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Sample records for agents hairy cell

  1. [Hairy cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, S; Andrulis, M; Zenz, T

    2015-04-01

    Hairy cell leukemia was initially described as a distinct entity in 1958. It is rare B-cell malignancy characterized by an indolent course. Advances in the treatment and understanding of the biology of hairy cell leukemia have made the disease exquisitely amenable to treatment. This review summarizes the present understanding of hairy cell leukemia with a particular focus on the development of novel and targeted approaches to treatment. PMID:25787322

  2. 75 FR 54496 - Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy Cell Leukemia and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-08

    ... Federal Register (75 FR 53202), an amendment to 38 CFR 3.309 to add hairy cell leukemia and other chronic B-cell leukemias, Parkinson's disease and ischemic heart disease to the list of diseases subject to... Cell Leukemia and Other Chronic B-Cell Leukemias, Parkinson's Disease and Ischemic Heart...

  3. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Option Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Hairy ...

  4. General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  5. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia: Introduction Request Permissions Print to PDF Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia: Introduction ... Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia Guide ...

  6. [Lymphoid myelofibrosis or hairy cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Lovisetto, P; Pellegrino, P; Tallone, M V; Biarese, V; La Rosa, G F

    1977-05-26

    By lymphoid myelofibrosis or hairy cell leukaemia or tricholeukaemia is meant an unusual haemopathic condition known only for the past few years. It is characterized pathognomonically by the presence of lymphocyte type cells with villous extroflexions, hence the name "hairy cell". Clinically the disease presents as an involutive myelopathy associated with splenomegaly, generally without any particular lymph gland involvement. The attention of students today is concentrated on the nature of the hairy cells; while some are inclined to admit their monocyte or histiocyte derivation, others consider that they derive from B lymphocytes. Therapeutically, almost everybody agrees that splenectomy is the only valid step. A case of H.C.L., which was typical from the clinical and laboratory viewpoints is reported. It is probable that certain haemopathic pictures once classified among atypical leucoses and lymphomas, would today be more correctly classed as hairy cell leukaemia. PMID:327348

  7. Eliminating Hairy Cell Leukemia Minimal Residual Disease

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have disease-related symptoms that require treatment will be randomly assigned to receive cladribine with either concurrent rituximab or rituximab at least 6 months after completing cladribine therapy.

  8. Immunotoxin Therapy for Relapsed Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have relapsed multiple times or not responded to prior chemotherapy will be treated with an experimental immunotoxin called moxetumomab pasudotox given intravenously on days 1, 3, and 5 of 28-day cycles

  9. Hairy cell leukemia: clinical features and therapeutic advances.

    PubMed

    Lembersky, B C; Golomb, H M

    1987-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a rare chronic lymphoproliferative disorder which has been extensively studied over the past decade. Much has been learned regarding the diagnosis, natural history, biology, and treatment of this unique neoplasm. The disease most commonly affects middle aged men and characteristic clinical features include splenomegaly, cytopenias, and usually the presence in the peripheral blood of distinctive 'hairy cells' with irregular cytoplasmic projections. Diagnosis can usually be confirmed by bone marrow biopsy. Although the natural history can be extremely variable among patients, complications are usually referable to the cytopenias, with anemia and infection being most frequent. In addition to pyogenic infections, patients are susceptible to unusual organisms including atypical mycobacterium, legionella, and fungi. The requirement of red blood cell transfusion, severe granulocytopenia or thrombocytopenia, frequent infections, or painful splenomegaly are all indications for treatment. Splenectomy is the standard initial treatment of choice. However, in the past few years there have been exciting major advances in the therapeutic modalities for HCL. Recombinant alpha-interferon is highly effective, with beneficial responses occurring in close to 90% of patients. The Food and Drug Administration has recently approved the use of interferon for HCL. This represents the first time a biological response modifier has been approved for the treatment of human disease. In addition, preliminary results with the adenosine deaminase inhibitor, 2'deoxycoformycin (dcf), have been encouraging. Further clinical trials are required in order to determine the optimal sequential treatment strategy for HCL. The exact mechanisms of action of both interferon and dcf in HCL remain to be elucidated. A better understanding of the unusual features of the hairy cell and the underlying biological effect of these two agents in HCL may have important applications in other

  10. Hairy cell leukemia – immunotargets and therapies

    PubMed Central

    Basheer, Faisal; Bloxham, David M; Scott, Mike A; Follows, George A

    2014-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is an indolent low-grade B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder that is reasonably sensitive to standard first-line purine analog therapy. However, in many cases, repeat relapses occur, requiring multiple courses of purine analog therapy, promoting eventual drug resistance. This, coupled with the concerning side effects of repeated purine analog exposure, has prompted the search for alternative targets and therapies that may provide deeper remissions. Novel strategies employing immune-mediated targeting via monoclonal antibody therapies and recombinant immunotoxins appear promising in HCL and are currently under investigation. More recently, the concept of targeted kinase inhibition using small-molecule inhibitors in HCL has emerged as another potentially viable option. As a deeper understanding of the aberrant molecular pathways contributing to the pathogenesis of HCL develops, the landscape of management for HCL, particularly in the relapse setting, may change significantly in the future as a result of these promising immunotargets and therapies. PMID:27471703

  11. Current and emerging treatment options for hairy cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    López-Rubio, Montserrat; Garcia-Marco, Jose Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a lymphoproliferative B-cell disorder characterized by pancytopenia, splenomegaly, and characteristic cytoplasmic hairy projections. Precise diagnosis is essential in order to differentiate classic forms from HCL variants, such as the HCL-variant and VH4-34 molecular variant, which are more resistant to available treatments. The current standard of care is treatment with purine analogs (PAs), such as cladribine or pentostatin, which provide a high rate of long-lasting clinical remissions. Nevertheless, ~30%–40% of the patients relapse, and moreover, some of these are difficult-to-treat refractory cases. The use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab in combination with PA appears to produce even higher responses, and it is often employed to minimize or eliminate residual disease. Currently, research in the field of HCL is focused on identifying novel therapeutic targets and potential agents that are safe and can universally cure the disease. The discovery of the BRAF mutation and progress in understanding the biology of the disease has enabled the scientific community to explore new therapeutic targets. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing various treatment strategies such as the combination of PA and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, recombinant immunotoxins targeting CD22, BRAF inhibitors, and B-cell receptor signal inhibitors. PMID:26316784

  12. Treating Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have not responded or relapsed after initial chemotherapy will be randomly assigned to receive rituximab combined with either pentostatin or bendamustine.

  13. BRAF MUTATIONS IN HAIRY CELL LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Tiacci, Enrico; Trifonov, Vladimir; Schiavoni, Gianluca; Holmes, Antony; Kern, Wolfgang; Martelli, Maria Paola; Pucciarini, Alessandra; Bigerna, Barbara; Pacini, Roberta; Wells, Victoria; Sportoletti, Paolo; Pettirossi, Valentina; Mannucci, Roberta; Elliott, Oliver; Liso, Arcangelo; Ambrosetti, Achille; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Forconi, Francesco; Trentin, Livio; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Inghirami, Giorgio; Capponi, Monia; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Patti, Caterina; Arcaini, Luca; Musto, Pellegrino; Pileri, Stefano; Haferlach, Claudia; Schnittger, Susanne; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Foà, Robin; Farinelli, Laurent; Haferlach, Torsten; Pasqualucci, Laura; Rabadan, Raul; Falini, Brunangelo

    2013-01-01

    Background Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a well defined clinico-pathological entity whose underlying genetic lesion is still obscure. Methods We searched for HCL-associated mutations by massively parallel sequencing of the whole exome of leukemic and matched normal mononuclear cells purified from the peripheral blood of one patient with HCL. Results Whole exome sequencing identified 5 missense somatic clonal mutations that were confirmed at Sanger sequencing, including a heterozygous V600E mutation involving the BRAF gene. Since the BRAF V600E mutation is oncogenic in other tumors, further analyses were focused on this genetic lesion. Sanger sequencing detected mutated BRAF in 46/46 additional HCL patients (47/47 including the index case; 100%). None of the 193 peripheral B-cell lymphomas/leukemias other than HCL that were investigated carried the BRAF V600E mutation, including 36 cases of splenic marginal zone lymphomas and unclassifiable splenic lymphomas/leukemias. Immunohistological and Western blot studies showed that HCL cells express phospho-MEK and phospho-ERK (the downstream targets of the BRAF kinase), indicating a constitutive activation of the RAF-MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in HCL. In vitro incubation of BRAF-mutated primary leukemic cells from 5 HCL patients with PLX-4720, a specific inhibitor of active BRAF, led to marked decrease of phosphorylated ERK and MEK. Conclusions The BRAF V600E mutation was present in all HCL patients investigated. This finding may have relevant implications for the pathogenesis, diagnosis and targeted therapy of HCL (Funded by the Associazione Italiana Ricerca Cancro and others). PMID:21663470

  14. A Unique Hairy Cell Leukemia Variant.

    PubMed

    Jian, Charles; Hsia, Cyrus C

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with easy bruising, left upper quadrant pain, decreased appetite, and weight loss. She had splenomegaly and lymphocytosis (lymphocyte count of 11.6 × 10(9)/l), with remarkably abnormal appearing morphology. Her hemoglobin and platelet counts were normal. Peripheral blood flow cytometry revealed a monoclonal B-cell population expressing CD11c, CD25, CD19, CD20, and CD103. An initial diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) was made, and the patient was treated with a standard 5-day course of cladribine. However, her lymphocytosis improved transiently, with a relapse 4 months later. There was no improvement in her splenomegaly. An HCL variant (HCL-v) was considered based on her resistance to treatment with a purine nucleoside analog. A subsequent splenectomy improved symptoms. Two years after, the patient suffered a relapse and underwent 6 cycles of CHOP-R (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunomycin, oncovin, prednisone, and rituximab), achieving partial remission. While under observation, she progressed with lymphocytosis 6 months later and was treated with pentostatin. There was no significant improvement in her disease, and she died 8 weeks following treatment initiation. HCL-v is a clinically more aggressive mature B-cell lymphoma than HCL with worse splenomegaly, higher lymphocyte counts, and resistance to typical HCL therapy with purine nucleoside analogs. Early recognition of HCL-v in the history, physical examination, and investigations with morphology and flow cytometry is key to patient management. Further, as in our case of HCL-v, cell morphology can be distinctly atypical, with large nucleoli and extremely convoluted nuclei. The distinction between HCL and HCL-v is important as HCL-v patients require more aggressive therapy and closer follow-up. PMID:27462230

  15. [Chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders with hairy cells].

    PubMed

    Troussard, Xavier; Cornet, Édouard

    2015-01-01

    The standardized blood smear examination is the first step in the diagnosis of a B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorder and can guide further investigations. In the laboratory, the identification of hairy cells on blood smear is a matter of daily practice. Hairy cell proliferations represent heterogeneous entities and their respective diagnoses can be difficult. If hairy cell leukemia (HCL) and splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) represent separate entities, the variant form of HCL (HCLv) and splenic diffuse red pulp small B-cell lymphoma (SDRPL) remain provisional entities in the 2008 WHO classification. We discuss the main clinical and biological characteristics of these four entities and appropriate means to characterize, identify and distinguish from each other; standardized blood smear examination, multiparameter flow cytometry analysis, analysis of the repertoire of immunoglobulins heavy chains genes and their mutational status (mutated or unmutated profile), molecular analyses: BRAF gene V600E mutation in HCL and MAP2K1 gene mutations in HCLv. We also discuss the main therapeutic aspects with emphasis on the new targeted drugs that enter into force in the therapeutic arsenal. PMID:25858127

  16. [Novelties in the diagnostics and therapy of hairy cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Sári, Eszter; Rajnai, Hajnalka; Dénes, Kitti; Bödör, Csaba; Csomor, Judit; Körösmezey, Gábor; Tárkányi, Ilona; Eid, Hanna; Nagy, Zsolt; Demeter, Judit

    2016-06-01

    Differential diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) and related disorders (hairy cell leukemia variant and splenic marginal zone lymphoma) is of utmost importance since the treatment and prognosis of these lymphomas differ. Since 2011 diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia has been easier because of discovery of the disease defining somatic mutation BRAF V600E mutation, which has been also known as driver mutation in malignant melanoma. The presence of this mutation enabled targeted molecular therapy in HCL as well. As first line therapy purine nucleoside analogues are the gold standard, but refractory/relapsed patient are candidates for targeted BRAF-inhibitor therapy. This manuscript serves as guidance in making diagnosis and standard treatment of HCL, and summarizes newest data about molecular therapy, including our single center experience collected from 75 patients. PMID:27275640

  17. Hairy cell leukemia: short review, today's recommendations and outlook

    PubMed Central

    Maevis, V; Mey, U; Schmidt-Wolf, G; Schmidt-Wolf, I G H

    2014-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is part of the low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma family and represents approximately 2% of all leukemias. Treatment with splenectomy and interferon-α historically belonged to the first steps of therapeutic options, achieving partial responses/remissions (PR) in most cases with a median survival between 4 and 6 years in the 1980s. The introduction of the purine analogs (PA) pentostatin and cladribine made HCL a well-treatable disease: overall complete response rates (CRR) range from 76 to 98%, with a median disease-free survival (DFS) of 16 years a normal lifespan can be reached and HCL-related deaths are rare. However, insufficient response to PA with poorer prognosis and relapse rates of 30–40% after 5–10 years of follow-up may require alternative strategies. Minimal residual disease can be detected by additional examinations of bone marrow specimens after treatment with PA. The use of immunotherapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAB) like rituximab as a single agent or in combination with a PA or more recently clinical trials with recombinant immunotoxins (RIT) show promising results to restrict these problems. Recently, the identification of the possible disease-defining BRAF V600E mutation may allow the development of new therapeutic targets. PMID:24531447

  18. The importance of the tissue microenvironment in hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sivina, Mariela; Burger, Jan A

    2015-12-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) cells engage in complex cellular and molecular interactions with accessory cells, matrix proteins, and various cytokines in the bone marrow and spleen, collectively referred to as the tissue microenvironment. Chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules are critical players for homing and retention within these microenvironments. Engagement of B cell antigen receptors and CD40 on HCL cells promote survival and proliferation. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge about the cellular and molecular interactions between HCL cells and their supportive tissue microenvironment, and provide insight into new therapeutic approaches targeting B cell receptor signaling in HCL. PMID:26614899

  19. Immunoconjugates in the management of hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, Robert J; Pastan, Ira

    2015-12-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is an indolent B-cell malignancy effectively treated but not often cured by purine analog therapy; after multiple courses of purine analogs, patients can become purine analog resistant and in need of alternative therapies. Complete remission to single-agent purine analog is often accompanied by minimal residual disease (MRD), residual HCL cells detectable by immunologic methods, considered a risk factor for eventual relapse. Several different non-chemotherapy approaches are being used to target relapsed and refractory HCL, including inhibitors of BRAF, but so far only monoclonal antibody (MAb)-based approaches have been reported to eliminate MRD in a high percentage of patients. One of the MAb-based options for HCL currently under clinical investigation involves recombinant immunotoxins, containing a fragment of a MAb and a bacterial toxin. The bacterial toxin, a highly potent fragment from Pseudomonas exotoxin, catalytically ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 (EF2), resulting in protein synthesis inhibition and apoptotic cell death. Recombinant immunotoxins tested in HCL patients include LMB-2, targeting CD25, and BL22, targeting CD22. An affinity matured version of BL22, termed moxetumomab pasudotox (formerly HA22 or CAT-8015) achieved high CR rates in phase I, and is currently undergoing multicenter Phase 3 testing. Phase I testing was without dose-limiting toxicity, although 2 patients had grade 2 hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) with transient grade 1 abnormalities in platelets and creatinine. Preclinical work is underway to identify residues on moxetumomab pasudotox leading to immunogenicity. Moxetumomab pasudotox is undergoing pivotal testing for relapsed and refractory HCL. PMID:26614902

  20. Skeletal complications in hairy cell leukemia: diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Lembersky, B C; Ratain, M J; Golomb, H M

    1988-08-01

    We identified eight patients with skeletal complications associated with hairy cell leukemia (HCL). The median time from diagnosis of HCL to the diagnosis of skeletal complications was 20 months (range, 0 to 93). All patients complained of pain and all but one lesion were located in the axial skeleton, primarily the proximal femur. Lytic lesions were seen on radiographic examination in all but one patient, and one patient additionally had multiple osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. Radionuclide technetium bone scan was abnormal in all patients examined. Although the peripheral blood counts were variable (only two patients had a leukemic phase of the disease), all patients examined had a hypercellular bone marrow biopsy with hairy cells comprising at least 90% of the hematopoietic elements. The skeletal abnormalities responded well to local radiation therapy. Seven patients were begun on systemic therapy with interferon alpha-2b after the diagnosis of the skeletal lesion. Four of five evaluable patients had a partial hematological response and a substantial improvement in the degree of hairy cell infiltration of the bone marrow. None of these patients has had a recurrence of skeletal complications at a median follow-up time of 29 months. One patient failed to respond hematologically and developed additional bone lesions after 1 year of treatment. Another patient developed a new skeletal lesion 3 months after the cessation of interferon therapy at which time the bone marrow was essentially packed with hairy cells. This retrospective study indicates that bone involvement is a rare complication of HCL and is associated with a high tumor burden in the bone marrow. In addition to local radiation therapy, systemic treatment with interferon should be considered. PMID:3411340

  1. Two Cases of Q-Fever in Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Iannitto, Emilio; Tick, Lidwine W.; Arents, Nicolaas L. A.; Kuijper, Philip H.; Nijziel, Marten R.

    2014-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a rare B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder accounting for about 2% of all leukemias. The clinical course is indolent, however HCL patients are particularly susceptible to infections. Here we report two cases of Q-fever as first manifestation of disease in two patients affected by HCL. Both patients described in this report showed an unusually sluggish clinical response to the antibiotic treatment with ciprofloxacin probably because of the marked immunodeficiency. However, treatment of HCL with cladribine administered soon after the resolution of QF pneumonitis was uneventful and led to a complete remission in both cases. Most probably the association of Coxiella burnetii (CB) infection and HCL that we observed in two patients is due to chance. However, a hairy cell resembling transformation of freshly isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes upon CB has been showed. We think that the possibility of CB infection in febrile HCL patient should be always taken in mind, especially in endemic areas. In addition the potential for such infections to become chronic in HCL patients should not be overlooked and the reporting of further cases should be encouraged. PMID:25180111

  2. Bone marrow and splenic histology in hairy cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Wotherspoon, Andrew; Attygalle, Ayoma; Mendes, Larissa Sena Teixeira

    2015-12-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia is a rare chronic neoplastic B-cell lymphoproliferation that characteristically involves blood, bone marrow and spleen with liver, lymph node and skin less commonly involved. Histologically, the cells have a characteristic appearance with pale/clear cytoplasm and round or reniform nuclei. In the spleen, the infiltrate involves the red pulp and is frequently associated with areas of haemorrhage (blood lakes). The cells stain for B-cell related antigens as well as with antibodies against tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, DBA44 (CD72), CD11c, CD25, CD103, CD123, cyclin D1 and annexin A1. Mutation of BRAF -V600E is present and antibody to the mutant protein can be used as a specific marker. Bone marrow biopsy is essential in the initial assessment of disease as the bone marrow may be inaspirable or unrepresentative of degree of marrow infiltration as a result of the tumour associated fibrosis preventing aspiration of the tumour cell component. Bone marrow biopsy is important in the assessment of therapy response but in this context staining for CD11c and Annexin A1 is not helpful as they are also markers of myeloid lineage and identification of low level infiltration may be obscured. In this context staining for CD20 may be used in conjunction with morphological assessment and staining of serial sections for cyclin D1 and DBA44 to identify subtle residual infiltration. Staining for CD79a and CD19 is not recommended as these antibodies will identify plasma cells and can lead to over-estimation of disease. Staining for CD20 should not be used in patients following with anti-CD20 based treatments. Down regulation of cyclin D1 and CD25 has been reported in patients following BRAF inhibitor therapy and assessment of these antigens should not be used in this context. Histologically, hairy cell leukaemia needs to be distinguished from other B-cell lymphoproliferations associated with splenomegaly including splenic marginal zone lymphoma, splenic

  3. Epidemiology and environmental risk in hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tadmor, Tamar; Polliack, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is an orphan subtype of leukaemia which constitutes less than 2% of all leukaemia's, with an incidence of less than 1 per 100,000 persons per annum. Median age at presentation is 55 years and it is 3-4 times more frequent in males. It is also more frequently encountered in whites and less in Asians, Africans and Arabs. The epidemiologic data are multi-factorial and influenced by ethnicity and geographical factors. Other reported associations relate to some environmental exposures and possible occupational factors. Smoking appears to have an inverse correlation with the development of hairy cell leukaemia, while farming and exposure to pesticides, petroleum products, diesel and ionizing radiation have also been reported to be associated with an increased risk. National and international collaborative efforts are needed in order to undertake more extensive studies involving larger patient cohorts, aiming to determine the role of occupational and environmental risk factors in the development of this rare form of chronic leukaemia. PMID:26614895

  4. Radiation exposure as a possible etiologic factor in hairy cell leukemia (leukemic reticuloendotheliosis).

    PubMed

    Stewart, D J; Keating, M J

    1980-10-01

    The frequency of prior occupational, accidental, or therapeutic radiation exposure was significantly higher for hairy cell leukemia patients than for a control group of solid tumor patients (8/23 vs. 4/56, P < 0.01). Hairy cell leukemia patients were also more frequently involved in occupations at high risk of radiation exposure such as chemist, engineer, physicist, and health care facility worker (7/23 vs. 4/56, P < 0.01). The observation that the incidence of thyroid disorders among hairy cell leukemia patients was also unusually high (5/23 vs. 2/56, P < 0.05) was interpreted as further indirect evidence of excessive radiation exposure. It appears that radiation exposure may be an important contribution factor in the development of some case of hairy cell leukemia. PMID:7417955

  5. Evidence of canonical somatic hypermutation in hairy cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Arons, Evgeny; Roth, Laura; Sapolsky, Jeffrey; Suntum, Tara; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice

    2011-01-01

    To compare hairy cell leukemia (HCL) with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and normal B cells with respect to their B-cell receptors, somatic hypermutation (SHM) features in HCL were examined in a series of 130 immunoglobulin gene heavy chain rearrangements, including 102 from 100 classic (HCLc) and 28 from 26 variant (HCLv) patients. The frequency of unmutated rearrangements in HCLc was much lower than that in HCLv (17% vs 54%, P < .001) or historically in CLL (17% vs 46%, P < .001), but HCLv and CLL were similar (P = .45). As previously reported for CLL, evidence of canonical SHM was observed in HCLc rearrangements, including: (1) a higher ratio of replacement to silent mutations in the complementarity determining regions than in the framework regions (2.83 vs 1.41, P < .001), (2) higher transition to transversion ratio than would be expected if mutations were random (1.49 vs 0.5, P < .001), and (3) higher than expected concentration of mutations within RGYW hot spots (13.92% vs 3.33%, P < .001). HCLv met these 3 criteria of canonical SHM to a lesser extent. These data suggest that, whereas HCLc cells may recognize antigen-like CLL and normal B cells before malignant transformation, HCLv cells from some patients may originate differently, possibly without undergoing antigen recognition. PMID:21368287

  6. CD27-positive hairy cell leukemia-Japanese variant.

    PubMed

    Tabata, Rie; Tabata, Chiharu; Iwama, Hideaki; Yasumizu, Ryoji; Kojima, Masaru

    2016-03-01

    We report a very rare case of a 45-year-old Japanese male patient with hairy cell leukemia-Japanese variant (HCL-JV) expressing CD27. The patient showed a high number of abnormal peripheral lymphocytes, thrombocytopenia, and severe splenomegaly but no lymphadenopathy. Histology of the resected spleen showed small-sized lymphoma cells diffusely infiltrating the red pulp without follicle formation. By immunohistochemistry, lymphoma cells were negative for CD3, CD5, CD8, CD10, CD34, cyclin-D1, and annexin A1 but positive for CD20 and BCL2. BRAF V600E mutation was not observed. Bone marrow aspirate showed preserved normal hematopoietic cells with invasion of lymphoma cells in an interstitial pattern without obvious nodules. The cells had abundant pale cytoplasm and round nuclei with inconspicuous nucleoli. After natural drying, the cells had unevenly distributed microvilli. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated positivity for CD11a, CD11c, CD19, CD20, CD22, CD27, surface IgG, and λ but not for CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD8, CD10, CD21, CD23, CD25, CD30, CD34, CD38, CD43, CD56, CD57, CD103, IgD, IgM, and κ. Monoclonal expansion of B cells was confirmed by an immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) rearrangement band as demonstrated by Southern blot hybridization. The lymphoma cells had unevenly distributed long, large, and broad-based microvilli, which resembled splenic diffuse red pulp small B cell lymphoma (SDRPL) cells. CD27 expression is extremely rare in HCL-JV, but the young age of the patient and high peripheral WBC counts were similar to HCL-JV, which suggests, in this case, an intermediate disease between SDRPL and HCL-JV. PMID:26868143

  7. Synchronous gastric and ampullary adenocarcinomas in a hairy cell leukemia patient treated with pentostatin eight years prior.

    PubMed

    Senatore, Frank J; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2016-06-01

    Hairy cell leukemia patients are at increased risk for second malignancies, including both solid and lymphoid neoplasms. Along with other factors, multiple immune defects present in hairy cell leukemia likely contribute to subsequent carcinogenesis. We report herein a case of synchronous high-grade gastric and ampullary adenocarcinomas in a patient with a history of hairy cell leukemia treated eight years prior with pentostatin. We include a review of immune alterations induced by both hairy cell leukemia and its therapies, and link them with the occurrence of second cancers in these patients. PMID:25712625

  8. Hairy cell leukaemia and occupational exposure to benzene.

    PubMed Central

    Clavel, J; Conso, F; Limasset, J C; Mandereau, L; Roche, P; Flandrin, G; Hémon, D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The role of occupational exposures in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) was investigated through a multicentre, hospital based, case-control study. This paper analyses the role of exposure to benzene in HCL. METHODS: A population of 226 male cases of HCL and 425 matched controls were included in the study. Benzene exposure was evaluated by expert review of the detailed data on occupational exposures generated by case-control interviews. RESULTS: No association was found between HCL and employment in a job exposed to benzene (odds ratio (OR) 0.9 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.6-1.3)). The sample included 125 subjects, 34 cases (15%), and 91 controls (21%) who had been exposed to benzene, as individually assessed by the experts, for at least one hour a month during one of their jobs. Benzene exposure was not associated with a risk of HCL (OR 0.8 (0.5-1.2)). No trend towards an increase in OR was detected for increasing exposures, the percentage of work time involving exposure to > 1 ppm, or the duration of exposure. No findings suggested a particular risk period, when the OR associated with the time since first or last exposure, or since the end of exposure, were examined. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, with the low exposures prevalent in the sample, the study did not show any association between benzene exposure and HCL. PMID:8983464

  9. RhoGTPases and p53 Are Involved in the Morphological Appearance and Interferon-α Response of Hairy Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaigne-Delalande, Benjamin; Deuve, Lynda; Reuzeau, Edith; Basoni, Caroline; Lafarge, David; Varon, Christine; Tatin, Florence; Anies, Guerric; Garand, Richard; Kramer, Ijsbrand; Génot, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia is an uncommon B-cell lymphoproliferative disease of unknown etiology in which tumor cells display characteristic microfilamentous membrane projections. Another striking feature of the disease is its exquisite sensitivity to interferon (IFN)-α. So far, none of the known IFN-α regulatory properties have explained IFN-α responsiveness nor have they taken into account the morphological characteristics of hairy cells. IFN-α profoundly alters cytoskeletal organization of hairy cells and causes reversion of the hairy appearance into a rounded morphology. Because cytoskeletal rearrangements are controlled by the Rho family of GTPases, we investigated the GTPase activation status in hairy cells and their regulation by IFN-α. Using immunolocalization techniques and biochemical assays, we demonstrate that hairy cells display high levels of active Cdc42 and Rac1 and that IFN-α down-regulates these activities. In sharp contrast, RhoA activity was low in hairy cells but was increased by IFN-α treatment. Finally, IFN-α-mediated morphological changes also implicated a p53-induced response. These observations shed light on the mechanism of action of IFN-α in hairy cell leukemia and are of potential relevance for the therapeutical applications of this cytokine. PMID:16436670

  10. Massive retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy as a terminal event in hairy cell leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Mehta, A B; Catovsky, D; O'Brien, C J; Lott, M; Bowley, N; Hemmingway, A

    1983-01-01

    A case of hairy cell leukaemia complicated as a terminal event by massive retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy is described. The patient had recently been treated with lithium carbonate and had previously been demonstrated to suffer from a systemic vasculitis, either or both of which may have contributed to the development of this rare complication. PMID:6360496

  11. Metabolism of oxybenzone in a hairy root culture: Perspectives for phytoremediation of a widely used sunscreen agent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feiran; Huber, Christian; May, Robert; Schröder, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Oxybenzone (OBZ), known as Benzophenone-3, is a commonly used UV filter in sun tans and skin protectants, entering aquatic systems either directly during recreational activities or indirectly through wastewater treatment plants discharge. To study the potential degradation capacity of plants for OBZ in phytotreatment, a well-established hairy root culture (Armoracia rusticana) was treated with OBZ. More than 20% of spiked OBZ (100μM) was eliminated from the medium by hairy roots after 3h of exposure. Two metabolites were identified as oxybenzone-glucoside (OBZ-Glu) and oxybenzone-(6-O-malonyl)-glucoside (OBZ-Mal-Glu) by LC-MS/MS and TOF-MS. Formation of these metabolites was confirmed by enzymatic synthesis, as well as enzymatic and alkaline hydrolysis. Incubation with O-glucosyltransferase (O-GT) extracted from roots formed OBZ-Glu; whereas β-d-Glucosidase hydrolyzed OBZ-Glu. However, alkaline hydrolysis led to cleavage of OBZ-Mal-Glu and yielded OBZ-Glu. In the hairy root culture, an excretion of OBZ-Glu into the growth medium was observed while the corresponding OBZ-Mal-Glu remained stored in root cells over the incubation time. We propose that metabolism of oxybenzone in plants involves initial conjugation with glucose to form OBZ-Glu followed by malonylation to yield OBZ-Mal-Glu. To our best knowledge this first finding presenting the potential of plants to degrade benzophenone type UV filters by phytoremediation. PMID:26736174

  12. Variables in the Quantification of CD4 in Normals and Hairy Cell Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Abbasi, Fatima; Jasper, Gregory A; Kreitman, Robert J; Liewehr, David; Marti, Gerald E.; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantitative flow cytometry (QFCM) is being applied in the clinical flow cytometry laboratory. Quantitative normal T-cell CD4 expression represents a biologic standard and quality control agent. However, low levels of CD4 expression were detected in normal T-cells in Hairy Cell Leukemia (HCL) samples. Methods The QuantiBrite System® was used to determine the level of CD4 expression (mean antibody bound per cell, ABC) in fresh and shipped HCL blood and fresh normal donor blood (NDB). The effects of shipping, lysing reagent, cell preparation method and antibody lot were evaluated. Results Shipped HCL specimens (n = 69) had a significantly lower mean CD4 ABC of 38,788 (CV = 9.1%) compared to fresh specimens (n = 105) CD4 value of 40,330 (CV = 8.4%) (p < 0 .05). In NDB, significant differences were seen for fresh versus shipped specimens using the stain/lyse method but not for lyse/stain method. Consistent differences in CD4 ABC based upon antibody lot were observed in fresh HCL and NDB samples. Stain/lyse and lyse/stain methods using NH4Cl lyse were compared in NDB using identical samples and antibodies. The NDB CD4 ABC values obtained with the lyse (NH4Cl )/stain method (45,562, 3.7% CV) were lower than those obtained with the stain/lyse (NH4Cl) method (49,955, 3.3% CV) with p<0.001. Conclusions CD4 expression in HCL patient samples is not inherently different from that observed in NDB and therefore may serve as a biological control in clinical QFCM. Technical variables impact significantly on QFCM of CD4. PMID:20687201

  13. Myelosuppression in HCL: role of hairy cells, T cells and haematopoietic growth factors.

    PubMed

    Schwarzmeier, J D; Gasché, C G; Hilgarth, M F; Reinisch, W W; Göbl, S; Berger, R

    1994-05-01

    To elucidate mechanisms which may be responsible for the haematopoietic insufficiency in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL), we investigated in an autologous in vitro system the influence of haematopoietic growth factors (CSFs) and the effects of hairy cells (HCs) as well as T cells on the formation of haematopoietic colonies (CFU). Colony forming assays were performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 6 HCL patients. To remove HCs, PBMCs were subjected to complement-mediated lysis, T cells were removed by E-rosette formation. Assays were done with and without recombinant human (rh) interleukin-3 (IL-3) and rh granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). All 6 patients exhibited a severe reduction of their circulating progenitor cell (CPC) compartment. There was no correlation between the degree of colony reduction and the number of HCs. However, a correlation was found between the numbers of CPCs of HCL patients and healthy donors and the monocyte counts in these groups (r = 0.8573, p < 0.001). The removal of autologous HCs, but also of T cells, resulted in a significant increase in colony formation (BFU-E, CFU-GM, CFU-mix). In none of the experiments, however, did colony numbers come close to the normal range. This was only achieved by supplementation of the culture medium with rh IL-3 and rh GM-CSF. The results suggest that the haematopoietic failure observed in HCL patients is probably due to an inadequate supply of CSFs as well as to an inhibitory activity of HCs and T cells which might exert their effects in a synergistic fashion. There is also evidence that the lack of monocytes plays a role in the development of the haematopoietic insufficiency in HCL. PMID:8020624

  14. Replication of type I herpes simplex virus in primary cultures of hairy cell leukemic leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Pozner, L. H.; Daniels, C. A.; Cooper, J. A.; Cohen, H. J.; Logue, G. L.; Croker, B. P.

    1978-01-01

    The ability of leukemic leukocytes to support the replication of herpes simplex virus (HSV) was studied. Mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) from the peripheral blood of patients with a variety of lymphoid leukemias were isolated on Ficoll-Hypaque gradients and infected with HSV at a multiplicity of infection of 5 to 10. No virus growth was detected in cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (9), acute lymphocytic leukemia (1), or lymphosarcoma cell leukemia (2), HSV replication did occur in hairy cell leukemic MNL from all of 4 patients studied. Maximal titers of 10(3.7) to 10(4.7) PFU/ml occurred 1 to 7 days after incubation. By electron microscopy, herpesvirus particles were seen in the nuclei of these infected cells after 3 days of culture, but none was seen in the cells not exposed to virus. Fluorescent antibody examination confirmed the presence of HSV antigens in the nuclei of infected hairy cells. No difference in the adsorption or penetration of the virus was found with the various MNL studied. Productive infection of the cells thus appeared to depend on the ability of the leukocyte ;o support a later stage of infection, either uncoating or replication of the virus. Images Figure 1 PMID:202167

  15. Targeting Mutant BRAF with Vemurafenib in Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tiacci, Enrico; Park, Jae H.; De Carolis, Luca; Chung, Stephen S.; Broccoli, Alessandro; Scott, Sasinya; Zaja, Francesco; Devlin, Sean; Pulsoni, Alessandro; Chung, Young Rock; Cimminiello, Michele; Kim, Eunhee; Rossi, Davide; Stone, Richard M.; Motta, Giovanna; Saven, Alan; Varettoni, Marzia; Altman, Jessica K.; Anastasia, Antonella; Grever, Michael R.; Ambrosetti, Achille; Rai, Kanti R.; Fraticelli, Vincenzo; Lacouture, Mario E.; Carella, Angelo Michele; Levine, Ross L.; Leoni, Pietro; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Falzetti, Franca; Ascani, Stefano; Capponi, Monia; Martelli, Maria Paola; Park, Christopher Y.; Pileri, Stefano Aldo; Rosen, Neal; Foà, Robin; Berger, Michael F.; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Falini, Brunangelo; Tallman, Martin S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND BRAF-V600E is the genetic lesion underlying hairy cell leukemia. We assessed the safety and activity of the oral BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib in patients with hairy cell leukemia who relapsed after or were refractory to purine analogues. METHODS We conducted in Italy and USA two phase-2 single-arm multicenter studies of vemurafenib (960 mg twice daily) given for a median of 16 and 18 weeks, respectively. Primary endpoints were complete remission rate and overall response rate. Patient enrollment was completed (n=28) in the Italian trial in April 2013 and is still open (n=26/36) in the American trial. RESULTS Drug-related adverse events were usually of grade 1-2, and those most frequently requiring dose reductions were rash and arthralgia/arthritis; secondary cutaneous tumors (treated with simple excision) developed in 6/50 patients. Overall response rates were 96% (25/26 evaluable Italian patients) and 100% (24/24 evaluable American patients), obtained after a median of 8 weeks and 12 weeks, respectively. Complete response rates were 34.6% (9/26) and 41.7% (10/24), respectively. In the Italian trial, after a median follow-up of 23 months, the median relapse-free and treatment-free survivals were respectively 19 and 25 months in complete responders, and 6 and 18 months in partial responders. In the American trial, 1-year progression-free and overall survival were 73% and 91%, respectively. Frequent persistence of phospho-ERK+ bone marrow leukemic cells at the end of treatment suggests bypass MEK-ERK reactivation as a resistance mechanism. CONCLUSIONS A short oral course of vemurafenib proved safe and highly effective in relapsed/refractory hairy cell leukemia patients (Funded by AIRC, ERC, Roche/Genentech and others; EudractCT number: 2011-005487-13, ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01711632). PMID:26352686

  16. Hairy Math: Add Wnt-3a to Multiply Bulge Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M. Zulfiquer; Garza, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signals are important for activation of epithelial skin stem cells, but the role of individual Wnt ligands remains uncertain. Ouji et al. demonstrate a key role for Wnt-3a in partial maintenance and long-term expansion of epithelial skin stem cells in vitro. They also report a method for expanding these cells in vitro without feeder cells. PMID:25964269

  17. Hairy Cell Leukemia with Systemic Lymphadenopathy: Detection of BRAF Mutations in Both Lymph Node and Peripheral Blood Specimens.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kazuya; Kunitomi, Akane; Sakai, Kazuya; Muranushi, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Yusuke; Tsukamoto, Taku; Sugiura, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Jo, Tomoyasu; Ueda, Tomoaki; Onishi, Tatsuhito; Ide, Masaru; Kimura, Shinya; Notohara, Kenji; Ueda, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old woman with pancytopenia, excessive systemic lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly was referred to our hospital. The peripheral blood (PB) smear findings indicated neutropenia with lymphoid cells exhibiting hairy projections, while the histological findings of the cervical lymph node (LN) suggested hairy cell leukemia (HCL). In addition, the BRAF V600E mutation was detected, and the immunoglobulin gene rearrangement patterns were identical in both the cervical LN and PB specimens. Based on these findings, we diagnosed the patient with systemic lymphadenopathy due to HCL. This is the first report of a BRAF mutation detected in both the PB and LN at the onset of HCL. PMID:26027995

  18. TGF-β1 induces bone marrow reticulin fibrosis in hairy cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Medhat; Schwarzmeier, Josef D.; Hilgarth, Martin; Hubmann, Rainer; Duechler, Markus; Gisslinger, Heinz

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms that lead to reticulin fibrosis of bone marrow (BM) in hairy cell leukemia (HCL) are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the involvement of TGF-β1, a potent fibrogenic cytokine, in this process. Immunoassays revealed that TGF-β1 is present at higher concentrations in BM, serum, and plasma of HCL patients in comparison with healthy donors (P < 0.001). RT-PCR and immunofluorescence studies showed that TGF-β1 is overexpressed at the mRNA and protein levels in peripheral blood, spleen, and BM mononuclear cells and that hairy cells (HCs) are the main source of TGF-β1. Active TGF-β1 correlated significantly with grades of BM fibrosis, infiltration with HCs, and serum procollagen type III aminoterminal propeptide (PIIINP). Ex vivo studies demonstrated that TGF-β1 significantly enhances the production and deposition of reticulin and collagen fibers by BM fibroblasts. In addition, BM plasma of HCL patients increased the synthesis of type I and type III procollagens, the main components of reticulin fibers, at the mRNA and protein levels. This fibrogenic activity of BM plasma was abolished by neutralizing anti–TGF-β1 antibodies. These results show, for the first time to our knowledge, that TGF-β1 is highly expressed in HCs and is directly involved in the pathogenesis of BM reticulin fibrosis in HCL. PMID:14991065

  19. Sensory Cells of the Fish Ear: A Hairy Enigma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popper, A. N.; Saidel, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of the structure of the ears in teleost fishes has led to the tentative suggestion that otolithic endorgans may function differently, in different species. Recently, evidence has demonstrated different 'types' of sensory hair cells can be found in the ears of teleost fishes, and individual hair cell types are found in discrete regions of individual sensory, epithelia. The presence of multiple hair cell types in fishes provides strong support to the hypothesis of regional differences in the responses of individual otolithic sensory epithelia. The finding of hair cell types in fishes that closely resemble those found in amniote vestibular endorgans also suggests that hair cell heterogeneity arose earlier in the evolution of the vertebrate ear than previously thought.

  20. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Origin of BRAFV600E Mutations in Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Young Rock; Lito, Piro; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Hu, Wenhuo; Beguelin, Wendy; Monette, Sebastien; Duy, Cihangir; Rampal, Raajit; Telis, Leon; Patel, Minal; Kim, Min Kyung; Huberman, Kety; Bouvier, Nancy; Berger, Michael F.; Melnick, Ari M.; Rosen, Neal; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by somatic BRAFV600E mutations. The malignant cell in HCL has immunophenotypic features of a mature B cell, but no normal counterpart along the continuum of developing B lymphocytes has been delineated as the cell of origin. We find that the BRAFV600E mutation is present in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in HCL patients, and that these patients exhibit marked alterations in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) frequencies. Quantitative sequencing analysis revealed a mean BRAFV600E-mutant allele frequency of 4.97% in HSCs from HCL patients. Moreover, transplantation of BRAFV600E-mutant HSCs from an HCL patient into immunodeficient mice resulted in stable engraftment of BRAFV600E-mutant human hematopoietic cells, revealing the functional self-renewal capacity of HCL HSCs. Consistent with the human genetic data, expression of BRafV600E in murine HSPCs resulted in a lethal hematopoietic disorder characterized by splenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, increased circulating soluble CD25, and increased clonogenic capacity of B lineage cells—all classic features of human HCL. In contrast, restricting expression of BRafV600E to the mature B cell compartment did not result in disease. Treatment of HCL patients with vemurafenib, an inhibitor of mutated BRAF, resulted in normalization of HSPC frequencies and increased myeloid and erythroid output from HSPCs. These findings link the pathogenesis of HCL to somatic mutations that arise in HSPCs and further suggest that chronic lymphoid malignancies may be initiated by aberrant HSCs. PMID:24871132

  1. Rapid response to 2'-deoxycoformycin in advanced hairy cell leukemia after failure of interferons alpha and gamma.

    PubMed

    Lembersky, B C; Ratain, M J; Westbrook, C; Golomb, H M

    1988-01-01

    A patient with advanced hairy cell leukemia initially had a short-lived minor response to interferon alpha therapy and failed to respond to interferon gamma. Subsequent treatment with 2'-deoxycoformycin (dCF) administered biweekly for 12 wk resulted in a complete hematological remission which has continued for 16 months without additional therapy. PMID:3128105

  2. The microenvironment in hairy cell leukemia: pathways and potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Jan A.; Sivina, Mariela; Ravandi, Farhad

    2014-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) cells accumulate and proliferate in the spleen and the bone marrow. In these tissue compartments, HCL cells interact with accessory cells, matrix proteins, and various cyctokines, collectively referred to as the ‘microenvironment.’ Surface receptors expressed on HCL cells and respective stromal ligands are critical for this cross-talk between HCL cells and the microenvironment. Chemokine receptors, adhesion molecules (integrins, CD44), the B cell antigen receptor (BCR), and CD40, expressed on the HCL cells, are likely to be critical for homing, retention, survival, and expansion of the neoplastic B cells. Some of these pathways are now targeted in first clinical trials in other mature B-cell malignancies. We summarize key aspects of the cellular and molecular interactions between HCL cells and their microenvironment. Also, we outline future prospects for therapeutic targeting of the microenvironment in HCL, focusing on CXCR4 and kinase inhibitors (Syk, Btk, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase [PI3K]) that target B cell receptor signaling. PMID:21438839

  3. BRAF inhibition in hairy cell leukemia with low-dose vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Sascha; Pircher, Andreas; Endris, Volker; Peyrade, Frédéric; Wendtner, Clemens-Martin; Follows, George A; Hüllein, Jennifer; Jethwa, Alexander; Ellert, Elena; Walther, Tatjana; Liu, Xiyang; Dyer, Martin J S; Elter, Thomas; Brummer, Tilman; Zeiser, Robert; Hermann, Michael; Herold, Michael; Weichert, Wilko; Dearden, Claire; Haferlach, Torsten; Seiffert, Martina; Hallek, Michael; von Kalle, Christof; Ho, Anthony D; Gaehler, Anita; Andrulis, Mindaugas; Steurer, Michael; Zenz, Thorsten

    2016-06-01

    The activating mutation of the BRAF serine/threonine protein kinase (BRAF V600E) is the key driver mutation in hairy cell leukemia (HCL), suggesting opportunities for therapeutic targeting. We analyzed the course of 21 HCL patients treated with vemurafenib outside of trials with individual dosing regimens (240-1920 mg/d; median treatment duration, 90 days). Vemurafenib treatment improved blood counts in all patients, with platelets, neutrophils, and hemoglobin recovering within 28, 43, and 55 days (median), respectively. Complete remission was achieved in 40% (6/15 of evaluable patients) and median event-free survival was 17 months. Response rate and kinetics of response were independent of vemurafenib dosing. Retreatment with vemurafenib led to similar response patterns (n = 6). Pharmacodynamic analysis of BRAF V600E downstream targets showed that vemurafenib (480 mg/d) completely abrogated extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation of hairy cells in vivo. Typical side effects also occurred at low dosing regimens. We observed the development of acute myeloid lymphoma (AML) subtype M6 in 1 patient, and the course suggested disease acceleration triggered by vemurafenib. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase hotspot mutation (E545K) was identified in the AML clone, providing a potential novel mechanism for paradoxical BRAF activation. These data provide proof of dependence of HCL on active BRAF signaling. We provide evidence that antitumor and side effects are observed with 480 mg vemurafenib, suggesting that dosing regimens in BRAF-driven cancers could warrant reassessment in trials with implications for cost of cancer care. PMID:26941398

  4. Durability of responses to interferon alfa-2b in advanced hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ratain, M J; Golomb, H M; Bardawil, R G; Vardiman, J W; Westbrook, C A; Kaminer, L S; Lembersky, B C; Bitter, M A; Daly, K

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that significant hematologic improvement occurs in the majority of patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL) treated with partially purified or recombinant interferon (IFN). Fifty-three patients received IFN alfa-2b for at least 3 months in a dose of 2 X 10(6) U/m2 subcutaneously thrice weekly. Of the 49 patients evaluable for response (at least 6 months of IFN therapy), there were ten complete responses and 29 partial responses for a total response rate of 80%. The peripheral blood counts and bone marrow continued to improve over the course of a full year of therapy. IFN was well tolerated, with no patients discontinuing therapy because of toxicity. Transient myelosuppression occurred in most patients during the first 1 to 2 months of therapy, occasionally precipitating a transfusion requirement. After IFN treatment was discontinued, there was a marked decrease in normal marrow elements and a relative increase in marrow hairy cells. This was associated with a transient increase in normal elements in the peripheral blood. Only one of 24 patients followed after receiving IFN for a median of 8.5 months (range, 3 to 16 months) has required further therapy. We conclude that low-dose IFN alfa-2b is highly effective in advanced HCL; responding patients should be treated for at least 1 year. The decision to initiate a second course of IFN therapy should be based primarily on peripheral blood counts and the clinical status of the patient rather than on the bone marrow. PMID:3814819

  5. Recurrent CDKN1B (p27) mutations in hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Sascha; Hüllein, Jennifer; Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Hutter, Barbara; Gonzalez, David; Jayne, Sandrine; Dyer, Martin J S; Oleś, Małgorzata; Else, Monica; Liu, Xiyang; Słabicki, Mikołaj; Wu, Bian; Troussard, Xavier; Dürig, Jan; Andrulis, Mindaugas; Dearden, Claire; von Kalle, Christof; Granzow, Martin; Jauch, Anna; Fröhling, Stefan; Huber, Wolfgang; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Torsten; Ho, Anthony D; Richter, Daniela; Brors, Benedikt; Glimm, Hanno; Matutes, Estella; Abdel Wahab, Omar; Zenz, Thorsten

    2015-08-20

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is marked by near 100% mutational frequency of BRAFV600E mutations. Recurrent cooperating genetic events that may contribute to HCL pathogenesis or affect the clinical course of HCL are currently not described. Therefore, we performed whole exome sequencing to explore the mutational landscape of purine analog refractory HCL. In addition to the disease-defining BRAFV600E mutations, we identified mutations in EZH2, ARID1A, and recurrent inactivating mutations of the cell cycle inhibitor CDKN1B (p27). Targeted deep sequencing of CDKN1B in a larger cohort of HCL patients identify deleterious CDKN1B mutations in 16% of patients with HCL (n = 13 of 81). In 11 of 13 patients the CDKN1B mutation was clonal, implying an early role of CDKN1B mutations in the pathogenesis of HCL. CDKN1B mutations were not found to impact clinical characteristics or outcome in this cohort. These data identify HCL as having the highest frequency of CDKN1B mutations among cancers and identify CDNK1B as the second most common mutated gene in HCL. Moreover, given the known function of CDNK1B, these data suggest a novel role for alterations in regulation of cell cycle and senescence in HCL with CDKN1B mutations. PMID:26065650

  6. BRAF mutation detection in hairy cell leukaemia from archival haematolymphoid specimens.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Carla; Amanuel, Benhur; Finlayson, Jill; Grieu-Iacopetta, Fabienne; Spagnolo, Dominic V; Erber, Wendy N

    2015-06-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is a rare, indolent chronic B-cell leukaemia accounting for approximately 2% of all adult leukaemias. The recent association of the BRAF p.Val600Glu (V600E) mutation in HCL makes it a valuable molecular diagnostic marker. We compared the ability of Sanger sequencing, fluorescent single-strand conformational polymorphism (F-SSCP) and high resolution melting (HRM) analysis to detect BRAF mutations in 20 cases of HCL consisting of four archival Romanowsky stained air-dried peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate smears, 12 mercury fixed decalcified bone marrow trephine biopsies, three formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) splenectomy samples and one fresh peripheral blood sample. DNA was amplified and BRAF mutation status determined by the three methods above. V600E mutation was identified in 94%, 89% and 72% of HCL cases by F-SSCP, HRM and Sanger sequencing, respectively. In one case, in addition to the p.Val600Glu mutation, a p.Lys601Thr (K601T) mutation was identified. DNA from archival slide scrapings, mercury-fixed and FFPE tissue can be used to identify BRAF mutations with high sensitivity, especially using HRM/F-SSCP. The V600E mutation can be used as a supplementary molecular marker to aid in the diagnosis of HCL and the presence of the mutation may provide a target for therapy. PMID:25938346

  7. Hairy-cell leukemia variant: recent view on diagnosis, biology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Robak, Tadeusz

    2011-02-01

    Hairy-cell leukemia variant (HCl-V) is a district clinico-pathological entity with intermediate features between classical HCl (HCl-C) and B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia. HCl-V is now included in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification as a provisional entity. It is an uncommon disorder accounting for approximately 0.4% of chronic lymphoid malignancies and 10% of all HCl cases. In contrast to HCl-C, HCl-V is a more aggressive disease and according to the new WHO classification it is no longer considered to be biologically related to HCl-C. Patients with HCl-V have an elevated white blood count, easy-to-aspirate bone marrow and weak reactivity to tartrate - resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). Immunophenotypically, HCl-V cells are positive for CD103 and CD11c and negative for CD25. The HCl-V cells express also the B-cell antigens, CD19, CD20 and CD22. The HCl-V patients have frequently an unmutated Ig gene configuration. Currently, the principles of therapy for this rare disease derive from uncontrolled single institutional studies, or even single case reports. In contrast to HCl-C, the HCl-V response to purine nucleoside analogs (PNA) is limited to partial responses in approximately 50% of patients. However, complete responses were observed in patients treated with rituximab and anti-CD22 immunotoxins. In Japan, a distinct subtype of HCl known as HCl-Japanese variant (HCl-JV) has been identified. As with HCl-V, patients with HCl-JV have leukocytosis, weak TRAP activity in leukemic cells, and lack of CD25 antigen. In this review, the biology, diagnostic criteria, and current therapeutic options in HCl-V and HCl-JV are presented. PMID:20558005

  8. Is it really possible to cure hairy cell leukemia patients only with frontline therapy?

    PubMed

    Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Stefoni, Vittorio; Broccoli, Alessandro; Pellegrini, Cinzia; Gandolfi, Letizia; Casadei, Beatrice; Maglie, Roberto; Pileri, Stefano; Argnani, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) patients could have an excellent prognosis with adequate treatment. Treatments are not generally curative but are extremely effective in inducing long-lasting clinical remissions. An observational retrospective study was conducted on a single-center registry of 144 patients with a median follow-up of 11.5 years, focusing on long-lasting continuous first complete remissions (CR) wondering if patients can be cured only with front-line approach. CR for more than 5 years after first-line therapy were found in 22.2 % cases. The median duration of response was 9.8 years, while for relapsed patients, the first response had a median duration of 2.4 years. Three different subsets of long-lasting first CR were identified: 15 patients are between 5 and 10 years with a median duration of CR of 6.5 years; 7 patients are between 10 and 15 years with a median duration of CR of 12.3 years; and 10 patients present a follow-up superior to 15 years with a median duration of CR of 20.0 years. There is a need for continuous study in this field to better define the optimal therapeutic regimen and, in particular, the biological issues since at least 20-25 % of HCL patients can be cured with only one treatment. PMID:24752417

  9. Soluble CD22 as a tumor marker for hairy cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Kakushi; Margulies, Inger; Onda, Masanori; Nagata, Satoshi; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice

    2008-01-01

    CD22 is an important immunotherapeutic target on B-cell malignancies, particularly hairy cell leukemia (HCL), but its soluble extracellular domain, sCD22, has not yet been reported in the blood. By immunoaffinity and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques using anti-CD22 monoclonal antibodies, we identified the 100-kDa extracellular domain of CD22 and an 80-kDa processed form in serum of patients with HCL. The median sCD22 level measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was 18 ng/mL for 93 patients with HCL. sCD22 levels varied from 2.1 to 163 ng/mL and were higher (P < .001) than 23 normal donors (median, 0.6 ng/mL). More than 95% of normal donors had sCD22 levels less than 1.9 ng/mL. sCD22 levels were proportional to concentrations of circulating HCL cells (P = .002), and HCL spleen size (P < .001). sCD22 levels normalized with complete but not partial response to treatment. sCD22 levels up to 300 ng/mL had less than a 2-fold effect on the cytotoxicity of the anti-CD22 recombinant immunotoxin BL22. sCD22 levels may be useful to follow in patients with HCL and may be more specific than sCD25 in patients with CD22+/CD25− disease. Trials are listed on www.cancer.gov as NCT00002765, NCT00021983, NCT00074048, NCT00085085, NCT00337311, and NCT00462189. PMID:18596230

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Cladribine: Subcutaneous versus Intravenous Administration in Hairy Cell Leukemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khorshid, Ola; Namour, Alfred Elias; El-Gammal, Mosaad M; Mahmoud, Tarek Yakout; Fortpied, Catherine; Abdel-Malek, Raafat; Ramadan, Safaa

    2015-01-01

    Cladribine induces durable complete remission (CR) in approximately 85% of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) patients. In Egypt, cladribine is mainly used as IV continuous infusion at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg/day for 7 days and as SC bolus injection at a dose of 0.14 mg/kg/day for 5 days. We aimed to compare the outcome and toxicity between these two regimens. We retrospectively collected data from HCL patients treated at the National Cancer Institute and its affiliated center, Nasser Institute, Cairo, Egypt. Forty-nine patients were identified, 18 treated with the IV regimen (IV group) and 31 with the SC regimen (SC group). Forty-one patients were newly diagnosed. Patient characteristics were balanced across the two groups. The CR rates in the IV and the SC group were 94% and 97%, respectively. The main complications in the IV group and the SC were neutropenia G3–4 (67% vs. 87%), mucositis mainly G1–2 (67% vs 32%) and infections (mainly viral, 78% vs 34%). In the IV group, five patients died, three of progression and infection, one of unknown cause and one of late heart failure. In the SC group, one patient died of disease progression and one of second cancer. After 33.5 months, median follow-up, the 3-year event free survival was 60% and 96%, respectively (p=0.104). The 3-year overall survival was 81% and 100%, respectively (p=0.277). In conclusion, SC cladribine is an excellent alternative to the IV regimen for the treatment of HCL. PMID:26543527

  11. An unusual indication for splenectomy in hairy cell leukaemia: a report of three cases with persistent splenomegaly after chemoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sarid, Nadav; Ahmad, Humayun N; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Dearden, Claire E; Else, Monica; Catovsky, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    We describe three cases of relapsed hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) treated with pentostatin plus rituximab. All three achieved bone marrow complete remission but had persistent splenomegaly and hypersplenism. Because of the clinical uncertainty of its significance, they were all splenectomized. The spleen histology showed no evidence of HCL, but a five-fold thickening of the splenic capsule and areas of fibrosis in the red pulp. This process may have contributed to the lack of elasticity and caused the persistent splenomegaly. We discuss the clinical implications for future patient management. The three patients remain in remission at 1 + , 5 + and 9 + years. PMID:26403440

  12. High prevalence of MAP2K1 mutations in variant and IGHV4-34-expressing hairy-cell leukemias.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Arons, Evgeny; Walker, Robert L; Pineda, Marbin; Roth, Laura; Killian, J Keith; Abaan, Ogan D; Davis, Sean R; Kreitman, Robert J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    To understand the genetic mechanisms driving variant and IGHV4-34-expressing hairy-cell leukemias, we performed whole-exome sequencing of leukemia samples from ten affected individuals, including six with matched normal samples. We identified activating mutations in the MAP2K1 gene (encoding MEK1) in 5 of these 10 samples and in 10 of 21 samples in a validation set (overall frequency of 15/31), suggesting potential new strategies for treating individuals with these diseases. PMID:24241536

  13. Central Role of Protein Kinase Cε in Constitutive Activation of ERK1/2 and Rac1 in the Malignant Cells of Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Slupsky, Joseph R.; Kamiguti, Aura S.; Harris, Robert J.; Cawley, John C.; Zuzel, Mirko

    2007-01-01

    We have previously identified the presence of Ras/Raf-independent constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the hairy cells (HCs) of hairy cell leukemia. The aim of the present study was to characterize the signaling components involved in this activation and their relationship to the reported activation of Rac1. We found that both Rac1 and ERK activation in HCs are downstream of active Src and protein kinase C (PKC). Inhibition with toxin B showed that Rac1 plays no role in ERK activation in HCs. However, toxin B inhibited p60src and the Rac1-GEF Vav, demonstrating a positive feedback/activation of p60src by Rac1. Treatment with specific small interfering RNA for various PKC isoforms, or with PKC isoform-specific inhibitors, demonstrated a central role for PKCε in the constitutive activation of Rac1 and ERK in HCs. PKCε and active ERK were mutually associated and co-localized with mitochondria in HCs. Furthermore, active PKCε was nitrated on tyrosine, pointing to a reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism of activation. By being involved in activation of ERK and Rac1, PKCε plays roles in both the survival of HCs and in the cytoskeletal dynamics responsible for the distinctive morphology and tissue homing of these cells. Our study therefore describes novel aspects of signaling important for the pathogenesis of hairy cell leukemia. PMID:17255340

  14. Black hairy tongue syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Tan, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Black hairy tongue (BHT) is a benign medical condition characterized by elongated filiform lingual papillae with typical carpet-like appearance of the dorsum of the tongue. Its prevalence varies geographically, typically ranging from 0.6% to 11.3%. Known predisposing factors include smoking, excessive coffee/black tea consumption, poor oral hygiene, trigeminal neuralgia, general debilitation, xerostomia, and medication use. Clinical presentation varies but is typically asymptomatic, although aesthetic concerns are common. Differential diagnosis includes pseudo-BHT, acanthosis nigricans, oral hairy leukoplakia, pigmented fungiform papillae of the tongue, and congenital melanocytic/melanotic nevi/macules. Clinical diagnosis relies on visual observation, detailed history taking, and occasionally microscopic evaluation. Treatment involves identification and discontinuation of the offending agent, modifications of chronic predisposing factors, patient’s re-assurance to the benign nature of the condition, and maintenance of adequate oral hygiene with gentle debridement to promote desquamation. Complications of BHT (burning mouth syndrome, halitosis, nausea, gagging, dysgeusia) typically respond to therapy. Prognosis is excellent with treatment of underlying medical conditions. BHT remains an important medical condition which may result in additional burden on the patient and health care system and requires appropriate prevention, recognition and treatment. PMID:25152586

  15. The BTK Inhibitor Ibrutinib (PCI-32765) Blocks Hairy Cell Leukaemia Survival, Proliferation and BCR Signalling: A New Therapeutic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sivina, Mariela; Kreitman, Robert J.; Arons, Evgeny; Ravandi, Farhad; Burger, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    B cell receptor (BCR) signalling plays a critical role in the progression of several B-cell malignancies, but its role in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is ambiguous. Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key player in BCR signalling, migration and adhesion, can be targeted with ibrutinib, a selective, irreversible BTK inhibitor. We analysed BTK expression and function in HCL and analysed the effects of ibrutinib on HCL cells. We demonstrated uniform BTK protein expression in HCL cells. Ibrutinib significantly inhibited HCL proliferation and cell cycle progression. Accordingly, ibrutinib also reduced HCL cell survival after BCR triggering with anti-immunoglobulins (A, G, and M) and abrogated the activation of kinases downstream of the BCR (PI3K and MAPK). Ibrutinib also inhibited BCR-dependent secretion of the chemokines CCL3 and CCL4 by HCL cells. Interestingly, ibrutinib inhibited CXCL12-induced signalling, a key pathway for bone marrow homing. Collectively, our data support the clinical development of ibrutinib in patients with HCL. PMID:24697238

  16. The prognostic impact of clinical and molecular features in hairy cell leukaemia variant and splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hockley, Sarah L; Else, Monica; Morilla, Alison; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Dearden, Claire; Catovsky, Daniel; Gonzalez, David; Matutes, Estella

    2012-08-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia variant (HCL-variant) and splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) are disorders with overlapping features. We investigated the prognostic impact in these disorders of clinical and molecular features including IGH VDJ rearrangements, IGHV gene usage and TP 53 mutations. Clinical and laboratory data were collected before therapy from 35 HCL-variant and 68 SMZL cases. End-points were the need for treatment and overall survival. 97% of HCL-variant and 77% of SMZL cases required treatment (P = 0·009). Survival at 5 years was significantly worse in HCL-variant [57% (95% confidence interval 38-73%)] compared with SMZL [84% (71-91%); Hazard Ratio 2·25 (1·20-4·25), P = 0·01]. In HCL-variant, adverse prognostic factors for survival were older age (P = 0·04), anaemia (P = 0·01) and TP 53 mutations (P = 0·02). In SMZL, splenomegaly, anaemia and IGHV genes with >98% homology to the germline predicted the need for treatment; older age, anaemia and IGHV unmutated genes (100% homology) predicted shorter survival. IGHV gene usage had no impact on clinical outcome in either disease. The combination of unfavourable factors allowed patients to be stratified into risk groups with significant differences in survival. Although HCL-variant and SMZL share some features, they have different outcomes, influenced by clinical and biological factors. PMID:22594855

  17. Class II human leucocyte antigen DRB1*11 in hairy cell leukaemia patients with and without haemolytic uraemic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arons, Evgeny; Adams, Sharon; Venzon, Venzon, David J; Pastan, Ira; Kreitman, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Frequencies of human leucocyte antigens (HLA) were determined in 287 classic hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) patients. With respect to both population (n=287) and allele (2n=574) frequency, respectively, the most common HLA class I and II antigens expressed were HLA-A*02 (49.1% and 28.6%), HLA-B*07 (21.3% and 11.1%), HLA-C*07 (46.7 and 28.2%), HLA-DQB1*03 (62.7% and 37.3%), HLA-DRB1*11 (30.0% and 16.0%) and HLA-DRB4*01 (45.3% and 29.6%). In comparing 6–14 databases of control Caucasians to 267 Caucasian HCL patients, only HLA-DRB1*11 was consistently over-represented in HCL, 31.1% of patients vs 17–19.9% of controls (p=0.0055 to <0.0001) and 16.5% of alleles vs 6.5–12.3% of control alleles (p=0.022 to <0.0001). HLA-DRB1*11 is a known risk factor for acquired thrombotic microangiopathy. Anti-CD22 recombinant immunotoxin BL22 in HCL was associated with a 12% incidence of completely reversible grade 3–4 haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS), mainly during the second or third retreatment cycle. Of 49 HCL patients receiving ≥2 cycles of BL22, 7 (14%) had HUS and HLA-DRB1*11 was expressed in 71% of 7 with HUS compared with only 21% of 42 without (p=0.015). These data suggest that DBR1*11 may be a marker for increased susceptibility to HCL and, among HCL patients, could be a risk factor for BL22-induced HUS. PMID:24931452

  18. 75 FR 14391 - Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy Cell Leukemia and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... myocardial oxygen supply and demand. Therefore, for purposes of this regulation, the term ``IHD'' includes, but is not limited to, acute, subacute, and old myocardial infarction; atherosclerotic...

  19. 75 FR 53202 - Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy Cell Leukemia and Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... number.) SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On March 25, 2010, VA published in the Federal Register (75 FR 14391... between myocardial oxygen supply and demand.'' 75 FR 14393; See Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine...; it typically occurs when there is an imbalance between myocardial oxygen supply and demand.'' 75...

  20. Potential role of AKT/mTOR signalling proteins in hairy cell leukaemia: association with BRAF/ERK activation and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Levidou, Georgia; Angelopoulou, Maria K.; Adamopoulos, Christos; Pangalis, Gerassimos; Rassidakis, George; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros; Gainaru, Gabriella; Flevari, Pagona; Sachanas, Sotirios; Saetta, Angelica A.; Sepsa, Athanasia; Moschogiannis, Maria; Kalpadakis, Christina; Tsesmetzis, Nikolaos; Milionis, Vassilios; Chatziandreou, Ilenia; Thymara, Irene; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Dimopoulou, Maria; Plata, Eleni; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Patsouris, Efstratios; Piperi, Christina; Korkolopoulou, Penelope

    2016-01-01

    The potential role of AKT/mTOR signalling proteins and its association with the Raf-MEK-ERK pathway was investigated in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). BRAFV600E expression and activated forms of AKT, mTOR, ERK1/2, p70S6k and 4E-BP1 were immunohistochemically assessed in 77 BM biopsies of HCL patients and correlated with clinicopathological and BM microvascular characteristics, as well as with c-Caspase-3 levels in hairy cells. Additionally, we tested rapamycin treatment response of BONNA-12 wild-type cells or transfected with BRAFV600E. Most HCL cases expressed p-p70S6K and p-4E-BP1 but not p-mTOR, being accompanied by p-ERK1/2 and p-AKT. AKT/mTOR activation was evident in BONNA-12 cells irrespective of the presence of BRAFV600E mutation and was implicated in cell proliferation enhancement. In multivariate analysis p-AKT/p-mTOR/p-4E-BP1 overexpression was an adverse prognostic factor for time to next treatment conferring earlier relapse. When p-AKT, p-mTOR and p-4E-BP1 were examined separately only p-4E-BP1 remained significant. Our findings indicate that in HCL, critical proteins up- and downstream of mTOR are activated. Moreover, the strong associations with Raf-MEK-ERK signalling imply a possible biologic interaction between these pathways. Most importantly, expression of p-4E-BP1 alone or combined with p-AKT and p-mTOR is of prognostic value in patients with HCL. PMID:26893254

  1. Hairy cell leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Updated by: Yi-Bin Chen, MD, Leukemia/Bone Marrow Transplant Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Also reviewed ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  2. Hairy Cell Leukemia Presenting with Isolated Skeletal Involvement Successfully Treated by Radiation Therapy and Cladribine: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Hindilerden, Fehmi; Bulut-Dereli, Sanem; Yıldız, Eren; Dogan, Ibrahim Oner; Nalcaci, Meliha

    2015-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) in a 55-year-old male presenting with isolated skeletal disease as the initial manifestation without abnormal peripheral blood counts, bone marrow involvement, or splenomegaly. To the best of our knowledge, there have been only two previous reports of a similar case. The patient presented with pain in the right femur. Anteroposterior radiographs of both femurs revealed mixed lytic-sclerotic lesions. PET scan showed multiple metastatic lesions on axial skeleton, pelvis, and both femurs. Histopathological examination of the bone biopsy revealed an infiltrate of HCL. Localized radiation therapy to both proximal femurs and subsequently 4 weeks later, a 7-day course of 0.1 mg/kg/day cladribine provided complete remission with relief of symptoms and resolution of bone lesions. We addressed the manifestations and management of HCL patients with skeletal involvement. PMID:26788382

  3. Crown Gall Disease and Hairy Root Disease 1

    PubMed Central

    Gelvin, Stanton B.

    1990-01-01

    The neoplastic diseases crown gall and hairy root are incited by the phytopathogenic bacteria Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes, respectively. Although the molecular mechanism of T-DNA transfer to the plant most likely is the same for both species, the physiological basis of tumorigenesis is fundamentally different. Crown gall tumors result from the over-production of the phytohormones auxin and cytokinin specified by A. tumefaciens T-DNA genes. Although the T-DNA of some Riplasmids of A. rhizogenes contains auxin biosynthetic genes, these loci are not always necessary for hairy root formation. Recent experiments suggest that hairy root tumors result from the increased sensitivity of transformed cells to endogenous auxin levels. An understanding of hairy root tumorigenesis will likely result in an increased knowledge of plant developmental processes. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667272

  4. Remediation of textile azo dye acid red 114 by hairy roots of Ipomoea carnea Jacq. and assessment of degraded dye toxicity with human keratinocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Jha, Pamela; Jobby, Renitta; Desai, N S

    2016-07-01

    Bioremediation has proven to be the most desirable and cost effective method to counter textile dye pollution. Hairy roots (HRs) of Ipomoea carnea J. were tested for decolourization of 25 textile azo dyes, out of which >90% decolourization was observed in 15 dyes. A diazo dye, Acid Red 114 was decolourized to >98% and hence, was chosen as the model dye. A significant increase in the activities of oxidoreductive enzymes was observed during decolourization of AR114. The phytodegradation of AR114 was confirmed by HPLC, UV-vis and FTIR spectroscopy. The possible metabolites were identified by GCMS as 4- aminobenzene sulfonic acid 2-methylaniline and 4- aminophenyl 4-ethyl benzene sulfonate and a probable pathway for the biodegradation of AR114 has been proposed. The nontoxic nature of the metabolites and toxicity of AR114 was confirmed by cytotoxicity tests on human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). When HaCaT cells were treated separately with 150 μg mL(-1) of AR114 and metabolites, MTT assay showed 50% and ≈100% viability respectively. Furthermore, flow cytometry data showed that, as compared to control, the cells in G2-M and death phase increased by 2.4 and 3.6 folds respectively on treatment with AR114 but remained unaltered in cells treated with metabolites. PMID:26971029

  5. Exome Sequencing in Classic Hairy Cell Leukaemia Reveals Widespread Variation in Acquired Somatic Mutations between Individual Tumours Apart from the Signature BRAF V(600)E Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Weston-Bell, Nicola J.; Tapper, Will; Gibson, Jane; Bryant, Dean; Moreno, Yurany; John, Melford; Ennis, Sarah; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Collins, Andrew R.; Sahota, Surinder S.

    2016-01-01

    In classic Hairy cell leukaemia (HCLc), a single case has thus far been interrogated by whole exome sequencing (WES) in a treatment naive patient, in which BRAF V(600)E was identified as an acquired somatic mutation and confirmed as occurring near-universally in this form of disease by conventional PCR-based cohort screens. It left open however the question whether other genome-wide mutations may also commonly occur at high frequency in presentation HCLc disease. To address this, we have carried out WES of 5 such typical HCLc cases, using highly purified splenic tumour cells paired with autologous T cells for germline. Apart from BRAF V(600)E, no other recurrent somatic mutation was identified in these HCLc exomes, thereby excluding additional acquired mutations as also prevalent at a near-universal frequency in this form of the disease. These data then place mutant BRAF at the centre of the neoplastic drive in HCLc. A comparison of our exome data with emerging genetic findings in HCL indicates that additional somatic mutations may however occur recurrently in smaller subsets of disease. As mutant BRAF alone is insufficient to drive malignant transformation in other histological cancers, it suggests that individual tumours utilise largely differing patterns of genetic somatic mutations to coalesce with BRAF V(600)E to drive pathogenesis of malignant HCLc disease. PMID:26871591

  6. Hairy root transformation using Agrobacterium rhizogenes as a tool for exploring cell type-specific gene expression and function using tomato as a model.

    PubMed

    Ron, Mily; Kajala, Kaisa; Pauluzzi, Germain; Wang, Dongxue; Reynoso, Mauricio A; Zumstein, Kristina; Garcha, Jasmine; Winte, Sonja; Masson, Helen; Inagaki, Soichi; Federici, Fernán; Sinha, Neelima; Deal, Roger B; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Brady, Siobhan M

    2014-10-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes (or Rhizobium rhizogenes) is able to transform plant genomes and induce the production of hairy roots. We describe the use of A. rhizogenes in tomato (Solanum spp.) to rapidly assess gene expression and function. Gene expression of reporters is indistinguishable in plants transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens as compared with A. rhizogenes. A root cell type- and tissue-specific promoter resource has been generated for domesticated and wild tomato (Solanum lycopersicum and Solanum pennellii, respectively) using these approaches. Imaging of tomato roots using A. rhizogenes coupled with laser scanning confocal microscopy is facilitated by the use of a membrane-tagged protein fused to a red fluorescent protein marker present in binary vectors. Tomato-optimized isolation of nuclei tagged in specific cell types and translating ribosome affinity purification binary vectors were generated and used to monitor associated messenger RNA abundance or chromatin modification. Finally, transcriptional reporters, translational reporters, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated nuclease9 genome editing demonstrate that SHORT-ROOT and SCARECROW gene function is conserved between Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tomato. PMID:24868032

  7. Hairy Root Transformation Using Agrobacterium rhizogenes as a Tool for Exploring Cell Type-Specific Gene Expression and Function Using Tomato as a Model1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ron, Mily; Kajala, Kaisa; Pauluzzi, Germain; Wang, Dongxue; Reynoso, Mauricio A.; Zumstein, Kristina; Garcha, Jasmine; Winte, Sonja; Masson, Helen; Inagaki, Soichi; Federici, Fernán; Sinha, Neelima; Deal, Roger B.; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Brady, Siobhan M.

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes (or Rhizobium rhizogenes) is able to transform plant genomes and induce the production of hairy roots. We describe the use of A. rhizogenes in tomato (Solanum spp.) to rapidly assess gene expression and function. Gene expression of reporters is indistinguishable in plants transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens as compared with A. rhizogenes. A root cell type- and tissue-specific promoter resource has been generated for domesticated and wild tomato (Solanum lycopersicum and Solanum pennellii, respectively) using these approaches. Imaging of tomato roots using A. rhizogenes coupled with laser scanning confocal microscopy is facilitated by the use of a membrane-tagged protein fused to a red fluorescent protein marker present in binary vectors. Tomato-optimized isolation of nuclei tagged in specific cell types and translating ribosome affinity purification binary vectors were generated and used to monitor associated messenger RNA abundance or chromatin modification. Finally, transcriptional reporters, translational reporters, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated nuclease9 genome editing demonstrate that SHORT-ROOT and SCARECROW gene function is conserved between Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tomato. PMID:24868032

  8. Aspects of hairy black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru

    2015-03-26

    We review the existence of exact hairy black holes in asymptotically flat, anti-de Sitter and de Sitter space-times. We briefly discuss the issue of stability and the charging of the black holes with a Maxwell field.

  9. [Induction of polyploid in hairy roots of Nicotiana tabacum and its plant regeneration].

    PubMed

    Hou, Lili; Shi, Heping; Yu, Wu; Tsang, Po Keung Eric; Chow, Cheuk Fai Stephen

    2014-04-01

    By genetic transformation with Agrobacterum rhizogenes and artificial chromosome doubling techniques, we studied the induction of hairy roots and their polyploidization, and subsequent plant regeneration and nicotine determination to enhance the content of nicotine in Nicotiana tabacum. The results show that hairy roots could be induced from the basal surface of leaf explants of N. tabacum 8 days after inoculation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes ATCC15834. The percentage of the rooting leaf explants was 100% 15 days after inoculation. The hairy roots could grow rapidly and autonomously on solid or liquid phytohormones-free MS medium. The transformation was confirmed by PCR amplification of rol gene of Ri plasmid and paper electrophoresis of opines from N. tabacum hairy roots. The highest rate of polyploidy induction, more than 64.71%, was obtained after treatment of hairy roots with 0.1% colchicine for 36 h. The optimum medium for plant regeneration from polyploid hairy roots was MS+2.0 mg/L 6-BA +0.2 mg/L NAA. Compared with the control diploid plants, the hairy roots-regenerated plants had weak apical dominance, more axillary buds and more narrow leaves; whereas the polyploid hairy root-regenerated plants had thicker stems, shorter internodes and the colour, width and thickness of leaves were significantly higher than that of the control. Observation of the number of chromosomes in their root tip cells reveals that the obtained polyploid regenerated plants were tetraploidy, with 96 (4n = 96) chromosomes. Pot-grown experiments showed compared to the control, the flowering was delayed by 21 days in diploid hairy roots-regenerated plants and polyploid hairy root-regenerated plants. GC-MS detection shows that the content of nicotine in polyploid plants was about 6.90 and 4.57 times the control and the diploid hairy roots-regenerated plants, respectively. PMID:25195248

  10. Hairy and Groucho mediate the action of juvenile hormone receptor Methoprene-tolerant in gene repression.

    PubMed

    Saha, Tusar T; Shin, Sang Woon; Dou, Wei; Roy, Sourav; Zhao, Bo; Hou, Yuan; Wang, Xue-Li; Zou, Zhen; Girke, Thomas; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2016-02-01

    The arthropod-specific juvenile hormone (JH) controls numerous essential functions. Its involvement in gene activation is known to be mediated by the transcription factor Methoprene-tolerant (Met), which turns on JH-controlled genes by directly binding to E-box-like motifs in their regulatory regions. However, it remains unclear how JH represses genes. We used the Aedes aegypti female mosquito, in which JH is necessary for reproductive maturation, to show that a repressor, Hairy, is required for the gene-repressive action of JH and Met. The RNA interference (RNAi) screen for Met and Hairy in the Aedes female fat body revealed a large cohort of Met- and Hairy-corepressed genes. Analysis of selected genes from this cohort demonstrated that they are repressed by JH, but RNAi of either Met or Hairy renders JH ineffective in repressing these genes in an in vitro fat-body culture assay. Moreover, this JH action was prevented by the addition of the translational inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) to the culture, indicating the existence of an indirect regulatory hierarchy. The lack of Hairy protein in the CHX-treated tissue was verified using immunoblot analysis, and the upstream regions of Met/Hairy-corepressed genes were shown to contain common binding motifs that interact with Hairy. Groucho (gro) RNAi silencing phenocopied the effect of Hairy RNAi knockdown, indicating that it is involved in the JH/Met/Hairy hierarchy. Finally, the requirement of Hairy and Gro for gene repression was confirmed in a cell transfection assay. Thus, our study has established that Hairy and its cofactor Gro mediate the repressive function of JH and Met. PMID:26744312

  11. Hairy and Groucho mediate the action of juvenile hormone receptor Methoprene-tolerant in gene repression

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Tusar T.; Shin, Sang Woon; Dou, Wei; Roy, Sourav; Zhao, Bo; Hou, Yuan; Wang, Xue-Li; Zou, Zhen; Girke, Thomas; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The arthropod-specific juvenile hormone (JH) controls numerous essential functions. Its involvement in gene activation is known to be mediated by the transcription factor Methoprene-tolerant (Met), which turns on JH-controlled genes by directly binding to E-box–like motifs in their regulatory regions. However, it remains unclear how JH represses genes. We used the Aedes aegypti female mosquito, in which JH is necessary for reproductive maturation, to show that a repressor, Hairy, is required for the gene-repressive action of JH and Met. The RNA interference (RNAi) screen for Met and Hairy in the Aedes female fat body revealed a large cohort of Met- and Hairy-corepressed genes. Analysis of selected genes from this cohort demonstrated that they are repressed by JH, but RNAi of either Met or Hairy renders JH ineffective in repressing these genes in an in vitro fat-body culture assay. Moreover, this JH action was prevented by the addition of the translational inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) to the culture, indicating the existence of an indirect regulatory hierarchy. The lack of Hairy protein in the CHX-treated tissue was verified using immunoblot analysis, and the upstream regions of Met/Hairy-corepressed genes were shown to contain common binding motifs that interact with Hairy. Groucho (gro) RNAi silencing phenocopied the effect of Hairy RNAi knockdown, indicating that it is involved in the JH/Met/Hairy hierarchy. Finally, the requirement of Hairy and Gro for gene repression was confirmed in a cell transfection assay. Thus, our study has established that Hairy and its cofactor Gro mediate the repressive function of JH and Met. PMID:26744312

  12. Medical History, Lifestyle, and Occupational Risk Factors for Hairy Cell Leukemia: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Slager, Susan L.; Hughes, Ann Maree; Smith, Alex; Glimelius, Bengt; Habermann, Thomas M.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Staines, Anthony; Norman, Aaron D.; Cerhan, James R.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Clavel, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about the etiology of hairy cell leukemia (HCL), a rare B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder with marked male predominance. Our aim was to identify key risk factors for HCL. Methods A pooled analysis of individual-level data for 154 histologically confirmed HCL cases and 8834 controls from five case–control studies, conducted in Europe and Australia, was undertaken. Age-, race and/or ethnicity-, sex-, and study-adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Results The usual patterns for age and sex in HCL were observed, with a median age of 55 years and sex ratio of 3.7 males to females. Cigarette smoking was inversely associated with HCL (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.37 to 0.71) with dose–response relationships observed for duration, frequency, and lifetime cigarette smoking (P trend < .001). In contrast, occupation as a farmer was positively associated with HCL (OR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.36 to 4.01), with a dose–response relationship observed for duration (OR = 1.82, 95% CI = 0.85 to 3.88 for ≤10 years vs never; and OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.50 to 5.93 for >10 years vs never; P trend = .025). Adult height was also positively associated with HCL (OR = 2.69, 95% CI = 1.39 to 5.29 for upper vs lower quartile of height). The observed associations remained consistent in multivariate analysis. Conclusions Our observations of an increased risk of HCL from farming exposures and decreased risk from smoking exposures, independent of one another, support a multifactorial origin and an etiological specificity of HCL compared with other non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes. The positive association with height is a novel finding that needs replication. PMID:25174032

  13. Podophyllotoxin and 6-methoxy podophyllotoxin Production in Hairy Root Cultures of Liunm mucronatum ssp. mucronatum

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Afsaneh; Jafari, Morad; Nejhad, Nasim Mohammad; Hossenian, Farah

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Two bacterial strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes, A13 and 9534 were evaluated for induction of transformed hairy roots in Linum mucronatum ssp. mucronatum, a high value medicinal plant. Materials and Methods: The hairy roots were successfully initiated, through infecting the hypocotyl and root explants and the A13 strain performed a high transformation frequency for hairy roots induction. Transgenic status of hairy roots was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the rol genes. Growth kinetics of transgenic roots induced by two strains indicated a similar pattern of growth, with maximum growth occurring between 42 to 56 days. The lignan contents in hairy roots were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Results: Transformed cultures showed significant differences (P < 0.05) in lignan content. The highest amount of Podophyllotoxin (PTOX, 5.78 mg/g DW) and 6-methoxy podophyllotoxin (MPTOX, 49.19 mg/g DW) was found in transformed lines induced by strain A13, which was four times higher than those of non-transformed roots. The results showed that hairy root cultures of L. mucronatum are rich sources of MPTOX. Conclusion: hairy root cultures from L. mucronatum can be used as a useful system for scale-up producing MPTOX and precursors for the production of antitumor agents in substitution with PTOX by considering the appropriate optimizations in future studies. PMID:24914281

  14. Air entrainment in hairy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasto, Alice; Regli, Marianne; Brun, P.-T.; Alvarado, José; Clanet, Christophe; Hosoi, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by diving semiaquatic mammals, we investigate the mechanism of dynamic air entrainment in hairy surfaces submerged in liquid. Hairy surfaces are cast out of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer and plunged into a fluid bath at different velocities. Experimentally, we find that the amount of air entrained is greater than what is expected for smooth surfaces. Theoretically, we show that the hairy surface can be considered as a porous medium and we describe the air entrainment via a competition between the hydrostatic forcing and the viscous resistance in the pores. A phase diagram that includes data from our experiments and biological data from diving semiaquatic mammals is included to place the model system in a biological context and predict the regime for which the animal is protected by a plastron of air.

  15. Novel Agents in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Marcus S.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is a mature B cell neoplasm constituting 5–7% of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Overall prognosis with current therapeutics remains poor, thus numerous novel agents are currently under investigation. In this review we focus on early phase trials that have demonstrated promise in mantle cell. Constitutive activation of signaling components downstream of the B cell receptor play an important role in the pathobiology of mantle cell lymphoma. Targeting of this signaling pathway has become a focus with specific agents under development including inhibitors of spleen tyrosine kinase, phosphoinositide-3-kinase and Bruton’s tyrosine kinase. Promsing data also supports further development of BH-3 mimetics, a crucial component of anti-apoptotic signaling. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have an established role in cutaneous T cell lymphoma and are now under investigation in mantle cell lymphoma as well. With further understanding of cellular signaling, the armamentarium of treatment options will be enhanced, with the hope of improving the prognosis of this disease. PMID:22687455

  16. Photoacoustic cell for ultrasound contrast agent characterization.

    PubMed

    Alippi, A; Bettucci, A; Biagioni, A; D'Orazio, A; Germano, M; Passeri, D

    2010-10-01

    Photoacoustics has emerged as a tool for the study of liquid gel suspension behavior and has been recently employed in a number of new biomedical applications. In this paper, a photoacoustic sensor is presented which was designed and realized for analyzing photothermal signals from solutions filled with microbubbles, commonly used as ultrasound contrast agents in echographic imaging techniques. It is a closed cell device, where photothermal volume variation of an aqueous solution produces the periodic deflection of a thin membrane closing the cell at the end of a short pipe. The cell then acts as a Helmholtz resonator, where the displacement of the membrane is measured through a laser probe interferometer, whereas photoacoustic signal is generated by a laser chopped light beam impinging onto the solution through a glass window. Particularly, the microbubble shell has been modeled through an effective surface tension parameter, which has been then evaluated from experimental data through the shift of the resonance frequencies of the photoacoustic sensor. This shift of the resonance frequencies of the photoacoustic sensor caused by microbubble solutions is high enough for making such a cell a reliable tool for testing ultrasound contrast agent, particularly for bubble shell characterization. PMID:21034110

  17. Photoacoustic cell for ultrasound contrast agent characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alippi, A.; Bettucci, A.; Biagioni, A.; D'Orazio, A.; Germano, M.; Passeri, D.

    2010-10-01

    Photoacoustics has emerged as a tool for the study of liquid gel suspension behavior and has been recently employed in a number of new biomedical applications. In this paper, a photoacoustic sensor is presented which was designed and realized for analyzing photothermal signals from solutions filled with microbubbles, commonly used as ultrasound contrast agents in echographic imaging techniques. It is a closed cell device, where photothermal volume variation of an aqueous solution produces the periodic deflection of a thin membrane closing the cell at the end of a short pipe. The cell then acts as a Helmholtz resonator, where the displacement of the membrane is measured through a laser probe interferometer, whereas photoacoustic signal is generated by a laser chopped light beam impinging onto the solution through a glass window. Particularly, the microbubble shell has been modeled through an effective surface tension parameter, which has been then evaluated from experimental data through the shift of the resonance frequencies of the photoacoustic sensor. This shift of the resonance frequencies of the photoacoustic sensor caused by microbubble solutions is high enough for making such a cell a reliable tool for testing ultrasound contrast agent, particularly for bubble shell characterization.

  18. Stable, Electroinactive Wetting Agent For Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, Surya G.; Olah, George A.; Narayanan, Sekharipuram R.; Surampudi, Subbarao; Halpert, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Straight-chain perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (C8 acid) identified as innocuous and stable wetting agent for use with polytetrafluoroethylene-containing electrodes in liquid-feed direct-oxidation fuel cells suggested for use in vehicles and portable power supplies. C8 acid in small concentrations in aqueous liquid solutions of methanol, trimethoxymethane, dimethoxymethane, and trioxane enables oxidation of these substances by use of commercially available electrodes of type designed originally for use with gases. This function specific to C8 acid molecule and not achieved by other related perfluorolkanesulfonic acids.

  19. Investigational agents for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Okpala, Iheanyi

    2006-08-01

    Developments in the treatment of sickle cell disease (SCD) have not kept pace with advances in understanding the pathophysiology of this haemoglobinopathy. Drugs undergoing preclinical and clinical assessment for the therapy of these globin gene disorders are discussed in this article. Beginning with investigational agents for treatment of SCD as a whole, the discussion proceeds to drugs being developed for specific manifestations or iatrogenic complications. Despite being licensed in the USA, the prototype antisickling agent, hydroxycarbamide, has not attained worldwide clinical use because of concerns about long-term toxicity. The less toxic decitabine, which (as with hydroxycarbamide) increases fetal haemoglobin level, cannot be administered orally; therefore, the search continues for effective and safe antisickling drugs that can be taken orally. The naturally occurring benzaldehyde 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural has shown promising antisickling properties in vitro, and when administered to transgenic sickle mice. These effects are surpassed by the new synthetic pyridyl derivatives of benzaldehyde. Studies in humans with SCD are required to assess the clinical efficacy of these benzaldehydes. Niprisan, another antisickling agent with significant clinical efficacy and an attractive safety profile, is undergoing further development. The prospects of antiadhesion therapy in SCD are demonstrated by a recombinant protein containing the Fc fragment of IgG fused to the natural ligand for selectins: the conjugate significantly inhibited blood vessel occlusion in transgenic sickle mice. Whereas the orally administrable iron-chelating agent deferasirox is likely to increasingly take the place of desferioxamine (which can only be given parenterally), effective treatment of priapism in SCD remains a distressing challenge. PMID:16859388

  20. Elicitation Approaches for Withanolide Production in Hairy Root Culture of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal.

    PubMed

    Sivanandhan, Ganeshan; Selvaraj, Natesan; Ganapathi, Andy; Manickavasagam, Markandan

    2016-01-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal is a versatile medicinal plant extensively utilized for production of phytochemical drug preparations. The roots and whole plants are traditionally used in Ayurveda, Unani, and Siddha medicines, as well as in homeopathy. Several studies provide evidence for an array of pharmaceutical properties due to the presence of steroidal lactones named "withanolides." A number of research groups have focused their attention on the effects of biotic and abiotic elicitors on withanolide production using cultures of adventitious roots, cell suspensions, shoot suspensions, and hairy roots in large-scale bioreactor for producing withanolides. This chapter explains the detailed procedures for induction and establishment of hairy roots from leaf explants of W. somnifera, proliferation and multiplication of hairy root cultures, estimation of withanolide productivity upon elicitation with salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, and quantification of major withanolides by HPLC. The protocol herein described could be implemented for large-scale cultivation of hairy root biomass to improve withanolide production. PMID:26843160

  1. [Induction of polyploid hairy roots and its plant regeneration in Pogostemon cablin].

    PubMed

    Shi, Heping; Yu, Wu; Zhang, Guopeng; Tsang, Pokeung Eric; Chow, Cheuk Fai Stephen

    2014-08-01

    Abstract: In order to enhance the content of secondary metabolites patchouli alcohol in Pogostemon cablin, we induced polyploid hairy roots and their plant regeneration, and determined the content of patchouli alcohol through artificial chromosome doubling with colchicine. The highest rate of polyploidy induction was more than 40% when hairy roots were treated with 0.05% colchicine for 36 h. The obtained polyploid hairy roots formed adventitious shoots when cultured in an MS medium with 6-BA 0.2 mg/L and NAA 0.1 mg/L for 60 d. Compared with the control diploid plants, the polyploid hairy root-regenerated plants of P. cablin had more developed root systems, thicker stems, shorter internodes and longer, wider and thicker leaves. Observation of the chromosome number in their root tip cells reveals that the obtained polyploid regenerated plants were tetraploidy, with 128 (4n = 128) chromosomes. The leaves contained around twice as many stomatal guard cells and chloroplasts as the controls, but the stomatal density declined with increasing ploidy. The stomatal density in diploid plants was around 1.67 times of that in polyploid plants. GC-MS analysis shows that the content of patchouli alcholol in the hairy root-derived polyploid plants was about 4.25 mg/g dry weight, which was 2.3 times of that in diploid plants. The present study demonstrates that polyploidization of hairy roots can stimulate the content of patchouli alcholol in medicinal plant of P. cablin. PMID:25507476

  2. [Induction of polyploid hairy roots and its plant regeneration in Pogostemon cablin].

    PubMed

    Shi, Heping; Yu, Wu; Zhang, Guopeng; Tsang, Pokeung Eric; Chow, Cheuk Fai Stephen

    2014-08-01

    Abstract: In order to enhance the content of secondary metabolites patchouli alcohol in Pogostemon cablin, we induced polyploid hairy roots and their plant regeneration, and determined the content of patchouli alcohol through artificial chromosome doubling with colchicine. The highest rate of polyploidy induction was more than 40% when hairy roots were treated with 0.05% colchicine for 36 h. The obtained polyploid hairy roots formed adventitious shoots when cultured in an MS medium with 6-BA 0.2 mg/L and NAA 0.1 mg/L for 60 d. Compared with the control diploid plants, the polyploid hairy root-regenerated plants of P. cablin had more developed root systems, thicker stems, shorter internodes and longer, wider and thicker leaves. Observation of the chromosome number in their root tip cells reveals that the obtained polyploid regenerated plants were tetraploidy, with 128 (4n = 128) chromosomes. The leaves contained around twice as many stomatal guard cells and chloroplasts as the controls, but the stomatal density declined with increasing ploidy. The stomatal density in diploid plants was around 1.67 times of that in polyploid plants. GC-MS analysis shows that the content of patchouli alcholol in the hairy root-derived polyploid plants was about 4.25 mg/g dry weight, which was 2.3 times of that in diploid plants. The present study demonstrates that polyploidization of hairy roots can stimulate the content of patchouli alcholol in medicinal plant of P. cablin. PMID:25423753

  3. Geometric optics and the "hairy ball theorem"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Kazachkov, Alexander

    Applications of the hairy ball theorem to the geometrical optics are discussed. When the ideal mirror, topologically equivalent to a sphere, is illuminated at every point, the "hairy ball theorem" prescribes the existence of at least one point at which the incident light will be normally reflected. For the more general case of the surface, topologically equivalent to a sphere, which is both reflecting and refracting the "hairy ball theorem" predicts the existence of at least one point, at which the incident light will be normally reflected and also normally refracted.

  4. Iron Oxide as an MRI Contrast Agent for Cell Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Korchinski, Daniel J.; Taha, May; Yang, Runze; Nathoo, Nabeela; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide contrast agents have been combined with magnetic resonance imaging for cell tracking. In this review, we discuss coating properties and provide an overview of ex vivo and in vivo labeling of different cell types, including stem cells, red blood cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, we provide examples of applications of cell tracking with iron contrast agents in stroke, multiple sclerosis, cancer, arteriovenous malformations, and aortic and cerebral aneurysms. Attempts at quantifying iron oxide concentrations and other vascular properties are examined. We advise on designing studies using iron contrast agents including methods for validation. PMID:26483609

  5. Hyperaccumulation of cadmium by hairy roots of Thlaspi caerulescens

    SciTech Connect

    Nedelkoska, T.V.; Doran, P.M.

    2000-03-05

    Hairy roots were used to investigate cadmium uptake by Thlaspi caerulescens, a metal hyperaccumulator plant with potential applications in phytoremediation and phytomining. Experiments were carried out in nutrient media under conditions supporting root growth. Accumulation of Cd in short-term (9-h) experiments varied with initial medium pH and increased after treating the roots with H{sup +}-ATPase inhibitor. The highest equilibrium Cd content measured in T. caerulescens roots was 62,800 {micro}g g{sup {minus}1} dry weight, or 6.3% dry weight, at a liquid Cd concentration of 3,710 ppm. Cd levels in live T. caerulescens roots were 1.5- to 1.7-fold those in hairy roots of nonhyperaccumulator species exposed to the same Cd concentration, but similar to the Cd content of auto-claved T. caerulescens roots. The ability to grow at Cd concentrations of up to 100 ppm clearly distinguished T. caerulescens hairy roots from the nonhyperaccumulators. The specific growth rate of T. caerulescens roots was essentially unaffected by 20 to 50 ppm Cd in the culture medium; in contrast, N. tabacum roots turned dark brown at 20 ppm and growth was negligible. Up to 10,600 {micro}g g{sup {minus}1} dry weight Cd was accumulated by growing T. caerulescens hairy roots. Measurement of Cd levels in while roots and in the cell wall fraction revealed significant differences in the responses of T. caerulescens and N. tabacum roots to 20 ppm Cd. Most metal was transported directly into the symplasm of N. tabacum roots within 3 days of exposure; in contrast, T. caerulescens roots stored virtually all of their Cd in the wall fraction for the first 7 to 10 days. This delay in transmembrane uptake may represent an important defensive strategy against Cd poisoning in T. caerulescens, allowing time for activation of intracellular mechanisms for heavy metal detoxification.

  6. Organic acid complexation, heavy metal distribution and the effect of ATPase inhibition in hairy roots of hyperaccumulator plant species.

    PubMed

    Boominathan, Rengasamy; Doran, Pauline M

    2003-03-01

    Heavy metal uptake and distribution were investigated in hairy roots of the Cd hyperaccumulator, Thlaspi caerulescens, and the Ni hyperaccumulator, Alyssum bertolonii. Hairy roots of both species contained high constitutive levels of citric, malic and malonic acids. After treatment with 20 ppm Cd or 25 ppm Ni, about 13% of the total Cd in T. caerulescens roots and 28% of the total Ni in A. bertolonii were associated with organic acids. T. caerulescens and A. bertolonii hairy roots remained healthy and grew well at high concentrations of Cd and Ni, respectively, whereas hairy roots of the non-hyperaccumulator, Nicotiana tabacum, did not. Most of the Cd in T. caerulescens and N. tabacum roots was localised in the cell walls. In contrast, 85-95% of the Ni in A. bertolonii and N. tabacum was associated with the symplasm. Growth of T. caerulescens and A. bertolonii hairy roots was severely reduced in the presence of diethylstilbestrol (DES), an inhibitor of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. Treatment with DES increased the concentration of Cd in the symplasm of T. caerulescens about 6-fold with retention of root viability, whereas viability and Ni transport across the plasma membrane were both reduced in A. bertolonii. These results suggest that the mechanisms of Cd tolerance and hyperaccumulation in T. caerulescens hairy roots are capable of withstanding the effects of plasma membrane depolarisation, whereas Ni tolerance and hyperaccumulation in A. bertolonii hairy roots are not. PMID:12568742

  7. Hairy balls and flux lines in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laver, Mark; Forgan, Ted

    2011-03-01

    Many physical phenomena originate from geometrical effects rather than from local physics. For example, the hairy ball theorem --- a hairy sphere cannot be combed --- is fulfilled by the atmospheric circulation with the existence of stratospheric polar vortices, and the fact that there is always at least one place on Earth where the horizontal wind is still. We examine the consequences of the hairy ball theorem for the flux line lattice (FLL). We find that discontinuities must exist in lattice shape as a function of field direction relative to the crystal. The remarkable ways in which the hairy ball theorem is fulfilled are demonstrated for FLL's in superconducting niobium. We show that extraordinary, unconventional flux line lattice shapes that spontaneously break the underlying crystal symmetry are surprisingly likely across all Type-II superconductors, both conventional and unconventional.

  8. Loss of Sertoli-germ cell adhesion determines the rapid germ cell elimination during the seasonal regression of the seminiferous epithelium of the large hairy armadillo Chaetophractus villosus.

    PubMed

    Luaces, Juan Pablo; Rossi, Luis Francisco; Sciurano, Roberta Beatriz; Rebuzzini, Paola; Merico, Valeria; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Merani, Maria Susana; Garagna, Silvia

    2014-03-01

    The armadillo Chaetophractus villosus is a seasonal breeder whose seminiferous epithelium undergoes rapid regression with massive germ cell loss, leaving the tubules with only Sertoli cells and spermatogonia. Here, we addressed the question of whether this regression entails 1) the disassembly of cell junctions (immunolocalization of nectin-3, Cadm1, N-cadherin, and beta-catenin, and transmission electron microscopy [TEM]); 2) apoptosis (immunolocalization of cytochrome c and caspase 3; TUNEL assay); and 3) the involvement of Sertoli cells in germ cell phagocytosis (TEM). We showed a dramatic reduction in the extension of vimentin filaments associated with desmosomelike junctions at the interface between Sertoli and germ cells, and an increased diffusion of the immunosignals of nectin-3, Cadm1, N-cadherin, and beta-catenin. Together, these results suggest loss of Sertoli-germ cell adhesion, which in turn might determine postmeiotic cell sloughing at the beginning of epithelium regression. Then, loss of Sertoli-germ cell adhesion triggers cell death. Cytochrome c is released from mitochondria, but although postmeiotic cells were negative for late apoptotic markers, at advanced regression spermatocytes were positive for all apoptotic markers. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed cytoplasmic engulfment of cell debris and lipid droplets within Sertoli cells, a sign of their phagocytic activity, which contributes to the elimination of the residual meiocytes still present in the latest regression phases. These findings are novel and add new players to the mechanisms of seminiferous epithelium regression occurring in seasonal breeders, and they introduce the armadillo as an interesting model for studying seasonal spermatogenesis. PMID:24451984

  9. Fusing multifocus images for yarn hairiness measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rongwu; Zhou, Jinfeng; Yu, Lingjie; Xu, Bugao

    2014-12-01

    Yarn hairiness has been an important indication of yarn quality that affects weaving production and fabric appearance. In addition to many dedicated instruments, various image analysis systems have been adopted to measure yarn hairiness for potential values of high accuracy and low cost. However, there is a common problem in acquiring yarn images; that is, hairy fibers protruding beyond the depth of field of the imaging system cannot be fully focused. Fuzzy fibers in the image inevitably introduce errors to the hairiness data. This paper presents a project that attempts to solve the off-focus problem of hairy fibers by applying a new imaging scheme-multifocus image fusion. This new scheme uses compensatory information in sequential images taken at the same position but different depths to construct a new image whose pixels have the highest sharpness among the sequential images. The fused image possesses clearer fiber edges, permitting more complete fiber segmentation and tracing. In the experiments, we used six yarns of different fiber contents and spinning methods to compare the hairiness measurements from the fused images with those from unfused images and from the Uster tester.

  10. Bioinspired superhydrophobic carbonaceous hairy microstructures with strong water adhesion and high gas retaining capability.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Qin, Minglei; Wang, Anjie; Kim, Dongpyo

    2013-09-01

    Various hydrophobic hairy carbonaceous fibers are obtained by a low-temperature CVD process on catalyst-patterned surface patches which are selectively coated with silica to make the surface superhydrophobic and yet allow strong water adhesion for the "Salvinia effect". The versatility of the functional hairy fiber surfaces is demonstrated with a liquid barrier grid for cell microarray, a gas retaining capability under water/liquid for a membrane-free microfluidic chemical process, and functionalized papillae for cell immobilization with green algae. PMID:23813481

  11. Development of a kinetic metabolic model: application to Catharanthus roseus hairy root

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, M.; Tikhomiroff, C.; Cloutier, M.; Perrier, M.

    2006-01-01

    A kinetic metabolic model describing Catharanthus roseus hairy root growth and nutrition was developed. The metabolic network includes glycolysis, pentose-phosphate pathway, TCA cycle and the catabolic reactions leading to cell building blocks such as amino acids, organic acids, organic phosphates, lipids and structural hexoses. The central primary metabolic network was taken at pseudo-steady state and metabolic flux analysis technique allowed reducing from 31 metabolic fluxes to 20 independent pathways. Hairy root specific growth rate was described as a function of intracellular concentration in cell building blocks. Intracellular transport and accumulation kinetics for major nutrients were included. The model uses intracellular nutrients as well as energy shuttles to describe metabolic regulation. Model calibration was performed using experimental data obtained from batch and medium exchange liquid cultures of C. roseus hairy root using a minimal medium in Petri dish. The model is efficient in estimating the growth rate. PMID:16453114

  12. Melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers in hairy cell leukaemia: a Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results population analysis and the 30-year experience at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Watts, Justin M; Kishtagari, Ashwin; Hsu, Meier; Lacouture, Mario E; Postow, Michael A; Park, Jae H; Stein, Eytan M; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Devlin, Sean M; Tallman, Martin S

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have examined melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) incidence rates after a diagnosis of hairy cell leukaemia (HCL). We assessed 267 HCL patients treated at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) and Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data for melanoma and NMSC incidence rates after HCL. Incidence data from MSKCC patients demonstrated a 10-year combined melanoma and NMSC skin cancer rate of 11·3%, melanoma 4·4% and NMSC 6·9%. Molecular analysis of skin cancers from MSKCC patients revealed activating RAS mutations in 3/9 patients, including one patient with melanoma. Of 4750 SEER patients with HCL, 55 (1·2%) had a subsequent diagnosis of melanoma. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) did not show that melanoma was more common in HCL patients versus the general population (SIR 1·3, 95% CI 0·78-2·03). Analysis of SEER HCL patients diagnosed before and after 1990 (approximately before and after purine analogue therapy was introduced) showed no evidence of an increased incidence after 1990. A better understanding of any potential association between HCL and skin cancer is highly relevant given ongoing trials using BRAF inhibitors, such as vemurafenib, for relapsed HCL, as RAS-mutant skin cancers could be paradoxically activated in these patients. PMID:26115047

  13. [Effects of 6-benzylaminopurine and α-naphthaleneacetic acid on growth and isoflavone contents of Pueraria phaseoloides hairy roots].

    PubMed

    He, Hanjie; Shi, Heping

    2014-10-01

    In order to study the effect of phytohormone on growth and isoflavones contents of Pueraria phaseoloides hairy roots, we cultured the hairy roots with different concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA) alone or in combination with α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Then we determined the effects of 6-BA alone or in combination with NAA on the growth and the contents of isoflavones compounds and levels of antioxidase activities of hairy roots by spectrophotometry. The results show that 6-BA inhibited the growth, and decreased biomass and total isoflavones compounds of P. phaseoloides hairy roots. Furthermore, the inhibition was increased with the concentrations of 6-BA. Compared with the controls, different concentrations of 6-BA in combination with NAA 2.0 mg/L could inhibit the growth of hairy roots and decrease the content of total isoflavone compounds, and also significantly enhanced the contents of soluble protein and levels of peroxidase (POD) activities, but decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD). DNA ladders detected by agarose gel electrophoresis can be observed after hairy roots of P. phaseoloides were cultured with 6-BA alone for 30 days, but can appear on the 20th day after culture with 6-BA in combination with NAA 2.0 mg/L. This result indicates that 6-BA or 6-BA in combination with NAA can both stimulate appearance of programmed cell death (PCD), and NAA may play a synergistic role on PCD. PMID:25726582

  14. Drag reduction of a hairy disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jun; Hu, David L.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate experimentally the hydrodynamics of a hairy disk immersed in a two-dimensional flowing soap film. Drag force is measured as a function of hair length, density, and coating area. An optimum combination of these parameters yields a drag reduction of 17%, which confirms previous numerical predictions (15%). Flow visualization indicates the primary mechanism for drag reduction is the bending, adhesion, and reinforcement of hairs trailing the disk, which reduces wake width and traps "dead water." Thus, the use of hairy coatings can substantially reduce an object's drag while negligibly increasing its weight.

  15. Bubble Jet agent release cartridge for chemical single cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wangler, N; Welsche, M; Blazek, M; Blessing, M; Vervliet-Scheebaum, M; Reski, R; Müller, C; Reinecke, H; Steigert, J; Roth, G; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2013-02-01

    We present a new method for the distinct specific chemical stimulation of single cells and small cell clusters within their natural environment. By single-drop release of chemical agents with droplets in size of typical cell diameters (d <30 μm) on-demand micro gradients can be generated for the specific manipulation of single cells. A single channel and a double channel agent release cartridge with integrated fluidic structures and integrated agent reservoirs are shown, tested, and compared in this publication. The single channel setup features a fluidic structure fabricated by anisotropic etching of silicon. To allow for simultaneous release of different agents even though maintaining the same device size, the second type comprises a double channel fluidic structure, fabricated by photolithographic patterning of TMMF. Dispensed droplet volumes are V = 15 pl and V = 10 pl for the silicon and the TMMF based setups, respectively. Utilizing the agent release cartridges, the application in biological assays was demonstrated by hormone-stimulated premature bud formation in Physcomitrella patens and the individual staining of one single L 929 cell within a confluent grown cell culture. PMID:22833153

  16. Cell-Permeable MR Contrast Agents with Increased Intracellular Retention

    PubMed Central

    Endres, Paul J.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Vogt, Stefan; Meade, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a technique used in both clinical and experimental settings to produce high resolution images of opaque organisms without ionizing radiation. Currently, MR imaging is augmented by contrast agents and the vast majority these small molecule Gd(III) chelates are confined to the extracellular regions. As a result, contrast agents are confined to vascular regions reducing their ability to provide information about cell physiology or molecular pathology. We have shown that polypeptides of arginine have the capacity to transport Gd(III) contrast agents across cell membranes. However, this transport is not unidirectional and once inside the cell the arginine-modified contrast agents efflux rapidly, decreasing the intracellular Gd(III) concentration and corresponding MR image intensity. By exploiting the inherent disulfide reducing environment of cells, thiol compounds, Gd(III)-DOTA-SS-Arg8 and Gd(III)-DTPA-SS-Arg8, are cleaved from their cell penetrating peptide transduction domains upon cell internalization. This reaction prolongs the cell-associated lifetime of the chelated Gd(III) by cleaving it from the cell transduction domain. PMID:18803414

  17. Detection of powdery scab on hairy nightshades

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the 2002 and 2003 growing seasons, powdery scab like root galls were detected on roots of hairynightshades (Solanum physalifolim, formerly S. sarrachoides) grown in potato fields where populations of the powdery scab pathogen were high. At the end of the 2007 growing season, hairy nightshades...

  18. Enzymes and other agents that enhance cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polysaccharides and proteins are secreted to the inner surface of the growing cell wall, where they assemble into a network that is mechanically strong, yet remains extensible until the cells cease growth. This review focuses on the agents that directly or indirectly enhance the extensibility properties of growing walls. The properties of expansins, endoglucanases, and xyloglucan transglycosylases are reviewed and their postulated roles in modulating wall extensibility are evaluated. A summary model for wall extension is presented, in which expansin is a primary agent of wall extension, whereas endoglucanases, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, and other enzymes that alter wall structure act secondarily to modulate expansin action.

  19. Differentiation of cultured epithelial cells: Response to toxic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, R.H.; LaMontagne, A.D.; Petito, C.T.; Rong, Xianhui )

    1989-03-01

    Cell culture systems are instrumental in elucidating regulation of normal function and mechanisms of its perturbation by toxic substances. To this end, three applications of epithelial cells cultured with 3T3 feeder layer support are described. First, treatment of the premalignant human epidermal keratinocyte line SCC-12F2 with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate suppressed cell growth and differentiation. This agent produced a biphasic growth response greatly inhibiting cell growth at 1 to 10 nM, but much less above 100 nM. Expression of the differentiated functions involucrin and transglutaminase was found to be inhibited markedly at concentrations above 10 nM. Second, 3-methylcholanthrene toxicity was surveyed in a variety of rat epithelial cell types. The two most sensitive to growth inhibition were epidermal and mammary epithelial cells, while those from bladder, prostate, thyroid, and endometrium were insensitive to growth inhibition. Finally, expression of estrogen receptors in rat endometrial cells was shown to be stimulated by the cAmP-elevating agent forskolin. Maximal stimulation of 3- to 6-fold occurred in 6 hr, compatible with a requirement for protein synthesis. Pursuit of such results will aid in understanding differences in response among cell types and species, in elucidating mechanisms of action of known toxic substances and, ultimately, in predicting toxicity of less well understood agents.

  20. Biologically inspired hairy surfaces for liquid repellency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shu-Hau

    Owing to remarkable features, such as self-cleaning, anti-biofouling and drag reduction, interest on rendering surfaces water-repellent has significantly grown within this decade. Attempts on making surfaces "superhydrophobic", where high water contact angle (θc >150°) accompanied with only few degrees of roll-off angle, have been extensively demonstrated through the mimicking of the surface chemistry and morphology of lotus leaves. This appealing phenomenon also exists on another structure from nature: surfaces comprising soft hairs. Although the role of this piliferous integument has long been recognized for providing life, arthropods in particular, waterrepellency, the synthetic superhydrophobic surfaces based on this structure are still very limited. In this study, the goal was to develop a novel liquid-repellent surface by mimicking the hairy exterior of species. The artificial hairy surfaces were prepared by means of pressurized membrane casting, in which thermoplastic sheets were forced to flow into porous membranes at elevated temperature. The G-shaped pillars on the membrane cast polypropylene substrate are particularly similar to the conformation of natural hairs. The principle of this fabrication technique is relatively accessible and is expected to be compatible with large-area fabrication of superhydrophobic interfaces. The artificial hairy surface features perfectly hydrophobic response where no contact angle hysteresis was observed from video assessment. Thus the artificial hairy surface of the current work appears to be the first report to have such extreme hydrophobicity with only structural modification from the original substrate. This ultralow adhesion to water droplet is believed to be attributed to the hydrophobic methyl groups and the mechanical response of the artificial hairs. Liquid repellency of the hairy surfaces was further enhanced by coating with fluorocarbon (CF) layers via deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). The contact angle of

  1. Tetraploid Artemisia annua hairy roots produce more artemisinin than diploids.

    PubMed

    De Jesus-Gonzalez, L; Weathers, P J

    2003-04-01

    Hairy root cultures of diploid Artemisia annua L. (clone YUT16) grow rapidly and produce the antimalarial sesquiterpene artemisinin. Little is known about how polyploidy affects the growth of transformed hairy roots and the production of secondary metabolites. Using colchicine, we produced four stable tetraploid clones of A. annua L. from the YUT16 hairy root clone. Analysis showed major differences in growth and artemisinin production compared to the diploid clone. Tetraploid clones produced up to six times more artemisinin than the diploid parent. This study provides an initial step in increasing our understanding of the role of polyploidy in secondary metabolite production, especially in hairy roots. PMID:12789527

  2. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Hairy Woodpecker

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sousa, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the hairy woodpecker (Picoides villosus). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  3. Epstein-Barr Virus and Its Association with Oral Hairy Leukoplakia: A Short Review.

    PubMed

    Khammissa, Razia Abdool Gafaar; Fourie, Jeanine; Chandran, Rakesh; Lemmer, Johan; Feller, Liviu

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised subjects, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of terminally differentiated oral keratinocytes may result in subclinical productive infection of the virus in the stratum spinosum and in the stratum granulosum with shedding of infectious virions into the oral fluid in the desquamating cells. In a minority of cases this productive infection with dysregulation of the cell cycle of terminally differentiated epithelial cells may manifest as oral hairy leukoplakia. This is a white, hyperkeratotic, benign lesion of low morbidity, affecting primarily the lateral border of the tongue. Factors that determine whether productive EBV replication within the oral epithelium will cause oral hairy leukoplakia include the fitness of local immune responses, the profile of EBV gene expression, and local environmental factors. PMID:27047546

  4. Epstein-Barr Virus and Its Association with Oral Hairy Leukoplakia: A Short Review

    PubMed Central

    Khammissa, Razia Abdool Gafaar; Fourie, Jeanine; Chandran, Rakesh; Lemmer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised subjects, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of terminally differentiated oral keratinocytes may result in subclinical productive infection of the virus in the stratum spinosum and in the stratum granulosum with shedding of infectious virions into the oral fluid in the desquamating cells. In a minority of cases this productive infection with dysregulation of the cell cycle of terminally differentiated epithelial cells may manifest as oral hairy leukoplakia. This is a white, hyperkeratotic, benign lesion of low morbidity, affecting primarily the lateral border of the tongue. Factors that determine whether productive EBV replication within the oral epithelium will cause oral hairy leukoplakia include the fitness of local immune responses, the profile of EBV gene expression, and local environmental factors. PMID:27047546

  5. Nonionic, water self-dispersible "hairy-rod" poly(p-phenylene)-g-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer/carbon nanotube conjugates for targeted cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Merve; Colak, Demet Goen; Akin, Mehriban; Cianga, Ioan; Kukut, Manolya; Medine, E Ilker; Can, Mustafa; Sakarya, Serhan; Unak, Perihan; Timur, Suna; Yagci, Yusuf

    2012-09-10

    The generation and fabrication of nanoscopic structures are of critical technological importance for future implementations in areas such as nanodevices and nanotechnology, biosensing, bioimaging, cancer targeting, and drug delivery. Applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biological fields have been impeded by the incapability of their visualization using conventional methods. Therefore, fluorescence labeling of CNTs with various probes under physiological conditions has become a significant issue for their utilization in biological processes. Herein, we demonstrate a facile and additional fluorophore-free approach for cancer cell-imaging and diagnosis by combining multiwalled CNTs with a well-known conjugated polymer, namely, poly(p-phenylene) (PP). In this approach, PP decorated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was noncovalently (π-π stacking) linked to acid-treated CNTs. The obtained water self-dispersible, stable, and biocompatible f-CNT/PP-g-PEG conjugates were then bioconjugated to estrogen-specific antibody (anti-ER) via -COOH functionalities present on the side-walls of CNTs. The resulting conjugates were used as an efficient fluorescent probe for targeted imaging of estrogen receptor overexpressed cancer cells, such as MCF-7. In vitro studies and fluorescence microscopy data show that these conjugates can specifically bind to MCF-7 cells with high efficiency. The represented results imply that CNT-based materials could easily be fabricated by the described approach and used as an efficient "fluorescent probe" for targeting and imaging, thereby providing many new possibilities for various applications in biomedical sensing and diagnosis. PMID:22866988

  6. POTATO DISEASE, NEMATODE, AND INSECT PROBLEMS WORSENED BY HAIRY NIGHTSHADE.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hairy nightshade is a close relative of potato and therefore hosts many disease, nematode, and insect pests of potato. Hairy nightshade presence in rotation crops nullifies many of the positive effects of crop rotation. Idaho studies have shown that green peach aphids reproduce more readily on hai...

  7. Polyampholytes as cryoprotective agents for mammalian cell cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Kazuaki; Bae, Jung Yoon; Hyon, Suong Hyu

    2010-01-01

    Cryoprotective agents (CPAs) such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), glycerol, ethylene glycol, and propylene glycol have been used for the cryopreservation of cells and tissues. DMSO is the most effective CPA but shows high cytotoxicity and can effect differentiation. ɛ-poly-L-lysine (PLL) derivatives show higher cryopreservation efficiency than the conventional CPAs. Culture medium solutions with 7.5 w/w% of PLL whose amino groups of more than 50 mol% were converted to carboxyl groups by succinic anhydride showed higher postthaw survival efficiency of L929 cells than those of current CPAs without the addition of any proteins. In addition, rat mesenchymal stem cells were cryopreserved more effectively than with DMSO and fully retained the potential for proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, many kinds of cells could be cryopreserved with PLL having the appropriate ratio of COOH groups, regardless of the cell types, including adhesive and floating cells, human- and mouse-derived cells, primary cells, and established cell lines. The properties might be associated with the antifreeze protein properties. These results indicate that these polymeric extracellular CPAs may replace current CPAs and the high viability after thawing and nonnecessity of serum ensure that these CPAs may be used in various preservation fields. PMID:20525437

  8. Hairy root culture: bioreactor design and process intensification.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Amanda R; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2013-01-01

    The cultivation of hairy roots for the production of secondary metabolites offers numerous advantages; hairy roots have a fast growth rate, are genetically stable, and are relatively simple to maintain in phytohormone free media. Hairy roots provide a continuous source of secondary metabolites, and are useful for the production of chemicals for pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and food additives. In order for hairy roots to be utilized on a commercial scale, it is necessary to scale-up their production. Over the last several decades, significant research has been conducted on the cultivation of hairy roots in various types of bioreactor systems. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of various bioreactor systems, the major factors related to large-scale bioreactor cultures, process intensification technologies and overview the mathematical models and computer-aided methods that have been utilized for bioreactor design and development. PMID:23604206

  9. Production and secretion of a heterologous protein by turnip hairy roots with superiority over tobacco hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Huet, Yoann; Ekouna, Jean-Pierre Ele; Caron, Aurore; Mezreb, Katiba; Boitel-Conti, Michèle; Guerineau, François

    2014-01-01

    A fully contained and efficient heterologous protein production system was designed using Brassica rapa rapa (turnip) hairy roots. Two expression cassettes containing a cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter with a duplicated enhancer region, an Arabidopsis thaliana sequence encoding a signal peptide and the CaMV polyadenylation signal were constructed. One cassette was used to express the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-encoding gene in hairy roots grown in flasks. A stable and fast-growing hairy root line secreted GFP at >120 mg/l culture medium. GFP represented 60 % of the total soluble proteins in the culture medium. Turnip hairy roots retained sustainable growth and stable GFP production over 3 years. These results were superior to those obtained using tobacco hairy roots. PMID:24078130

  10. Compliant electrostatic chuck based on hairy microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Shigeki; Soda, Fumiaki; Dhelika, Radon; Takahashi, Kunio; Takarada, Wataru; Kikutani, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    An electrostatic chuck (ESC) is a device used to clamp and transport flat-surfaced objects such as thin semiconductor wafers. Working by the principle of electrostatic force, its functionality is limited in handling objects with rough surfaces, as the attractive forces at work are significantly reduced. To improve this weak point, by employing 70 μm diameter polymer-based electrostatic inductive fibers with a conductive core, we develop a device prototype with an adhesional mechanism having a hairy microstructure with appropriate mechanical compliance. We theoretically and experimentally investigate how the prototype works, and how the fibers’ mechanical compliance affects the performance of ESC.

  11. Cell wall proteins of Sporothrix schenckii as immunoprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; López-Romero, Everardo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2014-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is the etiological agent of sporotrichosis, an endemic subcutaneous mycosis in Latin America. Cell wall (CW) proteins located on the cell surface are inducers of cellular and humoral immune responses, potential candidates for diagnosis purposes and to generate vaccines to prevent fungal infections. This mini-review emphasizes the potential use of S. schenckii CW proteins as protective and therapeutic immune response inducers against sporotrichosis. A number of pathogenic fungi display CW components that have been characterized as inducers of protective cellular and humoral immune responses against the whole pathogen from which they were originally purified. The isolation and characterization of immunodominant protein components of the CW of S. schenckii have become relevant because of their potential in the development of protective and therapeutic immune responses against sporotrichosis. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). PMID:24257472

  12. Investigational agents in metastatic basal cell carcinoma: focus on vismodegib

    PubMed Central

    Batty, Nicolas; Kossoff, Ellen; Dy, Grace K

    2012-01-01

    Vismodegib (GDC-0449, 2-chloro-N-(4-chloro-3-(pyridin-2-yl)phenyl)-4-(methylsulfonyl)benzamide, Erivedge™) is a novel first-in-human, first-in class, orally bio-available Hedgehog pathway signaling inhibitor of the G-protein coupled receptor-like protein smoothened (SMO) which was approved in the United States on January 2012. This signaling pathway is involved in the carcinogenesis of several types of tumor, as exemplified by basal cell carcinoma. This review focuses on the role of the Hedgehog pathway in the pathogenesis of basal cell carcinoma, the pharmacology and the clinical activity of vismodegib, as well as a brief summary of investigational agents in development targeting this pathway.

  13. Water as foaming agent for open cell polyurethane structures.

    PubMed

    Haugen, H; Ried, V; Brunner, M; Will, J; Wintermantel, E

    2004-04-01

    The problem of moisture in polymer processing is known to any polymer engineer, as air bubbles may be formed. Hence granulates are generally dried prior to manufacturing. This study tried to develop a novel processing methods for scaffolds with controlled moisture content in thermoplastic polyurethane. The common foaming agents for polyurethane are organic solvents, whose residues remaining in the scaffold may be harmful to adherent cells, protein growth factors or nearby tissues. Water was used as a foaming agent and NaCl was used as porogens to achieve an open-cell structure. The polyether-polyurethane samples were processed in a heated press, and achieved a porosity of 64%. The pore size ranged between 50 and 500 microm. Human fibroblasts adhered and proliferate in the scaffold. A non-toxic production process was developed to manufacture a porous structure with a thermoplastic polyether-polyurethane. The process enables a mass-production of samples with adjustable pore size and porosity. In contrast to an existing method (solvent casting), the processing of the samples was not limited by its thickness. The process parameters, which attribute mostly to the pore building, were filling volume, temperature, NaCl-concentration and water-uptake rate. PMID:15332597

  14. Decreased stability of DNA in cells treated with alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, O.S. )

    1990-12-01

    A modified highly sensitive procedure for the evaluation of DNA damage in individual cells treated with alkylating agents is reported. The new methodology is based on the amplification of single-strandedness in alkylated DNA by heating in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. Human ovarian carcinoma cells A2780 were treated with nitrogen mustard (HN2), fixed in methanol, and stained with monoclonal antibody (MOAB) F7-26 generated against HN2-treated DNA. Binding of MOAB was measured by flow cytometry with indirect immunofluorescence. Intensive binding of MOAB to control and drug-treated cells was observed after heating in Tris buffer supplemented with MgCl{sub 2}. Thus, the presence of phosphates and MgCl{sub 2} during heating was necessary for the detection of HN2-induced changes in DNA stability. Fluorescence of HN2-treated cells decreased to background levels after treatment with single-strand-specific S{sub 1} nuclease. MOAB F7-26 interacted with single-stranded regions in DNA and did not bind to dsDNA or other cellular antigens. It is suggested that alkylation of guanines decreased the stability of the DNA molecule and increased the access of MOAB F7-26 to deoxycytidines on the opposite DNA strand.

  15. Plant hairy root cultures as plasmodium modulators of the slime mold emergent computing substrate Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Ricigliano, Vincent; Chitaman, Javed; Tong, Jingjing; Adamatzky, Andrew; Howarth, Dianella G

    2015-01-01

    Roots of the medicinal plant Valeriana officinalis are well-studied for their various biological activities. We applied genetically transformed V. officinalis root biomass to exert control of Physarum polycephalum, an amoeba-based emergent computing substrate. The plasmodial stage of the P. polycephalum life cycle constitutes a single, multinucleate cell visible by unaided eye. The plasmodium modifies its network of oscillating protoplasm in response to spatial configurations of attractants and repellents, a behavior that is interpreted as biological computation. To program the computing behavior of P. polycephalum, a diverse and sustainable library of plasmodium modulators is required. Hairy roots produced by genetic transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes are a metabolically stable source of bioactive compounds. Adventitious roots were induced on in vitro V. officinalis plants following infection with A. rhizogenes. A single hairy root clone was selected for massive propagation and the biomass was characterized in P. polycephalum chemotaxis, maze-solving, and electrical activity assays. The Agrobacterium-derived roots of V. officinalis elicited a positive chemotactic response and augmented maze-solving behavior. In a simple plasmodium circuit, introduction of hairy root biomass stimulated the oscillation patterns of slime mold's surface electrical activity. We propose that manipulation of P. polycephalum with the plant root culture platform can be applied to the development of slime mold microfluidic devices as well as future models for engineering the plant rhizosphere. PMID:26236301

  16. Plant hairy root cultures as plasmodium modulators of the slime mold emergent computing substrate Physarum polycephalum

    PubMed Central

    Ricigliano, Vincent; Chitaman, Javed; Tong, Jingjing; Adamatzky, Andrew; Howarth, Dianella G.

    2015-01-01

    Roots of the medicinal plant Valeriana officinalis are well-studied for their various biological activities. We applied genetically transformed V. officinalis root biomass to exert control of Physarum polycephalum, an amoeba-based emergent computing substrate. The plasmodial stage of the P. polycephalum life cycle constitutes a single, multinucleate cell visible by unaided eye. The plasmodium modifies its network of oscillating protoplasm in response to spatial configurations of attractants and repellents, a behavior that is interpreted as biological computation. To program the computing behavior of P. polycephalum, a diverse and sustainable library of plasmodium modulators is required. Hairy roots produced by genetic transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes are a metabolically stable source of bioactive compounds. Adventitious roots were induced on in vitro V. officinalis plants following infection with A. rhizogenes. A single hairy root clone was selected for massive propagation and the biomass was characterized in P. polycephalum chemotaxis, maze-solving, and electrical activity assays. The Agrobacterium-derived roots of V. officinalis elicited a positive chemotactic response and augmented maze-solving behavior. In a simple plasmodium circuit, introduction of hairy root biomass stimulated the oscillation patterns of slime mold's surface electrical activity. We propose that manipulation of P. polycephalum with the plant root culture platform can be applied to the development of slime mold microfluidic devices as well as future models for engineering the plant rhizosphere. PMID:26236301

  17. Effect of elicitors and precursors on azadirachtin production in hairy root culture of Azadirachta indica.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Srivastava, A K

    2014-02-01

    The present study involved strategies for enhancement in in vitro azadirachtin (commercially used biopesticide) production by hairy root cultivation of Azadirachta indica. Improvement in the azadirachtin production via triggering its biosynthetic pathway in plant cells was carried out by the exogenous addition of precursors and elicitors in the growth medium. Among the different abiotic stress inducers (Ag(+), Hg(+2), Co(+2), Cu(+2)) and signal molecules (methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid) tested, salicylic acid at 15 mg l(-1) of concentration was found to enhance the azadirachtin yield in the hairy roots to the maximum (up to 4.95 mg g(-1)). Similarly, among the different biotic elicitors tested (filter-sterilized fungal culture filtrates of Phoma herbarium, Alternaria alternata, Myrothecium sp., Fusarium solani, Curvularia lunata, and Sclerotium rolfsii; yeast extract; and yeast extract carbohydrate fraction), addition of filter-sterilized fungal culture filtrate of C. lunata (1 % v/v) resulted in maximum azadirachtin yield enhancement in hairy root biomass (up to 7.1 mg g(-1)) with respect to the control (3.3 mg g(-1)). Among all the biosynthetic precursors studied (sodium acetate, cholesterol, squalene, isopentynyl pyrophosphate, mavalonic acid lactone, and geranyl pyrophosphate), the overall azadirachtin production (70.42 mg l(-1) in 25 days) was found to be the highest with cholesterol (50 mg l(-1)) addition as an indirect precursor in the medium. PMID:24357500

  18. Exact formation of hairy planar black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying; Chen, Bin

    2016-04-01

    We consider Einstein gravity minimally coupled to a scalar field with a given potential in general dimensions. We obtain large classes of static hairy planar black holes which are asymptotic to anti-de Sitter (AdS) space-times. In particular, for a special case μ =(n -2 )/2 , we obtain new classes of exact dynamical solutions describing black hole formation. We find there are two classes of collapse solutions. The first class of solutions describes the evolution start from AdS space-time with a naked singularity at the origin. The space-time is linearly unstable and evolves into stationary black hole states even under small perturbation. The second class of solutions describes the space-time spontaneously evolving from AdS vacua into stationary black hole states undergoing nonlinear instability. We also discuss the global properties of all these dynamical solutions.

  19. Elicitation Based Enhancement of Secondary Metabolites in Rauwolfia serpentina and Solanum khasianum Hairy Root Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Mrinalini; Sharma, Swati; Misra, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rauwolfia serpentina and Solanum khasianum are well-known medicinally important plants contained important alkaloids in their different parts. Elicitation of these alkaloids is important because of associated pharmaceutical properties. Targeted metabolites were ajmaline and ajmalicine in R. serpentina; solasodine and α-solanine in S. khasianum. Objective: Enhancement of secondary metabolites through biotic and abiotic elicitors in hairy root cultures of R. serpentina and S. khasianum. Materials and Methods: In this report, hairy root cultures of these two plants were established through Agrobacterium rhizogenes mediated transformation by optimizing various parameters as age of explants, duration of preculture, and co-cultivation period. NaCl was used as abiotic elicitors in these two plants. Cellulase from Aspergillus niger was used as biotic elicitor in S. khasianum and mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used in R. serpentina. Results: First time we have reported the effect of biotic and abiotic elicitors on the production of important metabolites in hairy root cultures of these two plants. Ajmalicine production was stimulated up to 14.8-fold at 100 mM concentration of NaCl after 1 week of treatment. Ajmaline concentration was also increased 2.9-fold at 100 mg/l dose of mannan after 1 week. Solasodine content was enhanced up to 4.0-fold and 3.6-fold at 100 mM and 200 mM NaCl, respectively, after 6 days of treatments. Conclusion: This study explored the potential of the elicitation strategy in A. rhizogenes transformed cell cultures and this potential further used for commercial production of these pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites. SUMMARY Hairy roots of Rauwolfia serpentina were subjected to salt (abiotic stress) and mannan (biotic stress) treatment for 1 week. Ajmaline and ajmalicine secondary metabolites were quantified before and after stress treatmentAjmalicine yield was enhanced up to 14.8-fold at 100 mM concentration of Na

  20. Engineering cells with intracellular agent-loaded microparticles to control cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Ankrum, James A; Miranda, Oscar R; Ng, Kelvin S; Sarkar, Debanjan; Xu, Chenjie; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2014-02-01

    Cell therapies enable unprecedented treatment options to replace tissues, destroy tumors and facilitate regeneration. The greatest challenge facing cell therapy is the inability to control the fate and function of cells after transplantation. We have developed an approach to control cell phenotype in vitro and after transplantation by engineering cells with intracellular depots that continuously release phenotype-altering agents for days to weeks. The platform enables control of cells' secretome, viability, proliferation and differentiation, and the platform can be used to deliver drugs or other factors (e.g., dexamethasone, rhodamine and iron oxide) to the cell's microenvironment. The preparation, efficient internalization and intracellular stabilization of ∼1-μm drug-loaded microparticles are critical for establishing sustained control of cell phenotype. Herein we provide a protocol to generate and characterize micrometer-sized agent-doped poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) particles by using a single-emulsion evaporation technique (7 h), to uniformly engineer cultured cells (15 h), to confirm particle internalization and to troubleshoot commonly experienced obstacles. PMID:24407352

  1. LOCAL ANTINOCICEPTION INDUCED BY ENDOTHELIN-1 IN THE HAIRY SKIN OF THE RAT’S BACK

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Saurav; Gracias, Neilia G.; Mujenda, Florence; Khodorova, Alla; Vasko, Michael R.; Strichartz, Gary .R.

    2009-01-01

    Subcutaneous injection of endothelin-1 (ET-1) into the glabrous skin of the rat’s hind paw is known to produce impulses in nociceptors and acute nocifensive behavioral responses, such as hind paw flinching, and to sensitize the skin to mechanical and thermal stimulation. Here we show that, in contrast to the responses in glabrous skin, ET-1 injected subcutaneously into rat hairy skin causes transient antinociception. Concentrations of 1-50 uM ET-1 (in 0.05 mL) depress the local nocifensive response to noxious tactile probing at the injection site with von Frey filaments, for 30 - 180 mins.; distant injections have no effect at this site, showing that the response is local. Selective inhibition of ETA, but not of ETB receptors inhibits this antinociception, as does co-injection with nimodipine (40μM), a blocker of L-type Ca2+ channels. Local subcutaneous injection of epinephrine (45uM) also causes antinociception, through alpha-1 adrenoreceptors, but such receptors are not involved in the ET-1-induced effect. Both epinephrine and ET-1, at antinociceptive concentrations, reduce blood flow in the skin; the effect from ET-1 is largely prevented by subcutaneous nimodipine. These data suggest that ET-1-induced antinociception in the hairy skin of the rat involves cutaneous vasoconstriction, presumably through neural ischemia, resulting in conduction block. Perspective The pain-inducing effects of endothelin-1 have been well-documented in glabrous skin of the rat, a frequently used test site. The opposite behavioral effect, antinociception, occurs from endothelin-1 in hairy skin, and is correlated with a reduction in blood flow. Vasoactive effects are important in assessing mechanisms of peripherally acting agents. PMID:19559389

  2. Hairy roots, their multiple applications and recent patents.

    PubMed

    Talano, Melina A; Oller, Ana Laura Wevar; González, Paola S; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2012-08-01

    In the last years, hairy root (HR) cultures are gaining attention in the biotechnology industry. This particular plant cell culture derives from explants infected with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. They constitute a relatively new approach to in vitro plant biotechnology and modern HR cultures are far away from the valuables findings performed by Philip R. White in the 1930's, who obtained indefinite growth of excised root tips. HR cultures are characterized by genetic and biochemical stability and high growth rate without expensive exogenous hormones source. HR cultures have allowed a deep study of plant metabolic pathways and the production of valuable secondary metabolites and enzymes, with therapeutic or industrial application. Furthermore, the potential of HR cultures is increasing continuously since different biotechnological strategies such as genetic engineering, elicitation and metabolic traps are currently being explored for discovery of new metabolites and pathways, as well as for increasing metabolites biosynthesis and/or secretion. Advances in design of proper bioreactors for HR growth are being of great interest, since scale up of metabolite production will allow the integration of this technology to industrial processes. Another application of HR cultures is related to their capabilities to biotransform and to degrade different xenobiotics. In this context, removal assays using this plant model system are useful tools for phytoremediation assays, previous to the application in the field. This review highlights the more recent application of HRs and those new patents which show their multiple utilities. PMID:22642821

  3. The Bacillus anthracis Exosporium: What's the Big "Hairy" Deal?

    PubMed

    Bozue, Joel A; Welkos, Susan; Cote, Christopher K

    2015-10-01

    In some Bacillus species, including Bacillus subtilis, the coat is the outermost layer of the spore. In others, such as the Bacillus cereus family, there is an additional layer that envelops the coat, called the exosporium. In the case of Bacillus anthracis, a series of fine hair-like projections, also referred to as a "hairy" nap, extends from the exosporium basal layer. The exact role of the exosporium in B. anthracis, or for any of the Bacillus species possessing this structure, remains unclear. However, it has been assumed that the exosporium would play some role in infection for B. anthracis, because it is the outermost structure of the spore and would make initial contact with host and immune cells during infection. Therefore, the exosporium has been a topic of great interest, and over the past decade much progress has been made to understand its composition, biosynthesis, and potential roles. Several key aspects of this spore structure, however, are still debated and remain undetermined. Although insights have been gained on the interaction of exosporium with the host during infection, the exact role and significance of this complex structure remain to be determined. Furthermore, because the exosporium is a highly antigenic structure, future strategies for the next-generation anthrax vaccine should pursue its inclusion as a component to provide protection against the spore itself during the initial stages of anthrax. PMID:26542035

  4. Gentiana dinarica Beck hairy root cultures and evaluation of factors affecting growth and xanthone production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The induction and establishment of hairy root cultures of Gentiana dinarica using two strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes (A4M70GUS and 15834/PI) is reported for the first time. Hairy roots were formed from the shoots 25 days after inoculation, and strain 15834/PI had higher induction rate of hairy ...

  5. Infection Potential of Hairy Nightshade By Phytophthora infestans and Epidemiological Implications of the Alternate Host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hairy nightshade (Solanum sarrachoides Sendt) is a common weed in the potato agro-ecosystem that can serve as an alternate host for late blight. The epidemiological significance of hairy nightshade to potato late blight has not been documented. Infection rates of P. infestans on potato and hairy nig...

  6. Regeneration of horseradish hairy roots incited by Agrobacterium rhizogenes infection.

    PubMed

    Noda, T; Tanaka, N; Mano, Y; Nabeshima, S; Ohkawa, H; Matsui, C

    1987-07-01

    Surface-sterilized leaf disks of horse-radish (Armoracia lapathifolia) were immersed in a suspension of Agrobacterium rhizogenes harboring the root-inducing plasmid (pRi) and cultured on a solid medium. Within about 10 days after inoculation, adventitious roots (hairy roots) emerged from the leaf disks. No roots emerged from the uninoculated leaf disks. The excised hairy roots grew vigorously in the dark and exhibited extensive lateral branches in the absence of phytohormones. When the hairy roots were moved into the light, numerous adventitious buds thrust out of the roots within about 10 days, and they developed into complete plants (R0 generation). R0 plants revealed leaf wrinkle. Root masses of cultured R0 plants were of two types. One had fibrous roots only and the other had both fibrous and tuberous roots Leaf disks of the R0 plants proliferated adventitious roots (R1 generation) on a solid medium after 1-2 weeks of culture. Phenotypical characters of the R1 roots were the same as those observed with the initial hairy roots. The T-DNA sequences of pRi were detected within DNA isolated from the hairy roots and their regenerants. PMID:24248760

  7. Protein-functionalized hairy diamond nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dahoumane, Si Amar; Nguyen, Minh Ngoc; Thorel, Alain; Boudou, Jean-Paul; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Mangeney, Claire

    2009-09-01

    Diazonium salt chemistry and atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were combined in view of preparing new bioactive hairy diamond nanoparticles containing, or potentially containing, nitrogen-vacancy (NV) fluorescent centers (fluorescent nanodiamonds, or fNDs). fNDs were modified by ATRP initiators using the electroless reduction of the diazonium salt BF(4)(-),(+)N(2)-C(6)H(4)-CH(CH(3))-Br. The strongly bound aryl groups -C(6)H(4)-CH(CH(3))-Br efficiently initiated the ATRP of tert-butyl methacrylate (tBMA) at the surface of the nanodiamonds, which resulted in obtaining ND-PtBMA hybrids. The grafted chain thickness, estimated from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), was found to increase linearly with respect to time before reaching a plateau value of ca. 2 nm. These nanoobjects were further hydrolyzed into ND-PMAA (where PMAA is the poly(methacrylic acid) graft) and further decorated by bovine serum albumin through the 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) coupling procedure. PMID:19634873

  8. Hairy Polyp of the Nasopharynx Arising from the Eustachian Tube.

    PubMed

    Wu, Judy; Schulte, Jefree; Yang, Carina; Baroody, Fuad; Ginat, Daniel Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Hairy polyps of the nasopharynx display characteristic radiological imaging findings, including the presence of fat in the polypoid mass. Furthermore, diagnostic imaging is useful for delineating the site of origin of these lesions, which can facilitate surgical planning. For instance hairy polyps that arise from the right Eustachian tube can be amputated via a trans-nasal approach with endoscopy, but may necessitate a two stage approach in order to avoid injury to critical structures, such as the internal carotid artery. On histology, hairy polyps comprise an outer keratinizing squamous epithelium with adnexal tissue, including hair follicles, and central fibroadipose and cartilaginous tissue. These features are exemplified in this sine qua non radiology-pathology correlation article. PMID:25939422

  9. Hairy black holes in the general Skyrme model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Kichakova, O.; Shnir, Ya.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2016-07-01

    We study the existence of hairy black holes in the generalized Einstein-Skyrme model. It is proven that in the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield model limit there are no hairy black hole solutions, although the model admits gravitating (and flat space) solitons. Furthermore, we find strong evidence that a necessary condition for the existence of black holes with Skyrmionic hair is the inclusion of the Skyrme term L4. As an example, we show that there are no hairy black holes in the L2+L6+L0 model and present a new kind of black hole solutions with compact Skyrmion hair in the L4+L6+L0 model.

  10. Using Hairy Roots for Production of Valuable Plant Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize a wide variety of natural products, which are traditionally termed secondary metabolites and, more recently, coined specialized metabolites. While these chemical compounds are employed by plants for interactions with their environment, humans have long since explored and exploited plant secondary metabolites for medicinal and practical uses. Due to the tissue-specific and low-abundance accumulation of these metabolites, alternative means of production in systems other than intact plants are sought after. To this end, hairy root culture presents an excellent platform for producing valuable secondary metabolites. This chapter will focus on several major groups of secondary metabolites that are manufactured by hairy roots established from different plant species. Additionally, the methods for preservations of hairy roots will also be reviewed. PMID:25583225

  11. Cell-based phenotypic screening of mast cell degranulation unveils kinetic perturbations of agents targeting phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shenlu; Wang, Xumeng; Wu, Huanwen; Xiao, Peng; Cheng, Hongqiang; Zhang, Xue; Ke, Yuehai

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play an essential role in initiating allergic diseases. The activation of mast cells are controlled by a complicated signal network of reversible phosphorylation, and finding the key regulators involved in this network has been the focus of the pharmaceutical industry. In this work, we used a method named Time-dependent cell responding profile (TCRP) to track the process of mast cell degranulation under various perturbations caused by agents targeting phosphorylation. To test the feasibility of this high-throughput cell-based phenotypic screening method, a variety of biological techniques were used. We further screened 145 inhibitors and clustered them based on the similarities of their TCRPs. Stat3 phosphorylation has been widely reported as a key step in mast cell degranulation. Interestingly, our TCRP results showed that a Stat3 inhibitor JSI124 did not inhibit degranulation like other Stat3 inhibitors, such as Stattic, clearly inhibited degranulation. Regular endpoint assays demonstrated that the distinctive TCRP of JSI124 potentially correlated with the ability to induce apoptosis. Consequently, different agents possibly have disparate functions, which can be conveniently detected by TCRP. From this perspective, our TCRP screening method is reliable and sensitive when it comes to discovering and selecting novel compounds for new drug developments. PMID:27502076

  12. Linezolid induced black hairy tongue: a rare side effect.

    PubMed

    Aijazi, Ishma; Abdulla, Fadhil M

    2014-01-01

    Linezolid induced black hairy tongue is a rare benign reversible side effect of linezolid therapy. We report a case of a 61 year old diabetic lady who developed thrombocytopenia and black hairy discoloration of the tongue after being prescribed linezolid for foot osteomyelitis by the orthopaedic surgeon. Patient was encouraged to practice good oral dental hygiene, advised to use a soft tooth brush, regular mouth wash and baking soda containing tooth paste. The condition resolved four weeks after cessation of the antibiotic therapy. PMID:25671958

  13. Experimental Observation of Hairy Surface Exposed in Airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Mitsugu; Sakaue, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    The development of drag reduction method is important to reduce the consumption of limited energy in the field of engineering. While active method which needs external energy has received significant attention, passive method which means no external energy use has been focused. As one of the potential passive drag reduction method for offshore structure, aircraft, wind turbine, flexible hair implanted on the object surface has been studied. Here we make hairy surface. We conduct flow visualization to investigate the behavior of hairy surface exposed in wind tunnel. In the presentation, a current status of this experiment will be presented.

  14. MALDI-TOF characterization of hGH1 produced by hairy root cultures of Brassica oleracea var. italica grown in an airlift with mesh bioreactor.

    PubMed

    López, Edgar García; Ramírez, Emma Gloria Ramos; Gúzman, Octavio Gómez; Calva, Graciano Calva; Ariza-Castolo, Armando; Pérez-Vargas, Josefina; Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Expression systems based on plant cells, tissue, and organ cultures have been investigated as an alternative for production of human therapeutic proteins in bioreactors. In this work, hairy root cultures of Brassica oleracea var. italica (broccoli) were established in an airlift with mesh bioreactor to produce isoform 1 of the human growth hormone (hGH1) as a model therapeutic protein. The hGH1 cDNA was cloned into the pCAMBIA1105.1 binary vector to induce hairy roots in hypocotyls of broccoli plantlets via Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Most of the infected plantlets (90%) developed hairy roots when inoculated before the appearance of true leaves, and keeping the emerging roots attached to hypocotyl explants during transfer to solid Schenk and Hildebrandt medium. The incorporation of the cDNA into the hairy root genome was confirmed by PCR amplification from genomic DNA. The expression and structure of the transgenic hGH1 was assessed by ELISA, western blot, and MALDITOF-MS analysis of the purified protein extracted from the biomass of hairy roots cultivated in bioreactor for 24 days. Production of hGH1 was 5.1 ± 0.42 µg/g dry weight (DW) for flask cultures, and 7.8 ± 0.3 µg/g DW for bioreactor, with productivity of 0.68 ± 0.05 and 1.5 ± 0.06 µg/g DW*days, respectively, indicating that the production of hGH1 was not affected by the growth rate, but might be affected by the culture system. These results demonstrate that hairy root cultures of broccoli have potential as an alternative expression system for production of hGH1, and might also be useful for production of other therapeutic proteins. PMID:24124083

  15. Eucalyptus hairy roots, a fast, efficient and versatile tool to explore function and expression of genes involved in wood formation.

    PubMed

    Plasencia, Anna; Soler, Marçal; Dupas, Annabelle; Ladouce, Nathalie; Silva-Martins, Guilherme; Martinez, Yves; Lapierre, Catherine; Franche, Claudine; Truchet, Isabelle; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline

    2016-06-01

    Eucalyptus are of tremendous economic importance being the most planted hardwoods worldwide for pulp and paper, timber and bioenergy. The recent release of the Eucalyptus grandis genome sequence pointed out many new candidate genes potentially involved in secondary growth, wood formation or lineage-specific biosynthetic pathways. Their functional characterization is, however, hindered by the tedious, time-consuming and inefficient transformation systems available hitherto for eucalypts. To overcome this limitation, we developed a fast, reliable and efficient protocol to obtain and easily detect co-transformed E. grandis hairy roots using fluorescent markers, with an average efficiency of 62%. We set up conditions both to cultivate excised roots in vitro and to harden composite plants and verified that hairy root morphology and vascular system anatomy were similar to wild-type ones. We further demonstrated that co-transformed hairy roots are suitable for medium-throughput functional studies enabling, for instance, protein subcellular localization, gene expression patterns through RT-qPCR and promoter expression, as well as the modulation of endogenous gene expression. Down-regulation of the Eucalyptus cinnamoyl-CoA reductase1 (EgCCR1) gene, encoding a key enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, led to transgenic roots with reduced lignin levels and thinner cell walls. This gene was used as a proof of concept to demonstrate that the function of genes involved in secondary cell wall biosynthesis and wood formation can be elucidated in transgenic hairy roots using histochemical, transcriptomic and biochemical approaches. The method described here is timely because it will accelerate gene mining of the genome for both basic research and industry purposes. PMID:26579999

  16. Hairy vetch seedbank persistence and implications for cover crop management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) is a fast growing, winter hardy annual legume that can produce shoot biomass levels upwards of 6500 kg ha-1. This cover crop is well suited for summer annual grain rotations, as it fixes considerable amounts of nitrogen, reduces erosion through rapid ground cover, an...

  17. Tumor cell response to bevacizumab single agent therapy in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis represents a highly multi-factorial and multi-cellular complex (patho-) physiologic event involving endothelial cells, tumor cells in malignant conditions, as well as bone marrow derived cells and stromal cells. One main driver is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA), which is known to interact with endothelial cells as a survival and mitogenic signal. The role of VEGFA on tumor cells and /or tumor stromal cell interaction is less clear. Condition specific (e.g. hypoxia) or tumor specific expression of VEGFA, VEGF receptors and co-receptors on tumor cells has been reported, in addition to the expression on the endothelium. This suggests a potential paracrine/autocrine loop that could affect changes specific to tumor cells. Methods We used the monoclonal antibody against VEGFA, bevacizumab, in various in vitro experiments using cell lines derived from different tumor entities (non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), breast cancer (BC) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC)) in order to determine if potential VEGFA signaling could be blocked in tumor cells. The experiments were done under hypoxia, a major inducer of VEGFA and angiogenesis, in an attempt to mimic the physiological tumor condition. Known VEGFA induced endothelial biological responses such as proliferation, migration, survival and gene expression changes were evaluated. Results Our study was able to demonstrate expression of VEGF receptors on tumor cells as well as hypoxia regulated angiogenic gene expression. In addition, there was a cell line specific effect in tumor cells by VEGFA blockade with bevacizumab in terms of proliferation; however overall, there was a limited measurable consequence of bevacizumab therapy detected by migration and survival. Conclusion The present study showed in a variety of in vitro experiments with several tumor cell lines from different tumor origins, that by blocking VEGFA with bevacizumab, there was a limited autocrine or cell

  18. Abnormal regulation of DNA replication and increased lethality in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to carcinogenic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Jaspers, N.G.; de Wit, J.; Regulski, M.R.; Bootsma, D.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of different carcinogenic agents on the rate of semiconservative DNA replication in normal and ataxia telangiectasis (AT) cells was investigated. The rate of DNA synthesis in all AT cell strains tested was depressed to a significantly lesser extent than in normal cells after exposure to X-rays under oxia or hypoxia or to bleomycin, agents to which AT cells are hypersensitive. In contrast, inhibition of DNA replication in normal human and AT cells was similar after treatment with some DNA-methylating agents or mitomycin C. Colony-forming ability of AT cells treated with these agents was not different from normal cells. Treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide elicited a variable response in both AT and normal cell strains. In some strains, including those shown to be hypersensitive to the drug by other workers, the inhibition of DNA synthesis was more pronounced than in other cell strains, but no significant difference between AT and normal cells could be detected. The rejoining of DNA strand breaks induced by X-rays, measured by DNA elution techniques, occurred within l2 hr after treatment and could not be correlated with the difference in DNA synthesis inhibition in AT and normal cells. After low doses of X-rays, AT cells rejoined single-strand breaks slightly more slowly than did normal cells. The rate of DNA replication in X-irradiation AT and normal cells was not affected by nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis. These data indicate that the diminished inhibition of DNA replication in carcinogen-treated AT cells (a) is a general characteristic of all AT cell strains, (b) correlates with AT cellular hypersensitivity, (c) is not directly caused by the bulk of the DNA strand breaks produced by carcinogenic agents, and (d) is not based on differences in the induction of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis between X-irradiated AT and normal cells.

  19. An efficient detection agent for the high throughput screening of recombinant manufacturing cell lines.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Valérie; Sauvage, Christophe; Kobr, Michel; Imhof, Markus O

    2013-12-31

    To ensure the selection of high producing recombinant cell lines, a number of screening processes were developed in the presence of detection agents. Here, CHO cell lines secreting recombinant antibodies were detected in semi-solid medium containing detection agents. The aim was to compare two protein A-derived detection agents to two commercial fluorescent antibodies directed against the Fc part of the antibody of interest: the protein A derived Z domain fused to the red fluorescent protein and protein A labelled with a fluorescent Dylight™ 488 dye. All of these agents were compatible with cell recovery and colony formation, and specifically detected colonies secreting recombinant antibodies. Optimisation of the concentration of the fluorescent protein A allowed the identification of a higher number of good producers. Thus these data demonstrate that fluorescently labelled protein A-derivatives can be used for the selection of high producer cells. PMID:23994258

  20. RAT TRACHEAL CELL CULTURE TRANSFORMATION SYSTEM FOR ASSESSMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS AS CARCINOGENS AND PROMOTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A tracheal cell culture system which can be used for detection of hazardous environmental agents is described. The culture system makes use of primary tracheal cells that are isolated from rats by protease digestion of the tracheal epithelium. The epithelial cells are plated on a...

  1. In vivo depletion of CD11c+ cells impairs scrapie agent neuroinvasion from the intestine.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Claudine R; Aucouturier, Pierre; Mabbott, Neil A

    2007-12-01

    Following oral exposure, some transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents accumulate first upon follicular dendritic cells (DCs) in the GALT. Studies in mice have shown that TSE agent accumulation in the GALT, in particular the Peyer's patches, is obligatory for the efficient transmission of disease to the brain. However, the mechanism through which TSE agents are initially conveyed from the gut lumen to the GALT is not known. Studies have implicated migratory hemopoietic DCs in this process, but direct demonstration of their involvement in vivo is lacking. In this study, we have investigated the contribution of CD11c(+) DCs in scrapie agent neuroinvasion through use of CD11c-diptheria toxin receptor-transgenic mice in which CD11c(+) DCs can be specifically and transiently depleted. Using two distinct scrapie agent strains (ME7 and 139A scrapie agents), we show that when CD11c(+) DCs were transiently depleted in the GALT and spleen before oral exposure, early agent accumulation in these tissues was blocked. In addition, CD11c(+) cell depletion reduced susceptibility to oral scrapie challenge indicating that TSE agent neuroinvasion from the GALT was impaired. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that migratory CD11c(+) DCs play a key role in the translocation of the scrapie agent from the gut lumen to the GALT from which neuroinvasion subsequently occurs. PMID:18025222

  2. Quantitative imaging of cell-permeable magnetic resonance contrast agents using x-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Endres, Paul J; Macrenaris, Keith W; Vogt, Stefan; Allen, Matthew J; Meade, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    The inability to transduce cellular membranes is a limitation of current magnetic resonance imaging probes used in biologic and clinical settings. This constraint confines contrast agents to extracellular and vascular regions of the body, drastically reducing their viability for investigating processes and cycles in developmental biology. Conversely, a contrast agent with the ability to permeate cell membranes could be used in visualizing cell patterning, cell fate mapping, gene therapy, and, eventually, noninvasive cancer diagnosis. Therefore, we describe the synthesis and quantitative imaging of four contrast agents with the capability to cross cell membranes in sufficient quantity for detection. Each agent is based on the conjugation of a Gd(III) chelator with a cellular transduction moiety. Specifically, we coupled Gd(III)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid DTPA and Gd(III)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid with an 8-amino acid polyarginine oligomer and an amphipathic stilbene molecule, 4-amino-4'-(N,N-dimethylamino)stilbene. The imaging modality that provided the best sensitivity and spatial resolution for direct detection of the contrast agents is synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF). Unlike optical microscopy, SR-XRF provides two-dimensional images with resolution 10(3) better than (153)Gd gamma counting, without altering the agent by organic fluorophore conjugation. The transduction efficiency of the intracellular agents was evaluated by T(1) analysis and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine the efficacy of each chelate-transporter combination. PMID:17150161

  3. The epitheliome: agent-based modelling of the social behaviour of cells.

    PubMed

    Walker, D C; Southgate, J; Hill, G; Holcombe, M; Hose, D R; Wood, S M; Mac Neil, S; Smallwood, R H

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a new computational modelling paradigm for predicting the emergent behaviour resulting from the interaction of cells in epithelial tissue. As proof-of-concept, an agent-based model, in which there is a one-to-one correspondence between biological cells and software agents, has been coupled to a simple physical model. Behaviour of the computational model is compared with the growth characteristics of epithelial cells in monolayer culture, using growth media with low and physiological calcium concentrations. Results show a qualitative fit between the growth characteristics produced by the simulation and the in vitro cell models. PMID:15351133

  4. Agent-Based Modeling of Cancer Stem Cell Driven Solid Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Macklin, Paul; Enderling, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Computational modeling of tumor growth has become an invaluable tool to simulate complex cell-cell interactions and emerging population-level dynamics. Agent-based models are commonly used to describe the behavior and interaction of individual cells in different environments. Behavioral rules can be informed and calibrated by in vitro assays, and emerging population-level dynamics may be validated with both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Here, we describe the design and implementation of a lattice-based agent-based model of cancer stem cell driven tumor growth. PMID:27044046

  5. Quinacrine sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to TRAIL and chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenge; Gallant, Jean-Nicolas; Katz, Sharyn I; Dolloff, Nathan G; Smith, Charles D; Abdulghani, Junaid; Allen, Joshua E; Dicker, David T; Hong, Bo; Navaraj, Arunasalam; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2011-08-01

    Quinacrine has been widely explored in treatment of malaria, giardiasis, and rheumatic diseases. We find that quinacrine stabilizes p53 and induces p53-dependent and independent cell death. Treatment by quinacrine alone at concentrations of 10-20 mM for 1-2 d cannot kill hepatocellular carcinoma cells, such as HepG2, Hep3B, Huh7, which are also resistant to TRAIL. However, quinacrine renders these cells sensitive to treatment by TRAIL. Co-treatment of these cells with quinacrine and TRAIL induces overwhelming cell death within 3-4 h. Levels of DR5, a pro-apoptotic death receptor of TRAIL, are increased upon treatment with quinacrine, while levels of Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, are decreased. While the synergistic effect of quinacrine with TRAIL appears to be in part independent of p53, knockdown of p53 in HepG2 cells by siRNA results in more cell death after treatment by quinacrine and TRAIL. The mechanism by which quinacrine sensitizes hepatocellular carcinoma cells to TRAIL and chemotherapies, and the potential for clinical application currently are being further explored. Lastly, quinacrine synergizes with chemotherapeutics, such as adriamycin, 5-FU, etoposide, CPT11, sorafenib, and gemcitabine, in killing hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and the drug enhances the activity of sorafenib to delay tumor growth in vivo. PMID:21725212

  6. Combining engineered cell-sensors with multi-agent systems to realize smart environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mei

    2013-03-01

    The connection of everything in a sensory and an intelligent way is a pursuit in smart environment. This paper introduces the engineered cell-sensors into the multi-agent systems to realize the smart environment. The seamless interface with the natural environment and strong information-processing ability of cell with the achievements of synthetic biology make the construction of engineered cell-sensors possible. However, the engineered cell-sensors are only simple-functional and unreliable computational entities. Therefore how to combine engineered cell-sensors with digital device is a key problem in order to realize the smart environment. We give the abstract structure and interaction modes of the engineered cell-sensors in order to introduce engineered cell-sensors into multi-agent systems. We believe that the introduction of engineered cell-sensors will push forward the development of the smart environment.

  7. Sensitivity of human dental pulp cells to eighteen chemical agents used for endodontic treatments in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Morio; Tsutsui, Takeo W; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Ohno, Maki; Higo, Yukari; Inaba, Tomohiro; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2013-01-01

    To determine the adverse effects against human dental pulp tissue, the sensitivity of human dental pulp cells (D824 cells) to 18 chemical agents used for endodontic treatments in dentistry was examined. The cytotoxicity, as determined by a decrease in colony-forming ability of cells treated with the chemical agents, increased as the concentration increased. As a quantitative measure of the cytotoxic effect, LC(50), the concentration which induces a 50% lethality, was extrapolated from the concentration-response curves. The rank of the chemical agents according to their cytotoxic effect (LC(50)) was sodium arsenite > formaldehyde > hydrogen peroxide > zinc oxide > thymol ≈ iodoform ≈ eugenol > guaiacol > ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid ≈ iodine > procaine > lidocaine ≈ chloramphenicol ≈ m-cresol > calcium hydroxide ≈ sodium hypochlorite ≈ phenol ≈ p-phenolsulfonic acid. To compare the cytotoxicity and the levels of apoptosis and mRNA expression of five genes related to the function of dental pulp tissue, D824 cells treated with the LC(50) concentrations of chemical agents were assayed by the TUNEL method and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, respectively. The inducibility of apoptotic cells and the level of mRNA expression of the genes varied with the chemical agents, indicating that both effects occurred independent of the rank of cytotoxic effect of the chemical agents. The results not only provide information concerning cytotoxicity of various chemical agents to human dental pulp cells, but also show an insight into the diversity of the pharmacodynamic action of the chemical agents. PMID:22083529

  8. Hairy carbon electrodes studied by cyclic voltammetry and battery discharge testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Deborah D. L.; Shui, Xiaoping; Frysz, Christine A.

    1993-01-01

    Hairy carbon is a new material developed by growing submicron carbon filaments on conventional carbon substrates. Typical substrate materials include carbon black, graphite powder, carbon fibers, and glassy carbon. A catalyst is used to initiate hair growth with carbonaceous gases serving as the carbon source. To study the electrochemical behavior of hairy carbons, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and discharge testing were conducted. In both cases, hairy carbon results surpassed those of the substrate material alone.

  9. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivors' benefits . Research on B-cell leukemias and herbicides The Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known ... sufficient evidence of an association between exposure to herbicides and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In 2003, VA recognized ...

  10. Increased radioresistance of tumor cells exposed to metallothionein-inducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Renan, M.J.; Dowman, P.I. )

    1989-12-01

    In this study, we have determined the radiosensitivity parameters of cells exposed in vitro to metallothionein-inducing agents. Three well-characterized tumor cell lines were chosen for investigation: HeLa, B16, and WHFIB. We have shown that exposure of cells in vitro to a heavy metal (cadmium), followed by irradiation, enhances cell survival for two out of three cell lines studied. As measured by the mean inactivation dose, the radioresistance increases by a factor of 1.6 for HeLa cells, 1.4 for WHFIB, and a negligible factor for B16 cells. An additional effect was noted when different classes of metallothionein inducers (such as serum factors, cadmium, and dexamethasone) were allowed to act together. Also, we found that the increase in radioresistance exhibits a peak at exposure times of approximately 10 h; longer exposure to inducing agents results in a reduction in radioresistance.

  11. Effects of mononuclear phagocyte system modulating agents on Fc and C3 receptors of adherent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hitomi, M.; Shimizu, F.

    1985-01-01

    Agents which modulate the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) were examined for their effects on Fc and C3 receptors of adherent cells (A-cells) as judged by rosette formation. Dextran sulphate, carrageenan, and immune complexes, known as MPS suppressants, reduced the percentage of receptor-positive A-cells, while levamisole, known as a MPS-activator, increased the percentage in vitro. The changes in the percentage of Fc receptor were parallel to those of the C3 receptor in vitro. The effects of these agents were also examined in vivo. PMID:2408651

  12. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  13. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  14. Oxidative phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cancer cell apoptosis in response to anticancer agents

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, N.; Kumar, S.; Marlowe, T.; Chaudhary, A. K.; Kumar, R.; Wang, J.; O'Malley, J.; Boland, P. M.; Jayanthi, S.; Kumar, T. K. S.; Yadava, N.; Chandra, D.

    2015-11-05

    Cancer cells tend to develop resistance to various types of anticancer agents, whether they adopt similar or distinct mechanisms to evade cell death in response to a broad spectrum of cancer therapeutics is not fully defined. Current study concludes that DNA-damaging agents (etoposide and doxorubicin), ER stressor (thapsigargin), and histone deacetylase inhibitor (apicidin) target oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for apoptosis induction, whereas other anticancer agents including staurosporine, taxol, and sorafenib induce apoptosis in an OXPHOS-independent manner. DNA-damaging agents promoted mitochondrial biogenesis accompanied by increased accumulation of cellular and mitochondrial ROS, mitochondrial protein-folding machinery, and mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis occurred in a caspase activation-independent mechanism but was reduced by autophagy inhibition and p53-deficiency. Abrogation of complex-I blocked DNA-damage-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, whereas inhibition of complex-II or a combined deficiency of OXPHOS complexes I, III, IV, and V due to impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis did not modulate caspase activity. Mechanistic analysis revealed that inhibition of caspase activation in response to anticancer agents associates with decreased release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in complex-I-deficient cells compared with wild type (WT) cells. Gross OXPHOS deficiencies promoted increased release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria compared with WT or complex-I-deficient cells, suggesting that cells harboring defective OXPHOS trigger caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent apoptosis in response to anticancer agents. Interestingly, DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin showed strong binding to mitochondria, which was disrupted by complex-I-deficiency but not by complex-II-deficiency. Thapsigargin-induced caspase activation was reduced upon abrogation of complex-I or gross OXPHOS deficiency

  15. Oxidative phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cancer cell apoptosis in response to anticancer agents

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yadav, N.; Kumar, S.; Marlowe, T.; Chaudhary, A. K.; Kumar, R.; Wang, J.; O'Malley, J.; Boland, P. M.; Jayanthi, S.; Kumar, T. K. S.; et al

    2015-11-05

    Cancer cells tend to develop resistance to various types of anticancer agents, whether they adopt similar or distinct mechanisms to evade cell death in response to a broad spectrum of cancer therapeutics is not fully defined. Current study concludes that DNA-damaging agents (etoposide and doxorubicin), ER stressor (thapsigargin), and histone deacetylase inhibitor (apicidin) target oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) for apoptosis induction, whereas other anticancer agents including staurosporine, taxol, and sorafenib induce apoptosis in an OXPHOS-independent manner. DNA-damaging agents promoted mitochondrial biogenesis accompanied by increased accumulation of cellular and mitochondrial ROS, mitochondrial protein-folding machinery, and mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Induction of mitochondrialmore » biogenesis occurred in a caspase activation-independent mechanism but was reduced by autophagy inhibition and p53-deficiency. Abrogation of complex-I blocked DNA-damage-induced caspase activation and apoptosis, whereas inhibition of complex-II or a combined deficiency of OXPHOS complexes I, III, IV, and V due to impaired mitochondrial protein synthesis did not modulate caspase activity. Mechanistic analysis revealed that inhibition of caspase activation in response to anticancer agents associates with decreased release of mitochondrial cytochrome c in complex-I-deficient cells compared with wild type (WT) cells. Gross OXPHOS deficiencies promoted increased release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria compared with WT or complex-I-deficient cells, suggesting that cells harboring defective OXPHOS trigger caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent apoptosis in response to anticancer agents. Interestingly, DNA-damaging agent doxorubicin showed strong binding to mitochondria, which was disrupted by complex-I-deficiency but not by complex-II-deficiency. Thapsigargin-induced caspase activation was reduced upon abrogation of complex-I or gross OXPHOS

  16. Brassica napus hairy roots and rhizobacteria for phenolic compounds removal.

    PubMed

    González, Paola S; Ontañon, Ornella M; Armendariz, Ana L; Talano, Melina A; Paisio, Cintia E; Agostini, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    Phenolic compounds are contaminants frequently found in water and soils. In the last years, some technologies such as phytoremediation have emerged to remediate contaminated sites. Plants alone are unable to completely degrade some pollutants; therefore, their association with rhizospheric bacteria has been proposed to increase phytoremediation potential, an approach called rhizoremediation. In this work, the ability of two rhizobacteria, Burkholderia kururiensis KP 23 and Agrobacterium rhizogenes LBA 9402, to tolerate and degrade phenolic compounds was evaluated. Both microorganisms were capable of tolerating high concentrations of phenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), guaiacol, or pentachlorophenol (PCP), and degrading different concentrations of phenol and 2,4-DCP. Association of these bacterial strains with B. napus hairy roots, as model plant system, showed that the presence of both rhizospheric microorganisms, along with B. napus hairy roots, enhanced phenol degradation compared to B. napus hairy roots alone. These findings are interesting for future applications of these strains in phenol rhizoremediation processes, with whole plants, providing an efficient, economic, and sustainable remediation technology. PMID:22961561

  17. Manipulating biological agents and cells in micro-scale volumes for applications in medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tasoglu, Savas; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Wang, ShuQi

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances provide new tools to manipulate cells and biological agents in micro/nano-liter volumes. With precise control over small volumes, the cell microenvironment and other biological agents can be bioengineered; interactions between cells and external stimuli can be monitored; and the fundamental mechanisms such as cancer metastasis and stem cell differentiation can be elucidated. Technological advances based on the principles of electrical, magnetic, chemical, optical, acoustic, and mechanical forces lead to novel applications in point-of-care diagnostics, regenerative medicine, in vitro drug testing, cryopreservation, and cell isolation/purification. In this review, we first focus on the underlying mechanisms of emerging examples for cell manipulation in small volumes targeting applications such as tissue engineering. Then, we illustrate how these mechanisms impact the aforementioned biomedical applications, discuss the associated challenges, and provide perspectives for further development. PMID:23575660

  18. Gels from soft hairy nanoparticles in polymeric matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    2013-03-01

    Hairy particles represent a huge class of soft colloids with tunable interactions and properties. Advances in synthetic chemistry have enabled obtaining well-characterized such systems for specific needs. In this talk we present two model hairy soft particles with diameters of the order of tens of nanometers, star polymers and polymerically grafted spherical particles. In particular, we discuss design strategies for dispersing them in polymeric matrices and eventually creating and breaking gels. Control parameters are the matrix molar mass, the grafting density (or functionality) and the size of the grafts (or arms). The linear viscoelastic properties and slow time evolution of the gels are examined in view of the existing knowledge from colloidal gels consisting of micron-sized particles, and compared. In the case of stars we start from a concentrated glassy suspension in molecular solvent and add homopolymer at increasing concentration, and as a result of the induced osmotic pressure the stars shrink and a depletion gel is formed. For the grafted colloidal particles, they are added at low concentration to a polymer matrix, and it has been shown that under certain conditions the anisotropy of interactions gives rise to network formation. We then focus on the nonlinear rheological response and in particular the effect of shear flow in inducing a solid to liquid transition. Our studies show that the yielding process is gradual and shares many common features with that of flocculated colloidal suspensions, irrespectively of the shape of the building block of the gel. Whereas shear can melt such a gel, it cannot break it into its constituent blocks and hence fully disperse the hairy nanoparticles. On the other hand, the hairy particles are intrinsically hybrid. We show how this important feature is reflected on the heating of the gels. In that case, the mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients of core and shell appears to play a role on the particle response as it

  19. Microbial cell wall agents as an occupational hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Sigsgaard, T. . E-mail: ts@mil.au.dk; Bonefeld-Jorgensen, E.C.; Hoffmann, H.J.; Bonlokke, J.; Krueger, T.

    2005-09-01

    Organic dusts cause inflammatory reactions in the tissues exposed. The lung and the cells lining the surface of the respiratory tract are a primary target. Many receptors have been shown to react specifically on the presence of microorganisms that are ubiquitous elements in organic dusts. There is a great variability in the individual response to organic dusts. Almost 50% of Caucasians are hyporesponders to LPS exposure, and people with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency are hyperresponsive to organic dust exposure. The diseases resulting from organic dust exposures include asthma, allergy, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and toxic pneumonitis (organic dust toxic syndrome).This paper deals with inflammation and the subsequent mechanism of disease as it is encountered in industries with these exposures. Toxicological studies including human experimental exposures and ex vivo studies of cells are described. Cellular reactions are mediated through the attachment of, e.g. LPS and {beta} (1,3)-D-glucan to lipopolysaccharide binding protein, CD14 and Toll-like receptors. The relation between protein release and the gene activation is described. Furthermore, studies of the individual susceptibility will be reviewed.

  20. A cell-based phenotypic assay to identify cardioprotective agents

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Stephanie; Olm-Shipman, Adam; Walters, Andrew; Urciuoli, William R.; Devito, Stefanie; Nadtochiy, Sergiy M.; Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Brookes, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Tissue ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury underlies several leading causes of death such as heart-attack and stroke. The lack of clinical therapies for IR injury may be partly due to the difficulty of adapting IR injury models to high-throughput screening (HTS). Objective To develop a model of IR injury that is both physiologically relevant and amenable to HTS. Methods and Results A micro-plate based respirometry apparatus was used. Controlling gas flow in the plate head space, coupled with the instrument’s mechanical systems, yielded a 24 well model of IR injury in which H9c2 cardiomyocytes were transiently trapped in a small volume, rendering them ischemic. Following initial validation with known protective molecules, the model was used to screen a 2000 molecule library, with post IR cell death as an endpoint. pO2 and pH monitoring in each well also afforded metabolic data. Ten protective, detrimental and inert molecules from the screen were subsequently tested in a Langendorff perfused heart model of IR injury, revealing strong correlations between the screening endpoint and both recovery of cardiac function (negative r2=0.66), and infarct size (positive, r2=0.62). Relationships between the effects of added molecules on cellular bioenergetics, and protection against IR injury, were also studied. Conclusion This novel cell-based assay can predict either protective or detrimental effects on IR injury in the intact heart. Its application may help identify therapeutic or harmful molecules. PMID:22394516

  1. Insulin nonattenuation of vasoactive agent-induced responses in mesangial cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Inishi, Y; Okuda, T; Arakawa, T; Yasuda, C; Ohara, M; Kurokawa, K

    1995-03-01

    We recently found that insulin attenuates intracellular calcium transients and cell contraction caused by vasoactive agents in cultured rat mesangial cells. Because altered glomerular function may be causally related to the evolution of hypertension, we examined in the present study the effects of insulin on the functions of mesangial cells derived from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) of 4- and 8-weeks of age. Age-matched Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) were used as controls. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured with Fura-2 method in suspended mesangial cells. Pretreatment of mesangial cells with 5 micrograms/ml insulin for 120 minutes did not affect basal [Ca2+]i in either WKY or SHR mesangial cells. However, insulin pretreatment significantly attenuated [Ca2+]i transients to vasoactive agents in WKY mesangial cells. In contrast, [Ca2+]i transients to these agents were not attenuated by insulin in SHR mesangial cells. Additionally, SHR mesangial cell contraction in response to angiotensin II (Ang II) was not altered by insulin, while WKY mesangial cell contraction to Ang II was, as in normal Wistar rats, significantly reduced by insulin. Since we previously showed the possibility that the attenuation of calcium signal by insulin is via insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) receptor, we also examined the effect of IGF-I. In contrast to WKY mesangial cells, IGF-I-induced attenuation of [Ca2+]i responses to platelet activating factor was absent in SHR mesangial cells. [125I]-IGF-I binding in SHR mesangial cells was not significantly different from that in WKY mesangial cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7752589

  2. Response of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Pb01 to stressor agents and cell wall osmoregulators.

    PubMed

    Tomazett, Patrícia Kott; Castro, Nadya da Silva; Lenzi, Henrique Leonel; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria; Pereira, Maristela

    2011-01-01

    In its attempt to survive, the fungal cell can change the cell wall composition and/or structure in response to environmental stress. The molecules involved in these compensatory mechanisms are a possible target for the development of effective antifungal agents. In the thermodimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Pb01, the main polymers that compose the cell wall are chitin and glucans. These polymers form a primary barrier that is responsible for the structural integrity and formation of the cell wall. In this study the behaviour of P. brasiliensis was evaluated under incubation with cell wall stressor agents such as Calcofluor White (CFW), Congo Red (CR), Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS), NaCl, KCl, and Sorbitol. Use of concentrations at which the fungus is visually sensitive to those agents helped to explain some of the adaptive mechanisms used by P. brasiliensis in response to cell wall stress. Our results show that 1,3-β-D-glucan synthase (PbFKS1), glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (PbGFA1) and β-1,3-glucanosyltransferase (PbGEL3)as well as 1,3-β-D-glucan and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residues in the cell wall are involved in compensatory mechanisms against cell wall damage. PMID:21215956

  3. Targeted therapy using novel agents in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Roy S

    2002-03-01

    Patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have a poor prognosis and high mortality. The therapeutic improvement caused by the new generation of cytotoxic agents seems to have reached a plateau. The main categories of targeted therapeutics applicable for NSCLC include receptor-targeted therapy, signal transduction or cell-cycle inhibition, angiogenesis inhibitors, gene therapy, and vaccines. Several major classes of agents directed at specific cellular mechanisms exist for the treatment of NSCLC. The anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) group contains trastuzumab and IMC-C225, monoclonal antibodies against EGFRs that are overexpressed in many cancers. OSI-774 and ZD1839 are inhibitors of EGFR tyrosine kinase, a key enzyme of the signaling pathway. Farnesyl transferase inhibitors, such as SCH66336, and protein kinase C inhibitors, such as ISIS 3521, have also shown antitumor activity. Antiangiogenesis agents that have shown promise include TNP-470, recombinant endostatin, and angiostatin. Antibodies to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also seem to control tumor progression and may prolong survival. LY317615, an inhibitor of protein kinase Cb, augmented the tumor growth delay produced by cytotoxic drugs. All of these agents are in different phases of clinical testing and have shown encouraging activity as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy drugs. These new agents are more target specific, less toxic, easier to administer, and may lead to enhanced safety and survival for patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:14720353

  4. Infection Potential of Hairy Nightshade (Solanum sarrachoides) by Phytophthora Infestans and Late Blight Implications of the Alternate Host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of hairy nightshade (Solanum sarrachoides Sendt) by Phytophthora infestans has been reported; however, the epidemiological significance of hairy nightshade to potato late blight is not well known. Disease development and infection rates of P. infestans were quantified on hairy nightshade r...

  5. Tumor Lysing Genetically Engineered T Cells Loaded with Multi-Modal Imaging Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A.; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-03-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-64Cu). This can now be potentially used for 64Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR+SPIONpos T cells effectively target in vitro CD19+ lymphoma.

  6. Spermatogenesis is seasonal in the large hairy armadillo, Chaetophractus villosus (Dasypodidae, Xenarthra, Mammalia).

    PubMed

    Luaces, Juan P; Rossi, Luis F; Merico, Valeria; Zuccotti, Maurizio; Redi, Carlo A; Solari, Alberto J; Merani, Maria S; Garagna, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the distinct reproductive biology of armadillos. Very few studies have investigated armadillo spermatogenesis, with data available only for Euphractus sexcinctus and Dasypus novemcinctus. In the present study, we analysed male germ cell differentiation in the large hairy armadillo Chaetophractus villosus throughout the year, describing a cycle of the seminiferous epithelium made of eight different stages. Evaluation of the testis/body mass ratio, analysis of the architecture of the seminiferous epithelium and the frequency of defective seminiferous tubules allowed identification of a temporal interruption of spermatogenesis during the period between mid-May to July (mid-end autumn) in correlation with very low testosterone levels. Overall, these results suggest that spermatogenesis is seasonal in C. villosus. PMID:22951275

  7. [Therapeutic potential of secondary metabolites produced in the hairy roots cultures].

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Łucka, Marta; Szemraj, Janusz; Sakowicz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Plants have always been a source of many valuable substances for humans. Growing advancement of methods of modern biotechnology, combined with genetic engineering techniques, gradually increase the variety of compounds obtained, the number of plant species used and the production efficiency. Consequently, there is an undebatable interest in biotechnological production of such compounds, especially those pharmacologically active, that can be used in treatment of neoplastic, viral, and many other types of diseases. Most of these compounds represent a diverse group of secondary metabolites. One of the effective ways of obtaining such molecules is the utilization of hairy roots cultures. The advantages of such systems make them an attractive method of obtaining important plant-derived compounds, creating an interesting alternative to other methods, including the cell suspension cultures or expensive chemical syntheses. PMID:25983294

  8. Semantic Extension of Agent-Based Control: The Packing Cell Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, Pavel; Radakovič, Miloslav; Obitko, Marek; Mařík, Vladimír

    The paper reports on the latest R&D activities in the field of agent-based manufacturing control systems. It is documented that this area becomes strongly influenced by the advancements of semantic technologies like the Web Ontology Language. The application of ontologies provides the agents with much more effective means for handling, exchanging and reasoning about the knowledge. The ontology dedicated for semantic description of orders, production processes and material handling tasks in discrete manufacturing domain has been developed. In addition, the framework for integration of this ontology in distributed, agent-based control solutions is given. The Manufacturing Agent Simulation Tool (MAST) is used as a base for pilot implementation of the ontology-powered multiagent control system; the packing cell environment is selected as a case study.

  9. Temperature, Relative Humidity and Pathogen Factors Influencing Phytophthora Infestans Development on Hairy Nightshade

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hairy nightshade (Solanum sarrachoides Sendt) is a common weed that can serve as an alternate host for potato late blight. Although environmental and pathogen factors are key variables affecting the development of late blight, little is known regarding their potential effects on infection of hairy n...

  10. Hairy Root as a Model System for Undergraduate Laboratory Curriculum and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyes, Carol A.; Subramanian, Senthil; Yu, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Hairy root transformation has been widely adapted in plant laboratories to rapidly generate transgenic roots for biochemical and molecular analysis. We present hairy root transformations as a versatile and adaptable model system for a wide variety of undergraduate laboratory courses and research. This technique is easy, efficient, and fast making…

  11. Effect of hairy nightshade (Solanum sarrachoides) presence on potato nematode, disease, and insect problems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hairy nightshade (Solanum sarrachoides) is a common weed in potato rotations in the western United States. Being a close relative of potato, hairy nightshade is a host of numerous viral diseases of potato [potato virus Y (PVY), potato virus (PVA), potato leaf roll virus (PLRV), tobacco rattle virus ...

  12. Scaling symmetry and scalar hairy rotating AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Byoungjoon; Hyun, Seungjoon; Park, Sang-A.; Yi, Sang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    By using the scaling symmetry in the reduced action formalism, we derive the novel Smarr relation which holds even for the hairy rotating AdS3 black holes. Then, by using the Smarr relation we argue that the hairy rotating AdS3 black holes are stable thermodynamically, compared to the nonhairy ones.

  13. Selection of high ginsenoside producing ginseng hairy root lines using targeted metabolic analysis.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sung-Sick; Song, Ji-Sook; Lee, Ju-Yeon; In, Dong Su; Chung, Hwa-Jee; Liu, Jang Ryol; Choi, Dong-Woog

    2004-10-01

    To develop an experimental system for studying ginsenoside biosynthesis, we generated thousands of ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) hairy roots, genetically transformed roots induced by Agrobacterium rhizogenes, and analyzed the ginsenosides in the samples. 27 putative ginsenosides were detected in ginseng hairy roots. Quantitative and qualitative variations in the seven major ginsenosides were profiled in 993 ginseng hairy root lines using LC/MS and HPLC-UV. Cluster analysis of metabolic profiling data enabled us to select hairy root lines, which varied significantly in ginsenoside production. We selected hairy root lines producing total ginsenoside contents 4-5 times higher than that of a common hairy root population, as well as lines that varied in the ratio of the protopanaxadiol to protopanaxatriol type ginsenoside. Some of the hairy root lines produce only a single ginsenoside in relatively high amounts. These metabolites represent the end product of gene expression, thus metabolic profiling can give a broad view of the biochemical status or biochemical phenotype of a hairy root line that can be directly linked to gene function. PMID:15474561

  14. Antineoplastic agents, 256. Cell growth inhibitory isocarbostyrils from Hymenocallis.

    PubMed

    Pettit, G R; Pettit, G R; Backhaus, R A; Boyd, M R; Meerow, A W

    1993-10-01

    The bulbs of Hymenocallis littoralis, collected in Hawaii and horticulturally grown in Arizona, and bulbs of Hymenocallis caribaea and Hymenocallis latifolia, collected in Singapore, were found to contain a cytotoxic, isocarbostyril-type biosynthetic product, 7-deoxy-trans-dihydronarciclasine [2]. This new compound inhibited the cytopathicity and/or replication of various viruses. Companion cytotoxic constituents of H. littoralis and Hymenocallis sp. were found to be pancratistatin [1], narciclasine [5], and 7-deoxynarciclasine [4]. These four compounds, along with four other closely related compounds, were comparatively evaluated in the National Cancer Institute's in vitro cytotoxicity panel. Although there were striking differences in overall potency, some of the compounds shared a highly characteristic differential cytotoxicity profile against the 60 diverse human tumor cell lines comprising the NCI panel. As a group, the melanoma subpanel lines were most sensitive; certain individual lines within other subpanels (eg., NSC lung, colon, brain, renal) were as much as a thousand-fold or more sensitive than the less sensitive lines. PMID:8277308

  15. Human Granulocytic Ehrlichiosis Agent and Ehrlichia chaffeensis Reside in Different Cytoplasmic Compartments in HL-60 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Jason; Barnewall, Roy E.; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    1999-01-01

    The human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) agent resides and multiplies exclusively in cytoplasmic vacuoles of granulocytes. Double immunofluorescence labeling was used to characterize the nature of the HGE agent replicative inclusions and to compare them with inclusions containing the human monocytic ehrlichia, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, in HL-60 cells. Although both Ehrlichia spp. can coinfect HL-60 cells, they resided in separate inclusions. Inclusions of both Ehrlichia spp. were not labeled with either anti-lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 or anti-CD63. Accumulation of myeloperoxidase-positive granules were seen around HGE agent inclusions but not around E. chaffeensis inclusions. 3-(2,4-Dinitroanilino)-3′-amino-N-methyldipropylamine and acridine orange were not localized to either inclusion type. Vacuolar-type H+-ATPase was not colocalized with HGE agent inclusions but was weakly colocalized with E. chaffeensis inclusions. E. chaffeensis inclusions were labeled with the transferrin receptor, early endosomal antigen 1, and rab5, but HGE agent inclusions were not. Some HGE agent and E. chaffeensis inclusions colocalized with major histocompatibility complex class I and II antigens. These two inclusions were not labeled for annexins I, II, IV, and VI; α-adaptin; clathrin heavy chain; or β-coatomer protein. Vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 colocalized to both inclusions. The cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor was not colocalized with either inclusion type. Endogenously synthesized sphingomyelin, from C6-NBD-ceramide, was not incorporated into either inclusion type. Brefeldin A did not affect the growth of either Ehrlichia sp. in HL-60 cells. These results suggest that the HGE agent resides in inclusions which are neither early nor late endosomes and does not fuse with lysosomes or Golgi-derived vesicles, while E. chaffeensis resides in an early endosomal compartment which accumulates the transferrin receptor. PMID:10024584

  16. [Establishment and characterization of human ovarian fibrosarcoma cell line and its sensitivity to anticancer agents].

    PubMed

    Kiyozuka, Y; Nishimura, H; Iwanaga, S; Yakushiji, M; Ito, K; Nakano, S; Tamori, N; Adachi, S; Noda, T; Imai, S

    1992-04-01

    We succeeded in establishing a cell line (KEN-3) for subculture from a fibrosarcoma which originated in the ovary in a girl aged 17 years. Its characteristics and sensitivity to anticancer agents are reported in this paper. 1. Characteristics of established cell line. Lined cells consist of multinucleated giant cells mixed among many spindle-shaped cells. They grow in small colonies and have none of the pavement-like arrangement characteristic of epithelial tumor cells. The number of chromosomes ranged from 45 to 128 (mode: pseudo-triploidy region, 65). The doubling time, cellular density and plating efficiency were 76.9 hours, 5.4 x 10(5)/cm2 and 30.2%, respectively. Concerning tumor markers, CEA and sialyl SSEA-1 were only produced in small quantities. Subculture was possible subcutaneously in the nude mouse with no capacity for the production of ascites. 2. Susceptibility to anticancer agents and GP170 expression. The in vitro susceptibility to about 12 types of anticancer agents was investigated with the MTT assay. IC50/PPC was shown to be less than 1 for Adriamycin only. The sensitivity to CDDP (IC50/PPC: 4.8) was low, and no sensitivity was observed at all to DTIC, which is used frequently for mesenchymal tumors. GP170 (mdr-1 products) was positive in established cells in immunohistochemical stain. PMID:1351514

  17. A new anti-inflammatory β-carboline alkaloid from the hairy-root cultures of Eurycoma longifolia.

    PubMed

    Ngoc, Pham Bich; Pham, Thanh Binh; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Tran, Thu Trang; Chu, Hoang Ha; Chau, Van Minh; Lee, Jeong-Hyung; Nguyen, Tien Dat

    2016-06-01

    One new β-carboline alkaloid 7-methoxy-(9H-β-carbolin-1-il)-(E)-1-propenoic acid (1) together with 9-methoxycanthin-6-one (2) and 9-hydroxycanthin-6-one (3) were isolated from the hairy-root cultures of Eurycoma longifolia. The effects of these compounds on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW264.7 cells were investigated. Compound 1 strongly inhibited the production of NO while 2 and 3 having weak or inactive effect. Consistently, compound 1 decreased the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. PMID:26165243

  18. Bactericidal effects of antimicrobial agents on epithelial cell-associated Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hirakata, Yoichi; Yano, Hisakazu; Arai, Kazuaki; Kitagawa, Miho; Hatta, Masumitsu; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    It is not clear whether antipseudomonal agents can kill cell-associated bacteria within a short time. Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and A549 cells were infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and PAO1 and the bactericidal activity of ceftazidime, imipenem, meropenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin against the organisms was investigated. In both MDCK and A549 cells, β-lactams could not kill epithelial cell-associated bacteria within 2 h. Gentamicin at concentrations ≤32 μg/ml killed more than 99% of epithelial cell-associated bacteria. Ciprofloxacin at 0.5 μg/ml killed more than 99.9% of MDCK cell-associated bacteria. Ciprofloxacin has the strongest and most rapid bactericidal activity against epithelial cell-associated bacteria, which may be explained by the combination of potent in-vitro bactericidal activity and high penetration ability into epithelial cells. PMID:22116462

  19. Imaging translucent cell bodies in the living mouse retina without contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Torres, A; Williams, D R; Schallek, J B

    2015-06-01

    The transparency of most retinal cell classes typically precludes imaging them in the living eye; unless invasive methods are used that deploy extrinsic contrast agents. Using an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) and capitalizing on the large numerical aperture of the mouse eye, we enhanced the contrast from otherwise transparent cells by subtracting the left from the right half of the light distribution in the detector plane. With this approach, it is possible to image the distal processes of photoreceptors, their more proximal cell bodies and the mosaic of horizontal cells in the living mouse retina. PMID:26114032

  20. Development and optimization of near-IR contrast agents for immune cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pratixa P.; Yoon, Soon Joon; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav; Sokolov, Konstantin V.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanorods (NRs) are attractive for in vivo imaging due to their high optical cross-sections and tunable absorbance. However, the feasibility of using NRs for cell tracking has not been fully explored. Here, we synthesized dye doped silica-coated NRs as multimodal contrast agents for imaging of macrophages – immune cells which play an important role in cancer and cardiovascular diseases. We showed the importance of silica coating in imaging of NR-labeled cells. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging of NRs labeled macrophages showed high sensitivity. Therefore, these results provide foundation for applications of silica-coated NRs and PA imaging in tracking of immune cells. PMID:24298419

  1. Imaging translucent cell bodies in the living mouse retina without contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Torres, A.; Williams, D. R.; Schallek, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    The transparency of most retinal cell classes typically precludes imaging them in the living eye; unless invasive methods are used that deploy extrinsic contrast agents. Using an adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) and capitalizing on the large numerical aperture of the mouse eye, we enhanced the contrast from otherwise transparent cells by subtracting the left from the right half of the light distribution in the detector plane. With this approach, it is possible to image the distal processes of photoreceptors, their more proximal cell bodies and the mosaic of horizontal cells in the living mouse retina. PMID:26114032

  2. Effect of anti-glycolytic agents on tumour cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, D. A.; Kondakova, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A metabolic change is one of the tumour hallmarks, which has recently attracted a great amount of attention. One of the main metabolic characteristics of tumour cells is a high level of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. The energy production is much less in a glycolysis pathway than that in a tricarboxylic acid cycle. The Warburg effect constitutes a fundamental adaptation of tumour cells to a relatively hostile environment, and supports the evolution of aggressive and metastatic phenotypes. As a result, tumour glycolysis may become an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here, we research the effect of potential anticancer agents on tumour cells in vitro. In our study, we found a high sensitivity of tumour cells to anti-glycolityc drugs. In addition, tumour cells are more resistant to the agents studied in comparison with normal cells. We also observed an atypical cooperative interaction of tumour cells in the median lethal dose of drugs. They formed the specific morphological structure of the surviving cells. This behavior is not natural for the culture of tumour cells. Perhaps this is one of the mechanisms of cells' adaptation to the aggressive environment.

  3. Labeling of human mesenchymal stem cell: Comparison between paramagnetic and superparamagnetic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chung-Yi; Tai, Ming-Fong; Chen, Shin-Tai; Wang, Yi-Ting; Chen, Ya-Fang; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Wang, Jaw-Lin; Liu, Hon-Man

    2009-04-01

    Paramagnetic and superparamagnetic substances are used to trace stem cell in living organisms under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared paramagnetic and superparamagnetic substance for their labeling efficiency by using clinically widely used gadolinium chelates and iron oxide nanoparticles. Without the aid of transfection agent, human mesenchymal stem cells were labeled with each agent separately in different concentration and the optimized concentration was determined by maintaining same cell viability as unlabeled cells. Iron oxide nanoparticle labeling has a detecting threshold of 12 500 cells in vitro, while gadolinium chelates labeling could be detected for at least 50 000 cells. In life animal study, we found there is an eightfold sensitivity in cells labeled with iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles; however, the magnetic susceptibility artifact would obscure the detail of adjacent anatomical structures. We conclude that labeling stem cells with superparamagnetic substance is more efficacious. However, the cells labeled by superparamagnetic nanoparticles might interfere with the interpretation of anatomical structure. These findings would be beneficial to applications of magnetic substances toward stem cell biology and tissue engineering.

  4. Suppression of alkylating agent induced cell transformation and gastric ulceration by low-dose alkylating agent pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, Akira; Kawai, Yuichi; Kashimura, Asako; Ogita, Fumiya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Itoh, Norio

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •Low-dose MNNG pretreatment suppresses high-dose MNNG induced in vitro transformation. •Gastric ulcers induced by high-dose MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. •Efficacy of low-dose MNNG related to resistance of mutation and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Exposure to mild stress by chemicals and radiation causes DNA damage and leads to acquired stress resistance. Although the linear no-threshold (LNT) model of safety assessment assumes risk from any dose, evidence from radiological research demonstrates a conflicting hormetic phenomenon known as the hormesis effect. However, the mechanisms underlying radiation hormesis have not yet been clarified, and little is known about the effects of low doses of chemical carcinogens. We analyzed the efficacy of pretreatment with low doses of the alkylating agent N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) on the subsequent induction of cell transformation and gastric ulceration by high-dose MNNG. We used an in vitro Balb/3T3 A31-1-1 cell transformation test and monitored the formation of gastric ulcers in 5-week-old male ICR mice that were administered MNNG in drinking water. The treatment concentrations of MNNG were determined by the cell survival rate and past reports. For low-dose in vitro and in vivo experiments, MNNG was used at 0.028 μM, and 2.8 μg/mL, respectively. The frequency of cell transformation induced by 10 μm MNNG was decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment to levels similar to that of spontaneous transformation. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mutation frequencies induced by 10 μm MNNG were decreased by low-dose MNNG pretreatment. Importantly, low-dose MNNG pretreatment had no effect on cell proliferation. In vivo studies showed that the number of gastric ulcers induced by 1 mg/mL MNNG decreased after low-dose MNNG pretreatment. These data indicate that low-dose pretreatment with carcinogens may play a beneficial role in the prevention of chemical toxicity

  5. Design of a hydrogen peroxide-activatable agent that specifically targets cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Vadukoot, Anish K.; AbdulSalam, Safnas F.; Wunderlich, Mark; Pullen, Eboni D.; Landero-Figueroa, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Some cancers, like acute myeloid leukemia (AML), use reactive oxygen species to endogenously activate cell proliferation and angiogenic signaling cascades. Thus many cancers display increases in reactive oxygen like hydrogen peroxide concentrations. To translate this finding into a therapeutic strategy we designed new hydrogen peroxide-activated agents with two key molecular pharmacophores. The first pharmacophore is a peroxide-acceptor and the second is a pendant amine. The acceptor is an N-(2,5-dihydroxyphenyl)acetamide susceptible to hydrogen peroxide oxidation. We hypothesized that selectivity between AML and normal cells could be achieved by tuning the pendant amine. Synthesis and testing of fourteen compounds that differed at the pendent amine led to the identification of an agent (14) with 2 μM activity against AML cancer cells and an eleven fold-lower activity in healthy CD34+ blood stem cells. Interestingly, analysis shows that upon oxidation the pendant amine cyclizes, ejecting water, with the acceptor to give a bicyclic compound capable of reacting with nucleophiles. Preliminary mechanistic investigations show that AML cells made from addition of two oncogenes (NrasG12D and MLL-AF9) increase the ROS-status, is initially an anti-oxidant as hydrogen peroxide is consumed to activate the pro-drug, and cells respond by upregulating electrophilic defense as visualized by western blotting of KEAP1. Thus, using this chemical approach we have obtained a simple, potent, and selective ROS-activated anti-AML agent. PMID:25464887

  6. Suprafenacine, an Indazole-Hydrazide Agent, Targets Cancer Cells Through Microtubule Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Bo-Hwa; Chattopadhaya, Souvik; Thanh, Le Nguyen; Feng, Lin; Nguyen, Quoc Toan; Lim, Chuan Bian; Harikishore, Amaravadhi; Nanga, Ravi Prakash Reddy; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Xuewei; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules are a highly validated target in cancer therapy. However, the clinical development of tubulin binding agents (TBA) has been hampered by toxicity and chemoresistance issues and has necessitated the search for new TBAs. Here, we report the identification of a novel cell permeable, tubulin-destabilizing molecule - 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-indazole-3-carboxylic acid [1p-tolyl-meth-(E)-ylidene]-hydrazide (termed as Suprafenacine, SRF). SRF, identified by in silico screening of annotated chemical libraries, was shown to bind microtubules at the colchicine-binding site and inhibit polymerization. This led to G2/M cell cycle arrest and cell death via a mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. Cell death was preceded by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, JNK - mediated phosphorylation of Bcl-2 and Bad, and activation of caspase-3. Intriguingly, SRF was found to selectively inhibit cancer cell proliferation and was effective against drug-resistant cancer cells by virtue of its ability to bypass the multidrug resistance transporter P-glycoprotein. Taken together, our results suggest that SRF has potential as a chemotherapeutic agent for cancer treatment and provides an alternate scaffold for the development of improved anti-cancer agents. PMID:25354194

  7. Taurolidine: a novel anti-neoplastic agent induces apoptosis of osteosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Walters, Denise K; Muff, Roman; Langsam, Bettina; Gruber, Philipp; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2007-08-01

    Taurolidine, the active agent of Taurolin, is a broad spectrum anti-biotic that has been used for over 15 years for the treatment of severe surgical infections. Recently, taurolidine has been shown to possess anti-neoplastic properties in vitro and in vivo against a variety of cancers including ovarian, colon and prostate. In this study we assessed the cytotoxic activity of taurolidine against human osteosarcoma (OS) cell lines and normal human bone cells. Treatment with taurolidine inhibited the growth of all ten osteosarcoma cell lines tested and taurolidine was equally potent against cell lines with and without distinct genetic defects (i.e. p53, Rb). Moreover, taurolidine-induced growth inhibition was found to be associated with a dose dependent increase in the number of apoptotic cells and apoptosis was shown to be caspase-dependent. Taurolidine treatment was also found to inhibit adhesion of OS cell lines. Compared to OS cell lines, normal bone cells in primary culture were found to be less sensitive to the cytotoxic and anti-adhesive effects of taurolidine. These data indicate that taurolidine possesses potent anti-neoplastic activity against osteosarcoma cell lines and may have potential as a novel OS chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:17458504

  8. Cell Death Pathways and Phthalocyanine as an Efficient Agent for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mfouo-Tynga, Ivan; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of cell death can be predetermined (programmed) or not and categorized into apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways. The process of Hayflick limits completes the execution of death-related mechanisms. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with oxidative stress and subsequent cytodamage by oxidizing and degrading cell components. ROS are also involved in immune responses, where they stabilize and activate both hypoxia-inducible factors and phagocytic effectors. ROS production and presence enhance cytodamage and photodynamic-induced cell death. Photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT) uses non-toxic chemotherapeutic agents, photosensitizer (PS), to initiate a light-dependent and ROS-related cell death. Phthalocyanines (PCs) are third generation and stable PSs with improved photochemical abilities. They are effective inducers of cell death in various neoplastic models. The metallated PCs localize in critical cellular organelles and are better inducers of cell death than other previous generation PSs as they favor mainly apoptotic cell death events. PMID:25955645

  9. Hairy roots are more sensitive to auxin than normal roots

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen Hui; Petit, Annik; Guern, Jean; Tempé, Jacques

    1988-01-01

    Responses to auxin of Lotus corniculatus root tips or protoplasts transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains 15834 and 8196 were compared to those of their normal counterparts. Three different types of experiments were performed, involving long-term, medium-term, or short-term responses to a synthetic auxin, 1-naphthaleneacetic acid. Root tip elongation, proton excretion by root tips, and transmembrane electrical potential difference of root protoplasts were measured as a function of exogenous auxin concentration. The sensitivity of hairy root tips or protoplasts to exogenous auxin was found to be 100-1000 times higher than that of untransformed material. PMID:16593928

  10. Hairy roots are more sensitive to auxin than normal roots.

    PubMed

    Shen, W H; Petit, A; Guern, J; Tempé, J

    1988-05-01

    Responses to auxin of Lotus corniculatus root tips or protoplasts transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains 15834 and 8196 were compared to those of their normal counterparts. Three different types of experiments were performed, involving long-term, medium-term, or short-term responses to a synthetic auxin, 1-naphthaleneacetic acid. Root tip elongation, proton excretion by root tips, and transmembrane electrical potential difference of root protoplasts were measured as a function of exogenous auxin concentration. The sensitivity of hairy root tips or protoplasts to exogenous auxin was found to be 100-1000 times higher than that of untransformed material. PMID:16593928

  11. Canonical energy and hairy AdS black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Seungjoon; Park, Sang-A.; Yi, Sang-Heon

    2016-08-01

    We propose the modified version of the canonical energy which was introduced originally by Hollands and Wald. Our construction depends only on the Euler-Lagrange expression of the system and thus is independent of the ambiguity in the Lagrangian. After some comments on our construction, we briefly mention on the relevance of our construction to the boundary information metric in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence. We also study the stability of three-dimensional hairy extremal black holes by using our construction.

  12. Preclinical Investigations of PM01183 (Lurbinectedin) as a Single Agent or in Combination with Other Anticancer Agents for Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Ryoko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Kawano, Mahiru; Sasano, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yuri; Kuroda, Hiromasa; Kozasa, Katsumi; Hashimoto, Kae; Sawada, Kenjiro; Kimura, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effects of lurbinectedin as a single agent or in combination with existing anticancer agents for clear cell carcinoma (CCC) of the ovary, which is regarded as an aggressive, chemoresistant, histological subtype. Methods Using human ovarian CCC cell lines, the antitumor effects of lurbinectedin, SN-38, doxorubicin, cisplatin, and paclitaxel as single agents were assessed using the MTS assay. Then, the antitumor effects of combination therapies involving lurbinectedin and 1 of the other 4 agents were evaluated using isobologram analysis to examine whether these combinations displayed synergistic effects. The antitumor activity of each treatment was also examined using cisplatin-resistant and paclitaxel-resistant CCC sublines. Finally, we determined the effects of mTORC1 inhibition on the antitumor activity of lurbinectedin-based chemotherapy. Results Lurbinectedin exhibited significant antitumor activity toward chemosensitive and chemoresistant CCC cells in vitro. An examination of mouse CCC cell xenografts revealed that lurbinectedin significantly inhibits tumor growth. Among the tested combinations, lurbinectedin plus SN-38 resulted in a significant synergistic effect. This combination also had strong synergistic effects on both the cisplatin-resistant and paclitaxel-resistant CCC cell lines. Everolimus significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of lurbinectedin-based chemotherapies. Conclusions Lurbinectedin, a new agent that targets active transcription, exhibits antitumor activity in CCC when used as a single agent and has synergistic antitumor effects when combined with irinotecan. Our results indicate that lurbinectedin is a promising agent for treating ovarian CCC, both as a first-line treatment and as a salvage treatment for recurrent lesions that develop after platinum-based or paclitaxel treatment. PMID:26986199

  13. Stress responses to DNA damaging agents in the human colon carcinoma cell line, RKO.

    PubMed

    Beard, S E; Capaldi, S R; Gee, P

    1996-11-01

    DNA damage results from a wide variety of external agents such as chemicals and radiation. The consequences of exposure to agents that damage DNA have been traditionally studied from the perspective of cell survival and mutagenesis. Mutations are late endpoints of DNA damage. Cells respond to the earlier stages of DNA damage by inducing the expression of several genes, including those specific of the nature of the lesion. These early transcriptional responses are likely to predetermine the later fate of the damaged cell. Genes activated during this early response include those involved in DNA repair, replication, and growth control. We are interested in the transcriptional mechanisms by which cells respond to DNA damaging agents. To facilitate the measurement of gene induction, we used seven different reporter constructs integrated stably into the RKO cell line derived from a human colon carcinoma. These constructs were derived from promoters and/or response elements isolated from genes associated with DNA damage responses in human cells, and were fused to the bacterial reporter gene, choramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT). The cell lines generated in this manner contain the promoters and/or response elements representing DNA polymerase beta, p53, gadd (growth arrest and DNA damage) 45 and 153, c-fos, TPA response element, and tissue-type plasminogen activator. These recombinant cell lines were assembled in a 96-well microtiter plate permitting their simultaneous exposure to compounds and subsequent CAT protein measurement. This assembly has been designated the CAT-Tox (D) assay. These cell lines were exposed to different classes of DNA damaging agents including those which covalently join bases to form dimers (e.g., UVC irradiation), generate DNA adducts by alkylation (e.g., methylmethane sulfonate [MMS], ethylmethane sulfonate [EMS], N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanine [MNNG], dimethylnitrosamine [DMN]), cross-link DNA (e.g., mitomycin C), and inhibit DNA

  14. Medical applications of nanoparticles in biological imaging, cell labeling, antimicrobial agents, and anticancer nanodrugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravina; Nalwa, Hari Singh

    2011-08-01

    This article reviews the applications of nanotechnology in the fields of medical and life sciences. Nanoparticles have shown promising applications from diagnosis to treatment of various types of diseases including cancer. In this review, we discuss the applications of nanostructured materials such as nanoparticles, quantum dots, nanorods, nanowires, and carbon nanotubes in diagnostics, biomarkers, cell labeling, contrast agents for biological imaging, antimicrobial agents, drug delivery systems, and anticancer nanodrugs for treatment of cancer and other infectious diseases. The adverse affects of nanoparticles on human skin from daily use in cosmetics and general toxicology of nanoscale materials are also reviewed. PMID:21870454

  15. Targeting cancer stem-like cells using dietary-derived agents - Where are we now?

    PubMed

    Khan, Sameena; Karmokar, Ankur; Howells, Lynne; Thomas, Anne L; Bayliss, Richard; Gescher, Andreas; Brown, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Diet has been linked to an overwhelming proportion of cancers. Current chemotherapy and targeted therapies are limited by toxicity and the development of resistance against these treatments results in cancer recurrence or progression. In vitro evidence indicates that a number of dietary-derived agents have activity against a highly tumorigenic, chemoradiotherapy resistant population of cells within a tumour. This population is associated with cancer recurrence and is therefore clinically significant. Targeting this subpopulation, termed cancer stem-like cells with dietary-derived agents provides a potentially low toxicity strategy to enhance current treatment regimens. In addition, dietary-derived compounds also provide a novel approach to cancer prevention strategies. This review focusses on selected diet-derived agents that have been shown to specifically target cancer stem-like cells using in vivo models, or in clinical trials. Furthermore, the potential limitations of these studies are discussed, and areas of research that need to be addressed to allow successful translation of dietary-derived agents to the clinical arena are highlighted. PMID:27060283

  16. Acetylation at lysine 71 inactivates superoxide dismutase 1 and sensitizes cancer cells to genotoxic agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Junyan; Xie, Zuoquan; Sun, Wenyi; Luo, Cheng; Ding, Jian; Yuan, Shengtao; Geng, Meiyu; Huang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells are characterized by a high dependency on antioxidant enzymes to cope with the elevated rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Impairing antioxidant capacity in cancer cells disturbs the ROS homeostasis and exposes cancer cells to massive oxidative stress. In this study, we have discovered that superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a major player in maintaining the cellular redox status, was acetylated at lysine 71. This acetylation, which was primarily deacetylated by Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), suppressed the enzymatic activity of SOD1 via disrupting its association with copper chaperone for SOD1 (CCS). More importantly, genotoxic agents, such as camptothecin (CPT), induced SOD1 acetylation by disrupting its binding with SIRT1. CPT-induced SOD1 acetylation was stimulated by its provoked ROS, suggesting a positive feedback loop, in which ROS per se impairs the antioxidative defence of cancer cells and reinforces oxidative stress stimulated by anticancer agents. The intrinsic abundance of SOD1 acetylation varied among cancer cells, and high level of SOD1 acetylation was correlated with elevated sensitivity to CPT. Together, our findings gained mechanistic insights into how cytotoxic agents fine tune the intracellular ROS homeostasis to strengthen their anticancer effects, and suggested SOD1 acetylation as a candidate biomarker for predicting response to CPT-based chemotherapy. PMID:26008972

  17. Methods for preclinical assessment of antipruritic agents and itch mechanisms independent of mast-cell histamine.

    PubMed

    Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Itch is a sensation that provokes a desire to scratch. Mast-cell histamine was thought to be a key itch mediator. However, histamine and mast-cell degranulation were reported not to elicit scratching in animals. It was difficult to investigate the pathophysiology of itching and to evaluate the antipruritic efficacy of chemical agents in the early 1990 s. We showed that hind-paw scratching and biting were elicited by stimulation with pruritogenic agents in mice. Those results demonstrated for the first time that cutaneous itching could be evaluated behaviorally in animals. We established various animal models of pathological itch of the skin (dry skin, mosquito allergy, surfactant-induced pruritus, and herpes zoster) and mucus membranes (pollen allergy). Mast-cell histamine did not play a key role in itching in any animal model examined except for the pollen allergy model. Histamine is not an exclusive itch mediator of mast cells; tryptase and leukotriene B4 released from mast cells also act as itch mediators. Epidermal keratinocytes release several itch mediators, such as leukotriene B4, sphingosylphosphorylcholine, thromboxane A2, nociceptin, nitric oxide, and histamine, which may play important roles in pathological itching. Appropriate animal models of pathological itching are needed for pharmacological evaluation of the antipruritic efficacy of chemical agents. PMID:25947907

  18. The antineoplastic agent α-bisabolol promotes cell death by inducing pores in mitochondria and lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Rigo, Antonella; Vinante, Fabrizio

    2016-08-01

    The sesquiterpene α-bisabolol (α-BSB) has been shown to be an effective cytotoxic agent for a variety of human cancer cells in culture and animal models. However, much of its intracellular action remains elusive. We evaluated the cytotoxic action of α-BSB against CML-T1, Jurkat and HeLa cell lines, as preclinical models for myeloid, lymphoid and epithelial neoplasias. The approach included single cell analysis (flow cytometry, immunocytology) combined with cytotoxicity and proliferation assays to characterize organelle damage, autophagy, cytostatic effect, and apoptosis. The study focuses on the relevant steps in the cytotoxic cascade triggered by α-BSB: (1) the lipid rafts through which α-BSB enters the cells, (2) the opening of pores in the mitochondria and lysosomes, (3) the activation of both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent cell death pathways, (4) the induction of autophagy and (5) apoptosis. The effectiveness of α-BSB as an agent against tumor cells is grounded on its capability to act on different layers of cell regulation to elicit different concurrent death signals, thereby neutralizing a variety of aberrant survival mechanisms leading to treatment resistance in neoplastic cell. PMID:27278818

  19. Highly Adaptable Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells as a Functional Model for Testing Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Balraj; Shamsnia, Anna; Raythatha, Milan R.; Milligan, Ryan D.; Cady, Amanda M.; Madan, Simran; Lucci, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    A major obstacle in developing effective therapies against solid tumors stems from an inability to adequately model the rare subpopulation of panresistant cancer cells that may often drive the disease. We describe a strategy for optimally modeling highly abnormal and highly adaptable human triple-negative breast cancer cells, and evaluating therapies for their ability to eradicate such cells. To overcome the shortcomings often associated with cell culture models, we incorporated several features in our model including a selection of highly adaptable cancer cells based on their ability to survive a metabolic challenge. We have previously shown that metabolically adaptable cancer cells efficiently metastasize to multiple organs in nude mice. Here we show that the cancer cells modeled in our system feature an embryo-like gene expression and amplification of the fat mass and obesity associated gene FTO. We also provide evidence of upregulation of ZEB1 and downregulation of GRHL2 indicating increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition in metabolically adaptable cancer cells. Our results obtained with a variety of anticancer agents support the validity of the model of realistic panresistance and suggest that it could be used for developing anticancer agents that would overcome panresistance. PMID:25279830

  20. Lysosomotropic agents selectively target chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells due to altered sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dielschneider, R F; Eisenstat, H; Mi, S; Curtis, J M; Xiao, W; Johnston, J B; Gibson, S B

    2016-06-01

    Lysosome membrane permeabilization (LMP) mediates cell death in a variety of cancer cells. However, little is known about lysosomes and LMP in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Owing to drug resistance and toxicity in CLL patients, better treatment strategies are required. Our results show that CLL cells were sensitive to the lysosomotropic agent siramesine. Furthermore, this drug was more effective in CLL cells, regardless of prognostic factors, compared with normal B cells. Siramesine caused LMP, lipid peroxidation and transcription factor EB nuclear translocation followed by mitochondrial membrane potential loss and reactive oxygen species release. Siramesine-induced cell death was blocked by lipid antioxidants, but not by soluble antioxidants or protease inhibitors. To determine whether CLL cells had altered lysosomes, we investigated sphingolipid metabolism as the lysosome is a hub for lipid metabolism. We found that CLL cells had more lysosomes, increased sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase 1 (SPP1) expression, and increased levels of sphingosine compared with normal B cells. Raising sphingosine levels increased LMP and cell death in CLL cells, but not in normal B cells. Together, these results show that excess sphingosine in CLL cells could contribute to their sensitivity toward LMP. Thus, targeting the lysosome could be a novel therapeutic strategy in CLL. PMID:26859075

  1. Enhancement of Cytotoxicity of Three Apoptosis-inducing Agents Against Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Line by Benzoxazinotropone.

    PubMed

    Tomikoshi, Yukiko; Nomura, Maki; Okudaira, Noriyuki; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Hidetsugu

    Tumor-specificity (TS) and anti-inflammatory activity of benzo[b]cyclohept[e][1,4]oxazin-6(11H)-one, generally known as benzoxazinotropone (BOT), have been reported. In order to find a new biological activity, the combination effect of BOT and three apoptosis-inducing agents was investigated. Cytotoxicity against four human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines and five human oral normal cells (gingival fibroblasts, periodontal ligament fibroblasts, pulp cells, oral keratinocytes and primary gingival epithelial cells) was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. TS was evaluated by the ratio of the mean 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) against normal oral cells to the one against OSCC cell lines. Synergy was evaluated by CompuSyn software program. Expression of cleaved forms of poly ADP-ribose polymerase and caspsase-3 was evaluated by western blot analysis. BOT induced activation of caspase 3, suggesting the apoptosis induction in HSC-2 OSCC cells. BOT enhanced the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin (DXR) additively and that of curcumin and resveratrol synergistically. On the other hand, BOT did not enhance, but rather inhibit the cytotoxicity of DXR against normal keratinocytes. The present study suggests that BOT may enhance the anti-tumor activity of apoptosis-inducing agents, while reducing its cytotoxicity against normal cells. PMID:27566085

  2. Dynamic analysis of changing features of tumor cells incubated with antitumor agents in vitro and its application for predictive activity assay of antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Oguro, M; Takagi, T; Takenaga, K

    1985-02-01

    Continuous observation of living malignant cells (L1210) in a specially devised glass observation chamber with an inverted microscope made it possible to classify various cellular morphological features induced by antitumor agents into the following four stages: 1) an initial stage consisting of cytoplasmic granulation and coloring, 2) an intermediate stage of shrinkage of nuclei, increases of vacuoles and cytoplasmic budding, 3) a determinate stage of cell ballooning and 4) the terminal stage (cell ghost). Both the initial and intermediate stages are characterized by cellular changes that appear at an early phase and remain opportunistic in terms of viability. Emergence of these cellular changes is largely dependent on the specific mode of action of antitumor agents. In contrast, definite irreversibility in the changes found in both the terminal and determinate stages was confirmed by continuous observation until the cells showed lytic or ghost features, using a video-recording system. A plot of the number of cells counted in both the determinate and terminal stages versus the time-dose schedule is designated as the "time-dose-response" plot, and this proved useful for estimating the characteristics of the antitumor agents tested and the actions of new antitumor agents on malignant cells (predictive activity assay graph). PMID:3920102

  3. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  4. Insulin attenuates intracellular calcium responses and cell contraction caused by vasoactive agents.

    PubMed

    Inishi, Y; Okuda, T; Arakawa, T; Kurokawa, K

    1994-05-01

    In the present study, we examined the effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) on cultured rat mesangial cell responses to vasoactive agents. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured with the Fura-2 method in suspended mesangial cells. Pretreatment of mesangial cells with insulin (from 0.05 to 5 micrograms/ml) attenuated Ca2+ transients by platelet activating factor (PAF) in a dose dependent and a time dependent manner. Insulin also attenuated sustained elevation of [Ca2+]i elicited by PAF. Basal [Ca2+]i was not affected by insulin pretreatment. Since the effective dose of insulin (0.5 microgram/ml or higher) is much higher than the physiological concentration, the effects of insulin may be via IGF-I receptor. Indeed, IGF-I (50 ng/ml) similarly attenuated [Ca2+]i responses to PAF. Moreover, insulin pretreatment attenuated [Ca2+]i responses evoked by angiotensin II (Ang II) and endothelin-1. In addition, the pretreatment with insulin or IGF-I inhibited mesangial cell contraction in response to Ang II. The suppression of [Ca2+]i responses to vasoactive agents by insulin was abolished when extracellular Ca2+ was removed. These data suggest that insulin, probably via IGF-I receptor, attenuates [Ca2+]i responses and cell contraction of mesangial cells induced by vasoactive agents. It is likely that the change in Ca2+ influx from outside to inside the cell underlie the effect of insulin. The modification of mesangial cell function through IGF-I receptor may play a role in the regulation of glomerular hemodynamics. PMID:8072243

  5. Upregulation of isoprenoid pathway genes during enhanced saikosaponin biosynthesis in the hairy roots of Bupleurum falcatum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Soon; Cho, Jung Hyun; Ahn, Juncheul; Hwang, Baik

    2006-12-31

    In order to characterize saikosaponin biosynthesis in Bupleurum falcatum, the expression of five isoprenoid pathway genes and their relationship to saikosaponin accumulation in the hairy roots were analyzed. The hairy roots exhibited a rapid accumulation of saikosaponins when incubated in a root culture medium (3XRCM). Homology-based RT-PCR was used to isolate core fragments of five genes, HMGR, IPPI, FPS, SS, and OSC, from the hairy roots. The deduced amino acid sequences exhibited amino acid identities of more than 85% to previously reported genes. Using the fragments as probes, the expression of these five genes in the hairy roots during incubation in 3XRCM medium was examined. Expression of all five genes in the hairy roots increased soon after incubation. In particular, the SS and OSC genes were coordinately induced at 8 days of incubation, and their expression persisted throughout the incubation period. A quantitative HPLC analysis showed that the saikosaponin content of the hairy root culture also began to increase at 8 days of culture. The correlation between SS transcript level and saikosaponin content in the hairy roots suggests that transcriptional regulation plays a regulatory role in saikosaponin biosynthesis. PMID:17202854

  6. Cryopreservation of Endothelial Cells in Various Cryoprotective Agents and Media – Vitrification versus Slow Freezing Methods

    PubMed Central

    von Bomhard, Achim; Elsässer, Alexander; Ritschl, Lucas Maximilian; Schwarz, Silke; Rotter, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Vitrification of endothelial cells (MHECT-5) has not previously been compared with controlled slow freezing methods under standardized conditions. To identify the best cryopreservation technique, we evaluated vitrification and standardized controlled-rate -1°C/minute cell freezing in a -80°C freezer and tested four cryoprotective agents (CPA), namely dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol (EG), propylene glycol (PG), and glycerol (GLY), and two media, namely Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium Ham’s F-12 (DMEM)and K+-modified TiProtec (K+TiP), which is a high-potassium-containing medium. Numbers of viable cells in proliferation were evaluated by the CellTiter 96® AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay (Promega Corporation, Mannheim, Germany). To detect the exact frozen cell number per cryo vial, DNA content was measured by using Hoechst 33258 dye prior to analysis. Thus, results could be evaluated unconstrained by absolute cell number. Thawed cells were cultured in 25 cm2 cell culture flasks to confluence and examined daily by phase contrast imaging. With regard to cell recovery immediately after thawing, DMSO was the most suitable CPA combined with K+TiP in vitrification (99 ±0.5%) and with DMEM in slow freezing (92 ±1.6%). The most viable cells in proliferation after three days of culture were obtained in cells vitrificated by using GLY with K+TiP (308 ±34%) and PG with DMEM in slow freezing (280 ±27%). PMID:26890410

  7. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J.

    2014-01-01

    One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the “magic bullet” concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, “targeted therapy” that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges. PMID:24936916

  8. Hairy cellulose nanocrystalloids: a novel class of nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    van de Ven, Theo G M; Sheikhi, Amir

    2016-08-18

    Nanomaterials have secured such a promising role in today's life that imagining the modern world without them is almost impossible. A large fraction of nanomaterials is synthesized from environmentally-dangerous elements such as heavy metals, which have posed serious side-effects to ecosystems. Despite numerous advantages of synthetic nanomaterials, issues such as renewability, sustainability, biocompatibility, and cost efficiency have drawn significant attention towards natural products such as cellulose-based nanomaterials. Within the past decade, nanocelluloses, most remarkably nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), have successfully been used for a wide spectrum of applications spanning from nanocomposites, packaging, and mechanical and rheological property modifications, to chemical catalysis and organic templating. Yet, there has been little effort to introduce fundamentally new polysaccharide-based nanomaterials. We have been able to develop the first kind of cellulose-based nanoparticles bearing both crystalline and amorphous regions. These nanoparticles comprise a crystalline body, similar to conventional NCC, but with polymer chains protruding from both ends; therefore, these particles are called hairy cellulose nanocrystalloids (HCNC). In this article, we touch on the philosophy of HCNC synthesis, the striking superiority over existing nanocelluloses, and applications of this novel class of nanocelluloses. We hope that the emergence of hairy cellulose nanocrystalloids extends the frontiers of sustainable, green nanotechnology. PMID:27453347

  9. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2016-01-01

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence) in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress) DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E2, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional “repair and survive, or die” hypothesis. PMID:27187358

  10. The Growing Complexity of Cancer Cell Response to DNA-Damaging Agents: Caspase 3 Mediates Cell Death or Survival?

    PubMed

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Kumar, Piyush; Murray, David

    2016-01-01

    It is widely stated that wild-type p53 either mediates the activation of cell cycle checkpoints to facilitate DNA repair and promote cell survival, or orchestrates apoptotic cell death following exposure to cancer therapeutic agents. This reigning paradigm has been challenged by numerous discoveries with different human cell types, including solid tumor-derived cell lines. Thus, activation of the p53 signaling pathway by ionizing radiation and other DNA-damaging agents hinders apoptosis and triggers growth arrest (e.g., through premature senescence) in some genetic backgrounds; such growth arrested cells remain viable, secrete growth-promoting factors, and give rise to progeny with stem cell-like properties. In addition, caspase 3, which is best known for its role in the execution phase of apoptosis, has been recently reported to facilitate (rather than suppress) DNA damage-induced genomic instability and carcinogenesis. This observation is consistent with an earlier report demonstrating that caspase 3 mediates secretion of the pro-survival factor prostaglandin E₂, which in turn promotes enrichment of tumor repopulating cells. In this article, we review these and related discoveries and point out novel cancer therapeutic strategies. One of our objectives is to demonstrate the growing complexity of the DNA damage response beyond the conventional "repair and survive, or die" hypothesis. PMID:27187358

  11. Peloruside A, a microtubule-stabilizing agent, induces aneuploidy in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ariane; Singh, A Jonathan; Northcote, Peter T; Miller, John H

    2016-08-01

    To ensure proper chromosome segregation, mitosis is tightly regulated by the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Low concentrations of microtubule-stabilizing agents can induce aneuploid populations of cells in the absence of G2/M block, suggesting pertubation of the spindle checkpoint. We investigated the effects of peloruside A, a microtubule-stabilizing agent, on expression levels of several key cell cycle proteins, MAD2, BUBR1, p55CDC and cyclin B1. Synchronized 1A9 ovarian carcinoma cells were allowed to progress through the cell cycle in the presence or absence of peloruside A. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blotting were used to probe the cell cycle kinetics of MAD2 and BUBR1 dissociation from p55CDC. Using confocal microscopy, we investigated whether premature dissociation of MAD2 and BUBR1 at low (40 nM) but not high (100 nM) concentrations of peloruside A was caused by defects in the attachment of chromosomes to the mitotic spindle. An increased frequency of polar chromosomes was observed at low concentrations of peloruside A, suggesting that an increased frequency of pseudo-metaphase cells, which are not detected by the spindle assembly checkpoint, may be underlying the induction of aneuploidy. PMID:27155614

  12. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Fofana, Isabel; Heydmann, Laura; Barth, Heidi; Soulier, Eric; Habersetzer, François; Doffoël, Michel; Bukh, Jens; Patel, Arvind H; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Baumert, Thomas F

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs) was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs. PMID:24830295

  13. Hepatitis C Virus Cell-Cell Transmission and Resistance to Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents

    PubMed Central

    Heydmann, Laura; Barth, Heidi; Soulier, Eric; Habersetzer, François; Doffoël, Michel; Bukh, Jens; Patel, Arvind H.; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs) was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs. PMID:24830295

  14. The ferroptosis inducer erastin enhances sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia cells to chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Xie, Yangchun; Cao, Lizhi; Yang, Liangchun; Yang, Minghua; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia in adults. Development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is a major hurdle in the effective treatment of patients with AML. The quinazolinone derivative erastin was originally identified in a screen for small molecules that exhibit synthetic lethality with expression of the RAS oncogene. This lethality was subsequently shown to occur by induction of a novel form of cell death termed ferroptosis. In this study we demonstrate that erastin enhances the sensitivity of AML cells to chemotherapeutic agents in an RAS-independent manner. Erastin dose-dependently induced mixed types of cell death associated with ferroptosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, and autophagy in HL-60 cells (AML, NRAS_Q61L), but not Jurkat (acute T-cell leukemia, RAS wild type), THP-1 (AML, NRAS_G12D), K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia, RAS wild type), or NB-4 (acute promyelocytic leukemia M3, KRAS_A18D) cells. Treatment with ferrostatin-1 (a potent ferroptosis inhibitor) or necrostatin-1 (a potent necroptosis inhibitor), but not with Z-VAD-FMK (a general caspase inhibitor) or chloroquine (a potent autophagy inhibitor), prevented erastin-induced growth inhibition in HL-60 cells. Moreover, inhibition of c-JUN N-terminal kinase and p38, but not of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, induced resistance to erastin in HL-60 cells. Importantly, low-dose erastin significantly enhanced the anticancer activity of 2 first-line chemotherapeutic drugs (cytarabine/ara-C and doxorubicin/adriamycin) in HL-60 cells. Collectively, the induction of ferroptosis and necroptosis contributed to erastin-induced growth inhibition and overcame drug resistance in AML cells. PMID:27308510

  15. The ferroptosis inducer erastin enhances sensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia cells to chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan; Xie, Yangchun; Cao, Lizhi; Yang, Liangchun; Yang, Minghua; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of leukemia in adults. Development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents is a major hurdle in the effective treatment of patients with AML. The quinazolinone derivative erastin was originally identified in a screen for small molecules that exhibit synthetic lethality with expression of the RAS oncogene. This lethality was subsequently shown to occur by induction of a novel form of cell death termed ferroptosis. In this study we demonstrate that erastin enhances the sensitivity of AML cells to chemotherapeutic agents in an RAS-independent manner. Erastin dose-dependently induced mixed types of cell death associated with ferroptosis, apoptosis, necroptosis, and autophagy in HL-60 cells (AML, NRAS_Q61L), but not Jurkat (acute T-cell leukemia, RAS wild type), THP-1 (AML, NRAS_G12D), K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia, RAS wild type), or NB-4 (acute promyelocytic leukemia M3, KRAS_A18D) cells. Treatment with ferrostatin-1 (a potent ferroptosis inhibitor) or necrostatin-1 (a potent necroptosis inhibitor), but not with Z-VAD-FMK (a general caspase inhibitor) or chloroquine (a potent autophagy inhibitor), prevented erastin-induced growth inhibition in HL-60 cells. Moreover, inhibition of c-JUN N-terminal kinase and p38, but not of extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, induced resistance to erastin in HL-60 cells. Importantly, low-dose erastin significantly enhanced the anticancer activity of 2 first-line chemotherapeutic drugs (cytarabine/ara-C and doxorubicin/adriamycin) in HL-60 cells. Collectively, the induction of ferroptosis and necroptosis contributed to erastin-induced growth inhibition and overcame drug resistance in AML cells. PMID:27308510

  16. LipoCEST and cellCEST imaging agents: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ferrauto, Giuseppe; Delli Castelli, Daniela; Di Gregorio, Enza; Terreno, Enzo; Aime, Silvio

    2016-07-01

    From the early days of CEST agents' disclosure, it was evident that their potential for in vivo applications was strongly hampered by the intrinsic low sensitivity. Therefore, much work has been devoted to seek out suitable routes to achieve strong CEST contrast enhancement. The use of nanosized systems turned out to be a strategic choice, because a very large amount of CEST agents can be delivered at the site of interest. However, the breakthrough innovation in term of increase of sensitivity was found by designing the lipoCEST agents. The naturally inspired, liposomes vesicles, when loaded with paramagnetic lanthanide-based shift reagents, can be transformed into CEST probes. The large number of water molecules entrapped inside the inner cavity of the nanovesicles represents an enormous pool of exchanging protons for the generation of CEST contrast, whereas the presence of the shift reagent increases the separation in chemical shift of their nuclear magnetic resonance signal from that of the bulk water, thus allowing for a proper exchange regime for the activation of CEST contrast. From lipoCEST, it has been rather straightforward to evolve to cellCEST in order to exploit the cytoplasmatic water molecules as source of the CEST effect, once cells have been loaded with the proper shift reagent. The red blood cells were found to be particularly suitable for the development of the cellCEST concept. Finally, an understanding of the main determinants of the CEST effects in nanosized and cellular-sized agents has allowed the design of innovative lipoCEST/RBC aggregates for potential theranostic applications. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:602-618. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1385 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26810631

  17. Oncolytic reovirus synergizes with chemotherapeutic agents to promote cell death in canine mammary gland tumor.

    PubMed

    Igase, Masaya; Hwang, Chung Chew; Kambayashi, Satoshi; Kubo, Masato; Coffey, Matt; Miyama, Takako Shimokawa; Baba, Kenji; Okuda, Masaru; Noguchi, Shunsuke; Mizuno, Takuya

    2016-01-01

    The oncolytic effects of reovirus in various cancers have been proven in many clinical trials in human medicine. Oncolytic virotherapy using reovirus for canine cancers is being developed in our laboratory. The objective of this study was to examine the synergistic anti-cancer effects of a combination of reovirus and low doses of various chemotherapeutic agents on mammary gland tumors (MGTs) in dogs. The first part of this study demonstrated the efficacy of reovirus in canine MGTs in vitro and in vivo. Reovirus alone exerted significant cell death by means of caspase-dependent apoptosis in canine MGT cell lines. A single injection of reovirus impeded growth of canine MGT tumors in xenografted mice, but was insufficient to induce complete tumor regression. The second part of this study highlighted the anti-tumor effects of reovirus in combination with low doses of paclitaxel, carboplatin, gemcitabine, or toceranib. Enhanced synergistic activity was observed in the MGT cell line treated concomitantly with reovirus and in all the chemotherapeutic agents except toceranib. In addition, combining reovirus with paclitaxel or gemcitabine at half dosage of half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) enhanced cytotoxicity by activating caspase 3. Our data suggest that the combination of reovirus and low dose chemotherapeutic agents provides an attractive option in canine cancer therapy. PMID:26733729

  18. Examination of the activities of 43 chemotherapeutic agents against Neospora caninum tachyzoites in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, D S; Rippey, N S; Cole, R A; Parsons, L C; Dubey, J P; Tidwell, R R; Blagburn, B L

    1994-07-01

    Neospora caninum causes serious disease in dogs, and it, or a similar parasite, is a major cause of abortion in cattle. Little is known about the susceptibility of this protozoan to antimicrobial agents. We studied several antimicrobial agents to determine which classes might have activity against this parasite. We also determined whether activity of such agents was coccidiocidal or coccidiostatic. A 2-day of treatment, monoclonal antibody-based enzyme immunoassay and a 5-day of treatment, cell culture flask (CCF), lesion-based assay were developed to examine the ability of test agents to inhibit tachyzoite multiplication. Seven sulfonamides were examined, with the following activities observed: sulfathiazole > or = sulfamethoxazole > sulfadiazine > sulfaquinoxaline > or = sulfamethazine > sulfadimethoxine > sulfamerazine. Dapsone, a sulfone, had little activity. Six dihydrofolate reductase/thymidylate synthase inhibitors were examined, with the following activities observed: piritrexim > pyrimethamine > ormetoprim > trimethoprim = diaveridine > methotrexate. Six ionophorous antibiotics were examined; lasalocid, maduramicin, monensin, narasin, and salinomycin had equivalent activities, but alborixin was toxic for host cells at the lowest concentration examined. Three macrolide antibiotics--azithromycin, clarithromycin, and erythromycin--were examined and had equivalent activities. Two tetracycline antibiotics, doxycycline and minocycline, were examined and had equivalent activities. Three lincosamide antibiotics were examined, with the following activities observed: clindamycin hydrochloride > clindamycin phosphate > lincomycin hydrochloride. Pentamidine and 6 of its analogs were examined, and only hexamidine and 1,4-Di[4-(2-imidazolinyl)-2-methoxy-phenoxy]butane had activity. Eight miscellaneous antiprotozoal agents were examined for activity. Amprolium, metronidazole, paromomycin, and roxarsone had little activity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7978638

  19. Effect of different agents onto multidrug resistant cells revealed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, C.; Roche, Y.; Jaffiol, R.; Millot, J.-M.; Millot, C.; Plain, J.; Deturche, R.; Jeannesson, P.; Manfait, M.; Royer, P.

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which is a sensitive and non invasive technique, has been used to characterize the plasma membrane fluidity and heterogeneity of multidrug resistant living cells. At the single cell level, the effects of different membrane agents present in the extra-cellular medium have been analyzed. Firstly, we reveal a modification of plasma membrane microviscosity according to the addition of a fluidity modulator, benzyl alcohol. In the other hand, revertant such as verapamil and cyclosporin-A appears to act more specifically on the slow diffusion sites as microdomains.

  20. Hydroponics gel as a new electrolyte gelling agent for alkaline zinc-air cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, R.; Basirun, W. J.; Yahaya, A. H.; Arof, A. K.

    The viability of hydroponics gel as a new alkaline electrolyte gelling agent is investigated. Zinc-air cells are fabricated employing 12 wt.% KOH electrolyte immobilised with hydroponics gel. The cells are discharged at constant currents of 5, 50 and 100 mA. XRD and SEM analysis of the anode plates after discharge show that the failure mode is due to the formation of zinc oxide insulating layers and not due to any side reactions between the gel and the plate or the electrolyte.

  1. Biological profile and response to anti-pneumocystis agents of Pneumocystis carinii in cell culture.

    PubMed Central

    Pifer, L L; Pifer, D D; Woods, D R

    1983-01-01

    Although the growth characteristics of Pneumocystis carinii have been described in several cell culture systems, the response of this organism to the drugs of choice, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and pentamidine isethionate, have not been described in vitro. The effect of various concentrations of drugs against P. carinii on the growth of this potentially hazardous opportunistic organism as well as the methodology for in vitro assay of these agents have been detailed. Fluorescence profiles illustrating size ranges of trophozoites and cysts derived from cell culture are described. PMID:6607029

  2. Targeting ferritin receptors for the selective delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geninatti Crich, S.; Cadenazzi, M.; Lanzardo, S.; Conti, L.; Ruiu, R.; Alberti, D.; Cavallo, F.; Cutrin, J. C.; Aime, S.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation.In this work the selective uptake of native horse spleen ferritin and apoferritin loaded with MRI contrast agents has been assessed in human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). The higher expression of L-ferritin receptors (SCARA5) led to an enhanced uptake in MCF-7 as shown in T2 and T1 weighted MR images, respectively. The high efficiency of ferritin internalization in MCF-7 has been exploited for the simultaneous delivery of curcumin, a natural therapeutic molecule endowed with antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory action, and the MRI contrast agent Gd-HPDO3A. This theranostic system is able to treat selectively breast cancer cells over-expressing ferritin receptors. By entrapping in apoferritin both Gd-HPDO3A and curcumin, it was possible to deliver a therapeutic dose of 167 μg ml-1 (as calculated by MRI) of this natural drug to MCF-7 cells, thus obtaining a significant reduction of cell proliferation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Competition studies with free apoferritin, Fig. S1; APO-FITC intracellular distribution by

  3. Chemotherapeutic attack of hypoxic tumor cells by the bioreductive alkylating agent mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Keyes, S R; Heimbrook, D C; Fracasso, P M; Rockwell, S; Sligar, S G; Sartorelli, A C

    1985-01-01

    Since the cure of solid tumors is limited by the presence of cells with low oxygen contents, we have approached the development of treatment regimens and of new drugs for these tumors by investigating agents which are preferentially bioactivated under hypoxia. Major emphasis has been directed at studying the mode of action of the mitomycin antibiotics, as bioreductive alkylating agents. Using primarily the EMT6 mouse mammary carcinoma as a solid tumor model, we have found that mitomycin C and porfiromycin are preferentially toxic to cells with low oxygen contents. The mitomycin analog BMY-25282 is more toxic to hypoxic cells than are mitomycin C and porfiromycin; however, unlike these antibiotics, BMY-25282 is preferentially toxic to well-oxygenated cells. With these three mitomycins, we have observed a correlation between cytotoxicity to hypoxic cells, the rate of generation of reactive products, and the redox potentials of the drugs. Investigations of the enzymes in EMT6 cells that could possibly activate mitomycin C have revealed that cytochrome P-450 and xanthine oxidase are not present in measurable quantities and therefore are not responsible for activation of mitomycin C. Activities representative of NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and DT-diaphorase are present in these neoplastic cells. Comparison of these enzymatic activities in EMT6, CHO, and V79 cells with the rate of generation of reactive products under hypoxia shows a direct correlation between these two parameters, but there is no quantitative correlation between these two parameters and the amount of cytotoxicity. Use of purified NADPH-cytochrome c reductase and inhibitors of this enzyme demonstrated that NADPH-cytochrome c reductase can activate mitomycin C, but that it is probably not the only enzyme participating in this bioactivation in EMT6 cells. The DT-diaphorase inhibitor dicoumarol was employed to show that this enzyme is not involved in the activation of mitomycin C to a cytotoxic agent

  4. Effects of psoralens as anti-tumoral agents in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Panno, Maria Luisa; Giordano, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This review examines the biological properties of coumarins, widely distributed at the highest levels in the fruit, followed by the roots, stems and leaves, by considering their beneficial effects in the prevention of some diseases and as anti-cancer agents. These compounds are well known photosensitizing drugs which have been used as pharmaceuticals for a broad number of therapeutic applications requiring cell division inhibitors. Despite this, even in the absence of ultraviolet rays they are active. The current paper mainly focuses on the effects of psoralens on human breast cancer as they are able to influence many aspects of cell behavior, such as cell growth, survival and apoptosis. In addition, analytical and pharmacological data have demonstrated that psoralens antagonize some metabolizing enzymes, affect estrogen receptor stability and counteract cell invasiveness as well as cancer drug resistance. The scientific findings summarized highlight the pleiotropic functions of phytochemical drugs, given that recently their target signals and how these are modified in the cells have been identified. The encouraging results in this field suggest that multiple modulating strategies based on coumarin drugs in combination with canonical chemotherapeutic agents or radiotherapy could be a useful approach to address the treatment of many types of cancer. PMID:25114850

  5. Noninvasive MRI of β-cell function using a Zn2+-responsive contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Lubag, Angelo J M; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M; Burgess, Shawn C; Sherry, A Dean

    2011-11-01

    Elevation of postprandial glucose stimulates release of insulin from granules stored in pancreatic islet β-cells. We demonstrate here that divalent zinc ions coreleased with insulin from β-cells in response to high glucose are readily detected by MRI using the Zn(2+)-responsive T(1) agent, GdDOTA-diBPEN. Image contrast was significantly enhanced in the mouse pancreas after injection of a bolus of glucose followed by a low dose of the Zn(2+) sensor. Images of the pancreas were not enhanced by the agent in mice without addition of glucose to stimulate insulin release, nor were images enhanced in streptozotocin-treated mice with or without added glucose. These observations are consistent with MRI detection of Zn(2+) released from β-cells only during glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Images of mice fed a high-fat (60%) diet over a 12-wk period and subjected to this same imaging protocol showed a larger volume of contrast-enhanced pancreatic tissue, consistent with the expansion of pancreatic β-cell mass during fat accumulation and progression to type 2 diabetes. This MRI sensor offers the exciting potential for deep-tissue monitoring of β-cell function in vivo during development of type 2 diabetes or after implantation of islets in type I diabetic patients. PMID:22025712

  6. Dendrimer-curcumin conjugate: a water soluble and effective cytotoxic agent against breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Shawon; Saloum, Darin; Dolai, Sukanta; Sun, Chong; Averick, Saadyah; Raja, Krishnaswami; Fata, Jimmie E

    2013-12-01

    Curcumin, which is derived from the plant Curcuma longa, has received considerable attention as a possible anti-cancer agent. In cell culture, curcumin is capable of inducing apoptosis in cancer cells at concentrations that do not affect normal cells. One draw-back holding curcumin back from being an effective anti-cancer agent in humans is that it is almost completely insoluble in water and therefore has poor absorption and subsequently poor bioavailability. Here we have generated a number of curcumin derivatives (tetrahydro-curcumin, curcumin mono-carboxylic acid, curcumin mono-galactose, curcumin mono-alkyne and dendrimer-curcumin conjugate) to test whether any of them display both cytotoxicity and water solubility. Of those tested only dendrimer-curcumin conjugate exhibited both water solubility and cytotoxicity against SKBr3 and BT549 breast cancer cells. When compared to curcumin dissolved in DMSO, dendrimer-curcumin conjugate dissolved in water was significantly more effective in inducing cytotoxicity, as measured by the MTT assay and effectively induced cellular apoptosis measured by caspase-3 activation. Since dendrimer-curcumin conjugate is water soluble and capable of inducing potent cytotoxic effects on breast cancer cell lines, it may prove to be an effective anti-cancer therapy to be used in humans. PMID:23387971

  7. Suppression of STN1 enhances the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents in cancer cells by elevating DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing; Chai, Weihang

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage-inducing agents are among the most effective treatment regimens in clinical chemotherapy. However, drug resistance and severe side effects caused by these agents greatly limit their efficacy. Sensitizing malignant cells to chemotherapeutic agents has long been a goal of chemotherapy. In the present study, suppression of STN1, a gene important for safeguarding genome stability, potentiated the anticancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents in tumor cells. Using multiple cancer cells from a variety of origins, it was observed that downregulation of STN1 resulted in a significant decrease in the half maximal inhibitory concentration values of several conventional anticancer agents. When cells are treated with anticancer agents, STN1 suppression leads to a decline in colony formation and diminished anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore, it was additionally observed that STN1 knockdown augmented the levels of DNA damage caused by damage-inducing agents. The present study concluded that suppression of STN1 enhances the cytotoxicity of damage-inducing chemotherapeutic agents by increasing DNA damage in cancer cells. PMID:27446354

  8. Tumor Lysing Genetically Engineered T Cells Loaded with Multi-Modal Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A.; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles – Copper-64; SPION-64Cu). This can now be potentially used for 64Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR+SPIONpos T cells effectively target in vitro CD19+ lymphoma. PMID:24675806

  9. Tumor lysing genetically engineered T cells loaded with multi-modal imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2014-01-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-(64)Cu). This can now be potentially used for (64)Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR(+)SPION(pos) T cells effectively target in vitro CD19(+) lymphoma. PMID:24675806

  10. Molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapy for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC).

    PubMed

    Azoury, SaÏd C; Gilmore, Richard C; Shukla, Vivek

    2016-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most frequent tumors of the head and neck and often presents at an advanced-stage. Traditionally, treatment for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has included surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy depending on both the site and stage of disease. Although the treatment approach for local disease is often standardized, the management of recurrent and advanced disease is evolving. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HNSCC has led to numerous promising investigations and the push for the development of novel therapies. Similarly, over the past several decades, growing data supports the notion that an individual's immune system can be manipulated in such a way to help eradicate cancer. The success of immunotherapeutic agents such as interleukin therapy and immune checkpoint inhibitor blockade in cancer, particularly advanced-stage melanoma, has stimulated researchers to uncover similar success stories in HNSCC. Examples of immunotherapeutics that are being studied for the treatment of HNSCC include adoptive T-cell therapy, vaccines, and immune checkpoint inhibitor proteins (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, -PD-1, -PD-L1). Molecularly targeted agents of interest include inhibitors of transmembrane growth factor receptors, angiogenesis, and PI3K/AKT/mTOR and NOTCH signaling pathways. To date, cetuximab, an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, is the only targeted agent for HNSCC that was approved by the Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the basis that it improves overall survival when combined with chemotherapy or radiation. Herein, the authors provide an up-to-date review of immunotherapeutic and molecularly targeted agents for the treatment of HNSCC. PMID:27448787

  11. Identification of thiostrepton as a novel therapeutic agent that targets human colon cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ju, S-Y; Huang, C-YF; Huang, W-C; Su, Y

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that colorectal cancer stem cells (CRSCs) are largely responsible for the metastasis and relapse of colorectal cancer (CRC) after therapy. Hence, identifying new agents that specifically target CRSCs would help improve the effectiveness of current CRC therapies. To accelerate identification of agents targeting CRSCs, the Connectivity Map (CMap) approach was used. Among the top-ranked candidates, thiostrepton, a thiazole antibiotic, was selected for further investigation because of its known tumoricidal activity. Thiostrepton could selectively induce apoptosis in CRSC subpopulations in both parental HCT-15 and HT-29 human CRC lines as well as in EMT and chemoresistant clones derived from them. Further, we investigated its inhibitory effects on the sphere- and colony-forming capabilities of the aforementioned CRC lines. The in vitro inhibition of sphere and colony formation was associated with downregulation of various modulators of the stem cell phenotype. The combination of thiostrepton and oxaliplatin eradicated both CD44+ HCT-15 and HT-29 cells more efficiently than either drug alone. FoxM1, an oncogenic transcription factor, was identified as a critical positive modulator of stemness and as the main target of thiostrepton in the CRC lines. This is the first report showing the selective killing of CRSCs by thiostrepton, which has been proposed to be a promising anti-neoplastic agent. On the basis of its synergism with oxaliplatin in killing CRSCs in vitro, if this activity is confirmed in vivo, thiostrepton may be a promising agent to be used clinically in combination with current chemotherapies to improve the efficacy of these regimens. PMID:26136074

  12. Identification of thiostrepton as a novel therapeutic agent that targets human colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, S-Y; Huang, C-Y F; Huang, W-C; Su, Y

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that colorectal cancer stem cells (CRSCs) are largely responsible for the metastasis and relapse of colorectal cancer (CRC) after therapy. Hence, identifying new agents that specifically target CRSCs would help improve the effectiveness of current CRC therapies. To accelerate identification of agents targeting CRSCs, the Connectivity Map (CMap) approach was used. Among the top-ranked candidates, thiostrepton, a thiazole antibiotic, was selected for further investigation because of its known tumoricidal activity. Thiostrepton could selectively induce apoptosis in CRSC subpopulations in both parental HCT-15 and HT-29 human CRC lines as well as in EMT and chemoresistant clones derived from them. Further, we investigated its inhibitory effects on the sphere- and colony-forming capabilities of the aforementioned CRC lines. The in vitro inhibition of sphere and colony formation was associated with downregulation of various modulators of the stem cell phenotype. The combination of thiostrepton and oxaliplatin eradicated both CD44(+) HCT-15 and HT-29 cells more efficiently than either drug alone. FoxM1, an oncogenic transcription factor, was identified as a critical positive modulator of stemness and as the main target of thiostrepton in the CRC lines. This is the first report showing the selective killing of CRSCs by thiostrepton, which has been proposed to be a promising anti-neoplastic agent. On the basis of its synergism with oxaliplatin in killing CRSCs in vitro, if this activity is confirmed in vivo, thiostrepton may be a promising agent to be used clinically in combination with current chemotherapies to improve the efficacy of these regimens. PMID:26136074

  13. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Qin; Tang, Ying; Fu, Rao; Meng, Qiu-Hua; Zhou, Xue; Ling, Ze-Min; Cheng, Xiao; Tian, Su-Wei; Wang, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xue-Guo; Zhou, Li-Hua

    2015-07-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats. PMID:25816076

  14. Efficient labeling in vitro with non-ionic gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent and fluorescent transfection agent in bone marrow stromal cells of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    LI, YING-QIN; TANG, YING; FU, RAO; MENG, QIU-HUA; ZHOU, XUE; LING, ZE-MIN; CHENG, XIAO; TIAN, SU-WEI; WANG, GUO-JIE; LIU, XUE-GUO; ZHOU, LI-HUA

    2015-01-01

    Although studies have been undertaken on gadolinium labeling-based molecular imaging in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the use of non-ionic gadolinium in the tracking of stem cells remains uncommon. To investigate the efficiency in tracking of stem cells with non-ionic gadolinium as an MRI contrast agent, a rhodamine-conjugated fluorescent reagent was used to label bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of neonatal rats in vitro, and MRI scanning was undertaken. The fluorescent-conjugated cell uptake reagents were able to deliver gadodiamide into BMSCs, and cell uptake was verified using flow cytometry. In addition, the labeled stem cells with paramagnetic contrast medium remained detectable by an MRI monitor for a minimum of 28 days. The present study suggested that this method can be applied efficiently and safely for the labeling and tracking of bone marrow stromal cells in neonatal rats. PMID:25816076

  15. Enhanced load-carrying capacity of hairy surfaces floating on water

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yahui; Yuan, Huijing; Su, Weidong; Shi, Yipeng; Duan, Huiling

    2014-01-01

    Water repellency of hairy surfaces depends on the geometric arrangement of these hairs and enables different applications in both nature and engineering. We investigate the mechanism and optimization of a hairy surface floating on water to obtain its maximum load-carrying capacity by the free energy and force analyses. It is demonstrated that there is an optimum cylinder spacing, as a result of the compromise between the vertical capillary force and the gravity, so that the hairy surface has both high load-carrying capacity and mechanical stability. Our analysis makes it clear that the setae on water striders' legs or some insects' wings are in such an optimized geometry. Moreover, it is shown that surface hydrophobicity can further increase the capacity of a hairy surface with thick cylinders, while the influence is negligible when the cylinders are thin. PMID:24808757

  16. Phenotypic and molecular evaluation of cotton hairy roots as a model system for studying nematode resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cellular mechanisms that mediate resistance of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium spp.) to root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) and reniform nematode (Rotylenchulus reniformis) are poorly understood. Here, Agrobacterium rhizogenes-induced hairy roots were investigated as a possible research...

  17. Enhanced load-carrying capacity of hairy surfaces floating on water.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yahui; Yuan, Huijing; Su, Weidong; Shi, Yipeng; Duan, Huiling

    2014-05-01

    Water repellency of hairy surfaces depends on the geometric arrangement of these hairs and enables different applications in both nature and engineering. We investigate the mechanism and optimization of a hairy surface floating on water to obtain its maximum load-carrying capacity by the free energy and force analyses. It is demonstrated that there is an optimum cylinder spacing, as a result of the compromise between the vertical capillary force and the gravity, so that the hairy surface has both high load-carrying capacity and mechanical stability. Our analysis makes it clear that the setae on water striders' legs or some insects' wings are in such an optimized geometry. Moreover, it is shown that surface hydrophobicity can further increase the capacity of a hairy surface with thick cylinders, while the influence is negligible when the cylinders are thin. PMID:24808757

  18. Production of Triterpenoid Sapogenins in Hairy Root Cultures of Silene vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Reed, Darwin W; Covello, Patrick S

    2015-11-01

    Silene vulgaris (Moench) Garcke (Caryophyllaceae) is widely distributed in North America and contains bioactive oleanane-type saponins. In order to investigate in vitro production of triterpenoid saponins, hairy root cultures of S. vulgaris were established by infecting leaf explants with five strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes (LBA9402, R1000, A4, 13333, and 15834). The A. rhizogenes strain LBA9402 had an infection of 100% frequency and induced the most hairy roots per plant. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-induced changes in triterpenoid saponins in S. vulgaris hairy roots were analyzed. Accumulation of segetalic acid and gypsogenic acid after MeJA treatment was 5-and 2-fold higher, respectively, than that of control root. We suggest that hairy root cultures of S. vulgaris could be an important alternative approach to the production of saponins. PMID:26749827

  19. Distinct cathepsins control necrotic cell death mediated by pyroptosis inducers and lysosome-destabilizing agents.

    PubMed

    Brojatsch, Jürgen; Lima, Heriberto; Palliser, Deborah; Jacobson, Lee S; Muehlbauer, Stefan M; Furtado, Raquel; Goldman, David L; Lisanti, Michael P; Chandran, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Necrotic cell death triggers a range of biological responses including a strong adaptive immune response, yet we know little about the cellular pathways that control necrotic cell death. Inhibitor studies suggest that proteases, and in particular cathepsins, drive necrotic cell death. The cathepsin B-selective inhibitor CA-074-Me blocks all forms of programmed necrosis by an unknown mechanism. We found that cathepsin B deficiency does not prevent induction of pyroptosis and lysosome-mediated necrosis suggesting that CA-074-Me blocks necrotic cell death by targeting cathepsins other than cathepsin B. A single cathepsin, cathepsin C, drives necrotic cell death mediated by the lysosome-destabilizing agent Leu-Leu-OMe (LLOMe). Here we present evidence that cathepsin C-deficiency and CA-074-Me block LLOMe killing in a distinct and cell type-specific fashion. Cathepsin C-deficiency and CA-074-Me block LLOMe killing of all myeloid cells, except for neutrophils. Cathepsin C-deficiency, but not CA-074-Me, blocks LLOMe killing of neutrophils suggesting that CA-074-Me does not target cathepsin C directly, consistent with inhibitor studies using recombinant cathepsin C. Unlike other cathepsins, cathepsin C lacks endoproteolytic activity, and requires activation by other lysosomal proteases, such as cathepsin D. Consistent with this theory, we found that lysosomotropic agents and cathepsin D downregulation by siRNA block LLOMe-mediated necrosis. Our findings indicate that a proteolytic cascade, involving cathepsins C and D, controls LLOMe-mediated necrosis. In contrast, cathepsins C and D were not required for pyroptotic cell death suggesting that distinct cathepsins control pyroptosis and lysosome-mediated necrosis. PMID:25830414

  20. Therapeutic and toxicologic evaluation of anti-lipogenic agents in cancer cells compared with non-neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Perinkulam Ravi; Vandhana, Suryanarayanan; Jayanthi, Udayakumar; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2012-06-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN), a multi-enzyme complex, is involved in lipid biosynthesis. FASN is over-expressed in different types of cancers and is being widely investigated for its role in cancer progression, diagnosis and therapy. Here, three inhibitors targeting different domains of FASN--cerulenin, triclosan and orlistat--were evaluated for their anti-proliferative efficacy in ocular cancer, retinoblastoma (RB) cells and their toxicity (if any) in normal cells. FASN inhibitors were tested in cultured retinoblastoma Y79 cells, normal fibroblast (3T3) and Müller glial (MIOM1) cells. Cell viability was determined by MTT-based assay, and IC(50) (50% inhibitory concentration) of the FASN inhibitors was calculated in neoplastic and non-neoplastic cells. The IC(50) after 48 and 96 hr of incubation with the three anti-FASN agents showed that cerulenin, triclosan and orlistat inhibited retinoblastoma cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The cancer cells exhibited differential dose- and time-dependent response/sensitivities to cerulenin, triclosan and orlistat. The 48-hr neoplastic IC(50) dosages were, however, not toxic to the normal cells. These findings were confirmed by phase-contrast microscopic assessment of cell morphology. Therapeutic index (TI) was calculated as a ratio of the IC(50) normal cells, to the IC(50) neoplastic cells. Relative to normal MIOM1 cells, TI was 9.18 for cerulenin, while 5.32 for triclosan and 1.72 for orlistat. The TI computed relative to 3T3 cells was 28.64, 7.10 and 2.58 for cerulenin, triclosan and orlistat, respectively. DNA fragmentation analysis suggests that FASN inhibitors induced apoptotic DNA damage in retinoblastoma cells. Thus, FASN inhibition can be an effective strategy in retinoblastoma therapy. PMID:22151915

  1. Loss of Atrx sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents through p53-mediated death pathways.

    PubMed

    Conte, Damiano; Huh, Michael; Goodall, Emma; Delorme, Marilyne; Parks, Robin J; Picketts, David J

    2012-01-01

    Prevalent cell death in forebrain- and Sertoli cell-specific Atrx knockout mice suggest that Atrx is important for cell survival. However, conditional ablation in other tissues is not associated with increased death indicating that diverse cell types respond differently to the loss of this chromatin remodeling protein. Here, primary macrophages isolated from Atrx(f/f) mice were infected with adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase or β-galactosidase, and assayed for cell survival under different experimental conditions. Macrophages survive without Atrx but undergo rapid apoptosis upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation suggesting that chromatin reorganization in response to external stimuli is compromised. Using this system we next tested the effect of different apoptotic stimuli on cell survival. We observed that survival of Atrx-null cells were similar to wild type cells in response to serum withdrawal, anti-Fas antibody, C2 ceramide or dexamethasone treatment but were more sensitive to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Cell survival could be rescued by re-introducing Atrx or by removal of p53 demonstrating the cell autonomous nature of the effect and its p53-dependence. Finally, we demonstrate that multiple primary cell types (myoblasts, embryonic fibroblasts and neurospheres) were sensitive to 5-FU, cisplatin, and UV light treatment. Together, our results suggest that cells lacking Atrx are more sensitive to DNA damaging agents and that this may result in enhanced death during development when cells are at their proliferative peak. Moreover, it identifies potential treatment options for cancers associated with ATRX mutations, including glioblastoma and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:23284920

  2. Isoflavonoid accumulation in soybean hairy roots upon treatment with Fusarium solani.

    PubMed

    Lozovaya, Vera V; Lygin, Anatoliy V; Zernova, Olga V; Li, Shuxian; Hartman, Glen L; Widholm, Jack M

    2004-01-01

    Hairy roots were initiated from two soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] genotypes with different susceptibility (susceptible 'Spencer' and partially resistant 'PI567.374') to the disease sudden death syndrome (SDS) caused by the soil-borne fungal pathogen Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (FSG) to study the role of isoflavonoids in the plant response to FSG infection. Hairy root cultures obtained by transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes allows normal root growth that can be visually monitored. The principal isoflavones (genistin, daidzin, glycitin and their malonyl conjugates and aglycones) and also isoflavonoid phytoalexins (coumestrol and glyceollin) were measured by HPLC in extracts of the FSG-inoculated and non-inoculated hairy roots. FSG mycelia grew more slowly on inoculated PI567.374 hairy roots than on Spencer hairy roots. The glyceollin content was higher in FSG-inoculated PI567.374 hairy roots than in Spencer hairy roots even though the glyceollin precursor, the isoflavone daidzein, was higher in Spencer. The de novo synthesis of isoflavones and glyceollin was confirmed by [(14)C]Phe incorporation into glyceollin, which was higher both in the FSG-inoculated roots and surrounding medium of the cv. PI567.374 than that of Spencer. Glyceollin was the most inhibitory to FSG growth among eight isoflavonoids tested. The levels of coumestrol, a putative phytoalexin, did not change upon FSG inoculation. The defense response was also elicited by FSG culture filtrates in hairy roots grown in liquid culture. The data obtained indicate that the ability of soybean roots to rapidly produce sufficient amounts of glyceollin in response to FSG infection might be important in providing partial resistance to this fungus. PMID:15331097

  3. Characterisation of Mesothelioma-Initiating Cells and Their Susceptibility to Anti-Cancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Pasdar, Elham Alizadeh; Smits, Michael; Stapelberg, Michael; Bajzikova, Martina; Stantic, Marina; Goodwin, Jacob; Yan, Bing; Stursa, Jan; Kovarova, Jaromira; Sachaphibulkij, Karishma; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Sobol, Margaryta; Filimonenko, Anatoly; Tomasetti, Marco; Zobalova, Renata; Hozak, Pavel; Dong, Lan-Feng; Neuzil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive type of tumour causing high mortality. One reason for this paradigm may be the existence of a subpopulation of tumour-initiating cells (TICs) that endow MM with drug resistance and recurrence. The objective of this study was to identify and characterise a TIC subpopulation in MM cells, using spheroid cultures, mesospheres, as a model of MM TICs. Mesospheres, typified by the stemness markers CD24, ABCG2 and OCT4, initiated tumours in immunodeficient mice more efficiently than adherent cells. CD24 knock-down cells lost the sphere-forming capacity and featured lower tumorigenicity. Upon serial transplantation, mesospheres were gradually more efficiently tumrigenic with increased level of stem cell markers. We also show that mesospheres feature mitochondrial and metabolic properties similar to those of normal and cancer stem cells. Finally, we show that mesothelioma-initiating cells are highly susceptible to mitochondrially targeted vitamin E succinate. This study documents that mesospheres can be used as a plausible model of mesothelioma-initiating cells and that they can be utilised in the search for efficient agents against MM. PMID:25932953

  4. Phytochelatin homologs induced in hairy roots of horseradish.

    PubMed

    Kubota, H; Sato, K; Yamada, T; Maitani, T

    2000-01-01

    When exposed to excess heavy metals, plants induce phytochelatins and related peptides (all designated as PCAs). Thus, when hairy roots of horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) were exposed for 3 days to cadmium (1 mM) along with reduced glutathione (2 mM), PCA induction occurred. Moreover, a new family of thiol peptides was detected as well as the previously known PCAs, as revealed by postcolumn-derivatization HPLC. Two were isolated and their structures were identified as (gamma-Glu-Cys)n-Gln (n = 3 and 4) by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometer spectra, this being confirmed by chemical synthesis of the peptides. These new analogs constitute the sixth PCA family identified to date. PMID:10680177

  5. A Novel Microtubule-Disrupting Agent Induces Endoplasmic Reticular Stress-Mediated Cell Death in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chun-Te; Chang, Yu-Jia; Yang, Li-Xi; Wei, Po-Li; Liu, Tsan-Zon; Liu, Jun-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Here, we present evidence of a novel microtubule-disrupting agent, N-deacetyl-N-(chromone-2-carbonyl)-thiocolchicine (TCD), exhibiting potent antitumor activity (with IC50 values in the nanomolar range) against hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. Cell cycle analysis revealed that TCD induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest in a dose- and time-dependent manner in both Hep-J5 and Mahlavu HCC cell lines. TCD also induced a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and caused DNA damage. Mechanistically, TCD activated protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticular kinase and several transcription factors, including activating transcription factor (ATF) 6, ATF4, ATF3, and the CCAAT-enhancer binding protein homologous protein. These data clearly demonstrate that the antitumor activity of TCD is mechanistically linked to its capacity to trigger both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic cell death via endoplasmic reticular stress pathway. The potent antitumor activity of TCD was similarly demonstrated in a hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft model, where 5 and 10 mg/kg doses of TCD significantly arrested Hep-J5 and Mahlavu tumor growth. Our finding suggests that TCD is a promising therapeutic agent against hepatocellular carcinoma; further translational assessment of its clinical usage is warranted. PMID:26355599

  6. Toxicity and in vitro activity of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents in primary CNS cells.

    PubMed

    Gray, Lachlan R; On, Hung; Roberts, Emma; Lu, Hao K; Moso, Michael A; Raison, Jacqueline A; Papaioannou, Catherine; Cheng, Wan-Jung; Ellett, Anne M; Jacobson, Jonathan C; Purcell, Damian F J; Wesselingh, Steve L; Gorry, Paul R; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J

    2016-08-01

    Despite the success of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV persists in long lived latently infected cells in the blood and tissue, and treatment is required lifelong. Recent clinical studies have trialed latency-reversing agents (LRA) as a method to eliminate latently infected cells; however, the effects of LRA on the central nervous system (CNS), a well-known site of virus persistence on cART, are unknown. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity and potency of a panel of commonly used and well-known LRA (panobinostat, romidepsin, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, hexamethylene bisacetamide [HMBA], and JQ-1) in primary fetal astrocytes (PFA) as well as monocyte-derived macrophages as a cellular model for brain perivascular macrophages. We show that most LRA are non-toxic in these cells at therapeutic concentrations. Additionally, romidepsin, JQ-1, and panobinostat were the most potent at inducing viral transcription, with greater magnitude observed in PFA. In contrast, vorinostat, chaetocin, disulfiram, and HMBA all demonstrated little or no induction of viral transcription. Together, these data suggest that some LRA could potentially activate transcription in latently infected cells in the CNS. We recommend that future trials of LRA also examine the effects of these agents on the CNS via examination of cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:26727904

  7. Delivery of optical contrast agents using Triton-X100, part 1: reversible permeabilization of live cells for intracellular labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Anne L.; Adler-Storthz, Karen; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2009-03-01

    Effective delivery of optical contrast agents into live cells remains a significant challenge. We sought to determine whether Triton-X100, a detergent commonly used for membrane isolation and protein purification, could be used to effectively and reversibly permeabilize live cells for delivery of targeted optical contrast agents. Although Triton-X100 is widely recognized as a good cell permeabilization agent, no systematic study has evaluated the efficiency, reproducibility, and reversibility of Triton-X100-mediated permeabilization in live mammalian cells. We report a series of studies to characterize macromolecule delivery in cells following Triton-X100 treatment. Using this approach, we demonstrate that molecules ranging from 1 to 150 kDa in molecular weight can be reproducibly delivered into live cells by controlling the moles of Triton-X100 relative to the number of cells to be treated. When Triton-X100 is administered at or near the minimum effective concentration, cell permeabilization is generally reversed within 24 h, and treated cells continue to proliferate and show metabolic activity during the restoration of membrane integrity. We conclude that Triton-X100 is a promising permeabilization agent for efficient and reproducible delivery of optical contrast agents into live mammalian cells.

  8. Metabolomic Analysis and Phenylpropanoid Biosynthesis in Hairy Root Culture of Tartary Buckwheat Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohua; Bok Kim, Yeon; Romij Uddin, Md; Kim, Sun Ju; Suzuki, Tatsuro; Park, Nam Il; Park, Sang Un

    2013-01-01

    Buckwheat, Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn., is an important medicinal plant, which contains several phenolic compounds, including one of the highest content of rutin, a phenolic compound with anti-inflammatory properties. An experiment was conducted to investigate the level of expression of various genes in the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway to analyze in vitro production of anthocyanin and phenolic compounds from hairy root cultures derived from 2 cultivars of tartary buckwheat (Hokkai T8 and T10). A total of 47 metabolites were identified by gas chromatography–time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS) and subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) in order to fully distinguish between Hokkai T8 and T10 hairy roots. The expression levels of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway genes, through qRT-PCR, showed higher expression for almost all the genes in T10 than T8 hairy root except for FtF3’H-2 and FtFLS-2. Rutin, quercetin, gallic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and 2 anthocyanin compounds were identified in Hokkai T8 and T10 hairy roots. The concentration of rutin and anthocyanin in Hokkai T10 hairy roots of tartary buckwheat was several-fold higher compared with that obtained from Hokkai T8 hairy root. This study provides useful information on the molecular and physiological dynamic processes that are correlated with phenylpropanoid biosynthetic gene expression and phenolic compound content in F. tataricum species. PMID:23799007

  9. Magnetic red blood cells as new contrast agents for MRI applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Antonella; Sfara, Carla; Manuali, Elisabetta; Salamida, Sonia; Louin, Gaëlle; Magnani, Mauro

    2013-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have been produced and used successfully as potent contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). However, a significant challenge associated with the biological application of SPIO-tracer agents is their behavior in vivo since their efficacy is often compromised due to a rapid recognition and clearance by the reticuloendothelial system (RES) which limits the applicability of such compounds in MRI. The advances in nanotechnology and molecular cell biology had lead to improve stability and biocompatibility of these nanoparticles, but despite a number of efforts, the SPIO half-life in blood circulation is very short. In this contest, the potential of red blood cells (RBCs) loaded with SPIO nanoparticles as a tracer material for MRI has been investigated in order to realize a blood pool tracer with longer blood retention time. Previously, we have proposed the encapsulation into RBCs of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles carboxydextran coated, such as Resovist contrast agent. This approach led to a nanoparticle reduction in uptake by the RES, increasing the blood circulation half-life of nanoparticles. Recently, the loading procedure was applied to a new contrast agent, the P904 ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles coated by hydrophilic derivatives of glucose, recently developed by Guerbet Laboratories. The results evidenced that this nanomaterial can be efficiently loaded into human and murine RBCs at concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 12 mM Fe. In vivo experiments performed in mice have showed an increased survival in the mouse vascular system of P904 encapsulated into RBCs respect to free P904 sample intravenously injected at the equivalent amounts.

  10. Whole cell-based surface plasmon resonance measurement to assess binding of anti-TNF agents to transmembrane target.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Takeharu; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Toyoda, Hiromu

    2016-09-01

    We developed a technique for the measurement of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to detect interactions of anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents with transmembrane TNF-α (mTNF-α) on living whole cells. The injection of a suspension of mTNF-α expressing Jurkat cells, used as an analyte, gave a clear binding response to anti-TNF agents, such as etanercept, infliximab and adalimumab, immobilized on sensorchip. The binding response of the analyte cells increased in a concentration-dependent manner and was competitively reduced by adding soluble TNF receptors to the analyte cell suspension. Treatment of analyte cells with free anti-TNF agent before injection reduced the binding response between the analyte cells and immobilized-etanercept on sensorchip, and the inhibitory effect of free anti-TNF agent was concordant with the affinity of anti-TNF agent for soluble TNF-α. These findings indicate that the SPR response arises from specific binding between anti-TNF agent and its target on cell membrane. PMID:27349512

  11. Cordycepin, a Natural Antineoplastic Agent, Induces Apoptosis of Breast Cancer Cells via Caspase-dependent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Di; Zhang, Yongfeng; Lu, Jiahui; Wang, Yang; Wang, Junyue; Meng, Qingfan; Lee, Robert J; Wang, Di; Teng, Lesheng

    2016-01-01

    Cordycepin, a major compound separated from Cordyceps sinensis, is known as a potential novel candidate for cancer therapy. Breast cancer, the most typical cancer diagnosed among women, remains a global health problem. In this study, the anti-breast cancer property of cordycepin and its underlying mechanisms was investigated. The direct effects of cordycepin on breast cancer cells both in in vitro and in vivo experiments were evaluated. Cordycepin exerted cytotoxicity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells confirmed by reduced cell viability, inhibition of cell proliferation, enhanced lactate dehydrogenase release and reactive oxygen species accumulation, induced mitochondrial dysfunction and nuclear apoptosis in human breast cancer cells. Cordycepin increased the activation of pro-apoptotic proteins, including caspase-8, caspase-9, caspase-3 and Bax, and suppressed the expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). The inhibition on MCF-7-xenografted tumor growth in nude mice further confirmed cordycepin's anti-breast cancer effect. These aforementioned results reveal that cordycepin induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells via caspase-dependent pathways. The data shed light on the possibility of cordycepin being a safe agent for breast cancer treatment. PMID:26996021

  12. Antibacterial agent triclosan suppresses RBL-2H3 mast cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Rachel K.; Hutchinson, Lee M.; Burpee, Benjamin T.; Tupper, Emily J.; Pelletier, Jonathan H.; Kormendy, Zsolt; Hopke, Alex R.; Malay, Ethan T.; Evans, Brieana L.; Velez, Alejandro; Gosse, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antibacterial agent, which has been shown previously to alleviate human allergic skin disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that the mechanism of this action of triclosan is, in part, due to effects on mast cell function. Mast cells play important roles in allergy, asthma, parasite defense, and carcinogenesis. In response to various stimuli, mast cells degranulate, releasing allergic mediators such as histamine. In order to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of triclosan on mast cells, we monitored the level of degranulation in a mast cell model, rat basophilic leukemia cells, clone 2H3. Having functional homology to human mast cells, as well as a very well defined signaling pathway leading to degranulation, this cell line has been widely used to gain insight into mast-cell driven allergic disorders in humans. Using a fluorescent microplate assay, we determined that triclosan strongly dampened the release of granules from activated rat mast cells starting at 2 μM treatment, with dose-responsive suppression through 30 μM. These concentrations were found to be non-cytotoxic. The inhibition was found to persist when early signaling events (such as IgE receptor aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation) were bypassed by using calcium ionophore stimulation, indicating that the target for triclosan in this pathway is likely downstream of the calcium signaling event. Triclosan also strongly suppressed F-actin remodeling and cell membrane ruffling, a physiological process that accompanies degranulation. Our finding that triclosan inhibits mast cell function may explain the clinical data mentioned above and supports the use of triclosan or a mechanistically similar compound as a topical treatment for allergic skin disease, such as eczema. -- Highlights: ►The effects of triclosan on mast cell function using a murine mast cell model. ►Triclosan strongly inhibits degranulation of mast cells.

  13. Inhibition of cell adhesion by anti–P-selectin aptamer: a new potential therapeutic agent for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutsaeva, Diana R.; Parkerson, James B.; Yerigenahally, Shobha D.; Kurz, Jeffrey C.; Schaub, Robert G.; Ikuta, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    Adhesive interactions between circulating sickle red blood cells (RBCs), leukocytes, and endothelial cells are major pathophysiologic events in sickle cell disease (SCD). To develop new therapeutics that efficiently inhibit adhesive interactions, we generated an anti–P-selectin aptamer and examined its effects on cell adhesion using knockout-transgenic SCD model mice. Aptamers, single-stranded oligonucleotides that bind molecular targets with high affinity and specificity, are emerging as new therapeutics for cardiovascular and hematologic disorders. In vitro studies found that the anti–P-selectin aptamer exhibits high specificity to mouse P-selectin but not other selectins. SCD mice were injected with the anti–P-selectin aptamer, and cell adhesion was observed under hypoxia. The anti–P-selectin aptamer inhibited the adhesion of sickle RBCs and leukocytes to endothelial cells by 90% and 80%, respectively. The anti–P-selectin aptamer also increased microvascular flow velocities and reduced the leukocyte rolling flux. SCD mice treated with the anti–P-selectin aptamer demonstrated a reduced mortality rate associated with the experimental procedures compared with control mice. These results demonstrate that anti–P-selectin aptamer efficiently inhibits the adhesion of both sickle RBCs and leukocytes to endothelial cells in SCD model mice, suggesting a critical role for P-selectin in cell adhesion. Anti–P-selectin aptamer may be useful as a novel therapeutic agent for SCD. PMID:20926770

  14. Collateral Chemoresistance to Anti-Microtubule Agents in a Lung Cancer Cell Line with Acquired Resistance to Erlotinib

    PubMed Central

    Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Suda, Kenichi; Sato, Katsuaki; Tomida, Shuta; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Various alterations underlying acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) have been described. Although treatment strategies specific for these mechanisms are under development, cytotoxic agents are currently employed to treat many patients following failure of EGFR-TKIs. However, the effect of TKI resistance on sensitivity to these cytotoxic agents is mostly unclear. This study investigated the sensitivity of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells to five cytotoxic agents using an in vitro EGFR-TKI-resistant model. Four erlotinib-sensitive lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and their resistant derivatives were tested. Of the resistant cell lines, all but one showed a similar sensitivity to the tested drugs as their parental cells. HCC4006ER cells with epithelial mesenchymal transition features acquired resistance to the three microtubule-targeting agents, docetaxel, paclitaxel and vinorelbine, but not to cisplatin and gemcitabine. Gene expression array and immunoblotting demonstrated that ATP-binding cassette subfamily B, member 1 (ABCB1) was up-regulated in HCC4006ER cells. ABCB1 knockdown by siRNA partially restored sensitivity to the anti-microtubule agents but not to erlotinib. Moreover, the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat sensitized HCC4006ER cells to anti-microtubule agents through ABCB1 suppression. Our study indicates that sensitivity of tumor cells to cytotoxic agents in general does not change before and after failure of EGFR-TKIs. However, we describe that two different molecular alterations confer acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs and cytotoxic agents, respectively. This phenomenon should be kept in mind in selection of subsequent therapy after failure of EGFR-TKIs. PMID:25875914

  15. Collateral chemoresistance to anti-microtubule agents in a lung cancer cell line with acquired resistance to erlotinib.

    PubMed

    Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Suda, Kenichi; Sato, Katsuaki; Tomida, Shuta; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Various alterations underlying acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) have been described. Although treatment strategies specific for these mechanisms are under development, cytotoxic agents are currently employed to treat many patients following failure of EGFR-TKIs. However, the effect of TKI resistance on sensitivity to these cytotoxic agents is mostly unclear. This study investigated the sensitivity of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells to five cytotoxic agents using an in vitro EGFR-TKI-resistant model. Four erlotinib-sensitive lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and their resistant derivatives were tested. Of the resistant cell lines, all but one showed a similar sensitivity to the tested drugs as their parental cells. HCC4006ER cells with epithelial mesenchymal transition features acquired resistance to the three microtubule-targeting agents, docetaxel, paclitaxel and vinorelbine, but not to cisplatin and gemcitabine. Gene expression array and immunoblotting demonstrated that ATP-binding cassette subfamily B, member 1 (ABCB1) was up-regulated in HCC4006ER cells. ABCB1 knockdown by siRNA partially restored sensitivity to the anti-microtubule agents but not to erlotinib. Moreover, the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat sensitized HCC4006ER cells to anti-microtubule agents through ABCB1 suppression. Our study indicates that sensitivity of tumor cells to cytotoxic agents in general does not change before and after failure of EGFR-TKIs. However, we describe that two different molecular alterations confer acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs and cytotoxic agents, respectively. This phenomenon should be kept in mind in selection of subsequent therapy after failure of EGFR-TKIs. PMID:25875914

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of Strychnos alkaloids as MDR reversal agents for cancer cell eradication.

    PubMed

    Munagala, Surendrachary; Sirasani, Gopal; Kokkonda, Praveen; Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia; Lu, Peihua; Sharom, Frances J; Chaudhury, Sidhartha; Abdulhameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Tawa, Gregory; Wallqvist, Anders; Martinez, Rogelio; Childers, Wayne; Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Krynetskiy, Evgeny; Andrade, Rodrigo B

    2014-02-01

    Natural products represent the fourth generation of multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal agents that resensitize MDR cancer cells overexpressing P-glycoprotein (Pgp) to cytotoxic agents. We have developed an effective synthetic route to prepare various Strychnos alkaloids and their derivatives. Molecular modeling of these alkaloids docked to a homology model of Pgp was employed to optimize ligand-protein interactions and design analogues with increased affinity to Pgp. Moreover, the compounds were evaluated for their (1) binding affinity to Pgp by fluorescence quenching, and (2) MDR reversal activity using a panel of in vitro and cell-based assays and compared to verapamil, a known inhibitor of Pgp activity. Compound 7 revealed the highest affinity to Pgp of all Strychnos congeners (Kd=4.4μM), the strongest inhibition of Pgp ATPase activity, and the strongest MDR reversal effect in two Pgp-expressing cell lines. Altogether, our findings suggest the clinical potential of these synthesized compounds as viable Pgp modulators justifies further investigation. PMID:24405813

  17. The role of multi-agent systems in improving performance of manufacturing robotized cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sękala, A.; Ćwikła, G.; Kost, G.

    2015-11-01

    Present market conditions causes that modern control systems of robotized manufacturing cells should be characterized by the much greater degree of flexibility, selforganization and, above all, adaptability to emerging outer excitations. The phenomenon of information distribution is one of the most important features of modern control systems. In the paper is presented the approach, based on application of multi-agent systems, for supporting the operation of robotized manufacturing cells. The aim of this approach is to obtain the flexible response to outer excitations and preventing situations that might cause the delay of the production process. The presented paper includes description of the concept of an informatics system designed for controlling the work of production systems, including work cells. Such systems could operate independently if it would be equipped with the selforganization mechanism. It is possible in the case of the proposed multi-agent system. The implementation of the presented concept will follow the present analysis of the described concept. The advantage of the proposed concept is its hierarchical depiction that allows integrating different utilized informatics tools in one complex system. It allows preparing the final computer program.

  18. Desmoplastic small round-cell tumor: an adult with previous exposure to agent orange.

    PubMed

    Baz, Walid; El-Soueidi, Raymond; Nakhl, Fadi; Aoun, Nelly; Chin, Nena; Dhar, Meeko

    2010-06-01

    Desmoplastic small round-cell tumor is an uncommon, highly aggressive tumor with a predilection for pediatric age groups and young adults. It is very unusual in the elderly population. Although Agent Orange has been associated with soft-tissue sarcoma, an association with desmoplastic small round-cell tumor has not been reported. A 52-year-old male presented with abdominal distention, dyspnea, and a 9 kg weight loss. Prior history was significant for hepatitis C and diabetes. He was a Vietnam veteran and he admitted being exposed to Agent Orange. On physical examination, the abdomen was distended and tense. Computed tomography scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis demonstrated extensive mediastinal and retroperitoneal adenopathy, diffuse omental masses and extensive pleural, intra-abdominal and pelvic ascites. Omental core needle biopsy was consistent with desmoplastic small round-cell tumor based on morphology and immunohistochemistry. He responded poorly to chemotherapy with high-dose cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and vincristine and died 5 months after presentation secondary to neutropenic sepsis despite G-CSF support and antibiotics. PMID:20382635

  19. Thiolated-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine protected silver nanoparticles as novel photo-induced cell-killing agents.

    PubMed

    Sangsuwan, Arunee; Kawasaki, Hideya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have several medical applications as antimicrobial agents such as in drug delivery and cancer therapy. However, AgNPs are of limited use because of their toxicity, which may damage the surrounding healthy tissue. In this study, thiolated-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC-SH) protected silver nanoparticles (MPC-AgNPs) are prepared as cell-killing agents under UV irradiation. MPC-AgNPs are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and UV-visible spectrophotometry. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of MPC-AgNPs is observed at 404nm, and the average diameter of the particles is determined at 13.4±2.2nm through transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and at 18.4nm (PDI=0.18) through dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cell viability in contact with MPC-AgNPs is relatively high, and MPC-AgNPs also exhibit a cell-killing effect under UV irradiation. PMID:26752209

  20. Effects and treatment of sarcoptic mange in southern hairy-nosed wombats (Lasiorhinus latifrons).

    PubMed

    Ruykys, Laura; Breed, Bill; Schultz, David; Taggart, David

    2013-04-01

    We examined the clinical and cellular effects of sarcoptic mange on southern hairy-nosed wombats (SHNW, Lasiorhinus latifrons) and the effectiveness of a single dose of ivermectin as a treatment for captive and wild animals. Wambats were caught at three sites in South Australia between April and August 2005 and blood and skin samples were collected. Hematology, biochemistry, and protein electrophoresis reference intervals were determined for healthy and diseased SHNW. Diseased SHNW had significantly higher white blood cell counts, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and total protein but lower red blood cell counts, hemoglobin, hematocrit, and creatinine. Microscopic investigation indicated substantial hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and fluid infiltration into the dermis and epidermis of diseased animals. Conclusions on the efficacy of a single dose of ivermectin were limited by low sample size (n=5, two captive and three wild SHNW) and are preliminary. However, ivermectin effectively treated mild, but not severe, mange in wild SHNW and severe mange in captive animals. This study has implications for the conservation and management of SHNW and the broader Vombatidae family. PMID:23568906

  1. Cell permeable vanX inhibitors as vancomycin re-sensitizing agents.

    PubMed

    Muthyala, Ramaiah; Rastogi, Namrata; Shin, Woo Shik; Peterson, Marnie L; Sham, Yuk Yin

    2014-06-01

    VanX is an induced zinc metallo d-Ala-d-Ala dipeptidase involved in the viable remodeling of bacterial cell wall that is essential for the development of VREF. Here we report two cyclic thiohydroxamic acid-based peptide analogs that were designed, synthesized and investigated as vancomycin re-sensitizing agents. These compounds exhibit low micromolar inhibitory activity against vanX, with low cytotoxicity and were shown to increase vancomycin sensitivity against VREF. The improved pharmacological properties of these novel inhibitors over previous transition state mimics should provide an enhanced platform for designing potent vanX inhibitors for overcoming vancomycin resistance. PMID:24751446

  2. A Novel Isoquinoline Derivative Anticancer Agent and Its Targeted Delivery to Tumor Cells Using Transferrin-Conjugated Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuewei; Yang, Shuang; Chai, Hongyu; Yang, Zhaogang; Lee, Robert J.; Liao, Weiwei; Teng, Lesheng

    2015-01-01

    We have screened 11 isoquinoline derivatives and α-methylene-γ-butyrolactones using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthi-azol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cytotoxicity assay in HeLa and HEK-293T cells. Compound 2 was identified as potential anticancer agent. To further improve its therapeutic potential, this agent was incorporated into transferrin (Tf)-conjugated liposomes (LPs) for targeted delivery to tumor cells. We have demonstrated Tf-LP-Compound 2 have superior antitumor activity compared to non-targeted controls and the free drug. These data show Tf-LP-Compound 2 to be a promising agent that warrants further evaluation. PMID:26309138

  3. Re-Directing an Alkylating Agent to Mitochondria Alters Drug Target and Cell Death Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wisnovsky, Simon P.; Pereira, Mark P.; Wang, Xiaoming; Hurren, Rose; Parfitt, Jeremy; Larsen, Lesley; Smith, Robin A. J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2013-01-01

    We have successfully delivered a reactive alkylating agent, chlorambucil (Cbl), to the mitochondria of mammalian cells. Here, we characterize the mechanism of cell death for mitochondria-targeted chlorambucil (mt-Cbl) in vitro and assess its efficacy in a xenograft mouse model of leukemia. Using a ρ° cell model, we show that mt-Cbl toxicity is not dependent on mitochondrial DNA damage. We also illustrate that re-targeting Cbl to mitochondria results in a shift in the cell death mechanism from apoptosis to necrosis, and that this behavior is a general feature of mitochondria-targeted Cbl. Despite the change in cell death mechanisms, we show that mt-Cbl is still effective in vivo and has an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to the parent drug. These findings illustrate that mitochondrial rerouting changes the site of action of Cbl and also alters the cell death mechanism drastically without compromising in vivo efficacy. Thus, mitochondrial delivery allows the exploitation of Cbl as a promiscuous mitochondrial protein inhibitor with promising therapeutic potential. PMID:23585833

  4. Effect of Antimicrobial Agents on MinD Protein Oscillations in E. coli Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Corey; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    The pole-to-pole oscillation of MinD proteins in E. coli cells determines the location of the division septum, and is integral to healthy cell division. It has been shown previously that the MinD oscillation period is approximately 40 s for healthy cells [1] but is strongly dependant on environmental factors such as temperature, which may place stress on the cell [2,3]. We use a strain of E. coli in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP), allowing fluorescence visualization of the MinD oscillation. We use high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a custom, temperature controlled flow cell to observe the effect of exposure to antimicrobial agents on the MinD oscillation period and, more generally, to analyze the time variation of the spatial distribution of the MinD proteins within the cells. These measurements provide insight into the mechanism of antimicrobial action. [1] Raskin, D.M.; de Boer, P. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 96: 4971-4976. [2] Touhami, A.; Jericho, M; Rutenberg, A. (2006) J. Bacteriol. 188: 7661-7667. [3] Downing, B.; Rutenberg, A.; Touhami, A.; Jericho, M. (2009) PLoS ONE 4: e7285.

  5. Enhanced nucleotide excision repair capacity in lung cancer cells by preconditioning with DNA-damaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Ye; Park, Jeong-Min; Yi, Joo Mi; Leem, Sun-Hee; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The capacity of tumor cells for nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a major determinant of the efficacy of and resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics, such as cisplatin. Here, we demonstrate that using lesion-specific monoclonal antibodies, NER capacity is enhanced in human lung cancer cells after preconditioning with DNA-damaging agents. Preconditioning of cells with a nonlethal dose of UV radiation facilitated the kinetics of subsequent cisplatin repair and vice versa. Dual-incision assay confirmed that the enhanced NER capacity was sustained for 2 days. Checkpoint activation by ATR kinase and expression of NER factors were not altered significantly by the preconditioning, whereas association of XPA, the rate-limiting factor in NER, with chromatin was accelerated. In preconditioned cells, SIRT1 expression was increased, and this resulted in a decrease in acetylated XPA. Inhibition of SIRT1 abrogated the preconditioning-induced predominant XPA binding to DNA lesions. Taking these data together, we conclude that upregulated NER capacity in preconditioned lung cancer cells is caused partly by an increased level of SIRT1, which modulates XPA sensitivity to DNA damage. This study provides some insights into the molecular mechanism of chemoresistance through acquisition of enhanced DNA repair capacity in cancer cells. PMID:26317794

  6. SIRT3 Acts as a Neuroprotective Agent in Rotenone-Induced Parkinson Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Yi; Deng, Yong-Ning; Zhang, Meng; Su, Hua; Qu, Qiu-Min

    2016-07-01

    SIRT3 is a member of Sirtuins family, which belongs to NAD(+) dependent class III histone deacetylases. Emerging evidence suggests that SIRT3 plays a pivotal role in regulating mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a main pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we have investigated the protective effect of SIRT3 for PD cell model. The rotenone-induced human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells damage was used as PD cell model. The lentiviral vectors were used to over-expression or knockdown SIRT3 expression. The cell viability was analyzed using MTT method. The apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured by flow cytometer. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) were detected by using automated microplate reader. The accumulation of α-synuclein was determined by immunofluorescence staining. SIRT3 knockdown significantly worsen rotenone-induced decline of cell viability (p < 0.01) and enhanced cell apoptosis (p < 0.01), exacerbated the decrease of SOD (p < 0.05) and GSH (p < 0.05), and augmented the accumulation of α-synuclein (p < 0.05). While SIRT3 overexpression dramatically increased cell viability (p < 0.01), and decreased cell apoptosis (p < 0.01), prevented the accumulation of α-synuclein (p < 0.05), suppressed the reducing of SOD (p < 0.05) and GSH (p < 0.01), decreased ROS generation (p < 0.05), and alleviated MMP collapse (p < 0.01) induced by rotenone. SIRT3 has neuroprotective effect in PD cell model and could be developed into a therapeutic agent for PD patients. PMID:27053302

  7. Hairy root biotechnology--indicative timeline to understand missing links and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Shakti; Srivastava, Vikas; Ur Rahman, Laiq; Kukreja, A K

    2015-09-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated hairy roots (HR) were developed in the laboratory to mimic the natural phenomenon of bacterial gene transfer and occurrence of disease syndrome. The timeline analysis revealed that during 90 s, the research expanded to the hairy root-based secondary metabolite production and different yield enhancement strategies like media optimization, up-scaling, metabolic engineering etc. An outlook indicates that much emphasis has been given to the strategies that are helpful in making this technology more practical in terms of high productivity at low cost. However, a sequential analysis of literature shows that this technique is upgraded to a biotechnology platform where different intra- and interdisciplinary work areas were established, progressed, and diverged to provide scientific benefits of various hairy root-based applications like phytoremediation, molecular farming, biotransformation, etc. In the present scenario, this biotechnology research platform includes (a) elemental research like hairy root-mediated secondary metabolite production coupled with productivity enhancement strategies and (b) HR-based functional research. The latter comprised of hairy root-based applied aspects such as generation of agro-economical traits in plants, production of high value as well as less hazardous molecules through biotransformation/farming and remediation, respectively. This review presents an indicative timeline portrayal of hairy root research reflected by a chronology of research outputs. The timeline also reveals a progressive trend in the state-of-art global advances in hairy root biotechnology. Furthermore, the review also discusses ideas to explore missing links and to deal with the challenges in future progression and prospects of research in all related fields of this important area of plant biotechnology. PMID:25626898

  8. Efficiency of different Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains on hairy roots induction in Solanum mammosum.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chai Theam; Syahida, Ahmad; Stanslas, Johnson; Maziah, Mahmood

    2013-03-01

    This article presents the abilities and efficiencies of five different strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes (strain ATCC 31798, ATCC 43057, AR12, A4 and A13) to induce hairy roots on Solanum mammosum through genetic transformation. There is significant difference in the transformation efficiency (average number of days of hairy root induction) and transformation frequency for all strains of A. rhizogenes (P < 0.05). Both A. rhizogenes strain AR12 and A13 were able to induce hairy root at 6 days of co-cultivation, which were the fastest among those tested. However, the transformation frequencies of all five strains were below 30 %, with A. rhizogenes strain A4 and A13 showing the highest, which were 21.41 ± 10.60 % and 21.43 ± 8.13 % respectively. Subsequently, the cultures for five different hairy root lines generated by five different strains of bacteria were established. However, different hairy root lines showed different growth index under the same culture condition, with the hairy root lines induced by A. rhizogenes strain ATCC 31798 exhibited largest increase in fresh biomass at 45 days of culture under 16 h light/8 h dark photoperiod in half-strength MS medium. The slowest growing hairy root line, which was previously induced by A. rhizogenes strain A13, when cultured in optimized half-strength MS medium containing 1.5 times the standard amount of ammonium nitrate and potassium nitrate and 5 % (w/v) sucrose, had exhibited improvement in growth index, that is, the fresh biomass was almost double as compared to its initial growth in unmodified half-strength MS medium. PMID:23090845

  9. Iron oxide nanoparticles as drug delivery agents in MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Christopher; Randriamahefa, Alexandrine; Lokko, Carl; Evans, Whitney; Watkins, Julian; Carrell, Holly; King, Natalie; Patel, Darayas

    2007-02-01

    Oleic acid (OA)-Pluronic-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). FT-IR confirmed the bonding of oleic acid and Pluronic (surfactant) to the nanoparticles. AFM measurements on these nanoparticles indicated a root mean square (RMS) roughness, a measure of nanoparticle size of (50 +/- 20) nm. The efficiency of these functionalized nanoparticles was investigated by loading with 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) in aqueous solution. AFM measurements were used to characterize modified iron oxide nanoparticles and pancreatic MIA PaCa-2 cells, including size distribution, stability and cellular uptake. Nanoparticles were added to MIA PaCa-2 cells and assayed for their cytotoxic effects after 24 and 48 hours. The outcome of this study demonstrated the effectiveness of oleic acid (OA)-Pluronic-coated iron oxide nanoparticles as a non-toxic drug delivery agent for pancreatic cancer.

  10. Neoplastic cell transformation by energetic heavy ions and its modification with chemical agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Tobias, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    One of the major deleterious late effects of ionizing radiation is related to the induction of neoplasms. In the present report recent experimental results on neoplastic cell transformation by heavy ions are presented, and possible means to circumvent the carcinogenic effect of space radiation are discussed. Biological effects observed in experiments involving the use of energetic heavy ions accelerated at the Bevalac suggest that many of the biological effects observed in earlier space flight experiments may be due to space radiation, particularly cosmic rays. It is found that the effect of radiation on cell transformation is dose-rate dependent. The frequency of neoplastic transformation for a given dose decreases with a decrease of dose rate of Co-60 gamma rays. It is found that various chemical agents give radiation protection, including DMSO.

  11. Fluorine-19 MRI Contrast Agents for Cell Tracking and Lung Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Matthew S.; Gaudet, Jeffrey M.; Foster, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorine-19 (19F)-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging stand to revolutionize imaging-based research and clinical trials in several fields of medical intervention. First, their use in characterizing in vivo cell behavior may help bring cellular therapy closer to clinical acceptance. Second, their use in lung imaging provides novel noninvasive interrogation of the ventilated airspaces without the need for complicated, hard-to-distribute hardware. This article reviews the current state of 19F-based cell tracking and lung imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and describes the link between the methods across these fields and how they may mutually benefit from solutions to mutual problems encountered when imaging 19F-containing compounds, as well as hardware and software advancements. PMID:27042089

  12. Contribution of Cell Surface Hydrophobicity in the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobial Agents.

    PubMed

    Lather, Puja; Mohanty, A K; Jha, Pankaj; Garsa, Anita Kumari

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is found in a wide variety of habitats, including human skin, where many strains are commensals that may be clinically significant or contaminants of food. To determine the physiological characteristics of resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus against pediocin, a class IIa bacteriocin, a resistant strain was compared with wild type in order to investigate the contribution of hydrophobicity to this resistance. Additional clumping of resistant strain relative to wild type in light microscopy was considered as an elementary evidence of resistance attainment. A delay in log phase attainment was observed in resistant strain compared to the wild type strain. A significant increase in cell surface hydrophobicity was detected for resistant strain in both hexadecane and xylene indicating the contribution of cell surface hydrophobicity as adaptive reaction against antimicrobial agents. PMID:26966577

  13. Contribution of Cell Surface Hydrophobicity in the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lather, Puja; Mohanty, A. K.; Jha, Pankaj; Garsa, Anita Kumari

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is found in a wide variety of habitats, including human skin, where many strains are commensals that may be clinically significant or contaminants of food. To determine the physiological characteristics of resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus against pediocin, a class IIa bacteriocin, a resistant strain was compared with wild type in order to investigate the contribution of hydrophobicity to this resistance. Additional clumping of resistant strain relative to wild type in light microscopy was considered as an elementary evidence of resistance attainment. A delay in log phase attainment was observed in resistant strain compared to the wild type strain. A significant increase in cell surface hydrophobicity was detected for resistant strain in both hexadecane and xylene indicating the contribution of cell surface hydrophobicity as adaptive reaction against antimicrobial agents. PMID:26966577

  14. DNA Repair in Human Cells Exposed to Combinations of Carcinogenic Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R. B.; Ahmed, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP2 fibroblasts were treated with UV plus UV-mimetic chemicals. The UV dose used was sufficient to saturate the UV excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a UV specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from UV and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of UV and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from UV or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170.

  15. QSAR modeling, synthesis and bioassay of diverse leukemia RPMI-8226 cell line active agents.

    PubMed

    Katritzky, Alan R; Girgis, Adel S; Slavov, Svetoslav; Tala, Srinivasa R; Stoyanova-Slavova, Iva

    2010-11-01

    A rigorous QSAR modeling procedure employing CODESSA PRO descriptors has been utilized for the prediction of more efficient anti-leukemia agents. Experimental data concerning the effect on leukemia RPMI-8226 cell line tumor growth of 34 compounds (treated at a dose of 10 μM) was related to their chemical structures by a 4-descriptor QSAR model. Four bis(oxy)bis-urea and bis(sulfanediyl)bis-urea derivatives (4a, 4b, 8, 11a) predicted as active by this model, together with 11b predicted to be of low activity, were synthesized and screened for anti-tumor activity utilizing 55 different tumor cell lines. Compounds 8 and 11a showed anti-tumor properties against most of the adopted cell lines with growth inhibition exceeding 50%. The highly promising preliminary anti-tumor properties of compounds 8 and 11a, were screened at serial dilutions (10(-4)-10(-8) μM) for determination of their GI(50) and TGI against the screened human tumor cell lines. Compound 11a (GI(50) = 1.55, TGI = 8.68 μM) is more effective than compound 8 (GI(50)=58.30, TGI = > 100 μM) against the target leukemia RPMI-8226 cell line. Compound 11a also exhibits highly pronounced anti-tumor properties against NCI-H226, NCI-H23 (non-small cell lung cancer), COLO 205 (colon cancer), SNB-75 (CNS cancer), OVCAR-3, SK-OV-3 (ovarian cancer), A498 (renal cancer) MDA-MB-231/ATCC and MDA-MB-468 (breast cancer) cell lines (GI(50) = 1.95, 1.61, 1.38, 1.56, 1.30, 1.98, 1.18, 1.85, 1.08, TGI = 8.35, 6.01, 2.67, 8.59, 4.01, 7.01, 5.62, 6.38, 5.63 μM, respectively). Thus 11a could be a suitable lead towards the design of broad spectrum anti-tumor active agents targeting various human tumor cell lines. PMID:20843586

  16. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells. PMID:27551077

  17. Cetuximab enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agent in ABCB1/P-glycoprotein-overexpressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Huang, Yue; Zhao, Jianming; Wang, Xiaokun; Yang, Ke; Ma, Shaolin; Huang, Liyan; Wah To, Kenneth Kin; Gu, Yong; Fu, Liwu

    2015-01-01

    The overexpression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters is closely associated with the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) in certain types of cancer, which represents a formidable obstacle to the successful cancer chemotherapy. Here, we investigated that cetuximab, an EGFR monoclonal antibody, reversed the chemoresistance mediated by ABCB1, ABCG2 or ABCC1. Our results showed that cetuximab significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of ABCB1 substrate agent in ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cells but had no effect in their parental drug sensitive cells and ABCC1, ABCG2 overexpressing cells. Furthermore, cetuximab markedly increased intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin (DOX) and rhodamine 123 (Rho 123) in ABCB1-overexpressing MDR cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Cetuximab stimulated the ATPase activity but did not alter the expression level of ABCB1 or block phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. Interestingly, cetuximab decreased the cell membrane fluidity which was known to decrease the function of ABCB1. Our findings advocate further clinical investigation of combination chemotherapy of cetuximab and conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in ABCB1 overexpressing cancer patients. PMID:26506420

  18. Recent progress in fungus-derived bioactive agents for targeting of signaling machinery in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiukun; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Ismail, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly understood that tumor cells may have different mutations and dependencies on diverse intracellular signaling cascades for survival or metastatic potential. Overexpression of oncogenes, inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, genetic/epigenetic mutations, genomic instability, and loss of apoptotic cell death are some of the mechanisms that have been widely investigated in molecular oncology. We partition this multicomponent review into the most recent evidence on the anticancer activity of fungal substances obtained from in vitro and xenografted models, and these fungal substances modulate expression of oncogenic and tumor suppressor miRNAs. There are some outstanding questions regarding fungus-derived chemical-induced modulation of intracellular signaling networks in different cancer cell lines and preclinical models. Certain hints have emerged, emphasizing mechanisms via which apoptosis can be restored in TRAIL-resistant cancer cells. Reconceptualization of the knowledge obtained from these emerging areas of research will enable us to potentially identify natural agents with notable anticancer activity and minimal off-target effects. Integration of experimentally verified evidence obtained from cancer cell line gene expression with large-scale functional screening results and pharmacological sensitivity data will be helpful in identification of therapeutics with substantial efficacy. New tools and technologies will further deepen our understanding of the signaling networks that underlie the development of cancer, metastasis, and resistance to different therapeutics at both a personal and systems-wide level. PMID:25848216

  19. Testing an agent-based model of bacterial cell motility: How nutrient concentration affects speed distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, V.; Birbaumer, M.; Schweitzer, F.

    2011-08-01

    We revisit a recently proposed agent-based model of active biological motion and compare its predictions with own experimental findings for the speed distribution of bacterial cells, Salmonella typhimurium. Agents move according to a stochastic dynamics and use energy stored in an internal depot for metabolism and active motion. We discuss different assumptions of how the conversion from internal to kinetic energy d( v) may depend on the actual speed, to conclude that d 2 v ξ with either ξ = 2 or 1 < ξ < 2 are promising hypotheses. To test these, we compare the model's prediction with the speed distribution of bacteria which were obtained in media of different nutrient concentration and at different times. We find that both hypotheses are in line with the experimental observations, with ξ between 1.67 and 2.0. Regarding the influence of a higher nutrient concentration, we conclude that the take-up of energy by bacterial cells is indeed increased. But this energy is not used to increase the speed, with 40 μm/s as the most probable value of the speed distribution, but is rather spend on metabolism and growth.

  20. Borrelia burgdorferi, the Causative Agent of Lyme Disease, Forms Drug-Tolerant Persister Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bijaya; Brown, Autumn V; Matluck, Nicole E; Hu, Linden T; Lewis, Kim

    2015-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease, which affects an estimated 300,000 people annually in the United States. When treated early, the disease usually resolves, but when left untreated, it can result in symptoms such as arthritis and encephalopathy. Treatment of the late-stage disease may require multiple courses of antibiotic therapy. Given that antibiotic resistance has not been observed for B. burgdorferi, the reason for the recalcitrance of late-stage disease to antibiotics is unclear. In other chronic infections, the presence of drug-tolerant persisters has been linked to recalcitrance of the disease. In this study, we examined the ability of B. burgdorferi to form persisters. Killing growing cultures of B. burgdorferi with antibiotics used to treat the disease was distinctly biphasic, with a small subpopulation of surviving cells. Upon regrowth, these cells formed a new subpopulation of antibiotic-tolerant cells, indicating that these are persisters rather than resistant mutants. The level of persisters increased sharply as the culture transitioned from the exponential to stationary phase. Combinations of antibiotics did not improve killing. Daptomycin, a membrane-active bactericidal antibiotic, killed stationary-phase cells but not persisters. Mitomycin C, an anticancer agent that forms adducts with DNA, killed persisters and eradicated growing and stationary cultures of B. burgdorferi. Finally, we examined the ability of pulse dosing an antibiotic to eliminate persisters. After addition of ceftriaxone, the antibiotic was washed away, surviving persisters were allowed to resuscitate, and the antibiotic was added again. Four pulse doses of ceftriaxone killed persisters, eradicating all live bacteria in the culture. PMID:26014929

  1. Borrelia burgdorferi, the Causative Agent of Lyme Disease, Forms Drug-Tolerant Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bijaya; Brown, Autumn V.; Matluck, Nicole E.; Hu, Linden T.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease, which affects an estimated 300,000 people annually in the United States. When treated early, the disease usually resolves, but when left untreated, it can result in symptoms such as arthritis and encephalopathy. Treatment of the late-stage disease may require multiple courses of antibiotic therapy. Given that antibiotic resistance has not been observed for B. burgdorferi, the reason for the recalcitrance of late-stage disease to antibiotics is unclear. In other chronic infections, the presence of drug-tolerant persisters has been linked to recalcitrance of the disease. In this study, we examined the ability of B. burgdorferi to form persisters. Killing growing cultures of B. burgdorferi with antibiotics used to treat the disease was distinctly biphasic, with a small subpopulation of surviving cells. Upon regrowth, these cells formed a new subpopulation of antibiotic-tolerant cells, indicating that these are persisters rather than resistant mutants. The level of persisters increased sharply as the culture transitioned from the exponential to stationary phase. Combinations of antibiotics did not improve killing. Daptomycin, a membrane-active bactericidal antibiotic, killed stationary-phase cells but not persisters. Mitomycin C, an anticancer agent that forms adducts with DNA, killed persisters and eradicated growing and stationary cultures of B. burgdorferi. Finally, we examined the ability of pulse dosing an antibiotic to eliminate persisters. After addition of ceftriaxone, the antibiotic was washed away, surviving persisters were allowed to resuscitate, and the antibiotic was added again. Four pulse doses of ceftriaxone killed persisters, eradicating all live bacteria in the culture. PMID:26014929

  2. Ability of fourteen chemical agents used in dental practice to induce chromosome aberrations in Syrian hamster embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Hikiba, Hirohito; Watanabe, Eiko; Barrett, J Carl; Tsutsui, Takeki

    2005-01-01

    To assess the genotoxicity of 14 chemical agents used in dental practice, the ability of these agents to induce chromosome aberrations was examined using Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Statistically significant increases in the frequencies of chromosome aberrations were induced in SHE cells treated with 7 of 10 chemical agents used as endodontic medicaments, that is, carbol camphor, m-cresol, eugenol, guaiacol, zinc oxide, hydrogen peroxide, and formaldehyde. The other 3 chemical agents, that is, thymol, glutaraldehyde, and iodoform, did not increase the levels of chromosome aberrations. Of the 4 chemical agents that are used as an antiseptic on the oral mucosa, chromosome aberrations were induced by iodine, but not by the other 3 antiseptics, benzalkonium chloride, benzethonium chloride, and chlorhexidine. Among the 6 chemical agents exhibiting a negative response in the assay, only thymol induced chromosome aberrations in the presence of exogenous metabolic activation. Our results indicate that chemical agents having a positive response in the present study are potentially genotoxic to mammalian cells and need to be studied further in detail. PMID:15665446

  3. Cotreatment with Smac mimetics and demethylating agents induces both apoptotic and necroptotic cell death pathways in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gerges, Steve; Rohde, Katharina; Fulda, Simone

    2016-05-28

    Treatment resistance in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is often caused by defects in programmed cell death, e.g. by overexpression of Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Here, we report that small-molecule Smac mimetics (i.e. BV6, LCL161, birinapant) that neutralize x-linked IAP (XIAP), cellular IAP (cIAP)1 and cIAP2 cooperate with demethylating agents (i.e. 5-azacytidine (5AC) or 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC)) to induce cell death in ALL cells. Molecular studies reveal that induction of cell death is preceded by BV6-mediated depletion of cIAP1 protein and involves tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α autocrine/paracrine signaling, since the TNFα-blocking antibody Enbrel significantly reduces BV6/5AC-induced cell death. While BV6/5AC cotreatment induces caspase-3 activation, the broad-range caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD.fmk) only partly rescues ALL cells from BV6/5AC-induced cell death. This indicates that BV6/5AC cotreatment engages non-apoptotic cell death upon caspase inhibition. Indeed, genetic silencing of key components of necroptosis such as Receptor-Interacting Protein (RIP)3 or mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) in parallel with administration of zVAD.fmk provides a significantly better protection against BV6/5AC-induced cell death compared to the use of zVAD.fmk alone. Similarly, concomitant administration of pharmacological inhibitors of necroptosis (i.e. necrostatin-1s, GSK'872, dabrafenib, NSA) together with zVAD.fmk is superior in rescuing cells from BV6/5AC-induced cell death compared to the use of zVAD.fmk alone. These findings demonstrate that in ALL cells BV6/5AC-induced cell death is mediated via both apoptotic and necroptotic pathways. Importantly, BV6/5AC cotreatment triggers necroptosis in ALL cells that are resistant to apoptosis due to caspase inhibition. This opens new perspectives to overcome apoptosis resistance with important implications for the development of new treatment strategies

  4. Multiplexed Nanoplasmonic Temporal Profiling of T-Cell Response under Immunomodulatory Agent Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs—agents regulating the immune response—are commonly used for treating immune system disorders and minimizing graft versus host disease in persons receiving organ transplants. At the cellular level, immunosuppressant drugs are used to inhibit pro-inflammatory or tissue-damaging responses of cells. However, few studies have so far precisely characterized the cellular-level effect of immunomodulatory treatment. The primary challenge arises due to the rapid and transient nature of T-cell immune responses to such treatment. T-cell responses involve a highly interactive network of different types of cytokines, which makes precise monitoring of drug-modulated T-cell response difficult. Here, we present a nanoplasmonic biosensing approach to quantitatively characterize cytokine secretion behaviors of T cells with a fine time-resolution (every 10 min) that are altered by an immunosuppressive drug used in the treatment of T-cell-mediated diseases. With a microfluidic platform integrating antibody-conjugated gold nanorod (AuNR) arrays, the technique enables simultaneous multi-time-point measurements of pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines secreted by T cells. The integrated nanoplasmonic biosensors achieve precise measurements with low operating sample volume (1 μL), short assay time (∼30 min), heightened sensitivity (∼20–30 pg/mL), and negligible sensor crosstalk. Data obtained from the multicytokine secretion profiles with high practicality resulting from all of these sensing capabilities provide a comprehensive picture of the time-varying cellular functional state during pharmacologic immunosuppression. The capability to monitor cellular functional response demonstrated in this study has great potential to ultimately permit personalized immunomodulatory treatment. PMID:27478873

  5. A highly fluorescent AIE-active theranostic agent with anti-tumor activity to specific cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yueyue; Kwok, Ryan T K; Lam, Jacky W Y; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-07-01

    A tetraphenylethene derivative with a structure resembling Tamoxifen is designed and synthesized as a theranostic agent for cell imaging and anti-breast cancer therapy. Its high brightness, excellent photostability and long-term cell tracing properties enable elucidation of its working mechanism and hence provide new insights into drug development. PMID:26781935

  6. Effects of chemotherapy agents on Sphingosine-1-Phosphate receptors expression in MCF-7 mammary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, P; Sukocheva, O A; Wang, T; Mayne, G C; Watson, D I; Hussey, D J

    2016-07-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a potent bioactive sphingolipid involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and cancer progression. Increased expression of S1P receptors has been detected in advanced breast tumours with poor prognosis suggesting that S1P receptors might control tumour response to chemotherapy. However, it remains unclear how the levels of S1P receptor expression are influenced by chemotherapy agents. Western immunoblotting, PCR analysis and fluorescent microscopy techniques were used in this study to analyze expression patterns of S1P receptors 2 and 3 (S1P2/S1P3) in MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells treated by Tamoxifen (TAM) and/or Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). We found that TAM/MPA induce downregulation of S1P3 receptors, but stimulate expression of S1P2. According to cell viability and caspase activity analyses, as expected, TAM activated apoptosis. We also detected TAM/MPA-induced autophagy marked by formation of macroautophagosomes and increased level of Beclin 1. Combined application of TAM and MPA resulted in synergistic apoptosis- and autophagy-stimulating effects. Assessed by fluorescent microscopy with autophagosome marker LAMP-2, changes in S1P receptor expression coincided with activation of autophagy, suggestively, directing breast cancer cells towards death. Further studies are warranted to explore the utility of manipulation of S1P2 and S1P3 receptor expression as a novel treatment approach. PMID:27261597

  7. Mutation induction by 125iodoacetylproflavine, a DNA-intercalating agent, in human cells.

    PubMed

    Whaley, J M; Kassis, A I; Kinsey, B M; Adelstein, S J; Little, J B

    1990-06-01

    Survival and the induction of mutations at the hprt and tk loci were measured in TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells following treatment with the DNA-intercalating agent 125iodoacetylproflavine (125IAP). 125IAP was readily taken up into the cells, was localized to the nucleus, and was released rapidly following resuspension of the cells in fresh medium. Treatment with 125IAP for 24 h yielded a D0 of 110 decays/cell and an induced mutant fraction of 0.13 x 10(-6) per decay at the hprt locus and 0.4 x 10(-6) per decay at the tk locus. Molecular analyses of 125IAP-induced hprt mutants by Southern blot revealed a high proportion of large-scale changes at this locus. When these results are compared with those observed with 125IdUrd, 125IAP shows a reduced effectiveness per decay, related perhaps to the non-covalent nature of intercalator binding, resulting in reduced energy deposition in the DNA. PMID:1971836

  8. Rapid induction of apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by the microtubule disrupting agent BNC105.

    PubMed

    Bates, Darcy; Feris, Edmond J; Danilov, Alexey V; Eastman, Alan

    2016-03-01

    Microtubule targeting agents, such as vinblastine, are usually thought to arrest cells in mitosis and subsequently induce apoptosis. However, they can also cause rapid induction of apoptosis in a cell-cycle phase independent manner. BNC105 is a novel vascular and microtubule disrupting drug that also induces apoptosis rapidly but with markedly increased potency compared to vinca alkaloids and combretastatin A4. BNC105 binds to the colchicine-binding site on tubulin resulting in activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphorylation of ATF2, and induction of ATF3 and Noxa leading to acute apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Apoptosis induced by BNC105 is dependent upon both JNK activation and Noxa induction. Normal leukocytes and one CLL sample also exhibited JNK activation but not Noxa induction and were resistant to BNC105. This study emphasizes the importance of Noxa and JNK for induction of apoptosis in CLL cells by microtubule targeting drugs, and highlights the potential of BNC105 as a potent therapeutic to treat haematopoietic malignancies. PMID:26891146

  9. A cell-based screening system for anti-influenza A virus agents

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wan Ying; Loh, Sheng Wei; Ng, Wei Lun; Tan, Ming Cheang; Yeo, Kok Siong; Looi, Chung Yeng; Maah, Mohd Jamil; Ea, Chee-Kwee

    2015-01-01

    Emerging of drug resistant influenza A virus (IAV) has been a big challenge for anti-IAV therapy. In this study, we describe a relatively easy and safe cell-based screening system for anti-IAV replication inhibitors using a non-replicative strain of IAV. A nickel (II) complex of polyhydroxybenzaldehyde N4-thiosemicarbazone (NiPT5) was recently found to exhibit anti-inflammatory activity in vivo and in vitro. NiPT5 impedes the signaling cascades that lead to the activation of NF-κB in response to different stimuli, such as LPS and TNFα. Using our cell-based screening system, we report that pretreating cells with NiPT5 protects cells from influenza A virus (IAV) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection. Furthermore, NiPT5 inhibits replication of IAV by inhibiting transcription and translation of vRNAs of IAV. Additionally, NiPT5 reduces IAV-induced type I interferon response and cytokines production. Moreover, NiPT5 prevents activation of NF-κB, and IRF3 in response to IAV infection. These results demonstrate that NiPT5 is a potent antiviral agent that inhibits the early phase of IAV replication. PMID:25728279

  10. COX-2 inhibitors block chemotherapeutic agent-induced apoptosis prior to commitment in hematopoietic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cerella, Claudia; Sobolewski, Cyril; Chateauvieux, Sébastien; Henry, Estelle; Schnekenburger, Michael; Ghelfi, Jenny; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2011-11-15

    Enzymatic inhibitors of pro-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) possess multiple anti-cancer effects, including chemosensitization. These effects are not always linked to the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here we analyze the effects of three COX-2 enzyme inhibitors (nimesulide, NS-398 and celecoxib) on apoptosis in different hematopoietic cancer models. Surprisingly, COX-2 inhibitors strongly prevent apoptosis induced by a panel of chemotherapeutic agents. We selected U937 cells as a model of sensitive cells for further studies. Here, we provide evidence that the protective effect is COX-independent. No suppression of the low basal prostaglandin (PG)E(2) production may be observed upon treatment by COX-2 inhibitors. Besides, the non-active celecoxib analog 2,5-dimethyl-celecoxib is able to protect from apoptosis as well. We demonstrate early prevention of the stress-induced apoptotic signaling, prior to Bax/Bak activation. This preventive effect fits with an impairment of the ability of chemotherapeutic agents to trigger apoptogenic stress. Accordingly, etoposide-induced DNA damage is strongly attenuated in the presence of COX-2 inhibitors. In contrast, COX-2 inhibitors do not exert any anti-apoptotic activity when cells are challenged with physiological stimuli (anti-Fas, TNFα or Trail) or with hydrogen peroxide, which do not require internalization and/or are not targeted by chemoresistance proteins. Altogether, our findings show a differential off-target anti-apoptotic effect of COX-2 inhibitors on intrinsic vs. extrinsic apoptosis at the very early steps of intracellular signaling, prior to commitment. The results imply that an exacerbation of the chemoresistance phenomena may be implicated. PMID:21745461

  11. [Role of NO signal in ABA-induced phenolic acids accumulation in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots].

    PubMed

    Shen, Lihong; Ren, Jiahui; Jin, Wenfang; Wang, Ruijie; Ni, Chunhong; Tong, Mengjiao; Liang, Zongsuo; Yang, Dongfeng

    2016-02-01

    To investigate roles of nitric oxide (NO) signal in accumulations of phenolic acids in abscisic.acid (ABA)-induced Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots, S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots were treated with different concentrations of sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-an exogenous NO donor, for 6 days, and contents of phenolic acids in the hairy roots are determined. Then with treatment of ABA and NO scavenger (2-(4-carboxy-2-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1- oxyl-3-oxide, c-PTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor (NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, L-NAME), contents of phenolic acids and expression levels of three key genes involved in phenolic acids biosynthesis were detected. Phenolic acids production in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots was most significantly improved by 100 µmoL/L SNP. Contents of RA and salvianolic acid B increased by 3 and 4 folds. ABA significantly improved transcript levels of PAL (phenylalanine ammonia lyase), TAT (tyrosine aminotransferase) and RAS (rosmarinic acid synthase), and increased phenolic acids accumulations. However, with treatments of ABA+c-PTIO or ABA+L-NAME, accumulations of phenolic acids and expression levels of the three key genes were significantly inhibited. Both NO and ABA can increase accumulations of phenolic acids in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots. NO signal probably mediates the ABA-induced phenolic acids production. PMID:27382772

  12. Lignan enhancement in hairy root cultures of Linum album using coniferaldehyde and methylenedioxycinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian Chashmi, Najmeh; Sharifi, Mohsen; Behmanesh, Mehrdad

    2016-07-01

    Feeding experiments with hairy root cultures of Linum album have established that the extracellular coniferaldehyde is a good precursor for production of two lignans: lariciresinol (LARI) and pinoresinol (PINO). The accumulation of the LARI, PINO, and podophyllotoxin (PTOX) in hairy roots were enhanced about 14.8-, 8.7-, and 1.5-fold (107.61, 8.7 and 6.42 µg g(-1) Fresh Wight), respectively, by the addition of coniferaldehyde (2 mM) to the culture media (after 24 hr). This result was correlated with an increase pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase (PLR) expression gene and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) activity in the fed hairy roots. Adding 3,4-(methylendioxy)cinnamic acid (MDCA) precursor did not influence on the lignans accumulation, but the lignin content of the hairy roots was increased. Moreover, the expression genes of phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL), CAD, and cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) were influenced after feeding hairy roots with MDCA. PMID:26444150

  13. Agrobacterium rhizogenes mediated hairy root induction in endangered Berberis aristata DC.

    PubMed

    Brijwal, Latika; Tamta, Sushma

    2015-01-01

    An efficient protocol for hairy root induction in Berberis aristata DC. was established using two different strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes, MTCC 532 and 2364 from IMTECH (Institute of Microbial Technology), Chandigarh, India. The strain 532 was more effective than strain 2364 in hairy root induction and in vitro grown callus (61.11 ± 1.60 % transformation frequency) was found to be suitable explant in comparison to leaves (42.59 ± 0.92 % transformation frequency) and nodal segments (34.25 ± 0.92 % transformation frequency) of in vitro grown microshoots for hairy root induction. The presence of rol A and rol B genes during amplification confirmed the transgenic nature of hairy roots and transformed callus. Transformation frequency of callus was further enhanced (from 61.11 ± 1.60 % to 72.22 ± 1.60 %; when infection time was 1 h) by using acetosyringone (100 µM) during co-cultivation period (48 h) on semisolid MS (Murashige and Skoog) medium. In conclusion, this study describes the protocol for hairy root induction which could further be useful for the production of berberin and may reduce the overharvesting of this endangered species from its natural habitat. PMID:26312208

  14. Linking a Germplasm Collection of the Cover Crop Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) to Traits Related to Improved Nitrogen Fixation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hairy vetch is used as a leguminous cover crop throughout the United States providing important ecosystem services in agro-ecosystems (Abdul-Baki et al., 2002; Mohler and Teasdale, 1993; Puget and Drinkwater, 2001; Seo et al., 2006; Stute and Posner, 1995). Many traits found in hairy vetch have pro...

  15. Black hairy tongue in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Erriu, Matteo; Pili, Francesca Maria Giovanna; Denotti, Gloria; Garau, Valentino

    2016-01-01

    Black hairy tongue (BHT) is a condition characterized by the elongation of filiform papillae associated with a marked discoloration, from yellowish-brown to black, and a thick lingual coating. BHT is usually observed in the elderly and in patients with limited self-sufficiency, as a consequence of poor oral hygiene. In this perspective, the patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) represent a high-risk category for the occurrence of BHT. The fast and inexorable loss of their self-sufficiency due to progressive muscle atrophy as well as the impropriate education of healthcare assistants have demonstrated to have significant reflection on the maintenance of an adequate standard of oral hygiene. This paper firstly described a case of BHT in a patient affected by ALS. A case of BHT in a patient (Caucasic, male, 63 years old) affected by ALS was described. The primary goal of the work was to teach and motivate the patient to the use of the tongue cleaner in association with the local application of chlorexidine 0.20%. Furthermore, in order to support the patient with accurate domiciliary oral hygiene, a proper training for his health-care assistant was provided. The maintenance of the oral health of ALS patient is fundamental to prevent systemic complications that could jeopardize the already fragile physical balance of these patients. The dedicated monitoring by a dentist or a dental hygienist would seem essential in order to achieve this objective. PMID:27011938

  16. Black hairy tongue in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Erriu, Matteo; Pili, Francesca Maria Giovanna; Denotti, Gloria; Garau, Valentino

    2016-01-01

    Black hairy tongue (BHT) is a condition characterized by the elongation of filiform papillae associated with a marked discoloration, from yellowish-brown to black, and a thick lingual coating. BHT is usually observed in the elderly and in patients with limited self-sufficiency, as a consequence of poor oral hygiene. In this perspective, the patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) represent a high-risk category for the occurrence of BHT. The fast and inexorable loss of their self-sufficiency due to progressive muscle atrophy as well as the impropriate education of healthcare assistants have demonstrated to have significant reflection on the maintenance of an adequate standard of oral hygiene. This paper firstly described a case of BHT in a patient affected by ALS. A case of BHT in a patient (Caucasic, male, 63 years old) affected by ALS was described. The primary goal of the work was to teach and motivate the patient to the use of the tongue cleaner in association with the local application of chlorexidine 0.20%. Furthermore, in order to support the patient with accurate domiciliary oral hygiene, a proper training for his health-care assistant was provided. The maintenance of the oral health of ALS patient is fundamental to prevent systemic complications that could jeopardize the already fragile physical balance of these patients. The dedicated monitoring by a dentist or a dental hygienist would seem essential in order to achieve this objective. PMID:27011938

  17. Removal of Phenol by A. belladonna L. Hairy Root.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, Hamide; Piri, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic compounds that present in the several industries are harmful and dangerous for human health. In this study we have studied the potential of Atropa belladonna hairy roots in phenol removal of wastewater. The optimal conditions for the removal process were evaluated using different phenol (10-500 mg.1(-1)) and H2O2 (1-15 Mm) concentrations. In the presence of H2O2, Roots were able to remove phenol concentrations up to 500 mg.1(-1). in the wide range of pH (4-9), reaching high removal efficiency. When roots were re-used for five consecutive cycles, phenol removal efficiency decreased from 98-62%, in the last cycle. After the removal process, the solutions were obtained from the experiment were estimated for their toxicity using a test with Lactaca sativa L. seeds. Results showed that the treated solution was less toxic than the parent solution. PMID:25950155

  18. Dielectric Performance of Matrix Free, Hairy Nanoparticle Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Christopher; Opsitnick, Elizabeth; Koerner, Hilmar; Durstock, Michael; Vaia, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Addressing the increasing electrical energy storage and power delivery needs of industry has driven development of novel insulating materials. The voltage breakdown characteristics of two-component polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) - nanoparticles dispersed in a polymer matrix - have been previously explored. Control of morphology and dispersion is challenging, however, due to aggregation at high inorganic fractions (> 5% v/v). To fully establish the potential of these nanostructure hybrid materials, we examine the dielectric performance of matrix free, hairy nanoparticle films. These single-component PNCs are comprised of silica nanoparticles with a polystyrene corona such that coronas of adjacent nanoparticles interpenetrate and entangle. Grafting the polymer directly to the nanoparticle provides certain benefits, including more uniform/predictable film morphologies and higher achievable nanoparticle loading. Energy storage capabilities will be assessed from dielectric experimental methods, which include measuring the characteristic dielectric film strength and dielectric permittivity for varying volume fractions of silica. The authors wish to acknowledge AFOSR and AFRL for their financial support.

  19. Physical Aging within Hairy NanoParticle Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerner, H.; Bockstaller, M.; Dang, A.; Mahoney, C.; Matyjaszewski, K.; Hui, C.-M.; Vaia, R.; Carnegie Mellon U Collaboration; Afrl-Wpafb Team

    2014-03-01

    Polymer grafted nanoparticles provide solutions to overcome dispersion challenges in conventional polymer-inorganic nanocomposites (NCs). While most research has focused on blends of these hairy nanoparticles (HNPs) into polymer matrices, recent work has demonstrated substantial promise for solvent- or matrix-free assemblies of HNPs (aHNPs). Significant progress has been made in understanding the relationship between the structure of the polymer corona at intermediate and high graft densities and the morphology, mechanical properties and melts dynamics of the assembly. However, very little is known about the behavior of aHNPs with low graft densities (σ<0.05 nm-2) of high molecular weight chains that are above entanglement (>60kDa). Such aHNPs contain more than 30 vol% inorganic, with maximum separation between particle surfaces less than 10 nanometers. For such materials, we discuss the physical aging characteristics from enthalpy relaxation experiments of these highly confined poly(styrene) and poly(methylmethacrylate) grafts. Physical aging is substantially suppressed in the low σ (σ<0.05) regime, as compared to conventional NCs at similar nanoparticle loadings. Furthermore, relaxation rate, distribution and fragility indicate that aHNPs with high σ exhibit behavior deep within the glass similar to conventional NCs and their neat polymers, however deviate substantially from Arrhenius behavior as Tg-T approaches 0.

  20. Nonisotropic Assembly of Single-Component Hairy Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaia, R.; Koerner, H.; Drummy, L.; Benicewicz, B.; Li, Y.; U Of South Carolina Collaboration; Afrl-Wpafb Team

    2014-03-01

    Solvent-free assemblies of hairy nanoparticles (HNPs) are providing avenues to avoid issues of mixing, agglomeration and limited inorganic content that plague traditional nanocomposites that are based on polymer-nanoparticle blending. We demonstrate that for a range of graft densities, depletion forces acting on high molecular weight poly(styrene) (120kDa) grafted to SiO2 (r0 = 8nm) lead to non-isotropic organization of the nanoparticle center of mass. The order within the neat HNP assembly (aHNP) and its elongational characteristics evolve as the architecture of the polymeric corona in solution transitions from concentrated (CBP) to semidilute (SDPB) polymer brush regimes. Specifically, local HNP packing adopts a non-isotropic arrangement at intermediate graft densities (σ = 0.01 - 0.1 chains/nm2) where the CPB-to-SDPB transition in solution is approximately r0. In concert, the neat HNP assembly responds to elongational deformation in a manner analogous to semi-crystalline elastomers. The correlation between the corona architecture of the HNP and the physical characteristics of the solvent free aHNP point toward a possible approach to tune mechanical, optical and electrical properties of single component hybrids in a manner analogous to block-copolymer mesoscale morphology.

  1. Global structure of exact scalar hairy dynamical black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhong-Ying; Chen, Bin; Lü, H.

    2016-05-01

    We study the global structure of some exact scalar hairy dynamical black holes which were constructed in Einstein gravity either minimally or non-minimally coupled to a scalar field. We find that both the apparent horizon and the local event horizon (measured in luminosity coordinate) monotonically increase with the advanced time as well as the Vaidya mass. At late advanced times, the apparent horizon approaches the event horizon and gradually becomes future outer. Correspondingly, the space-time arrives at stationary black hole states with the relaxation time inversely proportional to the 1/( n-1) power of the final black hole mass, where n is the space-time dimension. These results strongly support the solutions describing the formation of black holes with scalar hair. We also obtain new charged dynamical solutions in the non-minimal theory by introducing an Maxwell field which is non-minimally coupled to the scalar. The presence of the electric charge strongly modifies the dynamical evolution of the space-time.

  2. A novel alkylating agent Melflufen induces irreversible DNA damage and cytotoxicity in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Ray, Arghya; Ravillah, Durgadevi; Das, Deepika S; Song, Yan; Nordström, Eva; Gullbo, Joachim; Richardson, Paul G; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2016-08-01

    Our prior study utilized both in vitro and in vivo multiple myeloma (MM) xenograft models to show that a novel alkylator melphalan-flufenamide (Melflufen) is a more potent anti-MM agent than melphalan and overcomes conventional drug resistance. Here we examined whether this potent anti-MM activity of melflufen versus melphalan is due to their differential effect on DNA damage and repair signalling pathways via γ-H2AX/ATR/CHK1/Ku80. Melflufen-induced apoptosis was associated with dose- and time-dependent rapid phosphorylation of γ-H2AX. Melflufen induces γ-H2AX, ATR, and CHK1 as early as after 2 h exposure in both melphalan-sensitive and -resistant cells. However, melphalan induces γ-H2AX in melphalan-sensitive cells at 6 h and 24 h; no γ-H2AX induction was observed in melphalan-resistant cells even after 24 h exposure. Similar kinetics was observed for ATR and CHK1 in meflufen- versus melphalan-treated cells. DNA repair is linked to melphalan-resistance; and importantly, we found that melphalan, but not melflufen, upregulates Ku80 that repairs DNA double-strand breaks. Washout experiments showed that a brief (2 h) exposure of MM cells to melflufen is sufficient to initiate an irreversible DNA damage and cytotoxicity. Our data therefore suggest that melflufen triggers a rapid, robust, and an irreversible DNA damage which may account for its ability to overcome melphalan-resistance in MM cells. PMID:27098276

  3. The investigational agent MLN2238 induces apoptosis and is cytotoxic to CLL cells in vitro, as a single agent and in combination with other drugs.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Aneel; Masood, Aisha; Miller, Kena C; Khan, A N M Nazmul H; Akhtar, Drusilla; Advani, Pooja; Foran, James; Rivera, Candido; Roy, Vivek; Colon-Otero, Gerardo; Chitta, Kasyapa; Chanan-Khan, Asher

    2014-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is the most common haematological malignancy in the U.S. The course of the disease has been shown to be negatively impacted by increased levels of BCL2. Strategies to downregulate BCL2 and shift the balance towards cellular demise are actively being explored. Therefore, we examined whether the investigational agent MLN2238 could inhibit the proteasomal machinery and induce CLL cell death while also downregulating BCL2. MLN2238-induced cell death was studied in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 28 CLL patients. MLN2238 produced a dose-dependent reduction in BCL2 and CLL cell viability with maximum cell death observed at a 50 nmol/l concentration by 48 h. Annexin-V staining, PARP1 and caspase-3 cleavage along with an increase in mitochondrial membrane permeability were noted after cells were treated with MLN2238; however, apoptosis was only partially blocked by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD.fmk. Furthermore, we observed enhanced anti-CLL effects in tumour cells treated with either a combination of MLN2238 and the BH3 mimetic AT-101 or MLN2238 and fludarabine. Together, our data suggest the potential for proteasome inhibitor based therapy in CLL and the rationale design of drug combination strategies based on CLL biology. PMID:24467634

  4. Development of molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Adam; Bhosle, Jaishree; Abdelraouf, Fatma; Popat, Sanjay; O'Brien, Mary; Yap, Timothy A

    2016-06-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a smoking-induced malignancy with multiple toxin-associated mutations, which accounts for 15% of all lung cancers. It remains a clinical challenge with a rapid doubling time, early dissemination and poor prognosis. Despite multiple clinical trials in SCLC, platinum-based chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment in the first line advanced disease setting; good initial responses are nevertheless inevitably followed by disease relapse and survival ultimately remains poor. There are currently no molecularly targeted agents licenced for use in SCLC. Advances in sequencing the cancer genome and other high-throughput profiling technologies have identified aberrant pathways and mechanisms implicated in SCLC development and progression. Novel anti-tumour therapeutics that impact these putative targets are now being developed and investigated in SCLC. In this review, we discuss novel anti-tumour agents assessed in SCLC with reference to the complex molecular mechanisms implicated in SCLC development and progression. We focus on novel DNA damage response inhibitors, immune checkpoint modulators and antibody-drug conjugates that have shown promise in SCLC, and which may potentially transform treatment strategies in this disease. Finally, we envision the future management of SCLC and propose a biomarker-driven translational treatment paradigm for SCLC that incorporates next generation sequencing studies with patient tumours, circulating plasma DNA and functional imaging. Such modern strategies have the potential to transform the management and improve patient outcomes in SCLC. PMID:27060747

  5. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  6. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70–90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2–3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of

  7. Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: A Review with a Focus on Targeted Agents.

    PubMed

    Devata, Sumana; Wilcox, Ryan A

    2016-06-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of extranodal lymphomas involving the skin. Diagnosis of the two main subtypes of CTCL-mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS)-is based on the International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (ISCL/EORTC) classification system, which utilizes clinical, histopathological, molecular biologic, and immunopathologic features. Risk stratification, based on TNMB (tumor, node, metastasis, and blood) staging, provides prognostic information, with limited-stage disease conferring the longest median overall survival. Skin-directed therapies are preferred in the management of limited-stage disease, whereas advanced-stage disease requires systemic therapies. As the mechanisms of CTCL pathogenesis are increasingly understood, new monoclonal antibodies, checkpoint inhibitors, immunomodulatory agents, and small molecules are under investigation and may provide additional therapeutic options for those with advanced CTCL. This review examines the current landscape of targeted therapies in the treatment of CTCLs. PMID:26923912

  8. Nobiletin enhances the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents in ABCB1 overexpression cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenzhe; Feng, Senling; Yao, Xiaojun; Yuan, Zhongwen; Liu, Liang; Xie, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major obstacle to the successful chemotherapy treatment of many cancers. Here we found that nobiletin, a citrus methoxyflavone, significantly sensitized ABCB1 overexpressing cells A2780/T and A549/T to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel (a 433-fold reversal of MDR to PTX at 9 μM), doxorubicin (DOX), docetaxel and dounorubicin. Nobiletin profoundly inhibited ABCB1 transporter activity since it significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of DOX and Flutax-2 in A2780/T cells and decreased the efflux of ABCB1 substrates in Caco2 cells without altering the mRNA and protein expression of ABCB1. Moreover, nobiletin stimulated ATPase activity and inhibited verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. Consistent with these findings, molecular docking analysis also identified favorable binding of nobiletin with the transmemberane region site 1 of homology modeled human ABCB1 transporter. Moreover, the Nrf2 protein expression and phosphorylation levels of AKT/ERK were suppressed by co-treated with nobiletin and PTX at the reversal concentrations, suggesting that inhibition of the AKT/ERK/Nrf2 pathway was associated with the sensitizing effect of nobiletin. These findings encourage further animal and clinical MDR studies with the combination therapy of nobiletin and chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26689156

  9. Nobiletin enhances the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents in ABCB1 overexpression cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenzhe; Feng, Senling; Yao, Xiaojun; Yuan, Zhongwen; Liu, Liang; Xie, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major obstacle to the successful chemotherapy treatment of many cancers. Here we found that nobiletin, a citrus methoxyflavone, significantly sensitized ABCB1 overexpressing cells A2780/T and A549/T to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel (a 433-fold reversal of MDR to PTX at 9 μM), doxorubicin (DOX), docetaxel and dounorubicin. Nobiletin profoundly inhibited ABCB1 transporter activity since it significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of DOX and Flutax-2 in A2780/T cells and decreased the efflux of ABCB1 substrates in Caco2 cells without altering the mRNA and protein expression of ABCB1. Moreover, nobiletin stimulated ATPase activity and inhibited verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating a direct interaction with the transporter. Consistent with these findings, molecular docking analysis also identified favorable binding of nobiletin with the transmemberane region site 1 of homology modeled human ABCB1 transporter. Moreover, the Nrf2 protein expression and phosphorylation levels of AKT/ERK were suppressed by co-treated with nobiletin and PTX at the reversal concentrations, suggesting that inhibition of the AKT/ERK/Nrf2 pathway was associated with the sensitizing effect of nobiletin. These findings encourage further animal and clinical MDR studies with the combination therapy of nobiletin and chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:26689156

  10. Chemostat flow cell system: an in vitro model for the evaluation of antiplaque agents.

    PubMed

    Herles, S; Olsen, S; Afflitto, J; Gaffar, A

    1994-11-01

    We developed an experimental in vitro model of dental plaque to assess the potential efficacy of antiplaque agents. The model used a chemostat, which provided a continuous source of 5 species of oral bacteria grown in an artificial "saliva-like" medium. This mixture was pumped through six flow cells, each containing two types of surfaces on which plaque formed and was subsequently measured. Formation of bacterial plaque on hydroxyapatite surfaces was assessed by measurement of the DNA and protein content of the plaque film. The amount of bacterial plaque formed on germanium surfaces was measured by attenuated total reflectance (ATR/FT-IR) spectroscopy. Plaque viability was also assessed by a fluorescent staining technique. The quantity of plaque formed on both types of surfaces gradually increased with the duration of flow (from 24 to 72 h) through the cells during a 72-hour experimental period. The flow cells were then pulsed with experimental treatment solutions for 30 s, twice daily. Parallel to results of human clinical studies, the model was capable of discriminating among water, a placebo mouthrinse, and an active antimicrobial mouthrinse formulation containing 0.03% triclosan. It therefore offers a valuable alternative to animal model testing and allows for more rapid evaluations under well-controlled experimental conditions. PMID:7983262

  11. Evaluation of toxic agent effects on lung cells by fiber evanescent wave spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Pierre; Le Coq, David; Juncker, Christophe; Collier, Jayne; Boesewetter, Dianne E; Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Bureau, Bruno; Riley, Mark R

    2005-01-01

    Biochemical changes in living cells are detected using a fiber probe system composed of a single chalcogenide fiber acting as both the sensor and transmission line for infrared optical signals. The signal is collected via evanescent wave absorption along the tapered sensing zone of the fiber. We spectroscopically monitored the effects of the surfactant Triton X-100, which serves as a toxic agent simulant on a transformed human lung carcinoma type II epithelial cell line (A549). We observe spectral changes between 2800-3000 cm(-1) in four absorptions bands, which are assigned to hydrocarbon vibrations of methylene and methyl groups in membrane lipids. Comparison of fiber and transmission spectra shows that the present technique allows one to locally probe the cell plasma membrane in the lipid spectral region. These optical responses are correlated with cellular metabolic activity measurements and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) release assays that indicate a loss of cellular function and membrane integrity as would be expected in response to the membrane solubilizing Triton. The spectroscopic technique shows a significantly greater detection resolution in time and concentration. PMID:15720730

  12. In vitro and in vivo reactivity to fungal cell wall agents in sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Terčelj, M; Stopinšek, S; Ihan, A; Salobir, B; Simčič, S; Wraber, B; Rylander, R

    2011-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease. Epidemiological and treatment studies suggest that fungi play a part in the pathogenesis. The aim of this work was to study the effect of fungal cell wall agents (FCWA) on the in vitro secretion of cytokines from peripheral blood monocytes from subjects with sarcoidosis and relate the results to fungal exposure at home and clinical findings. Subjects with sarcoidosis (n = 22) and controls (n = 20) participated. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with soluble or particulate β-glucan (S-glucan, P-glucan), chitin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), whereafter tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and IL-12 were measured. The severity of sarcoidosis was determined using a chest X-ray-based score. Serum cytokines (IL-2R, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12) were determined. To measure domestic fungal exposure, air in the bedrooms was sampled on filters. N-acetylhexosaminidase (NAHA) on the filters was measured as a marker of fungal cell biomass. The induced secretion of cytokines was higher from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from subjects with sarcoidosis. P-glucan was more potent than S-glucan inducing a secretion. Chitin had a small effect. Among subjects with sarcoidosis there was a significant relation between the spontaneous PBMC production of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-12 and the NAHA levels at home. The P-glucan induced secretion of IL-12 was related to the duration of symptoms at the time of diagnosis. Their X-ray scores were related to an increased secretion of cytokines after stimulation with LPS or P-glucan. Subjects with sarcoidosis have a higher reactivity to FCWA in vitro and to home exposure. The influence of FCWA on inflammatory cells and their interference with the inflammatory defense mechanisms in terms of cytokine secretion could be important factors for the development of sarcoidosis. PMID:21910725

  13. Effects of epicatechin, a crosslinking agent, on human dental pulp cells cultured in collagen scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun-su; Lim, Myung-Jin; Min, Kyung-San; Kwon, Young-Sun; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Hong, Chan-Ui; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the biological effects of epicatechin (ECN), a crosslinking agent, on human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) cultured in collagen scaffolds. Material and Method To evaluate the effects of ECN on the proliferation of hDPCs, cell counting was performed using optical and fluorescent microscopy. Measurements of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, alizarin red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reactions were performed to assess odontogenic differentiation. The compressive strength and setting time of collagen scaffolds containing ECN were measured. Differential scanning calorimetry was performed to analyze the thermal behavior of collagen in the presence of ECN. Results Epicatechin increased ALP activity, mineralized nodule formation, and the mRNA expression of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), a specific odontogenic-related marker. Furthermore, ECN upregulated the expression of DSPP in hDPCs cultured in collagen scaffolds. Epicatechin activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and the treatment with an ERK inhibitor (U0126) blocked the expression of DSPP. The compressive strength was increased and the setting time was shortened in a dose-dependent manner. The number of cells cultured in the ECN-treated collagen scaffolds was significantly increased compared to the cells in the untreated control group. Conclusions Our results revealed that ECN promoted the proliferation and differentiation of hDPCs. Furthermore, the differentiation was regulated by the ERK signaling pathway. Changes in mechanical properties are related to cell fate, including proliferation and differentiation. Therefore, our study suggests the ECN treatment might be desirable for dentin-pulp complex regeneration. PMID:27008260

  14. Bifunctional hairy silica nanoparticles as high-performance additives for lubricant

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Tianyi; Song, Baoyu; Wen, Yu-ho; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bifunctional hairy silica nanoparticles (BHSNs), which are silica nanoparticles covered with alkyl and amino organic chains, were prepared as high-performance additives for lubricants. Compared with hairy silica nanoparticles covered by a single type of organic chain, binary hairy silica nanoparticles exhibit the advantages of both types of organic chains, which exhibit excellent compatibility with lubricants and adsorbability to metal surfaces. Nanoparticles with different ratios of amino and alkyl ligands were investigated. In comparison to an untreated lubricant, BHSNs reduce the friction coefficient and wear scar diameter by 40% and 60%, respectively. The wear mechanism of BHSNs was investigated, and the protective and filling effect of the nanoparticles improved because of collaboration of amino and alkyl ligands. PMID:26936117

  15. Bifunctional hairy silica nanoparticles as high-performance additives for lubricant.

    PubMed

    Sui, Tianyi; Song, Baoyu; Wen, Yu-Ho; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bifunctional hairy silica nanoparticles (BHSNs), which are silica nanoparticles covered with alkyl and amino organic chains, were prepared as high-performance additives for lubricants. Compared with hairy silica nanoparticles covered by a single type of organic chain, binary hairy silica nanoparticles exhibit the advantages of both types of organic chains, which exhibit excellent compatibility with lubricants and adsorbability to metal surfaces. Nanoparticles with different ratios of amino and alkyl ligands were investigated. In comparison to an untreated lubricant, BHSNs reduce the friction coefficient and wear scar diameter by 40% and 60%, respectively. The wear mechanism of BHSNs was investigated, and the protective and filling effect of the nanoparticles improved because of collaboration of amino and alkyl ligands. PMID:26936117

  16. Bifunctional hairy silica nanoparticles as high-performance additives for lubricant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Tianyi; Song, Baoyu; Wen, Yu-Ho; Zhang, Feng

    2016-03-01

    Bifunctional hairy silica nanoparticles (BHSNs), which are silica nanoparticles covered with alkyl and amino organic chains, were prepared as high-performance additives for lubricants. Compared with hairy silica nanoparticles covered by a single type of organic chain, binary hairy silica nanoparticles exhibit the advantages of both types of organic chains, which exhibit excellent compatibility with lubricants and adsorbability to metal surfaces. Nanoparticles with different ratios of amino and alkyl ligands were investigated. In comparison to an untreated lubricant, BHSNs reduce the friction coefficient and wear scar diameter by 40% and 60%, respectively. The wear mechanism of BHSNs was investigated, and the protective and filling effect of the nanoparticles improved because of collaboration of amino and alkyl ligands.

  17. The hairy family of Burma: a four generation pedigree of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Bondeson, J; Miles, A E

    1996-01-01

    A Burmese family with congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa had an eventful history in the nineteenth century. The earlier members of this family were employed at the court of Ava, but the later ones spent their lives in show business, being widely exhibited for money in the 1880s. Their extraordinary hairiness attracted much curiosity, and they were photographed several times. The hairy Burmese are the only example of a four-generation pedigree of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, which is consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. There is good evidence that, when the members of this family were hairy, their dentition was also deficient. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 (a) Figure 5 (b) PMID:8774541

  18. Novel active comb-shaped dry electrode for EEG measurement in hairy site.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Wu, Chung-Yu; Wong, Alice May-Kuen; Lin, Bor-Shyh

    2015-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is an important biopotential, and has been widely applied in clinical applications. The conventional EEG electrode with conductive gels is usually used for measuring EEG. However, the use of conductive gel also encounters with the issue of drying and hardening. Recently, many dry EEG electrodes based on different conductive materials and techniques were proposed to solve the previous issue. However, measuring EEG in the hairy site is still a difficult challenge. In this study, a novel active comb-shaped dry electrode was proposed to measure EEG in hairy site. Different form other comb-shaped or spike-shaped dry electrodes, it can provide more excellent performance of avoiding the signal attenuation, phase distortion, and the reduction of common mode rejection ratio. Even under walking motion, it can effectively acquire EEG in hairy site. Finally, the experiments for alpha rhythm and steady-state visually evoked potential were also tested to validate the proposed electrode. PMID:25137719

  19. 3'-Phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate synthase 1 (PAPSS1) knockdown sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer cells to DNA damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ada W Y; Dragowska, Wieslawa H; Ricaurte, Daniel; Kwok, Brian; Mathew, Veena; Roosendaal, Jeroen; Ahluwalia, Amith; Warburton, Corinna; Laskin, Janessa J; Stirling, Peter C; Qadir, Mohammed A; Bally, Marcel B

    2015-07-10

    Standard treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with no known driver mutation is platinum-based chemotherapy, which has a response rate of only 30-33%. Through an siRNA screen, 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) synthase 1 (PAPSS1), an enzyme that synthesizes the biologically active form of sulfate PAPS, was identified as a novel platinum-sensitizing target in NSCLC cells. PAPSS1 knockdown in combination with low-dose (IC10) cisplatin reduces clonogenicity of NSCLC cells by 98.7% (p < 0.001), increases DNA damage, and induces G1/S phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. PAPSS1 silencing also sensitized NSCLC cells to other DNA crosslinking agents, radiation, and topoisomerase I inhibitors, but not topoisomerase II inhibitors. Chemo-sensitization was not observed in normal epithelial cells. Knocking out the PAPSS1 homolog did not sensitize yeast to cisplatin, suggesting that sulfate bioavailability for amino acid synthesis is not the cause of sensitization to DNA damaging agents. Rather, sensitization may be due to sulfation reactions involved in blocking the action of DNA damaging agents, facilitating DNA repair, promoting cancer cell survival under therapeutic stress or reducing the bioavailability of DNA damaging agents. Our study demonstrates for the first time that PAPSS1 could be targeted to improve the activity of multiple anticancer agents used to treat NSCLC. PMID:26220590

  20. 3′-Phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate synthase 1 (PAPSS1) knockdown sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer cells to DNA damaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ada W. Y.; Dragowska, Wieslawa H.; Ricaurte, Daniel; Kwok, Brian; Mathew, Veena; Roosendaal, Jeroen; Ahluwalia, Amith; Warburton, Corinna; Laskin, Janessa J.; Stirling, Peter C.; Qadir, Mohammed A.; Bally, Marcel B.

    2015-01-01

    Standard treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with no known driver mutation is platinum-based chemotherapy, which has a response rate of only 30–33%. Through an siRNA screen, 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS) synthase 1 (PAPSS1), an enzyme that synthesizes the biologically active form of sulfate PAPS, was identified as a novel platinum-sensitizing target in NSCLC cells. PAPSS1 knockdown in combination with low-dose (IC10) cisplatin reduces clonogenicity of NSCLC cells by 98.7% (p < 0.001), increases DNA damage, and induces G1/S phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. PAPSS1 silencing also sensitized NSCLC cells to other DNA crosslinking agents, radiation, and topoisomerase I inhibitors, but not topoisomerase II inhibitors. Chemo-sensitization was not observed in normal epithelial cells. Knocking out the PAPSS1 homolog did not sensitize yeast to cisplatin, suggesting that sulfate bioavailability for amino acid synthesis is not the cause of sensitization to DNA damaging agents. Rather, sensitization may be due to sulfation reactions involved in blocking the action of DNA damaging agents, facilitating DNA repair, promoting cancer cell survival under therapeutic stress or reducing the bioavailability of DNA damaging agents. Our study demonstrates for the first time that PAPSS1 could be targeted to improve the activity of multiple anticancer agents used to treat NSCLC. PMID:26220590

  1. [Induction and in vitro culture of hairy roots of Dianthus caryophyllus and its plant regeneration].

    PubMed

    Shi, Heping; Zhu, Yuanfeng; Wang, Bei; Sun, Jiangbing; Huang, Shengqin

    2014-11-01

    To use Agrobacterium rhizogenes-induced hairy roots to create new germplasm of Dianthus caryophyllus, we transformed D. caryophyllus with A. rhizogenes by leaf disc for plant regeneration from hairy roots. The white hairy roots could be induced from the basal surface of leaf explants of D. caryophyllus 12 days after inoculation with A. rhizogenes ATCC15834. The percentage of the rooting leaf explants was about 90% 21 days after inoculation. The hairy roots could grow rapidly and autonomously in liquid or solid phytohormone-free MS medium. The transformation was confirmed by PCR amplification of rol gene of Ri plasmid and silica gel thin-layer chromatography of opines from D. caryophyllus hairy roots. Hairy roots could form light green callus after cultured on MS+6-BA 1.0-3.0 mg/L + NAA 0.1-0.2 mg/L for 15 days. The optimum medium for adventitious shoots formation was MS + 6-BA 2.0 mg/L + NAA 0.02 mg/L, where the rate of adventitious shoot induction was 100% after cultured for 6 weeks. The mean number of adventitious shoot per callus was 30-40. The adventitious shoots can form roots when cultured on phytohormone-free 1/2 MS or 1/2 MS +0.5 mg/L NAA for 10 days. When the rooted plantlets transplanted in the substrate mixed with perlite sand and peat (volume ratio of 1:2), the survival rate was above 95%. PMID:25985525

  2. Use of a human endometrial carcinoma cell line (RL-95) for in vitro testing of chemotherapeutic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C.; Deppe, G.; Saunders, D.; Malviya, V.

    1987-09-01

    RL-95, a moderately well-differentiated adenosquamous endometrial carcinoma cell line, can be used as a model for testing chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. Cells are grown in T-75 flasks, transferred to scintillation vials, and grown for 24 hr. Following this, medium is removed and new medium containing Adriamycin (Adr) and cis-platinum (CP) is added. Effects of the two drugs are measured by cell counts and DNA synthesis. To measure DNA synthesis, cells are incubated with (/sup 3/H)thymidine (/sup 3/H-THY) for up to 24 hr. Decreased DNA synthesis is reflected in decreased /sup 3/H-THY uptake. Cell kill is obtained with levels of drugs that are clinically achievable. Evidence is presented for increased cytotoxicity with concomitant, rather than sequential, chemotherapy. Results are also confirmed by testing the agent on MCF-7, a well-known breast cancer cell line. The results indicate that (1) endometrial carcinoma responds to Adriamycin and cis-platinum chemotherapeutic agents in vitro, and (2) RL-95 can be used as a model for testing varying concentrations, time of exposure, and combinations of chemotherapeutic agents.

  3. Expression of a Recombinant Anti-HIV and Anti-Tumor Protein, MAP30, in Nicotiana tobacum Hairy Roots: A pH-Stable and Thermophilic Antimicrobial Protein

    PubMed Central

    Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali; Afsharifar, Alireza; Taghavi, Seyed Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to conventional antibiotics, which microorganisms can readily evade, it is nearly impossible for a microbial strain that is sensitive to antimicrobial proteins to convert to a resistant strain. Therefore, antimicrobial proteins and peptides that are promising alternative candidates for the control of bacterial infections are under investigation. The MAP30 protein of Momordica charantia is a valuable type I ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) with anti-HIV and anti-tumor activities. Whereas the antimicrobial activity of some type I RIPs has been confirmed, less attention has been paid to the antimicrobial activity of MAP30 produced in a stable, easily handled, and extremely cost-effective protein-expression system. rMAP30-KDEL was expressed in Nicotiana tobacum hairy roots, and its effect on different microorganisms was investigated. Analysis of the extracted total proteins of transgenic hairy roots showed that rMAP30-KDEL was expressed effectively and that this protein exhibited significant antibacterial activity in a dose-dependent manner. rMAP30-KDEL also possessed thermal and pH stability. Bioinformatic analysis of MAP30 and other RIPs regarding their conserved motifs, amino-acid contents, charge, aliphatic index, GRAVY value, and secondary structures demonstrated that these factors accounted for their thermophilicity. Therefore, RIPs such as MAP30 and its derived peptides might have promising applications as food preservatives, and their analysis might provide useful insights into designing clinically applicable antibiotic agents. PMID:27459300

  4. Expression of a Recombinant Anti-HIV and Anti-Tumor Protein, MAP30, in Nicotiana tobacum Hairy Roots: A pH-Stable and Thermophilic Antimicrobial Protein.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Ali; Niazi, Ali; Afsharifar, Alireza; Taghavi, Seyed Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to conventional antibiotics, which microorganisms can readily evade, it is nearly impossible for a microbial strain that is sensitive to antimicrobial proteins to convert to a resistant strain. Therefore, antimicrobial proteins and peptides that are promising alternative candidates for the control of bacterial infections are under investigation. The MAP30 protein of Momordica charantia is a valuable type I ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) with anti-HIV and anti-tumor activities. Whereas the antimicrobial activity of some type I RIPs has been confirmed, less attention has been paid to the antimicrobial activity of MAP30 produced in a stable, easily handled, and extremely cost-effective protein-expression system. rMAP30-KDEL was expressed in Nicotiana tobacum hairy roots, and its effect on different microorganisms was investigated. Analysis of the extracted total proteins of transgenic hairy roots showed that rMAP30-KDEL was expressed effectively and that this protein exhibited significant antibacterial activity in a dose-dependent manner. rMAP30-KDEL also possessed thermal and pH stability. Bioinformatic analysis of MAP30 and other RIPs regarding their conserved motifs, amino-acid contents, charge, aliphatic index, GRAVY value, and secondary structures demonstrated that these factors accounted for their thermophilicity. Therefore, RIPs such as MAP30 and its derived peptides might have promising applications as food preservatives, and their analysis might provide useful insights into designing clinically applicable antibiotic agents. PMID:27459300

  5. MLH1 mediates PARP-dependent cell death in response to the methylating agent N-methyl-N-nitrosourea

    PubMed Central

    McDaid, J R; Loughery, J; Dunne, P; Boyer, J C; Downes, C S; Farber, R A; Walsh, C P

    2009-01-01

    Background: Methylating agents such as N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) can cause cell cycle arrest and death either via caspase-dependent apoptosis or via a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-dependent form of apoptosis. We wished to investigate the possible role of MLH1 in signalling cell death through PARP. Methods: Fibroblasts are particularly dependent on a PARP-mediated cell death response to methylating agents. We used hTERT-immortalised normal human fibroblasts (WT) to generate isogenic MLH1-depleted cells, confirmed by quantitative PCR and western blotting. Drug resistance was measured by clonogenic and cell viability assays and effects on the cell cycle by cell sorting. Damage signalling was additionally investigated using immunostaining. Results: MLH1-depleted cells were more resistant to MNU, as expected. Despite having an intact G2/M checkpoint, the WT cells did not initially undergo cell cycle arrest but instead triggered cell death directly by PARP overactivation and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). The MLH1-depleted cells showed defects in this pathway, with decreased staining for phosphorylated H2AX, altered PARP activity and reduced AIF translocation. Inhibitors of PARP, but not of caspases, blocked AIF translocation and greatly decreased short-term cell death in both WT and MLH1-depleted cells. This MLH1-dependent response to MNU was not blocked by inhibitors of ATM/ATR or p53. Conclusion: These novel data indicate an important role for MLH1 in signalling PARP-dependent cell death in response to the methylating agent MNU. PMID:19623177

  6. Hybrid micellar hydrogels of a thermosensitive ABA triblock copolymer and hairy nanoparticles: effect of spatial location of hairy nanoparticles on gel properties.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Henn, Daniel M; Wright, Roger A E; Zhao, Bin

    2014-09-23

    This article reports a method for control of spatial location of nanoparticles (NPs) in hybrid micellar hydrogels of a thermosensitive ABA triblock copolymer and polymer brush-grafted NPs (hairy NPs), either inside or outside the core of micelles, and the study of the effect of different locations of NPs on gel properties. Two batches of thermosensitive polymer brush-grafted, 17 nm silica NPs with different lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs) and a thermosensitive ABA triblock copolymer composed of a poly(ethylene oxide) central block and thermosensitive outer blocks (ABA-D) were synthesized. The different locations of NPs were achieved by controlling the LCST of hairy NPs (LCST(NP)) relative to that of the thermosensitive outer blocks of ABA-D (LCST(ABA)). When the LCST(NP) and LCST(ABA) were similar, the NPs resided in the core of micelles upon heating from below the LCST(NP) and LCST(ABA). When the LCST(NP) was significantly higher, the NPs were located outside the core of micelles as confirmed by fluorescent resonance energy transfer. The effects of different locations of hairy NPs and NP-to-polymer mass ratio on properties of hybrid micellar hydrogels formed from aqueous solutions of ABA-D with a concentration of 10 wt % and various amounts of hairy NPs were studied by rheological measurements. The sol-gel transition temperature (T(sol-gel)) and dynamic storage modulus G' of the gels with NPs inside the core of micelles did not change much with increasing the NP-to-polymer mass ratio. In contrast, the T(sol-gel) of gels with NPs in the interstitial space among micelles increased slightly and the G' decreased significantly with the increase of the NP-to-polymer ratio. The hairy NPs in the interstitial space appeared to affect the formation of polymer networks and increase the fraction of polymer loops, resulting in a lower density of bridging chains and thus a lower G'. In addition, for gels with NPs in the interstitial space, a noticeable increase in

  7. Preferential enlargement of leukemia cells using cytoskeletal-directed agents and cell cycle growth control parameters to induce sensitivity to low frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Trendowski, Matthew; Wong, Victoria; Zoino, Joseph N; Christen, Timothy D; Gadeberg, Lauren; Sansky, Michelle; Fondy, Thomas P

    2015-05-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) is a form of ultrasound therapy that has been shown to preferentially damage malignant cells based on the relatively enlarged size and altered cytology of neoplastic cells in comparison to normal cells. This study sought to determine whether cytoskeletal-directed agents that either disrupt (cytochalasin B and vincristine) or rigidify (jasplakinolide and paclitaxel) microfilaments and microtubules, respectively, affect ultrasonic sensitivity. U937 human monocytic leukemia cell populations were treated with each cytoskeletal-directed agent alone, and then sonicated at 23.5 kHz under relatively low power and intensity (20-40 W; 10-20 W/cm(2)), or at 20 kHz using moderate power and intensity (60 W; 80 W/cm(2)). In addition, human leukemia lines U937, THP1, K562, and Molt-4, and the murine leukemia line L1210 were sonicated using pulsed 20 kHz ultrasound (80.6 W; 107.5 W/cm(2)) both with and without the addition of cytoskeletal-directed agents to assess whether cytoskeletal-directed agents can potentiate ultrasonic sensitivity in different leukemia lines. Human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSCs) and leukocytes were sonicated with continuous 23.5 kHz ultrasound (20 W; 10 W/cm(2)) to determine whether this approach elicited the preferential damage of neoplastic cells over normal blood components. To determine whether ultrasonic sensitivity is exclusively dependent on cell size, leukemia cells were also enlarged via alteration of cell growth parameters including serum deprivation and re-addition, and plateau-phase subculturing. Results indicated that cytochalasin B/ultrasound treatments had the highest rates of initial U937 cell damage. The cells enlarged and partially synchronized, either by serum deprivation and re-addition or by plateau-phase subculturing and synchronous release, were not comparably sensitive to ultrasonic destruction based solely on their cell size. In addition, cytochalasin B significantly potentiated

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of naphthalene-based thiosemicarbazone derivatives as new anticancer agents against LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Altintop, Mehlika Dilek; Sever, Belgin; Özdemir, Ahmet; Kuş, Gökhan; Oztopcu-Vatan, Pinar; Kabadere, Selda; Kaplancikli, Zafer Asim

    2016-01-01

    Fourteen new naphthalene-based thiosemicarbazone derivatives were designed as anticancer agents against LNCaP human prostate cancer cells and synthesized. MTT assay indicated that compounds 6, 8 and 11 exhibited inhibitory effect on LNCaP cells. Among these compounds, 4-(naphthalen-1-yl)-1-[1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylidene)thiosemicarbazide (6), which caused more than 50% death on LNCaP cells, was chosen for flow cytometric analysis of apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis pointed out that compound 6 also showed apoptotic effect on LNCaP cells. Compound 6 can be considered as a promising anticancer agent against LNCaP cells owing to its potent cytotoxic activity and apoptotic effect. PMID:25826149

  9. Effect of the successive steps of a cryopreservation protocol on the structural integrity of Rubia akane Nakai hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Salma, Mohammad; Engelmann-Sylvestre, Isabelle; Collin, Myriam; Escoute, Jacques; Lartaud, Marc; Yi, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Haeng-Hoon; Verdeil, Jean-Luc; Engelmann, Florent

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we studied the impact of the successive steps of the droplet-vitrification protocol technique employed for cryopreservation of Rubia akane hairy roots on the features of cortical, pericycle and endoderm cells of apical and central root segments, using histology techniques and combining qualitative and quantitative observations. In apical segments, plasmolysis (22-71 %, depending on cell type) was observed only after the loading treatment and did not increase after the following steps of the protocol. By contrast, in central segments, plasmolysis (39-45 %) was already observed after the sucrose pretreatment; it increased to 54-68 %, depending on cell type, after the loading treatment, but no further changes were noted after treatment with the vitrification solution. After liquid nitrogen exposure and unloading treatment, deplasmolysis was more rapid in apical segments, with cortical and pericycle cells having retrieved their original features. In central segments, only cortical cells had retrieved their original features and endoderm and pericycle cells were still highly plasmolysed. Nuclei were more strongly impacted by the cryopreservation protocol in central segments, where they displayed a highly condensed nucleoplasm from the loading treatment onwards and had not retrieved their original aspect after the unloading treatment. By contrast, nuclei had a much less condensed nucleoplasm in cells of apical segments, and they had retrieved their original aspect after the unloading treatment. PMID:24150426

  10. Expression of sulfotransferase SULT1A1 in cancer cells predicts susceptibility to the novel anticancer agent NSC-743380

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Wu, Shuhong; Liu, Xiaoying; Li, Hongyu; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Rui-Yu; Sun, Xiaoping; Wei, Caimiao; Baggerly, Keith A.; Roth, Jack A.; Wang, Michael; Swisher, Stephen G.; Fang, Bingliang

    2015-01-01

    The small molecule anticancer agent NSC-743380 modulates functions of multiple cancer-related pathways and is highly active in a subset of cancer cell lines in the NCI-60 cell line panel. It also has promising in vivo anticancer activity. However, the mechanisms underlying NSC-743380's selective anticancer activity remain uncharacterized. To determine biomarkers that may be used to identify responders to this novel anticancer agent, we performed correlation analysis on NSC-743380's anticancer activity and the gene expression levels in NCI-60 cell lines and characterized the functions of the top associated genes in NSC-743380–mediated anticancer activity. We found sulfotransferase SULT1A1 is causally associated with NSC-743380's anticancer activity. SULT1A1 was expressed in NSC-743380–sensitive cell lines but was undetectable in resistant cancer cells. Ectopic expression of SULT1A1 in NSC743380 resistant cancer cells dramatically sensitized the resistant cells to NSC-743380. Knockdown of the SULT1A1 in the NSC-743380 sensitive cancer cell line rendered it resistance to NSC-743380. The SULT1A1 protein levels in cell lysates from 18 leukemia cell lines reliably predicted the susceptibility of the cell lines to NSC-743380. Thus, expression of SULT1A1 in cancer cells is required for NSC-743380's anticancer activity and can be used as a biomarker for identification of NSC-743380 responders. PMID:25514600

  11. Modification of phenolic metabolism in soybean hairy roots through down regulation of chalcone synthase or isoflavone synthase.

    PubMed

    Lozovaya, Vera V; Lygin, Anatoliy V; Zernova, Olga V; Ulanov, Alexander V; Li, Shuxian; Hartman, Glen L; Widholm, Jack M

    2007-02-01

    Soybean hairy roots, transformed with the soybean chalcone synthase (CHS6) or isoflavone synthase (IFS2) genes, with dramatically decreased capacity to synthesize isoflavones were produced to determine what effects these changes would have on susceptibility to a fungal pathogen. The isoflavone and coumestrol concentrations were decreased by about 90% in most lines apparently due to gene silencing. The IFS2 transformed lines had very low IFS enzyme activity in microsomal fractions as measured by the conversion of naringenin to genistein. The CHS6 lines with decreased isoflavone concentrations had 5 to 20-fold lower CHS enzyme activities than the appropriate controls. Both IFS2 and CHS transformed lines accumulated higher concentrations of both soluble and cell wall bound phenolic acids compared to controls with higher levels found in the CHS6 lines indicating alterations in the lignin biosynthetic branch of the pathway. Induction of the soybean phytoalexin glyceollin, of which the precursor is the isoflavone daidzein, by the fungal pathogen Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines (FSG) that causes soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS) showed that the low isoflavone transformed lines did not accumulate glyceollin while the control lines did. The (iso)liquritigenin content increased upon FSG induction in the IFS2 transformed roots indicating that the pathway reactions before this point can control isoflavonoid synthesis. The lowest fungal growth rate on hairy roots was found on the FSG partially resistant control roots followed by the SDS sensitive control roots and the low isoflavone transformants. The results indicate the importance of phytoalexin synthesis in root resistance to the pathogen. PMID:16924535

  12. Anti-cancer effects of newly developed chemotherapeutic agent, glycoconjugated palladium (II) complex, against cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cisplatin (CDDP) is the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agent for various types of advanced cancer, including gastric cancer. However, almost all cancer cells acquire resistance against CDDP, and this phenomenon adversely affects prognosis. Thus, new chemotherapeutic agents that can overcome the CDDP-resistant cancer cells will improve the survival of advanced cancer patients. Methods We synthesized new glycoconjugated platinum (II) and palladium (II) complexes, [PtCl2 (L)] and [PdCl2 (L)]. CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cell lines were established by continuous exposure to CDDP, and gene expression in the CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells was analyzed. The cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by [PtCl2 (L)] and [PdCl2 (L)] in CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells were evaluated. DNA double-strand breaks by drugs were assessed by evaluating phosphorylated histone H2AX. Xenograft tumor mouse models were established and antitumor effects were also examined in vivo. Results CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells exhibit ABCB1 and CDKN2A gene up-regulation, as compared with CDDP-sensitive gastric cancer cells. In the analyses of CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells, [PdCl2 (L)] overcame cross-resistance to CDDP in vitro and in vivo. [PdCl2 (L)] induced DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusion These results indicate that [PdCl2 (L)] is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for CDDP-resistant gastric cancer and may have clinical applications. PMID:23672493

  13. Porfiromycin as a bioreductive alkylating agent with selective toxicity to hypoxic EMT6 tumor cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Keyes, S R; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1985-08-01

    Hypoxic cells may limit the curability of solid tumors by conventional chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy. Agents which are preferentially toxic to cells with low oxygen contents could therefore be useful as adjuncts to the regimens now used to treat these cancers. To date, the best agent of this type that we have tested is porfiromycin. Porfiromycin is similar to mitomycin C in its toxicity to hypoxic EMT6 cells in vitro but has much less toxicity than mitomycin C to well-oxygenated EMT6 cells. EMT6 cell sonicates reduce mitomycin C and porfiromycin to reactive electrophiles at similar rates under hypoxic conditions, a finding that correlates with cytotoxicity, whereas the rate of production of reactive species from both drugs is very slow under aerobic conditions. We also show that porfiromycin is capable of killing hypoxic radiation-resistant cells in solid EMT6 tumors. Appropriate regimens combining porfiromycin (which preferentially kills hypoxic cells) and radiation (which preferentially kills aerated cells) may therefore be especially efficacious for the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:3926306

  14. Preferential kill of hypoxic EMT6 mammary tumor cells by the bioreductive alkylating agent porfiromycin.

    PubMed

    Sartorelli, A C; Belcourt, M F; Hodnick, W F; Keyes, S R; Pritsos, C A; Rockwell, S

    1995-01-01

    Hypoxic cells in solid tumors represent a therapeutically resistant population that limits the curability of many solid tumors by irradiation and by most chemotherapeutic agents. The oxygen deficit, however, creates an environment conducive to reductive processes; this results in a major exploitable difference between normal and neoplastic tissues. The mitomycin antibiotics can be reductively activated by a number of oxidoreductases, in a process required for the production of their therapeutic effects. Preferential activation of these drugs under hypoxia and greater toxicity to oxygen-deficient cells than to their oxygenated counterparts are obtained in most instances. The demonstration that mitomycin C and porfiromycin, used to kill the hypoxic fraction, in combination with irradiation, to eradicate the oxygenated portion of the tumor, produced enhanced cytodestructive effects on solid tumors in animals has led to the clinical evaluation of the mitomycins in combination with radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. The findings from these clinical trials have demonstrated the value of directing a concerted therapeutic attack on the hypoxic fraction of solid tumors as an approach toward enhancing the curability of localized neoplasms by irradiation. PMID:7572339

  15. Targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to cholangiocarcinoma cells using folic acid as a targeting agent.

    PubMed

    Ngernyuang, Nipaporn; Seubwai, Wunchana; Daduang, Sakda; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Daduang, Jureerut

    2016-03-01

    There are limits to the standard treatment for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) including drug resistance and side effects. The objective of this study was to develop a new technique for carrying drugs by conjugation with gold nanoparticles and using folic acid as a targeting agent in order to increase drug sensitivity. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were functionalized with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and folic acid (FA) using polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell as a linker (AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA). Its cytotoxicity was tested in CCA cell lines (M139 and M213) which express folic acid receptor (FA receptor). The results showed that AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA increased the cytotoxic effects in the M139 and M213 cells by 4.76% and 7.95%, respectively compared to those treated with free 5FU+FA. It is found that the cytotoxicity of the AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA correlates with FA receptor expression suggested the use of FA as a targeted therapy. The mechanism of cytotoxicity was mediated via mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as determined by apoptosis array. In conclusion, our findings shed some light on the use of gold nanoparticles for conjugation with potential compounds and FA as targeted therapy which contribute to the improvement of anti-cancer drug efficacy. In vivo study should be warranted for its effectiveness of stability, biosafety and side effect reduction. PMID:26706547

  16. Exosomes as Critical Agents of Cardiac Regeneration Triggered by Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed Gamal-Eldin; Cheng, Ke; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Summary The CADUCEUS trial of cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) has shown that it may be possible to regenerate injured heart muscle previously thought to be permanently scarred. The mechanisms of benefit are known to be indirect, but the mediators have yet to be identified. Here we pinpoint exosomes secreted by human CDCs as critical agents of regeneration and cardioprotection. CDC exosomes inhibit apoptosis and promote proliferation of cardiomyocytes, while enhancing angiogenesis. Injection of exosomes into injured mouse hearts recapitulates the regenerative and functional effects produced by CDC transplantation, whereas inhibition of exosome production by CDCs blocks those benefits. CDC exosomes contain a distinctive complement of microRNAs, with particular enrichment of miR-146a. Selective administration of a miR-146a mimic reproduces some (but not all) of the benefits of CDC exosomes. The findings identify exosomes as key mediators of CDC-induced regeneration, while highlighting the potential utility of exosomes as cell-free therapeutic candidates. PMID:24936449

  17. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the cell death process in Candida albicans treated by antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Kim, Young-Sun; Han, Ihn; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Jung, Min Hyung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-01-01

    The death process of Candida albicans was investigated after treatment with the antifungal agents flucytosine and amphotericin B by assessing morphological and biophysical properties associated with cell death. C. albicans was treated varying time periods (from 6 to 48 hours) and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM and AFM images clearly showed changes in morphology and biophysical properties. After drug treatment, the membrane of C. albicans was perforated, deformed, and shrunken. Compared to the control, C. albicans treated with flucytosine was softer and initially showed a greater adhesive force. Conversely, C. albicans treated with amphotericin B was harder and had a lower adhesive force. In both cases, the surface roughness increased as the treatment time increased. The relationships between morphological changes and the drugs were observed by AFM clearly; the surface of C. albicans treated with flucytosine underwent membrane collapse, expansion of holes, and shrinkage, while the membranes of cells treated with amphotericin B peeled off. According to these observations, the death process of C. albicans was divided into 4 phases, CDP(0), CDP(1), CDP(2), and CDP(4), which were determined based on morphological changes. Our results could be employed to further investigate the antifungal activity of compounds derived from natural sources. PMID:22174777

  18. Analysis of FDA-Approved Anti-Cancer Agents in the NCI60 Panel of Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Holbeck, Susan L.; Collins, Jerry M.; Doroshow, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Since the early 1990's the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has utilized a panel of 60 human tumor cell lines representing 9 tissue types to screen for potential new anti-cancer agents. To date, about 100,000 compounds and 50,000 natural product extracts have been screened. Early in this program it was discovered that the pattern of growth inhibition in these cell lines was similar for compounds of similar mechanism. The development of the COMPARE algorithm provided a means by which investigators, starting with a compound of interest, could identify other compounds whose pattern of growth inhibition was similar. With extensive molecular characterization of these cell lines, COMPARE and other user-defined algorithms have been used to link patterns of molecular expression and drug sensitivity. We describe here results of screening current FDA-approved anti-cancer agents in the NCI60 screen, with an emphasis on those agents that target signal transduction. We have analyzed results from agents with mechanisms of action presumed to be similar; we have also performed hierarchical clustering of all of these agents. The addition of data from recently approved anti-cancer agents will increase the utility of the NCI60 databases to the cancer research community. These data are freely accessible to the public on the DTP web site (http://dtp.cancer.gov/). The FDA-approved anti-cancer agents are themselves available from the NCI as a plated set of compounds for research use. PMID:20442306

  19. A novel vascular disrupting agent plinabulin triggers JNK-mediated apoptosis and inhibits angiogenesis in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajita V; Bandi, Madhavi; Raje, Noopur; Richardson, Paul; Palladino, Michael A; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2011-05-26

    Previous studies have established a role of vascular-disrupting agents as anti- cancer agents. Plinabulin is a novel vascular-disrupting agent that exhibits potent interruption of tumor blood flow because of the disruption of tumor vascular endothelial cells, resulting in tumor necrosis. In addition, plinabulin exerts a direct action on tumor cells, resulting in apoptosis. In the present study, we examined the anti-multiple myeloma (MM) activity of plinabulin. We show that low concentrations of plinabulin exhibit a potent antiangiogenic action on vascular endothelial cells. Importantly, plinabulin also induces apoptotic cell death in MM cell lines and tumor cells from patients with MM, associated with mitotic growth arrest. Plinabulin-induced apoptosis is mediated through activation of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Moreover, plinabulin triggered phosphorylation of stress response protein JNK, as a primary target, whereas blockade of JNK with a biochemical inhibitor or small interfering RNA strategy abrogated plinabulin-induced mitotic block or MM cell death. Finally, in vivo studies show that plinabulin was well tolerated and significantly inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival in a human MM.1S plasmacytoma murine xenograft model. Our study therefore provides the rationale for clinical evaluation of plinabulin to improve patient outcome in MM. PMID:21454451

  20. Metabolic shift from withasteroid formation to phenylpropanoid accumulation in cryptogein-cotransformed hairy roots of Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal.

    PubMed

    Sil, Bipradut; Mukherjee, Chiranjit; Jha, Sumita; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2015-07-01

    Cotransformed hairy roots containing a gene that encodes a fungal elicitor protein, β-cryptogein, were established in Withania somnifera, a medicinal plant widely used in Indian systems of medicine. To find out whether β-cryptogein protein endogenously elicits the pathway of withasteroid biosynthesis, withaferin A and withanolide A contents along with transcript accumulation of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthase, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), and sterol glycosyltransferase (SGT) were analyzed in both cryptogein-cotransformed and normal hairy roots of W. somnifera. It was observed that the withaferin A and withanolide A contents were drastically higher in normal hairy roots than cryptogein-cotransformed ones. Similar trends were also observed on the levels of transcript accumulation. Subsequently, the enzyme activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), one of the key enzymes of phenylpropanoid pathway, was measured in both cryptogein-cotransformed and normal hairy roots of W. somnifera along with the levels of PAL transcript accumulation. Upliftment of PAL activity was observed in cryptogein-cotransformed hairy roots as compared to the normal ones, and the PAL expression also reflected a similar trend, i.e., enhanced expression in the cryptogein-cotransformed lines. Upliftment of wall-bound ferulic acid accumulation was also observed in the cryptogein-cotransformed lines, as compared to normal hairy root lines. Thus, the outcome of the above studies suggests a metabolic shift from withanolide accumulation to phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in cryptogein-cotransformed hairy roots of W. somnifera. PMID:25534257

  1. Nitrite Reductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Released by Antimicrobial Agents and Complement Induces Interleukin-8 Production in Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sar, Borann; Oishi, Kazunori; Wada, Akihiro; Hirayama, Toshiya; Matsushima, Kouji; Nagatake, Tsuyoshi

    1999-01-01

    We have recently reported that nitrite reductase, a bifunctional enzyme located in the periplasmic space of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, could induce interleukin-8 (IL-8) generation in a variety of respiratory cells, including bronchial epithelial cells (K. Oishi et al. Infect. Immun. 65:2648–2655, 1997). In this report, we examined the mode of nitrite reductase (PNR) release from a serum-sensitive strain of live P. aeruginosa cells during in vitro treatment with four different antimicrobial agents or human complement. Bacterial killing of P. aeruginosa by antimicrobial agents induced PNR release and mediated IL-8 production in human bronchial epithelial (BET-1A) cells. Among these agents, imipenem demonstrated rapid killing of P. aeruginosa as well as rapid release of PNR and resulted in the highest IL-8 production. Complement-mediated killing of P. aeruginosa was also associated with PNR release and enhanced IL-8 production. The immunoprecipitates of the aliquots of bacterial culture containing imipenem or complement with anti-PNR immunoglobulin G (IgG) induced a twofold-higher IL-8 production than did the immunoprecipitates of the aliquots of bacterial culture with a control IgG. These pieces of evidence confirmed that PNR released in the aliquots of bacterial culture was responsible for IL-8 production in the BET-1A cells. Furthermore, the culture supernatants of the BET-1A cells stimulated with aliquots of bacterial culture containing antimicrobial agents or complement similarly mediated neutrophil migration in vitro. These data support the possibility that a potent inducer of IL-8, PNR, could be released from P. aeruginosa after exposure to antimicrobial agents or complement and contributes to neutrophil migration in the airways during bronchopulmonary infections with P. aeruginosa. PMID:10103183

  2. A highly fluorescent AIE-active theranostic agent with anti-tumor activity to specific cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yueyue; Kwok, Ryan T. K.; Lam, Jacky W. Y.; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2016-06-01

    A tetraphenylethene derivative with a structure resembling Tamoxifen is designed and synthesized as a theranostic agent for cell imaging and anti-breast cancer therapy. Its high brightness, excellent photostability and long-term cell tracing properties enable elucidation of its working mechanism and hence provide new insights into drug development.A tetraphenylethene derivative with a structure resembling Tamoxifen is designed and synthesized as a theranostic agent for cell imaging and anti-breast cancer therapy. Its high brightness, excellent photostability and long-term cell tracing properties enable elucidation of its working mechanism and hence provide new insights into drug development. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed synthesis and characterization of TPE-OH and TPE-TMX PL spectra of TPE-TMX fluorescent photographs of TPE-TMX taken under UV irradiation; various concentrations of TPE-TMX with different incubation times. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08782a

  3. Profilin potentiates chemotherapeutic agents mediated cell death via suppression of NF-κB and upregulation of p53.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Adeel H; Raviprakash, Nune; Mokhamatam, Raveendra B; Gupta, Pankaj; Manna, Sunil K

    2016-04-01

    The molecular mechanism by which Profilin acts as a tumor suppressor is still unclear. Several chemotherapeutic agents, used till date either have unfavorable side effects or acquired resistance in tumor cells. Our findings show that Profilin enhances cell death mediated by several chemotherapeutic-agents. The activation of NF-κB and its dependent genes, mediated by paclitaxel and vinblastine, was completely inhibited in Profilin overexpressing cells. This inhibition was due to the Profilin mediated attenuation of IκBα degradation, thereby preventing p65 nuclear translocation and low NF-κB DNA binding activity.Moreover, Profilin increases level of p53 in the presence of known inducers, such as doxorubicin, vinblastine, and benzofuran. This increased p53 level leads to enhanced cell death as indicated by activation of caspases 3, 8, 9, which results in cleavage of PARP.Furthermore, knocking down of p53 in Profilin overexpressing cells leads to decreased cell death. Ectopic expression of Profilin in HCT116 p53 knock out cells showed lesser cell death as compared to the HCT116 p53 wild type cells. For the first time, we provide evidences, which suggest that Profilin synergizes with chemotherapeutic drugs to induce tumor cell death by regulating NF-κB and p53. Thus, modulation of Profilin may be a useful strategy for effective combination therapy. PMID:26842845

  4. The Sarin-like Organophosphorus Agent bis (isopropyl methyl)phosphonate Induces Apoptotic Cell Death and COX-2 Expression in SK-N-SH Cells.

    PubMed

    Arima, Yosuke; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Namera, Akira; Makita, Ryosuke; Murata, Kazuhiro; Nagao, Masataka

    2016-03-01

    Organophosphorus compounds, such as sarin, are highly toxic nerve agents that inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE), but not cholinesterase, via multiple mechanisms. Recent studies have shown that organophosphorus compounds increase cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and induce neurotoxicity. In this study, we examined the toxicity of the sarin-like organophosphorus agent bis(isopropyl methyl)phosphonate (BIMP) and the effects of BIMP on COX-2 expression in SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells. Exposure to BIMP changed cell morphology and induced caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death accompanied by cleavage of caspase 3, caspase 9, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). It also increased COX-2 expression, while pretreatment with a COX inhibitor, ibuprofen, decreased BIMP-dependent cell death and COX-2 expression in SK-N-SH cells. Thus, our findings suggest that BIMP induces apoptotic cell death and upregulates COX-2 expression. PMID:27348899

  5. Inhibition of CRM1-dependent nuclear export sensitizes malignant cells to cytotoxic and targeted agents.

    PubMed

    Turner, Joel G; Dawson, Jana; Cubitt, Christopher L; Baz, Rachid; Sullivan, Daniel M

    2014-08-01

    the addition of alkylating agents (melphalan), anthracyclines (doxorubicin and daunomycin), BRAF inhibitors, platinum drugs (cisplatin and oxaliplatin), proteosome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib), or tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (imatinib). Also, the sequence of treatment may be important for combination therapy. We found that the most effective treatment regimen involved first priming the cancer cells with the CRM1 inhibitor followed by doxorubicin, bortezomib, carfilzomib, or melphalan. This order sensitized both de novo and acquired drug-resistant cancer cell lines. PMID:24631834

  6. The G-quadruplex-stabilising agent RHPS4 induces telomeric dysfunction and enhances radiosensitivity in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Berardinelli, F; Siteni, S; Tanzarella, C; Stevens, M F; Sgura, A; Antoccia, A

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) interacting agents are a class of ligands that can bind to and stabilise secondary structures located in genomic G-rich regions such as telomeres. Stabilisation of G4 leads to telomere architecture disruption with a consequent detrimental effect on cell proliferation, which makes these agents good candidates for chemotherapeutic purposes. RHPS4 is one of the most effective and well-studied G4 ligands with a very high specificity for telomeric G4. In this work, we tested the in vitro efficacy of RHPS4 in astrocytoma cell lines, and we evaluated whether RHPS4 can act as a radiosensitising agent by destabilising telomeres. In the first part of the study, the response to RHPS4 was investigated in four human astrocytoma cell lines (U251MG, U87MG, T67 and T70) and in two normal primary fibroblast strains (AG01522 and MRC5). Cell growth reduction, histone H2AX phosphorylation and telomere-induced dysfunctional foci (TIF) formation were markedly higher in astrocytoma cells than in normal fibroblasts, despite the absence of telomere shortening. In the second part of the study, the combined effect of submicromolar concentrations of RHPS4 and X-rays was assessed in the U251MG glioblastoma radioresistant cell line. Long-term growth curves, cell cycle analysis and cell survival experiments, clearly showed the synergistic effect of the combined treatment. Interestingly the effect was greater in cells bearing a higher number of dysfunctional telomeres. DNA double-strand breaks rejoining after irradiation revealed delayed repair kinetics in cells pre-treated with the drug and a synergistic increase in chromosome-type exchanges and telomeric fusions. These findings provide the first evidence that exposure to RHPS4 radiosensitizes astrocytoma cells, suggesting the potential for future therapeutic applications. PMID:25467559

  7. GTP depletion synergizes the anti-proliferative activity of chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tao; Meng, Lingjun; Tsai, Robert Y.L.

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} Strong synergy between mycophenolic acid (MPA) and 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells. {yields} Cell type-dependent synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents. {yields} The synergy of MPA on 5-FU is recapitulated by RNA polymerase-I inhibition. {yields} The synergy of MPA on 5-FU requires the expression of nucleostemin. -- Abstract: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) depletes intracellular GTP by blocking de novo guanine nucleotide synthesis. GTP is used ubiquitously for DNA/RNA synthesis and as a signaling molecule. Here, we made a surprising discovery that the anti-proliferative activity of MPA acts synergistically with specific chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, MPA shows an extremely potent synergy with 5-FU but not with doxorubicin or etoposide. The synergy between 5-FU and MPA works most effectively against the highly tumorigenic mammary tumor cells compared to the less tumorigenic ones, and does not work in the non-breast cancer cell types that we tested, with the exception of PC3 cells. On the contrary, MPA shows the highest synergy with paclitaxel but not with 5-FU in SCC-25 cells, derived from oral squamous cell carcinomas. Mechanistically, the synergistic effect of MPA on 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells can be recapitulated by inhibiting the RNA polymerase-I activity and requires the expression of nucleostemin. This work reveals that the synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents is determined by cell type-dependent factors.

  8. Hairy Nightshade is an Alternative Host of Spongospora subterranea, the Potato Powdery Scab Pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root galls possibly caused by Spongospora subterranea were observed on hairy nightshade (Solanum sarrachoide; HNS). HNS galls and galls from potato were used to artificially inoculate potato and HNS. Eighty-three and 52% potato and HNS plants inoculated with potato inoculum had root galls, respectiv...

  9. Genetic diversity of resident soil rhizobia isolated from nodules of distinct hairy vetch genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) is widely grown as a legume cover crop throughout the U.S.A., with biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) through symbiosis with Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae (Rlv) being one of the most sought after benefits of its cultivation. This study determined if HV culti...

  10. Evaporation Time and Spread Area of Adjuvant-amended Droplets on Waxy and Hairy Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the evaporation of pesticide droplets and wetting of leaf surfaces can increase foliar application efficiency and reduce pesticide use. Evaporation time and wetted area of single pesticide droplets on hairy and waxy geranium leaf surfaces were measured under the controlled conditions f...

  11. Hairy nightshade is an alternative host of spongospora subterranea, the potato powdery scab pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Structures, similar to galls developing on potato roots infected by the powdery scab pathogen S. subterranea, were observed on roots of hairy nightshades (Solanum physalifolium, formerly S. sarrachoides) collected from commercial potato fields in Washington State where populations of S. subterranea ...

  12. Hairy Nightshade Undermines Resistance of Potato Breeding Lines to Columbia Root-Knot Nematode

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columbia root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne chitwoodi, is a major pest of potato in the Pacific Northwest of the USA and is controlled by costly soil fumigation. Potato breeding lines have been developed with resistance to the predominant race 1 (CRN-1) of M. chitwoodi. Hairy nightshade, Solanum sarr...

  13. Glyphosate-resistant hairy fleabane (Conyza bonariensis) Documented in the Central Valley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years poor control of hairy fleabane (Conyza bonariensis) with glyphosate has been reported by growers and pest consultants in some areas of the Central Valley. Since glyphosate-resistance in a related species horseweed (Conyza canadensis) was recently documented in similar locations, we ...

  14. Effect of elicitors on the production of gossypol and methylated gossypol in cotton hairy roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of two-chemical elicitors, salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, on the production of gossypol, 6-methoxy gossypol, and 6,6'-dimethoxy gossypol in Gossypium barbadense hairy roots was examined. Methyl jasmonate, but not salicylic acid, was found to increase the production of gossypol and ...

  15. Cropping history affects nodulation and symbiotic efficiency of distinct hairy vetch genotypes with resident soil rhizobia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presence of compatible rhizobia strains is essential for nodulation and BNF of hairy vetch (Vicia villosa, HV). We evaluated how past HV cultivation affects nodulation and nitrogen fixation across host genotypes. Five groups of HV genotypes were inoculated with soil dilutions from six paired fields,...

  16. Hairy nightshade is an alternative host of Spongospora subterranea, the potato powdery scab pathogen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Root galls possibly caused by Spongospora subterranea were observed on hairy nightshade (Solanum sarrachoides; HNS). HNS galls and galls from potato were used to artificially inoculate potato and HNS. Eighty-three and 52% potato and HNS plants inoculated with potato inoculum had root galls, respecti...

  17. Factors influencing plant regeneration from seedling explants of Hairy nightshade (Solanum sarrachoides)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A good model plant to investigate plant – pathogen interactions would be easy to grow, have a short life cycle, be a natural host of many pathogens, and be easy to manipulate genetically. Hairy nightshade (Solanum sarrachoides) is a ubiquitous, fast growing weed that produces copious amounts of see...

  18. Mitragyna speciosa: hairy root culture for triterpenoid production and high yield of mitragynine by regenerated plants.

    PubMed

    Phongprueksapattana, Siriwan; Putalun, Waraporn; Keawpradub, Niwat; Wungsintaweekul, Juraithip

    2008-01-01

    Hairy root cultures of Mitragyna speciosa were established by infection of Agrobacterium rhizogenes ATCC 15834 and maintained in McCown woody plant medium (WPM) supplemented with 0.5 mg/1 naphthaleneacetic acid. The hairy roots were identified for the rooting genes loci of rolA and rolB by polymerase chain reaction. For studying the secondary metabolite production, the n-hexane extract of the hairy roots was prepared and the compounds were isolated by silica gel column chromatography, affording triterpenoids (ursolic acid and oleanolic acid) and phytosterols (beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol). The shoots from the hairy root cultures were regenerated and differentiated to the plantlets. For micropropagation, shoot multiplication was successfully induced from the axillary buds of the regenerated plantlets in WPM supplemented with 0.1 mg/l thidiazuron. The mitragynine contents of 5-month-old regenerated plants and in vitro plantlets (germinated from seeds) were determined using the TLC-densitometric method. The regenerated plants contained (14.25 +/- 0.25) mg/g dry wt mitragynine, whereas the in vitro plantlets contained (4.45 +/- 0.09) mg/g dry wt. PMID:19040109

  19. Evaporation and Coverage Area of Pesticide Droplets on Hairy and Waxy Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fate of pesticide droplets on leaves is significantly influenced by the fine structures found on leaf surfaces. Evaporation times and the maximum coverage areas of single droplets (246, 343, 575, 762, and 886 µm) on hairy and smooth waxy geranium leaf surfaces were determined under controlled co...

  20. Effectiveness of herbicides for control of hairy vetch (Vicia villosa) in winter wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We conducted a field experiment in 2009-10 at Pennsylvania and Maryland locations, and repeated it in 2010-11, to test the effectiveness of post-emergent herbicides applied at fall and spring timings on seeded hairy vetch in winter wheat. We tested 16 herbicide treatment combinations that included ...

  1. Thermally Reversible Physically Cross-Linked Hybrid Network Hydrogels Formed by Thermosensitive Hairy Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wright, Roger A E; Henn, Daniel M; Zhao, Bin

    2016-08-18

    This Article reports on thermally induced reversible formation of physically cross-linked, three-dimensional network hydrogels from aqueous dispersions of thermosensitive diblock copolymer brush-grafted silica nanoparticles (hairy NPs). The hairy NPs consisted of a silica core, a water-soluble polyelectrolyte inner block of poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium iodide), and a thermosensitive poly(methoxydi(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) (PDEGMMA) outer block synthesized by sequential surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerizations and postpolymerization quaternization of tertiary amine moieties. Moderately concentrated dispersions of these hairy nanoparticles in water underwent thermally induced reversible transitions between flowing liquids to self-supporting gels upon heating. The gelation was driven by the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) transition of the PDEGMMA outer block, which upon heating self-associated into hydrophobic domains acting as physical cross-linking points for the gel network. Rheological studies showed that the sol-gel transition temperature decreased with increasing hairy NP concentration, and the gelation was achieved at concentrations as low as 3 wt %. PMID:27455167

  2. Flumioxazin: A new tool for hairy nightshade control in potato production.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flumioxazin was tested at 53 g ai/ha as a tank mix partner for hairy nightshade (Solanum sarrachoides) control in potatoes near Aberdeen, ID, and Paterson, WA from 2001 to 2005. Herbicides were applied after final hilling and preemergence (PRE) to potato and weeds and sprinkler incorporated. Stud...

  3. Degringolade, a SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase, inhibits Hairy/Groucho-mediated repression.

    PubMed

    Abed, Mona; Barry, Kevin C; Kenyagin, Dorit; Koltun, Bella; Phippen, Taryn M; Delrow, Jeffrey J; Parkhurst, Susan M; Orian, Amir

    2011-04-01

    Transcriptional cofactors are essential for proper embryonic development. One such cofactor in Drosophila, Degringolade (Dgrn), encodes a RING finger/E3 ubiquitin ligase. Dgrn and its mammalian ortholog RNF4 are SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs). STUbLs bind to SUMOylated proteins via their SUMO interaction motif (SIM) domains and facilitate substrate ubiquitylation. In this study, we show that Dgrn is a negative regulator of the repressor Hairy and its corepressor Groucho (Gro/transducin-like enhancer (TLE)) during embryonic segmentation and neurogenesis, as dgrn heterozygosity suppresses Hairy mutant phenotypes and embryonic lethality. Mechanistically Dgrn functions as a molecular selector: it targets Hairy for SUMO-independent ubiquitylation that inhibits the recruitment of its corepressor Gro, without affecting the recruitment of its other cofactors or the stability of Hairy. Concomitantly, Dgrn specifically targets SUMOylated Gro for sequestration and antagonizes Gro functions in vivo. Our findings suggest that by targeting SUMOylated Gro, Dgrn serves as a molecular switch that regulates cofactor recruitment and function during development. As Gro/TLE proteins are conserved universal corepressors, this may be a general paradigm used to regulate the Gro/TLE corepressors in other developmental processes. PMID:21343912

  4. Determining efficacy of cancer chemopreventive agents using a cell-free system concomitant with DNA adduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, W A; Gupta, R C

    1999-03-10

    The large (>2000) and expanding number of natural and synthetic agents with potential cancer chemopreventive properties renders it economically and physically impossible to test each of these agents for their efficacy in the widely accepted 2-year animal bioassay and clinical trials. Therefore, there is a growing need for relevant short-term screening tests to study these compounds such that only the most efficacious ones undergo extensive long-term studies. We have previously reported in a pilot study that the use of a microsome-mediated test system concomitant with DNA adduction is a pertinent and relevant model for rapidly studying the efficacy and mechanisms of cancer chemopreventive agents. We have extended this study to investigate 26 additional agents for their potential chemopreventive abilities by studying their effects on microsome-mediated benzo[a]pyrene (BP)-DNA adduction. These agents had differential effects on the two major adducts of BP-DNA, i.e., BP-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE)-deoxyguanosine (dG) and 9-OH-BP-dG-derived adducts. These agents were therefore categorized into five classes. Three test agents (ellagic acid, genistein and oltipraz) were strong inhibitors of both adducts. These agents diminished BP-DNA adduction by 65-95% and were categorized as Class I agents. Six other agents (benzyl isocyanate, R(+)-1-phenylethyl isocyanate, linoleic acid ethyl ester, (+)-biotin, indole-3-carboxylic acid and beta-carotene) moderately inhibited both BP-DNA adducts (25-64%); these compounds were identified as Class II agents. Six additional test agents inhibited only one adduct selectively and nine others were ineffective; these agents were categorized as Class III and Class IV, respectively. Interestingly, seven test agents enhanced BPDE-dG or 9-OH-BP-dG or both adducts and were categorized as Class V agents. Four of these Class V agents concomitantly inhibited BPDE-dG while enhancing 9-OH-BP-dG. This emphasizes the importance of studying individual DNA

  5. Echium acanthocarpum hairy root cultures, a suitable system for polyunsaturated fatty acid studies and production

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The therapeutic and health promoting role of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) from fish, i.e. eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) are well known. These same benefits may however be shared by some of their precursors, the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as stearidonic acid (SDA, 18:4 n-3). In order to obtain alternative sources for the large-scale production of PUFAs, new searches are being conducted focusing on higher plants oils which can contain these n-3 and n-6 C18 precursors, i.e. SDA and GLA (18:3n-6, γ-linolenic acid). Results The establishment of the novel Echium acanthocarpum hairy root cultures represents a powerful tool in order to research the accumulation and metabolism of fatty acids (FAs) in a plant particularly rich in GLA and SDA. Furthermore, this study constitutes the first example of a Boraginaceae species hairy root induction and establishment for FA studies and production. The dominant PUFAs, 18:2n-6 (LA, linoleic acid) and 18:3n-6 (GLA), accounted for about 50% of total FAs obtained, while the n-3 PUFAs, 18:3n-3 (ALA, α-linolenic acid) and 18:4n-3 (SDA), represented approximately 5% of the total. Production of FAs did not parallel hairy root growth, and the optimal productivity was always associated with the highest biomass density during the culture period. Assuming a compromise between FA production and hairy root biomass, it was determined that sampling times 4 and 5 gave the most useful FA yields. Total lipid amounts were in general comparable between the different hairy root lines (29.75 and 60.95 mg/g DW), with the major lipid classes being triacylglycerols. The FAs were chiefly stored in the hairy roots with very minute amounts being released into the liquid nutrient medium. Conclusions The novel results presented here show the utility and high potential of E. acanthocarpum hairy roots. They are capable of biosynthesizing and accumulating a large range of

  6. Photovoltaic properties of high efficiency plastic dye-sensitized solar cells employing interparticle binding agent ``nanoglue''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuelong; Yoo, Kicheon; Lee, Doh-Kwon; Kim, Jin Young; Kim, Honggon; Kim, Bongsoo; Ko, Min Jae

    2013-05-01

    An interparticle binding agent, or nanoglue, was synthesized by a sol-gel process, which facilitated the preparation of well-interconnected TiO2 electrodes at low-temperatures for plastic dye-sensitized solar cells. The viscosity of the nanoglue-based pastes was seven times higher than that obtained in pastes without any nanoglue. The increased viscosity was sufficiently high enough for coating thick films to fabricate TiO2 electrodes. The structural and photovoltaic properties of the films were extensively investigated by varying the amounts of nanoglue. A reduced pore size and greatly enhanced surface area were observed in the nanoglue-based films. Improved interparticle connectivity, resulting in faster electron transport, was confirmed by photocurrent transient spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance measurements of the nanoglue-based films. The electron diffusion length and charge collection efficiency were also enhanced in these nanoglue-based films. A maximum conversion efficiency of 5.43% was achieved in films containing 20 wt% nanoglue fabricated on a plastic substrate under one-sun illumination, even without any additional treatment.

  7. The cyclophilin-binding agent Sanglifehrin A is a dendritic cell chemokine and migration inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Immecke, Sabrina N; Baal, Nelli; Wilhelm, Jochen; Bechtel, Juliane; Knoche, Angela; Bein, Gregor; Hackstein, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Sanglifehrin A (SFA) is a cyclophilin-binding immunosuppressant but the immunobiology of action is poorly understood. We and others have reported that SFA inhibits IL-12 production and antigen uptake in dendritic cells (DC) and exhibits lower activity against lymphocytes. Here we show that SFA suppresses DC chemokine production and migration. Gene expression analysis and subsequent protein level confirmation revealed that SFA suppressed CCL5, CCL17, CCL19, CXCL9 and CXCL10 expression in human monocyte-derived DC (moDC). A systems biology analysis, Onto Express, confirmed that SFA interferes with chemokine-chemokine receptor gene expression with the highest impact. Direct comparison with the related agent cyclosporine A (CsA) and dexamethasone indicated that SFA uniquely suppresses moDC chemokine expression. Competitive experiments with a 100-fold molar excess of CsA and with N-Methyl-Val-4-cyclosporin, representing a nonimmunosuppressive derivative of CsA indicated chemokine suppression through a cyclophilin-A independent pathway. Functional assays confirmed reduced migration of CD4+ Tcells and moDCs to supernatant of SFA-exposed moDCs. Vice versa, SFA-exposed moDC exhibited reduced migration against CCL19. Moreover, SFA suppressed expression of the ectoenzyme CD38 that was reported to regulate DC migration and cytokine production. These results identify SFA as a DC chemokine and migration inhibitor and provide novel insight into the immunobiology of SFA. PMID:21483789

  8. The Cyclophilin-Binding Agent Sanglifehrin A Is a Dendritic Cell Chemokine and Migration Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Immecke, Sabrina N.; Baal, Nelli; Wilhelm, Jochen; Bechtel, Juliane; Knoche, Angela; Bein, Gregor; Hackstein, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Sanglifehrin A (SFA) is a cyclophilin-binding immunosuppressant but the immunobiology of action is poorly understood. We and others have reported that SFA inhibits IL-12 production and antigen uptake in dendritic cells (DC) and exhibits lower activity against lymphocytes. Here we show that SFA suppresses DC chemokine production and migration. Gene expression analysis and subsequent protein level confirmation revealed that SFA suppressed CCL5, CCL17, CCL19, CXCL9 and CXCL10 expression in human monocyte-derived DC (moDC). A systems biology analysis, Onto Express, confirmed that SFA interferes with chemokine-chemokine receptor gene expression with the highest impact. Direct comparison with the related agent cyclosporine A (CsA) and dexamethasone indicated that SFA uniquely suppresses moDC chemokine expression. Competitive experiments with a 100-fold molar excess of CsA and with N-Methyl-Val-4-cyclosporin, representing a nonimmunosuppressive derivative of CsA indicated chemokine suppression through a cyclophilin-A independent pathway. Functional assays confirmed reduced migration of CD4+ Tcells and moDCs to supernatant of SFA-exposed moDCs. Vice versa, SFA-exposed moDC exhibited reduced migration against CCL19. Moreover, SFA suppressed expression of the ectoenzyme CD38 that was reported to regulate DC migration and cytokine production. These results identify SFA as a DC chemokine and migration inhibitor and provide novel insight into the immunobiology of SFA. PMID:21483789

  9. Loss of suppression of normal bone marrow colony formation by leukemic cell lines after differentiation is induced by chemical agents.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, H N; Tsiftsoglou, A S; Robinson, S H

    1985-01-01

    The human leukemic cell lines K562 and HL-60 were cocultured with normal bone marrow (BM) cells. Coculture with 10(4) K562 or HL-60 cells results in 50% inhibition of normal CFU-E and BFU-E colony formation. However, when the same number of K562 and HL-60 cells is first treated for two to five days with agents that induce their differentiation, a gradual loss in their capacity to inhibit CFU-E and BFU-E colony formation is observed. The inhibitory material in K562 cells is soluble and present in conditioned medium from cultures of these cells. The degree to which leukemic cell suppression of CFU-E and BFU-E growth is reversed is correlated with the time of exposure to the inducing agent. Suppression is no longer evident after five days of prior treatment with inducers. In fact, up to a 90% stimulation of CFU-E growth is observed in cocultures with K562 cells that have been pretreated with 30 to 70 mumol/L hemin for five days. K562 cells treated with concentrations of hemin as low as 30 mumol/L demonstrate increased hemoglobin synthesis and grow normally, but no longer have an inhibitory effect on CFU-E growth. Hence, reversal of normal BM growth inhibition must be caused by the more differentiated state of the K562 cells and not by a decrease in the number of these cells with treatment. Thus, induction of differentiation in cultured leukemic cells not only alters the malignant cell phenotype but also permits improved growth of accompanying normal marrow progenitor cells. Both are desired effects of chemotherapy. PMID:3838080

  10. Control of vortex shedding on a circular cylinder using self-adaptive hairy-flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Sebastian; Brücker, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Experiments on separation control using flexible self-adaptive hairy-flaps are presented herein. The wake-flow behind a circular cylinder is investigated without and with flexible hairy-flaps at the aft-part of the cylinder. Flow dynamics and hair motion were measured by particle image velocimetry and image processing in a range of Reynolds number 5000hairy-flaps alter the natural vortex separation cycle in such a way that the vortices do not shed in a zig-zag like arrangement as in the classical von Kármán vortex street but in line in a row with the cylinder wake axis. Thus, the wake-deficit is largely reduced. Furthermore, flow fluctuations are considerably reduced about 42% in streamwise and 35% in transversal direction compared to the reference case without hairy-flaps, too. The condition for this mode change is the lock-in of the vortex shedding with a traveling wave running through the flexible hair bundles in transversal direction at the aft-part of the cylinder. As a consequence, the vortex shedding frequency is increased, the length of the separation bubble is decreased and drag force is decreased, too. The lock-in appears as a jump-like change of the shedding frequency and a jump in the Strouhal-Reynolds number diagram. However, when the characteristic length for the normalized frequency is chosen as the length of the separation bubble instead of the cylinder diameter, the Str-Re dependence is regular again. This hints on the relevance of the resonator model as proposed by Sigurdson and Roshko (1988) [16] on vortex shedding mechanism when boundary conditions are changed such as in our case, where the hairy-flap bundle imposes a flexible wall with visco-elastic coupling in transversal direction.

  11. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Inducible DNA Cross-Linking Agents and Their Effect on Cancer Cells and Normal Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Reducing host toxicity is one of the main challenges of cancer chemotherapy. Many tumor cells contain high levels of ROS that make them distinctively different from normal cells. We report a series of ROS-activated aromatic nitrogen mustards that selectively kill chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) over normal lymphocytes. These agents showed powerful DNA cross-linking abilities when coupled with H2O2, one of the most common ROS in cancer cells, whereas little DNA cross-linking was detected without H2O2. Consistent with chemistry observation, in vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that these agents induced 40–80% apoptosis in primary leukemic lymphocytes isolated from CLL patients but less than 25% cell death to normal lymphocytes from healthy donors. The IC50 for the most potent compound (2) was ∼5 μM in CLL cells, while the IC50 was not achieved in normal lymphocytes. Collectively, these data provide utility and selectivity of these agents that will inspire further and effective applications. PMID:24801734

  12. Protection against radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells by treatment with antioxidant agents

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, X. Steven; Ware, Jeffrey H.; Zhou, Zhaozong; Donahue, Jeremiah J.; Guan, Jun; Kennedy, Ann R. . E-mail: akennedy@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of antioxidant agents against space radiation-induced oxidative stress in cultured human epithelial cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of selected concentrations of N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, co-enzyme Q10, {alpha}-lipoic acid, L-selenomethionine, and vitamin E succinate on radiation-induced oxidative stress were evaluated in MCF10 human breast epithelial cells exposed to radiation with X-rays, {gamma}-rays, protons, or high mass, high atomic number, and high energy particles using a dichlorofluorescein assay. Results: The results demonstrated that these antioxidants are effective in protecting against radiation-induced oxidative stress and complete or nearly complete protection was achieved by treating the cells with a combination of these agents before and during the radiation exposure. Conclusion: The combination of antioxidants evaluated in this study is likely be a promising countermeasure for protection against space radiation-induced adverse biologic effects.

  13. Reduction of misleading ("false") positive results in mammalian cell genotoxicity assays. III: sensitivity of human cell types to known genotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Paul; Smith, Robert; Smith, Katie; Young, Jamie; Jeffrey, Laura; Carmichael, Paul; Kirkland, David; Pfuhler, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the seemingly high rate of "false" or "misleading" positive results from in vitro micronucleus assays (MNvit) was greater when rodent derived cell lines and certain toxicity measures, such as relative cell count or replication index, were used. These studies suggested that the use of a human cell type with functional p53 and a toxicity measure that included a function of cell proliferation could dramatically reduce the detection of misleading positive results. A reduced "false positive rate" should not be at the expense of a loss of sensitivity of the assay. Therefore, we have investigated the sensitivity of the MNvit assay to known genotoxic agents using three cell types shown previously to be less prone to misleading positives, namely human lymphocytes (HuLy), TK6 and HepG2 cells. The 17 chemicals are well characterised and are from a list of chemicals known to produce positive results in in vitro mammalian cell assays. These data demonstrated a high sensitivity of the assay in which TK6 and HuLy cells were employed, such that 15 out of the 17 chemicals were correctly identified. By contrast, the use of HepG2 cells resulted in far fewer than expected positive responses. In conclusion, using TK6 and HuLy cells in preference to long established rodent cell lines in order to improve specificity does not compromise the sensitivity of the MNvit to detect known genotoxic agents. PMID:24632063

  14. Alkylating agent melphalan augments the efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyun; Ding, Zhi-Chun; Cao, Yang; Liu, Chufeng; Habtetsion, Tsadik; Yu, Miao; Lemos, Henrique; Salman, Huda; Xu, Hongyan; Mellor, Andrew L.; Zhou, Gang

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the immune-potentiating effects of some widely used chemotherapeutic agents have been increasingly appreciated. This provides a rationale for combining conventional chemotherapy with immunotherapy strategies to achieve durable therapeutic benefits. Previous studies have implicated the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan, an alkylating agent commonly used to treat multiple myeloma, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In the current study, we investigated the impact of melphalan on endogenous immune cells as well as adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells in tumor-bearing mice. We showed that melphalan treatment resulted in a rapid burst of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines during the cellular recovery phase after melphalan-induced myelo-leukodepletion. After melphalan treatment, tumor cells exhibited characteristics of immunogenic cell death, including membrane translocation of the endoplasmic reticulum resident calreticulin (CRT), and extracellular release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In addition, there was enhanced tumor antigen uptake by dendritic cells in the tumor-draining lymph node. Consistent with these immunomodulatory effects, melphalan treatment of tumor-bearing mice led to the activation of the endogenous CD8+ T cells, and more importantly, effectively drove the clonal expansion and effector differentiation of adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells. Notably, the combination of melphalan and CD4+ T-cell adoptive cell therapy (ACT) was more efficacious than either treatment alone in prolonging the survival of mice with advanced B-cell lymphomas or colorectal tumors. These findings provide mechanistic insights into melphalan’s immunostimulatory effects, and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of combining melphalan with adoptive cell therapy utilizing antitumor CD4+ T cells. PMID:25560408

  15. Evaluating a core germplasm collection of the cover crop hairy vetch for use in sustainable farming systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding linkage between genotype and agronomically important phenotypes (early flowering, hard seed and winter hardiness) will facilitate cultivar selection and inform breeding programs concerned with the cover crop hairy vetch (Vicia villosa). . We used molecular and biochemical techniques to...

  16. Use of non-melanocytic HEK293 cells stably expressing human tyrosinase for the screening of anti-melanogenic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mijin; An, Sang Mi; Koh, Jae-Sook; Jang, Dong-Il; Boo, Yong Chool

    2011-01-01

    Tyrosinase (TYR) from mushrooms has been inappropriately used in the screening assay for hypopigmenting agents even though its biochemical properties are different from those of human TYR. Cell-free extracts of human epidermal melanocyes (HEMs) could be another choice for the assay, but HEMs grow too slowly to get a sufficient amount of cell-free extracts. In the present study, human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells were transfected with a human TYR construct to establish a cell line that grows rapidly and expresses human TYR constitutively. Cell-free extracts of the established cell line, HEK293-TYR, were tentatively used in the screening assays for 11 phenylpropanoids that have chemical structures similar to that of L-tyrosine, the substrate of TYR. Of the 11 compounds, the strongest inhibition of TYR activity was shown by p-coumaric acid (IC50, 3 μM), followed by 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid (50 μM) and 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)lactic acid (70 μM). The results indicate that p-coumaric acid has an optimal chemical structure for the inhibition of TYR. The effects of these phenylpropanoids on melanin synthesis in HEMs correlated well with their effects on TYR activity in vitro. This study demonstrated that HEK293-TYR cells can be a good source of the human TYR enzymes needed in the screening assay of anti-melanogenic agents. PMID:22152495

  17. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents for Non-invasive Stem Cell Labeling and Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Jiang, Wen; Luo, Kui; Song, Hongmei; Lan, Fang; Wu, Yao; Gu, Zhongwei

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold great promise for the treatment of multiple human diseases and disorders. Tracking and monitoring of stem cells in vivo after transplantation can supply important information for determining the efficacy of stem cell therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with contrast agents is believed to be the most effective and safest non-invasive technique for stem cell tracking in living bodies. Commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in the aid of transfection agents (TAs) have been applied to labeling stem cells. However, owing to the potential toxicity of TAs, more attentions have been paid to develop novel SPIONs with specific surface coating or functional moieties which facilitate effective cell internalization in the absence of TAs. This review aims to summarize the recent progress in the design and preparation of SPIONs as cellular MRI probes, to discuss their applications and current problems facing in stem cell labeling and tracking, and to offer perspectives and solutions for the future development of SPIONs in this field. PMID:23946825

  18. Effects of antidiabetic agents on pancreatic beta-cell function in gestational diabetes: is there enough evidence?

    PubMed

    Tura, Andrea; Göbl, Christian; Pacini, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is typically characterized by the presence of insulin resistance. However, recent studies showed that both insulin resistance and pancreatic beta-cell function impairment may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes in women with history of GDM. In fact, beta-cell function decline was found as significant predictor of later disease in former GDM women progressing towards type 2 diabetes. Despite the evidence of the relevance of beta-cell function quantification in GDM, a low number of studies focused on the effects of GDM treatments on beta-cell function. We briefly present the evidence of the effects on beta-cell function of pharmacological agents, as well as nutrition supplements or medical nutrition therapy, used in the management of GDM. We found that few studies reported information on beta-cell function effects in GDM, despite some agents, such as glyburide, are well known insulin secretagogues. Therefore, further studies should be carried out to clearly assess the effects on beta-cell function of the treatments in GDM women. PMID:26609764

  19. Aδ-fiber low threshold mechanoreceptors innervating mammalian hairy skin: A review of their receptive, electrophysiological and cytochemical properties in relation to Aδ-fiber high threshold mechanoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Djouhri, Laiche

    2016-02-01

    The sensation of gentle touch of the mammalian hairy skin is mediated by morphologically and physiologically distinct classes of low-threshold mechanoreceptors (LTMs) which are classified, according to their axonal conduction velocities, into Aβ-, Aδ- and C-LTMs. Although Aδ-LTMs (D-hair cells) were first described about five decades ago, and have been found in hairy skin of every species examined including humans, it is commonly assumed that all Aδ-fiber neurons are nociceptors. This view is endorsed by many textbooks. This article reviews the evidence that Aδ-LTMs exist in substantial proportions in different species, and that their peripheral and central axonal endings, molecular markers, receptive, electrophysiological and cytochemical properties are distinct from those of Aδ-high-threshold mechanoreceptors (Aδ-HTMs). A brief overview of some of the ion channels and markers that are expressed by the two populations of primary afferent neurons is also provided. Failure to recognize the existence and properties of Aδ-LTMs might lead/have led to misinterpretations of data. Aβ-LTMs and C-LTMs have been reviewed elsewhere and are not subject of this review. PMID:26746589

  20. Use of trimetasphere metallofullerene MRI contrast agent for the non-invasive longitudinal tracking of stem cells in the lung.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean V; Hale, Austin; Reid, Tanya; Olson, John; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Tan, Josh; Zhou, Zhiguo; Jackson, John; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-15

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a commonly used, non-invasive imaging technique that provides visualization of soft tissues with high spatial resolution. In both a research and clinical setting, the major challenge has been identifying a non-invasive and safe method for longitudinal tracking of delivered cells in vivo. The labeling and tracking of contrast agent labeled cells using MRI has the potential to fulfill this need. Contrast agents are often used to enhance the image contrast between the tissue of interest and surrounding tissues with MRI. The most commonly used MRI contrast agents contain Gd(III) ions. However, Gd(III) ions are highly toxic in their ionic form, as they tend to accumulate in the liver, spleen, kidney and bones and block calcium channels. Endohedral metallofullerenes such as trimetallic nitride endohedral metallofullerenes (Trimetasphere®) are one unique class of fullerene molecules where a Gd3N cluster is encapsulated inside a C80 carbon cage referred to as Gd3N@C80. These endohedral metallofullerenes have several advantages over small chelated Gd(III) complexes such as increased stability of the Gd(III) ion, minimal toxic effects, high solubility in water and high proton relativity. In this study, we describe the evaluation of gadolinium-based Trimetasphere® positive contrast agent for the ​in vitro labeling and in vivo tracking of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells within lung tissue. In addition, we conducted a 'proof-of-concept' experiment demonstrating that this methodology can be used to track the homing of stem cells to injured lung tissue and provide longitudinal analysis of cell localization over an extended time course. PMID:26546729

  1. Use of trimetasphere metallofullerene MRI contrast agent for the non-invasive longitudinal tracking of stem cells in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Sean V.; Hale, Austin; Reid, Tanya; Olson, John; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Tan, Josh; Zhou, Zhiguo; Jackson, John; Atala, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a commonly used, non-invasive imaging technique that provides visualization of soft tissues with high spatial resolution. In both a research and clinical setting, the major challenge has been identifying a non-invasive and safe method for longitudinal tracking of delivered cells in vivo. The labeling and tracking of contrast agent labeled cells using MRI has the potential to fulfill this need. Contrast agents are often used to enhance the image contrast between the tissue of interest and surrounding tissues with MRI. The most commonly used MRI contrast agents contain Gd(III) ions. However, Gd(III) ions are highly toxic in their ionic form, as they tend to accumulate in the liver, spleen, kidney and bones and block calcium channels. Endohedral metallofullerenes such as trimetallic nitride endohedral metallofullerenes (Trimetasphere®) are one unique class of fullerene molecules where a Gd3N cluster is encapsulated inside a C80 carbon cage referred to as Gd3N@C80. These endohedral metallofullerenes have several advantages over small chelated Gd(III) complexes such as increased stability of the Gd(III) ion, minimal toxic effects, high solubility in water and high proton relativity. In this study, we describe the evaluation of gadolinium-based Trimetasphere® positive contrast agent for the in vitro labeling and in vivo tracking of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells within lung tissue. In addition, we conducted a ‘proof-of-concept’ experiment demonstrating that this methodology can be used to track the homing of stem cells to injured lung tissue and provide longitudinal analysis of cell localization over an extended time course. PMID:26546729

  2. Investigation of effect of anti-aggregation agent on the performance of nanostructure dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinnezhad, M.; Moradian, S.; Gharanjig, K.

    2015-06-01

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on indigo dyes exhibit suitable conversion efficiency. These organic dyes have been undergone for aggregation. Electron transfer process is reduced due to an aggregation of molecular dyes. Therefore, anti-aggregation agent is commonly utilized in fabrication of DSSCs. In the present study, two anti-aggregation agents namely as 3α,7α-dihydroxy-5β-cholanic acid (cheno) and 3α,7α,12α-trihydroxy-5β-cholanic acid (cholic acid) were added to indigo dye solution in DSSCs in order to determine the photovoltaic parameters such as short circuit photocurrent, open circuit voltage and conversion efficiency of each individual dye in the absence and presence of anti-aggregation agents. The results show that the conversion efficiencies are improved with reduced aggregation. Spectrophotometric evaluations of the indigo dyes in solution and on a TiO2 substrate were carried out in the absence and presence of anti-aggregation agents in order to estimate changes in the status of the dyes in different environments. J-type aggregates on the nano TiO2 are reduced in the presence of anti-aggregation agents.

  3. A high-throughput method to measure the sensitivity of yeast cells to genotoxic agents in liquid cultures.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, Martin; Levasseur, Geneviève; Gervais-Bird, Julien; Wellinger, Raymund J; Elela, Sherif Abou; Conconi, Antonio

    2006-07-14

    The sensitivity of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to DNA damaging agents is better represented when cells are grown in liquid media than on solid plates. However, systematic assessment of several strains that are grown in different conditions is a cumbersome undertaking. We report an assay to determine cell growth based on automatic measurements of optical densities of very small (100 microl) liquid cell cultures. Furthermore, an algorithm was elaborated to analyze large data files obtained from the cell growth curves, which are described by the growth rate--that starts at zero and accelerates to the maximal rate (mu(m))--and by the lag time (lambda). Cell dilution spot test for colony formation on solid media and the growth curve assay were used in parallel to analyze the phenotypes of cells after treatments with three different classes of DNA damaging agents (methyl methanesulfonate, bleomycin, and ultraviolet light). In these experiments the survival of the WT (wild type) and a number of DNA repair-deficient strains were compared. The results show that only the cell growth curve assay could uncover subtle phenotypes when WT cells, or mutant strains that are only weakly affected in DNA repair proficiency, were treated with low doses of cytotoxic compounds. The growth curve assay was also applied to establish whether histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases affect the resistance of yeast cells to UV irradiation. Out of 20 strains tested the sir2delta and rpd3delta cells were found to be more resistant than the WT, while gcn5delta and spt10delta cells were found to be more sensitive. This new protocol is sensitive, provides quantifiable data, offers increased screening capability and speed compared to the colony formation test. PMID:16713735

  4. Long-term cultured hairy roots of chicory-a rich source of hydroxycinnamates and 8-deoxylactucin glucoside.

    PubMed

    Malarz, Janusz; Stojakowska, Anna; Kisiel, Wanda

    2013-12-01

    A 12-year-old hairy root culture of Cichorium intybus L., a callus culture of the plant as well as roots and leaves of a wild plant of chicory, and roots of two C. intybus L. var. sativum cultivars were examined in respect of their hydroxycinnamate and sesquiterpene lactone compositions and contents. Total phenolics and diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity of the examined plant tissues were also analyzed. The most active in radical scavenging were extracts from the hairy roots and leaves of chicory. 3,5-Dicaffeoylquinic acid was the major antioxidant present in the hairy roots. Its content in the root biomass reached 5.5 %, calculated on a dry weight basis. 8-Deoxylactucin glucoside (crepidiaside A) was the major sesquiterpene lactone in the hairy roots. Its content reached 1.4 %, calculated on a dry weight basis, and was nearly two orders of magnitude higher than that in the roots of wild chicory plant. The glucosidic derivative of 8-deoxylactucin constituted over 85 % of the total sesquiterpene lactone content in the long-term cultured hairy roots of chicory. Aglycone of this compound was reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity. The qualitative and quantitative analyses of hydroxycinnamates in callus and hairy root cultures of C. intybus were undertaken for the first time. PMID:23975347

  5. Selection of reference genes for qPCR in hairy root cultures of peanut

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Hairy root cultures produced via Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation have emerged as practical biological models to elucidate the biosynthesis of specialized metabolites. To effectively understand the expression patterns of the genes involved in the metabolic pathways of these compounds, reference genes need to be systematically validated under specific experimental conditions as established by the MIQE (Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments) guidelines. In the present report we describe the first validation of reference genes for RT-qPCR in hairy root cultures of peanut which produce stilbenoids upon elicitor treatments. Results A total of 21 candidate reference genes were evaluated. Nineteen genes were selected based on previous qPCR studies in plants and two were from the T-DNAs transferred from A. rhizogenes. Nucleotide sequences of peanut candidate genes were obtained using their homologous sequences in Arabidopsis. To identify the suitable primers, calibration curves were obtained for each candidate reference gene. After data analysis, 12 candidate genes meeting standard efficiency criteria were selected. The expression stability of these genes was analyzed using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms and a ranking was established based on expression stability of the genes. Candidate reference gene expression was shown to have less variation in methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treated root cultures than those treated with sodium acetate (NaOAc). Conclusions This work constitutes the first effort to validate reference genes for RT-qPCR in hairy roots. While these genes were selected under conditions of NaOAc and MeJA treatment, we anticipate these genes to provide good targets for reference genes for hairy roots under a variety of stress conditions. The lead reference genes were a gene encoding for a TATA box binding protein (TBP2) and a gene encoding a ribosomal protein (RPL8C). A commonly used reference gene

  6. In silico modelling of a cancer stem cell-targeting agent and its effects on tumour control during radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Marcu, David

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNC), like most solid tumours, contain a subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSC) that are commonly responsible for treatment failure. Conventional therapies are unsuccessful in controlling CSCs, thus novel, targeting therapies are needed. A promising agent is ATRA (All-trans-retinoic acid) that was shown to induce CSC differentiation, cell cycle redistribution and CSCs radiosensitisation. To add to the limited data, this work simulated the effects of ATRA on a virtual HNC and evaluated tumour response to radiotherapy. A Monte Carlo technique was employed to grow a HNC consisting of all lineages of cancer cells. The biologically realistic input parameters led to a pre-treatment CSC population of 5.9%. The Linear Quadratic model was employed to simulate radiotherapy. ATRA-induced differentiation, cell arrest and apoptosis were modelled, based on literature data. While the effect of differentiation was marginal, the strongest influence on CSC subpopulation was displayed by ATRA’s cell arrest effect via an exponential behaviour of the dose-response curve. The apoptotic effect induced by ATRA shows linear correlation between the percentage of apoptotic cells and dose required to eradicate CSCs. In conclusion, ATRA is a potent CSC-targeting agent with viable impact on tumour control when combined with radiotherapy. PMID:27573059

  7. Direct cellular effects of some mediators, hormones and growth factor-like agents on denervated (isolated) rat gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Bódis, B; Karádi, O; Nagy, L; Dohoczky, C; Kolega, M; Mózsik, G

    1997-01-01

    The brain-gut axis has an important role in the mechanism of gastric cytoprotection in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of protective agents without any central and peripheral innervation. A mixed population of rat gastric mucosal cells was isolated by the method of Nagy et al (Gastroenterology (1994) 77, 433-443). Cells were incubated for 60 min with cytoprotective drugs such as prostacyclin, histamine, pentagastrin and PL-10 substances (synthesized parts of BPC). At the end of this incubation cells were treated by 15% ethanol for 5 min. Cell viability was tested by trypan blue exclusion test and succinic dehydrogenase activity. The following results were obtained: 1) prostacyclin, histamine and pentagastrin had no direct cytoprotective effect on isolated cells; and 2) PL-10 substances significantly protected the cells against ethanol-induced cellular damage. This led to the following conclusions: 1) in the phenomenon of gastric cytoprotection only the growth factor-like agents have a direct cellular effect; and 2) the intact peripheral innervation is basically necessary for the development of mediators and hormone-induced gastric cytoprotection. PMID:9403792

  8. Esters of Bendamustine Are by Far More Potent Cytotoxic Agents than the Parent Compound against Human Sarcoma and Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Stefan; Huettner, Johannes Philip; Hacker, Kristina; Bernhardt, Günther; König, Jörg; Buschauer, Armin

    2015-01-01

    The alkylating agent bendamustine is approved for the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies such as non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma. As preliminary data on recently disclosed bendamustine esters suggested increased cytotoxicity, we investigated representative derivatives in more detail. Especially basic esters, which are positively charged under physiological conditions, were in the crystal violet and the MTT assay up to approximately 100 times more effective than bendamustine, paralleled by a higher fraction of early apoptotic cancer cells and increased expression of p53. Analytical studies performed with bendamustine and representative esters revealed pronounced cellular accumulation of the derivatives compared to the parent compound. In particular, the pyrrolidinoethyl ester showed a high enrichment in tumor cells and inhibition of OCT1- and OCT3-mediated transport processes, suggesting organic cation transporters to be involved. However, this hypothesis was not supported by the differential expression of OCT1 (SLC22A1) and OCT3 (SLC22A3), comparing a panel of human cancer cells. Bendamustine esters proved to be considerably more potent cytotoxic agents than the parent compound against a broad panel of human cancer cell types, including hematologic and solid malignancies (e.g. malignant melanoma, colorectal carcinoma and lung cancer), which are resistant to bendamustine. Interestingly, spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes, as a model of “normal” cells, were by far less sensitive than tumor cells against the most potent bendamustine esters. PMID:26196503

  9. In silico modelling of a cancer stem cell-targeting agent and its effects on tumour control during radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Loredana G; Marcu, David

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancers (HNC), like most solid tumours, contain a subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSC) that are commonly responsible for treatment failure. Conventional therapies are unsuccessful in controlling CSCs, thus novel, targeting therapies are needed. A promising agent is ATRA (All-trans-retinoic acid) that was shown to induce CSC differentiation, cell cycle redistribution and CSCs radiosensitisation. To add to the limited data, this work simulated the effects of ATRA on a virtual HNC and evaluated tumour response to radiotherapy. A Monte Carlo technique was employed to grow a HNC consisting of all lineages of cancer cells. The biologically realistic input parameters led to a pre-treatment CSC population of 5.9%. The Linear Quadratic model was employed to simulate radiotherapy. ATRA-induced differentiation, cell arrest and apoptosis were modelled, based on literature data. While the effect of differentiation was marginal, the strongest influence on CSC subpopulation was displayed by ATRA's cell arrest effect via an exponential behaviour of the dose-response curve. The apoptotic effect induced by ATRA shows linear correlation between the percentage of apoptotic cells and dose required to eradicate CSCs. In conclusion, ATRA is a potent CSC-targeting agent with viable impact on tumour control when combined with radiotherapy. PMID:27573059

  10. Inhibition of DNA Synthesis by a Platinum–Acridine Hybrid Agent Leads to Potent Cell Kill in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The platinum–acridine anticancer agent [PtCl(en)(LH)](NO3)2 (1) [en = ethane-1,2-diamine, LH = N-(2-(acridin-9-ylamino)ethyl)-N-methylpropionimidamide, acridinium cation] and the clinical drug cisplatin were studied in chemoresistant nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines for their cytotoxic potency and cell kill mechanisms. In the three cell lines tested (NCI-H460, NCI-H522, and NCI-H1435), compound 1 shows a pronounced cytotoxic enhancement of 40–200-fold as compared to cisplatin at inhibitory concentrations reaching the low nanomolar range. On the basis of changes in cell adhesion and cell morphology, monitored in real time by impedance measurements, compound 1 kills NCI-H460 cells significantly more efficiently than cisplatin at equitoxic concentrations. Flow cytometry analysis of NCI-H460 cells reveals a robust S phase arrest of cells treated with compound 1, whereas cells treated with cisplatin progress to G2/M of the cell cycle. A pronounced inhibition of DNA replication in 75% of viable cells is observed in NCI-H460 cells treated with compound 1 at an IC90 molar concentration for 48 h, based on the reduced incorporation of the fluorophore-clickable nucleoside analogue 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) into newly synthesized DNA. The distinct cell cycle perturbations and cell kill potential of compound 1 are discussed in the light of the DNA interactions of this agent and its potential to overcome cisplatin resistance in NSCLC. PMID:22328962

  11. Inhibition of DNA Synthesis by a Platinum-Acridine Hybrid Agent Leads to Potent Cell Kill in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Smyre, Christopher L; Saluta, Gilda; Kute, Timothy E; Kucera, Gregory L; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2011-08-31

    The platinum-acridine anti-cancer agent [PtCl(en)(LH)](NO(3))(2) (1) (en = ethane-1,2-diamine, LH = N-(2-(acridin-9-ylamino)ethyl)-N-methylpropionimidamide, acridinium cation) and the clinical drug cisplatin were studied in chemoresistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines for their cytotoxic potency and cell-kill mechanisms. In the three cell lines tested (NCI-H460, NCI-H522, and NCI-H1435) compound 1 shows a pronounced cytotoxic enhancement of 40-200-fold compared to cisplatin at inhibitory concentrations reaching the low-nanomolar range. Based on changes in cell adhesion and cell morphology, monitored in real time by impedance measurements, compound 1 kills NCI-H460 cells significantly more efficiently than cisplatin at equitoxic concentrations. Flow cytometry analysis of NCI-H460 cells reveals a robust S-phase arrest of cells treated with compound 1, whereas cells treated with cisplatin progress to G2/M of the cell cycle. A pronounced inhibition of DNA replication in 75% of viable cells is observed in NCI-H460 cells treated with compound 1 at an IC(90) molar concentration for 48 h, based on the reduced incorporation of the fluorophore-clickable nucleoside analogue 5-ethynyl-2´-deoxyuridine (EdU) into newly synthesized DNA. The distinct cell-cycle perturbations and cell-kill potential of compound 1 are discussed in the light of the DNA interactions of this agent and its potential to overcome cisplatin resistance in NSCLC. PMID:22328962

  12. Optimal inductive and cultural conditions of Polygonum multiflorum transgenic hairy roots mediated with Agrobacterium rhizogenes R1601 and an analysis of their anthraquinone constituents

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bing; Lin, Huanjie; Yan, Chuanyan; Qiu, Hongyan; Qiu, Lipeng; Yu, Rongmin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Polygonum multiflorum is an important medicinal plant. Hairy roots systems obtained by transforming plant tissues with the natural genetic engineer Agrobacterium rhizogenes can produce valuable biological active substances, which have immense potential in the pharmaceutical industry. Objective: To optimize the inductive and cultural conditions of P. multiflorum hairy roots and to identify the major active secondary metabolites in hairy roots. Materials and Methods: P. multiflorum hairy root were mediated with A. rhizogenes R1601 to induce hairy roots. Four combinations, including Murashige–Skoog (MS), 1/2 MS, B5, and White, were investigated to optimize the culture medium. MS medium was selected for the growth measurement. The qualitative and quantitative determinations of free anthraquinone in hairy roots were compared with the calli and aseptic plantlets using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: The inductive rates of hairy roots by leaves were higher than for any other explants. The presence of agropine in the P. multiflorum hairy roots confirmed that they were indeed transgenic. MS medium was the most suitable of the four media for hairy root growth. Meanwhile, the growth kinetics and nutrient consumption results showed that the hairy roots displayed a sigmoidal growth curve and that their optimal inoculation time was 18-21 days. The determination of the anthraquinone constituents indicated that the rhein content of the hairy roots reached 2.495 μg g−1 and was 2.55-fold higher than that of natural plants. Conclusion: Transgenic hairy roots of P. multiflorum could be one of the most potent materials for industrial-scale production of bioactive anthraquinone constituents. PMID:24696550

  13. Resistance to DNA Damaging Agents Produced Invasive Phenotype of Rat Glioma Cells-Characterization of a New in Vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Stojković, Sonja; Podolski-Renić, Ana; Dinić, Jelena; Pavković, Željko; Ayuso, Jose M; Fernández, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio; Pérez-García, Victor M; Pešić, Vesna; Pešić, Milica

    2016-01-01

    Chemoresistance and invasion properties are severe limitations to efficient glioma therapy. Therefore, development of glioma in vivo models that more accurately resemble the situation observed in patients emerges. Previously, we established RC6 rat glioma cell line resistant to DNA damaging agents including antiglioma approved therapies such as 3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) and temozolomide (TMZ). Herein, we evaluated the invasiveness of RC6 cells in vitro and in a new orthotopic animal model. For comparison, we used C6 cells from which RC6 cells originated. Differences in cell growth properties were assessed by real-time cell analyzer. Cells' invasive potential in vitro was studied in fluorescently labeled gelatin and by formation of multicellular spheroids in hydrogel. For animal studies, fluorescently labeled cells were inoculated into adult male Wistar rat brains. Consecutive coronal and sagittal brain sections were analyzed 10 and 25 days post-inoculation, while rats' behavior was recorded during three days in the open field test starting from 25th day post-inoculation. We demonstrated that development of chemoresistance induced invasive phenotype of RC6 cells with significant behavioral impediments implying usefulness of orthotopic RC6 glioma allograft in preclinical studies for the examination of new approaches to counteract both chemoresistance and invasion of glioma cells. PMID:27355941

  14. Smart Plasmonic Glucose Nanosensors as Generic Theranostic Agents for Targeting-Free Cancer Cell Screening and Killing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Limei; Li, Haijuan; He, Haili; Wu, Haoxi; Jin, Yongdong

    2015-07-01

    Fast and accurate identification of cancer cells from healthy normal cells in a simple, generic way is very crucial for early cancer detection and treatment. Although functional nanoparticles, like fluorescent quantum dots and plasmonic Au nanoparticles (NPs), have been successfully applied for cancer cell imaging and photothermal therapy, they suffer from the main drawback of needing time-consuming targeting preparation for specific cancer cell detection and selective ablation. The lack of a generic and effective method therefore limits their potential high-throughput cancer cell preliminary screening and theranostic applications. We report herein a generic in vitro method for fast, targeting-free (avoiding time-consuming preparations of targeting moiety for specific cancer cells) visual screening and selective killing of cancer cells from normal cells, by using glucose-responsive/-sensitive glucose oxidase-modified Ag/Au nanoshells (Ag/Au-GOx NSs) as a smart plasmonic theranostic agent. The method is generic to some extent since it is based on the distinct localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) responses (and colors) of the smart nanoprobe with cancer cells (typically have a higher glucose uptake level) and normal cells. PMID:26027697

  15. The differential short- and long-term effects of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents on T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Clutton, G.; Xu, Y.; Baldoni, P. L.; Mollan, K. R.; Kirchherr, J.; Newhard, W.; Cox, Kara; Kuruc, J. D.; Kashuba, A.; Barnard, R.; Archin, N.; Gay, C. L.; Hudgens, M. G.; Margolis, D. M.; Goonetilleke, N.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the extraordinary success of HIV-1 antiretroviral therapy in prolonging life, infected individuals face lifelong therapy because of a reservoir of latently-infected cells that harbor replication competent virus. Recently, compounds have been identified that can reverse HIV-1 latency in vivo. These latency- reversing agents (LRAs) could make latently-infected cells vulnerable to clearance by immune cells, including cytolytic CD8+ T cells. We investigated the effects of two leading LRA classes on CD8+ T cell phenotype and function: the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) and protein kinase C modulators (PKCms). We observed that relative to HDACis, the PKCms induced much stronger T cell activation coupled with non-specific cytokine production and T cell proliferation. When examining antigen-specific CD8+ T cell function, all the LRAs except the HDACi Vorinostat reduced, but did not abolish, one or more measurements of CD8+ T cell function. Importantly, the extent and timing of these effects differed between LRAs. Panobinostat had detrimental effects within 10 hours of drug treatment, whereas the effects of the other LRAs were observed between 48 hours and 5 days. These observations suggest that scheduling of LRA and CD8+ T cell immunotherapy regimens may be critical for optimal clearance of the HIV-1 reservoir. PMID:27480951

  16. The differential short- and long-term effects of HIV-1 latency-reversing agents on T cell function.

    PubMed

    Clutton, G; Xu, Y; Baldoni, P L; Mollan, K R; Kirchherr, J; Newhard, W; Cox, Kara; Kuruc, J D; Kashuba, A; Barnard, R; Archin, N; Gay, C L; Hudgens, M G; Margolis, D M; Goonetilleke, N

    2016-01-01

    Despite the extraordinary success of HIV-1 antiretroviral therapy in prolonging life, infected individuals face lifelong therapy because of a reservoir of latently-infected cells that harbor replication competent virus. Recently, compounds have been identified that can reverse HIV-1 latency in vivo. These latency- reversing agents (LRAs) could make latently-infected cells vulnerable to clearance by immune cells, including cytolytic CD8+ T cells. We investigated the effects of two leading LRA classes on CD8+ T cell phenotype and function: the histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) and protein kinase C modulators (PKCms). We observed that relative to HDACis, the PKCms induced much stronger T cell activation coupled with non-specific cytokine production and T cell proliferation. When examining antigen-specific CD8+ T cell function, all the LRAs except the HDACi Vorinostat reduced, but did not abolish, one or more measurements of CD8+ T cell function. Importantly, the extent and timing of these effects differed between LRAs. Panobinostat had detrimental effects within 10 hours of drug treatment, whereas the effects of the other LRAs were observed between 48 hours and 5 days. These observations suggest that scheduling of LRA and CD8+ T cell immunotherapy regimens may be critical for optimal clearance of the HIV-1 reservoir. PMID:27480951

  17. The Prevalence of Antifungal Agents Administration in Patients Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kargar, Mona; Ahmadvand, Alireza; Ahmadvand, Milad; Hadjibabaie, Molouk; Gholami, Kheirollah; Khoee, Seyed Hamid; Javadi, Mohammad Reza; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2013-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are chief infectious complications in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, the diagnosis of fungal infections is difficult, and often empiric treatment initiates. Since there is no data available on the prevalence of antifungal drugs administration in allogeneic HSCT recipients in Iran, we decided to conduct this study. Methods This study was a retrospective review of records of patients who received allogeneic HSCT in the Hematology-Oncology, Bone Marrow Transplantation center at Shariati Hospital in Tehran, between August 2009 and August 2010. Results Sixty (73.1%) patients consist of 41 men (68.3%) with mean age of 26.3 (± 1.2) years received allogeneic HSCT. Patients received prophylaxis with fulconazole however; in 28 patients (46.7%) it was switched to low dose amphotericin B. Fifteen patients (25%) received treatment with antifungal agents. Amphotericin B was the empiric agent administered. In 3 patients treatment was switched to voriconazole. Neither positive culture nor direct microscopic evidence was available from the obtained specimen. Only in one patient the result of serum galactomannan assay was positive. There were no significant differences in neutropenia duration (P value: 0.54), length of hospital stay (P value: 0.27) and number of patients developed graft versus host disease (P value: 0.07) between patients received antifungal agents with those who did not receive treatment. Conclusion In this study HSCT recipients received antifungal agents for prophylaxis. Twenty five percent of patients received treatment with antifungal agents empirically. Improvement in diagnosis of these infections can be helpful and lead to targeted therapy. We suggest larger prospective trials for better assessment of antifungal agent administration. PMID:24505528

  18. OSU-CG5, a novel energy restriction mimetic agent, targets human colorectal cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Arafa, El-shaimaa A; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H; Arab, Hany H; Omar, Hany A

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Energy-restriction mimetic agents (ERMAs) are small-molecule agents that target various aspects of energy metabolism, which has emerged as a promising approach in cancer therapy. In the current study, we tested the ability of OSU-CG5, a novel ERMA, to target human colorectal cancer (CRC) in vitro. Methods: Two human CRC cell lines (HCT-116 and Caco-2) were tested. Cell viability was assessed using MTT assay. Caspase-3/7 activities were measured using Caspase-Glo 3/7 assay kit. Western blot analysis was used to measure the expression of relevant proteins in the cells. Glucose consumption of the cells was detected using glucose uptake cell-based assay kit. Results: OSU-CG5 dose-dependently inhibited HCT-116 and Caco-2 cell proliferation with the IC50 values of 3.9 and 4.6 μmol/L, respectively, which were 20–25-fold lower than those of resveratrol, a reference ERMA. Both OSU-CG5 (5, 10, and 20 μmol/L) and resveratrol (50, 100, and 200 μmol/L) dose-dependently increased caspase-3/7 activity and PARP level in the cells. Furthermore, both OSU-CG5 and resveratrol induced dose-dependent energy restriction in the cells: they suppressed glucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation, decreased the levels of p-mTOR and p-p70S6K, increased the levels of ER stress response proteins GRP78 and GADD153, and increased the level of β-TrCP, which led to the downregulation of cyclin D1 and Sp1. Conclusion: OSU-CG5 exhibits promising anti-cancer activity against human CRC cells in vitro, which was, at least in part, due to energy restriction and the consequent induction of ER stress and apoptosis. PMID:24464048

  19. Identification of the MmeHairy gene and expression analysis affected by two SNPs in the 3'-untranslated region in the clam Meretrix meretrix.

    PubMed

    Nie, Qing; Yue, Xin; Liu, Baozhong

    2016-04-01

    As a bHLH transcriptional repressor, Hairy-related proteins can bind to DNA sites in target gene promoters and negatively regulate gene transcription. In the present study, the full-length cDNA of Hairy was obtained from the clam Meretrix meretrix (MmeHairy), and two SNPs in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of this gene, SNP1066 and 1067, were identified and characterized. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that MmeHairy belongs to the Hairy protein subfamily. Analysis of tissue expression patterns showed that the mRNA of MmeHairy had the highest expression level in the hepatopancreas. The expression levels of MmeHairy were up-regulated in the hepatopancreas after Vibrio challenge. Genotyping and quantitative analysis showed that the mRNA levels of MmeHairy were significantly different among individual clams with different genotypes at SNP1066 and 1067 (P < 0.05), which indicated that these two SNP loci may affect the expression of MmeHairy and could be used as candidate markers for future selection in M. meretrix breeding programs. PMID:26873874

  20. Production of ribosome-inactivating protein from hairy root cultures of Luffa cylindrica (L.) Roem.

    PubMed

    di Toppi, L S; Gorini, P; Properzi, G; Barbieri, L; Spanò, L

    1996-09-01

    Transformed root lines of Luffa cylindrica (L.) Roem. (Cucurbitaceae) were established by inoculation of in vitro grown plantlets with wild type Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain 1855. Cloned lines of hairy roots were tested for the presence of ribosome-inactivating proteins; crude extracts inhibited protein synthesis in a reaction mixture based on rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Inhibitory activity increased during culture period, reaching a maximum value in the stationary phase. No activity could be detected in the culture medium, nor in extracts from callus and/or suspension cultures. A ribosome-inactivating protein having specific activity of 62,100 U mg protein(-1) and a molecular mass of 26-28,000 Da was purified to homogeneity. The protein showed N-glycosidase activity on rat liver ribosomes. The results demonstrate that hairy root cultures can be successfully utilized for the in vitro production of ribosome-inactivating proteins. PMID:24178273

  1. Hairy Root Cultures of Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. to Produce Gymnemic Acid.

    PubMed

    Rajashekar, J; Kumar, Vadlapudi; Veerashree, V; Poornima, D V; Sannabommaji, Torankumar; Gajula, Hari; Giridhara, B

    2016-01-01

    Gymnema sylvestre R. Br. (Asclepiadaceae) is an endangered species extensively used in the management of diabetes, obesity, and treatment of various diseases. Uncontrolled exploitation to meet the increasing demand and low seed viability hastens the disappearance of the plant from its natural habitat. Hairy root culture provides a suitable alternative for the enhanced production of active principles. The current protocol provides the optimized culture conditions for the establishment of hairy root cultures and elicitation studies and also confirmation of stable integration of A. rhizogenes plasmid T-DNA into host genetic material by PCR and RT-PCR. Furthermore, it also discusses the suitable methods for the extraction procedures, and qualitative and quantitative analysis of gymnemic acid by HPTLC and HPLC. PMID:27108334

  2. Root tip-dependent, active riboflavin secretion by Hyoscyamus albus hairy roots under iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Higa, Ataru; Miyamoto, Erika; ur Rahman, Laiq; Kitamura, Yoshie

    2008-04-01

    Hyoscyamus albus hairy roots with/without an exogenous gene (11 clones) were established by inoculation of Agrobacterium rhizogenes. All clones cultured under iron-deficient condition secreted riboflavin from the root tips into the culture medium and the productivity depended on the number and size of root tips among the clones. A decline of pH was observed before riboflavin production and root development. By studying effects of proton-pump inhibitors, medium acidification with external organic acid, and riboflavin addition upon pH change and riboflavin productivity, we indicate that riboflavin efflux is not directly connected to active pH reduction, and more significantly active riboflavin secretion occurs as a response to an internal requirement in H. albus hairy roots under iron deficiency. PMID:18367404

  3. Polymer Conformation and Topological Defects in Systems of Hairy and DNA hybridized Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorowski, Chris; Travesset, Alex

    2014-03-01

    Systems of hairy and DNA hybridized Nanoparticles are able to self-assemble into an array of superlattices. Understanding the role the polymer plays is critical to predicting the superlattice structure. In this talk, we use Molecular Dynamics to study hairy nanoparticles where the grafted polymer is modeled explicitly. We study self-assembly starting from a liquid and following the nucleation and growth of large nanoparticle superlattices (2000NP). We explore the role of polymer stretching as well as the geometric frustration of the polymer for both spherical and cubic nanoparticles. We also provide a characterization of the dynamics, including topological defects. Further, we will discuss the difficulties and methods for simulating large lattices in molecular dynamics.

  4. Hairy black holes in AdS5 × S 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markeviciute, Julija; Santos, Jorge E.

    2016-06-01

    We use numerical methods to exhaustively study a novel family of hairy black hole solutions in AdS5. These solutions can be uplifted to solutions of type IIB supergravity with AdS5 × S 5 asymptotics and are thus expected to play an important role in our understanding of AdS/CFT. We find an intricate phase diagram, with the aforementioned family of hairy black hole solutions branching from the Reissner-Nordström black hole at the onset of the superradiance instability. We analyse black holes with spherical and planar horizon topology and explain how they connect in the phase diagram. Finally, we detail their global and local thermodynamic stability across several ensembles.

  5. Different phases of hairy black holes in AdS5 space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giribet, Gaston; Goya, Andrés; Oliva, Julio

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the thermodynamics of hairy black holes in asymptotically anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, including backreaction. Resorting to the Euclidean path integral approach, we show that matter conformally coupled to Einstein gravity in five dimensions may exhibit a phase transition whose endpoint turns out to be a hairy black hole in AdS5 space. The scalar field configuration happens to be regular everywhere outside and on the horizon and behaves asymptotically in such a way that respects the AdS boundary conditions that are relevant for AdS/CFT. The theory presents other peculiar features in the ultraviolet, like the existence of black holes with arbitrarily low temperature in AdS5 . This provides a simple setup in which the fully backreacting problem of a hair forming in AdS at a certain critical temperature can be solved analytically.

  6. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase promotes tumor cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents via a mechanism involving delay in cell cycle progression

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Gail T.; Sullivan, Richard; Pare, Genevieve C.; Graham, Charles H.

    2010-11-15

    Approaches to overcome chemoresistance in cancer cells have involved targeting specific signaling pathways such as the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway, a stress response pathway known to be involved in the regulation of cell survival, apoptosis and growth. The present study determined the effect of PI3K inhibition on the clonogenic survival of human cancer cells following exposure to various chemotherapeutic agents. Treatment with the PI3K inhibitors LY294002 or Compound 15e resulted in increased survival of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells after exposure to doxorubicin, etoposide, 5-fluorouracil, and vincristine. Increased survival following PI3K inhibition was also observed in DU-145 prostate, HCT-116 colon and A-549 lung carcinoma cell lines exposed to doxorubicin. Increased cell survival mediated by LY294002 was correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation, which was linked to an increase in the proportion of cells in the G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Inhibition of PI3K signaling also resulted in higher levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}; and knockdown of p27{sup kip1} with siRNA attenuated resistance to doxorubicin in cells treated with LY294002. Incubation in the presence of LY294002 after exposure to doxorubicin resulted in decreased cell survival. These findings provide evidence that PI3K inhibition leads to chemoresistance in human cancer cells by causing a delay in cell cycle; however, the timing of PI3K inhibition (either before or after exposure to anti-cancer agents) may be a critical determinant of chemosensitivity.

  7. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents. PMID:27147293

  8. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  9. Dual functions of gold nanorods as photothermal agent and autofluorescence enhancer to track cell death during plasmonic photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Kannadorai, Ravi Kumar; Chiew, Geraldine Giap Ying; Luo, Kathy Qian; Liu, Quan

    2015-02-01

    Gold nanorods have the potential to localize the treatment procedure by hyperthermia and influence the fluorescence. The longitudinal plasmon peak contributes to the photothermal effect by converting light to heat. When these nanorods are PEGylated, it not only makes it biocompatible but also acts as a spacer layer during fluorescence enhancement. When the PEGylated nanorods are internalized inside the cells through endocytosis, the transverse plasmonic peak combined with the enhanced absorption and scattering properties of the nanorods can enhance the autofluorescence emission intensity from the cell. The autofluorescence from the mitochondria inside cells which reflects the respiratory status of the cell was enhanced two times by the presence of nanorods within the cell. At four minutes, the nanorods incubated cells reached the hyperthermic temperature when illuminated continuously with near infrared laser. The cell viability test and autofluorescence intensity curve showed a similar trend indicating the progress of cell death over time. This is the first report to the best of our knowledge to suggest the potential of exploiting the dual capabilities of gold nanorods as photothermal agents and autofluorescence enhancer to track cell death. PMID:25444933

  10. Secondary Metabolites from Plants Inhibiting ABC Transporters and Reversing Resistance of Cancer Cells and Microbes to Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Wink, Michael; Ashour, Mohamed L.; El-Readi, Mahmoud Zaki

    2012-01-01

    Fungal, bacterial, and cancer cells can develop resistance against antifungal, antibacterial, or anticancer agents. Mechanisms of resistance are complex and often multifactorial. Mechanisms include: (1) Activation of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-gp, which pump out lipophilic compounds that have entered a cell, (2) Activation of cytochrome p450 oxidases which can oxidize lipophilic agents to make them more hydrophilic and accessible for conjugation reaction with glucuronic acid, sulfate, or amino acids, and (3) Activation of glutathione transferase, which can conjugate xenobiotics. This review summarizes the evidence that secondary metabolites (SM) of plants, such as alkaloids, phenolics, and terpenoids can interfere with ABC transporters in cancer cells, parasites, bacteria, and fungi. Among the active natural products several lipophilic terpenoids [monoterpenes, diterpenes, triterpenes (including saponins), steroids (including cardiac glycosides), and tetraterpenes] but also some alkaloids (isoquinoline, protoberberine, quinoline, indole, monoterpene indole, and steroidal alkaloids) function probably as competitive inhibitors of P-gp, multiple resistance-associated protein 1, and Breast cancer resistance protein in cancer cells, or efflux pumps in bacteria (NorA) and fungi. More polar phenolics (phenolic acids, flavonoids, catechins, chalcones, xanthones, stilbenes, anthocyanins, tannins, anthraquinones, and naphthoquinones) directly inhibit proteins forming several hydrogen and ionic bonds and thus disturbing the 3D structure of the transporters. The natural products may be interesting in medicine or agriculture as they can enhance the activity of active chemotherapeutics or pesticides or even reverse multidrug resistance, at least partially, of adapted and resistant cells. If these SM are applied in combination with a cytotoxic or antimicrobial agent, they may reverse resistance in a synergistic fashion. PMID:22536197

  11. Classification of agents using Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay (CTA) with ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzai, Abdullah A; Trevisan, Júlio; Pang, Weiyi; Riding, Matthew J; Strong, Rebecca J; Llabjani, Valon; Pant, Kamala; Carmichael, Paul L; Scott, Andrew D; Martin, Francis L

    2015-09-01

    The Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay (pH 6.7) has a reported sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 83%, and an overall concordance of 85% with in vivo rodent bioassay data. To date, the SHE assay is the only in vitro assay that exhibits multistage carcinogenicity. The assay uses morphological transformation, the first stage towards neoplasm, as an endpoint to predict the carcinogenic potential of a test agent. However, scoring of morphologically transformed SHE cells is subjective. We treated SHE cells grown on low-E reflective slides with 2,6-diaminotoluene, N-nitroso-N-ethylnitroguanidine, N-nitroso-N-methylurea, N-nitroso-N-ethylurea, EDTA, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO; vehicle control), methyl methanesulfonate, benzo[e]pyrene, mitomycin C, ethyl methanesulfonate, ampicillin or five different concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene. Macroscopically visible SHE colonies were located on the slides and interrogated using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy acquiring five spectra per colony. The acquired IR data were analysed using Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (LDA) followed by principal component analysis (PCA)-LDA cluster vectors to extract major and minor discriminating wavenumbers for each treatment class. Each test agent vs. DMSO and treatment-induced transformed cells vs. corresponding non-transformed were classified by a unique combination of major and minor discriminating wavenumbers. Alterations associated with Amide I, Amide II, lipids and nucleic acids appear to be important in segregation of classes. Our findings suggest that a biophysical approach of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with multivariate analysis could facilitate a more objective interrogation of SHE cells towards scoring for transformation and ultimately employing the assay for risk assessment of test agents. PMID:25925069

  12. Drugs targeting the mitochondrial pore act as citotoxic and cytostatic agents in temozolomide-resistant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lena, Annalisa; Rechichi, Mariarosa; Salvetti, Alessandra; Bartoli, Barbara; Vecchio, Donatella; Scarcelli, Vittoria; Amoroso, Rosina; Benvenuti, Lucia; Gagliardi, Rolando; Gremigni, Vittorio; Rossi, Leonardo

    2009-01-01

    Background High grade gliomas are one of the most difficult cancers to treat and despite surgery, radiotherapy and temozolomide-based chemotherapy, the prognosis of glioma patients is poor. Resistance to temozolomide is the major barrier to effective therapy. Alternative therapeutic approaches have been shown to be ineffective for the treatment of genetically unselected glioma patients. Thus, novel therapies are needed. Mitochondria-directed chemotherapy is an emerging tool to combat cancer, and inner mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) represents a target for the development of cytotoxic drugs. A number of agents are able to induce MPT and some of them target MPT-pore (MPTP) components that are selectively up-regulated in cancer, making these agents putative cancer cell-specific drugs. Objective The aim of this paper is to report a comprehensive analysis of the effects produced by selected MPT-inducing drugs (Betulinic Acid, Lonidamine, CD437) in a temozolomide-resistant glioblastoma cell line (ADF cells). Methods EGFRvIII expression has been assayed by RT-PCR. EGFR amplification and PTEN deletion have been assayed by differential-PCR. Drugs effect on cell viability has been tested by crystal violet assay. MPT has been tested by JC1 staining. Drug cytostatic effect has been tested by mitotic index analysis. Drug cytotoxic effect has been tested by calcein AM staining. Apoptosis has been assayed by Hoechst incorporation and Annexine V binding assay. Authophagy has been tested by acridine orange staining. Results We performed a molecular and genetic characterization of ADF cells and demonstrated that this line does not express the EGFRvIII and does not show EGFR amplification. ADF cells do not show PTEN mutation but differential PCR data indicate a hemizygous deletion of PTEN gene. We analyzed the response of ADF cells to Betulinic Acid, Lonidamine, and CD437. Our data demonstrate that MPT-inducing agents produce concentration-dependent cytostatic and

  13. Spatial temperature distribution in human hairy and glabrous skin after infrared CO2 laser radiation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background CO2 lasers have been used for several decades as an experimental non-touching pain stimulator. The laser energy is absorbed by the water content in the most superficial layers of the skin. The deeper located nociceptors are activated by passive conduction of heat from superficial to deeper skin layers. Methods In the current study, a 2D axial finite element model was developed and validated to describe the spatial temperature distribution in the skin after infrared CO2 laser stimulation. The geometry of the model was based on high resolution ultrasound scans. The simulations were compared to the subjective pain intensity ratings from 16 subjects and to the surface skin temperature distributions measured by an infrared camera. Results The stimulations were sensed significantly slower and less intense in glabrous skin than they were in hairy skin (MANOVA, p < 0.001). The model simulations of superficial temperature correlated with the measured skin surface temperature (r > 0.90, p < 0.001). Of the 16 subjects tested; eight subjects reported pricking pain in the hairy skin following a stimulus of 0.6 J/cm2 (5 W, 0.12 s, d1/e2 = 11.4 mm) only two reported pain to glabrous skin stimulation using the same stimulus intensity. The temperature at the epidermal-dermal junction (depth 50 μm in hairy and depth 133 μm in glabrous skin) was estimated to 46°C for hairy skin stimulation and 39°C for glabrous skin stimulation. Conclusions As compared to previous one dimensional heat distribution models, the current two dimensional model provides new possibilities for detailed studies regarding CO2 laser stimulation intensity, temperature levels and nociceptor activation. PMID:21059226

  14. Biosynthetic origin of 2,3-epoxysesamone in a Sesamum indicum hairy root culture.

    PubMed

    Furumoto, Toshio

    2009-11-01

    The incorporation of [1-(13)C]glucose into 2,3-epoxysesamone, the main prenylnaphthoquinone in a hairy root culture of Sesamum indicum, indicated that the naphthoquinone moiety and dimethylallyl group were respectively derived from o-succinylbenzoate produced through a shikimate pathway and non-mevalonate pathway. The labeling pattern also demonstrated that prenylation occurred at C-2 in 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoate. PMID:19897903

  15. The effects of host age on follicular dendritic cell status dramatically impair scrapie agent neuroinvasion in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Karen L; Wathne, Gwennaelle J; Sales, Jill; Bruce, Moira E; Mabbott, Neil A

    2009-10-15

    Following peripheral exposure, many transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) agents accumulate first in lymphoid tissues before spreading to the CNS (termed neuroinvasion) where they cause neurodegeneration. Early TSE agent accumulation upon follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in lymphoid follicles appears critical for efficient neuroinvasion. Most clinical cases of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease have occurred in young adults, although the reasons behind this apparent age-related susceptibility are uncertain. Host age has a significant influence on immune function. As FDC status and immune complex trapping is reduced in aged mice (600 days old), we hypothesized that this aging-related decline in FDC function might impair TSE pathogenesis. We show that coincident with the effects of host age on FDC status, the early TSE agent accumulation in the spleens of aged mice was significantly impaired. Furthermore, following peripheral exposure, none of the aged mice developed clinical TSE disease during their lifespans, although most mice displayed histopathological signs of TSE disease in their brains. Our data imply that the reduced status of FDCs in aged mice significantly impairs the early TSE agent accumulation in lymphoid tissues and subsequent neuroinvasion. Furthermore, the inefficient neuroinvasion in aged individuals may lead to significant levels of subclinical TSE disease in the population. PMID:19786551

  16. Oncometabolite D-2-Hydroxyglutarate Inhibits ALKBH DNA Repair Enzymes and Sensitizes IDH Mutant Cells to Alkylating Agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pu; Wu, Jing; Ma, Shenghong; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Jun; Hoadley, Katherine A; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Perou, Charles M; Guan, Kun-Liang; Ye, Dan; Xiong, Yue

    2015-12-22

    Chemotherapy of a combination of DNA alkylating agents, procarbazine and lomustine (CCNU), and a microtubule poison, vincristine, offers a significant benefit to a subset of glioma patients. The benefit of this regimen, known as PCV, was recently linked to IDH mutation that occurs frequently in glioma and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG), a competitive inhibitor of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). We report here that D-2-HG inhibits the α-KG-dependent alkB homolog (ALKBH) DNA repair enzymes. Cells expressing mutant IDH display reduced repair kinetics, accumulate more DNA damages, and are sensitized to alkylating agents. The observed sensitization to alkylating agents requires the catalytic activity of mutant IDH to produce D-2-HG and can be reversed by the deletion of mutant IDH allele or overexpression of ALKBH2 or AKLBH3. Our results suggest that impairment of DNA repair may contribute to tumorigenesis driven by IDH mutations and that alkylating agents may merit exploration for treating IDH-mutated cancer patients. PMID:26686626

  17. Modification of the metabolism and cytotoxicity of bioreductive alkylating agents by dicoumarol in aerobic and hypoxic murine tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Keyes, S R; Rockwell, S; Sartorelli, A C

    1989-06-15

    We have demonstrated previously that dicoumarol (DIC) increased the generation of reactive metabolites from mitomycin C (MC) in EMT6 cells under hypoxic conditions in vitro. This increased reaction rate was associated with an increased toxicity of MC to hypoxic EMT6 cells. In contrast, aerobic cells treated with DIC in vitro were protected from MC toxicity. We now demonstrate that DIC sensitizes EMT6 cells to two MC analogues, porfiromycin (POR) and the 7-N-dimethylaminomethylene analogue of mitomycin C (BMY-25282), in hypoxia and protects cells from these agents in air, despite the fact that POR is preferentially toxic to hypoxic cells and BMY-25282 is preferentially toxic to aerobic cells. In contrast, DIC increases menadione cytotoxicity in both air and hypoxia and has no effect on the cytotoxicity of Adriamycin. We have also shown previously that the preferential toxicity of POR to hypoxic cells is associated with an increased rate of drug uptake. In the present study, DIC had no measurable effect on the uptake of [3H]POR but increased the extent of efflux of this agent. MC-induced DNA cross-links, which have been proposed as the lesions responsible for the lethality of MC, are decreased by DIC in air and increased by DIC in hypoxia, in concert with the observed modifications of MC cytotoxicity by DIC. However, in aerobic cells treated with DIC and MC, the decrease in DNA interstrand cross-links is not directly associated with a decrease in cytotoxicity. L1210 cells, which have no measurable quinone reductase activity, demonstrate increased toxicity when treated with DIC and MC in hypoxia, as observed with EMT6 cells. Unlike EMT6 cells, however, L1210 cells are not protected by DIC from MC toxicity in air. Taken together, these findings suggest that DIC is altering the intracellular metabolism of MC and that quinone reductase or another, unidentified, enzyme sensitive to DIC may be involved in activating MC to a toxic product in aerobic EMT6 cells. PMID:2470504

  18. Genetic Diversity and Symbiotic Phenotype of Hairy Vetch Rhizobia in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kun; Miwa, Hiroki; Iizuka, Maki; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Okazaki, Shin

    2016-06-25

    Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) is a leguminous crop widely used as green manure and a cover crop in Japan. It exhibits strong weed-suppressing activity, high resistance to insect pests, and the ability to fix nitrogen through symbiotic interactions with soil bacteria known as rhizobia. Few studies have investigated the rhizobia that form nodules on hairy vetch in Japan, and the biological resources available for selecting high nitrogen-fixing rhizobia are limited. In the present study, we isolated 110 hairy vetch rhizobia from 13 different areas in Japan. Based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences, 73% of the isolates were identified as Rhizobium leguminosarum. A comparative analysis of nodC and 16S rRNA gene phylogenies revealed that several isolates possessed congruent nodC sequences despite having divergent 16S rRNA gene sequences, suggesting that the horizontal transfer of nod genes occurred during the evolution of rhizobia. Inoculation tests showed that isolates closely related to R. leguminosarum had better plant growth-promoting effects than other strains, thereby providing a promising agricultural resource for inoculating crops. PMID:27151657

  19. Efficient genetic transformation and regeneration system from hairy root of Origanum vulgare.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Peyman; de Sa, Maria Fatima Grossi; da Silva, André Luís Lopes; Makhzoum, Abdullah; da Luz Costa, Jefferson; Borghetti, Ivo Albertto; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    Origanum vulgare L is commonly known as a wild marjoram and winter sweet which has been used in the traditional medicine due to its therapeutic effects as stimulant, anticancer, antioxidant, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and many other diseases. A reliable gene transfer system via Agrobacterium rhizogenes and plant regeneration via hairy roots was established in O. vulgare for the first time. The frequency of induced hairy roots was different by modification of the co-cultivation medium elements after infection by Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains K599 and ATCC15834. High transformation frequency (91.3 %) was achieved by co-cultivation of explants with A. rhizogenes on modified (MS) medium. The frequency of calli induction with an 81.5 % was achieved from hairy roots on MS medium with 0.25 mg/L(-1) 2,4-D. For shoot induction, initiated calli was transferred into a medium containing various concentrations of BA (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1 mg/L(-1)). The frequency of shoot generation (85.18 %) was achieved in medium fortified with 0.25 mg/L(-1) of BA. Shoots were placed on MS medium with 0.25 mg/l IBA for root induction. Roots appeared and induction rate was achieved after 15 days. PMID:27436918

  20. Enhanced Diterpene Tanshinone Accumulation and Bioactivity of Transgenic Salvia miltiorrhiza Hairy Roots by Pathway Engineering.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Luo, Xiuqin; Ju, Guanhua; Li, Leilei; Huang, Shengxiong; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Huizhong; Kai, Guoyin

    2016-03-30

    Tanshinones are health-promoting diterpenoids found in Salvia miltiorrhiza and have wide applications. Here, SmGGPPS (geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase) and SmDXSII (1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase) were introduced into hairy roots of S. miltiorrhiza. Overexpression of SmGGPPS and SmDXSII in hairy roots produces higher levels of tanshinone than control and single-gene transformed lines; tanshinone production in the double-gene transformed line GDII10 reached 12.93 mg/g dry weight, which is the highest tanshinone content that has been achieved through genetic engineering. Furthermore, transgenic hairy root lines showed higher antioxidant and antitumor activities than control lines. In addition, contents of chlorophylls, carotenoids, indoleacetic acid, and gibberellins were significantly elevated in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants. These results demonstrate a promising method to improve the production of diterpenoids including tanshinone as well as other natural plastid-derived isoprenoids in plants by genetic manipulation of the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. PMID:26753746

  1. Genetic Diversity and Symbiotic Phenotype of Hairy Vetch Rhizobia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kun; Miwa, Hiroki; Iizuka, Maki; Yokoyama, Tadashi; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Okazaki, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) is a leguminous crop widely used as green manure and a cover crop in Japan. It exhibits strong weed-suppressing activity, high resistance to insect pests, and the ability to fix nitrogen through symbiotic interactions with soil bacteria known as rhizobia. Few studies have investigated the rhizobia that form nodules on hairy vetch in Japan, and the biological resources available for selecting high nitrogen-fixing rhizobia are limited. In the present study, we isolated 110 hairy vetch rhizobia from 13 different areas in Japan. Based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences, 73% of the isolates were identified as Rhizobium leguminosarum. A comparative analysis of nodC and 16S rRNA gene phylogenies revealed that several isolates possessed congruent nodC sequences despite having divergent 16S rRNA gene sequences, suggesting that the horizontal transfer of nod genes occurred during the evolution of rhizobia. Inoculation tests showed that isolates closely related to R. leguminosarum had better plant growth-promoting effects than other strains, thereby providing a promising agricultural resource for inoculating crops. PMID:27151657

  2. Differing Neurophysiologic Mechanosensory Input From Glabrous and Hairy Skin in Juvenile Rats

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Timothy T.; Eisenach, James C.; Ririe, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory afferents in skin encode and convey thermal and mechanical conditions, including those that threaten tissue damage. A small proportion of skin, the glabrous skin of the distal extremities, is specialized to explore the environment in fine detail. Aside from increased innervation density, little is known regarding properties of mechanosensory afferents to glabrous skin in younger animals that explain the exquisite precision and high contrast in rapidly sampling physical structures, including those that threaten injury. To assess this, we obtained intact neuronal intracellular recordings in vivo from 115 mechanosensitive afferent neurons from lumbar and thoracic dorsal root ganglia in juvenile rats. Two characteristics were unique to glabrous skin: a threefold higher proportion of fast-conducting to slow-conducting afferents that were high-threshold mechanosensitive nociceptors compared with hairy skin and a twofold faster conduction velocity of fast-conducting nociceptors compared with hairy skin. Additionally differences were found in mechanical thresholds between glabrous skin and hairy skin for each fiber type. These differences reflect and help explain the rapid response of skin specialized to explore the physical environment. Additionally, these results highlight potential limitations of using passive electrical properties and conduction velocity alone to characterize primary afferents without knowledge of the skin type they innervated. PMID:20926608

  3. Production of oleanolic acid glycosides by hairy root established cultures of Calendula officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Długosz, Marek; Wiktorowska, Ewa; Wiśniewska, Anita; Pączkowski, Cezary

    2013-01-01

    In order to initiate hairy root culture initiation cotyledons and hypocotyls of Calendula officinalis L. were infected with Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain ATCC 15834 or the same strain containing pCAMBIA 1381Z vector with β-glucuronidase reporter gene under control of promoter of NIK (Nematode Induced Kinase) gene. The efficiency of induction of hairy roots reached 33.8% for cotyledons and 66.6% for hypocotyls together for both transformation experiments. Finally, eight control and nine modified lines were established as a long-term culture. The hairy root cultures showed the ability to synthesize oleanolic acid mainly (97%) as glycosides; control lines contained it at the average 8.42 mg · g(-1) dry weight in tissue and 0.23 mg · dm(-3) in medium; modified lines: 4.59 mg · g(-1) for the tissue, and 0.48 mg · dm(-3) for the medium. Additionally lines showed high positive correlation between dry/fresh weight and oleanolic acid concentration in tissue. Using the Killiani mixture in acidic hydrolysis of oleanolic acid glycosides released free aglycones that were partially acetylated in such conditions. PMID:24040627

  4. Production of chlorogenic acid and its derivatives in hairy root cultures of Stevia rebaudiana.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao; Yin, Zhong-Ping; Chen, Ji-Guang; Shangguan, Xin-Chen; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Qing-Feng; Peng, Da-Yong

    2015-01-14

    Chlorogenic acid and its derivatives (CADs) are valuable bioactive plant secondary metabolites with many health benefits. In the present study, Stevia rebaudiana hairy root cultures were established, and the culture conditions for the production of CADs were optimized. The hairy roots were induced by coculture of S. rebaudiana leaves and Agrobacterium rhizogenes (C58C1) after infection, which were further verified by PCR detection of rolB and rolC genes. HPLC-MS and HPLC analysis showed that chlorogenic acid (3-caffeoylquinic acid, 3-CQA), 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (3,5-CQA), and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (4,5-CQA) were the major CADs in the hairy roots. Eight single roots with rapid growth rate were selected. Among them, T3 had the highest yield of CADs. B5 medium supplemented with 40 g/L sucrose was more suitable for the production of CADs than others. Under optimal culture conditions, the total content of these three compounds reached 105.58 mg/g and total yield was 234.40 mg/100 mL. PMID:25548875

  5. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing in Soybean Hairy Roots.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yupeng; Chen, Li; Liu, Xiujie; Sun, Shi; Wu, Cunxiang; Jiang, Bingjun; Han, Tianfu; Hou, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    As a new technology for gene editing, the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)/Cas (CRISPR-associated) system has been rapidly and widely used for genome engineering in various organisms. In the present study, we successfully applied type II CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate and estimate genome editing in the desired target genes in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill.). The single-guide RNA (sgRNA) and Cas9 cassettes were assembled on one vector to improve transformation efficiency, and we designed a sgRNA that targeted a transgene (bar) and six sgRNAs that targeted different sites of two endogenous soybean genes (GmFEI2 and GmSHR). The targeted DNA mutations were detected in soybean hairy roots. The results demonstrated that this customized CRISPR/Cas9 system shared the same efficiency for both endogenous and exogenous genes in soybean hairy roots. We also performed experiments to detect the potential of CRISPR/Cas9 system to simultaneously edit two endogenous soybean genes using only one customized sgRNA. Overall, generating and detecting the CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome modifications in target genes of soybean hairy roots could rapidly assess the efficiency of each target loci. The target sites with higher efficiencies can be used for regular soybean transformation. Furthermore, this method provides a powerful tool for root-specific functional genomics studies in soybean. PMID:26284791

  6. Keeping warm with fur in cold water: entrainment of air in hairy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasto, Alice; Regli, Marianne; Brun, Pierre-Thomas; Clanet, Christophe; Hosoi, Anette

    2015-11-01

    Instead of relying on a thick layer of body fat for insulation as many aquatic mammals do, fur seals and otters trap air in their dense fur for insulation in cold water. Using a combination of model experiments and theory, we rationalize this mechanism of air trapping underwater for thermoregulation. For the model experiments, hairy surfaces are fabricated using laser cut molds and casting samples with PDMS. Modeling the hairy texture as a network of capillary tubes, the imbibition speed of water into the hairs is obtained through a balance of hydrostatic pressure and viscous stress. In this scenario, the bending of the hairs and capillary forces are negligible. The maximum diving depth that can be achieved before the hairs are wetted to the roots is predicted from a comparison of the diving speed and imbibition speed. The amount of air that is entrained in hairy surfaces is greater than what is expected for classic Landau-Levich-Derjaguin plate plunging. A phase diagram with the parameters from experiments and biological data allows a comparison of the model system and animals.

  7. Trapping and dynamic manipulation of polystyrene beads mimicking circulating tumor cells using targeted magnetic/photoacoustic contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Results on magnetically trapping and manipulating micro-scale beads circulating in a flow field mimicking metastatic cancer cells in human peripheral vessels are presented. Composite contrast agents combining magneto-sensitive nanospheres and highly optical absorptive gold nanorods were conjugated to micro-scale polystyrene beads. To efficiently trap the targeted objects in a fast stream, a dual magnet system consisting of two flat magnets to magnetize (polarize) the contrast agent and an array of cone magnets producing a sharp gradient field to trap the magnetized contrast agent was designed and constructed. A water-ink solution with an optical absorption coefficient of 10 cm-1 was used to mimic the optical absorption of blood. Magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging helped visualize bead trapping, dynamic manipulation of trapped beads in a flow field, and the subtraction of stationary background signals insensitive to the magnetic field. The results show that trafficking micro-scale objects can be effectively trapped in a stream with a flow rate up to 12 ml/min and the background can be significantly (greater than 15 dB) suppressed. It makes the proposed method very promising for sensitive detection of rare circulating tumor cells within high flow vessels with a highly absorptive optical background.

  8. Effects of various agents on flagellar activity, flagellar autotomy and cell viability in four species of Chlamydomonas (chlorophyta: volvocales).

    PubMed

    Lewin, R A; Lee, T H; Fang, L S

    1982-01-01

    Over 200 strains of green algal flagellates, representing about 100 species, were examined for their suitability as experimental organisms for studies of flagellar activity. The cells of all species shed their flagella under unfavourable conditions of temperature or pH, or in the presence of alcohols, detergents or toxic agents of various kinds. For further studies of flagellar activity, motility and autotomy (biologically induced shedding) in particular, we selected four species of Chlamydomonas: C. dysosmos Moewus, C. moewusii Gerloff, C. monoica Strehlow and C. reinhardtii Dangeard. Agents found to inhibit motility without inducing death or flagellar autotomy included azide, arsenite, thiosulphate, cyanide, ferricyanide, hydroxylamine, chloral hydrate, malonate, p-chloro-mercury benzoate and cytochalasin-B, each in a limited range of concentrations which differed according to species and strain. Higher concentrations of these agents caused the flagella to be shed. Since flagellar autotomy is a means by which a cell can quickly reduce the area of its permeable surface, it may have a positive survival value for species liable to be subjected to unfavourable physicochemical conditions. PMID:6764045

  9. Spectral imaging of microvascular function in a renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a vascular disrupting agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wankhede, Mamta; deDeugd, Casey; Siemann, Dietmar W.; Sorg, Brian S.

    2009-02-01

    Tumors are highly metabolically active and thus require ample oxygen and nutrients to proliferate. Neovasculature generated by angiogenesis is required for tumors to grow beyond a size of about 1-2mm. Functional tumor vasculature also provides an access point for development of distant metastases. Due to the importance of the microvasculature for tumor growth, proliferation, and metastasis, the microvasculature has emerged as a therapeutic target for treatment of solid tumors. We employed spectral imaging in a rodent window chamber model to observe and measure the oxygen transport function of tumor microvasculature in a human renal cell carcinoma after treatment with a fast acting vascular disrupting agent. Human Caki-1 cells were grown in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber in athymic nude mice. Spectral imaging was used to measure hemoglobin saturation immediately before, immediately after and also at 2, 4, 6, 8, 24 and 48 hours after administration of the tubulin binding agent OXi4503. Up to 4 hours after treatment, tumor microvasculature was disrupted from the tumor core towards the periphery as seen in deoxygenation as well as structural changes of the vasculature. Reoxygenation and neovascularization commenced from the periphery towards the core from 6 - 48 hours after treatment. The timing of the effects of vascular disrupting agents can influence scheduling of repeat treatments and combinatorial treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Spectral imaging can potentially provide this information in certain laboratory models from endogenous signals with microvessel resolution.

  10. Sarcoma Cell Line Screen of Oncology Drugs and Investigational Agents Identifies Patterns Associated with Gene and microRNA Expression.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Polley, Eric; Kunkel, Mark; Evans, David; Silvers, Thomas; Delosh, Rene; Laudeman, Julie; Ogle, Chad; Reinhart, Russell; Selby, Michael; Connelly, John; Harris, Erik; Monks, Anne; Morris, Joel

    2015-11-01

    The diversity in sarcoma phenotype and genotype make treatment of this family of diseases exceptionally challenging. Sixty-three human adult and pediatric sarcoma lines were screened with 100 FDA-approved oncology agents and 345 investigational agents. The investigational agents' library enabled comparison of several compounds targeting the same molecular entity allowing comparison of target specificity and heterogeneity of cell line response. Gene expression was derived from exon array data and microRNA expression was derived from direct digital detection assays. The compounds were screened against each cell line at nine concentrations in triplicate with an exposure time of 96 hours using Alamar blue as the endpoint. Results are presented for inhibitors of the following targets: aurora kinase, IGF-1R, MEK, BET bromodomain, and PARP1. Chemical structures, IC50 heat maps, concentration response curves, gene expression, and miR expression heat maps are presented for selected examples. In addition, two cases of exceptional responders are presented. The drug and compound response, gene expression, and microRNA expression data are publicly available at http://sarcoma.cancer.gov. These data provide a unique resource to the cancer research community. PMID:26351324

  11. Small interfering RNAs targeting cyclin D1 and cyclin D2 enhance the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents in mantle cell lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, Katrin; Alluin, Jessica V; Honegger, Anja; Chomchan, Pritsana; Gaur, Shikha; Yun, Yen; Forman, Stephen J; Rossi, John J; Chen, Robert W

    2011-11-01

    Cyclin D1 (CCND1) is a known cell cycle regulator whose overexpression is a hallmark of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Although molecular techniques have unified the diagnostic approach to MCL, no therapeutic advances have been made to target this particular pathway. The significance of CCND1 in the pathogenesis and treatment of MCL has yet to be defined. We have taken advantage of RNA interference (RNAi) to down-regulate CCND1 expression in two MCL cell lines (Granta-519 and Jeko-1) to investigate the cytotoxic effect of combining RNAi with conventional chemotherapeutic agents. We designed four small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) specific to CCND1, one specific to CCND2, and one dual-targeting siRNA that simultaneously down-regulates CCND1 and CCND2. Etoposide and doxorubicin were used as chemotherapeutics in combination with the siRNAs. The transfected siRNAs in MCL cell lines triggered 40-60% reduction in target mRNA and protein levels. Importantly, the siRNA-mediated reduction in cyclins resulted in decreased IC(50) (50% inhibitory concentration) values for both doxorubicin and etoposide. The combination of siRNA-mediated inhibition of the cyclins along with chemotherapeutic agents could potentially be used to lower the effective doses of the chemotherapeutic agents and reduce drug-related toxicities. PMID:21745168

  12. MLN2238, a proteasome inhibitor, induces caspase-dependent cell death, cell cycle arrest, and potentiates the cytotoxic activity of chemotherapy agents in rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive or rituximab-chemotherapy-resistant B-cell lymphoma preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Gu, Juan J; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J; Mavis, Cory; Czuczman, Natalie M; Deeb, George; Gibbs, John; Skitzki, Joseph J; Patil, Ritesh; Czuczman, Myron S

    2013-11-01

    To further develop therapeutic strategies targeting the proteasome system, we studied the antitumor activity and mechanisms of action of MLN2238, a reversible proteasome inhibitor, in preclinical lymphoma models. Experiments were conducted in rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive cell lines, rituximab-chemotherapy-resistant cell lines (RRCL), and primary B-cell lymphoma cells. Cells were exposed to MLN2238 or caspase-dependent inhibitors, and differences in cell viability, alterations in apoptotic protein levels, effects on cell cycle, and the possibility of synergy when combined with chemotherapeutic agents were evaluated. MLN2238 showed more potent dose-dependent and time-dependent cytotoxicity and inhibition of cell proliferation in lymphoma cells than bortezomib. Our data suggest that MLN2238 can induce caspase-independent cell death in RRCL. MLN2238 (and to a much lesser degree bortezomib) reduced RRCL S phase and induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Exposure of rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive cell lines and RRCL to MLN2238 potentiated the cytotoxic effects of gemcitabine, doxorubicin, and paclitaxel and overcame resistance to chemotherapy in RRCL. MLN2238 is a potent proteasome inhibitor active in rituximab-chemotherapy-sensitive and rituximab-chemotherapy-resistant cell models and potentiates the antitumor activity of chemotherapy agents and has the potential of becoming an effective therapeutic agent in the treatment of therapy-resistant B-cell lymphoma. PMID:23995855

  13. Surfactant-free Gd3+-ion-containing carbon nanotube MRI contrast agents for stem cell labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizzatov, Ayrat; Hernández-Rivera, Mayra; Keshishian, Vazrik; Mackeyev, Yuri; Law, Justin J.; Guven, Adem; Sethi, Richa; Qu, Feifei; Muthupillai, Raja; Cabreira-Hansen, Maria Da Graça; Willerson, James T.; Perin, Emerson C.; Ma, Qing; Bryant, Robert G.; Wilson, Lon J.

    2015-07-01

    There is an ever increasing interest in developing new stem cell therapies. However, imaging and tracking stem cells in vivo after transplantation remains a serious challenge. In this work, we report new, functionalized and high-performance Gd3+-ion-containing ultra-short carbon nanotube (US-tube) MRI contrast agent (CA) materials which are highly-water-dispersible (ca. 35 mg ml-1) without the need of a surfactant. The new materials have extremely high T1-weighted relaxivities of 90 (mM s)-1 per Gd3+ ion at 1.5 T at room temperature and have been used to safely label porcine bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for MR imaging. The labeled cells display excellent image contrast in phantom imaging experiments, and TEM images of the labeled cells, in general, reveal small clusters of the CA material located within the cytoplasm with 109 Gd3+ ions per cell.There is an ever increasing interest in developing new stem cell therapies. However, imaging and tracking stem cells in vivo after transplantation remains a serious challenge. In this work, we report new, functionalized and high-performance Gd3+-ion-containing ultra-short carbon nanotube (US-tube) MRI contrast agent (CA) materials which are highly-water-dispersible (ca. 35 mg ml-1) without the need of a surfactant. The new materials have extremely high T1-weighted relaxivities of 90 (mM s)-1 per Gd3+ ion at 1.5 T at room temperature and have been used to safely label porcine bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for MR imaging. The labeled cells display excellent image contrast in phantom imaging experiments, and TEM images of the labeled cells, in general, reveal small clusters of the CA material located within the cytoplasm with 109 Gd3+ ions per cell. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: NMRD profiles, the Fourier transforms of the EXAFS data, EXAFS curve fitting data, cell viability data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02078f

  14. Investigations into agents for improving cell labeling with positron- and gamma-emitting radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, S.S.; Thakur, M.L.; Gottschalk, A.; Pande, S.; Srivastava, S.C.; Richards, P.

    1982-01-01

    It was possible to label leukocytes with Co-oxine, but a large proportion of the radioactivity was eluted from the cells upon washing. Ruthenium oxine labeled platelets efficiently in plasma while negligible proportion of radioactivity was eluted from the cells. Three factors influence the labeling efficiency of the cells: duration of the incubation periods; cell concentration; and ACD concentration.

  15. The influence of Agrobacterium rhizogenes on induction of hairy roots and ß-carboline alkaloids production in Tribulus terrestris L.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Sara; Sattari, Taher Nejad; Zebarjadi, Alireza; Majd, Ahmad; Ghasempour, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an efficient transformation system for Tribulus terrestris L., an important medicinal plant, using Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains AR15834 and GMI9534 to generate hairy roots. Hairy roots were formed directly from the cut edges of leaf explants 10-14 days after inoculation with the Agrobacterium with highest frequency transformation being 49 %, which was achieved using Agrobacterium rhizogenes AR15834 on hormone-free MS medium after 28 days inoculation. PCR analysis showed that rolB genes of Ri plasmid of A. rhizogenes were integrated and expressed into the genome of transformed hairy roots. Isolated transgenic hairy roots grew rapidly on MS medium supplemented with indole-3-butyric acid. They showed characteristics of transformed roots such as fast growth and high lateral branching in comparison with untransformed roots. Isolated control and transgenic hairy roots grown in liquid medium containing IBA were analyzed to detect ß-carboline alkaloids by High Performance Thin Layer Chromatograghy (HPTLC). Harmine content was estimated to be 1.7 μg g(-1) of the dried weight of transgenic hairy root cultures at the end of 50 days of culturing. The transformed roots induced by AR15834 strain, spontaneously, dedifferentiated as callus on MS medium without hormone. Optimum callus induction and shoot regeneration of transformed roots in vitro was achieved on MS medium containing 0.4 mg L(-1) naphthaleneacetic acid and 2 mg L(-1) 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) after 50 days. The main objective of this investigation was to establish hairy roots in this plant by using A. rhizogenes to synthesize secondary products at levels comparable to the wild-type roots. PMID:24554840

  16. Induction of hairy roots by various strains of Agrobacterium rhizogenes in different types of Capsicum species explants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens, also known as “chilies”, belong to the Solanaceae family and have tremendous beneficial properties. The application of hairy root culture may become an alternative method for future development of these species by adding value, such as by increasing secondary metabolites and improving genetic and biochemical stability compared with normal Capsicum plants. Therefore, in this research, different types of explants of both species were infected with various Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains to provide more information about the morphology and induction efficiency of hairy roots. After 2 weeks of in vitro seed germination, young seedling explants were cut into three segments; the cotyledon, hypocotyl, and radical. Then, the explants were co-cultured with four isolated A. rhizogenes strains in Murashige & Skoog culture media (MS) containing decreasing carbenicillin disodium concentrations for one month. Results In this experiment, thick and short hairy roots were induced at all induction sites of C. annuum while thin, elongated hairy roots appeared mostly at wound sites of C. frutescens. Overall, the hairy root induction percentages of C. frutescens were higher compared with C. annuum. Hairy root initiation was observed earliest using radicles (1st week), followed by cotyledons (2nd week), and hypocotyls (3rd week). Cotyledon explants of both species had the highest induction frequency with all strains compared with the other explants types. Strains ATCC 13333 and ATCC 15834 were the most favourable for C. frutescens while ATCC 43056 and ATCC 43057 were the most favourable for C. annuum. The interactions between the different explants and strains showed significant differences with p-values < 0.0001 in both Capsicum species. Conclusions Both Capsicum species were amenable to A. rhizogenes infection and hairy root induction is recommended for use as an alternative explants in future plant-based studies. PMID

  17. A new class of flavonol-based anti-prostate cancer agents: Design, synthesis, and evaluation in cell models.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Chen, Guanglin; Zhang, Xiaojie; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Shilong; Wang, Guangdi; Chen, Qiao-Hong

    2016-09-01

    Flavonoids are a large class of polyphenolic compounds ubiquitously distributed in dietary plants with an array of biological activities. Flavonols are a major sub-class of flavonoids featuring a hydroxyl group at C-3. Certain natural flavonols, such as quercetin and fisetin, have been shown by in vitro cell-based and in vivo animal experiments to be potential anti-prostate cancer agents. However, the Achilles' heel of flavonols as drug candidates is their moderate potency and poor pharmacokinetic profiles. This study aims to explore the substitution effect of 3-OH in flavonols on the in vitro anti-proliferative potency against both androgen-sensitive and androgen-insensitive human prostate cancer cell lines. Our first lead flavonol (3',4'-dimethoxyflavonol), eight 3-O-alkyl-3',4'-dimethoxyflavonols, and six 3-O-aminoalkyl-3',4'-dimethoxyflavonols have been synthesized through aldol condensation and the Algar-Flynn-Oyamada (AFO) reaction. The WST-1 cell proliferation assay indicates (i) that all synthesized 3-O-alkyl-3',4'-dimethoxyflavonols and 3-O-aminoalkyl-3',4'-dimethoxyflavonols are more potent than the parent 3',4'-dimethoxyflavonol and the natural flavonol quercetin in suppressing prostate cancer cell proliferation; and (ii) that incorporation of a dibutylamino group to the 3-OH group through a three- to five-carbon linker leads to the optimal derivatives with up to 292-fold enhanced potency as compared with the parent flavonol. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the most potent derivative 22 can activate PC-3 cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and induce PC-3 cell apoptosis. No inhibitory ability of 22 up to 50μM concentration was observed against PWR-1E normal human epithelial prostate cells, suggesting its in vitro safety profile. The results indicate that chemical modulation at 3-OH is a vital strategy to optimize flavonols as anti-prostate cancer agents. PMID:27476422

  18. [Structural and biochemical characteristics of pathogenic fungus: cell walls, lipids and dimorphism, and action modes of antifungal agents].

    PubMed

    Kitajma, Y

    2000-01-01

    Cell walls (0.1-0.5 microm in thickness) of dermatophytes, at least Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Epidermophyton floccosum, are built of microfibrils (20 nm in diameter) and matrix embedding the fibrils. These fibrils are composed of chitin (70-80%) and a small amount of glucans, and the matrix is composed of beta-1-3, beta1-6 glucan, glucomannan, galactomannan and peptides. Another characteristic structure is the outermost layer (20-50 nm in thickness) of the cell wall, which consists of hydrophobic protein rodlets. Lipids are thought to play important roles in the regulation of dimorphism and virulence in pathogenic fungus. Generally, the ratio of phospholipid/ergosterol is less than 1 in yeast form and 2-20 in mycelial form cells in Candida albicans and Sporothrix schenckii. During the transition from yeast to mycelial forms, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine are reduced, whereas phosphatidylcholine increases. Phospho-lipase D is activated on this transition. Phospholipase B is now known to be a virulence factor in C. albicans. Polyene antifungal agents bind to ergosterol in membrane to form complexes, which generate pores and destroy the structures and functions of membrane. Azole antifungal agents inhibit the synthesis of ergosterol leading to deficiency in ergosterol content in membrane, and impair the function of membranes in fungal cells. We show the effects of polyenes on the ultrastructure of fungal plasma membrane and impairment of ionomycin-induced calcium influx in T. mentagrophytes, so that we can compare the differences in mode of actions between these two groups of agents. PMID:11064317

  19. Paired-agent imaging for resection during surgery (PAIRS) of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Chen, Eunice; Gunn, Jason R.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Wells, Wendy A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Ninety percent of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) have overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is correlated with poor prognosis. Complete surgical resection of HNSCC tumors has a large impact on patient survival, where detection of tumor at or close to surgical margins increases the risk of death at 5-years by 90%. In addition, large surgical margins can greatly increase the morbidity experienced by the patient due to functional and cosmetic damage of oral and facial structures. Single fluorescence targeting agents are often used for tumor detection in in vivo pre-clinical imaging; however, the arising signal is qualitative at best because it is a complex mixture of vascular perfusion, vascular leakage, inhibited lymphatic clearance, and receptor binding. In vivo ratiometric receptor concentration imaging (RCI) allows quantification of receptor expression (hence identification of cancerous tissue) by utilizing co-administered paired-agents consisting of a targeted agent and non-targeted perfusion agent to reference the plasma delivery and leakage. A panel of HNSCC tumors with varying levels of EGFR expression (SCC-15 >SCC-25 > SCC-09) have been imaged using ABY-029, a clinically relevant anti-EGFR affibody labeled with IRDye 800CW, and affibody control imaging agent labeled with IRDye 680RD. RCI maps of in vivo tissue have been created and are spatially correlated with EGFR and CD31 immunohistochemistry and basic H and E staining. The RCI threshold parameters for distinguishing tumor from normal tissues (skin and muscle) and the accuracy of margin detection in these tumors will be presented. RCI surgical resection will be further developed using a novel multi-channel, gated fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) imaging system that is capable of performing RCI in normal room light.

  20. A hairy fall: syncope resulting from topical application of minoxidil.

    PubMed

    Dubrey, S W; VanGriethuysen, J; Edwards, C M B

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a young man who developed syncope after using a high strength formulation of topical minoxidil as a hair growth restorer. Other potential cardiovascular and endocrine causes were excluded, and his symptoms resolved on discontinuation of the product. While syncope is a recognised side effect of using this powerful systemic antihypertensive agent, few cases are documented in the literature, which we illustrate in our discussion. PMID:26347235

  1. Induced cancer stem-like cells as a model for biological screening and discovery of agents targeting phenotypic traits of cancer stem cell.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Mayuko; Akutsu, Hidenori; Kudoh, Ayumi; Kimura, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Umezawa, Akihiro; Lee, Sam W; Ryo, Akihide

    2014-09-30

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) retain the capacity to propagate themselves through self-renewal and to produce heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells constituting the tumor. Novel drugs that target CSCs can potentially eliminate the tumor initiating cell population therefore resulting in complete cure of the cancer. We recently established a CSC-like model using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology to reprogram and partially differentiate human mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells. Using the induced CSC-like (iCSCL) model, we developed a phenotypic drug assay system to identify agents that inhibit the stemness and self-renewal properties of CSCs. The selectivity of the agents was assessed using three distinct assays characterized by cell viability, cellular stemness and tumor sphere formation. Using this approach, we found that withaferin A (WA), an Ayurvedic medicine constituent, was a potent inhibitor of CSC stemness leading to cellular senescence primarily via the induction of p21Cip1 expression. Moreover, WA exhibited strong anti-tumorigenic activity against the iCSCL. These results indicate that our iCSCL model provides an innovative high throughput platform for a simple, easy, and cost-effective method to search for novel CSC-targeting drugs. Furthermore, our current study identified WA as a putative drug candidate for abrogating the stemness and tumor initiating ability of CSCs. PMID:25228591

  2. Isolation and characterization of alborixin from Streptomyces scabrisporus: A potent cytotoxic agent against human colon (HCT-116) cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aabid Manzoor; Wani, Abubakar; Qazi, Parvaiz H; Rehman, Shakeel-U; Mushtaq, Saleem; Ali, Shiekh Abid; Hussain, Aehtesham; Shah, Aiyatullah; Qazi, Asif Khurshid; Makhdoomi, Ubaid Sharif; Hamid, Abid; Kumar, Ajay

    2016-08-25

    The ethyl acetate extract from the fermentation broth of an actinomycete strain, identified as Streptomyces scabrisporus isolated from soil of Kashmir Himalayas - India, exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against a panel of human cancer cell lines. The active fraction subjected to column chromatography led to the isolation of pharmacologically potent anticancer compound whose structure was established to be alborixin on the basis of spectral data analysis. The compound exhibited antiproliferative activity against panel of cell lines N2a, MCF-7, MiaPaca-2, PC-3, HCT-116, MDA-MB-231, HL-60 and A-549 cells with IC50 of 9.7, 15.4, 7.2, 8.1, 3.2, 9.7, 7.5 and 11.5 μM respectively. Alborixin displayed the maximum cytotoxic activity against HCT-116 human colon carcinoma cells and therefore further studies were carried on this cell line. Alborixin decreased the clonogenic potential of HCT-116 cells in a dose dependent manner. It induced apoptotic cell death in HCT116 cells that were confirmed by Flow cytometric analysis of Annexin V/PI staining and microscopic examination of cellular morphology through DAPI-stained cells. Biochemical evidence of apoptosis came from elevating the intracellular ROS level that was accompanied by mitochondrial membrane potential loss, decreasing the expression profile of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, whereas it augments cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP-1, activates caspase-8 and 9 with concomitant increase in expression of proapoptotic protein Bax in a dose dependent manner. These results indicate that alborixin obtained from Streptomyces scabrisporus IIIM55 induces apoptotic cell death in colon cancer cells HCT-116 and can be further evaluated for its potential as an anticancer agent. PMID:27378626

  3. Single-Cell-Arrayed Agarose Chip for in Situ Analysis of Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of DNA Cross-Linking Agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Lili; Wang, Weixing; Ding, Mingyu; Luo, Guoan; Liang, Qionglin

    2016-07-01

    Development of approach or device to allow continuous multiple measurements, such as integrating cytotoxic and genotoxic analysis, is quite appealing for study of the drug's activity and mechanism of action or resistance. In this study, a single-cell-arrayed agarose chip system was developed to combine cell cultivation with subsequent in situ analysis of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the chemotherapeutic agent. The modified alkaline comet assay coupled with the Live/Dead assay was used to monitor the interstrand cross-links (ICLs) formation and the cytotoxic effects in different glioma cell lines. In addition, the ICL-induced double strand breaks (DSBs) was measured on the chip to reflect the level of ICLs indirectly. Compared with the traditional methods, the microarray agarose device offers higher throughput, reproducibility, and robustness, exhibiting good potential for high-content drug screening. PMID:27269449

  4. Modification of in vitro and in vivo BCG cell wall-induced immunosuppression by treatment with chemotherapeutic agents or indomethacin

    SciTech Connect

    DeSilva, M.A.; Wepsic, H.T.; Mizushima, Y.; Nikcevich, D.A.; Larson, C.H.

    1985-04-01

    The in vitro inhibition of spleen cell blastogenesis response and the in vivo enhancement of tumor growth are phenomena associated with BCG cell wall (BCGcw) immunization. What effect treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and the prostaglandin inhibitor indomethacin would have on the in vitro and in vivo responses to BCGcw immunization was evaluated. In vitro blastogenesis studies showed that chemotherapy pretreatment prior to immunization with BCGcw resulted in a restoration of the spleen cell blastogenesis response. In blastogenesis addback studies, where BCGcw-induced irradiated splenic suppressor cells were admixed with normal cells, less inhibition of blastogenesis occurred when spleen cells were obtained from rats that had received the combined treatment of chemotherapy and BCGcw immunization versus only BCGcw immunization. The cocultivation of spleen cells from BCGcw-immunized rats with indomethacin resulted in a 30-40% restoration of the blastogenesis response. In vivo studies showed that BCGcw-mediated enhancement of intramuscular tumor growth of the 3924a ACI rat tumor could be abrogated by either pretreatment with busulfan or mitomycin or by the feeding of indomethacin.

  5. Peloruside A is a microtubule-stabilizing agent with exceptional anti-migratory properties in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Anutosh; Cabral, Fernando; Yang, Hailing; Patel, Kamala D.

    2015-01-01

    Peloruside A is a novel antimitotic drug originally isolated from the marine sponge Mycale hentschieli. Previous studies showed that peloruside A stabilizes microtubules by binding to a site on tubulin distinct from paclitaxel, another microtubule stabilizing drug. Peloruside A blocks mitosis, but little is known about the effects on other cellular activities. Here we report that peloruside A is the most potent microtubule inhibitor yet tested for its ability to block endothelial cell migration. Quantitative analysis indicated that it inhibits microtubule dynamics and endothelial cell migration at 1/200th of the concentration needed to inhibit cell division (the cytotoxic concentration), indicating that it could potentially have a large margin of safety when used to specifically target angiogenesis. By comparison, paclitaxel, a well-known cancer therapeutic drug, suppresses cell migration at 1/13th of its cytotoxic concentration; and vinblastine suppresses cell migration at just slightly below its cytotoxic antimitotic concentration. Thus, different microtubule targeted drugs have varying relative potencies for inhibition of cell migration versus cell division. The results suggest that peloruside A may be an especially useful agent for anti-angiogenesis therapy and point to the likelihood that other antimitotic drugs might be found with an even larger potential margin of safety. PMID:26244166

  6. Proof of concept for inhibiting metastasis: circulating tumor cell-triggered localized release of anticancer agent via a structure-switching aptamer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nandi; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Qing; Jian, Lixin; Shi, Hui; Qin, Shiya; Wang, Kemin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Wenjing

    2016-05-21

    Existing drug delivery systems were not suitable for killing cells in the circulatory system specifically. Herein, we developed a novel localized drug delivery strategy, in which the release of anticancer agents was specifically triggered by circulating tumor cells. Meanwhile, damage to non-target cells was avoided. PMID:27121864

  7. Agent-Based Computational Modeling of Cell Culture: Understanding Dosimetry In Vitro as Part of In Vitro to In Vivo Extrapolation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative characterization of cellular dose in vitro is needed for alignment of doses in vitro and in vivo. We used the agent-based software, CompuCell3D (CC3D), to provide a stochastic description of cell growth in culture. The model was configured so that isolated cells assu...

  8. The effects of UV-B stress on the production of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Binder, Bernard Y K; Peebles, Christie A M; Shanks, Jacqueline V; San, Ka-Yiu

    2009-01-01

    In nature, plants generate protective secondary metabolites in response to environmental stresses. Such metabolites include terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), which absorb UV-B light and serve putatively to protect the plant from harmful radiation. Catharanthus roseus plants, multiple shoot cultures, and cell suspension cultures exposed to UV-B light show significant increases in the production of TIAs, including precursors to vinblastine and vincristine, which have proven effective in the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. Here, the effect of UV-B light on C. roseus hairy roots was examined. Analysis of alkaloid concentrations up to 168 h after UV-B exposure shows significant increases in the concentrations of lochnericine and significant decreases in the concentration of hörhammericine over time (ANOVA, P < 0.05). Our results also indicate that increasing UV-B exposure time up to 20 min caused significant increases in lochnericine, serpentine, and ajmalicine and a decrease in hörhammericine (t-test, p < 0.05). PMID:19479674

  9. Repression of hsp70 heat shock gene transcription by the suppressor of hairy-wing protein of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Holdridge, C.; Dorsett, D. )

    1991-04-01

    The suppressor of hairy-wing [su(Hw)] locus of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a zinc finger protein that binds a repeated motif in the gypsy retroposon. Mutations of su(Hw) suppress the phenotypes associated with mutations caused by gypsy insertions. To examine the mechanisms by which su(Hw) alters gene expression, a fragment of gypsy containing multiple su(Hw) protein-binding sites was inserted into various locations in the well-characterized Drosophila hsp70 heat shock gene promoter. The authors found no evidence for activation of basal hsp70 transcription by su(Hw) protein in cultured Drosophila cells but observed that it can repress heat shock-induced transcription. Repression occurred only when su(Hw) protein-binding sites were positioned between binding sites for proteins required for heat shock transcription. They propose that su(Hw) protein interferes nonspecifically with protein-protein interactions required for heat shock transcription, perhaps sterically, or by altering the ability of DNA to bend or twist.

  10. Continuous exposure of pancreatic cancer cells to dietary bioactive agents does not induce drug resistance unlike chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fan, P; Zhang, Y; Liu, L; Zhao, Z; Yin, Y; Xiao, X; Bauer, N; Gladkich, J; Mattern, J; Gao, C; Schemmer, P; Gross, W; Herr, I

    2016-01-01

    The repeated treatment of cancer cells with chemo- or radiotherapy induces therapy resistance, but it was previously unknown whether the same effect occurs upon continuous exposure of cancer cells to diet-derived chemopreventive agents. We elucidated this interesting question in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, which is a highly aggressive cancer entity with a marked resistance toward gemcitabine and other cytotoxic drugs. The isothiocyanate sulforaphane, present in cruciferous vegetables, and the polyphenol quercetin, present in many fruits and vegetables induced apoptosis and reduced viability in gemcitabine-sensitive BxPC-3 cells but not in non-malignant ductal pancreas cells and mesenchymal stromal cells. In turn, BxPC-3 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of gemcitabine, sulforaphane or quercetin for more than 1 year and the surviving subclones Bx-GEM, Bx-SF and Bx-Q were selected, respectively. While Bx-GEM cells acquired a total resistance, Bx-SF or Bx-Q cells largely kept their sensitivity as proved by MTT assay, annexin staining and FACS analysis. The evaluation of the self-renewal-, differentiation- and migration-potential by colony formation, differentiation or migration assays demonstrated that cancer stem cell features were enriched in gemcitabine-resistant cells, but decreased in sulforaphane- and quercetin-long time-treated cells. These results were confirmed by orthotopic xenotransplantation of cancer cells to the mouse pancreas, where Bx-GEM formed large, Bx-Q small and Bx-SF cells almost undetectable tumors. An mRNA expression profiling array and subsequent gene set enrichment analysis and qRT-PCR confirmed that tumor progression markers were enriched in Bx-GEM, but reduced in Bx-SF and Bx-Q cells. This study demonstrates that the continuous exposure of pancreatic cancer cells to sulforaphane or quercetin does not induce resistance in surviving cells but reduces tumorigenicity by inhibition of tumor progression markers. These

  11. Enhanced detection of circulating melanoma cells using gold nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrasting agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, Devin R.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Kannan, Raghuraman; Katti, Kattesh; Viator, John A.

    2010-02-01

    Nanotechnology and the various properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are quickly changing the field of cancer detection and treatment. Photoacoustic detection methods show an increase in sensitivity using gold nanoparticle antibody conjugation, which selectively targets melanoma cancer cells. Instead of targeting melanoma tumors, we tag single cells, analogous to circulating metastatic melanoma cells. Using an in vitro, stationary cell system and planar samples, we demonstrate an average of 24% improved optical detectability of melanoma cells tagged with AuNPs over unprocessed melanoma cells. Tagged cells showed a raised plateau of absorbance from 470nm to 550nm. Untagged cells showed a general decline in absorption as wavelength increased. The results of our study have the potential to not only better develop photoacoustic detection of melanoma, but also extend the viability and use of photoacoustics into detection of otherwise unpigmented cancers.

  12. The DNA damage/repair cascade in glioblastoma cell lines after chemotherapeutic agent treatment.

    PubMed

    Annovazzi, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Mellai, Marta; Riganti, Chiara; Battaglia, Luigi; Chirio, Daniela; Melcarne, Antonio; Schiffer, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been linked to a subpopulation of cells with stem cell-like properties, the glioma stem cells (GSCs), responsible for cancer progression and recurrence. This study investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of three chemotherapeutics, temozolomide (TMZ), doxorubicin (Dox) and paclitaxel (PTX) on glioma cell lines, by analyzing the molecular mechanisms leading to DNA repair and cell resistance, or to cell death. The drugs were tested on 16 GBM cell lines, grown as neurospheres (NS) or adherent cells (AC), by studying DNA damage occurrence by Comet assay, the expression by immunofluorescence and western blotting of checkpoint/repair molecules and apoptosis. The three drugs were able to provoke a genotoxic injury and to inhibit dose- and time-dependently cell proliferation, more evidently in AC than in NS. The first cell response to DNA damage was the activation of the damage sensors (p-ATM, p-53BP1, γ-H2AX), followed by repair effectors; the expression of checkpoint/repair molecules appeared higher in NS than in AC. The non-homologous repair pathway (NHEJ) seemed more involved than the homologous one (HR). Apoptosis occurred after long treatment times, but only a small percentage of cells in NS underwent death, even at high drug concentration, whereas most cells survived in a quiescent state and resumed proliferation after drug removal. In tumor specimens, checkpoint/repair proteins were constitutively expressed in GBMs, but not in low-grade gliomas. PMID:25892134

  13. Suppressive effects of anti-inflammatory agents on human endothelial cell activation and induction of heat shock proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Amberger, A.; Hala, M.; Saurwein-Teissl, M.; Metzler, B.; Grubeck-Loebenstein, B.; Xu, Q.; Wick, G.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies from our laboratory have shown that the earliest stages of atherosclerosis may be mediated by an autoimmune reaction against heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). The interactions of Hsp60-specific T cells with arterial endothelial cells (EC) require expression of both Hsp60 and certain adhesion molecules shown to be induced simultaneously in EC by mechanical and other types of stress. Recently, it was shown that suppression of T cell-mediated immune responses by cyclosporin A (CyA) enhanced atherosclerotic lesion formation in mice. In contrast, aspirin was found to lower the risk of myocardial infarction in men. These conflicting observations may be due to different effects of anti-inflammatory agents on adhesion molecule and Hsp expression in EC, respectively. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the present study, we analyzed the effects of CyA, aspirin, and indomethacin on T cell proliferation using a proliferation assay. To explore the expression of adhesion molecules, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and Hsp60 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), Northern blot analyses were used. To examine the activation status of the transcription factors nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed. RESULTS: With the exception of indomethacin, the used immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory agents significantly inhibited T cell proliferation in response to influenza virus antigen in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, CyA and indomethacin did not suppress tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced adhesion molecule expression on HUVECs, whereas aspirin had an inhibitory effect. These observations correlated with the modulation of NF-kappaB activity in EC. All agents tested induced expression of Hsp60 6 hr after application. In addition, aspirin and indomethacin, but not CyA, induced Hsp70 expression in HUVECs that correlated with induction of HSF-1 activity

  14. New antineoplastic agent, MK615, from UME (a Variety of) Japanese apricot inhibits growth of breast cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Aya; Sawada, Tokihiko; Okada, Toshie; Ohsawa, Tatsushi; Adachi, Masakazu; Kubota, Keiichi

    2007-01-01

    MK615 is an extract mixture containing hydrophobic substances from Japanese apricot. In this study, the antineoplastic effects of MK615 against breast cancer cells were investigated. Two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-468 (MDA) and MCF7, were cultured with (600, 300, and 150 mug/mL) or without MK615. After 72 hours of incubation, growth inhibition was evaluated by MTT assay. The cells were then cultured with MK615 (300 mug/mL) and morphological changes were studied by light and electron microscopy. Finally, the mechanism of the antineoplastic effect of MK615 was evaluated by cell cycle and apoptosis assay. MK615 inhibited the growth of MDA and MCF7 in a dose-dependent manner. The percentage growth inhibition of MDA at dosages of 600, 300, and 150 mug/mL was 59.2%, 52.4%, and 23.3%, respectively, and that for MCF7 was 83.5%, 52.7%, and 16.6%, respectively. Morphological changes after MK615 treatment included massive vacuolization in the cytoplasm and apoptotic changes in the nucleus. These changes began to be apparent after at least 6 hours of incubation. Cell cycle analysis showed that MK615 increased the proportion of cells in the G2-M phase in both MDA (7.8-11.7%) and MCF7 (8.1-18.7%), and finally both cell lines became apoptotic. The proportion of apoptotic cells increased with incubation time. MK615 effectively inhibits the growth of breast cancer cells in vitro, possibly by cell cycle modification and apotosis induction. MK615 should be further investigated as a promising anti-breast cancer agent. PMID:17214792

  15. Effect of passage number on cellular response DNA-damaging agents: cell survival and gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Wolschak, G.E.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of different passage numbers on plating efficiency, doubling time, cell growth, and radiation sensitivity was assessed in Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cells. Changes in gene expression after UV or {gamma}-ray irradiation at different passage numbers were also examined. The SHE cells were maintained in culture medium for up to 64 passages. Cells were exposed to {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays or 254-m UV radiation. Differential display of cDNAs and Northern blots were used for the study of gene expression. With increasing passage number, SHE cells demonstrated decreased doubling time, increased plating efficiency, and a decreased yield in the number of cells per plate. Between passages 41 and 48 a ``crisis`` period was evident during which time cell growth in high serum (20%) was no longer optimal, and serum concentrations were reduced (to 10%) to maintain cell growth. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation was no different between early- and intermediate-passage cells. However, after UV exposure at low passages (passage 3), confluent cells were more sensitive to the killing effects of UV than were log-phase cells. At intermediate passages (passages 43, 48), confluent cells were slightly more radioresistant- than were log-phase cells. By passage 64, however, both confluent and log-phase cells showed similar patterns of UV sensitivity. Expression of {gamma}-actin, PCNA, and p53 transcripts did not change following UV exposure. p53 mRNA was induced following {gamma}-ray exposure of the intermediate (passage 45) epithelial cells. Differential display, however, revealed changes in expression of several transcripts following exposure to ionizing and ultraviolet radiations. The observed differences in radiation sensitivity associated with increasing passage number may be influenced by radiation-induced gene expression. We are conducting experiments to identify these genes.

  16. Enhanced production of artemisinin by hairy root cultivation of Artemisia annua in a modified stirred tank reactor.

    PubMed

    Patra, Nivedita; Srivastava, Ashok K

    2014-11-01

    Artemisinin is an important drug commonly used in the treatment of malaria as a combination therapy. It is primarily produced by a plant Artemisia annua, however, its supply from plant is significantly lower than its huge demand and therefore alternative in vitro production routes are sought. Hairy root cultivation could be one such alternative production protocol. Agrobacterium rhizogenes was used to induce hairy roots of A. annua. Statistical optimization of media was thereafter attempted to maximize the biomass/artemisinin production. The growth and product formation kinetics and the significant role of O2 in hairy root propagation were established in optimized media. Mass cultivation of hairy roots was, thereafter, attempted in a modified 3-L Stirred Tank Bioreactor (Applikon Dependable Instruments, The Netherlands) using optimized culture conditions. The reactor was suitably modified to obtain profuse growth of hairy roots by segregating and protecting the growing roots from the agitator rotation in the reactor using a perforated Teflon disk. It was possible to produce 18 g biomass L(-1) (on dry weight basis) and 4.63 mg L(-1) of artemisinin in 28 days, which increased to 10.33 mg L(-1) by the addition of elicitor methyl jasmonate. PMID:25172060

  17. Accumulation of phenylpropanoids and correlated gene expression in hairy roots of tartary buckwheat under light and dark conditions.

    PubMed

    Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, YeJi; Li, Xiaohua; Kim, Yeon Bok; Park, Nam-Il; Kim, Haeng Hoon; Kim, Sun-Ju; Park, Sang Un

    2014-12-01

    Differential expression patterns of flavonoid biosynthetic pathway genes in the hairy roots of tartary buckwheat cultivars "Hokkai T8" and "Hokkai T10" were studied over a time course of the light-dark cycle. The Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation system was applied for inducing hairy roots. Further, a total of six phenolic compounds and two anthocyanins were analyzed in the hairy roots which were exposed to both light and dark conditions, and their amounts were estimated by HPLC. The gene expression levels peaked on day 5 of culture during the time course of both dark and light conditions. Notably, FtPAL, Ft4CL, FtC4H, FtCHI, FtF3H, FtF3'H-1, and FtFLS-1 were more highly expressed in Hokkai T10 than in Hokkai T8 under dark conditions, among which FtPAL and FtCHI were found to be significantly upregulated, except on day 20 of culture. Significantly higher levels of phenolic compound, rutin, along with two anthocyanins were detected in the hairy roots of Hokkai T10 under both conditions. Furthermore, among all the phenolic compounds detected, the amount of rutin in Hokkai T10 hairy roots was found to be ∼5-fold (59,01 mg/g dry weight) higher than that in the control (12.45 mg/g dry weight) at the respective time periods under light and dark conditions. PMID:25194705

  18. Establishment of Hairy Root Cultures of Rhaponticum carthamoides (Willd.) Iljin for the Production of Biomass and Caffeic Acid Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Skała, Ewa; Kicel, Agnieszka; Olszewska, Monika A.; Kiss, Anna K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to obtain transformed roots of Rhaponticum carthamoides and evaluate their phytochemical profile. Hairy roots were induced from leaf explants by the transformation of Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains A4 and ATCC 15834. The best response (43%) was achieved by infection with A4 strain. The effects of different liquid media (WPM, B5, SH) with full and half-strength concentrations of macro- and micronutrients on biomass accumulation of the best grown hairy root line (RC3) at two different lighting conditions (light or dark) were investigated. The highest biomass (93 g L−1 of the fresh weight after 35 days) was obtained in WPM medium under periodic light. UPLC-PDA-ESI-MS3 and HPLC-PDA analyses of 80% aqueous methanol extracts from the obtained hairy roots revealed the presence of eleven caffeoylquinic acids and their derivatives and five flavonoid glycosides. The production of caffeoylquinic acids and their derivatives was elevated in hairy roots grown in the light. Only light-grown hairy roots demonstrated the capability for the biosynthesis of such flavonoid glycosides as quercetagetin, quercetin, luteolin, and patuletin hexosides. Chlorogenic acid, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid and a tentatively identified tricaffeoylquinic acid derivative were detected as the major compounds present in the transformed roots. PMID:25811023

  19. Impact of the antiproliferative agent ciclopirox olamine treatment on stem cells proteome

    PubMed Central

    Dihazi, Gry H; Bibi, Asima; Jahn, Olaf; Nolte, Jessica; Mueller, Gerhard A; Engel, Wolfgang; Dihazi, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the proteome changes of stem cells due to ciclopirox olamine (CPX) treatment compared to control and retinoic acid treated cells. METHODS: Stem cells (SCs) are cells, which have the ability to continuously divide and differentiate into various other kinds of cells. Murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and multipotent adult germline stem cells (maGSCs) were treated with CPX, which has been shown to have an antiproliferative effect on stem cells, and compared to stem cells treated with retinoic acid (RA), which is known to have a differentiating effect on stem cells. Classical proteomic techniques like 2-D gel electrophoresis and differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE) were used to generate 2D protein maps from stem cells treated with RA or CPX as well as from non-treated stem cells. The resulting 2D gels were scanned and the digitalized images were collated with the help of Delta 2D software. The differentially expressed proteins were analyzed by a MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometer, and the identified proteins were investigated and categorized using bioinformatics. RESULTS: Treatment of stem cells with CPX, a synthetic antifungal clinically used to treat superficial mycoses, resulted in an antiproliferative effect in vitro, without impairment of pluripotency. To understand the mechanisms induced by CPX treatments which results in arrest of cell cycle without any marked effect on pluripotency, a comparative proteomics study was conducted. The obtained data revealed that the CPX impact on cell proliferation was accompanied with a significant alteration in stem cell proteome. By peptide mass fingerprinting and tandem mass spectrometry combined with searches of protein sequence databases, a set of 316 proteins was identified, corresponding to a library of 125 non-redundant proteins. With proteomic analysis of ESCs and maGSCs treated with CPX and RA, we could identify more than 90 single proteins, which were differently expressed in both cell lines. We

  20. NAMPT inhibition synergizes with NQO1-targeting agents in inducing apoptotic cell death in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Ying; Li, Qing-Ran; Cheng, Xue-Fang; Wang, Guang-Ji; Hao, Hai-Ping

    2016-08-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) catalyzes the first rate-limiting step in converting nicotinamide to NAD(+), essential for a number of enzymes and regulatory proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes, including deacetylation enzyme SIRT1 which modulates several tumor suppressors such as p53 and FOXO. Herein we report that NQO1 substrates Tanshione IIA (TSA) and β-lapachone (β-lap) induced a rapid depletion of NAD(+) pool but adaptively a significant upregulation of NAMPT. NAMPT inhibition by FK866 at a nontoxic dose significantly enhanced NQO1-targeting agent-induced apoptotic cell death. Compared with TSA or β-lap treatment alone, co-treatment with FK866 induced a more dramatic depletion of NAD(+), repression of SIRT1 activity, and thereby the increased accumulation of acetylated FOXO1 and the activation of apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, the results from the present study support that NAMPT inhibition can synergize with NQO1 activation to induce apoptotic cell death, thereby providing a new rationale for the development of combinative therapeutic drugs in combating non-small lung cancer. PMID:27608947

  1. Protective Effect of Sodium Ascorbate on MDPC-23 Odontoblast-Like Cells Exposed to a Bleaching Agent

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Lessa, Fernanda Campos Rosetti; Hebling, Josimeri; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the cytotoxic effects of a bleaching agent composed of 0.01% carbamide peroxide (CP; 2.21μg/ml H2O2) on the MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell line, and to determine whether sodium ascorbate (SA) is capable of reducing, or even eliminating, the toxic effects caused by this bleaching agent. Methods: The cells were seeded in wells and incubated for 48 hours. CP and SA were dissolved in a culture medium (DMEM) in order to obtain experimental extracts. Six groups of cells (n=10) were treated as follows: G1: no treatment (control); G2: 0.25 mM SA/60 min; G3: 0.5 mM SA/60 min; G4: 0.25 mM SA+0.01% CP/60 min; G5: 0.5 mM SA+0.01% CP/60 min; and G6: 0.01% CP/60 min. The cell metabolism was evaluated by MTT assay, and the cell morphology was assessed by scanning electron microscopy. The data obtained were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey’s test (α=5%). Results: The percentages of cell metabolism were as follows: G1 (control)=100%; G2=110.06%, G3=108.57%, G4=90.35%, G5=97.63%, and G6=66.88%. Group 6 presented a statistically lower cell metabolism than did the other groups, and the cells that remained on the substrate exhibited changes in their morphology. SA decreased the cytotoxic effects caused by CP, demonstrating its protective effect against the toxic components of this dental product. Conclusions: It was concluded that CP gel has cytopathic effects on MDPC-23 odontoblastic cells, even at low concentrations such as 0.01%. SA at 0.25 mM, and that 0.5 mM is able to protect these cultured cells against the cytotoxic effects of CP. PMID:20613910

  2. Norlittorine and norhyoscyamine identified as products of littorine and hyoscyamine metabolism by (13)C-labeling in Datura innoxia hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Al Balkhi, Mohamad Houssam; Schiltz, Séverine; Lesur, David; Lanoue, Arnaud; Wadouachi, Anne; Boitel-Conti, Michèle

    2012-02-01

    The presence of two compounds, norlittorine and norhyoscyamine, has been reported in leaves and roots of Datura innoxia; however their metabolic origin in the tropane alkaloid pathway has remained unknown. Precise knowledge of this pathway is a necessary pre-requisite to optimize the production of hyoscyamine and scopolamine in D. innoxia hairy root cultures. The exact structure of norlittorine and norhyoscyamine was confirmed by LC-MS/MS and NMR analyses. Isotopic labeling experiments, using [1-(13)C]-phenylalanine, [1'-(13)C]-littorine and [1'-(13)C]-hyoscyamine, combined with elicitor treatments, using methyl jasmonate, coronalon and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, were used to investigate the metabolic origin of the N-demethylated tropane alkaloids. The results suggest that norlittorine and norhyoscyamine are induced under stress conditions by conversion of littorine and hyoscyamine. We propose the N-demethylation of tropane alkaloids as a mechanism to detoxify cells in overproducing conditions. PMID:22083085

  3. Alternative agents versus prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Gregg, Richard; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Murphy, Michael F; Tinmouth, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine whether alternative agents (e.g. artificial platelet substitutes, platelet-poor plasma, fibrinogen, rFVIIa, thrombopoietin mimetics) are as effective and safe as the use of platelet transfusions for the prevention of bleeding (prophylactic platelet transfusion) in patients with haematological disorders who are undergoing myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. Antifibrinolytics (lysine analogues) will not be included in this review because they have been the focus of another Cochrane review (Wardrop 2013). PMID:25722650

  4. Protein delivery into live cells by incubation with an endosomolytic agent

    PubMed Central

    Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Najjar, Kristina; Dayani, Laila; Wang, Ting-Yi; Johnson, Gregory A.; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We report on how a dimer of the cell-penetrating peptide TAT, dfTAT, penetrates live cells by escaping from endosomes with a particularly high efficiency. By mediating endosomal leakage, dfTAT also delivers proteins into cultured cells after a simple co-incubation procedure. Cytosolic delivery is achieved in most cells in a culture and only a relatively small amount of material remains trapped inside endosomes. Delivery does not require binding interactions between dfTAT and a protein, multiple molecules can be delivered at once, and delivery can be repeated. Remarkably, dfTAT-mediated delivery does not noticeably impact cell viability, proliferation, or gene expression. This new delivery strategy should be extremely useful for cell-based assays, cellular imaging applications, and the ex vivo manipulation of cells. PMID:24930129

  5. Loss of Nek11 Prevents G2/M Arrest and Promotes Cell Death in HCT116 Colorectal Cancer Cells Exposed to Therapeutic DNA Damaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Sabir, Sarah R.; Sahota, Navdeep K.; Jones, George D. D.; Fry, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    The Nek11 kinase is a potential mediator of the DNA damage response whose expression is upregulated in early stage colorectal cancers (CRCs). Here, using RNAi-mediated depletion, we examined the role of Nek11 in HCT116 WT and p53-null CRC cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) or the chemotherapeutic drug, irinotecan. We demonstrate that depletion of Nek11 prevents the G2/M arrest induced by these genotoxic agents and promotes p53-dependent apoptosis both in the presence and absence of DNA damage. Interestingly, Nek11 depletion also led to long-term loss of cell viability that was independent of p53 and exacerbated following IR exposure. CRC cells express four splice variants of Nek11 (L/S/C/D). These are predominantly cytoplasmic, but undergo nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mediated through adjacent nuclear import and export signals in the C-terminal non-catalytic domain. In HCT116 cells, Nek11S in particular has an important role in the DNA damage response. These data provide strong evidence that Nek11 contributes to the response of CRC cells to genotoxic agents and is essential for survival either with or without exposure to DNA damage. PMID:26501353

  6. Discovery of agents that eradicate leukemia stem cells using an in silico screen of public gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Hassane, Duane C.; Guzman, Monica L.; Corbett, Cheryl; Li, Xiaojie; Abboud, Ramzi; Young, Fay; Liesveld, Jane L.; Carroll, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that malignant stem cells are important for the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and represent a reservoir of cells that drive the development of AML and relapse. Therefore, new treatment regimens are necessary to prevent relapse and improve therapeutic outcomes. Previous studies have shown that the sesquiterpene lactone, parthenolide (PTL), ablates bulk, progenitor, and stem AML cells while causing no appreciable toxicity to normal hematopoietic cells. Thus, PTL must evoke cellular responses capable of mediating AML selective cell death. Given recent advances in chemical genomics such as gene expression-based high-throughput screening (GE-HTS) and the Connectivity Map, we hypothesized that the gene expression signature resulting from treatment of primary AML with PTL could be used to search for similar signatures in publicly available gene expression profiles deposited into the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). We therefore devised a broad in silico screen of the GEO database using the PTL gene expression signature as a template and discovered 2 new agents, celastrol and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, that effectively eradicate AML at the bulk, progenitor, and stem cell level. These findings suggest the use of multicenter collections of high-throughput data to facilitate discovery of leukemia drugs and drug targets. PMID:18305216

  7. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of mass transfer behavior in a bioreactor for hairy root culture. I. Model development and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Sun, Wei; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2011-01-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model based on a porous media model and a discrete population balance model was established to investigate the hydrodynamics and mass transfer behavior in an airlift bioreactor for hairy root culture.During the hairy root culture of Echinacea purpurea, liquid and gas velocity, gas holdup, mass transfer rate, as well as oxygen concentration distribution in the airlift bioreactor were simulated by this CFD model. Simulative results indicated that liquid flow and turbulence played a dominant role in oxygen mass transfer in the growth domain of the hairy root culture. The dissolved oxygen concentration in the hairy root clump increased from the bottom to the top of the bioreactor cultured with the hairy roots, which was verified by the experimental detection of dissolved oxygen concentration in the hairy root clump. This methodology provided insight understanding on the complex system of hairy root culture and will help to eventually guide the bioreactor design and process intensification of large-scale hairy root culture. PMID:22238770

  8. Application of High-Resolution Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy to Define the Cell Uptake of MRI Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabi, Luisella; Alfieri, Goffredo; Biondi, Luca; De Miranda, Mario; Paleari, Lino; Ghelli, Stefano

    2002-06-01

    A new method, based on proton high-resolution magic-angle spinning ( 1H HR-MAS) NMR spectroscopy, has been employed to study the cell uptake of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents (MRI-CAs). The method was tested on human red blood cells (HRBC) and white blood cells (HWBC) by using three gadolinium complexes, widely used in diagnostics, Gd-BOPTA, Gd-DTPA, and Gd-DOTA, and the analogous complexes obtained by replacing Gd(III) with Dy(III), Nd(III), and Tb(III) (i.e., complexes isostructural to the ones of gadolinium but acting as shift agents). The method is based on the evaluation of the magnetic effects, line broadening, or induced lanthanide shift (LIS) caused by these complexes on NMR signals of intra- and extracellular water. Since magnetic effects are directly linked to permeability, this method is direct. In all the tests, these magnetic effects were detected for the extracellular water signal only, providing a direct proof that these complexes are not able to cross the cell membrane. Line broadening effects (i.e., the use of gadolinium complexes) only allow qualitative evaluations. On the contrary, LIS effects can be measured with high precision and they can be related to the concentration of the paramagnetic species in the cellular compartments. This is possible because the HR-MAS technique provides the complete elimination of bulk magnetic susceptibility (BMS) shift and the differentiation of extra- and intracellular water signals. Thus with this method, the rapid quantification of the MRI-CA amount inside and outside the cells is actually feasible.

  9. Ultrastructural Study of Salmonella typhimurium Treated with Membrane-Active Agents: Specific Reaction of Dansylchloride with Cell Envelope Components

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Peter R. G.; Teuber, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Amino groups of cell envelope proteins, lipids, and lipopolysaccharides cannot be labeled in intact cells of Salmonella typhimurium G 30 by using 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonylchloride incorporated in lecithin-cholesterol vesicles. However, application of membrane-interacting agents like tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris)-hydrochloride, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Na salt) (EDTA), divalent cations, and sublethal doses of the cationic antibacterial agents polymyxin B and chlorhexidine induced specific fluorescent labeling of envelope proteins and lipids but not of cytoplasmic compounds, with the exception of a soluble protein with a molecular weight of 46,000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Treatment with Tris-hydrochloride buffer produced labeling of the heat-modifiable protein B/B+ and of proteins with molecular weights of 26,000, 22,000, and below 17,000. A combination of Tris-hydrochloride and EDTA induced additional dansylation of the major protein A and of proteins of molecular weights 80,000, 60,000, and 44,000. Polymyxin B and chlorhexidine caused similar labeling patterns. In every case, except with divalent cation treatment, protein B/B+ was the most prominently labeled species. Phosphatidylethanolamine was dansylated up to 30%. Lipopolysaccharide was not reactive under any condition or treatment. In addition, the peptidoglycan-bound lipoprotein did not react with dansylchloride in either intact or Tris-hydrochloride-treated cells. The results are discussed with regard to a possible localization of labeled and unlabeled compounds of the cell envelope on the basis of a model placing cell envelope amino groups into ion-ion interactions with anionic components of other envelope compounds like phosphate and carboxyl groups. Images PMID:97268

  10. Investigation of the essential role of platelet-tumor cell interactions in metastasis progression using an agent-based model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metastatic tumors are a major source of morbidity and mortality for most cancers. Interaction of circulating tumor cells with endothelium, platelets and neutrophils play an important role in the early stages of metastasis formation. These complex dynamics have proven difficult to study in experimental models. Prior computational models of metastases have focused on tumor cell growth in a host environment, or prediction of metastasis formation from clinical data. We used agent-based modeling (ABM) to dynamically represent hypotheses of essential steps involved in circulating tumor cell adhesion and interaction with other circulating cells, examine their functional constraints, and predict effects of inhibiting specific mechanisms. Methods We developed an ABM of Early Metastasis (ABMEM), a descriptive semi-mechanistic model that replicates experimentally observed behaviors of populations of circulating tumor cells, neutrophils, platelets and endothelial cells while incorporating representations of known surface receptor, autocrine and paracrine interactions. Essential downstream cellular processes were incorporated to simulate activation in response to stimuli, and calibrated with experimental data. The ABMEM was used to identify potential points of interdiction through examination of dynamic outcomes such as rate of tumor cell binding after inhibition of specific platelet or tumor receptors. Results The ABMEM reproduced experimental data concerning neutrophil rolling over endothelial cells, inflammation-induced binding between neutrophils and platelets, and tumor cell interactions with these cells. Simulated platelet inhibition with anti-platelet drugs produced unstable aggregates with frequent detachment and re-binding. The ABMEM replicates findings from experimental models of circulating tumor cell adhesion, and suggests platelets play a critical role in this pre-requisite for metastasis formation. Similar effects were observed with inhibition of tumor

  11. In vivo haematopoietic activity is induced in neurosphere cells by chromatin-modifying agents

    PubMed Central

    Schmittwolf, Carolin; Kirchhof, Nicole; Jauch, Anna; Dürr, Michael; Harder, Friedrich; Zenke, Martin; Müller, Albrecht M

    2005-01-01

    Modifications of DNA and chromatin are fundamental for the establishment and maintenance of cell type-specific gene expression patterns that constitute cellular identities. To test whether the developmental potential of fetal brain-derived cells that form floating sphere colonies (neurospheres) can be modified by destabilizing their epigenotype, neurosphere cells were treated with chemical compounds that alter the acetylation and methylation patterns of chromatin and DNA. Intravenous infusion of bulk or clonally derived neurosphere cells treated with a combination of trichostatin A (TSA) plus 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (AzaC) (TSA/AzaC neurosphere cells) yielded long-term, multilineage and transplantable neurosphere-derived haematopoietic repopulation. Untreated neurosphere cells exhibited no haematopoietic repopulation activity. The neurosphere-derived haematopoietic cells showed a diploid karyotype, indicating that they are unlikely to be products of cell fusion events, a conclusion strengthened by multicolour fluorescence in situ hybridization. Our results indicate that altering the epigenotype of neurosphere cells followed by transplantation enables the generation of neurosphere-derived haematopoietic cells. PMID:15660132

  12. Checkpoint kinase 1 inhibitors as targeted molecular agents for clear cell carcinoma of the ovary

    PubMed Central

    KOBAYASHI, HIROSHI; SHIGETOMI, HIROSHI; YOSHIMOTO, CHIHARU

    2015-01-01

    In clear cell carcinoma of the ovary, chemoresistance frequently results in treatment failure. The present study aimed to review the potential association of transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF)-1β with cell cycle checkpoint machinery, as a mechanism for chemoresistance. The English-language literature on the subject was reviewed to identify genomic alterations and aberrant molecular pathways interacting with chemoresistance in clear cell carcinoma. Oxidative stress induced by repeated hemorrhage induces greater susceptibility of endometriotic cells to DNA damage, and subsequent malignant transformation results in endometriosis-associated ovarian cancer. Molecular changes, including those in HNF-1β and checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1), may be a manifestation of essential alterations in cell cycle regulation, detoxification and chemoresistance in clear cell carcinoma. Chk1 is a critical signal transducer in the cell cycle checkpoint machinery. DNA damage, in turn, increases persistent phosphorylation of Chk1 and induction of G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in cells overexpressing HNF-1β. HNF-1β deletion induces apoptosis, suggesting that enhanced levels of HNF-1β may be associated with chemoresistance. Targeted therapy with Chk1 inhibitors may be explored as a potential treatment modality for patients with clear cell carcinoma. This provides a novel direction for combination therapy, including targeting of Chk1, which may overcome drug resistance and improve treatment efficacy. PMID:26622535

  13. Aryl-Alkyl-Lysines: Agents That Kill Planktonic Cells, Persister Cells, Biofilms of MRSA and Protect Mice from Skin-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Chandradhish; Manjunath, Goutham B.; Konai, Mohini M.; Uppu, Divakara S. S. M.; Hoque, Jiaul; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R.; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    Development of synthetic strategies to combat Staphylococcal infections, especially those caused by methicillin resistant Staphyloccus aureus (MRSA), needs immediate attention. In this manuscript we report the ability of aryl-alkyl-lysines, simple membrane active small molecules, to treat infections caused by planktonic cells, persister cells and biofilms of MRSA. A representative compound, NCK-10, did not induce development of resistance in planktonic cells in multiple passages and retained activity in varying environments of pH and salinity. At low concentrations the compound was able to depolarize and permeabilize the membranes of S. aureus persister cells rapidly. Treatment with the compound not only eradicated pre-formed MRSA biofilms, but also brought down viable counts in bacterial biofilms. In a murine model of MRSA skin infection, the compound was more effective than fusidic acid in bringing down the bacterial burden. Overall, this class of molecules bears potential as antibacterial agents against skin-infections. PMID:26669634

  14. Synergistic anti-cancer effects of silibinin with conventional cytotoxic agents doxorubicin, cisplatin and carboplatin against human breast carcinoma MCF-7 and MDA-MB468 cells.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Anil K; Agarwal, Chapla; Chan, Daniel C F; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2004-02-01

    Significant emphasis is being placed on combination chemotherapy of cancer using cytotoxic agents and naturally occurring chemopreventive agents, having different mechanisms of action with non-overlapping toxicity. In this regard, here we assessed whether a cancer preventive agent silibinin synergizes the therapeutic potential of doxorubicin (Dox), cisplatin or carboplatin, the chemotherapeutic drugs, in both estrogen-dependent and -independent human breast carcinoma, MCF-7 and MDA-MB468 cells, respectively. When tested alone, each of the four agents showed growth inhibition in both the cell lines in a dose- and a time-dependent manner. Based on their growth inhibitory effects, several combinations of silibinin (25-100 microM) with Dox (10-75 nM), cisplatin (0.2-2 microg/ml) or carboplatin (2-20 microg/ml) were next assessed for their synergistic, additive and/or antagonistic efficacy towards cell growth inhibition and apoptotic death. The strongest synergistic effects for cell growth inhibition [combination index (CI) 0.35 for MCF-7 and 0.45 for MDA-MB468 cells] were evident at a silibinin dose of 100 microM plus 25 nM Dox, in both the cell lines. Most of the CIs for other combinations of these three drugs with silibinin also suggested strong synergistic effects for cell growth inhibition in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB468 cells. In quantitative apoptosis studies, combination of silibinin with Dox resulted in much stronger apoptotic death compared to each agent alone in both cell lines. In case of silibinin combination with cisplatin, it showed no additional apoptotic effect in either cell line. Similarly, silibinin plus carboplatin combination showed stronger apoptotic effect only in MCF-7 cells. Together, these results suggest a possible synergism between silibinin and conventional cytotoxic agents for breast cancer treatment, and warrant further in vivo studies in pre-clinical breast cancer models. PMID:14719089

  15. Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase signaling as an emerging therapeutic agent of B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    XIA, BING; QU, FULIAN; YUAN, TIAN; ZHANG, YIZHUO

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is central to the development and function of B cells. BCR signaling has emerged as a pivotal pathway and a key driver of numerous B-cell lymphomas. Disruption of BCR signaling can be lethal to malignant B cells. Recently, kinase inhibitors that target BCR signaling have induced notable clinical responses. These inhibitors include spleen tyrosine kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, phosphoinositide 3′-kinase and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Ibrutinib, an oral irreversible BTK inhibitor, has emerged as a promising targeted therapy for patients with B-cell malignancies. The present review discusses the current understanding of BTK-mediated BCR signaling in the biology and pathobiology of normal and malignant B cells, and the cellular interaction with the tumor microenvironment. The data on ibrutinib in the preclinical and clinical settings is also discussed, and perspectives for the future use of ibrutinib are outlined. PMID:26788133

  16. Neural progenitor cells labeling with microbubble contrast agent for ultrasound imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wenjin; Tavri, Sidhartha; Benchimol, Michael J.; Itani, Malak; Olson, Emilia S.; Zhang, Hong; Decyk, Marika; Ramirez, Rosemarie G.; Barback, Christopher V.; Kono, Yuko; Mattrey, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Tracking neuroprogenitor cells (NPCs) that are used to target tumors, infarction or inflammation, is paramount for cell-based therapy. We employed ultrasound imaging that can detect a single microbubble because it can distinguish its unique signal from those of surrounding tissues. NPCs efficiently internalized positively charged microbubbles allowing a clinical ultrasound system to detect a single cell at 7 MHz. When injected intravenously, labeled NPCs traversed the lungs to be imaged in the left ventricle and the liver where they accumulated. Internalized microbubbles were not only less sensitive to destruction by ultrasound, but remained visible in vivo for days as compared to minutes when given free. The extended longevity provides ample time to allow cells to reach their intended target. We were also able to transfect NPCs in vitro when microbubbles were preloaded with GFP plasmid only when cells were insonated. Transfection efficiency and cell viability were both greater than 90%. PMID:23578557

  17. Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not alter sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Montero, C Marcela; McIntyre, Bradley W

    2005-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy-induced cell death can involve the induction of apoptosis. Thus, aberrant function of the pathways involved might result in chemoresistance. Since cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix acts as a survival factor that homeostatically maintains normal tissue architecture, it was tested whether acquisition of resistance to deadhesion-induced apoptosis (anoikis) in human osteosarcoma would result in resistance to chemotherapy. Methods Osteosarcoma cell lines (SAOS-2 and TE-85) obtained from ATCC and were maintained in complete Eagle's MEM medium. Suspension culture was established by placing cells in tissue culture wells coated with poly-HEMA. Cell cytotoxicity was determined using a live/dead cytotoxicity assay. Cell cycle/apoptosis analyses were performed using propidium iodide (PI) staining with subsequent FACS analysis. Apoptosis was also assayed by Annexin-FITC/PI staining. Results Etoposide, adriamycin, vinblastine, cisplatin and paclitaxel were able to induce apoptosis in human osteosarcoma cells SAOS-2 regardless of their anoikis resistance phenotype or the culture conditions (adhered vs. suspended). Moreover, suspended anoikis resistant TE-85 cells (TE-85ar) retained their sensitivity to chemotherapy as well. Conclusion Acquisition of anoikis resistance in human osteosarcoma cells does not result in a generalized resistance to all apoptotic stimuli, including chemotherapy. Moreover, our results suggest that the pathways regulating anoikis resistance and chemotherapy resistance might involve the action of different mediators. PMID:15829011

  18. Simple avarone mimetics as selective agents against multidrug resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jeremić, Marko; Pešić, Milica; Dinić, Jelena; Banković, Jasna; Novaković, Irena; Šegan, Dejan; Sladić, Dušan

    2016-08-01

    In this work, synthesis of alkylamino and aralkylamino derivatives of sesquiterpene quinone avarone and its model compound tert-butylquinone was described. For all obtained derivatives biological activity was studied. Cytotoxic activity of the synthesized derivatives towards multidrug resistant MDR human non-small cell lung carcinoma NCI-H460/R cells, their sensitive counterpart NCI-H460 and human normal keratinocytes (HaCaT) as well as detection of cell death superoxide anion generation were investigated. Antimicrobial activity towards Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria and fungal cultures was determined. The results showed that strong cytotoxic activity toward cancer cells was improved with simple avarone mimetics. Some derivatives were selective towards MDR cancer cells. The most active derivatives induced apoptosis in both cancer cell lines, but not in normal cells. Superoxide production was induced by 2,6-disubstituted compounds in MDR cancer cells and not by less active 2,5-disubstituted compounds and was accompanied by the collapse of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Two tert-butylquinone derivatives were particularly selective towards MDR cancer cells. Some tert-butylquinone derivatives exhibited a strong antimicrobial activity. PMID:27128177

  19. Alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a wave of global protein hyperacetylation: Implications in cancer cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Young; Kim, Myoung-Ae; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Bae, Yoe-Sik; Park, Joo-In; Kwak, Jong-Young; Chung, Jay H.; Yun, Jeanho . E-mail: yunj@dau.ac.kr

    2007-08-24

    Protein acetylation modification has been implicated in many cellular processes but the direct evidence for the involvement of protein acetylation in signal transduction is very limited. In the present study, we found that an alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces a robust and reversible hyperacetylation of both cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins during the early phase of the cellular response to MMS. Notably, the acetylation level upon MMS treatment was strongly correlated with the susceptibility of cancer cells, and the enhancement of MMS-induced acetylation by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors was shown to increase the cellular susceptibility. These results suggest protein acetylation is important for the cell death signal transduction pathway and indicate that the use of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of cancer is relevant.

  20. NOTCH1 inhibition enhances the efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic agents by targeting head neck cancer stem cell

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhi-Li; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Cong-Fa; Ma, Si-Rui; Bu, Lin-Lin; Liu, Jian-Feng; Yu, Guang-Tao; Liu, Bing; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Sun, Zhi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered responsible for tumor initiation and chemoresistance. This study was aimed to investigate the possibility of targeting head neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) by NOTCH1 pathway inhibition and explore the synergistic effect of combining NOTCH inhibition with conventional chemotherapy. NOTCH1/HES1 elevation was found in human HNSCC, especially in tissue post chemotherapy and lymph node metastasis, which is correlated with CSCs markers. NOTCH1 inhibitor DAPT (GSI-IX) significantly reduces CSCs population and tumor self-renewal ability in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry analysis showed that NOTCH1 inhibition reduces CSCs frequency either alone or in combination with chemotherapeutic agents, namely, cisplatin, docetaxel, and 5-fluorouracil. The combined strategy of NOTCH1 blockade and chemotherapy synergistically attenuated chemotherapy-enriched CSC population, promising a potential therapeutic exploitation in future clinical trial. PMID:27108536

  1. Investigations on Genetic Architecture of Hairy Loci in Dairy Cattle by Using Single and Whole Genome Regression Approaches.

    PubMed

    Karacaören, B

    2016-07-01

    Development of body hair is an important physiological and cellular process that leads to better adaption in tropical environments for dairy cattle. Various studies suggested a major gene and, more recently, associated genes for hairy locus in dairy cattle. Main aim of this study was to i) employ a variant of the discordant sib pair model, in which half sibs from the same sires are randomly sampled using their affection statues, ii) use various single marker regression approaches, and iii) use whole genome regression approaches to dissect genetic architecture of the hairy gene in the cattle. Whole and single genome regression approaches detected strong genomic signals from Chromosome 23. Although there is a major gene effect on hairy phenotype sourced from chromosome 23: whole genome regression approach also suggested polygenic component related with other parts of the genome. Such a result could not be obtained by any of the single marker approaches. PMID:26954150

  2. Enhanced production of antimicrobial sesquiterpenes and lipoxygenase metabolites in elicitor-treated hairy root cultures of Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Komaraiah, P; Reddy, G V; Reddy, P Srinivas; Raghavendra, A S; Ramakrishna, S V; Reddanna, P

    2003-04-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum) hairy root cultures, established by infecting potato tuber discs with Agrobacterium rhizogenes, were used as a model system for the production of antimicrobial sesquiterpenes and lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolites. Of the four sesquiterpene phytoalexins (rishitin, lubimin, phytuberin and phytuberol) detected in elicitor-treated hairy root cultures, rishitin (213 micrograms g-1 dry wt) was the most predominant followed by lubimin (171 micrograms g-1 dry wt). The elicitors also induced LOX activity (25-fold increase) and LOX metabolites, mainly 9-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid and 9-hydroxyoctadecatrienoic acid, in potato hairy root cultures. The combination of fungal elicitor plus cyclodextrin was the most effective elicitor treatment, followed by methyl jasmonate plus cyclodextrin in inducing sesquiterpenes and LOX metabolites. PMID:12882150

  3. Loss of functional E-cadherin renders cells more resistant to the apoptotic agent taxol in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, Paulo; Oliveira, Maria Jose; Beraldi, Eliana; Mateus, Ana Rita; Nakajima, Takashi; Gleave, Martin; Yokota, Jun; Carneiro, Fatima; Huntsman, David; Seruca, Raquel; Suriano, Gianpaolo . E-mail: gsuriano@ipatimup.pt

    2005-10-15

    Experimental evidence supports a role for E-cadherin in suppressing invasion, metastasis, and proliferation. Germline mutations of the E-cadherin represent the genetic cause of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In this type of tumor, isolated cancer cells permeate the basal membrane and paradoxically survive in the gastric wall in the absence of contact with neighbor epithelial cells or with the extracellular matrix. This suggests that upon E-cadherin deregulation, cells acquired resistance to apoptosis. To test this hypothesis, CHO cells stably expressing either wild-type E-cadherin or the HDGC-related germline mutations T340A and V832M were seeded either on a thin layer of collagen type I or on plastic and then subjected to the apoptotic agent taxol. We found that in vitro functional E-cadherin renders cells more sensitive to the effect of taxol. Our results also indicate that this effect is associated to decreased level of the anti-apoptotic bcl-2 protein.

  4. High affinity and covalent-binding microtubule stabilizing agents show activity in chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Benet; Calvo-Vidal, M. Nieves; Ambati, Srikanth; Jordi, Michel; Kahn, Alissa; Díaz, J. Fernando; Fang, Weishuo; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Cerchietti, Leandro; Moore, Malcolm A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is frequently due to the persistence of a cell population resistant to chemotherapy through different mechanisms, in which drug efflux via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, specifically P-glycoprotein, is one of the most recognized. However, disappointing results from clinical trials employing inhibitors for these transporters have demonstrated the need to adopt different strategies. We hypothesized that microtubule targeting compounds presenting high affinity or covalent binding could overcome the effect of ABC transporters. We therefore evaluated the activity of the high-affinity paclitaxel analog CTX-40 as well as the covalent binder zampanolide (ZMP) in AML cells. Both molecules were active in chemosensitive as well as in chemoresistant cell lines overexpressing P-glycoprotein. Moreover, ZMP or CTX-40 in combination with daunorubicin showed synergistic killing without increased in vitro hematopoietic toxicity. In a primary AML sample, we further demonstrated that ZMP and CTX-40 are active in progenitor and differentiated leukemia cell populations. In sum, our data indicate that high affinity and covalent-binding anti-microtubule agents are active in AML cells otherwise chemotherapy resistant. PMID:26277539

  5. Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: A Potential Alternative Therapeutic Agent in Orthopaedics

    PubMed Central

    Burke, John; Kolhe, Ravindra; Hunter, Monte; Isales, Carlos; Hamrick, Mark; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, many have sought to use stem cells as a promising way to heal human tissue; however, in the past few years, exosomes (packaged vesicles released from cells) have shown more exciting promise. Specifically, stem cell-derived exosomes have demonstrated great ability to provide therapeutical benefits. Exosomal products can include miRNA, other genetic products, proteins, and various factors. They are released from cells in a paracrine fashion in order to combat local cellular stress. Because of this, there are vast benefits that medicine can obtain from stem cell-derived exosomes. If exosomes could be extracted from stem cells in an efficient manner and packaged with particular regenerative products, then diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, bone fractures, and other maladies could be treated with cell-free regenerative medicine via exosomes. Many advances must be made to get to this point, and the following review highlights the current advances of stem cell-derived exosomes with particular attention to regenerative medicine in orthopaedics. PMID:26904130

  6. Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: A Potential Alternative Therapeutic Agent in Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Burke, John; Kolhe, Ravindra; Hunter, Monte; Isales, Carlos; Hamrick, Mark; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, many have sought to use stem cells as a promising way to heal human tissue; however, in the past few years, exosomes (packaged vesicles released from cells) have shown more exciting promise. Specifically, stem cell-derived exosomes have demonstrated great ability to provide therapeutical benefits. Exosomal products can include miRNA, other genetic products, proteins, and various factors. They are released from cells in a paracrine fashion in order to combat local cellular stress. Because of this, there are vast benefits that medicine can obtain from stem cell-derived exosomes. If exosomes could be extracted from stem cells in an efficient manner and packaged with particular regenerative products, then diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, bone fractures, and other maladies could be treated with cell-free regenerative medicine via exosomes. Many advances must be made to get to this point, and the following review highlights the current advances of stem cell-derived exosomes with particular attention to regenerative medicine in orthopaedics. PMID:26904130

  7. Willow Leaves' Extracts Contain Anti-Tumor Agents Effective against Three Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    El-Shemy, Hany A.; Aboul-Enein, Ahmed M.; Aboul-Enein, Khalid Mostafa; Fujita, Kounosuke

    2007-01-01

    Many higher plants contain novel metabolites with antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral properties. However, in the developed world almost all clinically used chemotherapeutics have been produced by in vitro chemical synthesis. Exceptions, like taxol and vincristine, were structurally complex metabolites that were difficult to synthesize in vitro. Many non-natural, synthetic drugs cause severe side effects that were not acceptable except as treatments of last resort for terminal diseases such as cancer. The metabolites discovered in medicinal plants may avoid the side effect of synthetic drugs, because they must accumulate within living cells. The aim here was to test an aqueous extract from the young developing leaves of willow (Salix safsaf, Salicaceae) trees for activity against human carcinoma cells in vivo and in vitro. In vivo Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma Cells (EACC) were injected into the intraperitoneal cavity of mice. The willow extract was fed via stomach tube. The (EACC) derived tumor growth was reduced by the willow extract and death was delayed (for 35 days). In vitro the willow extract could kill the majority (75%–80%) of abnormal cells among primary cells harvested from seven patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 13 with AML (acute myeloid leukemia). DNA fragmentation patterns within treated cells inferred targeted cell death by apoptosis had occurred. The metabolites within the willow extract may act as tumor inhibitors that promote apoptosis, cause DNA damage, and affect cell membranes and/or denature proteins. PMID:17264881

  8. Comparative proteomic analysis of the response to silver ions and yeast extract in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajun; Shen, Ye; Shen, Zhuo; Zhao, Le; Ning, Deli; Jiang, Chao; Zhao, Rong; Huang, Luqi

    2016-10-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses can inhibit plant growth, resulting in losses of crop productivity. However, moderate adverse stress can promote the accumulation of valuable natural products in medicinal plants. Elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms thus might help optimize the variety of available plant medicinal materials and improve their quality. In this study, Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy root cultures were employed as an in vitro model of the Chinese herb Danshen. A comparative proteomic analysis using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS was performed. By comparing the gel images of groups exposed to the stress of yeast extract (YE) combined with Ag(+) and controls, 64 proteins were identified that showed significant changes in protein abundance for at least one time point after treatment. According to analysis based on the KEGG and related physiological experimental verification, it was found that YE and Ag(+) stress induced a burst of reactive oxygen species and activated the Ca(2+)/calmodulin signaling pathway. Expression of immune-suppressive proteins increased. Epidermal cells underwent programmed cell death. Energy metabolism was enhanced and carbon metabolism shifted to favor the production of secondary metabolites such as lignin, tanshinone and salvianolic acids. The tanshinone and salvianolic acids were deposited on the collapsed epidermal cells forming a physicochemical barrier. The defense proteins and these natural products together enhanced the stress resistance of the plants. Since higher levels of natural products represent good qualit