under similar conditions, so foams offer inherent advantages for high-temperature simulation work, and high gelling-agent concentrations do not improve dynamic foam stability; instead, high-temperature dynamic stability depends on surfactant type and concentration. Mathematical equations have been developed from experimental data to describe foam rheological behavior from 75 to 300/sup 0/F (24 to 149/sup 0/C), 0 to 80 quality, containing 0 to 80 lbm hydroxypropyl guar (HPG)/1,000 gal (0 to 9586 g HPG/m/sup 3/) in the aqueous phase. Basic physical properties previously outlined determined foam rheological behavior at 75/sup 0/F (24/sup 0/C). Foams were classified as yield-pseudoplastic-type fluids. This paper extends the previous work from 75 to 300/sup 0/F (24 to 149/sup 0/C) and covers a broader range of external liquid-phase compositions applicable to foam stimulation work.

  14. Tunable thiol-epoxy shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellson, Gregory; Di Prima, Matthew; Ware, Taylor; Tang, Xiling; Voit, Walter

    2015-05-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are uniquely suited to a number of applications due to their shape storage and recovery abilities and the wide range of available chemistries. However, many of the desired performance properties are tied to the polymer chemistry which can make optimization difficult. The use of foaming techniques is one way to tune mechanical response of an SMP without changing the polymer chemistry. In this work, a novel thiol-epoxy SMP was foamed using glass microspheres (40 and 50% by volume Q-Cel 6019), using expandable polymer microspheres (1% 930 DU 120), and by a chemical blowing agent (1% XOP-341). Each approach created SMP foam with a differing density and microstructure from the others. Thermal and thermomechanical analysis was performed to observe the behavioral difference between the foaming techniques and to confirm that the glass transition (Tg) was relatively unchanged near 50 °C while the glassy modulus varied from 19.1 to 345 MPa and the rubbery modulus varied from 0.04 to 2.2 MPa. The compressive behavior of the foams was characterized through static compression testing at different temperatures, and cyclic compression testing at Tg. Constrained shape recovery testing showed a range of peak recovery stress from 5 MPa for the syntactic Q-Cel foams to ˜0.1 MPa for the chemically blown XOP-341 foam. These results showed that multiple foaming approaches can be used with a novel SMP to vary the mechanical response independent of Tg and polymer chemistry.

  15. Release of CFC-11 from disposal of polyurethane foam waste.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, P; Jensen, M H

    2001-07-15

    The halocarbon CFC-11 has extensively been used as a blowing agent for polyurethane (PUR) insulation foams in home appliances and for residential and industrial construction. Release of CFCs is an important factor in the depletion of the ozone layer. For CFC-11 the future atmospheric concentrations will mainly depend on the continued release from PUR foams. Little is known about rates and time frames of the CFC release from foams especially after treatment and disposal of foam containing waste products. The CFC release is mainly controlled by slow diffusion out through the PUR. From the literature and by reevaluation of an old reported experiment, diffusion coefficients in the range of 0.05-1.7 x 10(-14) m2 s-1 were found reflecting differences in foam properties and experimental designs. Laboratory experiments studying the distribution of CFC in the foam and the short-term releases after shredding showed that about 40% of the CFC is solubilized in the PUR phase, and that up to 10% of the total content will be released within a few weeks if the foam is shredded down to 2-cm sized pieces. For smaller pieces the quick release will be larger. Fifty percent of residual CFC content will be released within 9-300 years from 2-cm pieces based on the range in diffusion coefficients reported. For larger pieces the initial release is insignificant, and the release time frames are much longer than for the shredded foam.

  16. Polyurethane-foam-component incompatibilities. [As access deterrent

    SciTech Connect

    Wischmann, K.B.

    1982-01-01

    Access deterrent foams are generated by mixing separately stored and pressurized isocyanate and polyol components upon demand. This specially designed rigid polyurethane foam system must survive ambient storage and still give acceptable foams. The polyol component, a polypropylene oxide diol adduct of phosphoric acid, in the presence of moisture apparently hydrolyzes to phosphoric acid which attacks the container and alters the foaming action. The phosphate ester adduct's fire-retardant characteristics were sacrificed in favor of a superior aging polyol component. Thus, a second foam formulation which did not contain any phosphoric acid adducts while exhibiting virtually identical foaming properties was aged under accelerated conditions. These conditions consisted of aging at room temperature, 60 and 71/sup 0/C, whereby lifetime predictions could be made by Arrhenius modeling. Specifically, the amine equivalent was followed in the isocyanate component while acid number and hydroxyl equivalent were determined in the polyol component. Interestingly, the isocyanate behaved in a predictable manner; however, again problems were encountered with the polyol component. A reaction between the polyol and the blowing agent, Freon 11, was found to give high acid content abruptly following a temperature dependent initiation period. Attempts to add inhibitors to lengthen this initiation period failed. These unsolved incompatibility problems have resulted in a foam system of uncertain quality and unknown lifetime. A third foam system is currently under investigation. 4 figures, 5 tables.

  17. Chelation and foam separation of metal ions from solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Carleson, T.E.; Moussavi, M.

    1988-08-01

    An experimental study was conducted on the chelation and foam separation of trace amounts of cadmium, zinc, and lead from their water solutions. The chelation agents ethylenediaminetetraacetate (sodium salt), sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, and citric acid were used with sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) as a foam-producing agent. The chelation agents did not produce metal complexes that were very surface active. The foam-producing agent produced metal ion complexes that were surface active and resulted in appreciable separation of the metal ions. The use of 100 ppm SDS resulted in separation of 90% of the zinc ions from solution containing 2 to 20 ppm zinc. At concentrations below and above this, the removal efficiency dropped significantly.

  18. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Clough, R.L.; Curro, J.G.; Quintana, C.A.; Russick, E.M.; Shaw, M.T.

    1985-10-02

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the reusltant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 ..mu..m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  19. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, James H.; Clough, Roger L.; Curro, John G.; Quintana, Carlos A.; Russick, Edward M.; Shaw, Montgomery T.

    1987-01-01

    Low density, microporous polymer foams are provided by a process which comprises forming a solution of polymer and a suitable solvent followed by rapid cooling of the solution to form a phase-separated system and freeze the phase-separated system. The phase-separated system comprises a polymer phase and a solvent phase, each of which is substantially continuous within the other. The morphology of the polymer phase prior to and subsequent to freezing determine the morphology of the resultant foam. Both isotropic and anisotropic foams can be produced. If isotropic foams are produced, the polymer and solvent are tailored such that the solution spontaneously phase-separates prior to the point at which any component freezes. The morphology of the resultant polymer phase determines the morphology of the resultant foam and the morphology of the polymer phase is retained by cooling the system at a rate sufficient to freeze one or both components of the system before a change in morphology can occur. Anisotropic foams are produced by forming a solution of polymer and solvent that will not phase separate prior to freezing of one or both components of the solution. In such a process, the solvent typically freezes before phase separation occurs. The morphology of the resultant frozen two-phase system determines the morphology of the resultant foam. The process involves subjecting the solution to essentially one-dimensional cooling. Means for subjecting such a solvent to one-dimensional cooling are also provided. Foams having a density of less than 0.1 g/cc and a uniform cell size of less than 10 .mu.m and a volume such that the foams have a length greater than 1 cm are provided.

  20. Flow of foam through a convergent channel.

    PubMed

    Dollet, Benjamin; Bocher, Claire

    2015-11-01

    We study experimentally the flow of a foam confined as a bubble monolayer between two plates through a convergent channel. We quantify the velocity, the distribution and orientation of plastic events, and the elastic stress, using image analysis. We use two different soap solutions: a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, with a negligible wall friction between the bubbles and the confining plates, and a mixture containing a fatty acid, giving a large wall friction. We show that for SDS solutions, the velocity profile obeys a self-similar form which results from the superposition of plastic events, and the elastic deformation is uniform. For the other solution, the velocity field differs and the elastic deformation increases towards the exit of the channel. We discuss and quantify the role of wall friction on the velocity profile, the elastic deformation, and the rate of plastic events. PMID:26607260

  1. Function, characteristics of EOR foam behavior covered in laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, F.S.M.; Selby, R.J.

    1986-02-01

    The past two decades have seen numerous studies dealing with the flow of foam in porous media, its formation mechanics, and its rheological properties. Foam is a gas-liquid dispersion that is formed by mixing a gas (e.g., air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide) and a liquid to which a suitable surface-active agent has been added. In addition to its other industrial uses, applications of foam in the oil field include drilling and completion operations, hydraulic stimulation, cementing, and enhanced oil recovery (EOR).

  2. Shape memory effects of molded flexible polyurethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Jang, Moon Kyoung; Kim, Sung Hee; Kim, Byung Kyu

    2007-12-01

    Polyurethane flexible foam having shape memory effects has been synthesized from polyester polyol and 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) following the quasi-prepolymer method in the presence of water as the blowing agent, and the effect of the organometallic catalyst and the molecular weight of polyol has been studied. It was found that the closed cell content, foam density, rubbery modulus, compression set, and shape fixability increased with increasing amounts of organometallic catalyst and decreasing molecular weight of polyol, whereas the cell size showed the opposite tendency. On the other hand, the shape recoverability of the foam was over 99% regardless of the catalyst content and molecular weight of polyol.

  3. Foamed energy cell

    SciTech Connect

    Brotz, G.R.

    1990-02-13

    This patent describes an electric current generating cell. It comprises: a container; an open-cellular foamed material held within the container; a coating on the interior of the cells of the foam of a semiconductor or other type photoelectric junction material; a first pole electrode interconnected to the coating, the pole extending out of the container; a fluid or gaseous activating material entered into the open cells in the foam adapted to interact therewith for the production of an electric current; and a second pole electrode in the container in contact with the activating material, the pole extending out of the container.

  4. Removable foam encapsulants

    SciTech Connect

    Wischmann, K.B.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the use of two different expandable bead foams as solvent removable encapsulants; specifically they are polystyrene (STYROPOR BF-414, BASF Wyandotte) and a styrenemaleic anhydride copolymer (DYTHERM X214, ARCO/Polymers). These expandable bead foams are commercially available and normally used in insulating applications. However, they have been adapted to the unusual task of encapsulating sophisticated and expensive electronic hardware which requires a rework capability. The respective foams processing, resultant properties and removal methods are discussed in detail in this paper.

  5. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOEpatents

    Nuckolls, John H.; Thiessen, Albert R.; Dahlbacka, Glen H.

    1983-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  6. The foaming of lavas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okeefe, J. A.; Walton, W.

    1976-01-01

    Foaming is of great practical and theoretical significance for volcanic processes on the earth, the moon, and perhaps the meteorite parent bodies. The theory of foams agrees with steelmaking experience to indicate that their presence depends on the existence of solutes in the lavas which reduce the surface tension, and are not saturated. These solutes concentrate at the surface, and are called surfactants. The surfactant responsible for the formation of volcanic ash was not identified; it appears to be related to the oxygen partial pressure above the lava. This fact may explain why lunar and meteoritic melts are not observed to foam. Experimental studies are needed to clarify the process.

  7. LFT foam - Lightweight potential for semi-structural components through the use of long-glass-fiber-reinforced thermoplastic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roch, A.; Huber, T.; Henning, F.; Elsner, P.

    2014-05-01

    Investigations on PP-LGF30 foam sandwiches have been carried out using different manufacturing processes: standard injection molding, MuCell® and LFT-D foam. Both chemical and physical blowing agents were applied. Precision mold opening (breathing mold technology) was selected for the foaming process. The integral foam design, which can be conceived as a sandwich structure, helps to save material in the neutral axis area and maintains a distance between load-bearing, unfoamed skin layers. The experiments showed that, at a constant mass per unit area, integral foams have a significantly higher flexural rigidity than compact components, due to their greater area moment of inertia after foaming: with an increase of the wall thickness from 3.6 mm to 4.4 mm compared to compact construction, the flexural rigidity increased by 75 %. With a final wall thickness of 5.8 mm an increase of 300 % was measured. Compared to non-reinforced components that show significant embrittlement during foaming, the energy absorption capacity (impact strength) of LFT foam components remains almost constant.

  8. Mechanical Properties of 17-4PH Stainless Steel Foam Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.; Lerch, B. a.; Hebsur, M.; Cosgriff, L. M.; Fedor, J.

    2007-01-01

    Rectangular 17-4PH stainless steel sandwiched foam panels were fabricated using a commercial manufacturing technique by brazing two sheets to a foam core. Microstructural observations and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation of the panels revealed large variations in the quality of the brazed areas from one panel to the next as well as within the same panel. Shear tests conducted on specimens machined from the panels exhibited failures either in the brazed region or in the foam core for the poorly brazed and well-brazed samples, respectively. Compression tests were conducted on the foam cores to evaluate their elastic and plastic deformation behavior. These data were compared with published data on polymeric and metallic foams, and with theoretical deformation models proposed for open cell foams.

  9. Aging of clean foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Stewart, Peter S.

    2014-11-01

    Aging is an inevitable process in living systems. Here we show how clean foams age with time through sequential coalescence events: in particular, foam aging resembles biological aging. We measure population dynamics of bubbles in clean foams through numerical simulations with a bubble network model. We demonstrate that death rates of individual bubbles increase exponentially with time, independent on initial conditions, which is consistent with the Gompertz mortality law as usually found in biological aging. This consistency suggests that clean foams as far-from-equilibrium dissipative systems are useful to explore biological aging. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST.

  10. Rheology of aqueous foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollet, Benjamin; Raufaste, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    Aqueous foams are suspensions of bubbles inside aqueous phases. Their multiphasic composition leads to a complex rheological behavior that is useful in numerous applications, from oil recovery to food/cosmetic processing. Their structure is very similar to the one of emulsions, so that both materials share common mechanical properties. In particular, the presence of surfactants at the gas-liquid interfaces leads to peculiar interfacial and dissipative properties. Foam rheology has been an active research topics and is already reported in several reviews, most of them covering rheometry measurements at the scale of the foam, coupled with interpretations at the local scale of bubbles or interfaces. In this review, we start following this approach, then we try to cover the multiscale features of aqueous foam flows, emphasizing regimes where intermediate length scales need to be taken into account or regimes fast enough regarding internal time scales so that the flow goes beyond the quasi-static limit. xml:lang="fr"

  11. Responsive foams for nanoparticle delivery.

    PubMed

    Tang, Christina; Xiao, Edward; Sinko, Patrick J; Szekely, Zoltan; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-09-01

    We have developed responsive foam systems for nanoparticle delivery. The foams are easy to make, stable at room temperature, and can be engineered to break in response to temperature or moisture. Temperature-responsive foams are based on the phase transition of long chain alcohols and could be produced using medical grade nitrous oxide as a propellant. These temperature-sensitive foams could be used for polyacrylic acid (PAA)-based nanoparticle delivery. We also discuss moisture-responsive foams made with soap pump dispensers. Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoparticles or PMMA latex nanoparticles were loaded into Tween 20 foams and the particle size was not affected by the foam formulation or foam break. Using biocompatible detergents, we anticipate this will be a versatile and simple approach to producing foams for nanoparticle delivery with many potential pharmaceutical and personal care applications. PMID:26091943

  12. Ocean foam generation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, R. A.; Bechis, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory investigation was conducted to determine the physical and microwave properties of ocean foam. Special foam generators were designed and fabricated, using porous glass sheets, known as glass frits, as the principal element. The glass frit was sealed into a water-tight vertical box, a few centimeters from the bottom. Compressed air, applied to the lower chamber, created ocean foam from sea water lying on the frit. Foam heights of 30 cm were readily achieved, with relatively low air pressures. Special photographic techniques and analytical procedures were employed to determine foam bubble size distributions. In addition, the percentage water content of ocean foam was determined with the aid of a particulate sampling procedure. A glass frit foam generator, with pore diameters in the range 70 - 100 micrometers, produced foam with bubble distributions very similar to those found on the surface of natural ocean foam patches.

  13. Ultralight metal foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-09-01

    Ultralight (<10 mg/cm3) cellular materials are desirable for thermal insulation; battery electrodes; catalyst supports; and acoustic, vibration, or shock energy damping. However, most of these ultralight materials, especially ultralight metal foams, are fabricated using either expensive materials or complicated procedures, which greatly limit their large-scale production and practical applications. Here we report a simple and versatile method to obtain ultralight monolithic metal foams. These materials are fabricated with a low-cost polymeric template and the method is based on the traditional silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain ɛD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory.

  14. Ultralight metal foams

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bin; He, Chunnian; Zhao, Naiqin; Nash, Philip; Shi, Chunsheng; Wang, Zejun

    2015-01-01

    Ultralight (<10 mg/cm3) cellular materials are desirable for thermal insulation; battery electrodes; catalyst supports; and acoustic, vibration, or shock energy damping. However, most of these ultralight materials, especially ultralight metal foams, are fabricated using either expensive materials or complicated procedures, which greatly limit their large-scale production and practical applications. Here we report a simple and versatile method to obtain ultralight monolithic metal foams. These materials are fabricated with a low-cost polymeric template and the method is based on the traditional silver mirror reaction and electroless plating. We have produced ultralight monolithic metal foams, such as silver, nickel, cobalt, and copper via this method. The resultant ultralight monolithic metal foams have remarkably low densities down to 7.4 mg/cm3 or 99.9% porosity. The metal foams have a long flat stress-train curve in compression tests and the densification strain εD of the Ni/Ag foam with a porosity of 99.8% can reach 82%. The plateau stress σpl was measured and found to be in agreement with the value predicted by the cellular solids theory. PMID:26349002

  15. Foam Optics and Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durian, Douglas J.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    The Foam Optics and Mechanics (FOAM) project will exploit the microgravity environment to more accurately measure the rheological and optical characteristics of wet aqueous foams. Using both rheology and laser light scattering diagnostics, the goal is to quantify the unusual elastic character of foams in terms of their underlying microscopic structure and dynamics. Of particular interest is determining how the elastic character vanishes, i.e., how the foam 'melts' into a simple viscous liquid, as a function of both increasing liquid content and increasing shear strain rate. The unusual elastic character of foams will be quantified macroscopically by measurement of the shear stress as a function of shear strain rate and of time following a step strain. Such data will be analyzed in terms of a yield stress, shear moduli, and dynamical time scales. Microscopic information about bubble packing and rearrangement dynamics, from which the macroscopic non-Newtonian properties ultimately arise, will be obtained non-invasively by multiple-light scattering: diffuse transmission spectroscopy (DTS) and diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS). Quantitative trends with materials parameters, most importantly average bubble size and liquid content, will be sought in order to elucidate the fundamental connection between the microscopic structure and dynamics and the macroscopic rheology.

  16. Polymeric foams from cross-linkable poly-N-ary lenebenzimidazoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, E. S.; Delano, C. B.; Riccitello, S. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Foamed cross-linked poly-N-arylenebinzimidazoles are prepared by mixing an organic tetraamine and an ortho substituted aromatic dicarboxylic acid anhydride in the presence of a blowing agent, and then heating the prepolymer to a temperature sufficient to complete polymerization and foaming of the reactants. In another embodiment of the process, the reactants are heated to form a prepolymer. The prepolymer is then cured at higher temperatures to complete foaming and polymerization.

  17. Ambient cure polyimide foams. [thermal resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.; Hamermesh, C. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Flame and temperature resistant polyimide foams are prepared by the reaction of an aromatic dianhydride, (pyromellitic dianhydride) with an aromatic polyisocyanate, (polymethylene polyphenylisocyanate), in the presence of an inorganic acid and furfuryl alcohol. Usable acids include dilute sulfuric acid, dilute nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, polyphosphoric acid, and phosphoric acid, with the latter being preferred. The dianhydride and the isocyanate in about equimolar proportions constitute about 50% of the reaction mixture, the rest being made up with the acid and the alcohol in a ratio of about 1:10. An exothermic reaction between the acid and the alcohol provides the heat necessary for the other components to polymerize without recourse to external heat sources. The mixture can be sprayed on any surface to form polymeric foam in locations where the application of heat is not practical or possible, for instance, between walls or on mine tunnel surfaces.

  18. Toxicology evaluation and hazard review for non-CFC containing rigid foams BKC 44317 and last-a-foam MSL-02A

    SciTech Connect

    Greulich, K.A.; Archuleta, M.M.

    1996-06-01

    New pour-in-place, low density, rigid polyurethane foam kits have been developed to mechanically stabilize damaged explosive ordnance. Although earlier foam systems used chlorofluorocarbons as blowing agents, the current versions rely on carbon dioxide generated by the reaction of isocynates with water. In addition, these kits were developed to manually generate small quantifies of rigid foam in the field with minimal or no protective equipment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and summarize available hazard information for the components of these rigid foam kits and to provide recommendations for personal protective equipment to be used while performing the manual combination of the components. As with most rigid foam systems, these kits consist of two parts, one a mixture of isocyanates; the other, a combination of polyols, surfactants, and amine catalysts. Once completely deployed, the rigid foam is non-toxic. The components, however, have some important health effects which must be considered when establishing handling procedures.

  19. Effects of surfactants on the microstructure of porous ceramic scaffolds fabricated by foaming for bone tissue engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xi; Ruan Jianming; Chen Qiyuan

    2009-06-03

    A porous scaffold comprising a {beta}-tricalcium phosphate matrix and bioactive glass powders was fabricated by foaming method and the effects of surfactants as foaming agent on microstructure of scaffolds were investigated. Foaming capacity and foam stability of different surfactants in water firstly were carried out to evaluate their foam properties. The porous structure and pore size distribution of the scaffolds were systematically characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an optical microscopy connected to an image analyzer. The results showed that the foam stability of surfactant has more remarkable influence on their microstructure such as pore shape, size and interconnectivity than the foaming ability of one. Porous scaffolds fabricated using nonionic surfactant Tween 80 with large foam stability exhibited higher open and total porosities, and fully interconnected porous structure with a pore size of 750-850 {mu}m.

  20. Foam preparations for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Loew, Burr J; Siegel, Corey A

    2012-07-01

    Patients with ulcerative colitis uniformly have disease involving the distal colon. When patients have disease limited to the left colon or symptoms suggestive of active rectal inflammation, guidelines recommend topical rectal therapies as first-line agents either as monotherapy or in conjunction with oral products. Rectal delivery modalities offer the advantage of delivering high local concentrations of active medication to the site of maximal inflammation with minimization of systemic side effects. Methods of rectal administration include suppositories, liquid enemas and foams. Suppositories are limited to the treatment of rectal disease, and patients often have difficulty retaining the liquid enema secondary to its high volume and consistency. Rectal foams reliability extend to the descending and sigmoid colon with application. Foams are further characterized by increased viscosity, lower volumes, finer dispersion on the colonic mucosa, and increased adhesiveness to the colonic mucosa compared with liquid enemas. Additionally, rectal foam agents demonstrate equal efficacy to their liquid enema counterparts yet consistently yield better patient tolerance, lower incidence of side effects, and increased patient acceptability. Currently available agents include 5-aminosalicylic acid and corticosteroids, both first and newer generation. This review focuses on clinical trials assessing efficacy, tolerability, and patient preferences for these agents as well as describing the currently available rectal foam products.

  1. Acoustic Radiation from Smart Foam for Various Foam Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivakumar, Nishkala

    2011-10-01

    Smart foam is an emerging active-passive noise control technology with many applications. Smart foam consists of passive foam with an embedded curved piezoelectric (PZT) film. We experimented with three geometries of varying film curvatures and a constant cross-sectional area of 58 cm^2, constructed using melamine foam covered with 28 μm thick polyvinylidene fluoride (piezoelectric) films with Cu-Ni surface electrodes. An AC voltage provided by a signal generator and amplifier drives the smart foam. An omnidirectional microphone mounted at a distance 100mm from the foam surface measured the sound level (dB) and harmonic distortion generated by the smart foam. Experiments were repeated for voltages, 40V-140V, and frequencies, 300Hz-2000Hz. The result show that the sound level generated by the smart foams has a characteristic frequency response common to all geometries and a peak sound level between 900 to 1,100 Hz.

  2. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  3. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1300(a) § 63.1307(g) Mold release agent N/A § 63.1300(b) § 63.1307 (h) Rebond Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1301(a) § 63.1307 (g) Mold release agent N/A § 63.1301(b) §...

  4. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Reporting Molded Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1300(a) § 63.1307(g) Mold release agent N/A § 63.1300(b) § 63.1307 (h) Rebond Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1301(a) § 63.1307 (g) Mold release agent N/A §...

  5. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Reporting Molded Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1300(a) § 63.1307(g) Mold release agent N/A § 63.1300(b) § 63.1307 (h) Rebond Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1301(a) § 63.1307 (g) Mold release agent N/A §...

  6. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1300(a) § 63.1307(g) Mold release agent N/A § 63.1300(b) § 63.1307 (h) Rebond Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1301(a) § 63.1307 (g) Mold release agent N/A § 63.1301(b) §...

  7. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart III of... - Compliance Requirements for Molded and Rebond Foam Production Affected Sources

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1300(a) § 63.1307(g) Mold release agent N/A § 63.1300(b) § 63.1307 (h) Rebond Foam Equipment cleaning N/A § 63.1301(a) § 63.1307 (g) Mold release agent N/A § 63.1301(b) §...

  8. Nano-Aramid Fiber Reinforced Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmes, Edmund B.; Frances, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    Closed cell polyurethane and, particularly, polyisocyanurate foams are a large family of flexible and rigid products the result of a reactive two part process wherein a urethane based polyol is combined with a foaming or "blowing" agent to create a cellular solid at room temperature. The ratio of reactive components, the constituency of the base materials, temperature, humidity, molding, pouring, spraying and many other processing techniques vary greatly. However, there is no known process for incorporating reinforcing fibers small enough to be integrally dispersed within the cell walls resulting in superior final products. The key differentiating aspect from the current state of art resides in the many processing technologies to be fully developed from the novel concept of milled nano pulp aramid fibers and their enabling entanglement capability fully enclosed within the cell walls of these closed cell urethane foams. The authors present the results of research and development of reinforced foam processing, equipment development, strength characteristics and the evolution of its many applications.

  9. Solid state microcellular foamed poly(lactic acid): morphology and property characterization.

    PubMed

    Matuana, L M

    2008-06-01

    Poly(lactic acid) or PLA is a plant-based biodegrable plastic which exhibits many properties that are equivalent to or better than many petroleum-based plastics. However, there have been few commercial applications due to its lower impact resistance and higher cost than synthetic plastics. In this paper, the concept of creating microcellular foamed structures in PLA as a means to improve its shortcomings is presented. The effect of the foaming conditions (temperature and time) on the void fraction, volume expansion ratio, impact strength and tensile properties of foamed PLA is discussed. Each step of microcellular processing is addressed including: the manufacture of PLA film; the saturation of the samples with gas; the microcellular foaming of PLA; the void fraction determination, volume expansion ratio calculation, impact and tensile property characterization of foamed samples. The microcellular morphologies developed in PLA samples were a strong function of the foaming conditions. Due to the presence of foamed microcells, a twofold expansion ratio and significant improvements in the impact resistance (twofold increase over unfoamed PLA), strain at break (up to twofold increase over unfoamed PLA) and toughness (up to fourfold increase over unfoamed PLA) were achieved in PLA.

  10. Method of forming a foamed thermoplastic polymer

    DOEpatents

    Duchane, D.V.; Cash, D.L.

    1984-11-21

    A solid thermoplastic polymer is immersed in an immersant solution comprising a compatible carrier solvent and an infusant solution containing an incompatible liquid blowing agent for a time sufficient for the immersant solution to infuse into the polymer. The carrier solvent is then selectively extracted, preferably by a solvent exchange process in which the immersant solution is gradually diluted with and replaced by the infusant solution, so as to selectively leave behind the infustant solution permanently entrapped in the polymer. The polymer is then heated to volatilize the blowing agent and expand the polymer into a foamed state.

  11. Polystyrene Foam Products Equation of State as a Function of Porosity and Fill Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulford, R. N.; Swift, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam. Differences between air-filled, Ar-blown, and CO2-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with products of polystyrene decomposition. O2-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to amplify any consequences of reaction with oxygen in air. He-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to provide an extremum of density. Product pressures are slightly higher for oxygen-containing fill gases than for non-oxygen-containing fill gases. Examination of product species indicates that CO2 decomposes at high temperatures.

  12. Polystyrene foam products equation of state as a function of porosity and fill gas

    SciTech Connect

    Mulford, Roberta N; Swift, Damian C

    2009-01-01

    An accurate EOS for polystyrene foam is necessary for analysis of numerous experiments in shock compression, inertial confinement fusion, and astrophysics. Plastic to gas ratios vary between various samples of foam, according to the density and cell-size of the foam. A matrix of compositions has been investigated, allowing prediction of foam response as a function of the plastic-to-air ratio. The EOS code CHEETAH allows participation of the air in the decomposition reaction of the foam. Differences between air-filled, Ar-blown, and CO{sub 2}-blown foams are investigated, to estimate the importance of allowing air to react with products of polystyrene decomposition. O{sub 2}-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to amplify any consequences of reaction with oxygen in air. He-blown foams are included in some comparisons, to provide an extremum of density. Product pressures are slightly higher for oxygen-containing fill gases than for non-oxygen-containing fill gases. Examination of product species indicates that CO{sub 2} decomposes at high temperatures.

  13. Foams for Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raven, Jan-Paul

    2005-11-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the assembly of microbubbles into a 2D foam and its flow in microchannels. Using a flow focusing method, we can produce a foam in situ on a microfluidic chip for a large range of liquid fractions. We study its flow dissipation along a channel, and the effect of constrictions. Microscopic imaging allows monitoring the transition from separated bubbles into the desired foam in which bubbles are closely packed. The foam flowrate depends non-linearly on the applied pressure, displaying a threshold pressure due to capillarity. The measurements are made in a channel with a height of 250 μm, resulting in bubbles whose height to diameter aspect ratio ranges between 0.3 and 1. We also produce an ultraflat foam (reducing the channel height to about 8 μm) with a bubble aspect ratio down to 0.02; we observe a marked change in bubble shape during the flow. The control of microfoam flows provides possible applications like transporting amphiphilic molecules on interfaces or the individual handling of gas pockets.

  14. Preparation, testing, and delivery of low density polyimide foam panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, G. L., III; Post, L. K.; Salyer, I. O.

    1975-01-01

    Plastic foams based on polyimide resins were shown to be stable at relatively high temperatures, and to possess very low flame spread and smoke generation characteristics. A system and process were developed to prepare low-density polyimide foam from a liquid formulation. The system is based on the reaction of micropulverized grade pyromellitic dianhydride with a polymeric diisocyanate. The panels produced were postcured at elevated temperatures to achieve maximum thermal and fire resistance, and incorporation of a fire retardant into the formulation was considered. The effects of a flame retardant (Flameout 5600B1) were investigated, but eliminated in preference to the postcuring approach.

  15. Environmental Impacts of Class A Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, J. L.; Bennett, P.

    2001-12-01

    Class A foam (CAF) is widely used in wildland firefighting as an extinguishing agent. Commonly CAF concentrate consists of a mixture of water and glycol, with a blend of surfactants to enhance the `wetting' capability of water. CAF is attractive to firefighters as it enhances heat absorption of water, while increasing fuel moisture content, resulting in more effective extinguishment with less water, and greater safety. In other settings, however, surfactants were found to change soil properties, alter infiltration rates, and enhance contaminant mobility. Evaluation of wildfires at Los Alamos National Laboratory raised the question of the impact of extinguishing agents on the mobility of high explosive residues, such as TNT, in soil. The use of agents such as CAF may enhance the mobility of hydrophobic compounds, flushing the residues out of soil and into underlying water bearing units. We report here the results of field and laboratory experiments evaluating the potential impact of CAF on the mobility of organic contaminants in soil. Samples of CAF concentrate and water mixtures were characterized for surfactant content. The persistence of CAF under non-fire, wildfire and pre-burn versus post-burn application conditions were analyzed. Solubility of TNT in CAF solutions was determined, and transport of TNT and CAF solutions through soil columns was analyzed to determine the effect of CAF on retardation of TNT. The surfactant content in CAF concentrates is typically 10-20%. Field investigations show that the surfactants applied in at recommended concentrations (1%) persist in soil for about three weeks. Actual application rates are as much as 4 times the recommended rate due to equipment variability and widespread confusion during actual fire situations, and here surfactant persists for more than three months. Foam persistence decreases after exposure to fire, suggesting that surfactants volatilize or decompose during the fire. Foam solutions at typical fire

  16. Foam injection molding of elastomers with iron microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, Valentina; D'Auria, Marco; Sorrentino, Luigi; Davino, Daniele; Pantani, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a preliminary study of foam injection molding of a thermoplastic elastomer, Engage 8445, and its microcomposite loaded with iron particles was carried out, in order to evaluate the effect of the iron microparticles on the foaming process. In particular, reinforced samples have been prepared by using nanoparticles at 2% by volume. Nitrogen has been used as physical blowing agent. Foamed specimens consisting of neat and filled elastomer were characterized by density measurements and morphological analysis. While neat Engage has shown a well developed cellular morphology far from the injection point, the addition of iron microparticles considerably increased the homogeneity of the cellular morphology. Engage/iron foamed samples exhibited a reduction in density greater than 32%, with a good and homogeneous cellular morphology, both in the transition and in the core zones, starting from small distances from the injection point.

  17. Low density metal hydride foams

    DOEpatents

    Maienschein, Jon L.; Barry, Patrick E.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

  18. For lighter cars, a heavier plastics diet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-17

    The competition between plastics and aluminum for use in automobile components will intensify after 1985, since up to that time the automobile industry will rely primarily on size reduction to reduce automobile weights. If 1985 automobiles are to achieve 50 mpg, the average weight will have to be cut from the current 2120 lb to 1300 lb, which will require the use of 1000 lb of lightweight material. The cost of plastics in the lightweight car would be less than the cost of aluminum, and the equipment for working plastics is cheaper than metalworking equipment. The equipment for working plastics operates more slowly , however, and plastics cannot withstand the 400/sup 0/F heat of paint ovens, or acquire as good a finish as aluminum. According to the Society of the Plastics Industry Inc., the 1979 uses of plastics in U.S. transportation equipment amounted to (in millions of lb): all thermosets, 569; polyesters, 362; urea and melamine, 24; phenolics, 171; polyurethane foam, 418; all thermoplastics, 1365; low-density polyethylene, 56; high-density polyethylene, 90; polypropylene, 260; ABS and SAN, 317; polystyrene, 23; nylon, 96; PVC, 270; all other thermoplastics, 187; and all plastics (excluding polyurethane foam), 1934. Uses of plastics in specific automobile models are discussed.

  19. Materials Applications for Non-Lethal: Aqueous Foams

    SciTech Connect

    GOOLSBY,TOMMY D.; SCOTT,STEVEN H.

    1999-09-15

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In the mid-1990s, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate (foaming agent) with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objectives were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might be

  20. Update: HFC 245fa Blown Foam Development with External Tank Spray Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S.

    2001-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) Materials Research Laboratory is currently investigating environmentally friendly blowing agents for use in the insulations of the Space Shuttle's External Tank. The original TPS foam materials of the External Tank were blown with chlorofluorocarbon 11, which is now regulated because of its high Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP). Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), with an ODP that is one tenth that of CFCs, have been widely adopted as an interim blowing agent in urethane insulations. In FY96, Lockheed Martin completed the production qualification and validation of HCFC 141b blown insulations. Because of the expected limited commercial lifetime of HCFC 141b, research efforts are underway to identify and develop alternatives with zero ODP. HFC245fa (1,1,1,3,3-pentaflouropropane) has been chosen by the manufacturer as a third-generation blowing agent to be marketed commercially. Preliminary work evaluating this third-generation candidate has demonstrated promising material mechanical property data. Favorable results from small-scale spray activities have justified evaluations using production foam processing spray parameters. With the scale-up of the spray equipment, however, additional processing issues have been identified. This paper will present data collected to date regarding the use of this blowing agent in External Tank spray foams.

  1. Ambient curing fire resistant foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamermesh, C. L.; Hogenson, P. A.; Tung, C. Y.; Sawko, P. M.; Riccitiello, S. R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of development of an ambient curing foam is described. The thermal stability and flame spread index of the foams were found to be comparable to those of the high-temperature cured polyimide foams by Monsanto two-foot tunnel test and NASA T-3 Fire test. Adaptation of the material to spray in place applications is described

  2. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, J.D.

    1991-11-19

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 [mu]m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process. 8 figures.

  3. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular foam which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  4. Foaming in stout beers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. T.; Devereux, M. G.

    2011-10-01

    We review the differences between bubble formation in champagne and other carbonated drinks, and stout beers which contain a mixture of dissolved nitrogen and carbon dioxide. The presence of dissolved nitrogen in stout beers gives them several properties of interest to connoisseurs and physicists. These remarkable properties come at a price: stout beers do not foam spontaneously and special technology, such as the widgets used in cans, is needed to promote foaming. Nevertheless, the same mechanism, nucleation by gas pockets trapped in cellulose fibers, responsible for foaming in carbonated drinks is active in stout beers, but at an impractically slow rate. This gentle rate of bubble nucleation makes stout beers an excellent model system for investigating the nucleation of gas bubbles. The equipment needed is modest, putting such experiments within reach of undergraduate laboratories. We also consider the suggestion that a widget could be constructed by coating the inside of a beer can with cellulose fibers.

  5. Foams in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, S.S.

    1986-07-01

    In 1978 a literature search on selective blocking of fluid flow in porous media was done by Professor S.S. Marsden and two of his graduate students, Tom Elson and Kern Huppy. This was presented as SUPRI Report No. TR-3 entitled ''Literature Preview of the Selected Blockage of Fluids in Thermal Recovery Projects.'' Since then a lot of research on foam in porous media has been done on the SUPRI project and a great deal of new information has appeared in the literature. Therefore we believed that a new, up-to-date search should be done on foam alone, one which would be helpful to our students and perhaps of interest to others. This is a chronological survey showing the development of foam flow, blockage and use in porous media, starting with laboratory studies and eventually getting into field tests and demonstrations. It is arbitrarily divided into five-year time periods. 81 refs.

  6. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation.

  7. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation. PMID:26337962

  8. Toxicity evaluation and hazard review for Rigid Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, M.M.; Stocum, W.E.

    1994-02-01

    Rigid Foam is a chemical delay foam used to completely encapsulate an object or to block access to an area. Prior studies have indicated that the final foam product is essentially non-toxic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and summarize the current chemical and toxicological data available on the components of Rigid Foam and to update the information available on the toxicity of the final Rigid Foam product. Since the possibility exists for a partial deployment of Rigid Foam where only one of the components is released, this study also examined the toxicity of its chemical constituents. Rigid Foam is composed of an {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} Component. The {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} component is primarily a polymeric isocyanate and the {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} component is a mixture of polyols. In addition to the primary constituents, dichlorodifluoromethane and trichlorofluoromethane are present as blowing agents along with catalysts and silicone surfactants necessary for foaming. The pre-deployed {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} components are stored in separate vessels and are brought together in static mixing nozzles for dispersal. The results of this evaluation indicate that a completely deployed Rigid Foam under normal conditions is essentially non-toxic as determined previously. However, in the event of a partial deployment or deployment of an individual component directly at an unprotected individual, the degree of hazard is increased due to the toxic and corrosive nature of the individual constituents. The health hazard would depend on the properties of the material to which the person was exposed.

  9. Forming and Bending of Metal Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebosky, Paul; Tyszka, Daniel; Niebur, Glen; Schmid, Steven

    2004-06-01

    This study examines the formability of a porous tantalum foam, known as trabecular metal (TM). Used as a bone ingrowth surface on orthopedic implants, TM is desirable due to its combination of high strength, low relative density, and excellent osteoconductive properties. This research aims to develop bend and stretch forming as a cost-effective alternative to net machining and EDM for manufacturing thin parts made of TM. Experimentally, bending about a single axis using a wiping die was studied by observing cracking and measuring springback. It was found that die radius and clearance strongly affect the springback properties of TM, while punch speed, embossings, die radius and clearance all influence cracking. Depending on the various combinations of die radius and clearance, springback factor ranged from .70-.91. To examine the affect of the foam microstructure, bending also was examined numerically using a horizontal hexagonal mesh. As the hexagonal cells were elongated along the sheet length, elastic springback decreased. This can be explained by the earlier onset of plastic hinging occurring at the vertices of the cells. While the numerical results matched the experimental results for the case of zero clearance, differences at higher clearances arose due to an imprecise characterization of the post-yield properties of tantalum. By changing the material properties of the struts, the models can be modified for use with other open-cell metallic foams.

  10. Composite foam structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E. (Inventor); Brockmeyer, Jerry (Inventor); Tuffias, Robert H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A composite rigid foam structure that has a skin or coating on at least one of its surfaces. The skin is formed in situ by thermal spray techniques. The skin is bonded substantially throughout the surface of the porous substrate to the peripheries of the pores. The skin on the average does not penetrate the surface of the substrate by more than the depth of about 2 to 5 pores. Thus, thermal spraying the skin onto the rigid foam produces a composite that is tightly and uniformly bonded together without unduly increasing the weight of the composite structure. Both thermal conductivity and bonding are excellent.

  11. Long lasting decontamination foam

    DOEpatents

    Demmer, Ricky L.; Peterman, Dean R.; Tripp, Julia L.; Cooper, David C.; Wright, Karen E.

    2010-12-07

    Compositions and methods for decontaminating surfaces are disclosed. More specifically, compositions and methods for decontamination using a composition capable of generating a long lasting foam are disclosed. Compositions may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6. Such compositions may further include affinity-shifting chemicals. Methods may include decontaminating a contaminated surface with a composition or a foam that may include a surfactant and gelatin and have a pH of less than about 6.

  12. Convective Instabilities in Liquid Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veretennikov, Igor; Glazier, James A.

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to better understand foam behavior both on the Earth and in microgravity conditions and to determine the relation between a foam's structure and wetness and its rheological properties. Our experiments focused on the effects of the bubble size distribution (BSD) on the foam behavior under gradual or stepwise in the liquid flow rate and on the onset of the convective instability. We were able to show experimentally, that the BSD affects foam rheology very strongly so any theory must take foam texture into account.

  13. Laser Imprint Reduction Using a Low-Density Foam Buffer as a Thermal Smoothing Layer at 351-nm Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, R. G.; Duke, J.; Fontes, C. J.; Gobby, P. L.; Hollis, R. V.; Kopp, R. A.; Mason, R. J.; Wilson, D. C.; Verdon, C. P.; Boehly, T. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V.; Town, R. P.; Iwase, A.; Willi, O.

    1998-11-01

    Laser-nonuniformity-induced perturbation growth has been measured on planar foam-buffered plastic (CH) targets irradiated with 351-nm laser radiation. The maximum observed perturbation growth was reduced by about 50% by the foam buffer. Rayleigh-Taylor unstable growth of intentional mass modulations was minimally changed by the addition of the foam buffer. We conclude that the reduction of laser-induced perturbation growth is a result of a reduction in the perturbation seed amplitude rather than any changes in the growth rate in the solid due to preheating by radiation or shocks caused by the presence of the foam buffer.

  14. Advanced Signal Processing Techniques Applied to Terahertz Inspections on Aerospace Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Long Buu

    2009-01-01

    The space shuttle's external fuel tank is thermally insulated by the closed cell foams. However, natural voids composed of air and trapped gas are found as by-products when the foams are cured. Detection of foam voids and foam de-bonding is a formidable task owing to the small index of refraction contrast between foam and air (1.04:1). In the presence of a denser binding matrix agent that bonds two different foam materials, time-differentiation of filtered terahertz signals can be employed to magnify information prior to the main substrate reflections. In the absence of a matrix binder, de-convolution of the filtered time differential terahertz signals is performed to reduce the masking effects of antenna ringing. The goal is simply to increase probability of void detection through image enhancement and to determine the depth of the void.

  15. Thermal insulation of muscovite/glass ceramic foam for solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, Da-Wei; Tsai, Chu-Yu; Wei, Wen-Cheng J.

    2011-10-01

    A direct foaming method of dispersed suspensions containing muscovite particulates and a glass powder (47BaO-21B2O3-27SiO2-5Al2O3, in mol%) is used to prepare porous ceramic structures. The sintered foams exhibit extremely low thermal conductivity and slight expansion during the thermal treatment at 1000 °C. Both the foam stability and its thermal conductivity are investigated by considering foaming agents, muscovite/glass ratios, solid contents, microwave drying, wetting behaviors, and foam consolidation. One of the muscovite/glass ceramic foam, thermally treated at 950 °C for 1 h, showed the lowest thermal conductivity of 0.18 W m-1 K-1 at 800 °C among all of the prepared samples. Its gas permeability and compressive strength are 0.1 × 10-7 cm2 and 440 kPa, respectively.

  16. Development of test systems for characterizing emissions from spray polyurethane foam insulation (SPFI)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between onsite manufacture of spray polyurethane foam insulation (SPFI) and potential exposures to diisocyanates, amines, flame retardants (FRs), blowing agents, aldehydes and other organic compounds that may be emitted from SPFI is not well understood. EPA is de...

  17. Fire retardant cellulosic foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttinger, M.

    1973-01-01

    Method mixture of cyanamide, phosphoric acid, and monobasic ammonium phosphates for preliminary treatment of paper. Papier-mache, in second step, is pulped in water and latex is added. Urea formaldehyde solution mixed to maximize foaming and resin dispersion is added. Mixture is then cast within 30 to 60 seconds and dried twice.

  18. Nanofiller reinforcement versus surface treatment effect on the mechanical properties of syntactic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liying; Chen, Ye; Hu, Xiao; Liu, Ming

    2015-03-01

    Syntactic foams are one of the special kinds of composite materials which can be prepared in a mechanical way by mixing hollow particles (the filler) with a resin system (the binder). To improve the mechanical properties of syntactic foams, in our work, carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were added to reinforce the syntactic foam. Results showed that although the presence of carbon nanofiber improved the mechanical properties of the syntactic foam, it dramatically increased the density, i.e., destroyed the main advantage of syntactic foams. In addition, the introduction of CNFs could cause difficulty in fabrication and increase the production cost. In order to overcome these problems, two approaches of the surface treatment of hollow microspheres, namely coupling agent and polydopamine (PDA) coating, were applied. Results showed that better interfacial adhesion between hollow microspheres and matrix could be induced from both coupling agent and PDA treated hollow microspheres, which led to the enhancement in mechanical properties of the syntactic foam while maintaining their low density. Compared with the coupling agent approach, the facile one-step PDA coating was much more effective. The failure mechanisms of the CNFs reinforced syntactic foam (CNFRSF) and the syntactic foam containing treated hollow microspheres were discussed in detail.

  19. Method for epoxy foam production using a liquid anhydride

    DOEpatents

    Celina, Mathias

    2012-06-05

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 50 wt % and 100 wt %, an anhydride cure agent of between approximately 0 wt % and approximately 50 wt %, a tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride foaming agent of between proximately 0.1-20 wt %, a surfactant and an imidazole or similar catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt %, where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-10 wt % tert-butoxycarbonyl anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the resin in a suitable viscosity range, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which in the presence of an epoxy curative can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  20. Argon Excluder Foam Compression Data

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.; /Fermilab

    1991-07-25

    The argon excluder is designed to reduce the media density of the dead space between the internal modules of the end calorimeters and the concave convex head to less than that of argon. The design of the excluder includes a thin circular stainless steel plate welded to the inner side of the convex pressure vessel head at a radius of 26 and 15/16 inches. It is estimated that this plate will experience a pressure differential of approximately 40 pounds per square inch. A inner foam core is incorporated into the design of the excluder as structural support. This engineering note outlines the compression data for the foam used in the north end calorimeter argon excluder. Four test samples of approximately the same dimensions were cut and machined from large blocks of the poured foam. Two of these test samples were then subjected to varying compression magnitudes until failure. For this test failure was taken to mean plastic yielding or the point at which deformation increases without a corresponding increase in loading. The third sample was subjected to a constant compressive stress for an extended period of time, to identify any 'creeping' effects. Finally, the fourth sample was cooled to cryogenic temperatures in order to determine the coefficient of thermal expansion. The compression test apparatus consisted of a state of the art INSTROM coupled with a PC workstation. The tests were run at a constant strain rate with discrete data taken at 500 millisecond intervals. The sample data is plotted as a stress strain diagram in the results. The first test was run on sample number one at a compression rate of 0.833 mills or equivalently a strain rate of 3.245 x 10{sup -4} mil/mills. The corresponding stress was then calculated from the force measured divided by the given initial area. The test was run for thirty minutes until the mode of failure, plastic yielding, was reached. The second test was run as a check of the first using sample number two, and likewise was

  1. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  2. Cells on foam and fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Clyde, R.

    1996-12-31

    Some bacteria secrete an insoluble organic polymer in which colonies of bacteria become embedded and adhere to surfaces. Some fungi also form colonies. Their metabolic functions and interactions become enhanced, offering opportunities for increased efficiency in many biological waste remediation and bioreaction processes if a large surface area is available. Plastic foam and sponge encased in wire mesh, perforated cardboard, fibers, fiber discs, and titanium dioxide on fiberglass are a few examples of large surface areas, which, if oxygen is required, can be rotated in a rotating biological contactor (RBC) to increases oxygen contact and provide greatly increased bacterial activity. Ethanol fermentation is accomplished quickly. Lead and other toxic metals are quickly immobilized in bacteria. If light is required the thin liquid film enhances reactivity to quickly degrade chlorine compounds or remove sulfur from oil. Production of calcium magnesium acetate, a non-corrosive road deicer, can also be efficiently produced in this manner. Some primitive fungi also form colonies, notably the slime molds and filament-forming fungi, that enhance their biological effects. White rot fungus readily degrades chlorine compounds, azo dyes, TNT, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PHA), for example.

  3. Morphologies, Processing and Properties of Ceramic Foams and Their Potential as TPS Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Simoes, Conan R.; Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2002-01-01

    The current research is focused on processing ceramic foams with compositions that have potential as a thermal protection material. The use of pre-ceramic polymers with the addition of sacrificial blowing agents or sacrificial fillers offers a viable approach to form either open or closed cell insulation. Our work demonstrates that this is a feasible method to form refractory ceramic foams at relatively low processing temperatures. It is possible to foam complex shapes then pyrolize the system to form a ceramic while retaining the shape of the unfired foam. Initial work focused on identifying suitable pre-ceramic polymers with desired properties such as ceramic yield and chemical make up of the pyrolysis product after firing. We focused on making foams in the Si system (Sic, Si02, Si-0-C), which is in use in current acreage TPS systems. Ceramic foams with different architectures were formed from the pyrolysis of pre-ceramic polymers at 1200 C in different atmospheres. In some systems a sacrificial polyurethane was used as the blowing agent. We have also processed foams using sacrificial fillers to introduce controlled cell sizes. Each sacrificial filler or blowing agent leads to a unique morphology. The effect of different fillers on foam morphologies and the characterization of these foams in terms of mechanical and thermal properties are presented. We have conducted preliminary arc jet testing on selected foams with the materials being exposed to typical re-entry conditions for acreage TPS and these results will be discussed. Foams processed using these approaches have bulk densities ranging from 0.15 to 0.9 g/cm3 and cell sizes ranging from 5 to 500 pm. Compression strengths ranged from 2 to 7 MPa for these systems. Finally, preliminary oxidation studies have been conducted on selected systems and will be discussed.

  4. Optimisation of polymer foam bubble expansion in extruder by resident time distribution approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larochette, Mathieu; Graebling, Didier; Léonardi, Frédéric

    2007-04-01

    In this work, we used the Residence Time Distribution (RTD) to study the polystyrene foaming during an extrusion process. The extruder associated with a gear pump is simply and quantitatively described by three continuoustly stirred tank reactors with recycling loops and one plug-flow reactor. The blowing agent used is CO2 and its obtained by thermal decomposition of a chemical blowing agent (CBA). This approach allows to optimize the density of the foam in accordance with the CBA kinetic of decomposition.

  5. Simple shearing flow of dry soap foams with TCP structure[Tetrahedrally Close-Packed

    SciTech Connect

    REINELT,DOUGLAS A.; KRAYNIK,ANDREW M.

    2000-02-16

    The microrheology of dry soap foams subjected to large, quasistatic, simple shearing deformations is analyzed. Two different monodisperse foams with tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) structure are examined: Weaire-Phelan (A15) and Friauf-Laves (C15). The elastic-plastic response is evaluated by calculating foam structures that minimize total surface area at each value of strain. The minimal surfaces are computed with the Surface Evolver program developed by Brakke. The foam geometry and macroscopic stress are piecewise continuous functions of strain. The stress scales as T/V{sup 1/3} where T is surface tension and V is cell volume. Each discontinuity corresponds to large changes in foam geometry and topology that restore equilibrium to unstable configurations that violate Plateau's laws. The instabilities occur when the length of an edge on a polyhedral foam cell vanishes. The length can tend to zero smoothly or abruptly with strain. The abrupt case occurs when a small increase in strain changes the energy profile in the neighborhood of a foam structure from a local minimum to a saddle point, which can lead to symmetry-breaking bifurcations. In general, the new foam topology associated with each stable solution branch results from a cascade of local topology changes called T1 transitions. Each T1 cascade produces different cell neighbors, reduces surface energy, and provides an irreversible, film-level mechanism for plastic yield behavior. Stress-strain curves and average stresses are evaluated by examining foam orientations that admit strain-periodic behavior. For some orientations, the deformation cycle includes Kelvin cells instead of the original TCP structure; but the foam does not remain perfectly ordered. Bifurcations during subsequent T1 cascades lead to disorder and can even cause strain localization.

  6. Measurements and micro-mechanical modelling of the response of sintered titanium foams.

    PubMed

    Siegkas, P; Petrinic, N; Tagarielli, V L

    2016-04-01

    Titanium foams of relative density in the range 0.35-0.50 are tested in quasi-static compression, tension and shear. The response is ductile in compression but brittle, and weaker, in shear and tension. Virtual foam microstructures are generated by an algorithm based on Voronoi tessellation of three-dimensional space, capable of reproducing the measured size distribution of the pores in the foam. Finite Element (FE) simulations are conducted to explore the mechanical response of the material, by analysing the elasto-plastic response of a statistical volume element (SVE). The simulations correctly predict the ductile compressive response and its dependence on relative density. PMID:26947273

  7. Capillary rise of oil in an aqueous foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piroird, Keyvan; Lorenceau, Élise

    2012-11-01

    Oil is usually known as an anti-foaming agent. Yet, it has been shown that oil droplets present in the foaming solution can have the opposite effect and stabilize a foam when unable to cross the air/water interface. In these previous studies, oil is first emulsified and then mixed with air to generate a foam. In this work, we report experiments where an aqueous foam is put in direct contact with a large oil drop. With the appropriate choice of oil and surfactants, oil spontaneously invades the liquid network of the foam without damaging it. We study the dynamics of penetration at the scale of a single Plateau border, that acts as a ``liquid capillary tube'' in which oil flows in an unbroken stream. At the end of the experiment, a long and stable cylinder of oil is formed in the Plateau border. This cylinder breaks up into droplets when, following a rearrangement, oil is transferred from the Plateau border to a soap film.

  8. High-Rate Compaction of Aluminium Alloy Foams

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, J. J.; Hung, Y.-C.; Tan, P. J.; Bourne, N. K.; Withers, P. J.; Reid, S. R.; Millett, J. C. F.; Milne, A. M.

    2006-07-28

    The response of aluminium foams to impact can be categorised according to the impact velocity. Tests have been carried out at a range of impact velocities from quasi-static to velocities approaching the speed of sound in the foam. Various experimental arrangements have been employed including pneumatic launcher tests and plate impact experimants at velocities greater than 1000 m s-1. The quasi-static compression behaviour was approximately elastic, perfectly-plastic, locking. For static and dynamic compression at low impact velocities the deformation pattern was through the cumulative multiplication of discrete, non-contiguous crush bands. Selected impact tests are presented here for which the impact velocity is less than the velocity of sound, but above a certain critical impact velocity so that the plastic compression occurs in a shock-like manner and the specimens deform by progressive cell crushing. Laboratory X-ray microtomography has been employed to acquire tomographic datasets of aluminium foams before and after tests. The morphology of the underformed foam was used as the input dataset to an Eulerian code. Hydrocode simulations were then carried out on a real microstructure. These simulations provide insight to mechanisms associated with the localization of deformation.

  9. High-Rate Compaction of Aluminium Alloy Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, J. J.; Millett, J. C. F.; Milne, A. M.

    2005-07-01

    The response of aluminium foams to impact can be categorised by the impact velocity. Tests are reported ranging from quasi-static to impact velocities greater than the speed of sound in the foam. The techniques used ranging from drop-hammer and pneumatic launcher tests, to plate impact at velocities greater than 1000 m s-1. The quasi-static compression behaviour was elastic, perfectly-plastic, locking. For static and dynamic compression at low impact velocities, post-impact examination of partially crushed specimens showed that deformation was through the cumulative multiplication of crush bands. If the impact velocity is less than the velocity of sound, but above a certain critical impact velocity, the plastic compression occurs in a shock-like manner and the specimens deform by progressive cell crushing. At higher impact velocities the compaction front is not preceded by an elastic wave. Laboratory X-ray microtomography has been employed to acquire tomographic datasets of aluminium foams before and after tests. The morphology of the underformed foam was input as the input dataset to an Eulerian code. Hydrocode simulations were then carried out on real microstructure. These simulations provide insight to mechanisms associated with the localization of deformation.

  10. High-Rate Compaction of Aluminium Alloy Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, J. J.; Hung, Y.-C.; Tan, P. J.; Bourne, N. K.; Withers, P. J.; Reid, S. R.; Millett, J. C. F.; Milne, A. M.

    2006-07-01

    The response of aluminium foams to impact can be categorised according to the impact velocity. Tests have been carried out at a range of impact velocities from quasi-static to velocities approaching the speed of sound in the foam. Various experimental arrangements have been employed including pneumatic launcher tests and plate impact experimants at velocities greater than 1000 m s-1. The quasi-static compression behaviour was approximately elastic, perfectly-plastic, locking. For static and dynamic compression at low impact velocities the deformation pattern was through the cumulative multiplication of discrete, non-contiguous crush bands. Selected impact tests are presented here for which the impact velocity is less than the velocity of sound, but above a certain critical impact velocity so that the plastic compression occurs in a shock-like manner and the specimens deform by progressive cell crushing. Laboratory X-ray microtomography has been employed to acquire tomographic datasets of aluminium foams before and after tests. The morphology of the underformed foam was used as the input dataset to an Eulerian code. Hydrocode simulations were then carried out on a real microstructure. These simulations provide insight to mechanisms associated with the localization of deformation.

  11. Detailed Structural and Mechanical Response of Wet Foam to the Settling Particle.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zefeng; Wang, Shuzhong; Wang, Zhiguo

    2016-03-15

    Liquid foam, as a complex fluid, provides an observable prototype for studying a discrete fluid system. In this work, a numerical study on the settling behavior of a round particle in wet polydisperse foam has been conducted on the bubble scale. The local and nonuniform distribution of bubble pressure, as well as the localized plastic events, is presented. It shows a foam region of higher pressure in front of the settling particle due to the extrusion deformation of the bubbles applied by the particle. Additionally, the forces exerted on the particle by the disordered wet foam are measured during the sedimentation. It exhibits in particular a power-law dependence of the drag force caused by the bubble as a function of the foam quality. Moreover, sedimentation experiments are demonstrated to verify this power-law relation. The evolution of the components of drag force is demonstrated when a plastic event occurs in front of the settling particle. The result shows that both the contributions of the pulling force of foam films and the bubble pressure to the drag force decrease in that case. Likewise, the variation of both these contributions to the drag force is illustrated as well when a bubble in the wake detaches from the particle. These results assist in understanding the mesoscopic response of wet foam to a settling particle.

  12. Detailed Structural and Mechanical Response of Wet Foam to the Settling Particle.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zefeng; Wang, Shuzhong; Wang, Zhiguo

    2016-03-15

    Liquid foam, as a complex fluid, provides an observable prototype for studying a discrete fluid system. In this work, a numerical study on the settling behavior of a round particle in wet polydisperse foam has been conducted on the bubble scale. The local and nonuniform distribution of bubble pressure, as well as the localized plastic events, is presented. It shows a foam region of higher pressure in front of the settling particle due to the extrusion deformation of the bubbles applied by the particle. Additionally, the forces exerted on the particle by the disordered wet foam are measured during the sedimentation. It exhibits in particular a power-law dependence of the drag force caused by the bubble as a function of the foam quality. Moreover, sedimentation experiments are demonstrated to verify this power-law relation. The evolution of the components of drag force is demonstrated when a plastic event occurs in front of the settling particle. The result shows that both the contributions of the pulling force of foam films and the bubble pressure to the drag force decrease in that case. Likewise, the variation of both these contributions to the drag force is illustrated as well when a bubble in the wake detaches from the particle. These results assist in understanding the mesoscopic response of wet foam to a settling particle. PMID:26898137

  13. Influence of filler selection on twin screw foam granulation.

    PubMed

    Rocca, K E; Weatherley, S; Sheskey, P J; Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    The influence of filler selection in wet granulation was studied for the novel case where the binder is delivered as an unstable, semi-rigid aqueous foam to an extrusion process. The work primarily examined the impact of differing concentrations of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH® 101) in a formulation with spray-dried α-lactose monohydrate (Flowlac® 100) in regards to wetting and granule nucleation for this relatively new technique known as continuous foam granulation. Foam stability was varied within the work to change its drainage and coarsening behavior atop these powder excipients, by use of different foamable binding agents (METHOCEL™ F4 PLV and METHOCEL™ Premium VLV) as well as by adjusting the foam quality. A static bed penetration test was first used to study the foam behavior in wetting these powders without the processing constraints of an extruder which limit possible liquid-to-solids ratios as well as introduce shear which may complicate interpretation of the mechanism. The test found that the penetration time to saturate these powders decreased as their water absorption capacity increased which in turn decreased the size of the formed nuclei. Differences in the stability of the foamed binder had minimal influence on these attributes of wetting despite its high spread-to-soak behavior. The size of granules produced by extrusion similarly demonstrated sensitivity to the increasing water absorption capacity of the filler and little dependency on foam properties. The different liquid-to-solids ratios required to granulate these different formulations inside the extruder highlighted an evolving concept of powder lubricity for continuous foam granulation.

  14. Economic and energy audit of textile foam processing

    SciTech Connect

    Machacek, R.

    1983-06-01

    Conventional wet processing of textiles - dyeing, or application of such surface finishes as soil and water repellents, antistatic agents, fire retardants, permanent press agents, and starch - consumes about 0.19 quadrillion Btu's of energy per year, the equivalent of 30 million barrels of oil. Because wet processing involves immersion of the fabric in a water bath, most of the energy used is in the form of heat for drying. In the newer foam finishing approach, the chemicals for surface finishes are dispersed in a mixture of water and air. The chemicals are concentrated in a relatively small amount of water, and air is injected to form a thick, stable foam. Because little water is involved, drying time and temperature may be drastically reduced. Authur D. Little, Inc., conducted an economic and energy audit of foam processing that considered the technical feasibility, reliability, energy savings, and economic incentives for using foam finishing. We monitored four plants that finish textiles (carpets, broad-woven fabrics, and tubular knits). The plants were selected by the developer of the foaming process (United Merchants and Manufacturers, Inc.) to represent a wide range of textile finishing applications.

  15. Hypercrosslinked polymeric foams prepared by Friedel-Crafts polycondensation

    SciTech Connect

    Steckle, W.P. Jr.; Mitchell, M.A.; Apen, P.G.

    1995-12-31

    Porous materials are widely used in industry and government for chemical separations, processing and monitoring, environmental cleanup and remediation, energy efficiency, and conservation. Porous materials used in these applications include: foams, filters, membranes, absorbents, ion exchange resins, molecular sieves, zeolites, catalyst supports, sensors, and electrodes. Organic analogues to inorganic zeolites would be a significant step forward in engineered porous materials and would provide advantages in range, selectivity, tailorability and processing. A novel process for preparing hypercross linked polymeric foams has been developed via a Friedel-Crafts polycondensation reaction. A series of rigid hypercrosslinked foams have been prepared using simple rigid polyaromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, biphenyl, mterphenyl, diphenylmethane, and polystyrene, with p-dichloroxylene as the crosslinking agent. After drying the gels, the resulting foams are robust and rigid; densities range from 0.3 to 0.g/cc. Nitrogen adsorption studies have shown that by judiciously selecting monomers and crosslinking agent along with the level of crosslinking, the pore size and distribution along with total surface area of the foam can be tailored. Surface areas range from 160 to 1,200 m{sup 2}/g with pore sizes ranging from 6{Angstrom} to 250{Angstrom}. Further evidence of this has been confirmed by high resolution TEM.

  16. Low-Density High-Strength Foamed Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Elleman, D.; Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Molten bubbles of metal or plastic coalesce into strong, lightweight materials that look like solidified foam. Bubbles formed in compartment that receives molten material and compressed gas that fills bubbles. Compartment has matrix of nozzles. Leaving nozzles, bubbles fall into acoustic chamber and coalesce; then drop through funnel and are cast into desired shape by extrusion or molding. Materials used for construction, extruded into molds, sawed, nailed, and generally handled as wood.

  17. Plastic Jellyfish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Presents an environmental science activity designed to enhance students' awareness of the hazards of plastic waste for wildlife in aquatic environments. Discusses how students can take steps to reduce the effects of plastic waste. (WRM)

  18. Low density microcellular foams

    DOEpatents

    LeMay, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed is a process of producing microcellular from which comprises the steps of: (a) selecting a multifunctional epoxy oligomer resin; (b) mixing said epoxy resin with a non-reactive diluent to form a resin-diluent mixture; (c) forming a diluent containing cross-linked epoxy gel from said resin-diluent mixture; (d) replacing said diluent with a solvent therefore; (e) replacing said solvent with liquid carbon dioxide; and (f) vaporizing off said liquid carbon dioxide under supercritical conditions, whereby a foam having a density in the range of 35-150 mg/cc and cell diameters less than about 1 .mu.m is produced. Also disclosed are the foams produced by the process.

  19. Development of nonflammable cellulosic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luttinger, M.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a moldable cellulosic foam for use in Skylab instrument storage cushions is considered. Requirements include density of 10 lb cu ft or less, minimal friability with normal handling, and nonflammability in an atmosphere of 70 percent oxygen and 30 percent nitrogen at 6.2 psia. A study of halogenated foam components was made, including more highly chlorinated binders, halogen-containing additives, and halogenation of the cellulose. The immediate objective was to reduce the density of the foam through reduction in inorganic phosphate without sacrificing flame-retarding properties of the foams. The use of frothing techniques was investigated, with particular emphasis on a urea-formaldehyde foam. Halogen-containing flame retardants were deemphasized in favor of inorganic salts and the preparation of phosphate and sulphate esters of cellulose. Utilization of foam products for civilian applications was also considered.

  20. Pourable Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James A.; Butler, John M.; Chartoff, Richard P.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes search for polyisocyanurate/polyurethane foam insulation with superior characteristics. Discusses chemistry of current formulations. Tests of formulations, of individual ingredients and or alternative new formulations described. Search revealed commercially available formulations exhibiting increased thermal stability at temperatures up to 600 degree C, pours readily before curing, presents good appearance after curing, and remains securely bonded to aluminum at cryogenic temperatures. Total of 42 different formulations investigated, 10 found to meet requirements.

  1. Materials for foam type insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, W. E.

    1971-01-01

    An internal foam fabrication is one of the concepts being considered for cryogenic insulation on the hydrogen tanks of the shuttle vehicle. The three-dimensional polyurethane used on the S-4 B tanks failed to meet the higher temperature requirements of the shuttle vehicle, however, and other foams under consideration include polyisocyanurates, polyphenylene oxides, polyimides, and polybenzimidazoles. Improved adhesive systems for attaching the foams to the interior tank wall are under study.

  2. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  3. Polyimide Foams Offer Superior Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, Erik Weiser and his colleagues in the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch were working with a new substance for fabricating composites for use in supersonic aircraft. The team, however, was experiencing some frustration. Every time they tried to create a solid composite from the polyimide (an advanced polymer) material, it bubbled and foamed. It seemed like the team had reached a dead end in their research - until they had another idea. "We said, This isn t going to work for composites, but maybe we could make a foam out of it," Weiser says. "That was kind of our eureka moment, to see if we could go in a whole other direction. And it worked." Weiser and his colleagues invented a new kind of polyimide foam insulation they named TEEK. The innovation displayed a host of advantages over existing insulation options. Compared to other commercial foams, Weiser explains, polyimide foams perform well across a broad range of temperatures, noting that the NASA TEEK foams provide effective structural insulation up to 600 F and down to cryogenic temperatures. The foam does not burn or off-gas toxic fumes, and even at -423 F - the temperature of liquid hydrogen - the material stays flexible. The inventors could produce the TEEK foam at a range of densities, from 0.5 pounds per cubic foot up to 20 pounds per cubic foot, making the foam ideal for a range of applications, including as insulation for reusable launch vehicles and for cryogenic tanks and lines. They also developed a unique, friable balloon format for manufacturing the foam, producing it as hollow microspheres that allowed the foam to be molded and then cured into any desired shape - perfect for insulating pipes of different sizes and configurations. The team s originally unplanned invention won an "R&D 100" award, and a later form of the foam, called LaRC FPF-44 (Spinoff 2009), was named "NASA Invention of the Year" in 2007.

  4. Preparation and properties of an internal mold release for rigid urethane foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paker, B. G.

    1980-08-01

    Most mold release agents used in the molding of rigid polyurethane foam are applied to the internal surfaces of the mold. These materials form a thin layer between the surface of the mold and the foam, allowing for easy release of the molded parts. This type of mold release must be applied prior to each molding operation; and, after repeated use, cleaning of the mold is required. Small amounts of this mold release are transferred to the molded part, resulting in a part with poor surface bondability characteristics. An internal release agent, which can be mixed in a urethane foam resin was investigated. The internal mold release provided good releasability and resulted in urethane foam that has excellent surface bondability. No compatibility problems are expected from the use of this type of release agent.

  5. Fiber reinforced hybrid phenolic foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Amit

    Hybrid composites in recent times have been developed by using more than one type of fiber reinforcement to bestow synergistic properties of the chosen filler and matrix and also facilitating the design of materials with specific properties matched to end use. However, the studies for hybrid foams have been very limited because of problems related to fiber dispersion in matrix, non uniform mixing due to presence of more than one filler and partially cured foams. An effective approach to synthesize hybrid phenolic foam has been proposed and investigated here. Hybrid composite phenolic foams were reinforced with chopped glass and aramid fibers in varied proportions. On assessing mechanical properties in compression and shear several interesting facts surfaced but overall hybrid phenolic foams exhibited a more graceful failure, greater resistance to cracking and were significantly stiffer and stronger than foams with only glass and aramid fibers. The optimum fiber ratio for the reinforced hybrid phenolic foam system was found to be 1:1 ratio of glass to aramid fibers. Also, the properties of hybrid foam were found to deviate from rule of mixture (ROM) and thus the existing theories of fiber reinforcement fell short in explaining their complex behavior. In an attempt to describe and predict mechanical behavior of hybrid foams a statistical design tool using analysis of variance technique was employed. The utilization of a statistical model for predicting foam properties was found to be an appropriate tool that affords a global perspective of the influence of process variables such as fiber weight fraction, fiber length etc. on foam properties (elastic modulus and strength). Similar approach could be extended to study other fiber composite foam systems such as polyurethane, epoxy etc. and doing so will reduce the number of experimental iterations needed to optimize foam properties and identify critical process variables. Diffusivity, accelerated aging and flammability

  6. Method for providing a low density high strength polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Whinnery, Jr., Leroy L.; Goods, Steven H.; Skala, Dawn M.; Henderson, Craig C.; Keifer, Patrick N.

    2013-06-18

    Disclosed is a method for making a polyurethane closed-cell foam material exhibiting a bulk density below 4 lbs/ft.sup.3 and high strength. The present embodiment uses the reaction product of a modified MDI and a sucrose/glycerine based polyether polyol resin wherein a small measured quantity of the polyol resin is "pre-reacted" with a larger quantity of the isocyanate in a defined ratio such that when the necessary remaining quantity of the polyol resin is added to the "pre-reacted" resin together with a tertiary amine catalyst and water as a blowing agent, the polymerization proceeds slowly enough to provide a stable foam body.

  7. Preparation of conductive polypyrrole/polyurethane foams and their application as chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanbing

    Electrically conductive polypyrrole/polyurethane (PPy/PU) composite foams were prepared by first impregnating the PU foams with iodine, and then exposing the iodine-loaded PU foams to pyrrole vapor, which resulted in the in situ oxidative polymerization of pyrrole monomer by iodine oxidant. Iodine sorption by polyurethane (PU) and melamine-formaldehyde (MF) foams was studied using both iodine sublimation and iodine solutions with hexanes and toluene. In the sublimation process, the diffusion kinetics was investigated and the interaction between iodine and PU foams was characterized by DSC, TGA, Raman spectroscopy and electrical conductivity measurements. In the solution process, the equilibrium absorption followed the distribution law and the distribution coefficients varied depending on the solvent used. MF foam achieved no iodine absorption in both processes which can be attributed to the lack of charge-transfer interactions. The kinetics, equilibrium and mechanism of the in situ polymerization of pyrrole by iodine in a PU foam was investigated and discussed. The dopant for the PPy was primarily I3-, which formed a charge-transfer complex (PPy-I2) with the amine groups of the PPy. The conductivity of the composite foams was measured and several factors affecting the conductivity were analyzed. The chemical structure, morphology, mechanical properties and thermal stability of the composite foams, and the relationships between these factors were characterized. The PPy/PU composite foams were investigated as sensors for various volatile chemicals, including some chemical warfare simulants. High sensitivity has been demonstrated for organic amine compounds, as well as two mustard agent simulants. The quasireversibility and time scale of the resistance response was qualitatively explained based on the mass uptake characteristic of amine by the composite foam. Humidity also demonstrated its influence on the resistance of the foam sensor in a completely reversible

  8. Blending Novatein¯ thermoplastic protein with PLA for carbon dioxide assisted batch foaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walallavita, Anuradha; Verbeek, Casparus J. R.; Lay, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The convenience of polymeric foams has led to their widespread utilisation in everyday life. However, disposal of synthetic petroleum-derived foams has had a detrimental effect on the environment which needs to be addressed. This study uses a clean and sustainable approach to investigate the foaming capability of a blend of two biodegradable polymers, polylactic acid (PLA) and Novatein® Thermoplastic Protein (NTP). PLA, derived from corn starch, can successfully be foamed using a batch technique developed by the Biopolymer Network Ltd. NTP is a patented formulation of bloodmeal and chemical additives which can be extruded and injection moulded similar to other thermoplastics. However, foaming NTP is a new area of study and its interaction with blowing agents in the batch process is entirely unknown. Subcritical and supercritical carbon dioxide have been examined individually in two uniquely designed pressure vessels to foam various compositions of NTP-PLA blends. Foamed material were characterised in terms of expansion ratio, cell size, and cellular morphology in order to study how the composition of NTP-PLA affects foaming with carbon dioxide. It was found that blends with 5 wt. % NTP foamed using subcritical CO2 expanded up to 11 times due to heterogeneous nucleation. Morphology analysis using scanning electron microscopy showed that foams blown with supercritical CO2 had a finer cell structure with consistent cell size, whereas, foams blown with subcritical CO2 ranged in cell size and showed cell wall rupture. Ultimately, this research would contribute to the production of a biodegradable foam material to be used in packaging applications, thereby adding to the application potential of NTP.

  9. Dynamic fluid-loss characteristics of CO/sub 2/ foam fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, P.C.

    1984-09-01

    High quality carbon dioxide foam fracturing has become a very popular new stimulation tool in the past two years. Dynamic fluid loss measurements were performed on a broad range of core samples to measure the effect of several parameters on CO/sub 2/ foam fluid loss coefficients. The parameters tested were core permeability, foam quality, gelling agent concentration in the aqueous phase, and core temperature. Measurements were performed in a recirculating fluid flow test loop. A variation of one order of magnitude in Cw for two orders of magnitude change in permeability was observed from 0.02 to 10 md. For permeability below 1 md, there was no effect due to quality. Fluid loss control improved as gelling agent concentration in the liquid phase increased. Cw increased with increasing temperature due to temperature thinning of the aqueous phase. Passage of CO/sub 2/ foams through porous media caused a significant modification in quality from the input to the effluent fluid. The ratio of liquid to gas passing through the core was measured as a function of core permeability, quality and gelling agent concentration. In low permeability cores flow proceeded as separate phases; whereas, in higher permeability cores, the foam structure remained more nearly intact. CO/sub 2/ foams were found to be very similar to N/sub 2/ foams with respect to the above parameters.

  10. Simple shearing flow of dry soap foams with tetrahedrally close-packed structure

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; Kraynik, Andrew M.

    2000-05-01

    The microrheology of dry soap foams subjected to quasistatic, simple shearing flow is analyzed. Two different monodisperse foams with tetrahedrally close-packed (TCP) structure are examined: Weaire-Phelan (A15) and Friauf-Laves (C15). The elastic-plastic response is evaluated by using the Surface Evolver to calculate foam structures that minimize total surface area at each value of strain. The foam geometry and macroscopic stress are piecewise continuous functions of strain. The stress scales as T/V{sup 1/3}, where T is surface tension and V is cell volume. Each discontinuity corresponds to large changes in foam geometry and topology that restore equilibrium to unstable configurations that violate Plateau's laws. The instabilities occur when the length of an edge on a polyhedral foam cell vanishes. The length can tend to zero smoothly or abruptly with strain. The abrupt case occurs when a small increase in strain changes the energy profile in the neighborhood of a foam structure from a local minimum to a saddle point, which can lead to symmetry-breaking bifurcations. In general, the new structure associated with each stable solution branch results from an avalanche of local topology changes called T1 transitions. Each T1 cascade produces different cell neighbors, reduces surface energy, and provides an irreversible, film-level mechanism for plastic yield behavior. Stress-strain curves and average stresses are evaluated by examining foam orientations that admit strain-periodic behavior. For some orientations, the deformation cycle includes Kelvin cells instead of the original TCP structure; but the foam does not remain perfectly ordered. Bifurcations during subsequent T1 cascades lead to disorder and can even cause strain localization. (c) 2000 Society of Rheology.

  11. Sacrificial plastic mold with electroplatable base

    DOEpatents

    Domeier, Linda A.; Hruby, Jill M.; Morales, Alfredo M.

    2002-01-01

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided. One embodiment consists of the infusion of a softened or molten thermoplastic through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale molding tool contacting the porous metal substrate. Upon demolding, the porous metal substrate will be embedded within the thermoplastic and will project a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. This plastic structure, in turn, provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved to leave the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  12. Sacrificial Plastic Mold With Electroplatable Base

    DOEpatents

    Domeier, Linda A.; Hruby, Jill M.; Morales, Alfredo M.

    2005-08-16

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided. One embodiment consists of the infusion of a softened or molten thermoplastic through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale molding tool contacting the porous metal substrate. Upon demolding, the porous metal substrate will be embedded within the thermoplastic and will project a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. This plastic structure, in turn, provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved to leave the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  13. Castable plastic mold with electroplatable base

    DOEpatents

    Domeier, Linda A.; Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick M.

    2004-01-20

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided as are methods of making such a mold via the infusion of a castable liquid formulation through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale master mold. Upon casting and demolding, the porous metal substrate is embedded within the cast formulation and projects a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. The plastic structure provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate, which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved, leaving the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  14. Surface modification of polypropylene based particle foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, P.; Trassl, C.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with the modification of the surface properties of expanded polypropylene (EPP). EPP is a semi-hard to soft elastic thermoplastic foam. The characteristic surface of EPP shows process-related steam nozzle imprints and gussets. Therefore EPP does not satisfy the quality requirements for visible automotive applications. In order to meet these demands, plastic surfaces are usually enhanced with functional or decorative coatings, e.g. textiles, plastic films or paint. The coating of plastics with low surface energies such as PP often leads to adhesion problems by reason of the missing polar and functional groups. This paper gives an evaluation of activation and pre-treatment methods of EPP, with the aim to identify the most suitable pre-treatment method. For this purpose five typical surface treatment methods - flame treatment, corona, fluorination, atmospheric and low-pressure plasma - were performed on EPP samples. As a comparison criterion the maximum increase in the adhesion force between a polyurethane-based coating and the modified EPP substrate was selected. Moreover the influence of the selected pre-treatment method on the increase in the total surface energy and its polar component was investigated by the drop shape analysis method. The results showed that the contact angle measurement is a suitable method to determine the polar and disperse fractions of the surface tension of EPP. Furthermore, all performed methods increased the adhesion of EPP.

  15. STANDING WAVE PROBES FOR DIMENSIONAL METROLOGY OF LOW DENSITY FOAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Seugling, R M; Woody, S C; Bauza, M B

    2010-03-23

    Typically, parts and geometries of interest to LLNL are made from a combination of complex geometries and a wide array of different materials ranging from metals and ceramics to low density foams and plastic foils. These parts are combined to develop physics experiments for studying material properties, equation of state (EOS) and radiation transport. Understanding the dimensional uncertainty of the parts contained within an experiment is critical to the physical understanding of the phenomena being observed and represents the motivation for developing probe metrology capability that can address LLNL's unique problems. Standing wave probes were developed for measuring high aspect ratio, micrometer scaled features with nanometer resolution. Originally conceived of for the use in the automotive industry for characterizing fuel injector bores and similar geometries, this concept was investigated and improved for use on geometries and materials important to LLNL needs within target fabrication. As part of the original project, detailed understanding of the probe dynamics and interactions with the surface of the sample was investigated. In addition, the upgraded system was utilized for measuring fuel injector bores and micro-lenses as a means of demonstrating capability. This report discusses the use of the standing wave probe for measuring features in low density foams, 55 mg/cc SiO{sub 2} and 982 mg/cc (%6 relative density) copper foam respectively. These two foam materials represent a difficult metrology challenge because of their material properties and surface topography. Traditional non-contact metrology systems such as normal incident interferometry and/or confocal microscopy have difficulty obtaining a signal from the relatively absorptive characteristics of these materials. In addition to the foam samples, a solid copper and plastic (Rexolite{trademark}) sample of similar geometry was measured with the standing wave probe as a reference for both conductive and

  16. Supercritical CO2 Foaming of Thermoplastic Materials Derived from Maize: Proof-of-Concept Use in Mammalian Cell Culture Applications

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Portales-Cabrera, Cynthia Guadalupe; Portillo-Lara, Roberto; Araiz-Hernández, Diana; Del Barone, Maria Cristina; García-López, Erika; Rojas-de Gante, Cecilia; de los Angeles De Santiago-Miramontes, María; Segoviano-Ramírez, Juan Carlos; García-Lara, Silverio; Rodríguez-González, Ciro Ángel; Alvarez, Mario Moisés; Di Maio, Ernesto; Iannace, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Background Foams are high porosity and low density materials. In nature, they are a common architecture. Some of their relevant technological applications include heat and sound insulation, lightweight materials, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Foams derived from natural polymers are particularly attractive for tissue culture due to their biodegradability and bio-compatibility. Here, the foaming potential of an extensive list of materials was assayed, including slabs elaborated from whole flour, the starch component only, or the protein fraction only of maize seeds. Methodology/Principal Findings We used supercritical CO2 to produce foams from thermoplasticized maize derived materials. Polyethylene-glycol, sorbitol/glycerol, or urea/formamide were used as plasticizers. We report expansion ratios, porosities, average pore sizes, pore morphologies, and pore size distributions for these materials. High porosity foams were obtained from zein thermoplasticized with polyethylene glycol, and from starch thermoplasticized with urea/formamide. Zein foams had a higher porosity than starch foams (88% and 85%, respectively) and a narrower and more evenly distributed pore size. Starch foams exhibited a wider span of pore sizes and a larger average pore size than zein (208.84 vs. 55.43 μm2, respectively). Proof-of-concept cell culture experiments confirmed that mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) and two different prostate cancer cell lines (22RV1, DU145) attached to and proliferated on zein foams. Conclusions/Significance We conducted screening and proof-of-concept experiments on the fabrication of foams from cereal-based bioplastics. We propose that a key indicator of foamability is the strain at break of the materials to be foamed (as calculated from stress vs. strain rate curves). Zein foams exhibit attractive properties (average pore size, pore size distribution, and porosity) for cell culture applications; we were able to establish and sustain mammalian cell cultures on zein

  17. Processing integral-skin polyolefin foams in single-charge rotational foam molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pop-Iliev, Remon

    This thesis focuses on establishing the scientific and engineering foundations for gaining a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms and critical parameters governing the processing of integral-skin low-density polyolefin foams in rotational foam molding. The presented research is particularly intended to broaden the knowledge in the field of manufacturing adjacent, but clearly distinct, layers of non-cellular and cellular structures, consisting of identical or compatible plastic grades, using a single-charge processing concept. Although this technology is beneficial for the efficacy of the molding process and the structural homogeneity of the moldings, its optimization raised a fairly large number of fundamental issues that had to be resolved through further research. In this context, an attempt has been made to establish rigorous, experimentally validated, theoretical models that describe the phenomena identified as the fundamental challenges of this technology. The major contributions of this thesis include: (i) optimization of the single-charge rotational foam molding process for the manufacture of both PE/PE and PE/PP integral-skin cellular composites, (ii) development of a two-step oven temperature profile that prevents the foamable resins invading the solid skin layer and ensures that skin formation always completes prior to the activation of the foamable resin, (iii) fundamental study of the adherence behavior of powders and foamable pellets to a high-temperature rotating mold wall, (iv) fundamental study of the lifespan of CBA-blown bubbles in non-pressurized non-isothermal polymer melts using hot-stage optical microscopy and digital imaging, (v) development of a detailed theoretical model involving diffusion, surface tension, and viscosity to simulate the observed foaming mechanism, and (vi) fundamental study of the rotofoamablility of polyolefin resins using both dry blending and melt compounding based methods and characterization of rheological and

  18. Thermal resistance of composite panels containing superinsulation and urethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.; Graves, R.S.; Childs, K.W.

    1996-09-01

    Laboratory data are presented on the thermal resistance of composite panels that incorporate superinsulation embedded in urethane foam. Composite panels were fabricated using four types of advanced insulations (three types of evacuated panel superinsulation and one type of gas-filled panel), and three foam blowing agents (CFC-11, HCFC-141b, and HCFC-142b/22 blend). Panels were also fabricated with only the urethane foam to serve as a baseline. Thermal measurements were performed using an ASTM C 518 Heat Flow Meter Apparatus. The thermal resistances of the panels were measured over a two-year period to detect whether any significant changes occurred. A computer model was used to analyze the data, adjusting for differences in size of the advanced insulations, and extrapolating to different sizes of composite panels.

  19. Thermal resistance of superinsulation/foam composite panels

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkes, K.E.; Graves, R.S.; Childs, K.W.

    1996-05-01

    Laboratory data are presented on the thermal resistance of composite panels that incorporate superinsulation embedded in urethane foam. Composite panels were fabricated using four types of advanced insulations (three types of evacuated panel superinsulation and one type of gas-filled panel), and three foam blowing agents (CFC-11, HCFC-141b, and HCFC-142b/22 blend). Panels were also fabricated with only the urethane foam to serve as a baseline. Thermal measurements were performed using an ASTM C 518 Heat Flow Meter Apparatus. The thermal resistances of the panels were measured over a two-year period to detect whether any significant changes occurred. A computer model was used to analyze the data, normalizing for differences in size of the advanced insulations, and extrapolating to different sizes of composite panels.

  20. Immobilized catalase on CoFoam hydrophilic polyurethane composite.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Palligarnai T; Como, Karin

    2006-02-01

    Catalase from bovine liver was covalently immobilized on hydrophilic polyurethane composite (CoFoam). The activity of the enzyme was assayed in the decomposition of H2O2 at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. The effects of water-to-prepolymer ratio, the addition of a crosslinking agent, and the utilization of a spacer on enzyme activity were examined. The results of immobilization of the enzyme in a large-scale unit are reported. The advantage of the CoFoam composite lies in the low drop in pressure in a packed-bed reactor at fairly large flow rates. For example, at flow rates of 10-12 L/min, the drop in pressure is typically 3 kPa. Enzymes immobilized on CoFoam represent a novel use as catalysts in packed-bed reactors owing to the low drop in pressure. PMID:16484719

  1. Syntactic foam supports. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McIlroy, H.M.

    1980-06-01

    Foams consisting of blends of a polyimide resin and glass microbubbles were prepared to provide thermal protection and energy absorption. With the selected type of glass microbubble, tests wre conducted to measure the effect of foam formulation, microbubble strength, and molding pressure on certain mechanical, thermal, and environmental properties.

  2. Starch-Lignin Baked Foams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starch-kraft lignin foams were prepared by a baking process. Replacing up to 20% of the starch with lignin has no effect on foam density or overall morphology. At 10% replacement, lignin marginally increases water resistance and modulus of elasticity but decreases strain at maximum stress. At 20% re...

  3. Flame Resistant Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Solimide manufactured by Imi-Tech Corporation, is a lightweight fire resistant material produced under a manufacturing process that allows it to be uniformly foamed. Can be produced in a variety of densities and structural configurations and remains resilient under exposure to temperatures ranging from minus 300 to plus 500 degrees Fahrenheit. Is resistant to open flame and generates virtually no smoke or toxic by-products. Used in aircraft for its superior damping characteristics, lighter weight and fire barrier properties, it's also applicable to ships and surface transportation systems such as transit cars, trains, buses and automobiles.

  4. High temperature ablative foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An ablative foam composition is formed of approximately 150 to 250 parts by weight polymeric isocyanate having an isocyanate functionality of 2.6 to 3.2; approximately 15 to 30 parts by weight reactive flame retardant having a hydroxyl number range from 200-260; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight non-reactive flame retardant; approximately 10 to 40 parts by weight nonhydrolyzable silicone copolymer having a hydroxyl number range from 75-205; and approximately 3 to 16 parts by weight amine initiated polyether resin having an isocyanate functionality greater than or equal to 3.0 and a hydroxyl number range from 400-800.

  5. Spin foams without spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnybida, Jeff

    2016-10-01

    We formulate the spin foam representation of discrete SU(2) gauge theory as a product of vertex amplitudes each of which is the spin network generating function of the boundary graph dual to the vertex. In doing so the sums over spins have been carried out. The boundary data of each n-valent node is explicitly reduced with respect to the local gauge invariance and has a manifest geometrical interpretation as a framed polyhedron of fixed total area. Ultimately, sums over spins are traded for contour integrals over simple poles and recoupling theory is avoided using generating functions.

  6. Closed cell metal foam method

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Foamed metals and metal alloys which have a closed cellular structure are prepared by heating a metal body containing entrapped inert gas uniformly distributed throughout to a temperature above the melting point of the metal and maintaining the body at this temperature a period of time sufficient to permit the entrapped gas to expand, forming individual cells within the molten metal, thus expanding and foaming the molten metal. After cell formation has reached the desired amount, the foamed molten metal body is cooled to below the melting temperature of the metal. The void area or density of the foamed metal is controlled by predetermining the amount of inert gas entrapped in the metal body and by the period of time the metal body is maintained in the molten state. This method is useful for preparing foamed metals and metal alloys from any metal or other material of which a body containing entrapped inert gas can be prepared.

  7. Structure of random bidisperse foam.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinelt, Douglas A.; van Swol, Frank B.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2005-02-01

    The Surface Evolver was used to compute the equilibrium microstructure of random soap foams with bidisperse cell-size distributions and to evaluate topological and geometric properties of the foams and individual cells. The simulations agree with the experimental data of Matzke and Nestler for the probability {rho}(F) of finding cells with F faces and its dependence on the fraction of large cells. The simulations also agree with the theory for isotropic Plateau polyhedra (IPP), which describes the F-dependence of cell geometric properties, such as surface area, edge length, and mean curvature (diffusive growth rate); this is consistent with results for polydisperse foams. Cell surface areas are about 10% greater than spheres of equal volume, which leads to a simple but accurate relation for the surface free energy density of foams. The Aboav-Weaire law is not valid for bidisperse foams.

  8. Failure Maps for Rectangular 17-4PH Stainless Steel Sandwiched Foam Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.; Ghosn, L. J.

    2007-01-01

    A new and innovative concept is proposed for designing lightweight fan blades for aircraft engines using commercially available 17-4PH precipitation hardened stainless steel. Rotating fan blades in aircraft engines experience a complex loading state consisting of combinations of centrifugal, distributed pressure and torsional loads. Theoretical failure plastic collapse maps, showing plots of the foam relative density versus face sheet thickness, t, normalized by the fan blade span length, L, have been generated for rectangular 17-4PH sandwiched foam panels under these three loading modes assuming three failure plastic collapse modes. These maps show that the 17-4PH sandwiched foam panels can fail by either the yielding of the face sheets, yielding of the foam core or wrinkling of the face sheets depending on foam relative density, the magnitude of t/L and the loading mode. The design envelop of a generic fan blade is superimposed on the maps to provide valuable insights on the probable failure modes in a sandwiched foam fan blade.

  9. Southeast New Mexico. Methanol foam fracs open up Delaware

    SciTech Connect

    Mickey, V.

    1983-10-01

    Part of the recent success in Brushy Canyon, Cherry Canyon, and Delaware formations in SE. New Mexico is being attributed to improved stimulation techniques. Historically, fracturing Delaware-age sands caused water sensitive clays within the formation to swell. Methanol foam fracs have been applied in Delaware-aged formations for the past year, and results are encouraging. Well potentials have been improved on some wells from under 10 bopd after acidization to 100 bopd after stimulation with methanol in nitrogen foam. The wells are cleaned up after perforation with 7.5% iron and clay control acid. Then the well is stimulated with a 75-quality nitrogen foam. The remaining 25% of the fluid is 50% methanol and 50% KCl water, 2% or 3% concentration. Additives required are minor, and typically include 1 gal/1,000/gal of some nonemulsifying agent and a special methanol foamer. The base fluid is a 30-lb gel system which gives stability to the foam and improves the foam's sand transport qualities. The gel also reduces friction pressures.

  10. Foam structure :from soap froth to solid foams.

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2003-01-01

    The properties of solid foams depend on their structure, which usually evolves in the fluid state as gas bubbles expand to form polyhedral cells. The characteristic feature of foam structure-randomly packed cells of different sizes and shapes-is examined in this article by considering soap froth. This material can be modeled as a network of minimal surfaces that divide space into polyhedral cells. The cell-level geometry of random soap froth is calculated with Brakke's Surface Evolver software. The distribution of cell volumes ranges from monodisperse to highly polydisperse. Topological and geometric properties, such as surface area and edge length, of the entire foam and individual cells, are discussed. The shape of struts in solid foams is related to Plateau borders in liquid foams and calculated for different volume fractions of material. The models of soap froth are used as templates to produce finite element models of open-cell foams. Three-dimensional images of open-cell foams obtained with x-ray microtomography allow virtual reconstruction of skeletal structures that compare well with the Surface Evolver simulations of soap-froth geometry.

  11. Investigation of foaming during nuclear defense-waste solidification by electric melting

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, H.T.; Lukacs, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    To determine the cause of foaming, the physical and chemical composition of the glass formers that are added to the waste to produce a borosilicate melt were investigated. It was determined that the glass-forming frit was not the source of the foam-causing gases. Incomplete calcination of the waste, which results in residual hydrates, carbonates and nitrates, and the relatively high carbon and sulfate contents of the waste glass composition were also eliminated as possible sources of the foam. It was finally shown that the oxides of the multivalent ions of manganese and iron that are in the defense waste in high concentrations are the source of the foaming. Nickel oxide is also present in the waste and is suspected of contributing to the foaming. In investigating methods to reduce the foam, the focus was on the chemistry of the materials being processed rather than on the mechanical aspects of the processing equipment to avoid increasing the mechanical complexity of the melter operation. Reducing the waste loading in the host glass from 28 to 14 wt. % produced the most significant reduction in the foam. Of course this did not increase the rate at which waste can be processed. Adding carbonaceous additives or barium metaphosphate to the waste/frit mixture (batch) reduced the foaming somewhat. However, if too much reducing agent was added to the batch, iron-nickel alloys separated from the melt. Likewise, melting the batch in an inert or a reducing atmosphere reduced the foaming but produced a heterogeneous product. Finally, initial attempts to control foaming by adding reducing agents to the liquid waste and then spray-calcining it using an inert atomizing gas were not successful. The possibilities for liquid-waste treatment need to be investigated further.

  12. Effect of crystals and fibrous network polymer additives on cellular morphology of microcellular foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Ryoma; Utano, Tatsumi; Yasuhara, Shunya; Ishihara, Shota; Ohshima, Masahiro

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the core-back foam injection molding was used for preparing microcelluar polypropylene (PP) foam with either a 1,3:2,4 bis-O-(4-methylbenzylidene)-D-sorbitol gelling agent (Gel-all MD) or a fibros network polymer additive (Metablen 3000). Both agent and addiive could effectively control the celluar morphology in foams but somehow different ways. In course of cooling the polymer with Gel-all MD in the mold caity, the agent enhanced the crystal nucleation and resulted in the large number of small crystals. The crystals acted as effective bubble nucleation agent in foaming process. Thus, the agent reduced the cell size and increased the cell density, drastically. Furthermore, the small crystals provided an inhomogenuity to the expanding cell wall and produced the high open cell content with nano-scale fibril structure. Gell-all as well as Metablene 3000 formed a gel-like fibrous network in melt. The network increased the elongational viscosity and tended to prevent the cell wall from breaking up. The foaming temperature window was widened by the presence of the network. Especially, the temperature window where the macro-fibrous structure was formed was expanded to the higher temperature. The effects of crystal nucleating agent and PTFE on crystals' size and number, viscoelsticity, rheological propreties of PP and cellular morphology were compared and thorougly investigated.

  13. Preparation and characterization of novel foamed porous glass-ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sasmal, Nibedita; Garai, Mrinmoy; Karmakar, Basudeb

    2015-05-15

    Foamed glass-ceramics without using foaming agent have been synthesized in a novel glass system of SrO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-M{sub x}O{sub y} (where M = Ba, Mg, La, Ce and Ni) by a simple process of powder sintering. The glass and glass-ceramics are characterized by dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), heating stage microscopy (HSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), optical microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). All the glasses formed are amorphous and the glass transition temperature and dilatometric softening temperature of these glasses are found to be in the range 673–678 °C and 706–728 °C respectively. The glasses are highly stable as indicated by the DSC evaluated glass stability parameters of the range 195–240 °C. Quantitative sintering study of glass powder compacts revealed swelling in the samples with NiO and CeO{sub 2} corresponding to a geometry change of 75 and 108% around 900 °C respectively. With reference to this finding the glass powder compacts are heated to 900 °C and the foamed glass-ceramics are obtained. Characteristic crystalline silicate phases have been identified in the XRD studies and their microstructures are recorded by FESEM. Optical microscope study of the foamed samples revealed formation of bigger foamed cavity with residual pores in samples with NiO and CeO{sub 2} in comparison to samples with BaO, MgO and La{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The mean pore diameters of the samples with NiO and CeO{sub 2} are determined to be 43 and 32 μm, and their respective porosities are 2.34 and 1.82 cm{sup 3}/g respectively. Thus NiO and CeO{sub 2} are found to be very effective to obtain foamed glass-ceramics without using foaming agent by the viscous flow sintering of fine glass powder compacts along with the reduction of the respective polyvalent ions. - Highlights: • Synthesis of foamed porous glass

  14. Suitability of LN2 impregnated Open-Cell Foam as Electric Insulant for Superconducting Power Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumereder, C.; Mifka, M.; Muhr, M.

    2006-06-01

    The suitability of an open-cell foam is investigated for the application as electric insulant in superconducting power equipment. The tested foam is made from melamine resin, a thermoset plastic from the aminoplastics group; it is a mechanical very flexible material with excellence compatibility to high and low temperature. The aim of these investigations was to test the aptitude of the liquid nitrogen impregnated open-cell foam with respect to the dielectric properties and the electric strength under different conditions. In this paper the results of permittivity measurements and ramp voltage tests are discussed and an outlook for future applications is given. The tests showed excellence mechanical and thermal characteristics for the application in LN2 vessels. The ACBV of the LN2 impregnated foam was 50 % less than the ACBV of pure LN2.

  15. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi; Sugiman, Saputra, Yudhi

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing the core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.

  16. Mechanical Characterization of Rigid Polyurethane Foams

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang

    2014-12-01

    Foam materials are used to protect sensitive components from impact loading. In order to predict and simulate the foam performance under various loading conditions, a validated foam model is needed and the mechanical properties of foams need to be characterized. Uniaxial compression and tension tests were conducted for different densities of foams under various temperatures and loading rates. Crush stress, tensile strength, and elastic modulus were obtained. A newly developed confined compression experiment provided data for investigating the foam flow direction. A biaxial tension experiment was also developed to explore the damage surface of a rigid polyurethane foam.

  17. Porous poly(D,L-lactic acid) foams with tunable structure and mechanical anisotropy prepared by supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Floren, Michael; Spilimbergo, Sara; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claudio

    2011-11-01

    The design and tunability of tissue scaffolds, such as pore size and geometry, is crucial to the success of an engineered tissue replacement. Moreover, the mechanical nature of a tissue scaffold should display properties similar to the tissue of interest; therefore, tunability of the foam mechanical properties is desirable. Polymeric foams prepared using supercritical carbon dioxide as a blowing agent has emerged in recent years as a promising technique to prepare porous scaffolds. While a number of groups have reported on the tailoring of scaffold morphologies by using gas foaming techniques, few have considered the effects of such processing conditions on the physical and mechanical anisotropy achieved. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the tunability of the structure and mechanical anisotropy of foams prepared using a variety of different gas foaming conditions. Porous poly(D,L lactic acid) foams were prepared by the systematic adjustment of processing conditions, namely pressure, temperature and venting time, resulting in an extensive range of scaffold morphologies. Characterization of sample anisotropy was achieved by mechanical evaluation of foam specimens both longitudinal and transverse to the foaming direction. The obtained mechanical properties demonstrated a strong dependence of the processing conditions on mechanical anisotropy and performance. Furthermore, results indicate that factors other than pore geometry may be necessary to define the mechanical behavior of the foam specimens. The favorable compressive moduli, coupled with large degrees of anisotropy, suggests these foams may have suitable application as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

  18. Transcriptional profiling of foam cells in response to hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Goo, Young-Hwa; Yechoor, Vijay K; Paul, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a main risk factor for atherosclerosis development. Arterial macrophages, or foam cells, take-up and process lipoprotein particles deposited in arteries, and store much of the cholesterol carried by these particles in their cytoplasm. However, the effects of exposure to different cholesterol levels on foam cells remain poorly understood. Given the remarkable plasticity of macrophages in response to environmental variables, studies on macrophage biology should ideally be performed in the environment where they exert their physiological functions, namely atherosclerotic lesions in the case of foam cells. We used a mouse model of atherosclerosis, the apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse, to study in vivo the transcriptional response of foam cells to short- and long-term elevations in plasma cholesterol, induced by feeding mice a western type diet. The microarray data sets from this study have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus under the accession number GSE70619. Here we provide detailed information on the experimental set-up, on the isolation of RNA by laser capture microdissection, and on the methodology used for RNA amplification and analysis by microarray and quantitative real-time PCR. PMID:27408807

  19. A phenomenological constitutive model for low density polyurethane foams

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.; Morgan, H.S.; Krieg, R.D.

    1987-04-01

    Results from a series of hydrostatic and triaxial compression tests which were performed on polyurethane foams are presented in this report. These tests indicate that the volumetric and deviatoric parts of the foam behavior are strongly coupled. This coupling behavior could not be captured with any of several commonly used plasticity models. Thus, a new constitutive model was developed. This new model was based on a decomposition of the foam response into two parts: (1) response of the polymer skeleton, and (2) response of the air inside the cells. The air contribution was completely volumetric. The new constitutive model was implemented in two finite element codes, SANCHO and PRONTO. Results from a series of analyses completed with these codes indicated that the new constitutive model captured all of the foam behaviors that had been observed in the experiments. Finally, a typical dynamic problem was analyzed using the new constitutive model and other constitutive models to demonstrate differences between the models. Results from this series of analyses indicated that the new constitutive model generated displacement and acceleration predictions that were between predictions obtained using the other models. This result was expected. 9 refs., 45 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Transcriptional profiling of foam cells in response to hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Goo, Young-Hwa; Yechoor, Vijay K; Paul, Antoni

    2016-09-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a main risk factor for atherosclerosis development. Arterial macrophages, or foam cells, take-up and process lipoprotein particles deposited in arteries, and store much of the cholesterol carried by these particles in their cytoplasm. However, the effects of exposure to different cholesterol levels on foam cells remain poorly understood. Given the remarkable plasticity of macrophages in response to environmental variables, studies on macrophage biology should ideally be performed in the environment where they exert their physiological functions, namely atherosclerotic lesions in the case of foam cells. We used a mouse model of atherosclerosis, the apolipoprotein E-deficient mouse, to study in vivo the transcriptional response of foam cells to short- and long-term elevations in plasma cholesterol, induced by feeding mice a western type diet. The microarray data sets from this study have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus under the accession number GSE70619. Here we provide detailed information on the experimental set-up, on the isolation of RNA by laser capture microdissection, and on the methodology used for RNA amplification and analysis by microarray and quantitative real-time PCR.

  1. Sensory and foaming properties of sparkling cider.

    PubMed

    Picinelli Lobo, Anna; Fernández Tascón, Norman; Rodríguez Madrera, Roberto; Suárez Valles, Belén

    2005-12-28

    The effect of yeast strain and aging time on the chemical composition, analytical, and sensory foam properties of sparkling ciders has been studied. The analytical foam parameters (foamability, HM; Bikerman coefficient, sigma; and foam stability time, T(s)) were significantly influenced by aging and yeast strain. The sensory attributes (initial foam, foam area persistence, bubble size, foam collar, and overall foam quality) improved with aging time. Likewise, the yeast strain positively influenced the assessment of initial foam, foam area persistence, number of bubble chains, and overall foam quality. Significant and positive correlations were found between alcoholic proof, dry extract, total and volatile acidities, total phenols and total proteins, and sigma, whereas HM was negatively correlated with specific gravity, alcoholic proof, dry extract, and total proteins. PMID:16366693

  2. Plastics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Tommy G.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high schools industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in plastics technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to production technology; history and development of plastics; safety; youth leadership,…

  3. Identification of CFC and HCFC substitutes for blowing polyurethane foam insulation products. Final report, September 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.H.; Tunkel, J.L.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-10-01

    The report gives results of a cooperative effort to identify chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) substitutes for blowing polyurethane foam insulation products. More than 100 chemicals have been identified and ranked as polyurethane foam blowing agent candidates. The systematic investigation involved the analysis of vapor thermal conductivity predictive models and utilizing this methodology to identify and screen potential new foam blowing agents. Collection of physical/chemical properties of the new candidates enabled an overall evaluation. Based on the vapor thermal conductivity, boiling point, and other important properties, the chemical compounds were ranked to identify the most promising new blowing agent candidates. To efficiently evaluate new foam blowing agents, the compounds were placed and evaluated in 14 groups based on chemical structure.

  4. Injectable Foams for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Edna M.; Page, Jonathan M.; Harmata, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The design of injectable biomaterials has attracted considerable attention in recent years. Many injectable biomaterials, such as hydrogels and calcium phosphate cements, have nanoscale pores that limit the rate of cellular migration and proliferation. While introduction of macroporosity has been suggested to increase cellular infiltration and tissue healing, many conventional methods for generating macropores often require harsh processing conditions that preclude their use in injectable foams. In recent years, processes such as porogen leaching, gas foaming, and emulsion-templating have been adapted to generate macroporosity in injectable calcium phosphate cements, hydrogels, and hydrophobic polymers. While some of the more mature injectable foam technologies have been evaluated in clinical trials, there are challenges remaining to be addressed, such as the biocompatibility and ultimate fate of the sacrificial phase used to generate pores within the foam after it sets in situ. Furthermore, while implantable scaffolds can be washed extensively to remove undesirable impurities, all of the components required to synthesize injectable foams must be injected into the defect. Thus, every compound in the foam must be biocompatible and non-cytotoxic at the concentrations utilized. As future research addresses these critical challenges, injectable macroporous foams are anticipated to have an increasingly significant impact on improving patient outcomes for a number of clinical procedures. PMID:24127230

  5. Drainage in a rising foam.

    PubMed

    Yazhgur, Pavel; Rio, Emmanuelle; Rouyer, Florence; Pigeonneau, Franck; Salonen, Anniina

    2016-01-21

    Rising foams created by continuously blowing gas into a surfactant solution are widely used in many technical processes, such as flotation. The prediction of the liquid fraction profile in such flowing foams is of particular importance since this parameter controls the stability and the rheology of the final product. Using drift flux analysis and recently developed semi-empirical expressions for foam permeability and osmotic pressure, we build a model predicting the liquid fraction profile as a function of height. The theoretical profiles are very different if the interfaces are considered as mobile or rigid, but all of our experimental profiles are described by the model with mobile interfaces. Even the systems with dodecanol are well known to behave as rigid in forced drainage experiments. This is because in rising foams the liquid fraction profile is fixed by the flux at the bottom of the foam. Here the foam is wet with higher permeability and the interfaces are not in equilibrium. These results demonstrate once again that it is not only the surfactant system that controls the mobility of the interface, but also the hydrodynamic problem under consideration. For example liquid flow through the foam during generation or in forced drainage is intrinsically different. PMID:26554500

  6. Final Report: Research Study on Development of Environmental Friendly Spray-on Foam Insulation (SOFI) for the External Tank (ET)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, James M.

    1996-01-01

    The selection and quantification of four foams using a more environmentally friendly HCFC-141b blowing agent replacing foams that used the CFC-11 blowing agent for the external tank (ET) LWT has been addressed along with problems and solutions that were encountered during verification. The effort on two lower density spray foams for the ET SLWT are presented, but predicted weight savings were not encouraging. Suggestions for possible problem solving are included along with a new approach for selecting foams for qualification as back-up foams for the foams used on the ET LWT. We investigated three resins for use as thermally sprayed coatings for corrosion prevention on metal. The best coating was obtained with a thermoplastic polyimide resin. This coating has a good chance of meeting ET requirements. Possible third generation blowing agents have been shown usable in polyurethane spray and pour foams, and solubility in isocyannate foam components are acceptable. We considered aerogels as insulation materials on space vehicles, and suggested a liner for a liquid oxygen (LOX) composite tank.

  7. Foam composition for treating asbestos-containing materials and method of using same

    DOEpatents

    Block, J.; Krupkin, N.V.; Kuespert, D.R.; Nishioka, G.M.; Lau, J.W.K.; Palmer, N.I.

    1998-04-28

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, at least about 0.1% by weight of a source of fluoride ions, and a stable foam forming amount of a foaming agent system having both cationic and non-ionic functionality. A method of transforming the asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material using the present composition in the form of a foam also disclosed.

  8. Foam composition for treating asbestos-containing materials and method of using same

    DOEpatents

    Block, Jacob; Krupkin, Natalia Vera; Kuespert, Daniel Reid; Nishioka, Gary Masaru; Lau, John Wing-Keung; Palmer, Nigel Innes

    1998-04-28

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed, wherein the composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, at least about 0.1% by weight of a source of fluoride ions, and a stable foam forming amount of a foaming agent system having both cationic and non-ionic functionality. A method of transforming the asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material using the present composition in the form of a foam also disclosed.

  9. Preparation and properties of an internal mold release for rigid urethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.G.

    1980-08-01

    Internal mold releases which can be added to urethane foam resin were synthesized and evaluated. The use of this type of release agent eliminates the repeated cleaning and recoating of molds, a procedure required with surface-applied mold releases. The internal mold releases investigated are the reaction products of a fatty acid ester, containing an active hydrogen, and a monoisocycanate. The use of an internal mold release resulted in urethane foam with good releasability and excellent surface bondability. Several properties of rigid urethane foam formulated with the use of an internal mold release are presented.

  10. Properties of foam and composite materials made o starch and cellulose fiber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Composite materials were made of starch and cellulose fibers. Pre-gelatinized starch was effective in dispersing pulp fiber in a starch matrix to form a viscous starch/fiber dough. The starch/fiber dough was a useful feedstock for various composite foam and plastic materials. Viscous blends of star...

  11. Method of casting pitch based foam

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2002-01-01

    A process for producing molded pitch based foam is disclosed which minimizes cracking. The process includes forming a viscous pitch foam in a container, and then transferring the viscous pitch foam from the container into a mold. The viscous pitch foam in the mold is hardened to provide a carbon foam having a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts.

  12. Microgravity foam structure and rheology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durian, Douglas J.; Gopal, Anthony D.

    1994-01-01

    Our long-range objective is to establish the fundamental interrelationship between the microscopic structure and dynamics of foams and their macroscopic stability and rheology. Foam structure and dynamics are to be measured directly and noninvasively through the use and development of novel multiple light scattering techniques such as diffusing-wave spectroscopy (DWS). Foam rheology is to be measured in a custom rheometer which allows simultaneous optical access for multiple light drainage of liquid from in between gas bubbles as the liquid:gas volume fraction in increased towards the rigidity-loss transition.

  13. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  14. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOEpatents

    Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.; Kaschmitter, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  15. Calibrating the Abaqus Crushable Foam Material Model using UNM Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schembri, Philip E.; Lewis, Matthew W.

    2014-02-27

    Triaxial test data from the University of New Mexico and uniaxial test data from W-14 is used to calibrate the Abaqus crushable foam material model to represent the syntactic foam comprised of APO-BMI matrix and carbon microballoons used in the W76. The material model is an elasto-plasticity model in which the yield strength depends on pressure. Both the elastic properties and the yield stress are estimated by fitting a line to the elastic region of each test response. The model parameters are fit to the data (in a non-rigorous way) to provide both a conservative and not-conservative material model. The model is verified to perform as intended by comparing the values of pressure and shear stress at yield, as well as the shear and volumetric stress-strain response, to the test data.

  16. Amorphous microcellular polytetrafluoroethylene foam film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chongzheng

    1991-11-01

    We report herein the preparation of novel low-density ultramicrocellular fluorocarbon foams and their application. These fluorocarbon foams are of interest for the biochemistry arena in numerous applications including foodstuff, pharmacy, wine making, beer brewery, fermentation medical laboratory, and other processing factories. All of those require good quality processing programs in which, after eliminating bacterium and virus, compressed air is needed. Ordinarily, compressed air contains bacterium and virus, its size is 0.01 - 2 micrometers fluorocarbon foam films. Having average porous diameter 0.04 - 0.1 micrometers , these are stable to high temperature (280 degree(s)C) and chemical environments, and generally have good engineering and mechanical properties (e.g., low coefficient of thermal expansion, high modulus, and good dimensional stability). Our new process for preparing low density fluorocarbon foams provides materials with unique properties. As such, they offer the possibility for being superior to earlier materials for a number of the filter applications mentioned.

  17. 3-D foam adhesive deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.

    1976-01-01

    Bonding method, which reduces amount and weight of adhesive, is applicable to foam-filled honeycomb constructions. Novel features of process include temperature-viscosity control and removal of excess adhesive by transfer to cellophane film.

  18. Ceramic Foams for TPS Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockpoole, Mairead

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic foams have potential in many areas of Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) including acreage and tile leading edges as well as being suitable as a repair approach for re-entry vehicles. NASA Ames is conducting ongoing research in developing lower-density foams from pre-ceramic polymer routes. One of the key factors to investigate, when developing new materials for re-entry applications, is their oxidation behavior in the appropriate re-entry environment which can be simulated using ground based arc jet (plasma jet) testing. Arc jet testing is required to provide the appropriate conditions (stagnation pressures, heat fluxes, enthalpies, heat loads and atmospheres) encountered during flight. This work looks at the response of ceramic foams (Si systems) exposed to simulated reentry environments and investigates the influence of microstructure and composition on the material? response. Other foam properties (mechanical and thermal) will also be presented.

  19. Process for making carbon foam

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.

    2000-01-01

    The process obviates the need for conventional oxidative stabilization. The process employs mesophase or isotropic pitch and a simplified process using a single mold. The foam has a relatively uniform distribution of pore sizes and a highly aligned graphic structure in the struts. The foam material can be made into a composite which is useful in high temperature sandwich panels for both thermal and structural applications.

  20. Supercapacitors based on carbon foams

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.; Mayer, Steven T.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc-1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m.sup.2 /g-1000 m.sup.2 /g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved.

  1. Supercapacitors based on carbon foams

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1993-11-09

    A high energy density capacitor incorporating a variety of carbon foam electrodes is described. The foams, derived from the pyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde and related polymers, are high density (0.1 g/cc-1.0 g/cc) electrically conductive and have high surface areas (400 m[sup 2]/g-1000 m[sup 2]/g). Capacitances on the order of several tens of farad per gram of electrode are achieved. 9 figures.

  2. The Melting of Aqueous Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durian, Douglas J.; Gopal, Anthony D.; Vera, Moin U.; Langer, Stephen A.

    1996-01-01

    Diffusing-wave spectroscopy measurements show that ordinarily solid aqueous foams flow by a series of stick-slip avalanche-like rearrangements of neighboring bubbles from one tight packing configuration to another. Contrary to a recent prediction, the distribution of avalanche sizes do not obey a power-law distribution characteristic of self-organized criticality. This can be understood from a simple model of foam mechanics based on bubble-bubble interactions.

  3. Advances in cryogenic foam insulations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.; Watts, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a discretely oriented thread-reinforced polyurethane foam thermal insulation system for liquid hydrogen fuel tanks. The 3-D foam and glass liner composite is designed to be adhesively bonded to the inside surface of the tank wall and to be in direct contact with liquid hydrogen. All elements of this insulation composite are capable of sustaining the loads and environmental conditions imposed by testing under simulated Space Shuttle vehicle requirements at temperatures between -423 and +350 F.

  4. Gamma-irradiated cross-linked LDPE foams: Characteristics and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, E. C. L.; Scagliusi, S. R.; Parra, D. F.; Lugão, A. B.

    2013-03-01

    Foamed polymers are future materials, as they are increasingly considered "green materials" due to their interesting properties at very low consumption of raw materials. They can be used to improve appearance of insulation structures, thermal and acoustic insulation, core materials for sandwich panels, fabrication of furniture and flotation materials or to reduce costs involving materials. Low-density polyethylene is widely used because of its excellent properties, such as softness, elasticity, processibility and insulation. In general, cross-linking is often applied to improve the thermal and mechanical properties of polyethylene products, due to the formation of a three-dimensional network. In particular for the production of PE foams, cross-linking is applied prior the expansion to control bubble formation, cell characteristics and final properties of the foam. However, the usual production process of PE foams is a process in which a gaseous blowing agent is injected into a melted thermoplastic polymer, under pressure, to form a solution between blowing agent and melted polymer. An extrusion system is provided for foaming the polymer, supplied to an extruder and moving through a rotating screw. The pressure must be high enough to keep the gas blowing agent (or foaming agent) in the solution with the melt. The foaming agent is then diffused and dissolved in the molten material to form a single-phase solution. In the present work carbon dioxide was used as the bowing agent, a chemically stable and non-toxic gas, with good diffusion coefficient; gas pressure used varied within a 20-40 bar range. Some requirements for physical foaming are required, as low friction heat generation, homogeneous melt temperature distribution, melt temperature at die exit just above crystallization temperature (die) and high melt strength during expansion. This work studied foams properties gamma-irradiated within 0, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 kGy, from a LDPE exhibiting 2.6 g/10 min Melt

  5. Preparation and characterization of new biologically active polyurethane foams.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, Yuri; Veselov, Vitali; Markovskaya, Ludmila; Savelyeva, Olga; Akhranovich, Elena; Galatenko, Natalya; Robota, Ludmila; Travinskaya, Tamara

    2014-12-01

    Biologically active polyurethane foams are the fast-developed alternative to many applications of biomedical materials. Due to the polyurethane structure features and foam technology it is possible to incorporate into their structure the biologically active compounds of target purpose via structural-chemical modification of macromolecule. A series of new biologically active polyurethane foams (PUFs) was synthesized with polyethers (MM 2500-5000), polyesters MM (500-2200), 2,4(2,6) toluene diisocyanate, water as a foaming agent, catalysts, foam stabilizers and functional compounds. Different functional compounds: 1,4-di-N-oxy-2,3-bis-(oxymethyl)-quinoxaline (DOMQ), partial sodium salt of poly(acrylic acid) and 2,6-dimethyl-N,N-diethyl aminoacetatanilide hydrochloride were incorporated into the polymer structure/composition due to the chemical and/or physical bonding. Structural peculiarities of PUFs were studied by FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Self-adhesion properties of PUFs were estimated by measuring of tensile strength at break of adhesive junction. The optical microscopy method was performed for the PUF morphology studies. Toxicological estimation of the PUFs was carried out in vitro and in vivo. The antibacterial action towards the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli ATC 25922, E. coli ATC 2150, Klebsiella pneumoniae 6447, Staphylococcus aureus 180, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 8180, Proteus mirabilis F 403, P. mirabilis 6054, and Proteus vulgaris 8718) was studied by the disc method on the solid nutrient. Physic-chemical properties of the PUFs (density, tensile strength and elongation at break, water absorption and vapor permeability) showed that all studied PUFs are within the operational requirements for such materials and represent fine-cellular foams. Spectral studies confirmed the incorporation of DOMQ into the PUF's macrochain. PUFs are characterized by microheterogeneous structure. They are antibacterially active, non

  6. Catalytic thermal cracking of post-consumer waste plastics to fuels: Part 1 - Kinetics and optimization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to investigate thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of waste plastics such as prescription bottles (polypropylene/PP), high density polyethylene, landfill liners (polyethylene/PE), packing materials (polystyrene/PS), and foams (polyurethane/PU) into crude plastic...

  7. Effect of sand concentration in foam fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Shotton, B.

    1982-01-01

    Foams used as fracturing fluids for formation stimulation are mixtures of compressed nitrogen gas and a base liquid. The quality of a fracturing foam refers to the volumetric gas content of the foam and usually is in range of 65 to 95%. The addition of sand to a fracturing foam can have a significant effect on the actual flow rate of the base liquid at the surface. This effect on the surface will change the foam flow rate and foam quality desired down hole. The hydrostatic pressure exerted by the fracturing foam also will be effected as sand concentration changes. Using the true volume of sand as a basis, several equations are presented which compensate for the effects of sand concentration in foam. A well-designed foam frac job is necessary for proper implementation of the stimulation treatment.

  8. Microgravity studies of aqueous wet foams.

    PubMed

    Langevin, D; Vignes-Adler, M

    2014-03-01

    Foams and foaming pose important questions and problems for both fundamental research and practical applications. Despite the fact that foams have been extensively studied, many aspects of foam physics and chemistry still remain unclear. Experiments on foams performed under microgravity can be extended far beyond their counterpart where gravity is fully present (i.e. most experiments on Earth). They allow, in particular, observation of the wet foams obtained during the foaming process; on Earth, foams at this stage evolve too quickly due to gravity drainage and cannot be studied. This paper reviews the existing studies of foams under microgravity, which include studies in parabolic flights, in sounding rockets and in the International Space Station. PMID:24652241

  9. Advances in plastic recycling. Volume 1: Recycling of polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, K.C.; Klempner, D.; Prentice, G.

    1999-07-01

    ``Recycling of Polyurethanes'', the first volume in the Advances in Plastics Recycling series, is focused on the physical and chemical recycling of polyurethanes, with attention given to energy conversion. A compilation of the present ongoing studies on recycling of urethane and, in general, isocyanate-based polymers, the focus is on thermosetting urethane polymers. Contents include: Recycling of Polyurethane Plastics in the European Automotive Industry; Present State of Polyurethane Recycling in Europe; Processing Overview of Bonded Polyurethane Foam; Mechanical Recycling of Polyurethane Scrap; Ecostream{trademark}--A Technology Beyond Recycling; Recycling of Flexible polyurethane Foam; General purpose Adhesives Prepared from Chemically Recycled Waste Rigid Polyurethane Foams; and Utilization of Isocyanate Binders in Recycling of Scrap Automotive Headliners.

  10. Metal-doped organic foam

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A.

    1982-01-01

    Organic foams having a low density and very small cell size and method for producing same in either a metal-loaded or unloaded (nonmetal loaded) form are described. Metal-doped foams are produced by soaking a polymer gel in an aqueous solution of desired metal salt, soaking the gel successively in a solvent series of decreasing polarity to remove water from the gel and replace it with a solvent of lower polarity with each successive solvent in the series being miscible with the solvents on each side and being saturated with the desired metal salt, and removing the last of the solvents from the gel to produce the desired metal-doped foam having desired density cell size, and metal loading. The unloaded or metal-doped foams can be utilized in a variety of applications requiring low density, small cell size foam. For example, rubidium-doped foam made in accordance with the invention has utility in special applications, such as in x-ray lasers.

  11. Foam shell project: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Overturf, G.; Reibold, B.; Cook, B.; Schroen-Carey, D.

    1994-03-25

    The authors report on their work to produce a foam shell target for two possible applications: (1) as liquid-layered cryogenic target on Omega Upgrade, and (2) as a back-up design for the NIF. This target consists of a roughly 1 mm diameter and 100 {mu}m thick spherical low-density foam shell surrounding a central void. The foam will be slightly overfilled with liquid D{sub 2} or DT, the overfilled excess being symmetrically distributed on the inside of the shell and supported by thermal gradient techniques. The outside of the foam is overcoated with full density polymer which must be topologically smooth. The technology for manufacturing this style of foam shell involves microencapsulation techniques and has been developed by the Japanese at ILE. Their goal is to determine whether this technology can be successfully adapted to meet US ICF objectives. To this end a program of foam shell development has been initiated at LLNL in collaboration with both the General Atomics DOE Target Fabrication Contract Corporation and the Target Fabrication Group at LLE.

  12. Strain compatibility tests for sprayed foam cryogenic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, W. L.; Kimberlin, D. O.

    1970-01-01

    Mechanical stress applied to foam-coated aluminum alloy specimens maintained at cryogenic temperature simulates actual use conditions of the foam insulation. The testing reveals defects in the polyurethane foam or in the foam to metal bond.

  13. Assessment of instream foam formation and quantification of foam in effluents.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Katerina; Bletterie, Ulrike; Zessner, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Although the foam formation on surface waters nowadays is not comparable with the foam "mountains" in the 1970s, it still is an issue of water quality concern. A drawback in the discussion is the lack of methods to assess instream foam formation and foam emitted by point sources. Foam formation on a transboundary river in Austria led to an intensive study resulting in two parameters to quantify instream and emitted foam. Foam potential is introduced as emission parameter that is defined as flow rate of river water, which can foam due to an effluent's discharge. The foam index (FI) represents a parameter to assess the foam on the river and allows a semi-quantitative differentiation between the varying foaming conditions. This publication will present the developed methods and show some results to prove their accuracy and applicability.

  14. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2005-01-05

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research will lay the groundwork for more applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media.

  15. MECHANISTIC STUDIES OF IMPROVED FOAM EOR PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    William R. Rossen

    2005-03-16

    The objective of this research is to widen the application of foam to enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by investigating fundamental mechanisms of foams in porous media. This research is to lay the groundwork for more-applied research on foams for improved sweep efficiency in miscible gas, steam and surfactant-based EOR. Task 1 investigates the pore-scale interactions between foam bubbles and polymer molecules. Task 2 examines the mechanisms of gas trapping, and interaction between gas trapping and foam effectiveness. Task 3 investigates mechanisms of foam generation in porous media.

  16. Development of drilling foams for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, W.J.; Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; Chenevert, M.E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of foam drilling fluids in geothermal applications is addressed. A description of foams - what they are, how they are used, their properties, equipment required to use them, the advantages and disadvantages of foams, etc. - is presented. Geothermal applications are discussed. Results of industry interviews presented indicate significant potential for foams, but also indicate significant technical problems to be solved to achieve this potential. Testing procedures and results of tests on representative foams provide a basis for work to develop high-temperature foams.

  17. Development of Defoamers for Confinenment Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D M; Mitchell, A R

    2005-08-10

    Aqueous foam concentrate (AFC) 380 foam was developed by Sandia National Laboratory as a blast mitigation foam for unexploded ordnance (UXO) and its ''engineered foam structure'' is reported to be able to ''envelop chemical or biological aerosols'' [1]. It is similar to commercial fire-fighting foams, consisting mostly of water with small amounts of two alcohols, an ether and surfactant. It also contains xanthan gum, probably, to strengthen the foam film and delay drainage. The concentrate is normally diluted in a 6:94 ratio with water for foaming applications. The diluted solution is normally foamed with air to an expansion factor of about 100 (density 0.01 g/cc), which is called ''dry'' foam. Higher density foam (0.18 > {rho} > 0.03 g/cc) was discovered which had quite different characteristics from ''dry'' foam and was called ''wet'' foam. Some characterization of these foams has also been carried out, but the major effort described in this document is the evaluation, at the small and medium scale, of chemical, mechanical and thermal approaches to defoaming AFC 380 foam. Several chemical approaches to defoaming were evaluated including oxidation and precipitation of the xanthan, use of commercial oil-emulsion or suspension defoamers, pH modification, and cation exchange with the surfactant. Of these the commercial defoamers were most effective. Two mechanical approaches to defoaming were evaluated: pressure and foam rupture with very fine particles. Pressure and vacuum techniques were considered too difficult for field applications but high surface area silica particles worked very well on dry foam. Finally simple thermal techniques were evaluated. An order-disorder transition occurs in xanthan solutions at about 60 C, which may be responsible for the effectiveness of hot air as a defoamer. During defoaming of 55 gallons of foam with hot air, after about 70% of the AFC 380 foam had been defoamed, the effectiveness of hot air was dramatically reduced

  18. Statistics of bubble rearrangements in a slowly sheared two-dimensional foam.

    PubMed

    Dennin, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Many physical systems exhibit plastic flow when subjected to slow steady shear. A unified picture of plastic flow is still lacking; however, there is an emerging theoretical understanding of such flows based on irreversible motions of the constituent "particles" of the material. Depending on the specific system, various irreversible events have been studied, such as T1 events in foam and shear transformation zones (STZ's) in amorphous solids. This paper presents an experimental study of the T1 events in a model, two-dimensional foam: bubble rafts. In particular, I report on the connection between the distribution of T1 events and the behavior of the average stress and average velocity profiles during both the initial elastic response of the bubble raft and the subsequent plastic flow at sufficiently high strains.

  19. Statistics of bubble rearrangements in a slowly sheared two-dimensional foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennin, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Many physical systems exhibit plastic flow when subjected to slow steady shear. A unified picture of plastic flow is still lacking; however, there is an emerging theoretical understanding of such flows based on irreversible motions of the constituent “particles” of the material. Depending on the specific system, various irreversible events have been studied, such as T1 events in foam and shear transformation zones (STZ’s) in amorphous solids. This paper presents an experimental study of the T1 events in a model, two-dimensional foam: bubble rafts. In particular, I report on the connection between the distribution of T1 events and the behavior of the average stress and average velocity profiles during both the initial elastic response of the bubble raft and the subsequent plastic flow at sufficiently high strains.

  20. Foaming of mixtures of pure hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. V.; Woods, W. W.

    1950-01-01

    Mixtures of pure liquid hydrocarbons are capable of foaming. Nine hydrocarbons were mixed in pairs, in all possible combinations, and four proportions of each combination. These mixtures were sealed in glass tubes, and the foaming was tested by shaking. Mixtures of aliphatic with other aliphatic hydrocarbons, or of alkyl benzenes with other alkyl benzenes, did not foam. Mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons with alkyl benzenes did foam. The proportions of the mixtures greatly affected the foaming, the maximum foaming of 12 of 20 pairs being at the composition 20 percent aliphatic hydrocarbon, 80 percent alkyl benzene. Six seconds was the maximum foam lifetime of any of these mixtures. Aeroshell 120 lubricating oil was fractionated into 52 fractions and a residue by extraction with acetone in a fractionating extractor. The index of refraction, foam lifetime, color, and viscosity of these fractions were measured. Low viscosity and high index fractions were extracted first. The viscosity of the fractions extracted rose and the index decreased as fractionation proceeded. Foam lifetimes and color were lowest in the middle fractions. Significance is attached to the observation that none of the foam lifetimes of the fractions or residue is as high as the foam lifetime of the original Aeroshell, indicating that the foaming is not due to a particular foaming constituent, but rather to the entire mixture.

  1. Development of Expanded Thermoplastic Polyurethane Bead Foams and Their Sintering Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossieny, Nemat

    Polymer bead foaming technology represents a breakthrough in the production of low density plastic foamed components that have a complex geometrical structure and has helped to expand the market for plastic foams by broadening their applications. In this research, the unique microstructure of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) consisting of phase-separated hard segment (HS) domains dispersed in the soft segment (SS) matrix has been utilized to develop expanded TPU (E-TPU) bead foam with microcellular morphologies and also to create inter-bead sintering into three dimensional products using steam-chest molding machine. The phase-separation and crystallization behavior of the HS chains in the TPU microstructure was systematically studied in the presence of dissolved gases and also by changing the microstructure of TPU by melt-processing and addition of nano-/micro-sized additives. It was observed that the presence of gas improved the phase separation (i.e. crystallization) of HSs and increased the overall crystallinity of the TPU. It was also shown that by utilizing the HS crystalline domains, the overall foaming behavior of TPU (i.e. cell nucleation and expansion ratio) can be significantly improved. Moreover, the HS crystalline domains can be effective for both sintering of the beads as well strengthening the individual beads to improve the property of the moulded part. It was also observed that unlike other polymer bead foaming technologies, the E-TPU bead foaming sintering does not require formation of double melting-peak. The original broad melting peak existing in the TPU microstructure due to the wide size distribution of HS crystallites can be effectively utilized for the purpose of sintering as well as maintenance of the overall dimensional stability of the moulded part.

  2. Mechanical behavior and microstructure of compressed Ti foams synthesized via freeze casting.

    PubMed

    Jenei, Péter; Choi, Hyelim; Tóth, Adrián; Choe, Heeman; Gubicza, Jenő

    2016-10-01

    Pure Ti and Ti-5%W foams were prepared via freeze casting. The porosity and grain size of both the materials were 32-33% and 15-17µm, respectively. The mechanical behavior of the foams was investigated by uniaxial compression up to a plastic strain of ~0.26. The Young׳s moduli of both foams were ~23GPa, which was in good agreement with the value expected from their porosity. The Young׳s moduli of the foams were similar to the elastic modulus of cortical bones, thereby eliminating the osteoporosis-causing stress-shielding effect. The addition of W increased the yield strength from ~196MPa to ~235MPa. The microstructure evolution in the grains during compression was studied using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray line profile analysis (XLPA). After compression up to a plastic strain of ~0.26, the average dislocation densities increased to ~3.4×10(14)m(-2) and ~5.9×10(14)m(-2) in the Ti and Ti-W foams, respectively. The higher dislocation density in the Ti-W foam can be attributed to the pinning effect of the solute tungsten atoms on dislocations. The experimentally measured yield strength was in good agreement with the strength calculated from the dislocation density and porosity. This study demonstrated that the addition of W to Ti foam is beneficial for biomedical applications, because the compressive yield strength increased while its Young׳s modulus remained similar to that of cortical bones. PMID:27469602

  3. Properties of polidocanol foam in view of its use in sclerotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nastasa, V; Samaras, K; Ampatzidis, Ch; Karapantsios, T D; Trelles, M A; Moreno-Moraga, J; Smarandache, A; Pascu, M L

    2015-01-30

    Foam sclerotherapy is a widely used method to treat varicose veins disease. It is easy to use and apply, affordable, and has high efficiency that depends on foam stability upon injection. Since sclerotherapy is usually applied in a medical doctor's office, one of the most employed methods to generate foam is based on the Tessari technique which uses pumping cycles of liquid and air in-and-out of a double syringe system. Finally, the produced foam exits through a small orifice (∼2mm) at the output of a three-way valve. The present work shows results regarding the factors that may influence foam stability (liquid to air ratio, type of connector, syringe diameter, number of pumping cycles, etc.) of a commonly used sclerosing agent (polidocanol). Furthermore, an effort is made to evaluate the effect of adding different substances on the stability of polidocanol foams (0.5% w/w) by altering the surface tension or/and the bulk and interfacial rheological properties of the fluids. It is shown that adding small concentrations of nonionic surfactants can increase foam stability with just a very small variation of the mean bubbles size.

  4. Improvement of foam breaking and oxygen-transfer performance in a stirred-tank fermenter.

    PubMed

    Takesono, Satoshi; Onodera, Masayuki; Toda, Kiyoshi; Yoshida, Masanori; Yamagiwa, Kazuaki; Ohkawa, Akira

    2006-03-01

    This study examined a stirred-tank fermenter (STF) containing low-viscosity foaming liquids with an agitation impeller and foam-breaking impeller mounted on the same shaft. Results showed that the performance of the foam-breaking impeller can be improved by changing a conventional six-blade turbine impeller into a rod impeller as the agitation impeller. The volumetric oxygen-transfer coefficient, kLa, in the mechanical foam-control method (MFM) using a six-blade vaned disk as the foam-breaking impeller in the STF with the rod impeller was approximately five times greater than that of the chemical foam-control method (CFM) adding an anti-foaming agent in the STF with the six-blade turbine impeller. Application of the present method to the cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae K-7 demonstrated that the cultivation time up to the maximum cell concentration was remarkably shorter than that achieved using a conventional CFM. PMID:16208498

  5. The effect of moisture absorption on the physical properties of polyurethane shape memory polymer foams

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ya-Jen; Hearon, Keith; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of moisture absorption on the glass transition temperature (Tg) and stress/strain behavior of network polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) foams has been investigated. With our ultimate goal of engineering polyurethane SMP foams for use in blood contacting environments, we have investigated the effects of moisture exposure on the physical properties of polyurethane foams. To our best knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the effects of moisture absorption at varying humidity levels (non-immersion and immersion) on the physical properties of polyurethane SMP foams. The SMP foams were exposed to differing humidity levels for varying lengths of time, and they exhibited a maximum water uptake of 8.0% (by mass) after exposure to 100% relative humidity for 96 h. Differential scanning calorimetry results demonstrated that water absorption significantly decreased the Tg of the foam, with a maximum water uptake shifting the Tg from 67 °C to 5 °C. Samples that were immersed in water for 96 h and immediately subjected to tensile testing exhibited 100% increases in failure strains and 500% decreases in failure stresses; however, in all cases of time and humidity exposure, the plasticization effect was reversible upon placing moisture-saturated samples in 40% humidity environments for 24 h. PMID:21949469

  6. Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdolotti, Letizia; Liguori, Barbara; Capasso, Ilaria; Caputo, Domenico; Lavorgna, Marino; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a "meringue" type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (˜500 Kg/m3) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the "meringue" approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

  7. Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Verdolotti, Letizia; Capasso, Ilaria; Lavorgna, Marino; Liguori, Barbara; Caputo, Domenico; Iannace, Salvatore

    2014-05-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a “meringue” type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (∼500 Kg/m{sup 3}) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the “meringue” approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

  8. Correlation between porosity and space holder content at different sintering temperatures of aluminum foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushdi, N. M. F. M.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Mazlee, M. N.; Jamal, Z. A. Z.

    2016-07-01

    Aluminum foam is the most popular metal foam that can be used as energy absorbers, heat exchangers, air-oil separators and structure core of fuel cells. Melt-foaming agent, melt-gas injection, investment casting and powder-foaming agent techniques can be used to manufacture aluminum foam, but these techniques are too expensive. In this study, the aluminum foam was manufactured via a sintering dissolution process (SDP). Powders of aluminum and sodium chloride as space holder (25, 40, 50 wt. %) were mixed together to produce a homogeneous mixture. The mixture was compacted at 200 MPa followed by sintering at 500, 550 and 600˚C for 2 hours. A warm running water stream was used to dissolve the space holder that was embedded in the aluminum. The result showed that, the space holder content performed a significant role to control the total porosity to a value between 18 and 40%, and the porosity increased with increasing content of space holder and sintering temperature.

  9. Electron beam irradiation conditions and foam seat properties in polypropylene-polyethylene blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, S.; Kemmotsu, T.

    1995-02-01

    High expansion polypropylene foam (20-100kg/m 3) is industrially produced by blending polypropylene with thermal decomposition foaming agent, which is then irradiated with electron beam to induce crosslinking, and is finally heated, causing the foaming agent to decompose and generate foams. Here, crosslinking stage also serves to increase the melt viscosity of the mixture so that an appropriate value is obtained for foaming. In order to obtain desirable final product, the important factors in the above process are the material properties of the polypropylene and the appropriate control of crosslinking, which is governed by the selection of crosslinking-promoter and the irradiation conditions. We have used polypropylene random copolymer (R-PP) with low ethylene content and performed studies on the relation between the amount of electron beam irradiation and the degree of crosslinking and also on the effect of the multifunctional monomers as crosslinking-promoter. We have also produced foams using blends of this R-PP and linear low density polyethylene (L-LDPE) and evaluated their mechanical properties and their heat resistance.

  10. The plastic-associated microorganisms of the North Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Carson, Henry S; Nerheim, Magnus S; Carroll, Katherine A; Eriksen, Marcus

    2013-10-15

    Microorganisms likely mediate processes affecting the fate and impacts of marine plastic pollution, including degradation, chemical adsorption, and colonization or ingestion by macroorganisms. We investigated the relationship between plastic-associated microorganism communities and factors such as location, temperature, salinity, plankton abundance, plastic concentration, item size, surface roughness, and polymer type. Small plastic items from the surface of the North Pacific Gyre in 2011 were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Bacillus bacteria (mean 1664 ± 247 individuals mm(-2)) and pennate diatoms (1097 ± 154 mm(-2)) were most abundant, with coccoid bacteria, centric diatoms, dinoflagellates, coccolithophores, and radiolarians present. Bacterial abundance was patchy, but increased on foamed polystyrene. Diatom abundance increased on items with rough surfaces and at sites with high plastic concentrations. Morphotype richness increased slightly on larger fragments, and a biogeographic transition occurred between pennate diatom groups. Better characterizing this community will aid in understanding how it interacts with plastic pollution. PMID:23993070

  11. The plastic-associated microorganisms of the North Pacific Gyre.

    PubMed

    Carson, Henry S; Nerheim, Magnus S; Carroll, Katherine A; Eriksen, Marcus

    2013-10-15

    Microorganisms likely mediate processes affecting the fate and impacts of marine plastic pollution, including degradation, chemical adsorption, and colonization or ingestion by macroorganisms. We investigated the relationship between plastic-associated microorganism communities and factors such as location, temperature, salinity, plankton abundance, plastic concentration, item size, surface roughness, and polymer type. Small plastic items from the surface of the North Pacific Gyre in 2011 were examined using scanning electron microscopy. Bacillus bacteria (mean 1664 ± 247 individuals mm(-2)) and pennate diatoms (1097 ± 154 mm(-2)) were most abundant, with coccoid bacteria, centric diatoms, dinoflagellates, coccolithophores, and radiolarians present. Bacterial abundance was patchy, but increased on foamed polystyrene. Diatom abundance increased on items with rough surfaces and at sites with high plastic concentrations. Morphotype richness increased slightly on larger fragments, and a biogeographic transition occurred between pennate diatom groups. Better characterizing this community will aid in understanding how it interacts with plastic pollution.

  12. Plastic condoms.

    PubMed

    1968-01-01

    Only simple equipment, simple technology and low initial capital investment are needed in their manufacture. The condoms can be made by people who were previously unskilled or only semi-skilled workers. Plastic condoms differ from those made of latex rubber in that the nature of the plastic film allows unlimited shelf-life. Also, the plastic has a higher degree of lubricity than latex rubber; if there is a demand for extra lubrication in a particular market, this can be provided. Because the plastic is inert, these condoms need not be packaged in hermetically sealed containers. All these attributes make it possible to put these condoms on the distributors' shelves in developing countries competitively with rubber condoms. The shape of the plastic condom is based on that of the lamb caecum, which has long been used as luxury-type condom. The plastic condom is made from plastic film (ethylene ethyl acrilate) of 0.001 inch (0.0254 mm.) thickness. In addition, a rubber ring is provided and sealed into the base of the condom for retention during coitus. The advantage of the plastic condom design and the equipment on which it is made is that production can be carried out either in labour-intensive economy or with varying degrees of mechanization and automation. The uniform, finished condom if made using previously untrained workers. Training of workers can be done in a matter of hours on the two machines which are needed to produce and test the condoms. The plastic film is provided on a double wound roll, and condom blanks are prepared by means of a heat-sealing die on the stamping machine. The rubber rings are united to the condom blanks on an assembly machine, which consists of a mandrel and heat-sealing equipment to seal the rubber ring to the base of the condom. Built into the assembly machine is a simple air-testing apparatus that can detect the smallest pinhole flaw in a condom. The manufacturing process is completed by unravelling the condom from the assembly

  13. The influences of calcia silica contents to the compressive strength of the Al-7000 aluminium foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutarno; Soepriyanto, S.; Korda, A. A.; Dirgantara, T.

    2016-08-01

    This experiment evaluated the effect of calcia alumina and alumina silica that formed as side products involved in metal mixture of aluminium foam. These compounds are formed from additional calcium carbonate and silica in the mixture. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) roles as a blowing agent source of carbon dioxide (CO2). The formation of calcia alumina (CaO.Al2O3) is desired to improve the viscosity and to strengthen of cell wall of aluminium foam. However, Al-7000 aluminium foam showed a decrease tendency of compressive strength probably due to existence of alumina silica (3Al2O3.SiO2) in the metal mixture. In this case, the silica that thermally combines with alumina compound may degrade the metal mixture of aluminium foam structure.

  14. Panelized wall system with foam core insulation

    DOEpatents

    Kosny, Jan; Gaskin, Sally

    2009-10-20

    A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

  15. Structure design of and experimental research on a two-stage laval foam breaker for foam fluid recycling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-song; Cao, Pin-lu; Yin, Kun

    2015-07-01

    Environmental, economical and efficient antifoaming technology is the basis for achievement of foam drilling fluid recycling. The present study designed a novel two-stage laval mechanical foam breaker that primarily uses vacuum generated by Coanda effect and Laval principle to break foam. Numerical simulation results showed that the value and distribution of negative pressure of two-stage laval foam breaker were larger than that of the normal foam breaker. Experimental results showed that foam-breaking efficiency of two-stage laval foam breaker was higher than that of normal foam breaker, when gas-to-liquid ratio and liquid flow rate changed. The foam-breaking efficiency of normal foam breaker decreased rapidly with increasing foam stability, whereas the two-stage laval foam breaker remained unchanged. Foam base fluid would be recycled using two-stage laval foam breaker, which would reduce the foam drilling cost sharply and waste disposals that adverse by affect the environment. PMID:26387358

  16. Structure design of and experimental research on a two-stage laval foam breaker for foam fluid recycling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-song; Cao, Pin-lu; Yin, Kun

    2015-07-01

    Environmental, economical and efficient antifoaming technology is the basis for achievement of foam drilling fluid recycling. The present study designed a novel two-stage laval mechanical foam breaker that primarily uses vacuum generated by Coanda effect and Laval principle to break foam. Numerical simulation results showed that the value and distribution of negative pressure of two-stage laval foam breaker were larger than that of the normal foam breaker. Experimental results showed that foam-breaking efficiency of two-stage laval foam breaker was higher than that of normal foam breaker, when gas-to-liquid ratio and liquid flow rate changed. The foam-breaking efficiency of normal foam breaker decreased rapidly with increasing foam stability, whereas the two-stage laval foam breaker remained unchanged. Foam base fluid would be recycled using two-stage laval foam breaker, which would reduce the foam drilling cost sharply and waste disposals that adverse by affect the environment.

  17. Foam vessel for cryogenic fluid storage

    DOEpatents

    Spear, Jonathan D

    2011-07-05

    Cryogenic storage and separator vessels made of polyolefin foams are disclosed, as are methods of storing and separating cryogenic fluids and fluid mixtures using these vessels. In one embodiment, the polyolefin foams may be cross-linked, closed-cell polyethylene foams with a density of from about 2 pounds per cubic foot to a density of about 4 pounds per cubic foot.

  18. Highly concentrated foam formulation for blast mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.; Gao, Huizhen

    2010-12-14

    A highly concentrated foam formulation for blast suppression and dispersion mitigation for use in responding to a terrorism incident involving a radiological dispersion device. The foam formulation is more concentrated and more stable than the current blast suppression foam (AFC-380), which reduces the logistics burden on the user.

  19. Foam: The "Right Stuff" for Extreme Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Imi-Tech Corporation, in cooperation with Johnson Space Center, introduced the Solimide AC-500 series of polyimide foam products designed to meet the needs of the aircraft/aerospace industry. These foams accomodate the requirements of state-of-the-art insulation systems. Solimide polyimide foams are currently used in defense, industrial and commercial applications.

  20. Foam formation in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Mcmanus, Samuel P.; Matthews, John; Patel, Darayas

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus that produced the first polyurethane foam in low gravity has been described. The chemicals were mixed together in an apparatus designed for operation in low gravity. Mixing was by means of stirring the chemicals with an electric motor and propeller in a mixing chamber. The apparatus was flown on Consort 1, the first low-gravity materials payload launched by a commercial rocket launch team. The sounding rocket flight produced over 7 min of low gravity during which a polyurethane spheroidal foam of approximately 2300 cu cm was formed. Photographs of the formation of the foam during the flight show the development of the spheroidal form. This begins as a small sphere and grows to approximately a 17-cm-diam spheroid. The apparatus will be flown again on subsequent low-gravity flights.

  1. Dynamics of Aqueous Foam Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akhatov, Iskander; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn

    2001-01-01

    We develop a model for the nonlinear oscillations of spherical drops composed of aqueous foam. Beginning with a simple mixture law, and utilizing a mass-conserving bubble-in-cell scheme, we obtain a Rayleigh-Plesset-like equation for the dynamics of bubbles in a foam mixture. The dispersion relation for sound waves in a bubbly liquid is then coupled with a normal modes expansion to derive expressions for the frequencies of eigenmodal oscillations. These eigenmodal (breathing plus higher-order shape modes) frequencies are elicited as a function of the void fraction of the foam. A Mathieu-like equation is obtained for the dynamics of the higher-order shape modes and their parametric coupling to the breathing mode. The proposed model is used to explain recently obtained experimental data.

  2. Microcellular carbon foam and method

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

    1993-05-04

    A microcellular carbon foam is characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1,000 mg/cm[sup 3], substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 [mu]m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 [mu]m. The foam has a well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.

  3. Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    2014 Cosmetic Plastic Surgery Statistics Cosmetic Procedure Trends 2014 Plastic Surgery Statistics Report Please credit the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF PLASTIC SURGEONS when citing statistical data or using ...

  4. Plastics Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 16 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of plastics technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific occupation and would…

  5. OpenFOAM for beginners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedyalkov, Ivaylo; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    OpenFOAM has gained significant popularity in academia and industry, but is still not widely introduced to CFD novices - e.g., undergraduate students. This is likely due to the steep learning curve of the software. A relatively short tutorial was developed to introduce students to the basic features of OpenFOAM, allowing them to modify and create simulations, and to better understand other online resources. The tutorial has been successfully introduced to students working on undergraduate capstone projects at the University of New Hampshire and parts of it were presented at a tech-camp for K-12 students.

  6. Microcellular carbon foam and method

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.

    1993-01-01

    A microcellular carbon foam characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1000 mg/cm.sup.3, substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 .mu.m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 .mu.m, well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.

  7. Microcellular carbon foam and method

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

    1993-12-07

    A microcellular carbon foam is characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1000 mg/cm[sup 3], substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 [mu]m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 [mu]m, well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.

  8. Microcellular carbon foam and method

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, Ronald F.; Brown, John D.

    1994-01-01

    A microcellular carbon foam characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1000 mg/cm.sup.3, substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 .mu.m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 .mu.m, well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.

  9. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    DOEpatents

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  10. Process for epoxy foam production

    DOEpatents

    Celina, Mathias C.

    2011-08-23

    An epoxy resin mixture with at least one epoxy resin of between approximately 60 wt % and 90 wt %, a maleic anhydride of between approximately 1 wt % and approximately 30 wt %, and an imidazole catalyst of less than approximately 2 wt % where the resin mixture is formed from at least one epoxy resin with a 1-30 wt % maleic anhydride compound and an imidazole catalyst at a temperature sufficient to keep the maleic anhydride compound molten, the resin mixture reacting to form a foaming resin which can then be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form an epoxy foam.

  11. Thermal Expansion of Polyurethane Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Sullivan, Roy M.

    2006-01-01

    Closed cell foams are often used for thermal insulation. In the case of the Space Shuttle, the External Tank uses several thermal protection systems to maintain the temperature of the cryogenic fuels. A few of these systems are polyurethane, closed cell foams. In an attempt to better understand the foam behavior on the tank, we are in the process of developing and improving thermal-mechanical models for the foams. These models will start at the microstructural level and progress to the overall structural behavior of the foams on the tank. One of the key properties for model characterization and verification is thermal expansion. Since the foam is not a material, but a structure, the modeling of the expansion is complex. It is also exacerbated by the anisoptropy of the material. During the spraying and foaming process, the cells become elongated in the rise direction and this imparts different properties in the rise direction than in the transverse directions. Our approach is to treat the foam as a two part structure consisting of the polymeric cell structure and the gas inside the cells. The polymeric skeleton has a thermal expansion of its own which is derived from the basic polymer chemistry. However, a major contributor to the thermal expansion is the volume change associated with the gas inside of the closed cells. As this gas expands it exerts pressure on the cell walls and changes the shape and size of the cells. The amount that this occurs depends on the elastic and viscoplastic properties of the polymer skeleton. The more compliant the polymeric skeleton, the more influence the gas pressure has on the expansion. An additional influence on the expansion process is that the polymeric skeleton begins to breakdown at elevated temperatures and releases additional gas species into the cell interiors, adding to the gas pressure. The fact that this is such a complex process makes thermal expansion ideal for testing the models. This report focuses on the thermal

  12. High temperature structural, polymeric foams from high internal emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hoisington, M.A.; Duke, J.R.; Apen, P.G.

    1996-02-01

    In 1982, a high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) polymerization process to manufacture microcellular, polymeric foam systems was patented by Unilever. This patent discloses a polymerization process that occurs in a water-in-oil emulsion in which the water represents at least 76% of the emulsion by volume. The oil phase consists of vinyl monomers such as styrene and acrylates that are crosslinked by divinyl monomers during polymerization. After polymerization and drying to remove the water phase, the result is a crosslinked polymer foam with an open cell microstructure that is homogeneous throughout in terms of morphology, density, and mechanical properties. Since 1982, numerous patents have examined various HIPE polymerized foam processing techniques and applications that include absorbents for body fluids, cleaning materials, and ion exchange systems. All the published HIPE polymerized foams have concentrated on materials for low temperature applications. Copolymerization of styrene with maleic anhydride and N-substituted maleimides to produce heat resistant thermoplastics has been studied extensively. These investigations have shown that styrene will free radically copolymerize with N-substituted maleimides to create an alternating thermoplastic copolymer with a Tg of approximately 200{degrees}C. However, there are many difficulties in attempting the maleimide styrene copolymerization in a HIPE such as lower polymerization temperatures, maleimide solubility difficulties in both styrene and water, and difficulty obtaining a stable HIPE with a styrene/maleimide oil phase. This work describes the preparation of copolymer foams from N-ethylmaleimide and Bis(3-ethyl-5-methyl-4-maleimide-phenyl)methane with styrene based monomers and crosslinking agents.

  13. Foam Transport in Porous Media - A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong

    2009-11-11

    Amendment solutions with or without surfactants have been used to remove contaminants from soil. However, it has drawbacks such that the amendment solution often mobilizes the plume, and its movement is controlled by gravity and preferential flow paths. Foam is an emulsion-like, two-phase system in which gas cells are dispersed in a liquid and separated by thin liquid films called lamellae. Potential advantages of using foams in sub-surface remediation include providing better control on the volume of fluids injected, uniformity of contact, and the ability to contain the migration of contaminant laden liquids. It is expected that foam can serve as a carrier of amendments for vadose zone remediation, e.g., at the Hanford Site. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s EM-20 program, a numerical simulation capability will be added to the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) flow simulator. The primary purpose of this document is to review the modeling approaches of foam transport in porous media. However, as an aid to understanding the simulation approaches, some experiments under unsaturated conditions and the processes of foam transport are also reviewed. Foam may be formed when the surfactant concentration is above the critical micelle concentration. There are two main types of foams – the ball foam (microfoam) and the polyhedral foam. The characteristics of bulk foam are described by the properties such as foam quality, texture, stability, density, surface tension, disjoining pressure, etc. Foam has been used to flush contaminants such as metals, organics, and nonaqueous phase liquids from unsaturated soil. Ball foam, or colloidal gas aphrons, reportedly have been used for soil flushing in contaminated site remediation and was found to be more efficient than surfactant solutions on the basis of weight of contaminant removed per gram of surfactant. Experiments also indicate that the polyhedral foam can be used to enhance soil remediation. The

  14. Using Improved Equation of State to Model Simultaneous Nucleation and Bubble Growth in Thermoplastic Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Irfan; Costeux, Stephane; Adrian, David; Cristancho, Diego

    2013-11-01

    Due to environmental regulations carbon-dioxide (CO2) is increasingly being used to replace traditional blowing agents in thermoplastic foams. CO2 is dissolved in the polymer matrix under supercritical conditions. In order to predict the effect of process parameters on foam properties using numerical modeling, the P-V-T relationship of the blowing agents should accurately be represented at the supercritical state. Previous studies in the area of foam modeling have all used ideal gas equation of state to predict the behavior of the blowing agent. In this work the Peng-Robinson equation of state is being used to model the blowing agent during its diffusion into the growing bubble. The model is based on the popular ``Influence Volume Approach,'' which assumes a growing boundary layer with depleted blowing agent surrounds each bubble. Classical nucleation theory is used to predict the rate of nucleation of bubbles. By solving the mass balance, momentum balance and species conservation equations for each bubble, the model is capable of predicting average bubble size, bubble size distribution and bulk porosity. The effect of the improved model on the bubble growth and foam properties are discussed.

  15. Method of making a cyanate ester foam

    SciTech Connect

    Celina, Mathias C.; Giron, Nicholas Henry

    2014-08-05

    A cyanate ester resin mixture with at least one cyanate ester resin, an isocyanate foaming resin, other co-curatives such as polyol or epoxy compounds, a surfactant, and a catalyst/water can react to form a foaming resin that can be cured at a temperature greater than 50.degree. C. to form a cyanate ester foam. The cyanate ester foam can be heated to a temperature greater than 400.degree. C. in a non-oxidative atmosphere to provide a carbonaceous char foam.

  16. Foaming dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caps, H.; Vandewalle, N.; Broze, G.

    2006-06-01

    We have studied foaming dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells partially filled with a soap and water mixture. A series of upside-down flips produces an intermittent wetting of the cell and leads to foam formation. As a function of the number of flips, an increasing number of bubbles composes the foam, until saturation is observed. Statistical analysis shows that the bubble size follows a Gamma distribution. Contrary to common belief, this foaming dynamics by “shaking” creates homogeneous foam, even though the system may pass through transient heterogeneous configurations. A mechanistic interpretation is proposed and included into a theoretical model.

  17. Low density, microcellular foams, preparation, and articles

    DOEpatents

    Young, Ainslie T.; Marsters, Robert G.; Moreno, Dawn K.

    1984-01-01

    A microcellular low density foam of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) which is particularly useful for forming targets for inertial confinement fusion has been developed. Articles made from the foam have been machined to tolerances of 0.0001 inch, although the densities of the fragile foam are low (about 10 to about 100 mg/cc) and the cell sizes are small (about 10 to about 30 .mu.m). Methods for forming the foam and articles are given; and the yield strength of the foam of the invention is higher than was obtained in other structures of this same material.

  18. Low density, microcellular foams, preparation, and articles

    DOEpatents

    Young, A.T.

    1982-03-03

    A microcellular low-density foam of poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) particularly useful for forming targets for inertial confinement fusion has been developed. Articles made from the foam have been machined to tolerances of 0.0001 inch, although the densities of the fragile foam are low (about 10 to about 100 mg/cc) and the cell sizes are small (about 10 to about 30 ..mu..m). Methods for forming the foam and articles are given. The yield strength of the foam of the invention is higher than was obtained in other structures of this same material.

  19. Fluid Physics of Foam Evolution and Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aref, H.; Thoroddsen, S. T.; Sullivan, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    The grant supported theoretical, numerical and experimental work focused on the elucidation of the fluid physics of foam structure, evolution and flow. The experimental work concentrated on these subject areas: (a) Measurements of the speed of reconnections within a foam; (b) statistics of bubble rearrangements; and (c) three-dimensional reconstruction of the foam structure. On the numerical simulation and theory side our efforts concentrated on the subjects: (a) simulation techniques for 2D and 3D foams; (b) phase transition in a compressible foam; and (c) TCP structures.

  20. Foaming dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells.

    PubMed

    Caps, H; Vandewalle, N; Broze, G

    2006-06-01

    We have studied foaming dynamics in Hele-Shaw cells partially filled with a soap and water mixture. A series of upside-down flips produces an intermittent wetting of the cell and leads to foam formation. As a function of the number of flips, an increasing number of bubbles composes the foam, until saturation is observed. Statistical analysis shows that the bubble size follows a Gamma distribution. Contrary to common belief, this foaming dynamics by "shaking" creates homogeneous foam, even though the system may pass through transient heterogeneous configurations. A mechanistic interpretation is proposed and included into a theoretical model. PMID:16906898

  1. Properties of 30 lb/ft{sup 3} rigid polyurethane foams

    SciTech Connect

    Wenski. E.G.; Stinebaugh, R.E.; York, A.R. II

    1997-03-01

    This report summarizes tests on five different foams. Two are manufactured at Allied Signal, two at North Carolina Foam Industries, and one at General Plastics. The tests conducted are: thermal conductivity at various temperatures, specific heat at 60{degrees}C, compressive strength at ambient and 60{degrees}C, thermogravimetric analysis to 800{degrees}C, intumescence, and char formation properties. A CHN analysis was also performed. Funding for the testing of rigid polyurethane foams originated from the AT-400A container program at Sandia National Laboratories. This testing supported the development of the AT-400A container. The AT-400A is a storage and transportation container that will be used initially at the Pantex Plant for storage of plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons.

  2. Foam shell cryogenic ICF target

    DOEpatents

    Darling, Dale H.

    1987-01-01

    A uniform cryogenic layer of DT fuel is maintained in a fusion target having a low density, small pore size, low Z rigid foam shell saturated with liquid DT fuel. Capillary action prevents gravitational slumping of the fuel layer. The saturated shell may be cooled to produce a solid fuel layer.

  3. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  4. Open-celled polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. W.

    1970-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foam has a density of 8.3 pounds per cubic foot and a compressive strength of 295 to 325 psi. It is useful as a porous spacer in layered insulation and as an insulation material in vacuum tight systems.

  5. Washing Off Polyurethane Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Fogel, Irving

    1990-01-01

    Jet of hot water removes material quickly and safely. Simple, environmentally sound technique found to remove polyurethane foam insulation from metal parts. Developed for (but not limited to) use during rebuilding of fuel system of Space Shuttle main engine, during which insulation must be removed for penetrant inspection of metal parts.

  6. Multiscale modelling of evolving foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saye, R. I.; Sethian, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a set of multi-scale interlinked algorithms to model the dynamics of evolving foams. These algorithms couple the key effects of macroscopic bubble rearrangement, thin film drainage, and membrane rupture. For each of the mechanisms, we construct consistent and accurate algorithms, and couple them together to work across the wide range of space and time scales that occur in foam dynamics. These algorithms include second order finite difference projection methods for computing incompressible fluid flow on the macroscale, second order finite element methods to solve thin film drainage equations in the lamellae and Plateau borders, multiphase Voronoi Implicit Interface Methods to track interconnected membrane boundaries and capture topological changes, and Lagrangian particle methods for conservative liquid redistribution during rearrangement and rupture. We derive a full set of numerical approximations that are coupled via interface jump conditions and flux boundary conditions, and show convergence for the individual mechanisms. We demonstrate our approach by computing a variety of foam dynamics, including coupled evolution of three-dimensional bubble clusters attached to an anchored membrane and collapse of a foam cluster.

  7. Investigation of in-situ poly(lactic acid)/soy protein concentrate composites: Composite preparation, properties and foam application development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo

    2011-12-01

    In this study, soy protein (SP), the residue of oil crushing, was used for preparation of value-added thermoplastics. Novel poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/soy protein concentrate (SPC) blends were investigated and foaming of the resulting blends was developed. PLA/SPC blends were prepared by twin-screw extrusion and test specimens by injection molding. Unlike the practice elsewhere SP was used as a filler in mixing with other polymers, SPC was processed as a plastic component in blending process in this work. Processing SPC as plastic component, water played an important role in terms of the deformability and the morphology of SP thus the properties of the blends. Plasticization of SP, compatibilization of the blends and structure-property relationship of the PLA/SPC blends were studied. In the literature water and glycerol were often used together in preparing SP plastics or plastic blends, but this study found that this traditional combination did not provide the best results in terms of morphology and mechanical properties. Water is only recommended in plasticizing SP in the blends. This study showed water as a plasticizer was a domain factor on control of morphology and properties of PLA/SPC blends. The due to the evaporation of water after extrusion, SP domain lost its deformability thus resulted in in-situ composites. Interconnected SPC phase structure was achieved by control water content in the pre-formulated SPC and SPC content in the blends. A novel dual compatibilization method was developed to improve the properties of PLA/SPC blends. Poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) was used to improve the dispersion of SPC in the blending stage, and polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate was used to improve the interfacial adhesion between SPC and PLA in the subsequent processing. The result showed excellent mechanical properties and improved thermal properties of PLA/SPC blends. Using processing aids is an effective way to decrease processing temperature and thermal degradation

  8. Fabrication of Microporous Corundum-Spinel Refractory Castables by Foam-Gelcasting Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huan; Liang, Feng; Fang, Wei; Chen, Hui; Du, Xing; Wang, Fucheng; Zhao, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Microporous corundum-spinel castables with high strength and low thermal conductivity have been fabricated by foam-gelcasting methods. A systematical investigation on different properties of samples, such as porosity, pore size distribution, thermal conductivity, cold modulus of rupture, and cold crushing strength has been taken in this paper, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the microstructure of samples. Results show that the average pore size increases correspondingly when the content of foaming agent increases from 0 to 2.0 wt.%. It was found that when the content of the foaming agent is up to 1.5 wt.%, the thermal conductivity, cold modulus of rupture, and cold crushing strength of samples were 0.751 W/mK at 1000 °C, 30.5, and 136 MPa, respectively.

  9. Plastic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Anil Kumar; Vinoth, Bharathi; Kuruvilla, Sarah; Sivakumar, Kothandam

    2015-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis, a rare but serious clinical condition, commonly seen after Fontan surgeries in children, may be a manifestation of suboptimal adaptation to the cavopulmonary circulation with unfavorable hemodynamics. They are ominous with poor prognosis. Sometimes, infection or airway reactivity may provoke cast bronchitis as a two-step insult on a vulnerable vascular bed. In such instances, aggressive management leads to longer survival. This report of cast bronchitis discusses its current understanding. PMID:26556975

  10. Relative merits of polystyrene foam and paper in hot drink cups: Implications for packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Martin B.

    1991-11-01

    An analysis of the overall relative merits of the use of uncoated paper vs molded polystyrene bead foam in single-use 8-oz cups is described here as a manageable example of the use of paper vs plastics in packaging. In raw material requirements the paper cup required about 2.5 times its finished weight of raw wood and about the same hydrocarbon fueling requirement as is needed for the polystyrene foam cup. To process the raw materials about six times as much steam, 13 times as much electric power, and twice as much cooling water are consumed to produce the paper cup as compared to the polystyrene foam cup. Emission rates to air are similar and to water are generally higher for the paper cup. Virtually all primary use factors favor polystyrene foam over paper. Once used both cup types may be recycled. Landfill disposal of the two items under dry conditions will occupy similar landfill volumes after compaction and will confer similarly slow to nonexistent decomposition to either option. Under wet conditions polystyrene foam will not readily degrade, but may help other materials to do so. Paper under wet conditions will biodegrade to produce methane, a significant greenhouse gas, biochemical oxygen demand to any leachate, and instability to the land surface during the process. Both materials can be incinerated cleanly in a municipal waste stream with the option of energy recovery, to yield an ash volume of 2% 5% of the incoming waste volume. Overall this analysis would suggest that polystyrene foam, with an extension to plastics in general, should be given more evenhanded consideration relative to paper in packaging applications than is currently the case.

  11. Multi-Partner Demonstration of Energy-Efficient and Environmentally Improved Methods for the Production of Polyurethane Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Mark L. Listemann

    2006-03-08

    The work described was focused on commercializing a new energy-efficient, enabling technology silicon surfactants that will allow the flexible foam industry to utilize environmentally benign CO2 as a blowing agent. These new products provide the means for more cost-effective and energy-efficient production of foam in an industry that is under increasing threat from foreign competition and environmental regulation.

  12. Plastic Materials for Insulating Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, S. F.; Grossman, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the production and use of polymer materials as thermal insulators. Lists several materials that provide varying degrees of insulation. Describes the production of polymer foam and focuses on the major applications of polystyrene foam, polyurethane foam, and polyisocyanurate foam. (TW)

  13. Biodegradation characteristics of starch-polystyrene loose-fill foams in a composting medium.

    PubMed

    Pushpadass, Heartwin A; Weber, Robert W; Dumais, Joseph J; Hanna, Milford A

    2010-10-01

    The structures and biodegradabilities of loose-fill foams, containing starch and polystyrene at ratios of 70:30 and 80:20, were evaluated using a laboratory composting system. Each formulation was foamed (extrusion expanded) using either 0.2% azodicarbonamide or 0.25% citric acid as the chemical blowing agent. Biodegradability, a measure of the quantity of material mineralized, was expressed as the percentage of CO(2) in the exhaust gas eluted from the individual chambers. The CO(2) generation peaked after about 15 days of composting, and then decreased. The rate and amount of CO(2) eluted depended on the starch content in the foams. Similarly, there were significant differences in the rates and quantities of CO(2) emissions for the foams blown with azodicarbonamide versus citric acid. At the end of the composting tests, the remaining foam material had fibrous and crumbly textures, presumably consisting primarily of polystyrene. FTIR and NMR spectra of the foams, taken after 39days of composting, did not reveal the spectral features of starch, thereby confirming the decomposition of the starch.

  14. Enhanced oil recovery by CO/sub 2/ foam flooding. First annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-02-01

    An extensive review of the literature revealed that the use of foam to lower the mobility of gases used to displace oil has been considered since 1956. Although early work was related mainly to light hydrocarbons, it is natural to extend the concept to the CO/sub 2/ flooding process. Samples of foaming agents, compatible with oil reservoir environments, were obtained from major manufacturers. Ninety-three samples were tested both alone and in admixture. The most promising class of additives appears to be ionic surfactants produced by ethoxylation of a linear alcohol followed by sulfation. One of the best, Plurafoam NO-2N was tested in a linear sandpack and found to reduce the mobility of gas relative to water an average of 300-fold. Viscosity measurements of the foam at varying shear rates were made to help explain the dramatic change in gas mobility in the linear flow model. The foam is non-Newtonian but many-fold more viscous than the liquid from which it is generated at all reasonable shear rates. Viscosities exceeding 1000 centipose are routinely obtained. Addition of water-soluble polymers to the foaming liquid greatly enhances the stability of the foam. Five different polymer structures were tested, all of which had a common cellulosic type backbone. Of this group, hydroxypropyl cellulose and zanthan gum appear to be the most promising candidates. The superiority of these polymers lies primarily in their stability at reservoir conditions in the acid environment created when carbon dioxide dissolves in water.

  15. Investigations on injection molded, glass-fiber reinforced polyamide 6 integral foams using breathing mold technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roch, A.; Kehret, L.; Huber, T.; Henning, F.; Elsner, P.

    2015-05-01

    Investigations on PA6-GF50 integral foams have been carried out using different material systems: longfiber- and shortfiber-reinforced PA6 as well as unreinforced PA6 as a reference material. Both chemical and physical blowing agents were applied. Breathing mold technology (decompression of the mold) was selected for the foaming process. The integral foam design, which can be conceived as a sandwich structure, helps to save material in the neutral axis area and maintains a distance between load-bearing, unfoamed skin layers. For all test series an initial mold gap of 2.5 mm was chosen and the same amount of material was injected. In order to realize different density reductions, the mold opening stroke was varied. The experiments showed that, at a constant mass per unit area, integral polyamide 6 foams have a significantly higher bending stiffness than compact components, due to their higher area moment of inertia after foaming. At a constant surface weight the bending stiffness in these experiments could be increased by up to 600 %. Both shortfiber- and longfiber-reinforced polyamide 6 showed an increase in energy absorption during foaming.

  16. mTOR Enhances Foam Cell Formation by Suppressing the Autophagy Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingxia; Niu, Xiaolin; Dang, Xiaoyan; Li, Ping; Qu, Li; Bi, Xiaoju; Gao, Yanxia; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Manxiang; Qiao, Wanhai; Peng, Zhuo; Pan, Longfei

    2014-01-01

    Recently, autophagy has drawn more attention in cardiovascular disease as it has important roles in lipid metabolism. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of autophagy; however, its effect on atherosclerosis and the underlying mechanism remains undefined. In this study, an obvious upregulation of mTOR and p-mTOR protein was observed in macrophage-derived foam cells. Blocking mTOR expression with specific small interference RNA (siRNA) dramatically suppressed foam cell formation, accompanied by a decrease of lipid deposition. Further mechanistic analysis indicated that suppressing mTOR expression significantly upregulated autophagic marker LC3 expression and downregulated autophagy substrate p62 levels, indicating that mTOR silencing triggered autophagosome formation. Moreover, blocking mTOR expression obviously accelerated neutral lipid delivery to lysosome and cholesterol efflux from foam cells, implying that mTOR could induce macrophage foam cell formation by suppressing autophagic pathway. Further, mTOR silencing significantly upregulated ULK1 expression, which was accounted for mTOR-induced foam cell formation via autophagic pathway as treatment with ULK1 siRNA dampened LC3-II levels and increased p62 expression, concomitant with lipid accumulation and decreased cholesterol efflux from foam cells. Together, our data provide an insight into how mTOR accelerates the pathological process of atherosclerosis. Accordingly, blocking mTOR levels may be a promising therapeutic agent against atherosclerotic complications. PMID:24512183

  17. New Twist on an Old Favorite: Gentian Violet and Methylene Blue Antibacterial Foams

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Absorptive antibacterial dressings that assist in controlling bioburden without risks of cytotoxicity or residual absorption can be effectively used for prolonged periods throughout the wound healing continuum. Recent Advances: Until recently, gentian violet and methylene blue (GV/MB) antibacterial dressings have been commercially available only in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) foam; polyurethane (PU) foam bonded with GV and MB with thin film backing is now commercially available. GV/MB PU foam does not require hydration or a necessary secondary dressing. GV/MB PVA and PU foam dressings were recently granted FDA clearance as antibacterial dressings, as opposed to bacteriostatic dressings as previously classified. Within the class of antibacterial dressings, GV/MB foam dressings are of lower cost alternative to silver- or iodine-based antibacterial dressings with no risk of absorption of any of the foam components into the tissues. Critical Issues: Control of wound bioburden levels by antibacterial agents and absorption of excess exudate are crucial in preventing infections that drastically increase the price of wound care. Use of GV/MB dressings may improve wound healing outcomes and decrease overall costs through super absorption, promotion of autolytic debridement, bioburden reduction, ease of use, and decreased dressing change frequency. Future Directions: Evolution in resistant bacterial strains will drive continual changes in advanced wound care products. Demand will increase for economically priced, versatile wound care dressings that assist in debridement, maintain a moist wound environment, absorb and trap bacterial debris, and decrease dressing change frequency. PMID:26858911

  18. 46 CFR 108.463 - Foam rate: Protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Foam rate: Protein. 108.463 Section 108.463 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.463 Foam rate: Protein. (a) If the outlets of a protein foam extinguishing system are in a space, the foam rate at each outlet must be...

  19. 46 CFR 108.463 - Foam rate: Protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Foam rate: Protein. 108.463 Section 108.463 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.463 Foam rate: Protein. (a) If the outlets of a protein foam extinguishing system are in a space, the foam rate at each outlet must be...

  20. 46 CFR 108.463 - Foam rate: Protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Foam rate: Protein. 108.463 Section 108.463 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.463 Foam rate: Protein. (a) If the outlets of a protein foam extinguishing system are in a space, the foam rate at each outlet must be...

  1. 46 CFR 108.463 - Foam rate: Protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Foam rate: Protein. 108.463 Section 108.463 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.463 Foam rate: Protein. (a) If the outlets of a protein foam extinguishing system are in a space, the foam rate at each outlet must be...

  2. 46 CFR 108.463 - Foam rate: Protein.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Foam rate: Protein. 108.463 Section 108.463 Shipping... EQUIPMENT Fire Extinguishing Systems Foam Extinguishing Systems § 108.463 Foam rate: Protein. (a) If the outlets of a protein foam extinguishing system are in a space, the foam rate at each outlet must be...

  3. Advanced Metal Foam Structures for Outer Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanan, Jay; Johnson, William; Peker, Atakan

    2005-01-01

    A document discusses a proposal to use advanced materials especially bulk metallic glass (BMG) foams in structural components of spacecraft, lunar habitats, and the like. BMG foams, which are already used on Earth in some consumer products, are superior to conventional metal foams: BMG foams have exceptionally low mass densities and high strength-to-weight ratios and are more readily processable into strong, lightweight objects of various sizes and shapes. These and other attractive properties of BMG foams would be exploited, according to the proposal, to enable in situ processing of BMG foams for erecting and repairing panels, shells, containers, and other objects. The in situ processing could include (1) generation of BMG foams inside prefabricated deployable skins that would define the sizes and shapes of the objects thus formed and (2) thermoplastic deformation of BMG foams. Typically, the generation of BMG foams would involve mixtures of precursor chemicals that would be subjected to suitable pressure and temperature schedules. In addition to serving as structural components, objects containing or consisting of BMG foams could perform such functions as thermal management, shielding against radiation, and shielding against hypervelocity impacts of micrometeors and small debris particles.

  4. Small cell foams and blends and a process for their preparation

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrand, David M.; Tomalia, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    Dense star polymers or dendrimers, modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell, act as molecular nucleating agents. These modified dense star polymers or dendrimers are particularly effective for the production of small cell foams.

  5. Small cell foams and blends and a process for their preparation

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrand, D.M.; Tomalia, D.A.

    1995-02-07

    Dense star polymers or dendrimers, modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell, act as molecular nucleating agents. These modified dense star polymers or dendrimers are particularly effective for the production of small cell foams.

  6. Recovery Act. Advanced Building Insulation by the CO2 Foaming Process

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Arthur

    2013-12-30

    In this project, ISTN proposed to develop a new "3rd" generation of insulation technology. The focus was a cost-effective foaming process that could be used to manufacture XPS and other extruded polymer foams using environmentally clean blowing agents, and ultimately achieve higher R-values than existing products while maintaining the same level of cost-efficiency. In the U.S., state-of-the-art products are primarily manufactured by two companies: Dow and Owens Corning. These products (i.e., STYROFOAM and FOAMULAR) have a starting thermal resistance of R-5.0/inch, which declines over the life of the product as the HFC blowing agents essential to high R-value exchange with air in the environment. In the existing technologies, the substitution of CO2 for HFCs as the primary foaming agent results in a much lower starting R-value, as evidenced in CO2-foamed varieties of XPS in Europe with R-4.2/inch insulation value. The major overarching achievement from this project was ISTN's development of a new process that uses CO2 as a clean blowing agent to achieve up to R-5.2/inch at the manufacturing scale, with a production cost on a per unit basis that is less than the cost of Dow and Owens Corning XPS products.

  7. Linear elastic behavior of dry soap foams

    SciTech Connect

    Kraynik, A.M.; Reinelt, D.A.

    1996-08-10

    Linear elastic constants are computed for three dry foams that have crystal symmetry, bubbles with equal volume V, and films with uniform surface tension T. The Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams contain one, two, and eight bubbles in the unit cell, respectively. All three foams have 14-sided bubbles, but these tetrakaidecahedra have different topology; the Weaire-Phelan foam also contains pentagonal dodecahedra. In addition to the bulk modulus for volume compression, the authors calculate two shear moduli for the Kelvin and Weaire-Phelan foams, which have cubic symmetry, and four shear moduli for the Williams foam, which has tetragonal symmetry. The Williams foam has five elastic constants, not six, because the stress remains isotropic for uniform expansion; this is not guaranteed by symmetry alone. The two shear moduli for the Weaire-Phelan foam differ by less than 5%. The other two foams exhibit much greater elastic anisotropy; their shear moduli differ by a factor of 2. An effective isotropic shear modulus {bar G}, which represents the response averaged over all orientations, is evaluated for each foam. Scaled by T/V{sup 1/3}, {bar G} is 0.8070, 0.7955, and 0.8684 for the Kelvin, Williams, and Weaire-Phelan foams, respectively. When extrapolated to the dry limit, the shear modulus data of Princen and Kiss (for concentrated oil-in-water emulsions with polydisperse drop-size distributions) fall within the range of the calculations. The Surface Evolver program, developed by Brakke, was used to compute minimal surfaces for the dry foams. Also reported for each undeformed foam are various geometric constants relating to interfacial energy density, cell edge length, and bubble pressure.

  8. The deformation and failure response of closed-cell PMDI foams subjected to dynamic impact loading

    SciTech Connect

    Koohbor, Behrad; Mallon, Silas; Kidane, Addis; Lu, Wei -Yang

    2015-04-07

    The present work aims to investigate the bulk deformation and failure response of closed-cell Polymeric Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (PMDI) foams subjected to dynamic impact loading. First, foam specimens of different initial densities are examined and characterized in quasi-static loading conditions, where the deformation behavior of the samples is quantified in terms of the compressive elastic modulus and effective plastic Poisson's ratio. Then, the deformation response of the foam specimens subjected to direct impact loading is examined by taking into account the effects of material compressibility and inertia stresses developed during deformation, using high speed imaging in conjunction with 3D digital image correlation. The stress-strain response and the energy absorption as a function of strain rate and initial density are presented and the bulk failure mechanisms are discussed. As a result, it is observed that the initial density of the foam and the applied strain rates have a substantial influence on the strength, bulk failure mechanism and the energy dissipation characteristics of the foam specimens.

  9. The deformation and failure response of closed-cell PMDI foams subjected to dynamic impact loading

    DOE PAGES

    Koohbor, Behrad; Mallon, Silas; Kidane, Addis; Lu, Wei -Yang

    2015-04-07

    The present work aims to investigate the bulk deformation and failure response of closed-cell Polymeric Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (PMDI) foams subjected to dynamic impact loading. First, foam specimens of different initial densities are examined and characterized in quasi-static loading conditions, where the deformation behavior of the samples is quantified in terms of the compressive elastic modulus and effective plastic Poisson's ratio. Then, the deformation response of the foam specimens subjected to direct impact loading is examined by taking into account the effects of material compressibility and inertia stresses developed during deformation, using high speed imaging in conjunction with 3D digitalmore » image correlation. The stress-strain response and the energy absorption as a function of strain rate and initial density are presented and the bulk failure mechanisms are discussed. As a result, it is observed that the initial density of the foam and the applied strain rates have a substantial influence on the strength, bulk failure mechanism and the energy dissipation characteristics of the foam specimens.« less

  10. Lightweight polypropylene/stainless-steel fiber composite foams with low percolation for efficient electromagnetic interference shielding.

    PubMed

    Ameli, Aboutaleb; Nofar, Mohammadreza; Wang, Sai; Park, Chul B

    2014-07-23

    Lightweight polypropylene/stainless-steel fiber (PP-SSF) composites with 15-35% density reduction were fabricated using foam injection molding. The electrical percolation threshold, through-plane electrical conductivity, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of the PP-SSF composite foams were characterized and compared against the solid counterparts. With 3 wt % CO2 dissolved in PP as a temporary plasticizer and lubricant, the fiber breakage was significantly decreased during injection molding, and well-dispersed fibers with unprecedentedly large aspect ratios of over 100 were achieved. The percolation threshold was dramatically decreased from 0.85 to 0.21 vol %, accounting for 75% reduction, which is highly superior, compared to 28% reduction of the previous PP-carbon fiber composite foam.1 Unlike the case of carbon fiber,1 SSFs were much longer than the cell size, and the percolation threshold reduction of PP-SSF composite foams was thus primarily governed by the decreased fiber breakage instead of fiber orientation. The specific EMI SE was also significantly enhanced. A maximum specific EMI SE of 75 dB·g(-1)·cm(3) was achieved in PP-1.1 vol % SSF composite foams, which was much higher than that of the solid counterpart. Also, the relationships between the microstructure and properties were discussed. The mechanism of EMI shielding enhancement was also studied. PMID:24964159

  11. Foam injection molding of polypropylene/stainless steel fiber composites for efficient EMI shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, A.; Nofar, M.; Saniei, M.; Wang, S.; Park, C. B.

    2016-03-01

    Lightweight polypropylene/stainless-steel fiber (PP-SSF) composites with 15-35% density reduction were fabricated using foam injection molding and supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2). The electrical percolation threshold, through-plane electrical conductivity, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of the PP-SSF composite foams were characterized and compared against the solid samples. The effects of the plasticizing gas and the void fraction on fiber breakage and orientation were also investigated. Microstructure characterization showed that the presence of dissolved CO2 decreased fiber breakage by about 30%, and together with foaming action, contributed to less preferential orientation of fibers. Consequently, the percolation threshold decreased up to four folds from 0.85 to 0.21 vol.% as the void fraction increased from 0 to 35%. The specific EMI SE was also significantly enhanced. A maximum specific EMI SE of 75 dB.g-1cm3 was achieved in PP-1.1 vol.% SSF composite foams, which was highly superior to 38 dB.g-1cm3 of the solid PP-1.0 vol.% SSF composites. The results reveal that light and efficient products with a lower fiber content can be developed by foam for EMI shielding applications.

  12. Lightweight polypropylene/stainless-steel fiber composite foams with low percolation for efficient electromagnetic interference shielding.

    PubMed

    Ameli, Aboutaleb; Nofar, Mohammadreza; Wang, Sai; Park, Chul B

    2014-07-23

    Lightweight polypropylene/stainless-steel fiber (PP-SSF) composites with 15-35% density reduction were fabricated using foam injection molding. The electrical percolation threshold, through-plane electrical conductivity, and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of the PP-SSF composite foams were characterized and compared against the solid counterparts. With 3 wt % CO2 dissolved in PP as a temporary plasticizer and lubricant, the fiber breakage was significantly decreased during injection molding, and well-dispersed fibers with unprecedentedly large aspect ratios of over 100 were achieved. The percolation threshold was dramatically decreased from 0.85 to 0.21 vol %, accounting for 75% reduction, which is highly superior, compared to 28% reduction of the previous PP-carbon fiber composite foam.1 Unlike the case of carbon fiber,1 SSFs were much longer than the cell size, and the percolation threshold reduction of PP-SSF composite foams was thus primarily governed by the decreased fiber breakage instead of fiber orientation. The specific EMI SE was also significantly enhanced. A maximum specific EMI SE of 75 dB·g(-1)·cm(3) was achieved in PP-1.1 vol % SSF composite foams, which was much higher than that of the solid counterpart. Also, the relationships between the microstructure and properties were discussed. The mechanism of EMI shielding enhancement was also studied.

  13. Nanocellular thermoplastic foam and process for making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lingbo; Costeux, Stephane; Patankar, Kshitish A.; Moore, Jonathan D.

    2015-09-29

    Prepare a thermoplastic polymer foam having a porosity of 70% or more and at least one of: (i) an average cell size of 200 nanometers or less; and (ii) a nucleation density of at least 1.times.1015 effective nucleation sites per cubic centimeter of foamable polymer composition not including blowing agent using a foamable polymer composition containing a thermoplastic polymer selected from styrenic polymer and (meth)acrylic polymers, a blowing agent comprising at least 20 mole-percent carbon dioxide based on moles of blowing agent and an additive having a Total Hansen Solubility Parameter that differs from that of carbon dioxide by less than 2 and that is present at a concentration of 0.01 to 1.5 weight parts per hundred weight parts thermoplastic polymer.

  14. Plastic debris in the coastal environment: The invincible threat? Abundance of buried plastic debris on Malaysian beaches.

    PubMed

    Fauziah, S H; Liyana, I A; Agamuthu, P

    2015-09-01

    Studies on marine debris have gained worldwide attention since many types of debris have found their way into the food chain of higher organisms. Thus, it is crucial that more focus is given to this area in order to curb contaminations in sea food. This study was conducted to quantify plastic debris buried in sand at selected beaches in Malaysia. Marine debris was identified according to size range and distribution, and this information was related to preventive actions to improve marine waste issues. For the purpose of this study, comparison of plastic waste abundance between a recreational beach and fish-landing beaches was also carried out, since the different beach types represent different activities that produce debris. Six beaches along the Malaysian coastline were selected for this study. The plastic types in this study were related to the functions of the beach. While recreational beaches have abundant quantities of plastic film, foamed plastic including polystyrene, and plastic fragment, fish-landing beaches accumulated line and foamed plastic. A total of 2542 pieces (265.30 g m(-2)) of small plastic debris were collected from all six beaches, with the highest number from Kuala Terengganu, at 879 items m(-2) on Seberang Takir Beach, followed by Batu Burok Beach with 780 items m(-2). Findings from studies of Malaysian beaches have provided a clearer understanding of the distribution of plastic debris. This demonstrates that commitments and actions, such as practices of the 'reduce, reuse, recycle' (3R) approach, supporting public awareness programmes and beach clean-up activities, are essential in order to reduce and prevent plastic debris pollution.

  15. Plastic debris in the coastal environment: The invincible threat? Abundance of buried plastic debris on Malaysian beaches.

    PubMed

    Fauziah, S H; Liyana, I A; Agamuthu, P

    2015-09-01

    Studies on marine debris have gained worldwide attention since many types of debris have found their way into the food chain of higher organisms. Thus, it is crucial that more focus is given to this area in order to curb contaminations in sea food. This study was conducted to quantify plastic debris buried in sand at selected beaches in Malaysia. Marine debris was identified according to size range and distribution, and this information was related to preventive actions to improve marine waste issues. For the purpose of this study, comparison of plastic waste abundance between a recreational beach and fish-landing beaches was also carried out, since the different beach types represent different activities that produce debris. Six beaches along the Malaysian coastline were selected for this study. The plastic types in this study were related to the functions of the beach. While recreational beaches have abundant quantities of plastic film, foamed plastic including polystyrene, and plastic fragment, fish-landing beaches accumulated line and foamed plastic. A total of 2542 pieces (265.30 g m(-2)) of small plastic debris were collected from all six beaches, with the highest number from Kuala Terengganu, at 879 items m(-2) on Seberang Takir Beach, followed by Batu Burok Beach with 780 items m(-2). Findings from studies of Malaysian beaches have provided a clearer understanding of the distribution of plastic debris. This demonstrates that commitments and actions, such as practices of the 'reduce, reuse, recycle' (3R) approach, supporting public awareness programmes and beach clean-up activities, are essential in order to reduce and prevent plastic debris pollution. PMID:26092255

  16. Foam-oil interaction in porous media: implications for foam assisted enhanced oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Farajzadeh, R; Andrianov, A; Krastev, R; Hirasaki, G J; Rossen, W R

    2012-11-15

    The efficiency of a foam displacement process in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) depends largely on the stability of foam films in the presence of oil. Experimental studies have demonstrated the detrimental impact of oil on foam stability. This paper reviews the mechanisms and theories (disjoining pressure, coalescence and drainage, entering and spreading of oil, oil emulsification, pinch-off, etc.) suggested in the literature to explain the impact of oil on foam stability in the bulk and porous media. Moreover, we describe the existing approaches to foam modeling in porous media and the ways these models describe the oil effect on foam propagation in porous media. Further, we present various ideas on an improvement of foam stability and longevity in the presence of oil. The outstanding questions regarding foam-oil interactions and modeling of these interactions are pointed out.

  17. Thermodynamic and mechanical timescales involved in foam film rupture and liquid foam coalescence.

    PubMed

    Rio, Emmanuelle; Biance, Anne-Laure

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the coalescence in liquid foams are reviewed, with a special focus on the multiscale structure of foams. Studies concerning the stability of isolated foam films, on the one hand, and the coalescence process in macroscopic foams, on the other hand, are not always in good agreement. This discrepancy reveals that two routes can induce coalescence in a foam. The first route is thermodynamic and shows that coalescence is governed by a stochastic rupture of foam films. The second route relies on a mechanically induced rupture of the films, due to the spontaneous evolution of foams. From a literature review, the evaluation of the different timescales involved in these mechanisms allows defining the limiting parameters of foam coalescence.

  18. Rigid closed-cell polyimide foams for aircraft applications and foam-in-place technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliani, J.; Straub, P.; Gagliani, J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Significant accomplishments generated are summarized. Testing of closed cell foams, which has resulted in the characterization of compositions which produce rigid foams for use in galley structure applications is reported. It is shown that the density, compressive strength and shear strength of the foams are directly related to the concentrations of the microballoons. The same properties are also directly related to the resin loading. Prototype samples of rigid closed cell foams meeting the requirements of the program were submitted. Investigation of the apparatus to produce polyimide foams using foam in place techniques, resulted in the selection of a spray gun apparatus, capable to deliver a mixture of microballoons and resin binder on substrates which cures to yield a closed cell foam. It is found that the adhesion of the foam on aluminum, titanium and steel substrates is satisfactory. It is concluded that the material meets the mechanical and thermal requirements of the program.

  19. Microcellular carbon foam and method

    DOEpatents

    Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

    1994-04-05

    A microcellular carbon foam is described which is characterized by a density in the range of about 30 to 1000 mg/cm[sup 3], substantially uniform distribution of cell sizes of diameters less than 100 [mu]m with a majority of the cells being of a diameter of less than about 10 [mu]m, well interconnected strut morphology providing open porosity, and an expanded d(002) X-ray turbostatic spacing greater than 3.50 angstroms. The precursor for the carbon foam is prepared by the phase inversion of polyacrylonitrile in a solution consisting essentially of at least one alkali metal halide and a phase inversion solvent for the polyacrylonitrile.

  20. Foam Core Shielding for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A foam core shield (FCS) system is now being developed to supplant multilayer insulation (MLI) systems heretofore installed on spacecraft for thermal management and protection against meteoroid impacts. A typical FCS system consists of a core sandwiched between a face sheet and a back sheet. The core can consist of any of a variety of low-to-medium-density polymeric or inorganic foams chosen to satisfy application-specific requirements regarding heat transfer and temperature. The face sheet serves to shock and thereby shatter incident meteoroids, and is coated on its outer surface to optimize its absorptance and emittance for regulation of temperature. The back sheet can be dimpled to minimize undesired thermal contact with the underlying spacecraft component and can be metallized on the surface facing the component to optimize its absorptance and emittance. The FCS systems can perform better than do MLI systems, at lower mass and lower cost and with greater volumetric efficiency.