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Sample records for agents including cisplatin

  1. Selection of agents for prevention of cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yingjun; Lu, Xiuqiang; Lu, Chunwei; Li, Gexin; Jin, Yaping; Tang, Hao

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the optimal combination of agents used along with cisplatin for protection of hepatotoxicity. Animal experiment was carried out based on the orthogonal design L(8) (2(7)) setting seven factors with two different levels of each, and eight groups of mice were needed. The agents tested in this study were zinc, selenium, fosfomycin, sodium thiosulfate (STS), N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), methionine and taurine. Mice were supplemented by gavage with various combinations of agents as designed in the orthogonal table once a day for nine days beginning two days before cisplatin administration. 3.5mg/kg body weight of cisplatin was given intraperitoneally once a day for five days simultaneously. After cessation of cisplatin administration, the agents were supplemented continuously for two days. Activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in serum, levels of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in liver were analyzed after cessation of supplementation. Results showed zinc, fosfomycin and methionine were the effective factors for protection of weight loss; fosfomycin and methionine were the effective factors for prevention of decreased liver ratio; selenium, fosfomycin and STS were the effective factors for prevention of increased ALT activities in serum. On the other hand, methionine was the only effective factor for prevention of decreased GSH levels in liver; zinc, selenium and fosfomycin were the effective factors for prevention of increased MDA levels in liver. Based on the data observed in this study, the optimum combinations of agents were selenium, fosfomycin, methionine and taurine, and zinc, selenium, STS and methionine. In conclusion, each agent used in this study could play a beneficial role for prevention of cisplatin hepatotoxicity, however, none could play the crucial role. The potentiated actions for prevention of cisplatin hepatotoxicity could be achieved via combined use of these agents. PMID:18282716

  2. Cisplatin encapsulated nanoparticle as a therapeutic agent for anticancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eka Putra, Gusti Ngurah Putu; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of manipulating size of biomaterials encapsulated drug into nano-scale particles has been researched and developed in treating cancer. Cancer is the second worldwide cause of death, therefore it is critical to treat cancers challenging with therapeutic modality of various mechanisms. Our preliminary investigation has studied cisplatin encapsulated into lipid-based nanoparticle and examined the therapeutic effect on xenografted animal model. We used mice with tumor volume ranging from 195 to 214 mm3 and then few mice were grouped into three groups including: control (PBS), lipid platinum chloride (LPC) nanoparticles and CDDP (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) at dose of 3mg cisplatin /kg body weight. The effect of the treatment was observed for 12 days post-injection. It showed that LPC NPs demonstrated a better therapeutic effect compared to CDDP at same 3mg cisplatin/kg drug dose of tumor size reduction, 96.6% and 11.1% respectively. In addition, mouse body weight loss of LPC, CDDP and PBS treated group are 12.1%, 24.3% and 1.4%. It means that by compared to CDDP group, LPC group demonstrated less side effect as not much reduction of body weight have found. Our findings have shown to be a potential modality to further investigate as a feasible cancer therapy modality.

  3. Anti-platelet agents augment cisplatin nanoparticle cytotoxicity by enhancing tumor vasculature permeability and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ambarish; Sarangi, Sasmit; Chien, Kelly; Sengupta, Poulomi; Papa, Anne-Laure; Basu, Sudipta; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2014-11-01

    Tumor vasculature is critically dependent on platelet mediated hemostasis and disruption of the same can augment delivery of nano-formulation based chemotherapeutic agents which depend on enhanced permeability and retention for tumor penetration. Here, we evaluated the role of Clopidogrel, a well-known inhibitor of platelet aggregation, in potentiating the tumor cytotoxicity of cisplatin nano-formulation in a murine breast cancer model. In vivo studies in murine syngeneic 4T1 breast cancer model showed a significant greater penetration of macromolecular fluorescent nanoparticles after clopidogrel pretreatment. Compared to self-assembling cisplatin nanoparticles (SACNs), combination therapy with clopidogrel and SACN was associated with a 4 fold greater delivery of cisplatin to tumor tissue and a greater reduction in tumor growth as well as higher survival rate. Clopidogrel enhances therapeutic efficiency of novel cisplatin based nano-formulations agents by increasing tumor drug delivery and can be used as a potential targeting agent for novel nano-formulation based chemotherapeutics.

  4. Combination of Genistein and Cisplatin with Two Designed Monofunctional Platinum Agents in Human Ovarian Tumour Models.

    PubMed

    Arzuman, Laila; Beale, Philip; Proschogo, Nick; Yu, Jun Q; Huq, Fazlul

    2015-11-01

    A great amount of research effort has been directed at platinum compounds that bind with DNA differently from cisplatin with the idea that the difference may translate into an altered spectrum of activity. Recently research has also been directed at applying combinations of platinum agents with tumour-active phytochemicals with the aim of providing a means of overcoming platinum resistance in ovarian cancer. Herein we report the synthesis of monofunctional platinum tris(3-hydroxypyridine)chloroplatinum(II) chloride (coded as LH1) and tris(imidazole)chloroplatinum(II) chloride (coded as LH2), and their activity alone and in combination with genistein and cisplatin against human ovarian A2780, cisplatin-resistant A2780(cisR) and picoplatin-resistant A2780(ZD0473R) cancer cell lines. Although both LH1 and LH2 were found to be less active than cisplatin against the tumour models, they produced synergistic outcomes in combination with genistein. Both the level of cellular accumulation of Pt and of Pt-DNA binding resulting from the combination were greater in the A2780(cisR) cell line than in the parental A2780 cell line, irrespective of the sequence of administration. Absence of association between activity of LH1 and LH2 and the level of Pt-DNA binding indicates that the cell death induced by LH1 and LH2 may not be limited to the effect of their binding with DNA. PMID:26504026

  5. Advanced neuroblastoma: improved response rate using a multiagent regimen (OPEC) including sequential cisplatin and VM-26.

    PubMed

    Shafford, E A; Rogers, D W; Pritchard, J

    1984-07-01

    Forty-two children, all over one year of age, were given vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and sequentially timed cisplatin and VM-26 (OPEC) or OPEC and doxorubicin (OPEC-D) as initial treatment for newly diagnosed stage III or IV neuroblastoma. Good partial response was achieved in 31 patients (74%) overall and in 28 (78%) of 36 patients whose treatment adhered to the chemotherapy protocol, compared with a 65% response rate achieved in a previous series of children treated with pulsed cyclophosphamide and vincristine with or without doxorubicin. Only six patients, including two of the six children whose treatment did not adhere to protocol, failed to respond, but there were five early deaths from treatment-related complications. Tumor response to OPEC, which was the less toxic of the two regimens, was at least as good as tumor response to OPEC-D. Cisplatin-induced morbidity was clinically significant in only one patient and was avoided in others by careful monitoring of glomerular filtration rate and hearing. Other centers should test the efficacy of OPEC or equivalent regimens in the treatment of advanced neuroblastoma. PMID:6539811

  6. Tempol, a Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic Agent, Ameliorates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity through Alleviation of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Lamiaa A.; Shehata, Nagwa I.; Abdelkader, Noha F.; Khattab, Mahmoud M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction is a crucial mechanism by which cisplatin, a potent chemotherapeutic agent, causes nephrotoxicity where mitochondrial electron transport complexes are shifted mostly toward imbalanced reactive oxygen species versus energy production. In the present study, the protective role of tempol, a membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic agent, was evaluated on mitochondrial dysfunction and the subsequent damage induced by cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice. Methods and Findings Nephrotoxicity was assessed 72 h after a single i.p. injection of cisplatin (25 mg/kg) with or without oral administration of tempol (100 mg/kg/day). Serum creatinine and urea as well as glucosuria and proteinuria were evaluated. Both kidneys were isolated for estimation of oxidative stress markers, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content and caspase-3 activity. Moreover, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity, complexes I–IV activities and mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mNOS) protein expression were measured along with histological examinations of renal tubular damage and mitochondrial ultrastructural changes. Tempol was effective against cisplatin-induced elevation of serum creatinine and urea as well as glucosuria and proteinuria. Moreover, pretreatment with tempol notably inhibited cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and disruption of mitochondrial function by restoring mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, complexes I and III activities, mNOS protein expression and ATP content. Tempol also provided significant protection against apoptosis, tubular damage and mitochondrial ultrastructural changes. Interestingly, tempol did not interfere with the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin against the growth of solid Ehrlich carcinoma. Conclusion This study highlights the potential role of tempol in inhibiting cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity without affecting its antitumor activity via amelioration of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction

  7. In vitro antagonism between cisplatin and vinca alkaloids.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K.; Tanaka, M.; Kanamaru, H.; Hashimura, T.; Yamamoto, I.; Konishi, J.; Kuze, F.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the combination of cisplatin and other cytotoxic agents were studied in vitro. When A549 lung cancer cells were treated simultaneously with cisplatin and other cytotoxic agents, cisplatin additively increased the cytotoxic effects of etoposide, mitomycin C, adriamycin, 5-fluorouracil and 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine, but antagonised those of vincristine, vindesine, vinblastine and podophyllotoxin. The antagonism between cisplatin and vincristine was also observed with HT29 colon cancer cells. NC65 renal carcinoma cells and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells when these cells were simultaneously exposed to both agents. When A549 cells were exposed to cisplatin and vincristine sequentially, the antagonism between them was evident when cells were pretreated with cisplatin but not when treated in the opposite sequence. Therefore, when combination chemotherapy including cisplatin and vinca alkaloids is given, possible antagonism between them should be considered, especially in determining the schedule of drug administration. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2757923

  8. Membrane Transition Temperature Determines Cisplatin Response.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Krishnan; Ahsan, Aarif; Ray, Dipankar; Nyati, Mukesh K; Veatch, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a classical chemotherapeutic agent used in treating several forms of cancer including head and neck. However, cells develop resistance to the drug in some patients through a range of mechanisms, some of which are poorly understood. Using isolated plasma membrane vesicles as a model system, we present evidence suggesting that cisplatin induced resistance may be due to certain changes in the bio-physical properties of plasma membranes. Giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) isolated from cortical cytoskeleton exhibit a miscibility transition between a single liquid phase at high temperature and two distinct coexisting liquid phases at low temperature. The temperature at which this transition occurs is hypothesized to reflect the magnitude of membrane heterogeneity at physiological temperature. We find that addition of cisplatin to vesicles isolated from cisplatin-sensitive cells result in a lowering of this miscibility transition temperature, whereas in cisplatin-resistant cells such treatment does not affect the transition temperature. To explore if this is a cause or consequence of cisplatin resistance, we tested if addition of cisplatin in combination with agents that modulate GPMV transition temperatures can affect cisplatin sensitivity. We found that cells become more sensitive to cisplatin when isopropanol, an agent that lowers GPMV transition temperature, was combined with cisplatin. Conversely, cells became resistant to cisplatin when added in combination with menthol that raises GPMV transition temperatures. These data suggest that changes in plasma membrane heterogeneity augments or suppresses signaling events initiated in the plasma membranes that can determine response to cisplatin. We postulate that desired perturbations of membrane heterogeneity could provide an effective therapeutic strategy to overcome cisplatin resistance for certain patients. PMID:26484687

  9. Membrane Transition Temperature Determines Cisplatin Response

    PubMed Central

    Raghunathan, Krishnan; Ahsan, Aarif; Ray, Dipankar; Nyati, Mukesh K.; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a classical chemotherapeutic agent used in treating several forms of cancer including head and neck. However, cells develop resistance to the drug in some patients through a range of mechanisms, some of which are poorly understood. Using isolated plasma membrane vesicles as a model system, we present evidence suggesting that cisplatin induced resistance may be due to certain changes in the bio-physical properties of plasma membranes. Giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) isolated from cortical cytoskeleton exhibit a miscibility transition between a single liquid phase at high temperature and two distinct coexisting liquid phases at low temperature. The temperature at which this transition occurs is hypothesized to reflect the magnitude of membrane heterogeneity at physiological temperature. We find that addition of cisplatin to vesicles isolated from cisplatin-sensitive cells result in a lowering of this miscibility transition temperature, whereas in cisplatin-resistant cells such treatment does not affect the transition temperature. To explore if this is a cause or consequence of cisplatin resistance, we tested if addition of cisplatin in combination with agents that modulate GPMV transition temperatures can affect cisplatin sensitivity. We found that cells become more sensitive to cisplatin when isopropanol, an agent that lowers GPMV transition temperature, was combined with cisplatin. Conversely, cells became resistant to cisplatin when added in combination with menthol that raises GPMV transition temperatures. These data suggest that changes in plasma membrane heterogeneity augments or suppresses signaling events initiated in the plasma membranes that can determine response to cisplatin. We postulate that desired perturbations of membrane heterogeneity could provide an effective therapeutic strategy to overcome cisplatin resistance for certain patients. PMID:26484687

  10. Anti-cancer effects of newly developed chemotherapeutic agent, glycoconjugated palladium (II) complex, against cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cisplatin (CDDP) is the most frequently used chemotherapeutic agent for various types of advanced cancer, including gastric cancer. However, almost all cancer cells acquire resistance against CDDP, and this phenomenon adversely affects prognosis. Thus, new chemotherapeutic agents that can overcome the CDDP-resistant cancer cells will improve the survival of advanced cancer patients. Methods We synthesized new glycoconjugated platinum (II) and palladium (II) complexes, [PtCl2 (L)] and [PdCl2 (L)]. CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cell lines were established by continuous exposure to CDDP, and gene expression in the CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells was analyzed. The cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by [PtCl2 (L)] and [PdCl2 (L)] in CDDP-sensitive and CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells were evaluated. DNA double-strand breaks by drugs were assessed by evaluating phosphorylated histone H2AX. Xenograft tumor mouse models were established and antitumor effects were also examined in vivo. Results CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells exhibit ABCB1 and CDKN2A gene up-regulation, as compared with CDDP-sensitive gastric cancer cells. In the analyses of CDDP-resistant gastric cancer cells, [PdCl2 (L)] overcame cross-resistance to CDDP in vitro and in vivo. [PdCl2 (L)] induced DNA double-strand breaks. Conclusion These results indicate that [PdCl2 (L)] is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for CDDP-resistant gastric cancer and may have clinical applications. PMID:23672493

  11. 13 CFR 107.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 107.1620 Section 107.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance...

  12. 13 CFR 108.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 108.1620 Section 108.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA...

  13. Tinospora cordifolia as a protective and immunomodulatory agent in combination with cisplatin against murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Heena; Sehgal, Rakesh; Kaur, Sukhbir

    2014-02-01

    Effect of pure herb, Tinospora cordifolia was studied for its hepatoprotective, nephroprotective and immunomodulatory activity against high dose cisplatin treatment in Leishmania donovani infected BALB/c mice. Administration of cisplatin (5mg/kg b.wt. daily for 5 days, i.p.) reduced the parasite load in L. donovani infected BALB/c mice but produced damage in liver and kidney as manifested biochemically by an increase in serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum urea, serum creatinine and various electrolytes etc. These biochemical analyses were further supported by cisplatin induced morphological changes in kidney, liver and spleen. To combat this pure herb, T. cordifolia (100mg/kg b.wt. for 15 days daily) was used in combination with cisplatin in L. donovani infected BALB/c mice and it was found that all the aforementioned changes were effectively attenuated by T. cordifolia when administered in combination with cisplatin. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis of lymphocyte surface markers of T cells (CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+), NK1.1 and B cells (CD19) indicated prominent enhancement in proliferation and differentiation of lymphocytes. T. cordifolia in combination with cisplatin selectively induced Th1 type of immune response as depicted by enhanced levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 whereas Th2 specific cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 observed a moderate decline. Confirmation of Th1 polarization was further obtained from augmented levels of IgG2a over IgG1 and heightened DTH (delayed type hypersensitivity) response. Thus, our results suggest that treatment by T. cordifolia may be a critical remedy for the amelioration of adverse effects of cisplatin. Thus, this might serve as a novel combination against visceral leishmaniasis in future. PMID:24370645

  14. Comparison of the Anti-tumor Effects of Two Platinum Agents (Miriplatin and Fine-Powder Cisplatin)

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Shobu Nitta, Norihisa Ohta, Shinichi Sonoda, Akinaga Otani, Hideji Tomozawa, Yuki Nitta-Seko, Ayumi Tsuchiya, Keiko Tanka, Toyohiko Takahashi, Masashi Murata, Kiyoshi

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of miriplatin-lipidol and fine-powder cisplatin-lipiodol suspensions. Methods: Assessment of the cytotoxicity of two drugs was performed: a soluble derivative of miriplatin (DPC) and fine-powder cisplatin. We randomly divided 15 rabbits with transplanted VX2 liver tumors into three equal groups. They were infused via the proper hepatic artery with a miriplatin-lipiodol suspension (ML), a fine-powder cisplatin-lipiodol suspension (CL), or saline (control) and the tumor growth rate was determined on MR images acquired before and 7 days after treatment. The concentration of platinum (PCs) in blood was assayed immediately, and 10, 30, and 60 min, and 24 h and 7 days after drug administration. Its concentration in tumor and surrounding normal liver tissues was determined at 7 days postadministration. Results: At high concentrations, fine-powder cisplatin exhibited stronger cytotoxicity than DPC. At low concentrations, both agents manifested weak cytotoxicity. While there was no difference between the tumor growth rate of the ML and the CL groups, the difference between the controls and ML- and CL-treated rabbits was significant. The blood PCs peaked at 10 min and then gradually decreased over time. On the other hand, no platinum was detected at any point after the administration of ML. There was no difference between the ML and CL groups in the PCs in tumor tissues; however, in normal hepatic tissue, the PCs were higher in ML- than CL-treated rabbits. Conclusions: We confirmed the anti-tumor effect of ML and CL. There was no significant difference between the anti-tumor effect of ML and CL at 7 days postadministration.

  15. Cisplatin nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    de Kroon, Anton I P M; Staffhorst, Rutger W H M; Kruijff, Ben de; Burger, Koert N J

    2005-01-01

    Cisplatin nanocapsules represent a novel lipid formulation of the anticancer drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), in which nanoprecipitates of cisplatin are covered by a phospholipid bilayer coat consisting of an equimolar mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine. Cisplatin nanocapsules are characterized by an unprecedented cisplatin-to-lipid molar ratio and exhibit strongly improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells in vitro compared with the free drug. Here, methods for preparing and characterizing cisplatin nanocapsules are reported. PMID:15721377

  16. Agents in Safety Related Systems Including Ubiquitous Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandén, Lars

    The ADM (Autonomous Decision Maker) concept concerns the possibility of including intelligent interfaces, agent like, for supporting the use of ubiquitous networks, such as the Internet, in safety related applications. The need for such interfaces is inevitable if remote surveillance and control shall be supported. The single most important aspect of ADM is its capability of handling limited resources when making intelligent decisions. Intelligence in ADM is manifested in reasoning and learning. This paper outlines the role of ADM and especially in relation to the standard IEC 61508 and presents the overall properties that result. These are exemplified by a presentation of ADM demonstrator.

  17. Proteasome Inhibitor YSY01A Enhances Cisplatin Cytotoxicity in Cisplatin-Resistant Human Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Zhou, Quan; Yuan, Xia; Ge, Ze-mei; Ran, Fu-xiang; Yang, Hua-yu; Qiang, Guang-liang; Li, Run-tao; Cui, Jing-rong

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most common drugs used for treatment of solid tumors such as ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, the development of resistance against this cytotoxic agent limits its clinical use. Here we report that YSY01A, a novel proteasome inhibitor, is capable of suppressing survival of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. And YSY01A treatment enhances the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in drug-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Specifically, YSY01A abrogates regulatory proteins important for cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis including NF-κB p65 and STAT3, resulting in down-regulation of Bcl-2. A dramatic increase in cisplatin uptake was also observed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following exposure to YSY01A. Taken together, YSY01A serves as a potential candidate for further development as anticancer therapeutics targeting the proteasome. PMID:27326257

  18. Switching the Loaded Agent from Epirubicin to Cisplatin: Salvage Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization with Drug-eluting Microspheres for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Akihiko Hori, Shinich

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: There is no consensus on switching anticancer agents loaded onto drug carriers in transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to evaluate the safety and clinical outcomes of TACE with cisplatin-loaded microspheres (CLM-TACE) in HCC patients refractory to TACE with epirubicin-loaded microspheres (ELM-TACE). Methods: Between February 2008 and June 2010, 85 patients with unresectable HCC refractory to ELM-TACE were enrolled to undergo CLM-TACE. The number of ELM-TACE sessions until judgment of resistance ranged from 1 to 4 (median, 2.1). CLM-TACE was performed using 50-100-{mu}m superabsorbent polymer microspheres loaded with 1 mg cisplatin/1 mg microspheres together with hepatic arterial infusion of 25 mg cisplatin and 500 mg 5-fluorouracil per patient. Tumor responses were evaluated by computed tomography according to the European Association for the Study of the Liver criteria. Results: The median number of CLM-TACE treatment sessions was 1.8 (range, 1-5), and the mean total dose of cisplatin per session was 42.8 mg (range, 30.0-59.0). After 6 months, 3 (3.5%) patients achieved complete response, 31 (36.5%) had partial response, 15 (17.6%) had stable disease, and 36 (42.4%) had progressive disease. The median overall survival and time to treatment failure after initial CLM-TACE were 13.3 and 7.2 months, respectively. Overall, 9.4% of patients experienced grade 3/4 adverse events. Conclusions: witching the loaded agent from epirubicin to cisplatin is a safe, well-tolerated, and efficacious treatment strategy for salvage TACE with drug-eluting microspheres in HCC patients refractory to ELM-TACE.

  19. Synergistic anti-cancer effects of silibinin with conventional cytotoxic agents doxorubicin, cisplatin and carboplatin against human breast carcinoma MCF-7 and MDA-MB468 cells.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Anil K; Agarwal, Chapla; Chan, Daniel C F; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2004-02-01

    Significant emphasis is being placed on combination chemotherapy of cancer using cytotoxic agents and naturally occurring chemopreventive agents, having different mechanisms of action with non-overlapping toxicity. In this regard, here we assessed whether a cancer preventive agent silibinin synergizes the therapeutic potential of doxorubicin (Dox), cisplatin or carboplatin, the chemotherapeutic drugs, in both estrogen-dependent and -independent human breast carcinoma, MCF-7 and MDA-MB468 cells, respectively. When tested alone, each of the four agents showed growth inhibition in both the cell lines in a dose- and a time-dependent manner. Based on their growth inhibitory effects, several combinations of silibinin (25-100 microM) with Dox (10-75 nM), cisplatin (0.2-2 microg/ml) or carboplatin (2-20 microg/ml) were next assessed for their synergistic, additive and/or antagonistic efficacy towards cell growth inhibition and apoptotic death. The strongest synergistic effects for cell growth inhibition [combination index (CI) 0.35 for MCF-7 and 0.45 for MDA-MB468 cells] were evident at a silibinin dose of 100 microM plus 25 nM Dox, in both the cell lines. Most of the CIs for other combinations of these three drugs with silibinin also suggested strong synergistic effects for cell growth inhibition in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB468 cells. In quantitative apoptosis studies, combination of silibinin with Dox resulted in much stronger apoptotic death compared to each agent alone in both cell lines. In case of silibinin combination with cisplatin, it showed no additional apoptotic effect in either cell line. Similarly, silibinin plus carboplatin combination showed stronger apoptotic effect only in MCF-7 cells. Together, these results suggest a possible synergism between silibinin and conventional cytotoxic agents for breast cancer treatment, and warrant further in vivo studies in pre-clinical breast cancer models. PMID:14719089

  20. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    PubMed Central

    Dedduwa-Mudalige, Gayani N. P.; Chow, Christine S.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA) including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human. PMID:26370969

  1. Pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ozkok, Abdullah; Edelstein, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin and other platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors. A known complication of cisplatin administration is acute kidney injury (AKI). The nephrotoxic effect of cisplatin is cumulative and dose-dependent and often necessitates dose reduction or withdrawal. Recurrent episodes of AKI may result in chronic kidney disease. The pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced AKI involves proximal tubular injury, oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular injury in the kidney. There is predominantly acute tubular necrosis and also apoptosis in the proximal tubules. There is activation of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the kidney. Inhibition of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α or IL-33 or depletion of CD4+ T cells or mast cells protects against cisplatin-induced AKI. Cisplatin also causes endothelial cell injury. An understanding of the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced AKI is important for the development of adjunctive therapies to prevent AKI, to lessen the need for dose decrease or drug withdrawal, and to lessen patient morbidity and mortality. PMID:25165721

  2. Biodistribution of gadolinium-based contrast agents, including gadolinium deposition

    PubMed Central

    Aime, Silvio; Caravan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The biodistribution of approved gadolinium (Gd) based contrast agents (GBCA) is reviewed. After intravenous injection GBCA distribute in the blood and the extracellular space and transiently through the excretory organs. Preclinical animal studies and the available clinical literature indicate that all these compounds are excreted intact. Elimination tends to be rapid and for the most part, complete. In renally insufficient patients the plasma elimination half-life increases substantially from hours to days depending on renal function. In patients with impaired renal function and nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), the agents gadodiamide, gadoversetamide, and gadopentetate dimeglumine have been shown to result in Gd deposition in the skin and internal organs. In these cases, it is likely that the Gd is no longer present as the GBCA, but this has still not been definitively shown. In preclinical models very small amounts of Gd are retained in the bone and liver, and the amount retained correlates with the kinetic and thermodynamic stability of the GBCA with respect to Gd release in vitro. The pattern of residual Gd deposition in NSF subjects may be different than that observed in preclinical rodent models. GBCA are designed to be used via intravenous administration. Altering the route of administration and/or the formulation of the GBCA can dramatically alter the biodistribution of the GBCA and can increase the likelihood of Gd deposition. PMID:19938038

  3. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of cisplatin-containing EGFR targeting bioconjugates as potential therapeutic agents for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Rolf F; Wu, Gong; Meisen, W Hans; Nakkula, Robin J; Yang, Weilian; Huo, Tianyao; Kellough, David A; Kaumaya, Pravin; Turro, Claudia; Agius, Lawrence M; Kaur, Balveen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate four different platinated bioconjugates containing a cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [cis-DDP]) fragment and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting moieties as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of brain tumors using a human EGFR-expressing transfectant of the F98 rat glioma (F98EGFR) to assess their efficacy. The first two bioconjugates employed the monoclonal antibody cetuximab (C225 or Erbitux®) as the targeting moiety, and the second two used genetically engineered EGF peptides. C225-G5-Pt was produced by reacting cis-DDP with a fifth-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer (G5) and then linking it to C225 by means of two heterobifunctional reagents. The second bioconjugate (C225-PG-Pt) employed the same methodology except that polyglutamic acid was used as the carrier. The third and fourth bioconjugates used two different EGF peptides, PEP382 and PEP455, with direct coordination to the Pt center of the cis-DDP fragment. In vivo studies with C225-G5-Pt failed to demonstrate therapeutic activity following intracerebral (ic) convection-enhanced delivery (CED) to F98EGFR glioma-bearing rats. The second bioconjugate, C225-PG-Pt, failed to show in vitro cytotoxicity. Furthermore, because of its high molecular weight, we decided that lower molecular weight peptides might provide better targeting and microdistribution within the tumor. Both PEP382-Pt and PEP455-Pt bioconjugates were cytotoxic in vitro and, based on this, a pilot study was initiated using PEP455-Pt. The end point for this study was tumor size at 6 weeks following tumor cell implantation and 4 weeks following ic CED of PEP455-Pt to F98 glioma-bearing rats. Neuropathologic examination revealed that five of seven rats were either tumor-free or only had microscopic tumors at 42 days following tumor implantation compared to a mean survival time of 20.5 and 26.3 days for untreated controls. In conclusion, we have succeeded in reformatting the

  4. Protective effects of ghrelin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kimura, Toru; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Takabatake, Hiroyuki; Miyazato, Mikiya; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin is a potent chemotherapeutic agent that has activity against malignant tumors. However, cisplatin causes various adverse effects, such as nephrotoxicity, which are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have revealed that the mechanism of cisplatin nephrotoxicity includes a robust inflammatory response. Since ghrelin has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, we hypothesized that ghrelin might have protective effects against cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, cisplatin with vehicle, and cisplatin with ghrelin. Ghrelin (0.8μg/kg/min via osmotic-pump, subcutaneously) or vehicle administration was started one day before cisplatin injection. At 72h after cisplatin administration (20mg/kg, intraperitoneally), we measured serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, urine albumin/creatinine, renal mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and histological changes. Ghrelin significantly attenuated the increase in serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine induced by cisplatin. Ghrelin tended to attenuate the increase in urine albumin/creatinine, although not significantly. Cisplatin-induced renal tubular injury and apoptosis were significantly attenuated by ghrelin pretreatment. Consequently, ghrelin significantly attenuated renal mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. In conclusion, ghrelin produces protective effects in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through inhibition of inflammatory reactions. Pretreatment with ghrelin may become a new prophylactic candidate for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:27298204

  5. Fenofibrate reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis of renal proximal tubular cells via inhibition of JNK and p38 pathways.

    PubMed

    Thongnuanjan, Penjai; Soodvilai, Sirima; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Soodvilai, Sunhapas

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as a standard chemotherapy for solid tumors. The major adverse effect of cisplatin is nephrotoxicity in proximal tubular cells, via oxidative stress, DNA damage, cell apoptosis, and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacological effect and mechanism of fibrate drugs on cisplatin-induced renal proximal tubular cell death. Cisplatin decreased cell viability of LLC-PK1 and HK-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis was attenuated by co-treatment with fenofibrate while less so with clofibrate and bezafibrate. Fenofibrate's protective effect was not complimented by co-treatment with GW6471, a PPARα antagonist, indicating the protective effect occurred via a PPARα-independent mechanism. Treating cells with cisplatin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 kinase (p38), but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Fenofibrate reversed cisplatin-induced JNK and p38 activation, but had no effect on ROS production. The findings suggest fenofibrate's protective effect on cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity is mediated by inhibition of JNK and p38. Moreover, fenofibrate did not alter cisplatin's antitumor effect on cancer cell lines including T84, SW-480, HepG2, and SK-LU-1 cells. Therefore, fenofibrate may be a candidate agent for further development as an adjuvant to cisplatin treatment. PMID:27193727

  6. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., including chemical agents. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  7. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., including chemical agents. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  8. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., including chemical agents. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  9. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., including chemical agents. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  10. Mechanism of cisplatin proximal tubule toxicity revealed by integrating transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and biokinetics.

    PubMed

    Wilmes, Anja; Bielow, Chris; Ranninger, Christina; Bellwon, Patricia; Aschauer, Lydia; Limonciel, Alice; Chassaigne, Hubert; Kristl, Theresa; Aiche, Stephan; Huber, Christian G; Guillou, Claude; Hewitt, Philipp; Leonard, Martin O; Dekant, Wolfgang; Bois, Frederic; Jennings, Paul

    2015-12-25

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of solid tumours. The major dose-limiting factor is nephrotoxicity, in particular in the proximal tubule. Here, we use an integrated omics approach, including transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics coupled to biokinetics to identify cell stress response pathways induced by cisplatin. The human renal proximal tubular cell line RPTEC/TERT1 was treated with sub-cytotoxic concentrations of cisplatin (0.5 and 2 μM) in a daily repeat dose treating regime for up to 14 days. Biokinetic analysis showed that cisplatin was taken up from the basolateral compartment, transported to the apical compartment, and accumulated in cells over time. This is in line with basolateral uptake of cisplatin via organic cation transporter 2 and bioactivation via gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase located on the apical side of proximal tubular cells. Cisplatin affected several pathways including, p53 signalling, Nrf2 mediated oxidative stress response, mitochondrial processes, mTOR and AMPK signalling. In addition, we identified novel pathways changed by cisplatin, including eIF2 signalling, actin nucleation via the ARP/WASP complex and regulation of cell polarization. In conclusion, using an integrated omic approach together with biokinetics we have identified both novel and established mechanisms of cisplatin toxicity. PMID:25450742

  11. Enhancement of Aerosol Cisplatin Chemotherapy with Gene Therapy Expressing ABC10 protein in Respiratory System

    PubMed Central

    Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Linsmeier, Bernd; Kioumis, Ioannis; Li, Qiang; Huang, Haidong; Sachpatzidou, Despoina; Lampaki, Sofia; Organtzis, John; Domvri, Kalliopi; Sakkas, Leonidas; Zachariadis, George A.; Archontas, Konstantinos N.; Kallianos, Anastasios; Rapti, Aggeliki; Yarmus, Lonny; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Brachmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled therapy for lung cancer is a local form of treatment. Currently inhaled non-specific cytotoxic agents have been evaluated as a future treatment for local disease control and distant metastasis control. There are few information regarding the influence of local transporters and gene expression of the respiratory epithelium to the absorption of administered drugs. In the current work we used adenoviral-type 5(dE1/E3) (Cytomegalovirus promoter) with human ABCA10 transgene (Ad-h-ABCA10) purchased from Vector Labs® in order to investigate whether gene therapy can be used as a pre-treatment to enhance the efficiency of inhaled cisplatin. We included the following groups to our work: a) control, b) aerosol vector, c) aerosol vector plus cisplatin, d) aerosol cisplatin, e) intratumoral cisplatin administration, f) intratumoral vector plus cisplatin administration. The results indicate that the aerosol cisplatin group had a long term survival with the intratumoral cisplatin group following. The enhancement of the ABCA family locally to the respiratory system prior to the aerosol cisplatin administration can be used safely and efficiently. Future treatment design of local therapies should include the investigation of local transporters and genes. PMID:24723977

  12. Cisplatin induces resistance by triggering differentiation of testicular embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Abada, Paolo B; Howell, Stephen B

    2014-01-01

    Although testicular germ cell tumors are generally quite responsive to treatment with cisplatin, a small fraction of them acquire resistance during therapy. Even when cisplatin treatment is successful the patient is often left with a residual teratoma at the site of the primary tumor suggesting that cisplatin may trigger differentiation in some tumors. Using the human embryonal carcinoma cell line NTera2/D1, we confirmed that exposure to the differentiating agent retinoic acid produced a reduction in pluripotency markers NANOG and POU5F1 (Oct3/4) and an acute concentration-dependent increase in resistance to both cisplatin and paclitaxel that reached as high as 18-fold for cisplatin and 61-fold for paclitaxel within four days. A two day exposure to cisplatin also produced a concentration-dependent decrease in the expression of the NANOG and POU5F1 and increased expression of three markers whose levels increase with differentiation including Nestin, SCG10 and Fibronectin. In parallel, exposure to cisplatin induced up to 6.2-fold resistance to itself and 104-fold resistance to paclitaxel. Paclitaxel did not induce differentiation or resistance to either itself or cisplatin. Neither retinoic acid nor cisplatin induced resistance in cervical or prostate cancer cell lines or other germ cell tumor lines in which they failed to alter the expression of NANOG and POU5F1. Forced expression of NANOG prevented the induction of resistance to cisplatin by retinoic acid. We conclude that cisplatin can acutely induce resistance to itself and paclitaxel by triggering a differentiation response in pluripotent germ cell tumor cells. PMID:24475288

  13. 1,25D3 potentiates cisplatin antitumor activity by p73 induction in a squamous cell carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyu; Yu, Wei-Dong; Hershberger, Pamela A.; Flynn, Geraldine; Kong, Rui-Xian; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2008-01-01

    1,25D3 exhibits anti-tumor activity in a variety of cancers including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Intrinsic resistance of SCC cells to cisplatin was observed and led to the investigation into whether 1,25D3 sensitizes SCC cells to cisplatin. Pretreatment with 1,25D3 followed by cisplatin enhanced growth inhibition in SCC cells compared with 1,25D3 alone, as assessed by cytotoxicity and in vitro clonogenic assays. In addition, 1,25D3 sensitized SCC cells to cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Treatment of tumor-bearing C3H mice with 1,25D3 prior to cisplatin reduced clonogenic survival using in vivo excision clonogenic assay. These results were not observed in a 1,25D3-resistant SCC variant, indicating the critical role of 1,25D3 in sensitizing SCC cells to cisplatin. Further, a marked decrease in fractional tumor volume was observed when SCC tumor-bearing mice were treated with 1,25D3 prior to cisplatin as compared to either agent administered alone. Cisplatin has been shown to modulate p73 protein level in certain cancer cells. Our data showed that p73 level was not affected by cisplatin, but increased by 1,25D3 in SCC cells. Knocking down p73 by siRNA protected SCC cells against 1,25D3 and cisplatin-mediated clonogenic cell kill and apoptosis. Increasing p73 protein level by knocking down UFD2a, which mediates p73 degradation, promoted 1,25D3 and cisplatin-mediated clonogenic cell kill. These results suggest that 1,25D3 potentiates cisplatin anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo in a SCC model system, possibly through p73 induction and apoptosis. The combination treatment may provide a more effective therapeutic regimen in cancer treatment. PMID:18790784

  14. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies DNA Repair Pathways that Sensitize Cancer Cells to Combined ATR Inhibition and Cisplatin Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Mohni, Kareem N.; Thompson, Petria S.; Luzwick, Jessica W.; Glick, Gloria G.; Pendleton, Christopher S.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Cortez, David

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response kinase ATR may be a useful cancer therapeutic target. ATR inhibition synergizes with loss of ERCC1, ATM, XRCC1 and DNA damaging chemotherapy agents. Clinical trials have begun using ATR inhibitors in combination with cisplatin. Here we report the first synthetic lethality screen with a combination treatment of an ATR inhibitor (ATRi) and cisplatin. Combination treatment with ATRi/cisplatin is synthetically lethal with loss of the TLS polymerase ζ and 53BP1. Other DNA repair pathways including homologous recombination and mismatch repair do not exhibit synthetic lethal interactions with ATRi/cisplatin, even though loss of some of these repair pathways sensitizes cells to cisplatin as a single-agent. We also report that ATRi strongly synergizes with PARP inhibition, even in homologous recombination-proficient backgrounds. Lastly, ATR inhibitors were able to resensitize cisplatin-resistant cell lines to cisplatin. These data provide a comprehensive analysis of DNA repair pathways that exhibit synthetic lethality with ATR inhibitors when combined with cisplatin chemotherapy, and will help guide patient selection strategies as ATR inhibitors progress into the cancer clinic. PMID:25965342

  15. Insights into RNA binding by the anticancer drug cisplatin from the crystal structure of cisplatin-modified ribosome.

    PubMed

    Melnikov, Sergey V; Söll, Dieter; Steitz, Thomas A; Polikanov, Yury S

    2016-06-01

    Cisplatin is a widely prescribed anticancer drug, which triggers cell death by covalent binding to a broad range of biological molecules. Among cisplatin targets, cellular RNAs remain the most poorly characterized molecules. Although cisplatin was shown to inactivate essential RNAs, including ribosomal, spliceosomal and telomeric RNAs, cisplatin binding sites in most RNA molecules are unknown, and therefore it remains challenging to study how modifications of RNA by cisplatin contributes to its toxicity. Here we report a 2.6Å-resolution X-ray structure of cisplatin-modified 70S ribosome, which describes cisplatin binding to the ribosome and provides the first nearly atomic model of cisplatin-RNA complex. We observe nine cisplatin molecules bound to the ribosome and reveal consensus structural features of the cisplatin-binding sites. Two of the cisplatin molecules modify conserved functional centers of the ribosome-the mRNA-channel and the GTPase center. In the mRNA-channel, cisplatin intercalates between the ribosome and the messenger RNA, suggesting that the observed inhibition of protein synthesis by cisplatin is caused by impaired mRNA-translocation. Our structure provides an insight into RNA targeting and inhibition by cisplatin, which can help predict cisplatin-binding sites in other cellular RNAs and design studies to elucidate a link between RNA modifications by cisplatin and cisplatin toxicity. PMID:27079977

  16. Nanoparticle formulations of cisplatin for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaopin; He, Chunbai; Kron, Stephen J; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-09-01

    The genotoxic agent cisplatin, used alone or in combination with radiation and/or other chemotherapeutic agents, is an important first-line chemotherapy for a broad range of cancers. The clinical utility of cisplatin is limited both by intrinsic and acquired resistance and dose-limiting normal tissue toxicity. That cisplatin shows little selectivity for tumor versus normal tissue may be a critical factor limiting its value. To overcome the low therapeutic ratio of the free drug, macromolecular, liposomal, and nanoparticle drug delivery systems have been explored toward leveraging the enhanced permeability and retention effect and promoting delivery of cisplatin to tumors. Here, we survey recent advances in nanoparticle formulations of cisplatin, focusing on agents that show promise in preclinical or clinical settings. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:776-791. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1390 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26848041

  17. Replication-Competent Herpes Simplex Virus Vector G207 and Cisplatin Combination Therapy for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chahlavi, Ali; Todo, Tomoki; Martuza, Robert L; Rabkin, Samuel D

    1999-01-01

    Abstract Replication-competent virus vectors are attractive therapeutic agents for cancer. G207, a second-generation, multimutated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), is one such vector that is safe in primates and efficacious against human tumors in athymic mice. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most frequently encountered malignancy of the head and neck, and the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin is a standard treatment for recurrent head and neck cancer. In this study we examine the therapeutic potential of G207, alone and in combination with cisplatin, against squamous cell carcinoma. Human squamous cell carcinoma cell lines are sensitive to G207 replication and cytotoxicity in vitro at a multiplicity of infection of 0.01, including cisplatin sensitive (UMSCC-22A), moderately sensitive (UMSCC-38), and weakly sensitive (SQ20B) cell lines. Cisplatin did not inhibit the cytopathic effect of G207. G207 inhibited the growth of established subcutaneous head and neck tumors in athymic mice. The therapeutic effects of cisplatin and G207 in vivo were independent. However, in cisplatin-sensitive tumors (UMSCC-38), combination therapy resulted in 100% cures in contrast to 42% with G207 or 14% with cisplatin alone. We conclude that G207 should be considered for the treatment of head and neck cancer and that combination with chemotherapeutic agents may improve efficacy. PMID:10933051

  18. Cisplatin suppresses the growth and proliferation of breast and cervical cancer cell lines by inhibiting integrin β5-mediated glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaojia; Xie, Jie; Li, Jiajia; Liu, Fei; Wu, Xiaohua; Wang, Ziliang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells harbor lower energy consumption after rounds of anticancer drugs, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated metabolic alterations in cancer cells exposed to cisplatin. The present study exhibited cisplatin, known as a chemotherapeutic agent interacting with DNA, also acted as an anti-metabolic agent. We found that glycolysis levels of breast and cervical cancer cells were reduced after cisplatin treatment, resulting in cells growth and proliferation inhibition. We demonstrated that cisplatin suppressed glycolysis-related proteins expression, including glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB), through down-regulating integrin β5 (ITGB5)/focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. ITGB5 overexpression rescued cisplatin-induced inhibition of cancer cell glycolysis, growth and proliferation. Conclusively, we reveal a novel insight into cisplatin-induced anticancer mechanism, suggesting alternative strategies to the current therapeutic approaches of targeting ITGB5, as well as of a combination of cisplatin with glucose up-regulation chemotherapeutic agents to enhance anticancer effect. PMID:27294003

  19. The Effects of Chemotherapeutic Agents, Bleomycin, Etoposide, and Cisplatin, on Chromatin Remodeling in Male Rat Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Sereshki, Negar; Hales, Barbara F; Robaire, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    The coadministration of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) has increased the survival rate of testicular cancer patients to over 90%. Previous studies have demonstrated that BEP induces germ cell damage during the final stages of spermatogenesis, when major chromatin remodeling occurs. Chromatin remodeling permits histone-protamine exchange, resulting in sperm head chromatin compaction. This process involves different epigenetic modifications of the core histones. The objective of these studies was to investigate the effects of BEP on epigenetic modifications to histones involved in chromatin remodeling. Brown Norway rats were treated with BEP, and their testes were removed to isolate pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids by unit gravity sedimentation. Western blot analyses were conducted on extracted proteins to detect the expression of key modified histones. In a second cohort testes were prepared for immunohistochemical analysis. The stage-specific expression of each modified histone mark in rat spermatogenesis suggests the involvement of these modifications in chromatin remodeling. BEP treatment significantly increased expression of H3K9m and decreased that of tH2B (or Hist1h2ba) in pachytene spermatocytes, suggesting that nucleosomes were not destabilized to allow for transcription of genes involved in chromatin remodeling. Moreover, BEP treatment altered the expression of H4K8ac in round and elongating spermatids, suggesting that histone eviction was compromised, leading to a looser chromatin structure in mature spermatozoa. Less-compacted sperm chromatin, with alterations to the sperm epigenome, may have an adverse effect on male fertility. PMID:26911428

  20. Insights into RNA binding by the anticancer drug cisplatin from the crystal structure of cisplatin-modified ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Melnikov, Sergey V.; Söll, Dieter; Steitz, Thomas A.; Polikanov, Yury S.

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely prescribed anticancer drug, which triggers cell death by covalent binding to a broad range of biological molecules. Among cisplatin targets, cellular RNAs remain the most poorly characterized molecules. Although cisplatin was shown to inactivate essential RNAs, including ribosomal, spliceosomal and telomeric RNAs, cisplatin binding sites in most RNA molecules are unknown, and therefore it remains challenging to study how modifications of RNA by cisplatin contributes to its toxicity. Here we report a 2.6Å-resolution X-ray structure of cisplatin-modified 70S ribosome, which describes cisplatin binding to the ribosome and provides the first nearly atomic model of cisplatin–RNA complex. We observe nine cisplatin molecules bound to the ribosome and reveal consensus structural features of the cisplatin-binding sites. Two of the cisplatin molecules modify conserved functional centers of the ribosome—the mRNA-channel and the GTPase center. In the mRNA-channel, cisplatin intercalates between the ribosome and the messenger RNA, suggesting that the observed inhibition of protein synthesis by cisplatin is caused by impaired mRNA-translocation. Our structure provides an insight into RNA targeting and inhibition by cisplatin, which can help predict cisplatin-binding sites in other cellular RNAs and design studies to elucidate a link between RNA modifications by cisplatin and cisplatin toxicity. PMID:27079977

  1. Suramin protects from cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Dupre, Tess V; Doll, Mark A; Shah, Parag P; Sharp, Cierra N; Kiefer, Alex; Scherzer, Michael T; Saurabh, Kumar; Saforo, Doug; Siow, Deanna; Casson, Lavona; Arteel, Gavin E; Jenson, Alfred Bennett; Megyesi, Judit; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-02-01

    Cisplatin, a commonly used cancer chemotherapeutic, has a dose-limiting side effect of nephrotoxicity. Approximately 30% of patients administered cisplatin suffer from kidney injury, and there are limited treatment options for the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin, which is Federal Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, improves kidney function after various forms of kidney injury in rodent models. We hypothesized that suramin would attenuate cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin treatment before cisplatin administration reduced cisplatin-induced decreases in kidney function and injury. Furthermore, suramin attenuated cisplatin-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis in the kidney cortex. Treatment of mice with suramin 24 h after cisplatin also improved kidney function, suggesting that the mechanism of protection is not by inhibition of tubular cisplatin uptake or its metabolism to nephrotoxic species. If suramin is to be used in the context of cancer, then it cannot prevent cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity of cancer cells. Suramin did not alter the dose-response curve of cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. In addition, suramin pretreatment of mice harboring lung adenocarcinomas did not alter the initial cytotoxic effects of cisplatin (DNA damage and apoptosis) on tumor cells. These results provide evidence that suramin has potential as a renoprotective agent for the treatment/prevention of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury and justify future long-term preclinical studies using cotreatment of suramin and cisplatin in mouse models of cancer. PMID:26661653

  2. Increased γ-H2AX and Rad51 DNA Repair Biomarker Expression in Human Cell Lines Resistant to the Chemotherapeutic Agents Nitrogen Mustard and Cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Adam-Zahir, Sheba; Plowman, Piers N; Bourton, Emma C; Sharif, Fariha; Parris, Christopher N

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic anticancer drugs mediate cytotoxicity by a number of mechanisms. However, alkylating agents which induce DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL) are amongst the most effective anticancer agents and often form the mainstay of many anticancer therapies. The effectiveness of these drugs can be limited by the development of drug resistance in cancer cells and many studies have demonstrated that alterations in DNA repair kinetics are responsible for drug resistance. In this study we developed two cell lines resistant to the alkylating agents nitrogen mustard (HN2) and cisplatin (Pt). To determine if drug resistance was associated with enhanced ICL DNA repair we used immunocytochemistry and imaging flow cytometry to quantitate the number of γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci in the nuclei of cells after drug exposure. γ-H2AX was used to evaluate DNA strand breaks caused by repair incision nucleases and Rad51 was used to measure the activity of homologous recombination in the repair of ICL. In the drug-resistant derivative cell lines there was overall a significant increase in the number and persistence of both γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci in the nuclei of cells over a 72-hour period, when compared to the non-resistant parental cell lines (ANOVA p < 0.0001). In a Pt-resistant ovarian cancer cell line (A2780cis(R)) a similar enhancement of DNA repair was observed when compared to the non-drug-resistant wild-type ovarian cancer cells (A2780) following exposure to HN2. Our data suggest that using DNA repair biomarkers to evaluate mechanisms of resistance in cancer cell lines and human tumours may be of experimental and clinical benefit. We concede, however, that examination of a larger population of cell lines and tumours is required to fully evaluate the validity of this approach. PMID:26138778

  3. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Albert T

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10(-21)), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents. PMID:16024060

  4. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Albert T. . E-mail: lebedev@org.chem.msu.ru

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10{sup -21}), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  5. The synergistic effect of resveratrol in combination with cisplatin on apoptosis via modulating autophagy in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Li, Xiaolin; Xu, Rongrong; Ye, Lingyun; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Hong; Xie, Weiping

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have shown that combination treatment with natural products and chemotherapy agents can improve the sensitivity and cytotoxicity of chemotherapy agents. Resveratrol, a natural product, has many biological effects including antitumor and antiviral activities, as well as vascular protective effect. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic anticancer effect of resveratrol in combination with cisplatin and the potential anticancer mechanisms involved in A549 cells. The results obtained from Cell Counting Kit-8 and isobolographic analysis demonstrated that combination of resveratrol and cisplatin resulted in synergistic cytotoxic effects in A549 cells. Results from Hoechst staining, flow cytometry and western blot analysis suggested that resveratrol enhanced cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Meanwhile, the changes of LC3-II and P62 levels and formation of autophagosome suggested that resveratrol in combination with cisplatin triggered autophagy. More importantly, inhibiting autophagy by 3-methyladenine markedly attenuated the apoptosis caused by combination of resveratrol and cisplatin in A549 cells. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that resveratrol combined with cisplatin synergistically induce apoptosis via modulating autophagic cell death in A549 cells. These findings also help us to understand the role of natural products in combination with chemotherapy agents in lung cancer. PMID:27084520

  6. Capsaicin Ameliorates Cisplatin-Induced Renal Injury through Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Subin; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent chemotherapy agents. However, its use is limited due to its toxicity in normal tissues, including the kidney and ear. In particular, nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin is closely associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the heme metabolism, has been implicated in a various cellular processes, such as inflammatory injury and anti-oxidant/oxidant homeostasis. Capsaicin is reported to have therapeutic potential in cisplatin-induced renal failures. However, the mechanisms underlying its protective effects on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remain largely unknown. Herein, we demonstrated that administration of capsaicin ameliorates cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction by assessing the levels of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) as well as tissue histology. In addition, capsaicin treatment attenuates the expression of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress markers for renal damage. We also found that capsaicin induces HO-1 expression in kidney tissues and HK-2 cells. Notably, the protective effects of capsaicin were completely abrogated by treatment with either the HO inhibitor ZnPP IX or HO-1 knockdown in HK-2 cells. These results suggest that capsaicin has protective effects against cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction through induction of HO-1 as well as inhibition oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:24642709

  7. Long term results of comparison of concurrent low-dose daily cisplatin versus the standard weekly cisplatin with six fractions per week radiotherapy in locally advanced head neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pramod Kumar; Lal, Punita; Bajpai, Ranjeet; Goel, Anshu; Yadav, Rajan; Verma, Mranalini; Kumar, Shaleen

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objective: Weekly administration of cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [CDDP]) appears more feasible and substantially more popular than the 3 weekly schedules due to better compliance. Different concurrent cisplatin schedules have been attempted including a daily schedule. We did a comparison of two consecutive single arm studies, i.e., use of weekly cisplatin versus daily cisplatin when used with concurrently with a moderately accelerated radiotherapy (RT) schedule. Patients and Methods: Two prospective feasibility, safety and efficacy studies were carried out consecutively within the department. The weekly CDDP study was done from August 2003 to August 2005 and daily CDDP study was conducted from November 2005 to June 2007. Both studies included locally advanced stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region with RT dose of 70 Gy. Concurrent single-agent cisplatin was administered weekly (35 mg/m2) in the first and daily (6 mg/m2) in the second study. Results: Weekly cisplatin study had 68 and daily CDDP study had 52 patients. The median follow-up in the two studies was 93 and 63 months, respectively. Compliance in the two studies was comparable. Acute Grade III/IV mucositis and dysphagia were significantly higher in weekly cisplatin study. Late Grade II/III toxicities such as xerostomia, dysphagia, ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity were similar. The 5 years locoregional control was 18% and 25% and 5 years overall survival rate was 32% and 31% in weekly and daily cisplatin studies, respectively. Conclusions: Modest acceleration along with either weekly or daily cisplatin, whichever is possible in one's setup, is do-able, provided due attention is paid to patient selection and supportive care. PMID:27275456

  8. Melatonin prevents cisplatin-induced primordial follicle loss via suppression of PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a pathway activation in the mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hoon; Lee, Ok-Hee; Lee, Youngeun; Yoon, Hyemin; Chang, Eun Mi; Park, Miseon; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Hong, Kwonho; Kim, Jung Oh; Kim, Nam Keun; Ko, Jung Jae; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki; Lee, Woo Sik; Choi, Youngsok

    2016-04-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a major side effect of chemotherapy in young cancer patients. To develop pharmaceutical agents for preserving fertility, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced follicle loss. Here, we show that treatment with cisplatin, a widely used anticancer drug, depleted the dormant follicle pool in mouse ovaries by excessive activation of the primordial follicles, without inducing follicular apoptosis. Moreover, we show that co-treatment with the antioxidant melatonin prevented cisplatin-induced disruption of the follicle reserve. We quantified the various stages of growing follicles, including primordial, primary, secondary, and antral, to demonstrate that cisplatin treatment alone significantly decreased, whereas melatonin co-treatment preserved, the number of primordial follicles in the ovary. Importantly, analysis of the PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a pathway demonstrated that melatonin significantly decreased the cisplatin-mediated inhibitory phosphorylation of PTEN, a key negative regulator of dormant follicle activation. Moreover, melatonin prevented the cisplatin-induced activating phosphorylation of AKT, GSK3β, and FOXO3a, all of which trigger follicle activation. Additionally, we show that melatonin inhibited the cisplatin-induced inhibitory phosphorylation and nuclear export of FOXO3a, which is required in the nucleus to maintain dormancy of the primordial follicles. These findings demonstrate that melatonin attenuates cisplatin-induced follicle loss by preventing the phosphorylation of PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a pathway members; thus, melatonin is a potential therapeutic agent for ovarian protection and fertility preservation during chemotherapy in female cancer patients. PMID:26882203

  9. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage activates replication checkpoint signaling components that differentially affect tumor cell survival.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jill M; Karnitz, Larry M

    2009-07-01

    Cisplatin and other platinating agents are some of the most widely used chemotherapy agents. These drugs exert their antiproliferative effects by creating intrastrand and interstrand DNA cross-links, which block DNA replication. The cross-links mobilize signaling and repair pathways, including the Rad9-Hus1-Rad1-ATR-Chk1 pathway, a pathway that helps tumor cells survive the DNA damage inflicted by many chemotherapy agents. Here we show that Rad9 and ATR play critical roles in helping tumor cells survive cisplatin treatment. However, depleting Chk1 with small interfering RNA or inhibiting Chk1 with 3-(carbamoylamino)-5-(3-fluorophenyl)-N-(3-piperidyl)thiophene-2-carboxamide (AZD7762) did not sensitize these cells to cisplatin, oxaliplatin, or carboplatin. Moreover, when Rad18, Rad51, BRCA1, BRCA2, or FancD2 was disabled, Chk1 depletion did not further sensitize the cells to cisplatin. In fact, Chk1 depletion reversed the sensitivity seen when Rad18 was disabled. Collectively, these studies suggest that the pharmacological manipulation of Chk1 may not be an effective strategy to sensitize tumors to platinating agents. PMID:19403702

  10. A Dunnione Compound MB12662 Improves Cisplatin-Induced Tissue Injury and Emesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dongsun; Jo, In Geun; Jang, Ja Young; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Yoo, Sang Ku; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Joo, Seong Soo; Kim, Okjin; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of MB12662, a synthetic dunnione compound, on cisplatin-induced vomiting reflexes and intestinal, renal, immune system, and hematopoietic toxicities in ferrets and mice, respectively. Male ICR mice were orally administered MB12662 (5, 10, 25 or 50 mg/kg) for 10 days, during which intraperitoneally challenged with cisplatin (3.5 mg/kg) from day 4 to 7, and sacrificed on day 10 for the pathological examination. Male ferrets were orally administered MB12662 (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg) for 7 days, subcutaneously challenged with cisplatin (5 mg/kg), and monitored for vomiting reflexes and survival of the animals. Four-day injection of cisplatin (3.5 mg/kg) to mice caused body weight loss and degeneration and atrophy of intestinal villi, reducing villi/crypt ratio to a half level of control animals. Cisplatin also induced renal and hepatic toxicities, and depletion of splenocytes and bone marrow progenitor cells. The systemic toxicities including decreased villi/crypt ratio, immune system atrophy, splenocyte depletion, and decreased cellularity in bone marrow were improved by MB12662. Cisplatin (5 mg/kg) induced retching and emetic responses of ferrets, which were remarkably attenuated by MB12662 in a dose-dependent manner. All the ferrets pretreated with MB12662 survived the challenge of cisplatin, in comparison with 40% mortality in vehicle-treated animals, and blood parameters of nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity were markedly recovered. It is expected that MB12662 could be a candidate for the body protection against burden, including emesis, of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26336585

  11. A Dunnione Compound MB12662 Improves Cisplatin-Induced Tissue Injury and Emesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Dongsun; Jo, In Geun; Jang, Ja Young; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Yoo, Sang Ku; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Joo, Seong Soo; Kim, Okjin; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2015-09-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of MB12662, a synthetic dunnione compound, on cisplatin-induced vomiting reflexes and intestinal, renal, immune system, and hematopoietic toxicities in ferrets and mice, respectively. Male ICR mice were orally administered MB12662 (5, 10, 25 or 50 mg/kg) for 10 days, during which intraperitoneally challenged with cisplatin (3.5 mg/kg) from day 4 to 7, and sacrificed on day 10 for the pathological examination. Male ferrets were orally administered MB12662 (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg) for 7 days, subcutaneously challenged with cisplatin (5 mg/kg), and monitored for vomiting reflexes and survival of the animals. Four-day injection of cisplatin (3.5 mg/kg) to mice caused body weight loss and degeneration and atrophy of intestinal villi, reducing villi/crypt ratio to a half level of control animals. Cisplatin also induced renal and hepatic toxicities, and depletion of splenocytes and bone marrow progenitor cells. The systemic toxicities including decreased villi/crypt ratio, immune system atrophy, splenocyte depletion, and decreased cellularity in bone marrow were improved by MB12662. Cisplatin (5 mg/kg) induced retching and emetic responses of ferrets, which were remarkably attenuated by MB12662 in a dose-dependent manner. All the ferrets pretreated with MB12662 survived the challenge of cisplatin, in comparison with 40% mortality in vehicle-treated animals, and blood parameters of nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity were markedly recovered. It is expected that MB12662 could be a candidate for the body protection against burden, including emesis, of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26336585

  12. Knockdown of retinoblastoma protein may sensitize glioma cells to cisplatin through inhibition of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyu; Sun, Kangjian; Wang, Handong; Dai, Yuyuan

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the deadliest forms of cancer due to its limited sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Cisplatin (CCDP) is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for tumors, but the agent often results in the development of chemo-resistance. In several cancers, cisplatin resistance is associated with autophagy induction. Here, we found that in glioma cells cisplatin treatment induced autophagy. Our data indicates that the autophagy induction plays a critical role in cisplatin resistance of glioma cells, knockdown of RB inhibited autophagy induced by cisplatin, and inhibition of autophagy improved cisplatin-induced apoptosis. It suggests that a combination of autophagy inhibitors with cisplatin may improve the therapeutic efficiency of cisplatin towards GBM with acquired resistance. PMID:27048711

  13. Tumour resistance to cisplatin: a modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, L.; Bezak, E.; Olver, I.; van Doorn, T.

    2005-01-01

    Although chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of haematological tumours, in many common solid tumours the success has been limited. Some of the reasons for the limitations are: the timing of drug delivery, resistance to the drug, repopulation between cycles of chemotherapy and the lack of complete understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a specific agent. Cisplatin is among the most effective cytotoxic agents used in head and neck cancer treatments. When modelling cisplatin as a single agent, the properties of cisplatin only have to be taken into account, reducing the number of assumptions that are considered in the generalized chemotherapy models. The aim of the present paper is to model the biological effect of cisplatin and to simulate the consequence of cisplatin resistance on tumour control. The 'treated' tumour is a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, previously grown by computer-based Monte Carlo techniques. The model maintained the biological constitution of a tumour through the generation of stem cells, proliferating cells and non-proliferating cells. Cell kinetic parameters (mean cell cycle time, cell loss factor, thymidine labelling index) were also consistent with the literature. A sensitivity study on the contribution of various mechanisms leading to drug resistance is undertaken. To quantify the extent of drug resistance, the cisplatin resistance factor (CRF) is defined as the ratio between the number of surviving cells of the resistant population and the number of surviving cells of the sensitive population, determined after the same treatment time. It is shown that there is a supra-linear dependence of CRF on the percentage of cisplatin-DNA adducts formed, and a sigmoid-like dependence between CRF and the percentage of cells killed in resistant tumours. Drug resistance is shown to be a cumulative process which eventually can overcome tumour regression leading to treatment failure.

  14. Cisplatin-induced renal toxicity via tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, tumor suppressor P53, DNA damage, xanthine oxidase, histological changes, oxidative stress and nitric oxide in rats: protective effect of ginseng.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Mokhtar I; Hussien, Hend M

    2015-04-01

    Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent successfully used in the treatment of a wide range of solid tumors, while its usage is limited due to its nephrotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to examine the effectiveness of ginseng to ameliorate the renal nephrotoxicity, damage in kidney genomic DNA, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, tumor suppressor P53, histological changes and oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in rats. Cisplatin caused renal damage, including DNA fragmentation, upregulates gene expression of tumor suppressor protein p53 and tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6. Cisplatin increased the levels of kidney TBARS, xanthine oxidase, nitric oxide, serum urea and creatinine. Cisplatin decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (GST, GPX, CAT and SOD), ATPase and the levels of GSH. A microscopic examination showed that cisplatin caused kidney damage including vacuolization, severe necrosis and degenerative changes. Ginseng co-treatment with cisplatin reduced its renal damage, oxidative stress, DNA fragmentation and induced DNA repair processes. Also, ginseng diminished p53 activation and improved renal cell apoptosis and nephrotoxicity. It can be concluded that, the protective effects of ginseng against cisplatin induced-renal damage was associated with the attenuation of oxidative stress and the preservation of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:25640527

  15. Cisplatin versus carboplatin: comparative review of therapeutic management in solid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ho, Gwo Yaw; Woodward, Natasha; Coward, Jermaine I G

    2016-06-01

    The platinum analogues, cisplatin and carboplatin, are among the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents in oncology. Both agents have a broad spectrum of clinical activity in numerous malignancies including gynaecological cancers, germ cell tumours, head and neck cancer, thoracic cancers and bladder cancer. Although the final mechanism of inducing tumour cell apoptosis is similar for both compounds, cisplatin has been shown to be more effective in treating specific tumour types. Whilst more favourable toxicity profiles are often associated with carboplatin, this can frequently translate to inferior response in certain malignancies. This review succinctly collates the evidence for the preferential use of these platinum analogues in particular settings in addition to the long-standing dilemma surrounding the paucity of biomarkers predicting response to these agents. PMID:27105947

  16. Failure of Elevating Calcium Induces Oxidative Stress Tolerance and Imparts Cisplatin Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liwei; Wang, Hongjun; Wang, Chunyan; Su, Jing; Xie, Qi; Xu, Lu; Yu, Yang; Liu, Shibing; Li, Songyan; Xu, Ye; Li, Zhixin

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a commonly used chemotherapeutic drug, used for the treatment of malignant ovarian cancer, but acquired resistance limits its application. There is therefore an overwhelming need to understand the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, that is, ovarian cancer cells are insensitive to cisplatin treatment. Here, we show that failure of elevating calcium and oxidative stress tolerance play key roles in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cell lines. Cisplatin induces an increase in oxidative stress and alters intracellular Ca2+ concentration, including cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ in cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells, but not in cisplatin-resistant SKOV3/DDP cells. Cisplatin induces mitochondrial damage and triggers the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells, but rarely in cisplatin-resistant SKOV3/DDP cells. Inhibition of calcium signaling attenuates cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and intracellular Ca2+ overload in cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells. Moreover, in vivo xenograft models of nude mouse, cisplatin significantly reduced the growth rates of tumors originating from SKOV3 cells, but not that of SKOV3/DDP cells. Collectively, our data indicate that failure of calcium up-regulation mediates cisplatin resistance by alleviating oxidative stress in ovarian cancer cells. Our results highlight potential therapeutic strategies to improve cisplatin resistance. PMID:27330840

  17. Walnut consumption protects rats against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Mohammad; Nazeri, Masoud; Parsania, Shahrnaz; Razavinasab, Moazamehosadat; Zangiabadi, Nasser; Esmaeilpour, Khadije; Abareghi, Fatemeh

    2012-10-01

    Walnut is extensively used in traditional medicine for treatment of various ailments. It is described as an anticancer, anti-inflammatory, blood purifier and antioxidant agent. In this study, we investigated whether or not Walnut could protect neurons against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Dietary walnut (6%) was assessed for its neuroprotective effects through the alteration in performance of hippocampus- and cerebellum-related behaviors following chronic cisplatin treatment (5 mg/kg/week for 5 consecutive weeks) in male rats. We also evaluated the effect of cisplatin and walnut administration on nociception. We showed that exposure of adolescent rats to cisplatin resulted in significant decrease in explorative behaviors and memory retention. Walnut consumption improved memory and motor abilities in cisplatin treated rats, while walnut alone did not show any significant changes in these abilities compared to saline. Cisplatin increased latency of response to nociception, and walnut reversed this effect of cisplatin. We conclude that walnuts in the diet following anticancer drugs such as cisplatin might have a protective effect against cisplatin-induced disruptions in motor and cognitive function. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanisms of this protective effect of walnut and to explore underlying mechanisms. PMID:22935099

  18. Increased nephrotoxicity of combination taxol and cisplatin chemotherapy in gynecologic cancers as compared to cisplatin alone.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Davidson, S A; Schrier, R W

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the increased nephrotoxicity of taxol and cisplatin combination chemotherapy in gynecologic cancers as compared to cisplatin alone, the medical records of 25 patients with gynecological cancers were reviewed for evaluation of nephrotoxicity after chemotherapy treatment. The data included age, serum creatinine, calculated creatinine clearance, initial and cumulative dose of cisplatin and taxol, primary site of the cancer, renal ultrasound and hydration protocols. Renal function was evaluated before, during and 6 months after chemotherapy. Renal dysfunction was defined as a greater than 25% decrease in creatinine clearance. Comparing 11 patients treated with taxol and cisplatin versus 14 treated with cisplatin alone, there was a significant difference in effect on renal function. Nine of 11 patients (81%) treated with the combination chemotherapy had a greater than 25% decrease in creatinine clearance while only 4 of the 14 patients (29%) treated with cisplatin alone had such a decrease in creatinine clearance (p < 0.004). The patients treated with the combination chemotherapy, however, received a higher dose of cisplatin (80.4 vs. 66.4 mg/m2, p < 0.02) and were treated longer (6.7 vs. 4.3 months, p < 0.002). Nevertheless, when the patients were matched for age, initial dose and cumulative dose of cisplatin, a higher frequency of nephrotoxicity persisted in patients treated with taxol and cisplatin as compared to cisplatin alone (72 as compared to 20%, p < 0.02). The patients in both groups were comparably hydrated; prerenal failure and urinary tract obstruction were excluded in all patients. Six months after completion of chemotherapy, a significantly lower creatinine clearance was still observed in patients treated with taxol and cisplatin combination therapy (46 vs. 76 ml/min, p < 0.01). In summary, a retrospective analysis of renal function in patients with gynecological cancers showed an increased nephrotoxicity in patients treated with taxol and

  19. Genome Sequencing of Four Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, the Causative Agent of Epidemic Typhus, Including One Flying Squirrel Isolate.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Ge, Hong; Butani, Amy; Osborne, Brian; Verratti, Kathleen; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Pop, Mihai; Read, Timothy D; Richards, Allen L

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is a notable intracellular pathogen, the agent of epidemic typhus, and a potential biothreat agent. We present here whole-genome sequence data for four strains of R. prowazekii, including one from a flying squirrel. PMID:23814035

  20. Interventions for preventing neuropathy caused by cisplatin and related compounds

    PubMed Central

    Albers, James W; Chaudhry, Vinay; Cavaletti, Guido; Donehower, Ross C

    2013-01-01

    Background Cisplatin and several related antineoplastic agents used to treat many types of solid tumors are neurotoxic, and most patients completing a full course of cisplatin chemotherapy develop a clinically detectable sensory neuropathy. Effective neuroprotective therapies have been sought. Objectives To examine the efficacy of purported chemoprotective agents to prevent or limit the neurotoxicity of cisplatin and related agents. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register (25 August 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 3, 2010 in The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (January 1966 to August 2010), EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2010), LILACS (January 1982 to August 2010), CINAHL (January 1982 to August 2010) for randomized trials designed to evaluate neuroprotective agents used to prevent or limit neurotoxicity of cisplatin and related agents among human patients. Selection criteria Quasi-randomized or randomized controlled trials whose participants received cisplatin (or related compounds) chemotherapy with or without a potential chemoprotectant (acetylcysteine, amifostine, ACTH, BNP7787, calcium and magnesium, diethyldithiocarbamate, glutathione, Org 2766, oxcarbazepine, or vitamin E) and were evaluated zero to six months after completing chemotherapy using quantitative sensory testing (primary) or other measures including nerve conduction studies or neurological impairment rating using validated scales (secondary). Data collection and analysis We identified 16 randomized trials involving five possible chemoprotective agents in the initial 2006 review. Each study was reviewed by two authors who extracted the data and reached consensus. The 2010 update identified 11 additional randomized trials consisting of nine possible chemoprotective agents, including three treatments (acetylcysteine, calcium and magnesium, and oxcarbazepine) not among those described in the 2006 review. The included trials

  1. Cisplatin loaded albumin mesospheres for lung cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Goldberg, Eugene P; Kaye, Frederic; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2015-01-01

    The low solubility of cisplatin in aqueous solution limits the treatment effectiveness and the application of cisplatin in various kinds of drug-eluting devices. Although cisplatin has a high solubility in Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the toxicity of cisplatin can be greatly reduced while dissolved in DMSO. In this study, the solid powder of cisplatin-loaded albumin mesospheres (CDDP/DMSO-AMS), in a size range of 1 to 10 µm, were post-loaded with cisplatin and showed high cisplatin content (16% w/w) and effective cytotoxicity to lung cancer cells. Cisplatin were efficiently absorbed into the albumin mesospheres (AMS) in DMSO and, most importantly, the toxicity of cisplatin was remained at 100% after the loading process. This CDDP/DMSO-AMS was designed for the intratumoral injection through the bronchoscopic catheter or dry powder inhalation (DPI) due to its high stability in air or in solution. This CDDP/DMSO-AMS showed a fast cisplatin release within 24 hours. In the in vitro study, CDDP/DMSO-AMS showed high effectiveness on killing the lung cancer cells including the non-small cell lung cancer (NCL-H23 and A549), malignant mesothelioma (CRL-2081) and the mouse lung carcinoma (Lewis lung carcinoma) cell lines. The albumin based mesospheres provide an ideal loading matrix for cisplatin and other metal-based drugs due to the high swelling degree and fast uptake rate in the organic solvents with high polarity. In addition, to investigate the effects of polysaccharides, such as chitosan and chondroitin, on enhancing loading efficiency and lasting cytotoxicity of cisplatin, the polysaccharide-modified albumin mesospheres were synthesized and loaded with cisplatin in this study. PMID:25973300

  2. Cisplatin loaded albumin mesospheres for lung cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Goldberg, Eugene P; Kaye, Frederic; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2015-01-01

    The low solubility of cisplatin in aqueous solution limits the treatment effectiveness and the application of cisplatin in various kinds of drug-eluting devices. Although cisplatin has a high solubility in Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the toxicity of cisplatin can be greatly reduced while dissolved in DMSO. In this study, the solid powder of cisplatin-loaded albumin mesospheres (CDDP/DMSO-AMS), in a size range of 1 to 10 µm, were post-loaded with cisplatin and showed high cisplatin content (16% w/w) and effective cytotoxicity to lung cancer cells. Cisplatin were efficiently absorbed into the albumin mesospheres (AMS) in DMSO and, most importantly, the toxicity of cisplatin was remained at 100% after the loading process. This CDDP/DMSO-AMS was designed for the intratumoral injection through the bronchoscopic catheter or dry powder inhalation (DPI) due to its high stability in air or in solution. This CDDP/DMSO-AMS showed a fast cisplatin release within 24 hours. In the in vitro study, CDDP/DMSO-AMS showed high effectiveness on killing the lung cancer cells including the non-small cell lung cancer (NCL-H23 and A549), malignant mesothelioma (CRL-2081) and the mouse lung carcinoma (Lewis lung carcinoma) cell lines. The albumin based mesospheres provide an ideal loading matrix for cisplatin and other metal-based drugs due to the high swelling degree and fast uptake rate in the organic solvents with high polarity. In addition, to investigate the effects of polysaccharides, such as chitosan and chondroitin, on enhancing loading efficiency and lasting cytotoxicity of cisplatin, the polysaccharide-modified albumin mesospheres were synthesized and loaded with cisplatin in this study. PMID:25973300

  3. Crystal Structures of Cisplatin Bound to a Human Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-08-16

    Copper trafficking proteins, including the chaperone Atox1 and the P{sub 1B}-type ATPase ATP7B, have been implicated in cellular resistance to the anticancer drug cisplatin. We have determined two crystal structures of cisplatin-Atox1 adducts that reveal platinum coordination by the conserved CXXC copper-binding motif. Direct interaction of cisplatin with this functionally relevant site has significant implications for understanding the molecular basis for resistance mediated by copper transport pathways.

  4. Recognition of cisplatin adducts by cellular proteins.

    PubMed

    Kartalou, M; Essigmann, J M

    2001-07-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent. It reacts with nucleophilic bases in DNA and forms 1,2-d(ApG), 1,2-d(GpG) and 1,3-d(GpTpG) intrastrand crosslinks, interstrand crosslinks and monofunctional adducts. The presence of these adducts in DNA is through to be responsible for the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin. The exact signal transduction pathway that leads to cell cycle arrest and cell death following treatment with the drug is not known but cell death is believed to be mediated by the recognition of the adducts by cellular proteins. Here we describe the structural information available for cisplatin and related platinum adducts, the interactions of the adducts with cellular proteins and the implications of these interactions for cell survival. PMID:11406166

  5. Cisplatin induces stemness in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, Andrew; Saygin, Caner; Thiagarajan, Praveena S; Rao, Vinay S; Hale, James S; Gupta, Nikhil; Hitomi, Masahiro; Nagaraj, Anil Belur; DiFeo, Analisa; Lathia, Justin D; Reizes, Ofer

    2016-05-24

    The mainstay of treatment for ovarian cancer is platinum-based cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, therapeutic resistance and recurrence is a common eventuality for nearly all ovarian cancer patients, resulting in poor median survival. Recurrence is postulated to be driven by a population of self-renewing, therapeutically resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). A current limitation in CSC studies is the inability to interrogate their dynamic changes in real time. Here we utilized a GFP reporter driven by the NANOG-promoter to enrich and track ovarian CSCs. Using this approach, we identified a population of cells with CSC properties including enhanced expression of stem cell transcription factors, self-renewal, and tumor initiation. We also observed elevations in CSC properties in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells as compared to cisplatin-naïve ovarian cancer cells. CD49f, a marker for CSCs in other solid tumors, enriched CSCs in cisplatin-resistant and -naïve cells. NANOG-GFP enriched CSCs (GFP+ cells) were more resistant to cisplatin as compared to GFP-negative cells. Moreover, upon cisplatin treatment, the GFP signal intensity and NANOG expression increased in GFP-negative cells, indicating that cisplatin was able to induce the CSC state. Taken together, we describe a reporter-based strategy that allows for determination of the CSC state in real time and can be used to detect the induction of the CSC state upon cisplatin treatment. As cisplatin may provide an inductive stress for the stem cell state, future efforts should focus on combining cytotoxic chemotherapy with a CSC targeted therapy for greater clinical utility. PMID:27105520

  6. In vitro toxicity assay of cisplatin on mouse acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shabani, R; Ashtari, K; Behnam, B; Izadyar, F; Asgari, H; Asghari Jafarabadi, M; Ashjari, M; Asadi, E; Koruji, M

    2016-06-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer affecting men in reproductive age, and cisplatin is one of the major helpful chemotherapeutic agents for treatment of this cancer. In addition, exposure of testes cancer cells to cisplatin could potentially eliminate tumour cells from germ cells in patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cisplatin on viability of mouse acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell line (EL-4) and neonatal mouse spermatogonial cells in vitro. In this study, the isolated spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) and EL-4 were divided into six groups including control (received medium), sham (received DMSO in medium) and experimental groups which received different doses of cisplatin (0.5, 5, 10 and 15 μg ml(-1) ). Cells viability was evaluated with MTT assay. The identity of the cultured cells was confirmed by the expression of specific markers. Our finding showed that viability of both SSC and EL-4 cells was reduced with the dose of 15 μg/ml when compared to the control group (P ≤ 0.05). Also, the differences between the IC50 in doses 10 and 15 μg/ml at different time were significant (P ≤ 0.05). The number of TUNEL-positive cells was increased, and the BAX and caspase-3 expressions were upregulated in EL4 cells for group that received an effective dose of cisplatin). In conclusion, despite the dramatic effects of cisplatin on both cells, spermatogonial stem cells could form colony in culture. PMID:26428408

  7. Anatomical and physiological basis for the allometric scaling of cisplatin clearance in dogs.

    PubMed

    Achanta, S; Sewell, A; Ritchey, J W; Broaddus, K; Bourne, D W A; Clarke, C R; Maxwell, L K

    2016-06-01

    Cisplatin is a platinum-containing cytotoxic drug indicated for the treatment of solid tumors in veterinary and human patients. Several of the algorithms used to standardize the doses of cytotoxic drugs utilize allometry, or the nonproportional relationships between anatomical and physiological variables, but the underlying basis for these relationships is poorly understood. The objective of this proof of concept study was to determine whether allometric equations explain the relationships between body weight, kidney weight, renal physiology, and clearance of a model, renally cleared anticancer agent in dogs. Postmortem body, kidney, and heart weights were collected from 364 dogs (127 juveniles and 237 adults, including 51 dogs ≥ 8 years of age). Renal physiological and cisplatin pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in ten intact male dogs including two juvenile and eight adult dogs (4-55 kg). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR), effective renal plasma flow, effective renal blood flow, renal cisplatin clearance, and total cisplatin clearance were allometrically related to body weight with powers of 0.75, 0.59, 0.61, 0.71, and 0.70, respectively. The similar values of these diverse mass exponents suggest a common underlying basis for the allometry of kidney size, renal physiology, and renal drug handling. PMID:26440900

  8. Reduction of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in vivo by selenomethionine: the effect on cisplatin-DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    García Sar, Daniel; Montes-Bayón, Maria; Blanco González, Elisa; Sierra Zapico, Luisa M; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2011-06-20

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents, although its clinical use is limited by severe renal toxicity. This toxicity seems to be related to the accumulation of the drug in kidney tissues, leading to renal failure. For this reason, several compounds have been evaluated to ameliorate the nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin. In the present investigation, we report the effect of the oral administration of selenomethionine before intraperitoneal cisplatin treatment. The preadministration of this Se species has been shown to have an important effect in reducing renal damage induced by cisplatin by increasing the excreted urea and improving creatinine clearance. Quantification of the level of DNA--cisplatin adducts in kidney and liver tissues was carried out by postcolumn isotope dilution analysis using liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma (LC-ICP-MS) as speciation set up. The level of DNA--cisplatin adducts in rats given Se-methionine in the drinking water before cisplatin administration was considerably lower in kidney tissues with respect to the animals drinking only water. Such effects were not observed in liver tissue. Initial speciation studies of Pt and Se conducted in kidney tissues of exposed animals by HPLC-ICP-MS have revealed the presence of cisplatin as part of a complex with Se-methionine, which can be eventually excreted into urine. This Pt--Se complex could explain the observed reduction of the kidney damage in Se-methionine-treated animals. PMID:21491944

  9. A novel cisplatin mediated apoptosis pathway is associated with acid sphingomyelinase and FAS proapoptotic protein activation in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Maurmann, L; Belkacemi, L; Adams, N R; Majmudar, P M; Moghaddas, S; Bose, R N

    2015-07-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs, including cisplatin and carboplatin, have been cornerstones in the treatment of solid tumors. We report here that these DNA-damaging agents, particularly cisplatin, induce apoptosis through plasma membrane disruption, triggering FAS death receptor via mitochondrial (intrinsic) pathways. Our objectives were to: quantify the composition of membrane metabolites; and determine the potential involvement of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) in the FAS-mediated apoptosis in ovarian cancer after cisplatin treatment. The resulting analysis revealed enhanced apoptosis as measured by: increased phosphocholine, and glycerophosphocholine; elevated cellular energetics; and phosphocreatine and nucleoside triphosphate concentrations. The plasma membrane alterations were accompanied by increased ASMase activity, leading to the upregulation of FAS, FASL and related pro-apoptotic BAX and PUMA genes. Moreover FAS, FASL, BAX, PUMA, CASPASE-3 and -9 proteins were upregulated. Our findings implicate ASMase activity and the intrinsic pathways in cisplatin-mediated membrane demise, and contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms by which ovarian tumors may become resistant to cisplatin. PMID:25846011

  10. Self-assembled Nanoscale Coordination Polymers Carrying siRNAs and Cisplatin for Effective Treatment of Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Chunbai; Liu, Demin; Lin, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin is a major limitation for the successful treatment of many cancers. Development of novel strategies to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to chemotherapy is of critical importance to effective treatment of ovarian cancer and other types of cancers. We have sought to re-sensitize resistant ovarian cancer cells to chemotherapy by co-delivering chemotherapeutics and pooled siRNAs targeting multi-drug resistance (MDR) genes using self-assembled nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs). In this work, NCP-1 particles with trigger release properties were first constructed by linking cisplatin prodrug-based bisphosphonate bridging ligands with Zn2+ metal-connecting points and then coated with a cationic lipid layer, followed by the adsorption of pooled siRNAs targeting three MDR genes including survivin, Bcl-2, and P-glycoprotein via electrostatic interactions. The resulting NCP-1/siRNA particles promoted cellular uptake of cisplatin and siRNA and enabled efficient endosomal escape in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. By down-regulating the expression of MDR genes, NCP-1/siRNAs enhanced the chemotherapeutic efficacy as indicated by cell viability assay, DNA ladder, and flow cytometry. Local administration of NCP-1/siRNAs effectively reduced tumor sizes of cisplatin-resistant SKOV-3 subcutaneous xenografts. This work shows that the NCP-1/siRNA platform holds great promise in enhancing chemotherapeutic efficacy for the effective treatment of drug-resistant cancers. PMID:25315138

  11. Cisplatin Induces Overactivation of the Dormant Primordial Follicle through PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a Pathway which Leads to Loss of Ovarian Reserve in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eun Mi; Lim, Eunjin; Yoon, Sookyoung; Jeong, Kyungah; Bae, Sijeong; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a first-line chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer that acts by promoting DNA cross links and adduct. However drug resistance and considerable side effects including reproductive toxicity remain a significant challenge. PTEN is well known as a tumor suppressor function which plays a fundamental role in the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis and development of cancer. At the same time PTEN has been revealed to be critically important for the maintenance of the primordial follicle pool. In this study, we investigated the role of PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in cisplatin-induced primordial follicle depletion. Cisplatin induced ovarian failure mouse model was used to evaluate how this pathway involves. In vitro maturation was used for oocyte rescue after cisplatin damage. We found that cisplatin treatment decreased PTEN levels, leading to a subsequent increase in the phosphorylation of key molecules in the pathway. The activation of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway cascade increased cytoplasmic translocation of FOXO3a in cisplatin-treated follicles, which in turn increased the pool size of growing follicles, and rapidly depleted the number of dormant follicles. Once activated, the follicles were more prone to apoptosis, and their cumulus cells showed a loss of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor expression, which leads to failure during final maturation and ovulation. In vitro maturation to rescue oocytes in a cisplatin-treated mouse model resulted in successful maturation and fertilization. This study is the first to show the involvement of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in premature ovarian failure after cisplatin treatment and the possibility of rescue through in vitro maturation. PMID:26656301

  12. Squalene Selectively Protects Mouse Bone Marrow Progenitors Against Cisplatin and Carboplatin-Induced Cytotoxicity In Vivo Without Protecting Tumor Growth12

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bikul; Antoon, Roula; Tsuchida, Rika; Lotfi, Shamim; Morozova, Olena; Farhat, Walid; Malkin, David; Koren, Gideon; Yeger, Herman; Baruchel, Sylvain

    2008-01-01

    Squalene, an isoprenoid antioxidant is a potential cytoprotective agent against chemotherapy-induced toxicity. We have previously published that squalene protects light-density bone marrow cells against cis-diamminedichloroplatinum( II) (cisplatin)-induced toxicity without protecting tumor cells in vitro. Here, we developed an in vivo mouse model of cisplatin and cis-diammine (cyclobutane-1,1-dicarboxylato) platinum(II) (carboplatin)-induced toxicity to further investigate squalene-mediated LD-BM cytoprotection including the molecular mechanism behind selective cytoprotection. We found that squalene significantly reduced the body weight loss of cisplatin and carboplatin-treated mice. Light-density bone marrow cells from squalene-treated mice exhibited improved formation of hematopoietic colonies (colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage). Furthermore, squalene also protected mesenchymal stem cell colonies (colony-forming unit-fibroblast) from cisplatin and carboplatin-induced toxicity. Squalene-induced protection was associated with decreased reactive oxygen species and increased levels of glutathione and glutathione peroxidase/glutathione-S-transferase. Importantly, squalene did not protect neuroblastoma, small cell carcinoma, or medulloblastoma xenografts against cisplatin-induced toxicity. These results suggest that squalene is a potential candidate for future development as a cytoprotective agent against chemotherapeutic toxicity. PMID:18813359

  13. Cisplatin and CCNU synergism in spheroid cell subpopulations.

    PubMed Central

    Durand, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of two antineoplastic drugs, cisplatin and CCNU, was evaluated in Chinese hamster V79 multicell spheroids using the drugs as single agents or combinations. Cells obtained from different depths within spheroids 550-750 microns in diameter showed different sensitivities to the two agents; the external cells of the spheroids were more sensitive than the internal cells to cisplatin, whereas the internal cells were most effectively killed by CCNU. Combining the two agents produced the expected 'complementary' activity, and in addition, synergism was observed between the drugs at exposure levels practical for clinical use. For the combination treatments, both the net pattern of cell killing through the spheroid and the degree of interaction between the agents (quantified using the combination index method) were a function of the dose ratio of the two drugs, and of overall treatment intensity. BCNU produced patterns of cell killing similar to CCNU, but showed little interaction with cisplatin. Our results suggest significant clinical potential in using CCNU with cisplatin, particularly since CCNU-cisplatin combinations were synergistic even in the cell subpopulations most resistant to each drug as a single agent. PMID:2257225

  14. 4-Aminoantipyrine reduces toxic and genotoxic effects of doxorubicin, cisplatin, and cyclophosphamide in male mice.

    PubMed

    Berno, Claudia Rodrigues; Rós, Barbara de Toledo; da Silveira, Ingridhy Ostaciana Maia Freitas; Coelho, Henrique Rodrigues; Antoniolli, Andréia Conceição Milan Brochado; Beatriz, Adilson; de Lima, Dênis Pires; Monreal, Antônio Carlos Duenhas; Sousa, Fabricio Garmus; da Silva Gomes, Roberto; Oliveira, Rodrigo Juliano

    2016-07-01

    The analgesic drug dipyrone is used to treat side effects (including pain and fever) of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Dipyrone is metabolized to 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA), a PGE2-dependent blocker and inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX). We evaluated the genotoxic, mutagenic, apoptotic, and immunomodulatory activities of 4-AA in vivo and the effects of its combination with the antineoplastic drugs doxorubicin, cisplatin, and cyclophosphamide. 4-AA did not cause genotoxic/mutagenic damage, splenic phagocytosis, or leukocyte alterations. However, when combined with the antineoplastic agents, 4-AA decreased their genotoxic, mutagenic, apoptotic, and phagocytic effects. These results suggest that 4-AA might interfere with DNA damage-mediated chemotherapy. PMID:27402479

  15. New Therapeutic Concept of NAD Redox Balance for Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Cho, Eun-Young; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Kwak, Tae Hwan; So, Hong-Seob

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various tumors. In addition to its antitumor activity, cisplatin affects normal cells and may induce adverse effects such as ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and peripheral neuropathy. Various mechanisms such as DNA adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses are closely associated with cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity; however, the precise mechanism remains unclear. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) has emerged as a key regulator of cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis. Recent studies have demonstrated associations between disturbance in intracellular NAD+ levels and clinical progression of various diseases through the production of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that reduction of the intracellular NAD+/NADH ratio is critically involved in cisplatin-induced kidney damage through inflammation and oxidative stress and that increase of the cellular NAD+/NADH ratio suppresses cisplatin-induced kidney damage by modulation of potential damage mediators such as oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. In this review, we describe the role of NAD+ metabolism in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and discuss a potential strategy for the prevention or treatment of cisplatin-induced adverse effects with a particular focus on NAD+-dependent cellular pathways. PMID:26881219

  16. Cetuximab intensifies cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Levi, Mattan; Popovtzer, Aron; Tzabari, Moran; Mizrachi, Aviram; Savion, Naphtali; Stemmer, Salomon M; Shalgi, Ruth; Ben-Aharon, Irit

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has proliferative properties in the testis. Cetuximab, an anti-EGFR, is administered together with chemotherapy to patients with various types of cancer. This studies aim was to investigate the effect of cetuximab on testicular function. Adult male mice were injected with cetuximab (10 mg/kg), cisplatin (8 mg/kg) or a combination of both, and killed one week or one month later. The doses were chosen by human equivalent dose calculation. Testicular function was evaluated by epididymal-spermatozoa total motile count and sperm motility, weights of testes and epididymides, and the level of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in the serum. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine germ cell proliferation (Ki-67), apoptosis (Terminal transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphosphate nick-end labelling), reserve (DAZL-Deleted in azoospermia-like, Promyelocytic leukaemia zinc-finger), blood vessels (CD34) and Sertoli cells (GATA-4). Administration of cetuximab alone increased testicular apoptosis and decreased epididymal-spermatozoa total motile count over time. When added to cisplatin, cetuximab exacerbated most of the recorded testicular parameters, compared with the effect of cisplatin alone, including testis and epididymis weights, epididymal-spermatozoa total motile count, AMH concentration, meiosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, cetuximab has only a mild effect on testicular reserve, but when added to cisplatin, it exacerbates cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity. PMID:27184186

  17. Hepatoprotective effect of curcumin and alpha-tocopherol against cisplatin-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background cis-Diammineplatinum (II) dichloride (cisplatin) is the important anti-cancer agent useful in treatment of various cancers. Unfortunately, it can produce unwanted side effects in various tissues, including the liver. The present study investigated the possible protective role of curcumin and α-tocopherol against oxidative stress-induced hepatotoxicity in rats upon cisplatin treatment. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups (n = 5). Saline and Cis groups, rats were intraperitoneal (i.p.) injected with normal saline and cisplatin [20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)], respectively. Cis + α-tocopherol group, Cis + Cur group and Cis + α-tocopherol + Cur group, rats were pre-treated with a single dose of α-tocopherol (250 mg/kg b.w.), curcumin (200 mg/kg b.w.) and combined α-tocopherol with curcumin, respectively, for 24 h prior the administration of cisplatin. After 72 h of first injection, specimens were collected. Liver enzyme, lipid peroxidation biomarker, liver histopathology and gene expression of liver nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase were investigated. Results Cisplatin revealed a significant increase of hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and a significant reduction of hepatic superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities compared to the saline group. It elicited a marked increase of the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels and demonstrated the liver pathologies including liver congestion, disorganization of hepatic cords and ground glass appearance of hepatocytes. It also demonstrated a significant increase of NADPH oxidase gene expression compared to saline group. Pre-treatment with combined curcumin and α-tocopherol improved the liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation biomarker, liver histopathology and gene expression of liver NADPH oxidase in cisplatin-treated rats. Conclusions The findings indicate that pre-treatment with combined curcumin

  18. Cisplatin and Doxorubicin Induce Distinct Mechanisms of Ovarian Follicle Loss; Imatinib Provides Selective Protection Only against Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stephanie; Lopes, Federica; Gourley, Charlie; Anderson, Richard A.; Spears, Norah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Chemotherapy treatment in premenopausal women has been linked to ovarian follicle loss and premature ovarian failure; the exact mechanism by which this occurs is uncertain. Here, two commonly used chemotherapeutic agents (cisplatin and doxorubicin) were added to a mouse ovary culture system, to compare the sequence of events that leads to germ cell loss. The ability of imatinib mesylate to protect the ovary against cisplatin or doxorubicin-induced ovarian damage was also examined. Experimental design Newborn mouse ovaries were cultured for a total of six days, exposed to a chemotherapeutic agent on the second day: this allowed for the examination of the earliest stages of follicle development. Cleaved PARP and TUNEL were used to assess apoptosis following drug treatment. Imatinib was added to cultures with cisplatin and doxorubicin to determine any protective effect. Results Histological analysis of ovaries treated with cisplatin showed oocyte-specific damage; in comparison doxorubicin preferentially caused damage to the granulosa cells. Cleaved PARP expression significantly increased for cisplatin (16 fold, p<0.001) and doxorubicin (3 fold, p<0.01). TUNEL staining gave little evidence of primordial follicle damage with either drug. Imatinib had a significant protective effect against cisplatin-induced follicle damage (p<0.01) but not against doxorubicin treatment. Conclusion Cisplatin and doxorubicin both induced ovarian damage, but in a markedly different pattern, with imatinib protecting the ovary against damage by cisplatin but not doxorubicin. Any treatment designed to block the effects of chemotherapeutic agents on the ovary may need to be specific to the drug(s) the patient is exposed to. PMID:23922929

  19. Global transcriptional responses to cisplatin in Dictyostelium discoideum identify potential drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, Nancy; Alexander, Hannah; Min, Junxia; Kuspa, Adam; Alexander, Stephen; Shaulsky, Gad

    2007-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum is a useful model for studying mechanisms of cisplatin drug sensitivity. Our previous findings, that mutations in sphingolipid metabolism genes confer cisplatin resistance in D. discoideum and in human cells, raised interest in the resistance mechanisms and their implications for cisplatin chemotherapy. Here we used expression microarrays to monitor physiological changes and to identify pathways that are affected by cisplatin treatment of D. discoideum. We found >400 genes whose regulation was altered by cisplatin treatment of wild-type cells, including groups of genes that participate in cell proliferation and in nucleotide and protein metabolism, showing that the cisplatin response is orderly and multifaceted. Transcriptional profiling of two isogenic cisplatin-resistant mutants, impaired in different sphingolipid metabolism steps, showed that the effect of cisplatin treatment was greater than the effect of the mutations, indicating that cisplatin resistance in the mutants is due to specific abilities to overcome the drug effects rather than to general drug insensitivity. Nevertheless, the mutants exhibited significantly different responses to cisplatin compared with the parent, and >200 genes accounted for that difference. Mutations in five cisplatin response genes (sgkB, csbA, acbA, smlA, and atg8) resulted in altered drug sensitivity, implicating novel pathways in cisplatin response. Our data illustrate how modeling complex cellular responses to drugs in genetically stable and tractable systems can uncover new targets with the potential for improving chemotherapy. PMID:17878305

  20. Tempol protects human lymphocytes from genotoxicity induced by cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Khabour, Omar F; Alzoubi, Karem H; Mfady, Doa'a S; Alasseiri, Mohammed; Hasheesh, Taghrid F

    2014-01-01

    The use of cisplatin in treatments of human malignancies is limited by its side effects that include DNA damage and the subsequent risk of developing secondary cancer. In this study, we examined the possible protective effect of Tempol against DNA damage induced by cisplatin in human lymphocytes using chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) assays. Cisplatin induced significant elevation in the frequencies of CAs and SCEs in cultured human lymphocytes (P < 0.01). Treatment of lymphocytes with Tempol significantly lowered CAs and SCEs induced by cisplatin. Tempol alone did not affect spontaneous levels of SCEs and CAs observed in the control group (P > 0.05). In conclusion, Tempol protects human lymphocytes against genotoxicity induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin. PMID:24955171

  1. [Cisplatin influence on: the radiosensitivity and recovery of yeast cells].

    PubMed

    Evstratova, E S; Petin, V G

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the simultaneous combined action of ionizing radiation and cisplatin on the radiosensitivity and liquid holding recovery (LHR) of diploid yeast cells was studied. It was shown that regardless of the cisplatin concentration (0; 0.002; 0.01; 0.02 g/ml) the radiosensitivity of cells was increased by 1.3 times. The ability of a cell to the LHR was progressively decreased with the increasing cisplatin concentration up to the complete inhibition. It was shown that the LHR of yeast cells after a combined action of ionizing radiation and chemical agents is mainly inhibited due to formation of a greater proportion of irreversible damage. The constant of recovery, characterizing the probability of recovery per a unit of time, was independent on cisplatine concentration. PMID:25486742

  2. [Cisplatin influence on: the radiosensitivity and recovery of yeast cells].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the simultaneous combined action of ionizing radiation and cisplatin on the radiosensitivity and liquid holding recovery (LHR) of diploid yeast cells was studied. It was shown that regardless of the cisplatin concentration (0; 0.002; 0.01; 0.02 g/ml) the radiosensitivity of cells was increased by 1.3 times. The ability of a cell to the LHR was progressively decreased with the increasing cisplatin concentration up to the complete inhibition. It was shown that the LHR of yeast cells after a combined action of ionizing radiation and chemical agents is mainly inhibited due to formation of a greater proportion of irreversible damage. The con- stant of recovery, characterizing the probability of recovery per a unit of time, was independent on cisplatine concentration. PMID:25508873

  3. In-depth Identification of Pathways Related to Cisplatin-induced Hepatotoxicity through an Integrative Method Based on an Informatics-assisted Label-free Protein Quantitation and Microarray Gene Expression Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Eun; Singh, Thoudam S. K.; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Myung-Hoon; Choi, Eung-Chil; Chen, Yu-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is used widely for treatment of a variety of cancer diseases. Recently, however, the use of cisplatin is restricted because of its adverse effects such as hepatotoxicity. There is no study with current proteomics technology to evaluate cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity, even if some studies have reported on the hepatotoxicity. In this study, proteomic as well as genomic analyses have been used for identification of proteins and genes that respond to cisplatin treatment in rat primary hepatocytes. To investigate the hepatotoxic effects of cisplatin, rat primary hepatocytes were treated with an IC20 concentration for 24 h. From proteomic analysis based on label-free quantitation strategy, cisplatin induced 76 up-regulated and 19 down-regulated proteins among 325 distinct proteins. In the mRNA level, genomic analysis revealed 72 up-regulated and 385 down-regulated genes in the cisplatin-treated group. Based on these two analyses, 19 pathways were commonly altered, whereas seven pathways were identified only by proteomic analysis, and 19 pathways were identified only by genomic analysis. Overall, this study explained the mechanism of cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity with two points of view: well known pathways including drug metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and glycolysis/TCA cycle and little known pathways including urea cycle and inflammation metabolism, for hepatotoxicity of other toxic agents. Up-regulated proteins detected by proteomic analysis in the cisplatin-treated group: FBP1 (fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase 1), FASN (fatty acid synthase), CAT (catalase), PRDX1 (peroxiredoxin-1), HSPD1 (60-kDa heat shock protein), MDH2 (malate dehydrogenase 2), and ARG1 (arginase 1), and also down-regulated proteins in the cisplatin-treated group: TPM1 (tropomyosin 1), TPM3 (tropomyosin 3), and CTSB (cathepsin B), were confirmed by Western blot analysis. In addition, up-regulated mRNAs detected by microarray analysis in the cisplatin-treated group: GSTA2, GSTT2, YC2

  4. p53-dependent global nucleotide excision repair of cisplatin-induced intrastrand cross links in human cells.

    PubMed

    Bhana, Sara; Hewer, Alan; Phillips, David H; Lloyd, Daniel R

    2008-03-01

    Cisplatin is an extremely effective chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of testicular and other solid tumours. It induces a variety of structural modifications in DNA, the most abundant being the GpG- and ApG-1,2-intrastrand cross links formed between adjacent purine bases. These cross links account for approximately 90% of cisplatin-induced DNA damage and are thought to be responsible for the cytotoxic activity of the drug. In human cells, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) process removes the intrastrand cross links from the genome, the efficiency of which is likely to be an important determinant of cisplatin cytotoxicity. We have investigated whether the p53 tumour suppressor status affects global NER of cisplatin-induced intrastrand cross links in human cells. We have used a (32)P-postlabelling method to monitor the removal of GpG- and ApG-intrastrand cross links from two human cell models (the 041TR system, in which p53 is regulated by a tetracycline-inducible promoter, together with WI38 fibroblasts and the SV40-transformed derivative VA13) that each differ in p53 status. We demonstrate that the absence of functional p53 leads to persistence of both cisplatin-induced intrastrand cross links in the genome, suggesting that p53 regulates NER of these DNA lesions. This observation extends the role of p53 in NER beyond enhancing the removal of environmentally induced DNA lesions to include those of clinical origin. Given the frequency of p53 mutations in human tumours, these results may have implications for the use of cisplatin in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:18267949

  5. Enhancement of Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity by Morphine and Its Attenuation by the Opioid Antagonist Naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Atefeh; Javadi, Shiva; Rahimian, Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Asadi Amoli, Fahimeh; Moghaddas, Payman; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram

    2016-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Morphine and other opioids are also used extensively in different types of cancer for the clinical management of pain associated with local or metastatic neoplastic lesions. In addition to its analgesic effects, morphine has also been reported to possess potential immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. Herein, we investigated the effects of morphine in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Following administration of a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg), animals received intraperitoneal injections of morphine (5 mg/kg/day) and/or naltrexone (20 mg/kg/day), an opioid antagonist, for 5 days. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was detected by a significant increase in plasma urea and creatinine levels in addition to alterations in kidney tissue morphology. Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased in the renal tissue in cisplatin group. Moreover, glutathione (GSH) concentration and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly reduced in renal tissue in cisplatin group compared with control animals. Treatment with morphine aggravated the deleterious effects of cisplatin at clinical, biochemical and histopathological levels; whereas naltrexone diminished the detrimental effects of morphine in animals receiving morphine and cisplatin. Morphine or naltrexone alone had no effect on the mentioned parameters. Our findings indicate that concomitant treatment with morphine might intensify cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats. These findings suggest that morphine and other opioids should be administered cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy. PMID:27424012

  6. Hydration of Two Cisplatin Aqua-Derivatives Studied by Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Andrea; Tolazzi, Marilena; Martínez, José Manuel; Pappalardo, Rafael R; Sánchez Marcos, Enrique

    2015-04-14

    The hydration of the cisplatin aqua-derivatives, cis-[PtCl(H2O)(NH3)2](+) (w-cisplatin) and cis-[Pt(H2O)2(NH3)2](2+) (w2-cisplatin), has been studied by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations. The new platinum complex-water interaction potential, w-cisplatin-W, has been built on the basis of the already obtained cisplatin-water interaction potential (cisplatin-W) [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2013 9, 4562]. That potential has been then transferred to the w2-cisplatin-W potential. The w-cisplatin and w2-cisplatin atomic charges were specifically derived from their solute's wave functions. Bulk solvent effects on the complex-water interactions have been included by means of a continuum model. Classical MD simulations with 1 platinum complex and 1000 SPC/E water molecules have been carried out. Angle-solved radial distribution functions and spatial distribution functions have been used to provide detailed pictures of the local hydration structure around the ligands (water, chloride, and ammine) and the axial region. A novel definition of a multisite cavity has been employed to compute the hydration number of complexes in order to provide a consistent definition of their first-hydration shell. Interestingly, the hydration number decreases with the increase of the complex net charge from 27 for cisplatin to 23 and 18 for w-cisplatin and w2-cisplatin, respectively. In parallel to this hydration number behavior, the compactness of the hydration shell increases when going from the neutral complex, i.e. cisplatin, to the doubly charged complex, w2-cisplatin. Quantum mechanics estimation of the hydration energies for the platinum complexes allows the computation of the reaction energy for the first- and second-hydrolysis of cisplatin in water. The agreement with experimental data is satisfactory. PMID:26574384

  7. Neuropeptide Y protects kidney against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by regulating p53-dependent apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namoh; Min, Woo-Kie; Park, Min Hee; Lee, Jong Kil; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-Sung

    2016-05-01

    Cisplatin is a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug for treating various types of cancers. However, the use of cisplatin is limited by its negative effect on normal tissues, particularly nephrotoxicity. Various mechanisms such as DNA adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis are involved in the adverse effect induced by cisplatin treatment. Several studies have suggested that neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in neuroprotection as well as restoration of bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy induced nerve injury. However, the role of NPY in chemotherapy- induced nephrotoxicity has not been studied. Here, we show that NPY rescues renal dysfunction by reducing the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins in cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity through Y1 receptor, suggesting that NPY can protect kidney against cisplatin nephrotoxicity as a possible useful agent to prevent and treat cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 288-292]. PMID:26728272

  8. S-Adenosyl-L-methionine increases serum BUN and creatinine in cisplatin-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Bernardo; Bobadilla, Norma; Arrellín, Gerardo; Herrera, Luis A

    2009-01-01

    Cisplatin is an effective antineoplastic agent in the treatment of various solid tumors, although its full clinical utility is limited because of its renal toxicity. Several measures to protect the kidneys from cisplatin toxicity have been investigated and implemented in clinical trials; however, none of these were completely effective or without secondary effects. The aim of this study was to investigate S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) as an agent that protects against cisplatin nephrotoxicity without affecting the antineoplastic activity of cisplatin. The cytotoxic effect was evaluated in cultured HeLa cells treated with cisplatin, SAM, and the combination cisplatin + SAM. No modification of the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin was induced by SAM. Similarly, SAM did not influence the antitumoral activity of cisplatin observed in HeLa cells implanted in nude mice. However, a significant increase in renal dysfunction was induced by SAM in animals treated with cisplatin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a potential severe adverse effect of SAM administration, which should be considered for further evaluation due to the wide use of SAM as a nutritional supplement in humans. PMID:19064128

  9. The effect of resveratrol on the prevention of cisplatin ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Erdem, T; Bayindir, Tuba; Filiz, A; Iraz, M; Selimoglu, E

    2012-10-01

    One of the most important adverse effects of cisplatin, a chemotherapeutic agent which is widely used in the treatment of cancer patients, is hearing loss. This has primarily been associated with the loss of inner ear hairy and spiral ganglion cells due to oxidative stress. Resveratrol is known to be an antioxidant agent, which has the theoretical potential of preventing cisplatin-related ototoxicity. This experimental study was approved by Animal Ethics Committee of Inonu University (2008-20) and supported by Inonu University Scientific Research Projects Support Fund (2009-17). Thirty-four 3-month-old Wistar albino female rats weighing 210-270 g were used in the study. The animals were allocated into four groups: in cisplatin group (Group A), a single dose of 12 mg/kg cisplatin was administered intraperitoneally to 10 rats; in cisplatin + resveratrol group (Group B), a single dose of 12 mg/kg cisplatin and 10 mg/kg resveratrol were administered intraperitoneally for 5 days to 10 rats; in resveratrol group (Group C), 10 mg/kg resveratrol was administered intraperitoneally for 5 days to seven rats and in control group (Group D), resveratrol solvent (5% alcohol-95% physiological saline) was administered intraperitoneally for 5 days to seven rats. Resveratrol administration has begun 1 day before cisplatin administration in the group treated with cisplatin and resveratrol combination. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) (Grason Stadler, Madison, USA) measurements were performed in the same ear of all rats (right ear) under general anesthesia at baseline, 1st and 5th days after drug administration. Statistically significant distortion product amplitude reductions were found in the cisplatin group at 1,418, 2,003, 3,363, 5,660, 8,003 and 9,515 Hz frequencies. Whereas in the cisplatin + resveratrol group, statistically significant difference was found between 1st and 5th day measurements only at 3,996 Hz frequency. No significant differences were noted

  10. Cisplatin-induced Kidney Dysfunction and Perspectives on Improving Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Pandit, Arpana

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used and highly effective drug for the treatment of various solid tumors; however, it has dose-dependent side effects on the kidney, cochlear, and nerves. Nephrotoxicity is the most well-known and clinically important toxicity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that several mechanisms, including oxidative stress, DNA damage, and inflammatory responses, are closely associated with cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Even though the establishment of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity can be alleviated by diuretics and pre-hydration of patients, the prevalence of cisplatin nephrotoxicity is still high, occurring in approximately one-third of patients who have undergone cisplatin therapy. Therefore it is imperative to develop treatments that will ameliorate cisplatin-nephrotoxicity. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of cisplatin-induced renal toxicity and the new strategies for protecting the kidneys from the toxic effects without lowering the tumoricidal activity. PMID:25606044

  11. Enhanced antitumor efficacy of cisplatin in combination with HemoHIM in tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin alone does not achieve a satisfactory therapeutic outcome. Also cisplatin accumulation shows toxicity to normal tissues. In this study, we examined the possibility of HemoHIM both to enhance anticancer effect with cisplatin and to reduce the side effects of cisplatin in melanoma-bearing mice. Methods HemoHIM was prepared by adding the ethanol-insoluble fraction to the total water extract of a mixture of 3 edible herbs, Angelica Radix, Cnidium Rhizoma and Paeonia Radix. Anticancer effects of HemoHIM with cisplatin were evaluated in melanoma-bearing mice. We used a Cr51-release assay to measure the activity of NK/Tc cell and ELISA to evaluate the production of cytokines. Results In melanoma-bearing mice, cisplatin (4 mg/kg B.W.) reduced the size and weight of the solid tumors, and HemoHIM supplementation with cisplatin enhanced the decrease of both the tumor size (p < 0.1) and weight (p < 0.1). HemoHIM itself did not inhibit melanoma cell growth in vitro, and did not disturb the effects of cisplatin in vitro. However HemoHIM administration enhanced both NK cell and Tc cell activity in mice. Interestingly, HemoHIM increased the proportion of NK cells in the spleen. In melanoma-bearing mice treated with cisplatin, HemoHIM administration also increased the activity of NK cells and Tc cells and the IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion from splenocytes, which seemed to contribute to the enhanced efficacy of cisplatin by HemoHIM. Also, HemoHIM reduced nephrotoxicity as seen by tubular cell of kidney destruction. Conclusion HemoHIM may be a beneficial supplement during cisplatin chemotherapy for enhancing the anti-tumor efficacy and reducing the toxicity of cisplatin. PMID:19292900

  12. Modified agar dilution susceptibility testing method for determining in vitro activities of antifungal agents, including azole compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T; Jono, K; Okonogi, K

    1997-01-01

    In vitro activities of antifungal agents, including azole compounds, against yeasts were easily determined by using RPMI-1640 agar medium and by incubating the plates in the presence of 20% CO2. The end point of inhibition was clear by this method, even in the case of azole compounds, because of the almost complete inhibition of yeast growth at high concentrations which permitted weak growth of some Candida strains by traditional methods. MICs obtained by the agar dilution method were similar to those obtained by the broth dilution method proposed by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. PMID:9174197

  13. Alterations in gene promoter methylation and transcript expression induced by cisplatin in comparison to 5-Azacytidine in HeLa and SiHa cervical cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sood, Swati; Srinivasan, Radhika

    2015-06-01

    Despite recent advances in treatment, cervical cancer still remains one of the leading causes of cancer related mortality among women worldwide including India. Chemoradiation treatment is the standard-of-care which involves administration of cisplatin, a radiosensitizer along with radiation. The epigenetic changes induced by cisplatin are not known and so we designed this in vitro experimental study. We evaluated the changes induced by cisplatin administration in gene promoter methylation and the transcript levels of set of 7 genes and compared it to the changes induced by 5-Azacytidine, a known demethylating agent in two cervical cancer cell lines: HeLa (adenocarcinoma derived) and SiHa (squamous cell carcinoma derived) cell lines. Overall, there was a pronounced cytotoxic and growth inhibitory effect of both the drugs alone and in combination for both the cell lines which was dose and time dependent. Cisplatin as well as 5-Azacytidine treatment affected gene promoter methylation status resulting in demethylation and re-expression of the genes under investigation which was more pronounced in case of SiHa cells as compared to HeLa cells. Further, both the drugs acted in synergism as evident from their combination treatment. Therefore, at the cellular level, cisplatin and 5-Azacytidine can induce epigenetic changes in gene promoter methylation with altered expression which can have implications for treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:25772483

  14. Physalis alkekengi and Alhagi maurorum ameliorate the side effect of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Changizi-Ashtiyani, S; Alizadeh, M; Najafi, H; Babaei, S; Khazaei, M; Jafari, M; Hossaini, N; Avan, A; Bastani, B

    2016-07-01

    Cisplatin is frequently being used for the treatment of different tumors, although the application of this agent is associated with nephrotoxicity. Here, we explored the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of Physalis alkekengi and Alhagi maurorum; 400 mg kg(-1) per day P. alkekengi and 100 mg kg(-1) per day A. maurorum were administered in rats, orally for 10 days after a single dose of 7 mg kg(-1) intraperitoneal cisplatin. The concentrations of creatinine, urea-nitrogen, and relative and absolute excretion of sodium/potassium were evaluated before/after therapy. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) were measured to assess the oxidative stress induced by cisplatin. Moreover, tissues sections were used for histological analyses and evaluation of the degree of tissue damage. Cisplatin increased serum levels of creatinine and urea-nitrogen, relative/absolute excretion of sodium/potassium, and MDA, whereas decreased FRAP level. Interestingly, P. alkekengi or A. maurorum were able to reduce the level of the renal function markers as well as the levels of sodium/potassium. This effect was more pronounced by P. alkekengi. Moreover, cisplatin induced pathological damage in kidney, whereas treatment with these agents improved this condition. Our findings demonstrate the potential therapeutic impact of P. alkekengi and A. maurorum for improving cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, supporting further investigations on the novel potential clinical application of these agents for patients being treated with cisplatin to ameliorate cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:27255563

  15. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin cytotoxicity in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjay; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin) is a widely used anti-tumor drug for the treatment of a broad range of human malignancies with successful therapeutic outcomes for head and neck, ovarian, and testicular cancers. It has been found to inhibit cell cycle progression and to induce oxidative stress and apoptosis in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. However, its molecular mechanisms of cytotoxic action are poorly understood. We hypothesized that cisplatin induces cytotoxicity through DNA adduct formation, oxidative stress, transcriptional factors (p53 and AP-1), cell cycle regulation, stress signaling and apoptosis in APL cells. We used the APL cell line as a model, and applied a variety of molecular tools to elucidate the cytototoxic mode of action of cisplatin. We found that cisplatin inhibited cell proliferation by a cytotoxicity, characterized by DNA damage and modulation of oxidative stress. Cisplatin also activated p53 and phosphorylated activator protein (AP-1) component, c-Jun at serine (63, 73) residue simultaneously leading to cell cycle arrest through stimulation of p21 and down regulation of cyclins and cyclin dependent kinases in APL cell lines. It strongly activated the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis through alteration of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome C, and up-regulation of caspase 3 activity. It also down regulated the p38MAPK pathway. Overall, this study highlights the molecular mechanisms that underline cisplatin toxicity to APL cells, and provides insights into selection of novel targets and/or design of therapeutic agents to treat APL. PMID:26486083

  16. Probenecid Sensitizes Neuroblastoma Cancer Stem Cells to Cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Campos-Arroyo, Denise; Maldonado, Vilma; Bahena, Ivan; Quintanar, Valeria; Patiño, Nelly; Carlos Martinez-Lazcano, Juan; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2016-03-15

    We used both in vitro cultures of neuroblastoma cell lines and nude-mice xenotransplants to explore the effects of co-administration of cisplatin and probenecid. Probenecid sensitized neuroblastoma cells, including tumor cells with stem features, to the effects of cisplatin, both in vitro and in vivo. This effect was mediated by an increase in the apoptotic cell death and a concomitant decrease in cell proliferation. This effect is accompanied by modulation of the mRNA and protein of the drug efflux transporters MDR1, MRP2, and BCRP. The co-administration of probenecid with cisplatin should be explored as a possible therapeutic strategy. PMID:26963048

  17. Overexpression of DDB2 enhances the sensitivity of human ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by augmenting cellular apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Bassant M.; Wang, Qi-En; Han, Chunhua; Milum, Keisha; Yin, De-Tao; Zhao, Qun; Wani, Gulzar; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A.; El-Mahdy, Mohamed A.; Wani, Altaf A.

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used anticancer agents, displaying activity against a wide variety of tumors. However, development of drug resistance presents a challenging barrier to successful cancer treatment by cisplatin. To understand the mechanism of cisplatin resistance, we investigated the role of damaged DNA binding protein complex subunit 2 (DDB2) in cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. We show that DDB2 is not required for the repair of cisplatin-induced DNA damage, but can be induced by cisplatin treatment. DDB2-deficient noncancer cells exhibit enhanced resistance to cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by cisplatin than cells with fully restored DDB2 function. Moreover, DDB2 expression in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line CP70 and MCP2 was lower than their cisplatin-sensitive parental A2780 cells. Overexpression of DDB2 sensitized CP70 cells to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis via activation of the caspase pathway and downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein. Further analysis indicates that the overexpression of DDB2 in CP70 cells downregulates Bcl-2 expression through decreasing Bcl-2 mRNA level. These results suggest that ovarian cancer cells containing high level of DDB2 become susceptible to cisplatin by undergoing enhanced apoptosis. PMID:20013802

  18. Peripheral neuropathy induced by combination chemotherapy of docetaxel and cisplatin.

    PubMed Central

    Hilkens, P. H.; Pronk, L. C.; Verweij, J.; Vecht, C. J.; van Putten, W. L.; van den Bent, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Docetaxel, a new semisynthetic taxoid that has demonstrated promising activity as an antineoplastic agent, was administered in combination with cisplatin to 63 patients in a dose-escalating study. As both drugs were known to be potentially neurotoxic, peripheral neurotoxicity was prospectively assessed in detail. Neuropathy was evaluated by clinical sum-score for signs and symptoms and by measurement of the vibration perception threshold (VPT). The severity of neuropathy was graded according to the National Cancer Institute's 'Common Toxicity Criteria'. The docetaxel-cisplatin combination chemotherapy induced a predominantly sensory neuropathy in 29 (53%) out of 55 evaluable patients. At cumulative doses of both cisplatin and docetaxel above 200 mg m(-2), 26 (74%) out of 35 patients developed a neuropathy which was mild in 15, moderate in ten and severe in one patient. Significant correlations were present between both the cumulative dose of docetaxel and cisplatin and the post-treatment sum-score of neuropathy (P < 0.01) as well as the post-treatment VPT (P < 0.01). The neurotoxic effects of this combination were more severe than either cisplatin or docetaxel as single agent at similar doses. PMID:9020489

  19. The antioxidant and antigenotoxic effects of pycnogenol(®) on rats treated with cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Birsen; Unsal, Meftun; Sekeroglu, Zulal A; Gülbahar, Yavuz

    2011-09-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are implicated in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced toxicity. Pycnogenol® is known for its strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, the possible protective effects of pycnogenol on kidney, bone marrow, and red blood cells in rats treated with cisplatin were investigated. The rats were divided into four groups. Group 1 was the control and groups 2, 3, and 4 were orally treated with pycnogenol (200 mg/kg bw, o.p) for 5 days, treated with cisplatin (7 mg/kg bw, i.p.) on the fifth day and treated with cisplatin plus pycnogenol, respectively. Antioxidative parameters in kidney and red blood cells were measured. Chromosome anomalies in bone marrow and renal histopathology were also investigated. Activities of pro-oxidant enzymes (myeloperoxidase and xanthine oxidase), malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide levels significantly increased but antioxidant enzymes activities decreased in the kidneys and red blood cells after cisplatin treatment. Pycnogenol treatment prior to the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased cisplatin-induced injury, as evidenced by its normalizing these parameters. Chromosomal aberrations decreased and mitotic index frequencies increased in bone marrow treated with cisplatin plus pycnogenol. These findings suggest that pycnogenol may be a useful protective agent against the toxicity associated with cisplatin therapy. PMID:20676799

  20. Targeting Apoptosis to Overcome Cisplatin Resistance: A Translational Study in Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Joshua A.; Kumar, Bhavna; Cordell, Kitrina G.; Prince, Mark E.; Tran, Huong H.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Wang, Steven; Eisbruch, Avraham; Tsien, Christina I.; Urba, Susan G.; Worden, Francis P.; Lee, Julia M.S.; Griffith, Kent A.; Taylor, Jeremy; D'Silva, Nisha; Wang, Shaomeng J.; Wolter, Keith G.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Cisplatin resistance remains a barrier to organ-sparing and survival of patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Targeted therapies to overcome cisplatin-resistant HNSCC are being developed. Methods and Materials: Cisplatin-sensitive parental HNSCC cell lines and cisplatin-resistant progeny were studied. Pretreatment HNSCC biopsies were used to construct tissue microarrays which were stained for p53 and Bcl-xL. Results: HNSCC cell lines selected for cisplatin resistance had wild-type p53 and high levels of Bcl-xL. Expression of wild-type p53 in cell lines with low Bcl-xL enhanced cisplatin sensitivity. Expression of both Bcl-xL and wild-type p53 caused tumor cells to become cisplatin resistant. Patients whose tumors expressed low levels of p53 and Bcl-xL enjoyed the best organ preservation and disease-free survival whereas patients whose tumors expressed low levels of p53 and high levels of Bcl-xL had the worst outcome. Novel agents that inhibit Bcl-xL or activate p53 function may target cisplatin-resistant HNSCC. Conclusion: Cisplatin resistance in HNSCC is mediated, at least in part, by high Bcl-xL and functional p53.

  1. Nephroprotective effect of bee honey and royal jelly against subchronic cisplatin toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdelazim; Eldaim, Mabrouk A Abd; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent and effective chemotherapeutic agents. However, its antineoplastic use is limited due to its cumulative nephrotoxic side effects. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine the nephroprotective potential of dietary bee honey and royal jelly against subchronic cisplatin toxicity in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into controls, cisplatin-treated, bee honey-pretreated cisplatin-treated and royal jelly-pretreated cisplatin-treated groups. Bee honey and royal jelly were given orally at doses of 20 and 100 mg/kg, respectively. Subchronic toxicity was induced by cisplatin (1 mg/kg bw, ip), twice weekly for 10 weeks. Cisplatin treated animals revealed a significant increase in serum level of renal injury products (urea, creatinine and uric acid). Histopathologically, cisplatin produced pronounced tubulointerstitial injuries, upregulated the fibrogenic factors, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and transforming growth factor β1(TGF-β1), and downregulated the cell proliferation marker, bromodeoxyuridine (Brdu). Dietary bee honey and royal jelly normalized the elevated serum renal injury product biomarkers, improved the histopathologic changes, reduced the expression of α-SMA and TGF-β1 and increased the expression of Brdu. Therefore, it could be concluded that bee honey, and royal jelly could be used as dietary preventive natural products against subchronic cisplatin-induced renal injury. PMID:25720368

  2. Hydrogen sulfide: A novel nephroprotectant against cisplatin-induced renal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dugbartey, George J; Bouma, Hjalmar R; Lobb, Ian; Sener, Alp

    2016-07-01

    Cisplatin is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various solid-organ cancers. However, a plethora of evidence indicates that nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin therapy. While the antineoplastic action of cisplatin is due to formation of cisplatin-DNA cross-links, which damage rapidly dividing cancer cells upon binding to DNA, its nephrotoxic effect results from metabolic conversion of cisplatin into a nephrotoxin and production of reactive oxygen species, causing oxidative stress leading to renal tissue injury and potentially, kidney failure. Despite therapeutic targets in several pre-clinical and clinical studies, there is still incomplete protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third discovered gasotransmitter next to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, has recently been identified in several in vitro and in vivo studies to possess specific antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties that modulate several pathogenic pathways involved in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The current article reviews the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and displays recent findings in the H2S field that could disrupt such mechanisms to ameliorate cisplatin-induced renal injury. PMID:27095538

  3. Baicalein increases the cytotoxicity of cisplatin by enhancing gap junction intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiwen; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Suzhi; Zhang, Yuan; Tao, Liang

    2014-07-01

    Drug resistance limits the clinical application of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapeutic agent. Gap junction (GJ) is a channel that enhances cytotoxicity of certain chemotherapeutic agents. Baicalein is well known for its antitumor activity. This study investigated the effect of baicalein on cisplatin cytotoxicity and the relationship between this effect and the modulation of the GJ function in connexin 26 (Cx26)‑transfected HeLa cells. The sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay was used to examine the effect of baicalein on cell viability. A 'parachute' assay was used to investigate the effect of baicalein on GJ function. The effects of baicalein on cisplatin cytotoxicity and GJ function were assayed by standard colony‑forming assays. The expression of Cx26 was monitored by western blotting. It was observed that exposure of Cx26‑transfected cells to cisplatin reduced the number of colonies formed in low‑density cultures (no GJ formation) and in high‑density cultures (GJ formation), but the toxic effect was greater when cells were seeded at a high density. In the absence of connexin expression or with blockage of connexin channels however, cell density had no effect on cisplatin toxicity. Baicalein significantly enhanced cisplatin cytotoxicity, but this effect required the presence of functional GJs between the cells. In conclusion, the dependence of cisplatin toxicity on cell density is mediated by GJs. Baicalein increases cisplatin cytotoxicity through enhancing GJ intercellular communication. PMID:24736991

  4. Hypoxia-induced autophagy mediates cisplatin resistance in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Mei; Jiang, Zi-Feng; Ding, Pei-Shan; Shao, Li-Jie; Liu, Rong-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia which commonly exists in solid tumors, leads to cancer cells chemoresistance via provoking adaptive responses including autophagy. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the role of autophagy and hypoxia as well as the underlying mechanism in the cisplatin resistance of lung cancer cells. Our study demonstrated that hypoxia significantly protected A549 and SPC-A1 cells from cisplatin-induced cell death in a Hif-1α- and Hif-2α- dependent manner. Moreover, compared with normoxia, cisplatin-induced apoptosis under hypoxia was markedly reduced. However, when autophagy was inhibited by 3-MA or siRNA targeted ATG5, this reduction was effectively attenuated, which means autophagy mediates cisplatin resisitance under hypoxia. In parallel, we showed that hypoxia robustly augmented cisplatin-induced autophagy activation, accompanying by suppressing cisplatin-induced BNIP3 death pathways, which was due to the more efficient autophagic process under hypoxia. Consequently, we proposed that autophagy was a protective mechanism after cisplatin incubation under both normoxia and hypoxia. However, under normoxia, autophagy activation ‘was unable to counteract the stress induced by cisplatin, therefore resulting in cell death, whereas under hypoxia, autophagy induction was augmented that solved the cisplatin-induced stress, allowing the cells to survival. In conclusion, augmented induction of autophagy by hypoxia decreased lung cancer cells susceptibility to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. PMID:26201611

  5. [Clinical pharmacology of anticancer agents. (Part 1) Introduction, alkylating agents and platinum compounds].

    PubMed

    Fujita, H

    1991-11-01

    Pharmacokinetic concepts as to absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of anticancer agents, and how drugs reach to the site of action were reviewed. Then, roles of the liver and kidney to the excretion and metabolism, intracellular pharmacokinetics, and relationships between drug response and cell proliferation kinetics or cell cycle phase were explained. Drug development, mode of action and pharmacokinetics of alkylating agents and platinum compounds were reviewed. This includes: alkylating agents: nitrogen mustard, phenylalanine mustard, estracyte, cyclophosphamide, carboquone, busulfan, nitrosourea, etc., and platinum compounds: cisplatin, carboplatin, 254-S, DWA-2114 R, NK-121. PMID:1952967

  6. Can pharmacogenetics explain efficacy and safety of cisplatin pharmacotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Roco, Ángela; Cayún, Juan; Contreras, Stephania; Stojanova, Jana; Quiñones, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Several recent pharmacogenetic studies have investigated the variability in both outcome and toxicity in cisplatin-based therapies. These studies have focused on the genetic variability of therapeutic targets that could affect cisplatin response and toxicity in diverse type of cancer including lung, gastric, ovarian, testicular, and esophageal cancer. In this review, we seek to update the reader in this area of investigation, focusing primarily on DNA reparation enzymes and cisplatin metabolism through Glutathione S-Transferases (GSTs). Current evidence indicates a potential application of pharmacogenetics in therapeutic schemes in which cisplatin is the cornerstone of these treatments. Therefore, a collaborative effort is required to study these molecular characteristics in order to generate a genetic panel with clinical utility. PMID:25452763

  7. Hypersensitivity reaction to cisplatin during chemoradiation therapy for gynecologic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Koren, Claude; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Katz, Alan; Malik, Hana; Sulkes, Aaron; Fenig, Eyal

    2002-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous cisplatin are rare. The appearance of hypersensitivity reactions in 4 of 25 consecutive patients treated with concomitant pelvic radiation and weekly intravenous cisplatin for gynecologic malignancies is reported. The reactions appeared within hours of cisplatin delivery and included primarily fever, rash, and pruritus. Infection was ruled out by blood cultures and other laboratory studies. Affected patients were treated prophylactically with an antihistamine before subsequent courses of cisplatin, with excellent results. The high rate of hypersensitivity reactions in our series may be attributable to tumor necrosis and cytokine release caused by the pelvic irradiation. Clinicians should be aware of this potential side effect so that early premedication regimens can be instituted to prevent unnecessary toxicity. PMID:12478013

  8. Cell fate determination in cisplatin resistance and chemosensitization.

    PubMed

    Luong, Khanh V; Wang, Ling; Roberts, Brett J; Wahl, James K; Peng, Aimin

    2016-04-26

    Understanding the determination of cell fate choices after cancer treatment will shed new light on cancer resistance. In this study, we quantitatively analyzed the individual cell fate choice in resistant UM-SCC-38 head and neck cancer cells exposed to cisplatin. Our study revealed a highly heterogeneous pattern of cell fate choices in UM-SCC-38 cells, in comparison to that of the control, non-tumorigenic keratinocyte HaCaT cells. In both UM-SCC-38 and HaCaT cell lines, the majority of cell death occurred during the immediate interphase without mitotic entry, whereas significant portions of UM-SCC-38 cells survived the treatment via either checkpoint arrest or checkpoint slippage. Interestingly, checkpoint slippage occurred predominantly in cells treated in late S and G2 phases, and cells in M-phase were hypersensitive to cisplatin. Moreover, although the cisplatin-resistant progression of mitosis exhibited no delay in general, prolonged mitosis was correlated with the induction of cell death in mitosis. The finding thus suggested a combinatorial treatment using cisplatin and an agent that blocks mitotic exit. Consistently, we showed a strong synergy between cisplatin and the proteasome inhibitor Mg132. Finally, targeting the DNA damage checkpoint using inhibitors of ATR, but not ATM, effectively sensitized UM-SCC-38 to cisplatin treatment. Surprisingly, checkpoint targeting eliminated both checkpoint arrest and checkpoint slippage, and augmented the induction of cell death in interphase without mitotic entry. Taken together, our study, by profiling cell fate determination after cisplatin treatment, reveals new insights into chemoresistance and suggests combinatorial strategies that potentially overcome cancer resistance. PMID:26993599

  9. Cisplatin-resistant cells express increased levels of a factor that recognizes damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, G.; Chang, E. )

    1990-05-01

    Cancer treatment with the drug cisplatin is often thwarted by the emergence of drug-resistant cells. To study this phenomenon, the authors identified two independent cellular factors that recognize cisplatin-damaged DNA. One of the two factors, designated XPE binding factor, is deficient in complementation group E of xeroderma pigmentosum, an inherited disease characterized by defective repair of DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation, cisplatin, and other agents. Human tumor cell lines selected for resistance to cisplatin showed more efficient DNA repair and increased expression of XPE binding factor. These results suggest that XPE binding factor may be responsible, at least in part, for the development of cisplatin resistance in human tumors and that the mechanism may be increased DNA repair.

  10. Protection against cisplatin ototoxicity in a Sprague-Dawley rat animal model

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, P; Lorito, G; Ciorba, A; Martini, A; Hatzopoulos, S

    2006-01-01

    Summary Cisplatin (CDDP) is an anti-neoplastic drug extensively used in cases of head and neck cancer. Cisplatin induces numerous untoward side-effects including ototoxicity. In this study, cisplatin ototoxicity in Sprague-Dawley rat animal model has been evaluated and the oto-protection provided by the systemic administration of the antioxidant drug D-methionine has been tested. A total of 12 Sprague-Dawley rats were used: 8 were treated intra-peritoneally with D-methionine (300 mg/kg) and cisplatin (16 mg/kg, slow 30 min-infusion), 4 only with cisplatin. The hearing threshold of the animals was evaluated by electrophysiological procedures as Otoacoustic Emissions and Auditory Brainstem Responses. The effects of protection were evaluated after 72 hours. The data from the Otoacoustic Emissions (in the 4.0–12 kHz band) and Auditory Brainstem Responses recordings suggested that D-methionine can partially protect from Cisplatin ototoxicity. PMID:18236636

  11. Uncoupling protein-2 knockdown mediates the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Santandreu, Francisca M; Roca, Pilar; Oliver, Jordi

    2010-08-15

    Cisplatin is among the most important chemotherapeutic agents ever developed. However, more than a generation after its clinical introduction, its exact mechanism of action on tumor cells is not fully defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of oxidative stress as a mediator of cisplatin action on colon cancer cells, studying the influence of mitochondrial physiology and composition on its effectiveness. The chemosensitivity shown by cancer cells to mechanistically dissimilar antitumor drugs is shown to be associated with their capacity to induce early alterations in mitochondrial and redox metabolism. Specifically, cisplatin exerted a marked pro-oxidative action on mitochondria by inhibiting resting respiration and stimulating the immediate generation of ROS in isolated mitochondria. Antioxidants and mitochondrial uncouplers counteracted cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in tumor cells, reflecting that oxidative stress and the inhibition of mitochondrial uncoupling are relevant to its antiproliferative activity. Additionally, inhibition of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) caused cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells via ROS of mitochondrial origin. In conclusion, we show for the first time that UCP2 knockdown participates in the mechanism of action of cisplatin, thus providing evidence that targeting UCP2 may offer clinical benefit in the treatment of cancer. PMID:20595066

  12. Defects in interstrand cross-link uncoupling do not account for the extreme sensitivity of ERCC1 and XPF cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Inusha U; McHugh, Peter J; Clingen, Peter H; Hartley, John A

    2002-09-01

    The anticancer drug cisplatin reacts with DNA leading to the formation of interstrand and intrastrand cross-links that are the critical cytotoxic lesions. In contrast to cells bearing mutations in other components of the nucleotide excision repair apparatus (XPB, XPD, XPG and CSB), cells defective for the ERCC1-XPF structure-specific nuclease are highly sensitive to cisplatin. To determine if the extreme sensitivity of XPF and ERCC1 cells to cisplatin results from specific defects in the repair of either intrastrand or interstrand cross-links we measured the elimination of both lesions in a range of nucleotide excision repair Chinese hamster mutant cell lines, including XPF- and ERCC1-defective cells. Compared to the parental, repair-proficient cell line all the mutants tested were defective in the elimination of both classes of adduct despite their very different levels of increased sensitivity. Consequently, there is no clear relationship between initial incisions at interstrand cross-links or removal of intrastrand adducts and cellular sensitivity. These results demonstrate that the high cisplatin sensitivity of ERCC1 and XPF cells likely results from a defect other than in excision repair. In contrast to other conventional DNA cross-linking agents, we found that the repair of cisplatin adducts does not involve the formation of DNA double-strand breaks. Surprisingly, XRCC2 and XRCC3 cells are defective in the uncoupling step of cisplatin interstrand cross-link repair, suggesting that homologous recombination might be initiated prior to excision of this type of cross-link. PMID:12202770

  13. N-acetylcysteine chemoprotection without decreased cisplatin antitumor efficacy in pediatric tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Muldoon, Leslie L.; Wu, Y. Jeffrey; Pagel, Michael A.; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Decreasing oxidative damage with the antioxidant agent N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can block the side effects of chemotherapy, but may diminish anti-tumor efficacy. We tested the potential for interactions of high dose NAC against a minimally effective cisplatin chemotherapy regimen in rat models of human pediatric cancers. PROCEDURE Athymic rats received subcutaneous implantation of human SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells or intra-cerebellar implantation of human D283-MED medulloblastoma cells. Rats were untreated or treated with cisplatin (3 or 4 mg/kg IV) with or without NAC (1000 mg/kg IV) 30 min before or 4 h after cisplatin treatment. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and tumor volumes were measured. RESULTS Cisplatin decreased the growth of SK-N-AS neuroblastoma subcutaneous tumors from 17.7 ± 4.9 to 6.4 ± 2.5 fold over baseline 2 weeks after treatment (P<0.001). Pretreatment with NAC decreased cisplatin efficacy, while 4 h delayed NAC did not significantly affect cisplatin anti-tumor effects (relative tumor volume 6.8 ± 2.0 fold baseline, P<0.001). In D283-MED medulloblastoma brain tumors, cisplatin decreased final tumor volume to 3.9 ± 2.3 mm3 compared to untreated tumor volume of 45.9 ± 38.7 (P = 0.008). Delayed NAC did not significantly alter cisplatin efficacy (tumor volume 6.8 ± 8.1 mm3, P = 0.014 versus control). Cisplatin was minimally nephrotoxic in these models. NAC decreased cisplatin-induced elevations in BUN (P<0.02). CONCLUSIONS NAC chemoprotection did not alter cisplatin therapy, if delayed until 4 h after chemotherapy. These data support a Phase I/II clinical trial of delayed NAC to reduce ototoxicity in children with localized pediatric cancers. PMID:25411097

  14. N-acetylcysteine chemoprotection without decreased cisplatin antitumor efficacy in pediatric tumor models.

    PubMed

    Muldoon, Leslie L; Wu, Y Jeffrey; Pagel, Michael A; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2015-02-01

    Decreasing oxidative damage with the antioxidant agent N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can block the side effects of chemotherapy, but may diminish anti-tumor efficacy. We tested the potential for interactions of high dose NAC against a minimally effective cisplatin chemotherapy regimen in rat models of human pediatric cancers. Athymic rats received subcutaneous implantation of human SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells or intra-cerebellar implantation of human D283-MED medulloblastoma cells. Rats were untreated or treated with cisplatin (3 or 4 mg/kg IV) with or without NAC (1,000 mg/kg IV) 30 min before or 4 h after cisplatin treatment. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and tumor volumes were measured. Cisplatin decreased the growth of SK-N-AS neuroblastoma subcutaneous tumors from 17.7 ± 4.9 to 6.4 ± 2.5 fold over baseline 2 weeks after treatment (P < 0.001). Pretreatment with NAC decreased cisplatin efficacy, while 4 h delayed NAC did not significantly affect cisplatin anti-tumor effects (relative tumor volume 6.8 ± 2.0 fold baseline, P < 0.001). In D283-MED medulloblastoma brain tumors, cisplatin decreased final tumor volume to 3.9 ± 2.3 mm(3) compared to untreated tumor volume of 45.9 ± 38.7 (P = 0.008). Delayed NAC did not significantly alter cisplatin efficacy (tumor volume 6.8 ± 8.1 mm(3), P = 0.014 versus control). Cisplatin was minimally nephrotoxic in these models. NAC decreased cisplatin-induced elevations in BUN (P < 0.02). NAC chemoprotection did not alter cisplatin therapy, if delayed until 4 h after chemotherapy. These data support a Phase I/II clinical trial of delayed NAC to reduce ototoxicity in children with localized pediatric cancers. PMID:25411097

  15. Infrasound sensitizes human glioblastoma cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rachlin, Kenneth; Moore, Dan H; Yount, Garret

    2013-11-01

    The development of nontoxic agents that can selectively enhance the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy is an important aim in oncology. This study evaluates the ability of infrasound exposure to sensitize glioblastoma cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. The infrasound was delivered using a device designed to replicate the unique infrasound emissions measured during external Qigong treatments. Human glioblastoma cell lines harboring wild-type p53 (U87) or mutant p53 (U251, SF210, and SF188) were treated in culture with cisplatin, infrasound emissions, or the combination of the 2 agents. Induction of apoptosis was quantified after 24 hours by flow cytometry following annexin V/propidium iodide staining. Infrasound emissions alone, delivered at moderate levels (~10 mPa) with dynamic frequency content (7-13 Hz), did not induce apoptosis, yet combining infrasound with cisplatin augmented the induction of apoptosis by cisplatin in all the 4 cell lines (P < .05). Increased cellular uptake of the fluorophore calcein associated with infrasound exposure was quantified by fluorescence microscopy as well as flow cytometry, demonstrating increased cell membrane permeability. The 4 cell lines differed in the degree to which infrasound exposure increased calcein uptake, and these differences were predictive of the extent to which infrasound enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis. When exposed to specific frequencies, membrane permeabilization also appeared to be differentially responsive for each cell line, suggesting the potential for selective targeting of tissue types using isolated infrasonic frequencies. Additionally, the pressure amplitudes used in this study were several orders of magnitude less than those used in similar studies involving ultrasound and shock waves. The results of this study provide support for using infrasound to enhance the chemotherapeutic effects of cisplatin in a clinical setting. PMID:23165942

  16. Indole-3-carbinol protects against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity: role of calcitonin gene-related peptide and insulin-like growth factor-1.

    PubMed

    El-Naga, Reem N; Mahran, Yasmen F

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity associated with the clinical use of the anticancer drug cisplatin is a limiting problem. Thus, searching for new protective measures is required. Indole-3-carbinol is a powerful anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agent. The present study aimed to investigate the potential protective effect of indole-3-carbinol against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity in rats. Rats were pre-treated with 20 mg/kg indole-3-carbinol orally before giving cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity was demonstrated where relative kidney weight, BUN and serum creatinine were significantly increased. Increased oxidative stress was evident in cisplatin group where GSH and SOD tissue levels were significantly depleted. Also, lipid peroxidation and NOX-1 were increased as compared to the control. Additionally, renal expression of pro-inflammatory mediators was induced by cisplatin. Cisplatin-induced cell death was shown by increased caspase-3 and decreased expression of EGF, IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptor. Nephrotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptotic effects induced by cisplatin were significantly ameliorated by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment. Besides, the role of CGRP in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was explored. Furthermore, cisplatin cytotoxic activity was significantly enhanced by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment in vitro. In conclusion, indole-3-carbinol provides protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Also, reduced expression of CGRP may play a role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced renal injury. PMID:27417335

  17. Indole-3-carbinol protects against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity: role of calcitonin gene-related peptide and insulin-like growth factor-1

    PubMed Central

    El-Naga, Reem N.; Mahran, Yasmen F.

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity associated with the clinical use of the anticancer drug cisplatin is a limiting problem. Thus, searching for new protective measures is required. Indole-3-carbinol is a powerful anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agent. The present study aimed to investigate the potential protective effect of indole-3-carbinol against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity in rats. Rats were pre-treated with 20 mg/kg indole-3-carbinol orally before giving cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity was demonstrated where relative kidney weight, BUN and serum creatinine were significantly increased. Increased oxidative stress was evident in cisplatin group where GSH and SOD tissue levels were significantly depleted. Also, lipid peroxidation and NOX-1 were increased as compared to the control. Additionally, renal expression of pro-inflammatory mediators was induced by cisplatin. Cisplatin-induced cell death was shown by increased caspase-3 and decreased expression of EGF, IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptor. Nephrotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptotic effects induced by cisplatin were significantly ameliorated by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment. Besides, the role of CGRP in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was explored. Furthermore, cisplatin cytotoxic activity was significantly enhanced by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment in vitro. In conclusion, indole-3-carbinol provides protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Also, reduced expression of CGRP may play a role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced renal injury. PMID:27417335

  18. Ancient Chinese Formula Qiong-Yu-Gao Protects Against Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity Without Reducing Anti-tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Zhi-Ying; Cheng, Xiao-Lan; Cai, Xue-Ting; Yang, Yang; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Jin-Di; Lu, Wu-Guang; Chen, Jiao; Hu, Chun-Ping; Zhou, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Li, Song-Lin; Cao, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a highly effective anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical use is severely limited by serious side effects, of which nephrotoxicity is the most important. In this study, we investigated whether Qiong-Yu-Gao (QYG), a popular traditional Chinese medicinal formula described 840 years ago, exhibits protective effects against cisplatin-induced renal toxicity. Using a mouse model of cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction, we observed that pretreatment with QYG attenuated cisplatin-induced elevations in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels, ameliorated renal tubular lesions, reduced apoptosis, and accelerated tubular cell regeneration. Cisplatin-mediated elevations in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) mRNA, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein in the kidney were also significantly suppressed by QYG treatment. Furthermore, QYG reduced platinum accumulation in the kidney by decreasing the expression of copper transporter 1 and organic cation transporter 2. An in vivo study using implanted Lewis lung cancer cells revealed that concurrent administration of QYG and cisplatin did not alter the anti-tumor activity of cisplatin. Our findings suggest that the traditional Chinese medicinal formula QYG inhibits cisplatin toxicity by several mechanisms that act simultaneously, without compromising its therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, QYG may be useful in the clinic as a protective agent to prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:26510880

  19. Effect of creatine and pioglitazone on Hk-2 cell line cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Genc, Gurkan; Kilinc, Veli; Bedir, Abdulkerim; Ozkaya, Ozan

    2014-08-01

    Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent, which is used in the treatment of various solid organ cancers, and its main dose limiting side effect of cisplatin is nephrotoxicity. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of pioglitazone and creatine on cisplatin nephrotoxicity in vitro. Real-time cell analyzer system (RTCA) was used for real-time and time-dependent analysis of the cellular response of HK-2 cells following incubation with cisplatin and combination with creatine or pioglitazone hydrochloride. First, half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of cisplatin, creatine and pioglitazone were calculated by RTCA system. Afterwards creatine and pioglitazone was administered with serial dilutions under RTCA system. IC50 dose for cisplatin was 7.69 M × 10(-5) at 24th hour and 3.93 M × 10(-6) at 48th hour. IC50 dose for pioglitazone was 1.61 M × 10(-3) at 24th hour and 2.85 M × 10(-4) at 48th hour. Although cells were treated the dose of 40,225 mM creatine, IC50 dose could not been reached. Neither pioglitazone nor creatine had additional protective effect in any dose. Consequently, beneficial effect of creatine and pioglitazone on cisplatin-induced cell death could not be found. Further studies and clinical trials are needed to evaluate the effect of different doses of these drugs in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:24937012

  20. Cyclopentenylcytosine does not enhance cisplatin-induced radiosensitization in human lung tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    RODERMOND, HANS M.; CATE, ROSEMARIE TEN; HAVEMAN, JAAP; VAN KUILENBURG, ANDRÉ; MEDEMA, JAN PAUL; VAN BREE, CHRIS; FRANKEN, NICOLAAS A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The search for agents that enhance the effect of ionizing radiation has been an object of study for decades. In this study, the sensitizing properties of cyclopentenylcytosine (CPEC) on radiation and cisplatin-induced radiosensitization in human squamous lung carcinoma cells were investigated. Human lung tumour SW-1573 cells (SWp, parental; SWg, gemcitabine-resistant) were incubated with CPEC and cisplatin and subsequently irradiated with different doses of γ-rays. Clonogenic survival was determined to measure the effectiveness of the treatments. CPEC (1 or 2 μM) treatment for 4 h decreased the plating efficiency to 75 and 50% in SWp and SWg cells, respectively. In the SWg cells, 0.1 and 1 μM CPEC for 4 h enhanced the cell killing effect of cisplatin. However, an increase was not noted in the SWp cells. Due to the moderate toxicity of 1 μM for 4 h, this CPEC dose was used in the radiosensitization experiments. However, CPEC neither radiosensitized the lung tumour cells nor enhanced the radiosensitizing effect of cisplatin. A 2-h incubation with 4 μM cisplatin also decreased the plating efficiency to 75–80% in the two cell lines. Using this cisplatin dose, radiosensitization was obtained in the two cell lines. Although cisplatin treatment clearly radiosensitized the lung tumour cells, CPEC treatment did not. Cisplatin-induced radiosensitization was also not enhanced by CPEC. PMID:22966339

  1. Effect of Eisenia foetida Extract against Cisplatin-Induced Kidney Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Heidari, Reza; Golzar, Tahereh; Derakhshanfar, Amin

    2016-09-01

    Kidney injury is a deleterious side effect accompanied by therapeutic uses of cisplatin as an antineoplastic agent. However, no therapeutic option is available against this complication. This study was designed to evaluate the protective role of a glycoprotein extract obtained from Eisenia foetida against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Rats were treated with cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, i.p.) and Eisenia foetida extract (300 and 500 mg/kg, i.p. and/or oral). Serum creatinine (Cr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were significantly elevated in cisplatin-treated rats. A significant amount of lipid peroxidation was detected in drug-treated animals. Furthermore, kidney histopathological findings revealed acute tubular necrosis and hyaline cast formation caused by cisplatin. Eisenia foetida extract administration (300 and 500 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced serum BUN and creatinine and lipid peroxidation in kidney tissue. Moreover, cisplatin-induced histopathological lesions were alleviated by Eisenia foetida extract. This investigation concluded that Eisenia foetida extract ameliorated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. This protection might be mediated by preventing cisplatin-induced oxidative stress. PMID:26864051

  2. Modulation of cisplatin cytotoxicity and cisplatin-induced DNA cross-links in HepG2 cells by regulation of glutathione-related mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Chew, M; Yang, E B; Wong, K P; Mack, P

    2001-04-01

    Glutathione (GSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and glutathione conjugate export pump (GS-X pump) have been shown to participate collectively in the detoxification of many anticancer drugs, including cisplatin. Identification and regulation of the rate-limiting step in the overall system for cisplatin detoxification is of crucial importance for sensitization of human tumor cells to cisplatin. In this study, the GSH content, GST activity, and GS-X pump activity were regulated separately to examine effects of the regulation on cisplatin cytotoxicity and cisplatin-induced DNA interstrand cross-links (ICL) in HepG2 cells. Seventy-percent depletion of GSH by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and 50% increase of GSH by monoethyl GSH ester (GSHe) potentiated and decreased cisplatin cytotoxicity, respectively. This was reflected by a significant decrease and increase of their respective IC(50) values by 62 and 107%. Cisplatin-induced ICL was also potentiated by depletion of GSH by BSO and decreased by enrichment of GSH by GSHe, as shown by a 125% increase and a 34% decrease of cross-linked DNA compared with control samples exposed to cisplatin alone (p = 0.008 and 0.03, respectively). On the other hand, inhibition of GST and GS-X pump by ethacrynic acid, quercetin, tannic acid, and indomethacin at concentrations that inhibited activities of GST and GS-X pump by more than 50% had no significant effects on cisplatin cytotoxicity and cisplatin-induced DNA ICL in these cells. The results showed that of the parameters measured, intracellular GSH seems to be the rate-limiting factor, and its regulation would provide a more promising strategy for sensitization of human liver tumor cells to cisplatin. PMID:11259628

  3. Cancer morbidity in British military veterans included in chemical warfare agent experiments at Porton Down: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Linsell, L; Brooks, C; Keegan, T J; Langdon, T; Doyle, P; Maconochie, N E S; Fletcher, T; Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Beral, V

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine cancer morbidity in members of the armed forces who took part in tests of chemical warfare agents from 1941 to 1989. Design Historical cohort study, with cohort members followed up to December 2004. Data source Archive of UK government research facility at Porton Down, UK military personnel records, and national death and cancer records. Participants All veterans included in the cohort study of mortality, excluding those known to have died or been lost to follow-up before 1 January 1971 when the UK cancer registration system commenced: 17 013 male members of the UK armed forces who took part in tests (Porton Down veterans) and a similar group of 16 520 men who did not (non-Porton Down veterans). Main outcome measures Cancer morbidity in each group of veterans; rate ratios, with 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for age group and calendar period. Results 3457 cancers were reported in the Porton Down veterans compared with 3380 cancers in the non-Porton Down veterans. While overall cancer morbidity was the same in both groups (rate ratio 1.00, 95% confidence interval 0.95 to 1.05), Porton Down veterans had higher rates of ill defined malignant neoplasms (1.12, 1.02 to 1.22), in situ neoplasms (1.45, 1.06 to 2.00), and those of uncertain or unknown behaviour (1.32, 1.01 to 1.73). Conclusion Overall cancer morbidity in Porton Down veterans was no different from that in non-Porton Down veterans. PMID:19318700

  4. A role for the copper transporter Ctr1 in the synergistic interaction between hyperthermia and cisplatin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Landon, Chelsea D.; Benjamin, Sarah E.; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hyperthermia enhances cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesised that hyperthermia increases cisplatin accumulation and efficacy by modulating function of copper transport protein 1 (Ctr1), a major regulator of cellular cisplatin uptake. We examined the significance of Ctr1 in the synergistic interaction between hyperthermia and cisplatin. We assessed the importance of cisplatin- and hyperthermia-induced Ctr1 multimerisation in sensitising cells to cisplatin cytotoxicity. Materials and methods Ctr1 protein levels and cisplatin sensitivities were assessed in bladder cancer cell lines with immunoblotting and clonogenic survival assays. Using Myc-tagged-Ctr1 HEK293 cells, we assessed the effect of hyperthermia on Ctr1 multimerisation with immunoblotting. The effect of hyperthermia on cisplatin sensitivity and accumulation was assessed in wild-type (WT) and Ctr1 knockout (Ctr1−/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with clonogenic assays and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results Increased Ctr1 protein expression was observed for the most cisplatin-sensitive bladder cancer cell lines and MEFs. Heat-induced increase in Ctr1 multimerisation with cisplatin was observed in Myc-tagged Ctr1 cells. Hyperthermia enhanced cisplatin-mediated cytotoxicity in WT more than Ctr1−/− cells (dose modifying factors 1.75 versus 1.4, respectively). WT cells accumulated more platinum versus Ctr1−/− cells; this was further increased by hyperthermia in WT cells. Conclusions Hyperthermia enhanced cisplatin uptake and cytotoxicity in WT cells. Heat increased Ctr1 activity by increasing multimerisation, enhancing drug cytotoxicity. Furthermore, Ctr1 protein profiles of bladder tumours, as well as other tumour types, may predict their response to cisplatin and overall efficacy of treatment. PMID:23879689

  5. Identification of cisplatin-binding proteins using agarose conjugates of platinum compounds.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M; Steyger, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as an antineoplastic drug, but its ototoxic and nephrotoxic side-effects, as well as the inherent or acquired resistance of some cancers to cisplatin, remain significant clinical problems. Cisplatin's selectivity in killing rapidly proliferating cancer cells is largely dependent on covalent binding to DNA via cisplatin's chloride sites that had been aquated. We hypothesized that cisplatin's toxicity in slowly proliferating or terminally differentiated cells is primarily due to drug-protein interactions, instead of drug-DNA binding. To identify proteins that bind to cisplatin, we synthesized two different platinum-agarose conjugates, one with two amino groups and another with two chlorides attached to platinum that are available for protein binding, and conducted pull-down assays using cochlear and kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis on protein bands after gel electrophoresis and Coomassie blue staining identified several proteins, including myosin IIA, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), calreticulin, valosin containing protein (VCP), and ribosomal protein L5, as cisplatin-binding proteins. Future studies on the interaction of these proteins with cisplatin will elucidate whether these drug-protein interactions are involved in ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, or contribute to tumor sensitivity or resistance to cisplatin treatment. PMID:23755301

  6. Identification of Cisplatin-Binding Proteins Using Agarose Conjugates of Platinum Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M.; Steyger, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as an antineoplastic drug, but its ototoxic and nephrotoxic side-effects, as well as the inherent or acquired resistance of some cancers to cisplatin, remain significant clinical problems. Cisplatin's selectivity in killing rapidly proliferating cancer cells is largely dependent on covalent binding to DNA via cisplatin's chloride sites that had been aquated. We hypothesized that cisplatin's toxicity in slowly proliferating or terminally differentiated cells is primarily due to drug-protein interactions, instead of drug-DNA binding. To identify proteins that bind to cisplatin, we synthesized two different platinum-agarose conjugates, one with two amino groups and another with two chlorides attached to platinum that are available for protein binding, and conducted pull-down assays using cochlear and kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis on protein bands after gel electrophoresis and Coomassie blue staining identified several proteins, including myosin IIA, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), calreticulin, valosin containing protein (VCP), and ribosomal protein L5, as cisplatin-binding proteins. Future studies on the interaction of these proteins with cisplatin will elucidate whether these drug-protein interactions are involved in ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, or contribute to tumor sensitivity or resistance to cisplatin treatment. PMID:23755301

  7. Conjugation of Cisplatin Analogues and Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors to Overcome Cisplatin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Wilma; Crews, Brenda C.; Sárosi, Menyhárt B.; Daniel, Cristina M.; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Scholz, Matthias S.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) is an enzyme involved in tumorigenesis and is associated with tumor cell resistance against platinum-based antitumor drugs. Cisplatin analogues were conjugated with COX inhibitors (indomethacin, ibuprofen) to study the synergistic effects that were previously observed in combination treatments. The conjugates ensure concerted transport of both drugs into cells, and subsequent intracellular cleavage enables a dual-action mode. Whereas the platinum(II) complexes showed cytotoxicities similar to those of cisplatin, the platinum(IV) conjugates revealed highly increased cytotoxic activities and were able to completely overcome cisplatin-related resistance. Although some of the complexes are potent COX inhibitors, the conjugates appear to execute their cytotoxic action via COX-independent mechanisms. Instead, the increased lipophilicity and kinetic inertness of the conjugates seem to facilitate cellular accumulation of the platinum drugs and thus improve the efficacy of the antitumor agents. These conjugates are important tools for the elucidation of the direct influence of COX inhibitors on platinum-based anticancer drugs in tumor cells. PMID:25318459

  8. Familial hearing loss and cisplatin therapy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, B J; Torkelson, J L

    1998-01-01

    Familial high-tone hearing loss in males is a recessive trait often unrecognized. Cisplatin chemotherapy may be associated with hearing loss. A review was made of audiograms in 85 patients with testicular carcinoma prior to cisplatin chemotherapy to determine the extent of preexisting familial hearing loss. Clinical histories defined patients exposed to high noise levels and other common causes of hearing loss. Audiometric findings were classified according to normal hearing or mild, moderate, and severe hearing impairment. Pretreatment audiograms were normal in 51 patients and abnormal in 19 patients with histories of high-level noise exposure, and in 15 patients with high-frequency hearing loss there was no history of noise exposure, ear infection, or other potential causes of hearing loss. These last 15 patients were judged to have recessive familial hearing loss. Awareness of familial hearing loss is important in male patients in whom cisplatin chemotherapy is planned. Pretreatment hearing assessment, including audiograms, is recommended for such male patients. PMID:9589029

  9. Aloe vera inhibits proliferation of human breast and cervical cancer cells and acts synergistically with cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Arif; Sharma, Chhavi; Khan, Saniyah; Shah, Kruti; Haque, Shafiul

    2015-01-01

    Many of the anti-cancer agents currently used have an origin in natural sources including plants. Aloe vera is one such plant being studied extensively for its diverse health benefits, including cancer prevention. In this study, the cytotoxic potential of Aloe vera crude extract (ACE) alone or in combination with cisplatin in human breast (MCF-7) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells was studied by cell viability assay, nuclear morphological examination and cell cycle analysis. Effects were correlated with modulation of expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and drug metabolism by RT-PCR. Exposure of cells to ACE resulted in considerable loss of cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, which was found to be mediated by through the apoptotic pathway as evidenced by changes in the nuclear morphology and the distribution of cells in the different phases of the cell cycle. Interestingly, ACE did not have any significant cytotoxicity towards normal cells, thus placing it in the category of safe chemopreventive agent. Further, the effects were correlated with the downregulation of cyclin D1, CYP 1A1, CYP 1A2 and increased expression of bax and p21 in MCF-7 and HeLa cells. In addition, low dose combination of ACE and cisplatin showed a combination index less than 1, indicating synergistic growth inhibition compared to the agents applied individually. In conclusion, these results signify that Aloe vera may be an effective anti-neoplastic agent to inhibit cancer cell growth and increase the therapeutic efficacy of conventional drugs like cispolatin. Thus promoting the development of plant-derived therapeutic agents appears warranted for novel cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25854386

  10. MCL-1 is the key target of adjuvant chemotherapy to reverse the cisplatin-resistance in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Zhenxian; Wu, Kaiming; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Kuanzhi

    2016-08-10

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of lung cancer. However, the acquired resistance occurred in cancer cells limits the clinical application of cisplatin. MCL-1, which is an important member in the pro-survival Bcl-2 family, plays a critical role in multidrug resistance (MDR). The aim of the present study is to investigate the value of Pan-Bcl-2 inhibitor as sensitizer for the chemotherapy of cisplatin-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. We found the obatoclax but not the ABT-737 significantly decreased the IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) of cisplatin in cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mechanism of obatoclax-promoted cell death induced by cisplatin was dependent on the inhibition of MCL-1, which couldn't be inhibited by ABT-737 but is the target of obatoclax. Moreover, inhibition of MCL-1 recovered the function of NOXA and BAK in cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells, leading to the promotion of mitochondrial apoptosis induced by cisplatin. Interestingly, our date indicated the obatoclax also reversed the cross-resistance in cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells. Therefore, we demonstrated that the targeted therapy with MCL-1 inhibitors, such as obatoclax, may represent a novel strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:27138804

  11. Carvedilol protects the kidneys of tumor-bearing mice without impairing the biodistribution or the genotoxicity of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Carvalho Rodrigues, Maria A; dos Santos, Neife A G; da Silva Faria, Marcia C; Rodrigues, Jairo Lisboa; Kinoshita, Angela; Baffa, Oswaldo; Antunes, Lusania M Greggi; Barbosa, Fernando; Gobe, Glenda C; dos Santos, Antonio Cardozo

    2016-02-01

    Cisplatin (Cisp) is an effective antitumor drug; however, it causes severe nephrotoxicity. Minimization of renal toxicity is essential, but the interference of nephroprotective agents, particularly antioxidants, with the antitumor activity of cisplatin is a general concern. We have recently demonstrated that the anti-hypertensive and antioxidant drug carvedilol (CV) protects against the renal damage and increases the survival of tumor-bearing mice without impairing the tumor reduction by cisplatin. So far, reports on the antioxidant mechanism of CV are controversial and there are no data on the impact of CV on the antitumor mechanisms of cisplatin. Therefore, this study addresses the effect of CV on mechanisms underlying the tumor control by cisplatin. CV did not interfere with the biodistribution or the genotoxicity of cisplatin. We also addressed the antioxidant mechanisms of CV and demonstrated that it does not neutralize free radicals, but is an efficient chelator of ferrous ions that are relevant catalyzers in cisplatin nephrotoxicity. The present data suggest that oxidative damage and genotoxicity play different roles in the toxicity of cisplatin on kidneys and tumors and therefore, some antioxidants might be safe as chemoprotectors. Altogether, our studies provide consistent evidence of the beneficial effect of CV on animals treated with cisplatin and might encourage clinical trials. PMID:26751708

  12. DNA-crosslinker cisplatin eradicates bacterial persister cells.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nityananda; Wood, Thammajun L; Martínez-Vázquez, Mariano; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-09-01

    For all bacteria, nearly every antimicrobial fails since a subpopulation of the bacteria enter a dormant state known as persistence, in which the antimicrobials are rendered ineffective due to the lack of metabolism. This tolerance to antibiotics makes microbial infections the leading cause of death worldwide and makes treating chronic infections, including those of wounds problematic. Here, we show that the FDA-approved anti-cancer drug cisplatin [cis-diamminodichloroplatinum(II)], which mainly forms intra-strand DNA crosslinks, eradicates Escherichia coli K-12 persister cells through a growth-independent mechanism. Additionally, cisplatin is more effective at killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa persister cells than mitomycin C, which forms inter-strand DNA crosslinks, and cisplatin eradicates the persister cells of several pathogens including enterohemorrhagic E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and P. aeruginosa. Cisplatin was also highly effective against clinical isolates of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, cisplatin has broad spectrum activity against persister cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1984-1992. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26914280

  13. Sensitization of head and neck cancer to cisplatin through the use of a novel curcumin analogue

    PubMed Central

    Abuzeid, Waleed M.; Davis, Samantha; Tang, Alice; Saunders, Lindsay; Brenner, J. Chadwick; Lin, Jiayuh; Fuchs, James R.; Light, Emily; Bradford, Carol R.; Prince, Mark E.P.; Carey, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins regulate key cellular fate decisions including proliferation and apoptosis. Over-expression of STAT3 induces tumor growth. We hypothesized that a novel small molecule inhibitor derived from curcumin (FLLL32) that targets STAT3 would induce cytotoxicity in STAT3 dependent HNSCC cells and would sensitize tumors to cisplatin. Design Basic science. Two HNSCC cell lines, UM-SCC-29 and -74B, were characterized for cisplatin sensitivity. Baseline expression of STAT3 and other apoptosis proteins was determined. The FLLL32 IC50 dose was determined for each cell line and the effect of FLLL32 treatment on the expression of phosphorylated STAT3 and other key proteins was elucidated. The anti-tumor efficacy of cisplatin, FLLL32 and combination treatment was measured. The proportion of apoptotic cells after cisplatin, FLLL32 or combination therapy was determined. Results The UM-SCC-29 cell line is cisplatin resistant and the UM-SCC-74B cell line is sensitive. Both cell lines express STAT3, phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) and key apoptotic proteins. FLLL32 downregulates the active form of STAT3, pSTAT3, in HNSCC cells and induces a potent anti-tumor effect. FLLL32, alone or with cisplatin, increases the proportion of apoptotic cells. FLLL32 sensitized cisplatin resistant cancer cells, achieving an equivalent tumor kill with a four-fold lower dose of cisplatin. Conclusions FLLL32 monotherapy induces a potent anti-tumor effect and sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin, permitting an equivalent or improved anti-tumor effect at lower doses of cisplatin. Our results suggest that FLLL32 acts by inhibiting STAT3 phosphorylation, reduced survival signaling, increased susceptibility to apoptosis, and sensitization to cisplatin. PMID:21576562

  14. Protective effects of pine bark extract against cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Je-Won; Lee, In-Chul; Park, Sung-Hyuk; Moon, Changjong; Kang, Seong-Soo; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects of pine bark extract (pycnogenol®, PYC) against cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. Twenty-four male rats were divided into the following four groups: (1) vehicle control, (2) cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg), (3) cisplatin & PYC 10 (10 mg/kg/day), and (4) cisplatin & PYC 20 (20 mg/kg/day). A single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin induced hepatotoxicity, as evidenced by an increase in serum aminotransferase and histopathological alterations, including degeneration/necrosis of hepatocytes, vacuolation, and sinusoidal dilation. In addition, an increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration and a decrease in the reduced glutathione (GSH) content and catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were observed in the cisplatin-treated rat hepatic tissues. In contrast, PYC treatment effectively prevented cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity, including the elevation of aminotransferase and histopathological lesions, in a dosedependent manner. Moreover, PYC treatment also induced antioxidant activity by decreasing MDA level and increasing GSH content and SOD and GST activities in liver tissues. These results indicate that PYC has a protective effect against acute hepatotoxicity induced by cisplatin in rats, and that the protective effects of PYC may be due to inhibiting lipid peroxidation and increasing antioxidant activity. PMID:25628728

  15. Protective effects of pine bark extract against cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ko, Je-Won; Lee, In-Chul; Park, Sung-Hyuk; Moon, Changjong; Kang, Seong-Soo; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the protective effects of pine bark extract (pycnogenol®, PYC) against cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. Twenty-four male rats were divided into the following four groups: (1) vehicle control, (2) cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg), (3) cisplatin & PYC 10 (10 mg/kg/day), and (4) cisplatin & PYC 20 (20 mg/kg/day). A single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin induced hepatotoxicity, as evidenced by an increase in serum aminotransferase and histopathological alterations, including degeneration/necrosis of hepatocytes, vacuolation, and sinusoidal dilation. In addition, an increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration and a decrease in the reduced glutathione (GSH) content and catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were observed in the cisplatin-treated rat hepatic tissues. In contrast, PYC treatment effectively prevented cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity, including the elevation of aminotransferase and histopathological lesions, in a dosedependent manner. Moreover, PYC treatment also induced antioxidant activity by decreasing MDA level and increasing GSH content and SOD and GST activities in liver tissues. These results indicate that PYC has a protective effect against acute hepatotoxicity induced by cisplatin in rats, and that the protective effects of PYC may be due to inhibiting lipid peroxidation and increasing antioxidant activity. PMID:25628728

  16. Cisplatin induced sensory neuropathy is prevented by vascular endothelial growth factor-A

    PubMed Central

    Vencappa, Samanta; Donaldson, Lucy F; Hulse, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Increased patient survival is a mark of modern anti-cancer therapy success. Unfortunately treatment side-effects such as neurotoxicity are a major long term concern. Sensory neuropathy is one of the common toxicities that can arise during platinum based chemotherapy. In many cases the current poor understanding of the neurological degeneration and lack of suitable analgesia has led to high incidences of patient drop out of treatment. VEGF-A is a prominent neuroprotective agent thus it was hypothesised to prevent cisplatin induced neuropathy. Systemic cisplatin treatment (lasting 3 weeks biweekly) resulted in mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in mice when compared to vehicle control. PGP9.5 sensory nerve fibre innervation was reduced in the plantar skin in the cisplatin treated group versus vehicle control mice. The cisplatin induced sensory neurodegeneration was associated with increased cleaved caspase 3 expression as well as a reduction in Activating Transcription Factor 3 and pan VEGF-A expression in sensory neurons. VEGF-A165b expression was unaltered between vehicle and cisplatin treatment. rhVEGF-A165a and rhVEGF-A165b both prevented cisplatin induced sensory neurodegeneration. Cisplatin exposure blunts the regenerative properties of sensory neurons thus leading to sensory neuropathy. However, here it is identified that administration of VEGF-A isoform subtypes induce regeneration and prevent cell death and are therefore a possible adjunct therapy for chemotherapy induced neuropathy. PMID:26279748

  17. Pistachio supplementation attenuates motor and cognition impairments induced by cisplatin or vincristine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Golchin, Leila; Shabani, Mohammad; Harandi, Shaahin; Razavinasab, Moazamehosadat

    2015-01-01

    Background: A large number of natural products and dietary components have been evaluated as potential chemoprotective agents. In the present investigation we report the effects of treatment with the dietary antioxidant, pistachio, on cisplatin- or vincristine-induced neurotoxicity in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Dietary pistachio (10%) was assessed for its neuroprotective effects through the alteration in performance of hippocampus- and cerebellum-related behaviors following chronic cisplatin (5 mg/kg) or vincristine (0.2 mg/kg) treatment in male rats. We also evaluated the effects of cisplatin, vincristine, and pistachio administration on nociception. Six behavioral tasks were used: open field, rotarod, grasping, Morris water maze (MWM), hot plate, and motor nerve conductive velocity (MNCV). Results: We showed that the exposure of adolescent rats to cisplatin or vincristine resulted in a significant decrease in explorative behaviors and memory retention. Pistachio consumption somewhat improved memory and motor abilities in cisplatin- or vincristine-treated rats, while pistachio alone did not show any significant changes in these abilities compared to saline. Cisplatin and vincristine increased the latency of response to nociception, and pistachio did not reverse this effect. Conclusion: We conclude that pistachio in the diet following anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and vincristine might have a protective effect against anticancer drug-induced disruptions in motor and cognitive function. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanisms of this protective effect of pistachio. PMID:26015918

  18. Cisplatin induced sensory neuropathy is prevented by vascular endothelial growth factor-A.

    PubMed

    Vencappa, Samanta; Donaldson, Lucy F; Hulse, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Increased patient survival is a mark of modern anti-cancer therapy success. Unfortunately treatment side-effects such as neurotoxicity are a major long term concern. Sensory neuropathy is one of the common toxicities that can arise during platinum based chemotherapy. In many cases the current poor understanding of the neurological degeneration and lack of suitable analgesia has led to high incidences of patient drop out of treatment. VEGF-A is a prominent neuroprotective agent thus it was hypothesised to prevent cisplatin induced neuropathy. Systemic cisplatin treatment (lasting 3 weeks biweekly) resulted in mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in mice when compared to vehicle control. PGP9.5 sensory nerve fibre innervation was reduced in the plantar skin in the cisplatin treated group versus vehicle control mice. The cisplatin induced sensory neurodegeneration was associated with increased cleaved caspase 3 expression as well as a reduction in Activating Transcription Factor 3 and pan VEGF-A expression in sensory neurons. VEGF-A165b expression was unaltered between vehicle and cisplatin treatment. rhVEGF-A165a and rhVEGF-A165b both prevented cisplatin induced sensory neurodegeneration. Cisplatin exposure blunts the regenerative properties of sensory neurons thus leading to sensory neuropathy. However, here it is identified that administration of VEGF-A isoform subtypes induce regeneration and prevent cell death and are therefore a possible adjunct therapy for chemotherapy induced neuropathy. PMID:26279748

  19. [Cisplatin and derivatives with radiation therapy: for what clinical use?].

    PubMed

    Durdux, C

    2004-11-01

    Since its discovery by Rosenberg in 1965, cisplatin and its derivatives have appeared as the most important chemotherapeutic agents, particularly for their radiosensitizing properties and their clinical use with radiation. In spite of numerous preclinical and clinical studies, optimal schedules of platin and radiotherapy combination have to be defined. The first part of this overview will describe biological mechanisms of interaction between radiation therapy and platinum derivatives. The second part will report the major clinical impact of their association. PMID:15679253

  20. Amphiphilic oligomer-based micelles as cisplatin nanocarriers for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiuxiu; Li, Najun; Gu, Hongwei; Xu, Yujie; Xu, Ying; Jiao, Yang; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; Lu, Jianmei

    2013-09-01

    Polymeric micelles (~10 nm) have been prepared from the amphiphilic oligomer comprising oligomeric polystyrene as the hydrophobic inner core and half of EDTA (-N(CH2COOH)2) as the hydrophilic outermost shell. After chelating cisplatin with -N(CH2COOH)2 in water, polymeric micelles containing Pt on the spherical surface have been easily obtained. Since the chelate group is introduced into the amphiphilic oligomer as the terminal group by a RAFT agent, the chelation of cisplatin with PS(COOH)2 is almost stoichiometric. The drug carrier based on PS(COOH)2 showed a high loading efficiency (>70%) towards cisplatin. The release of the therapeutic Pt from the cisplatin-loaded composites (PS(COOH)2-Pt) triggered under weak acidic conditions resulted in good Pt-release and accumulation in tumor cells. Both in vitro and in vivo, the chelated cisplatin inhibited Sk-Br3 cancer more effectively than the intact cisplatin does. Furthermore, neither PS(COOH)2 nor PS(COOH)2-Pt showed obvious systematic toxicity.Polymeric micelles (~10 nm) have been prepared from the amphiphilic oligomer comprising oligomeric polystyrene as the hydrophobic inner core and half of EDTA (-N(CH2COOH)2) as the hydrophilic outermost shell. After chelating cisplatin with -N(CH2COOH)2 in water, polymeric micelles containing Pt on the spherical surface have been easily obtained. Since the chelate group is introduced into the amphiphilic oligomer as the terminal group by a RAFT agent, the chelation of cisplatin with PS(COOH)2 is almost stoichiometric. The drug carrier based on PS(COOH)2 showed a high loading efficiency (>70%) towards cisplatin. The release of the therapeutic Pt from the cisplatin-loaded composites (PS(COOH)2-Pt) triggered under weak acidic conditions resulted in good Pt-release and accumulation in tumor cells. Both in vitro and in vivo, the chelated cisplatin inhibited Sk-Br3 cancer more effectively than the intact cisplatin does. Furthermore, neither PS(COOH)2 nor PS(COOH)2-Pt showed obvious

  1. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  2. Cisplatin Resistant Spheroids Model Clinically Relevant Survival Mechanisms in Ovarian Tumors.

    PubMed

    Chowanadisai, Winyoo; Messerli, Shanta M; Miller, Daniel H; Medina, Jamie E; Hamilton, Joshua W; Messerli, Mark A; Brodsky, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    The majority of ovarian tumors eventually recur in a drug resistant form. Using cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines assembled into 3D spheroids we profiled gene expression and identified candidate mechanisms and biological pathways associated with cisplatin resistance. OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cells were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cisplatin to create a matched cisplatin-resistant cell line, OVCAR-8R. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer spheroids identified 3,331 significantly differentially expressed probesets coding for 3,139 distinct protein-coding genes (Fc >2, FDR < 0.05) (S2 Table). Despite significant expression changes in some transporters including MDR1, cisplatin resistance was not associated with differences in intracellular cisplatin concentration. Cisplatin resistant cells were significantly enriched for a mesenchymal gene expression signature. OVCAR-8R resistance derived gene sets were significantly more biased to patients with shorter survival. From the most differentially expressed genes, we derived a 17-gene expression signature that identifies ovarian cancer patients with shorter overall survival in three independent datasets. We propose that the use of cisplatin resistant cell lines in 3D spheroid models is a viable approach to gain insight into resistance mechanisms relevant to ovarian tumors in patients. Our data support the emerging concept that ovarian cancers can acquire drug resistance through an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. PMID:26986722

  3. Cisplatin Resistant Spheroids Model Clinically Relevant Survival Mechanisms in Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel H.; Medina, Jamie E.; Hamilton, Joshua W.; Messerli, Mark A.; Brodsky, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of ovarian tumors eventually recur in a drug resistant form. Using cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines assembled into 3D spheroids we profiled gene expression and identified candidate mechanisms and biological pathways associated with cisplatin resistance. OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cells were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cisplatin to create a matched cisplatin-resistant cell line, OVCAR-8R. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer spheroids identified 3,331 significantly differentially expressed probesets coding for 3,139 distinct protein-coding genes (Fc >2, FDR < 0.05) (S2 Table). Despite significant expression changes in some transporters including MDR1, cisplatin resistance was not associated with differences in intracellular cisplatin concentration. Cisplatin resistant cells were significantly enriched for a mesenchymal gene expression signature. OVCAR-8R resistance derived gene sets were significantly more biased to patients with shorter survival. From the most differentially expressed genes, we derived a 17-gene expression signature that identifies ovarian cancer patients with shorter overall survival in three independent datasets. We propose that the use of cisplatin resistant cell lines in 3D spheroid models is a viable approach to gain insight into resistance mechanisms relevant to ovarian tumors in patients. Our data support the emerging concept that ovarian cancers can acquire drug resistance through an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. PMID:26986722

  4. Gingko biloba extracts protect auditory hair cells from cisplatin-induced ototoxicity by inhibiting perturbation of gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Choi, S J; Kim, S W; Lee, J B; Lim, H J; Kim, Y J; Tian, C; So, H S; Park, R; Choung, Y-H

    2013-08-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) may play an important role in the hearing process. Cisplatin is an anticancer drug that causes hearing loss and Gingko biloba extracts (EGb 761) have been used as an antioxidant and enhancer for GJIC. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficiency of EGb 761 in protecting against cisplatin-induced apoptosis and disturbance of GJIC. House Ear Institute-Organ of Corti 1 auditory cells were cultured and treated with cisplatin (50 μM) and EGb (300 μg/ml) for 24h, and then analyzed by immunocytochemistry (Annexin V/propidium iodide) and Western blots. GJIC was evaluated by scrape-loading dye transfer (SLDT). Basal turn organ of Corti (oC) explants from neonatal (p3) rats were exposed to cisplatin (1-10 μM) and EGb (50-400 μg/ml). The number of intact hair cells was counted by co-labeling with phalloidin and MyoVIIa. EGb prevented cisplatin-induced apoptosis in immunostaining and decreased caspase 3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase bands, which were increased in cisplatin-treated cells in Western blots. EGb prevented abnormal intracellular locations of connexin (Cx) 26, 30, 31, and 43 in cells treated with cisplatin and increased quantities of Cx bands. EGb also prevented cisplatin-induced disturbance of GJIC in SLDT. In oC explants, EGb significantly prevented hair cell damage induced by cisplatin. In animal studies, EGb significantly prevented cisplatin-induced hearing loss across 16 and 32 kHz. These results show that cisplatin induces ototoxicity including hearing loss as well as down-regulation of GJIC and inhibition of Cxs in auditory cells. EGb prevents hearing loss in cisplatin-treated rats by inhibiting down-regulation of Cx expression and GJIC. The disturbance of GJIC or Cx expression may be one of the important mechanisms of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:23583760

  5. Say No to DMSO: Dimethylsulfoxide Inactivates Cisplatin, Carboplatin and Other Platinum Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew D.; Telma, Katherine A.; Chang, Ki-Eun; Lee, Tobie D.; Madigan, James P.; Lloyd, John R.; Goldlust, Ian S.; Hoeschele, James D.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The platinum drugs cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin are highly utilized in the clinic and as a consequence are extensively studied in the laboratory setting. In this study, we examined the literature and found a significant number of studies (11 - 34%) in prominent cancer journals utilizing cisplatin dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). However, dissolving cisplatin in DMSO for laboratory-based studies results in ligand displacement and changes the structure of the complex. We examined the effect of DMSO on platinum complexes, including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, finding that DMSO reacted with the complexes, inhibited their cytotoxicity and their ability to initiate cell death. These results render a substantial portion of the literature on cisplatin uninterpretable. Raising awareness of this significant issue in the cancer biology community is critical, and we make recommendations on appropriate solvation of platinum drugs for research. PMID:24812268

  6. Possible Protective Effect of Sertraline against Cisplatin-Induced Ototoxicity: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Selcuk; Sarı, Fatih; Erdogan, Selvet; Topdag, Murat; Iseri, Mete

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective. Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, but its ototoxicity side effect can occur in the majority of patients. Lots of agents were tried to prevent this, but there is not a routine treatment modality yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the otoprotective effect of sertraline, which is an antidepressant with neuroprotective effects, against cisplatin, in rats. Design. Experimental animal study. Material and Methods. Forty-eight rats were randomly separated in two groups as groups I and II. Group I was identified as the control group and only a single dose of intraperitoneal cisplatin was administered. In group II, in addition to cisplatin, sertraline was administered to the rats through an oral cannula for ten-day period. Distortion product otoacoustic emission measurements were performed at the first day and the 10th day. Results. When the ototoxicity rates after cisplatin in group I and group II in distortion product otoacoustic emission measurements were compared, it was statistically significantly lower in group II in frequencies of 5652, 6165, 6726, 7336, and 7996 Hz (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Sertraline seems to have a protective effect on cisplatin ototoxicity and could be used to prevent the ototoxicity and also to treat the depression that occurred in cancer patients together. PMID:24198723

  7. Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) Exacerbates Cisplatin-induced Sensory Hair Cell Death in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Gleichman, Julia S.; Kramer, Matthew D.; Wang, Qi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M.; Steyger, Peter S.; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Matsui, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    Inner ear sensory hair cells die following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics or chemotherapeutics like cisplatin, leading to permanent auditory and/or balance deficits in humans. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are used to study drug-induced sensory hair cell death since their hair cells are similar in structure and function to those found in humans. We developed a cisplatin dose-response curve using a transgenic line of zebrafish that expresses membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein under the control of the Brn3c promoter/enhancer. Recently, several small molecule screens have been conducted using zebrafish to identify potential pharmacological agents that could be used to protect sensory hair cells in the presence of ototoxic drugs. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is typically used as a solvent for many pharmacological agents in sensory hair cell cytotoxicity assays. Serendipitously, we found that DMSO potentiated the effects of cisplatin and killed more sensory hair cells than treatment with cisplatin alone. Yet, DMSO alone did not kill hair cells. We did not observe the synergistic effects of DMSO with the ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin. Cisplatin treatment with other commonly used organic solvents (i.e. ethanol, methanol, and polyethylene glycol 400) also did not result in increased cell death compared to cisplatin treatment alone. Thus, caution should be exercised when interpreting data generated from small molecule screens since many compounds are dissolved in DMSO. PMID:23383324

  8. Evaluation of nanoparticle delivered cisplatin in beagles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldhaeusser, Brittany; Platt, Simon R.; Marrache, Sean; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Pathak, Rakesh K.; Montgomery, David J.; Reno, Lisa R.; Howerth, Elizabeth; Dhar, Shanta

    2015-08-01

    Intracranial neoplasia is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in both human and veterinary patients, and is difficult to treat with traditional therapeutic methods. Cisplatin is a platinum (Pt)-containing chemotherapeutic agent approved by the Food and Drug Administration; however, substantial limitations exist for its application in canine brain tumor treatment due to the difficulty in crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), development of resistance, and toxicity. A modified Pt(iv)-prodrug of cisplatin, Platin-M, was recently shown to be deliverable to the brain via a biocompatible mitochondria-targeted lipophilic polymeric nanoparticle (NP) that carries the drug across the BBB and to the mitochondria. NP mediated controlled release of Platin-M and subsequent reduction of this prodrug to cisplatin allowed cross-links to be formed with the mitochondrial DNA, which have no nucleotide excision repair system, forcing the overactive cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. Here, we report in vitro effects of targeted Platin-M NPs (T-Platin-M-NPs) in canine glioma and glioblastoma cell lines with results indicating that this targeted NP formulation is more effective than cisplatin. In both the cell lines, T-Platin-M-NP was significantly more efficacious compared to carboplatin, another Pt-based chemotherapy, which is used in the settings of recurrent high-grade glioblastoma. Mitochondrial stress analysis indicated that T-Platin-M-NP is more effective in disrupting the mitochondrial bioenergetics in both the cell types. A 14-day distribution study in healthy adult beagles using a single intravenous injection at 0.5 mg kg-1 (with respect to Platin-M) of T-Platin-M-NPs showed high levels of Pt accumulation in the brain, with negligible amounts in the other analyzed organs. Safety studies in the beagles monitoring physical, hematological, and serum chemistry evaluations were within the normal limits on days 1, 7, and 14 after injection of either 0.5 mg kg-1 or 2 mg kg

  9. Evaluation of nanoparticle delivered cisplatin in beagles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldhaeusser, Brittany; Platt, Simon R.; Marrache, Sean; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Pathak, Rakesh K.; Montgomery, David J.; Reno, Lisa R.; Howerth, Elizabeth; Dhar, Shanta

    2015-08-01

    Intracranial neoplasia is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in both human and veterinary patients, and is difficult to treat with traditional therapeutic methods. Cisplatin is a platinum (Pt)-containing chemotherapeutic agent approved by the Food and Drug Administration; however, substantial limitations exist for its application in canine brain tumor treatment due to the difficulty in crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), development of resistance, and toxicity. A modified Pt(iv)-prodrug of cisplatin, Platin-M, was recently shown to be deliverable to the brain via a biocompatible mitochondria-targeted lipophilic polymeric nanoparticle (NP) that carries the drug across the BBB and to the mitochondria. NP mediated controlled release of Platin-M and subsequent reduction of this prodrug to cisplatin allowed cross-links to be formed with the mitochondrial DNA, which have no nucleotide excision repair system, forcing the overactive cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. Here, we report in vitro effects of targeted Platin-M NPs (T-Platin-M-NPs) in canine glioma and glioblastoma cell lines with results indicating that this targeted NP formulation is more effective than cisplatin. In both the cell lines, T-Platin-M-NP was significantly more efficacious compared to carboplatin, another Pt-based chemotherapy, which is used in the settings of recurrent high-grade glioblastoma. Mitochondrial stress analysis indicated that T-Platin-M-NP is more effective in disrupting the mitochondrial bioenergetics in both the cell types. A 14-day distribution study in healthy adult beagles using a single intravenous injection at 0.5 mg kg-1 (with respect to Platin-M) of T-Platin-M-NPs showed high levels of Pt accumulation in the brain, with negligible amounts in the other analyzed organs. Safety studies in the beagles monitoring physical, hematological, and serum chemistry evaluations were within the normal limits on days 1, 7, and 14 after injection of either 0.5 mg kg-1 or 2 mg kg

  10. Cisplatin stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shrivastava, A; Sodhi, A

    1995-03-01

    Cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiamine platinum (II)], a potent anti-tumor compound, stimulates immune responses by activating monocyte-macrophages and other cells of the immune system. The mechanism by which cisplatin activates these cells is poorly characterized. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event that mediates cellular responses, we examined whether cisplatin alters tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. We found that cisplatin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in peritoneal macrophages and in P388D1 and IC-21 macrophage cell lines. Treatment of macrophages with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genestein and lavendustin A, inhibited cisplatin-stimulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. Macrophages treated with cisplatin also exhibit increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These data indicate that protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in cisplatin-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539662

  11. Real-time in situ monitoring via europium emission of the photo-release of antitumor cisplatin from a Eu-Pt complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongguang; Lan, Rongfeng; Chan, Chi-Fai; Jiang, Lijun; Dai, Lixiong; Kwong, Daniel W J; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Wong, Ka-Leung

    2015-09-25

    A water-soluble light-responsive antitumor agent, PtEuL, based on a cisplatin-linked europium-cyclen complex has been synthesized and evaluated for controlled cisplatin release by linear/two-photon excitation in vitro with concomitant turn-on and long-lived europium emission as a responsive traceable signal. PMID:26257074

  12. Sirtuin 1 promotes the growth and cisplatin resistance of endometrial carcinoma cells: a novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Asaka, Ryoichi; Miyamoto, Tsutomu; Yamada, Yasushi; Ando, Hirofumi; Mvunta, David Hamisi; Kobara, Hisanori; Shiozawa, Tanri

    2015-12-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), originally identified as a longevity gene, is induced by caloric restriction, and regulates various cellular functions including DNA repair, cell survival and metabolism via the deacetylation of target proteins such as histone and p53. These functions are considered to act dualistically as preventing or facilitating cancer. This study aimed to clarify the expression and role of SIRT1 in endometrial carcinoma. Because a high-calorie diet was a well-known risk factor for endometrial carcinoma, we first hypothesized that SIRT1 might be downregulated in normal endometrial glandular cells of obese women. However, no correlation was observed between the expression of SIRT1 and body mass index (BMI). In contrast, regardless of BMI, the immunohistochemical expression of SIRT1 was significantly higher in endometrial carcinoma (108 cases) than in normal endometria (60 cases) (P<0.05), and its overexpression was associated with a shorter survival (P<0.05). Our experiments in vivo revealed that SIRT1 accelerated the proliferation of endometrial carcinoma cell lines (HHUA, HEC151, and HEC1B). SIRT1 overexpression significantly enhanced the resistance for cisplatin and paclitaxel in HHUA cells. Although p53 is an important target protein for SIRT1, the selective SIRT1 inhibitor (EX527) significantly suppressed the proliferation and cisplatin resistance of three endometrial carcinoma cell lines regardless of the p53 mutation status. In addition, SIRT1 overexpression in HHUA cells accelerated tumor growth and cisplatin resistance in nude mice, and EX527 significantly suppressed the growth of tumors of HHUA and HEC1B cells. No adverse effect of EX527 was observed in these mice. In conclusion, SIRT1 is involved in the acquisition of the aggressive behavior associated with endometrial carcinoma, and the SIRT1 inhibitor, EX527, may be a useful agent for the treatment of this malignancy. PMID:26367491

  13. An Epigenomic Approach to Improving Response to Neoadjuvant Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xylinas, Evanguelos; Hassler, Melanie R; Zhuang, Dazhong; Krzywinski, Martin; Erdem, Zeynep; Robinson, Brian D; Elemento, Olivier; Clozel, Thomas; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is among the five most common cancers diagnosed in the Western world and causes significant mortality and morbidity rates in affected patients. Therapeutic options to treat the disease in advanced muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) include cystectomy and chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is effective in MIBC; however, it has not been widely adopted by the community. One reason is that many patients do not respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and no biomarker currently exists to identify these patients. It is also not clear whether a strategy to sensitize chemoresistant patients may exist. We sought to identify cisplatin-resistance patterns in preclinical models of bladder cancer, and test whether treatment with the epigenetic modifier decitabine is able to sensitize cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell lines. Using a screening approach in cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell lines, we identified dysregulated genes by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) and DNA methylation assays. DNA methylation analysis of tumors from 18 patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy was used to confirm in vitro results. Cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cells were treated with decitabine to investigate epigenetic sensitization of resistant cell lines. Our results show that HOXA9 promoter methylation status is associated with response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in bladder cancer cell lines and in metastatic bladder cancer. Bladder cancer cells resistant to cisplatin chemotherapy can be sensitized to cisplatin by the DNA methylation inhibitor decitabine. Our data suggest that HOXA9 promoter methylation could serve as potential predictive biomarker and decitabine might sensitize resistant tumors in patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:27598218

  14. Downregulation of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor subunits modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kothandapani, Anbarasi; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Kahali, Bhaskar; Reisman, David; Patrick, Steve M.

    2012-10-01

    Chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF plays important roles in many cellular processes including transcription, proliferation, differentiation and DNA repair. In this report, we investigated the role of SWI/SNF catalytic subunits Brg1 and Brm in the cellular response to cisplatin in lung cancer and head/neck cancer cells. Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhanced cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Repair kinetics of cisplatin DNA adducts revealed that downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impeded the repair of both intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Cisplatin ICL-induced DNA double strand break repair was also decreased in Brg1 and Brm depleted cells. Altered checkpoint activation with enhanced apoptosis as well as impaired chromatin relaxation was observed in Brg1 and Brm deficient cells. Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm did not affect the recruitment of DNA damage recognition factor XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions, but affected ERCC1 recruitment, which is involved in the later stages of DNA repair. Based on these results, we propose that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity by facilitating efficient repair of the cisplatin DNA lesions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhances cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impedes the repair of cisplatin intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brg1 and Brm deficiency results in impaired chromatin relaxation, altered checkpoint activation as well as enhanced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm affects recruitment of ERCC1, but not XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions.

  15. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  16. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  17. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use... GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  18. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  19. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics..., mercury compounds have also been widely used as preservatives in cosmetics such as hand and body...

  20. Effects of Src kinase inhibition induced by dasatinib in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines treated with cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Ceppi, Paolo; Papotti, Mauro; Monica, Valentina; Lo Iacono, Marco; Saviozzi, Silvia; Pautasso, Marisa; Novello, Silvia; Mussino, Stefano; Bracco, Enrico; Volante, Marco; Scagliotti, Giorgio V

    2009-11-01

    c-Src is a tyrosine kinase involved in tumor proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis and has been shown to modulate the cytotoxicity following cisplatin-induced DNA damages. c-Src is frequently activated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and cell lines, but no preclinical data regarding the effects of the novel potent Src inhibitor, dasatinib (BMS-354825), in the modulation of cisplatin resistance are currently available. The present study reports that treatment with dasatinib completely abrogated Src phosphorylation in the majority of the NSCLC cell lines tested (n = 7), with modest effects on cell proliferation and survival. In five cell lines, a higher cytotoxicity was observed delivering cisplatin in combination with dasatinib: the most evident effects were found in the squamous H520 cells due to the effective block of cisplatin-induced Src phosphorylation. Moreover, dasatinib treatment significantly blocked cisplatin-induced transcription of a panel of DNA repair and synthesis genes. In addition, a real-time PCR analysis done on tumor and matched normal lung specimens from 44 surgically resected NSCLC patients showed that Src transcripts are significantly upregulated in 23% of cases. In conclusion, Src-directed therapeutic strategies could interfere with cisplatin resistance, possibly allowing to reduce cisplatin doses, thus improving its efficacy. The data of this study support further clinical studies aimed to evaluate the efficacy of Src-inhibiting agents in combination with cisplatin in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:19861409

  1. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Ana-Maria; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs) and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects. PMID:24212665

  2. GMI, an Immunomodulatory Protein from Ganoderma microsporum, Potentiates Cisplatin-Induced Apoptosis via Autophagy in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hsin, I-Lun; Ou, Chu-Chyn; Wu, Ming-Fang; Jan, Ming-Shiou; Hsiao, Yi-Min; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Ko, Jiunn-Liang

    2015-05-01

    Cisplatin-based therapy is common in the treatment of several types of cancers, including lung cancers. In our previous study, GMI, an immunomodulatory protein cloned from Ganoderma microsporum, induced a cytotoxic effect in lung cancer cells via autophagy. The aim of this study is to examine the role of GMI in enhancing cisplatin-mediated cell death. On the basis of MTT assay and Combination Index, GMI and cisplatin cotreatment induced a synergistic cytotoxic effect. GMI and cisplatin-induced apoptosis was determined by sub-G1, nuclear condensation, and annexin-V/propidium iodide analyses. On Western blot, expressions of γH2AX and cleaved forms of PARP, caspase-3, and caspase-7 were induced by combined treatment. Akt/mTOR pathway activity, LC3-II expression, and acidic vesicular organelle development demonstrated that cisplatin does not abolish GMI-mediated autophagy. Cyto-ID Green/hoechst 33342 double staining and time-dependent experiment indicated that GMI and cisplatin-treated A549 cells simultaneously express autophagosomes and apoptotic nuclei. To elucidate the role of autophagy in inducing apoptosis by GMI and cisplatin, chemical inhibitors and LC3 shRNA were used to inhibit autophagy. The results showed that 3-methyladenine decreases, while chloroquine increases GMI and cisplatin cotreatment-induced cleavage of caspase-7 and PARP. LC3 silencing abolished activation of apoptosis in A549 cells. Caspase inhibitors and caspase-7 silencing mitigated GMI and cisplatin-elicited cell viability inhibition and apoptosis. This is the first study to reveal the novel function of GMI in potentiating cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. GMI and cisplatin induce apoptosis via autophagy/caspase-7-dependent and survivin- and ERCC1-independent pathway. GMI may be a potential cisplatin adjuvant against lung cancer. PMID:25811903

  3. Cisplatin sensitization to radiotherapy of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Leipzig, B.

    1983-10-01

    A combined modality of treatment utilizing cisplatin as a radiosensitizing agent concomitantly with full-course radical irradiation has been studied in 14 patients. Cisplatin at a dose of 15 mg/M2 body surface area was given intravenously on days 1 through 5 and 21 through 25 of the radiation therapy course. Among the 14 patients so treated, 11 patients had evidence of complete clinical regression of their tumors. Most remained in remission without evidence of recurrent disease for as long as 18 months. Recurrence in the field of treatment was even more rare. Symptomatic improvement was very encouraging in these patients. Most of them have had a significant improvement in their tolerance of pain and in the ability to swallow foods and maintain weight without a nasogastric feeding tube. Decannulation of the tracheostomy is usual. Problems included four patients with renal toxicity, one of whom died with renal failure. No patient required interruption of therapy due to mocositis or dysphagia. Nausea was rare. This encouraging data in our pilot study of a new therapeutic regimen justifies a full-scale clinical trial.

  4. In vitro and in vivo targeting of bladder carcinoma with metformin in combination with cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    WANG, DONG; WU, XIAOHOU

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the ninth most common carcinoma worldwide, and improving the sensitivity of this cancer to chemotherapy is a current clinical challenge. Metformin is a potentially useful therapeutic agent for the treatment of certain types of cancer. In the present study, metformin and cisplatin (a first-line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of bladder cancer) were administered to T24 and BIU-87 bladder cancer cells lines alone or in combination, prior to undergoing MTT assay and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis to determine cell viability and cell cycle distribution, respectively. Western blotting was used to examine the expression of proteins associated with the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways. In addition, a xenograft model was constructed to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of metformin and cisplatin treatment, alone or in combination. Immunohistochemistry was performed to detect the expression levels of proteins associated with xenograft growth and angiogenesis. Furthermore, western blotting was performed to observe the expression of proteins associated with the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in the xenograft model. The results demonstrated that the treatment of T24 and BIU-87 cells with metformin or cisplatin resulted in decreased tumor cell proliferation. However, the joint application of metformin and cisplatin was significantly more effective than that of each compound alone (P<0.05). Similarly, cells more markedly accumulated in the sub-G1 phase following joint treatment with metformin and cisplatin, compared with metformin or cisplatin treatment alone. In addition, human cell cycle signaling pathway western blotting arrays were performed, which identified the marked downregulation of phosphorylated (p)-mTOR and unchanged expression of p-AMPK, AMPK and mTOR following combined treatment with cisplatin and metformin. Concurrently, combined use of metformin and cisplatin

  5. ER stress and autophagy are involved in the apoptosis induced by cisplatin in human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, SHAOMIN; TAN, PING; YAN, BINGDI; GAO, RONG; ZHAO, JIANJUN; WANG, JING; GUO, JIA; LI, NING; MA, ZHONGSEN

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (CDDP)] is one of the most classical and effective chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of cancers including lung cancer. However, the presence of cisplatin resistance in cancer lowers its curative effect and limits its usage in the clinic. The aim of the present study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in lung cancer involving endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. In the present study, we detected the effect of cisplatin on cell viability, ER stress and autophagy in lung cancer cell lines A549 and H460. We also tested the effects of ER stress and autophagy on apoptosis induced by cisplatin. The results showed that cisplatin induced apoptosis, ER stress and autophagy in lung cancer cell lines. In addition, the inhibition of ER stress by 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) or tauroursodeoxycholic acid sodium (TUDC) enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in the human lung cancer cells. Meanwhile, combination treatment with the autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or chloroquine (CQ) further increased the apoptosis induced by cisplatin in the human lung cancer cells. The present study provides a novel treatment strategy - cisplatin in combination with an autophagic inhibitor or an ER stress inhibitor leads to increased apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. PMID:26985651

  6. ER stress and autophagy are involved in the apoptosis induced by cisplatin in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shaomin; Tan, Ping; Yan, Bingdi; Gao, Rong; Zhao, Jianjun; Wang, Jing; Guo, Jia; Li, Ning; Ma, Zhongsen

    2016-05-01

    Cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (CDDP)] is one of the most classical and effective chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of cancers including lung cancer. However, the presence of cisplatin resistance in cancer lowers its curative effect and limits its usage in the clinic. The aim of the present study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in lung cancer involving endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. In the present study, we detected the effect of cisplatin on cell viability, ER stress and autophagy in lung cancer cell lines A549 and H460. We also tested the effects of ER stress and autophagy on apoptosis induced by cisplatin. The results showed that cisplatin induced apoptosis, ER stress and autophagy in lung cancer cell lines. In addition, the inhibition of ER stress by 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) or tauroursodeoxycholic acid sodium (TUDC) enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in the human lung cancer cells. Meanwhile, combination treatment with the autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or chloroquine (CQ) further increased the apoptosis induced by cisplatin in the human lung cancer cells. The present study provides a novel treatment strategy - cisplatin in combination with an autophagic inhibitor or an ER stress inhibitor leads to increased apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. PMID:26985651

  7. Ondansetron can enhance cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via inhibition of multiple toxin and extrusion proteins (MATEs)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qing; Guo, Dong; Dong, Zhongqi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Polli, James E.; Shu, Yan

    2013-11-15

    The nephrotoxicity limits the clinical application of cisplatin. Human organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) work in concert in the elimination of cationic drugs such as cisplatin from the kidney. We hypothesized that co-administration of ondansetron would have an effect on cisplatin nephrotoxicity by altering the function of cisplatin transporters. The inhibitory potencies of ondansetron on metformin accumulation mediated by OCT2 and MATEs were determined in the stable HEK-293 cells expressing these transporters. The effects of ondansetron on drug disposition in vivo were examined by conducting the pharmacokinetics of metformin, a classical substrate for OCTs and MATEs, in wild-type and Mate1−/− mice. The nephrotoxicity was assessed in the wild-type and Mate1−/− mice received cisplatin with and without ondansetron. Both MATEs, including human MATE1, human MATE2-K, and mouse Mate1, and OCT2 (human and mouse) were subject to ondansetron inhibition, with much greater potencies by ondansetron on MATEs. Ondansetron significantly increased tissue accumulation and pharmacokinetic exposure of metformin in wild-type but not in Mate1−/− mice. Moreover, ondansetron treatment significantly enhanced renal accumulation of cisplatin and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity which were indicated by increased levels of biochemical and molecular biomarkers and more severe pathohistological changes in mice. Similar increases in nephrotoxicity were caused by genetic deficiency of MATE function in mice. Therefore, the potent inhibition of MATEs by ondansetron enhances the nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin treatment in mice. Potential nephrotoxic effects of combining the chemotherapeutic cisplatin and the antiemetic 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT{sub 3}) receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron, should be investigated in patients. - Highlights: • Nephrotoxicity significantly limits clinical use of the chemotherapeutic

  8. Enhanced expression of DNA polymerase eta contributes to cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Han, Chunhua; Zhao, Ran; Cui, Tiantian; Dai, Yuntao; Mao, Charlene; Zhao, Weiqiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yu, Jianhua; Wang, Qi-En

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) with enhanced tumorigenicity and chemoresistance are believed to be responsible for treatment failure and tumor relapse in ovarian cancer patients. However, it is still unclear how CSCs survive DNA-damaging agent treatment. Here, we report an elevated expression of DNA polymerase η (Pol η) in ovarian CSCs isolated from both ovarian cancer cell lines and primary tumors, indicating that CSCs may have intrinsically enhanced translesion DNA synthesis (TLS). Down-regulation of Pol η blocked cisplatin-induced CSC enrichment both in vitro and in vivo through the enhancement of cisplatin-induced apoptosis in CSCs, indicating that Pol η-mediated TLS contributes to the survival of CSCs upon cisplatin treatment. Furthermore, our data demonstrated a depletion of miR-93 in ovarian CSCs. Enforced expression of miR-93 in ovarian CSCs reduced Pol η expression and increased their sensitivity to cisplatin. Taken together, our data suggest that ovarian CSCs have intrinsically enhanced Pol η-mediated TLS, allowing CSCs to survive cisplatin treatment, leading to tumor relapse. Targeting Pol η, probably through enhancement of miR-93 expression, might be exploited as a strategy to increase the efficacy of cisplatin treatment. PMID:25831546

  9. Evaluating the various phases of cisplatin-induced emesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Use of cisplatin as a chemotherapeutic agent causes acute and delayed emesis. Kaolin, saccharin solution and normal feed consumption have been evaluated as an index of cisplatin-induced emesis in rats; however, the most preferable of these methods for evaluating the various phases of emesis remains unclear. In the current study, kaolin, saccharin solution and normal feed consumption following cisplatin administration (6 mg/kg intraperitoneally) were simultaneously investigated in rats. Kaolin consumption increased significantly following cisplatin administration and was attenuated by granisetron administration 0-24 h following the injection. Saccharin solution consumption, however, decreased significantly 0-48 h following cisplatin administration, however, was attenuated by administration of granisetron within 0-24 h only. A reduced intake of normal feed was observed in the control group and was reversed by granisetron within the 0-72 h period. The present study indicates that kaolin consumption may be evaluated as an index of cisplatin-induced acute emesis and saccharin solution consumption may be evaluated as an index of delayed emesis, while normal feed consumption as an indicator of anorexia nervosa may be suitable to evaluate all phases of emesis and serve as an indicator of quality of life. PMID:25289087

  10. Chrysanthemum indicum attenuates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity both in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Won; Kim, Young-Jung; Park, So-Ra; Seo, Chang-Seob; Ha, Hyekyung; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo; Jung, Ju-Young

    2015-03-01

    Chrysanthemum indicum Linné has been used in traditional medicine to treat various inflammatory diseases in East Asia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of C. indicum ethanol extract (CILE) against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. An HPLC-photodiode array method was used for fingerprint analysis of the CILE and ten major constituents were quantitatively analyzed. The protective effect of CILE on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was assessed using both in vitro (porcine kidney cell; PK15 cell) and in vivo (Sprague Dawley rat) experiments. In the in vitro study, CILE enhanced PK15 cell viability after cisplatin treatment with recovered antioxidant status. Moreover, the increased p53 expression after cisplatin treatment was decreased in the CILE pretreated cells. In the in vivo study, SD rats were treated for 28 consecutive days with CILE (0, 100, 300 and 500 mg/kg). On day 23, a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg) was injected to induce nephrotoxicity. The CILE pretreated group showed recovered serum renal function index with ameliorated oxidative stress. Histopathological alterations and apoptosis in the kidney were also decreased in CILE pretreated rats. Taken together, CILE could attenuate cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and might be a beneficial agent for acute renal failure management. PMID:25924514

  11. Molecular mechanisms underlying attenuation of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by epicatechin gallate.

    PubMed

    Malik, Salma; Suchal, Kapil; Bhatia, Jagriti; Gamad, Nanda; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Arya, Dharamvir Singh

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin, a platinum compound, is used as a first-line agent against various forms of solid cancers. Nephrotoxicity is an important adverse effect of cisplatin therapy, which involves increased oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis, and activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It is well known that the bioactive compounds present in green tea are used to treat various disorders due to their biological activities. With this background, the present study was aimed to investigate the effect of epicatechin gallate (ECG), a green tea polyphenol, in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. To achieve this, ECG (1.25, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg; intraperitoneal (i.p.)) was administered to male albino Wistar rats for the period of 10 days. On the 7th day, a single i.p. injection of cisplatin (8 mg/kg) was injected into rats to produce kidney injury and the animals were then killed on the 10th day. Cisplatin toxicity was associated with enhanced oxidative stress, impaired renal function along with marked tubular necrosis in Histopathology. Furthermore, cisplatin activated the MAPK pathway, which contributed to inflammation and apoptosis in the kidney of treated rats. In contrast, ECG (5 mg/kg) pretreatment normalized cisplatin-induced oxidative stress, renal function, and histopathological changes. ECG also prevented the activation of the MAPK pathway, and attenuated inflammation and apoptosis in rats. These findings suggest that ECG prevented cisplatin-induced oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis by downregulating the MAPK pathway and resulted in improved renal function. PMID:27239733

  12. Heat shock protein-mediated protection against Cisplatin-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tiffany G; Roy, Soumen; Brandon, Carlene S; Kramarenko, Inga K; Francis, Shimon P; Taleb, Mona; Marshall, Keely M; Schwendener, Reto; Lee, Fu-Shing; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2015-02-01

    Cisplatin is a highly successful and widely used chemotherapy for the treatment of various solid malignancies in both adult and pediatric patients. Side effects of cisplatin treatment include nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity results from damage to and death of cells in the inner ear, including sensory hair cells. We showed previously that heat shock inhibits cisplatin-induced hair cell death in whole-organ cultures of utricles from adult mice. Since heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is the most upregulated HSP in response to heat shock, we investigated the role of HSP70 as a potential protectant against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Our data using utricles from HSP70 (-/-) mice indicate that HSP70 is necessary for the protective effect of heat shock against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. In addition, constitutive expression of inducible HSP70 offered modest protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. We also examined a second heat-inducible protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, also called HSP32). HO-1 is an enzyme responsible for the catabolism of free heme. We previously showed that induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) inhibits aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. Here, we show that HO-1 also offers significant protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. HO-1 induction occurred primarily in resident macrophages, with no detectable expression in hair cells or supporting cells. Depletion of macrophages from utricles abolished the protective effect of HO-1 induction. Together, our data indicate that HSP induction protects against cisplatin-induced hair cell death, and they suggest that resident macrophages mediate the protective effect of HO-1 induction. PMID:25261194

  13. The use of zebrafish for assessing ototoxic and otoprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Ton, Christopher; Parng, Chuenlei

    2005-10-01

    Zebrafish and other fish exhibit hair cells in the lateral-line neuromasts which are structurally and functionally similar to mammalian inner ear hair cells. To facilitate drug screening for ototoxic or otoprotective agents, we report a straightforward, quantitative in vivo assay to determine potential ototoxicity of drug candidates and to screen otoprotective agents in zebrafish larva. In this study, a fluorescent vital dye, DASPEI (2-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-ethylpyridinium iodide), was used to stain zebrafish hair cells in vivo and morphometric analysis was performed to quantify fluorescence intensity and convert images to numerical endpoints. Various therapeutics, including gentamicin, cisplatin, vinblastine sulfate, quinine, and neomycin, which cause ototoxicity in humans, also resulted in hair cell loss in zebrafish. In addition, protection against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity was observed in zebrafish larva co-treated with cisplatin and different antioxidants including, glutathione (GSH), allopurinol (ALO), N-acetyl l-cysteine (l-NAC), 2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate (OTC) and d-methionine (d-MET). Our data indicate that results of ototoxicity and otoprotection in zebrafish correlated with results in humans, supporting use of zebrafish for preliminary drug screening. PMID:16014323

  14. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induced cell-specific drug transporters with acquired cisplatin resistance in cisplatin sensitive cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gotovdorj, Tuvshinjargal; Lee, Eunil; Lim, Yongchul; Cha, Eun Jeong; Kwon, Daeho; Hong, Eunyoung; Kim, YunJeong; Oh, Min-Yeong

    2014-09-01

    2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) can induce drug transporter genes such as the ATP-binding cassette G member 2 (ABCG2), which contributes to multidrug resistance. We investigated the effect of TCDD pretreatment on drug transporters induction from cancer cells of various origins. Cell viabilities after treatment of cisplatin were measured to evaluate acquiring cisplatin resistance by TCDD. Acquring cisplatin resistance was found only in cisplatin senstivie cancer cells including gastric SNU601, colon LS180, brain CRT-MG and lymphoma Jurkat cells which showed a significant increase in cell viability after combined treatment with TCDD and cisplatin. High increase of ABCG2 gene expression was found in SNU601 and LS180 cells with a mild increase in the expression of the ABCC3, ABCC5,and SLC29A2 genes in SNU601 cells, and of major vault protein (MVP) in LS180 cells. The AhR inhibitor kaempferol suppressed the upregulation of ABCG2 expression and reversed the TCDD-induced increase in cell viability in LS180 cells. However, in CRT-MG cells, other transporter genes including ABCC1, ABCC5, ABCA3, ABCA2, ABCB4, ABCG1, and SLC29A1 were up-regulated. These findings suggested the acquiring cisplatin resistance by TCDD associated with cancer cell-type-specific induction of drug transporters. PMID:25246735

  15. Pooled Analysis of Clinical Outcomes with Neoadjuvant Cisplatin and Gemcitabine Chemotherapy for Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuh, Bertram E.; Ruel, Nora; Wilson, Timothy G.; Vogelzang, Nicholas; Pal§, Sumanta K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer has been shown to confer a survival advantage in phase III studies. Although cisplatin and gemcitabine are often used in this setting, a comprehensive evaluation of this regimen is lacking. In this review we summarize the efficacy of neoadjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine chemotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer based on currently published studies. Materials and Methods A systematic literature review was conducted in April 2012 searching MEDLINE® databases. Articles were selected if they included patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer, evaluated the combination of cisplatin and gemcitabine as neoadjuvant treatment, and reported pathological data after cystectomy. Cisplatin and gemcitabine dosing regimens and clinical data were further summarized using weighted averages. Results Seven studies encompassing 164 patients were published between 2007 and 2012. The majority of patients (79%) received cisplatin and gemcitabine on a 21-day cycle. A weighted average of 19.2 lymph nodes was obtained at cystectomy, and 29.7% of patients were found to have pN1 disease. Pathological down staging to pT0 and less than pT2 occurred in 42 (25.6%) and 67 (46.5%) patients, respectively. Conclusions Neoadjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine yield appreciable pathological response rates in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. Since pathological response has been implicated as a potential surrogate for survival in muscle invasive bladder cancer, these data suggest that neoadjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine may warrant further prospective assessment. PMID:23123547

  16. The Effect of Dexpanthenol on Ototoxicity Induced by Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Toplu, Yuksel; Sapmaz, Emrah; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Kelles, Mehmet; Kalcioglu, M. Tayyar; Tanbek, Kevser; Kizilay, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was aimed to investigate the protective effects of dexpanthenol (Dxp) on against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. Methods To examine this effect, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) measurements and serum levels of oxidative and antioxidant status (including malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, total oxidant status, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index) were evaluated. Thirty-two adult female Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 4 equal groups; control (K), cisplatin (C), cisplatin plus Dxp (CD), and Dxp (D). In all groups DPOAEs measurements, between 996 and 10,078 Hz as DPOAEs and input/output functions, were performed on days 0, 1th, 5th, and 12th. Prior to death, the last DPOAEs measurements and blood samples were taken. Results In the C group, statistically significant differences were detected at all frequencies between 0 and 5 days and 0 and 12 days measurements (P<0.05). Serum level of oxidant and antioxidant status were detected statistically significantly changed in this group versus K group (P<0.05). Contrary to the C group, in the CD group hearing ability was seen largely preserved at many frequencies and serum levels of all biochemical parameters were shifted toward normal values, similar to the K group. No significant differences were detected in the either D or K group’s measurements. Conclusion According to these results, Dxp may prevent cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:26976021

  17. Influence of Oct1/Oct2-Deficiency on Cisplatin-Induced Changes in Urinary N-Acetyl-β-D-Glucosaminidase

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Ryan M.; Kosloske, Ashley M.; Lancaster, Cynthia S.; Filipski, Kelly K.; Hu, Chaoxin; Zolk, Oliver; Mathijssen, Ron H.; Sparreboom, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Organic cation transporters have previously been implicated in cisplatin nephrotoxicity. In this study, we found that renal tubular secretion of cisplatin is abolished in mice lacking the Oct1 and Oct2 transporters [Oct1/2(−/−) mice], and these mice are protected from experiencing severe cisplatin-induced renal damage. Compared to wildtype mice, Oct1/2(−/−) mice also experienced a significantly decreased change in urinary activity of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) following cisplatin administration (~4-fold, P=0.0016). A cutoff for cumulative urinary NAG activity of >0.4 AU was associated with a 21-fold increased odds for severe nephrotoxicity (P=0.0017), which in turn was linked with overall survival [hazard ratio (95%CI), 8.1 (2.1–31), P=0.0078]. Next, we screened 16 agents at varying concentrations for inhibitory potential against the human homolog transporter, OCT2, using transfected 293Flp-In cells. We focused further on the possible utility of cimetidine as an OCT2 inhibitor because of its strong potency (>95% inhibition), and because this agent is not routinely co-administered with cisplatin. In mice, we found that cimetidine inhibited cisplatin-induced urinary NAG activity changes to a degree significantly different from vehicle-control treated mice (P=0.016), but similar to that seen in Oct1/2(−/−) mice (P=0.91). Interestingly, cimetidine did not affect the uptake of cisplatin into SKOV-3 cells, the NCI60 cell line with the highest OCT2 expression. Collectively, this study suggests that OCT2 inhibitors can completely inhibit transporter-mediated uptake of cisplatin in renal proximal tubular cells, and subsequently ameliorate cisplatin nephrotoxicity without affecting the accumulation in tumor cells. PMID:20601443

  18. Structure Determination of Cisplatin-Amino Acid Analogues by Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Action Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chenchen; Bao, Xun; Zhu, Yanlong; Strobehn, Stephen; Kimutai, Bett; Nei, Y.-W.; Chow, C. S.; Rodgers, M. T.; Gao, Juehan; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    To gain a better understanding of the binding mechanism and assist in the optimization of relevant drug and chemical probe design, both experimental and theoretical studies were performed on a series of amino acid-linked cisplatin derivatives, including glycine-, lysine-, and ornithine-linked cisplatin, Gplatin, Kplatin, and Oplatin, respectively. Cisplatin, the first FDA-approved platinum-based anticancer drug, has been widely used in cancer chemotherapy. Its pharmacological mechanism has been identified as its ability to coordinate to genomic DNA, and guanine is its major target. In previous reports, cisplatin was successfully utilized as a chemical probe to detect solvent accessible sites in ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Among the amino-acid-linked cisplatin derivatives, Oplatin exhibits preference for adenine over guanine. The mechanism behind its different selectivity compared to cisplatin may relate to its potential of forming a hydrogen bond between the carboxylate group in Pt (II) complex and the 6-amino moiety of adenosine stabilizes A-Oplatin products. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis also indicates that different coordination sites of Oplatin on adenosine affect glycosidic bond stability. Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments were performed on all three amino acid-linked cisplatin to characterize their structures. An extensive theoretical study has been performed on Gplatin to guide the selection of the most effective theory and basis set based on its geometric information. The results for Gplatin provide the foundation for characterization of the more complex amino acid-linked cisplatin derivatives, Oplatin and Kplatin. Structural and energetic information elucidated for these compounds, particularly Oplatin reveal the reason for its alternative selectivity compared to cisplatin.

  19. Ondansetron Can Enhance Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity via Inhibition of Multiple Toxin and Extrusion Proteins (MATEs)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Guo, Dong; Dong, Zhongqi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Lei K.; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Polli, James E.; Shu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The nephrotoxicity limits the clinical application of cisplatin. Human organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) work in concert in the elimination of cationic drugs such as cisplatin from the kidney. We hypothesized that co-administration of ondansetron would have an effect on cisplatin nephrotoxicity by altering the function of cisplatin transporters. The inhibitory potencies of ondansetron on metformin accumulation mediated by OCT2 and MATEs were determined in the stable HEK-293 cells expressing these transporters. The effects of ondansetron on drug disposition in vivo were examined by conducting the pharmacokinetics of metformin, a classical substrate for OCTs and MATEs, in wild-type and Mate1−/− mice. The nephrotoxicity was assessed in the wild-type and Mate1−/− mice received cisplatin with and without ondansetron. Both MATEs, including human MATE1, human MATE2-K, and mouse Mate1, and OCT2 (human and mouse) were subject to ondansetron inhibition, with much greater potencies by ondansetron on MATEs. Ondansetron significantly increased tissue accumulation and pharmacokinetic exposure of metformin in wild-type but not in Mate1−/− mice. Moreover, ondansetron treatment significantly enhanced renal accumulation of cisplatin and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity which were indicated by increased levels of biochemical and molecular biomarkers and more severe pathohistological changes in mice. Similar increases in nephrotoxicity were caused by genetic deficiency of MATE function in mice. Therefore, the potent inhibition of MATEs by ondansetron enhances the nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin treatment in mice. Potential nephrotoxic effects of combining the chemotherapeutic cisplatin and the antiemetic 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron, should be investigated in patients. PMID:24001450

  20. Ondansetron can enhance cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via inhibition of multiple toxin and extrusion proteins (MATEs).

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Guo, Dong; Dong, Zhongqi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Polli, James E; Shu, Yan

    2013-11-15

    The nephrotoxicity limits the clinical application of cisplatin. Human organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) work in concert in the elimination of cationic drugs such as cisplatin from the kidney. We hypothesized that co-administration of ondansetron would have an effect on cisplatin nephrotoxicity by altering the function of cisplatin transporters. The inhibitory potencies of ondansetron on metformin accumulation mediated by OCT2 and MATEs were determined in the stable HEK-293 cells expressing these transporters. The effects of ondansetron on drug disposition in vivo were examined by conducting the pharmacokinetics of metformin, a classical substrate for OCTs and MATEs, in wild-type and Mate1-/- mice. The nephrotoxicity was assessed in the wild-type and Mate1-/- mice received cisplatin with and without ondansetron. Both MATEs, including human MATE1, human MATE2-K, and mouse Mate1, and OCT2 (human and mouse) were subject to ondansetron inhibition, with much greater potencies by ondansetron on MATEs. Ondansetron significantly increased tissue accumulation and pharmacokinetic exposure of metformin in wild-type but not in Mate1-/- mice. Moreover, ondansetron treatment significantly enhanced renal accumulation of cisplatin and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity which were indicated by increased levels of biochemical and molecular biomarkers and more severe pathohistological changes in mice. Similar increases in nephrotoxicity were caused by genetic deficiency of MATE function in mice. Therefore, the potent inhibition of MATEs by ondansetron enhances the nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin treatment in mice. Potential nephrotoxic effects of combining the chemotherapeutic cisplatin and the antiemetic 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron, should be investigated in patients. PMID:24001450

  1. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu; Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  2. Downregulation of miR-363 increases drug resistance in cisplatin-treated HepG2 by dysregulating Mcl-1.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yangyang; Zhai, Denggao; Wu, Nan; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    Systemic therapy with cytotoxic agents provides marginal benefit in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment especially for patients with advanced HCC. Cisplatin is one of the most active cytotoxic agents for HCC treatment. However, acquisition of cisplatin resistance is common, and one important underlying mechanism of such resistance is apoptosis-resistance. In this study, we found that miR-363 levels were significantly decreased in HCC patients treated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. MiR-363 levels were also lower in cisplatin-resistant HepG2 (HepG2-R) cells than in HepG2 cells. Exogenous miR-363 significantly overcame cisplatin resistance in HepG2-R cells, whereas miR-363 knockdown increased the cell viability during cisplatin treatment. We further demonstrated that miR-363 directly targeted to Mcl-1 3'-UTR (3'-Untranslated Regions). Downregulation of miR-363 resulted in upregulation of Mcl-1 which is a key member of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family and increased drug resistance. We finally demonstrated that miR-363 decreased cisplatin resistance of HCC cell, partly by targeting Mcl-1. These data suggest that the combination of miR-363 and cisplatin may represent a novel approach in treatment for HCC, thus offering a new target for chemotherapy of HCC. PMID:26143754

  3. Prospective randomized study comparing concomitant chemoradiotherapy using weekly cisplatin & paclitaxel versus weekly cisplatin in locally advanced carcinoma cervix

    PubMed Central

    Seam, Rajeev; Gupta, Manoj; Gupta, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the benefit with the addition of paclitaxel to cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy (C-CRT) for the treatment of locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix in terms of local control, disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Methods From 1/7/2011 to 31/5/2012, 81 women (median age of 50 years) with newly diagnosed, histopathologically proven carcinoma cervix with FIGO stages IIA to IIIB were randomized to two arms—cisplatin 40 mg/m2/week for 5 weeks was given in single agent cisplatin (control arm), while cisplatin 30 mg/m2/week and paclitaxel 50 mg/m2/week for 5 weeks were given in cisplatin and paclitaxel (study arm). External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was delivered to a total dose of 50 Gray (Gy) in 25 fractions (#) followed by intracavitary (I/C) brachytherapy or supplement EBRT at 20 Gy/10# with 2 cycles of respective chemotherapy. This prospective trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01593306). Results Patients (n=81) had a maximum follow up of 36 months with a median follow up of 29 months. At first follow up study arm showed complete response in 84% vs. 75.6% in control arm (P=0.4095). An increase in toxicities was observed in the study arm in comparison to the control arm in terms of haematological grade II (35% vs. 12.2%), gastrointestinal (GI) grade III (20% vs. 7.4%) and GI grade IV (12.5% vs. 2.4%) toxicities. At median follow-up, the study arm demonstrated enhanced outcomes over the control arm in terms of DFS (79.5% vs. 64.3%; P=0.07) and OS (87.2% vs. 78.6%; P=0.27). Conclusions Despite the expected increase in manageable toxicities, these early results reveal promise with the inclusion of paclitaxel into the standard cisplatin based chemoradiation regime. Larger multi-institutional studies are justified to confirm a potential for the enhancement of response rates and survival. PMID:26904570

  4. Nanotechnology in oncology: Characterization and in vitro release kinetics of cisplatin-loaded albumin nanoparticles: Implications in anticancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saikat; Jagan, Lavanya; Isiah, Rajesh; Rajesh, B.; Backianathan, Selvamani; Subhashini, J.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Nanotechnology is an empowering technology that holds promise in cancer therapeutics by increasing the ratio of tumor control probability to normal tissue complication probability. It can increase the bioavailability of the drug at the target site, reduce the frequency of administration and reach otherwise lesser-accessible sites. The present study shows the feasibility of the cisplatin-loaded albumin nanoparticle as a sustained delivery system. Aims: Cisplatin is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of malignant disorders. Conventional cisplatin formulation given as intravenous infusion has low bioavailability to the target organ in addition to significant side-effects, like ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity. The aim of this study was to develop a protein-based nanoparticulate system for sustained release of cisplatin. Materials and Methods: Nanoparticles were prepared by the coacervaton method of microcapsulation and chemical cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. Particle size was characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Results and Conclusions: Using the coacervation method, nanoparticles of less than 70 nm diameter were produced. Drug encapsulation measured by ultraviolet spectroscopy varied from 30% to 80% for different ratios of cisplatin and protein. In vitro release kinetics shows that the nanoparticle-based formulation has biphasic release kinetics and is capable of sustained release compared with the free drug (80% release in 45 h). The study proves the feasibility of the albumin-based cisplatin nanoparticle formulation as a sustained release vehicle of cisplatin. PMID:21844995

  5. Calcium efflux from the endoplasmic reticulum regulates cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, LUYAN; WEN, NAIYAN; XIA, MEIHUI; ZHANG, YU; LIU, WEIMIN; XU, YE; SUN, LIANKUN

    2016-01-01

    The function of calcium efflux from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in cisplatin-induced apoptosis is not fully understood in cancer cells. The present study used western blot analysis, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay to investigate calcium signaling in human cervical cancer cells exposed to cisplatin. In the present study, treatment with cisplatin increased free Ca2+ levels in the cytoplasm and mitochondria of human cervical cancer HeLa cells, which further triggers the mitochondria-mediated and ER stress-associated apoptosis pathways. Notably, blocking calcium signaling using the calcium chelating agent bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid acetoxymethyl ester inhibited cisplatin-induced apoptosis via downregulation of the calcium-dependent proteases, the calpains, and innate apoptosis proteins, such as caspsae-3, caspase-4 and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). In addition, use of the inositol triphosphate receptor inhibitor, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, to inhibit calcium efflux from the ER resulted in similar effects. This data indicated that calcium efflux from the ER plays a significant role in cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells, which provides further mechanistic insights into the tumor cell-killing effect of cisplatin and potential therapeutic strategies to improve cisplatin chemotherapy. PMID:27073489

  6. Inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 enhances the chemosensitivity of laryngeal squamous cell cancer Hep-2 cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xin; Song, Dong-mei; Niu, Ying-hao; Wang, Bao-shan

    2016-04-01

    It has been previously reported that cisplatin is a well-known anticancer drug being used against a wide range of malignancies including head and neck, ovarian and non-small cell lung carcinoma, and demonstrated its anticancer activity by reacting with DNA or changing cell structure, immune response, reactive oxygen species level (ROS). In this research we proved that cisplatin induced cell injuries and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in laryngeal squamous cell cancer Hep-2 cells through ROS generation. The induction of HO-1 clearly protected Hep-2 cells from cisplatin-induced cell death and ROS reaction, and the inhibitor of HO-1 enhanced the cell death and ROS generation induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, the HO-1 expression induced by cisplatin was strongly inhibited by the knockdown of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2), and the oxidative damages induced by cisplatin were significantly enhanced. Therefore, it may be concluded that the inhibition of HO-1 or the knockdown of Nrf-2 significantly enhanced cisplatin's anticancer effects on Hep-2 cells. In clinic, with the overexpression of HO-1 in laryngeal squamous cancer tissues, the combination of cisplatin with the inhibitor of HO-1 or Nrf-2 siRNA may act as a new method to the treatment of laryngeal squamous cancer. PMID:26801320

  7. Pharmacogenetics of resistance to cisplatin and other anti-cancer drugs and the role of sphingolipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Stephen; Swatson, William S.; Alexander, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dictyostelium discoideum has proven to be a useful lead genetic system for identifying novel genes and pathways responsible for the regulation of sensitivity to the widely used anti-cancer drug cisplatin. Resistance to cisplatin is a major factor limiting the efficacy of the drug in treating many types of cancer. Studies using unbiased insertional mutagenesis in D. discoideum have identified the pathway of sphingolipid metabolism as a key regulator in controlling sensitivity to cisplatin. Using the genetic tools including directed homologous recombination and ectopic gene expression available with D. discoideum has shown how pharmacological modulation of this pathway can increase sensitivity to cisplatin, and these results have been extensively translated to, and validated in, human cells. Strategies, experimental conditions and methods are presented to enable further study of resistance to cisplatin as well as other important drugs. PMID:23494308

  8. Anti-tumour activity of two novel compounds in cisplatin-resistant testicular germ cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nitzsche, B; Gloesenkamp, C; Schrader, M; Hoffmann, B; Zengerling, F; Balabanov, S; Honecker, F; Höpfner, M

    2012-01-01

    growth of cisplatin-resistant TGCT cells and suppresses tumour angiogenesis. Thus, HP-14 may be an interesting new agent that should be further explored for TGCT treatment, especially in TGCTs that are resistant to cisplatin. PMID:23169338

  9. Cisplatin Resistance: A Cellular Self-Defense Mechanism Resulting from Multiple Epigenetic and Genetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ding-Wu; Pouliot, Lynn M.; Hall, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective broad-spectrum anticancer drugs. Its effectiveness seems to be due to the unique properties of cisplatin, which enters cells via multiple pathways and forms multiple different DNA-platinum adducts while initiating a cellular self-defense system by activating or silencing a variety of different genes, resulting in dramatic epigenetic and/or genetic alternations. As a result, the development of cisplatin resistance in human cancer cells in vivo and in vitro by necessity stems from bewilderingly complex genetic and epigenetic changes in gene expression and alterations in protein localization. Extensive published evidence has demonstrated that pleiotropic alterations are frequently detected during development of resistance to this toxic metal compound. Changes occur in almost every mechanism supporting cell survival, including cell growth-promoting pathways, apoptosis, developmental pathways, DNA damage repair, and endocytosis. In general, dozens of genes are affected in cisplatin-resistant cells, including pathways involved in copper metabolism as well as transcription pathways that alter the cytoskeleton, change cell surface presentation of proteins, and regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Decreased accumulation is one of the most common features resulting in cisplatin resistance. This seems to be a consequence of numerous epigenetic and genetic changes leading to the loss of cell-surface binding sites and/or transporters for cisplatin, and decreased fluid phase endocytosis. PMID:22659329

  10. Curcumin prevents cisplatin-induced decrease in the tight and adherens junctions: relation to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Joyce; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Reyes, José Luis; Loredo, María L; Barrera-Oviedo, Diana; Pinzón, Enrique; Rodríguez-Rangel, Daniela Saraí; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is a polyphenol and cisplatin is an antineoplastic agent that induces nephrotoxicity associated with oxidative stress, apoptosis, fibrosis and decrease in renal tight junction (TJ) proteins. The potential effect of curcumin against alterations in TJ structure and function has not been evaluated in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The present study explored whether curcumin is able to prevent the cisplatin-induced fibrosis and decreased expression of the TJ and adherens junction (AJ) proteins occludin, claudin-2 and E-cadherin in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Curcumin (200 mg kg(-1)) was administered in three doses, and rats were sacrificed 72 h after cisplatin administration. Curcumin was able to scavenge, in a concentration-dependent way, superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite anion, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide. Cisplatin-induced renal damage was associated with alterations in plasma creatinine, expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and of kidney injury molecule-1, histological damage, increase in apoptosis, fibrosis (evaluated by transforming growth factor β1, collagen I and IV and α-smooth muscle actin expressions), increase in oxidative/nitrosative stress (evaluated by Hsp70/72 expression, protein tyrosine nitration, superoxide anion production in isolated glomeruli and proximal tubules, and protein levels of NADPH oxidase subunits p47(phox) and gp91(phox), protein kinase C β2, and Nrf2) as well as by decreased expression of occludin, claudin-2, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Curcumin treatment prevented all the above-described alterations. The protective effect of curcumin against cisplatin-induced fibrosis and decreased proteins of the TJ and AJ was associated with the prevention of glomerular and proximal tubular superoxide anion production induced by NADPH oxidase activity. PMID:26467482

  11. FTIR Biospectroscopy Investigation on Cisplatin Cytotoxicity in Three Pairs of Sensitive and Resistant Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Ensieh; Kobarfard, Farzad; H Shirazi, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) has extensively been used for biological applications. Cisplatin is one the most useful antineoplastic chemotherapy drugs for a variety of different human cancers. One of the clinical problems in its application, which would consequently affect the therapeutic outcome of its application, is the occurrence of resistance to this agent. In this project three different pairs of sensitive and resistant cell lines of human ovarian A2780 and its resistant pair of A2780-CP, human ovarian OV2008 and its resistant pair of C13, and finally human lung carcinoma of HTB56 and its resistant pair of HTB56-CP were grown in the laboratory under the standard procedure. Saline was exposed to control cells, whereas 1, 5 and 10 µg/mL of cisplatin was exposed to experimental cells, for 1 h. Cells were then collected and lyophilized from which spectra were taken. According to our results, we could not trigger a well-recognized cells biomolecular band at 1015 cm(-1), being modified after exposure to cisplatin in all cell lines. On the other hand, there was a clear dose-dependent increase in protein β-sheet structure related peaks shift in resistant cell lines after exposure to cisplatin. This would probably indicate an easier protein interaction site for cisplatin in the resistant cell lines, which would probably inhibit cisplatin from binding to DNA, as the cytotoxic target. As a conclusion, FTIR biospectroscopy has proven its potency to identify the interactions, as well as the false engagement cellular sites for cisplatin in sensitive and resistant cell lines. PMID:27610161

  12. FTIR Biospectroscopy Investigation on Cisplatin Cytotoxicity in Three Pairs of Sensitive and Resistant Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Ensieh; Kobarfard, Farzad; H. Shirazi, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) has extensively been used for biological applications. Cisplatin is one the most useful antineoplastic chemotherapy drugs for a variety of different human cancers. One of the clinical problems in its application, which would consequently affect the therapeutic outcome of its application, is the occurrence of resistance to this agent. In this project three different pairs of sensitive and resistant cell lines of human ovarian A2780 and its resistant pair of A2780-CP, human ovarian OV2008 and its resistant pair of C13, and finally human lung carcinoma of HTB56 and its resistant pair of HTB56-CP were grown in the laboratory under the standard procedure. Saline was exposed to control cells, whereas 1, 5 and 10 µg/mL of cisplatin was exposed to experimental cells, for 1 h. Cells were then collected and lyophilized from which spectra were taken. According to our results, we could not trigger a well-recognized cells biomolecular band at 1015 cm-1, being modified after exposure to cisplatin in all cell lines. On the other hand, there was a clear dose-dependent increase in protein β-sheet structure related peaks shift in resistant cell lines after exposure to cisplatin. This would probably indicate an easier protein interaction site for cisplatin in the resistant cell lines, which would probably inhibit cisplatin from binding to DNA, as the cytotoxic target. As a conclusion, FTIR biospectroscopy has proven its potency to identify the interactions, as well as the false engagement cellular sites for cisplatin in sensitive and resistant cell lines. PMID:27610161

  13. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sagara, Atsunobu; Arakawa, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Jo, Ara; Sato, Ken; Chiba, Yoshihiko; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Matoba, Motohiro; Narita, Minoru

    2014-07-15

    Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms of “muscle fatigue” induced by anti-cancer drugs are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the muscle-atrophic effect of cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 4 consecutive days. On Day 5, hindlimb and quadriceps muscles were isolated from mice. The loss of body weight and food intake under the administration of cisplatin was the same as those in a dietary restriction (DR) group. Under the present conditions, the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased not only the muscle mass of the hindlimb and quadriceps but also the myofiber diameter, compared to those in the DR group. The mRNA expression levels of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) were significantly and further increased by cisplatin treated group, compared to DR. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of myostatin and p21 were significantly upregulated by the administration of cisplatin, compared to DR. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, which leads to the blockade of the upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx, was significantly and dramatically decreased by cisplatin. These findings suggest that the administration of cisplatin increases atrophic gene expression, and may lead to an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation pathways, which would lead to muscle atrophy. This phenomenon could, at least in part, explain the mechanism of cisplatin-induced muscle fatigue. - Highlights: • Cisplatin decreased mass and myofiber diameter in quadriceps muscle. • The mRNA of MAFbx, MuRF1 and FOXO3 were increased by the cisplatin. • The mRNA of myostatin and p21 were upregulated by cisplatin. • The phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a was decreased by cisplatin.

  14. Toward overcoming cisplatin resistance via sterically hindered platinum(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyan; Gou, Shaohua; Wang, Zhimei; Chen, Feihong; Fang, Lei

    2016-05-23

    A number of platinum(II) complexes with steric hindrance derived from (1R,2R)-N(1)-benzylcyclohexane-1,2-diamine derivatives were designed and prepared. Biological assay indicated that most complexes showed antitumor activity against the tested cancer cell lines, especially those with chloride anions as leaving groups had compatible or superior activity to cisplatin and oxaliplatin. Complex 2a, as the most potent agent, is also sensitive to cisplatin resistant SGC7901/CDDP cancer cell line, which has been subsequently studied by cellular uptake, flow cytometry, gel electrophoresis and western blot assays. The steric hindrance resulting from a pending 2-fluorobenzyl moiety of the ligand might be the key factor for its ability to overcome cisplatin resistant cancer cells. PMID:26974381

  15. Synthesis and studies of anticancer properties of lupane-type triterpenoid derivatives containing a cisplatin fragment.

    PubMed

    Emmerich, Daniel; Vanchanagiri, Kranthi; Baratto, Leopoldo C; Schmidt, Harry; Paschke, Reinhard

    2014-03-21

    Both betulinic acid 1 and cisplatin are promising antitumor agents, which induce apoptotic cell death of cancer cells. In the present investigation a new series of betulinic acid-cisplatin conjugates were synthesized and cytotoxicity and selectivity were assessed against five different tumor cell lines. The aim was to combine two structural units, both related with apoptosis induction. The derivatives exerted a dose-dependent antiproliferative action at micromolar concentrations and the effect of these structural variations on anticancer activity was studied and discussed. Several compounds revealed significant antitumor activity, as the most active substance 3-O-acetylbetulinic (2-(2-aminoethyl)aminoethyl)amide (IC50=1.30-2.24 μM). Interestingly, Betulinic acid-cisplatin conjugates were less cytotoxic than the precursors. PMID:24561674

  16. Revisiting DNA damage repair, p53-mediated apoptosis and cisplatin sensitivity in germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Francesca; Feldman, Darren R; Barchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), ie, seminomas and nonseminomas, account for 1% to 3% of all neoplasms in men. They are the most common cancer in young white males and are unique in their responsiveness to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. For this reason, TGCTs are considered a model for curative disease. However, up to now, the molecular mechanisms behind this exceptional responsiveness to DNA-damaging agents have remained unclear. A hypersensitive apoptotic response, as well as a reduction in the proficiency to repair cisplatin-induced DNA damage might account for this behavior. In this review, building on recent findings of p53-induced apoptosis and DNA-repair mechanisms in TGCTs, we will discuss the molecular bases that drive tumor sensitivity to cisplatin, emphasizing the new therapeutic approaches proposed to eventually constrain tumor recurrence, and target TGCTs which are unresponsive to standard therapies. PMID:23784838

  17. Management of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients on Multiday Cisplatin Based Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Praveen; Einhorn, Lawrence; Albany, Costantine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of germ cell tumors. A common side effect of multiday cisplatin chemotherapy is severe nausea and vomiting. Considerable progress has been made in the control of these side effects since the introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy in the 1970s. Germ cell tumor which is a model for a curable neoplasm has also turned into an excellent testing ground to develop effective strategies to prevent chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in multiday cisplatin based regimens. The use of combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)3 receptor antagonist, a neurokinin-1 (NK1) antagonist, and dexamethasone has greatly improved our ability to prevent and control acute and delayed CINV. Mechanism and pattern of CINV with multiday chemotherapy may differ from those in single day chemotherapy and therefore efficacy of antiemetic drugs as observed in single day chemotherapy may not be applicable. There are only few randomized clinical trials with special emphasis on multiday chemotherapy. Further studies are essential to determine the efficacy, optimal dose, and duration of the newer agents and combinations in multiday cisplatin based chemotherapy. PMID:26425563

  18. LHRH-targeted nanogels as delivery system for cisplatin to ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nukolova, Natalia V.; Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Zhao, Yi; Chekhonin, Vladimir P.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery using multifunctional polymeric nanocarriers is a modern approach for cancer therapy. Our purpose was to prepare targeted nanogels for selective delivery of chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor overexpressing tumor in vivo. Building blocks of such delivery systems consisted of innovative soft block copolymer nanogels with ionic cores serving as a reservoir for cisplatin (loading 35%) and a synthetic analog of LHRH conjugated to the nanogels via poly(ethylene glycol) spacer. Covalent attachment of (D-Lys6)-LHRH to nanogels was shown to be possible without loss in either the ligand binding affinity or the nanogel drug incorporation ability. LHRH-nanogel accumulation was specific to the LHRH-receptor positive A2780 ovarian cancer cells and not towards LHRH-receptor negative SKOV-3 cells. The LHRH-nanogel cisplatin formulation was more effective and less toxic than equimolar doses of free cisplatin or untargeted nanogels in the treatment of receptor-positive ovarian cancer xenografts in mice. Collectively, the study indicates that LHRH mediated nanogel-cisplatin delivery is a promising formulation strategy for therapy of tumors that express the LHRH receptor. PMID:23957812

  19. Pemetrexed/cisplatin as first-line chemotherapy for advanced lung cancer with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    He, Guangzhao; Xiao, Xiaoguang; Zou, Man; Zhang, Chengliang; Xia, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Brain metastases (BMs) are a common and serious complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), surgery, and molecular targeted therapy are usually used to treat NSCLC with BM. Chemotherapeutic options for BM are limited by tumor resistance, ineffective agents, and the blood–brain barrier. Pemetrexed/cisplatin is the preferred chemotherapy in nonsquamous NSCLC, but the efficacy of this treatment for nonsquamous NSCLC with BM is uncertain. Methods: We present a case of nonsquamous NSCLC with asymptomatic BM presenting with irritating cough and right shoulder back pain (unknown sensitizing epidermal growth factor receptor mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase). Results: He benefited from administration of first-line chemotherapy of pemetrexed/cisplatin. Partial remission was achieved in the primary lesion of the lungs and BM lesion. He was further given 3 cycles of pemetrexed monotherapy and WBRT. Complete remission was further achieved in BM lesion. Conclusion: The findings of clinical trials and theoretical studies about the current pemetrexed/cisplatin in the treatment of nonsquamous NSCLC with BM are also summarized to provide a reference for the application of pemetrexed/cisplatin in nonsquamous NSCLC with BM. Whether or not pemetrexed/cisplatin is definitely effective in nonsquamous NSCLC with BM must be proven by subsequent phase III clinical trials. PMID:27512852

  20. In situ analysis of cisplatin binding to DNA: the effects of physiological ionic conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Sung; Kim, Sook Ho; Lee, Nam-Kyung; Lee, Kyoung J; Hong, Seok-Cheol

    2012-03-01

    Platinum-based anti-cancer drugs form a major family of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Cisplatin, the first member of the family, remains a potent anti-cancer drug and exhibits its clinical effect by inducing local DNA kinks and subsequently interfering with DNA metabolism. Although its mechanism is reasonably well understood, effects of intracellular ions on cisplatin activity are left to be elucidated because cisplatin binding to DNA, thus its drug efficacy, is modified by various ions. One such issue is the effect of carbonate ions: cisplatin binding to DNA is suppressed under physiological carbonate conditions. Here, we examined the role of common cellular ions (carbonate and chloride) by measuring cisplatin binding in relevant physiological buffers via a DNA micromanipulation technique. Using two orthogonal single-molecule methods, we succeeded in detecting hidden monofunctional adducts (kink-free, presumably clinically inactive form) and clearly showed that the major effect of carbonates was to form such adducts and to prevent them from converting to bifunctional adducts (kinked, clinically active). The chloride-rich environment also led to the formation of monofunctional adducts. Our approach is widely applicable to the study of the transient behaviours of various drugs and proteins that bind to DNA in different modes depending on various physical and chemical factors such as tension, torsion, ligands, and ions. PMID:22286168

  1. Synergistic effect of olaparib with combination of cisplatin on PTEN-deficient lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Minami, Daisuke; Takigawa, Nagio; Takeda, Hiromasa; Takata, Minoru; Ochi, Nobuaki; Ichihara, Eiki; Hisamoto, Akiko; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2013-02-01

    PARP enzyme plays a key role in the cellular machinery responsible for DNA damage repair. PTEN is a tumor-suppressor gene deactivating PI3K downstream of EGFR signaling. We hypothesize that PTEN-deficient lung cancer cells suppressed DNA damage signaling and that the absence of PTEN can sensitize these cells to a concurrent treatment of a DNA-damaging agent (cisplatin) and a PARP inhibitor (olaparib). To investigate the effect of olaparib and cisplatin on PTEN-deficient lung tumors, two EGFR-mutant (deletion in exon19) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, PC-9 (PTEN wild-type) and H1650 (PTEN loss), were used. We transfected intact PTEN gene into H1650 cells (H1650(PTEN+)) and knocked down PTEN expression in the PC-9 cells (PC-9(PTEN-)) using short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Combination of cisplatin with olaparib showed a synergistic effect in vitro according to the combination index in H1650 cells. Restoration of PTEN in the H1650 cells decreased sensitivity to the combination. Ablation of PTEN in PC-9 cells increased sensitivity to olaparib and cisplatin. We also examined the effectiveness of cisplatin and olaparib in a xenograft model using H1650 and PC-9(PTEN-) cells. The combination of cisplatin with olaparib was more effective than each agent individually. This effect was not observed in a xenograft model using H1650(PTEN+) and PC-9 cells. Mechanistic investigations revealed that PTEN deficiency caused reductions in nuclear RAD51 and RPA focus formation and phosphorylated Chk1 and Mre11. Thus, genetic inactivation of PTEN led to the suppression of DNA repair. PMID:23239809

  2. Participation of autophagy in the cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells by cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Shen, Meng; Duan, Wei-Ming; Wu, Meng-Yao; Wang, Wen-Jie; Liu, Lu; Xu, Meng-Dan; Zhu, Jie; Li, Dao-Ming; Gui, Qi; Lian, Lian; Gong, Fei-Ran; Chen, Kai; Li, Wei; Tao, Min

    2015-07-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting women worldwide. Conventional chemotherapy is still one of the major approaches to the treatment of breast cancer. Autophagy, also termed as type II programmed cell death (PCD), exhibits either a protumorigenic or antitumorigenic function. In the present study, we investigated whether autophagy could be involved in the effect of chemotherapy against breast cancer. Epirubicin, docetaxel, methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin were applied in the present investigation. All of these chemotherapeutics presented cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells. DsRed-LC3 reporter assay revealed that only docetaxel and cisplatin induced autophagy. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) strengthened the cytotoxicity of docetaxel, yet impaired the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, suggesting that docetaxel stimulates protumorigenic autophagy, while cisplatin-induced autophagy could be antitumorigenic. Real-time PCR revealed that cisplatin upregulated multiple autophagy-related genes, including AMBRA1, ATG3, ATG4C, ATG4D, ATG5, ATG7, ATG13, ATG14, ATG16L2, Beclin1, DRAM1, GABARAP, GABARAPL1, GABARAPL2, HDAC6, IRGM, MAP1LC3B and ULK1, indicating that cisplatin induced autophagy through a multiple mechanism involved manner. PMID:26005215

  3. A H2S Donor GYY4137 Exacerbates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mi; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Aihua; Yang, Tianxin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is highly involved in inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis and contributes to the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. However, the role of H2S in cisplatin nephrotoxicity is still debatable. Here we investigated the effect of GYY4137, a novel slow-releasing H2S donor, on cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with GYY4137 for 72 h prior to cisplatin injection. After cisplatin treatment for 72 h, mice developed obvious renal dysfunction and kidney injury as evidenced by elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and histological damage. Consistently, these mice also showed increased proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in circulation and/or kidney tissues. Meanwhile, circulating thiobarbituric aid-reactive substances (TBARS) and renal apoptotic indices including caspase-3, Bak, and Bax were all elevated. However, application of GYY4137 further aggravated renal dysfunction and kidney structural injury in line with promoted inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptotic response following cisplatin treatment. Taken together, our results suggested that GYY4137 exacerbated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice possibly through promoting inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptotic response. PMID:27340345

  4. Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity and Longitudinal Growth in Children With Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Triana, Clímaco Andres; Castelán-Martínez, Osvaldo D.; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Jiménez-Méndez, Ricardo; Medina, Aurora; Clark, Patricia; Rassekh, Rod; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Carleton, Bruce; Medeiros, Mara

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cisplatin, a major antineoplastic drug used in the treatment of solid tumors, is a known nephrotoxin. This retrospective cohort study evaluated the prevalence and severity of cisplatin nephrotoxicity in 54 children and its impact on height and weight. We recorded the weight, height, serum creatinine, and electrolytes in each cisplatin cycle and after 12 months of treatment. Nephrotoxicity was graded as follows: normal renal function (Grade 0); asymptomatic electrolyte disorders, including an increase in serum creatinine, up to 1.5 times baseline value (Grade 1); need for electrolyte supplementation <3 months and/or increase in serum creatinine 1.5 to 1.9 times from baseline (Grade 2); increase in serum creatinine 2 to 2.9 times from baseline or need for electrolyte supplementation for more than 3 months after treatment completion (Grade 3); and increase in serum creatinine ≥3 times from baseline or renal replacement therapy (Grade 4). Nephrotoxicity was observed in 41 subjects (75.9%). Grade 1 nephrotoxicity was observed in 18 patients (33.3%), Grade 2 in 5 patients (9.2%), and Grade 3 in 18 patients (33.3%). None had Grade 4 nephrotoxicity. Nephrotoxicity patients were younger and received higher cisplatin dose, they also had impairment in longitudinal growth manifested as statistically significant worsening on the height Z Score at 12 months after treatment. We used a multiple logistic regression model using the delta of height Z Score (baseline-12 months) as dependent variable in order to adjust for the main confounder variables such as: germ cell tumor, cisplatin total dose, serum magnesium levels at 12 months, gender, and nephrotoxicity grade. Patients with nephrotoxicity Grade 1 where at higher risk of not growing (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.07–24.3, P = 0.04). The cisplatin total dose had a significant negative relationship with magnesium levels at 12 months (Spearman r = −0.527, P = <0.001). PMID:26313789

  5. Combining disulfiram and poly(l-glutamic acid)-cisplatin conjugates for combating cisplatin resistance.

    PubMed

    Song, Wantong; Tang, Zhaohui; Shen, Na; Yu, Haiyang; Jia, Yanjie; Zhang, Dawei; Jiang, Jian; He, Chaoliang; Tian, Huayu; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-06-10

    A poly(l-glutamic acid) graft polyethylene glycol-cisplatin complex (PGA-CisPt) performs well in reducing the toxicity of free cisplatin and greatly enhances the accumulation and retention of cisplatin in solid tumors. However, there is a lack of effective treatment options for cisplatin-resistant tumors. A major reason for this is the dense PEG shell, which ensures that the PGA-CisPt maintains a long retention time in the blood that may result in it bypassing the tumor cells or failing to be endocytosed within the tumor microenvironment. Consequently, the cisplatin from PGA-CisPt is released to the extracellular space in the presence of cisplatin-resistant tumor cells and the resistant problem to free cisplatin still valid. Therefore, we devised a strategy to combat the resistance of cisplatin in the tumor microenvironment using nanoparticles-loaded disulfiram (NPs-DSF) as a modulator. In vitro, cisplatin, in combination with DSF, had a synergistic effect and decreased cell survival rate of cisplatin-resistant A549DDP cells. This effect was also observed when combining PGA-CisPt with NPs-DSF. Similarly, in Balb/C nude mice with A549DDP xenografts, NPs-DSF improved PGA-CisPt effectiveness in inhibiting tumor growth while maintaining low toxicity. Our data demonstrate that DSF reduces intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, inhibits NFκB activity, and modulates the expression of apoptosis-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax, thereby improves the effectiveness of cisplatin in resistant cell lines. Here, we provide a promising method for overcoming cisplatin resistance in tumors, while maintaining the in vivo benefits of the PGA-CisPt complex. PMID:26928530

  6. Metformin potentiates rapamycin and cisplatin in gastric cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yunshu; Jiao, Xiaodong; Huang, Suyun; Wang, Jiejun; Li, Zhaosheng; Xie, Keping

    2015-01-01

    Here we showed that pAMPKα and PTEN were down-regulated and p-mTOR, p-S6, p-4EBP1, MMP7, and DCN1 were up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissue samples as compared to that in the noncancerous tissues. Metformin inhibited tumor growth in mice. Also it enhanced cisplatin- or rapamycin-induced reduction of tumor growth as compared with treatment of either drug alone. In addition to activation of AMPK and suppression of the mTOR pathway, a series of increased and decreased genes expression were induced by metformin, including PTEN, MMP7, and FN1. We suggest that metformin could potentially be used for the treatment of gastric cancer especially in combination with cisplatin or rapamycin. PMID:25909163

  7. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action. PMID:24955838

  8. Screening of antimicrobial agents for in vitro radiation protection and mitigation capacity, including those used in supportive care regimens for bone marrow transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Epperly, Michael W; Franicola, Darcy; Shields, Donna; Rwigema, Jean-Claude; Stone, Brandon; Zhang, Xichen; McBride, William; Georges, George; Wipf, Peter; Greenberger, Joel S

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotic and antifungal agents used in supportive care regimens for bone marrow transplantation recipients contribute to a significant dose-modifying effect of otherwise lethal total body irradiation. To determine whether drugs used in supportive care and other commonly used antibiotics such as tetracycline function as radiation protectors or damage mitigators in vitro, 13 drugs were tested for radiation protection and radiation damage mitigation of 32D cl 3 hematopoietic progenitor cells in clonagenic survival curves in vitro. Antibiotic/Antifungal agents including cilastatin, amikacin, ceftazidine, vancomycin, tetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, methacycline, minocycline, meclocycline, oxytetracycline and rolitetracycline were added in 1, 10, or 100 micromolar concentrations to murine interleukin-3-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line 32D cl 3 cells either before or after irradiation of 0 to 8 Gy. Control irradiated 32D cl 3 cells showed radiosensitivity comparable to freshly explanted mouse marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells (D(0) 1.1+/-0.1 Gy, N 1.5+/-0.4). Positive control GS-nitroxide JP4-039 (known radiation mitigator) treated 32D cl 3 cells were radioresistant (D(0) 1.2+/-0.1, N 5.8+/-2.4 (p=0.009)). Of the 13 drugs tested, tetracycline was found to be a significant radiation mitigator (D(0) 0.9+/-0.1, N 13.9+/-0.4 (p=0.0027)). Thus, the radiation dose-modifying effect of some antibiotics, but not those currently used in the supportive care (antibiotic/antifungal regimens) for marrow transplant patients, may act as radiation damage mitigators for hematopoietic cells as well as decreasing the growth and inflammatory response to microbial pathogens. PMID:20133970

  9. Cisplatin in cancer therapy: molecular mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Shaloam; Tchounwou, Paul Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin, cisplatinum, or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II), is a well-known chemotherapeutic drug. It has been used for treatment of numerous human cancers including bladder, head and neck, lung, ovarian, and testicular cancers. It is effective against various types of cancers, including carcinomas, germ cell tumors, lymphomas, and sarcomas. Its mode of action has been linked to its ability to crosslink with the purine bases on the DNA; interfering with DNA repair mechanisms, causing DNA damage, and subsequently inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. However, because of drug resistance and numerous undesirable side effects such as severe kidney problems, allergic reactions, decrease immunity to infections, gastrointestinal disorders, hemorrhage, and hearing loss especially in younger patients, other platinum-containing anti-cancer drugs such as carboplatin, oxaliplatin and others, have also been used. Furthermore, combination therapies of cisplatin with other drugs have been highly considered to overcome drug-resistance and reduce toxicity. This comprehensive review highlights the physicochemical properties of cisplatin and related platinum-based drugs, and discusses its uses (either alone or in combination with other drugs) for the treatment of various human cancers. A special attention is given to its molecular mechanisms of action, and its undesirable side effects. PMID:25058905

  10. Co-treatment of wild‑type EGFR head and neck cancer cell lines with afatinib and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Brands, Roman C; Müller-Richter, Urs D A; De Donno, Francesco; Seher, Axel; Mutzbauer, Grit; Linz, Christian; Kübler, Alexander C; Hartmann, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains challenging. Non‑surgical approaches typically comprise radiotherapy and antineoplastic chemotherapy, of which platinum‑based agents are the most common. Similar to other malignancies, targeted therapies have an increasing role in the treatment of head and neck cancer. The overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a useful target for specific therapeutic strategies. Resistance to EGFR‑directed therapies, including cetuximab, is partly mediated by the activation of alternative receptors and pathways. Therefore, other members of the ErbB family, including human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2 and HER4, may have important therapeutic roles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of afatinib, an EGFR/HER2/HER4 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in combination with cisplatin in HNSCC cell lines. The cisplatin concentration used was set at cell line‑specific half maximal inhibitory concentration values. Since the vast majority of head and neck cancers do not exhibit any EGFR tyrosine kinase domain mutations, five human EGFR wild‑type HNSCC cell lines were used in the present study. For statistical analyses, non‑parametric Mann‑Whitney tests were conducted. The present study detected a concentration‑dependent efficacy of afatinib. In three out of the five cell lines (PCI‑9, PCI‑52 and PCI‑68), 0.625 µM afatinib in combination with cisplatin exerted significant antiproliferative effects. In the two other cell lines (PCI‑1 and PCI‑13), significant effects were observed following treatment with ≥1.25 µM afatinib. Notably, compared with the findings of previous studies, cell lines (PCI-9 and PCI-52) less vulnerable to erlotinib or gefitinib were more vulnerable to the afatinib/cisplatin combination, and vice versa. Differences in the treatment success of erlotinib/gefitinib (targeting only EGFR) and afatinib (targeting EGFR, HER2 and HER4

  11. Current state of evidence on 'off-label' therapeutic options for systemic lupus erythematosus, including biological immunosuppressive agents, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland--a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Burkhardt, H; Burmester, G R; Fischer-Betz, R; Fleck, M; Graninger, W; Hiepe, F; Jacobi, A M; Kötter, I; Lakomek, H J; Lorenz, H M; Manger, B; Schett, G; Schmidt, R E; Schneider, M; Schulze-Koops, H; Smolen, J S; Specker, C; Stoll, T; Strangfeld, A; Tony, H P; Villiger, P M; Voll, R; Witte, T; Dörner, T

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a severe and potentially life-threatening disease that often represents a therapeutic challenge because of its heterogeneous organ manifestations. Only glucocorticoids, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide and very recently belimumab have been approved for SLE therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Dependence on glucocorticoids and resistance to the approved therapeutic agents, as well as substantial toxicity, are frequent. Therefore, treatment considerations will include 'off-label' use of medication approved for other indications. In this consensus approach, an effort has been undertaken to delineate the limits of the current evidence on therapeutic options for SLE organ disease, and to agree on common practice. This has been based on the best available evidence obtained by a rigorous literature review and the authors' own experience with available drugs derived under very similar health care conditions. Preparation of this consensus document included an initial meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review with subsequent formulation of a consensus and determination of the evidence level followed by collecting the level of agreement from the panel members. In addition to overarching principles, the panel have focused on the treatment of major SLE organ manifestations (lupus nephritis, arthritis, lung disease, neuropsychiatric and haematological manifestations, antiphospholipid syndrome and serositis). This consensus report is intended to support clinicians involved in the care of patients with difficult courses of SLE not responding to standard therapies by providing up-to-date information on the best available evidence. PMID:22072024

  12. Is the addition of cisplatin to S-1 better than S-1 alone for patients with advanced gastroesophageal cancer?

    PubMed

    Ajani, Jaffer A

    2008-09-01

    The investigators of the recent phase III SPIRITS trial found that the addition of cisplatin to S-1 (a fourth generation oral fluoropyrimidine) provided a significant overall survival advantage (P = 0.04) over treatment with S-1 alone among previously untreated patients with advanced gastric cancer. In addition, the combination had an acceptable safety profile. This trial establishes a new first-line standard treatment for patients with advanced gastric cancer in Japan. Level 1 evidence for prolonged survival of patients with advanced gastroesophageal cancer has been established for docetaxel (V-325 trial) and cisplatin (SPIRITS trial) but not for S-1. Fluoropyrimidines (S-1 included) have been considered part of standard front-line therapy without the establishment of level 1 evidence for prolonging survival. The future lies in the rapid incorporation of biologic agents in combination with cytotoxics, with a continued focus on safety and convenience, and efforts to individualize therapy for each patient. Individualized therapy may be defined as the selection of optimum treatment for a specific patient on the basis of knowledge of the cancer's genetic and epigenetic alterations and the patient's genotype. PMID:18628737

  13. ATR CONTRIBUTES TO CELL CYCLE ARREST AND SURVIVAL AFTER CISPLATIN BUT NOT OXALIPLATIN1

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kriste A.; Lilly, Kia K.; Reynolds, Evelyn A.; Sullivan, William P.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Cliby, William A.

    2009-01-01

    The DNA cross-linking agents cisplatin and oxaliplatin are widely used in the treatment of human cancer. Lesions produced by these agents are widely known to activate the G1 and G2 cell cycle checkpoints. Less is known about the role of the intra-S phase checkpoint in the response to these agents. In the present study, two different cell lines expressing a dominant negative kinase-dead (kd) version of the ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related) kinase in an inducible fashion were examined for their responses to these two platinating agents and a variety of other DNA cross-linking drugs. Expression of the kdATR allele markedly sensitized the cells to cisplatin, but not oxaliplatin, as assessed by inhibition of colony formation, induction of apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis. Similar differences in survival were noted for melphalan (ATR-dependent) and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4HC) (ATR-independent). Further experiments demonstrated that ATR function is not necessary for removal of Pt-DNA adducts. The predominant difference between the responses to the two platinum drugs was presence of a drug-specific ATR-dependent S phase arrest after cisplatin but not oxaliplatin. These results indicate that involvement of ATR in the response to DNA cross-linking agents is lesion specific. This observation might need to be taken into account in the development and use of ATR or Chk1 inhibitors. PMID:19372558

  14. Cisplatin/gemcitabine or oxaliplatin/gemcitabine in the treatment of advanced biliary tract cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Fiteni, Frédéric; Nguyen, Thierry; Vernerey, Dewi; Paillard, Marie-Justine; Kim, Stefano; Demarchi, Martin; Fein, Francine; Borg, Christophe; Bonnetain, Franck; Pivot, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin/gemcitabine association has been a standard of care for first-line regimen in advanced biliary tract cancer nevertheless oxaliplatin/gemcitabine regimen is frequently preferred. Because comparative effectiveness in clinical outcomes of cisplatin- versus oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy is not available, a systematic review of studies assessing cisplatin/gemcitabine or oxaliplatin/gemcitabine chemotherapies in advanced biliary tract cancer was performed. Published studies evaluating cisplatin/gemcitabine or oxaliplatin/gemcitabine in advanced biliary tract cancer were included. Each study was weighted according to the number of patients included. The primary objective was to assess weighted median of medians overall survival (mOS) reported for both regimens. Secondary goals were to assess weighted median of medians progression-free survival (mPFS) and toxic effects were pooled and compared within each arm. Thirty-three studies involving 1470 patients were analyzed. In total, 771 and 699 patients were treated by cisplatin/gemcitabine and oxaliplatin/gemcitabine, respectively. Weighted median of mOS was 9.7 months in cisplatin group and 9.5 months in oxaliplatin group. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was significantly associated with more grade 3 and 4 asthenia, diarrhea, liver toxicity, and hematological toxicity. Sensitivity analysis including only the studies with the standard regimen of cisplatin (25–35 mg/m2 administered on days 1 and 8) showed that the weighted median of mOS increased from 9.7 to 11.7 months but Gem/CDDP regimen remained more toxic than Gemox regimen. These results suggest that the Gem/CDDP regimen with cisplatin (25–35 mg/m2) administered on days 1 and 8 is associated with survival advantage than Gemox regimen but with addition of toxicity. PMID:25111859

  15. Conjugated polyelectrolyte-cisplatin complex nanoparticles for simultaneous in vivo imaging and drug tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dan; Li, Kai; Zhu, Zhenshu; Pu, Kan-Yi; Hu, Yong; Jiang, Xiqun; Liu, Bin

    2011-05-01

    A molecular brush based on conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) grafted with dense poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains was successfully complexed with an anticancer agent, cisplatin, to form cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles (CPE-PEG-Pt). The obtained nanoparticles have high far-red/near-infrared fluorescence and are able to release the drug in a continuous and slow manner. These nanoparticles have not only been used to visualize HepG2 cancer cells, but also served as an in vivo fluorescent imaging probe that simultaneously tracks the in vivo drug distribution in nude mice upon intravenous administration.A molecular brush based on conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) grafted with dense poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains was successfully complexed with an anticancer agent, cisplatin, to form cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles (CPE-PEG-Pt). The obtained nanoparticles have high far-red/near-infrared fluorescence and are able to release the drug in a continuous and slow manner. These nanoparticles have not only been used to visualize HepG2 cancer cells, but also served as an in vivo fluorescent imaging probe that simultaneously tracks the in vivo drug distribution in nude mice upon intravenous administration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: size distributions and 3D CLSM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00950d

  16. Targeting argininosuccinate synthetase negative melanomas using combination of arginine degrading enzyme and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Savaraj, Niramol; Wu, Chunjing; Li, Ying-Ying; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; You, Min; Bomalaski, John; He, Wei; Kuo, Macus Tien; Feun, Lynn G

    2015-03-20

    Loss of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression in melanoma makes these tumor cells vulnerable to arginine deprivation. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) which degrades arginine to citrulline and ammonia has been used clinically and partial responses and stable disease have been noted with minimal toxicity. In order to improve the therapeutic efficacy of ADI-PEG20, we have combined ADI-PEG20 with a DNA damaging agent, cisplatin. We have shown that the combination of the two drugs together significantly improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to ADI-PEG20 alone or cisplatin alone in 4 melanoma cell lines, regardless of their BRAF mutation. In-vivo study also exhibited the same effect as in-vitro with no added toxicity to either agent alone. The underlying mechanism is complex, but increased DNA damage upon arginine deprivation due to decreased DNA repair proteins, FANCD2, ATM, and CHK1/2 most likely leads to increased apoptosis. This action is further intensified by increased proapoptotic protein, NOXA, and decreased antiapoptotic proteins, SURVIVIN, BCL2 and XIAP. The autophagic process which protects cells from apoptosis upon ADI-PEG20 treatment also dampens upon cisplatin administration. Thus, the combination of arginine deprivation and cisplatin function in concert to kill tumor cells which do not express ASS without added toxicity to normal cells. PMID:25749046

  17. JWA reverses cisplatin resistance via the CK2—XRCC1 pathway in human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, W; Chen, Q; Wang, Q; Sun, Y; Wang, S; Li, A; Xu, S; Røe, O D; Wang, M; Zhang, R; Yang, L; Zhou, J

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common malignancy in China, with a median 5-year survival of only 20%. Cisplatin has been used in first-line cancer treatment for several types of cancer including gastric cancer. However, patients are often primary resistant or develop acquired resistance resulting in relapse of the cancer and reduced survival. Recently, we demonstrated that the reduced expression of base excision repair protein XRCC1 and its upstream regulator JWA in gastric cancerous tissues correlated with a significant survival benefit of adjuvant first-line platinum-based chemotherapy as well as XRCC1 playing an important role in the DNA repair of cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrated the role of JWA in cisplatin-induced DNA lesions and aquired cisplatin resistance in five cell-culture models: gastric epithelial cells GES-1, cisplatin-sensitive gastric cancer cell lines BGC823 and SGC7901, and the cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cell lines BGC823/DDP and SGC7901/DDP. Our results indicated that JWA is required for DNA repair following cisplatin-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) via XRCC1 in normal gastric epithelial cells. However, in gastric cancer cells, JWA enhanced cisplatin-induced cell death through regulation of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. The protein expression of JWA was significantly decreased in cisplatin-resistant cells and contributed to cisplatin resistance. Interestingly, as JWA upregulated XRCC1 expression in normal cells, JWA downregulated XRCC1 expression through promoting the degradation of XRCC1 in cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, the negative regulation of JWA to XRCC1 was blocked due to the mutation of 518S/519T/523T residues of XRCC1, and indicating that the CK2 activated 518S/519T/523T phosphorylation is a key point in the regulation of JWA to XRCC1. In conclusion, we report for the first time that JWA regulated cisplatin-induced DNA damage and apoptosis through the

  18. Assessing cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and otoprotection in whole organ culture of the mouse inner ear in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Tropitzsch, Anke; Arnold, Heinz; Bassiouni, Mohamed; Müller, Andrea; Eckhard, Andreas; Müller, Marcus; Löwenheim, Hubert

    2014-06-16

    Cisplatin is a widely used anti-cancer drug. Ototoxicity is a major dose-limiting side-effect. A reproducible mammalian in-vitro model of cisplatin ototoxicity is required to screen and validate otoprotective drug candidates. We utilized a whole organ culture system of the postnatal mouse inner ear in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor under "simulated microgravity" culture conditions. As previously described this system allows whole organ culture of the inner ear and quantitative assessment of ototoxic effects of aminoglycoside induced hair cell loss. Here we demonstrate that this model is also applicable to the assessment of cisplatin induced ototoxicity. In this model cisplatin induced hair cell loss was dose and time dependent. Increasing exposure time of cisplatin led to decreasing EC50 concentrations. Outer hair cells were more susceptible than inner hair cells, and hair cells in the cochlear base were more susceptible than hair cells in the cochlear apex. Initial cisplatin dose determined the final extent of hair cell loss irrespective if the drug was withdrawn or continued. Dose dependant otoprotection was demonstrated by co-administration of the antioxidant agent N-acetyl l-cysteine. The results support the use of this inner ear organ culture system as an in vitro assay and validation platform for inner ear toxicology and the search for otoprotective compounds. PMID:24709139

  19. Arctigenin enhances chemosensitivity to cisplatin in human nonsmall lung cancer H460 cells through downregulation of survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan-qin; Jin, Jian-jun; Wang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Arctigenin, a dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, enhances cisplatin-mediated cell apoptosis in cancer cells. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of arctigenin on cisplatin-treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 cells. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and annexin-V/propidium iodide staining were performed to analyze the proliferation and apoptosis of H460 cells. Arctigenin dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and potentiated cell apoptosis, coupled with increased cleavage of caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Moreover, arctigenin sensitized H460 cells to cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis. Arctigenin alone or in combination with cisplatin had a significantly lower amount of survivin. Ectopic expression of survivin decreased cell apoptosis induced by arctigenin (P < 0.05) or in combination with cisplatin (P < 0.01). Moreover, arctigenin (P < 0.05) or in combination with cisplatin (P < 0.01) induced G1/G0 cell-cycle arrest. Our data provide evidence that arctigenin has a therapeutic potential in combina-tion with chemotherapeutic agents for NSLC. PMID:24395429

  20. Change in soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) during cisplatin-induced acute renal failure in mice.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Terumasa; Fang, Yang-Il; Ohata, Hisayuki; Honda, Kazuo

    2015-08-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents against various types of cancers; however, it is also associated with nephrotoxicity. Recently, it was reported that inflammatory mechanisms play a key role in the development of nephrotoxicity. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) have an anti-inflammatory effect and are metabolized by soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH: encoded by EPHX2 gene). Here, we determined the change in sEH activity and EPHX2 expression in renal tissue associated with the development of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Cisplatin administration decreased hydrolase activity accompanied by down-regulation of sEH and EPHX2 expression. The down-regulation occurred prior to the elevation of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) gene expression or at treatment with low dose cisplatin. In addition, a negative correlation was found between EPHX2 expression and renal thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS), and edaravone, a radical scavenger, administration did not down-regulate expression of this gene. The results of this study suggest that cisplatin decreased sEH activity through the down-regulation of sEH and EPHX2 expression, and this down-regulation was involved in a negative feedback loop to protect renal tissue from further damage. Thus, sEH is a potential therapeutic target of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:26165641

  1. Checkpoint kinase 1 modulates sensitivity to cisplatin after spindle checkpoint activation in SW620 cells.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Sastre, A; Manguan-Garcia, C; de Luis, A; Belda-Iniesta, C; Moreno, S; Perona, R; Sanchez-Perez, I

    2010-02-01

    Aneuploidy is a common feature of tumours that arise by errors in chromosome segregation during mitosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate possible signaling pathways involved in sensitization to chemotherapy in cells with chromosomal instability. We designed a screen using the fission yeast Squizossaccharomyces pombe, to isolate strains showing a phenotype of chromosome mis-segregation and higher sensitivity to the antitumoral drug Bleomycin. We examined differences in gene expression using a comparative analysis of genome-wide expression of the wild type strain and one of the mutants. The results revealed a set of genes involved in cell cycle control, including Mad3/BubR1 and Chk1. We then studied the levels of these two proteins in colorectal cancer human cell lines with different genomic content. Among these, SW620 cells showed higher BubR1 and Chk1 mRNA levels than control cells under normal conditions. Since Chk1 is required for both S and G2/M checkpoints, and the microtubule-destabilizing agent, nocodazole induces mitotic arrest, we attempted to investigate the potential anticancer effects of nocodazole in combination with cisplatin. These studies showed that SW620 cells undergo synergistic cell death after spindle checkpoint activation followed by cisplatin treatment, suggesting a role of Chk1 in this checkpoint, very likely dependent on BubR1 protein. Importantly, Chk1-depleted SW620 cells lost this synergistic effect. In summary, we propose that Chk1 could be a biomarker predictive of the efficacy of chemotherapy across different types of tumors with aneuploidy. These findings may be potentially very useful for the stratification of patients for treatment. PMID:19931410

  2. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ► Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ► Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ► CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage

  3. Berberine in combination with cisplatin suppresses breast cancer cell growth through induction of DNA breaks and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuwan; Jing, Zuolei; Li, Yan; Mao, Weifeng

    2016-07-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from medicinal plants such as Hydrastis canadensis, Berberis aristata and Coptis chinensis. BBR displays a number of beneficial roles in the treatment of various types of cancers, yet the precise mechanisms of its action remain unclear. Cisplatin is an effective cancer chemotherapeutic agent and functions by generating DNA damage, promoting DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis; however, its efficacy is challenged by the resistance of tumor cells in clinical application. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of BBR in combination with cisplatin on human breast cancer cells. MTT assay showed that BBR inhibited breast cancer MCF-7 cell growth with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 52.178±1.593 µM and the IC50 value of cisplatin was 49.541±1.618 µM, while in combination with 26 µM BBR, the IC50 value of cisplatin was 5.759±0.76 µM. BBR sensitized the MCF-7 cells to cisplatin in a time- and dose-dependent manner. After treatment of BBR and cisplatin, the cellular pro-apoptotic capase-3 and cleaved capspase-3 and caspase-9 were upregulated and the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was downregulated. Importantly, BBR restrained the expression of cellular PCNA, and immunofluoresence analysis of γH2AX showed that BBR increased the DNA damages induced by cisplatin. Taken together, the results demonstrated that BBR sensitized MCF-7 cells to cisplatin through induction of DNA breaks and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. PMID:27177238

  4. D-Methionine attenuated cisplatin-induced vestibulotoxicity through altering ATPase activities and oxidative stress in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, P.-W.; Liu, S.-H.; Young, Y.-H.; Lin-Shiau, Shoei-Yn . E-mail: syl@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2006-09-01

    Cisplatin has been used as a chemotherapeutic agent to treat many kinds of malignancies. Its damage to the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) system has been reported. However, the underlying biochemical change in the inner ear or central vestibular nervous system is not fully understood. In this study, we attempted to examine whether cisplatin-induced vestibulotoxicity and D-methionine protection were correlated with the changes of ATPase activities and oxidative stress of ampullary tissue of vestibules as well as cerebellar cortex (the inhibitory center of VOR system) of guinea pigs. By means of a caloric test coupled with electronystagmographic recordings, we found that cisplatin exposure caused a dose-dependent (1, 3, or 5 mg/kg) vestibular dysfunction as revealed by a decrease of slow phase velocity (SPV). In addition, cisplatin significantly inhibited the Na{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activities in the ampullary tissue with a good dose-response relationship but not those of cerebellar cortex. Regression analysis indicated that a decrease of SPV was well correlated with the reduction of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activities of the ampullary tissue. D-Methionine (300 mg/kg) reduced both abnormalities of SPV and ATPase activities in a correlated manner. Moreover, cisplatin exposure led to a significant dose-dependent increase of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide concentrations of the vestibules, which could be significantly suppressed by D-methionine. However, cisplatin did not alter the levels of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide of the cerebellum. In conclusion, cisplatin inhibited ATPase activities and increased oxidative stress in guinea pig vestibular labyrinths. D-Methionine attenuated cisplatin-induced vestibulotoxicity associated with ionic disturbance through its antioxidative property.

  5. Influence of reducing agents on the cytotoxic activity of platinum(IV) complexes: induction of G2/M arrest, apoptosis and oxidative stress in A2780 and cisplatin resistant A2780cis cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Verena; Göschl, Simone; Schreiber-Brynzak, Ekaterina; Jakupec, Michael A; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2015-07-01

    The concept of Pt(IV) prodrug design is one advanced strategy to increase the selectivity for cancer cells and to reduce systemic toxicity in comparison to established platinum-based chemotherapy. Pt(IV) complexes are thought to be activated by reduction via physiological reductants, such as ascorbic acid or glutathione. Nevertheless, only few investigations on the link between the reduction rate, which is influenced by the reductant, and the ligand sphere of the Pt(IV) metal centre have been performed so far. Herein, we investigated a set of Pt(IV) compounds with varying rates of reduction with respect to their cytotoxicity and drug accumulation in A2780 and A2780cis ovarian cancer cell lines, their influence on the cell cycle, efficiency of triggering apoptosis, and ability to interfere with plasmid DNA (pUC19). The effects caused by Pt(IV) compounds were compared without or with extracellularly added ascorbic acid and glutathione (or its precursor N-acetylcysteine) to gain understanding of the impact of increased levels of the reductant on the activity of such complexes. Our results demonstrate that reduction is required prior to plasmid interaction. Furthermore, the rate of reduction is crucial for the efficiency of this set of Pt(IV) compounds. The substances that are reduced least likely showed similar performances, whereas the fastest reducing substance was negatively affected by an increased extracellular level of reducing agents, with reduced cytotoxicity and lower efficiency in inducing apoptosis and G2/M arrest. These results confirm the connection between reduction and activity, and prove the strong impact of the reduction site on the activity of Pt(IV) complexes. PMID:26073554

  6. Amniotic Fluid-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cut Short the Acuteness of Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Husseiny, Fatma; Sobh, Mohamed Ahmed; Ashour, Rehab H.; Foud, Samah; Medhat, Tarek; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Elghannam, Doaa; Abdel-Ghaffar, Hassan; Saad, Mohamed-Ahdy; Sobh, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Cisplatin is a nephrotoxic chemotherapeutic agent. So, preventive measures worth to be evaluated. Human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFSCs) in prevention or amelioration of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) in Sprague-Dawley rates have been tested. Methods 80 Sprague-Dawley rats (250~300 g) were used and divided into 4 major groups, 20 rats each. Group I: Saline-injected group. Group II: Cisplatin-injected group (5 mg/kg I.P). Group III: Cisplatin-injected and hAFSCs-treated group (5×106 hAFSCs I.V. one day after cisplatin administration). Group IV: Cisplatin-injected and culture media-treated group. Each major group was further divided into 4 equal subgroups according to the timing of sacrifice; 4, 7, 11 and 30 days post-cisplatin injection. Renal function tests were done. Kidney tissue homogenate oxidative stress parameters malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) were determined. Histopathological scoring systems for active injury, regenerative and chronic changes were analyzed separately. Results hAFSCs characterization and differentiation was proved. Cisplatin injection resulted in a significant increase in serum creatinine and MDA and decrease in SOD, GSH and creatinine clearance. These changes were attenuated early by day 4 with the use of hAFSCs. Cisplatin injection induced tubular necrosis, atrophy, inflammatory cells infiltration and fibrosis. The use of hAFSCs was associated with significantly lowered injury score at day 4, 7, 11 and 30 with marked regenerative changes starting from day 4. Conclusion hAFSCs have both a protective and regenerative activities largely through an antioxidant activity. This activity cut short the acuteness of cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:27426088

  7. IKK phosphorylation of NF-κB at serine 536 contributes to acquired cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhipeng; Yang, Zejia; Lapidus, Rena G; Liu, Xuefeng; Cullen, Kevin J; Dan, Han C

    2015-01-01

    Current treatment methods for advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) include surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. For recurrent and metastatic HNSCC, cisplatin is the most common treatment option, but most of patients will eventually develop cisplatin resistance. Therefore, it is imperative to define the mechanisms involved in cisplatin resistance and find novel therapeutic strategies to overcome this deadly disease. In order to determine the role of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in contributing to acquired cisplatin resistance in HNSCC, the expression and activity of NF-κB and its upstream kinases, IKKα and IKKβ, were evaluated and compared in three pairs of cisplatin sensitive and resistant HNSCC cell lines, including a pair of patient derived HNSCC cell line. The experiments revealed that NF-κB p65 activity was elevated in cisplatin resistant HNSCC cells compared to that in their parent cells. Importantly, the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 at serine 536 and the phosphorylation of IKKα and IKKβ at their activation loops were dramatically elevated in the resistant cell lines. Furthermore, knockdown of NF-κB or overexpression of p65-S536 alanine (p65-S536A) mutant sensitizes resistant cells to cisplatin. Additionally, the novel IKKβ inhibitor CmpdA has been shown to consistently block the phosphorylation of NF-κB at serine 536 while also dramatically improving the efficacy of cisplatin in inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in the cisplatin resistant cancer cells. These results indicated that IKK/NF-κB plays a pivotal role in controlling acquired cisplatin resistance and that targeting the IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway may provide a possible therapeutic method to overcome the acquired resistance to cisplatin in HNSCC. PMID:26693062

  8. The Ethanolic Extract of Taiwanofungus camphoratus (Antrodia camphorata) Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Enhances Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin and Doxorubicin on Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Tai, Chen-Jei; Su, Ching-Hua; Chang, Fang-Mo; Choong, Chen-Yen; Wang, Chien-Kai; Tai, Cheng-Jeng

    2015-01-01

    Taiwanofungus camphoratus (synonym Antrodia camphorata) is a widely used medicinal fungus in the folk medicine of Taiwan with several pharmacological features such as anti-inflammatory, liver protection, antihypertensive, and antioxidative activities. The ethanolic extract of T. camphoratus (TCEE) which contains abundant bioactive compounds including triterpenoids and polysaccharides also has antitumor effects in various human cancer cell lines. The aims of this study are to clarify the antitumor effects of TCEE on human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and also evaluate the combination drug effects with conventional chemotherapy agents, cisplatin and doxorubicin. In the present study, the TCEE treatment induced cell cycle arrest and suppressed cell growth on both Hep3B and HepJ5 cells. Expression of cell cycle inhibitors, P21 and P27, and activation of apoptosis executer enzyme, caspase-3, were also induced by TCEE. In combination with the chemotherapy agents, TCEE treatment further enhanced the tumor suppression efficiency of cisplatin and doxorubicin. These results together suggested that TCEE is a potential ingredient for developing an integrated chemotherapy for human liver cancer. PMID:26557666

  9. Arsenic trioxide enhances the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    KOTOWSKI, ULANA; HEIDUSCHKA, GREGOR; BRUNNER, MARKUS; EROVIC, BOBAN M.; MARTINEK, HELGA; THURNHER, DIETMAR

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been approved for the treatment of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukaemia. The aim of this study was to determine whether ATO would lead to cell death in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines and whether it was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of cisplatin, a standard chemotherapeutic agent. The four HNSCC cell lines SCC9, SCC25, CAL27 and FADU were treated with ATO or cisplatin alone or with ATO and cisplatin in combination. Cytotoxicity assays, immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and flow cytometry were carried out. Possible interactions between the two drugs were calculated using the Chou-Talalay equation. Ther results demonstrated a synergistic cytotoxic effect of the combination of ATO and cisplatin at high doses. The two agents induced apoptosis in all four HNSCC cell lines. In conclusion, this study showed that ATO is a promising therapeutic drug with cytotoxic effects in HNSCC. We demonstrated a synergistic effect in the combined treatment with cisplatin at high doses. PMID:22783443

  10. miR214-regulated p53-NOX4/p66shc pathway plays a crucial role in the protective effect of Ginkgolide B against cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in HEI-OC1 cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weijun; Li, Jianping; Hu, Juan; Cheng, Ying; Wang, Junli; Zhang, Xiaotong; Xu, Min

    2016-02-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent, cisplatin, is widely used for the treatment of several neoplastic diseases. The concomitant cytotoxicity in cochlear cells severely limits the maximum dose of cisplatin. Our previous study has shown that Ginkgolide B (GB) could protect against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the probable mechanism underlying GB-mediated protective effects against cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. The results showed that, in HEI-OC1 auditory cells, both NOX4 and p66(shc) expression was increased by cisplatin. GB significantly reduced NOX4 and p66(shc) expression and superoxide generation. Over-expression of NOX4 or p66(shc) suppressed the inhibitory effects of GB on superoxide generation and the protective effects of GB on loss of cell viability and apoptosis associated with cisplatin. Moreover, p53 expression was increased by cisplatin. GB significantly decreased p53 expression and p53-binding of the promoters of NOX4 and p66(shc). Over-expression of p53 suppressed the inhibitory effects of GB on NOX4 and p66(shc) expression and superoxide generation and the protective effects of GB on loss of cell viability and apoptosis associated with cisplatin. Furthermore, miR214 expression was decreased by cisplatin. GB significantly increased miR214 expression and inhibition of miR214 suppressed the inhibitory effects of GB on p53, NOX4 and p66(shc) expression and superoxide generation and the protective effects of GB against cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. We demonstrate that GB decreases superoxide generation and the subsequent apoptosis through reduction of p53-mediated NOX4/p66(shc) pathway via up-regulation of miR214, resulting in attenuation of cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. Our findings have gained an insight into the molecular mechanism of GB-exhibited inhibitory effect on cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:26768586

  11. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  12. Evaluation of cisplatin plasma levels in patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fleres, Francesco; Saladino, Edoardo; Catanoso, Rosaria; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Mandolfino, Tommaso; Cucinotta, Eugenio; Macrì, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Introduction Peritoneal surface malignancies have long been regarded as incurable, however, they can be treated with cytoreductive surgery in addition to hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. This approach is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality, unless hyperhydration is provided in a timely manner. Methods Cisplatin (CDDP) is the most widely used chemotherapeutic agent. Plasma levels of cisplatin (CDDP), a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, were measured before, during, and after the procedure. This was done in order to identify the window of highest risk as a function of drug concentrations, assuming a dose-dependent effect. Results Plasma levels of CDDP peak during perfusion. The concentration remains high until the 4th post-operative day and returns to pre-operative levels by the 7th post-operative day. Conclusions Our findings suggest that ensuring hyperhydration as well as infusing albumin and fresh frozen plasma may be of particular value for at least the first 4 days after the procedure. PMID:27385136

  13. Cisplatin inhibits bone healing during distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stine, Kimo C; Wahl, Elizabeth C; Liu, Lichu; Skinner, Robert A; Vanderschilden, Jacquelyn; Bunn, Robert C; Montgomery, Corey O; Suva, Larry J; Aronson, James; Becton, David L; Nicholas, Richard W; Swearingen, Christopher J; Lumpkin, Charles K

    2014-03-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common malignant bone tumor affecting children and adolescents. Many patients are treated with a combination of chemotherapy, resection, and limb salvage protocols. Surgical reconstructions after tumor resection include structural allografts, non-cemented endoprostheses, and distraction osteogenesis (DO), which require direct bone formation. Although cisplatin (CDP) is extensively used for OS chemotherapy, the effects on bone regeneration are not well studied. The effects of CDP on direct bone formation in DO were compared using two dosing regimens and both C57BL/6 (B6) and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 knockout (TNFR1KO) mice, as CDP toxicity is associated with elevated TNF levels. Detailed evaluation of the five-dose CDP regimen (2 mg/kg/day), demonstrated significant decreases in new bone formation in the DO gaps of CDP treated versus vehicle treated mice (p < 0.001). Further, no significant inhibitory effects from the five-dose CDP regimen were observed in TNFR1KO mice. The two-dose regimen significantly inhibited new bone formation in B6 mice. These results demonstrate that CDP has profound short term negative effects on the process of bone repair in DO. These data provide the mechanistic basis for modeling peri-operative chemotherapy doses and schedules and may provide new opportunities to identify molecules that spare normal cells from the inhibitory effects of CDP. PMID:24259375

  14. Ghrelin Prevents Cisplatin-Induced Testicular Damage by Facilitating Repair of DNA Double Strand Breaks Through Activation of p53 in Mice.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jose M; Chen, Ji-an; Guillory, Bobby; Donehower, Lawrence A; Smith, Roy G; Lamb, Dolores J

    2015-07-01

    Cisplatin administration induces DNA damage resulting in germ cell apoptosis and subsequent testicular atrophy. Although 50 percent of male cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy develop long-term secondary infertility, medical treatment to prevent spermatogenic failure after chemotherapy is not available. Under normal conditions, testicular p53 promotes cell cycle arrest, which allows time for DNA repair and reshuffling during meiosis. However, its role in the setting of cisplatin-induced infertility has not been studied. Ghrelin administration ameliorates the spermatogenic failure that follows cisplatin administration in mice, but the mechanisms mediating these effects have not been well established. The aim of the current study was to characterize the mechanisms of ghrelin and p53 action in the testis after cisplatin-induced testicular damage. Here we show that cisplatin induces germ cell damage through inhibition of p53-dependent DNA repair mechanisms involving gamma-H2AX and ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein kinase. As a result, testicular weight and sperm count and motility were decreased with an associated increase in sperm DNA damage. Ghrelin administration prevented these sequelae by restoring the normal expression of gamma-H2AX, ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and p53, which in turn allows repair of DNA double stranded breaks. In conclusion, these findings indicate that ghrelin has the potential to prevent or diminish infertility caused by cisplatin and other chemotherapeutic agents by restoring p53-dependent DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:26019260

  15. Ghrelin Prevents Cisplatin-Induced Testicular Damage by Facilitating Repair of DNA Double Strand Breaks Through Activation of p53 in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Jose M.; Chen, Ji-an; Guillory, Bobby; Donehower, Lawrence A.; Smith, Roy G.; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin administration induces DNA damage resulting in germ cell apoptosis and subsequent testicular atrophy. Although 50 percent of male cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy develop long-term secondary infertility, medical treatment to prevent spermatogenic failure after chemotherapy is not available. Under normal conditions, testicular p53 promotes cell cycle arrest, which allows time for DNA repair and reshuffling during meiosis. However, its role in the setting of cisplatin-induced infertility has not been studied. Ghrelin administration ameliorates the spermatogenic failure that follows cisplatin administration in mice, but the mechanisms mediating these effects have not been well established. The aim of the current study was to characterize the mechanisms of ghrelin and p53 action in the testis after cisplatin-induced testicular damage. Here we show that cisplatin induces germ cell damage through inhibition of p53-dependent DNA repair mechanisms involving gamma-H2AX and ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein kinase. As a result, testicular weight and sperm count and motility were decreased with an associated increase in sperm DNA damage. Ghrelin administration prevented these sequelae by restoring the normal expression of gamma-H2AX, ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and p53, which in turn allows repair of DNA double stranded breaks. In conclusion, these findings indicate that ghrelin has the potential to prevent or diminish infertility caused by cisplatin and other chemotherapeutic agents by restoring p53-dependent DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:26019260

  16. Rigosertib Is a More Effective Radiosensitizer Than Cisplatin in Concurrent Chemoradiation Treatment of Cervical Carcinoma, In Vitro and In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Agoni, Lorenzo; Basu, Indranil; Gupta, Seema; Alfieri, Alan; Gambino, Angela; Goldberg, Gary L.; Reddy, E. Premkumar; Guha, Chandan

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare rigosertib versus cisplatin as an effective radiosensitizing agent for cervical malignancies. Methods and Materials: Rigosertib and cisplatin were tested in cervical cancer cell lines, HeLa and C33A. A 24-hour incubation with rigosertib and cisplatin, before irradiation (2-8 Gy), was used for clonogenic survival assays. Cell cycle analysis (propidium iodide staining) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX expression) were evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter cytometry. Rigosertib was also tested in vivo in tumor growth experiments on cervical cancer xenografts. Results: Rigosertib was demonstrated to induce a G{sub 2}/M block in cancer cells. Survival curve comparison revealed a dose modification factor, as index of radiosensitization effect, of 1.1-1.3 for cisplatin and 1.4-2.2 for rigosertib. With 6-Gy irradiation, an increase in DNA damage of 15%-25% was achieved in both HeLa and C33A cells with cisplatin pretreatment, and a 71-108% increase with rigosertib pretreatment. In vivo tumor growth studies demonstrated higher performance of rigosertib when compared with cisplatin, with 53% longer tumor growth delay. Conclusions: Rigosertib was more effective than cisplatin when combined with radiation and caused minimal toxicity. These data support the need for clinical trials with rigosertib in combination therapy for patients with cervical carcinoma.

  17. Assessment of thermal treatment via irrigation of external ear to reduce cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Spankovich, Christopher; Lobarinas, Edward; Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard; Le Prell, Colleen G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic and local changes in body temperature can have a profound effect on traumatic injuries including those to the inner ear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of acutely increasing or decreasing the temperature of the external ear canal on cisplatin-induced hearing loss. The external auditory canals of male guinea pigs were acutely irrigated with warm (44 °C), euthermic (37 °C), or cool (30 °C) water and subsequently injected with cisplatin (12 mg/kg, i.p.). Hearing was assessed by the auditory brainstem response and cochleograms were prepared to determine loss of hair cells. Ear canal irrigation with warm water potentiated cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss whereas cool ear canal irrigation showed significant protection from cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss. These results suggest that non-invasive cool water ear canal irrigation may be highly effective clinical procedure for protecting against cisplatin-induced hearing loss. PMID:26639015

  18. Direct intercalation of cisplatin into zirconium phosphate nanoplatelets for potential cancer nanotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Agustín; González, Millie L.; Pérez, Riviam J.; David, Amanda; Mukherjee, Atashi; Báez, Adriana; Clearfield, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    We report the use of zirconium phosphate nanoplatelets (ZrP) for the encapsulation of the anticancer drug cisplatin and its delivery to tumor cells. Cisplatin was intercalated into ZrP by direct-ion exchange and was tested in-vitro for cytotoxicity in the human breast cancer (MCF-7) cell line. The structural characterization of the intercalated cisplatin in ZrP suggests that during the intercalation process, the chloride ligands of the cisplatin complex were substituted by phosphate groups within the layers. Consequently, a new phosphate phase with the platinum complex directly bound to ZrP (cisPt@ZrP) is produced with an interlayer distance of 9.3 Å. The in-vitro release profile of the intercalated drug by pH stimulus shows that at low pH under lysosomal conditions the platinum complex is released with simultaneous hydrolysis of the zirconium phosphate material, while at higher pH the complex is not released. Experiments with the MCF-7 cell line show that cisPt@ZrP reduced the cell viability up to 40%. The cisPt@ZrP intercalation product is envisioned as a future nanotherapy agent for cancer. Taking advantage of the shape and sizes of the ZrP particles and controlled release of the drug at low pH, it is intended to exploit the enhanced permeability and retention effect of tumors, as well as their intrinsic acidity, for the destruction of malignant cells. PMID:24072038

  19. Pit-1 inhibits BRCA1 and sensitizes human breast tumors to cisplatin and vitamin D treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Samuel; Arias, Efigenia; Sigueiro, Rita; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Martinez-Ordoñez, Anxo; Castelao, Esteban; Eiró, Noemí; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Macia, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Maestro, Miguel; Vizoso, Francisco; Mouriño, Antonio; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The POU class 1 homeobox 1 (POU1F1, also known as Pit-1), pertaining to the Pit-Oct-Unc (POU) family of transcription factors, has been related to tumor growth and metastasis in breast. However, its role in response to breast cancer therapy is unknown. We found that Pit-1 down-regulated DNA-damage and repair genes, and specifically inhibited BRCA1 gene expression, sensitizing breast cancer cells to DNA-damage agents. Administration of 1α, 25-dihydroxy-3-epi-vitamin D3 (3-Epi, an endogenous low calcemic vitamin D metabolite) reduced Pit-1 expression, and synergized with cisplatin, thus, decreasing cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro, and reducing tumor growth in vivo. In addition, fifteen primary cultures of human breast tumors showed significantly decreased proliferation when treated with 3-Epi+cisplatin, compared to cisplatin alone. This response positively correlated with Pit-1 levels. Our findings demonstrate that high levels of Pit-1 and reduced BRCA1 levels increase breast cancer cell susceptibility to 3-Epi+cisplatin therapy. PMID:25992773

  20. MEK Inhibition Overcomes Cisplatin Resistance Conferred by SOS/MAPK Pathway Activation in Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Li Ren; Chua, Kian Ngiap; Sim, Wen Jing; Ng, Hsien Chun; Bi, Chonglei; Ho, Jingshan; Nga, Min En; Pang, Yin Huei; Ong, Weijie Richard; Soo, Ross Andrew; Huynh, Hung; Chng, Wee Joo; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Goh, Boon Cher

    2015-07-01

    Genomic analyses of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) have yet to yield significant strategies against pathway activation to improve treatment. Platinum-based chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for SCC of different histotypes either as a single-agent or alongside other chemotherapeutic drugs or radiotherapy; however, resistance inevitably emerges, which limits the duration of treatment response. To elucidate mechanisms that mediate resistance to cisplatin, we compared drug-induced perturbations to gene and protein expression between cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant SCC cells, and identified MAPK-ERK pathway upregulation and activation in drug-resistant cells. ERK-induced resistance appeared to be activated by Son of Sevenless (SOS) upstream, and mediated through Bim degradation downstream. Clinically, elevated p-ERK expression was associated with shorter disease-free survival in patients with locally advanced head and neck SCC treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Inhibition of MEK/ERK, but not that of EGFR or RAF, augmented cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and demonstrated efficacy and tolerability in vivo. Collectively, these findings suggest that inhibition of the activated SOS-MAPK-ERK pathway may augment patient responses to cisplatin treatment. PMID:25939760

  1. Enhanced cytotoxic effect of cisplatin using diagnostic ultrasound and microbubbles in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Noboru; Nakamura, Kensuke; Murakami, Masahiro; Lim, Sue Yee; Ohta, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-10-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has accomplished drug and gene delivery by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD). However, the efficacy of delivery is still relatively low. Therefore, we optimized conditions of UTMD using diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles. Canine thyroid adenocarcinoma cells were cultured in a 96-well plate. After addition of cisplatin and Sonazoid®, the plate was inverted to raise microbubbles near cells and incubated. Cells were exposed to diagnostic ultrasound using a linear probe operated in the contrast harmonic imaging mode. The center frequency was 2.5 MHz with a mechanical index of 1.33 and a frame rate of 48 frames/sec. Cytotoxic effect of cisplatin was evaluated 24h after exposure using trypan blue dye exclusion test. We optimized incubation duration, cisplatin concentration, and the relationship between microbubble concentration and exposure duration. The optimum enhancement was observed at incubation duration of 5min, cisplatin concentration of 1 μg/ml, and microbubble concentration of 2.4 × 105 microbubbles/ml. Exposure duration did not influence the enhancement at the microbubble concentration of 2.4 × 105 microbubbles/ml. Our results suggest that relative low concentrations of drug and microbubbles with short exposure duration might be sufficient for drug delivery by UTMD using diagnostic ultrasound.

  2. Comparison of inhibition kinetics of several organophosphates, including some nerve agent surrogates, using human erythrocyte and rat and mouse brain acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Coban, Alper; Carr, Russell L; Chambers, Howard W; Willeford, Kenneth O; Chambers, Janice E

    2016-04-25

    Because testing of nerve agents is limited to only authorized facilities, our laboratory developed several surrogates that resemble nerve agents because they phosphylate the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with the same moiety as the actual nerve agents. The inhibition kinetic parameters were determined for AChE by surrogates of cyclosarin (NCMP), sarin (NIMP, PIMP and TIMP) and VX (NEMP and TEMP) and other organophosphorus compounds derived from insecticides. All compounds were tested with rat brain and a subset was tested with mouse brain and purified human erythrocyte AChE. Within the compounds tested on all AChE sources, chlorpyrifos-oxon had the highest molecular rate constant followed by NCMP and NEMP. This was followed by NIMP then paraoxon and DFP with rat and mouse brain AChE but DFP was a more potent inhibitor than NIMP and paraoxon with human AChE. With the additional compounds tested only in rat brain, TEMP was slightly less potent than NEMP but more potent than PIMP which was more potent than NIMP. Methyl paraoxon was slightly less potent than paraoxon but more potent than TIMP which was more potent than DFP. Overall, this study validates that the pattern of inhibitory potencies of our surrogates is comparable to the pattern of inhibitory potencies of actual nerve agents (i.e., cyclosarin>VX>sarin), and that these are more potent than insecticidal organophosphates. PMID:26965078

  3. High performance liquid chromatography: Tandem mass spectrometric determination of cisplatin levels in different visceral pleura layers of rats

    PubMed Central

    XIA, HUI; ZHANG, WEN; LI, YINGJIE; YU, CHANGHAI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the concentration of cisplatin in different layers of the visceral pleura in rats, following drug administration. In this study, a sensitive and specific liquid chromatography method coupled with electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry was established to investigate the disposition of cisplatin in different layers of the visceral pleura in rats. Methodological data, including specificity, linearity, accuracy, recovery, precision and lower limits of quantification, confirmed that this novel method may be used to efficiently quantify the cisplatin concentrations in visceral pleura of rats following administration of the drug. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the desired drug concentration was not achieved in the outer or inner elastic layers of the visceral pleura following injection with cisplatin through various administration methods. PMID:26137076

  4. The effect of cisplatin pretreatment on the accumulation of MIBG by neuroblastoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Armour, A.; Cunningham, S. H.; Gaze, M. N.; Wheldon, T. E.; Mairs, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    [131I]meta-iodobenzylguanidine ([131I]MIBG) provides a means of selectively delivering radiation to neuroblastoma cells and is a promising addition to the range of agents used to treat neuroblastoma. As MIBG is now being incorporated into multimodal approaches to therapy, important questions arise about the appropriate scheduling and sequencing of the various agents employed. As the ability of neuroblastoma cells to actively accumulate MIBG is crucial to the success of this therapy, the effect of chemotherapeutic agents on this uptake capacity needs to be investigated. We report here our initial findings on the effect of cisplatin pretreatment on the neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE (2c). After treating these cells with therapeutically relevant concentrations of cisplatin (2 microM and 20 microM), a stimulation in uptake of [131I]MIBG was observed. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that this effect was due to increased expression of the noradrenaline transporter. These results suggest that appropriate scheduling of cisplatin and [131I]MIBG may lead to an increase in tumour uptake of this radiopharmaceutical with consequent increases in radiation dose to the tumour. Images Table 1 Figure 4 PMID:9052395

  5. Strong adsorption of Al-doped carbon nanotubes toward cisplatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Li, Guo-Qing; Lu, Xiao-Min; Ma, Juan-Juan; Zeng, Peng-Yu; He, Qin-Yu; Wang, Yin-Zhen

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of cisplatin molecule on Al-doped CNTs is investigated using density functional theory. The obtained results indicate that Al-doped carbon nanotubes can strongly absorb cisplatin. After absorbing cisplatin, the symmetry of CNTs has some changes. We innovatively defined a parameter of symmetry variation which relates to the adsorption. By analyzing the electronic structure, it can be concluded that under the circumstance that cisplatin was absorbed by Al-doped CNTs through aluminum atom of Al-doped CNTs. In conclusion, Al-doped CNTs is a kind of potential delivery carrier with high quality for anticancer drug cisplatin.

  6. A randomized phase III trial of oral S-1 plus cisplatin versus docetaxel plus cisplatin in Japanese patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: TCOG0701 CATS trial

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, K.; Sakai, H.; Katakami, N.; Nishio, M.; Inoue, A.; Okamoto, H.; Isobe, H.; Kunitoh, H.; Takiguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Sugawara, S.; Minato, K.; Fukuda, M.; Yokoyama, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Michimae, H.; Gemma, A.; Kudoh, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Platinum-based two-drug combination chemotherapy has been standard of care for patients with advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The primary aim was to compare overall survival (OS) of patients with advanced NSCLC between the two chemotherapy regimens. Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), response, safety, and quality of life (QoL). Patients and methods Patients with previously untreated stage IIIB or IV NSCLC, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0–1 and adequate organ function were randomized to receive either oral S-1 80 mg/m2/day on days 1–21 plus cisplatin 60 mg/m2 on day 8 every 4–5 weeks, or docetaxel 60 mg/m2 on day 1 plus cisplatin 80 mg/m2 on day 1 every 3–4 weeks, both up to six cycles. Results A total of 608 patients from 66 sites in Japan were randomized to S-1 plus cisplatin (n = 303) or docetaxel plus cisplatin (n = 305). OS for oral S-1 plus cisplatin was noninferior to docetaxel plus cisplatin [median survival, 16.1 versus 17.1 months, respectively; hazard ratio = 1.013; 96.4% confidence interval (CI) 0.837–1.227]. Significantly higher febrile neutropenia (7.4% versus 1.0%), grade 3/4 neutropenia (73.4% versus 22.9%), grade 3/4 infection (14.5% versus 5.3%), and grade 1/2 alopecia (59.3% versus 12.3%) were observed in the docetaxel plus cisplatin than in the S-1 plus cisplatin. There were no differences found in PFS or response between the two arms. QoL data investigated by EORTC QLQ-C30 and LC-13 favored the S-1 plus cisplatin. Conclusion Oral S-1 plus cisplatin is not inferior to docetaxel plus cisplatin and is better tolerated in Japanese patients with advanced NSCLC. Clinical trial number UMIN000000608. PMID:25908605

  7. Use of an automated capillary DNA sequencer to investigate the interaction of cisplatin with telomeric DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Paul, Moumita; Murray, Vincent

    2012-03-01

    The determination of the sequence selectivity of DNA-damaging agents is very important in elucidating the mechanism of action of anti-tumour drugs. The development of automated capillary DNA sequencers with fluorescent labelling has enabled a more precise method for DNA sequence specificity analysis. In this work we utilized the ABI 3730 capillary sequencer with laser-induced fluorescence to examine the sequence selectivity of cisplatin with purified DNA sequences. The use of this automated machine enabled a higher degree of precision of both position and intensity of cisplatin-DNA adducts than previously possible with manual and automated slab gel procedures. A problem with artefact bands was overcome by ethanol precipitation. It was found that cisplatin strongly formed adducts with telomeric DNA sequences. PMID:21678458

  8. S-1 plus cisplatin versus fluorouracil plus cisplatin in advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma patients: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guoping; Lu, Huishan; Liu, Yunpeng; Zhong, Meizuo; Zhang, Helong; Yu, Shiying; Li, Wei; Hu, Xiaohua; Wang, Jiejun; Cheng, Ying; Zhou, Juntian; Guo, Zengqing; Guan, Zhongzhen; Xu, Ruihua

    2015-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of S-1 plus cisplatin in Chinese advanced gastric cancer patients in first line setting is unknown. In this pilot study, patients with advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma were enrolled and randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive S-1 plus cisplatin (CS group) or 5-FU plus cisplatin (CF group). The primary endpoint was time to progression (TTP). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS) and safety. This study was registered on ClinicalTrials. Gov, number NCT01198392. A total of 236 patients were enrolled. Median TTP was 5.51 months in CS group compared with 4.62 months in CF group [hazard ratio (HR) 1.028, 95% confidential interval (CI) 0.758-1.394, p = 0.859]. Median OS was 10.00 months and 10.46 months in CS and CF groups (HR 1.046, 95%CI 0.709-1.543, p = 0.820), respectively. The most common adverse events in both groups were anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, nausea, thrombocytopenia, vomiting, anorexia and diarrhea. We find that S-1 plus cisplatin is an effective and tolerable option for advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma patients in China. PMID:26439700

  9. Selective activation of SHP2 activity by cisplatin revealed by a novel chemical probe-based assay

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Chun-Chen; Chu, Chi-Yuan; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lo, Lee-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Src homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2) is known to participate in several different signaling pathways to mediate cell growth, survival, migration, and differentiation. However, due to the lack of proper analytical tools, it is unclear whether the phosphatase activity of SHP2 is activated in most studies. We have previously developed an activity-based probe LCL2 that formed covalent linkage with catalytically active protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Here, by combining LCL2 with a SHP2 specific antibody, we established an assay system that enables the direct monitoring of SHP2 activity upon cisplatin treatment of cancer cells. The protocol is advantageous over conventional colorimetric or in-gel PTP assays as it is specific and does not require the use of radioisotope reagents. Using this assay, we found SHP2 activity was selectively activated by cisplatin. Moreover, the activation of SHP2 appeared to be specific for cisplatin as other DNA damage agents failed to activate the activity. Although the role of SHP2 activation by cisplatin treatments is still unclear to us, our results provide the first direct evidence for the activation of SHP2 during cisplatin treatments. More importantly, the concept of using activity-based probe in conjunction with target-specific antibodies could be extended to other enzyme classes.

  10. Vandetanib Restores Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells’ Sensitivity to Cisplatin and Radiation In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Fumihiko; Valdecanas, David R.; Zhao, Mei; Molkentine, David P.; Takahashi, Yoko; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vali; Heymach, John; Milas, Luka; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether vandetanib, an inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase activities of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Rearranged during transfection (RET), could augment the antitumor activity of radiation with or without cisplatin in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Experimental design OSC-19 and HN5 HNSCC cells that were cisplatin and radioresistant were treated with vandetanib, cisplatin, and radiation alone or in combination in vitro and in vivo using an orthotopic nude mouse model. Treatment effects were assessed using clonogenic survival assay, tumor volume, bioluminescence imaging, tumor growth delay, survival, microvessel density, tumor and endothelial cell apoptosis, and EGFR and Akt phosphorylation data. Results Vandetanib plus cisplatin radiosensitized HNSCC cells in vitro and in vivo. The combination treatment with vandetanib, cisplatin, and radiation was superior to the rest of treatments (including the double combinations) in antitumoral effects, prolonging survival, decreasing cervical lymph node metastases in vivo. It also increased both tumor and tumor-associated endothelial cell apoptosis and decreased microvessel density in vivo. An analysis of tumor growth delay data revealed that vandetanib plus cisplatin enhanced radioresponse in vivo. All vandetanib-containing treatments inhibited EGFR and Akt phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion The addition of vandetanib to combination therapy with cisplatin and radiation was able to effectively overcome cisplatin and radioresistance in in vitro and in vivo models of HNSCC. Further study of this regimen in clinical trials may be warranted. PMID:21350000

  11. Challenges in management of patients with intracranial germ cell tumor and diabetes insipidus treated with cisplatin and/or ifosfamide based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Samina; Wherrett, Diane; Bartels, Ute; Tabori, Uri; Huang, Annie; Stephens, Derek; Bouffet, Eric

    2010-05-01

    Patients with intracranial germ cell tumor (IGCT) often present with pituitary dysfunction, including diabetes insipidus (DI). Recent protocols have used pre-radiation chemotherapy with combinations of etoposide, carboplatin and/or cisplatin, and ifosfamide. Management of DI in these patients requires monitoring of electrolytes and fluids during chemotherapy and hyperhydration. All consecutive patients treated with chemotherapy for an IGCT during the period 1990-2007 at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto were reviewed. Out of 32 patients who received chemotherapy, 21 had DI. Only cycles containing cisplatin and/or ifosfamide and hyperhydration were considered. DI and non-DI patients were compared for each cycle of chemotherapy. Patients were studied for number of days in hospital per chemotherapy course, daily fluid input and output, changes in dose, schedule and route of administration of desmopressin (DDAVP) during chemotherapy, daily variations in sodium level, electrolyte monitoring requirements per day, and complications related to fluid and electrolyte disturbances. Fifty-four cycles of chemotherapy in DI patients were compared to 25 cycles in non DI patients. All 21 patients with DI required daily change in dosage and schedule of DDAVP. Marked variations in daily sodium level were observed in the DI group. Seventeen courses required prolonged admission in the DI group (one in non DI patients) and 6 patients experienced serious complications. In conclusion, DI is a risk factor for complications when cisplatin and/or ifosfamide based protocols are used. The role of these agents in the management of ICGT should be carefully evaluated and guidelines for management of DI established. PMID:19820898

  12. Hepatitis B virus enhances cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity via a mechanism involving suppression of glucose-regulated protein of 78 Kda.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxue; Zhang, Rui; Yang, HuiOu; Xiang, Qian; Jiang, Qing; He, Qi; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Huifen; Wang, Qiang; Ning, Qin; Li, Yiwu; Lei, Ping; Shen, Guanxin

    2016-07-25

    Cisplatin is a classical platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug used in the treatment of many cancer types, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The application of cisplatin is significantly limited by its toxicity, which may be affected by various biological factors. Persistence of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection leads to HCC development and may be associated with higher incidence of severe hepatitis during chemotherapy. However, whether HBV alters the susceptibility of hepatocytes to cisplatin remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that HBV transfection enhanced cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity via a mechanism involving suppression of glucose-regulated protein of 78 KDa (Grp78), a major stress-induced chaperone that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Silencing Grp78 gene increased the susceptibility of HepG2 to cisplatin by activating caspase-3. Grp78 expression was down-regulated by HBV infection both in vitro and in liver tissues of patients. We compared the cisplatin sensitivity of hepatoma cells either expressing (HepG2.2.15 cells) or not expressing the entire Hepatitis B Virus genome (HepG2). HepG2.2.15 cells showed increased sensitivity to cisplatin and a higher apoptosis rate. Overexpression of Grp78 counteracted the increase of sensitivity of HepG2.215 cells to cisplatin. Furthermore, we found that HBV disrupted Grp78 synthesis in response to cisplatin stimulation, which may trigger severe and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that can induce cellular apoptosis. Our findings provide new information into the effect of HBV in the modulation of Grp78 expression, and, consequently on cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity during viral infection. PMID:27234046

  13. Synergistic killing of lung cancer cells by cisplatin and radiation via autophagy and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Ma, Shumei; Liu, Mingbo; Hou, Yufei; Liang, Bing; Su, Xu; Liu, Xiaodong

    2014-06-01

    Cisplatin is a commonly used drug for chemotherapy, however, whether it may be used synergistically with radiotherapy remains unclear. The present study investigated the underlying mechanisms of synergistic killing by radiosensitization and cisplatin, with a focus on the growth inhibition, apoptosis and autophagy of non-small cell human lung cancer cells in vitro and in a tumor xenograft in vivo. A549 cells were used for the in vitro experiments and divided into the following four treatment groups: Sham-irradiated; conventional radiotherapy (CRT) of five doses of 2 Gy every day; hyperfractionated radiotherapy of five doses of 2 Gy (1 Gy twice a day at 4 h intervals) every day; and CRT plus cisplatin. A xenograft tumor-bearing C57BL/6 model was established for the in vivo experiments and the above-mentioned treatments were administered. MTT and colony formation assays were used to detect cell viability and western blotting was performed to detect the levels of protein expression. Monodansylcadaverine staining and the immunofluorescence technique were used to analyze the autophagy rate, while flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect the expression levels of the genes associated with apoptosis and autophagy, including microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAPLC3)-II, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) III, Beclin1, phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-AKT), damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein, caspase-3 and p21. The MTT assay demonstrated that cisplatin exhibits a dose-dependent cytotoxicity in A549 cells and synergizes with radiation to promote the cell-killing effect of radiation. In the xenograft mouse model of Lewis cells, cisplatin plus ionizing radiation (IR) (five doses of 2 Gy) yielded the most significant tumor suppression. The autophagic vacuoles, the ratio of MAPLC3-II to MAPLC3-I (LC3-II/LC3-I) and the levels of Beclin1 were found to increase in all treatment

  14. Protective effects of ethyl pyruvate in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kelle, Ilker; Akkoc, Hasan; Tunik, Selcuk; Nergiz, Yusuf; Erdinc, Meral; Erdinc, Levent

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of ethyl pyruvate on changes in renal functions and oxidative stress related renal injury caused by cisplatin (cis-dichlorodiammine platinum-II; CDDP). Male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups (n = 8): (1) control group (1 ml Ringer's lactate solution i.p.); (2) ethyl pyruvate (EP) group (50 mg/kg Ringer's EP solution (REPS) i.p.); (3) cisplatin group (a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg, i.p.); and (4) cisplatin + EP group (a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg, i.p.) + REPS 50 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for five days. At the sixth day, kidneys of rats were mounted to a Langendorff apparatus. Renal perfusion pressures were recorded. Blood samples were taken for serum urea, creatinine, total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant status (TAS) and oxidative stres index (OSI) evaluations. Kidney tissues were obtained for malondialdehyde (MDA) analyses and histopathological examination. Perfusion pressures, serum urea, creatinine, TOS, OSI and tissue MDA levels were found significantly higher, whereas TAS was notably lower in cisplatin group. Histopathological examination showed apparent renal paranchymal injury in cisplatin group. In cisplatin + REPS group, perfusion pressures, serum urea, creatinine and tissue MDA levels were decreased. Moreover, EP co-administration provided less inflammatory cell infiltration, tubular dilatation, whereas TOS, TAS and OSI improved significantly versus cisplatin group. These findings show that EP has protective effects against cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:26019553

  15. LY2109761 enhances cisplatin antitumor activity in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuxiu; Shan, Ning; Zhao, Cheng; Wang, Yunhai; Xu, Fuliang; Li, Jiacun; Yu, Xiaoqian; Gao, Lifeng; Yi, Zhengjun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Ovarian cancer is among the most lethal of all malignancies in women. While chemotherapy is the preferred treatment modality, chemoresistance severely limits treatment success. Because transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) could increase survival of ovarian cancer cells in the presence of cisplatin, we conducted a preclinical study of the antitumor effects of the TGF-β type I (TβRI) and type II (TβRII) kinase inhibitor LY2109761 in combination with cisplatin. Methods: SKOV3, OV-90 and SKOV3DDP cells were treated with LY2109761, and/or cisplatin, and cell viability, apoptosis mRNA and protein expression levels were then evaluated. Furthermore, the efficacy of LY2109761 combined with cisplatin was further examined in established xenograft models. Results: LY2109761 was sufficient to induce spontaneous apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells. Combination with LY2109761 significantly augmented the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in both parental and cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. LY2109761 significantly increased apoptotic cell death in cisplatin-resistant cells. Combination treatment of LY2109761 and cisplatin showed antiproliferative effects and induced a greater rate of apoptosis than the sum of the single-treatment rates and promoted tumor regression in established parental and cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer xenograft models. Conclusions: Chemotherapeutic approaches using LY2109761 might enhance the treatment benefit of the cisplatin in the treatment of ovarian cancer patients. PMID:26191185

  16. Chemical conversion of cisplatin and carboplatin with histidine in a model protein crystallized under sodium iodide conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-08-29

    Crystals of HEWL with cisplatin and HEWL with carboplatin grown in sodium iodide conditions both show a partial chemical transformation of cisplatin or carboplatin to a transiodoplatin (PtI{sub 2}X{sub 2}) form. The binding is only at the N{sup δ} atom of His15. A further Pt species (PtI{sub 3}X) is also seen, in both cases bound in a crevice between symmetry-related protein molecules. Cisplatin and carboplatin are platinum anticancer agents that are used to treat a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine in hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) showed a partial chemical conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high sodium chloride concentration used in the crystallization conditions. Also, the co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin in sodium bromide conditions resulted in the partial conversion of carboplatin to the transbromoplatin form, with a portion of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate (CBDC) moiety still present. The results of the co-crystallization of HEWL with cisplatin or carboplatin in sodium iodide conditions are now reported in order to determine whether the cisplatin and carboplatin converted to the iodo form, and whether this took place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin in NaCl conditions or to transbromoplatin in NaBr conditions as seen previously. It is reported here that a partial chemical transformation has taken place to a transplatin form for both ligands. The NaI-grown crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The chemically transformed cisplatin and carboplatin bind to both His15 residues, i.e. in each asymmetric unit. The binding is only at the N{sup δ} atom of His15. A third platinum species is also seen in both conditions bound in a crevice between symmetry-related molecules. Here, the platinum is bound to three I atoms identified based on their anomalous difference electron densities

  17. Getting Acquainted: An Induction Training Guide for First-Year Extension Agents. Suggestions for Completing Certain Learning Experiences Included in the Induction Training Guide; a Supplement to "Getting Acquainted."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Mary Louise; Gassie, Edward W.

    An induction guide to help the extension agent get acquainted with his role and suggestions for completing learning experiences that are included in the guide comprise this two-part publication. The training guide learning experiences, a total of 25, are made up of: Objectives of the New Worker; When Completed; Learning Experiences; Person(s)…

  18. Elevation of XPA protein level in testis tumor cells without increasing resistance to cisplatin or UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Köberle, Beate; Roginskaya, Vera; Zima, Karen S; Masters, John R W; Wood, Richard D

    2008-08-01

    Most testicular germ cell tumors are curable using cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and cell lines from these tumors are unusually sensitive to cisplatin and other DNA-damaging agents. It has been suggested that this might be caused by a lower-than normal nucleotide excision repair (NER) activity. Previous studies found that cell lines from testicular germ cell tumors have on average about one-third the level of the NER protein XPA in comparison to cell lines from other tumors. We asked whether over-expression of XPA protein would alleviate the cellular sensitivity and increase the DNA repair capacity of a testis tumor cell line. Increasing XPA levels in 833K cells by 10-fold did not increase resistance to UV irradiation. XPA was localized to the cell nucleus in all cell lines, before and after exposure to UV-radiation. 833K cells were proficient in removing UV radiation-induced photoproducts from the genome and increased XPA did not enhance the rate of removal. Further, over-expressing functional XPA protein did not correlate with increased resistance of 833K testis tumor cells to cisplatin. Thus, although the amount of XPA in this testis tumor cell line is lower than normal, it is sufficient for NER in vivo. The relative sensitivity of testis tumor cells to cisplatin, UV radiation, and other DNA damaging agents is likely related not to NER capacity, but to other factors such as the integrity of the p53 pathway in these cells. PMID:18240296

  19. SKA1 regulates the metastasis and cisplatin resistance of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, LIHUA; YANG, MIN; LIN, QIONGHUA; ZHANG, ZHONGWEI; MIAO, CHANGHONG; ZHU, BIAO

    2016-01-01

    Currently, chemotherapy with platinum-based drugs including cisplatin is the most effective therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). However, the efficacy of chemotherapy is limited due to commonly developed drug resistance. Spindle and kinetochore-associated complex subunit 1 (SKA1) is part of a complex essential for stabilizing the attachment of spindle microtubules to kinetochores and for maintaining the metaphase plate during mitosis. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of SKA1 in the process of metastasis and drug resistance of NSCLC. We completed a series of experiments to investigate the function of SKA1 in NSCLC metastasis and drug resistance including qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blotting, as well as MTT, BrdU, wounded healing, Transwell and gelatin zymography assays. We demonstrated that the expression levels of SKA1 were elevated in NSCLC and were correlated with cancer progression and malignancy. We also reported that SKA1 positively regulated the proliferation and metastatic ability of NSCLC cells. In addition, we determined that SKA1 contributed to cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells by protecting these cells from cisplatin-induced cell apoptosis. SKA1 also appeared to regulate the ERK1/2 and the Akt-mediated signaling pathways in NSCLC cells. SKA1 is required for metastasis and cisplatin resistance of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:26985856

  20. SKA1 regulates the metastasis and cisplatin resistance of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lihua; Yang, Min; Lin, Qionghua; Zhang, Zhongwei; Miao, Changhong; Zhu, Biao

    2016-05-01

    Currently, chemotherapy with platinum-based drugs including cisplatin is the most effective therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). However, the efficacy of chemotherapy is limited due to commonly developed drug resistance. Spindle and kinetochore-associated complex subunit 1 (SKA1) is part of a complex essential for stabilizing the attachment of spindle microtubules to kinetochores and for maintaining the metaphase plate during mitosis. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of SKA1 in the process of metastasis and drug resistance of NSCLC. We completed a series of experiments to investigate the function of SKA1 in NSCLC metastasis and drug resistance including qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blotting, as well as MTT, BrdU, wounded healing, Transwell and gelatin zymography assays. We demonstrated that the expression levels of SKA1 were elevated in NSCLC and were correlated with cancer progression and malignancy. We also reported that SKA1 positively regulated the proliferation and metastatic ability of NSCLC cells. In addition, we determined that SKA1 contributed to cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells by protecting these cells from cisplatin-induced cell apoptosis. SKA1 also appeared to regulate the ERK1/2 and the Akt-mediated signaling pathways in NSCLC cells. SKA1 is required for metastasis and cisplatin resistance of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:26985856

  1. Lidocaine Sensitizes the Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin in Breast Cancer Cells via Up-Regulation of RARβ2 and RASSF1A Demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kehan; Yang, Jianxue; Han, Xuechang

    2014-01-01

    It has been reported that lidocaine is toxic to various types of cells. And a recent study has confirmed that lidocaine exerts a demethylation effect and regulates the proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines. To recognize a potential anti-tumor effect of lidocaine, we evaluated the DNA demethylation by lidocaine in human breast cancer lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, and determined the influence of demethylation on the toxicity to these cells of cisplatin, which is a commonly utilized anti-tumor agent for breast cancer. Results demonstrated that lidocaine promoted a significant global genomic demethylation, and particularly in the promoters of tumor suppressive genes (TSGs), RARβ2 and RASSF1A. Further, the lidocaine treatment increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis and enhanced cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. The combined treatment with both lidocaine and cisplatin promoted a significantly higher level of MCF-7 cell apoptosis than singular lidocaine or cisplatin treatment. Moreover, the abrogation of RARβ2 or RASSF1A expression inhibited such apoptosis. In conclusion, the present study confirms the demethylation effect of lidocaine in breast cancer cells, and found that the demethylation of RARβ2 and RASSF1A sensitized the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in breast cancer cells. PMID:25526566

  2. Discovery and basic pharmacology of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), including the hyperglycosylated ESA, darbepoetin alfa: an update of the rationale and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Zoltán; Elliott, Steven; Jedynasty, Kinga; Tesar, Vladimír; Szegedi, János

    2010-04-01

    Cloning of the human erythropoietin (EPO) gene and development of the first recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) drug were truly breakthroughs. This allowed a deeper understanding of the structure and pharmacology of rHuEpo, which in turn inspired the discovery and development of additional erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). In vivo specific activity and serum half-life of rHuEPO are influenced by the amount and structure of the attached carbohydrate. Increased numbers of sialic acids on carbohydrate attached to rHuEPO correlated with a relative increase in in-vivo-specific activity and increased serum half-life. The effect of increasing the number of sialic-acid-containing carbohydrates on in-vivo-specific activity was explored. Initial research focused on solving the problem of how the protein backbone could be engineered so a cell would add more carbohydrate to it. Additional work resulted in darbepoetin alfa, a longer-acting molecule with two additional carbohydrate chains. PMID:20127232

  3. Cisplatin-induced early and delayed emesis in the pigeon

    PubMed Central

    Tanihata, Sachiko; Igarashi, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Masami; Uchiyama, Toshimitsu

    2000-01-01

    Intravenously injected cisplatin at a dose of 4 mg kg−1 induced early and delayed emesis in all pigeons without occurrence of lethality during a 72 h observation period. The early emetic response occurred with a latency of 81.3±8.0 min (n=15) and reached a peak at 2–3 h, and decreased gradually within 8 h after injection. Then the delayed emetic response, whose peak was found between 10 to 23 h, lasted up to 48 h. The emetic response markedly declined after 48 h.Reserpine markedly reduced monoamine levels in both brain and intestine and completely abolished the early and delayed emesis. Dexamethasone markedly reduced not only the early but also the delayed emetic responses. p-Chlorophenylalanine decreased the level of serotonin in brain and intestine without affecting noradrenaline and dopamine and partly reduced the early emetic response, but did not affect delayed emesis.Bilateral vagotomy prolonged the latency time to the onset of early emesis, and reduced the emetic responses in both the early and delayed phases.The above results suggest that the cisplatin-induced early emesis in the pigeon is partially mediated via the vagal nerve and reserpine-sensitive monoaminergic systems including the serotonergic system; the delayed emesis is associated with monoaminergic but not the serotonergic systems. PMID:10781008

  4. Flavonoids, the emerging dietary supplement against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Athira, K V; Madhana, Rajaram Mohanrao; Lahkar, Mangala

    2016-03-25

    The letter illustrates the emerging potential of flavonoids as dietary supplement to ameliorate cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and refers to the recent article on ''Anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects of naringin on cisplatin-induced renal injury in the rat'' by Chtourou et al. They demonstrated that supplementation of naringin, a flavanone glycoside, found in grape and citrus fruit species, can attenuate cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction via restoration of redox balance and suppression of inflammation, NF-κB activation and apoptosis. The chemotherapeutic efficacy of cisplatin has always compelled the researchers to find solution to ameliorate its side effects. In recent years, numerous candidates have been evaluated for their protective potential against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and flavonoids have come up with promising results. The future prospects might be promising with a proper refinement and collective integration of the preclinical and clinical research in the field of flavonoid supplementation to cisplatin therapy. PMID:26876905

  5. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of pomegranate rind extract to ameliorate cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Karwasra, Ritu; Kalra, Prerna; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Saini, Deepika; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Surender

    2016-07-13

    Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent, but the therapeutic utility is limited due to its dose dependent nephrotoxicity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the nephroprotective effect of pomegranate in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. Wistar rats were allocated into six groups as follows: the normal control, cisplatin-induced, pomegranate rind extract treatment (50, 100 and 200 mg kg(-1)) and pomegranate rind extract per se group. All the experimental test drugs/vehicle were administered orally for a period of ten days. Intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin (8 mg kg(-1)) was administered on day 7 to all the groups except the normal control and pomegranate per se group. On day 10, cisplatin resulted in significant nephrotoxicity in Wistar rats with a drastic elevation of serum creatinine and BUN, a decline in the concentrations of GSH, MDA and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and an elevation in the TNF-α level in renal tissues. Pathological changes in renal tissues were examined by histopathology and dysfunction in mitochondria and proximal tubule cells was detected by transmission electron microscopy. The rate of apoptosis and the expression of caspase-3, Il-1β and IL-6 in rat renal tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. The administration of pomegranate at a dose of 200 mg per kg body weight significantly (p < 0.001) ameliorates increased serum creatinine and BUN. In parallel to this, pomegranate also exhibits anti-apoptotic activity through the reduction of active caspase-3 expression in kidneys. Additionally, in-silico studies also confirmed a renoprotective effect of pomegranate. The above findings suggest that pomegranate can be used as a dietary supplement in the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury by reducing apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:27273121

  6. Association of ABCC2 polymorphisms with cisplatin disposition and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Sprowl, JA; Gregorc, V; Lazzari, C; Mathijssen, RH; Loos, WJ; Sparreboom, A

    2012-01-01

    ABCC2 (MRP2; cMOAT) expression has been implicated in cisplatin resistance in vitro. In mice, cisplatin disposition and toxicity were unaffected by Abcc2 knockout. Moreover, in cancer patients (n=237), cisplatin pharmacokinetics (P>0.12) and efficacy (P>0.41) were not associated with 7 SNPs in ABCC2. These SNPs were also not correlated with ABCC2 expression in the NCI60 panel (P>0.26) or cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity (P=0.21). These findings highlight the importance of verifying drug-transporter interactions from in vitro tests in humans. PMID:22534871

  7. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haiyan; Luo, Hui; Zhang, Wenwen; Shen, Zhaojun; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%–20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the disease effectively. However, resistance to cisplatin may develop, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of cisplatin to treat advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. In this article, we systematically review the recent literature and summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer. PMID:27354763

  8. The protective effect of curcumin on hepatotoxicity and ultrastructural damage induced by cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Hu, Peng-Chao; Gao, Fang-Fang; Lv, Jia-Wei; Xu, Shuai; Kuang, Chang-Chun; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jing-Wei

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the protective effect of curcumin (CU) on the hepatic ultrastructural damage induced by cisplatin in mice. 18 adult Kunming mice were randomly divided into normal saline (NS) group, cisplatin treatment group (CP) and CU + CP group (n = 6 for each group). Mice in control group and CP group were administered with NS (20 mL/kg/day) and CU + CP group were i.p injected with CU (200 mg/kg/day) for 10 days. Then cisplatin (50 mg/kg/day) was injected in mice of CP group and CU + CP group, while those in control group were given the same volume of NS. Five days after injection all mice were killed and liver dissected. The hepatic morphological structures were observed under light microscope and transmission electron microscope. The results indicated that CU alleviated the hepatic histopathological damages induced by cisplatin, which included declined body weight, vacuolated cytoplasm and blurred liver trabecular structure. Moreover, no hepatic ultrastructural damages were observed in the CU protective group with condensed and marginated nuclear chromatin, bile canaliculi outstreched and bile deposited. PMID:25079681

  9. Review of Cisplatin and Oxaliplatin in Current Immunogenic and Monoclonal Antibody Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Mehmood, Rao Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy agents initially transformed cancer treatment. However their effectiveness peaked as combined regimes showed little additional benefit in trials. New research frontiers developed with the discovery that conventional chemotherapy can induce immunological cell death by recruiting high mobility group box 1 protein through T-cell immunity. Simultaneously monoclonal antibody agents (not effective as monotherapies) showed good results in combination with conventional chemotherapy. Some of these combinations are currently in use and researchers hope to develop regimes which can offer substantial benefits. Several resistance mechanisms against platinum compounds are known, but more knowledge is still needed to gain a full understanding. It seems reasonable therefore to revisit the pharmacology of these agents, which may also lead to identify rational combinations with monoclonal agents providing regimes with less toxicity and better efficacy. This article reviews the pharmacology of cisplatin and oxaliplatin and explores their possible association with monoclonal antibody treatments. PMID:25992242

  10. Ghrelin partially protects against cisplatin-induced male murine gonadal toxicity in a GHSR-1a-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Whirledge, Shannon D; Garcia, Jose M; Smith, Roy G; Lamb, Dolores J

    2015-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin causes a number of dose-dependent side effects, including cachexia and testicular damage. Patients receiving a high cumulative dose of cisplatin may develop permanent azoospermia and subsequent infertility. Thus, the development of chemotherapeutic regimens with the optimal postsurvival quality of life (fertility) is of high importance. This study tested the hypothesis that ghrelin administration can prevent or minimize cisplatin-induced testicular damage and cachexia. Ghrelin and its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR-1a), are expressed and function in the testis. Targeted deletion of ghrelin, or its receptor, significantly increases the rate of cell death in the testis, suggesting a protective role. Intraperitoneal administration of vehicle, ghrelin, or cisplatin alone or in combination with ghrelin, in cycles of 9 or 18 days, to adult male C57Bl/6 mice was performed. Body weight was measured daily and testicular and epididymal weight, sperm density and motility, testicular histology, and testicular cell death were analyzed at the time of euthanization. Ghrelin coadministration decreased the severity of cisplatin-induced cachexia and gonadal toxicity. Body, testicular, and epididymal weights significantly increased as testicular cell death decreased with ghrelin coadministration. The widespread damage to the seminiferous epithelium induced by cisplatin administration was less severe in mice simultaneously treated with ghrelin. Furthermore, ghrelin diminished the deleterious effects of cisplatin on testis and body weight homeostasis in wild-type but not Ghsr(-/-) mice, showing that ghrelin's actions are mediated via GHSR. Ghrelin or more stable GHSR agonists potentially offer a novel therapeutic approach to minimize the testicular damage that occurs after gonadotoxin exposure. PMID:25631345

  11. Ghrelin Partially Protects Against Cisplatin-Induced Male Murine Gonadal Toxicity in a GHSR-1a-Dependent Manner1

    PubMed Central

    Whirledge, Shannon D.; Garcia, Jose M.; Smith, Roy G.; Lamb, Dolores J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin causes a number of dose-dependent side effects, including cachexia and testicular damage. Patients receiving a high cumulative dose of cisplatin may develop permanent azoospermia and subsequent infertility. Thus, the development of chemotherapeutic regimens with the optimal postsurvival quality of life (fertility) is of high importance. This study tested the hypothesis that ghrelin administration can prevent or minimize cisplatin-induced testicular damage and cachexia. Ghrelin and its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR-1a), are expressed and function in the testis. Targeted deletion of ghrelin, or its receptor, significantly increases the rate of cell death in the testis, suggesting a protective role. Intraperitoneal administration of vehicle, ghrelin, or cisplatin alone or in combination with ghrelin, in cycles of 9 or 18 days, to adult male C57Bl/6 mice was performed. Body weight was measured daily and testicular and epididymal weight, sperm density and motility, testicular histology, and testicular cell death were analyzed at the time of euthanization. Ghrelin coadministration decreased the severity of cisplatin-induced cachexia and gonadal toxicity. Body, testicular, and epididymal weights significantly increased as testicular cell death decreased with ghrelin coadministration. The widespread damage to the seminiferous epithelium induced by cisplatin administration was less severe in mice simultaneously treated with ghrelin. Furthermore, ghrelin diminished the deleterious effects of cisplatin on testis and body weight homeostasis in wild-type but not Ghsr−/− mice, showing that ghrelin's actions are mediated via GHSR. Ghrelin or more stable GHSR agonists potentially offer a novel therapeutic approach to minimize the testicular damage that occurs after gonadotoxin exposure. PMID:25631345

  12. Radiotherapy potentiation with weekly cisplatin compared to standard every 3 weeks cisplatin chemotherapy for locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fayette, Jérôme; Molin, Yann; Lavergne, Emilie; Montbarbon, Xavier; Racadot, Séverine; Poupart, Marc; Ramade, Antoine; Zrounba, Philippe; Ceruse, Philippe; Pommier, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite its toxicity, cisplatin every 3 weeks (q3w) is the standard potentiation of chemo-radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. This study aimed to determine whether weekly cisplatin (q1w) could be a safe and effective alternative. Patients and methods Two hundred and sixty-two patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, irradiated in our institution with cisplatin (q1w or q3w) between January 2004 and December 2008, were retrospectively included. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated. Survival distributions were estimated by Kaplan–Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Prognostic effect of chemo-radiotherapy was explored using Cox model. Results A total of 165 and 97 patients received q1w and q3w cisplatin, respectively. Median age, stage at diagnosis, alcohol consumption, intensity-modulated radiation therapy use, median weight, and renal failure before radiotherapy were significantly different, showing lower risk in the q3w group. Q3w cisplatin was found to be more toxic in terms of weight loss, renal failure, worse chemotherapy plan completion, and grade 3/4 mucositis and dermatitis, with more patients requiring analgesics, secondary hospitalization, and radiotherapy interruption (≥3 days), and patients affected by long-term toxicities. With a median follow-up of 73 months (95% confidence interval [CI] [68.9–76.2]), OS was found to be significantly better with q3w (5 years OS: 62.3%; 95% CI [51.6–71.3]) than with q1w cisplatin (5 years OS: 52.6%; 95% CI [44.5–60.0]) (log-rank P=0.0146). More number of patients treated according to the q1w schedule experienced a recurrence: 47.3% vs 30.9% (P=0.009). Thus, the PFS for q3w schedule was found to be globally better (5 years PFS: 55.8%; 95% CI [45.0–65.3]) than for q1w schedule (5 years PFS: 43.6%; 95% CI [35.9–51.0]) (log-rank P=0.0161). However, both multivariate analyses, OS and PFS, produce no significant hazard

  13. Detoxifying Antitumoral Drugs via Nanoconjugation: The Case of Gold Nanoparticles and Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Francisco; Gallego, Oscar; Barnadas, Agustí; Parada, Tomás García-Caballero; Domínguez, Fernando; Puntes, Víctor F.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as a potential tool to improve cancer treatment. Among the proposed uses in imaging and therapy, their use as a drug delivery scaffold has been extensively highlighted. However, there are still some controversial points which need a deeper understanding before clinical application can occur. Here the use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to detoxify the antitumoral agent cisplatin, linked to a nanoparticle via a pH-sensitive coordination bond for endosomal release, is presented. The NP conjugate design has important effects on pharmacokinetics, conjugate evolution and biodistribution and results in an absence of observed toxicity. Besides, AuNPs present unique opportunities as drug delivery scaffolds due to their size and surface tunability. Here we show that cisplatin-induced toxicity is clearly reduced without affecting the therapeutic benefits in mice models. The NPs not only act as carriers, but also protect the drug from deactivation by plasma proteins until conjugates are internalized in cells and cisplatin is released. Additionally, the possibility to track the drug (Pt) and vehicle (Au) separately as a function of organ and time enables a better understanding of how nanocarriers are processed by the organism. PMID:23082177

  14. Essential role for acid sphingomyelinase-inhibited autophagy in melanoma response to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Cervia, Davide; Assi, Emma; De Palma, Clara; Giovarelli, Matteo; Bizzozero, Laura; Pambianco, Sarah; Di Renzo, Ilaria; Zecchini, Silvia; Moscheni, Claudia; Vantaggiato, Chiara; Procacci, Patrizia; Clementi, Emilio; Perrotta, Cristiana

    2016-05-01

    The sphingolipid metabolising enzyme Acid Sphingomyelinase (A-SMase) has been recently shown to inhibit melanoma progression and correlate inversely to tumour grade. In this study we have investigated the role of A-SMase in the chemo-resistance to anticancer treatmentusing mice with melanoma allografts and melanoma cells differing in terms of expression/activity of A-SMase. Since autophagy is emerging as a key mechanism in tumour growth and chemo-resistance, we have also investigated whether an action of A-SMase in autophagy can explain its role. Melanoma sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin in terms of cell viability/apoptosis, tumour growth, and animal survival depended directly on the A-SMase levels in tumoural cells. A-SMase action was due to inhibition of autophagy through activation of Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Treatment of melanoma-bearing mice with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine restored sensitivity to cisplatin of tumours expressing low levels of A-SMase while no additive effects were observed in tumours characterised by sustained A-SMase levels. The fact that A-SMase in melanomas affects mTOR-regulated autophagy and plays a central role in cisplatin efficacy encourages pre-clinical testing on the modulation of A-SMase levels/activity as possible novel anti-neoplastic strategy. PMID:27107419

  15. Evaluating the effect of zingiber officinalis on nausea and vomiting in patients receiving Cisplatin based regimens.

    PubMed

    Fahimi, Fanak; Khodadad, Kian; Amini, Somayeh; Naghibi, Farzaneh; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Baniasadi, Shadi

    2011-01-01

    Ginger, the rhizome of Zingiber officinalis, has long been used as herbal medicine for its antiemetic effect. For evaluating the effect of zingiber officinalis on nausea and vomiting (N and V) in patients receiving cisplatin based regimens, a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over clinical trial was carried out in patients receiving cisplatin in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. The patients were randomly assigned to receive ginger capsules (rhizome of zingiber officinalis) or placebo in their first cycle of the study. All patients received standard antiemetics for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). The patients were crossed-over to receive ginger or placebo in their next cycle of chemotherapy. Among 36 eligible patients who received both cycles of treatment, there were no difference in prevalence, severity, and duration of both acute and delayed N and V. Addition of ginger to the standard antiemetic regimen has shown no advantage in reducing acute and delayed N and V in patients with cisplatin-based regimen in this study. PMID:24250368

  16. β-caryophyllene ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in a cannabinoid 2 receptor-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Béla; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Kechrid, Malek; Patel, Vivek; Tanashian, Galin; Wink, David A.; Gertsch, Jürg; Pacher, Pál

    2012-01-01

    (E)-β-caryophyllene (BCP) is a natural sequiterpene found in many essential oils of spice (best known for contributing to the spiciness of black pepper) and food plants with recognized anti-inflammatory properties. Recently it was shown that BCP is a natural agonist of endogenous cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptors, which are expressed in immune cells and mediate anti-inflammatory effects. In this study we aimed to test the effects of BCP in a clinically relevant murine model of nephropathy (induced by the widely used antineoplastic drug cisplatin) in which the tubular injury is largely dependent on inflammation and oxidative/nitrative stress. β-caryophyllene dose-dependently ameliorated cisplatin-induced kidney dysfunction, morphological damage, and renal inflammatory response (chemokines MCP-1 and MIP-2, cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, adhesion molecule ICAM-1, and neutrophil and macrophage infiltration). It also markedly mitigated oxidative/nitrative stress (NOX-2, NOX-4 expression, 4-HNE and 3-NT content) and cell death. The protective effects of BCP against biochemical and histological markers of nephropathy were absent in CB2 knockout mice. Thus, BCP may be an excellent therapeutic agent to prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through a CB2 receptor dependent pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of BCP in humans it has tremendous therapeutic potential in multitude of diseases associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:22326488

  17. Liquid crystalline nanoparticles encapsulating cisplatin and docetaxel combination for targeted therapy of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Raj Kumar; Choi, Ju Yeon; Gupta, Biki; Ramasamy, Thiruganesh; Poudel, Bijay Kumar; Ku, Sae Kwang; Youn, Yu Seok; Choi, Han Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2016-08-16

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death. A combination of anticancer agents can effectively kill cancer through multiple pathways; however, improvements to their delivery are needed. Hence, docetaxel and cisplatin-loaded liquid crystalline nanoparticles with folic acid were prepared for effective and targeted anticancer therapy. Notably, hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin/cisplatin complexes in 0.9% NaCl solution were used for the prevention of possible aquation of cisplatin, which would otherwise lead to severe adverse effects. The optimized nanoparticles exhibited small particle size, high drug loading capacity (>90%), and controlled drug release profiles. In vitro cell cytotoxicity assays demonstrated that the optimized nanoparticles were taken up by folate receptor-expressing cells to a greater extent than non-folate expressing cells, which is attributable to folate-specific endocytosis of the optimized nanoparticles. Enhanced expression of apoptotic markers (Bax, p21, and cleaved caspase-3) along with enhanced anti-migration effects in MDA-MB-231 cells following treatment suggests that the optimized nanoparticles provide an effective treatment for metastatic breast cancer. These results were further supported by in vivo findings obtained for a MDA-MB-231 tumor xenograft model. Altogether, the optimized nanoparticles may potentially be developed as an effective treatment modality for folate-targeted metastatic breast cancer treatment. PMID:27412822

  18. Evaluating the Effect of Zingiber Officinalis on Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Cisplatin Based Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Fahimi, Fanak; Khodadad, Kian; Amini, Somayeh; Naghibi, Farzaneh; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Baniasadi, Shadi

    2011-01-01

    Ginger, the rhizome of Zingiber officinalis, has long been used as herbal medicine for its antiemetic effect. For evaluating the effect of zingiber officinalis on nausea and vomiting (N and V) in patients receiving cisplatin based regimens, a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over clinical trial was carried out in patients receiving cisplatin in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. The patients were randomly assigned to receive ginger capsules (rhizome of zingiber officinalis) or placebo in their first cycle of the study. All patients received standard antiemetics for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). The patients were crossed-over to receive ginger or placebo in their next cycle of chemotherapy. Among 36 eligible patients who received both cycles of treatment, there were no difference in prevalence, severity, and duration of both acute and delayed N and V. Addition of ginger to the standard antiemetic regimen has shown no advantage in reducing acute and delayed N and V in patients with cisplatin-based regimen in this study. PMID:24250368

  19. Direct intercalation of cisplatin into zirconium phosphate nanoplatelets for potential cancer nanotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Agustín; González, Millie L.; Pérez, Riviam J.; David, Amanda; Mukherjee, Atashi; Báez, Adriana; Clearfield, Abraham; Colón, Jorge L.

    2013-11-01

    We report the use of zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets for the encapsulation of the anticancer drug cisplatin and its delivery to tumor cells. Cisplatin was intercalated into ZrP by direct ion exchange and was tested in vitro for cytotoxicity in the human breast cancer (MCF-7) cell line. The structural characterization of the intercalated cisplatin in ZrP suggests that during the intercalation process, the chloride ligands of the cisplatin complex were substituted by phosphate groups within the layers. Consequently, a new phosphate phase with the platinum complex directly bound to ZrP (cisPt@ZrP) is produced with an interlayer distance of 9.3 Å. The in vitro release profile of the intercalated drug upon a pH stimulus shows that at low pH under lysosomal conditions the platinum complex is released with simultaneous hydrolysis of the zirconium phosphate material, while at higher pH the complex is not released. Experiments with the MCF-7 cell line show that cisPt@ZrP reduced the cell viability up to 40%. The cisPt@ZrP intercalation product is envisioned as a future nanotherapy agent against cancer. Taking advantage of the shape and sizes of the ZrP particles and controlled release of the drug at low pH, it is intended to exploit the enhanced permeability and retention effect of tumors, as well as their intrinsic acidity, for the destruction of malignant cells.We report the use of zirconium phosphate (ZrP) nanoplatelets for the encapsulation of the anticancer drug cisplatin and its delivery to tumor cells. Cisplatin was intercalated into ZrP by direct ion exchange and was tested in vitro for cytotoxicity in the human breast cancer (MCF-7) cell line. The structural characterization of the intercalated cisplatin in ZrP suggests that during the intercalation process, the chloride ligands of the cisplatin complex were substituted by phosphate groups within the layers. Consequently, a new phosphate phase with the platinum complex directly bound to ZrP (cisPt@ZrP) is

  20. MKP1/CL100 controls tumor growth and sensitivity to cisplatin in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, S; Machado-Pinilla, R; Manguan-García, C; Belda-Iniesta, C; Moratilla, C; Cejas, P; Fresno-Vara, J A; de Castro-Carpeño, J; Casado, E; Nistal, M; Gonzalez-Barón, M; Perona, R

    2006-06-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents the most frequent and therapy-refractive sub-class of lung cancer. Improving apoptosis induction in NSCLC represents a logical way forward in treating this tumor. Cisplatin, a commonly used therapeutic agent in NSCLC, induces activation of N-terminal-c-Jun kinase (JNK) that, in turn, mediates induction of apoptosis. In analysing surgical tissue samples of NSCLC, we found that expression of MKP1/CL100, a negative regulator of JNK, showed a strong nuclear staining for tumor cells, whereas, in normal bronchial epithelia, MKP1 was localized in the cytoplasm as well as in nuclei. In the NSCLC-derived cell lines H-460 and H-23, we found that MKP1 was constitutively expressed. Expressing a small-interfering RNA (siRNA) vector for MKP1 in H-460 cells resulted in a more efficient activation by cisplatin of JNK and p38 than in the parental cells, and this correlated with a 10-fold increase in sensitivity to cisplatin. A similar response was also observed in H-460 and H-23 cells when treated with the MKP1 expression inhibitor RO-31-8220. Moreover, expression of a siRNA-MKP2, an MKP1-related phosphatase, had no effect on H-460 cell viability response to cisplatin. Tumors induced by H-460 cells expressing MKP1 siRNA grew slower in nu(-)/nu(-) mice and showed more susceptibility to cisplatin than parental cells, and resulted in an impaired growth of the tumor in mice. On the other hand, overexpression of MKP1 in the H-1299 NSCLC-derived cell line resulted in further resistance to cisplatin. Overall, the results showed that inhibition of MKP1 expression contributes to a slow down in cell growth in mice and an increase of cisplatin-induced cell death in NSCLC. As such, MKP1 can be an attractive target in sensitizing cells to cisplatin to increase the effectiveness of the drug in treating NSCLC. PMID:16462770

  1. Assessment of D-methionine protecting cisplatin-induced otolith toxicity by vestibular-evoked myogenic potential tests, ATPase activities and oxidative state in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wu-Chia; Chang, Chih-Ming; Liao, Li-Jen; Wang, Chi-Te; Young, Yi-Ho; Chang, Yih-Leong; Cheng, Po-Wen

    2015-01-01

    To date, inadequate study has been devoted to the toxic vestibular effects caused by cisplatin. In addition, no electrophysiological examination has been conducted to assess cisplatin-induced otolith toxicity. The purposes of this study are thus two-fold: 1) to determine whether cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) and ocular VEMPs are practical electrophysiological methods of testing for cisplatin-induced otolith toxicity and 2) to examine if D-methionine (D-met) pre-injection would protect the otolith organs against cisplatin-induced changes in enzyme activities and/or oxidative status. Guinea pigs were intraperitoneally treated once daily with the following injections for seven consecutive days: sterile 0.9% saline control, cisplatin (5 mg/kg) only, D-met (300 mg/kg) only, or a combination of d-met (300 mg/kg) and cisplatin (5 mg/kg), respectively, with a 30 minute window in between. Each animal underwent the oVEMP and cVEMP tests before and after treatment. The changes in the biochemistry of the otolith organs, including membranous Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase, lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels and nitric oxide (NO) levels, were also evaluated. In the cisplatin-only treated guinea pigs, the mean amplitudes of the oVEMP tests were significantly (p<0.05) decreased when compared to the other three groups. In guinea pigs receiving both D-met and cisplatin, the amplitudes of their oVEMP tests were significantly larger (p<0.05) than those of the cisplatin-only group, but smaller (p<0.05) than those of the saline control or D-met-only group. However, no significant difference of the amplitudes of cVEMP tests was noted among the four groups. In comparison with the other three groups, the cisplatin-only group had the lowest (ps<0.05) mean Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase, and the highest (ps<0.05) LPO and NO levels. The oVEMP tests were feasible for the evaluation of cisplatin-related otolith dysfunction. D-Met attenuated the reduced ATPase

  2. Improved efficacy of cisplatin in combination with a nano-formulation of pentacyclic triterpenediol.

    PubMed

    Alam, Noor; Qayum, Arem; Kumar, Ashok; Khare, Vaibhav; Sharma, Parduman Raj; Andotra, Samar Singh; Singh, Shashank K; Koul, Surinder; Gupta, Prem N

    2016-11-01

    Cisplatin is widely used for the treatment of various cancers including cervical, ovarian, lung and head and neck, however, its clinical success is limited owing to the dose-dependent adverse effects, mainly nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity. In order to address this limitation, the present study was undertaken to investigate growth inhibitory effect of cisplatin in combination with a triterpenediol (3a, 24-dihydroxyurs-12-ene and 3a, 24-dihydroxyolean-12-ene, TPD) on human ovarian cancer cell line. Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles loaded with TPD (TPD-PLGA-NPs) were successfully developed by emulsion solvent evaporation method. The TPD-PLGA-NPs were characterized for size distribution and zeta potential which was in order of 152.56±3.01nm and -17.36±0.37mV respectively. The morphological evaluation was carried out by transmission electron microscopy and the formulation was also characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The drug loading of the optimized formulation was 51.03±1.52μg/mg and the formulation exhibited sustained drug release profile. The in vitro cellular uptake study of coumarin-6 loaded PLGA nanoparticles in OVCAR-5 cells demonstrated a time dependent increase in uptake efficiency. Further, growth inhibitory effect of cisplatin was investigated in combination with TPD-PLGA-NPs. The combination index (CI) was <1, indicating a synergistic interaction. Further, at 75% of cell growth inhibition (ED75) the dose of cisplatin was reduced to 3.8 folds using this combination. The results indicated the potential of cisplatin and TPD-PLGA-NPs combination in order to reduce to dose limiting toxicities of the former. PMID:27524002

  3. An upconversion nanoplatform for simultaneous photodynamic therapy and Pt chemotherapy to combat cisplatin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ai, Fujin; Sun, Tianying; Xu, Zoufeng; Wang, Zhigang; Kong, Wei; To, Man Wai; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Guangyu

    2016-08-16

    Platinum-based antineoplastic drugs are among the first-line chemotherapeutic agents against a variety of solid tumors, but toxic side-effects and drug resistance issues limit their clinical optimization. Novel strategies and platforms to conquer cisplatin resistance are highly desired. Herein, we assembled a multimodal nanoplatform utilizing 808 nm-excited and biocompatible core-shell-shell upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) [NaGdF4:Yb/Nd@NaGdF4:Yb/Er@NaGdF4] that were covalently loaded with not only photosensitizers (PSs), but also Pt(iv) prodrugs, which were rose bengal (RB) and c,c,t-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2(OCOCH2CH2NH2)2], respectively. The UCNPs had the capability to convert near infrared (NIR) light to visible light, which was further utilized by RB to generate singlet oxygen. At the same time, the nanoplatform delivered the Pt(iv) prodrug into cancer cells. Thus, this upconversion nanoplatform was able to carry out combined and simultaneous photodynamic therapy (PDT) and Pt chemotherapy. The nanoplatform was well characterized and the energy transfer efficiency was confirmed. Compared with free cisplatin or UCNPs loaded with RB only, our nanoplatform showed significantly improved cytotoxicity upon 808 nm irradiation in both cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant human ovarian cancer cells. A mechanistic study showed that the nanoparticles efficiently delivered the Pt(iv) prodrug into cancer cells, resulting in Pt-DNA damage, and that the nanoplatform generated cellular singlet oxygen to kill cancer cells. We, therefore, provide a comprehensive strategy to use UCNPs for combined Pt chemotherapy and PDT against cisplatin resistance, and our nanoplatform can also be used as a theranostic tool due to its NIR bioimaging capacity. PMID:27430044

  4. Circadian control of XPA and excision repair of cisplatin-DNA damage by cryptochrome and HERC2 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae-Hong; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura A; Reardon, Joyce T; Sancar, Aziz

    2010-03-16

    Cisplatin is one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs. It kills cancer cells by damaging their DNA, and hence cellular DNA repair capacity is an important determinant of its efficacy. Here, we investigated the repair of cisplatin-induced DNA damage in mouse liver and testis tissue extracts prepared at regular intervals over the course of a day. We find that the XPA protein, which plays an essential role in repair of cisplatin damage by nucleotide excision repair, exhibits circadian oscillation in the liver but not in testis. Consequently, removal of cisplatin adducts in liver extracts, but not in testis extracts, exhibits a circadian pattern with zenith at approximately 5 pm and nadir at approximately 5 am. Furthermore, we find that the circadian oscillation of XPA is achieved both by regulation of transcription by the core circadian clock proteins including cryptochrome and by regulation at the posttranslational level by the HERC2 ubiquitin ligase. These findings may be used as a guide for timing of cisplatin chemotherapy. PMID:20304803

  5. Raloxifene Inhibits NF-kB Pathway and Potentiates Anti-Tumour Activity of Cisplatin with Simultaneous Reduction in its Nephrotoxictiy.

    PubMed

    Jamdade, Vinayak Sudhir; Mundhe, Nitin A; Kumar, Parveen; Tadla, Venkatesh; Lahkar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity is the chief obstacle in the use of cisplatin as chemotherapeutic agent. However, it remains as most widely employed anticancer agent to treat various solid tumours like head-neck, testicular, ovarian and mammary gland cancer. Raloxifene is claimed to be potent anti-inflammatory as well as anti-cancer agent. The present study was carried out to explore the effect of pre-treatment of raloxifene on cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity and its anti-tumour activity in 7, 12 dimethyl benz [a] anthracene induced mammary tumour in animal model. Renal damage was accessed by measuring serum level of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and albumin whereas systemic inflammation was accessed by measuring level of pro-inflammatory cytokines like tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). Moreover, assessment of tumour reduction was done by measuring tumour volume and percentage tumour reduction. A single dose of cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg) resulted in significant increase in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, NF-kB, TNF-α and IL-6 levels along with decrease in albumin and IL-10 levels. However, there were no significant changes in raloxifene (8 mg/kg) treated group. Pre-treatment of raloxifene (8 mg/kg) caused marked decrease in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, TNF-α and IL-6 levels whereas increase in albumin and IL-10 levels. However, pre-treatment of raloxifene showed maximum tumour reduction as compared to cisplatin and raloxifene treated groups. The present study demonstrates that raloxifene potentiates anti-tumour activity of cisplatin with simultaneous reduction in its nephrotoxicity, and this effect is attributed to its direct anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:26439246

  6. Novel orally active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) analogs attenuate cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Abdul Hye; Liu, Jing; Kumar, Ganesh; Skapek, Stephen X; Falck, John R; Imig, John D

    2013-08-01

    Nephrotoxicity severely limits the use of the anticancer drug cisplatin. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contribute to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. We developed novel orally active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) analogs and investigated their prophylactic effect in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was manifested by increases in blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, urinary N-acetyl-β-(d)-glucosaminidase activity, kidney injury molecule 1, and histopathology. EET analogs (10 mg/kg/d) attenuated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by reducing these renal injury markers by 40-80% along with a 50-70% reduction in renal tubular cast formation. This attenuated renal injury is associated with reduced oxidative stress, inflammation, and ER stress evident from reduction in related biomarkers and in the renal expression of genes involved in these pathways. Moreover, we demonstrated that the attenuated nephrotoxicity correlated with decreased apoptosis that is associated with 50-90% reduction in Bcl-2 protein family mediated proapoptotic signaling, reduced renal caspase-12 expression, and a 50% reduction in renal caspase-3 activity. We further demonstrated in vitro that the protective activity of EET analogs does not compromise the anticancer effects of cisplatin. Collectively, our data provide evidence that EET analogs attenuate cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by reducing oxidative stress, inflammation, ER stress, and apoptosis without affecting the chemotherapeutic effects of cisplatin. PMID:23603837

  7. Rationally engineered polymeric cisplatin nanoparticles for improved antitumor efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paraskar, Abhimanyu; Soni, Shivani; Basu, Sudipta; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J.; Lupoli, Nicola; Srivats, Shyam; Sinha Roy, Rituparna; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2011-07-01

    The use of cisplatin, a first line chemotherapy for most cancers, is dose-limited due to nephrotoxicity. While this toxicity can be addressed through nanotechnology, previous attempts at engineering cisplatin nanoparticles have been limited by the impact on the potency of cisplatin. Here we report the rational engineering of a novel cisplatin nanoparticle by harnessing a novel polyethylene glycol-functionalized poly-isobutylene-maleic acid (PEG-PIMA) copolymer, which can complex with cis-platinum (II) through a monocarboxylato and a coordinate bond. We show that this complex self-assembles into a nanoparticle, and exhibits an IC50 = 0.77 ± 0.11 µM comparable to that of free cisplatin (IC50 = 0.44 ± 0.09 µM). The nanoparticles are internalized into the endolysosomal compartment of cancer cells, and release cisplatin in a pH-dependent manner. Furthermore, the nanoparticles exhibit significantly improved antitumor efficacy in a 4T1 breast cancer model in vivo, with limited nephrotoxicity, which can be explained by preferential biodistribution in the tumor with reduced kidney concentrations. Our results suggest that the PEG-PIMA-cisplatin nanoparticle can emerge as an attractive solution to the challenges in cisplatin chemotherapy.

  8. Anti-tumor Efficiency of Lipid-coated Cisplatin Nanoparticles Co-loaded with MicroRNA-375

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tan; Zhao, Pengxuan; Rong, Zhao; Li, Bin; Xue, Huiying; You, Jia; He, Chuanchuan; Li, Weijie; He, Xingxing; Lee, Robert J.; Ma, Xiang; Xiang, Guangya

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment is its insensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we report the development of novel lipid-coated cisplatin nanoparticles co-loaded with microRNA-375 (NPC/miR-375) as a potential treatment for chemotherapy insensitive HCC. The NPC/miR-375 was fabricated by mixing two reverse microemulsions containing KCl solution and a highly soluble cis-diaminedihydroplatinum (II) coated with a cationic lipid layer. Subsequently, the miR-375 was incorporated into the lipid-coated cisplatin nanoparticles. The NPC/miR375 nanoparticles were expected to further decrease cell proliferation and to enhance the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin in chemotherapy resistant HCC cells. In vitro analysis of intracellular trafficking revealed that NPC/miR-375 were able to escape from the late endosomes instead of lysosomes thus avoiding degradation of the miR-375 in lysosomes. Importantly, NPC/miR-375 enhanced apoptosis and induced cell cycle arrest in HCC cells in vitro. In the double oncogenes Akt/Ras-induced primary HCC mouse model, multiple doses of NPC/miR-375 significantly inhibited tumor growth and delayed the tumor relapse. Our results indicate that cisplatin nanoparticles co-loaded with miR-375 represent a potential therapeutic agent for chemotherapy-insensitive HCC. PMID:26722380

  9. Cetuximab and Cisplatin Show Different Combination Effect in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells Lines via Inactivation of EGFR/AKT Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jiajia; Yin, Li; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Nan; Huang, Teng; Ding, Kai; Cao, Haixia; Xu, Lin; He, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a common malignant cancer in South China. Cisplatin is a classical chemotherapeutic employed for NPC treatment. Despite the use of cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy, distant failure still confuses clinicians and the outcome of metastatic NPC remains disappointing. Hence, a potent systemic therapy is needed for this cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) represents a promising new therapeutic target in cancer. We predicted that combining the conventional cytotoxic drug cisplatin with the novel molecular-targeted agent cetuximab demonstrates a strong antitumor effect on NPC cells. In this study, we selected HNE1 and CNE2 cells, which have been proved to possess different EGFR expression levels, to validate our conjecture. The two-drug regimen showed a significant synergistic effect in HNE1 cells but an additive effect in CNE2 cells. Our results showed that cisplatin-induced apoptosis was significantly enhanced by cetuximab in the high EGFR-expressing HNE1 cells but not in CNE2 cells. Further molecular mechanism study indicated that the EGFR/AKT pathway may play an important role in cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial-mediated intrinsic pathway and lead to the different antitumor effects of this two-drug regimen between HNE1 and CNE2 cells. Thus, the regimen may be applied in personalized NPC treatments. PMID:27313893

  10. Anti-tumor Efficiency of Lipid-coated Cisplatin Nanoparticles Co-loaded with MicroRNA-375.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tan; Zhao, Pengxuan; Rong, Zhao; Li, Bin; Xue, Huiying; You, Jia; He, Chuanchuan; Li, Weijie; He, Xingxing; Lee, Robert J; Ma, Xiang; Xiang, Guangya

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment is its insensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we report the development of novel lipid-coated cisplatin nanoparticles co-loaded with microRNA-375 (NPC/miR-375) as a potential treatment for chemotherapy insensitive HCC. The NPC/miR-375 was fabricated by mixing two reverse microemulsions containing KCl solution and a highly soluble cis-diaminedihydroplatinum (II) coated with a cationic lipid layer. Subsequently, the miR-375 was incorporated into the lipid-coated cisplatin nanoparticles. The NPC/miR375 nanoparticles were expected to further decrease cell proliferation and to enhance the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin in chemotherapy resistant HCC cells. In vitro analysis of intracellular trafficking revealed that NPC/miR-375 were able to escape from the late endosomes instead of lysosomes thus avoiding degradation of the miR-375 in lysosomes. Importantly, NPC/miR-375 enhanced apoptosis and induced cell cycle arrest in HCC cells in vitro. In the double oncogenes Akt/Ras-induced primary HCC mouse model, multiple doses of NPC/miR-375 significantly inhibited tumor growth and delayed the tumor relapse. Our results indicate that cisplatin nanoparticles co-loaded with miR-375 represent a potential therapeutic agent for chemotherapy-insensitive HCC. PMID:26722380

  11. [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] versus cisplatin: apoptotic effects in B50 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Maddalena; Santin, Giada; Insolia, Violetta; Dal Bo, Veronica; Piccolini, Valeria Maria; Veneroni, Paola; Barni, Sergio; Verri, Manuela; De Pascali, Sandra Angelica; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo; Bernocchi, Graziella; Bottone, Maria Grazia

    2016-05-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most active chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of childhood and adult malignancies. Cisplatin induces cell death through different pathways. Despite its effectiveness, the continued clinical use of cisplatin is limited by onset of severe side effects (nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity and neurotoxicity) and drug resistance. Therefore, one of the main experimental oncology purpose is related to the search for new platinum-based drugs to create different types of adducts or more specific and effective subcellular targets. Thus, [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)], which reacts preferentially with protein thiols or thioether, was synthesized. In our research, different approaches were used to compare cisplatin and [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] effects in B50 rat neuroblastoma cells. Our results, using immunocytochemical, cytometric and morphological techniques, showed that these compounds exert a cytostatic action and activate apoptosis with different pathways. Long-term effects demonstrated that [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] exerts cytotoxic effects in neuronal B50 cell line not inducing drug resistance. Analysis was performed both to compare the ability of these platinum compounds to induce cell death and to investigate the intracellular mechanisms at the basis of their cytotoxicity. PMID:26748644

  12. Inhibition of p38 MAPK sensitizes tumour cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis mediated by reactive oxygen species and JNK

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Lorena; Igea, Ana; Canovas, Begoña; Dolado, Ignacio; Nebreda, Angel R

    2013-01-01

    The p38 MAPK pathway is an important regulator of many cellular responses. It is well established that p38 MAPK signalling negatively regulates epithelial cell transformation, but enhanced p38 MAPK activity has been also correlated with bad clinical prognosis in some tumour types. Here, we provide genetic and pharmacological evidence showing that p38 MAPK inhibition cooperates with the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin to kill tumour cells. We show that p38 MAPK inhibition results in ROS upregulation, which in turn activates the JNK pathway via inactivation of phosphatases, sensitizing human tumour cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Using a mouse model for breast cancer, we confirm that inhibition of p38 MAPK cooperates with cisplatin treatment to reduce tumour size and malignancy in vivo. Taken together, our results illustrate a new function of p38 MAPK that helps tumour cells to survive chemotherapeutic drug treatments, and reveal that the combination of p38 MAPK inhibitors with cisplatin can be potentially exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:24115572

  13. Inhibition of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation and synergism of cisplatin with silvestrol and episilvestrol isolated from Aglaia stellatopilosa

    PubMed Central

    DAKER, MAELINDA; YEO, JIUN-TZEN; BAKAR, NORHASIMAH; ABDUL RAHMAN, ASMA' SAIYIDATINA AISHAH ABDUL; AHMAD, MUNIRAH; YEO, TIONG-CHIA; KHOO, ALAN SOO-BENG

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a type of tumour that arises from the epithelial cells that line the surface of the nasopharynx. NPC is treated with radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. However, current strategies are often associated with potential toxicities. This has prompted efforts to identify alternative methods of treatment. The present study aimed to investigate silvestrol and episilvestrol-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation in human NPC cells. The growth kinetics of NPC cells treated with silvestrol or episilvestrol were monitored dynamically using a real-time, impedance-based cell analyzer, and dose-response profiles were generated using a colorimetric cell viability assay. Furthermore, apoptosis was evaluated using flow cytometry and high content analysis. In addition, flow cytometry was performed to determine cell cycle distribution. Finally, the effects of combining silvestrol or episilvestrol with cisplatin on NPC cells was examined. Apoptosis was not observed in silvestrol and episilvestrol-treated NPC cells, although cell cycle perturbation was evident. Treatment with both compounds induced a significant increase in the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase, as compared with the control. In vitro cultures combining silvestrol or episilvestrol with cisplatin showed synergistic effects against NPC cells. The results of the present study suggested that silvestrol and episilvestrol had an anti-tumour activity in NPC cells. Silvestrol and episilvestrol, particularly in combination with cisplatin, merit further investigation, so as to determine the cellular mechanisms underlying their action(s) as anti-NPC agents. PMID:27284293

  14. Genistein enhances the cisplatin-induced inhibition of cell growth and apoptosis in human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shingo; Bito, Toshinori; Ichihashi, Masamitsu; Ueda, Masato

    2003-10-01

    Genistein, a naturally occurring isoflavone found chiefly in soybeans, has been reported to be a potent antitumor agent. Genistein is presumed to exert multiple effects related to the inhibition of cancer growth. Metastatic melanoma is a chemotherapy-refractory neoplasm. The present study was designed to explore the possible activity of genistein to inhibit the aberrant proliferation and to induce apoptosis of human malignant melanoma cells in cooperation with cisplatin treatment. Five human melanoma cell lines were utilized for these experiments. Genistein at physiologic concentrations (20 microM) did not induce apoptosis by itself but did enhance cisplatin-induced apoptosis in all five human melanoma cell lines tested. The enhanced susceptibility among the cell lines was diverse. Changes in the expression of two anti-apoptotic proteins, bcl-2 and bcl-xL, and one pro-apoptotic protein, apoptotic protease activating factor-1 (Apaf-1), were examined. Genistein alone or cisplatin alone generally did not alter bcl-2 expression or bcl-xL expression, but slightly increased Apaf-1 in some cell lines. The combined treatment with genistein and cisplatin significantly reduced bcl-2 and bcl-xL protein and increased Apaf-1 protein expression. These data suggest that genistein therapy may enhance the chemosensitivity of melanoma patients. PMID:12950722

  15. Common variants in ACYP2 influence susceptibility to cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Robinson, Giles W; Huang, Jie; Lim, Joshua Yew-Suang; Zhang, Hui; Bass, Johnnie K; Broniscer, Alberto; Chintagumpala, Murali; Bartels, Ute; Gururangan, Sri; Hassall, Tim; Fisher, Michael; Cohn, Richard; Yamashita, Tetsuji; Teitz, Tal; Zuo, Jian; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Gajjar, Amar; Stewart, Clinton F; Yang, Jun J

    2015-03-01

    Taking a genome-wide association study approach, we identified inherited genetic variations in ACYP2 associated with cisplatin-related ototoxicity (rs1872328: P = 3.9 × 10(-8), hazard ratio = 4.5) in 238 children with newly diagnosed brain tumors, with independent replication in 68 similarly treated children. The ACYP2 risk variant strongly predisposed these patients to precipitous hearing loss and was related to ototoxicity severity. These results point to new biology underlying the ototoxic effects of platinum agents. PMID:25665007

  16. Evaluation of the Retinoids with Cisplatin and Vincristine in Xenograft Models of Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Robin E.; Nguyen, Vu T.; Adamson, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Retinoids have been studied for the treatment of children with neuroblastoma for more than 25 years. Post-transplant administration of isotretinoin is standard of care for children with high-risk neuroblastoma, while fenretinide remains investigational. Previous preclinical studies have evaluated the interaction of retinoids and cytotoxic agents with conflicting results. We evaluated the schedule dependent interaction of the cytotoxics, vincristine and cisplatin, with the retinoids, isotretinoin and fenretinide, in xenograft models of neuroblastoma. Concomitant administration of isotretinoin or fenretinide with the cytotoxics did not result in any clear potentiation of cytotoxicity. PMID:23669732

  17. Polymer-Caged Nanobins for Synergistic Cisplatin-Doxorubicin Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Min

    2013-01-01

    Multicomponent chemotherapy has increasingly become a strategy of great importance in clinical cancer treatments. However, this type of chemotherapy has not been demonstrated in nanoscale delivery vehicles where two cytotoxic agents can be packaged together, potentially leading to synergistic drug activities. Herein, we present the co-delivery of doxorubicin and cisplatin via a single polymer-caged nanobin (PCN) and show that co-packaging can yield strong synergy in the efficacy of these agents. Such a PCN comprises of a doxorubicin-encapsulated liposomal core protected by a pH-responsive cisplatin prodrug-loaded polymer shell with tunable drug ratios and surface charge potentials. This dual-agent Pt-PCNDXR formulation dramatically enhances the overall cytotoxicity of each drug against cancer cells at reduced doses and exhibits higher synergy than combinations of either the free drugs or separately nano-packaged drugs. These results clearly indicate that the polymer-caged nanobin platform can offer new means for building synergy into combination chemotherapy regimens. PMID:21077673

  18. Dendrimers bind antioxidant polyphenols and cisplatin drug.

    PubMed

    Abderrezak, Amine; Bourassa, Philippe; Mandeville, Jean-Sebastian; Sedaghat-Herati, Reza; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic polymers of a specific shape and size play major role in drug delivery systems. Dendrimers are unique synthetic macromolecules of nanometer dimensions with a highly branched structure and globular shape with potential applications in gene and drug delivery. We examine the interaction of several dendrimers of different compositions mPEG-PAMAM (G3), mPEG-PAMAM (G4) and PAMAM (G4) with hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs cisplatin, resveratrol, genistein and curcumin at physiological conditions. FTIR and UV-visible spectroscopic methods as well as molecular modeling were used to analyse drug binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of drug complexation on dendrimer stability and conformation. Structural analysis showed that cisplatin binds dendrimers in hydrophilic mode via Pt cation and polymer terminal NH(2) groups, while curcumin, genistein and resveratrol are located mainly in the cavities binding through both hydrophobic and hydrophilic contacts. The overall binding constants of durg-dendrimers are ranging from 10(2) M(-1) to 10(3) M(-1). The affinity of dendrimer binding was PAMAM-G4>mPEG-PAMAM-G4>mPEG-PAMAM-G3, while the order of drug-polymer stability was curcumin>cisplatin>genistein>resveratrol. Molecular modeling showed larger stability for genisten-PAMAM-G4 (ΔG = -4.75 kcal/mol) than curcumin-PAMAM-G4 ((ΔG = -4.53 kcal/mol) and resveratrol-PAMAM-G4 ((ΔG = -4.39 kcal/mol). Dendrimers might act as carriers to transport hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs. PMID:22427960

  19. Curcumin downregulates p38 MAPK-dependent X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 (XRCC1) expression to enhance cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chen, Wen-Ching; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chang, Po-Yuan; Liao, Kai-Sheng; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Cisplatin is a well-studied and widely used chemotherapeutic agent and is effective in the treatment of the advanced human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Curcumin is a yellow pigment derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa and has been proved to have antioxidant and antitumor properties. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein involved in base excision repair and plays an important role in the development of lung cancer. In this study, we characterize the role of curcumin in the cytotoxicity, p38 MAPK activation, and XRCC1 expression affected by cisplatin in NSCLC cells. We show that curcumin enhanced the cytotoxicity induced by cisplatin in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1703. Treatment with cisplatin alone increased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through p38 MAPK activation. Moreover, SB2023580 (p38 inhibitor) decreased the XRCC1 mRNA and protein stability upon cisplatin treatment. Knockdown of XRCC1 in NSCLC cells by transfection of XRCC1 siRNA or inactivation of p38 MAPK resulted in enhancing the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition induced by cisplatin. Curcumin inhibited the expression of XRCC1 in cisplatin-exposed NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK6 or HA-p38 MAPK vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level and also the cell survival suppressed by cisplatin and curcumin combination in A549 and H1703 cells. These findings suggested that the downregulation of XRCC1 expression by curcumin can enhance the chemosensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells. PMID:27026405

  20. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Riad, Sandra; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death). Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death). PMID:25685789

  1. Molecular characteristics and in vitro susceptibility to antimicrobial agents, including the des-fluoro(6) quinolone DX-619, of Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from the community and hospitals.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Dohmae, Soshi; Saito, Kohei; Otsuka, Taketo; Takano, Tomomi; Chiba, Megumi; Fujikawa, Katsuko; Tanaka, Mayumi

    2006-12-01

    Highly virulent, community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) genes have been found increasingly worldwide. Among a total of 2,101 MRSA strains isolated from patients in hospitals in Japan, two were positive for PVL genes. One strain was identified as a community-acquired MRSA strain with genotype sequence type 30 (ST30) and spa (staphylococcal protein A gene) type 19 from Japan and was resistant only to beta-lactam antimicrobial agents. The other strain was closely related to PVL+ multidrug-resistant, hospital-acquired MRSA strains (ST30, spa type 43) derived from nosocomial outbreaks in the 1980s to 1990s in Japan but with a divergent sequence type, ST765 (a single-locus variant of ST30). Twenty-two PVL+ MRSA strains, including those from Japan and those from other countries with various sequence types (ST1, ST8, ST30, ST59, and ST80) and genotypes, were examined for susceptibility to 31 antimicrobial agents. Among the agents, DX-619, a des-fluoro(6) quinolone, showed the greatest activity, followed by rifampin and sitafloxacin, a fluoroquinolone. The data suggest that DX-619 exhibits a superior activity against PVL+ MRSA strains with various virulence genetic traits from the community as well as from hospitals. PMID:17043124

  2. Antitumoral effect of PLK-1-inhibitor BI2536 in combination with cisplatin and docetaxel in squamous cell carcinoma cell lines of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Wagenblast, Jens; Hirth, Daniel; Eckardt, Anne; Leinung, Martin; Diensthuber, Marc; Stöver, Timo; Hambek, Markus

    2013-03-01

    Inhibition of the polo-like-kinase-1 (PLK-1) has been shown to be effective in several haematological and solid tumor models. In this systemic in vitro study, the antitumor effect of BI2536, a small molecule inhibitor of PLK-1, in combination with cisplatin and docetaxel was examined in nine squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, most of which had a head and neck origin (SCCHN). Dose escalation studies were conducted with nine SCCHN cell lines using BI2536, cisplatin and docetaxel in cell line-specific concentrations. Growth inhibitory and proapoptotic effects were measured quantitatively using cytohistology and a Human Apoptose Array kit. BI2536 in combination with cisplatin and docetaxel showed a markedly higher antiproliferative and apoptotic activity in the SCCHN cell lines investigated (P≤0.008), compared with single agent cisplatin or docetaxel alone. The findings of this study showed that the addition of PLK-1-inhibitor BI2536 to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs led to a statistically higher antiproliferative and apoptotic effect in SCCHN cell lines compared with cisplatin or docetaxel alone. Inaugurating BI2536 in the clinical setting might enhance the antitumoral activity of conventional drugs, possibly leading to less toxic side effects of cancer therapy. PMID:24649162

  3. X-ray analysis of the effect of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron on gastrointestinal motility in rats repeatedly treated with the antitumoral drug cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Vera, Gema; López-Pérez, Ana Esther; Martínez-Villaluenga, María; Cabezos, Pablo Antonio; Abalo, Raquel

    2014-08-01

    Cancer chemotherapy is associated with the development of numerous adverse effects, including nausea, emesis and other alterations in gastrointestinal (GI) motility. The administration of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists has provided a clinical advance in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced vomiting but these drugs lose efficacy throughout chronic treatment. The effects of these drugs in experimental animals under chronic administration are not well known. Our aim was to study, using radiographic methods, the effect of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron on GI dysmotility induced in the rat by repeated cisplatin administration. First, invasive methods were used to select a dose of granisetron capable of reducing increased stomach weight due to acute cisplatin administration (6 mg/kg, ip). Second, rats received two intraperitoneal (ip) injections once a week for 4 weeks: granisetron (1 mg/kg, ip) or saline and, thirty min later, saline or cisplatin (2 mg/kg, ip). Body weight gain was measured throughout treatment. Radiological techniques were used to determine the acute (after first dose) and chronic (after last dose) effects of cisplatin and/or granisetron on GI motility. Repeated cisplatin-induced weight loss which granisetron did not prevent. Gastric emptying was delayed after the first cisplatin administration. Granisetron completely prevented this effect. After weekly administration, cisplatin-induced gastric dysmotility was enhanced and granisetron was not capable of completely preventing this effect. Granisetron prevents gastric emptying alterations, but its efficacy decreases throughout antineoplastic treatment. This might be due to the enhanced effect of cisplatin. PMID:24798399

  4. Study of the Effect of Route of Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Cisplatin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Fatma E; Sobh, Mohamed-A; Abouelkheir, Mohamed; Khater, Youmna; Mahmoud, Khalid; Saad, Mohamed-Ahdy; Sobh, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to ameliorate cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). The present study compares the efficacy of different routes of MSCs administration on kidney damage and regeneration after cisplatin-induced AKI. Methods A single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin (5 mg/kg) was used to induce AKI in 160 rats. MSCs (5×106) were given by either intravenous, intra-arterial or kidney sub capsular injection one day after cisplatin injection. Suitable control groups were included. Rats were sacrificed at 4, 7, 11 and 30 days after cisplatin injection. Kidney function parameters, kidney tissue oxidative stress markers, and scoring for renal tissue injury, regeneration and chronicity were all determined. Results MSCs by any routes were able to ameliorate kidney function deterioration and renal tissue damage induced by cisplatin. The overall results of the three routes were equal. Differences between the different routes in one parameter were transient and inconsistent with other parameters. Conclusions Changing the route of MSCs injection does not have a major influence on the outcome. Future evaluation should focus on differences between the routes of administration considering the long term safety. PMID:27426089

  5. Persistence of cisplatin-induced mutagenicity in hematopoietic stem cells: implications for secondary cancer risk following chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dertinger, Stephen D; Avlasevich, Svetlana L; Torous, Dorothea K; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Phonethepswath, Souk; Labash, Carson; Carlson, Kristine; Mereness, Jared; Cottom, John; Palis, James; MacGregor, James T

    2014-08-01

    Cisplatin is a cytostatic agent used in the treatment of many types of cancer, but its use is associated with increased incidences of secondary leukemia. We evaluated cisplatin's in vivo genotoxic potential by analyzing peripheral blood for Pig-a mutant phenotype erythrocytes and for chromosomal damage in the form of micronuclei. Mutant phenotype reticuloyte and erythrocyte frequencies, based on anti-CD59 antibody labeling and flow cytometric analysis, were determined in male Sprague Dawley rats treated for 28 consecutive days (days 1-28) with up to 0.4 mg cisplatin/kg/day, and sampled on days -4, 15, 29, and 56. Vehicle and highest dose groups were evaluated at additional time points post-treatment up to 6 months. Day 4 and 29 blood samples were also analyzed for micronucleated reticulocyte frequency using flow cytometry and anti-CD71-based labeling. Mutant phenotype reticulocytes were significantly elevated at doses ≥0.1 mg/kg/day, and mutant phenotype erythrocytes were elevated at doses ≥0.05 mg/kg/day. In the 0.4 mg/kg/day group, these effects persisted for the 6 month observation period. Cisplatin also induced a modest but statistically significant increase in micronucleus frequency at the highest dose tested. The prolonged persistence in the production of mutant erythrocytes following cisplatin exposure suggests that this drug mutates hematopoietic stem cells and that this damage may ultimately contribute to the increased incidence of secondary leukemias seen in patients cured of primary malignancies with platinum-based regimens. PMID:24798381

  6. Persistence of Cisplatin-Induced Mutagenicity in Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Implications for Secondary Cancer Risk Following Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dertinger, Stephen D.; Avlasevich, Svetlana L.; Torous, Dorothea K.; Bemis, Jeffrey C.; Phonethepswath, Souk; Labash, Carson; Carlson, Kristine; Mereness, Jared; Cottom, John; Palis, James; MacGregor, James T.

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is a cytostatic agent used in the treatment of many types of cancer, but its use is associated with increased incidences of secondary leukemia. We evaluated cisplatin's in vivo genotoxic potential by analyzing peripheral blood for Pig-a mutant phenotype erythrocytes and for chromosomal damage in the form of micronuclei. Mutant phenotype reticuloyte and erythrocyte frequencies, based on anti-CD59 antibody labeling and flow cytometric analysis, were determined in male Sprague Dawley rats treated for 28 consecutive days (days 1–28) with up to 0.4 mg cisplatin/kg/day, and sampled on days −4, 15, 29, and 56. Vehicle and highest dose groups were evaluated at additional time points post-treatment up to 6 months. Day 4 and 29 blood samples were also analyzed for micronucleated reticulocyte frequency using flow cytometry and anti-CD71-based labeling. Mutant phenotype reticulocytes were significantly elevated at doses ≥0.1 mg/kg/day, and mutant phenotype erythrocytes were elevated at doses ≥0.05 mg/kg/day. In the 0.4 mg/kg/day group, these effects persisted for the 6 month observation period. Cisplatin also induced a modest but statistically significant increase in micronucleus frequency at the highest dose tested. The prolonged persistence in the production of mutant erythrocytes following cisplatin exposure suggests that this drug mutates hematopoietic stem cells and that this damage may ultimately contribute to the increased incidence of secondary leukemias seen in patients cured of primary malignancies with platinum-based regimens. PMID:24798381

  7. Ethoxyquin provides neuroprotection against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Reed, Nicole; Mi, Ruifa; Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido; Hoke, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Ethoxyquin was recently identified as a neuroprotective compound against toxic neuropathies and efficacy was demonstrated against paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. In this study we examined the efficacy of ethoxyquin in preventing neurotoxicity of cisplatin in rodent models of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and explored its mechanism of action. Ethoxyquin prevented neurotoxicity of cisplatin in vitro in a sensory neuronal cell line and primary rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. In vivo, chronic co-administration of ethoxyquin partially abrogated cisplatin-induced behavioral, electrophysiological and morphological abnormalities. Furthermore, ethoxyquin did not interfere with cisplatin's ability to induce tumor cell death in ovarian cancer cell line in vitro and in vivo. Finally, ethoxyquin reduced the levels of two client proteins (SF3B2 and ataxin-2) of a chaperone protein, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) when co-administered with cisplatin in vitro. These results implied that the neuroprotective effect of ethoxyquin is mediated through these two client proteins of Hsp90. In fact, reducing levels of SF3B2 in tissue-cultured neurons was effective against neurotoxicity of cisplatin. These findings suggest that ethoxyquin or other compounds that inhibit chaperone activity of Hsp90 and reduce levels of its client protein, SF3B2 may be developed as an adjuvant therapy to prevent neurotoxicity in cisplatin-based chemotherapy protocols. PMID:27350330

  8. PREVENTION OF CISPLATIN-INDUCED NEPHROTOXICITY BY METHIMAZOLE.

    PubMed

    Osman; El-Sayed; El-Demerdash; Al-Hyder; El-Didi; Attia; Hamada

    2000-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a dose-limiting factor in the use of cisplatin against solid tumours. Methimazole, an antithyroid drug containing a free SH group, has a nephroprotective potential against chemically-induced nephrotoxicity. We tried to explore the nephrotoxic effect of the experimentally therapeutic dose of cisplatin (7 mg kg(-1), i.p.), particularly on the nuclear level of kidney cells in male albino rats, as well as the possible protective effect of methimazole. Furthermore, the drug interaction regarding the oncolytic effect of cisplatin was examined in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC)-bearing mice. A single dose of cisplatin caused kidney damage, 6 days after injection, manifested by 219% increase in serum creatinine, 384% increase in blood urea nitrogen and 170% increase in kidney content of lipid peroxides. Kidney DNA showed clear fragmentations detected by gel electrophoresis. However, kidney reduced glutathione was unchanged at that time period. Histological examination of kidney confirmed the toxic effect of cisplatin. Methimazole (40 mg kg(-1), i.p., 30 min before cisplatin injection) significantly protected the kidney from the nephrotoxic effect of cisplatin as judged from the biochemical parameters investigated as well as the histopathological examination. On the other hand, the survival data in EAC-bearing mice treated with both drugs indicated the persistence of an effective cytotoxic action. This study points to a promising use of this combination and necessitates further experimental and clinical studies. 2000 Academic Press@p$hr Copyright 2000 Academic Press. PMID:10712836

  9. Prevention of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by methimazole.

    PubMed

    Osman, A M; El-Sayed, E M; El-Demerdash, E; Al-Hyder, A; El-Didi, M; Attia, A S; Hamada, F M

    2000-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a dose-limiting factor in the use of cisplatin against solid tumours. Methimazole, an antithyroid drug containing a free SH group, has a nephroprotective potential against chemically-induced nephrotoxicity. We tried to explore the nephrotoxic effect of the experimentally therapeutic dose of cisplatin (7 mg kg(-1), i.p.), particularly on the nuclear level of kidney cells in male albino rats, as well as the possible protective effect of methimazole. Furthermore, the drug interaction regarding the oncolytic effect of cisplatin was examined in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC)-bearing mice. A single dose of cisplatin caused kidney damage, 6 days after injection, manifested by 219% increase in serum creatinine, 384% increase in blood urea nitrogen and 170% increase in kidney content of lipid peroxides. Kidney DNA showed clear fragmentations detected by gel electrophoresis. However, kidney reduced glutathione was unchanged at that time period. Histological examination of kidney confirmed the toxic effect of cisplatin. Methimazole (40 mg kg(-1), i.p., 30 min before cisplatin injection) significantly protected the kidney from the nephrotoxic effect of cisplatin as judged from the biochemical parameters investigated as well as the histopathological examination. On the other hand, the survival data in EAC-bearing mice treated with both drugs indicated the persistence of an effective cytotoxic action. This study points to a promising use of this combination and necessitates further experimental and clinical studies. PMID:10600279

  10. Probe DNA-Cisplatin Interaction with Solid-State Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Ying; Li, Wei; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Pengye; Bai, Xuedong; Shan, Xinyan; Lu, Xinghua; Nanopore Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of DNA-cisplatin interaction is essential for clinical application and novel drug design. As an emerging single-molecule technology, solid-state nanopore has been employed in biomolecule detection and probing DNA-molecule interactions. Herein, we reported a real-time monitoring of DNA-cisplatin interaction by employing solid-state SiN nanopores. The DNA-cisplatin interacting process is clearly classified into three stages by measuring the capture rate of DNA-cisplatin adducts. In the first stage, the negative charged DNA molecules were partially discharged due to the bonding of positive charged cisplatin and forming of mono-adducts. In the second stage, forming of DNA-cisplatin di-adducts with the adjacent bases results in DNA bending and softening. The capture rate increases since the softened bi-adducts experience a lower barrier to thread into the nanopores. In the third stage, complex structures, such as micro-loop, are formed and the DNA-cisplatin adducts are aggregated. The capture rate decreases to zero as the aggregated adduct grows to the size of the pore. The characteristic time of this stage was found to be linear with the diameter of the nanopore and this dynamic process can be described with a second-order reaction model. We are grateful to Laboratory of Microfabrication, Dr. Y. Yao, and Prof. R.C. Yu (Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for technical assistance.

  11. Transportan 10 improves the anticancer activity of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Izabela, Rusiecka; Jarosław, Ruczyński; Magdalena, Alenowicz; Piotr, Rekowski; Ivan, Kocić

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine whether cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) such as transportan 10 (TP10) or protein transduction domain (PTD4) may improve the anticancer activity of cisplatin (cPt). The complexes of TP10 or PTD4 with cPt were used in the experiments. They were carried out on two non-cancer (HEK293 (human embryonic kidney) and HEL299 (human embryo lung)) and two cancer (HeLa (human cervical cancer) and OS143B (human osteosarcoma 143B)) cell lines. Both complexes were tested (MTT assay) with respect to their anticancer or cytotoxic actions. TAMRA (fluorescent dye)-stained preparations were visualized in a fluorescence microscope. The long-term effect of TP10 + cPt and its components on non-cancer and cancer cell lines was observed in inverted phase contrast microscopy. In the MTT test (cell viability assay), the complex of TP10 + cPt produced a more potent effect on the cancer cell lines (HeLa, OS143B) in comparison to that observed after separate treatment with TP10 or cPt. At the same time, the action of the complex and its components was rather small on non-cancer cell lines. On the other hand, a complex of another CPP with cPt, i.e., PTD4 + cPt, was without a significant effect on the cancer cell line (OS143B). The images of the fluorescent microscopy showed TAMRA-TP10 or TAMRA-TP10 + cPt in the interior of the HeLa cells. In the case of TAMRA-PTD4 or TAMRA-PTD4 + cPt, only the first compound was found inside the cancer cell line. In contrast, none of the tested compounds gained access to the interior of the non-cancer cells (HEK293, HEL299). Long-term incubation with the TP10 + cPt (estimated by inverted phase contrast microscopy) lead to an enhanced action of the complex on cell viability (decrease in the number of cells and change in their morphology) as compared with that produced by each single agent. With regard to the tested CPPs, only TP10 improved the anticancer activity of cisplatin if both compounds were used in the form of a

  12. FOXO3a reactivation mediates the synergistic cytotoxic effects of rapamycin and cisplatin in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Liang; Wang Huiming; Zhou Lin; Yu Da

    2011-02-15

    FOXO3a, a well-known transcriptional regulator, controls a wide spectrum of biological processes. The Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway inactivates FOXO3a via phosphorylation-induced nuclear exclusion and degradation. A loss or gain of FOXO3a activity has been correlated with efficiency of chemotherapies in various cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Therefore, in the current study, we have investigated the FOXO3a activity modulating and antitumor effects of rapamycin and cisplatin in OSCC cells. Cisplatin inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent way in OSCC Tca8113 cells. Rapamycin alone had no effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Rapamycin downregulated the expression of S-phase kinase associated protein-2 (Skp2) and increased the FOXO3a protein stability but induced the upregulation of feedback Akt activation-mediated FOXO3a phosphorylation. Cisplatin decreased the phosphorylation of FOXO3a via Akt inhibition. Rapamycin combined with cisplatin as its feedback Akt activation inhibitor revealed the most dramatic FOXO3a nuclear localization and reactivation with the prevention of its feedback loop and exposed significant synergistic effects of decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in vitro and decreased tumor size in vivo. Furthermore, the downstream effects of FOXO3a reactivation were found to be accumulation of p27 and Bim. In conclusion, rapamycin/cisplatin combination therapy boosts synergistic antitumor effects through the significant FOXO3a reactivation in OSCC cells. These results may represent a novel mechanism by which rapamycin/cisplatin combination therapy proves to be a potent molecular-targeted strategy for OSCC.

  13. Small molecule inhibitor of c-Met (PHA665752) suppresses the growth of ovarian cancer cells and reverses cisplatin resistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Enze; Hu, Zheng; Sun, Yi; Zhou, Qi; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2016-06-01

    c-Met as a tyrosine-kinase receptor plays a major role in tumorigenesis, invasion, and metastatic spread of human tumors, including ovarian cancer. Expressing high levels of c-Met proteins is often associated with resistance to chemotherapy and an adverse prognosis. In this study, we have determined the effect of PHA665752, a small molecule inhibitor of c-Met proteins, with and without cisplatin and the role of c-Met in several ovarian cancer cell lines having high c-Met expression. The methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay was used to detect cell proliferation, and apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry. Western blotting was carried out to determine protein expression levels. Gene silencing was used to detect the influence of c-Met gene silence on the resistance to cisplatin. Compared to more sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and 3AO, we found that the expression of c-Met was significantly increased in SKOV3(DDP), OVCAR3, and OV-90 ovarian cancer cell lines, which were resistant to cisplatin. Our data indicated that cisplatin sustained activated phosphor-Met in SKOV3(DDP), OVCAR3, and OV-90 cell lines. We also observed a significant transient activation of c-Met phosphorylation in SKOV3 and 3AO cells. Treatment with PHA665752 inhibited c-Met expression inhibited cell growth, induced apoptosis, and enhanced cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in c-Met over-expressed cell lines. In addition, blocking c-Met expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) overcame the resistance of cancer cells to cisplatin. Thus, blocking c-Met expression presents a promising therapeutic approach for ovarian cancer. PMID:26695152

  14. Systems biology of cisplatin resistance: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Michels, J; Brenner, C; Szabadkai, G; Harel-Bellan, A; Castedo, M; Kroemer, G

    2014-01-01

    The platinum derivative cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), best known as cisplatin, is currently employed for the clinical management of patients affected by testicular, ovarian, head and neck, colorectal, bladder and lung cancers. For a long time, the antineoplastic effects of cisplatin have been fully ascribed to its ability to generate unrepairable DNA lesions, hence inducing either a permanent proliferative arrest known as cellular senescence or the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Accumulating evidence now suggests that the cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of cisplatin involves both a nuclear and a cytoplasmic component. Despite the unresolved issues regarding its mechanism of action, the administration of cisplatin is generally associated with high rates of clinical responses. However, in the vast majority of cases, malignant cells exposed to cisplatin activate a multipronged adaptive response that renders them less susceptible to the antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of the drug, and eventually resume proliferation. Thus, a large fraction of cisplatin-treated patients is destined to experience therapeutic failure and tumor recurrence. Throughout the last four decades great efforts have been devoted to the characterization of the molecular mechanisms whereby neoplastic cells progressively lose their sensitivity to cisplatin. The advent of high-content and high-throughput screening technologies has accelerated the discovery of cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic pathways that may be targeted to prevent or reverse cisplatin resistance in cancer patients. Still, the multifactorial and redundant nature of this phenomenon poses a significant barrier against the identification of effective chemosensitization strategies. Here, we discuss recent systems biology studies aimed at deconvoluting the complex circuitries that underpin cisplatin resistance, and how their findings might drive the development of rational approaches to tackle this clinically relevant

  15. Novel orally active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) analogs attenuate cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Md. Abdul Hye; Liu, Jing; Kumar, Ganesh; Skapek, Stephen X.; Falck, John R.; Imig, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity severely limits the use of the anticancer drug cisplatin. Oxidative stress, inflammation, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contribute to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. We developed novel orally active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) analogs and investigated their prophylactic effect in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was manifested by increases in blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine, urinary N-acetyl-β-(d)-glucosaminidase activity, kidney injury molecule 1, and histopathology. EET analogs (10 mg/kg/d) attenuated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by reducing these renal injury markers by 40–80% along with a 50–70% reduction in renal tubular cast formation. This attenuated renal injury is associated with reduced oxidative stress, inflammation, and ER stress evident from reduction in related biomarkers and in the renal expression of genes involved in these pathways. Moreover, we demonstrated that the attenuated nephrotoxicity correlated with decreased apoptosis that is associated with 50–90% reduction in Bcl-2 protein family mediated proapoptotic signaling, reduced renal caspase-12 expression, and a 50% reduction in renal caspase-3 activity. We further demonstrated in vitro that the protective activity of EET analogs does not compromise the anticancer effects of cisplatin. Collectively, our data provide evidence that EET analogs attenuate cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by reducing oxidative stress, inflammation, ER stress, and apoptosis without affecting the chemotherapeutic effects of cisplatin.—Khan, Md. A. H., Liu, J., Kumar, G., Skapek, S. X., Falck, J. R., Imig, J. D. Novel orally active epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) analogs attenuate cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:23603837

  16. Systems biology of cisplatin resistance: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Michels, J; Brenner, C; Szabadkai, G; Harel-Bellan, A; Castedo, M; Kroemer, G

    2014-01-01

    The platinum derivative cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), best known as cisplatin, is currently employed for the clinical management of patients affected by testicular, ovarian, head and neck, colorectal, bladder and lung cancers. For a long time, the antineoplastic effects of cisplatin have been fully ascribed to its ability to generate unrepairable DNA lesions, hence inducing either a permanent proliferative arrest known as cellular senescence or the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Accumulating evidence now suggests that the cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of cisplatin involves both a nuclear and a cytoplasmic component. Despite the unresolved issues regarding its mechanism of action, the administration of cisplatin is generally associated with high rates of clinical responses. However, in the vast majority of cases, malignant cells exposed to cisplatin activate a multipronged adaptive response that renders them less susceptible to the antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of the drug, and eventually resume proliferation. Thus, a large fraction of cisplatin-treated patients is destined to experience therapeutic failure and tumor recurrence. Throughout the last four decades great efforts have been devoted to the characterization of the molecular mechanisms whereby neoplastic cells progressively lose their sensitivity to cisplatin. The advent of high-content and high-throughput screening technologies has accelerated the discovery of cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic pathways that may be targeted to prevent or reverse cisplatin resistance in cancer patients. Still, the multifactorial and redundant nature of this phenomenon poses a significant barrier against the identification of effective chemosensitization strategies. Here, we discuss recent systems biology studies aimed at deconvoluting the complex circuitries that underpin cisplatin resistance, and how their findings might drive the development of rational approaches to tackle this clinically relevant

  17. Carnitine deficiency provokes cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Majed, Abdulhakeem A

    2007-03-01

    This study investigates whether or not carnitine deficiency is a risk factor and could contribute to cisplatin-induced liver toxicity. A total of 60 adult male Wistar albino rats were divided into six groups. The first three groups were injected intraperitoneally with normal saline, propionyl-l-carnitine (500 mg/kg), and d-carnitine (500 mg/kg), respectively, for 10 successive days. The fourth, fifth and sixth groups were injected intraperitoneally with the same doses of normal saline, propionyl-l-carnitine and d-carnitine, respectively, for 5 successive days before and after a single dose of cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Administration of the standard nephrotoxic dose of cisplatin did not produce any changes in serum alanine transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transferase and no morphological changes in liver tissues. However, it did produce a significant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and total nitrate/nitrite and a significant decrease in reduced glutathione content in liver tissues. On the other hand, combined treatment with cisplatin and d-carnitine induced a dramatic increase in serum alanine transaminase and gamma-glutamyl transferase, as well as progressive reduction in total carnitine and ATP content in liver tissue. Moreover, histopathological examination of liver tissues confirmed the biochemical data, where cisplatin and d-carnitine combination showed signs of liver injury manifested as focal necro-inflammatory changes and portal inflammation. Interestingly, in carnitine supplemented rats using propionyl-l-carnitine, cisplatin did not produce any biochemical and histopathological changes in liver tissues. In conclusion, data from this study suggest for the first time that (1) carnitine deficiency is a risk factor and could precipitate cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity, (2) oxidative stress is not the main cause of cisplatin-related hepatotoxicity and (3) propionyl-l-carnitine prevents the development of cisplatin-induced liver injury. PMID

  18. Organometallic Antitumour Agents with Alternative Modes of Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casini, Angela; Hartinger, Christian G.; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Dyson, Paul J.

    The therapeutic index of drugs that target DNA, a ubiquitous target present in nearly all cells, is low. Nevertheless, DNA has remained the primary target for medicinal chemists developing metal-based anticancer drugs, although DNA has been essentially abandoned in favour of non-genomic targets by medicinal chemists developing organic drugs. A number of organometallic drugs that target proteins/enzymes have been developed and these compounds, based on ruthenium, osmium and gold, are described in this chapter. Targets include cathepsin B, thioredoxin reductases, multidrug resistance protein (Pgp), glutathione S-transferases and kinases. It is found that compounds that inhibit these various targets are active against metastatic tumours, or tumours that are resistant to classical DNA damaging agents such as cisplatin, and therefore offer considerable potential in clinical applications.

  19. Understanding the Risk Factors and Long-Term Consequences of Cisplatin-Associated Acute Kidney Injury: An Observational Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Zeenat Yousuf; Cadnapaphornchai, Pravit; Ginsburg, Kevin; Sivagnanam, Milani; Chopra, Shamit; Treadway, Corey K; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Yoo, George; Sukari, Ammar; Doshi, Mona D

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-known complication of cisplatin-based chemotherapy; however, its impact on long-term patient survival is unclear. We sought to determine the incidence and risk factors for development of cisplatin-associated AKI and its impact on long-term renal function and patient survival. We identified 233 patients who received 629 cycles of high-dose cisplatin (99±9mg/m2) for treatment of head and neck cancer between 2005 and 2011. These subjects were reviewed for development of AKI. Cisplatin nephrotoxicity (CN) was defined as persistent rise in serum creatinine, with a concomitant decline in serum magnesium and potassium, in absence of use of nephrotoxic agents and not reversed with hydration. All patients were hydrated per protocol and none had baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR) via CKD-EPI<60mL/min/1.73m2. The patients were grouped based on development of AKI and were staged for levels of injury, per KDIGO-AKI definition. Renal function was assessed via serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) via CKD-EPI at baseline, 6- and 12-months. Patients with AKI were screened for the absence of nephrotoxic medication use and a temporal decline in serum potassium and magnesium levels. Logistic regression models were constructed to determine risk factors for cisplatin-associated AKI. Twelve-month renal function was compared among groups using ANOVA. Kaplan-Maier curves and Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to study its impact on patient survival. Of 233 patients, 158(68%) developed AKI; 77 (49%) developed stage I, 55 (35%) developed stage II, and 26 (16%) developed stage III AKI. Their serum potassium and magnesium levels correlated negatively with level of injury (p<0.05). African American race was a significant risk factor for cisplatin-associated AKI, OR 2.8 (95% CI 1.3 to 6.3) and 2.8 (95% CI 1.2 to 6.7) patients with stage III AKI had the lowest eGFR value at 12 months (p = 0.05) and long

  20. Understanding the Risk Factors and Long-Term Consequences of Cisplatin-Associated Acute Kidney Injury: An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Zeenat Yousuf; Cadnapaphornchai, Pravit; Ginsburg, Kevin; Sivagnanam, Milani; Chopra, Shamit; Treadway, Corey K.; Lin, Ho-Sheng; Yoo, George; Sukari, Ammar; Doshi, Mona D.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a well-known complication of cisplatin-based chemotherapy; however, its impact on long-term patient survival is unclear. We sought to determine the incidence and risk factors for development of cisplatin-associated AKI and its impact on long-term renal function and patient survival. We identified 233 patients who received 629 cycles of high-dose cisplatin (99±9mg/m2) for treatment of head and neck cancer between 2005 and 2011. These subjects were reviewed for development of AKI. Cisplatin nephrotoxicity (CN) was defined as persistent rise in serum creatinine, with a concomitant decline in serum magnesium and potassium, in absence of use of nephrotoxic agents and not reversed with hydration. All patients were hydrated per protocol and none had baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR) via CKD-EPI<60mL/min/1.73m2. The patients were grouped based on development of AKI and were staged for levels of injury, per KDIGO-AKI definition. Renal function was assessed via serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) via CKD-EPI at baseline, 6- and 12-months. Patients with AKI were screened for the absence of nephrotoxic medication use and a temporal decline in serum potassium and magnesium levels. Logistic regression models were constructed to determine risk factors for cisplatin-associated AKI. Twelve-month renal function was compared among groups using ANOVA. Kaplan-Maier curves and Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to study its impact on patient survival. Of 233 patients, 158(68%) developed AKI; 77 (49%) developed stage I, 55 (35%) developed stage II, and 26 (16%) developed stage III AKI. Their serum potassium and magnesium levels correlated negatively with level of injury (p<0.05). African American race was a significant risk factor for cisplatin-associated AKI, OR 2.8 (95% CI 1.3 to 6.3) and 2.8 (95% CI 1.2 to 6.7) patients with stage III AKI had the lowest eGFR value at 12 months (p = 0.05) and long

  1. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. PMID:23260366

  2. Radiotherapy and Concomitant Intra-Arterial Docetaxel Combined With Systemic 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Preliminary Report-Improvement of Locoregional Control of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Oikawa, Hirobumi Nakamura, Ryuji; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Kohji; Sato, Hiroaki; Ehara, Shigeru

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To confirm the advantage of chemoradiotherapy using intra-arterial docetaxel with intravenous cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. Patients and Methods: A total of 26 oropharyngeal cancer patients (1, 2, 2, and 21 patients had Stage I, II, III, and IVa-IVc, respectively) were treated with two sessions of this chemoradiotherapy regimen. External beam radiotherapy was delivered using large portals that included the primary site and the regional lymph nodes initially (range, 40-41.4 Gy) and the metastatic lymph nodes later (60 or 72 Gy). All tumor-supplying branches of the carotid arteries were cannulated, and 40 mg/m{sup 2} docetaxel was individually infused on Day 1. The other systemic chemotherapy agents included 60 mg/m{sup 2} cisplatin on Day 2 and 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil on Days 2-6. Results: The primary response of the tumor was complete in 21 (81%), partial in 4 (15%), and progressive in 1 patient. Grade 4 mucositis, leukopenia, and dermatitis was observed in 3, 2, and 1 patients, respectively. During a median follow-up of 10 months, the disease recurred at the primary site and at a distant organ in 2 (8%) and 3 (12%) patients, respectively. Three patients died because of cancer progression. Two patients (8%) with a partial response were compromised by lethal bleeding from the tumor bed or chemotherapeutic toxicity. The 3-year locoregional control rate and the 3-year overall survival rate was 73% and 77%, respectively. Conclusion: This method resulted in an excellent primary tumor response rate (96%) and moderate acute toxicity. Additional follow-up is required to ascertain the usefulness of this modality.

  3. Transarterial Chemoembolization Using Cisplatin Powder in a Rabbit Model of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morimoto, Kengo Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Kiyosei; Anai, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Takayuki; Satake, Mitsuo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pharmacological advantages of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with cisplatin powder for hypervascular hepatic tumors in animal experiments. VX2 tumors were transplanted to the livers of nine rabbits. Cisplatin (1 mg/kg) was infused into the proper hepatic artery. In the cisplatin-HAI group, cisplatin solution was infused. In the cisplatin-GS-TACE group, after infusion of cisplatin solution, gelatin sponge particles were used for embolization. In the cisplatin-Lp-TACE group, after infusion of a cisplatin powder and lipiodol (10 mg/ml) suspension, gelatin sponge particles were used for embolization. Before and after administration, platinum concentrations in plasma were measured. Using liver specimens that were excised 60 min after infusion, platinum concentrations in tumorous and nontumorous liver tissues were measured. The mean platinum concentration in tumorous tissue was 0.88 {mu}g/ml for the cisplatin-HAI group, 1.23 {mu}g/ml for the cisplatin-GS-TACE group, and 12.65 {mu}g/ml for the cisplatin-Lp-TACE group. The platinum concentration for the cisplatin-Lp-TACE group was significantly higher than that for the cisplatin-HAI group (p = 0.004) and the cisplatin-GS-TAE group (p = 0.004). The mean platinum concentration in nontumorous liver tissue was 0.98 {mu}g/ml for the cisplatin-HAI group, 1.13 {mu}g/ml for the cisplatin-GS-TACE group, and 1.09 {mu}g/ml for the cisplatin-Lp-TACE group; no significant differences were seen. At both 5 and 10 min after infusion, the platinum concentrations for the cisplatin-Lp-TACE group were lower than those for the other two groups. The present results suggest that TACE using cisplatin powder/lipiodol suspension and gelatin sponge for hypervascular hepatic tumors has a number of pharmacological advantages.

  4. Antitumor activity of YM155, a selective survivin suppressant, in combination with cisplatin in hepatoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Zhao, Xiaosu; Zhang, Yu; Kang, Yanling; Wang, Jiaqi; Liu, Yingchun

    2015-07-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is a chemotherapeutic drug that is often used for the treatment of hepatoblastoma. However, many patients acquire resistance to therapeutic agents leading to local and distant treatment failure. It has been shown that suppression survivin contributed to the inhibition of tumor growth and enhanced chemotherapeutic sensitivity in several types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to determine whether treatment with sepantronium bromide (YM155), a novel small molecule inhibitor of survivin, enhanced the sensitivity of CDDP to hepatoblastoma cells, leading to the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin. In vitro and in vivo models were used to examine the anticancer efficacy of YM155, either as a monotherapy or in combination with CDDP to identify more effective therapeutics against hepatoblastoma. The results showed that survivin expression was upregulated in hepatoblastoma tissues and cell lines, and that YM155 inhibited survivin expression in hepatoblastoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. YM155 enhanced sensitivity of CDDP to human HepG2 and HuH-6 hepatoblastoma cells. The YM155 combination with CDDP in hepatoblastoma cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and formation, and induced cell apoptosis than either agent alone. In a mouse xenograft model, YM155 combined with CDDP significantly suppressed tumor growth compared to the monotherapy. Taken together, these findings suggested that the combination of YM155 and CDDP is a promising drug candidate for the treatment of hepatoblastoma. PMID:25955434

  5. Relative Contributions of Radiation and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy to Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, Ying J. Tward, Jonathan D.; Szabo, Aniko; Bentz, Brandon G.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in patients with head-and-neck cancer and treated with radiation therapy (RT) or concomitant cisplatin-based chemoradiation, the relationship among SNHL and radiation dose to the cochlea, the use of two common cisplatin dose regimens. Methods and Materials: A total of 62 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with curative intent were included in this prospective study. Of the patients, 21 received RT alone, 27 received 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly cisplatin, 13 received 100 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks during RT, and 1 received RT with weekly epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor antibody. The effect of chemotherapy and RT dose on hearing was determined using a model that accounted for the age and variability between each ear for each patient. Results: We constructed a model to predict dose-dependent hearing loss for RT or cisplatin-based chemotherapy either alone or in combination. For patients only receiving RT, no significant hearing loss was found at doses to the cochlea of less than 40 Gy. Patients receiving 100 mg/m{sup 2} or 40 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin chemotherapy had an estimated +21.5 dB and +9.5 dB hearing loss at 8,000 Hz with low radiation doses (10 Gy), which rose to +38.4 dB and +18.9 dB for high radiation doses (40 Gy). Conclusions: Use of RT alone with doses of less than 40 Gy did not result in clinically significant hearing loss. High-frequency SNHL was profoundly damaged in patients who received concomitant cisplatin when doses of 100 mg/m{sup 2} were used. The threshold cochlear dose for hearing loss with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and RT was predicted to be 10 Gy. The inner ear radiation dose constraints and cisplatin dose intensity should be considered in the treatment of advanced head-and-neck cancer.

  6. Coumarin-appended phosphorescent cyclometalated iridium(iii) complexes as mitochondria-targeted theranostic anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-08-16

    Theranostic anticancer agents incorporating anticancer properties with capabilities for real-time treatment assessment are appealing candidates for chemotherapy. The design of mitochondria-targeted cytotoxic drugs represents a promising approach to target tumors selectively and overcome resistance to current anticancer therapies. In this work, three coumarin-appended phosphorescent cyclometalated iridium(iii) complexes 1-3 have been explored as mitochondria-targeted theranostic anticancer agents. These complexes display rich photophysical properties, which facilitate the study of their intracellular fate. All three complexes can specifically target mitochondria and show much higher antiproliferative activities than cisplatin against various cancer cells including cisplatin-resistant cells. 1-3 can penetrate into human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells quickly and efficiently, and they can carry out theranostic functions by simultaneously inducing and monitoring the morphological changes in mitochondria. Mechanism studies show that 1-3 exert their anticancer efficacy by initiating a cascade of events related to mitochondrial dysfunction. Genome-wide transcriptional and Connectivity Map analyses reveal that the cytotoxicity of complex 3 is associated with pathways involved in mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. PMID:27139504

  7. Trends in the susceptibility of commonly encountered clinically significant anaerobes and susceptibilities of blood isolates of anaerobes to 16 antimicrobial agents, including fidaxomicin and rifaximin, 2008-2012, northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, F D; Liao, C H; Lin, Y T; Sheng, W H; Hsueh, P R

    2014-11-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial resistance trends and profiles of clinical anaerobic isolates in northern Taiwan. Trends in the susceptibility of five commonly encountered clinical anaerobic isolates to seven agents from 2008 to 2012 were measured using the Cochran-Armitage trend test. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 16 antimicrobial agents, including fidaxomicin and rifaximin, against anaerobic blood isolates from two medical centers were determined using the agar dilution method. During the study period, susceptibility data on 11,105 isolates were evaluated. Metronidazole and chloramphenicol retained excellent activities. Around 20-30 % of isolates of Bacteroides and Prevotella species were resistant to ampicillin-sulbactam, cefmetazole, flomoxef, and clindamycin. Of the 507 tested blood isolates, the rates of resistance to commonly used agents were much higher, namely, 16.2 % for amoxicillin-clavulanate, 15.6 % for ampicillin-sulbactam, 24.7 % for cefmetazole, and 36.1 % for clindamycin. Notably, 13.5 % of B. fragilis isolates were resistant to ertapenem. Also, 15.2 % of B. uniformis, 17.2 % of other Bacteroides species, 14.3 % of Prevotella species, and 14 % of Clostridium other than C. perfringens isolates were resistant to moxifloxacin. Cefoperazone-sulbactam was active against most isolates, except for Clostridium species other than perfringens (resistance rate, 18.6 %). Fidaxomicin exerted poor activities against most anaerobes tested (MIC90 of >128 μg/ml for B. fragilis and all isolates), except for C. perfringens (MIC90 of 0.03 μg/ml) and Peptostreptococcus micros (MIC90 of 2 μg/ml). However, rifaximin showed a wide range of susceptibilities against the tested anaerobes (MIC90 of 0.5 μg/ml for B. fragilis). The emergence of resistance to ertapenem and moxifloxacin among bacteremic anaerobes highlights the need for continuous monitoring. PMID:24930042

  8. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  9. Candidate DNA methylation drivers of acquired cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer identified by methylome and expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Zeller, C; Dai, W; Steele, N L; Siddiq, A; Walley, A J; Wilhelm-Benartzi, C S M; Rizzo, S; van der Zee, A; Plumb, J A; Brown, R

    2012-10-18

    Multiple DNA methylation changes in the cancer methylome are associated with the acquisition of drug resistance; however it remains uncertain how many represent critical DNA methylation drivers of chemoresistance. Using isogenic, cisplatin-sensitive/resistant ovarian cancer cell lines and inducing resensitizaton with demethylating agents, we aimed to identify consistent methylation and expression changes associated with chemoresistance. Using genome-wide DNA methylation profiling across 27 578 CpG sites, we identified loci at 4092 genes becoming hypermethylated in chemoresistant A2780/cp70 compared with the parental-sensitive A2780 cell line. Hypermethylation at gene promoter regions is often associated with transcriptional silencing; however, expression of only 245 of these hypermethylated genes becomes downregulated in A2780/cp70 as measured by microarray expression profiling. Treatment of A2780/cp70 with the demethylating agent 2-deoxy-5'-azacytidine induces resensitization to cisplatin and re-expression of 41 of the downregulated genes. A total of 13/41 genes were consistently hypermethylated in further independent cisplatin-resistant A2780 cell derivatives. CpG sites at 9 of the 13 genes (ARHGDIB, ARMCX2, COL1A, FLNA, FLNC, MEST, MLH1, NTS and PSMB9) acquired methylation in ovarian tumours at relapse following chemotherapy or chemoresistant cell lines derived at the time of patient relapse. Furthermore, 5/13 genes (ARMCX2, COL1A1, MDK, MEST and MLH1) acquired methylation in drug-resistant ovarian cancer-sustaining (side population) cells. MLH1 has a direct role in conferring cisplatin sensitivity when reintroduced into cells in vitro. This combined genomics approach has identified further potential key drivers of chemoresistance whose expression is silenced by DNA methylation that should be further evaluated as clinical biomarkers of drug resistance. PMID:22249249

  10. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy: prospective clinical and neurophysiological studies.

    PubMed

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, S; Schmalbruch, H; Rørth, M; Krarup, C

    2007-04-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron or the distal axon was primarily affected, we have carried out serial clinical and electrophysiological studies in 16 males with testicular cancer before or early and late during and after treatment with cisplatin, etoposide and bleomycin at limited (<400 mg/m2 cisplatin), conventional (approximately 400 mg/m2 cisplatin) or high (>400 mg/m2 cisplatin) doses. At cumulative doses of cisplatin higher than 300 mg/m2 the patients lost distal tendon and H-reflexes and displayed reduced vibration sense in the feet and the fingers. The amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) from the fingers innervated by the median nerve and the dorsolateral side of the foot innervated by the sural nerve were 50-60% reduced, whereas no definite changes occurred at lower doses. The SNAP conduction velocities were reduced by 10-15% at cumulative doses of 400-700 mg/m2 consistent with loss of large myelinated fibres. SNAPs from primarily Pacinian corpuscles in digit 3 and the dorsolateral side of the foot evoked by a tactile probe showed similar changes to those observed in SNAPs evoked by electrical stimulation. At these doses, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) from the tibial nerve had increased latencies of peripheral, spinal and central responses suggesting loss of central processes of large dorsal root ganglion cells. Motor conduction studies, autonomic function and warm and cold temperature sensation remained unchanged at all doses of cisplatin treatment. The results of these studies are consistent with degeneration of large sensory neurons whereas there was no evidence of distal axonal degeneration even at the lowest toxic doses of cisplatin. PMID:17301082

  11. Hydrolysis of cisplatin--a first-principles metadynamics study.

    PubMed

    Lau, Justin Kai-Chi; Ensing, Bernd

    2010-09-21

    Cisplatin, or cis-[Pt(NH(3))(2)Cl(2)], was the first member of a new revolutionary class of anticancer drugs that is still used today for the treatment of a wide variety of cancers. The mode of action of cisplatin starts inside the cell with the hydrolysis of Pt-Cl bonds to form a Pt-aqua complex. The solvent environment plays an essential role in many biochemical processes in general, and is expected to have a particular strong effect on the activation (hydrolysis) of cisplatin and cisplatin derivatives. To investigate these solvent effects, we have studied the explicit solvent structures during cisplatin hydrolysis by means of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. Since hydrolysis is an activated process, and thus a rare event on the simulation timescale, we have applied the metadynamics sampling technique to map out the free energy landscape from which the reaction mechanism and activation free energy are obtained. Our simulations show that hydrogen bonding between solvent water molecules and metal complexes in the hydrolyzed product systems is stronger than that in the reactant cisplatin system. In addition, the free energy profiles from our metadynamics simulations for the cisplatin hydrolysis shows that the second hydrolysis of cisplatin is thermodynamically favourable, which is in good agreement with experimental results and previous static density functional theory calculations. The reactant channels for both hydrolysis steps are rather wide and flat, indicative of a continuous spectrum of allowed mechanisms with no strong preference for either concerted dissociative or concerted associative pathways. Three or five coordinated metastable intermediates do not exist in aqueous solution. PMID:20582358

  12. Efficacy of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel regimen for carcinoma of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Belani, C P; Luketich, J D; Landreaneau, R J; Kim, R; Ramanathan, R K; Day, R; Ferson, P F; Keenan, R J; Posner, M; Seeger, J; Lembersky, B

    1997-12-01

    Eighteen patients with esophageal carcinoma (16 adenocarcinoma, two squamous cell carcinoma) were treated with two cycles of induction chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) 175 mg/m2 (3-hour infusion), cisplatin 20 mg/m2/d x 4 days, and 5-fluorouracil 1 g/m2/d (continuous infusion x 4 days) separated by a 28-day interval before surgical resection. After resection, patients received two more cycles of the same regimen. A thorough staging evaluation was performed before patients were enrolled in the study. The salient chemotherapy toxicities included grade 3 nausea (two patients), grade 3 vomiting (two patients), grades 3 and 4 diarrhea (one patient each), and grades 3 and 4 neutropenia (two and 10 patients, respectively). No deaths occurred due to toxicity. Surgical resection was attempted in all 18 patients (100%) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy. Esophageal resection was successfully completed in 17 patients. Liver metastases were noted at laparotomy in the one patient who subsequently did not undergo esophageal resection. Surgical complications were minor, and no postoperative deaths occurred. Fifteen patients received two additional cycles of the paclitaxel/5-fluorouracil/cisplatin regimen postoperatively, two received only one cycle, and one refused further therapy. Of 15 patients alive, 14 show no evidence of disease. The 1-year actuarial survival rate of this group of patients is 82%. In conclusion, the paclitaxel/5-fluorouracil/cisplatin combination is well tolerated and is an active regimen in esophageal carcinoma. PMID:9427275

  13. Immune-dependent antineoplastic effects of cisplatin plus pyridoxine in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Aranda, F; Bloy, N; Pesquet, J; Petit, B; Chaba, K; Sauvat, A; Kepp, O; Khadra, N; Enot, D; Pfirschke, C; Pittet, M; Zitvogel, L; Kroemer, G; Senovilla, L

    2015-06-01

    cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP), which is mostly referred to as cisplatin, is a widely used antineoplastic. The efficacy of cisplatin can be improved by combining it with the vitamin B6 precursor pyridoxine. Here, we evaluated the putative synergistic interaction of CDDP with pyridoxine in the treatment of an orthotopic mouse model of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). CDDP and pyridoxine exhibited hyperadditive therapeutic effects. However, this synergy was only observed in the context of an intact immune system and disappeared when the otherwise successful drug combination was applied to the same NSCLC cancer implanted in the lungs of athymic mice (which lack T lymphocytes). Immunocompetent mice that had been cured from NSCLC by the combined regimen of CDDP plus pyridoxine became resistant against subcutaneous rechallenge with the same (but not with an unrelated) cancer cell line. In vitro, CDDP and pyridoxine did not only cause synergistic killing of NSCLC cells but also elicited signs of immunogenic cell death including an endoplasmic reticulum stress response and exposure of calreticulin at the surface of the NSCLC cells. NSCLC cells treated with CDDP plus pyridoxine in vitro elicited a protective anticancer immune response upon their injection into immunocompetent mice. Altogether, these results suggest that the combined regimen of cisplatin plus pyridoxine mediates immune-dependent antineoplastic effects against NSCLC. PMID:25065595

  14. Ethoxyquin provides neuroprotection against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Reed, Nicole; Mi, Ruifa; Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido; Hoke, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Ethoxyquin was recently identified as a neuroprotective compound against toxic neuropathies and efficacy was demonstrated against paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. In this study we examined the efficacy of ethoxyquin in preventing neurotoxicity of cisplatin in rodent models of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and explored its mechanism of action. Ethoxyquin prevented neurotoxicity of cisplatin in vitro in a sensory neuronal cell line and primary rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. In vivo, chronic co-administration of ethoxyquin partially abrogated cisplatin-induced behavioral, electrophysiological and morphological abnormalities. Furthermore, ethoxyquin did not interfere with cisplatin’s ability to induce tumor cell death in ovarian cancer cell line in vitro and in vivo. Finally, ethoxyquin reduced the levels of two client proteins (SF3B2 and ataxin-2) of a chaperone protein, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) when co-administered with cisplatin in vitro. These results implied that the neuroprotective effect of ethoxyquin is mediated through these two client proteins of Hsp90. In fact, reducing levels of SF3B2 in tissue-cultured neurons was effective against neurotoxicity of cisplatin. These findings suggest that ethoxyquin or other compounds that inhibit chaperone activity of Hsp90 and reduce levels of its client protein, SF3B2 may be developed as an adjuvant therapy to prevent neurotoxicity in cisplatin-based chemotherapy protocols. PMID:27350330

  15. Curcumin alleviates cisplatin-induced learning and memory impairments.

    PubMed

    Oz, Mehmet; Nurullahoglu Atalik, K Esra; Yerlikaya, F Humeyra; Demir, Enver Ahmet

    2015-09-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the role of curcumin on cisplatin-inducedcognitive impairment and to reveal mechanisms of cisplatin's detrimental actions on cognition in rats. Animals were treated with cisplatin (5mg/kg/week) and/or curcumin (300mg/kg/day) for 5weeks. Morris water maze test was used to assess spatial learning and memory. Enzymatic activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were evaluated from hippocampus and plasma samples, and malondialdehyde (MDA), which is the end-product of lipid peroxidation, was determined by a colorimetric method. Our results showed that cisplatin (5mg/kg/week, 5weeks) caused learning and memory deficits, elevated MDA content, decreased SOD activity in the hippocampus and plasma, and AChE activity in the hippocampus. Curcumin improved learning and memory in rats with administration of cisplatin. In addition, curcumin significantly reduced the level of MDA and increased the activities of SOD and AChE. Taken together, our findings indicate that curcumin ameliorates cisplatin-induced spatial learning and memory impairment, possibly through restored cholinergic function and enhanced oxidative status. PMID:25982942

  16. Galectin-1-Induced Autophagy Facilitates Cisplatin Resistance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Chi; Davuluri, Goutham Venkata Naga; Chen, Cheng-Hao; Shiau, Dong-Che; Chen, Chien-Chin; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chang, Chih-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in Taiwan. Although chemotherapy is the primary treatment for HCC patients, drug resistance often leads to clinical failure. Galectin-1 is a beta-galactoside binding lectin which is up-regulated in HCC patients and promotes tumor growth by mediating cancer cell adhesion, migration and proliferation, but its role in chemoresistance of HCC is poorly understood. In this study we found that galectin-1 is able to lead to chemoresistance against cisplatin treatment, and subsequent inhibition has reversed the effect of cell death in HCC cells. Moreover, galectin-1 was found to induce autophagic flux in HCC cells. Inhibition of autophagy by inhibitors or knockdown of Atg5 cancels galectin-1-induced cisplatin resistance in HCC cells. Increase of mitophagy triggered by galectin-1 was found to reduce the mitochondrial potential loss and apoptosis induced by cisplatin treatment. Finally, using an in situ hepatoma mouse model, we clearly demonstrated that inhibition of galectin-1 by thiodigalactoside could significantly augment the anti-HCC effect of cisplatin. Taken together, our findings offer a new insight into the chemoresistance galectin-1 causes against cisplatin treatment, and points to a potential approach to improve the efficacy of cisplatin in the treatment of HCC patients. PMID:26859293

  17. Influence of mitochondrion-toxic agents on the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Ohnsorge, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease may be induced or worsened by mitochondrion-toxic agents. Mitochondrion-toxic agents may be classified as those with or without a clinical effect, those which induce cardiac disease only in humans or animals or both, as prescribed drugs, illicit drugs, exotoxins, or nutritiants, as those which affect the heart exclusively or also other organs, as those which are effective only in patients with a mitochondrial disorder or cardiac disease or also in healthy subjects, or as solid, liquid, or volatile agents. In humans, cardiotoxic agents due to mitochondrial dysfunction include anthracyclines (particularly doxorubicin), mitoxantrone, cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, fluorouracil, imatinib, bortezomib, trastuzumab, arsenic trioxide, cyclosporine-A, zidovudine, lamotrigine, glycosides, lidocain, isoproterenol, nitroprusside, pivalic acid, alcohol, cocaine, pesticides, cadmium, mycotoxins, cyanotoxins, meat meal, or carbon monoxide. Even more agents exhibit cardiac abnormalities due to mitochondrion-toxicity only in animals or tissue cultures. The mitochondrion-toxic effect results from impairment of the respiratory chain, the oxidative phosphorylation, the Krebs cycle, or the β-oxidation, from decrease of the mitochondrion-membrane potential, from increased oxidative stress, reduced anti-oxidative capacity, or from induction of apoptosis. Cardiac abnormalities induced via these mechanisms include cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, coronary heart disease, arrhythmias, heart failure, or Takotsubo syndrome. Discontinuation of the cardiotoxic agent results in complete recovery in the majority of the cases. Antioxidants and nutritiants may be of additional help. Particularly coenzyme-Q, riboflavin, vitamin-E, vitamin-C, L-carnitine, vitamin-D, thiamin, folic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, and D-ribose may alleviate mitochondrial cardiotoxic effects. PMID:24036395

  18. Combined Effects of Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid and Cisplatin on Radiation Sensitivity and Cancer Cell Invasion in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianguo; Zhang, Shirong; Wu, Kan; Wang, Bing; Wong, Jeffrey Y C; Jiang, Hong; Xu, Rujun; Ying, Lisha; Huang, Haixiu; Zheng, Xiaoliang; Chen, Xufeng; Ma, Shenglin

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, and concurrent chemoradiotherapy has been explored as a therapeutic option. However, the chemotherapeutic agents cannot be administered for most patients at full doses safely with radical doses of thoracic radiation, and further optimizations of the chemotherapy regimen to be given with radiation are needed. In this study, we examined the effects of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and cisplatin on DNA damage repairs, and determined the combination effects of SAHA and cisplatin on human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in response to treatment of ionizing radiation (IR), and on tumor growth of lung cancer H460 xenografts receiving radiotherapy. We also investigated the potential differentiation effect of SAHA and its consequences on cancer cell invasion. Our results showed that SAHA and cisplatin compromise distinct DNA damage repair pathways, and treatment with SAHA enhanced synergistic radiosensitization effects of cisplatin in established NSCLC cell lines in a p53-independent manner, and decreased the DNA damage repair capability in cisplatin-treated primary NSCLC tumor tissues in response to IR. SAHA combined with cisplatin also significantly increased inhibitory effect of radiotherapy on tumor growth in the mouse xenograft model. In addition, SAHA can induce differentiation in stem cell-like cancer cell population, reduce tumorigenicity, and decrease invasiveness of human lung cancer cells. In conclusion, our data suggest a potential clinical impact for SAHA as a radiosensitizer and as a part of a chemoradiotherapy regimen for NSCLC. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 842-53. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26839308

  19. Global Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Unanticipated Networks Responsive to Cisplatin Treatment of Embryonic Stem Cells ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pines, Alex; Kelstrup, Christian D.; Vrouwe, Mischa G.; Puigvert, Jordi C.; Typas, Dimitris; Misovic, Branislav; de Groot, Anton; von Stechow, Louise; van de Water, Bob; Danen, Erik H. J.; Vrieling, Harry; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Olsen, Jesper V.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular responses to DNA-damaging agents involve the activation of various DNA damage signaling and transduction pathways. Using quantitative and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, we determined global changes in protein level and phosphorylation site profiles following treatment of SILAC (stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture)-labeled murine embryonic stem cells with the anticancer drug cisplatin. Network and pathway analyses indicated that processes related to the DNA damage response and cytoskeleton organization were significantly affected. Although the ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) consensus sequence (S/T-Q motif) was significantly overrepresented among hyperphosphorylated peptides, about half of the >2-fold-upregulated phosphorylation sites based on the consensus sequence were not direct substrates of ATM and ATR. Eleven protein kinases mainly belonging to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family were identified as being regulated in their kinase domain activation loop. The biological importance of three of these kinases (cyclin-dependent kinase 7 [CDK7], Plk1, and KPCD1) in the protection against cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity was demonstrated by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown. Our results indicate that the cellular response to cisplatin involves a variety of kinases and phosphatases not only acting in the nucleus but also regulating cytoplasmic targets, resulting in extensive cytoskeletal rearrangements. Integration of transcriptomic and proteomic data revealed a poor correlation between changes in the relative levels of transcripts and their corresponding proteins, but a large overlap in affected pathways at the levels of mRNA, protein, and phosphoprotein. This study provides an integrated view of pathways activated by genotoxic stress and deciphers kinases that play a pivotal role in regulating cellular processes other than the DNA damage response. PMID:22006019

  20. PP2A inhibition with LB100 enhances cisplatin cytotoxicity and overcomes cisplatin resistance in medulloblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Maric, Dragan; Amable, Lauren; Hall, Matthew D.; Feldman, Gerald M.; Ray-Chaudhury, Abhik; Lizak, Martin J.; Vera, Juan-Carlos; Robison, R. Aaron; Zhuang, Zhengping; Heiss, John D.

    2016-01-01

    The protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibitor, LB100, has been shown in pre-clinical studies to be an effective chemo- and radio-sensitizer for treatment of various cancers. We investigated effects associated with LB100 treatment alone and in combination with cisplatin for medulloblastoma (MB) in vitro and in vivo in an intracranial xenograft model. We demonstrated that LB100 had a potent effect on MB cells. By itself, LB100 inhibited proliferation and induced significant apoptosis in a range of pediatric MB cell lines. It also attenuated MB cell migration, a pre-requirement for invasion. When used in combination, LB100 enhanced cisplatin-mediated cytotoxic effects. Cell viability in the presence of 1 uM cisplatin alone was 61% (DAOY), 100% (D341), and 58% (D283), but decreased with the addition of 2 μM of LB100 to 26% (DAOY), 67% (D341), and 27% (D283), (p < 0.005). LB100 suppressed phosphorylation of the STAT3 protein and several STAT3 downstream targets. Also, LB100 directly increased cisplatin uptake and overcame cisplatin-resistance in vitro. Finally, LB100 exhibited potent in vivo anti-neoplastic activity in combination with cisplatin in an intracranial xenograft model. PMID:26799670

  1. Effect of Gingerol on Cisplatin-Induced Pica Analogous to Emesis Via Modulating Expressions of Dopamine 2 Receptor, Dopamine Transporter and Tyrosine Hydroxylase in the Vomiting Model of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Weibin; Cai, Xinrui; Wang, Yingying; Zhang, Xinying; Zhao, Hongmin; Qian, Qiuhai; Yang, Zhihong; Liu, Zhantao; Hasegawa, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Gingerol, the generic term for pungent constituents in ginger, has been used for treating vomiting in China. We are going to investigate the mechanisms of inhibitive effect of gingerol on cisplatin-induced pica behaviour by studying on both peripheral and central levels, and the effects of gingerol on homeostasis of dopamine (DA) transmission: dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), dopamine transporter (DAT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Methods The antiemetic effect of gingerol was investigated on a vomiting model in rats induced by cisplatin 3 mg·kg−1 intraperitoneal injection (i.p.). Rats were randomly divided into the normal control group (C), simple gingerol control group (CG), cisplatin control group (V), cisplatin + metoclopramide group (M), cisplatin + low-dose gingerol group (GL), cisplatin + middle-dose gingerol group (GM) and cisplatin + high-dose gingerol group (GH). In observation period, rats in Groups C and V were pretreated with sterile saline 3 mL i.g.; rats in Group CG were pretreated with gingerol 40 mg·kg−1 i.g.; rats in Group M were pretreated with metoclopramide 2.5 mg·kg−1 i.g.; rats in Groups GL, GM and GH were pretreated with gingerol 10, 20 and 40 mg·kg−1 i.g. for 3 days, respectively. Cisplatin (3 mg·kg−1, i.p.) was administered one time after each treatment with the antiemetic agent or its vehicle except the Groups C and CG. The distribution of D2R, DAT and TH in the area postrema and ileum were measured by immunohistochemistry and quantitated based on the image analysis, and the expression of DAT and TH in the area postrema and ileum were measured by RT-PCR. The weights of kaolin eaten of the remaining rats were observed in every 6 h continuously for 72 h. Results The weight of kaolin eaten in rats induced by cisplatin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with gingerol in a dose-dependent manner during the 0–24 h and 24–72 h periods (P < 0.05). Gingerol markedly improved gastric emptying induced by cisplatin in

  2. Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) enhance cytotoxicity of cisplatin to hepatocellular cells by microdomain disruption on plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shengyong; Chen, Xinhua; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Guo, Danjing; Xu, Yuning; Wu, Liming; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-08-15

    Previous studies showed nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) can ablate solid tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but its effect on cell membrane is not fully understood. We hypothesized nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on outer-cellular membrane with direct mechanical force and as a result the plasma membrane permeability increases to facilitate the small molecule intake. Three HCC cells were pulsed one pulse per minute, an interval longer than nanopore resealing time. The cationized ferritin was used to mark up the electronegative microdomains, propidium iodide (PI) for membrane permeabilization, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for the negative cell surface charge and cisplatin for inner-cellular cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that the ferritin marked-microdomain and negative cell surface charge were disrupted by nsPEF caused-mechanical force. The cell uptake of propidium and cytotoxicity of DNA-targeted cisplatin increased with a dose effect. Cisplatin gains its maximum inner-cellular cytotoxicity when combining with nsPEF stimulation. We conclude that nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on the outer cellular membrane directly and increase the membrane permeabilization for PI and cisplatin. The microdomain disruption and membrane infiltration changes are caused by the mechanical force from the changes of negative cell surface charge. PMID:27375200

  3. Repeated cisplatin treatment can lead to a multiresistant tumor cell population with stem cell features and sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Wintzell, My; Löfstedt, Lina; Johansson, Joel; Pedersen, Anne B; Fuxe, Jonas; Shoshan, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Cisplatin is used in treatment of several types of cancer, including epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). In order to mimic clinical treatment and to investigate longterm effects of cisplatin in surviving cancer cells, two EOC cell lines were repeatedly treated with low doses. In the SKOV-3 cell line originating from malignant ascites, but not in A2780 cells from a primary tumor, this led to emergence of a stable population (SKOV-3-R) which in the absence of cisplatin showed increased motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expression of cancer stem cell markers CD117, CD44 and ALDH1. Accordingly, the cells formed self-renewing spheres in serum-free stem cell medium. Despite upregulation of mitochondrial mass and cytochrome c, and no upregulation of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, SKOV-3-R were multiresistant to antineoplastic drugs. Cancer stem cells, or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are highly chemoresistant and are believed to cause relapse into disseminated and resistant EOC. Our second aim was therefore to target resistance in these TIC-like cells. Resistance could be correlated with upregulation of hexokinase-II and VDAC, which are known to form a survival-promoting mitochondrial complex. The cells were thus sensitive to 3-bromopyruvate, which dissociates hexokinase-II from this complex, and were particularly sensitive to combination treatment with cisplatin at doses down to 0.1 x IC 50. 3-bromopyruvate might thus be of use in targeting the especially aggressive TIC populations. PMID:22954696

  4. The effect of thymoquinone treatment on the combined renal and pulmonary toxicity of cisplatin and diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Shalaby, Asem; Manoj, Priyadarsini; Waly, Mostafa I; Yasin, Javed; Fahim, Mohamed; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2015-12-01

    Particulate air pollution (PAP) exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with renal disease. However, there are only a few studies on the interaction between PAP and renal injury, and none on agents that may ameliorate it. We studied the interaction between cisplatin (CP) nephrotoxicity and a single exposure to diesel exhaust particle (DEP) in rats 24 h before sacrifice, and assessed the effect of co-treatment with the active ingredient in Nigella Sativa seed oil, thymoquinone (TQ) thereon. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with CP (6 mg/kg) and four days later, they were exposed intratracheally to DEP (0.5 mg/kg), and were sacrificed 24 h later. Oral TQ (20 mg/kg) was given daily throughout the experimental period. CP alone caused several physiological, biochemical, and histopathological changes that included reduced growth and creatinine clearance, and raised plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP), creatinine and urea concentrations, and urinary N-acetyl-b-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activities. It adversely affected several indices of oxidative damage in the kidneys, and induced renal tubular necrosis. Most of these actions were significantly potentiated in rats given both CP and DEP. TQ significantly abrogated many of the effects of CP and DEP, given alone and in combination. These results provide experimental evidence that subjects with renal diseases can be at higher risk from PAP, and that TQ, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, can be considered a useful agent in patients with renal diseases and exposed to PAP. PMID:25925792

  5. Antidiabetic Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antidiabetic agents is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  6. Phase II Trial of Preoperative Irinotecan-Cisplatin Followed by Concurrent Irinotecan-Cisplatin and Radiotherapy for Resectable Locally Advanced Gastric and Esophagogastric Junction Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Fernando; Galan, Maica; Tabernero, Josep; Cervantes, Andres; Vega-Villegas, M. Eugenia; Gallego, Javier; Laquente, Berta; Rodriguez, Edith; Carrato, Alfredo; Escudero, Pilar; Massuti, Bartomeu; Alonso-Orduna, Vicente; Cardenal, Adelaida; Saenz, Alberto; Giralt, Jordi; Yuste, Ana Lucia

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine in a Phase II trial whether preoperative irinotecan-cisplatin (IC) followed by concurrent IC therapy and radiotherapy (IC/RT) improved outcome in patients with resectable, locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma (GC) or esophagogastric junction cancer (EGJC). Patients and Methods: Patients with resectable Stage II-IV, M0 GC or EGJC made up the study population. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR). Two courses of IC (irinotecan, 65mg/m{sup 2}; cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 8 every 21 days) were given. Patients without progression then received IC/RT, consisting of daily radiotherapy (45Gy) with concurrent IC (irinotecan, 65mg/m{sup 2}; cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22). Surgical resection was performed, if feasible, 5-8 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: Twenty-three patients were included in the study: 10 with EGJC and 13 with GC. Two patients (9%) achieved pCR. The incidences of Grade 3-4 toxicities were as follows: IC: neutropenia 35% (febrile 13%), anemia 22%, diarrhea 22%, emesis 8%; IC/RT: neutropenia 52% (febrile 5%), asthenia 19%, anemia 9%, emesis 9%, diarrhea 5%, cardiotoxicity 5%. No patients died during IC or IC/RT. R0 resection was achieved in 15 patients (65%). Median survival was 14.5 months, and the actuarial 2-year survival rate was 35%. Conclusions: Preoperative IC followed by IC/RT resulted in moderate response and resection rates with mild toxicity in patients with GC and EGJC.

  7. Discovery – Cisplatin and The Treatment of Testicular and Other Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Prior to the discovery of cisplatin in 1965, men with testicular cancer had few medical options. Now, thanks to NCI research, cisplatin and similar chemotherapy drugs are known for curing testicular and other forms of cancer.

  8. Common variations in ERCC2 are associated with response to cisplatin chemotherapy and clinical outcome in osteosarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Caronia, D; Patiño-García, A; Milne, R L; Zalacain-Díez, M; Pita, G; Alonso, M R; Moreno, L T; Sierrasesumaga-Ariznabarreta, L; Benítez, J; González-Neira, A

    2009-10-01

    Platinum agents cause DNA cross-linking. Nucleotide excision repair genes play a key role in DNA damage repair. This study aims to investigate whether polymorphisms in these genes are associated with tumor response and survival in cisplatin-treated osteosarcoma patients. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms in ERCC2, XPC, XPA, ERCC1, ERCC4 and ERCC5 genes were analyzed in 91 patients diagnosed with osteosarcoma and treated with cisplatin. A significant association with tumor response, after correction for multiple testing, was found for the Lys751Gln polymorphism in the ERCC2 gene. We found that only 45% of patients with at least one polymorphic G allele responded compared with 80% of patients homozygous for the common T allele (odds ratio=4.9, 95% confidence interval=1.64-14.54, adjusted P-value=0.047). In addition, carrying at least one ERCC2 Lys751GlnG allele was significantly associated with shorter event-free survival (median=184 months, compared with 240 months for TT homozygotes; hazard ratio=5.76, 95% confidence interval=1.30-25.55; P-value=0.021). Although ototoxicity was only recorded in 32 patients, we found weak evidence of an association with the CC genotype of XPC Lys939Gln (P-value= 0.042). This is the first pharmacogenetic study focused on osteosarcoma treatment providing evidence that polymorphic variants in DNA repair genes could be useful predictors of response to cisplatin chemotherapy in osteosarcoma patients. PMID:19434073

  9. Irradiation, Cisplatin, and 5-Azacytidine Upregulate Cytomegalovirus Promoter in Tumors and Muscles: Implementation of Non-invasive Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kamensek, Urska; Sersa, Gregor; Vidic, Suzana; Tevz, Gregor; Kranjc, Simona

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter is one of the most commonly used promoters for expression of transgenes in mammalian cells. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of methylation and upregulation of the CMV promoter by irradiation and the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin in vivo using non-invasive fluorescence in vivo imaging. Procedures Murine fibrosarcoma LPB and mammary carcinoma TS/A cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding CMV and p21 promoter-driven green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. Solid TS/A tumors were induced by subcutaneous injection of fluorescent tumor cells, while leg muscles were transiently transfected with plasmid encoding GFP under the control of the CMV promoter. Cells, tumors, and legs were treated either by DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine, irradiation, or cisplatin. GFP expression was determined using a fluorescence microplate reader in vitro and by non-invasive fluorescence imaging in vivo. Results Treatment of cells, tumors, and legs with 5-azacytidine (re)activated the CMV promoter. Furthermore, treatment with irradiation or cisplatin resulted in significant upregulation of GFP expression both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions Observed alterations in the activity of the CMV promoter limit the usefulness of this widely used promoter as a constitutive promoter. On the other hand, inducibility of CMV promoters can be beneficially used in gene therapy when combined with standard cancer treatment, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. PMID:20396957

  10. Knockdown of the FoxM1 enhances the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to cisplatin by targeting Mcl-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomei; Liang, Jun; Liu, Ying-Xun; Wang, Yuming; Yang, Xiao-Hui; Bao-Hongluan; Zhang, Gui-Lling; Du, Juan; Wu, Xia-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a main obstacle for effective treatment of gastric cancer, the mechanism of which is still poorly understood. Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) plays an important role in chemo-resistance of various tumors. This study aimed to explore whether FoxM1 mediated resistance of the gastric cancer cell line SGC7901 to the chemotherapy agent cisplatin (DDP). In the study, we detected FoxM1 and Mcl-1 expression via real time-PCR and western blot and demonstrated that FoxM1 is overexpressed in cisplatin-resistance GC cells and Mcl-1 expression is regulated by FoxM1. We examined SGC7901/DDP cell viability by MTT assay, which revealed that suppression of the FoxM1/Mcl-1 pathway impaired cell viability and thus increased sensitivity to cisplatin in gastric cancer cells. Taken together, the study implied that the FoxM1/Mcl-1 pathway may overcome cispaltin resistance of gastric cancer and provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27455555

  11. Persistent GP130/STAT3 Signaling Contributes to the Resistance of Doxorubicin, Cisplatin, and MEK Inhibitor in Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaojuan; Xiao, Hui; Wang, Ruoning; Liu, Lingling; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh

    2016-01-01

    To test the role of STAT3 in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells, genetic approaches were used to either knockdown the expression of STAT3 and GP130, an upstream activator of STAT3 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or express persistently active STAT3 protein. Knockdown expression of GP130 or STAT3 sensitized cells to anti-cancer drugs doxorubicin, cisplatin, and MEK inhibitor AZD6244. On the other hand, expression of the constitutively active STAT3 protein reduced the sensitivity of rhabdomyosarcoma cells to those drugs. In addition, we tested a small molecule STAT3 inhibitor LY5 and a GP130 inhibitor bazedoxifene in rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Our data demonstrated that the combination of LY5 or bazedoxifene with doxorubicin, cisplatin, and AZD6244 showed stronger inhibitory effects than single agent alone. In summary, our results demonstrated that GP130/STAT3 signaling contributes to the resistance of these drugs in rhabdomyosarcoma cells. They also suggested a potentially novel cancer therapeutic strategy using the combination of inhibitors of GP130/STAT3 signaling with doxorubicin, cisplatin, or AZD6244 for rhabdomyosarcoma treatments. PMID:26373715

  12. Replication of TPMT and ABCC3 Genetic Variants Highly Associated With Cisplatin-Induced Hearing Loss in Children

    PubMed Central

    Pussegoda, K; Ross, CJ; Visscher, H; Yazdanpanah, M; Brooks, B; Rassekh, SR; Zada, YF; Dubé, M-P; Carleton, BC; Hayden, MR

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of solid tumors. A serious complication of cisplatin treatment is permanent hearing loss. The aim of this study was to replicate previous genetic findings in an independent cohort of 155 pediatric patients. Associations were replicated for genetic variants in TPMT (rs12201199, P = 0.0013, odds ratio (OR) 6.1) and ABCC3 (rs1051640, P = 0.036, OR 1.8). A predictive model combining variants in TPMT, ABCC3, and COMT with clinical variables (patient age, vincristine treatment, germ-cell tumor, and cranial irradiation) significantly improved the prediction of hearing-loss development as compared with using clinical risk factors alone (area under the curve (AUC) 0.786 vs. 0.708, P = 0.00048). The novel combination of genetic and clinical factors predicted the risk of hearing loss with a sensitivity of 50.3% and a specificity of 92.7%. These findings provide evidence to support the importance of TPMT, COMT, and ABCC3 in the prediction of cisplatin-induced hearing loss in children. PMID:23588304

  13. X-ray microimaging of cisplatin distribution in ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyozuka, Yasuhiko; Takemoto, Kuniko; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Guttmann, Peter; Tsubura, Airo; Kihara, Hiroshi

    2000-05-01

    X-ray microscopy has the possibility to be in use for elemental analysis of tissue and cells especially under physiological conditions with high lateral resolution. In X-ray microimaging cisdiamminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin: CDDP), an anticancer agent, which has a platinum atom at its functional center gives sufficient contrast against organic material at sub-cellular level. We analyzed the enhance effect and intracellular distribution of CDDP in human ovarian cancer cells with the transmission X-ray microscope at BESSY, Berlin. Two human ovarian cancer cell lines (MN-1 and EC) were treated with 1 and 10 μg/ml of CDDP for 4 hours and compared with untreated cells X-ray images of CDDP-treated samples show clearly labeled nucleoli, periphery of the nucleus and mitochondria, in a concentration-dependent manner. CDDP binds to DNA molecules via the formation of intra- or-inter-strand cross-links. Higher contrasts at the periphery of nucleus and nucleoli suggest the distribution of tightly packed heterochromatin. In addition, results show the possibility that CDDP binds to mitochondrial DNA. Biological function of cisplatin is not only the inhibition of DNA replication but is suggested to disturb mitochondrial function and RNA synthesis in the nucleolus.

  14. Platinum-containing compound platinum pyrithione is stronger and safer than cisplatin in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chong; Chen, Xin; Zang, Dan; Lan, Xiaoying; Liao, Siyan; Yang, Changshan; Zhang, Peiquan; Wu, Jinjie; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Ningning; Liao, Yuning; Huang, Hongbiao; Shi, Xianping; Jiang, Lili; Liu, Xiuhua; He, Zhimin; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2016-09-15

    DNA is the well-known molecular target of current platinum-based anticancer drugs; consequently, their clinical use is severely restricted by their systemic toxicities and drug resistance originating from non-selective DNA damage. Various strategies have been developed to circumvent the shortcomings of platinum-based chemotherapy but the inherent problem remains unsolved. Here we report that platinum pyrithione (PtPT), a chemically well-characterized synthetic complex of platinum, inhibits proteasome function and thereby exhibits greater and more selective cytotoxicity to multiple cancer cells than cisplatin, without showing discernible DNA damage both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, unlike the classical proteasome inhibitor bortezomib/Velcade which inhibits the proteasome via blocking the peptidase activity of 20S proteasomes, PtPT primarily deactivates 26S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases USP14 and UCHL5. Furthermore, PtPT can selectively induce cytotoxicity and proteasome inhibition in cancer cells from leukemia patients but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy humans. In nude mice, PtPT also remarkably inhibited tumor xenograft growth, without showing the adverse effects that were induced by cisplatin. Hence, we have discovered a new platinum-based anti-tumor agent PtPT which targets 26S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases rather than DNA in the cell and thereby exerts safer and more potent anti-tumor effects, identifying a highly translatable new platinum-based anti-cancer strategy. PMID:27381943

  15. DNA damage response (DDR) pathway engagement in cisplatin radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sears, Catherine R; Cooney, Sean A; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Mendonca, Marc S; Turchi, John J

    2016-04-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are commonly treated with a platinum-based chemotherapy such as cisplatin (CDDP) in combination with ionizing radiation (IR). Although clinical trials have demonstrated that the combination of CDDP and IR appear to be synergistic in terms of therapeutic efficacy, the mechanism of synergism remains largely uncharacterized. We investigated the role of the DNA damage response (DDR) in CDDP radiosensitization using two NSCLC cell lines. Using clonogenic survival assays, we determined that the cooperative cytotoxicity of CDDP and IR treatment is sequence dependent, requiring administration of CDDP prior to IR (CDDP-IR). We identified and interrogated the unique time and agent-dependent activation of the DDR in NSCLC cells treated with cisplatin-IR combination therapy. Compared to treatment with CDDP or IR alone, CDDP-IR combination treatment led to persistence of γH2Ax foci, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), for up to 24h after treatment. Interestingly, pharmacologic inhibition of DDR sensor kinases revealed the persistence of γ-H2Ax foci in CDDP-IR treated cells is independent of kinase activation. Taken together, our data suggest that delayed repair of DSBs in NSCLC cells treated with CDDP-IR contributes to CDDP radiosensitization and that alterations of the DDR pathways by inhibition of specific DDR kinases can augment CDDP-IR cytotoxicity by a complementary mechanism. PMID:26991853

  16. Effect of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 silencing on cisplatin sensitivity in endometrial carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEN-XIN; LIU, XIANG-YU; YU, HU; CHEN, YING; HAO, QUAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) silencing on the sensitivity of the HEC-1-A endometrial carcinoma cell line to cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum (II), or DDP]. Four CDK7 siRNA fragments were designed and synthesized based on the gene sequence of CDK7 and transfected into HEC-1-A cells. The RNA interference of the fragments was confirmed by semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analyses. The CDK7-423 siRNA fragment exhibited the most marked silencing of CDK-7 (>70%), and was chosen for the subsequent experiments in HEC-1-A endometrial carcinoma cells. The sensitivity of the cells to a chemotherapeutic agent (cisplatin) was determined before and after transfection of the siRNA, using a MTT cytotoxicity assay, flow cytometry and Hoechst/propidium iodide (PI) double-staining immunofluorescence microscopy. The results of the MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the half maximal inhibitory concentration of cisplatin was reduced from 45.12 μg/ml to 3.200 μg/ml following the inhibition of CDK7 expression levels, indicating a significantly increased cytotoxicity in the treated cells (P<0.05). The flow cytometry analysis showed that the mean rate of apoptosis in the CDK7 low-expression group was 37.57%, which was significantly higher than the rate in the parental cells (11.66%) (P<0.05). Hoechst/PI co-immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the number of apoptotic bodies in the CDK7 low-expression HEC-1-A cells was significantly increased as compared with the parental cells. Downregulation of CDK7 expression levels in HEC-1-A endometrial carcinoma cells via the transfection of CDK7 siRNA may significantly enhance cancer cell sensitivity to cisplatin chemotherapy and increasing apoptosis. CDK7 is a novel promising treatment for endometrial carcinoma that requires further in-depth study. PMID:25411854

  17. Transarterial Chemoembolization With Cisplatin as Second-Line Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Unresponsive to Chemoembolization With Epirubicin-Lipiodol Emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Noboru Osuga, Keigo; Higashihara, Hiroki; Tomoda, Kaname; Mikami, Koji; Nakazawa, Tetsuro; Nakamura, Hironobu; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) using cisplatin as a second-line treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) unresponsive to TACE using epirubicin-Lipiodol emulsion at our institution. Materials and Methods: Between January 2006 and March 2009, 51 patients with unresectable HCC underwent TACE using cisplatin. All patients had shown persistent viable tumor or tumor progression after at least 2 sessions of TACE using epirubicin-Lipiodol emulsion. TACE procedures consisted of arterial injection of a mixture of Lipiodol and cisplatin (30-100 mg [mean 57 {+-} 21]) (n = 29) or arterial infusion of cisplatin (30-100 mg [mean 87 {+-} 19]) solution (n = 22) followed by injection of 1-mm porous gelatin particles. Early tumor response was assessed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria. Overall survival and progression-free survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed according to NCI-CTCAE version 3 criteria. Results: Response rates were 11.8 and 27.5% by RECIST and EASL criteria, respectively. Overall survival rates were 61.9, 48.2, and 28.9% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively, and the median survival time was 15.4 months. Progression-free survival rate was 35.2% at 1 year, and median progression-free survival time was 3.1 months. No major complications were observed, and the occurrence of postembolization syndrome was minimal. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities included thrombocytopenia (5.8%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level (35.3%), and increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level (23.5%). Conclusions: witching the TACE anticancer drug from epirubicin to cisplatin might be the feasible option for advanced HCC, even when considered resistant to the initial form of TACE.

  18. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with docetaxel and cisplatin followed by consolidation chemotherapy in locally advanced unresectable non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eroglu, Celalettin; Orhan, Okan; Unal, Dilek; Dogu, Gamze G.; Karaca, Halit; Dikilitas, Mustafa; Oztürk, Ahmet; Ozkan, Metin; Kaplan, Bünyamin

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate treatment results and toxicities in patients who received concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by consolidation with docetaxel and cisplatin in locally advanced unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: Ninety three patients were included in this retrospective study. The patients received 66 Gy radiotherapy and weekly 20 mg/m2 docetaxel and 20 mg/m2 cisplatin chemotherapy concomitantly. One month later than the end of CRT, consolidation chemotherapy with four cycles of docetaxel 75 mg/m2 and cisplatin 75 mg/m2 were administered at each 21 days. RESULTS: Median age of the patients was 57 (range, 30-74). Following concomitant CRT, 14 patients (15%) showed complete and 50 patients (54%) showed partial response (total response rate was 69%). The median follow-up was 13 months (range: 2-51 months). The median overall survival was 18 months (95% confidential interval [CI]: 13.8-22.1 months); local control was 15 months (95% CI: 9.3-20.6 months); progression-free survival was 9 months (95% CI: 6.5-11.4 months). Esophagitis in eight (9%) patients, neutropenia in seven (8%) patients and pneumonitis in eight (9%) patients developed as grade III-IV toxicity due to concomitant CRT. CONCLUSION: Concomitant CRT with docetaxel and cisplatin followed by docetaxel and cisplatin consolidation chemotherapy might be considered as a feasible, and well tolerated treatment modality with high response rates despite the fact that it has not a survival advantage in patients with locally advanced unresectable NSCLC. PMID:23741274

  19. Cisplatin fails to induce puma mediated apoptosis in mucosal melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Fritsche, Marie Kristin; Metzler, Veronika; Becker, Karen; Plettenberg, Christian; Heiser, Clemens; Hofauer, Benedikt; Knopf, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Mucosal melanomas (MM) are aggressive subtypes of common melanomas. It remains unclear whether limitations in their resectability or their distinctive molecular mechanisms are responsible for the aggressive phenotype. Methods In total, 112 patients with cutaneous melanomas (CM) and 27 patients with MM were included. Clinical parameters were analysed using Chi square, Fisher exact and student's t-test. Survival rates were calculated by Kaplan–Meier. Analysis of p53, p21, Mdm2, Hipk2, Gadd45, Puma, Bax, Casp9 and Cdk1 via quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed. TP53 induction after cisplatin treatment was analysed in 10 cell lines (melanocytes, four MM and five CM) using western blot (WB) and qPCR. Results The overall/recurrence-free survival differed significantly between MM (40 months and 30 months) and CM (90 months and 107 months; p < 0.001). IHC and WB confirmed high p53 expression in all melanomas. Hipk2 and Gadd45 showed significantly higher expressions in CM (p < 0.005; p = 0.004). QPCR and WB of wild-type cell lines demonstrated no differences for p53, p21, Mdm2, Bax and Casp9. WB failed to detect Puma in MM, while Cdk1 regulation occurred exclusively in MM. Conclusions The aggressive phenotype of MM did not appear to be due to differential expressions of p53, p21, Mdm2, Bax or Casp9. A non-functional apoptosis in MM may have further clinical implications. PMID:25831048

  20. Genetic risk factors of cisplatin induced ototoxicity in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Talach, T; Rottenberg, J; Gal, B; Kostrica, R; Jurajda, M; Kocak, I; Lakomy, R; Vogazianos, E

    2016-01-01

    Ototoxicity is an important adverse effect of using Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum) (CDDP) as a form of chemotherapy. The clinical picture of CDDP induced ototoxicity includes perceptive hearing impairment (reversible or permanent) and tinnitus. Ototoxicity manifests with considerable variability between patients. The objective of this prospective study was to investigate a possible genetic background to this variability. We assessed ototoxicity induced by therapeutic doses of CDDP in adult patients with germinative testicular tumors, or other tumors treated with an identical CDDP dosage scheme. Audiological examination before, during and after the treatment has shown deterioration in hearing; first in the high-frequencies and with increased CDDP cumulative doses, impairment in other frequencies as well. Occurrence of tinnitus was not dependent on the administered dose of CDDP, or the other risk factors examined in this study. The association of CDDP induced ototoxicity with genetic polymorphisms in candidate genes was examined. Our study has demonstrated an association of early onset of CDDP induced ototoxicity with the presence of two copies of GSTT1 gene (p=0,009) and with T allele of rs9332377 polymorphism in COMT gene (p=0,001). PMID:26774148

  1. DFT study of cisplatin@carbon nanohorns complexes.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Leonardo A; Nogueira, Camila A S; Lopes, Juliana F; Dos Santos, Hélio F; De Almeida, Wagner B

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports a quantum chemical investigation of the inclusion complex formation between a carbon nanohorn structure and cisplatin molecule, using the density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP functional and 6-31G(d,p)/LanL2DZ standard basis sets. The inclusion of the drug in host molecules such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), aims to reduce the toxicity and enhance the effectiveness of cisplatin. In this work we carried out a search for minimum energy structures on the potential energy surface (PES) for CNH-cisplatin interaction, and then calculated the stabilization energy, charge distribution and NMR spectra, which can be of great aid for the experimental identification of the inclusion compound. Our results indicate that the CNH and cisplatin can indeed form stable inclusion complex, with the calculated (1)H NMR and (15)N NMR chemical shifts for cisplatin atoms revealing very substantial changes due to complex formation (~20ppm) that can be easily experimentally observed, which is helpful to the spectra assignment and the inclusion compound structural elucidation. PMID:24091348

  2. Cisplatin induces loop structures and condensation of single DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xi-Miao; Zhang, Xing-Hua; Wei, Kong-Ji; Ji, Chao; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Wang, Wei-Chi; Li, Ming; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2009-01-01

    Structural properties of single λ DNA treated with anti-cancer drug cisplatin were studied with magnetic tweezers and AFM. Under the effect of low-concentration cisplatin, the DNA became more flexible, with the persistence length decreased significantly from ∼52 to 15 nm. At a high drug concentration, a DNA condensation phenomenon was observed. Based on experimental results from both single-molecule and AFM studies, we propose a model to explain this kind of DNA condensation by cisplatin: first, di-adducts induce local distortions of DNA. Next, micro-loops of ∼20 nm appear through distant crosslinks. Then, large aggregates are formed through further crosslinks. Finally, DNA is condensed into a compact globule. Experiments with Pt(dach)Cl2 indicate that oxaliplatin may modify the DNA structures in the same way as cisplatin. The observed loop structure formation of DNA may be an important feature of the effect of platinum anti-cancer drugs that are analogous to cisplatin in structure. PMID:19129234

  3. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia enhancement of cisplatin chemotherapy cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Gottesman, Rachel E.; Kaufman, Peter A.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic effect of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) combined with systemic cisplatin chemotherapy in a murine mammary adenocarcinoma model (MTGB). Materials and methods An alternating magnetic field (35.8 kA/m at 165 kHz) was used to activate 110 nm hydroxyethyl starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles (mNP) to a thermal dose of 60 min at 43 °C. Intratumoral mNP were delivered at 7.5 mg of Fe/cm3 of tumour (four equal tumour quadrants). Intraperitoneal cisplatin at 5 mg/kg body weight was administered 1 h prior to mNPH. Tumour regrowth delay time was used to assess the treatment efficacy. Results mNP hyperthermia, combined with cisplatin, was 1.7 times more effective than mNP hyperthermia alone and 1.4 times more effective than cisplatin alone (p<0.05). Conclusions Our results demonstrate that mNP hyperthermia can result in a safe and significant therapeutic enhancement for cisplatin cancer therapy. PMID:24144336

  4. Mass spectrometric studies on the interaction of cisplatin and insulin.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yue, Lei; Liu, Yaqin; Yin, Xinchi; Yin, Qi; Pan, Yuanjiang; Yang, Lirong

    2016-04-01

    The interaction of antitumor drug, cisplatin (cis-[PtCl2(NH3)2], CDDP) with insulin from porcine pancreas has been investigated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and high resolution hybrid ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALIDI-TOF/TOF-MS and ESI-IT/TOF MS). The MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS results demonstrated that the presence of cisplatin complex resulted in the reduction of the disulfide bond in porcine pancreas after the incubations of the two substances were performed in vitro. It indicated that the presence of cisplatin would destroy the native configuration of insulin, which may lead to the inactivation of insulin. High resolution mass values and the characteristic isotopic pattern of the platinated insulin ions allowed the analysis of platinated mono-, di- and triadducts of cisplatin and insulin in the incubations under different conditions. The laser-induced dissociation of the monoadduct obtained in MALDI source was carried out and one platinum was found to bind to insulin B chain was determined. The platinum binding sites were further identified to be the N terminus (B chain), cysteine 7 (B chain) and cysteine 19 (B chain) residues by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The identification of the interaction between insulin and cisplatin broadens the horizon of the knowledge in the interaction of the proteins and metallodrugs. PMID:26724920

  5. Structural changes of linear DNA molecules induced by cisplatin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhiguo; Liu, Ruisi; Zhou, Zhen; Zu, Yuangang; Xu, Fengjie

    2015-02-20

    Interaction between long DNA molecules and activated cisplatin is believed to be crucial to anticancer activity. However, the exact structural changes of long DNA molecules induced by cisplatin are still not very clear. In this study, structural changes of long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) induced by activated cisplatin have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that long DNA molecules gradually formed network structures, beads-on-string structures and their large aggregates. Electrostatic and coordination interactions were considered as the main driving forces producing these novel structures. An interesting finding in this study is the beads-on-string structures. Moreover, it is worth noting that the beads-on-string structures were linked into the networks, which can be ascribed to the strong DNA–DNA interactions. This study expands our knowledge of the interactions between DNA molecules and cisplatin. - Highlights: • We investigate structural changes of dsDNA and ssDNA induced by cisplatin. • AFM results indicated long dsDNA formed network, beads-on-string and aggregates. • ssDNA can form very similar structures as those of long linear dsDNA. • A possible formation process of theses novel structure is proposed.

  6. Theoretical evaluation of antiemetic effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists for prevention of vomiting induced by cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hironori; Yokoyama, Haruko; Takayanagi, Risa; Yoshimoto, Koichi; Nakajima, Akihiro; Okuyama, Kiyoshi; Iwase, Osamu; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2015-03-01

    5-HT(3) receptor antagonists are widely used as antiemetic agents in clinical setting, of which palonosetron, with a long elimination half life (t(1/2)), has recently become available. It is important to evaluate the concentration of serotonin when investigating the antiemetic effects of 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists, as those effects are not based solely on the t(1/2) value. We theoretically evaluated the antiemetic effects of three 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists (granisetron, azasetron, palonosetron) on cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting by estimating the time course of the 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy of serotonin. We estimated the 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy of serotonin in the small intestine, based on the time course of plasma concentration of each 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist and the time course of concentration of serotonin near the 5-HT(3) receptor in the small intestine after administration of cisplatin. The antiemetic effect of each 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist was evaluated based on the normal level of 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy of serotonin. Our results suggest that an adequate antiemetic effect will be provided when a dose of 75 mg/m(2) of cisplatin is given to patients along with any single administration of granisetron, azasetron, or palonosetron at a usual dose. On the other hand, the 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy of serotonin was found to be significantly lower than normal for several days after administration of palonosetron, as compared to granisetron and azasetron, indicating that constipation may be induced. Our results show that granisetron, azasetron, and palonosetron each have an adequate antiemetic effect after administration of 75 mg/m(2) of cisplatin. PMID:24470169

  7. Specific antioxidant compounds differentially modulate cytotoxic activity of doxorubicin and cisplatin: in vitro and in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Panchuk, Rostyslav; Skorokhyd, Nadia; Chumak, Vira; Lehka, Lilya; Omelyanchik, Sofya; Gurinovich, Valery; Moiseenok, Andrey; Heffeter, Petra; Berger, Walter; Stoika, Rostyslav

    2014-01-01

    Aim To use the antioxidant compounds (sodium selenite, selenomethionine, D-pantethine) for modulation of cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin and cisplatin toward wild type and drug-resistant mutants of several human tumor cells. Similar treatments were applied in vivo toward adult male Wistar rats. Methods Human tumor cells of different lines (HCT-116, Jurkat and HL-60) with various mechanisms of drug-resistance were treated with doxorubicin or cisplatin, alone or in combination with sodium selenite, selenomethionine, or D-pantethine. Cell viability, induction of apoptosis, and production of O2- radicals were measured. Activity of redox potential modulating enzymes was measured in the liver and blood plasma of adult male Wistar rats subjected to similar treatments. Results All antioxidants used in physiologically harmless concentration inhibited cytotoxic action of doxorubicin toward tumor cells sensitive to chemotherapy treatment by 15%-30%, and slightly enhanced cytotoxic effect of this medicine toward drug-resistant malignant cells. At the same time, there was no significant effect of these antioxidants on cisplatin action. Such effects were accompanied by a complete inhibition of production of superoxide radicals induced by doxorubicin. The results of in vivo study in adult male Wistar rats were in agreement with the results of in vitro study of human tumor cells. Conclusion Protective effect of specific antioxidant agents during cytotoxic action of doxorubicin was demonstrated in vitro in drug-sensitive human tumor cells and in adult male Wistar rats, while there was no protective effect in drug-resistant sub-lines of these tumor cells during action of doxorubicin and cisplatin. PMID:24891279

  8. The Essential Role of H19 Contributing to Cisplatin Resistance by Regulating Glutathione Metabolism in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Hong; Suo, Sha-Sha; Xu, Xiao-Li; Ni, Mao-Wei; Gu, Lin-Hui; Chen, Wei; Wang, Liang-Yan; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yue-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Primary and acquired drug resistance is one of the main obstacles encountered in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) chemotherapy. Cisplatin induces DNA damage through cross-linking and long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) play an important role in chemical induced DNA-damage response, which suggests that lincRNAs may be also associated with cisplatin resistance. However, the mechanism of long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) acting on cisplatin resistance is not well understood. Here, we showed that expression of lin-RECK-3, H19, LUCAT1, LINC00961, and linc-CARS2-2 was enhanced in cisplatin-resistant A2780-DR cells, while transcriptome sequencing showed decreased Linc-TNFRSF19-1 and LINC00515 expression. Additionally, we verified that different H19 expression levels in HGSC tissues showed strong correlation with cancer recurrence. H19 knockdown in A2780-DR cells resulted in recovery of cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative proteomics analysis indicated that six NRF2-targeted proteins, including NQO1, GSR, G6PD, GCLC, GCLM and GSTP1 involved in the glutathione metabolism pathway, were reduced in H19-knockdown cells. Furthermore, H19-knockdown cells were markedly more sensitive to hydrogen-peroxide treatment and exhibited lower glutathione levels. Our results reveal a previously unknown link between H19 and glutathione metabolism in the regulation of cancer-drug resistance. PMID:27193186

  9. The Essential Role of H19 Contributing to Cisplatin Resistance by Regulating Glutathione Metabolism in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Hong; Suo, Sha-Sha; Xu, Xiao-Li; Ni, Mao-Wei; Gu, Lin-Hui; Chen, Wei; Wang, Liang-Yan; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yue-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Primary and acquired drug resistance is one of the main obstacles encountered in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) chemotherapy. Cisplatin induces DNA damage through cross-linking and long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) play an important role in chemical induced DNA-damage response, which suggests that lincRNAs may be also associated with cisplatin resistance. However, the mechanism of long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) acting on cisplatin resistance is not well understood. Here, we showed that expression of lin-RECK-3, H19, LUCAT1, LINC00961, and linc-CARS2-2 was enhanced in cisplatin-resistant A2780-DR cells, while transcriptome sequencing showed decreased Linc-TNFRSF19-1 and LINC00515 expression. Additionally, we verified that different H19 expression levels in HGSC tissues showed strong correlation with cancer recurrence. H19 knockdown in A2780-DR cells resulted in recovery of cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative proteomics analysis indicated that six NRF2-targeted proteins, including NQO1, GSR, G6PD, GCLC, GCLM and GSTP1 involved in the glutathione metabolism pathway, were reduced in H19-knockdown cells. Furthermore, H19-knockdown cells were markedly more sensitive to hydrogen-peroxide treatment and exhibited lower glutathione levels. Our results reveal a previously unknown link between H19 and glutathione metabolism in the regulation of cancer-drug resistance. PMID:27193186

  10. Evaluation of Hybrid Theoretical Approaches for Structural Determination of a Glycine-Linked Cisplatin Derivative via Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation (IRMPD) Action Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, C C; Kimutai, B; Bao, X; Hamlow, L; Zhu, Y; Strobehn, S F; Gao, J; Berden, G; Oomens, J; Chow, C S; Rodgers, M T

    2015-11-01

    To gain a better understanding of the binding mechanism and assist in the optimization of chemical probing and drug design applications, experimental and theoretical studies of a series of amino acid-linked cisplatin derivatives are being pursued. Glyplatin (glycine-linked cisplatin) was chosen for its structural simplicity and to enable backbone effects to be separated from side-chain effects on the structure and reactivity of ornithine- and lysine-linked cisplatin (Ornplatin and Lysplatin, respectively). Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments were performed on Glyplatin to characterize its structure and guide the selection of the most effective hybrid theoretical approach for determining its structure and IR spectrum. The simplicity of the Glyplatin system allows a wide variety of density functionals, treatments of the Pt center including the use of all-electron basis sets vs valence basis sets combined with an effective core potential (ECP), and basis sets for all other atoms to be evaluated at a reasonable computational cost. The results for Glyplatin provide the foundation for calculations of more complex amino acid-linked cisplatin derivatives such as Ornplatin and Lysplatin. Present results suggest that the B3LYP/mDZP/def2-TZVP hybrid method can be effectively employed for structural and IR characterization of more complex amino acid-linked cisplatin complexes and their nucleic acid derivatives. PMID:26473433

  11. Phase III study of cisplatin with pemtrexed or vinorelbine plus concurrent late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Wang, Zhongtang; Huang, Wei; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Shuzeng; Zhou, Tao; Han, Dan; Wu, Zhenying; Gong, Heyi; Sun, Hongfu; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Yumei; Li, Hongsheng; Zhang, Zicheng; Lin, Haiqun; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cisplatin with pemtrexed or vinorelbine and concurrent late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (LCAHRT). Patients with unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were randomly assigned to two regimens. The experimental (PP) arm included cisplatin, pemtrexed and concurrent LCAHRT based on bilateral lung V20 = 33%. The control (NP) arm used cisplatin, vinorelbine with the same radiotherapy protocol. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Median survival times were 26.0 months (95% CI 23.2 to 28.7 months) and 28.5 months (95% CI 17.1 to 39.9 months) for the NP and PP arms, respectively (P = 0.26). Median progression-free survival was 12.5 months and 17.5 months in the NP and PP arms (P = 0.07). In both arms of the study, there were no differences in overall survival between patients with squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC. The incidences of grade 3 or 4 toxicity were higher in NP than PP arm. With concurrent LCAHRT, pemetrexed/cisplatin was equally as efficacious as vinorelbine/cisplatin, but showed a more favorable toxicity profile. PMID:26761213

  12. Cisplatin-MECY (methotrexate-leucovorin rescue plus cyclophosphamide) versus cisplatin-CHAD (cyclophosphamide, hexamethylmelamine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin) as initial chemotherapy in stage III-IV ovarian adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Barlow, J J; Lele, S B

    1984-12-01

    Thirty-three patients with advanced-stage ovarian adenocarcinomas, with no prior chemotherapy, were treated with weekly cisplatin (DDP) for four courses followed by five monthly courses of one of two randomly assigned multidrug combinations. These combinations were high-dose methotrexate-leucovorin plus cyclophosphamide (MECY) or cyclophosphamide, hexamethylmelamine, doxorubicin, and DDP (CHAD). Patients with no clinically measurable disease after 6 months of therapy were evaluated by laparoscopy. In the absence of disease progression at the time of the laparoscopy the study design called for a repeat cycle of four weekly DDP courses and another five monthly courses of the assigned multidrug combination. All patients with no evidence of disease after 1 year of treatment had a second-look laparoscopy which, if negative, was followed by a second-look laparotomy. This report includes all of the consecutively entered patients observed for a minimum of 1 year or to death. DDP-MECY and DDP-CHAD were similarly active for overall response rates and complete response rates according to laparoscopic criteria. However, DDP-MECY had a statistically significantly lower relapse rate (P less than 0.02) and a statistically significantly higher negative second-look laparotomy rate than did DDP-CHAD. Using all entered patients, with no exclusions from analysis, eight of 17 patients (47%) treated with DDP-MECY had negative second-looks after 1 year of treatment. This compares with one of 16 (6%) negative second-looks in patients treated with DDP-CHAD (P less than 0.02). The high negative second-look rate with DDP-MECY is exciting. Positive cytologic washings at the 6-month laparoscopic evaluation were highly predictive that residual disease would be found at the 1-year second-look surgery. Only one patient with positive peritoneal cytology after 6 months of treatment was found to have a negative second-look after 1 year of therapy. PMID:6439408

  13. Ruthenium(II) Complexes with 2-Phenylimidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline Derivatives that Strongly Combat Cisplatin-Resistant Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Leli; Chen, Yu; Liu, Jiangping; Huang, Huaiyi; Guan, Ruilin; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin was the first metal-based therapeutic agent approved for the treatment of human cancers, but its clinical activity is greatly limited by tumor drug resistance. This work utilized the parent complex [Ru(phen)2(PIP)]2+ (1) to develop three Ru(II) complexes (2–4) with different positional modifications. These compounds exhibited similar or superior cytotoxicities compared to cisplatin in HeLa, A549 and multidrug-resistant (A549R) tumor cell lines. Complex 4, the most potent member of the series, was highly active against A549R cancer cells (IC50 = 0.8 μM). This complex exhibited 178-fold better activity than cisplatin (IC50 = 142.5 μM) in A549R cells. 3D multicellular A549R tumor spheroids were also used to confirm the high proliferative and cytotoxic activity of complex 4. Complex 4 had the greatest cellular uptake and had a tendency to accumulate in the mitochondria of A549R cells. Further mechanistic studies showed that complex 4 induced A549R cell apoptosis via inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), elevated intracellular ROS levels, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell cycle arrest, making it an outstanding candidate for overcoming cisplatin resistance. PMID:26763798

  14. Aloin enhances cisplatin antineoplastic activity in B16-F10 melanoma cells by transglutaminase-induced differentiation.

    PubMed

    Tabolacci, Claudio; Rossi, Stefania; Lentini, Alessandro; Provenzano, Bruno; Turcano, Lorenzo; Facchiano, Francesco; Beninati, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Aloin, a natural anthracycline from aloe plant, is a hydroxyanthraquinone derivative shown to have antitumor properties. This study demonstrated that aloin exerted inhibition of cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion abilities of B16-F10 melanoma cells under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Furthermore, aloin induced melanoma cell differentiation through the enhancement of melanogenesis and transglutaminase activity. To improve the growth-inhibiting effect of anticancer agents, we found that the combined treatment of cells with aloin and low doses of cisplatin increases the antiproliferative activity of aloin. The results suggest that aloin possesses antineoplastic and antimetastatic properties, exerted likely through the induction of melanoma cell differentiation. PMID:22139409

  15. Concurrent delivery of carmustine, irinotecan, and cisplatin to the cerebral cavity using biodegradable nanofibers: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yuan-Yun; Wang, Yi-Chuan; Su, Chen-Hsing; Yang, Tao-Chieh; Chang, Tzu-Min; Kau, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2015-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor, and the prognosis of patients afflicted with GBM has been dismal, exhibiting progressive neurologic impairment and imminent death. Even with the most active regimens currently available, chemotherapy achieves only modest improvement in the overall survival. New chemotherapeutic agents and novel approaches to therapy are required for improving clinical outcomes. In this study, we used an electrospinning technique and developed biodegradable poly[(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide] nanofibrous membranes that facilitated a sustained release of carmustine (or bis-chloroethylnitrosourea, BCNU), irinotecan, and cisplatin. An elution method and a high-performance liquid chromatography assay were employed to characterize the in vitro and in vivo release behaviors of pharmaceuticals from the nanofibrous membranes. The experimental results showed that the biodegradable, nanofibrous membranes released high concentrations of BCNU, irinotecan, and cisplatin for more than 8 weeks in the cerebral cavity of rats. A histological examination revealed progressive atrophy of the brain tissues without inflammatory reactions. Biodegradable drug-eluting nanofibrous membranes may facilitate sustained delivery of various and concurrent chemotherapeutic agents in the cerebral cavity, enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of GBM treatment and preventing toxic effects resulting from the systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26209775

  16. Protein flexibility is key to cisplatin crosslinking in calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huilin; Wells, Stephen A; Jimenez-Roldan, J Emilio; Römer, Rudolf A; Zhao, Yao; Sadler, Peter J; O'Connor, Peter B

    2012-01-01

    Chemical crosslinking in combination with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) has significant potential for studying protein structures and protein–protein interactions. Previously, cisplatin has been shown to be a crosslinker and crosslinks multiple methionine (Met) residues in apo-calmodulin (apo-CaM). However, the inter-residue distances obtained from nuclear magnetic resonance structures are inconsistent with the measured distance constraints by crosslinking. Met residues lie too far apart to be crosslinked by cisplatin. Here, by combining FTICR MS with a novel computational flexibility analysis, the flexible nature of the CaM structure is found to be key to cisplatin crosslinking in CaM. It is found that the side chains of Met residues can be brought together by flexible motions in both apo-CaM and calcium-bound CaM (Ca4-CaM). The possibility of cisplatin crosslinking Ca4-CaM is then confirmed by MS data. Therefore, flexibility analysis as a fast and low-cost computational method can be a useful tool for predicting crosslinking pairs in protein crosslinking analysis and facilitating MS data analysis. Finally, flexibility analysis also indicates that the crosslinking of platinum to pairs of Met residues will effectively close the nonpolar groove and thus will likely interfere with the binding of CaM to its protein targets, as was proved by comparing assays for cisplatin-modified/unmodified CaM binding to melittin. Collectively, these results suggest that cisplatin crosslinking of apo-CaM or Ca4-CaM can inhibit the ability of CaM to recognize its target proteins, which may have important implications for understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance to platinum anticancer drugs. PMID:22733664

  17. Cisplatin inhibits MEK1/2

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Tetsu; Tsigelny, Igor F.; Götz, Andreas W.; Howell, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin (cDDP) is known to bind to the CXXC motif of proteins containing a ferrodoxin-like fold but little is known about its ability to interact with other Cu-binding proteins. MEK1/2 has recently been identified as a Cu-dependent enzyme that does not contain a CXXC motif. We found that cDDP bound to and inhibited the activity of recombinant MEK1 with an IC50 of 0.28 μM and MEK1/2 in whole cells with an IC50 of 37.4 μM. The inhibition of MEK1/2 was relieved by both Cu+1 and Cu+2 in a concentration-dependent manner. cDDP did not inhibit the upstream pathways responsible for activating MEK1/2, and did not cause an acute depletion of cellular Cu that could account for the reduction in MEK1/2 activity. cDDP was found to bind MEK1/2 in whole cells and the extent of binding was augmented by supplementary Cu and reduced by Cu chelation. Molecular modeling predicts 3 Cu and cDDP binding sites and quantum chemistry calculations indicate that cDDP would be expected to displace Cu from each of these sites. We conclude that, at clinically relevant concentrations, cDDP binds to and inhibits MEK1/2 and that both the binding and inhibitory activity are related to its interaction with Cu bound to MEK1/2. This may provide the basis for useful interactions of cDDP with other drugs that inhibit MAPK pathway signaling. PMID:26155939

  18. Paclitaxel- and/or cisplatin-induced ocular neurotoxicity: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Li, Yanping; Li, Junyu; Pi, Guoliang; Tan, Wenyong

    2014-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) and/or cisplatin (CDDP), as important cytotoxic anti-cancer agents, are widely used to treat various solid tumors. Both may cause moderate or severe neurotoxicity, but ocular neurotoxicity is also occasionally reported. A patient diagnosed with nasopharyngeal cancer suffering acute ocular neurotoxicity 10 days after paclitaxel and CDDP administration at the recommended dose is described in the present case report, and PTX- and/or CDDP-induced ocular neurotoxicity are summarized according to previous reports. Possible mechanisms and the potential diagnostic, therapeutic and predictive strategies of PTX- and/or CDDP-induced ocular neurotoxicity are reviewed, to help the oncologist to take the infrequent toxicity of cytotoxic drugs into account and improve patient safety during anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25114574

  19. Protective effects of subchronic caffeine administration on cisplatin induced urogenital toxicity in male mice.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, M; Bayat, P D; Ghanbari, A; Khazaei, S; Feizian, M; Khodaei, A; Alian, H A S

    2012-09-01

    In Cisplatin treated group, the degeneration intensity of the kidneys the diameter of seminiferous tubules as well as the apoptotic index in testes and kidney were increased. In Caffeine+Cisplatin treated groups, the total body weight, the weight of testes and kidneys and also the histopathological data did not show significant differences. The motility of sperm in cisplatin group reduced but in Caffeine+Cisplatin groups this parameter was increased. These data suggest that caffeine recovers toxicity induced by cisplatin in both kidneys and testes of mice. PMID:23140022

  20. Lipocalin 2 Enhances Migration and Resistance against Cisplatin in Endometrial Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Hiroyasu; Yamada, Yasushi; Kobara, Hisanori; Asaka, Ryoichi; Ando, Hirofumi; Higuchi, Shotaro; Ida, Koichi; Mvunta, David Hamisi; Shiozawa, Tanri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is a secretory protein that is involved in various physiological processes including iron transport. We previously identified LCN2 as an up-regulated gene in endometrial carcinoma, and found that the overexpression of LCN2 and its receptor, SLC22A17, was associated with a poor prognosis. However, the functions and mechanism of action of LCN2 currently remain unclear. Methods The LCN2-overexpressing endometrial carcinoma cell lines, HHUA and RL95-2, and LCN2-low-expressing one, HEC1B, were used. The effects of LCN2 on cell migration, cell viability, and apoptosis under various stresses, including ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and cisplatin treatment, were examined using the scratch wound healing assay, WST-1 assay, and Apostrand assay, respectively. Results LCN2-silencing using shRNA method significantly reduced the migration ability of cells (p<0.05). Cytotoxic stresses significantly decreased the viability of LCN2-silenced cells more than that of control cells. In contrast, LCN2 overexpression was significantly increased cisplatin resistance. These effects were canceled by the addition of the iron chelator, deferoxamine. After UV irradiation, the expression of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) was decreased in LCN2-silenced cells, and the PI3K inhibitor canceled the difference induced in UV sensitivity by LCN2. The cisplatin-induced expression of pAkt was not affected by LCN2; however, the expression of p53 and p21 was increased by LCN2-silencing. Conclusions These results indicated that LCN2 was involved in the migration and survival of endometrial carcinoma cells under various stresses in an iron-dependent manner. The survival function of LCN2 may be exerted through the PI3K pathway and suppression of the p53-p21 pathway. These functions of LCN2 may increase the malignant potential of endometrial carcinoma cells. PMID:27168162

  1. Maitake beta-glucan enhances therapeutic effect and reduces myelosupression and nephrotoxicity of cisplatin in mice.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yuki; Inoue, Munechika; Miyata, Ayu; Mizuno, Shigeto; Nanba, Hiroaki

    2009-05-01

    Cisplatin is broadly used clinically as an anticancer drug. Despite its significant anticancer activity, cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and myelosuppression limit its use. MD-Fraction is glucan purified from maitake (Grifola frondosa), which has beta-1, 6-main chain with beta-1, 3-branches, has been reported to exhibit antitumor and antimetastatic activities by enhancing the immune system. In this study, we demonstrate that MD-Fraction in combination with cisplatin significantly enhanced antitumor and antimetastatic activity compared to cisplatin alone. MD-Fraction reduced decreases in body weight, spleen weight and the number of immunocompetent cells such as macrophages, DCs and NK cells in cisplatin-treated mice. MD-Fraction also induced IL-12p70 production by splenocytes, resulting in increased NK cell activity in cisplatin-treated mice. MD-Fraction significantly increased the mRNA expression of GM-CSF, G-CSF, M-CSF, IFN-gamma, IL-12 p40 in splenocytes and reduced the decrease in the number of CFU-GM colonies in cisplatin-treated bone marrow. These facts suggest that MD-Fraction can reduce cisplatin-induced myelosuppression. Moreover, treatment with MD-Fraction significantly reduced cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity accompanied by increases in serum creatinine level, necrosis and apoptosis of renal tubular cells. These results suggest that MD-Fraction in combination with cisplatin cannot only enhance antitumor and antimentastatic acitivity, but also reduce cisplatin-induced myelotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. PMID:19249389

  2. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Hailey, Dale W; Stawicki, Tamara M; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W; Simon, Julian A; Ou, Henry C

    2013-03-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analog of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line. PMID:23467357

  3. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andrew J.; Hailey, Dale W.; Stawicki, Tamara M.; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Raible, David W.; Simon, Julian A.; Ou, Henry C.

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anti-cancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analogue of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line. PMID:23467357

  4. Prediction of treatment outcome by cisplatin-DNA adduct formation in patients with stage III/IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, treated by concurrent cisplatin-radiation (RADPLAT).

    PubMed

    Hoebers, Frank J P; Pluim, Dick; Verheij, Marcel; Balm, Alfons J M; Bartelink, Harry; Schellens, Jan H M; Begg, Adrian C

    2006-08-15

    The purpose of our study was to test the predictive value of cisplatin-DNA adduct levels in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with cisplatin-radiation. Patients with advanced-stage HNSCC were treated within a randomized trial, investigating the optimal route of cisplatin administration, concurrently with radiation. Cisplatin was administered intra-arterially (IA, 150 mg/m2, with systemic rescue by sodium thiosulfate) or intravenously (IV, 100 mg/m2). In a subgroup, adducts were quantified in normal tissue and tumor. 32P-postlabeling was used to quantify intrastrand guanosine-guanosine adducts (GG-adducts) and adenosine-guanosine adducts (AG-adducts). Adduct levels were correlated with treatment outcome. Thirty-five patients were included (21 IV and 14 IA). At median follow-up of 27 months, locoregional (LR) control was 75% at 1 and 70% at 2 years. Adduct levels in tumor were 4-5-fold higher than in white blood cells (WBC) for both IA and IV treatment (p = 0.01). Adduct formation in WBC and buccal cells was higher in IV treated patients compared with IA infusion (p = 0.049 and 0.005 for GG-adducts in WBC and buccal cells, respectively). Adducts in tumors after IA infusion were not statistically different from those after IV. A strong correlation was observed between GG- and AG-adduct formation (r = 0.86, p < 0.001). Patients with higher GG adduct levels (>median) in primary tumor had significantly better disease free survival (DFS) than patients with lower (< or = median) adduct levels (p = 0.02). For overall survival (OS), a nonsignificant trend was observed, again in favor of patients with higher adduct levels (p = 0.06). In conclusion, cisplatin-DNA adduct formation in primary tumor appears to be predictive for DFS in HNSCC. No differences were observed in intratumoral adduct levels between IA and IV treatments, despite selective infusion of high-dose cisplatin with the IA procedure. However, systemic adduct levels (WBC and buccal

  5. Preparation and stability of lipid-coated nanocapsules of cisplatin: anionic phospholipid specificity.

    PubMed

    Velinova, Maria J; Staffhorst, Rutger W H M; Mulder, Willem J M; Dries, Arno S; Jansen, Bart A J; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2004-05-27

    Cisplatin nanocapsules represent a novel lipid formulation of the anti-cancer drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin), in which nanoprecipitates of cisplatin are coated by a phospholipid bilayer consisting of a 1:1 mixture of zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) and negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS). Cisplatin nanocapsules are characterized by an unprecedented cisplatin-to-lipid ratio and exhibit increased in vitro cytotoxicity compared to the free drug [Nat. Med. 8, (2002) 81]. In the present study, the stability of the cisplatin nanocapsules was optimized by varying the lipid composition of the bilayer coat and monitoring in vitro cytotoxicity and the release of contents during incubations in water and in mouse serum. The release of cisplatin from the PC/PS (1:1) nanocapsules in water increased with increasing temperature with a t(1/2) of 6.5 h at 37 degrees C. At 4 degrees C, cisplatin was retained in the nanocapsules for well over 8 days. Replacement of PS by either phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid revealed that nanocapsules prepared of PS were more stable, which was found to be due to the ability of PS to form a stable cisplatin-PS coordination complex. Mouse serum had a strong destabilizing effect on the cisplatin nanocapsules. The PC/PS formulation lost over 80% of cisplatin within minutes after resuspension in serum. Incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol 2000) (PEG)-derivatized phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol in the bilayer coat extended the lifetime of the cisplatin nanocapsules in mouse serum to almost an hour. The results demonstrate that specificity in the interaction of cisplatin with anionic phospholipids is an important criterium for the formation and stability of cisplatin nanocapsules. PMID:15157616

  6. The synergistic effects of DNA-damaging drugs cisplatin and etoposide with a histone deacetylase inhibitor valproate in high-risk neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Groh, Tomas; Hrabeta, Jan; Khalil, Mohammed Ashraf; Doktorova, Helena; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie

    2015-07-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains one of the most important therapeutic challenges for pediatric oncologists. New agents or regimens are urgently needed to improve the treatment outcome of this fatal tumor. We examined the effect of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors in a combination with other chemotherapeutics on a high-risk neuroblastoma UKF-NB-4 cell line. Treatment of UKF-NB-4 cells with DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics cisplatin or etoposide combined with the HDAC inhibitor valproate (VPA) resulted in the synergistic antitumor effect. This was associated with caspase-3-dependent induction of apoptosis. Another HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A and a derivative of VPA that does not exhibit HDAC inhibitory activity, valpromide, lacked this effect. The synergism was only induced when VPA was combined with cytostatics targeted to cellular DNA; VPA does not potentiate the cytotoxicity of the anticancer drug vincristine that acts by a mechanism different from that of DNA damage. The VPA-mediated sensitization of UKF-NB-4 cells to cisplatin or etoposide was dependent on the sequence of drug administration; the potentiating effect was only produced either by simultaneous treatment with these drugs or when the cells were pretreated with cisplatin or etoposide before their exposure to VPA. The synergistic effects of VPA with cisplatin or etoposide were associated with changes in the acetylation status of histones H3 and H4. The results of this study provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of the combination of VPA and cisplatin or etoposide for treating children suffering from high-risk neuroblastoma. PMID:25963435

  7. Phase I Trial of Radiation With Concurrent and Consolidation Pemetrexed and Cisplatin in Patients With Unresectable Stage IIIA/B Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brade, Anthony; Bezjak, Andrea; MacRae, Robert; Laurie, Scott; Sun, Alex; Cho, John; Leighl, Natasha; Pearson, Shannon; Southwood, Bernadette; Wang, Lisa; McGill, Shauna; Iscoe, Neill; Shepherd, Frances A.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of concurrent pemetrexed/cisplatin/thoracic radiotherapy followed by consolidation pemetrexed/cisplatin for unresectable Stage IIIA/B non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with <5% weight loss and good performance status received two cycles of pemetrexed (300, 400, or 500 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 22 for Dose Levels 1, 2, and 3/4, respectively) and cisplatin (25 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1-3 for Dose Levels 1-3; 20 mg/m{sup 2} Days 1-5 for Dose Level 4) concurrent with thoracic radiation (61-66 Gy in 31-35 fractions). Consolidation consisted of two cycles of pemetrexed/cisplatin (500 mg/m{sup 2}, 75 mg/m{sup 2}) 21 days apart, after concurrent therapy. Results: Between January 2006 and October 2007, 16 patients entered the study. Median follow-up was 17.2 months. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Median radiation dose was 64 Gy (range, 45-66 Gy). Rates of significant Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity were 38% and 7%, respectively. One patient experienced Grade 3 acute esophagitis, and 2 experienced late (Grade 3) esophageal stricture, successfully managed with dilation. One patient experienced Grade 3 pneumonitis. The overall response rate was 88%. One-year overall survival was 81%. Conclusions: Full systemic dose pemetrexed seems to be safe with full-dose cisplatin and thoracic radiation in Stage IIIA/B NSCLC. Pemetrexed is the first third-generation cytotoxic agent tolerable at full dose in this setting. A Phase II study evaluating Dose Level 4 is ongoing.

  8. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (epoetin and darbepoetin) for treating cancer treatment-induced anaemia (including review of technology appraisal no. 142): a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Crathorne, Louise; Huxley, Nicola; Haasova, Marcela; Snowsill, Tristan; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Hoyle, Martin; Briscoe, Simon; Coelho, Helen; Long, Linda; Medina-Lara, Antonieta; Mujica-Mota, Ruben; Napier, Mark; Hyde, Chris

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anaemia is a common side effect of cancer treatments and can lead to a reduction in quality of life. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are licensed for use in conjunction with red blood cell transfusions to improve cancer treatment-induced anaemia (CIA). OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ESAs in anaemia associated with cancer treatment (specifically chemotherapy). DATA SOURCES The following databases were searched from 2004 to 2013: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, British Nursing Index, Health Management Information Consortium, Current Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov. The US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency websites were also searched. Bibliographies of included papers were scrutinised for further potentially includable studies. REVIEW METHODS The clinical effectiveness review followed principles published by the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), or systematic reviews of RCTs, of ESAs (epoetin or darbepoetin) for treating people with CIA were eligible for inclusion in the review. Comparators were best supportive care, placebo or other ESAs. Anaemia- and malignancy-related outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. When appropriate, data were pooled using meta-analysis. An empirical health economic model was developed comparing ESA treatment with no ESA treatment. The model comprised two components: one evaluating short-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (while patients are anaemic) and one evaluating long-term QALYs. Costs and benefits were discounted at 3.5% per annum. Probabilistic and univariate deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS Of 1457 titles and abstracts screened, 23 studies assessing ESAs within their licensed

  9. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Scarrow, Robert C.; White, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided.

  10. Human Helicase RECQL4 Drives Cisplatin Resistance in Gastric Cancer by Activating an AKT-YB1-MDR1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mo, Dongliang; Fang, Hongbo; Niu, Kaifeng; Liu, Jing; Wu, Meng; Li, Shiyou; Zhu, Tienian; Aleskandarany, Mohammed A; Arora, Arvind; Lobo, Dileep N; Madhusudan, Srinivasan; Balajee, Adayabalam S; Chi, Zhenfen; Zhao, Yongliang

    2016-05-15

    Elevation of the DNA-unwinding helicase RECQL4, which participates in various DNA repair pathways, has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenicity of various human cancers, including gastric cancer. In this study, we addressed the prognostic and chemotherapeutic significance of RECQL4 in human gastric cancer, which has yet to be determined. We observed significant increases in RECQL4 mRNA or protein in >70% of three independent sets of human gastric cancer specimens examined, relative to normal gastric tissues. Strikingly, high RECQL4 expression in primary tumors correlated well with poor survival and gastric cancer lines with high RECQL4 expression displayed increased resistance to cisplatin treatment. Mechanistic investigations revealed a novel role for RECQL4 in transcriptional regulation of the multidrug resistance gene MDR1, through a physical interaction with the transcription factor YB1. Notably, ectopic expression of RECQL4 in cisplatin-sensitive gastric cancer cells with low endogenous RECQL4 was sufficient to render them resistant to cisplatin, in a manner associated with YB1 elevation and MDR1 activation. Conversely, RECQL4 silencing in cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells with high endogenous RECQL4 suppressed YB1 phosphorylation, reduced MDR1 expression, and resensitized cells to cisplatin. In establishing RECQL4 as a critical mediator of cisplatin resistance in gastric cancer cells, our findings provide a therapeutic rationale to target RECQL4 or the downstream AKT-YB1-MDR1 axis to improve gastric cancer treatment. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3057-66. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27013200

  11. Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Signaling Pathway in Cisplatin-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yunguang; Zheng Siyuan; Torossian, Artour; Speirs, Christina K.; Schleicher, Stephen; Giacalone, Nicholas J.; Carbone, David P.; Zhao Zhongming; Lu Bo

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The development of drug-resistant phenotypes has been a major obstacle to cisplatin use in non-small-cell lung cancer. We aimed to identify some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie cisplatin resistance using microarray expression analysis. Methods and Materials: H460 cells were treated with cisplatin. The differences between cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells and parental H460 cells were studied using Western blot, MTS, and clonogenic assays, in vivo tumor implantation, and microarray analysis. The cisplatin-R cells were treated with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 and siRNA targeting IGF-1 receptor. Results: Cisplatin-R cells illustrated greater expression of the markers CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase, more rapid in vivo tumor growth, more resistance to cisplatin- and etoposide-induced apoptosis, and greater survival after treatment with cisplatin or radiation than the parental H460 cells. Also, cisplatin-R demonstrated decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and increased activation of IGF-1 receptor signaling compared with parental H460 cells in the presence of IGF-1. Human recombinant IGF binding protein-3 reversed cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-R cells and targeting of IGF-1 receptor using siRNA resulted in sensitization of cisplatin-R-cells to cisplatin and radiation. Conclusions: The IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to cisplatin-R to cisplatin and radiation. Thus, this pathway represents a potential target for improved lung cancer response to treatment.

  12. Development and characterization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with a cisplatin-bearing polymer coating for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Unterweger, Harald; Tietze, Rainer; Janko, Christina; Zaloga, Jan; Lyer, Stefan; Dürr, Stephan; Taccardi, Nicola; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Hoppe, Alexander; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Schubert, Dirk W; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Alexiou, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    A highly selective and efficient cancer therapy can be achieved using magnetically directed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) bearing a sufficient amount of the therapeutic agent. In this project, SPIONs with a dextran and cisplatin-bearing hyaluronic acid coating were successfully synthesized as a novel cisplatin drug delivery system. Transmission electron microscopy images as well as X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the individual magnetite particles were around 4.5 nm in size and monocrystalline. The small crystallite sizes led to the superparamagnetic behavior of the particles, which was exemplified in their magnetization curves, acquired using superconducting quantum interference device measurements. Hyaluronic acid was bound to the initially dextran-coated SPIONs by esterification. The resulting amide bond linkage was verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The additional polymer layer increased the vehicle size from 22 nm to 56 nm, with a hyaluronic acid to dextran to magnetite weight ratio of 51:29:20. A maximum payload of 330 μg cisplatin/mL nanoparticle suspension was achieved, thus the particle size was further increased to around 77 nm with a zeta potential of −45 mV. No signs of particle precipitation were observed over a period of at least 8 weeks. Analysis of drug-release kinetics using the dialysis tube method revealed that these were driven by inverse ligand substitution and diffusion through the polymer shell as well as enzymatic degradation of hyaluronic acid. The biological activity of the particles was investigated in a nonadherent Jurkat cell line using flow cytometry. Further, cell viability and proliferation was examined in an adherent PC-3 cell line using xCELLigence analysis. Both tests demonstrated that particles without cisplatin were biocompatible with these cells, whereas particles with the drug induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, with secondary necrosis after prolonged incubation

  13. Membrane Transporters as Mediators of Cisplatin Effects and Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ciarimboli, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    Transporters are important mediators of specific cellular uptake and thus, not only for effects, but also for side effects, metabolism, and excretion of many drugs such as cisplatin. Cisplatin is a potent cytostatic drug, whose use is limited by its severe acute and chronic nephro-, oto-, and peripheral neurotoxicity. For this reason, other platinum derivatives, such as carboplatin and oxaliplatin, with less toxicity but still with antitumoral action have been developed. Several transporters, which are expressed on the cell membranes, have been associated with cisplatin transport across the plasma membrane and across the cell: the copper transporter 1 (Ctr1), the copper transporter 2 (Ctr2), the P-type copper-transporting ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B, the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2), and the multidrug extrusion transporter 1 (MATE1). Some of these transporters are also able to accept other platinum derivatives as substrate. Since membrane transporters display a specific tissue distribution, they can be important molecules that mediate the entry of platinum derivatives in target and also nontarget cells possibly mediating specific effects and side effects of the chemotherapeutic drug. This paper summarizes the literature on toxicities of cisplatin compared to that of carboplatin and oxaliplatin and the interaction of these platinum derivatives with membrane transporters. PMID:24278698

  14. Nebivolol Ameliorates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Mohamed A; Heeba, Gehan H

    2016-06-01

    Treatment with cisplatin is associated with dose-limiting side effects, mainly nephrotoxicity. On the other hand, nebivolol, a β1 -adrenoceptor antagonist, exhibits vasodilatory and antioxidative properties. This study aimed to determine whether nebivolol possesses a protective effect against cisplatin nephrotoxicity and explore many mechanisms underlying this potential effect. Nephrotoxicity was induced in Wistar rats by a single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin (6 mg/kg) on day 2. Nebivolol (10 mg/kg) was administered orally for 7 consecutive days. Nebivolol showed a nephroprotective effect as demonstrated by the significant reduction in the elevated levels of serum creatinine and urea as well as renal levels of malondialdehyde, nitric oxide products (nitrite/nitrate), inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, caspase-3, angiotensin II and endothelin-1 with a concurrent increase in renal levels of reduced glutathione and endothelial nitric oxide synthase compared to untreated rats. Histopathological examination confirmed the nephroprotective effect of nebivolol. Pre-treatment with Nω -nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, the non-specific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, partially altered the protection afforded by nebivolol. In conclusion, nebivolol protects rats against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity that is most likely through its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic effects as well as by abrogation of the augmented angiotensin II and endothelin-1 levels. PMID:26617394

  15. Improvement in intraperitoneal intraoperative cisplatin exposure based on pharmacokinetic analysis in patients with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Royer, Bernard; Delroeux, Delphine; Guardiola, Emmanuel; Combe, Marielle; Hoizey, Guillaume; Montange, Damien; Kantelip, Jean-Pierre; Chauffert, Bruno; Heyd, Bruno; Pivot, Xavier

    2008-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of gynecological cancer-related death in Western countries. The present treatment standards for ovarian cancer are based on the association of debulking surgery with platinum-based chemotherapy. Another strategy that could be further investigated is intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IP). We previously described that the 2-h administration of intraoperative IP cisplatin did not reach satisfactory concentrations. In the present study, we present the results of a pharmacokinetic analysis performed after two consecutive 1-h IP 30 mg/l cisplatin administrations. Twenty-seven patients with advanced epithelial cancer classified FIGO stage IIIC were included in the study. Blood and IP samples were taken over a 24-h period, during and after IP treatment. Both total and ultrafiltered (Uf) platinum (Pt) concentration levels were analyzed. Biological and clinical toxicities were also recorded. With this strategy, IP Pt concentrations stayed above the target concentration (10 mg/l) for a satisfactory length of time. The serum Pt concentrations were higher than those observed with the "one-bath" protocol and they induced the occurrence of recoverable renal toxicities (3 grade 1, 7 grade 2 and 4 grade 3). The best predictive parameter for renal failure was the total Pt 24-h Area Under the Curve (AUC) with a threshold value of 25 mg h/l RR = 0.31 (95% CI 0.13 - 0.49, P < 0.01). Administration of an increased amount of cisplatin is feasible and a satisfactory level of IP Pt concentrations is obtained. However, this improvement is associated with an increase in serum Pt levels and resulting renal toxicities. An attractive solution would be to decrease Pt transfer from peritoneum to bloodstream. A phase 1 study using intraoperative IP epinephrine in order to decrease this transfer is presently being carried out. PMID:17503047

  16. 5-Fluorouracil, folinic acid and cisplatin in advanced colorectal cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Tsavaris, N; Tentas, K; Bacoyiannis, C; Katsikas, M; Sakelaropoulos, N; Kosmas, C; Daliani, D; Kosmidis, P

    1995-08-01

    The combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and folinic acid (FA) has demonstrated activity in colorectal cancer (CC). Cisplatin is reported to have synergistic activity with 5-FU. We examined the combination FA + 5-FU + cisplatin in patients who had previously received chemotherapy with FA + 5-FU and relapsed. Two months after the last dose of FA + 5-FU and documentation of relapse, patients continued with the regimen consisting of cisplatin 20 mg/m2 in 15 min i.v. infusion followed by FA 500 mg/m2 in 1 h i.v. infusion, in the middle of which 5-FU 500 mg/m2 i.v. bolus was administered, with adequate post-hydration. This was repeated weekly for 4 weeks followed by a 2 week rest, for a maximum of six cycles. A total of 30 patients with CC that had relapsed to the combination of FA + 5-FU were treated; 23 had previous surgery and none had radiotherapy. Local recurrence was found in eight patients, metastases in the liver in 21, in lymph nodes in six, lung six and peritoneal metastases in seven. Seven patients responded partially. Toxicity requiring dose reduction or discontinuation of treatment included neutropenia 42% (grade 3:7%), mucositis 28% (grade 1:2), diarrhea 63% (Grade 3:10%), nausea-vomiting 55% (Grade 3:10%), increased creatinine value in three patients and peripheral neuropathy in two patients. We conclude that evaluation of this regimen shows substantial toxicity, with satisfactory response as a second line chemotherapy in these heavily pretreated patients. PMID:7579565

  17. Cisplatin, Gemcitabine, and Lapatinib as Neoadjuvant Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Vivek; Mamtani, Ronac; Keefe, Stephen; Guzzo, Thomas; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Vaughn, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to investigate the safety and efficacy of gemcitabine, cisplatin, and lapatinib (GCL) as neoadjuvant therapy in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) planned for radical cystectomy. Materials and Methods Four cycles of GCL were administered as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with MIBC. Although initially designed as a phase II efficacy study with a primary endpoint of pathologic complete response at the time of radical cystectomy, the dose selected for investigation proved excessively toxic. A total of six patients were enrolled. Results The initial four patients received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m2 intravenously on days 1 and 8 and cisplatin 70 mg/m2 intravenously on day 1 of each 21-day treatment cycle. Lapatinib was administered as 1,000 mg orally daily starting one week prior to the initiation of cycle 1 of gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) and continuing until the completion of cycle 4 of GC. These initial doses were poorly tolerated, and the final two enrolled patients received a reduced lapatinib dose of 750 mg orally daily. However, reduction of the lapatinib dose did not result in improved tolerance or drug-delivery, and the trial was terminated early due to excessive toxicity. Grade 3/4 toxicities included diarrhea (33%), nausea/vomiting (33%), and thrombocytopenia (33%). Conclusion The addition of lapatinib to GC as neoadjuvant therapy for MIBC was limited by excessive treatment-related toxicity. These findings highlight the importance of thorough dose-escalation investigation of combination therapies prior to evaluation in the neoadjuvant setting, as well as the limitations of determination of maximum tolerated dose for novel targeted combination regimens. PMID:26639198

  18. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  19. Electroacupuncture alleviates cisplatin-induced nausea in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yingxue; Wang, Linpeng; Shi, Guangxia; Liu, Lu; Pei, Pei; Guo, Jianyou

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture has been shown to be effective for the treatment of chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms of action underlying the anti-emetic effect of electroacupuncture (EA). Design Forty-eight rats received saline (n=12) or 6 mg/kg cisplatin (n=36) to establish a chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting model. EA was performed at CV12 (n=12), bilateral PC6 (n=12), or sham points (n=12) 3 days before and 1–2 days after cisplatin administration (4–5 times in total), at 0.5–1 mA intensity and 2/15 Hz frequency for 10 min. Kaolin intake, food intake and bodyweight change were evaluated as markers of nausea and vomiting severity. Concentrations of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in the duodenum and c-Fos expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) were measured using high performance liquid chromatography and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results Cisplatin administration led to increased kaolin intake and reduced food intake and bodyweight over the following 2 days. EA at CV12 significantly reversed the cisplatin-induced change in kaolin intake (on days 1 and 2) and food intake and bodyweight (on day 1). EA at CV12 also attenuated the cisplatin-induced increase in 5-HT in the duodenum and suppressed c-Fos expression in the NTS. EA at PC6 influenced kaolin intake (on day 1 only) and c-Fos expression, but had no statistically significant effect on food intake, bodyweight or 5-HT expression. Conclusions This study demonstrated beneficial effects of EA on chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in a rat model. The anti-emetic effect of EA may be mediated through inhibition of 5-HT secretion in the duodenum and activity of the NTS. PMID:26386034

  20. Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Combination With Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo; Afonso, Sergio Luis; Cardoso Tavares, Vivian; Bernardes Godoi da Silva, Lucas; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose by describing the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of weekly gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck (LAHN) cancer concomitant to irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LAHN cancer were enrolled in a prospective, dose-escalation Phase I study. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria score. Maximum tolerated dose was defined when DLT developed in 2 of 6 patients. The starting dose of cisplatin was 20 mg/m{sup 2} and that of gemcitabine was 10 mg/m{sup 2} in 3 patients, with a subsequent dose escalation of 10 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin only for 3 new patients. In the next levels, only a dose escalation of gemcitabine with 10 mg/m{sup 2} for each new cohort was used (Level 1, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 20 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; Level 2, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; and Level 3, 20 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin). Radiation therapy was administered by use of a conformal technique over a period of 6 to 7 weeks in 2.0-Gy daily fractions for 5 consecutive days per week to a total dose of 70 Gy. Results: From 2008 to 2009, 12 patients completing 3 dose levels were included in the study. At Dose Level 3, 1 of 3 patients had DLT with Grade 3 mucositis. Of the next 3 required patients, 2 showed DLT with Grade 3 dermatitis. At a follow-up of 3 months, 10 of 12 evaluable patients (83.3%) obtained a complete response and 1 patient (8.3%) obtained a partial response. Among the complete responders, at a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 6-14 months), 9 patients are alive and disease free. Conclusion: Gemcitabine at low doses combined with cisplatin is a potent radiosensitizer effective in patients with LAHN cancer. The recommended Phase II dose is 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin with an acceptable tolerability profile.

  1. Elemental bioimaging of Cisplatin in Caenorhabditis elegans by LA-ICP-MS

    PubMed Central

    Crone, Barbara; Aschner, Michael; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Karst, Uwe; Bornhorst, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (Cisplatin) is one of the most important and frequently used cytostatic drugs for the treatment of various solid tumors. Herein, a laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) method incorporating a fast and simple sample preparation protocol was developed for the elemental mapping of Cisplatin in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). The method allows imaging of the spatially-resolved elemental distribution of platinum in the whole organism with respect to the anatomic structure in L4 stage worms at a lateral resolution of 5 µm. In addition, a dose- and time-dependent Cisplatin uptake was corroborated quantitatively by a total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (TXRF) method, and the elemental mapping indicated that Cisplatin is located in the intestine and in the head of the worms. Better understanding of the distribution of Cisplatin in this well-established model organism will be instrumental in deciphering Cisplatin toxicity and pharmacokinetics. Since the cytostatic effect of Cisplatin is based on binding the DNA by forming intra- and interstrand crosslinks, the response of poly(ADP-ribose)metabolism enzyme 1 (pme-1) deletion mutants to Cisplatin was also examined. Loss of pme-1, which is the C. elegans ortholog of human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) led to disturbed DNA damage response. With respect to survival and brood size, pme-1 deletion mutants were more sensitive to Cisplatin as compared to wildtype worms, while Cisplatin uptake was indistinguishable. PMID:25996669

  2. Cisplatin Concentrations in Long and Short Duration Infusion: Implications for the Optimal Time of Radiation Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Binu Susan; Das, Saikat; Isaiah, Rajesh; John, Subashini; Prabha, Ratna; Fleming, Denise Helen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cisplatin has radiosensitizing properties and the best sensitization to radiotherapy occurs with a higher plasma concentration of cisplatin. To our knowledge the optimal time sequence between chemotherapy and administration of radiation therapy, to obtain maximum effect from concurrent chemoradiation is unclear. Aim The aim of this study was to measure the two cisplatin infusion regimens in order to determine the total and free cisplatin post infusion concentration changes over time. These changes may have clinical implications on the optimum time of administration of post infusion radiation therapy. Materials and Methods Two cohorts of patients were recruited and both, total and free plasma concentration of cisplatin following long and short durations of intravenous infusion was determined. Blood samples were collected at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 and 5 hours from the start of the infusion in the 1hour infusion group and at 2, 3, 3.5, 4, 6 and 24 hours from the start of the infusion, in the 3 hour infusion group. Total and free cisplatin concentrations were measured using a validated HPLC-UV method. Results The highest concentration of total and free cisplatin was achieved at the end of the infusion in both regimens. Total cisplatin concentration declined 30 minutes after the end of infusion in both the groups. After 1hour of discontinuing cisplatin, the free cisplatin concentration also declined significantly. Conclusion We conclude that radiation should be administered within 30 minutes of completion of the infusion irrespective of the duration of infusion.

  3. Anti-apoptotic effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Beom; Jun, Hyoung-Oh; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Kyu-Won; Min, Bon Hong; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2013-12-01

    Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is known to protect various retinal cells. It was also reported to be overexpressed in several types of malignant tumors, whose chemoresistance correlates with the expression of clusterin. Herein, we investigated the effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells. Firstly, evaluation of clusterin expression demonstrated that it was highly expressed in human retinoblastoma tissues and cell lines (SNUOT-Rb1 and Y79) particularly in the area between viable cells around vessels and necrotic zones in the relatively avascular area in human retinoblastoma tissues. Furthermore, the effects of cisplatin on retinoblastoma cells were evaluated. Cisplatin (1 µg/ml) significantly affected cell viability of SNUOT-Rb1 cells by inducing caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Notably, the cell death due to cisplatin was prevented by 5 µg/ml of clusterin administered 4 h prior to cisplatin treatment by inhibiting cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, overexpression of clusterin exerted its anti-apoptotic effect on cisplatin-induced apoptosis, and effectively prevented cisplatin-induced cell death. These data suggest that clusterin, found to be expressed in human retinoblastoma, may exert anti-apoptotic effects on cisplatin-induced apoptosis and prevent cell death. Therefore, clusterin can contribute to cisplatin resistance of retinoblastoma. PMID:24085287

  4. Enhanced gastric retention of solid resin beads as a marker for emetic potential of agents in rats.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kentaro; Takagi, Kan; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    Whereas nausea and emesis are burdensome side effects that lead to poor treatment compliance especially in chemotherapy, it is difficult to predict the emetic potential of agents in rats and mice because rodents do not vomit. We examined the effect of emetics on gastric retention and role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)3 receptor in chemotherapeutic-induced enhancement of gastric retention in rats. The gastric retention of solid material was determined using resin beads, which were suitable to beads made with metals or glasses in size, hardness and weight. Each rat was orally given distilled water (0.5 ml/rat) containing 40 resin beads via a plastic feeding tube. The stomach was removed at 1 hr post-dose and cut along the greater curvature under carbon dioxide anesthesia. Beads were given immediately after administration of the drugs except with cisplatin, when there was a 1 hr delay. Cancer chemotherapeutics including cisplatin(0.1-3 mg/kg i.v.) and doxorubicin(0.3-10 mg/kg i.v.) and a nauseant, copper sulfate(1-30 mg/kg p.o.) enhanced gastric retention of beads. Ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently antagonized the enhanced gastric retention by cisplatin and doxorubicin. The copper sulfate-induced enhancement was also reversed by ondansetron. Our results suggest that 5-HT3 receptors mediate the cancer chemotherapeutic-enhanced gastric retention of solid material in rats. This implicates that the gastric retention of solid material is a useful marker to predict the potential of compounds to induce nausea and/or emesis in non-vomiting rodents. PMID:22687994

  5. Sodium selenosulfate at an innocuous dose markedly prevents cisplatin-induced gastrointestinal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Sun, Kang; Ni, Lijuan; Wang, Xufang; Wang, Dongxu; Zhang, Jinsong

    2012-02-01

    Our previous studies in mice revealed that two weeks short-term toxicity of sodium selenosulfate was significantly lower than that of sodium selenite, but selenium repletion efficacy of both compounds was equivalent. In addition, we showed that sodium selenosulfate reduced nephrotoxicity of cisplatin (CDDP) without compromising its anticancer activity, thus leading to a dramatic increase of cancer cure rate from 25% to 75%. Hydration has been used in clinical practice to reduce CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity, but it cannot mitigate CDDP-induced gastrointestinal toxicity. The present work investigated whether sodium selenosulfate is a potential preventive agent for the gastrointestinal toxicity. In tumor-bearing mice, sodium selenosulfate was administered at a dose of 9.5 μmol/kg daily for 11 days, CDDP alone resulted in diarrhea by 88% on day 12, whereas the co-administration of CDDP and sodium selenosulfate dramatically reduced diarrhea to 6% (p < 0.0001). Such a prominent protective effect promoted us to evaluate the safety potential of long-term sodium selenosulfate application. Mice were administered with sodium selenosulfate or sodium selenite for 55 days at the doses of 12.7 and 19 μmol/kg. The low-dose sodium selenite caused growth suppression and hepatotoxicity which were aggravated by the high-dose, leading to 40% mortality rate, but no toxic symptoms were observed in the two sodium selenosulfate groups. Altogether these results clearly show that sodium selenosulfate at an innocuous dose can markedly prevent CDDP-induced gastrointestinal toxicity. -- Highlights: ►Cisplatin resulted in diarrhea in mice by 88%. ►i.p. selenosulfate at 9.5 μmol/kg daily for 11 days reduced diarrhea to 6%. ►i.p. selenosulfate at 19 μmol/kg daily for 55 days was not toxic. ►i.p. selenite at 19 μmol/kg daily for 55 days was lethal. ►Innocuous dose of selenosulfate greatly prevents cisplatin-induced diarrhea.

  6. Hydrolysis theory for cisplatin and its analogues based on density functional studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Guo, Z; You, X Z

    2001-09-26

    reactions. Comparing with the computational results of gas-phase reactions, it can be concluded that the solvent effect should be considered to obtain an accurate hydrolysis picture. The most affected structural parameters after solvation are related to the equatorial plane of the TBP-like geometry. The results provide theoretical guidance on detailed understanding on the mechanism of the hydrolysis of cisplatin, which could be useful in the design of novel Pt-based anticancer agents. PMID:11562220

  7. Inhibition of nuclear factor κB transcription activity drives a synergistic effect of cisplatin and oridonin on HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinjun; Liu, Feiyan; Li, Mianli

    2016-04-01

    Activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) by cisplatin and other chemotherapeutics is responsible, at least in part, for the development of drug resistance in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Therefore, a combination of chemotherapeutics with NF-κB inhibitors could overcome resistance of cancer cells. Oridonin is a diterpenoid isolated from Rabdosia rubescens that can block the NF-κB signaling cascades. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of oridonin and cisplatin on human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Cell apoptosis and mitochondrial membrane potential loss were examined using Hoechst 33258 and rhodamine-123 staining, followed by flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins and NF-κB subunits was detected by real-time PCR and western blot. The activity of caspase 3 and 9 was measured using the Caspase Activity Kit. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based kit were used to assess the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. We found a synergistic antitumor effect between cisplatin and oridonin on HepG2 cells both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the combination of cisplatin and oridonin synergistically induces apoptosis and regulates the expression and activity of several key apoptosis-related proteins. Furthermore, the combination treatment not only downregulates nuclear translocation of p50 and p65, but more significantly, decreases the transcription activity of all NF-κB subunits to a greater degree than either agent alone. Our results suggest that the synergistic effect between both agents is likely to be driven by the inhibition of transcription activity of NF-κB and the resulting increased apoptosis. PMID:26704389

  8. Combining TBP-based rOFFGEL-IEF with FASP and nLC-ESI-LTQ-MS/MS for the analysis of cisplatin-binding proteins in rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Moraleja, I; Moreno-Gordaliza, E; Mena, M L; Gómez-Gómez, M M

    2014-03-01

    In this work, a methodology based on a reducing IEF separation in combination with a FASP tryptic digestion able to maintain the integrity of cisplatin-protein complexes has been developed. The method is based on OFFGEL-IEF under conditions provided by the thiol-free reducing agent TBP, which allowed the separation of cisplatin-binding proteins in liquid fractions. The FASP procedure is applied as an intermediate stage between the IEF separation and MS analysis where the proteins are retained and concentrated in a commercially available ultrafiltration device. The filter unit acts as a proteomic reactor for detergent removal, buffer exchange, chemical modification (reduction and alkylation) and protein digestion. Finally, purified peptides are recovered by centrifugation. This procedure provides efficiencies comparable to standard in-solution digestion and the risk of platinum-complexes loss is minimized due to the fact that reagents employed along the process are subsequently eliminated before the following step. The stability of platinum-protein complexes under the FASP tryptic digestion, either using TBP or DTT as reducing agents, was maintained, allowing the identification of several platinum-containing peptides from cisplatin-HSA. This methodology was applied to the separation of platinum-enriched protein fractions obtained by SEC-ICP-MS in a kidney tissue extract from a rat treated with cisplatin, followed by further identification by nLC-ESI-LTQ-MS/MS after FASP tryptic digestion of selected platinum-containing liquid fractions. PMID:24468393

  9. RasGAP-derived peptide GAP159 enhances cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HCT116 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Shenghua; He, Hongwei; Zhang, Caixia; Chen, Yi; Yu, Dongke; Chen, Jianhua; Shao, Rongguang

    2014-01-01

    To increase the efficacy of currently used anti-cancer genotoxins, one of the current efforts is to find agents that can sensitize cancer cells to genotoxins so that the efficacious doses of genotoxins can be lowered to reduce deleterious side-effects. In this study, we reported that a synthetic RasGAP-derived peptide GAP159 could enhance the effect of chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin (CDDP) in human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells. Our results showed that GAP159 significantly increased the CDDP-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HCT116 cells. This synergistic effect was associated with the inhibitions of phospho-AKT, phospho-ERK and NF-κB. In mouse colon tumor CT26 animal models, GAP159 combined with CDDP significantly suppressed CT26 tumor growth, and GAP159 alone showed slight inhibitory effect. Our data suggests that co-treatment of GAP159 and chemotherapeutics will become a potential therapeutic strategy for colon cancers. PMID:26579374

  10. Quantitative imaging of platinum based on laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to investigate toxic side effects of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Köppen, C; Reifschneider, O; Castanheira, I; Sperling, M; Karst, U; Ciarimboli, G

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a quantitative bioimaging method for platinum based on laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and its application for a biomedical study concerning toxic side effects of cisplatin. To trace the histopathology back to cisplatin, platinum was localized and quantified in major functional units of testicle, cochlea, kidney, nerve and brain sections from cisplatin treated mice. The direct consideration of the histology enables precise interpretation of the Pt images and the novel quantitative evaluation approach allows significantly more precise investigations than the pure image. For the first time, platinum was detected and quantified in all major injured structures including organ of Corti of cochlea and seminiferous tubule of testicle. In this way, proximal tubule in kidney, Leydig cells in testicle, stria vascularis and organ of Corti in cochlea and nerve fibers in sciatic nerves are confirmed as targets of cisplatin in these organs. However, the accumulation of platinum in almost all investigated structures also raises questions about more complex pathogenesis including direct and indirect interruption of several biological processes. PMID:26477751

  11. A Store-and-Forward Tele-Audiology Solution to Promote Efficient Screenings for Ototoxicity during Cisplatin Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dille, Marilyn F.; McMillan, Garnett P.; Helt, Wendy J.; Konrad-Martin, Dawn; Jacobs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Tele-audiology improves access, controls cost, and improves efficiency of many aspects within health care. We have developed and validated a device, the ototoxicity identification device (OtoID), which enables remote hearing monitoring by a patient during chemotherapy treatment. Aspects of the design such as patient self-testing and texting of results to the audiology clinic are important features of this device. Purpose The purpose of this article is to present the efficacy and effectiveness of the OtoID hearing screener. Research Design A repeated measures design was used in this study. Study Sample Twenty-one veterans undergoing cisplatin chemotherapy were recruited in this study. Data Collection and Analysis Participants were tested using the OtoID at each cisplatin treatment by an audiologist using the manual mode of test and the participant using the automated mode of test. Test sensitivity and specificity were developed from the detection (yes/no) of an American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) change in hearing. Results The OtoID had a test sensitivity of 80.6% and specificity of 85.3%. A logistic regression model analysis of the probability of an ASHA shift identified by the automated OtoID was conducted. Separate models were fit to establish effects of age, average baseline thresholds in the sensitive range for ototoxicity (SRO), and dose of cisplatin on the probability of a positive hearing change result. Interactions were also included to evaluate these effects on the sensitivity and false-positive rates of the automated test. Results indicated no statistically significant effects of age, of baseline hearing in the SRO frequencies, or of cisplatin dose. Conclusions The OtoID automated test can be recommended for use. The automated test provides significant personnel efficiencies. The modem with simple text messaging function recently added to the device improves on these efficiencies. PMID:26415968

  12. MicroRNA-182 modulates chemosensitivity of human non-small cell lung cancer to cisplatin by targeting PDCD4

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Overexpression of microRNA-182 (miR-182) is found in various human cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our aim is to investigate the association of miR-182 expression with the sensitivity of NSCLC to cisplatin. Methods TaqMan RT-PCR or Western blot assay was performed to detect the expression of mature miR-182 and programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) protein. miR-182 and (or) PDCD4 depleted cell lines were generated using miR-182 inhibitor and (or) siRNA. The viabilities of treated cells were analyzed using MTT assay. Results The expression level of miR-182 in A549 cell line was significantly higher than that in NHBE cell line (p < 0.01). Transfection of miR-182 inhibitor induced sensitivity of A549 cells to cisplatin. A549 cells transfected with PDCD4 siRNA became more resistant to cisplatin therapy. We found an increase PDCD4 protein level following the transfection of miR-182 inhibitor using Western blot analysis. In addition, the enhanced growth-inhibitory effect by miR-182 inhibitor was weakened after the addition of PDCD4 siRNA. Conclusions The results of the present study demonstrated that overexpression of miR-182 may involve in chemoresistance of NSCLC cells to cisplatin by down-regulating PDCD4. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1793467320130186 PMID:25012722

  13. Phase I Study of Axitinib in Combination with Cisplatin and Capecitabine in Patients with Previously Untreated Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Do-Youn; Doi, Toshihiko; Shirao, Kuniaki; Lee, Keun-Wook; Park, Sook Ryun; Chen, Ying; Yang, Liqiang; Valota, Olga; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This phase I trial evaluated the question of whether the standard starting dose of axitinib could be administered in combination with therapeutic doses of cisplatin/capecitabine in patients with previously untreated advanced gastric cancer, and assessed overall safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor activity of this combination. Materials and Methods Patients in dose level (DL) 1 received axitinib 5 mg twice a day (days 1 to 21) with cisplatin 80 mg/m2 (day 1) and capecitabine 1,000 mg/m2 twice a day (days 1 to 14) in 21-day cycles. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was the highest dose at which ≤ 30% of the first 12 patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) during cycle 1. Ten additional patients were enrolled and treated at the MTD in order to obtain additional safety and pharmacokinetic data. Results Three DLTs occurred during cycle 1 in three (25%) of the first 12 patients: ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, acute renal failure, and > 5 consecutive days of missed axitinib due to thrombocytopenia. DL1 was established as the MTD, since higher DL cohorts were not planned. Common grade 3/4 non-hematologic adverse events in 22 patients treated at DL1 included hypertension (36.4%) and decreased appetite and stomatitis (18.2% each). Cisplatin/capecitabine slightly increased axitinib exposure; axitinib decreased capecitabine and 5-fluorouracil exposure. Eight patients (36.4%) each had partial response or stable disease. Median response duration was 9.1 months; median progression-free survival was 3.8 months. Conclusion In patients with advanced gastric cancer, standard doses of axitinib plus therapeutic doses of cisplatin and capecitabine could be administered in combination. Adverse events were manageable. PMID:25687867

  14. Prospective Pilot Study of Consolidation Chemotherapy With Docetaxel and Cisplatin After Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyun Chan; Lee, Seok Ho; Lee, Yuna; Park, Se Hoon Park, Jinny; Cho, Eun Kyung; Shin, Dong Bok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Seon Tae

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: With the improvement concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in the management of patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), distant failures have become a more relevant problem in terms of survival. The primary objective of this Phase II study is to assess the feasibility of docetaxel and cisplatin consolidation after primary CCRT for patients with HNSCC. Methods and Materials: Patients with locoregionally advanced HNSCC received chemotherapy with three cycles of cisplatin, 100 mg/m{sup 2}, on Days 1, 22, and 43. Concurrent radiotherapy to the primary tumor and neck was given in a daily dose of 2 Gy to a total dose of 70-70.2 Gy over 7 weeks. After completion of CCRT, patients without evidence of disease progression received an additional four cycles of consolidation chemotherapy with docetaxel, 75 mg/m{sup 2}, and cisplatin, 75 mg/m{sup 2}, every 3 weeks. Results: Of 33 patients, 27 (81%) completed CCRT. After CCRT, three complete and 19 partial responses were recorded, giving an overall response rate of 67%. Of 19 patients who went to the consolidation phase, only 4 (21%) received all four cycles of docetaxel and cisplatin. Causes of failure of consolidation chemotherapy were toxicity in 11 patients, including three treatment-related deaths, and progression in 4 patients. Three patients died of sepsis during the consolidation phase. Median survival was 11 months for all patients and 8 months for those treated with consolidation chemotherapy. Conclusion: The poor compliance and high incidence of severe toxicities prompted no further evaluation of this consolidation chemotherapy after CCRT.

  15. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma in the nasal cavity treated with proton beam therapy concurrent with cisplatin: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a rare and aggressive variant of squamous cell carcinoma. Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is mostly seen in the upper aerodigestive tract and has a propensity for lymph node spread and systemic metastases. Various treatment modalities have been reported, including surgical excision supplemented with radiotherapy/adjuvant chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge, treatment of nasal basaloid squamous cell carcinoma with proton beam therapy and cisplatin has not been described in the literature. Case presentation We report the case of a 56-year-old Japanese man with locally invasive basaloid squamous cell carcinoma in his right nasal cavity with invasion of the orbit, paranasal sinus, and buccal subcutaneous tissue. He underwent proton beam therapy concurrent with cisplatin. Acute and late side effects did not exceed grade 3. At 24-month follow up, he remains in complete remission. Conclusion Proton beam therapy concurrent with cisplatin may be one choice for locally invasive basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:24716457

  16. Definitive extended field intensity-modulated radiotherapy and concurrent cisplatin chemosensitization in the treatment of IB2-IIIB cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guangyu; He, Fangfang; Fu, Chunli; Zhang, Youzhong; Yang, Qiuan; Wang, Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the toxicity of delivering extended field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (EF-IMRT) and concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical carcinoma. Methods Forty-five patients who underwent EF-IMRT and concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy for the treatment of stage IB2 to IIIB cervical cancer were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical target volume included all areas of gross and potentially microscopic disease and regional lymph node regions. All patients underwent high-dose-rate brachytherapy. The acute and late toxicity were scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late radiation morbidity scoring criteria, respectively. Results The median follow-up was 28 months (range, 5 to 62 months). Forty-two patients had a complete response, and three had a persistent disease. Of those 42 patients, 15 patients (35.7%) had recurrence. The regions of recurrence were in-field in 2 patients and out-field in 13 patients. Acute grade ≥3 gastrointestinal, genitourinary and hematologic toxicity occurred in 3, 1, and 9 patients, respectively. Three patients (6.7%) suffered from late grade 3 toxicities. Seven patients experienced ovarian transposition, 5 of those patients (71%) maintained ovarian function. Thirty-eight patients (84.4%) were alive at the last follow-up. Conclusion Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy with EF-IMRT was safe. The acute and late toxicities are acceptable. EF-IMRT provides an opportunity to preserve endocrine function for patients with ovarian transposition. PMID:24459576

  17. SOD2 genetic variant associated with treatment-related ototoxicity in cisplatin-treated pediatric medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Austin L; Lupo, Philip J; Okcu, Mehmet Fatih; Lau, Ching C; Rednam, Surya; Scheurer, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), encoded by the SOD2 gene, is involved in the detoxification of superoxide anion. Superoxide is likely a source of oxidative stress in the cochlea following treatment with platinum agents and radiation. Therefore, we examined SOD2 variants in association with ototoxicity among cisplatin-treated childhood medulloblastoma patients. Blood samples were obtained from 71 eligible patients treated for pediatric medulloblastoma at Texas Children’s Cancer Center (1987–2010). Ototoxicity was defined as requiring the use of a hearing aid sometime after the initiation of therapy. DNA was genotyped on the Illumina HumanOmni-1 Quad BeadChip. A linkage disequilibrium (LD)-based single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) selection strategy was used to identify a minimal set of informative variants. Associations between SNPs and ototoxicity were assessed using logistic regression. Of the 71 eligible patients, 26 (37%) suffered from cisplatin-related ototoxicity. Study participants were primarily male (73%) and non-Hispanic white (42%). Five SOD2 variants (rs7855, rs5746151, rs5746136, rs2758331, and rs4880) identified by the LD-based selection strategy were genotyped. After correcting for multiple comparisons, the C-allele of the rs4880 variant was significantly associated with ototoxicity (odds ratio = 3.06, 95% confidence interval: 1.30–7.20) in adjusted models. The rs4880 T > C substitution results in a Val > Ala amino acid change at position 16 of the MnSOD mitochondrial targeting sequence. The Ala variant, which has been associated with increased MnSOD activity, was associated with hearing damage in this study. Platinum-based therapies increase the expression of MnSOD, which may result in an abundance of hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species. Therefore, oxidative stress may be an important mechanism in therapy-related cochlear damage. PMID:26400460

  18. Anticancer effect of bromelain with and without cisplatin or 5-FU on malignant peritoneal mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Krishna; Ehteda, Anahid; Akhter, Javid; Chua, Terence C; Morris, David L

    2014-02-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare neoplasm of the peritoneum, causally related to asbestos exposure. Nonspecific symptoms with a late diagnosis results in poor survival (<1 year). Treatment with cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has improved survival in some patients (median 3-5 years). Hence, new therapies are urgently needed. MUC1 is a glycosylation-dependent protein that confers tumours with invasiveness, metastasis and chemoresistance. Bromelain (cysteine proteinase) hydrolyses glycosidic bonds. Therefore, we investigated the antitumour effect of bromelain on MUC1-expressing MPM cell lines. MUC1 expressions in cells were assessed using immunofluorescent probes with cells grown on cover slips and western blot analysis on cell lysates. The cell lines were treated with various concentrations of bromelain and after 4 and 72 h, their viability was assessed using standard sulforhodamine assays. The cells were also treated with combinations of bromelain and cytotoxic drugs (cisplatin or 5-FU) and their viability was assessed at 72 h. Finally, with western blotting, the effects of bromelain on cellular survival proteins were investigated. PET cells expressed more MUC1 compared with YOU cells. The cell viability of both PET and YOU cells was adversely affected by bromelain, with PET cells being slightly resistant. The addition of bromelain increased the cytotoxicity of cisplatin significantly in both cell lines. However, 5-FU with bromelain did not show any significant increase in cytotoxicity. Bromelain-induced cell death is by apoptosis and autophagy. Bromelain has the potential of being developed as a therapeutic agent in MPM. PMID:24366282

  19. New histone deacetylase inhibitors improve cisplatin antitumor properties against thoracic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gueugnon, Fabien; Cartron, Pierre-François; Charrier, Cedric; Bertrand, Philippe; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Gregoire, Marc; Blanquart, Christophe

    2014-06-30

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown promising antitumor effects on numerous cancer cells including malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and lung adenocarcinoma (ADCA) cells. However, clinical trials using these compounds alone have shown limited efficacy against solid tumors. Therefore, new molecules are being developed and combinations with classical chemotherapeutic drugs are being tested. Here, we have evaluated on three MPM and three lung ADCA cell lines the antitumor potential of four new HDACi compounds, either alone or in combination with cisplatin. These effects were compared with those of vorinostat, an HDACi approved for cancer treatments. First, we characterized the HDAC mRNA expression profiles of tumor cells and showed an increase of the classI/classII HDAC ratio. We then treated cancer cells with these new HDACi and observed a cell-death induction and an increase of HDACi target genes and proteins expression. This was particularly evident for NODH compound (pan-HDACi) which had similar effects at nanomolar concentrations as micromolar concentrations of vorinostat. Interestingly, we observed that the HDACi/cisplatin combination strongly increased cell-death and limited resistance-phenotype emergence as compared with results obtained when the drugs were used alone. These results could be exploited to develop MPM and lung ADCA treatments combining chemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:24980825

  20. New histone deacetylase inhibitors improve cisplatin antitumor properties against thoracic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gueugnon, Fabien; Cartron, Pierre-François; Charrier, Cedric; Bertrand, Philippe; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Gregoire, Marc; Blanquart, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have shown promising antitumor effects on numerous cancer cells including malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and lung adenocarcinoma (ADCA) cells. However, clinical trials using these compounds alone have shown limited efficacy against solid tumors. Therefore, new molecules are being developed and combinations with classical chemotherapeutic drugs are being tested. Here, we have evaluated on three MPM and three lung ADCA cell lines the antitumor potential of four new HDACi compounds, either alone or in combination with cisplatin. These effects were compared with those of vorinostat, an HDACi approved for cancer treatments. First, we characterized the HDAC mRNA expression profiles of tumor cells and showed an increase of the classI/classII HDAC ratio. We then treated cancer cells with these new HDACi and observed a cell-death induction and an increase of HDACi target genes and proteins expression. This was particularly evident for NODH compound (pan-HDACi) which had similar effects at nanomolar concentrations as micromolar concentrations of vorinostat. Interestingly, we observed that the HDACi/cisplatin combination strongly increased cell-death and limited resistance-phenotype emergence as compared with results obtained when the drugs were used alone. These results could be exploited to develop MPM and lung ADCA treatments combining chemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:24980825

  1. An open-label, dose-escalation study to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of CEP-9722 (a PARP-1 and PARP-2 inhibitor) in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Awada, Ahmad; Campone, Mario; Varga, Andrea; Aftimos, Philippe; Frenel, Jean-Sébastien; Bahleda, Rastilav; Gombos, Andrea; Bourbouloux, Emmanuelle; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2016-04-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitors may potentiate chemotherapy by hindering DNA damage repair pathways. CEP-9722 is the prodrug of CEP-8983, a selective inhibitor of PARP-1 and PARP-2. Preclinical studies and a prior phase 1 study suggested that CEP-9722 may cause less myelosuppression than has been observed with other oral PARP inhibitors. The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose of CEP-9722 in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with advanced solid tumors. All patients received cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) on day 1 and gemcitabine 1250 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 of a 21-day cycle. Patients who completed one cycle of chemotherapy alone continued chemotherapy in combination with CEP-9722 150, 200, 300, or 400 mg orally twice daily on days 2-7, with dose-limiting toxicity assessed in cycle 2. Patients experiencing clinical benefit could continue treatment until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Thirty-two patients enrolled; 18 patients completed cycle 1 and received chemotherapy plus CEP-9722. The median (range) treatment administration with CEP-9722 was five (1-12) cycles. No patient experienced dose-limiting toxicity with CEP-9722 treatment. Grade 3/4 hematologic adverse events included neutropenia (28%) and leukopenia (11%); adverse events led to discontinuation in 33% of patients. One patient achieved complete response, three had partial responses, and 11 had stable disease; however, the relative contribution of CEP-9722 and/or the chemotherapeutic agents cannot be determined from this single-arm design. This study was discontinued before determination of the maximum-tolerated dose because of highly variable CEP-8983 exposure in all cohorts and toxicity, particularly chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression. PMID:26796987

  2. Targeted Delivery of Cisplatin to Lung Cancer Using ScFvEGFR-Heparin-Cisplatin Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Yiqing; Huang, Donghai; Wang, Yuxiang; Shin, Hyung Juc.; Chen, Zhengjia; Spewak, Micheal B; Mao, Hui; Wang, Xu; Wang, Ying; Chen, Zhuo (Georgia); Nie, Shuming; Shin, Dong M.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical application of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (DDP, cisplatin) for cancer therapy is limited by its non-specific biodistribution and severe side effects. Here, we have developed EGFR-targeted heparin-DDP (EHDDP) nanoparticles for tumor targeted delivery of DDP. This nanoparticle delivery system possesses the following unique properties: i) the succinic anhydride-modified heparin is biocompatible and biodegradable with no anticoagulant activity; ii) the single chain variable fragment anti-EGFR antibody (ScFvEGFR) was conjugated to the nanoparticles as an EGFR-targeting ligand. Our results showed that EHDDP nanoparticles can significantly increase the intracellular concentrations of DDP and Pt-DNA adducts in EGFR-expressing non-small cell lung cancer H292 cells via an EGFR-mediated pathway. Compared to the free DDP, significantly prolonged blood circulation time and improved pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of Pt were observed after systemic delivery of the EHDDP nanoparticles. The new EHDDP nanoparticle delivery system significantly enhanced antitumor activity of DDP without weight loss or damage to the kidney and spleen in nude mice bearing H292 cell tumors. PMID:22032622

  3. Cisplatin induces Bmi-1 and enhances the stem cell fraction in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Nör, Carolina; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Warner, Kristy A; Bernardi, Lisiane; Visioli, Fernanda; Helman, Joseph I; Roesler, Rafael; Nör, Jacques E

    2014-02-01

    Recent evidence has unveiled a subpopulation of highly tumorigenic, multipotent cells capable of self-renewal in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). These unique cells, named here cancer stem cells (CSCs), proliferate slowly and might be involved in resistance to conventional chemotherapy. We have shown that CSCs are found in perivascular niches and rely on endothelial cell-secreted factors [particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6)] for their survival and self-renewal in HNSCC. Here, we hypothesized that cisplatin enhances the stem cell fraction in HNSCC. To address this hypothesis, we generated xenograft HNSCC tumors with University of Michigan-squamous cell carcinoma 22B (UM-SCC-22B) cells and observed that cisplatin treatment increased (P = .0013) the fraction of CSCs [i.e., aldehyde dehydrogenase activity high and cluster of differentiation 44 high (ALDH(high)CD44(high))]. Cisplatin promoted self-renewal and survival of CSCs in vitro, as seen by an increase in the number of orospheres in ultralow attachment plates and induction in B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (Bmi-1) and octamer-binding transcription factor 4 expression. Cisplatin-resistant cells expressed more Bmi-1 than cisplatin-sensitive cells. IL-6 potentiated cisplatin-induced orosphere formation generated when primary human HNSCC cells were sorted for ALDH(high)CD44(high) immediately after surgery and plated onto ultralow attachment plates. IL-6-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation (indicative of stemness) was unaffected by treatment with cisplatin in UM-SCC-22B cells, whereas IL-6-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation (indicative of differentiation processes) was partially inhibited by cisplatin. Notably, cisplatin-induced Bmi-1 was inhibited by interleukin-6 receptor blockade in parental and cisplatin-resistant cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that cisplatin enhances the fraction of CSCs

  4. Blockade of KCa3.1 potassium channels protects against cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Lung; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Hu, Oliver Yoa-Pu; Pao, Li-Heng

    2016-09-01

    Tubular cell apoptosis significantly contributes to cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) pathogenesis. Although KCa3.1, a calcium-activated potassium channel, participates in apoptosis, its involvement in cisplatin-induced AKI is unknown. Here, we found that cisplatin treatment triggered an early induction of KCa3.1 expression associated with HK-2 cell apoptosis, the development of renal tubular damage, and apoptosis in mice. Treatment with the highly selective KCa3.1 blocker TRAM-34 suppressed cisplatin-induced HK-2 cell apoptosis. We further assessed whether KCa3.1 mediated cisplatin-induced AKI in genetic knockout and pharmacological blockade mouse models. KCa3.1 deficiency reduced renal function loss, renal tubular damage, and the induction of the apoptotic marker caspase-3 in the kidneys of cisplatin-treated KCa3.1 (-/-) mice. Pharmacological blockade of KCa3.1 by TRAM-34 similarly attenuated cisplatin-induced AKI in mice. Furthermore, we dissected the mechanisms underlying cisplatin-induced apoptosis reduction via KCa3.1 blockade. We found that KCa3.1 blockade attenuated cytochrome c release and the increase in the intrinsic apoptotic mediators Bax, Bak, and caspase-9 after cisplatin treatment. KCa3.1 blocking inhibited the cisplatin-induced activation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress mediator caspase-12, which is independent of calcium-dependent protease m-calpain activation. Taken together, KCa3.1 blockade protects against cisplatin-induced AKI through the attenuation of apoptosis by interference with intrinsic apoptotic and ER stress-related mediators, providing a potential target for the prevention of cisplatin-induced AKI. PMID:26438401

  5. DNA-cisplatin interaction studied with single molecule stretching experiments.

    PubMed

    Crisafuli, F A P; Cesconetto, E C; Ramos, E B; Rocha, M S

    2012-05-01

    By performing single molecule stretching experiments with optical tweezers, we have studied the changes in the mechanical properties of DNA-cisplatin complexes as a function of some variables of interest such as the drug diffusion time and concentration in the sample. We propose a model to explain the behavior of the persistence length as a function of the drug concentration, extracting the binding data from pure mechanical measurements. Such analysis has allowed us to show that cisplatin binds cooperatively to the DNA molecule. In addition, DNA compaction by the action of the drug was also observed under our experimental conditions by studying the kinetics of some mechanical properties such as the radius of gyration and the end-to-end distance, e.g. Crisafuli et al., Integr. Biol., 2011, xx, xxxx. PMID:22513758

  6. Remotely Triggered Cisplatin Release from Carbon Nanocapsules by Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Mustafa; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Guven, Adem; Corr, Stuart J.; Wilson, Lon J.; Curley, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery is limited by its peri-vascular sequestration, thus necessitating a strategy to trigger drug release from such intra-tumoral nanocarrier-drug depots. In our efforts to explore remotely-activated nanocarriers, we have developed carbon nanocapsules comprised of an ultrashort carbon nanotube shell (US-tubes) loaded with cisplatin (CDDP@US-tubes) and covered with a Pluronic surfactant wrapping to minimize passive release. We demonstrate here that non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) field activation of the CDDP@US-tubes produces heat that causes Pluronic disruption which triggers cisplatin release in an RF-dependent manner. Furthermore, release-dependent cytotoxicity is demonstrated in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. PMID:23228421

  7. Genotoxic effects of cisplatin in somatic tissue of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster transdihybrid for mwh and flr were exposed to varying concentrations of cisplatin by feeding on dry media wetted with aqueous solutions of the test compound. Larval feeding continued until pupation, and surviving transdihybrid adults were collected seven days following commencement of feeding. Wings of adults were removed and scored under 400X magnification for the presence of twin spots and single spots comprised of clones of cells possessing malformed wing hairs. Cisplatin was found to induce both twin spots and single spots, and significant linear concentration-response relationships were obtained with respect to the induction of all endpoints. This capacity to induce mitotic exchange in the somatic tissue of Drosophila compares well with the compound's reported ability to induce chromosome breaks in Drosophila germ cells. However, not all compounds possess similar genotoxic profiles in the somatic an germ tissue of Drosophila.

  8. Cerebellum neurotransmission during postnatal development: [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] vs cisplatin and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Piccolini, Valeria Maria; Esposito, Alessandra; Dal Bo, Veronica; Insolia, Violetta; Bottone, Maria Grazia; De Pascali, Sandra Angelica; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo; Bernocchi, Graziella

    2015-02-01

    Several chemotherapeutic drugs are known to cause neurotoxicity. Platinum-based agents in use or in clinical trials display neurotoxic potential accompanied by neurological complications; recent studies have identified a large number of behavioural issues in paediatric oncology patients. To understand the toxicity of platinum drugs at the molecular and cellular levels, this study compares the possible cytotoxic effects of an older platinum compound, cisplatin and a new platinum compound, [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)], on the CNS of postnatally developing rats, which is much more vulnerable to injury than the CNS of adult rats. Since several drugs interact with neurotransmitters during neuronal maturation, we performed immunostainings with antibodies raised against markers of glutamate and GABA, the major neurotransmitters in the cerebellum. After a single injection of cisplatin at postnatal day 10 (PD10), the labelling of Purkinje cells with the neurotransmitter markers evidenced alterations between PD11 and PD30, i.e. atrophy of the dendrite tree, changes in the distribution of synaptic contacts of parallel and climbing fibres, delay in the elimination of transient synapses on cell soma and severely impaired pinceau formation at the axon hillock. After treatment with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)], the sole relevant change concerned the timing of climbing fibres elimination; the transient synapses disappearance on the Purkinje cell soma was delayed in some cells; instead, the growth of Purkinje cell dendrite tree was normal as was the formation of inhibitory synaptic contacts on these neurons. These findings add new evidence not only on the lower neurotoxicity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] vs cisplatin but also on the involvement of neurotransmitters and relative synaptic connections in the maturation of central nerve tissue. PMID:25450526

  9. Origanum majorana Attenuates Nephrotoxicity of Cisplatin Anticancer Drug through Ameliorating Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Amel M; Desouky, Shreen; Marzouk, Mohamed; Sayed, Amany A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that cisplatin is an important anticancer drug, its clinical utilization is limited by nephrotoxicity during long term medication. Combined cisplatin chemotherapy with plant extracts can diminish toxicity and enhance the antitumor efficacy of the drug. This study evaluated the effect of Originum majorana ethanolic extract (OMEE) on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Eighteen male rats were divided into three groups as follows: a control group, a group treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg body weight), and a group that received both cisplatin and OMEE (500 mg/kg body weight) for 14 days. Cisplatin induced a significant increase in creatinine, urea, uric acid, blood urea nitrogen, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide levels. However, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase levels were significantly diminished. Conversely, OMEE significantly modulated the renal and oxidative markers negatively impacted by cisplatin. OMEE significantly reduced the effects of cisplatin-induced changes in renal and oxidative markers, possibly through its free radical scavenging activity. Thus, OMEE may be combined with cisplatin to alleviate nephrotoxicity in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27164131

  10. Emodin mitigates the oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in osteosarcoma MG63 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li; Hu, Rui; Tu, Song; Cheng, Wen-Jun; Zheng, Qiong; Wang, Jun-Wen; Kan, Wu-Sheng; Ren, Yi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Previously, the application of cisplatin in chemotherapy was limited due to the significant side effects on normal cell growth. In the present study, the concomitant application of emodin with cisplatin was demonstrated to ameliorate cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and markedly suppress tumor cell proliferation for the first time. Human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells were treated with cisplatin alone or in combination with emodin. The cell viability was determined by MTS assays and the augmentation of reactive oxygen species were determined by fluorogenic probes; in addition, a stable MG-63 subline bearing antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven luciferase expression was developed to monitor the activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-ARE signaling pathway. The results indicated that cisplatin or emodin may inhibit MG-63 cell proliferation in a time- or dose-dependent manner, respectively. Concomitant treatment with cisplatin and emodin demonstrated synergic anti-tumor effects. Cisplatin augmented reactive oxygen species in the MG-63 cells, followed by the translocation of Nrf2 from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which triggered ARE-driven luciferase expression. The addition of emodin diminished the previously described phenomenon, resulting in decreased ROS augmentation, translocation of Nrf2 and ARE-driven luciferase activity. In conclusion, emodin could ameliorate cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and protect the cells from oxidative stress-induced damage. The findings of the present study provide a novel strategy for the treatment of osteosarcoma using emodin and cisplatin. PMID:27602124

  11. Origanum majorana Attenuates Nephrotoxicity of Cisplatin Anticancer Drug through Ameliorating Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Amel M.; Desouky, Shreen; Marzouk, Mohamed; Sayed, Amany A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that cisplatin is an important anticancer drug, its clinical utilization is limited by nephrotoxicity during long term medication. Combined cisplatin chemotherapy with plant extracts can diminish toxicity and enhance the antitumor efficacy of the drug. This study evaluated the effect of Originum majorana ethanolic extract (OMEE) on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Eighteen male rats were divided into three groups as follows: a control group, a group treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg body weight), and a group that received both cisplatin and OMEE (500 mg/kg body weight) for 14 days. Cisplatin induced a significant increase in creatinine, urea, uric acid, blood urea nitrogen, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide levels. However, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase levels were significantly diminished. Conversely, OMEE significantly modulated the renal and oxidative markers negatively impacted by cisplatin. OMEE significantly reduced the effects of cisplatin-induced changes in renal and oxidative markers, possibly through its free radical scavenging activity. Thus, OMEE may be combined with cisplatin to alleviate nephrotoxicity in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27164131

  12. Role of mismatch repair proteins in the processing of cisplatin interstrand cross-links.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Akshada; Kothandapani, Anbarasi; Zhitkovich, Anatoly; Sobol, Robert W; Patrick, Steve M

    2015-11-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency gives rise to cisplatin resistance and can lead to poor prognosis in cancers. Various models have been proposed to explain this low level of resistance caused due to loss of MMR proteins. We have shown that MMR proteins are required to maintain cisplatin interstrand cross-links (ICLs) on the DNA leading to increased cellular sensitivity. In our previous studies, we have shown that BER processing of the cisplatin ICLs is mutagenic. Polymerase β (Polβ) can generate mismatches which leads to the activation and the recruitment of mismatch repair proteins. In this paper, we distinguished between the requirement of different downstream MMR proteins for maintaining cisplatin sensitivity. We show that the MutSα (MSH2-MSH6) heterocomplex is required to maintain cisplatin sensitivity, whereas the Mutsβ complex has no effect. These results can be correlated with the increased repair of cisplatin ICLs and ICL induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in the resistant cells. Moreover, we show that MLH1 proficient cells displayed a cisplatin sensitive phenotype when compared with the MLH1 deficient cells and the ATPase activity of MLH1 is essential to mediate this effect. Based on these results, we propose that MutSα as well as the downstream MMR pathway proteins are essential to maintain a cisplatin sensitive phenotype as a consequence of processing Polβ induced mismatches at sites flanking cisplatin ICLs. PMID:26519826

  13. Renal Toxicity of Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy With Cisplatin in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Welz, Stefan Hehr, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Christian; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Belka, Claus; Budach, Wilfried

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemoradiotherapy for completely resected high-risk gastric adenocarcinoma has been shown to improve survival in a randomized Intergroup trial. However, the results still showed an unsatisfactory outcome. On the basis of previously reported results of a Phase II trial using a more aggressive, cisplatin-containing chemoradiotherapy schedule, we investigated the effects of this approach on long-term renal function. Patients and Methods: Between December 2000 and September 2003, 27 patients were treated at Tuebingen University in a Phase II multicenter trial investigating adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. The adjuvant chemoradiotherapy consisted of two cycles of adjuvant 5-FU, folinic acid, cisplatin (200 mg/m{sup 2}), and paclitaxel before and after radiotherapy (45 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions) with daily concomitant 5-FU (225 mg/m{sup 2}/24 h). A dose constraint of {<=}12 Gy for 37.5% of the functional volume of both kidneys was used. Renal function was assessed by the changes in creatinine and creatinine clearance during follow-up. Results: The prescribed 45 Gy was administered to 100% of the patients, and the cumulative cisplatin dose was 200 mg/m{sup 2} in 74% of all patients. In 89%, the constraints concerning the renal absorbed doses were met. The median follow-up for the creatinine and clearance values was 30 and 26 months, respectively. The creatinine values tended to worsen over time without reaching critical levels. We were unable to demonstrate a significant dose-response relationship for renal damage in the tested dose range. Conclusions: Using a dose constraint of {<=}12 Gy for 37.5% of the functional volume of both kidneys appears to be safe at a median follow-up of 2 years for a cumulative cisplatin dose of 200 mg/m{sup 2} administered before and after simultaneous 5-FU and radiotherapy.

  14. Propofol depresses cisplatin cytotoxicity via the inhibition of gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xiyan; Wang, Qin; Ge, Hui; Tao, Liang

    2016-06-01

    The general anesthetic, propofol, affects chemotherapeutic activity, however, the mechanism underlying its effects remains to be fully elucidated. Our previous study showed that tramadol and flurbiprofen depressed the cytotoxicity of cisplatin via the inhibition of gap junction (GJ) intercellular communication (GJIC) in connexin (Cx)32 HeLa cells. The present study investigated whether the effects of propofol on the cytotoxicity of cisplatin were mediated by GJ in U87 glioma cells and Cx26‑transfected HeLa cells. Standard colony formation assay was used to determine the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. Parachute dye coupling assay was used to measure GJ function, and western blot analysis was used to determine the expression levels of Cx32. The results revealed that exposure of the U87 glioma cells and the Cx26-transfected HeLa cells to cisplatin for 1 h reduced clonogenic survival in low density cultures (without GJs) and high density cultures (with GJs). However, the toxic effect was higher in the high density culture. In addition, pretreatment of the cells with propofol significantly reduced cisplatin‑induced cytotoxicity, but only in the presence of functional GJs. Furthermore, propofol significantly inhibited dye coupling through junctional channels, and a long duration of exposure of the cells to propofol downregulated the expression levels of Cx43 and Cx26. These results demonstrated that the inhibition of GJIC by propofol affected the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. The present study provides evidence of a novel mechanism underlying the effects of analgesics in counteracting chemotherapeutic efficiency. PMID:27082707

  15. Antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Ryder, N S

    1999-12-01

    At this year's ICAAC Meeting, new data on approximately 20 different antifungal agents were presented, while no new agents were disclosed. Drugs in late development include the triazoles, voriconazole (Pfizer Ltd) and Sch-56592 (Schering-Plough Corp), and the echinocandins, caspofungin (Merck & Co Inc) and FK-463 (Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co Ltd). In contrast to previous years, presentations on these and earlier developmental compounds were relatively modest in scope, with few significant new data. Little new information appeared on the most recent novel class of agents, the sordarins (Glaxo Wellcome plc). Early clinical results were presented for FK-463, showing acceptable tolerability and dose-dependent efficacy in AIDS-associated esophageal candidiasis. A new liposomal formulation of nystatin (Nyotran; Aronex Pharmaceuticals Inc) was shown to be equivalent to conventional amphotericin B in empiric therapy of presumed fungal infection in neutropenic patients, but with reduced toxicity. Intravenous itraconazole (Janssen Pharmaceutica NV) was an effective prophylactic therapy in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, while oral itraconazole was discussed as a treatment for fungal infection in heart and liver transplant patients. The allylamine compound, terbinafine (Novartis AG), showed good clinical efficacy against fungal mycetoma, a serious tropical infection. A major highlight was the first presentation of inhibitors of fungal efflux pumps as a strategy for overcoming resistance. MC-510027 (milbemycin alpha-9; Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) and its derivatives, potentiated the antifungal activity of triazoles and terbinafine in a number of Candida spp. Another pump inhibitor, MC-005172 (Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) showed in vivo potentiation of fluconazole in a mouse kidney infection model. Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc also presented inhibitors of bacterial efflux pumps. PMID:16113946

  16. Cisplatin-induced Casepase-3 activation in different tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hua; Li, Xiao; Su, Ting; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an essential role in normal organism development which is one of the main types of programmed cell death to help tissues maintain homeostasis. Defective apoptosis can result in cell accumulation and therefore effects on tumor pathogenesis, progression and therapy resistance. A family of proteins, known as caspases, is typically activated in the early stages of apoptosis. Therefore, studying the kinetics of activation of caspases induced by antitumor drugs can contribute to antitumor drug discovery and explanation of the molecular mechanisms. This paper detected the Caspase-3 activity induced by cisplatin in human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-M), human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) and human epithelial carcinoma cell line (Hela) with stably expressing ECFP-DEVDDsRed (CD3) probe, a fluorescent probe consisting of Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), red fluorescent protein (DsRed) and a linker with a recognition site of Caspase-3, by using the capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging system. Under the same concentration of cisplatin, ACC-M cells responded the most rapidly, and then HepG2 cells and Hela cells, respectively, in the early 30 hours. Later, HepG2 cells represented acceleration in the Caspase-3 activation speed and reached full activation the earliest comparing to other two cell types. The results demonstrated that ACC-M cell is more sensitive than the other two cell types under the treatment of cisplatin.

  17. Effect of Cisplatin on Parotid Gland Function in Concomitant Radiochemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, Jeremias; Setz, Juergen; Gerlach, Reinhard; Vordermark, Dirk; Gernhardt, Christian R.; Kuhnt, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of concomitant radiochemotherapy with cisplatin on parotid gland tissue complication probability. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with either radiotherapy (n = 61) or concomitant radiochemotherapy with cisplatin (n = 36) for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively evaluated. The dose and volume distributions of the parotid glands were noted in dose-volume histograms. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured before, during the 2nd and 6th weeks and at 4 weeks and 6 months after the treatment. The data were fit using the normal tissue complication probability model of Lyman. Complication was defined as a reduction of the salivary flow rate to less than 25% of the pretreatment flow rate. Results: The normal tissue complication probability model parameter TD{sub 50} (the dose leading to a complication probability of 50%) was found to be 32.2 Gy at 4 weeks and 32.1 Gy at 6 months for concomitant radiochemotherapy and 41.1 Gy at 4 weeks and 39.6 Gy at 6 months for radiotherapy. The tolerated dose for concomitant radiochemotherapy was at least 7 to 8 Gy lower than for radiotherapy alone at TD{sub 50}. Conclusions: In this study, the concomitant radiochemotherapy tended to cause a higher probability of parotid gland tissue damage. Advanced radiotherapy planning approaches such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy may be partiticularly important for parotid sparing in radiochemotherapy because of cisplatin-related increased radiosensitivity of glands.

  18. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis in non-small-cell lung cancer cells is dependent on Bax- and Bak-induction pathway and synergistically activated by BH3-mimetic ABT-263 in p53 wild-type and mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masaru; Nakajima, Wataru; Seike, Masahiro; Gemma, Akihiko; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-29

    Cisplatin is a highly effective anticancer drug for treatment of various tumors including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and is especially useful in cases nonresponsive to molecular-targeted drugs. Accumulating evidence has shown that cisplatin activates the p53-dependent apoptotic pathway, but it also induces apoptosis in p53-mutated cancer cells. Here we demonstrated that DNA-damage inducible proapoptotic BH3 (Bcl-2 homology region 3)-only Bcl-2 family members, Noxa, Puma, Bim and Bid, are not involved in cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human NSCLC cell lines. In contrast, the expression of proapoptotic multidomain Bcl-2-family members, Bak and Bax, was induced by cisplatin in p53-dependent and -independent manners, respectively. Moreover, in wild-type p53-expressing cells, cisplatin mainly used the Bak-dependent apoptotic pathway, but this apoptotic pathway shifted to the Bax-dependent pathway by loss-of-function of p53. Furthermore, both Bak- and Bax-induced apoptosis was enhanced by the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, Bcl-XL knockdown, but not by Mcl-1 knockdown. From this result, we tested the effect of ABT-263 (Navitoclax), the specific inhibitor of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, but not Mcl-1, and found that ABT-263 synergistically enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells in the presence or absence of p53. These results indicate a novel regulatory system in cisplatin-induced NSCLC cell apoptosis, and a candidate efficient combination chemotherapy method against lung cancers. PMID:26996126

  19. Dihydroartemisinin potentiates the anticancer effect of cisplatin via mTOR inhibition in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells: involvement of apoptosis and autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xue; Li, Ling; Jiang, Hong; Jiang, Keping; Jin, Ye; Zheng, Jianhua

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • Phosphorylation of mTOR is abnormal activation in SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cells. • Downregulation of mTOR by DHA helps to sensitize the SKOV3/DDP cells to chemotherapy. • DHA has the potential of induce autophagy in cancer cells. - Abstract: Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) exhibits anticancer activity in tumor cells but its mechanism of action is unclear. Cisplatin (DDP) is currently the best known chemotherapeutic available for ovarian cancer. However, tumors return de novo with acquired resistance over time. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important kinase that regulates cell apoptosis and autophagy, and its dysregulation has been observed in chemoresistant human cancers. Here, we show that compared with control ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3), mTOR phosphorylation was abnormally activated in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3/DDP) following cisplatin monotherapy. Treatment with cisplatin combined with DHA could enhance cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition in SKOV3/DDP cells. This mechanism is at least partially due to DHA deactivation of mTOR kinase and promotion of apoptosis. Although autophagy was also induced by DHA, the reduced cell death was not found by suppressing autophagic flux by Bafilomycin A1 (BAF). Taken together, we conclude that inhibition of cisplatin-induced mTOR activation is one of the main mechanisms by which DHA dramatically promotes its anticancer effect in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells.

  20. Morphine, a potential antagonist of cisplatin cytotoxicity, inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis and suppression of tumor growth in nasopharyngeal carcinoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Long-Hui; Li, Hui-Ting; Lin, Wen-Qian; Tan, Hong-Ying; Xie, Lan; Zhong, Zhong-Jian; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Morphine is an opioid analgesic drug often used for pain relief in cancer patients. However, there is growing evidence that morphine may modulate tumor growth, progression and metastasis. In this study, we evaluated whether morphine modulates cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE-2 cells and whether morphine affects the antitumor activity of cisplatin on tumor growth in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE-2 xenografts in nude mice. We showed that a pretreatment with morphine (1 μg/ml) inhibited the sensitivity of CNE-2 cells to cisplatin by inhibiting cisplatin-induced CNE-2 cell apoptosis, decreasing caspase-3 activity and increasing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. However, a high dose of morphine (1000 μg/ml) had the opposite effect. We also showed that at a low dose, morphine enhances chemoresistance in an in vivo nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) model by inhibiting cisplatin-induced apoptosis and decreasing neovascularization. Taken together, our results indicate that a low dose of morphine may lead to chemoresistance of cisplatin in NPC models in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting cisplatin-induced apoptosis and decreasing neovascularization. PMID:26729257

  1. Examination of distal involvement in cisplatin-induced neuropathy in man. An electrophysiological and histological study with particular reference to touch receptor function.

    PubMed

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Fugleholm, K; Helweg-Larsen, S; Hauge, E N; Schmalbruch, H; Trojaborg, W; Krarup, C

    1993-10-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used anti-neoplastic agent with dose-dependent sensory neuropathy as a major side-effect. The mechanism for the neuropathy is poorly understood; it may be caused by a lesion of the dorsal root ganglion cells or by a distal axonopathy. This distinction is important since regeneration in a neuronopathy is impossible, whereas recovery may occur if the axon is affected only distally. The most distal part of the sensory nerve fibre is, however, not accessible for conventional electrophysiological examination. To ascertain whether the distal receptor-associated part of the fibre is involved, we have used a method previously untested in patients with neuropathy. In 26 males treated with cisplatin for testicular cancer 3-6.5 years previously, and in 22 normal males, the compound sensory action potentials evoked by a tactile probe were recorded through needle electrodes placed close to the sural and median nerves. The responses were compared with action potentials evoked by electrical stimulation of the same nerves. Biopsies from the distal sural nerve at the dorsolateral aspect of the foot were obtained in three patients and in four subjects not treated with cisplatin. Sixteen patients had received a conventional dose (307-435 mg/m2) of cisplatin and 10 patients had received a high dose (553-1197 mg/m2). Two-thirds of the conventional dose patients and all the high dose patients had mild to severe sensory loss and reduced or absent tendon reflexes. The amplitude of the electrically evoked sensory action potential decreased with increasing dose of cisplatin and was correlated with the reduction of vibration sense. Tactile responses, probably originating mainly from Pacinian corpuscles, were, with the exception of two high dose patients, recorded from all sural and median nerves. The two high dose patients without a tactile response had a severely reduced or no electrically evoked response at the sural nerve. The sural nerve biopsies from high dose