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Sample records for agents including cisplatin

  1. Cisplatin encapsulated nanoparticle as a therapeutic agent for anticancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eka Putra, Gusti Ngurah Putu; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of manipulating size of biomaterials encapsulated drug into nano-scale particles has been researched and developed in treating cancer. Cancer is the second worldwide cause of death, therefore it is critical to treat cancers challenging with therapeutic modality of various mechanisms. Our preliminary investigation has studied cisplatin encapsulated into lipid-based nanoparticle and examined the therapeutic effect on xenografted animal model. We used mice with tumor volume ranging from 195 to 214 mm3 and then few mice were grouped into three groups including: control (PBS), lipid platinum chloride (LPC) nanoparticles and CDDP (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) at dose of 3mg cisplatin /kg body weight. The effect of the treatment was observed for 12 days post-injection. It showed that LPC NPs demonstrated a better therapeutic effect compared to CDDP at same 3mg cisplatin/kg drug dose of tumor size reduction, 96.6% and 11.1% respectively. In addition, mouse body weight loss of LPC, CDDP and PBS treated group are 12.1%, 24.3% and 1.4%. It means that by compared to CDDP group, LPC group demonstrated less side effect as not much reduction of body weight have found. Our findings have shown to be a potential modality to further investigate as a feasible cancer therapy modality.

  2. Plant-Derived Agents for Counteracting Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Balaji; Kurdi, Amani; Mahgoub, Eglal; Sadek, Bassem

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin (CSP) is a chemotherapeutic agent commonly used to treat a variety of malignancies. The major setback with CSP treatment is that its clinical efficacy is compromised by its induction of organ toxicity, particular to the kidneys and ears. Despite the significant strides that have been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying CSP-induced renal toxicity, advances in developing renoprotective strategies are still lacking. In addition, the renoprotective approaches described in the literature reveal partial amelioration of CSP-induced renal toxicity, stressing the need to develop potent combinatorial/synergistic agents for the mitigation of renal toxicity. However, the ideal renoprotective adjuvant should not interfere with the anticancer efficacy of CSP. In this review, we have discussed the progress made in utilizing plant-derived agents (phytochemicals) to combat CSP-induced nephrotoxicity in preclinical studies. Furthermore, we have also presented strategies to utilize phytochemicals as prototypes for the development of novel renoprotective agents for counteracting chemotherapy-induced renal damage. PMID:27774117

  3. Anti-platelet agents augment cisplatin nanoparticle cytotoxicity by enhancing tumor vasculature permeability and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ambarish; Sarangi, Sasmit; Chien, Kelly; Sengupta, Poulomi; Papa, Anne-Laure; Basu, Sudipta; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2014-11-01

    Tumor vasculature is critically dependent on platelet mediated hemostasis and disruption of the same can augment delivery of nano-formulation based chemotherapeutic agents which depend on enhanced permeability and retention for tumor penetration. Here, we evaluated the role of Clopidogrel, a well-known inhibitor of platelet aggregation, in potentiating the tumor cytotoxicity of cisplatin nano-formulation in a murine breast cancer model. In vivo studies in murine syngeneic 4T1 breast cancer model showed a significant greater penetration of macromolecular fluorescent nanoparticles after clopidogrel pretreatment. Compared to self-assembling cisplatin nanoparticles (SACNs), combination therapy with clopidogrel and SACN was associated with a 4 fold greater delivery of cisplatin to tumor tissue and a greater reduction in tumor growth as well as higher survival rate. Clopidogrel enhances therapeutic efficiency of novel cisplatin based nano-formulations agents by increasing tumor drug delivery and can be used as a potential targeting agent for novel nano-formulation based chemotherapeutics.

  4. Advanced neuroblastoma: improved response rate using a multiagent regimen (OPEC) including sequential cisplatin and VM-26.

    PubMed

    Shafford, E A; Rogers, D W; Pritchard, J

    1984-07-01

    Forty-two children, all over one year of age, were given vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and sequentially timed cisplatin and VM-26 (OPEC) or OPEC and doxorubicin (OPEC-D) as initial treatment for newly diagnosed stage III or IV neuroblastoma. Good partial response was achieved in 31 patients (74%) overall and in 28 (78%) of 36 patients whose treatment adhered to the chemotherapy protocol, compared with a 65% response rate achieved in a previous series of children treated with pulsed cyclophosphamide and vincristine with or without doxorubicin. Only six patients, including two of the six children whose treatment did not adhere to protocol, failed to respond, but there were five early deaths from treatment-related complications. Tumor response to OPEC, which was the less toxic of the two regimens, was at least as good as tumor response to OPEC-D. Cisplatin-induced morbidity was clinically significant in only one patient and was avoided in others by careful monitoring of glomerular filtration rate and hearing. Other centers should test the efficacy of OPEC or equivalent regimens in the treatment of advanced neuroblastoma. PMID:6539811

  5. DNA compaction by mononuclear platinum cancer drug cisplatin and the trisplatinum anticancer agent BBR3464: Differences and similarities.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, T; Dubey, P; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2012-02-01

    Cisplatin, a mononuclear platinum compound, which is known as a cancer drug for long time, can exhibit considerable side effects and is also not effective in many types of cancer. Therefore, the alternative platinum anticancer agents that can act at a much lower dose limit compared to the dose relevant for cisplatin treatment have been searched for. BBR3464, a trinuclear platinum compound, is found to exhibit cytotoxic effects at 10 to 1000 times lower dose limit, even in cisplatin-resistant cancer cells. The primary cellular target for cisplatin and BBR3464 is thought to be DNA. Herein, we report the nature of DNA structural changes that are induced by cisplatin and BBR3464, considering the same DNA sequence and similar sample deposition methods for comparison purpose. We have applied high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to obtain an idea about the molecular basis of BBR3464's effectiveness at the lower dose limit. We show from the molecularly resolved AFM images that both the compounds can compact the whole dsDNA molecules, though the degree of compaction in case of BBR3464 treatment is significantly higher. Furthermore, local compaction in terms of loop structure formation could be induced by both BBR3464 and cisplatin, though BBR3464 generated microloops and macroloops both, whereas cisplatin could generate primarily the microloops. It is a significant observation that BBR3464 could induce relatively drastic DNA structural changes in terms of loop formation as well as overall DNA compaction at a molar ratio, which is 50 times less than that applied for cisplatin treatment. Implications of such structural changes in cytotoxic effects of the platinum anticancer agents will be mentioned.

  6. 13 CFR 107.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including... Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for... Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. (a) Agents....

  7. Tempol, a Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic Agent, Ameliorates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity through Alleviation of Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Lamiaa A.; Shehata, Nagwa I.; Abdelkader, Noha F.; Khattab, Mahmoud M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction is a crucial mechanism by which cisplatin, a potent chemotherapeutic agent, causes nephrotoxicity where mitochondrial electron transport complexes are shifted mostly toward imbalanced reactive oxygen species versus energy production. In the present study, the protective role of tempol, a membrane-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic agent, was evaluated on mitochondrial dysfunction and the subsequent damage induced by cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice. Methods and Findings Nephrotoxicity was assessed 72 h after a single i.p. injection of cisplatin (25 mg/kg) with or without oral administration of tempol (100 mg/kg/day). Serum creatinine and urea as well as glucosuria and proteinuria were evaluated. Both kidneys were isolated for estimation of oxidative stress markers, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content and caspase-3 activity. Moreover, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity, complexes I–IV activities and mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mNOS) protein expression were measured along with histological examinations of renal tubular damage and mitochondrial ultrastructural changes. Tempol was effective against cisplatin-induced elevation of serum creatinine and urea as well as glucosuria and proteinuria. Moreover, pretreatment with tempol notably inhibited cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and disruption of mitochondrial function by restoring mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, complexes I and III activities, mNOS protein expression and ATP content. Tempol also provided significant protection against apoptosis, tubular damage and mitochondrial ultrastructural changes. Interestingly, tempol did not interfere with the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin against the growth of solid Ehrlich carcinoma. Conclusion This study highlights the potential role of tempol in inhibiting cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity without affecting its antitumor activity via amelioration of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction

  8. A WEE1 Inhibitor Analog of AZD1775 Maintains Synergy with Cisplatin and Demonstrates Reduced Single-Agent Cytotoxicity in Medulloblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Christopher J; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Amani, Vladimir; Harris, Peter S; Backos, Donald S; Donson, Andrew M; Wempe, Michael F; Foreman, Nicholas K; Vibhakar, Rajeev; Reigan, Philip

    2016-04-15

    The current treatment for medulloblastoma includes surgical resection, radiation, and cytotoxic chemotherapy. Although this approach has improved survival rates, the high doses of chemotherapy required for clinical efficacy often result in lasting neurocognitive defects and other adverse events. Therefore, the development of chemosensitizing agents that allow dose reductions of cytotoxic agents, limiting their adverse effects but maintaining their clinical efficacy, would be an attractive approach to treat medulloblastoma. We previously identified WEE1 kinase as a new molecular target for medulloblastoma from an integrated genomic analysis of gene expression and a kinome-wide siRNA screen of medulloblastoma cells and tissue. In addition, we demonstrated that WEE1 prevents DNA damage-induced cell death by cisplatin and that the WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 displays synergistic activity with cisplatin. AZD1775 was developed as a WEE1 inhibitor from an initial hit from a high-throughput screen. However, given the lack of structure-activity data for AZD1775, we developed a small series of analogs to determine the requirements for WEE1 inhibition and further examine the effects of WEE1 inhibition in medulloblastoma. Interestingly, the compounds that inhibited WEE1 in the same nanomolar range as AZD1775 had significantly reduced single-agent cytotoxicity compared with AZD1775 and displayed synergistic activity with cisplatin in medulloblastoma cells. The potent cytotoxicity of AZD1775, unrelated to WEE1 inhibition, may result in dose-limiting toxicities and exacerbate adverse effects; therefore, WEE1 inhibitors that demonstrate low cytotoxicity could be dosed at higher concentrations to chemosensitize the tumor and potentiate the effect of DNA-damaging agents such as cisplatin. PMID:26745241

  9. Biodegradable polymeric system for cisplatin delivery: development, in vitro characterization and investigation of toxicity profile.

    PubMed

    Alam, Noor; Khare, Vaibhav; Dubey, Ravindra; Saneja, Ankit; Kushwaha, Manoj; Singh, Gurdarshan; Sharma, Neelam; Chandan, Balkrishan; Gupta, Prem N

    2014-05-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent anticancer agent used in the treatment of various solid tumors, however, its clinical use is limited due to severe adverse effects including nephrotoxicity. In this investigation cisplatin loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were developed and characterized for various in vitro characteristics including size distribution, zeta potential, drug loading and release profile. PLGA nanoparticles were successfully developed as investigated using scanning electron microscopy and exhibited average particles size and zeta potential as 284.8 nm and -15.8 mV, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry indicated an absence of any polymer-drug interactions. Cisplatin nanoparticles exhibited in vitro anticancer activity against A549 cells comparable to that of cisplatin solution. The biodistribution study in mice indicated that the kidney cisplatin level was significantly (p<0.01) lower with cisplatin nanoparticles than cisplatin solution. Following two cycles of cisplatin treatment, a week apart, blood urea nitrogen level was found to be higher in case of cisplatin solution as compared to cisplatin nanoparticles. Further, there was a significant (p<0.01) increase in plasma creatinine level in case of cisplatin solution as compared to cisplatin nanoparticles. Histopathological examination of kidney from cisplatin nanoparticles treated group revealed no kidney damage, however, a sign of nephrotoxicity was observed in the case of cisplatin solution. The results suggest that PLGA nanoparticle based formulation could be a potential option for cisplatin delivery. PMID:24656356

  10. 13 CFR 108.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 108.1620 Section 108.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA...

  11. Tinospora cordifolia as a protective and immunomodulatory agent in combination with cisplatin against murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Heena; Sehgal, Rakesh; Kaur, Sukhbir

    2014-02-01

    Effect of pure herb, Tinospora cordifolia was studied for its hepatoprotective, nephroprotective and immunomodulatory activity against high dose cisplatin treatment in Leishmania donovani infected BALB/c mice. Administration of cisplatin (5mg/kg b.wt. daily for 5 days, i.p.) reduced the parasite load in L. donovani infected BALB/c mice but produced damage in liver and kidney as manifested biochemically by an increase in serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum urea, serum creatinine and various electrolytes etc. These biochemical analyses were further supported by cisplatin induced morphological changes in kidney, liver and spleen. To combat this pure herb, T. cordifolia (100mg/kg b.wt. for 15 days daily) was used in combination with cisplatin in L. donovani infected BALB/c mice and it was found that all the aforementioned changes were effectively attenuated by T. cordifolia when administered in combination with cisplatin. Moreover, flow cytometric analysis of lymphocyte surface markers of T cells (CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+), NK1.1 and B cells (CD19) indicated prominent enhancement in proliferation and differentiation of lymphocytes. T. cordifolia in combination with cisplatin selectively induced Th1 type of immune response as depicted by enhanced levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 whereas Th2 specific cytokines IL-4 and IL-10 observed a moderate decline. Confirmation of Th1 polarization was further obtained from augmented levels of IgG2a over IgG1 and heightened DTH (delayed type hypersensitivity) response. Thus, our results suggest that treatment by T. cordifolia may be a critical remedy for the amelioration of adverse effects of cisplatin. Thus, this might serve as a novel combination against visceral leishmaniasis in future. PMID:24370645

  12. Comparison of the Anti-tumor Effects of Two Platinum Agents (Miriplatin and Fine-Powder Cisplatin)

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Shobu Nitta, Norihisa Ohta, Shinichi Sonoda, Akinaga Otani, Hideji Tomozawa, Yuki Nitta-Seko, Ayumi Tsuchiya, Keiko Tanka, Toyohiko Takahashi, Masashi Murata, Kiyoshi

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of miriplatin-lipidol and fine-powder cisplatin-lipiodol suspensions. Methods: Assessment of the cytotoxicity of two drugs was performed: a soluble derivative of miriplatin (DPC) and fine-powder cisplatin. We randomly divided 15 rabbits with transplanted VX2 liver tumors into three equal groups. They were infused via the proper hepatic artery with a miriplatin-lipiodol suspension (ML), a fine-powder cisplatin-lipiodol suspension (CL), or saline (control) and the tumor growth rate was determined on MR images acquired before and 7 days after treatment. The concentration of platinum (PCs) in blood was assayed immediately, and 10, 30, and 60 min, and 24 h and 7 days after drug administration. Its concentration in tumor and surrounding normal liver tissues was determined at 7 days postadministration. Results: At high concentrations, fine-powder cisplatin exhibited stronger cytotoxicity than DPC. At low concentrations, both agents manifested weak cytotoxicity. While there was no difference between the tumor growth rate of the ML and the CL groups, the difference between the controls and ML- and CL-treated rabbits was significant. The blood PCs peaked at 10 min and then gradually decreased over time. On the other hand, no platinum was detected at any point after the administration of ML. There was no difference between the ML and CL groups in the PCs in tumor tissues; however, in normal hepatic tissue, the PCs were higher in ML- than CL-treated rabbits. Conclusions: We confirmed the anti-tumor effect of ML and CL. There was no significant difference between the anti-tumor effect of ML and CL at 7 days postadministration.

  13. 7 CFR 4290.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Financial Assistance for RBICs (Leverage) Funding Leverage by Use of Guaranteed Trust Certificates (âtcsâ) § 4290.1620 Functions of...

  14. Comparison of in Vitro Cytotoxicity and Apoptogenic Activity of Magnesium Chloride and Cisplatin as Conventional Chemotherapeutic Agents in the MCF-7 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Mirmalek, Seyed Abbas; Jangholi, Ehsan; Jafari, Mohammad; Yadollah-Damavandi, Soheila; Javidi, Mohammad Amin; Parsa, Yekta; Parsa, Tina; Salimi-Tabatabaee, Seyed Alireza; Ghasemzadeh Kolagar, Hossein; Khazaei Jalil, Saeed; Alizadeh-Navaei, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy and also the second leading cause of cancer death among women and also in women that have a high mortality. Previous studies showed that magnesium (Mg) has cytotoxic effects on malignant cell lines. However, the anti-cancer effects of Mg on MCF-7 breast cancer cells are uncertain. This study was aimed at the comparison of the cytotoxic effect of Mg salt (MgCl2) and cisplatin on MCF-7 cells and fibroblasts (as normal cells). After treatment with various concentrations of MgCl2, and cisplatin as a positive control for 24 and 48 hours (h), cytotoxicity activity was measured by MTT assay. In addition, apoptosis was determined by annexin V/propidium iide assay. Both cisplatin and the MgCl2 exhibited dose-dependent cytotoxic effects in the MCF-7 cell line, although the LD50 of the Mg was significantly higher when compared to cispaltin (40 μg/ml vs. 20 μg/ml). Regarding annexin V/propidium results, treatment of MCF-7 cells with LD50 concentrations of cisplatin and Mg showed 59% and 44% apoptosis at 24h, respectively. Finally, the results indicated that Mg has cytotoxic effects on MCF-7 cells, but less than cisplatin as a conventional chemotherapeutic agent. However, regarding the side effects of chemotherapy drugs, it seems that Mg can be considered as a supplement for the treatment of breast cancer.

  15. Proteasome Inhibitor YSY01A Enhances Cisplatin Cytotoxicity in Cisplatin-Resistant Human Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Zhou, Quan; Yuan, Xia; Ge, Ze-mei; Ran, Fu-xiang; Yang, Hua-yu; Qiang, Guang-liang; Li, Run-tao; Cui, Jing-rong

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most common drugs used for treatment of solid tumors such as ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, the development of resistance against this cytotoxic agent limits its clinical use. Here we report that YSY01A, a novel proteasome inhibitor, is capable of suppressing survival of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. And YSY01A treatment enhances the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in drug-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Specifically, YSY01A abrogates regulatory proteins important for cell proliferation and anti-apoptosis including NF-κB p65 and STAT3, resulting in down-regulation of Bcl-2. A dramatic increase in cisplatin uptake was also observed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following exposure to YSY01A. Taken together, YSY01A serves as a potential candidate for further development as anticancer therapeutics targeting the proteasome. PMID:27326257

  16. Switching the Loaded Agent from Epirubicin to Cisplatin: Salvage Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization with Drug-eluting Microspheres for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Akihiko Hori, Shinich

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: There is no consensus on switching anticancer agents loaded onto drug carriers in transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to evaluate the safety and clinical outcomes of TACE with cisplatin-loaded microspheres (CLM-TACE) in HCC patients refractory to TACE with epirubicin-loaded microspheres (ELM-TACE). Methods: Between February 2008 and June 2010, 85 patients with unresectable HCC refractory to ELM-TACE were enrolled to undergo CLM-TACE. The number of ELM-TACE sessions until judgment of resistance ranged from 1 to 4 (median, 2.1). CLM-TACE was performed using 50-100-{mu}m superabsorbent polymer microspheres loaded with 1 mg cisplatin/1 mg microspheres together with hepatic arterial infusion of 25 mg cisplatin and 500 mg 5-fluorouracil per patient. Tumor responses were evaluated by computed tomography according to the European Association for the Study of the Liver criteria. Results: The median number of CLM-TACE treatment sessions was 1.8 (range, 1-5), and the mean total dose of cisplatin per session was 42.8 mg (range, 30.0-59.0). After 6 months, 3 (3.5%) patients achieved complete response, 31 (36.5%) had partial response, 15 (17.6%) had stable disease, and 36 (42.4%) had progressive disease. The median overall survival and time to treatment failure after initial CLM-TACE were 13.3 and 7.2 months, respectively. Overall, 9.4% of patients experienced grade 3/4 adverse events. Conclusions: witching the loaded agent from epirubicin to cisplatin is a safe, well-tolerated, and efficacious treatment strategy for salvage TACE with drug-eluting microspheres in HCC patients refractory to ELM-TACE.

  17. Mechanism of polyuria after cisplatin therapy.

    PubMed

    Wong, N L; Walker, V R; Wong, E F; Sutton, R A

    1993-01-01

    Cisplatin is an antineoplastic agent. Several nephrotoxic effects are associated with its use including chronic and acute renal failure, renal magnesium wasting, and polyuria. We have investigated polyuria in groups of rats treated with cisplatin at doses of 2.5 and 5 mg/kg body weight given once weekly for 3 weeks to determine possible mechanisms of this impairment. After cisplatin administration, glomerular filtration rate was reduced and significant increases in sodium and water loss were also seen. These changes were associated with decreases in urinary cAMP. Inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells were removed from these animals and were stimulated with graded doses of vasopressin. Cells from cisplatin-treated rats showed an impaired response in cAMP generation to vasopressin stimulation as compared to cells from normal animals. To determine more precisely the site of impairment, the adenylate cyclase complex of the IMCD cells was further studied with forskolin and NaF. Forskolin was used to probe the catalytic unit activating adenylate cyclase, and NaF the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (G protein). In response to forskolin, cells from cisplatin-treated rats and normal rats responded similarly in generating cAMP. However, following NaF, the cAMP response was blunted in the cells from the cisplatin rats. These results suggested that the catalytic unit was not injured by cisplatin (forskolin study) but the G protein was (NaF). In conclusion, the present study suggests that the polyuria seen following cisplatin administration is associated with an end-organ resistance to vasopressin manifested by reduced cAMP generation, secondary in part or whole to a defect at the level of the G protein. PMID:8302421

  18. Cisplatin Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... has worsened after treatment with other medications or radiation therapy. Cisplatin is used alone or in combination ... has worsened after treatment with other medications or radiation therapy. Cisplatin is also used alone or in ...

  19. Therapeutic Potential and Molecular Mechanisms of Emblica officinalis Gaertn in Countering Nephrotoxicity in Rats Induced by the Chemotherapeutic Agent Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Salma; Suchal, Kapil; Bhatia, Jagriti; Khan, Sana I.; Vasisth, Swati; Tomar, Ameesha; Goyal, Sameer; Kumar, Rajeev; Arya, Dharamvir S.; Ojha, Shreesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Emblica officinalis Gaertn. belonging to family Euphorbiaceae is commonly known as Indian gooseberry or “Amla” in India. It is used as a ‘rejuvenating herb’ in traditional system of Indian medicine. It has been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects. Thus, on the basis of its biological effects, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effect of the dried fruit extract of the E. Officinalis (EO) in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats and also to evaluate the mechanism of its nephroprotection. The study was done on male albino Wistar rats. They were divided into six groups (n = 6) viz. control, cisplatin-control, cisplatin and EO (150, 300, and 600 mg/kg; p.o. respectively in different groups) and EO only (600 mg/kg; p.o. only). EO was administered orally to the rats for a period of 10 days and on the 7th day, a single injection of cisplatin (8 mg/kg; i.p.) was administered to the cisplatin-control and EO treatment groups. The rats were sacrificed on the 10th day. Cisplatin-control rats had deranged renal function parameters and the kidney histology confirmed the presence of acute tubular necrosis. Furthermore, there were increased oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation along with higher expression of MAPK pathway proteins in the rat kidney from the cisplatin-control group. Contrary to this, EO (600 mg/kg) significantly normalized renal function, bolstered antioxidant status and ameliorated histological alterations. The inflammation and apoptosis were markedly lower in comparison to cisplatin-control rats. Furthermore, EO (600 mg/kg) inhibited MAPK phosphorylation which was instrumental in preserving renal function and morphology. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrated that EO attenuated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats through suppression of MAPK induced inflammation and apoptosis. PMID:27752245

  20. Efficacy of weekly paclitaxel treatment as a single agent chemotherapy following first-line cisplatin treatment in urothelial bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    SIDERIS, SPYRIDON; AOUN, FOUAD; ZANATY, MARC; MARTINEZ, NIEVES CHANZA; LATIFYAN, SOFIA; AWADA, AHMAD; GIL, THIERRY

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of paclitaxel following a first-line cisplatin regimen in patients with metastatic bladder cancer. The present study retrospectively evaluated the clinical effects and toxicities of second-line paclitaxel regimens following first-line cisplatin treatment in metastatic bladder cancer. A total of 42 patients with progressing metastatic urothelial bladder cancer following cisplatin-based chemotherapy were enrolled. The patients received weekly treatment with paclitaxel (80 mg/m2) with a median duration of 3 months. The overall response rate, disease control rate and median progression free survival were 9.5, 45.2 and 6.4 months, respectively. Weekly paclitaxel was well-tolerated with rare grade III or IV toxicities. Second-line weekly paclitaxel treatment following first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy is an effective and well-tolerated regimen in urothelial metastatic bladder cancer. PMID:27284445

  1. 7 CFR 4290.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Financial Assistance for RBICs (Leverage) Funding Leverage by Use of Guaranteed Trust Certificates (âtcsâ) § 4290.1620 Functions of agents... to: (i) Establish performance criteria for Poolers. (ii) Monitor and evaluate the financial...

  2. Curculigo orchioides protects cisplatin-induced cell damage.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tong Ho; Hong, Bin Na; Jung, Su-Young; Lee, Jeong-Han; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil; You, Yong-Ouk

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is commonly used as a chemotherapeutic agent against many human cancers. However, it generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and has serious dose-limiting side effects, including ototoxicity. The roots of Curculigo orchioides (C. orchioides) have been used to treat auditory diseases such as tinnitus and hearing loss in Chinese traditional medicine. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of an ethanol extract obtained from C. orchioides rhizome (COR) on cisplatin-induced cell damage in auditory cells (HEI-OC1). COR (2.5-25 μg/ml) inhibited cisplatin-induced HEI-OC1 cell damage in a dose-dependent manner. To investigate the protective mechanism of COR on cisplatin cytotoxicity in HEI-OC1 cells, we measured the effects of COR on ROS generation and lipid peroxidation in cisplatin-treated cells as well as its scavenging activities against superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide, and DPPH radicals. COR (1-25 μg/ml) had scavenging activities against superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide, and DPPH radicals, as well as reduced lipid peroxidation. In in vivo experiments, COR was shown to reduce cochlear and peripheral auditory function impairments through cisplatin-induced auditory damage in mice. These results indicate that COR protects from cisplatin-induced auditory damage by inhibiting lipid peroxidation and scavenging activities against free radicals.

  3. Pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ozkok, Abdullah; Edelstein, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin and other platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors. A known complication of cisplatin administration is acute kidney injury (AKI). The nephrotoxic effect of cisplatin is cumulative and dose-dependent and often necessitates dose reduction or withdrawal. Recurrent episodes of AKI may result in chronic kidney disease. The pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced AKI involves proximal tubular injury, oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular injury in the kidney. There is predominantly acute tubular necrosis and also apoptosis in the proximal tubules. There is activation of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the kidney. Inhibition of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α or IL-33 or depletion of CD4+ T cells or mast cells protects against cisplatin-induced AKI. Cisplatin also causes endothelial cell injury. An understanding of the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced AKI is important for the development of adjunctive therapies to prevent AKI, to lessen the need for dose decrease or drug withdrawal, and to lessen patient morbidity and mortality. PMID:25165721

  4. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of cisplatin-containing EGFR targeting bioconjugates as potential therapeutic agents for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Rolf F; Wu, Gong; Meisen, W Hans; Nakkula, Robin J; Yang, Weilian; Huo, Tianyao; Kellough, David A; Kaumaya, Pravin; Turro, Claudia; Agius, Lawrence M; Kaur, Balveen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate four different platinated bioconjugates containing a cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [cis-DDP]) fragment and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting moieties as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of brain tumors using a human EGFR-expressing transfectant of the F98 rat glioma (F98EGFR) to assess their efficacy. The first two bioconjugates employed the monoclonal antibody cetuximab (C225 or Erbitux®) as the targeting moiety, and the second two used genetically engineered EGF peptides. C225-G5-Pt was produced by reacting cis-DDP with a fifth-generation polyamidoamine dendrimer (G5) and then linking it to C225 by means of two heterobifunctional reagents. The second bioconjugate (C225-PG-Pt) employed the same methodology except that polyglutamic acid was used as the carrier. The third and fourth bioconjugates used two different EGF peptides, PEP382 and PEP455, with direct coordination to the Pt center of the cis-DDP fragment. In vivo studies with C225-G5-Pt failed to demonstrate therapeutic activity following intracerebral (ic) convection-enhanced delivery (CED) to F98EGFR glioma-bearing rats. The second bioconjugate, C225-PG-Pt, failed to show in vitro cytotoxicity. Furthermore, because of its high molecular weight, we decided that lower molecular weight peptides might provide better targeting and microdistribution within the tumor. Both PEP382-Pt and PEP455-Pt bioconjugates were cytotoxic in vitro and, based on this, a pilot study was initiated using PEP455-Pt. The end point for this study was tumor size at 6 weeks following tumor cell implantation and 4 weeks following ic CED of PEP455-Pt to F98 glioma-bearing rats. Neuropathologic examination revealed that five of seven rats were either tumor-free or only had microscopic tumors at 42 days following tumor implantation compared to a mean survival time of 20.5 and 26.3 days for untreated controls. In conclusion, we have succeeded in reformatting the

  5. Protective effects of ghrelin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Kimura, Toru; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Takabatake, Hiroyuki; Miyazato, Mikiya; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin is a potent chemotherapeutic agent that has activity against malignant tumors. However, cisplatin causes various adverse effects, such as nephrotoxicity, which are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Recent studies have revealed that the mechanism of cisplatin nephrotoxicity includes a robust inflammatory response. Since ghrelin has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, we hypothesized that ghrelin might have protective effects against cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Mice were randomly divided into three groups: control, cisplatin with vehicle, and cisplatin with ghrelin. Ghrelin (0.8μg/kg/min via osmotic-pump, subcutaneously) or vehicle administration was started one day before cisplatin injection. At 72h after cisplatin administration (20mg/kg, intraperitoneally), we measured serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, urine albumin/creatinine, renal mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and histological changes. Ghrelin significantly attenuated the increase in serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine induced by cisplatin. Ghrelin tended to attenuate the increase in urine albumin/creatinine, although not significantly. Cisplatin-induced renal tubular injury and apoptosis were significantly attenuated by ghrelin pretreatment. Consequently, ghrelin significantly attenuated renal mRNA levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, interleukin-6, kidney injury molecule-1, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. In conclusion, ghrelin produces protective effects in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through inhibition of inflammatory reactions. Pretreatment with ghrelin may become a new prophylactic candidate for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:27298204

  6. Fenofibrate reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis of renal proximal tubular cells via inhibition of JNK and p38 pathways.

    PubMed

    Thongnuanjan, Penjai; Soodvilai, Sirima; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Soodvilai, Sunhapas

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as a standard chemotherapy for solid tumors. The major adverse effect of cisplatin is nephrotoxicity in proximal tubular cells, via oxidative stress, DNA damage, cell apoptosis, and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the pharmacological effect and mechanism of fibrate drugs on cisplatin-induced renal proximal tubular cell death. Cisplatin decreased cell viability of LLC-PK1 and HK-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis was attenuated by co-treatment with fenofibrate while less so with clofibrate and bezafibrate. Fenofibrate's protective effect was not complimented by co-treatment with GW6471, a PPARα antagonist, indicating the protective effect occurred via a PPARα-independent mechanism. Treating cells with cisplatin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), c-JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 kinase (p38), but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Fenofibrate reversed cisplatin-induced JNK and p38 activation, but had no effect on ROS production. The findings suggest fenofibrate's protective effect on cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity is mediated by inhibition of JNK and p38. Moreover, fenofibrate did not alter cisplatin's antitumor effect on cancer cell lines including T84, SW-480, HepG2, and SK-LU-1 cells. Therefore, fenofibrate may be a candidate agent for further development as an adjuvant to cisplatin treatment. PMID:27193727

  7. Cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Arany, Istvan; Safirstein, Robert L

    2003-09-01

    Cisplatin remains a major antineoplastic drug for the treatment of solid tumors. Its chief dose-limiting side effect is nephrotoxicity, which evolves slowly and predictably after initial and repeated exposure. The kidney accumulates cisplatin to a higher degree than other organs perhaps via mediated transport. Functionally, reduced renal perfusion and a concentrating defect characterize its nephrotoxicity, whereas morphologically necrosis of the terminal portion of the proximal tubule and apoptosis predominantly in the distal nephron characterize its effects on cell fate. Among the earliest reactions of the kidney to cisplatin is the activation of the MAPK cascade and molecular responses typical of the stress response. Repression of genes characteristic of the mature phenotype of the kidney, especially those serving transport function of the kidney, is also prominent. Metabolic responses, cell cycle events and the inflammatory cascade seem to be important determinants of the degree of renal failure induced by cisplatin. Manipulation of these responses may be exploited to reduce its toxicity clinically.

  8. Cisplatin induces resistance by triggering differentiation of testicular embryonal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Abada, Paolo B; Howell, Stephen B

    2014-01-01

    Although testicular germ cell tumors are generally quite responsive to treatment with cisplatin, a small fraction of them acquire resistance during therapy. Even when cisplatin treatment is successful the patient is often left with a residual teratoma at the site of the primary tumor suggesting that cisplatin may trigger differentiation in some tumors. Using the human embryonal carcinoma cell line NTera2/D1, we confirmed that exposure to the differentiating agent retinoic acid produced a reduction in pluripotency markers NANOG and POU5F1 (Oct3/4) and an acute concentration-dependent increase in resistance to both cisplatin and paclitaxel that reached as high as 18-fold for cisplatin and 61-fold for paclitaxel within four days. A two day exposure to cisplatin also produced a concentration-dependent decrease in the expression of the NANOG and POU5F1 and increased expression of three markers whose levels increase with differentiation including Nestin, SCG10 and Fibronectin. In parallel, exposure to cisplatin induced up to 6.2-fold resistance to itself and 104-fold resistance to paclitaxel. Paclitaxel did not induce differentiation or resistance to either itself or cisplatin. Neither retinoic acid nor cisplatin induced resistance in cervical or prostate cancer cell lines or other germ cell tumor lines in which they failed to alter the expression of NANOG and POU5F1. Forced expression of NANOG prevented the induction of resistance to cisplatin by retinoic acid. We conclude that cisplatin can acutely induce resistance to itself and paclitaxel by triggering a differentiation response in pluripotent germ cell tumor cells. PMID:24475288

  9. Bufalin reverses intrinsic and acquired drug resistance to cisplatin through the AKT signaling pathway in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongyan; Zhao, Dali; Jin, Huilin; Li, Hongwei; Yang, Xiaoying; Zhuang, Liwei; Liu, Tiefu

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin is the most common chemotherapeutic agent for gastric cancer (GC), however it activates AKT, which contributes to intrinsic and acquired resistance. Bufalin, a traditional Chinese medicine, shows significant anticancer activity by inhibiting the AKT pathway. It was therefore hypothesized that bufalin could counteract cisplatin resistance in GC cells. SGC7901, MKN‑45 and BGC823 human GC cells were cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Effects of cisplatin and bufalin on GC cells were measured by a cell counting kit, apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry, and immunoblotting was used to detect proteins associated with the AKT signaling pathway. It was demonstrated that bufalin synergized with cisplatin to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of GC cells by diminishing the activation of cisplatin-induced AKT under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Bufalin also inhibits cisplatin-activated molecules downstream of AKT that affect proliferation and apoptosis, including glycogen synthase kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin, ribosomal protein S6 Kinase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor-4E-binding protein-1. To investigate acquired cisplatin resistance, a cisplatin‑resistant cell line SGC7901‑CR was used. It was demonstrated that bufalin reversed acquired cisplatin resistance and significantly induced apoptosis through the AKT pathway. These results imply that bufalin could extend the therapeutic effect of cisplatin on GC cells when administered in combination. PMID:27357249

  10. Protective effect of cysteine and vitamin E, Crocus sativus and Nigella sativa extracts on cisplatin-induced toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    el Daly, E S

    1998-01-01

    . Cysteine together with vitamin E, Crocus sativus and Nigella sativa tended to protect from cisplatin-induced falls in leucocyte counts, haemoglobin levels and mean osmotic fragility of erythrocytes and also prevented the increase in haematocrit. The results of this study indicate a basis for the toxic effects of cisplatin, and suggest a possible way of counteracting the toxicity by introducing protective agents such sulphydryl compounds, other antioxidants and extracts of natural products. It also appears that cells adapt to the effects of cisplatin through the induction of systems that produce NADPH, which in turn compensates the decrease of free sulphydryl groups. We conclude that cysteine and vitamin E, Crocus sativus and Nigella Sativa may be a promising compound for reducing cisplatin-toxic side effects including nephrotoxicity.

  11. Cisplatin suppresses the growth and proliferation of breast and cervical cancer cell lines by inhibiting integrin β5-mediated glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaojia; Xie, Jie; Li, Jiajia; Liu, Fei; Wu, Xiaohua; Wang, Ziliang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells harbor lower energy consumption after rounds of anticancer drugs, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated metabolic alterations in cancer cells exposed to cisplatin. The present study exhibited cisplatin, known as a chemotherapeutic agent interacting with DNA, also acted as an anti-metabolic agent. We found that glycolysis levels of breast and cervical cancer cells were reduced after cisplatin treatment, resulting in cells growth and proliferation inhibition. We demonstrated that cisplatin suppressed glycolysis-related proteins expression, including glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB), through down-regulating integrin β5 (ITGB5)/focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. ITGB5 overexpression rescued cisplatin-induced inhibition of cancer cell glycolysis, growth and proliferation. Conclusively, we reveal a novel insight into cisplatin-induced anticancer mechanism, suggesting alternative strategies to the current therapeutic approaches of targeting ITGB5, as well as of a combination of cisplatin with glucose up-regulation chemotherapeutic agents to enhance anticancer effect. PMID:27294003

  12. Cisplatin suppresses the growth and proliferation of breast and cervical cancer cell lines by inhibiting integrin β5-mediated glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaojia; Xie, Jie; Li, Jiajia; Liu, Fei; Wu, Xiaohua; Wang, Ziliang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells harbor lower energy consumption after rounds of anticancer drugs, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated metabolic alterations in cancer cells exposed to cisplatin. The present study exhibited cisplatin, known as a chemotherapeutic agent interacting with DNA, also acted as an anti-metabolic agent. We found that glycolysis levels of breast and cervical cancer cells were reduced after cisplatin treatment, resulting in cells growth and proliferation inhibition. We demonstrated that cisplatin suppressed glycolysis-related proteins expression, including glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) and lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB), through down-regulating integrin β5 (ITGB5)/focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. ITGB5 overexpression rescued cisplatin-induced inhibition of cancer cell glycolysis, growth and proliferation. Conclusively, we reveal a novel insight into cisplatin-induced anticancer mechanism, suggesting alternative strategies to the current therapeutic approaches of targeting ITGB5, as well as of a combination of cisplatin with glucose up-regulation chemotherapeutic agents to enhance anticancer effect. PMID:27294003

  13. Insights into RNA binding by the anticancer drug cisplatin from the crystal structure of cisplatin-modified ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Melnikov, Sergey V.; Söll, Dieter; Steitz, Thomas A.; Polikanov, Yury S.

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely prescribed anticancer drug, which triggers cell death by covalent binding to a broad range of biological molecules. Among cisplatin targets, cellular RNAs remain the most poorly characterized molecules. Although cisplatin was shown to inactivate essential RNAs, including ribosomal, spliceosomal and telomeric RNAs, cisplatin binding sites in most RNA molecules are unknown, and therefore it remains challenging to study how modifications of RNA by cisplatin contributes to its toxicity. Here we report a 2.6Å-resolution X-ray structure of cisplatin-modified 70S ribosome, which describes cisplatin binding to the ribosome and provides the first nearly atomic model of cisplatin–RNA complex. We observe nine cisplatin molecules bound to the ribosome and reveal consensus structural features of the cisplatin-binding sites. Two of the cisplatin molecules modify conserved functional centers of the ribosome—the mRNA-channel and the GTPase center. In the mRNA-channel, cisplatin intercalates between the ribosome and the messenger RNA, suggesting that the observed inhibition of protein synthesis by cisplatin is caused by impaired mRNA-translocation. Our structure provides an insight into RNA targeting and inhibition by cisplatin, which can help predict cisplatin-binding sites in other cellular RNAs and design studies to elucidate a link between RNA modifications by cisplatin and cisplatin toxicity. PMID:27079977

  14. Suramin protects from cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Dupre, Tess V; Doll, Mark A; Shah, Parag P; Sharp, Cierra N; Kiefer, Alex; Scherzer, Michael T; Saurabh, Kumar; Saforo, Doug; Siow, Deanna; Casson, Lavona; Arteel, Gavin E; Jenson, Alfred Bennett; Megyesi, Judit; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-02-01

    Cisplatin, a commonly used cancer chemotherapeutic, has a dose-limiting side effect of nephrotoxicity. Approximately 30% of patients administered cisplatin suffer from kidney injury, and there are limited treatment options for the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin, which is Federal Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, improves kidney function after various forms of kidney injury in rodent models. We hypothesized that suramin would attenuate cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin treatment before cisplatin administration reduced cisplatin-induced decreases in kidney function and injury. Furthermore, suramin attenuated cisplatin-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis in the kidney cortex. Treatment of mice with suramin 24 h after cisplatin also improved kidney function, suggesting that the mechanism of protection is not by inhibition of tubular cisplatin uptake or its metabolism to nephrotoxic species. If suramin is to be used in the context of cancer, then it cannot prevent cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity of cancer cells. Suramin did not alter the dose-response curve of cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. In addition, suramin pretreatment of mice harboring lung adenocarcinomas did not alter the initial cytotoxic effects of cisplatin (DNA damage and apoptosis) on tumor cells. These results provide evidence that suramin has potential as a renoprotective agent for the treatment/prevention of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury and justify future long-term preclinical studies using cotreatment of suramin and cisplatin in mouse models of cancer.

  15. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  16. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  17. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  18. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  19. Synergistic effect of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) on cisplatin efficacy in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xiang; Westover, David; Cao, Felicia; Cao, Shousong; He, Xiang; Kim, Hak-Ryul; Zhang, Yuesheng; Chan, Daniel CF; Li, Fengzhi

    2015-01-01

    Although in vitro studies have shown that isothiocyanates (ITCs) can synergistically sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin treatment, the underlying mechanisms have not been well defined, and there are no in vivo demonstrations of this synergy. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo data for the combination of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), one of the most common naturally occurring ITCs, with cisplatin. Our study revealed that cisplatin and AITC combination synergistically inhibits cancer cell growth and colony formation, and enhances apoptosis in association with the downregulation of antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and survivin. Importantly, the in vivo combination treatment suppresses human tumor growth in animal models without observable increases in toxicity (body weight loss) in comparison with single agent treatment. Furthermore, our data revealed that addition of AITC to cisplatin treatment changes the profile of G2/M arrest (e.g. increase in M phase cell number) and significantly extends the duration of G2/M arrest in comparison with cisplatin treatment alone. To explore the underlying mechanism, we found that AITC treatment rapidly depletes b-tubulin. Combination of AITC and cisplatin inhibits the expression of G2/M checkpoint-relevant proteins including CDC2, cyclin B1 and CDC25. Together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for AITC enhancing cisplatin efficacy and provides the first in vivo evidence to support ITCs as potential candidates for developing new regimens to overcome platinum resistance. PMID:26396928

  20. Downregulation of DOCK1 sensitizes bladder cancer cells to cisplatin through preventing epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Da-jin; Chen, Wei; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Hao; Wang, Yu-cheng; Chen, Jiang-hua

    2016-01-01

    During the past several decades, resistance to single or multiple anticancer agents has posed a great challenge in cancer therapy. Dedicator of cytokinesis 1 (DOCK1), the first identified member in DOCK family, plays diverse roles in cellular processes, including tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the biological role of DOCK1 in the chemotherapeutic resistance in bladder cancer and its underlying mechanism. Our results showed that the bladder cancer cell lines UM-UC-3 and J82 with higher DOCK1 are more resistant to cisplatin, whereas B87 cells with the lowest expression of DOCK1 exhibited the highest sensitivity to cisplatin. Down-regulation of DOCK1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased the cisplatin sensitivity in bladder cancer cells. Moreover, treatment with cisplatin induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), while transfection with Twist siRNA restored the chemosensitivity to cisplatin. In addition, we found that downregulation of DOCK1 reversed EMT program in bladder cancer cells. However, cotransfection with DOCK1 siRNA could not further enhance the cisplatin sensitivity and cellular phenotypic changes in tumor cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that downregulation of DOCK1 could increase the chemosensitivity in bladder cancer cells via preventing cisplatin-induced EMT, suggesting that DOCK1 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in bladder cancer.

  1. Downregulation of DOCK1 sensitizes bladder cancer cells to cisplatin through preventing epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Da-jin; Chen, Wei; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Hao; Wang, Yu-cheng; Chen, Jiang-hua

    2016-01-01

    During the past several decades, resistance to single or multiple anticancer agents has posed a great challenge in cancer therapy. Dedicator of cytokinesis 1 (DOCK1), the first identified member in DOCK family, plays diverse roles in cellular processes, including tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the biological role of DOCK1 in the chemotherapeutic resistance in bladder cancer and its underlying mechanism. Our results showed that the bladder cancer cell lines UM-UC-3 and J82 with higher DOCK1 are more resistant to cisplatin, whereas B87 cells with the lowest expression of DOCK1 exhibited the highest sensitivity to cisplatin. Down-regulation of DOCK1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased the cisplatin sensitivity in bladder cancer cells. Moreover, treatment with cisplatin induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), while transfection with Twist siRNA restored the chemosensitivity to cisplatin. In addition, we found that downregulation of DOCK1 reversed EMT program in bladder cancer cells. However, cotransfection with DOCK1 siRNA could not further enhance the cisplatin sensitivity and cellular phenotypic changes in tumor cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that downregulation of DOCK1 could increase the chemosensitivity in bladder cancer cells via preventing cisplatin-induced EMT, suggesting that DOCK1 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in bladder cancer. PMID:27660415

  2. EGCG Enhances Cisplatin Sensitivity by Regulating Expression of the Copper and Cisplatin Influx Transporter CTR1 in Ovary Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemin; Jiang, Pan; Wang, Pengqi; Yang, Chung S; Wang, Xuerong; Feng, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the first-line platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents for treatment of many types of cancer, including ovary cancer. CTR1 (copper transporter 1), a transmembrane solute carrier transporter, has previously been shown to increase the cellular uptake and sensitivity of cisplatin. It is hypothesized that increased CTR1 expression would enhance the sensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin (cDDP). The present study demonstrates for the first time that (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major polyphenol from green tea, can enhance CTR1 mRNA and protein expression in ovarian cancer cells and xenograft mice. EGCG inhibits the rapid degradation of CTR1 induced by cDDP. The combination of EGCG and cDDP increases the accumulation of cDDP and DNA-Pt adducts, and subsequently enhances the sensitivity of ovarian cancer SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent. In the OVCAR3 ovarian cancer xenograft nude mice model, the combination of the lower concentration of cDDP and EGCG strongly repressed the tumor growth and exhibited protective effect on the nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin. Overall, these findings uncover a novel chemotherapy mechanism of EGCG as an adjuvant for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25927922

  3. Dasatinib enhances cisplatin sensitivity in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells via suppression of PI3K/AKT and Stat3 pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Lan, Tian; Zhang, Weimin; Dong, Lijia; Kang, Nan; Fu, Ming; Liu, Bing; Liu, Kangtai; Zhang, Cuixiang; Hou, Jincai; Zhan, Qimin

    2015-06-01

    The clinical efficacy of cisplatin in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) treatment remains undesirable. Src, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase involved in multiple fields of tumorigenesis, recently has been indicated as a promising therapeutic target in the treatment of solid tumors including ESCC. However, whether inhibition of Src activity can increase cisplatin efficacy in ESCC cells remains unknown. The present study found that inhibition of Src by its inhibitor-dasatinib sensitized ESCC cells to cisplatin in vitro. Our data also suggest a likely mechanism for this synergy that dasatinib reduces expression of critical oncogenic members of the signaling pathways, such as AKT or Stat3, and cisplatin-resistant molecules, such as ERCC1 and BRCA1, under the control of Src. Furthermore, dasatinib could sensitize ESCC cells to another platin-based agent, carboplatin. Therefore, this study provides a potential target for improving cisplatin efficacy in ESCC therapy.

  4. The synergistic effect of resveratrol in combination with cisplatin on apoptosis via modulating autophagy in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Song; Li, Xiaolin; Xu, Rongrong; Ye, Lingyun; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Hong; Xie, Weiping

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have shown that combination treatment with natural products and chemotherapy agents can improve the sensitivity and cytotoxicity of chemotherapy agents. Resveratrol, a natural product, has many biological effects including antitumor and antiviral activities, as well as vascular protective effect. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic anticancer effect of resveratrol in combination with cisplatin and the potential anticancer mechanisms involved in A549 cells. The results obtained from Cell Counting Kit-8 and isobolographic analysis demonstrated that combination of resveratrol and cisplatin resulted in synergistic cytotoxic effects in A549 cells. Results from Hoechst staining, flow cytometry and western blot analysis suggested that resveratrol enhanced cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. Meanwhile, the changes of LC3-II and P62 levels and formation of autophagosome suggested that resveratrol in combination with cisplatin triggered autophagy. More importantly, inhibiting autophagy by 3-methyladenine markedly attenuated the apoptosis caused by combination of resveratrol and cisplatin in A549 cells. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that resveratrol combined with cisplatin synergistically induce apoptosis via modulating autophagic cell death in A549 cells. These findings also help us to understand the role of natural products in combination with chemotherapy agents in lung cancer.

  5. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Albert T

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10(-21)), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  6. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Albert T. . E-mail: lebedev@org.chem.msu.ru

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10{sup -21}), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  7. Retained platinum uptake and indifference to p53 status make novel transplatinum agents active in platinum-resistant cells compared to cisplatin and oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Robert F.; Komlodi-Pasztor, Edina; Robey, Rob; Balis, Frank M.; Farrell, Nicholas P.; Fojo, Tito

    2012-01-01

    Despite the clinical success of platinum-containing drugs in the treatment of solid tumors, acquired resistance remains a major obstacle. We previously identified a group of novel transplanaramine or transplatinum compounds based on distinct activity profiles in the NCI-60 panel. In the present study, parental KB-3.1 cells with wild-type p53 and its cisplatin- and oxaliplatin-resistant sublines harboring mutant p53 proteins were used to contrast several transplatinum compounds with cisplatin and oxaliplatin. The transplatinum compounds retained cytotoxic activity in the resistant cell lines. While intracellular accumulation and DNA platination of cisplatin and oxaliplatin was decreased in the resistant cells, the transplatinum compounds both accumulated intracellularly and platinated DNA at comparable levels in all cell lines. Cytoflow analysis confirmed that cisplatin and oxaliplatin alter the cell cycle distribution and result in apoptosis; however, at comparably toxic concentrations, the transplatinum compounds did not alter the cell cycle distribution. Analysis of the cytoplasmic fraction treated with acetone showed that cisplatin and oxaliplatin readily bound to macromolecules in the pellet, whereas a larger percentage of the transplatinum compounds remained in the supernatant. We concluded that, distinct from platinum compounds currently in use, transplatinum compounds accumulate intracellularly in resistant cells at levels comparable to those in drug-sensitive cells, do not affect the cell cycle and thus retain cytotoxicity independent of p53 status and likely have cytoplasmic targets that are important in their activity. PMID:22333583

  8. Long term results of comparison of concurrent low-dose daily cisplatin versus the standard weekly cisplatin with six fractions per week radiotherapy in locally advanced head neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pramod Kumar; Lal, Punita; Bajpai, Ranjeet; Goel, Anshu; Yadav, Rajan; Verma, Mranalini; Kumar, Shaleen

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objective: Weekly administration of cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum [CDDP]) appears more feasible and substantially more popular than the 3 weekly schedules due to better compliance. Different concurrent cisplatin schedules have been attempted including a daily schedule. We did a comparison of two consecutive single arm studies, i.e., use of weekly cisplatin versus daily cisplatin when used with concurrently with a moderately accelerated radiotherapy (RT) schedule. Patients and Methods: Two prospective feasibility, safety and efficacy studies were carried out consecutively within the department. The weekly CDDP study was done from August 2003 to August 2005 and daily CDDP study was conducted from November 2005 to June 2007. Both studies included locally advanced stage III and IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region with RT dose of 70 Gy. Concurrent single-agent cisplatin was administered weekly (35 mg/m2) in the first and daily (6 mg/m2) in the second study. Results: Weekly cisplatin study had 68 and daily CDDP study had 52 patients. The median follow-up in the two studies was 93 and 63 months, respectively. Compliance in the two studies was comparable. Acute Grade III/IV mucositis and dysphagia were significantly higher in weekly cisplatin study. Late Grade II/III toxicities such as xerostomia, dysphagia, ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity were similar. The 5 years locoregional control was 18% and 25% and 5 years overall survival rate was 32% and 31% in weekly and daily cisplatin studies, respectively. Conclusions: Modest acceleration along with either weekly or daily cisplatin, whichever is possible in one's setup, is do-able, provided due attention is paid to patient selection and supportive care. PMID:27275456

  9. 5-Fluorouracil + cisplatin + mitomycin C is a relatively most effective combination against xenograft lines of human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, K; Nio, Y; Imamura, M

    1997-09-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has been an accepted effective against colorectal cancer, but combination regimens resulted in a lesser effect than 5-FU alone. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of various combination chemotherapies, including 5-FU, on human colorectal cancer xenograft lines (CC-KK and RC-TK), which had been passed by transplantation in nude mice. Eight anticancer agents [5-FU, mitomycin C (MMC), adriamycin (ADR), 4'-epirubicin (EPIR), carboquone (CQ), cisplatin, carboplatin and etoposide (VP-16)] and their combinations were evaluated at 2-4 times the clinical dose. When the agents were administered singly, 5-FU, EPIR and CQ were effective against CC-KK, and 5-FU, MMC, EPIR, ADR, CQ and carboplatin were effective against RC-TK. Of the two-agent combinations including 5-FU, cisplatin + 5-FU was the most effective against both CC-KK and RC-TK. However, of the three-agent combinations, only cisplatin + 5-FU + MMC was more effective against both lines than cisplatin + 5-FU. These results suggest that cisplatin + 5-FU + MMC may be the most useful regimen against colorectal cancers in clinical application.

  10. Melatonin prevents cisplatin-induced primordial follicle loss via suppression of PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a pathway activation in the mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hoon; Lee, Ok-Hee; Lee, Youngeun; Yoon, Hyemin; Chang, Eun Mi; Park, Miseon; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Hong, Kwonho; Kim, Jung Oh; Kim, Nam Keun; Ko, Jung Jae; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki; Lee, Woo Sik; Choi, Youngsok

    2016-04-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a major side effect of chemotherapy in young cancer patients. To develop pharmaceutical agents for preserving fertility, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced follicle loss. Here, we show that treatment with cisplatin, a widely used anticancer drug, depleted the dormant follicle pool in mouse ovaries by excessive activation of the primordial follicles, without inducing follicular apoptosis. Moreover, we show that co-treatment with the antioxidant melatonin prevented cisplatin-induced disruption of the follicle reserve. We quantified the various stages of growing follicles, including primordial, primary, secondary, and antral, to demonstrate that cisplatin treatment alone significantly decreased, whereas melatonin co-treatment preserved, the number of primordial follicles in the ovary. Importantly, analysis of the PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a pathway demonstrated that melatonin significantly decreased the cisplatin-mediated inhibitory phosphorylation of PTEN, a key negative regulator of dormant follicle activation. Moreover, melatonin prevented the cisplatin-induced activating phosphorylation of AKT, GSK3β, and FOXO3a, all of which trigger follicle activation. Additionally, we show that melatonin inhibited the cisplatin-induced inhibitory phosphorylation and nuclear export of FOXO3a, which is required in the nucleus to maintain dormancy of the primordial follicles. These findings demonstrate that melatonin attenuates cisplatin-induced follicle loss by preventing the phosphorylation of PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a pathway members; thus, melatonin is a potential therapeutic agent for ovarian protection and fertility preservation during chemotherapy in female cancer patients.

  11. A Dunnione Compound MB12662 Improves Cisplatin-Induced Tissue Injury and Emesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dongsun; Jo, In Geun; Jang, Ja Young; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Yoo, Sang Ku; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Joo, Seong Soo; Kim, Okjin; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2015-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of MB12662, a synthetic dunnione compound, on cisplatin-induced vomiting reflexes and intestinal, renal, immune system, and hematopoietic toxicities in ferrets and mice, respectively. Male ICR mice were orally administered MB12662 (5, 10, 25 or 50 mg/kg) for 10 days, during which intraperitoneally challenged with cisplatin (3.5 mg/kg) from day 4 to 7, and sacrificed on day 10 for the pathological examination. Male ferrets were orally administered MB12662 (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg) for 7 days, subcutaneously challenged with cisplatin (5 mg/kg), and monitored for vomiting reflexes and survival of the animals. Four-day injection of cisplatin (3.5 mg/kg) to mice caused body weight loss and degeneration and atrophy of intestinal villi, reducing villi/crypt ratio to a half level of control animals. Cisplatin also induced renal and hepatic toxicities, and depletion of splenocytes and bone marrow progenitor cells. The systemic toxicities including decreased villi/crypt ratio, immune system atrophy, splenocyte depletion, and decreased cellularity in bone marrow were improved by MB12662. Cisplatin (5 mg/kg) induced retching and emetic responses of ferrets, which were remarkably attenuated by MB12662 in a dose-dependent manner. All the ferrets pretreated with MB12662 survived the challenge of cisplatin, in comparison with 40% mortality in vehicle-treated animals, and blood parameters of nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity were markedly recovered. It is expected that MB12662 could be a candidate for the body protection against burden, including emesis, of chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26336585

  12. Knockdown of retinoblastoma protein may sensitize glioma cells to cisplatin through inhibition of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyu; Sun, Kangjian; Wang, Handong; Dai, Yuyuan

    2016-05-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the deadliest forms of cancer due to its limited sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Cisplatin (CCDP) is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for tumors, but the agent often results in the development of chemo-resistance. In several cancers, cisplatin resistance is associated with autophagy induction. Here, we found that in glioma cells cisplatin treatment induced autophagy. Our data indicates that the autophagy induction plays a critical role in cisplatin resistance of glioma cells, knockdown of RB inhibited autophagy induced by cisplatin, and inhibition of autophagy improved cisplatin-induced apoptosis. It suggests that a combination of autophagy inhibitors with cisplatin may improve the therapeutic efficiency of cisplatin towards GBM with acquired resistance. PMID:27048711

  13. Cisplatin-induced renal toxicity via tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, tumor suppressor P53, DNA damage, xanthine oxidase, histological changes, oxidative stress and nitric oxide in rats: protective effect of ginseng.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Mokhtar I; Hussien, Hend M

    2015-04-01

    Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent successfully used in the treatment of a wide range of solid tumors, while its usage is limited due to its nephrotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to examine the effectiveness of ginseng to ameliorate the renal nephrotoxicity, damage in kidney genomic DNA, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, tumor suppressor P53, histological changes and oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in rats. Cisplatin caused renal damage, including DNA fragmentation, upregulates gene expression of tumor suppressor protein p53 and tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6. Cisplatin increased the levels of kidney TBARS, xanthine oxidase, nitric oxide, serum urea and creatinine. Cisplatin decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes (GST, GPX, CAT and SOD), ATPase and the levels of GSH. A microscopic examination showed that cisplatin caused kidney damage including vacuolization, severe necrosis and degenerative changes. Ginseng co-treatment with cisplatin reduced its renal damage, oxidative stress, DNA fragmentation and induced DNA repair processes. Also, ginseng diminished p53 activation and improved renal cell apoptosis and nephrotoxicity. It can be concluded that, the protective effects of ginseng against cisplatin induced-renal damage was associated with the attenuation of oxidative stress and the preservation of antioxidant enzymes.

  14. Increased nephrotoxicity of combination taxol and cisplatin chemotherapy in gynecologic cancers as compared to cisplatin alone.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Davidson, S A; Schrier, R W

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the increased nephrotoxicity of taxol and cisplatin combination chemotherapy in gynecologic cancers as compared to cisplatin alone, the medical records of 25 patients with gynecological cancers were reviewed for evaluation of nephrotoxicity after chemotherapy treatment. The data included age, serum creatinine, calculated creatinine clearance, initial and cumulative dose of cisplatin and taxol, primary site of the cancer, renal ultrasound and hydration protocols. Renal function was evaluated before, during and 6 months after chemotherapy. Renal dysfunction was defined as a greater than 25% decrease in creatinine clearance. Comparing 11 patients treated with taxol and cisplatin versus 14 treated with cisplatin alone, there was a significant difference in effect on renal function. Nine of 11 patients (81%) treated with the combination chemotherapy had a greater than 25% decrease in creatinine clearance while only 4 of the 14 patients (29%) treated with cisplatin alone had such a decrease in creatinine clearance (p < 0.004). The patients treated with the combination chemotherapy, however, received a higher dose of cisplatin (80.4 vs. 66.4 mg/m2, p < 0.02) and were treated longer (6.7 vs. 4.3 months, p < 0.002). Nevertheless, when the patients were matched for age, initial dose and cumulative dose of cisplatin, a higher frequency of nephrotoxicity persisted in patients treated with taxol and cisplatin as compared to cisplatin alone (72 as compared to 20%, p < 0.02). The patients in both groups were comparably hydrated; prerenal failure and urinary tract obstruction were excluded in all patients. Six months after completion of chemotherapy, a significantly lower creatinine clearance was still observed in patients treated with taxol and cisplatin combination therapy (46 vs. 76 ml/min, p < 0.01). In summary, a retrospective analysis of renal function in patients with gynecological cancers showed an increased nephrotoxicity in patients treated with taxol and

  15. Crystal Structures of Cisplatin Bound to a Human Copper Chaperone

    SciTech Connect

    Boal, Amie K.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-08-16

    Copper trafficking proteins, including the chaperone Atox1 and the P{sub 1B}-type ATPase ATP7B, have been implicated in cellular resistance to the anticancer drug cisplatin. We have determined two crystal structures of cisplatin-Atox1 adducts that reveal platinum coordination by the conserved CXXC copper-binding motif. Direct interaction of cisplatin with this functionally relevant site has significant implications for understanding the molecular basis for resistance mediated by copper transport pathways.

  16. Genome Sequencing of Four Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, the Causative Agent of Epidemic Typhus, Including One Flying Squirrel Isolate.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Ge, Hong; Butani, Amy; Osborne, Brian; Verratti, Kathleen; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Pop, Mihai; Read, Timothy D; Richards, Allen L

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is a notable intracellular pathogen, the agent of epidemic typhus, and a potential biothreat agent. We present here whole-genome sequence data for four strains of R. prowazekii, including one from a flying squirrel. PMID:23814035

  17. Cisplatin induces stemness in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, Andrew; Saygin, Caner; Thiagarajan, Praveena S; Rao, Vinay S; Hale, James S; Gupta, Nikhil; Hitomi, Masahiro; Nagaraj, Anil Belur; DiFeo, Analisa; Lathia, Justin D; Reizes, Ofer

    2016-05-24

    The mainstay of treatment for ovarian cancer is platinum-based cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, therapeutic resistance and recurrence is a common eventuality for nearly all ovarian cancer patients, resulting in poor median survival. Recurrence is postulated to be driven by a population of self-renewing, therapeutically resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). A current limitation in CSC studies is the inability to interrogate their dynamic changes in real time. Here we utilized a GFP reporter driven by the NANOG-promoter to enrich and track ovarian CSCs. Using this approach, we identified a population of cells with CSC properties including enhanced expression of stem cell transcription factors, self-renewal, and tumor initiation. We also observed elevations in CSC properties in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells as compared to cisplatin-naïve ovarian cancer cells. CD49f, a marker for CSCs in other solid tumors, enriched CSCs in cisplatin-resistant and -naïve cells. NANOG-GFP enriched CSCs (GFP+ cells) were more resistant to cisplatin as compared to GFP-negative cells. Moreover, upon cisplatin treatment, the GFP signal intensity and NANOG expression increased in GFP-negative cells, indicating that cisplatin was able to induce the CSC state. Taken together, we describe a reporter-based strategy that allows for determination of the CSC state in real time and can be used to detect the induction of the CSC state upon cisplatin treatment. As cisplatin may provide an inductive stress for the stem cell state, future efforts should focus on combining cytotoxic chemotherapy with a CSC targeted therapy for greater clinical utility. PMID:27105520

  18. Cisplatin Induces Differentiation of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Praseetha; Hassiotou, Foteini; Blancafort, Pilar; Filgueira, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Breast tumors are heterogeneous including cells with stem cell properties and more differentiated cells. This heterogeneity is reflected into the molecular breast cancer subtypes. Breast cancer stem cells are resistant to chemotherapy, thus recent efforts are focusing on identifying treatments that shift them toward a more differentiated phenotype, making them more susceptible to chemotherapy. We examined whether the drug cisplatin induces differentiation in breast cancer cell lines that represent different breast cancer subtypes. We used three cell lines representing triple-negative breast cancers, BT-549 and MDA-MB-231 (claudin-low), and MDA-MB-468 (basal-like), along with estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells (luminal). Cisplatin was applied at 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 μM, and cell viability and proliferation were measured using MTS and BrdU assays, respectively. The effect of cisplatin on the cellular hierarchy was examined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR. Cisplatin treatment of 10 and 20 μM reduced cell viability by 36–51% and proliferation capacity by 36–67%. Treatment with cisplatin resulted in 12–67% down-regulation of stem cell markers (CD49f, SSEA4) and 10–130% up-regulation of differentiation markers (CK18, SMA, β-tubulin). At the mRNA level, CD49f was down-regulated whilst β-tubulin was up-regulated in the claudin-low cell lines. SSEA4 protein expression decreased upon cisplatin treatment, but SSEA4 mRNA expression increased indicating a differential regulation of cisplatin at the post-transcriptional level. It is concluded that cisplatin reduces breast cancer cell survival and induces differentiation of stem/progenitor cell subpopulations within breast cancer cell lines. These effects indicate the potential of this drug to target specific chemotherapy-resistant cells within a tumor. PMID:23761858

  19. Self-assembled nanoscale coordination polymers carrying siRNAs and cisplatin for effective treatment of resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Chunbai; Liu, Demin; Lin, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin is a major limitation for the successful treatment of many cancers. Development of novel strategies to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to chemotherapy is of critical importance to effective treatment of ovarian cancer and other types of cancers. We have sought to re-sensitize resistant ovarian cancer cells to chemotherapy by co-delivering chemotherapeutics and pooled siRNAs targeting multi-drug resistance (MDR) genes using self-assembled nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs). In this work, NCP-1 particles with trigger release properties were first constructed by linking cisplatin prodrug-based bisphosphonate bridging ligands with Zn(2+) metal-connecting points and then coated with a cationic lipid layer, followed by the adsorption of pooled siRNAs targeting three MDR genes including survivin, Bcl-2, and P-glycoprotein via electrostatic interactions. The resulting NCP-1/siRNA particles promoted cellular uptake of cisplatin and siRNA and enabled efficient endosomal escape in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. By down-regulating the expression of MDR genes, NCP-1/siRNAs enhanced the chemotherapeutic efficacy as indicated by cell viability assay, DNA ladder, and flow cytometry. Local administration of NCP-1/siRNAs effectively reduced tumor sizes of cisplatin-resistant SKOV-3 subcutaneous xenografts. This work shows that the NCP-1/siRNA platform holds great promise in enhancing chemotherapeutic efficacy for the effective treatment of drug-resistant cancers.

  20. Self-assembled Nanoscale Coordination Polymers Carrying siRNAs and Cisplatin for Effective Treatment of Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Chunbai; Liu, Demin; Lin, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin is a major limitation for the successful treatment of many cancers. Development of novel strategies to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to chemotherapy is of critical importance to effective treatment of ovarian cancer and other types of cancers. We have sought to re-sensitize resistant ovarian cancer cells to chemotherapy by co-delivering chemotherapeutics and pooled siRNAs targeting multi-drug resistance (MDR) genes using self-assembled nanoscale coordination polymers (NCPs). In this work, NCP-1 particles with trigger release properties were first constructed by linking cisplatin prodrug-based bisphosphonate bridging ligands with Zn2+ metal-connecting points and then coated with a cationic lipid layer, followed by the adsorption of pooled siRNAs targeting three MDR genes including survivin, Bcl-2, and P-glycoprotein via electrostatic interactions. The resulting NCP-1/siRNA particles promoted cellular uptake of cisplatin and siRNA and enabled efficient endosomal escape in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. By down-regulating the expression of MDR genes, NCP-1/siRNAs enhanced the chemotherapeutic efficacy as indicated by cell viability assay, DNA ladder, and flow cytometry. Local administration of NCP-1/siRNAs effectively reduced tumor sizes of cisplatin-resistant SKOV-3 subcutaneous xenografts. This work shows that the NCP-1/siRNA platform holds great promise in enhancing chemotherapeutic efficacy for the effective treatment of drug-resistant cancers. PMID:25315138

  1. Cisplatin Induces Overactivation of the Dormant Primordial Follicle through PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a Pathway which Leads to Loss of Ovarian Reserve in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eun Mi; Lim, Eunjin; Yoon, Sookyoung; Jeong, Kyungah; Bae, Sijeong; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki; Choi, Youngsok; Lee, Woo Sik

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a first-line chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer that acts by promoting DNA cross links and adduct. However drug resistance and considerable side effects including reproductive toxicity remain a significant challenge. PTEN is well known as a tumor suppressor function which plays a fundamental role in the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis and development of cancer. At the same time PTEN has been revealed to be critically important for the maintenance of the primordial follicle pool. In this study, we investigated the role of PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in cisplatin-induced primordial follicle depletion. Cisplatin induced ovarian failure mouse model was used to evaluate how this pathway involves. In vitro maturation was used for oocyte rescue after cisplatin damage. We found that cisplatin treatment decreased PTEN levels, leading to a subsequent increase in the phosphorylation of key molecules in the pathway. The activation of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway cascade increased cytoplasmic translocation of FOXO3a in cisplatin-treated follicles, which in turn increased the pool size of growing follicles, and rapidly depleted the number of dormant follicles. Once activated, the follicles were more prone to apoptosis, and their cumulus cells showed a loss of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor expression, which leads to failure during final maturation and ovulation. In vitro maturation to rescue oocytes in a cisplatin-treated mouse model resulted in successful maturation and fertilization. This study is the first to show the involvement of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in premature ovarian failure after cisplatin treatment and the possibility of rescue through in vitro maturation.

  2. Cisplatin Induces Overactivation of the Dormant Primordial Follicle through PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a Pathway which Leads to Loss of Ovarian Reserve in Mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eun Mi; Lim, Eunjin; Yoon, Sookyoung; Jeong, Kyungah; Bae, Sijeong; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki; Choi, Youngsok; Lee, Woo Sik

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a first-line chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer that acts by promoting DNA cross links and adduct. However drug resistance and considerable side effects including reproductive toxicity remain a significant challenge. PTEN is well known as a tumor suppressor function which plays a fundamental role in the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis and development of cancer. At the same time PTEN has been revealed to be critically important for the maintenance of the primordial follicle pool. In this study, we investigated the role of PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in cisplatin-induced primordial follicle depletion. Cisplatin induced ovarian failure mouse model was used to evaluate how this pathway involves. In vitro maturation was used for oocyte rescue after cisplatin damage. We found that cisplatin treatment decreased PTEN levels, leading to a subsequent increase in the phosphorylation of key molecules in the pathway. The activation of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway cascade increased cytoplasmic translocation of FOXO3a in cisplatin-treated follicles, which in turn increased the pool size of growing follicles, and rapidly depleted the number of dormant follicles. Once activated, the follicles were more prone to apoptosis, and their cumulus cells showed a loss of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor expression, which leads to failure during final maturation and ovulation. In vitro maturation to rescue oocytes in a cisplatin-treated mouse model resulted in successful maturation and fertilization. This study is the first to show the involvement of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in premature ovarian failure after cisplatin treatment and the possibility of rescue through in vitro maturation. PMID:26656301

  3. Cisplatin Induces Overactivation of the Dormant Primordial Follicle through PTEN/AKT/FOXO3a Pathway which Leads to Loss of Ovarian Reserve in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Eun Mi; Lim, Eunjin; Yoon, Sookyoung; Jeong, Kyungah; Bae, Sijeong; Lee, Dong Ryul; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a first-line chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer that acts by promoting DNA cross links and adduct. However drug resistance and considerable side effects including reproductive toxicity remain a significant challenge. PTEN is well known as a tumor suppressor function which plays a fundamental role in the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis and development of cancer. At the same time PTEN has been revealed to be critically important for the maintenance of the primordial follicle pool. In this study, we investigated the role of PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in cisplatin-induced primordial follicle depletion. Cisplatin induced ovarian failure mouse model was used to evaluate how this pathway involves. In vitro maturation was used for oocyte rescue after cisplatin damage. We found that cisplatin treatment decreased PTEN levels, leading to a subsequent increase in the phosphorylation of key molecules in the pathway. The activation of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway cascade increased cytoplasmic translocation of FOXO3a in cisplatin-treated follicles, which in turn increased the pool size of growing follicles, and rapidly depleted the number of dormant follicles. Once activated, the follicles were more prone to apoptosis, and their cumulus cells showed a loss of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor expression, which leads to failure during final maturation and ovulation. In vitro maturation to rescue oocytes in a cisplatin-treated mouse model resulted in successful maturation and fertilization. This study is the first to show the involvement of the PTEN/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in premature ovarian failure after cisplatin treatment and the possibility of rescue through in vitro maturation. PMID:26656301

  4. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic preparations also regarded as drugs. (a)...

  5. Squalene Selectively Protects Mouse Bone Marrow Progenitors Against Cisplatin and Carboplatin-Induced Cytotoxicity In Vivo Without Protecting Tumor Growth12

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bikul; Antoon, Roula; Tsuchida, Rika; Lotfi, Shamim; Morozova, Olena; Farhat, Walid; Malkin, David; Koren, Gideon; Yeger, Herman; Baruchel, Sylvain

    2008-01-01

    Squalene, an isoprenoid antioxidant is a potential cytoprotective agent against chemotherapy-induced toxicity. We have previously published that squalene protects light-density bone marrow cells against cis-diamminedichloroplatinum( II) (cisplatin)-induced toxicity without protecting tumor cells in vitro. Here, we developed an in vivo mouse model of cisplatin and cis-diammine (cyclobutane-1,1-dicarboxylato) platinum(II) (carboplatin)-induced toxicity to further investigate squalene-mediated LD-BM cytoprotection including the molecular mechanism behind selective cytoprotection. We found that squalene significantly reduced the body weight loss of cisplatin and carboplatin-treated mice. Light-density bone marrow cells from squalene-treated mice exhibited improved formation of hematopoietic colonies (colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage). Furthermore, squalene also protected mesenchymal stem cell colonies (colony-forming unit-fibroblast) from cisplatin and carboplatin-induced toxicity. Squalene-induced protection was associated with decreased reactive oxygen species and increased levels of glutathione and glutathione peroxidase/glutathione-S-transferase. Importantly, squalene did not protect neuroblastoma, small cell carcinoma, or medulloblastoma xenografts against cisplatin-induced toxicity. These results suggest that squalene is a potential candidate for future development as a cytoprotective agent against chemotherapeutic toxicity. PMID:18813359

  6. New Therapeutic Concept of NAD Redox Balance for Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Shim, Hyeok; Cho, Eun-Young; Kwon, Kang-Beom; Kwak, Tae Hwan; So, Hong-Seob

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various tumors. In addition to its antitumor activity, cisplatin affects normal cells and may induce adverse effects such as ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and peripheral neuropathy. Various mechanisms such as DNA adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses are closely associated with cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity; however, the precise mechanism remains unclear. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) has emerged as a key regulator of cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis. Recent studies have demonstrated associations between disturbance in intracellular NAD+ levels and clinical progression of various diseases through the production of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that reduction of the intracellular NAD+/NADH ratio is critically involved in cisplatin-induced kidney damage through inflammation and oxidative stress and that increase of the cellular NAD+/NADH ratio suppresses cisplatin-induced kidney damage by modulation of potential damage mediators such as oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. In this review, we describe the role of NAD+ metabolism in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and discuss a potential strategy for the prevention or treatment of cisplatin-induced adverse effects with a particular focus on NAD+-dependent cellular pathways. PMID:26881219

  7. Cetuximab intensifies cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Levi, Mattan; Popovtzer, Aron; Tzabari, Moran; Mizrachi, Aviram; Savion, Naphtali; Stemmer, Salomon M; Shalgi, Ruth; Ben-Aharon, Irit

    2016-07-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has proliferative properties in the testis. Cetuximab, an anti-EGFR, is administered together with chemotherapy to patients with various types of cancer. This studies aim was to investigate the effect of cetuximab on testicular function. Adult male mice were injected with cetuximab (10 mg/kg), cisplatin (8 mg/kg) or a combination of both, and killed one week or one month later. The doses were chosen by human equivalent dose calculation. Testicular function was evaluated by epididymal-spermatozoa total motile count and sperm motility, weights of testes and epididymides, and the level of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in the serum. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine germ cell proliferation (Ki-67), apoptosis (Terminal transferase-mediated deoxyuridine 5-triphosphate nick-end labelling), reserve (DAZL-Deleted in azoospermia-like, Promyelocytic leukaemia zinc-finger), blood vessels (CD34) and Sertoli cells (GATA-4). Administration of cetuximab alone increased testicular apoptosis and decreased epididymal-spermatozoa total motile count over time. When added to cisplatin, cetuximab exacerbated most of the recorded testicular parameters, compared with the effect of cisplatin alone, including testis and epididymis weights, epididymal-spermatozoa total motile count, AMH concentration, meiosis and apoptosis. In conclusion, cetuximab has only a mild effect on testicular reserve, but when added to cisplatin, it exacerbates cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity. PMID:27184186

  8. 4-Aminoantipyrine reduces toxic and genotoxic effects of doxorubicin, cisplatin, and cyclophosphamide in male mice.

    PubMed

    Berno, Claudia Rodrigues; Rós, Barbara de Toledo; da Silveira, Ingridhy Ostaciana Maia Freitas; Coelho, Henrique Rodrigues; Antoniolli, Andréia Conceição Milan Brochado; Beatriz, Adilson; de Lima, Dênis Pires; Monreal, Antônio Carlos Duenhas; Sousa, Fabricio Garmus; da Silva Gomes, Roberto; Oliveira, Rodrigo Juliano

    2016-07-01

    The analgesic drug dipyrone is used to treat side effects (including pain and fever) of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Dipyrone is metabolized to 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA), a PGE2-dependent blocker and inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX). We evaluated the genotoxic, mutagenic, apoptotic, and immunomodulatory activities of 4-AA in vivo and the effects of its combination with the antineoplastic drugs doxorubicin, cisplatin, and cyclophosphamide. 4-AA did not cause genotoxic/mutagenic damage, splenic phagocytosis, or leukocyte alterations. However, when combined with the antineoplastic agents, 4-AA decreased their genotoxic, mutagenic, apoptotic, and phagocytic effects. These results suggest that 4-AA might interfere with DNA damage-mediated chemotherapy. PMID:27402479

  9. In-depth identification of pathways related to cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity through an integrative method based on an informatics-assisted label-free protein quantitation and microarray gene expression approach.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Eun; Singh, Thoudam S K; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Moon, Pyong-Gon; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Myung-Hoon; Choi, Eung-Chil; Chen, Yu-Ju; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is used widely for treatment of a variety of cancer diseases. Recently, however, the use of cisplatin is restricted because of its adverse effects such as hepatotoxicity. There is no study with current proteomics technology to evaluate cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity, even if some studies have reported on the hepatotoxicity. In this study, proteomic as well as genomic analyses have been used for identification of proteins and genes that respond to cisplatin treatment in rat primary hepatocytes. To investigate the hepatotoxic effects of cisplatin, rat primary hepatocytes were treated with an IC(20) concentration for 24 h. From proteomic analysis based on label-free quantitation strategy, cisplatin induced 76 up-regulated and 19 down-regulated proteins among 325 distinct proteins. In the mRNA level, genomic analysis revealed 72 up-regulated and 385 down-regulated genes in the cisplatin-treated group. Based on these two analyses, 19 pathways were commonly altered, whereas seven pathways were identified only by proteomic analysis, and 19 pathways were identified only by genomic analysis. Overall, this study explained the mechanism of cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity with two points of view: well known pathways including drug metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and glycolysis/TCA cycle and little known pathways including urea cycle and inflammation metabolism, for hepatotoxicity of other toxic agents. Up-regulated proteins detected by proteomic analysis in the cisplatin-treated group: FBP1 (fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase 1), FASN (fatty acid synthase), CAT (catalase), PRDX1 (peroxiredoxin-1), HSPD1 (60-kDa heat shock protein), MDH2 (malate dehydrogenase 2), and ARG1 (arginase 1), and also down-regulated proteins in the cisplatin-treated group: TPM1 (tropomyosin 1), TPM3 (tropomyosin 3), and CTSB (cathepsin B), were confirmed by Western blot analysis. In addition, up-regulated mRNAs detected by microarray analysis in the cisplatin-treated group: GSTA2, GSTT2, YC2

  10. Enhancement of Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity by Morphine and Its Attenuation by the Opioid Antagonist Naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Aminian, Atefeh; Javadi, Shiva; Rahimian, Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Asadi Amoli, Fahimeh; Moghaddas, Payman; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram

    2016-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Morphine and other opioids are also used extensively in different types of cancer for the clinical management of pain associated with local or metastatic neoplastic lesions. In addition to its analgesic effects, morphine has also been reported to possess potential immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. Herein, we investigated the effects of morphine in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Following administration of a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg), animals received intraperitoneal injections of morphine (5 mg/kg/day) and/or naltrexone (20 mg/kg/day), an opioid antagonist, for 5 days. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was detected by a significant increase in plasma urea and creatinine levels in addition to alterations in kidney tissue morphology. Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased in the renal tissue in cisplatin group. Moreover, glutathione (GSH) concentration and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly reduced in renal tissue in cisplatin group compared with control animals. Treatment with morphine aggravated the deleterious effects of cisplatin at clinical, biochemical and histopathological levels; whereas naltrexone diminished the detrimental effects of morphine in animals receiving morphine and cisplatin. Morphine or naltrexone alone had no effect on the mentioned parameters. Our findings indicate that concomitant treatment with morphine might intensify cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats. These findings suggest that morphine and other opioids should be administered cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy. PMID:27424012

  11. Novel synthetic protective compound, KR-22335, against cisplatin-induced auditory cell death.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yoo Seob; Song, Suk Jin; Kang, Sungun; Hwang, Hye Sook; Jung, Young-Sik; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Cisplatin [cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum (II)] is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, and one of its most severe side effects is ototoxicity. In the course of developing a new protective agent against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity, we have been interested in a novel synthetic compound, 3-Amino-3-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-1H-quinoline-2,4-dione (KR-22335). We evaluated the effectiveness of KR-22335 as an otoprotective agent against cisplatin-induced toxicity. The otoprotective effect of KR-22335 against cisplatin was tested in vitro in cochlear organs of Corti-derived cell lines, HEI-OC1, and in vivo in a zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were demonstrated in HEI-OC1 cells. KR-22335 inhibited cisplatin-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial injury in HEI-OC1 cells. KR-22335 inhibited cisplatin-induced activation of JNK, p-38, caspase-3 and PARP in HEI-OC1 cells. Scanning and transmission electron micrographs showed that KR-22335 prevented cisplatin-induced destruction of kinocilium and stereocilia in zebrafish neuromasts. Tissue TUNEL of neuromasts in zebrafish demonstrated that KR-22335 blocked cisplatin-induced TUNEL positive hair cells in neuromasts. The results of this study suggest that KR-22335 may prevent ototoxicity caused by the administration of cisplatin through the inhibition of mitochondrial dysfunction and suppression of ROS generation. KR-22335 may be considered as a potential candidate for protective agents against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  12. Hydration of Two Cisplatin Aqua-Derivatives Studied by Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Andrea; Tolazzi, Marilena; Martínez, José Manuel; Pappalardo, Rafael R; Sánchez Marcos, Enrique

    2015-04-14

    The hydration of the cisplatin aqua-derivatives, cis-[PtCl(H2O)(NH3)2](+) (w-cisplatin) and cis-[Pt(H2O)2(NH3)2](2+) (w2-cisplatin), has been studied by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations. The new platinum complex-water interaction potential, w-cisplatin-W, has been built on the basis of the already obtained cisplatin-water interaction potential (cisplatin-W) [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2013 9, 4562]. That potential has been then transferred to the w2-cisplatin-W potential. The w-cisplatin and w2-cisplatin atomic charges were specifically derived from their solute's wave functions. Bulk solvent effects on the complex-water interactions have been included by means of a continuum model. Classical MD simulations with 1 platinum complex and 1000 SPC/E water molecules have been carried out. Angle-solved radial distribution functions and spatial distribution functions have been used to provide detailed pictures of the local hydration structure around the ligands (water, chloride, and ammine) and the axial region. A novel definition of a multisite cavity has been employed to compute the hydration number of complexes in order to provide a consistent definition of their first-hydration shell. Interestingly, the hydration number decreases with the increase of the complex net charge from 27 for cisplatin to 23 and 18 for w-cisplatin and w2-cisplatin, respectively. In parallel to this hydration number behavior, the compactness of the hydration shell increases when going from the neutral complex, i.e. cisplatin, to the doubly charged complex, w2-cisplatin. Quantum mechanics estimation of the hydration energies for the platinum complexes allows the computation of the reaction energy for the first- and second-hydrolysis of cisplatin in water. The agreement with experimental data is satisfactory.

  13. Hydration of Two Cisplatin Aqua-Derivatives Studied by Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Melchior, Andrea; Tolazzi, Marilena; Martínez, José Manuel; Pappalardo, Rafael R; Sánchez Marcos, Enrique

    2015-04-14

    The hydration of the cisplatin aqua-derivatives, cis-[PtCl(H2O)(NH3)2](+) (w-cisplatin) and cis-[Pt(H2O)2(NH3)2](2+) (w2-cisplatin), has been studied by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations. The new platinum complex-water interaction potential, w-cisplatin-W, has been built on the basis of the already obtained cisplatin-water interaction potential (cisplatin-W) [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2013 9, 4562]. That potential has been then transferred to the w2-cisplatin-W potential. The w-cisplatin and w2-cisplatin atomic charges were specifically derived from their solute's wave functions. Bulk solvent effects on the complex-water interactions have been included by means of a continuum model. Classical MD simulations with 1 platinum complex and 1000 SPC/E water molecules have been carried out. Angle-solved radial distribution functions and spatial distribution functions have been used to provide detailed pictures of the local hydration structure around the ligands (water, chloride, and ammine) and the axial region. A novel definition of a multisite cavity has been employed to compute the hydration number of complexes in order to provide a consistent definition of their first-hydration shell. Interestingly, the hydration number decreases with the increase of the complex net charge from 27 for cisplatin to 23 and 18 for w-cisplatin and w2-cisplatin, respectively. In parallel to this hydration number behavior, the compactness of the hydration shell increases when going from the neutral complex, i.e. cisplatin, to the doubly charged complex, w2-cisplatin. Quantum mechanics estimation of the hydration energies for the platinum complexes allows the computation of the reaction energy for the first- and second-hydrolysis of cisplatin in water. The agreement with experimental data is satisfactory. PMID:26574384

  14. Preventive Effect of Dihydromyricetin against Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a frequent severe side effect of cisplatin chemotherapy, limiting its clinical use despite being one of the most potent chemotherapy drugs. Dihydromyricetin is a highly abundant compound purified from the leaves of Ampelopsis grossedentata. Previous studies have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of Dihydromyricetin both in vitro and in vivo, but little is known about the effects of Dihydromyricetin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and its underlying mechanisms. In the present study, we investigated its potential renoprotective effect and found that Dihydromyricetin ameliorated the renal functional impairment and structural damage caused by cisplatin. Moreover, Dihydromyricetin markedly attenuated cisplatin-induced oxidative stress, as well as protecting against cisplatin-induced inflammation and apoptotic cell death in mouse kidney tissues. These results collectively highlight the potential of DMY as a rational renoprotective agent against cisplatin.

  15. Neuropeptide Y protects kidney against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by regulating p53-dependent apoptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namoh; Min, Woo-Kie; Park, Min Hee; Lee, Jong Kil; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-sung

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug for treating various types of cancers. However, the use of cisplatin is limited by its negative effect on normal tissues, particularly nephrotoxicity. Various mechanisms such as DNA adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis are involved in the adverse effect induced by cisplatin treatment. Several studies have suggested that neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in neuroprotection as well as restoration of bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy induced nerve injury. However, the role of NPY in chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity has not been studied. Here, we show that NPY rescues renal dysfunction by reducing the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins in cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity through Y1 receptor, suggesting that NPY can protect kidney against cisplatin nephrotoxicity as a possible useful agent to prevent and treat cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 288-292] PMID:26728272

  16. Preventive Effect of Dihydromyricetin against Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Li, Yi; Song, Haibo; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Yuzhu; Jiang, Miao; Wang, Fang; Mu, Qian; Zhang, Wen; Li, Liang; Tang, Dongqi

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a frequent severe side effect of cisplatin chemotherapy, limiting its clinical use despite being one of the most potent chemotherapy drugs. Dihydromyricetin is a highly abundant compound purified from the leaves of Ampelopsis grossedentata. Previous studies have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of Dihydromyricetin both in vitro and in vivo, but little is known about the effects of Dihydromyricetin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and its underlying mechanisms. In the present study, we investigated its potential renoprotective effect and found that Dihydromyricetin ameliorated the renal functional impairment and structural damage caused by cisplatin. Moreover, Dihydromyricetin markedly attenuated cisplatin-induced oxidative stress, as well as protecting against cisplatin-induced inflammation and apoptotic cell death in mouse kidney tissues. These results collectively highlight the potential of DMY as a rational renoprotective agent against cisplatin. PMID:27642358

  17. Preventive Effect of Dihydromyricetin against Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a frequent severe side effect of cisplatin chemotherapy, limiting its clinical use despite being one of the most potent chemotherapy drugs. Dihydromyricetin is a highly abundant compound purified from the leaves of Ampelopsis grossedentata. Previous studies have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of Dihydromyricetin both in vitro and in vivo, but little is known about the effects of Dihydromyricetin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and its underlying mechanisms. In the present study, we investigated its potential renoprotective effect and found that Dihydromyricetin ameliorated the renal functional impairment and structural damage caused by cisplatin. Moreover, Dihydromyricetin markedly attenuated cisplatin-induced oxidative stress, as well as protecting against cisplatin-induced inflammation and apoptotic cell death in mouse kidney tissues. These results collectively highlight the potential of DMY as a rational renoprotective agent against cisplatin. PMID:27642358

  18. The effect of resveratrol on the prevention of cisplatin ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Erdem, T; Bayindir, Tuba; Filiz, A; Iraz, M; Selimoglu, E

    2012-10-01

    One of the most important adverse effects of cisplatin, a chemotherapeutic agent which is widely used in the treatment of cancer patients, is hearing loss. This has primarily been associated with the loss of inner ear hairy and spiral ganglion cells due to oxidative stress. Resveratrol is known to be an antioxidant agent, which has the theoretical potential of preventing cisplatin-related ototoxicity. This experimental study was approved by Animal Ethics Committee of Inonu University (2008-20) and supported by Inonu University Scientific Research Projects Support Fund (2009-17). Thirty-four 3-month-old Wistar albino female rats weighing 210-270 g were used in the study. The animals were allocated into four groups: in cisplatin group (Group A), a single dose of 12 mg/kg cisplatin was administered intraperitoneally to 10 rats; in cisplatin + resveratrol group (Group B), a single dose of 12 mg/kg cisplatin and 10 mg/kg resveratrol were administered intraperitoneally for 5 days to 10 rats; in resveratrol group (Group C), 10 mg/kg resveratrol was administered intraperitoneally for 5 days to seven rats and in control group (Group D), resveratrol solvent (5% alcohol-95% physiological saline) was administered intraperitoneally for 5 days to seven rats. Resveratrol administration has begun 1 day before cisplatin administration in the group treated with cisplatin and resveratrol combination. Distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) (Grason Stadler, Madison, USA) measurements were performed in the same ear of all rats (right ear) under general anesthesia at baseline, 1st and 5th days after drug administration. Statistically significant distortion product amplitude reductions were found in the cisplatin group at 1,418, 2,003, 3,363, 5,660, 8,003 and 9,515 Hz frequencies. Whereas in the cisplatin + resveratrol group, statistically significant difference was found between 1st and 5th day measurements only at 3,996 Hz frequency. No significant differences were noted

  19. Cisplatin-induced Kidney Dysfunction and Perspectives on Improving Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gi-Su; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Pandit, Arpana

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used and highly effective drug for the treatment of various solid tumors; however, it has dose-dependent side effects on the kidney, cochlear, and nerves. Nephrotoxicity is the most well-known and clinically important toxicity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that several mechanisms, including oxidative stress, DNA damage, and inflammatory responses, are closely associated with cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Even though the establishment of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity can be alleviated by diuretics and pre-hydration of patients, the prevalence of cisplatin nephrotoxicity is still high, occurring in approximately one-third of patients who have undergone cisplatin therapy. Therefore it is imperative to develop treatments that will ameliorate cisplatin-nephrotoxicity. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms of cisplatin-induced renal toxicity and the new strategies for protecting the kidneys from the toxic effects without lowering the tumoricidal activity. PMID:25606044

  20. Enhanced antitumor efficacy of cisplatin in combination with HemoHIM in tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Although cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin alone does not achieve a satisfactory therapeutic outcome. Also cisplatin accumulation shows toxicity to normal tissues. In this study, we examined the possibility of HemoHIM both to enhance anticancer effect with cisplatin and to reduce the side effects of cisplatin in melanoma-bearing mice. Methods HemoHIM was prepared by adding the ethanol-insoluble fraction to the total water extract of a mixture of 3 edible herbs, Angelica Radix, Cnidium Rhizoma and Paeonia Radix. Anticancer effects of HemoHIM with cisplatin were evaluated in melanoma-bearing mice. We used a Cr51-release assay to measure the activity of NK/Tc cell and ELISA to evaluate the production of cytokines. Results In melanoma-bearing mice, cisplatin (4 mg/kg B.W.) reduced the size and weight of the solid tumors, and HemoHIM supplementation with cisplatin enhanced the decrease of both the tumor size (p < 0.1) and weight (p < 0.1). HemoHIM itself did not inhibit melanoma cell growth in vitro, and did not disturb the effects of cisplatin in vitro. However HemoHIM administration enhanced both NK cell and Tc cell activity in mice. Interestingly, HemoHIM increased the proportion of NK cells in the spleen. In melanoma-bearing mice treated with cisplatin, HemoHIM administration also increased the activity of NK cells and Tc cells and the IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion from splenocytes, which seemed to contribute to the enhanced efficacy of cisplatin by HemoHIM. Also, HemoHIM reduced nephrotoxicity as seen by tubular cell of kidney destruction. Conclusion HemoHIM may be a beneficial supplement during cisplatin chemotherapy for enhancing the anti-tumor efficacy and reducing the toxicity of cisplatin. PMID:19292900

  1. Probenecid Sensitizes Neuroblastoma Cancer Stem Cells to Cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Campos-Arroyo, Denise; Maldonado, Vilma; Bahena, Ivan; Quintanar, Valeria; Patiño, Nelly; Carlos Martinez-Lazcano, Juan; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    We used both in vitro cultures of neuroblastoma cell lines and nude-mice xenotransplants to explore the effects of co-administration of cisplatin and probenecid. Probenecid sensitized neuroblastoma cells, including tumor cells with stem features, to the effects of cisplatin, both in vitro and in vivo. This effect was mediated by an increase in the apoptotic cell death and a concomitant decrease in cell proliferation. This effect is accompanied by modulation of the mRNA and protein of the drug efflux transporters MDR1, MRP2, and BCRP. The co-administration of probenecid with cisplatin should be explored as a possible therapeutic strategy. PMID:26963048

  2. Cisplatin induced paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Raja, Waseem; Mir, M Hussain; Dar, Imtiyaz; Banday, Muzamil Ahmad; Ahmad, Irfan

    2013-10-01

    Cisplatin or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP) is the first member of a class of platinum-containing anti-cancer drugs that act by binding to and causing cross-linking of deoxyribonucleic acid, which ultimately triggers apoptosis. Cisplatin has a broad-spectrum antineoplastic activity against various types of human tumors. Unfortunately, the optimal usefulness of Cisplatin is limited secondary to its dose related toxicity especially nephrotoxicity. Cisplatin chemotherapy is also associated with cardiotoxic effects that may range from silent arrhythmias to heart failure and even sudden cardiac death. These effects are more pronounced when cisplatin is combined with other cardiotoxic drugs. Here, we report a case of patient of cancer lung who developed paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia following administration of Cisplatin. A brief review of the literature follows.

  3. Role of ellagic acid against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ateşşahín, Ahmet; Ceríbaşi, Ali Osman; Yuce, Abdurrauf; Bulmus, Ozgür; Cikim, Gürkan

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective role of antioxidant treatment with ellagic acid on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity using biochemical and histopatological approaches. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. The control group received 0.9% saline; animals in the ellagic acid group received only ellagic acid (10 mg/kg); animals in the cisplatin group received only cisplatin (7 mg/kg); animals in the cisplatin + ellagic acid group received ellagic acid for 10 days after cisplatin. The effects of ellagic acid on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity were evaluated by plasma creatinine, urea, sodium and calcium concentrations; kidney tissue malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH peroxidase) and catalase activities and histopatological examinations. Administration of cisplatin to rats induced a marked renal failure, characterized by significant increases in plasma creatinine, urea and calcium concentrations. Cisplatin also induced oxidative stress, as indicated by increased kidney tissue concentrations of malondialdehyde, and reduced activities of GSH peroxidase and catalase. Furthermore, treatment with cisplatin caused a marked tubular necrosis, degeneration and desquamation, luminal cast formation, karyomegaly, tubular dilatation, interstitial mononuclear cell infiltration and inter-tubular haemorrhagia. Ellagic acid markedly reduced elevated plasma creatinine, urea and calcium levels and counteracted the deleterious effects of cisplatin on oxidative stress markers. In the same way, ellagic acid ameliorated cisplatin-induced pathological changes including tubular necrosis, degeneration, karyomegaly, tubular dilatation when compared to the cisplatin alone group. These results indicate that the antioxidant ellagic acid might have a protective effect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rat, but not enough to inhibit cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction.

  4. Nephroprotective effect of bee honey and royal jelly against subchronic cisplatin toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Abdelazim; Eldaim, Mabrouk A Abd; Abdel-Daim, Mohamed M

    2016-08-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent and effective chemotherapeutic agents. However, its antineoplastic use is limited due to its cumulative nephrotoxic side effects. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine the nephroprotective potential of dietary bee honey and royal jelly against subchronic cisplatin toxicity in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into controls, cisplatin-treated, bee honey-pretreated cisplatin-treated and royal jelly-pretreated cisplatin-treated groups. Bee honey and royal jelly were given orally at doses of 20 and 100 mg/kg, respectively. Subchronic toxicity was induced by cisplatin (1 mg/kg bw, ip), twice weekly for 10 weeks. Cisplatin treated animals revealed a significant increase in serum level of renal injury products (urea, creatinine and uric acid). Histopathologically, cisplatin produced pronounced tubulointerstitial injuries, upregulated the fibrogenic factors, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and transforming growth factor β1(TGF-β1), and downregulated the cell proliferation marker, bromodeoxyuridine (Brdu). Dietary bee honey and royal jelly normalized the elevated serum renal injury product biomarkers, improved the histopathologic changes, reduced the expression of α-SMA and TGF-β1 and increased the expression of Brdu. Therefore, it could be concluded that bee honey, and royal jelly could be used as dietary preventive natural products against subchronic cisplatin-induced renal injury.

  5. Targeting Apoptosis to Overcome Cisplatin Resistance: A Translational Study in Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Joshua A.; Kumar, Bhavna; Cordell, Kitrina G.; Prince, Mark E.; Tran, Huong H.; Wolf, Gregory T.; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Wang, Steven; Eisbruch, Avraham; Tsien, Christina I.; Urba, Susan G.; Worden, Francis P.; Lee, Julia M.S.; Griffith, Kent A.; Taylor, Jeremy; D'Silva, Nisha; Wang, Shaomeng J.; Wolter, Keith G.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Cisplatin resistance remains a barrier to organ-sparing and survival of patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Targeted therapies to overcome cisplatin-resistant HNSCC are being developed. Methods and Materials: Cisplatin-sensitive parental HNSCC cell lines and cisplatin-resistant progeny were studied. Pretreatment HNSCC biopsies were used to construct tissue microarrays which were stained for p53 and Bcl-xL. Results: HNSCC cell lines selected for cisplatin resistance had wild-type p53 and high levels of Bcl-xL. Expression of wild-type p53 in cell lines with low Bcl-xL enhanced cisplatin sensitivity. Expression of both Bcl-xL and wild-type p53 caused tumor cells to become cisplatin resistant. Patients whose tumors expressed low levels of p53 and Bcl-xL enjoyed the best organ preservation and disease-free survival whereas patients whose tumors expressed low levels of p53 and high levels of Bcl-xL had the worst outcome. Novel agents that inhibit Bcl-xL or activate p53 function may target cisplatin-resistant HNSCC. Conclusion: Cisplatin resistance in HNSCC is mediated, at least in part, by high Bcl-xL and functional p53.

  6. Hydrogen sulfide: A novel nephroprotectant against cisplatin-induced renal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dugbartey, George J; Bouma, Hjalmar R; Lobb, Ian; Sener, Alp

    2016-07-01

    Cisplatin is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various solid-organ cancers. However, a plethora of evidence indicates that nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin therapy. While the antineoplastic action of cisplatin is due to formation of cisplatin-DNA cross-links, which damage rapidly dividing cancer cells upon binding to DNA, its nephrotoxic effect results from metabolic conversion of cisplatin into a nephrotoxin and production of reactive oxygen species, causing oxidative stress leading to renal tissue injury and potentially, kidney failure. Despite therapeutic targets in several pre-clinical and clinical studies, there is still incomplete protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third discovered gasotransmitter next to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, has recently been identified in several in vitro and in vivo studies to possess specific antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties that modulate several pathogenic pathways involved in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The current article reviews the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and displays recent findings in the H2S field that could disrupt such mechanisms to ameliorate cisplatin-induced renal injury.

  7. Peripheral neuropathy induced by combination chemotherapy of docetaxel and cisplatin.

    PubMed Central

    Hilkens, P. H.; Pronk, L. C.; Verweij, J.; Vecht, C. J.; van Putten, W. L.; van den Bent, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Docetaxel, a new semisynthetic taxoid that has demonstrated promising activity as an antineoplastic agent, was administered in combination with cisplatin to 63 patients in a dose-escalating study. As both drugs were known to be potentially neurotoxic, peripheral neurotoxicity was prospectively assessed in detail. Neuropathy was evaluated by clinical sum-score for signs and symptoms and by measurement of the vibration perception threshold (VPT). The severity of neuropathy was graded according to the National Cancer Institute's 'Common Toxicity Criteria'. The docetaxel-cisplatin combination chemotherapy induced a predominantly sensory neuropathy in 29 (53%) out of 55 evaluable patients. At cumulative doses of both cisplatin and docetaxel above 200 mg m(-2), 26 (74%) out of 35 patients developed a neuropathy which was mild in 15, moderate in ten and severe in one patient. Significant correlations were present between both the cumulative dose of docetaxel and cisplatin and the post-treatment sum-score of neuropathy (P < 0.01) as well as the post-treatment VPT (P < 0.01). The neurotoxic effects of this combination were more severe than either cisplatin or docetaxel as single agent at similar doses. PMID:9020489

  8. Thalidomide ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by inhibiting renal inflammation in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Khalili, Ali-Reza

    2015-04-01

    Cisplatin is a platinum-based chemotherapy drug. However, its chemotherapeutic use is restricted by serious side effects, especially nephrotoxicity. Inflammatory mechanisms have a significant role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Thalidomide is an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory agent and is used for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential nephroprotective effect of thalidomide in a mouse model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Nephrotoxicity was induced in mice by a single injection of cisplatin (15 mg/kg, i.p.) and treated with thalidomide (50 and 100 mg/kg/day, orally) for 4 days, beginning 24 h prior to the cisplatin injection. Renal toxicity induced by cisplatin was demonstrated by increasing plasma levels of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Cisplatin increased the renal production of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. In addition, kidney levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and nitric oxide (NO) were increased by cisplatin. Biochemical results showed that thalidomide reduced cisplatin-induced increase in plasma creatinine and BUN. Thalidomide treatment also significantly reduced tissue levels of the proinflammatory cytokines, MDA, MPO, and NO and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Furthermore, histological examination indicated that thalidomide ameliorated renal damage caused by cisplatin. These data suggest that thalidomide attenuates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity possibly by inhibition of inflammatory reactions. Taken together, our findings indicate that thalidomide might be a valuable candidate for the prevention of nephrotoxicity in patients receiving cisplatin.

  9. Efficacy of concurrent single-agent chemotherapy using radiotherapy in patients with cervical cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Yang, Zhicheng; Zhou, Yijin; Pan, Jingjing; Liu, Yongyuan

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy has proven to be more effective on patients with advanced cervical cancer than radiotherapy alone. Although cisplatin has been recommended to be the standard agent in chemotherapy, it has some limitations in clinical use because of its strong side effects. Moreover, the optimal chemotherapy regimen remains unclear. A comprehensive electronic search was conducted via the Internet retrieval system to identify eligible trials. The ending points included response, overall survival (OS), local recurrent, and distant metastasis rates. Odds ratios and 95% confidence interval were calculated to compare the effects. Fifteen trials with 1142 patients were eligible. With regard to the response rate, only nedaplatin showed a significant improvement compared with cisplatin. Docetaxel, pacitaxel, fluoropyrimidine, paclitaxel liposome, and irinotecan did not show any advantages. When targeted on OS or local recurrent rate, no significant advantage was found when these single-drug regimens were compared with cisplatin. However, when aimed at distant metastasis rate, fluoropyrimidine showed a disadvantage to cisplatin, whereas others showed equal efficacy. Nedaplatin, docetaxel, pacitaxel, and fluoropyrimidine showed a better effect on reducing chemotherapy toxicity than cisplatin. Single-drug chemotherapy concurrent with radiotherapy, except for nedaplatin, may have no advantage on clinical outcomes when compared with cisplatin but showed a better effect on reducing chemotherapy toxicity, which could be used as an alternative to patients who can not tolerate the side effects of cisplatin. Nedaplatin is also effective and safe, and may be highly valuable in clinical applications. PMID:26309518

  10. Hypoxia-induced autophagy mediates cisplatin resistance in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Mei; Jiang, Zi-Feng; Ding, Pei-Shan; Shao, Li-Jie; Liu, Rong-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia which commonly exists in solid tumors, leads to cancer cells chemoresistance via provoking adaptive responses including autophagy. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the role of autophagy and hypoxia as well as the underlying mechanism in the cisplatin resistance of lung cancer cells. Our study demonstrated that hypoxia significantly protected A549 and SPC-A1 cells from cisplatin-induced cell death in a Hif-1α- and Hif-2α- dependent manner. Moreover, compared with normoxia, cisplatin-induced apoptosis under hypoxia was markedly reduced. However, when autophagy was inhibited by 3-MA or siRNA targeted ATG5, this reduction was effectively attenuated, which means autophagy mediates cisplatin resisitance under hypoxia. In parallel, we showed that hypoxia robustly augmented cisplatin-induced autophagy activation, accompanying by suppressing cisplatin-induced BNIP3 death pathways, which was due to the more efficient autophagic process under hypoxia. Consequently, we proposed that autophagy was a protective mechanism after cisplatin incubation under both normoxia and hypoxia. However, under normoxia, autophagy activation ‘was unable to counteract the stress induced by cisplatin, therefore resulting in cell death, whereas under hypoxia, autophagy induction was augmented that solved the cisplatin-induced stress, allowing the cells to survival. In conclusion, augmented induction of autophagy by hypoxia decreased lung cancer cells susceptibility to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. PMID:26201611

  11. Can pharmacogenetics explain efficacy and safety of cisplatin pharmacotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Roco, Ángela; Cayún, Juan; Contreras, Stephania; Stojanova, Jana; Quiñones, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Several recent pharmacogenetic studies have investigated the variability in both outcome and toxicity in cisplatin-based therapies. These studies have focused on the genetic variability of therapeutic targets that could affect cisplatin response and toxicity in diverse type of cancer including lung, gastric, ovarian, testicular, and esophageal cancer. In this review, we seek to update the reader in this area of investigation, focusing primarily on DNA reparation enzymes and cisplatin metabolism through Glutathione S-Transferases (GSTs). Current evidence indicates a potential application of pharmacogenetics in therapeutic schemes in which cisplatin is the cornerstone of these treatments. Therefore, a collaborative effort is required to study these molecular characteristics in order to generate a genetic panel with clinical utility. PMID:25452763

  12. Cell fate determination in cisplatin resistance and chemosensitization.

    PubMed

    Luong, Khanh V; Wang, Ling; Roberts, Brett J; Wahl, James K; Peng, Aimin

    2016-04-26

    Understanding the determination of cell fate choices after cancer treatment will shed new light on cancer resistance. In this study, we quantitatively analyzed the individual cell fate choice in resistant UM-SCC-38 head and neck cancer cells exposed to cisplatin. Our study revealed a highly heterogeneous pattern of cell fate choices in UM-SCC-38 cells, in comparison to that of the control, non-tumorigenic keratinocyte HaCaT cells. In both UM-SCC-38 and HaCaT cell lines, the majority of cell death occurred during the immediate interphase without mitotic entry, whereas significant portions of UM-SCC-38 cells survived the treatment via either checkpoint arrest or checkpoint slippage. Interestingly, checkpoint slippage occurred predominantly in cells treated in late S and G2 phases, and cells in M-phase were hypersensitive to cisplatin. Moreover, although the cisplatin-resistant progression of mitosis exhibited no delay in general, prolonged mitosis was correlated with the induction of cell death in mitosis. The finding thus suggested a combinatorial treatment using cisplatin and an agent that blocks mitotic exit. Consistently, we showed a strong synergy between cisplatin and the proteasome inhibitor Mg132. Finally, targeting the DNA damage checkpoint using inhibitors of ATR, but not ATM, effectively sensitized UM-SCC-38 to cisplatin treatment. Surprisingly, checkpoint targeting eliminated both checkpoint arrest and checkpoint slippage, and augmented the induction of cell death in interphase without mitotic entry. Taken together, our study, by profiling cell fate determination after cisplatin treatment, reveals new insights into chemoresistance and suggests combinatorial strategies that potentially overcome cancer resistance. PMID:26993599

  13. Cell fate determination in cisplatin resistance and chemosensitization

    PubMed Central

    Luong, Khanh V.; Wang, Ling; Roberts, Brett J.; Wahl, James K.; Peng, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the determination of cell fate choices after cancer treatment will shed new light on cancer resistance. In this study, we quantitatively analyzed the individual cell fate choice in resistant UM-SCC-38 head and neck cancer cells exposed to cisplatin. Our study revealed a highly heterogeneous pattern of cell fate choices in UM-SCC-38 cells, in comparison to that of the control, non-tumorigenic keratinocyte HaCaT cells. In both UM-SCC-38 and HaCaT cell lines, the majority of cell death occurred during the immediate interphase without mitotic entry, whereas significant portions of UM-SCC-38 cells survived the treatment via either checkpoint arrest or checkpoint slippage. Interestingly, checkpoint slippage occurred predominantly in cells treated in late S and G2 phases, and cells in M-phase were hypersensitive to cisplatin. Moreover, although the cisplatin-resistant progression of mitosis exhibited no delay in general, prolonged mitosis was correlated with the induction of cell death in mitosis. The finding thus suggested a combinatorial treatment using cisplatin and an agent that blocks mitotic exit. Consistently, we showed a strong synergy between cisplatin and the proteasome inhibitor Mg132. Finally, targeting the DNA damage checkpoint using inhibitors of ATR, but not ATM, effectively sensitized UM-SCC-38 to cisplatin treatment. Surprisingly, checkpoint targeting eliminated both checkpoint arrest and checkpoint slippage, and augmented the induction of cell death in interphase without mitotic entry. Taken together, our study, by profiling cell fate determination after cisplatin treatment, reveals new insights into chemoresistance and suggests combinatorial strategies that potentially overcome cancer resistance. PMID:26993599

  14. Prevention and Restoration of Hearing Loss Associated with the Use of Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Chirtes, Felician; Albu, Silviu

    2014-01-01

    Background. Cisplatin is a well known platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of various malignant tumours. A frequent side effect of cisplatin therapy is ototoxicity. Unfortunately, currently there are no available treatments. Material and Methods. Experimental, clinical studies and reviews published between 2004 and 2014 in the English medical literature concerning ototoxicity were selected using Medline, PubMed, and Google Scholar databases. Inclusion criteria were cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and therapy aimed at preventing or curing this disorder. Molecular mechanisms and clinical, audiological, and histological markers of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity are described. Moreover, experimental and clinical strategies for prevention or treatment of hearing loss were also reviewed. Results and Discussion. Experimental studies demonstrate a wide range of otoprotective molecules and strategies efficient against cisplatin-induced hearing loss. However, only dexamethasone proved a slight otoprotective effect in a clinical study. Conclusion. Further research must be completed to bring future therapeutic options into clinical setting. PMID:25140325

  15. The anticancer drug cisplatin interacts with the human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Hernández, P; Villena, F; Sotomayor, C P

    2000-01-01

    Drugs which exert their effects by interacting with DNA cause structural and functional membrane alterations which may be essential for growth inhibition by these agents. This paper describes the interaction of cisplatin with the human erythrocyte membrane and models constituted by bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) and diacylphosphatidylserine (DAPS), representative of phospholipid classes located in the inner monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane, and of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), a class present in its outer monolayer. Cisplatin ability to perturb DMPE, DAPS and DMPC bilayer structures was determined by X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy. Electron microscopy disclosed that human erythrocytes incubated with 35 microM cisplatin, which is its therapeutical concentration in serum, developed cup-shaped forms (stomatocytes). According to the bilayer couple hypothesis, this means that the drug is inserted into the inner monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane, a conclusion supported by the studies on model systems. PMID:10928560

  16. Infrasound sensitizes human glioblastoma cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rachlin, Kenneth; Moore, Dan H; Yount, Garret

    2013-11-01

    The development of nontoxic agents that can selectively enhance the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy is an important aim in oncology. This study evaluates the ability of infrasound exposure to sensitize glioblastoma cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. The infrasound was delivered using a device designed to replicate the unique infrasound emissions measured during external Qigong treatments. Human glioblastoma cell lines harboring wild-type p53 (U87) or mutant p53 (U251, SF210, and SF188) were treated in culture with cisplatin, infrasound emissions, or the combination of the 2 agents. Induction of apoptosis was quantified after 24 hours by flow cytometry following annexin V/propidium iodide staining. Infrasound emissions alone, delivered at moderate levels (~10 mPa) with dynamic frequency content (7-13 Hz), did not induce apoptosis, yet combining infrasound with cisplatin augmented the induction of apoptosis by cisplatin in all the 4 cell lines (P < .05). Increased cellular uptake of the fluorophore calcein associated with infrasound exposure was quantified by fluorescence microscopy as well as flow cytometry, demonstrating increased cell membrane permeability. The 4 cell lines differed in the degree to which infrasound exposure increased calcein uptake, and these differences were predictive of the extent to which infrasound enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis. When exposed to specific frequencies, membrane permeabilization also appeared to be differentially responsive for each cell line, suggesting the potential for selective targeting of tissue types using isolated infrasonic frequencies. Additionally, the pressure amplitudes used in this study were several orders of magnitude less than those used in similar studies involving ultrasound and shock waves. The results of this study provide support for using infrasound to enhance the chemotherapeutic effects of cisplatin in a clinical setting. PMID:23165942

  17. Indole-3-carbinol protects against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity: role of calcitonin gene-related peptide and insulin-like growth factor-1

    PubMed Central

    El-Naga, Reem N.; Mahran, Yasmen F.

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity associated with the clinical use of the anticancer drug cisplatin is a limiting problem. Thus, searching for new protective measures is required. Indole-3-carbinol is a powerful anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agent. The present study aimed to investigate the potential protective effect of indole-3-carbinol against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity in rats. Rats were pre-treated with 20 mg/kg indole-3-carbinol orally before giving cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity was demonstrated where relative kidney weight, BUN and serum creatinine were significantly increased. Increased oxidative stress was evident in cisplatin group where GSH and SOD tissue levels were significantly depleted. Also, lipid peroxidation and NOX-1 were increased as compared to the control. Additionally, renal expression of pro-inflammatory mediators was induced by cisplatin. Cisplatin-induced cell death was shown by increased caspase-3 and decreased expression of EGF, IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptor. Nephrotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptotic effects induced by cisplatin were significantly ameliorated by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment. Besides, the role of CGRP in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was explored. Furthermore, cisplatin cytotoxic activity was significantly enhanced by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment in vitro. In conclusion, indole-3-carbinol provides protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Also, reduced expression of CGRP may play a role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced renal injury. PMID:27417335

  18. Ancient Chinese Formula Qiong-Yu-Gao Protects Against Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity Without Reducing Anti-tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Zhi-Ying; Cheng, Xiao-Lan; Cai, Xue-Ting; Yang, Yang; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Jin-Di; Lu, Wu-Guang; Chen, Jiao; Hu, Chun-Ping; Zhou, Qian; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Li, Song-Lin; Cao, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a highly effective anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent; however, its clinical use is severely limited by serious side effects, of which nephrotoxicity is the most important. In this study, we investigated whether Qiong-Yu-Gao (QYG), a popular traditional Chinese medicinal formula described 840 years ago, exhibits protective effects against cisplatin-induced renal toxicity. Using a mouse model of cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction, we observed that pretreatment with QYG attenuated cisplatin-induced elevations in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels, ameliorated renal tubular lesions, reduced apoptosis, and accelerated tubular cell regeneration. Cisplatin-mediated elevations in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) mRNA, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein in the kidney were also significantly suppressed by QYG treatment. Furthermore, QYG reduced platinum accumulation in the kidney by decreasing the expression of copper transporter 1 and organic cation transporter 2. An in vivo study using implanted Lewis lung cancer cells revealed that concurrent administration of QYG and cisplatin did not alter the anti-tumor activity of cisplatin. Our findings suggest that the traditional Chinese medicinal formula QYG inhibits cisplatin toxicity by several mechanisms that act simultaneously, without compromising its therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, QYG may be useful in the clinic as a protective agent to prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:26510880

  19. A role for the copper transporter Ctr1 in the synergistic interaction between hyperthermia and cisplatin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Landon, Chelsea D.; Benjamin, Sarah E.; Ashcraft, Kathleen A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hyperthermia enhances cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesised that hyperthermia increases cisplatin accumulation and efficacy by modulating function of copper transport protein 1 (Ctr1), a major regulator of cellular cisplatin uptake. We examined the significance of Ctr1 in the synergistic interaction between hyperthermia and cisplatin. We assessed the importance of cisplatin- and hyperthermia-induced Ctr1 multimerisation in sensitising cells to cisplatin cytotoxicity. Materials and methods Ctr1 protein levels and cisplatin sensitivities were assessed in bladder cancer cell lines with immunoblotting and clonogenic survival assays. Using Myc-tagged-Ctr1 HEK293 cells, we assessed the effect of hyperthermia on Ctr1 multimerisation with immunoblotting. The effect of hyperthermia on cisplatin sensitivity and accumulation was assessed in wild-type (WT) and Ctr1 knockout (Ctr1−/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with clonogenic assays and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Results Increased Ctr1 protein expression was observed for the most cisplatin-sensitive bladder cancer cell lines and MEFs. Heat-induced increase in Ctr1 multimerisation with cisplatin was observed in Myc-tagged Ctr1 cells. Hyperthermia enhanced cisplatin-mediated cytotoxicity in WT more than Ctr1−/− cells (dose modifying factors 1.75 versus 1.4, respectively). WT cells accumulated more platinum versus Ctr1−/− cells; this was further increased by hyperthermia in WT cells. Conclusions Hyperthermia enhanced cisplatin uptake and cytotoxicity in WT cells. Heat increased Ctr1 activity by increasing multimerisation, enhancing drug cytotoxicity. Furthermore, Ctr1 protein profiles of bladder tumours, as well as other tumour types, may predict their response to cisplatin and overall efficacy of treatment. PMID:23879689

  20. Identification of cisplatin-binding proteins using agarose conjugates of platinum compounds.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Takatoshi; Sibrian-Vazquez, Martha; Strongin, Robert M; Steyger, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used as an antineoplastic drug, but its ototoxic and nephrotoxic side-effects, as well as the inherent or acquired resistance of some cancers to cisplatin, remain significant clinical problems. Cisplatin's selectivity in killing rapidly proliferating cancer cells is largely dependent on covalent binding to DNA via cisplatin's chloride sites that had been aquated. We hypothesized that cisplatin's toxicity in slowly proliferating or terminally differentiated cells is primarily due to drug-protein interactions, instead of drug-DNA binding. To identify proteins that bind to cisplatin, we synthesized two different platinum-agarose conjugates, one with two amino groups and another with two chlorides attached to platinum that are available for protein binding, and conducted pull-down assays using cochlear and kidney cells. Mass spectrometric analysis on protein bands after gel electrophoresis and Coomassie blue staining identified several proteins, including myosin IIA, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), calreticulin, valosin containing protein (VCP), and ribosomal protein L5, as cisplatin-binding proteins. Future studies on the interaction of these proteins with cisplatin will elucidate whether these drug-protein interactions are involved in ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity, or contribute to tumor sensitivity or resistance to cisplatin treatment. PMID:23755301

  1. Rural-urban migration including formal and informal workers in the urban sector: an agent-based numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Nilton; Oliveira, Tharnier; Silveira, Jaylson

    2012-02-01

    The goal of this work is to study rural-urban migration in the early stages of industrialization. We use an agent-based model and take into account the existence of informal and formal workers on the urban sector and possible migration movements, dependent on the agents' social and private utilities. Our agents are place on vertices of a square lattice, such that each vertex has only one agent. Rural, urban informal and urban formal workers are represented by different states of a three-state Ising model. At every step, a fraction a of the agents may change sectors or migrate. The total utility of a given agent is then calculated and compared to a random utility, in order to check if this agent turns into an actual migrant or changes sector. The dynamics is carried out until an equilibrium state is reached and equilibrium variables are then calculated and compared to available data. We find that a generalized Harris-Todaro condition is satisfied [1] on these equilibrium regimes, i.e, the ratio between expected wages between any pair of sectors reach a constant value. [4pt] [1] J. J. Silveira, A. L. Esp'indola and T. J. Penna, Physica A, 364, 445 (2006).

  2. Conjugation of Cisplatin Analogues and Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors to Overcome Cisplatin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Wilma; Crews, Brenda C.; Sárosi, Menyhárt B.; Daniel, Cristina M.; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Scholz, Matthias S.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) is an enzyme involved in tumorigenesis and is associated with tumor cell resistance against platinum-based antitumor drugs. Cisplatin analogues were conjugated with COX inhibitors (indomethacin, ibuprofen) to study the synergistic effects that were previously observed in combination treatments. The conjugates ensure concerted transport of both drugs into cells, and subsequent intracellular cleavage enables a dual-action mode. Whereas the platinum(II) complexes showed cytotoxicities similar to those of cisplatin, the platinum(IV) conjugates revealed highly increased cytotoxic activities and were able to completely overcome cisplatin-related resistance. Although some of the complexes are potent COX inhibitors, the conjugates appear to execute their cytotoxic action via COX-independent mechanisms. Instead, the increased lipophilicity and kinetic inertness of the conjugates seem to facilitate cellular accumulation of the platinum drugs and thus improve the efficacy of the antitumor agents. These conjugates are important tools for the elucidation of the direct influence of COX inhibitors on platinum-based anticancer drugs in tumor cells. PMID:25318459

  3. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  4. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  5. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  6. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  7. Aloe vera inhibits proliferation of human breast and cervical cancer cells and acts synergistically with cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Arif; Sharma, Chhavi; Khan, Saniyah; Shah, Kruti; Haque, Shafiul

    2015-01-01

    Many of the anti-cancer agents currently used have an origin in natural sources including plants. Aloe vera is one such plant being studied extensively for its diverse health benefits, including cancer prevention. In this study, the cytotoxic potential of Aloe vera crude extract (ACE) alone or in combination with cisplatin in human breast (MCF-7) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells was studied by cell viability assay, nuclear morphological examination and cell cycle analysis. Effects were correlated with modulation of expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and drug metabolism by RT-PCR. Exposure of cells to ACE resulted in considerable loss of cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, which was found to be mediated by through the apoptotic pathway as evidenced by changes in the nuclear morphology and the distribution of cells in the different phases of the cell cycle. Interestingly, ACE did not have any significant cytotoxicity towards normal cells, thus placing it in the category of safe chemopreventive agent. Further, the effects were correlated with the downregulation of cyclin D1, CYP 1A1, CYP 1A2 and increased expression of bax and p21 in MCF-7 and HeLa cells. In addition, low dose combination of ACE and cisplatin showed a combination index less than 1, indicating synergistic growth inhibition compared to the agents applied individually. In conclusion, these results signify that Aloe vera may be an effective anti-neoplastic agent to inhibit cancer cell growth and increase the therapeutic efficacy of conventional drugs like cispolatin. Thus promoting the development of plant-derived therapeutic agents appears warranted for novel cancer treatment strategies.

  8. Astragalosides reduce cisplatin ototoxicity in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Min; He, Qinglian; Wang, Jian; Lai, Huangwen

    2011-01-01

    Cisplatin is known to cause high-frequency neurosensory hearing loss. While reactive oxygen species have been shown to play a role, reactive nitrogen species have been implicated, but not proven to be involved, in cisplatin ototoxicity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in cisplatin ototoxicity by administering astragalosides, a natural antioxidant, in conjunction with cisplatin. Guinea pigs were injected with cisplatin, astragalosides or both. Auditory brainstem-evoked responses (ABRs) were measured before and 3 days after cisplatin administration. The cochlear tissue was then assayed for NO and malondialdehyde (MDA), and cochleae were also examined by scanning electron microscopy. Cisplatin alone caused significant ABR threshold shifts at all stimuli tested, whereas astragalosides alone caused no shifts. There was a significant reduction in threshold shift for clicks, 8-kHz and 16-kHz tone bursts (but not 32 kHz) when astragalosides was given with cisplatin. Both the MDA concentration and the NO concentration in the astragalosides/cisplatin group were significantly lower than those of the cisplatin group. Correspondingly, the loss of outer hair cells in the astragalosides/cisplatin group was much less than that in the cisplatin group. This suggests that astragalosides reduces cisplatin ototoxicity by its antioxidant property. PMID:21494054

  9. MCL-1 is the key target of adjuvant chemotherapy to reverse the cisplatin-resistance in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Zhenxian; Wu, Kaiming; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Kuanzhi

    2016-08-10

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of lung cancer. However, the acquired resistance occurred in cancer cells limits the clinical application of cisplatin. MCL-1, which is an important member in the pro-survival Bcl-2 family, plays a critical role in multidrug resistance (MDR). The aim of the present study is to investigate the value of Pan-Bcl-2 inhibitor as sensitizer for the chemotherapy of cisplatin-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. We found the obatoclax but not the ABT-737 significantly decreased the IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) of cisplatin in cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mechanism of obatoclax-promoted cell death induced by cisplatin was dependent on the inhibition of MCL-1, which couldn't be inhibited by ABT-737 but is the target of obatoclax. Moreover, inhibition of MCL-1 recovered the function of NOXA and BAK in cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells, leading to the promotion of mitochondrial apoptosis induced by cisplatin. Interestingly, our date indicated the obatoclax also reversed the cross-resistance in cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells. Therefore, we demonstrated that the targeted therapy with MCL-1 inhibitors, such as obatoclax, may represent a novel strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:27138804

  10. DNA-crosslinker cisplatin eradicates bacterial persister cells.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Nityananda; Wood, Thammajun L; Martínez-Vázquez, Mariano; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Wood, Thomas K

    2016-09-01

    For all bacteria, nearly every antimicrobial fails since a subpopulation of the bacteria enter a dormant state known as persistence, in which the antimicrobials are rendered ineffective due to the lack of metabolism. This tolerance to antibiotics makes microbial infections the leading cause of death worldwide and makes treating chronic infections, including those of wounds problematic. Here, we show that the FDA-approved anti-cancer drug cisplatin [cis-diamminodichloroplatinum(II)], which mainly forms intra-strand DNA crosslinks, eradicates Escherichia coli K-12 persister cells through a growth-independent mechanism. Additionally, cisplatin is more effective at killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa persister cells than mitomycin C, which forms inter-strand DNA crosslinks, and cisplatin eradicates the persister cells of several pathogens including enterohemorrhagic E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and P. aeruginosa. Cisplatin was also highly effective against clinical isolates of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, cisplatin has broad spectrum activity against persister cells. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1984-1992. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26914280

  11. A novel charged trinuclear platinum complex effective against cisplatin-resistant tumours: hypersensitivity of p53-mutant human tumour xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Pratesi, G; Perego, P; Polizzi, D; Righetti, S C; Supino, R; Caserini, C; Manzotti, C; Giuliani, F C; Pezzoni, G; Tognella, S; Spinelli, S; Farrell, N; Zunino, F

    1999-01-01

    Multinuclear platinum compounds were rationally designed to bind to DNA in a different manner from that of cisplatin and its mononuclear analogues. A triplatinum compound of the series (BBR 3464) was selected for preclinical development, since, in spite of its charged nature, it was very potent as cytotoxic agent and effective against cisplatin-resistant tumour cells. Anti-tumour efficacy studies were performed in a panel of human tumour xenografts refractory or poorly responsive to cisplatin. The novel platinum compound exhibited efficacy in all tested tumours and an impressive efficacy (including complete tumour regressions) was displayed in two lung carcinoma models, CaLu-3 and POCS. Surprisingly, BBR 3464 showed a superior activity against p53-mutant tumours as compared to those carrying the wild-type gene. The involvement of p53 in tumour response was investigated in an osteosarcoma cell line, SAOS, which is null for p53 and is highly sensitive to BBR 3464, and in the same cells following introduction of the wild-type p53 gene. Thus the pattern of cellular response was investigated in a panel of human tumour cells with a different p53 gene status. The results showed that the transfer of functional p53 resulted in a marked (tenfold) reduction of cellular chemosensitivity to the multinuclear platinum complex but in a moderate sensitization to cisplatin. In addition, in contrast to cisplatin, the triplatinum complex was very effective as an inducer of apoptosis in a lung carcinoma cell line carrying mutant p53. The peculiar pattern of anti-tumour activity of the triplatinum complex and its ability to induce p53-independent cell death may have relevant pharmacological implications, since p53, a critical protein involved in DNA repair and induction of apoptosis by conventional DNA-damaging agents, is defective in several human tumours. We suggest that the peculiar DNA binding properties of the triplatinum complex may contribute to the striking profile of anti

  12. The tocotrienol-rich fraction from rice bran enhances cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human mesothelioma H28 cells.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Keisuke; Virgona, Nantiga; Miyazawa, Mio; Watanabe, Takashi; Yano, Tomohiro

    2010-09-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy (chemoresistance) is a serious problem in malignant mesothelioma, a highly aggressive neoplasm. Gamma-tocotrienol (gamma-T3) can sensitize various cancerous cells to chemotherapeutic agents by inhibiting pathways that lead to treatment resistance. In this study, we investigated the modulating effect of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) from rice bran, which is abundant in gamma-T3, on chemoresistance in human MM H28 cells. TRF treatment caused a marked reduction in the viability of H28 cells in a dose-dependent manner, while cisplatin treatment had no effect on the cells, indicating that H28 cells are resistant to cisplatin. A significant increase in cytotoxicity was observed in H28 cells treated with TRF, and this effect was enhanced by the combination treatment with cisplatin. The cytotoxic effect was closely related to the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT signaling. Inactivation of Akt signaling by TRF or the combination with cisplatin mitigated cisplatin-induced activation of Akt, resulting in reducing the chemoresistance H28 cells to cisplatin. Reduced cell viability and attenuated chemoresistance of the H28 cells against cisplatin were also observed following the use of a PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. These results suggest that the combination therapy of cisplatin with TRF is a plausible strategy for achieving tolerance for the chemotherapeutic agent in MM therapy.

  13. Cisplatin induced sensory neuropathy is prevented by vascular endothelial growth factor-A.

    PubMed

    Vencappa, Samanta; Donaldson, Lucy F; Hulse, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Increased patient survival is a mark of modern anti-cancer therapy success. Unfortunately treatment side-effects such as neurotoxicity are a major long term concern. Sensory neuropathy is one of the common toxicities that can arise during platinum based chemotherapy. In many cases the current poor understanding of the neurological degeneration and lack of suitable analgesia has led to high incidences of patient drop out of treatment. VEGF-A is a prominent neuroprotective agent thus it was hypothesised to prevent cisplatin induced neuropathy. Systemic cisplatin treatment (lasting 3 weeks biweekly) resulted in mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in mice when compared to vehicle control. PGP9.5 sensory nerve fibre innervation was reduced in the plantar skin in the cisplatin treated group versus vehicle control mice. The cisplatin induced sensory neurodegeneration was associated with increased cleaved caspase 3 expression as well as a reduction in Activating Transcription Factor 3 and pan VEGF-A expression in sensory neurons. VEGF-A165b expression was unaltered between vehicle and cisplatin treatment. rhVEGF-A165a and rhVEGF-A165b both prevented cisplatin induced sensory neurodegeneration. Cisplatin exposure blunts the regenerative properties of sensory neurons thus leading to sensory neuropathy. However, here it is identified that administration of VEGF-A isoform subtypes induce regeneration and prevent cell death and are therefore a possible adjunct therapy for chemotherapy induced neuropathy. PMID:26279748

  14. Pistachio supplementation attenuates motor and cognition impairments induced by cisplatin or vincristine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Golchin, Leila; Shabani, Mohammad; Harandi, Shaahin; Razavinasab, Moazamehosadat

    2015-01-01

    Background: A large number of natural products and dietary components have been evaluated as potential chemoprotective agents. In the present investigation we report the effects of treatment with the dietary antioxidant, pistachio, on cisplatin- or vincristine-induced neurotoxicity in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Dietary pistachio (10%) was assessed for its neuroprotective effects through the alteration in performance of hippocampus- and cerebellum-related behaviors following chronic cisplatin (5 mg/kg) or vincristine (0.2 mg/kg) treatment in male rats. We also evaluated the effects of cisplatin, vincristine, and pistachio administration on nociception. Six behavioral tasks were used: open field, rotarod, grasping, Morris water maze (MWM), hot plate, and motor nerve conductive velocity (MNCV). Results: We showed that the exposure of adolescent rats to cisplatin or vincristine resulted in a significant decrease in explorative behaviors and memory retention. Pistachio consumption somewhat improved memory and motor abilities in cisplatin- or vincristine-treated rats, while pistachio alone did not show any significant changes in these abilities compared to saline. Cisplatin and vincristine increased the latency of response to nociception, and pistachio did not reverse this effect. Conclusion: We conclude that pistachio in the diet following anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and vincristine might have a protective effect against anticancer drug-induced disruptions in motor and cognitive function. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanisms of this protective effect of pistachio. PMID:26015918

  15. Cisplatin induced sensory neuropathy is prevented by vascular endothelial growth factor-A

    PubMed Central

    Vencappa, Samanta; Donaldson, Lucy F; Hulse, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Increased patient survival is a mark of modern anti-cancer therapy success. Unfortunately treatment side-effects such as neurotoxicity are a major long term concern. Sensory neuropathy is one of the common toxicities that can arise during platinum based chemotherapy. In many cases the current poor understanding of the neurological degeneration and lack of suitable analgesia has led to high incidences of patient drop out of treatment. VEGF-A is a prominent neuroprotective agent thus it was hypothesised to prevent cisplatin induced neuropathy. Systemic cisplatin treatment (lasting 3 weeks biweekly) resulted in mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia in mice when compared to vehicle control. PGP9.5 sensory nerve fibre innervation was reduced in the plantar skin in the cisplatin treated group versus vehicle control mice. The cisplatin induced sensory neurodegeneration was associated with increased cleaved caspase 3 expression as well as a reduction in Activating Transcription Factor 3 and pan VEGF-A expression in sensory neurons. VEGF-A165b expression was unaltered between vehicle and cisplatin treatment. rhVEGF-A165a and rhVEGF-A165b both prevented cisplatin induced sensory neurodegeneration. Cisplatin exposure blunts the regenerative properties of sensory neurons thus leading to sensory neuropathy. However, here it is identified that administration of VEGF-A isoform subtypes induce regeneration and prevent cell death and are therefore a possible adjunct therapy for chemotherapy induced neuropathy. PMID:26279748

  16. Involvement of caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways in cisplatin-induced apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Yingjie; Wang, Xianwang

    2009-02-01

    Cisplatin, an efficient anticancer agent, can trigger multiple apoptotic pathways in cancer cells. However, the signal transduction pathways in response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy are complicated, and the mechanism is not fully understood. In current study, we showed that, during cisplatin-induced apoptosis of human lung adenocarcinoma cells, both the caspase-dependent and -independent pathways were activated. Herein, we reported that after cisplatin treatment, the activities of caspase-9/-3 were sharply increased; pre-treatment with Z-LEHD-fmk (inhibitor of caspase-9), Z-DEVD-fmk (inhibitor of caspase-3), and Z-VAD-fmk (a pan-caspase inhibitor) increased cell viability and decreased apoptosis, suggesting that caspase-mediated apoptotic pathway was activated following cisplatin treatment. Confocal imaging of the cells transfected with AIF-GFP demonstrated that AIF release occurred about 9 h after cisplatin treatment. The event proceeded progressively over time, coinciding with a nuclear translocation and lasting for more than 2 hours. Down-regulation of AIF by siRNA also significantly increased cell viability and decreased apoptosis, these results suggested that AIF-mediated caspase-independent apoptotic pathway was involved in cispatin-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that both caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways were involved in cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  17. Simultaneous determination of four anti-dandruff agents including octopirox in shampoo products by reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chao, L

    2001-06-01

    A method based on reversed-phase liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for the simultaneous identification and quantitative determination of four anti-dandruff agents such as salicylic acid, ketoconazole, climbazole, octopirox in commercial anti-dandruff shampoo products. A symmetry C18 column (5 microm, 250 mm x 4.6 mm i.d.) was used at temperature of 35 degrees C, mobile phase with flow rate of 0.8 mL min(-1) was acetonitrile: water (containing 10 mm potassium dihydrogen phosphate, pH 4.0, adjusted with orthophosphoric acid) = 60 : 40 (V/V) and UV detection at 224 nm and 305 nm. Samples were extracted with mobile phase by stirring and ultrasonic method. The average recoveries of four anti-dandruff agents were 98.0-104.1%. The relative standard deviations for samples were 0.11-0.90%. The method is simple, rapid and reproducible. PMID:18498472

  18. Amphiphilic oligomer-based micelles as cisplatin nanocarriers for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xiuxiu; Li, Najun; Gu, Hongwei; Xu, Yujie; Xu, Ying; Jiao, Yang; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; Lu, Jianmei

    2013-09-01

    Polymeric micelles (~10 nm) have been prepared from the amphiphilic oligomer comprising oligomeric polystyrene as the hydrophobic inner core and half of EDTA (-N(CH2COOH)2) as the hydrophilic outermost shell. After chelating cisplatin with -N(CH2COOH)2 in water, polymeric micelles containing Pt on the spherical surface have been easily obtained. Since the chelate group is introduced into the amphiphilic oligomer as the terminal group by a RAFT agent, the chelation of cisplatin with PS(COOH)2 is almost stoichiometric. The drug carrier based on PS(COOH)2 showed a high loading efficiency (>70%) towards cisplatin. The release of the therapeutic Pt from the cisplatin-loaded composites (PS(COOH)2-Pt) triggered under weak acidic conditions resulted in good Pt-release and accumulation in tumor cells. Both in vitro and in vivo, the chelated cisplatin inhibited Sk-Br3 cancer more effectively than the intact cisplatin does. Furthermore, neither PS(COOH)2 nor PS(COOH)2-Pt showed obvious systematic toxicity.Polymeric micelles (~10 nm) have been prepared from the amphiphilic oligomer comprising oligomeric polystyrene as the hydrophobic inner core and half of EDTA (-N(CH2COOH)2) as the hydrophilic outermost shell. After chelating cisplatin with -N(CH2COOH)2 in water, polymeric micelles containing Pt on the spherical surface have been easily obtained. Since the chelate group is introduced into the amphiphilic oligomer as the terminal group by a RAFT agent, the chelation of cisplatin with PS(COOH)2 is almost stoichiometric. The drug carrier based on PS(COOH)2 showed a high loading efficiency (>70%) towards cisplatin. The release of the therapeutic Pt from the cisplatin-loaded composites (PS(COOH)2-Pt) triggered under weak acidic conditions resulted in good Pt-release and accumulation in tumor cells. Both in vitro and in vivo, the chelated cisplatin inhibited Sk-Br3 cancer more effectively than the intact cisplatin does. Furthermore, neither PS(COOH)2 nor PS(COOH)2-Pt showed obvious

  19. Gingko biloba extracts protect auditory hair cells from cisplatin-induced ototoxicity by inhibiting perturbation of gap junctional intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Choi, S J; Kim, S W; Lee, J B; Lim, H J; Kim, Y J; Tian, C; So, H S; Park, R; Choung, Y-H

    2013-08-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) may play an important role in the hearing process. Cisplatin is an anticancer drug that causes hearing loss and Gingko biloba extracts (EGb 761) have been used as an antioxidant and enhancer for GJIC. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficiency of EGb 761 in protecting against cisplatin-induced apoptosis and disturbance of GJIC. House Ear Institute-Organ of Corti 1 auditory cells were cultured and treated with cisplatin (50 μM) and EGb (300 μg/ml) for 24h, and then analyzed by immunocytochemistry (Annexin V/propidium iodide) and Western blots. GJIC was evaluated by scrape-loading dye transfer (SLDT). Basal turn organ of Corti (oC) explants from neonatal (p3) rats were exposed to cisplatin (1-10 μM) and EGb (50-400 μg/ml). The number of intact hair cells was counted by co-labeling with phalloidin and MyoVIIa. EGb prevented cisplatin-induced apoptosis in immunostaining and decreased caspase 3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase bands, which were increased in cisplatin-treated cells in Western blots. EGb prevented abnormal intracellular locations of connexin (Cx) 26, 30, 31, and 43 in cells treated with cisplatin and increased quantities of Cx bands. EGb also prevented cisplatin-induced disturbance of GJIC in SLDT. In oC explants, EGb significantly prevented hair cell damage induced by cisplatin. In animal studies, EGb significantly prevented cisplatin-induced hearing loss across 16 and 32 kHz. These results show that cisplatin induces ototoxicity including hearing loss as well as down-regulation of GJIC and inhibition of Cxs in auditory cells. EGb prevents hearing loss in cisplatin-treated rats by inhibiting down-regulation of Cx expression and GJIC. The disturbance of GJIC or Cx expression may be one of the important mechanisms of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:23583760

  20. Protection of renal cells from cisplatin toxicity by cell cycle inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Price, Peter M; Safirstein, Robert L; Megyesi, Judit

    2004-02-01

    The optimal use of cisplatin as a chemotherapeutic drug has been limited by its nephrotoxicity. Murine models have been used to study cisplatin-induced acute renal failure. After cisplatin administration, cells of the S3 segment in the renal proximal tubule are especially sensitive and undergo extensive necrosis in vivo. Similarly, cultured proximal tubule cells undergo apoptosis in vitro after cisplatin exposure. We have shown in vivo that kidney cells enter the cell cycle after cisplatin administration but that cell cycle-inhibitory proteins p21 and 14-3-3sigma are also upregulated. These proteins coordinate the cell cycle, and deletion of either of the genes resulted in increased nephrotoxicity in vivo or increased cell death in vitro after exposure to cisplatin. However, it was not known whether cell cycle inhibition before acute renal failure could protect from cisplatin-induced cell death, especially in cells with functional p21 and 14-3-3sigma genes. Using several cell cycle inhibitors, including a p21 adenovirus, and the drugs roscovitine and olomoucine, we have been able to completely protect a mouse kidney proximal tubule cell culture from cisplatin-induced apoptosis. The protection by p21 was independent of an effect on the cell cycle and was likely caused by selective inhibition of caspase-dependent and -independent cell death pathways in the cells.

  1. Cisplatin Resistant Spheroids Model Clinically Relevant Survival Mechanisms in Ovarian Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Daniel H.; Medina, Jamie E.; Hamilton, Joshua W.; Messerli, Mark A.; Brodsky, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of ovarian tumors eventually recur in a drug resistant form. Using cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines assembled into 3D spheroids we profiled gene expression and identified candidate mechanisms and biological pathways associated with cisplatin resistance. OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cells were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cisplatin to create a matched cisplatin-resistant cell line, OVCAR-8R. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer spheroids identified 3,331 significantly differentially expressed probesets coding for 3,139 distinct protein-coding genes (Fc >2, FDR < 0.05) (S2 Table). Despite significant expression changes in some transporters including MDR1, cisplatin resistance was not associated with differences in intracellular cisplatin concentration. Cisplatin resistant cells were significantly enriched for a mesenchymal gene expression signature. OVCAR-8R resistance derived gene sets were significantly more biased to patients with shorter survival. From the most differentially expressed genes, we derived a 17-gene expression signature that identifies ovarian cancer patients with shorter overall survival in three independent datasets. We propose that the use of cisplatin resistant cell lines in 3D spheroid models is a viable approach to gain insight into resistance mechanisms relevant to ovarian tumors in patients. Our data support the emerging concept that ovarian cancers can acquire drug resistance through an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. PMID:26986722

  2. Say No to DMSO: Dimethylsulfoxide Inactivates Cisplatin, Carboplatin and Other Platinum Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew D.; Telma, Katherine A.; Chang, Ki-Eun; Lee, Tobie D.; Madigan, James P.; Lloyd, John R.; Goldlust, Ian S.; Hoeschele, James D.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The platinum drugs cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin are highly utilized in the clinic and as a consequence are extensively studied in the laboratory setting. In this study, we examined the literature and found a significant number of studies (11 - 34%) in prominent cancer journals utilizing cisplatin dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). However, dissolving cisplatin in DMSO for laboratory-based studies results in ligand displacement and changes the structure of the complex. We examined the effect of DMSO on platinum complexes, including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin, finding that DMSO reacted with the complexes, inhibited their cytotoxicity and their ability to initiate cell death. These results render a substantial portion of the literature on cisplatin uninterpretable. Raising awareness of this significant issue in the cancer biology community is critical, and we make recommendations on appropriate solvation of platinum drugs for research. PMID:24812268

  3. Protective effect of bixin on cisplatin-induced genotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Graciela Cristina; Mendonça, Leonardo Meneghin; Antonucci, Gilmara Ausech; Dos Santos, Antonio Cardozo; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Bianchi, Maria de Lourdes Pires

    2012-02-01

    Bixin is the main carotenoid found in annatto seeds (Bixa orellana L.) and is responsible for their reddish-orange color. The antioxidant properties of this compound are associated with its ability to scavenge free radicals, which may reduce damage and protect tissues against toxicity caused by anticancer drugs such as cisplatin. In this study, the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of bixin on cisplatin-induced toxicity in PC12 cells was assessed. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using the MTT assay, mutagenicity, genotoxicity, and protective effect of bixin were evaluated using the micronucleus test and comet assay. PC12 cells were treated with bixin (0.05, 0.08, and 0.10μg/mL), cisplatin (0.1μg/mL) or a combination of both bixin and cisplatin. Bixin was neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic compared to the controls. In the combined treatment bixin significantly reduced the percentage of DNA in tail and the frequency of micronuclei induced by cisplatin. This result suggests that bixin can function as a protective agent, reducing cisplatin-induced DNA damage in PC12 cells, and it is possible that this protection could also extend to neuronal cells. Further studies are being conducted to better understand the mechanisms involved in the activity of this protective agent prior to using it therapeutically. PMID:22019694

  4. Augmentation of NAD+ by NQO1 attenuates cisplatin-mediated hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H-J; Oh, G-S; Shen, A; Lee, S-B; Choe, S-K; Kwon, K-B; Lee, S; Seo, K-S; Kwak, T H; Park, R; So, H-S

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diaminedichloroplatinum-II) is an extensively used chemotherapeutic agent, and one of its most adverse effects is ototoxicity. A number of studies have demonstrated that these effects are related to oxidative stress and DNA damage. However, the precise mechanism underlying cisplatin-associated ototoxicity is still unclear. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) has emerged as a key regulator of cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that, in cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity, the levels and activities of SIRT1 are suppressed by the reduction of intracellular NAD+ levels. We provide evidence that the decrease in SIRT1 activity and expression facilitated by increasing poly(ADP-ribose) transferase (PARP)-1 activation and microRNA-34a through p53 activation aggravates cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity. Moreover, we show that the induction of cellular NAD+ levels using β-lapachone (β-Lap), whose intracellular target is NQO1, prevents the toxic effects of cisplatin through the regulation of PARP-1 and SIRT1 activity. These results suggest that direct modulation of cellular NAD+ levels by pharmacological agents could be a promising therapeutic approach for protection from cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:24922076

  5. Enhancing tumor-specific uptake of the anticancer drug cisplatin with a copper chelator

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Seiko; McCormick, Frank; Smith-McCune, Karen; Hanahan, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Uptake of the anticancer drug cisplatin is mediated by the copper transporter Ctr1 in cultured cells. Here we show in human ovarian tumors that low levels of Ctr1 mRNA are associated with poor clinical response to platinum-based therapy. Using a mouse model of human cervical cancer, we demonstrate that combined treatment with a copper chelator and cisplatin increases cisplatin-DNA adduct levels in cancerous but not in normal tissues, impairs angiogenesis, and improves therapeutic efficacy. The copper chelator also enhances the killing of cultured human cervical and ovarian cancer cells with cisplatin. Our results identify the copper transporter as a therapeutic target, which can be manipulated with copper chelating drugs to selectively enhance the benefits of platinum-containing chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:20541702

  6. Amifostine (WR2721) Confers DNA Protection to In Vivo Cisplatin-Treated Murine Peripheral Blood Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Prieto González, E. A.; Fuchs, A. G.; Sánchez, González S.

    2009-01-01

    Amifostine [S-2-3-aminopropil amino ethyl phosphorotioic acid], a modulator agent for antineoplastic drugs involved in free radicals generation has given controversial results in cisplatin treated leukocytes in vitro. We have evaluated the amifostine protection over leukocytes in vivo, using comet assay. Groups of five OF1 male mice were given one of three doses of amifostine (56, 105 and 200 mg/Kg) after a cisplatin single injection (10 mg/Kg). Serum malonyldialdehide levels, catalase and superoxide dismutase activity were also evaluated. Amifostine showed significant DNA protection (p< 0.01) at the two lower doses evaluated. Malonyldildehide decreased in all amifostine treatments with respect to cisplatin while antioxidant enzyme activities remained unchanged. However, DNA migration increased with the highest amifostine dose; in fact highest dose of amifostine did no protect damage caused by cisplatin this result have implications on amifostine treatment schedules in clinical practice. PMID:19809542

  7. Preparation, characterization, and cytotoxic effects of liposomal nanoparticles containing cisplatin: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Poy, Donya; Akbarzadeh, Azim; Ebrahimi Shahmabadi, Hasan; Ebrahimifar, Meysam; Farhangi, Ali; Farahnak Zarabi, Maryam; Akbari, Azam; Saffari, Zahra; Siami, Fatemeh

    2016-10-01

    Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent used for treating various malignancies. The study aimed to prepare pegylated liposomal cisplatin and evaluate its efficacy against human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Drug-loaded nanoparticles were synthesized by reverse phase evaporation technique. The study is highlighted by extensive characterization of nanoparticles in terms of nanoparticle morphology, type of drug entrapment, cisplatin retention capability, and cytotoxicity effects. The size, size distribution, and zeta potential of nanodrug were estimated 142 nm, 0.33, and -22 mV, respectively. Drug-loading efficiency was equal to 48% that occurred physically. Furthermore, high retention capability (39% of drug was released after 72 h) with significantly enhanced cytotoxicity of nanodrug (1.75 times more than the standard drug) confirmed the potency of liposomal nanoparticles as proper cisplatin carrier. PMID:27178305

  8. Enhancing tumor-specific uptake of the anticancer drug cisplatin with a copper chelator.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Seiko; McCormick, Frank; Smith-McCune, Karen; Hanahan, Douglas

    2010-06-15

    Uptake of the anticancer drug cisplatin is mediated by the copper transporter CTR1 in cultured cells. Here we show in human ovarian tumors that low levels of Ctr1 mRNA are associated with poor clinical response to platinum-based therapy. Using a mouse model of human cervical cancer, we demonstrate that combined treatment with a copper chelator and cisplatin increases cisplatin-DNA adduct levels in cancerous but not in normal tissues, impairs angiogenesis, and improves therapeutic efficacy. The copper chelator also enhances the killing of cultured human cervical and ovarian cancer cells with cisplatin. Our results identify the copper transporter as a therapeutic target, which can be manipulated with copper chelating drugs to selectively enhance the benefits of platinum-containing chemotherapeutic agents.

  9. Cisplatin stimulates protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R; Shrivastava, A; Sodhi, A

    1995-03-01

    Cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiamine platinum (II)], a potent anti-tumor compound, stimulates immune responses by activating monocyte-macrophages and other cells of the immune system. The mechanism by which cisplatin activates these cells is poorly characterized. Since protein tyrosine phosphorylation appears to be a major intracellular signalling event that mediates cellular responses, we examined whether cisplatin alters tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. We found that cisplatin increased tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins in peritoneal macrophages and in P388D1 and IC-21 macrophage cell lines. Treatment of macrophages with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, genestein and lavendustin A, inhibited cisplatin-stimulated protein tyrosine phosphorylation in macrophages. Macrophages treated with cisplatin also exhibit increased fluorescence with anti-phosphotyrosine-FITC antibody. These data indicate that protein tyrosine phosphorylation plays a role in cisplatin-induced activation of macrophages. PMID:7539662

  10. Evaluation of nanoparticle delivered cisplatin in beagles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldhaeusser, Brittany; Platt, Simon R.; Marrache, Sean; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Pathak, Rakesh K.; Montgomery, David J.; Reno, Lisa R.; Howerth, Elizabeth; Dhar, Shanta

    2015-08-01

    Intracranial neoplasia is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in both human and veterinary patients, and is difficult to treat with traditional therapeutic methods. Cisplatin is a platinum (Pt)-containing chemotherapeutic agent approved by the Food and Drug Administration; however, substantial limitations exist for its application in canine brain tumor treatment due to the difficulty in crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), development of resistance, and toxicity. A modified Pt(iv)-prodrug of cisplatin, Platin-M, was recently shown to be deliverable to the brain via a biocompatible mitochondria-targeted lipophilic polymeric nanoparticle (NP) that carries the drug across the BBB and to the mitochondria. NP mediated controlled release of Platin-M and subsequent reduction of this prodrug to cisplatin allowed cross-links to be formed with the mitochondrial DNA, which have no nucleotide excision repair system, forcing the overactive cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. Here, we report in vitro effects of targeted Platin-M NPs (T-Platin-M-NPs) in canine glioma and glioblastoma cell lines with results indicating that this targeted NP formulation is more effective than cisplatin. In both the cell lines, T-Platin-M-NP was significantly more efficacious compared to carboplatin, another Pt-based chemotherapy, which is used in the settings of recurrent high-grade glioblastoma. Mitochondrial stress analysis indicated that T-Platin-M-NP is more effective in disrupting the mitochondrial bioenergetics in both the cell types. A 14-day distribution study in healthy adult beagles using a single intravenous injection at 0.5 mg kg-1 (with respect to Platin-M) of T-Platin-M-NPs showed high levels of Pt accumulation in the brain, with negligible amounts in the other analyzed organs. Safety studies in the beagles monitoring physical, hematological, and serum chemistry evaluations were within the normal limits on days 1, 7, and 14 after injection of either 0.5 mg kg-1 or 2 mg kg

  11. Evaluation of nanoparticle delivered cisplatin in beagles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldhaeusser, Brittany; Platt, Simon R.; Marrache, Sean; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Pathak, Rakesh K.; Montgomery, David J.; Reno, Lisa R.; Howerth, Elizabeth; Dhar, Shanta

    2015-08-01

    Intracranial neoplasia is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in both human and veterinary patients, and is difficult to treat with traditional therapeutic methods. Cisplatin is a platinum (Pt)-containing chemotherapeutic agent approved by the Food and Drug Administration; however, substantial limitations exist for its application in canine brain tumor treatment due to the difficulty in crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), development of resistance, and toxicity. A modified Pt(iv)-prodrug of cisplatin, Platin-M, was recently shown to be deliverable to the brain via a biocompatible mitochondria-targeted lipophilic polymeric nanoparticle (NP) that carries the drug across the BBB and to the mitochondria. NP mediated controlled release of Platin-M and subsequent reduction of this prodrug to cisplatin allowed cross-links to be formed with the mitochondrial DNA, which have no nucleotide excision repair system, forcing the overactive cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. Here, we report in vitro effects of targeted Platin-M NPs (T-Platin-M-NPs) in canine glioma and glioblastoma cell lines with results indicating that this targeted NP formulation is more effective than cisplatin. In both the cell lines, T-Platin-M-NP was significantly more efficacious compared to carboplatin, another Pt-based chemotherapy, which is used in the settings of recurrent high-grade glioblastoma. Mitochondrial stress analysis indicated that T-Platin-M-NP is more effective in disrupting the mitochondrial bioenergetics in both the cell types. A 14-day distribution study in healthy adult beagles using a single intravenous injection at 0.5 mg kg-1 (with respect to Platin-M) of T-Platin-M-NPs showed high levels of Pt accumulation in the brain, with negligible amounts in the other analyzed organs. Safety studies in the beagles monitoring physical, hematological, and serum chemistry evaluations were within the normal limits on days 1, 7, and 14 after injection of either 0.5 mg kg-1 or 2 mg kg

  12. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis involves membrane fluidification via inhibition of NHE1 in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rebillard, Amélie; Tekpli, Xavier; Meurette, Olivier; Sergent, Odile; LeMoigne-Muller, Gwenaëlle; Vernhet, Laurent; Gorria, Morgane; Chevanne, Martine; Christmann, Markus; Kaina, Bernd; Counillon, Laurent; Gulbins, Erich; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse

    2007-08-15

    We have previously shown that cisplatin triggers an early acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase)-dependent ceramide generation concomitantly with an increase in membrane fluidity and induces apoptosis in HT29 cells. The present study further explores the role and origin of membrane fluidification in cisplatin-induced apoptosis. The rapid increase in membrane fluidity following cisplatin treatment was inhibited by membrane-stabilizing agents such as cholesterol or monosialoganglioside-1. In HT29 cells, these compounds prevented the early aggregation of Fas death receptor and of membrane lipid rafts on cell surface and significantly inhibited cisplatin-induced apoptosis without altering drug intracellular uptake or cisplatin DNA adducts formation. Early after cisplatin treatment, Na+/H+ membrane exchanger-1 (NHE1) was inhibited leading to intracellular acidification, aSMase was activated, and ceramide was detected at the cell membrane. Treatment of HT29 cells with Staphylococcus aureus sphingomyelinase increased membrane fluidity. Moreover, pretreatment with cariporide, a specific inhibitor of NHE1, inhibited cisplatin-induced intracellular acidification, aSMase activation, ceramide membrane generation, membrane fluidification, and apoptosis. Finally, NHE1-expressing PS120 cells were more sensitive to cisplatin than NHE1-deficient PS120 cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that the apoptotic pathway triggered by cisplatin involves a very early NHE1-dependent intracellular acidification leading to aSMase activation and increase in membrane fluidity. These events are independent of cisplatin-induced DNA adducts formation. The membrane exchanger NHE1 may be another potential target of cisplatin, increasing cell sensitivity to this compound.

  13. Real-time in situ monitoring via europium emission of the photo-release of antitumor cisplatin from a Eu-Pt complex.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongguang; Lan, Rongfeng; Chan, Chi-Fai; Jiang, Lijun; Dai, Lixiong; Kwong, Daniel W J; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Wong, Ka-Leung

    2015-09-25

    A water-soluble light-responsive antitumor agent, PtEuL, based on a cisplatin-linked europium-cyclen complex has been synthesized and evaluated for controlled cisplatin release by linear/two-photon excitation in vitro with concomitant turn-on and long-lived europium emission as a responsive traceable signal.

  14. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  15. Downregulation of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor subunits modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kothandapani, Anbarasi; Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel; Kahali, Bhaskar; Reisman, David; Patrick, Steve M.

    2012-10-01

    Chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF plays important roles in many cellular processes including transcription, proliferation, differentiation and DNA repair. In this report, we investigated the role of SWI/SNF catalytic subunits Brg1 and Brm in the cellular response to cisplatin in lung cancer and head/neck cancer cells. Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhanced cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Repair kinetics of cisplatin DNA adducts revealed that downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impeded the repair of both intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Cisplatin ICL-induced DNA double strand break repair was also decreased in Brg1 and Brm depleted cells. Altered checkpoint activation with enhanced apoptosis as well as impaired chromatin relaxation was observed in Brg1 and Brm deficient cells. Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm did not affect the recruitment of DNA damage recognition factor XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions, but affected ERCC1 recruitment, which is involved in the later stages of DNA repair. Based on these results, we propose that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity by facilitating efficient repair of the cisplatin DNA lesions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhances cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impedes the repair of cisplatin intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brg1 and Brm deficiency results in impaired chromatin relaxation, altered checkpoint activation as well as enhanced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm affects recruitment of ERCC1, but not XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions.

  16. An Epigenomic Approach to Improving Response to Neoadjuvant Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Xylinas, Evanguelos; Hassler, Melanie R; Zhuang, Dazhong; Krzywinski, Martin; Erdem, Zeynep; Robinson, Brian D; Elemento, Olivier; Clozel, Thomas; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is among the five most common cancers diagnosed in the Western world and causes significant mortality and morbidity rates in affected patients. Therapeutic options to treat the disease in advanced muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) include cystectomy and chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is effective in MIBC; however, it has not been widely adopted by the community. One reason is that many patients do not respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and no biomarker currently exists to identify these patients. It is also not clear whether a strategy to sensitize chemoresistant patients may exist. We sought to identify cisplatin-resistance patterns in preclinical models of bladder cancer, and test whether treatment with the epigenetic modifier decitabine is able to sensitize cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell lines. Using a screening approach in cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell lines, we identified dysregulated genes by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) and DNA methylation assays. DNA methylation analysis of tumors from 18 patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy was used to confirm in vitro results. Cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cells were treated with decitabine to investigate epigenetic sensitization of resistant cell lines. Our results show that HOXA9 promoter methylation status is associated with response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in bladder cancer cell lines and in metastatic bladder cancer. Bladder cancer cells resistant to cisplatin chemotherapy can be sensitized to cisplatin by the DNA methylation inhibitor decitabine. Our data suggest that HOXA9 promoter methylation could serve as potential predictive biomarker and decitabine might sensitize resistant tumors in patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:27598218

  17. An Epigenomic Approach to Improving Response to Neoadjuvant Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xylinas, Evanguelos; Hassler, Melanie R.; Zhuang, Dazhong; Krzywinski, Martin; Erdem, Zeynep; Robinson, Brian D.; Elemento, Olivier; Clozel, Thomas; Shariat, Shahrokh F.

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is among the five most common cancers diagnosed in the Western world and causes significant mortality and morbidity rates in affected patients. Therapeutic options to treat the disease in advanced muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) include cystectomy and chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is effective in MIBC; however, it has not been widely adopted by the community. One reason is that many patients do not respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and no biomarker currently exists to identify these patients. It is also not clear whether a strategy to sensitize chemoresistant patients may exist. We sought to identify cisplatin-resistance patterns in preclinical models of bladder cancer, and test whether treatment with the epigenetic modifier decitabine is able to sensitize cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell lines. Using a screening approach in cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell lines, we identified dysregulated genes by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) and DNA methylation assays. DNA methylation analysis of tumors from 18 patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy was used to confirm in vitro results. Cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cells were treated with decitabine to investigate epigenetic sensitization of resistant cell lines. Our results show that HOXA9 promoter methylation status is associated with response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in bladder cancer cell lines and in metastatic bladder cancer. Bladder cancer cells resistant to cisplatin chemotherapy can be sensitized to cisplatin by the DNA methylation inhibitor decitabine. Our data suggest that HOXA9 promoter methylation could serve as potential predictive biomarker and decitabine might sensitize resistant tumors in patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy. PMID:27598218

  18. Dependence of cisplatin-induced cell death in vitro and in vivo on cyclin-dependent kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Price, Peter M; Yu, Fang; Kaldis, Philipp; Aleem, Eiman; Nowak, Grazyna; Safirstein, Robert L; Megyesi, Judit

    2006-09-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutics, but its usefulness is limited by its toxicity to normal tissues, including cells of the kidney proximal tubule. The purpose of these studies was to determine the mechanism of cisplatin cytotoxicity. It was shown in vivo that cisplatin administration induces upregulation of the gene for the p21 cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor in kidney cells. This protein is a positive effector on the fate of cisplatin-exposed renal tubule cells in vivo and in vitro; adenoviral transduction of p21 completely protected proximal tubule cells from cisplatin toxicity. Herein is reported that cdk2 inhibitory drugs protect kidney cells in vivo and in vitro, that transduction of kidney cells in vitro with dominant-negative cdk2 also protected, and that cdk2 knockout cells were resistant to cisplatin. The cdk2 knockout cells regained cisplatin sensitivity after transduction with wild-type cdk2. It is concluded that cisplatin cytotoxicity depends on cdk2 activation and that the mechanism of p21 protection is by direct inhibition of cdk2. This demonstrated the involvement of a protein that previously was associated with cell-cycle progression with pathways of apoptosis. It also was demonstrated that this pathway of cisplatin-induced cell death can be interceded in vivo to prevent nephrotoxicity.

  19. ER stress and autophagy are involved in the apoptosis induced by cisplatin in human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, SHAOMIN; TAN, PING; YAN, BINGDI; GAO, RONG; ZHAO, JIANJUN; WANG, JING; GUO, JIA; LI, NING; MA, ZHONGSEN

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (CDDP)] is one of the most classical and effective chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of cancers including lung cancer. However, the presence of cisplatin resistance in cancer lowers its curative effect and limits its usage in the clinic. The aim of the present study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in lung cancer involving endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. In the present study, we detected the effect of cisplatin on cell viability, ER stress and autophagy in lung cancer cell lines A549 and H460. We also tested the effects of ER stress and autophagy on apoptosis induced by cisplatin. The results showed that cisplatin induced apoptosis, ER stress and autophagy in lung cancer cell lines. In addition, the inhibition of ER stress by 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) or tauroursodeoxycholic acid sodium (TUDC) enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in the human lung cancer cells. Meanwhile, combination treatment with the autophagic inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or chloroquine (CQ) further increased the apoptosis induced by cisplatin in the human lung cancer cells. The present study provides a novel treatment strategy - cisplatin in combination with an autophagic inhibitor or an ER stress inhibitor leads to increased apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. PMID:26985651

  20. Cisplatin sensitization to radiotherapy of squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Leipzig, B.

    1983-10-01

    A combined modality of treatment utilizing cisplatin as a radiosensitizing agent concomitantly with full-course radical irradiation has been studied in 14 patients. Cisplatin at a dose of 15 mg/M2 body surface area was given intravenously on days 1 through 5 and 21 through 25 of the radiation therapy course. Among the 14 patients so treated, 11 patients had evidence of complete clinical regression of their tumors. Most remained in remission without evidence of recurrent disease for as long as 18 months. Recurrence in the field of treatment was even more rare. Symptomatic improvement was very encouraging in these patients. Most of them have had a significant improvement in their tolerance of pain and in the ability to swallow foods and maintain weight without a nasogastric feeding tube. Decannulation of the tracheostomy is usual. Problems included four patients with renal toxicity, one of whom died with renal failure. No patient required interruption of therapy due to mocositis or dysphagia. Nausea was rare. This encouraging data in our pilot study of a new therapeutic regimen justifies a full-scale clinical trial.

  1. Ondansetron can enhance cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via inhibition of multiple toxin and extrusion proteins (MATEs)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qing; Guo, Dong; Dong, Zhongqi; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Polli, James E.; Shu, Yan

    2013-11-15

    The nephrotoxicity limits the clinical application of cisplatin. Human organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) work in concert in the elimination of cationic drugs such as cisplatin from the kidney. We hypothesized that co-administration of ondansetron would have an effect on cisplatin nephrotoxicity by altering the function of cisplatin transporters. The inhibitory potencies of ondansetron on metformin accumulation mediated by OCT2 and MATEs were determined in the stable HEK-293 cells expressing these transporters. The effects of ondansetron on drug disposition in vivo were examined by conducting the pharmacokinetics of metformin, a classical substrate for OCTs and MATEs, in wild-type and Mate1−/− mice. The nephrotoxicity was assessed in the wild-type and Mate1−/− mice received cisplatin with and without ondansetron. Both MATEs, including human MATE1, human MATE2-K, and mouse Mate1, and OCT2 (human and mouse) were subject to ondansetron inhibition, with much greater potencies by ondansetron on MATEs. Ondansetron significantly increased tissue accumulation and pharmacokinetic exposure of metformin in wild-type but not in Mate1−/− mice. Moreover, ondansetron treatment significantly enhanced renal accumulation of cisplatin and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity which were indicated by increased levels of biochemical and molecular biomarkers and more severe pathohistological changes in mice. Similar increases in nephrotoxicity were caused by genetic deficiency of MATE function in mice. Therefore, the potent inhibition of MATEs by ondansetron enhances the nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin treatment in mice. Potential nephrotoxic effects of combining the chemotherapeutic cisplatin and the antiemetic 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT{sub 3}) receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron, should be investigated in patients. - Highlights: • Nephrotoxicity significantly limits clinical use of the chemotherapeutic

  2. Attenuation of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase activity and mRNA levels by cisplatin and temozolomide in jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    D'Atri, S; Graziani, G; Lacal, P M; Nisticò, V; Gilberti, S; Faraoni, I; Watson, A J; Bonmassar, E; Margison, G P

    2000-08-01

    The DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is important in cellular resistance to certain alkylating antitumor agents such as the methylating drug temozolomide (TMZ). To provide a more rational basis for clinical combinations with another commonly used drug, cisplatin, we assessed the modulation of MGMT protein and mRNA levels in the human leukemic cell line Jurkat after treatment with these agents. Cisplatin decreased MGMT activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with maximal suppression (50%) observed 24 h after treatment with 25 microM cisplatin. This was probably the result of decreased transcription of the MGMT gene, because there was an earlier nadir of MGMT mRNA levels after cisplatin treatment and neither cisplatin nor DNA reacted with cisplatin in vitro was able to inhibit MGMT activity in an in vitro assay. TMZ alone depleted MGMT activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner with almost complete loss of activity occurring immediately after treatment with 500 microM TMZ. Combinations of cisplatin (12.5 microM) and TMZ (250 microM) caused substantial and prolonged MGMT depletion with recovery to only 30% of pretreatment levels by 48 h. These results suggest that the clinical efficacy of TMZ and cisplatin may be improved by appropriate schedules of combinations of these agents.

  3. Comprehensive identification of the binding sites of cisplatin in hen egg white lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ningbo; Du, Yonggang; Cui, Meng; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2014-06-01

    Platinum drugs have become one of the most important kinds of chemotherapy agents, and the interactions of these drugs with proteins play very important roles in their side effects and drug resistance. However, it is still a challenge to determine the binding sites of platinum drugs in proteins with multiple disulfide bonds and stable three-dimensional structures using mass spectrometry. Here, the interaction between cisplatin and hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL), a multi-disulfide-bond-containing protein with a stable three-dimensional structure, was investigated using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Typical disulfide bond reduction with dithiothreitol/tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine before trypsin digestion destroyed the binding of cisplatin to HEWL, and no platination sites were found. Efficient trypsin digestion methods for HEWL-cisplatin adducts were developed to avoid the loss of platinum binding to protein. At 55 °C, platinated HEWL was digested directly by trypsin in 6 h, and multiple platinated peptides were observed. In 60% acetonitrile, the digestion time of platinated HEWL was shortened to 2 h, and most of the platinated peptides were observed. In addition, the reduction of the disulfide bonds of HEWL greatly accelerated the reaction between HEWL and cisplatin, and the potential binding sites of cisplatin in reduced HEWL could be easily recognized. On the basis of the above-mentioned methods, multiple binding sites of cisplatin in HEWL were first identified by mass spectrometry. PMID:24748452

  4. Genetic variants in TPMT and COMT are associated with hearing loss in children receiving cisplatin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ross, Colin J D; Katzov-Eckert, Hagit; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Brooks, Beth; Rassekh, S Rod; Barhdadi, Amina; Feroz-Zada, Yassamin; Visscher, Henk; Brown, Andrew M K; Rieder, Michael J; Rogers, Paul C; Phillips, Michael S; Carleton, Bruce C; Hayden, Michael R

    2009-12-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used and effective chemotherapeutic agent, although its use is restricted by the high incidence of irreversible ototoxicity associated with it. In children, cisplatin ototoxicity is a serious and pervasive problem, affecting more than 60% of those receiving cisplatin and compromising language and cognitive development. Candidate gene studies have previously reported associations of cisplatin ototoxicity with genetic variants in the genes encoding glutathione S-transferases and megalin. We report association analyses for 220 drug-metabolism genes in genetic susceptibility to cisplatin-induced hearing loss in children. We genotyped 1,949 SNPs in these candidate genes in an initial cohort of 54 children treated in pediatric oncology units, with replication in a second cohort of 112 children recruited through a national surveillance network for adverse drug reactions in Canada. We identified genetic variants in TPMT (rs12201199, P value = 0.00022, OR = 17.0, 95% CI 2.3-125.9) and COMT (rs9332377, P value = 0.00018, OR = 5.5, 95% CI 1.9-15.9) associated with cisplatin-induced hearing loss in children.

  5. Berberine modulates cisplatin sensitivity of human gastric cancer cells by upregulation of miR-203.

    PubMed

    You, He-Yi; Xie, Xue-Meng; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Zhu, Heng-Liang; Jiang, Fei-Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapeutic resistance is the main reason of the failure in clinical treatment of gastric cancer. Berberine (BER) is the active compound of traditional Chinese medicine Huang Lian. The aim of this present study is to evaluate the effect of BER on cisplatin resistance in gastric cancer cells and to investigate its possible mechanism. Gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and BGC-823 and their respective cisplatin-resistant variants SGC-7901/DDP and BGC-823/DDP were used in this study. We found that BER treatment significantly reversed cisplatin sensitivity and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in SGC-7901/DDP and BGC-823/DDP cells; BER treatment induced miR-203 expression, and overexpression of miR-203 mimicked the cisplatin-sensitizing effect of BER. Importantly, we showed that miR-203 was able to target the 3'UTR of Bcl-w. Therefore, we conclude that BER treatment reduces cisplatin resistance of gastric cancer cells by modulating the miR-203/Bcl-w apoptotic axis. BER may be a novel agent to enhance chemotherapeutic responses in cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer patients.

  6. Simvastatin protects Sertoli cells against cisplatin cytotoxicity through enhanced gap junction intercellular communication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingzhi; Peng, Jianxin; Huang, Huansen; Wang, Qin; Yu, Meiling; Tao, Liang

    2015-10-01

    Cisplatin, an important chemotherapeutic agent against testicular germ cell cancer, induces testicular toxicity on Leydig and Sertoli cells, leading to serious side-effects such as azoospermia and infertility. In a previous study, it was found that simvastatin enhanced the sensitivity of Leydig tumor cells to chemotherapeutic toxicity through the enhancement of gap junction functions. In the present study, the effect of simvastatin on the sensitivity of normal Sertoli cells to cisplatin and the role of gap junctions in such effects was investigated. The results showed that, simvastatin attenuated cisplatin toxicity only when cells exhibited high-density culture where gap junctional formation was possible. When gap junction function was decreased by the gap junction inhibitor or by siRNA targeting connexin 43, the protective effect of simvastatin to cisplatin toxicity was substantially attenuated. Simvastatin also enhanced gap junction functions between Sertoli cells. This effect was mediated by the reduction of PKC-mediated connexin phosphorylation, thereby increasing connexin 43 membrane localization. Thus, simvastatin-induced enhancement of gap junction‑mediated intercellular communication attenuated cisplatin toxicity on Sertoli cells. This result indicated that enhancement of gap junction function by simvastatin may have bilateral beneficial effects on cisplatin‑based chemotherapy, enhancing cisplatin killing on cancer while ameliorating the reproduction toxicity.

  7. Riboflavin as adjuvant with cisplatin: study in mouse skin cancer model.

    PubMed

    Salman, Maria; Naseem, Imrana

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin used in treatment of solid tumor induces oxidative stress which leads to hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. New strategies are therefore needed to combat toxicity and optimize its therapeutic potential. Riboflavin (VitaminB2) under photoillumination works as an anti proliferative agent and induces apoptosis. These properties of riboflavin have been exploited to mitigate cisplatin induced toxicities. 9,10-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene /12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate  were used to induce skin tumor in Swiss albino mice. The tumor induced mice were treated with cisplatin, riboflavin as well as their combination under photo illumination. In comparison to tumor control group the cisplatin and riboflavin treated groups showed a compromised level of antioxidant enzymes, functional markers and a higher degree of lipid peroxidation. However these parameters tended towards normal in the combination treated group. The results from histopathology indicate that apoptosis was favored mode of cell death and that necrosis was reduced in combination treated groups. Our findings indicate that combination of cisplatin with riboflavin under photo illumination synergizes its anti cancer activity towards cancer cells and attenuates the cisplatin induced toxicities.

  8. Heat shock protein-mediated protection against Cisplatin-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tiffany G; Roy, Soumen; Brandon, Carlene S; Kramarenko, Inga K; Francis, Shimon P; Taleb, Mona; Marshall, Keely M; Schwendener, Reto; Lee, Fu-Shing; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2015-02-01

    Cisplatin is a highly successful and widely used chemotherapy for the treatment of various solid malignancies in both adult and pediatric patients. Side effects of cisplatin treatment include nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity results from damage to and death of cells in the inner ear, including sensory hair cells. We showed previously that heat shock inhibits cisplatin-induced hair cell death in whole-organ cultures of utricles from adult mice. Since heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is the most upregulated HSP in response to heat shock, we investigated the role of HSP70 as a potential protectant against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Our data using utricles from HSP70 (-/-) mice indicate that HSP70 is necessary for the protective effect of heat shock against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. In addition, constitutive expression of inducible HSP70 offered modest protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. We also examined a second heat-inducible protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, also called HSP32). HO-1 is an enzyme responsible for the catabolism of free heme. We previously showed that induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) inhibits aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. Here, we show that HO-1 also offers significant protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. HO-1 induction occurred primarily in resident macrophages, with no detectable expression in hair cells or supporting cells. Depletion of macrophages from utricles abolished the protective effect of HO-1 induction. Together, our data indicate that HSP induction protects against cisplatin-induced hair cell death, and they suggest that resident macrophages mediate the protective effect of HO-1 induction.

  9. Heat shock protein-mediated protection against Cisplatin-induced hair cell death.

    PubMed

    Baker, Tiffany G; Roy, Soumen; Brandon, Carlene S; Kramarenko, Inga K; Francis, Shimon P; Taleb, Mona; Marshall, Keely M; Schwendener, Reto; Lee, Fu-Shing; Cunningham, Lisa L

    2015-02-01

    Cisplatin is a highly successful and widely used chemotherapy for the treatment of various solid malignancies in both adult and pediatric patients. Side effects of cisplatin treatment include nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity results from damage to and death of cells in the inner ear, including sensory hair cells. We showed previously that heat shock inhibits cisplatin-induced hair cell death in whole-organ cultures of utricles from adult mice. Since heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is the most upregulated HSP in response to heat shock, we investigated the role of HSP70 as a potential protectant against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Our data using utricles from HSP70 (-/-) mice indicate that HSP70 is necessary for the protective effect of heat shock against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. In addition, constitutive expression of inducible HSP70 offered modest protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. We also examined a second heat-inducible protein, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, also called HSP32). HO-1 is an enzyme responsible for the catabolism of free heme. We previously showed that induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) inhibits aminoglycoside-induced hair cell death. Here, we show that HO-1 also offers significant protection against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. HO-1 induction occurred primarily in resident macrophages, with no detectable expression in hair cells or supporting cells. Depletion of macrophages from utricles abolished the protective effect of HO-1 induction. Together, our data indicate that HSP induction protects against cisplatin-induced hair cell death, and they suggest that resident macrophages mediate the protective effect of HO-1 induction. PMID:25261194

  10. YM155 reverses cisplatin resistance in head and neck cancer by decreasing cytoplasmic survivin levels

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bhavna; Yadav, Arti; Lang, James C.; Cipolla, Michael; Schmitt, Alessandra C.; Arradaza, Nicole; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Kumar, Pawan

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, acquisition of cisplatin resistance is common in patients with HNSCC and it often leads to local and distant failure. In this study, we demonstrate that survivin expression is significantly upregulated in HNSCC primary tumors and cell lines. In addition, survivin levels were significantly higher in HPV negative patients that normally respond poorly to cisplatin treatment. Survivin expression was further increased in cisplatin resistant cells (CAL27-CisR) as compared to its parent cells (CAL27). Therefore, we hypothesize that targeting of survivin in HNSCC could reverse the resistant phenotype in tumor cells thereby enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin. We used both in vitro and in vivo models to test the efficacy of YM155, a small molecule survivin inhibitor, either as a single agent or in combination with cisplatin. YM155 significantly decreased survivin levels and cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, YM155 pretreatment significantly reversed cisplatin resistance in cancer cells. Interestingly, YM155 treatment altered the dynamic localization of survivin in cells by inducing a rapid reduction in cytoplasmic survivin, which plays a critical role in its anti-apoptotic function. In a SCID mouse xenograft model, YM155 significantly enhanced the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic effects of cisplatin with no added systemic toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest a potentially novel strategy to use YM155 to overcome the resistance in tumor cells thereby enhancing the effectiveness of the chemotherapy in HNSCC. PMID:22723337

  11. Solution structures of a DNA dodecamer duplex with and without a cisplatin 1,2-d(GG) intrastrand cross-link: comparison with the same DNA duplex containing an oxaliplatin 1,2-d(GG) intrastrand cross-link.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yibing; Bhattacharyya, Debadeep; King, Candice L; Baskerville-Abraham, Irene; Huh, Sung-Ho; Boysen, Gunnar; Swenberg, James A; Temple, Brenda; Campbell, Sharon L; Chaney, Stephen G

    2007-06-01

    Proteins that discriminate between cisplatin-DNA adducts and oxaliplatin-DNA adducts are thought to be responsible for the differences in tumor range, toxicity, and mutagenicity of these two important chemotherapeutic agents. However, the structural basis for differential protein recognition of these adducts has not been determined and could be important for the design of more effective platinum anticancer agents. We have determined high-resolution NMR structures for cisplatin-GG and undamaged DNA dodecamers in the AGGC sequence context and have compared these structures with the oxaliplatin-GG structure in the same sequence context determined previously in our laboratory. This structural study allows the first direct comparison of cisplatin-GG DNA and oxaliplatin-GG DNA solution structures referenced to undamaged DNA in the same sequence context. Non-hydrogen atom rmsds of 0.81 and 1.21 were determined for the 15 lowest-energy structures for cisplatin-GG DNA and undamaged DNA, respectively, indicating good structural convergence. The theoretical NOESY spectra obtained by back-calculation from the final average structures showed excellent agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the final structures are consistent with the NMR data. Several significant conformational differences were observed between the cisplatin-GG adduct and the oxaliplatin-GG adduct, including buckle at the 5' G6.C19 base pair, opening at the 3' G7.C18 base pair, twist at the A5G6.T20C19 base pair step, slide, twist, and roll at the G6G7.C19C18 base pair step, slide at the G7C8.C18G17 base pair step, G6G7 dihedral angle, and overall bend angle. We hypothesize that these conformational differences may be related to the ability of various DNA repair proteins, DNA binding proteins, and DNA polymerases to discriminate between cisplatin-GG and oxaliplatin-GG adducts.

  12. Assessment of low-dose cisplatin as a model of nausea and emesis in beagle dogs, potential for repeated administration.

    PubMed

    Kenward, Hannah; Pelligand, Ludovic; Elliott, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    Cisplatin is a highly emetogenic cancer chemotherapy agent, which is often used to induce nausea and emesis in animal models. The cytotoxic properties of cisplatin also cause adverse events that negatively impact on animal welfare preventing repeated administration of cisplatin. In this study, we assessed whether a low (subclinical) dose of cisplatin could be utilized as a model of nausea and emesis in the dog while decreasing the severity of adverse events to allow repeated administration. The emetic, nausea-like behavior and potential biomarker response to both the clinical dose (70 mg/m2) and low dose (15 mg/m2) of cisplatin was assessed. Plasma creatinine concentrations and granulocyte counts were used to assess adverse effects on the kidneys and bone marrow, respectively. Nausea-like behavior and emesis was induced by both doses of cisplatin, but the latency to onset was greater in the low-dose group. No significant change in plasma creatinine was detected for either dose groups. Granulocytes were significantly reduced compared with baseline (P = 0.000) following the clinical, but not the low-dose cisplatin group. Tolerability of repeated administration was assessed with 4 administrations of an 18 mg/m2 dose cisplatin. Plasma creatinine did not change significantly. Cumulative effects on the granulocytes occurred, they were significantly decreased (P = 0.03) from baseline at 3 weeks following cisplatin for the 4th administration only. Our results suggest that subclinical doses (15 and 18 mg/m2) of cisplatin induce nausea-like behavior and emesis but have reduced adverse effects compared with the clinical dose allowing for repeated administration in crossover studies.

  13. BGP-15 - a novel poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor - protects against nephrotoxicity of cisplatin without compromising its antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Racz, Ildiko; Tory, Kalman; Gallyas, Ferenc; Berente, Zoltán; Osz, Erzsebet; Jaszlits, Laszlo; Bernath, Sandor; Sumegi, Balazs; Rabloczky, Gyorgy; Literati-Nagy, Peter

    2002-03-15

    Nephrotoxicity is one of the major dose limiting side effects of cisplatin chemotherapy. The antitumor and toxic effects are mediated in part by different mechanisms, thus, permitting a selective inhibition of certain side effects. The influence of O-(3-piperidino-2-hydroxy-1-propyl)nicotinic amidoxime (BGP-15) - a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor - on the nephrotoxicity and antitumor efficacy of cisplatin has been evaluated in experimental models. BGP-15 either blocked or significantly reduced (60-90% in 100-200 mg/kg oral dose) cisplatin induced increase in serum urea and creatinine level in mice and rats and prevented the structural degeneration of the kidney, as well. The nephroprotective effect of BGP-15 treatment was revealed also in living mice by MRI analysis manifesting in the lack of oedema which otherwise developed as a result of cisplatin treatment. The protective effect was accompanied by inhibition of cisplatin-induced poly-ADP-ribosylation and by the restoration of the disturbed energy metabolism. The preservation of ATP level in the kidney was demonstrated in vivo by localized NMR spectroscopy. BGP-15 decreased cisplatin-induced ROS production in rat kidney mitochondria and improved the antioxidant status of the kidney in mice with cisplatin-induced nephropathy. In rat kidney, cisplatin caused a decrease in the level of Bcl-x, a mitochondrial protective protein, and this was normalized by BGP-15 treatment. On the other hand, BGP-15 did not inhibit the antitumor efficacy of cisplatin in cell culture and in transplantable solid tumors of mice. Treatment with BGP-15 increased the mean survival time of cisplatin-treated P-388 leukemia bearing mice from 13 to 19 days. PARP inhibitors have been demonstrated to diminish the consequences of free radical-induced damage, and this is related to the chemoprotective effect of BGP-15, a novel PARP inhibitor. Based on these results, we propose that BGP-15 represents a novel, non-thiol chemoprotective

  14. The Effect of Dexpanthenol on Ototoxicity Induced by Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Toplu, Yuksel; Sapmaz, Emrah; Parlakpinar, Hakan; Kelles, Mehmet; Kalcioglu, M. Tayyar; Tanbek, Kevser; Kizilay, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was aimed to investigate the protective effects of dexpanthenol (Dxp) on against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. Methods To examine this effect, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) measurements and serum levels of oxidative and antioxidant status (including malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, total oxidant status, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress index) were evaluated. Thirty-two adult female Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 4 equal groups; control (K), cisplatin (C), cisplatin plus Dxp (CD), and Dxp (D). In all groups DPOAEs measurements, between 996 and 10,078 Hz as DPOAEs and input/output functions, were performed on days 0, 1th, 5th, and 12th. Prior to death, the last DPOAEs measurements and blood samples were taken. Results In the C group, statistically significant differences were detected at all frequencies between 0 and 5 days and 0 and 12 days measurements (P<0.05). Serum level of oxidant and antioxidant status were detected statistically significantly changed in this group versus K group (P<0.05). Contrary to the C group, in the CD group hearing ability was seen largely preserved at many frequencies and serum levels of all biochemical parameters were shifted toward normal values, similar to the K group. No significant differences were detected in the either D or K group’s measurements. Conclusion According to these results, Dxp may prevent cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:26976021

  15. Influence of Oct1/Oct2-Deficiency on Cisplatin-Induced Changes in Urinary N-Acetyl-β-D-Glucosaminidase

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Ryan M.; Kosloske, Ashley M.; Lancaster, Cynthia S.; Filipski, Kelly K.; Hu, Chaoxin; Zolk, Oliver; Mathijssen, Ron H.; Sparreboom, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Organic cation transporters have previously been implicated in cisplatin nephrotoxicity. In this study, we found that renal tubular secretion of cisplatin is abolished in mice lacking the Oct1 and Oct2 transporters [Oct1/2(−/−) mice], and these mice are protected from experiencing severe cisplatin-induced renal damage. Compared to wildtype mice, Oct1/2(−/−) mice also experienced a significantly decreased change in urinary activity of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) following cisplatin administration (~4-fold, P=0.0016). A cutoff for cumulative urinary NAG activity of >0.4 AU was associated with a 21-fold increased odds for severe nephrotoxicity (P=0.0017), which in turn was linked with overall survival [hazard ratio (95%CI), 8.1 (2.1–31), P=0.0078]. Next, we screened 16 agents at varying concentrations for inhibitory potential against the human homolog transporter, OCT2, using transfected 293Flp-In cells. We focused further on the possible utility of cimetidine as an OCT2 inhibitor because of its strong potency (>95% inhibition), and because this agent is not routinely co-administered with cisplatin. In mice, we found that cimetidine inhibited cisplatin-induced urinary NAG activity changes to a degree significantly different from vehicle-control treated mice (P=0.016), but similar to that seen in Oct1/2(−/−) mice (P=0.91). Interestingly, cimetidine did not affect the uptake of cisplatin into SKOV-3 cells, the NCI60 cell line with the highest OCT2 expression. Collectively, this study suggests that OCT2 inhibitors can completely inhibit transporter-mediated uptake of cisplatin in renal proximal tubular cells, and subsequently ameliorate cisplatin nephrotoxicity without affecting the accumulation in tumor cells. PMID:20601443

  16. The role of mTOR during cisplatin treatment in an in vitro and ex vivo model of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Leisching, G R; Loos, B; Botha, M H; Engelbrecht, A-M

    2015-09-01

    Cisplatin is used as a cytotoxic agent for the management of cervical cancer. However, the severity of the side-effects limits the use of this drug, particularly at high doses. Resistance to cisplatin is often attributed to a disruption in the normal apoptotic response via aberrant activation of pathways such as the mTOR pathway. Here we assess the role of mTOR and its effect on cell death sensitization and autophagy in response to a low concentration of cisplatin in cervical cancer cells. Additionally we measured the expression profile of mTOR in normal, low- and high-grade squamous intraepithelial (LSIL and HSIL) lesions and cancerous tissue. An in vitro model of cervical cancer was established using HeLa and CaSki cells. mTOR protein expression as well as autophagy-related proteins were evaluated through Western blotting. Inhibition of mTOR was achieved with the use of rapamycin and RNA silencing. A low concentration of cisplatin administered as a single agent induces autophagy, but not apoptosis. Cisplatin cytotoxicity was greatly enhanced in cancer cells when mTOR had been inhibited prior to cisplatin treatment which was likely due to autophagy being increased above cisplatin-induced levels, thereby inducing apoptosis. Cervical tissue samples revealed an increase in mTOR protein expression in LSIL and carcinoma tissue which suggests a change in autophagy control. Our data suggest that utilising a lower dose of cisplatin combined with mTOR inhibition is a viable treatment option and addresses the challenge of cisplatin dose-dependent toxicity, however future studies are required to confirm this in a clinical setting. PMID:26201060

  17. Structure Determination of Cisplatin-Amino Acid Analogues by Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Action Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chenchen; Bao, Xun; Zhu, Yanlong; Strobehn, Stephen; Kimutai, Bett; Nei, Y.-W.; Chow, C. S.; Rodgers, M. T.; Gao, Juehan; Oomens, J.

    2015-06-01

    To gain a better understanding of the binding mechanism and assist in the optimization of relevant drug and chemical probe design, both experimental and theoretical studies were performed on a series of amino acid-linked cisplatin derivatives, including glycine-, lysine-, and ornithine-linked cisplatin, Gplatin, Kplatin, and Oplatin, respectively. Cisplatin, the first FDA-approved platinum-based anticancer drug, has been widely used in cancer chemotherapy. Its pharmacological mechanism has been identified as its ability to coordinate to genomic DNA, and guanine is its major target. In previous reports, cisplatin was successfully utilized as a chemical probe to detect solvent accessible sites in ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Among the amino-acid-linked cisplatin derivatives, Oplatin exhibits preference for adenine over guanine. The mechanism behind its different selectivity compared to cisplatin may relate to its potential of forming a hydrogen bond between the carboxylate group in Pt (II) complex and the 6-amino moiety of adenosine stabilizes A-Oplatin products. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis also indicates that different coordination sites of Oplatin on adenosine affect glycosidic bond stability. Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments were performed on all three amino acid-linked cisplatin to characterize their structures. An extensive theoretical study has been performed on Gplatin to guide the selection of the most effective theory and basis set based on its geometric information. The results for Gplatin provide the foundation for characterization of the more complex amino acid-linked cisplatin derivatives, Oplatin and Kplatin. Structural and energetic information elucidated for these compounds, particularly Oplatin reveal the reason for its alternative selectivity compared to cisplatin.

  18. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrim, Ana P.; Yoshikawa, Masanobu; Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu; Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Baum, Bruce J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  19. The alkaline single cell electrophoresis assay with eight mouse organs: results with 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Matsusaka, N; Madarame, H; Miyamae, Y; Ishida, K; Satoh, M; Sekihashi, K; Sasaki, Y F

    2000-04-13

    The genotoxicity of 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers selected from IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) groups 1, 2A, and 2B was evaluated in eight mouse organs with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) (comet) assay. Groups of four mice were treated once intraperitoneally at the dose at which micronucleus tests had been conducted, and the stomach, colon, liver, kidney, bladder, lung, brain, and bone marrow were sampled 3, 8, and/or 24 h later. All chemicals were positive in the SCGE assay in at least one organ. Of the 22 mono-functional alkylating agents, over 50% were positive in all organs except the brain and bone marrow. The two subsets of mono-functional alkylating agents differed in their bone marrow genotoxicity: only 1 of the 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines was positive in bone marrow as opposed to 8 of the 13 other alkylating agents, reflecting the fact that dialkyl N-nitrosoamines are poor micronucleus inducers in hematopoietic cells. The two groups of mono-functional alkylating agents also differ in hepatic carcinogenicity in spite of the fact that they are similar in hepatic genotoxicity. While dialkyl N-nitrosoamines produce tumors primarily in mouse liver, only one (styrene-7,8-oxide) out of 10 of the other type of mono-functional alkylating agents is a mouse hepatic carcinogen. Taking into consideration our previous results showing high concordance between hepatic genotoxicity and carcinogenicity for aromatic amines and azo compounds, a possible explanation for the discrepancy might be that chemicals that require metabolic activation show high concordance between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in the liver. A high percent of the 10 DNA crosslinkers were positive in the SCGE assay in the gastrointestinal mucosa, but less than 50% were positive in the liver and lung. In this study, we allowed 10 min alkali-unwinding to obtain low and stable control values

  20. Fisetin, a dietary bioflavonoid, reverses acquired Cisplatin-resistance of lung adenocarcinoma cells through MAPK/Survivin/Caspase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Wenlei; Zhang, Liang; Zhu, Yi; Zhu, Bo; Chen, Zhengtang

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin has been a key chemotherapy drug for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) for decades. However, the efficacy of Cisplatin is usually reduced by the occurrence of drug-resistance of cancer cells. Fisetin is a flavonol naturally found in many fruits and vegetables, which has been reported to suppress cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in various cancers. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether Fisetin was capable of enhancing cytotoxicity of Cisplatin in Cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells, and explore the possible signaling pathways involved. Cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells, A549-CR, was established by repeated subculturing of A549 cells with increasing Cisplatin. Proliferation ability was assessed by MTT analysis and apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. The results showed that Fisetin effectively increased sensitivity of A549-CR cells to Cisplatin, possibly mediated by inhibiting aberrant activation of MAPK signaling pathways. This increases the possibility of Fisetin as a promising agent for lung cancer therapy. PMID:26692948

  1. Alterations of MicroRNA Expression Patterns in Human Cervical Carcinoma Cells (Ca Ski) toward 1′S-1′-Acetoxychavicol Acetate and Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Phuah, Neoh Hun; In, Lionel LA; Azmi, Mohamad Nurul; Ibrahim, Halijah; Awang, Khalijah

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the combined effects of a natural compound 1′S-1′-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) with cisplatin (CDDP) on HPV-positive human cervical carcinoma cell lines (Ca Ski—low cisplatin sensitivity and HeLa—high cisplatin sensitivity), and to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) modulated in response toward ACA and/or CDDP. It was revealed that both ACA and CDDP induced dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity when used as a stand-alone agent, while synergistic effects were observed when used in combination with a combination index (CI) value of 0.74 ± 0.01 and 0.85 ± 0.01 in Ca Ski and HeLa cells, respectively. A total of 25 miRNAs were found to be significantly differentially expressed in response to ACA and/or CDDP. These include hsa-miR-138, hsa-miR-210, and hsa-miR-744 with predicted gene targets involved in signaling pathways regulating apoptosis and cell cycle progression. In conclusion, ACA acts as a chemosensitizer which synergistically potentiates the cytotoxic effect of CDDP in cervical cancer cells. The altered miRNA expression upon administration of ACA and/or CDDP suggests that miRNAs play an important role in anticancer drug responses, which can be manipulated for therapeutic purposes. PMID:23012319

  2. Alterations of microRNA expression patterns in human cervical carcinoma cells (Ca Ski) toward 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Phuah, Neoh Hun; In, Lionel L A; Azmi, Mohamad Nurul; Ibrahim, Halijah; Awang, Khalijah; Nagoor, Noor Hasima

    2013-05-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the combined effects of a natural compound 1'S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) with cisplatin (CDDP) on HPV-positive human cervical carcinoma cell lines (Ca Ski-low cisplatin sensitivity and HeLa-high cisplatin sensitivity), and to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) modulated in response toward ACA and/or CDDP. It was revealed that both ACA and CDDP induced dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity when used as a stand-alone agent, while synergistic effects were observed when used in combination with a combination index (CI) value of 0.74 ± 0.01 and 0.85 ± 0.01 in Ca Ski and HeLa cells, respectively. A total of 25 miRNAs were found to be significantly differentially expressed in response to ACA and/or CDDP. These include hsa-miR-138, hsa-miR-210, and hsa-miR-744 with predicted gene targets involved in signaling pathways regulating apoptosis and cell cycle progression. In conclusion, ACA acts as a chemosensitizer which synergistically potentiates the cytotoxic effect of CDDP in cervical cancer cells. The altered miRNA expression upon administration of ACA and/or CDDP suggests that miRNAs play an important role in anticancer drug responses, which can be manipulated for therapeutic purposes.

  3. Cisplatin Properties in a Nanobiotechnological Approach to Cancer: A Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Marcato, P D; Fávaro, W J; Durán, N

    2014-01-01

    For many years, cisplatin has been used to treat many types of cancer, including urogenital, skin and lung cancers. Unfortunately, treatment with this drug causes serious side effects, such as severe toxicity; including nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, peripheral neuropathy, ototoxicity, asthenia and hematological toxicity.Therefore, the clinical use of cisplatin has been hampered.The incidence of nephrotoxicity frequently prevents the use of high enough doses to maximize the antineoplastic effects, and strict attention must be given to the hydration of cisplatin-treated patients to minimize kidney damage.Nanobiotechnology, or nanomedicine, was developed to mitigate, or even eliminate,the toxic effects of pharmaceutical compounds; for example, drug-targeting systems were developed to enable site specificity and to control the delivery drug. Therefore, biomedical nanotechnology researchers attempted to develop nanostructures not only to deliver chemotherapeutics to the desired treatment site but also to control when and how quickly the compounds are released. To achieve these ends, a drug can either be encapsulated in a matrix or attached to a particle surface. Studies concerning the encapsulation of cisplatin in liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, as well as the immobilization of cisplatin on metallic nanoparticles, have already been published. The association of cancer treatment, particularly chemotherapeutics, with nanotechnology is currently one of the most exciting areas of research. In this mini-review, cisplatin will be discussed in terms of its efficacy against many cancers, including bladder cancer. Additionally, established nanostructure-based drug delivery systems for cisplatin and their efficacy against different types of cancer will be reviewed. Because cisplatin is a standard treatment with good performance statistics and with an effective renal function-glomerular filtration rate

  4. Role of copper transporters in resistance to platinating agents

    PubMed Central

    Rabik, Cara A.; Maryon, Edward B.; Kasza, Kristen; Shafer, John T.; Bartnik, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Copper transporters have been proposed to be involved in cellular import and export of platinating agents. Expression of the human copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) is thought to result in increased sensitivity to cisplatin, whereas expression of ATP7A and ATP7B are thought to be involved in resistance to cisplatin either by sequestering drug away from its targets (ATP7A) or by exporting the drug from the cell (ATP7B). In this study, we evaluated the sensitivity of cells expressing copper transporters to cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. We also examined whether O6-benzylguanine, a modulator of platinating agent cytotoxicity, enhanced sensitivity of cells with or without the transporters to cisplatin. Overexpression of hCtr1 in the HEK293 cell line did not result in increased sensitivity to cisplatin, either alone or following treatment with O6-benzylguanine. In contrast, overexpression of ATP7A and ATP7B in Me32a fibroblasts resulted in increased resistance to cisplatin, but not to carboplatin or oxaliplatin. ATP7A-expressing cells (MeMNK) showed a significant enhancement of cisplatin cytotoxicity following O6-benzylguanine treatment, but ATP7B-expressing cells (MeWND) did not. Notably, expression of either ATP7A or ATP7B did not result in a change in total cytoplasmic platinum levels following treatment with BG plus cisplatin. The mechanism of BG enhancement of cisplatin cytotoxicity is not likely through regulation of copper transporters. PMID:18998134

  5. Protective effect of Korean red ginseng extract on cisplatin ototoxicity in HEI-OC1 auditory cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Gi Jung; Chang, Ji Won; Choi, June; Chae, Sung Won; Ko, Eun Ju; Jung, Hak Hyun

    2010-04-01

    Ginseng extract is known to have many beneficial effects, including the reversal of pathological and physiological changes induced by ischemia, stress, and aging. Cisplatin, an effective antineoplastic drug, can cause irreversible sensorineural hearing loss and serious tinnitus in humans; thus cisplatin-induced ototoxicity is a useful experimental model for ototoxicity. This study investigated the protective effects of Korean red ginseng extract on cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in auditory cells. Pretreatment with 2.5 mg/mL of ginseng extract prior to application of 20 microM of cisplatin significantly increased cell viability after 48 h of incubation in auditory cells. Pretreatment with ginseng extract significantly attenuated the cisplatin-induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ginseng extract also inhibited the expression of caspase-3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase related to cisplatin-induced apoptosis because a major mechanism of cisplatin-induced toxicity involves ROS production. Thus, Korean red ginseng extract can play both an anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative role on cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in an auditory cell line. PMID:20020438

  6. Clinical evaluation of a frozen commercially prepared microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of seven antifungal agents, including the new triazoles posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Messer, S A; Boyken, L; Huynh, H; Hollis, R J

    2002-05-01

    A commercially prepared frozen broth microdilution panel (Trek Diagnostic Systems, Westlake, Ohio) was compared with a reference microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of two quality control (QC) strains and 99 clinical isolates of Candida spp. The antifungal agents tested included amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole. Microdilution testing was performed according to NCCLS recommendations. MIC endpoints were read visually after 48 h of incubation and were assessed independently for each microdilution panel. The MICs for the QC strains were within published limits for both the reference and Trek microdilution panels. Discrepancies among MIC endpoints of no more than 2 dilutions were used to calculate the percent agreement. Acceptable levels of agreement between the Trek and reference panels were observed for all antifungal agents tested against the 99 clinical isolates. The overall agreement for each antifungal agent ranged from 96% for ravuconazole to 100% for amphotericin B. The Trek microdilution panel appears to be a viable alternative to frozen microdilution panels prepared in-house. PMID:11980944

  7. Computational metallomics of the anticancer drug cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Calandrini, Vania; Rossetti, Giulia; Arnesano, Fabio; Natile, Giovanni; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Cisplatin, cis-diamminedichlorido-platinum(II), is an important therapeutic tool in the struggle against different tumors, yet it is plagued with the emergence of resistance mechanisms after repeated administrations. This hampers greatly its efficacy. Overcoming resistance problems requires first and foremost an integrated and systematic understanding of the structural determinants and molecular recognition processes involving the drug and its cellular targets. Here we review a strategy that we have followed for the last few years, based on the combination of modern tools from computational chemistry with experimental biophysical methods. Using hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) simulations, validated by spectroscopic experiments (including NMR, and CD), we have worked out for the first time at atomic level the structural determinants in solution of platinated cellular substrates. These include the copper homeostasis proteins Ctr1, Atox1, and ATP7A. All of these proteins have been suggested to influence the pre-target resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, coupling hybrid QM/MM simulations with classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) and free energy calculations, based on force field parameters refined by the so-called "Force Matching" procedure, we have characterized the structural modifications and the free energy landscape associated with the recognition between platinated DNA and the protein HMGB1, belonging to the chromosomal high-mobility group proteins HMGB that inhibit the repair of platinated DNA. This may alleviate issues relative to on-target resistance process. The elucidation of the mechanisms by which tumors are sensitive or refractory to cisplatin may lead to the discovery of prognostic biomarkers. The approach reviewed here could be straightforwardly extended to other metal-based drugs.

  8. Anti-tumour activity of two novel compounds in cisplatin-resistant testicular germ cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nitzsche, B; Gloesenkamp, C; Schrader, M; Hoffmann, B; Zengerling, F; Balabanov, S; Honecker, F; Höpfner, M

    2012-01-01

    growth of cisplatin-resistant TGCT cells and suppresses tumour angiogenesis. Thus, HP-14 may be an interesting new agent that should be further explored for TGCT treatment, especially in TGCTs that are resistant to cisplatin. PMID:23169338

  9. Exosomes derived from gefitinib-treated EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells alter cisplatin sensitivity via up-regulating autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lu-Lu; Liu, Yu; Cheng, Liang; Wang, Fang; Yu, Han-Qing; Gao, Jian; Wei, Wei; Wang, Hua; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical trials indicate that concurrent administration of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, such as gefitinib or erlotinib) with chemotherapy agents fails to improve overall survival in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the antagonistic effects remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of exosomes in the antagonistic effects of concurrent administration of chemotherapy and TKIs. Exosomes derived from gefitinib-treated PC9 cells (Exo-GF) decreased the antitumor effects of cisplatin, while exosomes derived from cisplatin-treated PC9 cells (Exo-DDP) did not significantly affect the antitumor effects of gefitinib. Additionally, inhibition of exosome secretion by GW4869 resulted in a modest synergistic effect when cisplatin and gefitinib were co-administered. Furthermore, Exo-GF co-incubation with cisplatin increased autophagic activity and reduced apoptosis, as demonstrated by an upregulation of LC3-II and Bcl-2 protein levels and downregulation of p62 and Bax protein levels. Thus, the antagonistic effects of gefitinib and cisplatin were mainly attributed to Exo-GF, which resulted in upregulated autophagy and increased cisplatin resistance. These results suggest that inhibition of exosome secretion may be a helpful strategy to overcome the antagonistic effects when TKIs and chemotherapeutic agents are co-administered. Before administering chemotherapy, introducing a washout period to completely eliminate TKI-related exosomes, may be a better procedure for administering chemotherapy and TKIs. PMID:27029054

  10. Cisplatin resistance: a cellular self-defense mechanism resulting from multiple epigenetic and genetic changes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ding-Wu; Pouliot, Lynn M; Hall, Matthew D; Gottesman, Michael M

    2012-07-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective broad-spectrum anticancer drugs. Its effectiveness seems to be due to the unique properties of cisplatin, which enters cells via multiple pathways and forms multiple different DNA-platinum adducts while initiating a cellular self-defense system by activating or silencing a variety of different genes, resulting in dramatic epigenetic and/or genetic alternations. As a result, the development of cisplatin resistance in human cancer cells in vivo and in vitro by necessity stems from bewilderingly complex genetic and epigenetic changes in gene expression and alterations in protein localization. Extensive published evidence has demonstrated that pleiotropic alterations are frequently detected during development of resistance to this toxic metal compound. Changes occur in almost every mechanism supporting cell survival, including cell growth-promoting pathways, apoptosis, developmental pathways, DNA damage repair, and endocytosis. In general, dozens of genes are affected in cisplatin-resistant cells, including pathways involved in copper metabolism as well as transcription pathways that alter the cytoskeleton, change cell surface presentation of proteins, and regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Decreased accumulation is one of the most common features resulting in cisplatin resistance. This seems to be a consequence of numerous epigenetic and genetic changes leading to the loss of cell-surface binding sites and/or transporters for cisplatin, and decreased fluid phase endocytosis. PMID:22659329

  11. Cisplatin Resistance: A Cellular Self-Defense Mechanism Resulting from Multiple Epigenetic and Genetic Changes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Ding-Wu; Pouliot, Lynn M.; Hall, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective broad-spectrum anticancer drugs. Its effectiveness seems to be due to the unique properties of cisplatin, which enters cells via multiple pathways and forms multiple different DNA-platinum adducts while initiating a cellular self-defense system by activating or silencing a variety of different genes, resulting in dramatic epigenetic and/or genetic alternations. As a result, the development of cisplatin resistance in human cancer cells in vivo and in vitro by necessity stems from bewilderingly complex genetic and epigenetic changes in gene expression and alterations in protein localization. Extensive published evidence has demonstrated that pleiotropic alterations are frequently detected during development of resistance to this toxic metal compound. Changes occur in almost every mechanism supporting cell survival, including cell growth-promoting pathways, apoptosis, developmental pathways, DNA damage repair, and endocytosis. In general, dozens of genes are affected in cisplatin-resistant cells, including pathways involved in copper metabolism as well as transcription pathways that alter the cytoskeleton, change cell surface presentation of proteins, and regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Decreased accumulation is one of the most common features resulting in cisplatin resistance. This seems to be a consequence of numerous epigenetic and genetic changes leading to the loss of cell-surface binding sites and/or transporters for cisplatin, and decreased fluid phase endocytosis. PMID:22659329

  12. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide: An essential factor in preserving hearing in cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Su-Bin; Khadka, Dipendra; Pandit, Arpana; Shim, Hyeok; Yang, Sei-Hoon; Cho, Eun-Young; Song, Jeho; Kwak, Tae Hwan; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2015-08-01

    Ototoxicity is an important issue in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy. Numerous studies have demonstrated that several mechanisms, including oxidative stress, DNA damage, and inflammatory responses, are closely associated with cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. Although much attention has been directed at identifying ways to protect the inner ear from cisplatin-induced damage, the precise underlying mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) has emerged as an important regulator of cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis. NAD(+) acts as a cofactor for various enzymes including sirtuins (SIRTs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs), and therefore, maintaining adequate NAD(+) levels has therapeutic benefits because of its effect on NAD(+)-dependent enzymes. Recent studies demonstrated that disturbance in intracellular NAD(+) levels is critically involved in cisplatin-induced cochlear damage associated with oxidative stress, DNA damage, and inflammatory responses. In this review, we describe the importance of NAD(+) in cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and discuss potential strategies for the prevention or treatment of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity with a particular focus on NAD(+)-dependent cellular pathways. PMID:25891352

  13. Curcumin prevents cisplatin-induced decrease in the tight and adherens junctions: relation to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Joyce; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Reyes, José Luis; Loredo, María L; Barrera-Oviedo, Diana; Pinzón, Enrique; Rodríguez-Rangel, Daniela Saraí; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin is a polyphenol and cisplatin is an antineoplastic agent that induces nephrotoxicity associated with oxidative stress, apoptosis, fibrosis and decrease in renal tight junction (TJ) proteins. The potential effect of curcumin against alterations in TJ structure and function has not been evaluated in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The present study explored whether curcumin is able to prevent the cisplatin-induced fibrosis and decreased expression of the TJ and adherens junction (AJ) proteins occludin, claudin-2 and E-cadherin in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Curcumin (200 mg kg(-1)) was administered in three doses, and rats were sacrificed 72 h after cisplatin administration. Curcumin was able to scavenge, in a concentration-dependent way, superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite anion, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide. Cisplatin-induced renal damage was associated with alterations in plasma creatinine, expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and of kidney injury molecule-1, histological damage, increase in apoptosis, fibrosis (evaluated by transforming growth factor β1, collagen I and IV and α-smooth muscle actin expressions), increase in oxidative/nitrosative stress (evaluated by Hsp70/72 expression, protein tyrosine nitration, superoxide anion production in isolated glomeruli and proximal tubules, and protein levels of NADPH oxidase subunits p47(phox) and gp91(phox), protein kinase C β2, and Nrf2) as well as by decreased expression of occludin, claudin-2, β-catenin and E-cadherin. Curcumin treatment prevented all the above-described alterations. The protective effect of curcumin against cisplatin-induced fibrosis and decreased proteins of the TJ and AJ was associated with the prevention of glomerular and proximal tubular superoxide anion production induced by NADPH oxidase activity.

  14. Biochemical and histological study of rat liver and kidney injury induced by Cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Palipoch, Sarawoot; Punsawad, Chuchard

    2013-09-01

    Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used in treatment of several cancers. It is documented as a major cause of clinical nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced liver and kidney injury. Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Group 1 (control) was intraperitoneally (IP) injected with a single dose of 0.85% normal saline. Groups 2, 3 and 4 were IP injected with single doses of cisplatin at 10, 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight (BW), respectively. At 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h after injection, BW, levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, malondialdehyde (MDA), and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and histology of the liver and kidney were evaluated. Cisplatin caused a reduction in BW of rats in groups 2, 3 and 4 at all post injection intervals. The levels of serum ALT, AST, BUN and creatinine and MDA of the kidney and liver were markedly increased especially at 48 and 72 h, whereas the activity of SOD was decreased after cisplatin injection. Liver sections revealed moderate to severe congestion with dilation of the hepatic artery, portal vein and bile duct and disorganization of hepatic cords at 50 mg/kg of cisplatin. Kidney sections illustrated mild to moderate tubular necrosis at 25 and 50 mg/kg of cisplatin. Therefore, oxidative stress was implicated in the pathogenesis of liver and kidney injury causing biochemical and histological alterations.

  15. FTIR Biospectroscopy Investigation on Cisplatin Cytotoxicity in Three Pairs of Sensitive and Resistant Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Ensieh; Kobarfard, Farzad; H Shirazi, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) has extensively been used for biological applications. Cisplatin is one the most useful antineoplastic chemotherapy drugs for a variety of different human cancers. One of the clinical problems in its application, which would consequently affect the therapeutic outcome of its application, is the occurrence of resistance to this agent. In this project three different pairs of sensitive and resistant cell lines of human ovarian A2780 and its resistant pair of A2780-CP, human ovarian OV2008 and its resistant pair of C13, and finally human lung carcinoma of HTB56 and its resistant pair of HTB56-CP were grown in the laboratory under the standard procedure. Saline was exposed to control cells, whereas 1, 5 and 10 µg/mL of cisplatin was exposed to experimental cells, for 1 h. Cells were then collected and lyophilized from which spectra were taken. According to our results, we could not trigger a well-recognized cells biomolecular band at 1015 cm(-1), being modified after exposure to cisplatin in all cell lines. On the other hand, there was a clear dose-dependent increase in protein β-sheet structure related peaks shift in resistant cell lines after exposure to cisplatin. This would probably indicate an easier protein interaction site for cisplatin in the resistant cell lines, which would probably inhibit cisplatin from binding to DNA, as the cytotoxic target. As a conclusion, FTIR biospectroscopy has proven its potency to identify the interactions, as well as the false engagement cellular sites for cisplatin in sensitive and resistant cell lines. PMID:27610161

  16. FTIR Biospectroscopy Investigation on Cisplatin Cytotoxicity in Three Pairs of Sensitive and Resistant Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Ensieh; Kobarfard, Farzad; H. Shirazi, Farshad

    2016-01-01

    Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) has extensively been used for biological applications. Cisplatin is one the most useful antineoplastic chemotherapy drugs for a variety of different human cancers. One of the clinical problems in its application, which would consequently affect the therapeutic outcome of its application, is the occurrence of resistance to this agent. In this project three different pairs of sensitive and resistant cell lines of human ovarian A2780 and its resistant pair of A2780-CP, human ovarian OV2008 and its resistant pair of C13, and finally human lung carcinoma of HTB56 and its resistant pair of HTB56-CP were grown in the laboratory under the standard procedure. Saline was exposed to control cells, whereas 1, 5 and 10 µg/mL of cisplatin was exposed to experimental cells, for 1 h. Cells were then collected and lyophilized from which spectra were taken. According to our results, we could not trigger a well-recognized cells biomolecular band at 1015 cm-1, being modified after exposure to cisplatin in all cell lines. On the other hand, there was a clear dose-dependent increase in protein β-sheet structure related peaks shift in resistant cell lines after exposure to cisplatin. This would probably indicate an easier protein interaction site for cisplatin in the resistant cell lines, which would probably inhibit cisplatin from binding to DNA, as the cytotoxic target. As a conclusion, FTIR biospectroscopy has proven its potency to identify the interactions, as well as the false engagement cellular sites for cisplatin in sensitive and resistant cell lines. PMID:27610161

  17. Oxaliplatin-Based Doublets Versus Cisplatin or Carboplatin-Based Doublets in the First-Line Treatment of Advanced Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Xiao, Jing; Yang, Yifan; Cao, Bangwei

    2015-07-01

    The efficacy and toxicity of oxaliplatin-based versus carboplatin/cisplatin-based doublets in patients with previously untreated nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been compared.We searched published randomized controlled trials of oxaliplatin-based or carboplatin/cisplatin-based medications for NSCLC. A fixed effect model was used to analyze outcomes which were expressed as the hazard ratio for overall survival (OS) and time-to-progression (TTP), relative risk, overall response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), 1-year survival, and the odds ratios for toxicity were pooled.Eight studies involving 1047 patients were included. ORR tended to favor carboplatin/cisplatin but the effect was not significantly different compared with oxaliplatin doublets (P = 0.05). The effects of OS, TTP, DCR, and 1-year survival between the 2 regimens were comparable. Oxaliplatin doublets caused less grade 3/4 leukocytopenia and neutropenia. Grades 3 to 4 nonhematological toxicities and grades 3 to 4 hematological toxicities showed little difference between oxaliplatin doublets and carboplatin/cisplatin doublets.Meta-analysis shows that the efficacy of oxaliplatin doublets is similar to that of other currently used platinum doublets. The lack of significant differences in the statistic analysis does not preclude genuine differences in clinical efficacy, because higher diversities between the studies covered differences between the 2 groups in each study. Oxaliplatin combined with a third-generation agent should be considered for use as alternative chemotherapy in patients who cannot tolerate conventional platinum-based regimens because the toxicity profile is much more favorable.

  18. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Hiroyasu; Sagara, Atsunobu; Arakawa, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Jo, Ara; Sato, Ken; Chiba, Yoshihiko; Yamazaki, Mitsuaki; Matoba, Motohiro; Narita, Minoru

    2014-07-15

    Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms of “muscle fatigue” induced by anti-cancer drugs are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the muscle-atrophic effect of cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 4 consecutive days. On Day 5, hindlimb and quadriceps muscles were isolated from mice. The loss of body weight and food intake under the administration of cisplatin was the same as those in a dietary restriction (DR) group. Under the present conditions, the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased not only the muscle mass of the hindlimb and quadriceps but also the myofiber diameter, compared to those in the DR group. The mRNA expression levels of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) were significantly and further increased by cisplatin treated group, compared to DR. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of myostatin and p21 were significantly upregulated by the administration of cisplatin, compared to DR. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, which leads to the blockade of the upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx, was significantly and dramatically decreased by cisplatin. These findings suggest that the administration of cisplatin increases atrophic gene expression, and may lead to an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation pathways, which would lead to muscle atrophy. This phenomenon could, at least in part, explain the mechanism of cisplatin-induced muscle fatigue. - Highlights: • Cisplatin decreased mass and myofiber diameter in quadriceps muscle. • The mRNA of MAFbx, MuRF1 and FOXO3 were increased by the cisplatin. • The mRNA of myostatin and p21 were upregulated by cisplatin. • The phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a was decreased by cisplatin.

  19. Effects of Cisplatin in Neuroblastoma Rat Cells: Damage to Cellular Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Santin, Giada; Scietti, Luigi; Veneroni, Paola; Barni, Sergio; Bernocchi, Graziella; Bottone, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin (cisPt) is a chemotherapy agent used as a treatment for several types of cancer. The main cytotoxic effect of cisplatin is generally accepted to be DNA damage. Recently, the mechanism by which cisPt generates the cascade of events involved in the apoptotic process has been demonstrated. In particular it has been shown that some organelles are cisPt target and are involved in cell death. This paper aims to describe the morphological and functional changes of the Golgi apparatus and lysosomes during apoptosis induced in neuronal rat cells (B50) by cisplatin. The results obtained show that the cellular organelles are the target of cisPt, so their damage can induce cell death. PMID:22505928

  20. Revisiting DNA damage repair, p53-mediated apoptosis and cisplatin sensitivity in germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Francesca; Feldman, Darren R; Barchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), ie, seminomas and nonseminomas, account for 1% to 3% of all neoplasms in men. They are the most common cancer in young white males and are unique in their responsiveness to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. For this reason, TGCTs are considered a model for curative disease. However, up to now, the molecular mechanisms behind this exceptional responsiveness to DNA-damaging agents have remained unclear. A hypersensitive apoptotic response, as well as a reduction in the proficiency to repair cisplatin-induced DNA damage might account for this behavior. In this review, building on recent findings of p53-induced apoptosis and DNA-repair mechanisms in TGCTs, we will discuss the molecular bases that drive tumor sensitivity to cisplatin, emphasizing the new therapeutic approaches proposed to eventually constrain tumor recurrence, and target TGCTs which are unresponsive to standard therapies. PMID:23784838

  1. The protective effect of thiamine pyrophosphate, but not thiamine, against cardiotoxicity induced with cisplatin in rats.

    PubMed

    Coskun, Resit; Turan, Mehmet Ibrahim; Turan, Isil Siltelioglu; Gulapoglu, Mine

    2014-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of thiamine pyrophosphate on oxidative damage associated with cardiotoxicity caused by cisplatin (CIS), an antineoplastic agent, in rats, and compared this with thiamine. Animals used in the study were divided into four groups of 6 rats each. These represented a control group receiving 5 mg/kg of CIS, study groups receiving 20 mg/kg of thiamine pyrophosphate plus 5 mg/kg of cisplatin (CTPG) or 20 mg/kg of thiamine plus 5 mg/kg of cisplatin and a healthy (H) group. All doses were administered intraperitoneally once a day for 14 days. Malondialdehyde, total glutathione and products of DNA injury results were similar in the CTPG and H groups (p > 0.05). Creatinine kinase, creatine kinase MB and troponin 1 levels were similar in the CTPG and H groups (p > 0.05). Thiamine pyrophosphate prevented CIS-associated oxidative stress and heart injury, whereas thiamine did not prevent these.

  2. Cisplatin selects for stem-like cells in osteosarcoma by activating Notch signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Gao, Tian; Simões, Bruno M.; Eyre, Rachel; Guo, Weichun; Clarke, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling regulates normal stem cells and is also thought to regulate cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recent data indicate that Notch signaling plays a role in the development and progression of osteosarcoma, however the regulation of Notch in chemo-resistant stem-like cells has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study we generated cisplatin-resistant osteosarcoma cells by treating them with sub-lethal dose of cisplatin, sufficient to induce DNA damage responses. Cisplatin-resistant osteosarcoma cells exhibited lower proliferation, enhanced spheroid formation and more mesenchymal characteristics than cisplatin-sensitive cells, were enriched for Stro-1+/CD117+ cells and showed increased expression of stem cell-related genes. A similar effect was observed in vivo, and in addition in vivo tumorigenicity was enhanced during serial transplantation. Using several publicly available datasets, we identified that Notch expression was closely associated with osteosarcoma stem cells and chemotherapy resistance. We confirmed that cisplatin-induced enrichment of osteosarcoma stem cells was mediated through Notch signaling in vitro, and immunohistochemistry showed that cleaved Notch1 (NICD1) positive cells were significantly increased in a relapsed xenograft which had received cisplatin treatment. Furthermore, pretreatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) to prevent Notch signalling inhibited cisplatin-enriched osteosarcoma stem cell activity in vitro, including Stro-1+/CD117+ double positive cells and spheroid formation capacity. The Notch inhibitor DAPT also prevented tumor recurrence in resistant xenograft tumors. Overall, our results show that cisplatin induces the enrichment of osteosarcoma stem-like cells through Notch signaling, and targeted inactivation of Notch may be useful for the elimination of CSCs and overcoming drug resistance. PMID:27102300

  3. Bardoxolone methyl modulates efflux transporter and detoxifying enzyme expression in cisplatin-induced kidney cell injury.

    PubMed

    Atilano-Roque, Amandla; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Joy, Melanie S

    2016-09-30

    Cisplatin is prescribed for the treatment of solid tumors and elicits toxicity to kidney tubules, which limits its clinical use. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, NFE2L2) is a critical transcription factor that has been shown to protect against kidney injury through activation of antioxidant mechanisms. We aimed to evaluate the ability of short-term treatment with the Nrf2 activator bardoxolone methyl (CDDO-Me) to protect against cisplatin-induced kidney cell toxicity. Cell viability was assessed in human kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells (hPTCs) exposed to low, intermediate, and high cisplatin concentrations in the presence and absence of CDDO-Me, administered either prior to or after cisplatin. Treatment with cisplatin alone resulted in reductions in hPTC viability, while CDDO-Me administered prior to or after cisplatin exposure yielded significantly higher cell viability (17%-71%). Gene regulation (mRNA expression) studies revealed the ability of CDDO-Me to modify protective pathways including Nrf2 induced detoxifying genes [GCLC (increased 1.9-fold), NQO1 (increased 9.3-fold)], and an efflux transporter [SLC47A1 (increased 4.5-fold)] at 12h. Protein assessments were in agreement with gene expression. Immunofluorescence revealed localization of GCLC and NQO1 to the nucleus and cytosol, respectively, with CDDO-Me administered prior to or after cisplatin exposure. The findings of enhanced cell viability and increased expression of detoxifying enzymes (GCLC and NQO1) and the multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1) efflux transporter (SLC47A1) in hPTCs exposed to CDDO-Me, suggest that intermittent treatment with CDDO-Me prior to or after cisplatin exposure may be a promising approach to mitigate acute kidney injury.

  4. Bardoxolone methyl modulates efflux transporter and detoxifying enzyme expression in cisplatin-induced kidney cell injury.

    PubMed

    Atilano-Roque, Amandla; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Joy, Melanie S

    2016-09-30

    Cisplatin is prescribed for the treatment of solid tumors and elicits toxicity to kidney tubules, which limits its clinical use. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, NFE2L2) is a critical transcription factor that has been shown to protect against kidney injury through activation of antioxidant mechanisms. We aimed to evaluate the ability of short-term treatment with the Nrf2 activator bardoxolone methyl (CDDO-Me) to protect against cisplatin-induced kidney cell toxicity. Cell viability was assessed in human kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells (hPTCs) exposed to low, intermediate, and high cisplatin concentrations in the presence and absence of CDDO-Me, administered either prior to or after cisplatin. Treatment with cisplatin alone resulted in reductions in hPTC viability, while CDDO-Me administered prior to or after cisplatin exposure yielded significantly higher cell viability (17%-71%). Gene regulation (mRNA expression) studies revealed the ability of CDDO-Me to modify protective pathways including Nrf2 induced detoxifying genes [GCLC (increased 1.9-fold), NQO1 (increased 9.3-fold)], and an efflux transporter [SLC47A1 (increased 4.5-fold)] at 12h. Protein assessments were in agreement with gene expression. Immunofluorescence revealed localization of GCLC and NQO1 to the nucleus and cytosol, respectively, with CDDO-Me administered prior to or after cisplatin exposure. The findings of enhanced cell viability and increased expression of detoxifying enzymes (GCLC and NQO1) and the multidrug and toxin extrusion protein 1 (MATE1) efflux transporter (SLC47A1) in hPTCs exposed to CDDO-Me, suggest that intermittent treatment with CDDO-Me prior to or after cisplatin exposure may be a promising approach to mitigate acute kidney injury. PMID:27480280

  5. Pemetrexed/cisplatin as first-line chemotherapy for advanced lung cancer with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    He, Guangzhao; Xiao, Xiaoguang; Zou, Man; Zhang, Chengliang; Xia, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Brain metastases (BMs) are a common and serious complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), surgery, and molecular targeted therapy are usually used to treat NSCLC with BM. Chemotherapeutic options for BM are limited by tumor resistance, ineffective agents, and the blood–brain barrier. Pemetrexed/cisplatin is the preferred chemotherapy in nonsquamous NSCLC, but the efficacy of this treatment for nonsquamous NSCLC with BM is uncertain. Methods: We present a case of nonsquamous NSCLC with asymptomatic BM presenting with irritating cough and right shoulder back pain (unknown sensitizing epidermal growth factor receptor mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase). Results: He benefited from administration of first-line chemotherapy of pemetrexed/cisplatin. Partial remission was achieved in the primary lesion of the lungs and BM lesion. He was further given 3 cycles of pemetrexed monotherapy and WBRT. Complete remission was further achieved in BM lesion. Conclusion: The findings of clinical trials and theoretical studies about the current pemetrexed/cisplatin in the treatment of nonsquamous NSCLC with BM are also summarized to provide a reference for the application of pemetrexed/cisplatin in nonsquamous NSCLC with BM. Whether or not pemetrexed/cisplatin is definitely effective in nonsquamous NSCLC with BM must be proven by subsequent phase III clinical trials. PMID:27512852

  6. Management of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients on Multiday Cisplatin Based Combination Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Praveen; Einhorn, Lawrence; Albany, Costantine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of germ cell tumors. A common side effect of multiday cisplatin chemotherapy is severe nausea and vomiting. Considerable progress has been made in the control of these side effects since the introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy in the 1970s. Germ cell tumor which is a model for a curable neoplasm has also turned into an excellent testing ground to develop effective strategies to prevent chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in multiday cisplatin based regimens. The use of combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)3 receptor antagonist, a neurokinin-1 (NK1) antagonist, and dexamethasone has greatly improved our ability to prevent and control acute and delayed CINV. Mechanism and pattern of CINV with multiday chemotherapy may differ from those in single day chemotherapy and therefore efficacy of antiemetic drugs as observed in single day chemotherapy may not be applicable. There are only few randomized clinical trials with special emphasis on multiday chemotherapy. Further studies are essential to determine the efficacy, optimal dose, and duration of the newer agents and combinations in multiday cisplatin based chemotherapy. PMID:26425563

  7. Management of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients on Multiday Cisplatin Based Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Praveen; Einhorn, Lawrence; Albany, Costantine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of germ cell tumors. A common side effect of multiday cisplatin chemotherapy is severe nausea and vomiting. Considerable progress has been made in the control of these side effects since the introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy in the 1970s. Germ cell tumor which is a model for a curable neoplasm has also turned into an excellent testing ground to develop effective strategies to prevent chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in multiday cisplatin based regimens. The use of combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)3 receptor antagonist, a neurokinin-1 (NK1) antagonist, and dexamethasone has greatly improved our ability to prevent and control acute and delayed CINV. Mechanism and pattern of CINV with multiday chemotherapy may differ from those in single day chemotherapy and therefore efficacy of antiemetic drugs as observed in single day chemotherapy may not be applicable. There are only few randomized clinical trials with special emphasis on multiday chemotherapy. Further studies are essential to determine the efficacy, optimal dose, and duration of the newer agents and combinations in multiday cisplatin based chemotherapy. PMID:26425563

  8. A H2S Donor GYY4137 Exacerbates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mi; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Aihua; Yang, Tianxin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is highly involved in inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis and contributes to the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. However, the role of H2S in cisplatin nephrotoxicity is still debatable. Here we investigated the effect of GYY4137, a novel slow-releasing H2S donor, on cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with GYY4137 for 72 h prior to cisplatin injection. After cisplatin treatment for 72 h, mice developed obvious renal dysfunction and kidney injury as evidenced by elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and histological damage. Consistently, these mice also showed increased proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in circulation and/or kidney tissues. Meanwhile, circulating thiobarbituric aid-reactive substances (TBARS) and renal apoptotic indices including caspase-3, Bak, and Bax were all elevated. However, application of GYY4137 further aggravated renal dysfunction and kidney structural injury in line with promoted inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptotic response following cisplatin treatment. Taken together, our results suggested that GYY4137 exacerbated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice possibly through promoting inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptotic response. PMID:27340345

  9. A H 2 S Donor GYY4137 Exacerbates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mi; Jia, Zhanjun; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Aihua; Yang, Tianxin

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is highly involved in inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis and contributes to the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. However, the role of H2S in cisplatin nephrotoxicity is still debatable. Here we investigated the effect of GYY4137, a novel slow-releasing H2S donor, on cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with GYY4137 for 72 h prior to cisplatin injection. After cisplatin treatment for 72 h, mice developed obvious renal dysfunction and kidney injury as evidenced by elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and histological damage. Consistently, these mice also showed increased proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in circulation and/or kidney tissues. Meanwhile, circulating thiobarbituric aid-reactive substances (TBARS) and renal apoptotic indices including caspase-3, Bak, and Bax were all elevated. However, application of GYY4137 further aggravated renal dysfunction and kidney structural injury in line with promoted inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptotic response following cisplatin treatment. Taken together, our results suggested that GYY4137 exacerbated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice possibly through promoting inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptotic response. PMID:27340345

  10. MCT1 promotes the cisplatin-resistance by antagonizing Fas in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunxiao; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Chunxia; Chen, Xuejun; Han, Xuechuan; Liu, Xueqin; Ma, Hongyun; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of MCT1 in the development of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer and its possible relationship with Fas. We found the expression of MCT1 was obviously increased both in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer tissue and A2780/CP cells compared with sensitive ovarian cancer tissue and cell lines A2780. And in A2780 cells treated with Cisplatin, the expression of MCT1 increased in a concentration-dependent manner, MCT1 knockdown attenuates cisplatin-induced cell viability. In A2780 and A2780/CP cells transfected with MCT1 siRNA, the activation of several downstream targets of Fas, including FasL and FAP-1 were largely prevented, whereas the expression of Caspase-3 was increased, accompanying with increased abundance of Fas. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence showed that there is interaction between endogenous MCT1 with Fas in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, depletion of MCT1 by shRNA reverses cisplatin-resistance and the expression of Fas. This study showed that down regulation of MCT1 promote the sensibility to Cisplatin in ovarian cancer cell line. And this effect appeared to be mediated via antagonizing the effect of Fas. PMID:26045776

  11. Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity and Longitudinal Growth in Children With Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Triana, Clímaco Andres; Castelán-Martínez, Osvaldo D.; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Jiménez-Méndez, Ricardo; Medina, Aurora; Clark, Patricia; Rassekh, Rod; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Carleton, Bruce; Medeiros, Mara

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cisplatin, a major antineoplastic drug used in the treatment of solid tumors, is a known nephrotoxin. This retrospective cohort study evaluated the prevalence and severity of cisplatin nephrotoxicity in 54 children and its impact on height and weight. We recorded the weight, height, serum creatinine, and electrolytes in each cisplatin cycle and after 12 months of treatment. Nephrotoxicity was graded as follows: normal renal function (Grade 0); asymptomatic electrolyte disorders, including an increase in serum creatinine, up to 1.5 times baseline value (Grade 1); need for electrolyte supplementation <3 months and/or increase in serum creatinine 1.5 to 1.9 times from baseline (Grade 2); increase in serum creatinine 2 to 2.9 times from baseline or need for electrolyte supplementation for more than 3 months after treatment completion (Grade 3); and increase in serum creatinine ≥3 times from baseline or renal replacement therapy (Grade 4). Nephrotoxicity was observed in 41 subjects (75.9%). Grade 1 nephrotoxicity was observed in 18 patients (33.3%), Grade 2 in 5 patients (9.2%), and Grade 3 in 18 patients (33.3%). None had Grade 4 nephrotoxicity. Nephrotoxicity patients were younger and received higher cisplatin dose, they also had impairment in longitudinal growth manifested as statistically significant worsening on the height Z Score at 12 months after treatment. We used a multiple logistic regression model using the delta of height Z Score (baseline-12 months) as dependent variable in order to adjust for the main confounder variables such as: germ cell tumor, cisplatin total dose, serum magnesium levels at 12 months, gender, and nephrotoxicity grade. Patients with nephrotoxicity Grade 1 where at higher risk of not growing (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.07–24.3, P = 0.04). The cisplatin total dose had a significant negative relationship with magnesium levels at 12 months (Spearman r = −0.527, P = <0.001). PMID:26313789

  12. Metformin potentiates rapamycin and cisplatin in gastric cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yunshu; Jiao, Xiaodong; Huang, Suyun; Wang, Jiejun; Li, Zhaosheng; Xie, Keping

    2015-01-01

    Here we showed that pAMPKα and PTEN were down-regulated and p-mTOR, p-S6, p-4EBP1, MMP7, and DCN1 were up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissue samples as compared to that in the noncancerous tissues. Metformin inhibited tumor growth in mice. Also it enhanced cisplatin- or rapamycin-induced reduction of tumor growth as compared with treatment of either drug alone. In addition to activation of AMPK and suppression of the mTOR pathway, a series of increased and decreased genes expression were induced by metformin, including PTEN, MMP7, and FN1. We suggest that metformin could potentially be used for the treatment of gastric cancer especially in combination with cisplatin or rapamycin. PMID:25909163

  13. Cisplatin/gemcitabine or oxaliplatin/gemcitabine in the treatment of advanced biliary tract cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fiteni, Frédéric; Nguyen, Thierry; Vernerey, Dewi; Paillard, Marie-Justine; Kim, Stefano; Demarchi, Martin; Fein, Francine; Borg, Christophe; Bonnetain, Franck; Pivot, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Cisplatin/gemcitabine association has been a standard of care for first-line regimen in advanced biliary tract cancer nevertheless oxaliplatin/gemcitabine regimen is frequently preferred. Because comparative effectiveness in clinical outcomes of cisplatin- versus oxaliplatin-containing chemotherapy is not available, a systematic review of studies assessing cisplatin/gemcitabine or oxaliplatin/gemcitabine chemotherapies in advanced biliary tract cancer was performed. Published studies evaluating cisplatin/gemcitabine or oxaliplatin/gemcitabine in advanced biliary tract cancer were included. Each study was weighted according to the number of patients included. The primary objective was to assess weighted median of medians overall survival (mOS) reported for both regimens. Secondary goals were to assess weighted median of medians progression-free survival (mPFS) and toxic effects were pooled and compared within each arm. Thirty-three studies involving 1470 patients were analyzed. In total, 771 and 699 patients were treated by cisplatin/gemcitabine and oxaliplatin/gemcitabine, respectively. Weighted median of mOS was 9.7 months in cisplatin group and 9.5 months in oxaliplatin group. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy was significantly associated with more grade 3 and 4 asthenia, diarrhea, liver toxicity, and hematological toxicity. Sensitivity analysis including only the studies with the standard regimen of cisplatin (25-35 mg/m(2) administered on days 1 and 8) showed that the weighted median of mOS increased from 9.7 to 11.7 months but Gem/CDDP regimen remained more toxic than Gemox regimen. These results suggest that the Gem/CDDP regimen with cisplatin (25-35 mg/m(2)) administered on days 1 and 8 is associated with survival advantage than Gemox regimen but with addition of toxicity.

  14. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action.

  15. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action. PMID:24955838

  16. ATR CONTRIBUTES TO CELL CYCLE ARREST AND SURVIVAL AFTER CISPLATIN BUT NOT OXALIPLATIN1

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kriste A.; Lilly, Kia K.; Reynolds, Evelyn A.; Sullivan, William P.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Cliby, William A.

    2009-01-01

    The DNA cross-linking agents cisplatin and oxaliplatin are widely used in the treatment of human cancer. Lesions produced by these agents are widely known to activate the G1 and G2 cell cycle checkpoints. Less is known about the role of the intra-S phase checkpoint in the response to these agents. In the present study, two different cell lines expressing a dominant negative kinase-dead (kd) version of the ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related) kinase in an inducible fashion were examined for their responses to these two platinating agents and a variety of other DNA cross-linking drugs. Expression of the kdATR allele markedly sensitized the cells to cisplatin, but not oxaliplatin, as assessed by inhibition of colony formation, induction of apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis. Similar differences in survival were noted for melphalan (ATR-dependent) and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4HC) (ATR-independent). Further experiments demonstrated that ATR function is not necessary for removal of Pt-DNA adducts. The predominant difference between the responses to the two platinum drugs was presence of a drug-specific ATR-dependent S phase arrest after cisplatin but not oxaliplatin. These results indicate that involvement of ATR in the response to DNA cross-linking agents is lesion specific. This observation might need to be taken into account in the development and use of ATR or Chk1 inhibitors. PMID:19372558

  17. JWA reverses cisplatin resistance via the CK2—XRCC1 pathway in human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, W; Chen, Q; Wang, Q; Sun, Y; Wang, S; Li, A; Xu, S; Røe, O D; Wang, M; Zhang, R; Yang, L; Zhou, J

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common malignancy in China, with a median 5-year survival of only 20%. Cisplatin has been used in first-line cancer treatment for several types of cancer including gastric cancer. However, patients are often primary resistant or develop acquired resistance resulting in relapse of the cancer and reduced survival. Recently, we demonstrated that the reduced expression of base excision repair protein XRCC1 and its upstream regulator JWA in gastric cancerous tissues correlated with a significant survival benefit of adjuvant first-line platinum-based chemotherapy as well as XRCC1 playing an important role in the DNA repair of cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrated the role of JWA in cisplatin-induced DNA lesions and aquired cisplatin resistance in five cell-culture models: gastric epithelial cells GES-1, cisplatin-sensitive gastric cancer cell lines BGC823 and SGC7901, and the cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cell lines BGC823/DDP and SGC7901/DDP. Our results indicated that JWA is required for DNA repair following cisplatin-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) via XRCC1 in normal gastric epithelial cells. However, in gastric cancer cells, JWA enhanced cisplatin-induced cell death through regulation of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. The protein expression of JWA was significantly decreased in cisplatin-resistant cells and contributed to cisplatin resistance. Interestingly, as JWA upregulated XRCC1 expression in normal cells, JWA downregulated XRCC1 expression through promoting the degradation of XRCC1 in cisplatin-resistant gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, the negative regulation of JWA to XRCC1 was blocked due to the mutation of 518S/519T/523T residues of XRCC1, and indicating that the CK2 activated 518S/519T/523T phosphorylation is a key point in the regulation of JWA to XRCC1. In conclusion, we report for the first time that JWA regulated cisplatin-induced DNA damage and apoptosis through the

  18. Metabolomic study of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Portilla, D; Li, S; Nagothu, K K; Megyesi, J; Kaissling, B; Schnackenberg, L; Safirstein, R L; Beger, R D

    2006-06-01

    We have shown that cisplatin inhibits fatty acid oxidation, and that fibrate treatment ameliorates renal function by preventing the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation and proximal tubule cell death. Urine samples of mice treated with single injection of cisplatin (20 mg/kg body weight) were collected for 3 days and analyzed by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In a separate group, urine samples of mice treated with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) ligand WY were also analyzed by NMR after 2 days of cisplatin exposure. Biochemical analysis of endogenous metabolites was performed in serum, urine, and kidney tissue. Electron microscopic studies were carried out to examine the effects of PPARalpha ligand and cisplatin. Principal component analysis demonstrated the presence of glucose, amino acids, and trichloacetic acid cycle metabolites in the urine after 48 h of cisplatin administration. These metabolic alterations precede changes in serum creatinine. Biochemical studies confirmed the presence of glucosuria, but also demonstrated the accumulation of nonesterified fatty acids, and triglycerides in serum, urine, and kidney tissue, in spite of increased levels of plasma insulin. These metabolic alterations were ameliorated by the use of PPARalpha ligand. Electron microscopic analysis confirmed the protective effect of the fibrate on preventing cisplatin-mediated necrosis of the S3 segment of the proximal tubule. Our study shows that cisplatin-induces a unique NMR metabolic profile in urine of mice that developed acute renal failure, and confirms the protective effect of a fibrate class of PPARalpha ligands. We propose that the injury-induced metabolic profile may be used as a biomarker of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  19. Targeting argininosuccinate synthetase negative melanomas using combination of arginine degrading enzyme and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Savaraj, Niramol; Wu, Chunjing; Li, Ying-Ying; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; You, Min; Bomalaski, John; He, Wei; Kuo, Macus Tien; Feun, Lynn G

    2015-03-20

    Loss of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression in melanoma makes these tumor cells vulnerable to arginine deprivation. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) which degrades arginine to citrulline and ammonia has been used clinically and partial responses and stable disease have been noted with minimal toxicity. In order to improve the therapeutic efficacy of ADI-PEG20, we have combined ADI-PEG20 with a DNA damaging agent, cisplatin. We have shown that the combination of the two drugs together significantly improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to ADI-PEG20 alone or cisplatin alone in 4 melanoma cell lines, regardless of their BRAF mutation. In-vivo study also exhibited the same effect as in-vitro with no added toxicity to either agent alone. The underlying mechanism is complex, but increased DNA damage upon arginine deprivation due to decreased DNA repair proteins, FANCD2, ATM, and CHK1/2 most likely leads to increased apoptosis. This action is further intensified by increased proapoptotic protein, NOXA, and decreased antiapoptotic proteins, SURVIVIN, BCL2 and XIAP. The autophagic process which protects cells from apoptosis upon ADI-PEG20 treatment also dampens upon cisplatin administration. Thus, the combination of arginine deprivation and cisplatin function in concert to kill tumor cells which do not express ASS without added toxicity to normal cells. PMID:25749046

  20. Targeting argininosuccinate synthetase negative melanomas using combination of arginine degrading enzyme and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Savaraj, Niramol; Wu, Chunjing; Li, Ying-Ying; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; You, Min; Bomalaski, John; He, Wei; Kuo, Macus Tien; Feun, Lynn G.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression in melanoma makes these tumor cells vulnerable to arginine deprivation. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) which degrades arginine to citrulline and ammonia has been used clinically and partial responses and stable disease have been noted with minimal toxicity. In order to improve the therapeutic efficacy of ADI-PEG20, we have combined ADI-PEG20 with a DNA damaging agent, cisplatin. We have shown that the combination of the two drugs together significantly improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to ADI-PEG20 alone or cisplatin alone in 4 melanoma cell lines, regardless of their BRAF mutation. In-vivo study also exhibited the same effect as in-vitro with no added toxicity to either agent alone. The underlying mechanism is complex, but increased DNA damage upon arginine deprivation due to decreased DNA repair proteins, FANCD2, ATM, and CHK1/2 most likely leads to increased apoptosis. This action is further intensified by increased proapoptotic protein, NOXA, and decreased antiapoptotic proteins, SURVIVIN, BCL2 and XIAP. The autophagic process which protects cells from apoptosis upon ADI-PEG20 treatment also dampens upon cisplatin administration. Thus, the combination of arginine deprivation and cisplatin function in concert to kill tumor cells which do not express ASS without added toxicity to normal cells. PMID:25749046

  1. Targeting argininosuccinate synthetase negative melanomas using combination of arginine degrading enzyme and cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Savaraj, Niramol; Wu, Chunjing; Li, Ying-Ying; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; You, Min; Bomalaski, John; He, Wei; Kuo, Macus Tien; Feun, Lynn G

    2015-03-20

    Loss of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) expression in melanoma makes these tumor cells vulnerable to arginine deprivation. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20) which degrades arginine to citrulline and ammonia has been used clinically and partial responses and stable disease have been noted with minimal toxicity. In order to improve the therapeutic efficacy of ADI-PEG20, we have combined ADI-PEG20 with a DNA damaging agent, cisplatin. We have shown that the combination of the two drugs together significantly improved the therapeutic efficacy when compared to ADI-PEG20 alone or cisplatin alone in 4 melanoma cell lines, regardless of their BRAF mutation. In-vivo study also exhibited the same effect as in-vitro with no added toxicity to either agent alone. The underlying mechanism is complex, but increased DNA damage upon arginine deprivation due to decreased DNA repair proteins, FANCD2, ATM, and CHK1/2 most likely leads to increased apoptosis. This action is further intensified by increased proapoptotic protein, NOXA, and decreased antiapoptotic proteins, SURVIVIN, BCL2 and XIAP. The autophagic process which protects cells from apoptosis upon ADI-PEG20 treatment also dampens upon cisplatin administration. Thus, the combination of arginine deprivation and cisplatin function in concert to kill tumor cells which do not express ASS without added toxicity to normal cells.

  2. Arctigenin enhances chemosensitivity to cisplatin in human nonsmall lung cancer H460 cells through downregulation of survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan-qin; Jin, Jian-jun; Wang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Arctigenin, a dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, enhances cisplatin-mediated cell apoptosis in cancer cells. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of arctigenin on cisplatin-treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 cells. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and annexin-V/propidium iodide staining were performed to analyze the proliferation and apoptosis of H460 cells. Arctigenin dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and potentiated cell apoptosis, coupled with increased cleavage of caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Moreover, arctigenin sensitized H460 cells to cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis. Arctigenin alone or in combination with cisplatin had a significantly lower amount of survivin. Ectopic expression of survivin decreased cell apoptosis induced by arctigenin (P < 0.05) or in combination with cisplatin (P < 0.01). Moreover, arctigenin (P < 0.05) or in combination with cisplatin (P < 0.01) induced G1/G0 cell-cycle arrest. Our data provide evidence that arctigenin has a therapeutic potential in combina-tion with chemotherapeutic agents for NSLC.

  3. Arctigenin enhances chemosensitivity to cisplatin in human nonsmall lung cancer H460 cells through downregulation of survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan-qin; Jin, Jian-jun; Wang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Arctigenin, a dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, enhances cisplatin-mediated cell apoptosis in cancer cells. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of arctigenin on cisplatin-treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 cells. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and annexin-V/propidium iodide staining were performed to analyze the proliferation and apoptosis of H460 cells. Arctigenin dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and potentiated cell apoptosis, coupled with increased cleavage of caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Moreover, arctigenin sensitized H460 cells to cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis. Arctigenin alone or in combination with cisplatin had a significantly lower amount of survivin. Ectopic expression of survivin decreased cell apoptosis induced by arctigenin (P < 0.05) or in combination with cisplatin (P < 0.01). Moreover, arctigenin (P < 0.05) or in combination with cisplatin (P < 0.01) induced G1/G0 cell-cycle arrest. Our data provide evidence that arctigenin has a therapeutic potential in combina-tion with chemotherapeutic agents for NSLC. PMID:24395429

  4. Assessing cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and otoprotection in whole organ culture of the mouse inner ear in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Tropitzsch, Anke; Arnold, Heinz; Bassiouni, Mohamed; Müller, Andrea; Eckhard, Andreas; Müller, Marcus; Löwenheim, Hubert

    2014-06-16

    Cisplatin is a widely used anti-cancer drug. Ototoxicity is a major dose-limiting side-effect. A reproducible mammalian in-vitro model of cisplatin ototoxicity is required to screen and validate otoprotective drug candidates. We utilized a whole organ culture system of the postnatal mouse inner ear in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor under "simulated microgravity" culture conditions. As previously described this system allows whole organ culture of the inner ear and quantitative assessment of ototoxic effects of aminoglycoside induced hair cell loss. Here we demonstrate that this model is also applicable to the assessment of cisplatin induced ototoxicity. In this model cisplatin induced hair cell loss was dose and time dependent. Increasing exposure time of cisplatin led to decreasing EC50 concentrations. Outer hair cells were more susceptible than inner hair cells, and hair cells in the cochlear base were more susceptible than hair cells in the cochlear apex. Initial cisplatin dose determined the final extent of hair cell loss irrespective if the drug was withdrawn or continued. Dose dependant otoprotection was demonstrated by co-administration of the antioxidant agent N-acetyl l-cysteine. The results support the use of this inner ear organ culture system as an in vitro assay and validation platform for inner ear toxicology and the search for otoprotective compounds. PMID:24709139

  5. Ginsenoside Rg5 Ameliorates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Mice through Inhibition of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Yan, Meng-Han; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhi; Wang, Zi; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Yin-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Although cisplatin is an effective anti-cancer agent that is widely used for treating various types of malignant solid tumors, the nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin severely limits its clinical application. The present study was designed to explore the potential protective effect of ginsenoside Rg5, a rare ginsenoside generated during steaming ginseng, on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in a mouse experimental model. The possible mechanisms underlying this nephroprotective effect were also investigated for the first time. Rg5 was given at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg for 10 consecutive days. On Day 7, a single nephrotoxic dose of cisplatin (25 mg/kg) was injected to mice. Cisplatin administration resulted in renal dysfunction as evidenced by increase in serum creatinine (CRE) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels. In addition, cisplatin increased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), the makers of lipid peroxidation, and depleted glutathione (GSH) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in renal tissues. These effects were associated with the significantly increased levels of cytochrome P450 E1 (CYP2E1), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in renal tissues. However, pretreatment with ginsenoside Rg5 significantly attenuated the renal dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation response induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rg5 supplementation inhibited activation of apoptotic pathways through increasing Bcl-2 and decreasing Bax expression levels. Histopathological examination further confirmed the nephroprotective effect of Rg5. Collectively, these results clearly suggest that Rg5-mediated alleviation of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity may be related to its anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:27649238

  6. D-Methionine attenuated cisplatin-induced vestibulotoxicity through altering ATPase activities and oxidative stress in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, P.-W.; Liu, S.-H.; Young, Y.-H.; Lin-Shiau, Shoei-Yn . E-mail: syl@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2006-09-01

    Cisplatin has been used as a chemotherapeutic agent to treat many kinds of malignancies. Its damage to the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) system has been reported. However, the underlying biochemical change in the inner ear or central vestibular nervous system is not fully understood. In this study, we attempted to examine whether cisplatin-induced vestibulotoxicity and D-methionine protection were correlated with the changes of ATPase activities and oxidative stress of ampullary tissue of vestibules as well as cerebellar cortex (the inhibitory center of VOR system) of guinea pigs. By means of a caloric test coupled with electronystagmographic recordings, we found that cisplatin exposure caused a dose-dependent (1, 3, or 5 mg/kg) vestibular dysfunction as revealed by a decrease of slow phase velocity (SPV). In addition, cisplatin significantly inhibited the Na{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activities in the ampullary tissue with a good dose-response relationship but not those of cerebellar cortex. Regression analysis indicated that a decrease of SPV was well correlated with the reduction of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activities of the ampullary tissue. D-Methionine (300 mg/kg) reduced both abnormalities of SPV and ATPase activities in a correlated manner. Moreover, cisplatin exposure led to a significant dose-dependent increase of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide concentrations of the vestibules, which could be significantly suppressed by D-methionine. However, cisplatin did not alter the levels of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide of the cerebellum. In conclusion, cisplatin inhibited ATPase activities and increased oxidative stress in guinea pig vestibular labyrinths. D-Methionine attenuated cisplatin-induced vestibulotoxicity associated with ionic disturbance through its antioxidative property.

  7. Ginsenoside Rg5 Ameliorates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Mice through Inhibition of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Yan, Meng-Han; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhi; Wang, Zi; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Yin-Shi

    2016-01-01

    Although cisplatin is an effective anti-cancer agent that is widely used for treating various types of malignant solid tumors, the nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin severely limits its clinical application. The present study was designed to explore the potential protective effect of ginsenoside Rg5, a rare ginsenoside generated during steaming ginseng, on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in a mouse experimental model. The possible mechanisms underlying this nephroprotective effect were also investigated for the first time. Rg5 was given at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg for 10 consecutive days. On Day 7, a single nephrotoxic dose of cisplatin (25 mg/kg) was injected to mice. Cisplatin administration resulted in renal dysfunction as evidenced by increase in serum creatinine (CRE) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels. In addition, cisplatin increased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), the makers of lipid peroxidation, and depleted glutathione (GSH) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in renal tissues. These effects were associated with the significantly increased levels of cytochrome P450 E1 (CYP2E1), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in renal tissues. However, pretreatment with ginsenoside Rg5 significantly attenuated the renal dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation response induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rg5 supplementation inhibited activation of apoptotic pathways through increasing Bcl-2 and decreasing Bax expression levels. Histopathological examination further confirmed the nephroprotective effect of Rg5. Collectively, these results clearly suggest that Rg5-mediated alleviation of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity may be related to its anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:27649238

  8. Berberine in combination with cisplatin suppresses breast cancer cell growth through induction of DNA breaks and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuwan; Jing, Zuolei; Li, Yan; Mao, Weifeng

    2016-07-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from medicinal plants such as Hydrastis canadensis, Berberis aristata and Coptis chinensis. BBR displays a number of beneficial roles in the treatment of various types of cancers, yet the precise mechanisms of its action remain unclear. Cisplatin is an effective cancer chemotherapeutic agent and functions by generating DNA damage, promoting DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis; however, its efficacy is challenged by the resistance of tumor cells in clinical application. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of BBR in combination with cisplatin on human breast cancer cells. MTT assay showed that BBR inhibited breast cancer MCF-7 cell growth with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 52.178±1.593 µM and the IC50 value of cisplatin was 49.541±1.618 µM, while in combination with 26 µM BBR, the IC50 value of cisplatin was 5.759±0.76 µM. BBR sensitized the MCF-7 cells to cisplatin in a time- and dose-dependent manner. After treatment of BBR and cisplatin, the cellular pro-apoptotic capase-3 and cleaved capspase-3 and caspase-9 were upregulated and the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was downregulated. Importantly, BBR restrained the expression of cellular PCNA, and immunofluoresence analysis of γH2AX showed that BBR increased the DNA damages induced by cisplatin. Taken together, the results demonstrated that BBR sensitized MCF-7 cells to cisplatin through induction of DNA breaks and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. PMID:27177238

  9. Protection of cisplatin-induced spermatotoxicity, DNA damage and chromatin abnormality by selenium nano-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Rezvanfar, Mohammad Amin; Rezvanfar, Mohammad Ali; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza; Ahmadi, Abbas; Baeeri, Maryam; Mohammadirad, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-02-01

    Cisplatin (CIS), an anticancer alkylating agent, induces DNA adducts and effectively cross links the DNA strands and so affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. The present study investigated the cellular/biochemical mechanisms underlying possible protective effect of selenium nano-particles (Nano-Se) as an established strong antioxidant with more bioavailability and less toxicity, on reproductive toxicity of CIS by assessment of sperm characteristics, sperm DNA integrity, chromatin quality and spermatogenic disorders. To determine the role of oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of CIS gonadotoxicity, the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and peroxynitrite (ONOO) as a marker of nitrosative stress (NS) and testosterone (T) concentration as a biomarker of testicular function were measured in the blood and testes. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were equally divided into four groups. A single IP dose of CIS (7 mg/kg) and protective dose of Nano-Se (2 mg/kg/day) were administered alone or in combination. The CIS-exposed rats showed a significant increase in testicular and serum LPO and ONOO level, along with a significant decrease in enzymatic antioxidants levels, diminished serum T concentration and abnormal histologic findings with impaired sperm quality associated with increased DNA damage and decreased chromatin quality. Coadministration of Nano-Se significantly improved the serum T, sperm quality, and spermatogenesis and reduced CIS-induced free radical toxic stress and spermatic DNA damage. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that Nano-Se may be useful to prevent CIS-induced gonadotoxicity through its antioxidant potential. Highlights: ► Cisplatin (CIS) affects spermatozoa as a male reproductive toxicant. ► Effect of Nano-Se on CIS-induced spermatotoxicity was investigated. ► CIS-exposure induces oxidative sperm DNA damage

  10. Protein expression profile related to cisplatin resistance in bladder cancer cell lines detected by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Taoka, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Ohashi, Kazuya; Minamida, Satoru; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Nagi, Shoji; Saito, Tatsuya; Kodera, Yoshio; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    We used a proteomic approach to compare the differentially regulated protein expression profiles of cisplatin-naïve and cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell lines to screen candidate molecules related to cisplatin resistance. The cisplatin-resistant cell line T24 was established by the stepwise exposure of T24 cells to up to 40 μM of cisplatin. We performed a comprehensive study of protein expression in bladder cancer cell lines that included cisplatin-naïve (T24) and cisplatin-resistant cells (T24CDDPR) by means of agarose two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by analysis of liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy. We identified 25 obviously different spots for T24 and T24 CDDPR. Seven spots had increased expression and 18 spots had decreased expression in T24CDDPR compared to those in T24. Cytoskeletal proteins and enzyme modulators were prominent among differential proteins. Of the 25 proteins, we selected HNRNPA3, PCK2, PPL, PGK1, TKT, SERPINB2, GOT2, and EIF3A for further validation by Western blot. HNRNPA3, PGK1, TKT, and SERPINB2 had more than 1.5-times incremental expression in T24CDDPR compared to that in T24. PCK2 and PPL expressions were decreased less than 20% in T24CDDPR compared to that in T24. The results of 25 new proteins in this study could be valuable and could lead to the development of a new molecular marker. PMID:26299484

  11. Sodium Arsenite ± Hyperthermia Sensitizes p53-Expressing Human Ovarian Cancer Cells to Cisplatin by Modulating Platinum-DNA Damage Responses

    PubMed Central

    Muenyi, Clarisse S.; Pinhas, Allan R.; Fan, Teresa W.; Brock, Guy N.; Helm, C. William; States, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of gynecological cancer death in the United States. Cisplatin is a DNA damaging agent initially effective against EOC but limited by resistance. P53 plays a critical role in cellular response to DNA damage and has been implicated in EOC response to platinum chemotherapy. In this study, we examined the role of p53 status in EOC response to a novel combination of cisplatin, sodium arsenite, and hyperthermia. Human EOC cells were treated with cisplatin ± 20μM sodium arsenite at 37°C or 39°C for 1 h. Sodium arsenite ± hyperthermia sensitized wild-type p53-expressing (A2780, A2780/CP70, OVCA 420, OVCA 429, and OVCA 433) EOC cells to cisplatin. Hyperthermia sensitized p53-null SKOV-3 and p53-mutant (OVCA 432 and OVCAR-3) cells to cisplatin. P53 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection abrogated sodium arsenite sensitization effect. XPC, a critical DNA damage recognition protein in global genome repair pathway, was induced by cisplatin only in wild-type p53-expressing cells. Cotreatment with sodium arsenite ± hyperthermia attenuated cisplatin-induced XPC in wild-type p53-expressing cells. XPC siRNA transfection sensitized wild-type p53-expressing cells to cisplatin, suggesting that sodium arsenite ± hyperthermia attenuation of XPC is a mechanism by which wild-type p53-expressing cells are sensitized to cisplatin. Hyperthermia ± sodium arsenite enhanced cellular and DNA accumulation of platinum in wild-type p53-expressing cells. Only hyperthermia enhanced platinum accumulation in p53-null cells. In conclusion, sodium arsenite ± hyperthermia sensitizes wild-type p53-expressing EOC cells to cisplatin by suppressing DNA repair protein XPC and increasing cellular and DNA platinum accumulation. PMID:22331493

  12. Amniotic Fluid-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cut Short the Acuteness of Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Husseiny, Fatma; Sobh, Mohamed Ahmed; Ashour, Rehab H.; Foud, Samah; Medhat, Tarek; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Elghannam, Doaa; Abdel-Ghaffar, Hassan; Saad, Mohamed-Ahdy; Sobh, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Cisplatin is a nephrotoxic chemotherapeutic agent. So, preventive measures worth to be evaluated. Human amniotic fluid stem cells (hAFSCs) in prevention or amelioration of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) in Sprague-Dawley rates have been tested. Methods 80 Sprague-Dawley rats (250~300 g) were used and divided into 4 major groups, 20 rats each. Group I: Saline-injected group. Group II: Cisplatin-injected group (5 mg/kg I.P). Group III: Cisplatin-injected and hAFSCs-treated group (5×106 hAFSCs I.V. one day after cisplatin administration). Group IV: Cisplatin-injected and culture media-treated group. Each major group was further divided into 4 equal subgroups according to the timing of sacrifice; 4, 7, 11 and 30 days post-cisplatin injection. Renal function tests were done. Kidney tissue homogenate oxidative stress parameters malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) were determined. Histopathological scoring systems for active injury, regenerative and chronic changes were analyzed separately. Results hAFSCs characterization and differentiation was proved. Cisplatin injection resulted in a significant increase in serum creatinine and MDA and decrease in SOD, GSH and creatinine clearance. These changes were attenuated early by day 4 with the use of hAFSCs. Cisplatin injection induced tubular necrosis, atrophy, inflammatory cells infiltration and fibrosis. The use of hAFSCs was associated with significantly lowered injury score at day 4, 7, 11 and 30 with marked regenerative changes starting from day 4. Conclusion hAFSCs have both a protective and regenerative activities largely through an antioxidant activity. This activity cut short the acuteness of cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:27426088

  13. Oridonin effectively reverses cisplatin drug resistance in human ovarian cancer cells via induction of cell apoptosis and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase expression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shihong; Tan, Wenhua; Du, Botao; Liu, Wei; Li, Weijia; Che, Dehong; Zhang, Guangmei

    2016-04-01

    Cisplatin is a first generation platinum‑based chemotherapeutic agent, however, the extensive application of cisplatin inevitably results in drug resistance, which is a major obstacle in cancer chemotherapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficiency of reversing cisplatin‑resistance with the use of combination therapy with oridonin and cisplatin in human ovarian cancer cells, and attempt to reduce the side effects of the therapeutic agents when used alone. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of cisplatin were determined in cisplatin‑sensitive and cisplatin‑resistant ovarian cancer cells using an MTT assay. IC50 values of cisplatin in A2780, A2780/DDP, SKOV3 and SKOV3/DDP cells were significantly decreased in a time‑dependent manner. The antitumor effect of oridonin in A2780/DDP cells was also detected by the MTT assay and the inhibitory effects of oridonin increased in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner. A2780/DDP cells were treated with 20 µM oridonin in combination with increasing concentrations of cisplatin for 48 h, and the result demonstrated that oridonin synergistically increased the antitumor effects of cisplatin in A2780/DDP cells. Notably, the combination treatment of oridonin and cisplatin effectively reversed cisplatin resistance and the IC50 values were significantly decreased from 50.97 µM and 135.20 to 26.12 µM and 73.00 µM in A2780/DDP and SKOV3/DDP cells at 48 h, respectively. Furthermore, oridonin induced cell apoptosis in a dose‑dependent manner and promoted cell‑cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase in ovarian cancer cells. Oridonin and cisplatin synergistically increased the cell apoptosis rate of A2780/DDP cells, which was detected by fluorescence‑activated cell sorting analysis. Downregulated expression levels of Bcl‑2 and upregulated the expression of Bax protein were demonstrated by western blot analysis, further indicating increased apoptosis. In addition, the expression levels of

  14. Renal tubular Fas ligand mediates fratricide in cisplatin-induced acute kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Linkermann, Andreas; Himmerkus, Nina; Rölver, Lars; Keyser, Kirsten A; Steen, Philip; Bräsen, Jan-Hinrich; Bleich, Markus; Kunzendorf, Ulrich; Krautwald, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Cisplatin, a standard chemotherapeutic agent for many tumors, has an unfortunately common toxicity where almost a third of patients develop renal dysfunction after a single dose. Acute kidney injury caused by cisplatin depends on Fas-mediated apoptosis driven by Fas ligand (FasL) expressed on tubular epithelial and infiltrating immune cells. Since the role of FasL in T cells is known, we investigated whether its presence in primary kidney cells is needed for its toxic effect. We found that all cisplatin-treated wild-type (wt) mice died within 6 days; however, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)/beige mice (B-, T-, and natural killer-cell-deficient) displayed a significant survival benefit, with only 55% mortality while exhibiting significant renal failure. Treating SCID/beige mice with MFL3, a FasL-blocking monoclonal antibody, completely restored survival after an otherwise lethal cisplatin dose, suggesting another source of FasL besides immune cells. Freshly isolated primary tubule segments from wt mice were co-incubated with thick ascending limb (TAL) segments freshly isolated from mice expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene (same genetic background) to determine whether FasL-mediated killing of tubular cells is an autocrine or paracrine mechanism. Cisplatin-stimulated primary segments induced apoptosis in the GFP-tagged TAL cells, an effect blocked by MFL3. Thus, our study shows that cisplatin-induced nephropathy is mediated through FasL, functionally expressed on tubular cells that are capable of inducing death of cells of adjacent tubules. PMID:20811331

  15. Butein sensitizes HeLa cells to cisplatin through the AKT and ERK/p38 MAPK pathways by targeting FoxO3a

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, LIRUI; YANG, XIAOFENG; LI, XU; LI, CHEN; ZHAO, LE; ZHOU, YUANYUAN; HOU, HUILIAN

    2015-01-01

    -2 and the upregulation of p27 and Bax. In addition, the combination of both agents markedly inhibited tumor growth and increased the expression of FoxO3a in mouse tumor xenograft models of cervical cancer. Taken together, to the best of our knowledge, our results reveal for the first time that butein sensitizes cervical cancer cells to cisplatin in vitro and in vivo, and these effects of butien may be related to the inhibition of the activation of the AKT and ERK/p38 MAPK pathways by targeting FoxO3a. PMID:26310353

  16. Current state of evidence on 'off-label' therapeutic options for systemic lupus erythematosus, including biological immunosuppressive agents, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland--a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Burkhardt, H; Burmester, G R; Fischer-Betz, R; Fleck, M; Graninger, W; Hiepe, F; Jacobi, A M; Kötter, I; Lakomek, H J; Lorenz, H M; Manger, B; Schett, G; Schmidt, R E; Schneider, M; Schulze-Koops, H; Smolen, J S; Specker, C; Stoll, T; Strangfeld, A; Tony, H P; Villiger, P M; Voll, R; Witte, T; Dörner, T

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a severe and potentially life-threatening disease that often represents a therapeutic challenge because of its heterogeneous organ manifestations. Only glucocorticoids, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide and very recently belimumab have been approved for SLE therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Dependence on glucocorticoids and resistance to the approved therapeutic agents, as well as substantial toxicity, are frequent. Therefore, treatment considerations will include 'off-label' use of medication approved for other indications. In this consensus approach, an effort has been undertaken to delineate the limits of the current evidence on therapeutic options for SLE organ disease, and to agree on common practice. This has been based on the best available evidence obtained by a rigorous literature review and the authors' own experience with available drugs derived under very similar health care conditions. Preparation of this consensus document included an initial meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review with subsequent formulation of a consensus and determination of the evidence level followed by collecting the level of agreement from the panel members. In addition to overarching principles, the panel have focused on the treatment of major SLE organ manifestations (lupus nephritis, arthritis, lung disease, neuropsychiatric and haematological manifestations, antiphospholipid syndrome and serositis). This consensus report is intended to support clinicians involved in the care of patients with difficult courses of SLE not responding to standard therapies by providing up-to-date information on the best available evidence.

  17. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 contributes to oxidative stress through downregulation of sirtuin 3 during cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Pil

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced oxidative stress is a hallmark of cisplatin nephrotoxicity, and inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) attenuates oxidative stress during cisplatin nephrotoxicity; however, the precise mechanisms behind its action remain elusive. Here, using an in vitro model of cisplatin-induced injury to human kidney proximal tubular cells, we demonstrated that the protective effect of PARP1 inhibition on oxidative stress is associated with sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) activation. Exposure to 400 µM cisplatin for 8 hours in cells decreased activity and expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and SIRT3, while it increased their lysine acetylation. However, treatment with 1 µM PJ34 hydrochloride, a potent PARP1 inhibitor, restored activity and/or expression in those antioxidant enzymes, decreased lysine acetylation of those enzymes, and improved SIRT3 expression and activity in the cisplatin-injured cells. Using transfection with SIRT3 double nickase plasmids, SIRT3-deficient cells given cisplatin did not show the ameliorable effect of PARP1 inhibition on lysine acetylation and activity of antioxidant enzymes, including MnSOD, catalase and GPX. Furthermore, SIRT3 deficiency in cisplatin-injured cells prevented PARP1 inhibition-induced increase in forkhead box O3a transcriptional activity, and upregulation of MnSOD and catalase. Finally, loss of SIRT3 in cisplatin-exposed cells removed the protective effect of PARP1 inhibition against oxidative stress, represented by the concentration of lipid hydroperoxide and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine; and necrotic cell death represented by a percentage of propidium iodide–positively stained cells. Taken together, these results indicate that PARP1 inhibition protects kidney proximal tubular cells against oxidative stress through SIRT3 activation during cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:27722009

  18. Modulation of cisplatin cytotoxicity by sulphasalazine.

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, S.; Sharma, R.; Singhal, S. S.; Herzog, N. K.; Chaubey, M.; Awasthi, Y. C.

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of cisplatin [cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II); DDP] is hampered by acquired or de novo resistance of malignant cells to its cytotoxic effects. We have previously reported that cisplatin resistance parallels glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in several human small-cell lung cancer cell lines. In the presently described studies, we used sulphasalazine, an inhibitor of GSTs, to evaluate the relative role of GSTs in mediating cisplatin resistance in two human small-cell lung cancer cell lines, NCI H-69 and H-2496. The H-69 cell line, which contained relatively higher GST activity than the H-2496 cell line (317 +/- 7 vs 9 +/- 1 mU mg-1 protein respectively), also displayed a greater degree of cisplatin resistance (IC50 values of 25.0 +/- 3.9 vs 4.5 +/- 1.0 microM respectively). Western blot and Northern blot analyses of purified GSTs revealed the expression of only the pi-class GST in both cell lines. Sulphasalazine inhibited the purified GSTs (IC50 of 10 microM for H-69 and 12 microM for H-2496) from both lines in a competitive manner with similar Ki values (6.5 and 7.9 microM for the H-69 and H-2496 cell lines respectively). Cytotoxicity studies revealed that sulphasalazine increased the cytotoxicity of cisplatin towards both cell lines. Isobologram analysis showed that sulphasalazine synergistically enhanced the cytotoxicity of cisplatin towards both cell lines, the magnitude of synergy being remarkably higher in H-69 cells than in H-2496 cells. Our studies indicate that clinically achievable concentrations of sulphasalazine may be useful in modulating cisplatin resistance in malignancies with increased GST-pi content. Images Figure 1 PMID:7914420

  19. The Ethanolic Extract of Taiwanofungus camphoratus (Antrodia camphorata) Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Enhances Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin and Doxorubicin on Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Tai, Chen-Jei; Su, Ching-Hua; Chang, Fang-Mo; Choong, Chen-Yen; Wang, Chien-Kai; Tai, Cheng-Jeng

    2015-01-01

    Taiwanofungus camphoratus (synonym Antrodia camphorata) is a widely used medicinal fungus in the folk medicine of Taiwan with several pharmacological features such as anti-inflammatory, liver protection, antihypertensive, and antioxidative activities. The ethanolic extract of T. camphoratus (TCEE) which contains abundant bioactive compounds including triterpenoids and polysaccharides also has antitumor effects in various human cancer cell lines. The aims of this study are to clarify the antitumor effects of TCEE on human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and also evaluate the combination drug effects with conventional chemotherapy agents, cisplatin and doxorubicin. In the present study, the TCEE treatment induced cell cycle arrest and suppressed cell growth on both Hep3B and HepJ5 cells. Expression of cell cycle inhibitors, P21 and P27, and activation of apoptosis executer enzyme, caspase-3, were also induced by TCEE. In combination with the chemotherapy agents, TCEE treatment further enhanced the tumor suppression efficiency of cisplatin and doxorubicin. These results together suggested that TCEE is a potential ingredient for developing an integrated chemotherapy for human liver cancer. PMID:26557666

  20. RAD50 targeting impairs DNA damage response and sensitizes human breast cancer cells to cisplatin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Pérez, Ali; Rafaelli, Lourdes E; Ramírez-Torres, Nayeli; Aréchaga-Ocampo, Elena; Frías, Sara; Sánchez, Silvia; Marchat, Laurence A; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Quintanar-Jurado, Valeria; Rodríguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Bautista-Piña, Verónica; Carlos-Reyes, Ángeles; López-Camarillo, César

    2014-01-01

    In tumor cells the effectiveness of anti-neoplastic agents that cause cell death by induction of DNA damage is influenced by DNA repair activity. RAD50 protein plays key roles in DNA double strand breaks repair (DSBs), which is crucial to safeguard genome integrity and sustain tumor suppression. However, its role as a potential therapeutic target has not been addressed in breast cancer. Our aim in the present study was to analyze the expression of RAD50 protein in breast tumors, and evaluate the effects of RAD50-targeted inhibition on the cytotoxicity exerted by cisplatin and anthracycline and taxane-based therapies in breast cancer cells. Immunohistochemistry assays on tissue microarrays indicate that the strong staining intensity of RAD50 was reduced in 14% of breast carcinomas in comparison with normal tissues. Remarkably, RAD50 silencing by RNA interference significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. Combinations of cisplatin with doxorubicin and paclitaxel drugs induced synergistic effects in early cell death of RAD50-deficient MCF-7, SKBR3, and T47D breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we found an increase in the number of DSBs, and delayed phosphorylation of histone H2AX after cisplatin treatment in RAD50-silenced cells. These cellular events were associated to a dramatical increase in the frequency of chromosomal aberrations and a decrease of cell number in metaphase. In conclusion, our data showed that RAD50 abrogation impairs DNA damage response and sensitizes breast cancer cells to cisplatin-combined therapies. We propose that the development and use of inhibitors to manipulate RAD50 levels might represent a promising strategy to sensitize breast cancer cells to DNA damaging agents. PMID:24642965

  1. Evaluation of cisplatin plasma levels in patients undergoing cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fleres, Francesco; Saladino, Edoardo; Catanoso, Rosaria; Arcoraci, Vincenzo; Mandolfino, Tommaso; Cucinotta, Eugenio; Macrì, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Introduction Peritoneal surface malignancies have long been regarded as incurable, however, they can be treated with cytoreductive surgery in addition to hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy. This approach is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality, unless hyperhydration is provided in a timely manner. Methods Cisplatin (CDDP) is the most widely used chemotherapeutic agent. Plasma levels of cisplatin (CDDP), a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, were measured before, during, and after the procedure. This was done in order to identify the window of highest risk as a function of drug concentrations, assuming a dose-dependent effect. Results Plasma levels of CDDP peak during perfusion. The concentration remains high until the 4th post-operative day and returns to pre-operative levels by the 7th post-operative day. Conclusions Our findings suggest that ensuring hyperhydration as well as infusing albumin and fresh frozen plasma may be of particular value for at least the first 4 days after the procedure. PMID:27385136

  2. Rigosertib Is a More Effective Radiosensitizer Than Cisplatin in Concurrent Chemoradiation Treatment of Cervical Carcinoma, In Vitro and In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Agoni, Lorenzo; Basu, Indranil; Gupta, Seema; Alfieri, Alan; Gambino, Angela; Goldberg, Gary L.; Reddy, E. Premkumar; Guha, Chandan

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To compare rigosertib versus cisplatin as an effective radiosensitizing agent for cervical malignancies. Methods and Materials: Rigosertib and cisplatin were tested in cervical cancer cell lines, HeLa and C33A. A 24-hour incubation with rigosertib and cisplatin, before irradiation (2-8 Gy), was used for clonogenic survival assays. Cell cycle analysis (propidium iodide staining) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX expression) were evaluated by fluorescence-activated cell sorter cytometry. Rigosertib was also tested in vivo in tumor growth experiments on cervical cancer xenografts. Results: Rigosertib was demonstrated to induce a G{sub 2}/M block in cancer cells. Survival curve comparison revealed a dose modification factor, as index of radiosensitization effect, of 1.1-1.3 for cisplatin and 1.4-2.2 for rigosertib. With 6-Gy irradiation, an increase in DNA damage of 15%-25% was achieved in both HeLa and C33A cells with cisplatin pretreatment, and a 71-108% increase with rigosertib pretreatment. In vivo tumor growth studies demonstrated higher performance of rigosertib when compared with cisplatin, with 53% longer tumor growth delay. Conclusions: Rigosertib was more effective than cisplatin when combined with radiation and caused minimal toxicity. These data support the need for clinical trials with rigosertib in combination therapy for patients with cervical carcinoma.

  3. Ghrelin Prevents Cisplatin-Induced Testicular Damage by Facilitating Repair of DNA Double Strand Breaks Through Activation of p53 in Mice.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Jose M; Chen, Ji-an; Guillory, Bobby; Donehower, Lawrence A; Smith, Roy G; Lamb, Dolores J

    2015-07-01

    Cisplatin administration induces DNA damage resulting in germ cell apoptosis and subsequent testicular atrophy. Although 50 percent of male cancer patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy develop long-term secondary infertility, medical treatment to prevent spermatogenic failure after chemotherapy is not available. Under normal conditions, testicular p53 promotes cell cycle arrest, which allows time for DNA repair and reshuffling during meiosis. However, its role in the setting of cisplatin-induced infertility has not been studied. Ghrelin administration ameliorates the spermatogenic failure that follows cisplatin administration in mice, but the mechanisms mediating these effects have not been well established. The aim of the current study was to characterize the mechanisms of ghrelin and p53 action in the testis after cisplatin-induced testicular damage. Here we show that cisplatin induces germ cell damage through inhibition of p53-dependent DNA repair mechanisms involving gamma-H2AX and ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein kinase. As a result, testicular weight and sperm count and motility were decreased with an associated increase in sperm DNA damage. Ghrelin administration prevented these sequelae by restoring the normal expression of gamma-H2AX, ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and p53, which in turn allows repair of DNA double stranded breaks. In conclusion, these findings indicate that ghrelin has the potential to prevent or diminish infertility caused by cisplatin and other chemotherapeutic agents by restoring p53-dependent DNA repair mechanisms. PMID:26019260

  4. Assessment of thermal treatment via irrigation of external ear to reduce cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Spankovich, Christopher; Lobarinas, Edward; Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard; Le Prell, Colleen G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic and local changes in body temperature can have a profound effect on traumatic injuries including those to the inner ear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of acutely increasing or decreasing the temperature of the external ear canal on cisplatin-induced hearing loss. The external auditory canals of male guinea pigs were acutely irrigated with warm (44 °C), euthermic (37 °C), or cool (30 °C) water and subsequently injected with cisplatin (12 mg/kg, i.p.). Hearing was assessed by the auditory brainstem response and cochleograms were prepared to determine loss of hair cells. Ear canal irrigation with warm water potentiated cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss whereas cool ear canal irrigation showed significant protection from cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss. These results suggest that non-invasive cool water ear canal irrigation may be highly effective clinical procedure for protecting against cisplatin-induced hearing loss. PMID:26639015

  5. Pre-treatment with glutamine reduces genetic damage due to cancer treatment with cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R J; Sassaki, E S; Monreal, A C D; Monreal, M T F D; Pesarini, J R; Mauro, M O; Matuo, R; Silva, A F; Zobiole, N N; Siqueira, J M; Ribeiro, L R; Mantovani, M S

    2013-12-02

    Cisplatin is an effective antineoplastic drug. However, it provokes considerable collateral effects, including genotoxic and clastogenic activity. It has been reported that a diet rich in glutamine can help inhibit such collateral effects. We evaluated this activity in 40 Swiss mice, distributed into eight experimental groups: G1 - Control group (PBS 0.1 mL/10 g body weight); G2 - cisplatin group (cisplatin 6 mg/kg intraperitoneally); G3, G4, G5 - glutamine groups (glutamine at 150, 300, and 600 mg/kg, respectively; orally); G6, G7, G8 - Pre-treatment groups (glutamine at 150, 300, and 600 mg/kg, respectively; orally and cisplatin 6 mg/kg intraperitonially). For the micronucleus assay, samples of blood were collected (before the first use of the drugs at T0, then 24 (T1) and 48 (T2) hours after the first administration). For the comet assay, blood samples were collected only at T2. The damage reduction percentages for the micronucleus assay were 90.0, 47.3, and 37.3% at T1 and 46.0, 38.6, and 34.7% at T2, for G6, G7, and G8 groups, respectively. For the comet assay, the damage reduction percentages were 113.0, 117.4, and 115.0% for G6, G7, and G8, respectively. We conclude that glutamine is able to prevent genotoxic and clastogenic damages caused by cisplatin.

  6. Assessment of thermal treatment via irrigation of external ear to reduce cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Spankovich, Christopher; Lobarinas, Edward; Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard; Le Prell, Colleen G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic and local changes in body temperature can have a profound effect on traumatic injuries including those to the inner ear. Therefore, we investigated the effects of acutely increasing or decreasing the temperature of the external ear canal on cisplatin-induced hearing loss. The external auditory canals of male guinea pigs were acutely irrigated with warm (44 °C), euthermic (37 °C), or cool (30 °C) water and subsequently injected with cisplatin (12 mg/kg, i.p.). Hearing was assessed by the auditory brainstem response and cochleograms were prepared to determine loss of hair cells. Ear canal irrigation with warm water potentiated cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss whereas cool ear canal irrigation showed significant protection from cisplatin-induced hearing loss and outer hair cell loss. These results suggest that non-invasive cool water ear canal irrigation may be highly effective clinical procedure for protecting against cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

  7. Metformin combined with p38 MAPK inhibitor improves cisplatin sensitivity in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    XIE, YA; PENG, ZHENG; SHI, MINGXING; JI, MEI; GUO, HONGJUN; SHI, HUIRONG

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of metformin, combined with a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, on the sensitivity of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer to cisplatin. The expression and distribution of phosphorylated p38 MAPK (P-p38 MAPK) was confirmed in drug-resistant and primary ovarian cancer tissues by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. A bromodeoxyuridine ELISA kit was used to analyze the effects of metformin, SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, and metformin combined with SB203580, on the cell proliferation of SKOV3/DDP cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. The protein expression of P-p38 MAPK was significantly higher in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer, as compared with the primary ovarian cancer tissues. Metformin combined with SB203580 significantly enhanced the sensitivity of SKOV3/DDP cells to cisplatin. In conclusion, the p38 MAPK signaling pathway may be associated with cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer. Metformin, combined with the p38 MAPK inhibitor, significantly increased the sensitivity of SKOV3/DDP cells to cisplatin treatment. PMID:25118792

  8. Common Variants in ACYP2 Influence Susceptibility to Cisplatin-induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Heng; Robinson, Giles W.; Huang, Jie; Lim, Joshua Yew-Suang; Zhang, Hui; Bass, Johnnie K.; Broniscer, Alberto; Chintagumpala, Murali; Bartels, Ute; Gururangan, Sri; Hassall, Tim; Fisher, Michael; Cohn, Richard; Yamashita, Tetsuji; Teitz, Tal; Zuo, Jian; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Gajjar, Amar; Stewart, Clinton F.; Yang, Jun J.

    2015-01-01

    Taking a genome-wide association study approach, we identified inherited genetic variations in ACYP2 associated with cisplatin ototoxicity (rs1872328, P = 3.9×10-8, hazard ratio = 4.5) in 238 children with newly-diagnosed brain tumors, with independent replication in 68 similarly treated children. ACYP2 risk variant strongly predisposed patients to precipitous hearing loss and was related to ototoxicity severity. These results point to novel biology of ototoxic effects of platinum agents. PMID:25665007

  9. Behavioral and electrophysiological studies in rats with cisplatin-induced chemoneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Cata, Juan P; Weng, Han-Rong; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2008-09-16

    Neuropathy is the chief dose-limiting side effect associated with the major classes of frontline cancer therapy drugs. Here the changes in behavioral responses of rats to cutaneous mechanical and thermal stimuli occurring following treatment with cisplatin and the changes in spinal neurophysiology accompanying the development of chemotherapy-induced hyperalgesia were explored. Systemic treatment with cisplatin induced changes in both mechanical and thermal cutaneous sensory withdrawal thresholds of Sprague-Dawley rats. High doses of chemotherapy produced hypoalgesia whereas lower doses produced hyperalgesia. Follow-up neurophysiological studies in rats with chemotherapy-induced hyperalgesia revealed that deep spinal lamina wide dynamic range neurons had significantly higher spontaneous activity and longer afterdischarges to noxious mechanical stimuli than wide dynamic range neurons in control rats; cisplatin administration was also associated with longer afterdischarges and abnormal wind-up to transcutaneous electrical stimuli. The hyperexcitability observed during cisplatin-induced hyperalgesia is very similar to that observed in rats with hyperalgesia produced following treatment with other very diverse types of chemotherapeutic agents and similar to that observed following specific types of direct nerve injury. PMID:18657527

  10. Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity Involves Mitochondrial Injury with Impaired Tubular Mitochondrial Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ellezian, Lena; Brown, Dan; Horváth, Béla; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Parikh, Samir M.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Stillman, Isaac E.; Pacher, Pál

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used antineoplastic agent. However, its major limitation is dose-dependent nephrotoxicity whose precise mechanism is poorly understood. Recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction in tubular epithelium contributes to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Here the authors extend those findings by describing the role of an important electron transport chain enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (COX). Immunohistochemistry for COX 1 protein demonstrated that, in response to cisplatin, expression was mostly maintained in focally damaged tubular epithelium. In contrast, COX enzyme activity in proximal tubules (by light microscopy) was decreased. Ultrastructural analysis of the cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla showed decreased mitochondrial mass, disruption of cristae, and extensive mitochondrial swelling in proximal tubular epithelium. Functional electron microscopy showed that COX enzyme activity was decreased in the remaining mitochondria in the proximal tubules but maintained in distal tubules. In summary, cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with structural and functional damage to the mitochondria. More broadly, using functional electron microscopy to measure mitochondrial enzyme activity may generate mechanistic insights across a spectrum of renal disorders. PMID:22511597

  11. Cisplatin nephrotoxicity involves mitochondrial injury with impaired tubular mitochondrial enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zsengellér, Zsuzsanna K; Ellezian, Lena; Brown, Dan; Horváth, Béla; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Parikh, Samir M; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Stillman, Isaac E; Pacher, Pál

    2012-07-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used antineoplastic agent. However, its major limitation is dose-dependent nephrotoxicity whose precise mechanism is poorly understood. Recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial dysfunction in tubular epithelium contributes to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Here the authors extend those findings by describing the role of an important electron transport chain enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase (COX). Immunohistochemistry for COX 1 protein demonstrated that, in response to cisplatin, expression was mostly maintained in focally damaged tubular epithelium. In contrast, COX enzyme activity in proximal tubules (by light microscopy) was decreased. Ultrastructural analysis of the cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla showed decreased mitochondrial mass, disruption of cristae, and extensive mitochondrial swelling in proximal tubular epithelium. Functional electron microscopy showed that COX enzyme activity was decreased in the remaining mitochondria in the proximal tubules but maintained in distal tubules. In summary, cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with structural and functional damage to the mitochondria. More broadly, using functional electron microscopy to measure mitochondrial enzyme activity may generate mechanistic insights across a spectrum of renal disorders. PMID:22511597

  12. Enhanced cytotoxic effect of cisplatin using diagnostic ultrasound and microbubbles in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Noboru; Nakamura, Kensuke; Murakami, Masahiro; Lim, Sue Yee; Ohta, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-10-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has accomplished drug and gene delivery by ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD). However, the efficacy of delivery is still relatively low. Therefore, we optimized conditions of UTMD using diagnostic ultrasound and ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles. Canine thyroid adenocarcinoma cells were cultured in a 96-well plate. After addition of cisplatin and Sonazoid®, the plate was inverted to raise microbubbles near cells and incubated. Cells were exposed to diagnostic ultrasound using a linear probe operated in the contrast harmonic imaging mode. The center frequency was 2.5 MHz with a mechanical index of 1.33 and a frame rate of 48 frames/sec. Cytotoxic effect of cisplatin was evaluated 24h after exposure using trypan blue dye exclusion test. We optimized incubation duration, cisplatin concentration, and the relationship between microbubble concentration and exposure duration. The optimum enhancement was observed at incubation duration of 5min, cisplatin concentration of 1 μg/ml, and microbubble concentration of 2.4 × 105 microbubbles/ml. Exposure duration did not influence the enhancement at the microbubble concentration of 2.4 × 105 microbubbles/ml. Our results suggest that relative low concentrations of drug and microbubbles with short exposure duration might be sufficient for drug delivery by UTMD using diagnostic ultrasound.

  13. Pit-1 inhibits BRCA1 and sensitizes human breast tumors to cisplatin and vitamin D treatment

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Samuel; Arias, Efigenia; Sigueiro, Rita; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Martinez-Ordoñez, Anxo; Castelao, Esteban; Eiró, Noemí; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Macia, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Maestro, Miguel; Vizoso, Francisco; Mouriño, Antonio; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The POU class 1 homeobox 1 (POU1F1, also known as Pit-1), pertaining to the Pit-Oct-Unc (POU) family of transcription factors, has been related to tumor growth and metastasis in breast. However, its role in response to breast cancer therapy is unknown. We found that Pit-1 down-regulated DNA-damage and repair genes, and specifically inhibited BRCA1 gene expression, sensitizing breast cancer cells to DNA-damage agents. Administration of 1α, 25-dihydroxy-3-epi-vitamin D3 (3-Epi, an endogenous low calcemic vitamin D metabolite) reduced Pit-1 expression, and synergized with cisplatin, thus, decreasing cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro, and reducing tumor growth in vivo. In addition, fifteen primary cultures of human breast tumors showed significantly decreased proliferation when treated with 3-Epi+cisplatin, compared to cisplatin alone. This response positively correlated with Pit-1 levels. Our findings demonstrate that high levels of Pit-1 and reduced BRCA1 levels increase breast cancer cell susceptibility to 3-Epi+cisplatin therapy. PMID:25992773

  14. PIM2 kinase is induced by cisplatin in ovarian cancer cells and limits drug efficacy.

    PubMed

    Musiani, Daniele; Hammond, Dean E; Cirillo, Luca; Erriquez, Jessica; Olivero, Martina; Clague, Michael J; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2014-11-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapy is widely used to treat various cancers, but many patients ultimately relapse due to drug resistance. We employed phosphoproteomic analysis and functional assays of the response of SK-OV-3 ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin as a strategy to identify kinases as candidate druggable targets to sensitize cells to platinum. A SILAC-based approach combined with TiO2-based phosphopeptide enrichment allowed the direct identification of ERK1/2, p90RSK, and ERBB2 as kinases whose phosphorylation is regulated by cisplatin. Bioinformatic analysis revealed enrichment in linear phosphorylation motifs predicted to be targets of p38MAPK, CDK2, and PIM2. All three PIM kinases were found expressed in a panel of 10 ovarian cancer cell lines, with the oncogenic PIM2 being the most commonly induced by cisplatin. Targeting PIM2 kinase by either biochemical inhibitors or RNA interference impaired cell growth, decreased cisplatin-triggered BAD phosphorylation, and sensitized ovarian cancer cells to drug-induced apoptosis. Overexpression of PIM2 triggered anchorage-independent growth and resulted in increased BAD phosphorylation and cell resistance to DNA damaging agents. The data show that the PIM2 kinase plays a role in the response of ovarian cancer cells to platinum drugs and suggest that PIM inhibitors may find clinical application as an adjunct to platinum-based therapies. PMID:25099161

  15. MEK Inhibition Overcomes Cisplatin Resistance Conferred by SOS/MAPK Pathway Activation in Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Li Ren; Chua, Kian Ngiap; Sim, Wen Jing; Ng, Hsien Chun; Bi, Chonglei; Ho, Jingshan; Nga, Min En; Pang, Yin Huei; Ong, Weijie Richard; Soo, Ross Andrew; Huynh, Hung; Chng, Wee Joo; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Goh, Boon Cher

    2015-07-01

    Genomic analyses of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) have yet to yield significant strategies against pathway activation to improve treatment. Platinum-based chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for SCC of different histotypes either as a single-agent or alongside other chemotherapeutic drugs or radiotherapy; however, resistance inevitably emerges, which limits the duration of treatment response. To elucidate mechanisms that mediate resistance to cisplatin, we compared drug-induced perturbations to gene and protein expression between cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant SCC cells, and identified MAPK-ERK pathway upregulation and activation in drug-resistant cells. ERK-induced resistance appeared to be activated by Son of Sevenless (SOS) upstream, and mediated through Bim degradation downstream. Clinically, elevated p-ERK expression was associated with shorter disease-free survival in patients with locally advanced head and neck SCC treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Inhibition of MEK/ERK, but not that of EGFR or RAF, augmented cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and demonstrated efficacy and tolerability in vivo. Collectively, these findings suggest that inhibition of the activated SOS-MAPK-ERK pathway may augment patient responses to cisplatin treatment.

  16. Molecular portrait of cisplatin induced response in human testis cancer cell lines based on gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Duale, Nur; Lindeman, Birgitte; Komada, Mitsuko; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Andreassen, Ashild; Soderlund, Erik J; Brunborg, Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    literature, we provide a global pattern of cisplatin induced cellular response that is specific for testicular cancer cell lines. We have identified cisplatin-responsive functional classes and pathways, such as the angiogenesis, Wnt, integrin, and cadherin signaling pathways. The identification of differentially expressed genes in this study may contribute to a better understanding of the unusual sensitivity of TGCT to some DNA-damaging agents. PMID:17711579

  17. Induction Chemotherapy with Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil in Advanced Head and Neck Cancers: A Short Term Response Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra; Shenoy, Vijendra; Hegde, Mahesh Chandra; Prasad, Vishnu; Prasad, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background Considering the uprising number of Head and neck cancer in the state with limited options of medical and surgical treatment, the focus of this study involved on chemotherapy in advanced Head and neck cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of combination of Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil (PF) as induction chemotherapy in patients in locally advanced squamous cell cancer of head and neck. Materials and Methods Forty four patients with previously untreated stage III -IV advanced and inoperable cases were included in this prospective study. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 3 cycles of Cisplatin 100mg/mt2 as infusion on day 1, 5-Fluorouracil of 750mg/mt2 on day 2, 5-Fluorouracil of 1000mg/mt2 as infusion on day 3 in an inpatient basis. Cycles were repeated with an interval of 21 days. Patients were evaluated within a period of 3 weeks at the end of completion of third cycle of chemotherapy. Post chemotherapy local therapy was individualized based on the response, site and stage of the tumour. Results Out of 44 eligible and evaluable patients, major dominance was noted in male group constituting 68%. After induction chemotherapy 58.8% of stage III experienced stable response, & 44% had partial response. In stage IV, 44% showed a stable response and 33.3% had partial response. But in comparison to primary tumour response and nodal response, which had a significant clinical response, the overall response of malignancy with respect to stage and site specificity was clinically insignificant. Moderate adverse reaction was noted in 47.6% and 42.1% had mild reactions. Majority of patients experienced grade 3 adverse events, of which anaemia in females and leucopenia in males pre-dominated. Conclusion With the use of cisplatin and 5-FU as induction chemotherapy agents in advanced and inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck, a distinct benefit was seen in stabilizing the tumour from progression. But achieving a significant

  18. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  19. Interaction of electrons with cisplatin and the subsequent effect on DNA damage: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsing-Yin; Chen, Hui-Fen; Kao, Chai-Lin; Yang, Po-Yu; Hsu, Sodio C N

    2014-09-28

    Cisplatin, Pt(NH3)2Cl2, is a leading chemotherapeutic agent that has been widely used for various cancers. Recent experiments show that combining cisplatin and electron sources can dramatically enhance DNA damage and the cell-killing rate and, therefore, is a promising way to overcome the side effects and the resistance of cisplatin. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not clear yet. By using density functional theory calculations, we confirm that cisplatin can efficiently capture the prehydrated electrons and then undergo dissociation. The first electron attachment triggers a spontaneous departure of the chloride ion, forming a T-shaped [Pt(NH3)2Cl]˙ neutral radical, whereas the second electron attachment leads to a spontaneous departure of ammine, forming a linear [Pt(NH3)Cl](-) anion. We further recognize that the one-electron reduced product [Pt(NH3)2Cl]˙ is extremely harmful to DNA. It can abstract hydrogen atoms from the C-H bonds of the ribose moiety and the methyl group of thymine, which in turn leads to DNA strand breaks and cross-link lesions. The activation energies of these hydrogen abstraction reactions are relatively small compared to the hydrolysis of cisplatin, a prerequisite step in the normal mechanism of action of cisplatin. These results rationalize the improved cytotoxicity of cisplatin by supplying electrons. Although the biological effects of the two-electron reduced product [Pt(NH3)Cl](-) are not clear at this stage, our calculations indicate that it might be protonated by the surrounding water.

  20. Chemical conversion of cisplatin and carboplatin with histidine in a model protein crystallized under sodium iodide conditions.

    PubMed

    Tanley, Simon W M; Helliwell, John R

    2014-09-01

    Cisplatin and carboplatin are platinum anticancer agents that are used to treat a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine in hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) showed a partial chemical conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high sodium chloride concentration used in the crystallization conditions. Also, the co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin in sodium bromide conditions resulted in the partial conversion of carboplatin to the transbromoplatin form, with a portion of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate (CBDC) moiety still present. The results of the co-crystallization of HEWL with cisplatin or carboplatin in sodium iodide conditions are now reported in order to determine whether the cisplatin and carboplatin converted to the iodo form, and whether this took place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin in NaCl conditions or to transbromoplatin in NaBr conditions as seen previously. It is reported here that a partial chemical transformation has taken place to a transplatin form for both ligands. The NaI-grown crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P21 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The chemically transformed cisplatin and carboplatin bind to both His15 residues, i.e. in each asymmetric unit. The binding is only at the N(δ) atom of His15. A third platinum species is also seen in both conditions bound in a crevice between symmetry-related molecules. Here, the platinum is bound to three I atoms identified based on their anomalous difference electron densities and their refined occupancies, with the fourth bound atom being a Cl atom (in the cisplatin case) or a portion of the CBDC moiety (in the carboplatin case).

  1. Strong adsorption of Al-doped carbon nanotubes toward cisplatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Li, Guo-Qing; Lu, Xiao-Min; Ma, Juan-Juan; Zeng, Peng-Yu; He, Qin-Yu; Wang, Yin-Zhen

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of cisplatin molecule on Al-doped CNTs is investigated using density functional theory. The obtained results indicate that Al-doped carbon nanotubes can strongly absorb cisplatin. After absorbing cisplatin, the symmetry of CNTs has some changes. We innovatively defined a parameter of symmetry variation which relates to the adsorption. By analyzing the electronic structure, it can be concluded that under the circumstance that cisplatin was absorbed by Al-doped CNTs through aluminum atom of Al-doped CNTs. In conclusion, Al-doped CNTs is a kind of potential delivery carrier with high quality for anticancer drug cisplatin.

  2. S-1 plus cisplatin versus fluorouracil plus cisplatin in advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu Hong; Qiu, Miao Zhen; Xu, Jian Ming; Sun, Guo Ping; Lu, Hui Shan; Liu, Yun Peng; Zhong, Mei Zuo; Zhang, He Long; Yu, Shi Ying; Li, Wei; Hu, Xiao Hua; Wang, Jie Jun; Cheng, Ying; Zhou, Jun Tian; Guo, Zeng Qing; Guan, Zhon Gzhen; Xu, Rui Hua

    2015-10-27

    The safety and efficacy of S-1 plus cisplatin in Chinese advanced gastric cancer patients in first line setting is unknown. In this pilot study, patients with advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma were enrolled and randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive S-1 plus cisplatin (CS group) or 5-FU plus cisplatin (CF group). The primary endpoint was time to progression (TTP). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS) and safety. This study was registered on ClinicalTrials. Gov, number NCT01198392. A total of 236 patients were enrolled. Median TTP was 5.51 months in CS group compared with 4.62 months in CF group [hazard ratio (HR) 1.028, 95% confidential interval (CI) 0.758-1.394, p = 0.859]. Median OS was 10.00 months and 10.46 months in CS and CF groups (HR 1.046, 95%CI 0.709-1.543, p = 0.820), respectively. The most common adverse events in both groups were anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, nausea, thrombocytopenia, vomiting, anorexia and diarrhea. We find that S-1 plus cisplatin is an effective and tolerable option for advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma patients in China.

  3. Vandetanib Restores Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells’ Sensitivity to Cisplatin and Radiation In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Fumihiko; Valdecanas, David R.; Zhao, Mei; Molkentine, David P.; Takahashi, Yoko; Hanna, Ehab Y.; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vali; Heymach, John; Milas, Luka; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We investigated whether vandetanib, an inhibitor of the tyrosine kinase activities of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Rearranged during transfection (RET), could augment the antitumor activity of radiation with or without cisplatin in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Experimental design OSC-19 and HN5 HNSCC cells that were cisplatin and radioresistant were treated with vandetanib, cisplatin, and radiation alone or in combination in vitro and in vivo using an orthotopic nude mouse model. Treatment effects were assessed using clonogenic survival assay, tumor volume, bioluminescence imaging, tumor growth delay, survival, microvessel density, tumor and endothelial cell apoptosis, and EGFR and Akt phosphorylation data. Results Vandetanib plus cisplatin radiosensitized HNSCC cells in vitro and in vivo. The combination treatment with vandetanib, cisplatin, and radiation was superior to the rest of treatments (including the double combinations) in antitumoral effects, prolonging survival, decreasing cervical lymph node metastases in vivo. It also increased both tumor and tumor-associated endothelial cell apoptosis and decreased microvessel density in vivo. An analysis of tumor growth delay data revealed that vandetanib plus cisplatin enhanced radioresponse in vivo. All vandetanib-containing treatments inhibited EGFR and Akt phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion The addition of vandetanib to combination therapy with cisplatin and radiation was able to effectively overcome cisplatin and radioresistance in in vitro and in vivo models of HNSCC. Further study of this regimen in clinical trials may be warranted. PMID:21350000

  4. Comparison of inhibition kinetics of several organophosphates, including some nerve agent surrogates, using human erythrocyte and rat and mouse brain acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Coban, Alper; Carr, Russell L; Chambers, Howard W; Willeford, Kenneth O; Chambers, Janice E

    2016-04-25

    Because testing of nerve agents is limited to only authorized facilities, our laboratory developed several surrogates that resemble nerve agents because they phosphylate the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with the same moiety as the actual nerve agents. The inhibition kinetic parameters were determined for AChE by surrogates of cyclosarin (NCMP), sarin (NIMP, PIMP and TIMP) and VX (NEMP and TEMP) and other organophosphorus compounds derived from insecticides. All compounds were tested with rat brain and a subset was tested with mouse brain and purified human erythrocyte AChE. Within the compounds tested on all AChE sources, chlorpyrifos-oxon had the highest molecular rate constant followed by NCMP and NEMP. This was followed by NIMP then paraoxon and DFP with rat and mouse brain AChE but DFP was a more potent inhibitor than NIMP and paraoxon with human AChE. With the additional compounds tested only in rat brain, TEMP was slightly less potent than NEMP but more potent than PIMP which was more potent than NIMP. Methyl paraoxon was slightly less potent than paraoxon but more potent than TIMP which was more potent than DFP. Overall, this study validates that the pattern of inhibitory potencies of our surrogates is comparable to the pattern of inhibitory potencies of actual nerve agents (i.e., cyclosarin>VX>sarin), and that these are more potent than insecticidal organophosphates.

  5. The Role of Inherited TPMT and COMT Genetic Variation in Cisplatin-induced Ototoxicity in Children with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun J.; Lim, Joshua Yew-Suang; Huang, Jie; Bass, Johnnie; Wu, Jianrong; Wang, Chong; Fang, Jie; Stewart, Elizabeth; Harstead, Elaine H.; Shuyu, E; Robinson, Giles W.; Evans, William E.; Pappo, Alberto; Zuo, Jian; Relling, Mary V.; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Gajjar, Amar; Stewart, Clinton F.

    2013-01-01

    Ototoxicity is a debilitating side effect of platinating agents with substantial inter-patient variability. We sought to evaluate the association of TPMT and COMT genetic variations with cisplatin-related hearing damage in the context of frontline pediatric cancer treatment protocols. In 213 children from St. Jude Medulloblastoma-96 and -03 protocols, hearing loss was related to younger age (P=0.013) and craniospinal irradiation (P=0.001), but did not differ by TPMT or COMT variants. Results were similar in an independent cohort of 41 children from solid tumor frontline protocols. Functional hearing loss or hair cell damage was not different in TPMT knockout vs. wildtype mice following cisplatin treatment, and neither TPMT nor COMT variant was associated with cisplatin cytotoxicity in lymphoblastoid cell lines. In conclusion, our results indicated that TPMT or COMT genetic variation was not related to cisplatin ototoxicity in children with cancer and did not influence cisplatin-induced hearing damage in laboratory models. PMID:23820299

  6. Selective activation of SHP2 activity by cisplatin revealed by a novel chemical probe-based assay

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Chun-Chen; Chu, Chi-Yuan; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lo, Lee-Chiang

    2010-01-01

    Src homology-2 (SH2) domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2) is known to participate in several different signaling pathways to mediate cell growth, survival, migration, and differentiation. However, due to the lack of proper analytical tools, it is unclear whether the phosphatase activity of SHP2 is activated in most studies. We have previously developed an activity-based probe LCL2 that formed covalent linkage with catalytically active protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Here, by combining LCL2 with a SHP2 specific antibody, we established an assay system that enables the direct monitoring of SHP2 activity upon cisplatin treatment of cancer cells. The protocol is advantageous over conventional colorimetric or in-gel PTP assays as it is specific and does not require the use of radioisotope reagents. Using this assay, we found SHP2 activity was selectively activated by cisplatin. Moreover, the activation of SHP2 appeared to be specific for cisplatin as other DNA damage agents failed to activate the activity. Although the role of SHP2 activation by cisplatin treatments is still unclear to us, our results provide the first direct evidence for the activation of SHP2 during cisplatin treatments. More importantly, the concept of using activity-based probe in conjunction with target-specific antibodies could be extended to other enzyme classes.

  7. Identification of the functional domain of p21(WAF1/CIP1) that protects cells from cisplatin cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang; Megyesi, Judit; Safirstein, Robert L; Price, Peter M

    2005-09-01

    The p21 cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor protects cells from cisplatin cytotoxicity in vivo and in vitro. However, the mechanism of protection is not known. Separate p21 domains are known to interact with several different proteins having proapoptotic functions. To investigate the mechanism of protection by p21, we have constructed adenoviruses encoding the different domains of p21. We were able to localize the protective activity to a region of 54 amino acids containing the cyclin-cdk interacting moiety. Other protein binding domains of p21, including the NH2-terminal procaspase-3 interactive region and the COOH-terminal region containing the proliferating cell nuclear antigen binding domain and the nuclear localization signal, had little protective effect on cisplatin cytotoxicity. The dependence of cisplatin cytotoxicity on cdk2 activity was also demonstrated because 1) cisplatin caused a marked increase in cdk2 activity, which was prevented by the p21 expression adenovirus, and 2) a cdk2 dominant-negative adenovirus also protected cells from cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Thus the data suggest that the mechanism of p21 protection is by direct inhibition of cdk2 activity and that cisplatin-induced apoptosis is caused by a cdk2-dependent pathway.

  8. Asparagus racemosus ameliorates cisplatin induced toxicities and augments its antileishmanial activity by immunomodulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Heena; Sehgal, Rakesh; Kaur, Sukhbir

    2014-02-01

    Current drugs for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis are inadequate and their efficacies are also compromised due to suppression of immune function associated during the course of infection. To overcome this problem, efforts are needed to develop therapies with effective immunomodulatory agents where decrease of parasitic burden and simultaneous enhancement of adaptive immunity can be achieved. In this study we have evaluated a new therapeutic approach based on combination of Asparagus racemosus, an immunomodulatory drug, in combination with cisplatin against Leishmania donovani infected BALB/c mice. We demonstrate that A. racemosus (650 mg/kg b.wt./day for 15 days, orally) in combination with cisplatin (5 mg/kg b.wt./day for 5 days, intraperitoneally) enhanced the clearance of parasites as determined by Giemsa-stained liver impression smears. Besides having better killing activity, this combination group achieved increased production of disease resolving Th-1 response (IFN-gamma, IL-2), heightened DTH (delayed type hypersensitivity) response and augmented levels of IgG2a. Moreover, A. racemosus in combination with cisplatin not only provided enhanced protective immune response but also resulted in remarkable improved kidney and liver function tests as manifested by normal levels of SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine and urea in blood plasma with normal histological observations as compared to only cisplatin treated L. donovani infected BALB/c mice. Through this study we have ascertained that A. racemosus in combination with cisplatin in L. donovani infected BALB/c mice boosted as well as restored both cellular and humoral immunity. Thus in view of severe immunosuppression in visceral leishmaniasis, a better and effective strategy for optimum efficacy of future antileishmanial drugs would direct not only killing of parasite by the drug, but also simultaneous generation of immunity against the disease.

  9. Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity and Longitudinal Growth in Children With Solid Tumors: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Triana, Clímaco Andres; Castelán-Martínez, Osvaldo D; Rivas-Ruiz, Rodolfo; Jiménez-Méndez, Ricardo; Medina, Aurora; Clark, Patricia; Rassekh, Rod; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Carleton, Bruce; Medeiros, Mara

    2015-08-01

    Cisplatin, a major antineoplastic drug used in the treatment of solid tumors, is a known nephrotoxin. This retrospective cohort study evaluated the prevalence and severity of cisplatin nephrotoxicity in 54 children and its impact on height and weight.We recorded the weight, height, serum creatinine, and electrolytes in each cisplatin cycle and after 12 months of treatment. Nephrotoxicity was graded as follows: normal renal function (Grade 0); asymptomatic electrolyte disorders, including an increase in serum creatinine, up to 1.5 times baseline value (Grade 1); need for electrolyte supplementation <3 months and/or increase in serum creatinine 1.5 to 1.9 times from baseline (Grade 2); increase in serum creatinine 2 to 2.9 times from baseline or need for electrolyte supplementation for more than 3 months after treatment completion (Grade 3); and increase in serum creatinine ≥3 times from baseline or renal replacement therapy (Grade 4).Nephrotoxicity was observed in 41 subjects (75.9%). Grade 1 nephrotoxicity was observed in 18 patients (33.3%), Grade 2 in 5 patients (9.2%), and Grade 3 in 18 patients (33.3%). None had Grade 4 nephrotoxicity. Nephrotoxicity patients were younger and received higher cisplatin dose, they also had impairment in longitudinal growth manifested as statistically significant worsening on the height Z Score at 12 months after treatment. We used a multiple logistic regression model using the delta of height Z Score (baseline-12 months) as dependent variable in order to adjust for the main confounder variables such as: germ cell tumor, cisplatin total dose, serum magnesium levels at 12 months, gender, and nephrotoxicity grade. Patients with nephrotoxicity Grade 1 where at higher risk of not growing (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.07-24.3, P=0.04). The cisplatin total dose had a significant negative relationship with magnesium levels at 12 months (Spearman r=-0.527, P=<0.001). PMID:26313789

  10. Identification of cisplatin-regulated metabolic pathways in pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    von Stechow, Louise; Ruiz-Aracama, Ainhoa; van de Water, Bob; Peijnenburg, Ad; Danen, Erik; Lommen, Arjen

    2013-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic compound, cisplatin causes various kinds of DNA lesions but also triggers other pertubations, such as ER and oxidative stress. We and others have shown that treatment of pluripotent stem cells with cisplatin causes a plethora of transcriptional and post-translational alterations that, to a major extent, point to DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. The orchestrated DDR signaling network is important to arrest the cell cycle and repair the lesions or, in case of damage beyond repair, eliminate affected cells. Failure to properly balance the various aspects of the DDR in stem cells contributes to ageing and cancer. Here, we performed metabolic profiling by mass spectrometry of embryonic stem (ES) cells treated for different time periods with cisplatin. We then integrated metabolomics with transcriptomics analyses and connected cisplatin-regulated metabolites with regulated metabolic enzymes to identify enriched metabolic pathways. These included nucleotide metabolism, urea cycle and arginine and proline metabolism. Silencing of identified proline metabolic and catabolic enzymes indicated that altered proline metabolism serves as an adaptive, rather than a toxic response. A group of enriched metabolic pathways clustered around the metabolite S-adenosylmethionine, which is a hub for methylation and transsulfuration reactions and polyamine metabolism. Enzymes and metabolites with pro- or anti-oxidant functions were also enriched but enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species were not measured in cisplatin-treated ES cells. Lastly, a number of the differentially regulated metabolic enzymes were identified as target genes of the transcription factor p53, pointing to p53-mediated alterations in metabolism in response to genotoxic stress. Altogether, our findings reveal interconnecting metabolic pathways that are responsive to cisplatin and may serve as signaling modules in the DDR in pluripotent stem cells.

  11. Identification of Cisplatin-Regulated Metabolic Pathways in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    van de Water, Bob; Peijnenburg, Ad; Danen, Erik; Lommen, Arjen

    2013-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic compound, cisplatin causes various kinds of DNA lesions but also triggers other pertubations, such as ER and oxidative stress. We and others have shown that treatment of pluripotent stem cells with cisplatin causes a plethora of transcriptional and post-translational alterations that, to a major extent, point to DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. The orchestrated DDR signaling network is important to arrest the cell cycle and repair the lesions or, in case of damage beyond repair, eliminate affected cells. Failure to properly balance the various aspects of the DDR in stem cells contributes to ageing and cancer. Here, we performed metabolic profiling by mass spectrometry of embryonic stem (ES) cells treated for different time periods with cisplatin. We then integrated metabolomics with transcriptomics analyses and connected cisplatin-regulated metabolites with regulated metabolic enzymes to identify enriched metabolic pathways. These included nucleotide metabolism, urea cycle and arginine and proline metabolism. Silencing of identified proline metabolic and catabolic enzymes indicated that altered proline metabolism serves as an adaptive, rather than a toxic response. A group of enriched metabolic pathways clustered around the metabolite S-adenosylmethionine, which is a hub for methylation and transsulfuration reactions and polyamine metabolism. Enzymes and metabolites with pro- or anti-oxidant functions were also enriched but enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species were not measured in cisplatin-treated ES cells. Lastly, a number of the differentially regulated metabolic enzymes were identified as target genes of the transcription factor p53, pointing to p53-mediated alterations in metabolism in response to genotoxic stress. Altogether, our findings reveal interconnecting metabolic pathways that are responsive to cisplatin and may serve as signaling modules in the DDR in pluripotent stem cells. PMID:24146875

  12. Structure Determination of Ornithine-Linked Cisplatin by Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation Action Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Chenchen; Kimutai, Bett; Hamlow, Lucas; Roy, Harrison; Nei, Y.-W.; Bao, Xun; Gao, Juehan; Martens, Jonathan K.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Maitre, Philippe; Steinmetz, Vincent; McNary, Christopher P.; Armentrout, Peter B.; Chow, C. S.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    Cisplatin [(NH_3)_2PtCl_2], the first FDA-approved platinum-based anticancer drug, has been widely used in cancer chemotherapy. Its pharmacological mechanism has been identified as its ability to coordinate to genomic DNA with guanine as its major target. Amino acid-linked cisplatin derivatives are being investigated as alternatives for cisplatin that may exhibit altered binding selectivity such as that found for ornithine-linked cisplatin (Ornplatin, [(Orn)PtCl_2]), which exhibits a preference for adenine over guanine in RNA. Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments and complementary electronic structure calculations are performed on a series of Ornplatin complexes to elucidate the nature of binding of the Orn amino acid to the Pt center and how that binding is influenced by the local environment. The complexes examined in the work include: [(Orn-H)PtCl_2]-, [(Orn)PtCl]+, [(Orn)Pt(H_2O)Cl]+, and [(Orn)PtCl_2+Na]+. In contrast to that found previously for the glycine-linked cisplatin complex (Glyplatin), which binds via the backbone amino and carboxylate groups, binding of Orn in these complexes is found to involve both the backbone and sidechain amino groups. Extensive broadening of the IRMPD spectrum for the [(Orn)Pt(H_2O)Cl]+ complex suggests that either multiple structures are contributing to the measured spectrum or strong intra-molecular hydrogen-binding interactions are present. The results for Ornplatin lead to an interesting discussion about the differences in selectivity and reactivity versus cisplatin.

  13. Cisplatin-induced anorexia and ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Tomohisa; Yakabi, Koji; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin, a formidable anticancer treatment, is used for several varieties of cancer. There are, however, many cases in which treatment must be abandoned due to a decrease in the patient's quality of life from loss of appetite associated with vomiting and nausea. There is a moderate degree of improvement in prevention of cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting when serotonin (5-HT) 3 receptor antagonists, neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists, and steroids-either alone or in combination-are administered. The mechanism of action for anorexia, which continues during or after treatment, is, however, still unclear. This anorexia is, similar to the onset of vomiting and nausea, caused by the action of large amounts of 5-HT released as a result of cisplatin administration on tissue 5-HT receptors. Among the 5-HT receptors, the activation of 5-HT2b and 5-HT2c receptors, in particular, seems to play a major role in cisplatin-induced anorexia. Following activation of these two receptors, there is reduced gastric and hypothalamic secretion of the appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin. There is ample evidence of the usefulness of exogenous ghrelin, synthetic ghrelin agonists, and the endogenous ghrelin signal-enhancer rikkunshito, which are expected to play significant roles in the clinical treatment and prevention of anorexia in future.

  14. Drosophila modifier screens to identify novel neuropsychiatric drugs including aminergic agents for the possible treatment of Parkinson’s disease and depression

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Terrell, Ashley; Lam, Hoa A.; Djapri, Christine; Jang, Jennifer; Hadi, Richard; Roberts, Logan; Shahi, Varun; Chou, Man-Ting; Biedermann, Traci; Huang, Brian; Lawless, George M.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Krantz, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that increase the presynaptic function of aminergic cells may provide neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease as well as treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression. Model genetic organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster may enhance the detection of new drugs via modifier or “enhancer/suppressor” screens, but this technique has not been applied to processes relevant to psychiatry. To identify new aminergic drugs in vivo, we used a mutation in the Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter (dVMAT) as a sensitized genetic background, and performed a suppressor screen. We fed dVMAT mutant larvae ~1000 known drugs and quantitated rescue (suppression) of an amine-dependent locomotor deficit in the larva. To determine which drugs might specifically potentiate neurotransmitter release, we performed an additional secondary screen for drugs that require presynaptic amine storage to rescue larval locomotion. Using additional larval locomotion and adult fertility assays, we validated that at least one compound previously used clinically as an antineoplastic agent potentiates the presynaptic function of aminergic circuits. We suggest that structurally similar agents might be used to development treatments for Parkinson’s disease, depression and ADHD and that modifier screens in Drosophila provide a new strategy to screen for neuropsychiatric drugs. More generally, our findings demonstrate the power of physiologically based screens for identifying bioactive agents for select neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23229049

  15. Chemical conversion of cisplatin and carboplatin with histidine in a model protein crystallized under sodium iodide conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-08-29

    Crystals of HEWL with cisplatin and HEWL with carboplatin grown in sodium iodide conditions both show a partial chemical transformation of cisplatin or carboplatin to a transiodoplatin (PtI{sub 2}X{sub 2}) form. The binding is only at the N{sup δ} atom of His15. A further Pt species (PtI{sub 3}X) is also seen, in both cases bound in a crevice between symmetry-related protein molecules. Cisplatin and carboplatin are platinum anticancer agents that are used to treat a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine in hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) showed a partial chemical conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high sodium chloride concentration used in the crystallization conditions. Also, the co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin in sodium bromide conditions resulted in the partial conversion of carboplatin to the transbromoplatin form, with a portion of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate (CBDC) moiety still present. The results of the co-crystallization of HEWL with cisplatin or carboplatin in sodium iodide conditions are now reported in order to determine whether the cisplatin and carboplatin converted to the iodo form, and whether this took place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin in NaCl conditions or to transbromoplatin in NaBr conditions as seen previously. It is reported here that a partial chemical transformation has taken place to a transplatin form for both ligands. The NaI-grown crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The chemically transformed cisplatin and carboplatin bind to both His15 residues, i.e. in each asymmetric unit. The binding is only at the N{sup δ} atom of His15. A third platinum species is also seen in both conditions bound in a crevice between symmetry-related molecules. Here, the platinum is bound to three I atoms identified based on their anomalous difference electron densities

  16. A dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitor shows antitumor activity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells and sensitizes them to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Xi, Qingsong; Chen, Yu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Ping; Xia, Shu; Yu, Shiying

    2013-10-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is critical for the growth and proliferation of various malignant tumors, including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Therefore, targeting of mTOR protein is a promising strategy for therapy in this disease. In the present study, we examined the antitumor effects of a specific mTOR kinase inhibitor, PP242, which blocks both mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) pathways, in two ESCC cell lines: Eca-109 and TE-1. We showed that PP242, but not rapamycin, attenuated the activities of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling in ESCC. PP242 inhibited 4E-binding protein-1 phosphorylation and abrogated mTORC1-dependent PI3K/Akt feedback activation. Significantly, PP242 effectively suppressed ESCC cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and arrested the cell cycle. Furthermore, PP242 promoted cisplatin-induced apoptosis and enhanced the antitumor efficacy of cisplatin in ESCC cells, which was likely to be associated with inhibition of Akt activity. Our results show that simultaneous targeting of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 pathways leads to effective antitumor actions in ESCC, and strongly suggest that dual mTORC1/2 inhibitors should be developed as potential agents for the treatment of ESCC.

  17. A comparison of hyperthermia cisplatin sensitization in human ovarian carcinoma and glioma cell lines sensitive and resistant to cisplatin treatment.

    PubMed

    Raaphorst, G P; Doja, S; Davis, L; Stewart, D; Ng, C E

    1996-01-01

    Two pairs of human tumor cell lines (glioma and ovarian carcinoma (OvCa) each having a parental cell line and cisplatin-resistant variant, were evaluated for (a) cisplatin response, (b) hyperthermia response, and (c) combined hyperthermia and cisplatin response. The two resistant lines had comparable resistant responses while for the parental lines, the OvCa was more sensitive than the glioma to cisplatin doses up to 14 microgram/ml. For the hyperthermia response, the OvCa parental line was more resistant than the variant line at low-temperature hyperthermia (41 degrees C or 42 degrees C) but became more sensitive at high temperature (45 degree C). For the glioma, the parental line was more sensitive to hyperthermia at all temperatures tested. Hyperthermia caused sensitization to cisplatin in all cell lines but was generally greater in the glioma cell lines. In the OvCa system, hyperthermia had a slightly greater sensitizing effect on the resistant cell lines, while in the glioma the opposite was true. The degree of sensitization increased with hyperthermia temperature. In summary, the results showed that there is no cross- resistance for hyperthermia and cisplatin, that the degree of thermal sensitization is not reduced in cisplatin- resistant cell lines, and that cisplatin thermal sensitization is cell-line and temperature dependent. Thus, hyperthermia can effectively improve tumor cell response to cisplatin and may be useful in overcoming resistance to cisplatin.

  18. SKA1 regulates the metastasis and cisplatin resistance of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, LIHUA; YANG, MIN; LIN, QIONGHUA; ZHANG, ZHONGWEI; MIAO, CHANGHONG; ZHU, BIAO

    2016-01-01

    Currently, chemotherapy with platinum-based drugs including cisplatin is the most effective therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). However, the efficacy of chemotherapy is limited due to commonly developed drug resistance. Spindle and kinetochore-associated complex subunit 1 (SKA1) is part of a complex essential for stabilizing the attachment of spindle microtubules to kinetochores and for maintaining the metaphase plate during mitosis. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of SKA1 in the process of metastasis and drug resistance of NSCLC. We completed a series of experiments to investigate the function of SKA1 in NSCLC metastasis and drug resistance including qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blotting, as well as MTT, BrdU, wounded healing, Transwell and gelatin zymography assays. We demonstrated that the expression levels of SKA1 were elevated in NSCLC and were correlated with cancer progression and malignancy. We also reported that SKA1 positively regulated the proliferation and metastatic ability of NSCLC cells. In addition, we determined that SKA1 contributed to cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells by protecting these cells from cisplatin-induced cell apoptosis. SKA1 also appeared to regulate the ERK1/2 and the Akt-mediated signaling pathways in NSCLC cells. SKA1 is required for metastasis and cisplatin resistance of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:26985856

  19. Hydroxyl radical mediates cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human hair follicle dermal papilla cells and keratinocytes through Bcl-2-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Leonard, Stephen S.; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Wang, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Induction of massive apoptosis of hair follicle cells by chemotherapy has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), but the underlying mechanisms of regulation are not well understood. The present study investigated the apoptotic effect of cisplatin in human hair follicle dermal papilla cells and HaCaT keratinocytes, and determined the identity and role of specific reactive oxygen species (ROS) involved in the process. Treatment of the cells with cisplatin induced ROS generation and a parallel increase in caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of ROS generation by antioxidants inhibited the apoptotic effect of cisplatin, indicating the role of ROS in the process. Studies using specific ROS scavengers further showed that hydroxyl radical, but not hydrogen peroxide or superoxide anion, is the primary oxidative species responsible for the apoptotic effect of cisplatin. Electron spin resonance studies confirmed the formation of hydroxyl radicals induced by cisplatin. The mechanism by which hydroxyl radical mediates the apoptotic effect of cisplatin was shown to involve down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 through ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. Bcl-2 was also shown to have a negative regulatory role on hydroxyl radical. Together, our results indicate an essential role of hydroxyl radical in cisplatin-induced cell death of hair follicle cells through Bcl-2 regulation. Since CIA is a major side effect of cisplatin and many other chemotherapeutic agents with no known effective treatments, the knowledge gained from this study could be useful in the design of preventive treatment strategies for CIA through localized therapy without compromising the chemotherapy efficacy. PMID:21573972

  20. Evaluation of the protective effect of α-lipoic acid on cisplatin ototoxicity using distortion-product otoacoustic emission measurements: an experimental animal study.

    PubMed

    Ozkul, Yilmaz; Songu, Murat; Basoglu, Mehmet Sinan; Ozturkcan, Sedat; Katilmis, Huseyin

    2014-07-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the effectiveness of intratympanic α-lipoic acid injection as an otoprotective agent against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in guinea pigs. Twenty-four adult male albino guinea pigs with normal hearing were divided into 4 groups. The guinea pigs received intraperitoneal cisplatin in group 1, intraperitoneal cisplatin and intratympanic α-lipoic acid in group 2, intratympanic α-lipoic acid in group 3, as well as intraperitoneal cisplatin and intratympanic saline in group 4. Distortion-product otoacoustic emission measurements were obtained for both ears at the following time points: before administration (baseline recording) and on day 3 (72 h later). In group 1 (cisplatin), significant deterioration was observed at all frequencies on day 3 (P < 0.05). In group 2 (cisplatin + α-lipoic acid), deterioration was observed at all frequencies on day 3; however, this deterioration did not reach a statistical significance (P > 0.05). In group 3 (α-lipoic acid), no significant difference was observed between baseline and day 3 (P > 0.05). In group 4 (cisplatin + saline), deterioration was observed at all frequencies on day 3; however, this deterioration did not reach a statistical significance (P > 0.05). Cisplatin-induced hearing loss in the guinea pigs may be limited to some extent by the concomitant use of α-lipoic acid. Dose-dependent changes in the possible effects of α-lipoic acid need further investigation. Future morphologic studies may contribute to expose clearly the protective effect of α-lipoic acid.

  1. Hydroxyl radical mediates cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human hair follicle dermal papilla cells and keratinocytes through Bcl-2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Nimmannit, Ubonthip; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Leonard, Stephen S; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Wang, Liying; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2011-08-01

    Induction of massive apoptosis of hair follicle cells by chemotherapy has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA), but the underlying mechanisms of regulation are not well understood. The present study investigated the apoptotic effect of cisplatin in human hair follicle dermal papilla cells and HaCaT keratinocytes, and determined the identity and role of specific reactive oxygen species (ROS) involved in the process. Treatment of the cells with cisplatin induced ROS generation and a parallel increase in caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. Inhibition of ROS generation by antioxidants inhibited the apoptotic effect of cisplatin, indicating the role of ROS in the process. Studies using specific ROS scavengers further showed that hydroxyl radical, but not hydrogen peroxide or superoxide anion, is the primary oxidative species responsible for the apoptotic effect of cisplatin. Electron spin resonance studies confirmed the formation of hydroxyl radicals induced by cisplatin. The mechanism by which hydroxyl radical mediates the apoptotic effect of cisplatin was shown to involve down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 through ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. Bcl-2 was also shown to have a negative regulatory role on hydroxyl radical. Together, our results indicate an essential role of hydroxyl radical in cisplatin-induced cell death of hair follicle cells through Bcl-2 regulation. Since CIA is a major side effect of cisplatin and many other chemotherapeutic agents with no known effective treatments, the knowledge gained from this study could be useful in the design of preventive treatment strategies for CIA through localized therapy without compromising the chemotherapy efficacy.

  2. Rapamycin inhibits prostate cancer cell growth through cyclin D1 and enhances the cytotoxic efficacy of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Imrali, Ahmet; Mao, Xueying; Yeste-Velasco, Marc; Shamash, Jonathan; Lu, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in Western men and hormone refractory cancer (HRPC) kills most of the patients. Chemo-resistance is a major obstacle for the treatment of prostate cancer. Platinum-complexes have been used to treat a number of malignancies including prostate cancer. However, it has limited effect to prostate cancer and with significant toxicity at higher doses. In recent years, increasing numbers of new agents targeting cancer specific pathways have become available and with low toxic side-effects. Rapamycin (Sirolimus) is an mTORC1 inhibitor, which inhibits the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, which is commonly altered in prostate cancer. We determined the expression of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated-mTOR proteins in association with the response to rapamycin in two androgen sensitive (22RV1 and LNCaP) and two androgen independent (DU145 and PC3) prostate cancer cell lines and found that the base-line and changes of cyclin D1 level, but not the expression level of p-mTOR, correlated with rapamycin sensitivity. We evaluated the cell killing effect of combined rapamycin and cisplatin treatment and showed that the combination had a more than additive effect in both androgen dependent and independent prostate cancer cells, which may be partially explained by the reduction of cyclin D1 expression by rapamycin. We also evaluated a range of combined treatment schedules, simultaneously or sequentially and found that continuous rapamycin treatment after a short cisplatin exposure was effective. The clinical application of these findings for prostate cancer treatment should be further investigated. PMID:27648364

  3. Rapamycin inhibits prostate cancer cell growth through cyclin D1 and enhances the cytotoxic efficacy of cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Imrali, Ahmet; Mao, Xueying; Yeste-Velasco, Marc; Shamash, Jonathan; Lu, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in Western men and hormone refractory cancer (HRPC) kills most of the patients. Chemo-resistance is a major obstacle for the treatment of prostate cancer. Platinum-complexes have been used to treat a number of malignancies including prostate cancer. However, it has limited effect to prostate cancer and with significant toxicity at higher doses. In recent years, increasing numbers of new agents targeting cancer specific pathways have become available and with low toxic side-effects. Rapamycin (Sirolimus) is an mTORC1 inhibitor, which inhibits the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, which is commonly altered in prostate cancer. We determined the expression of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated-mTOR proteins in association with the response to rapamycin in two androgen sensitive (22RV1 and LNCaP) and two androgen independent (DU145 and PC3) prostate cancer cell lines and found that the base-line and changes of cyclin D1 level, but not the expression level of p-mTOR, correlated with rapamycin sensitivity. We evaluated the cell killing effect of combined rapamycin and cisplatin treatment and showed that the combination had a more than additive effect in both androgen dependent and independent prostate cancer cells, which may be partially explained by the reduction of cyclin D1 expression by rapamycin. We also evaluated a range of combined treatment schedules, simultaneously or sequentially and found that continuous rapamycin treatment after a short cisplatin exposure was effective. The clinical application of these findings for prostate cancer treatment should be further investigated. PMID:27648364

  4. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of pomegranate rind extract to ameliorate cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Karwasra, Ritu; Kalra, Prerna; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Saini, Deepika; Kumar, Ajay; Singh, Surender

    2016-07-13

    Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent, but the therapeutic utility is limited due to its dose dependent nephrotoxicity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the nephroprotective effect of pomegranate in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. Wistar rats were allocated into six groups as follows: the normal control, cisplatin-induced, pomegranate rind extract treatment (50, 100 and 200 mg kg(-1)) and pomegranate rind extract per se group. All the experimental test drugs/vehicle were administered orally for a period of ten days. Intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin (8 mg kg(-1)) was administered on day 7 to all the groups except the normal control and pomegranate per se group. On day 10, cisplatin resulted in significant nephrotoxicity in Wistar rats with a drastic elevation of serum creatinine and BUN, a decline in the concentrations of GSH, MDA and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and an elevation in the TNF-α level in renal tissues. Pathological changes in renal tissues were examined by histopathology and dysfunction in mitochondria and proximal tubule cells was detected by transmission electron microscopy. The rate of apoptosis and the expression of caspase-3, Il-1β and IL-6 in rat renal tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. The administration of pomegranate at a dose of 200 mg per kg body weight significantly (p < 0.001) ameliorates increased serum creatinine and BUN. In parallel to this, pomegranate also exhibits anti-apoptotic activity through the reduction of active caspase-3 expression in kidneys. Additionally, in-silico studies also confirmed a renoprotective effect of pomegranate. The above findings suggest that pomegranate can be used as a dietary supplement in the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury by reducing apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:27273121

  5. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haiyan; Luo, Hui; Zhang, Wenwen; Shen, Zhaojun; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%–20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the disease effectively. However, resistance to cisplatin may develop, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of cisplatin to treat advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. In this article, we systematically review the recent literature and summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer. PMID:27354763

  6. Survival and SOS induction in cisplatin-treated Escherichia coli deficient in Pol II, RecBCD and RecFOR functions.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Resham; Beck, Doris J

    2002-11-01

    Cisplatin is a potent anticancer agent forming intrastrand-crosslinks in DNA. The efficacy of cisplatin in chemotherapy can be limited by the development of tumor resistances such as elevated DNA repair or damage tolerance. In Escherichia coli, cisplatin treatment causes induction of the SOS regulon resulting in elevated levels of DNA Pol II, DNA Pol IV, DNA Pol V, the cell division inhibitor SfiA (SulA), homologous recombination (HR) and DNA repair. In this work, the roles of Pol II and HR in facilitating resistance of E. coli to cisplatin are studied. SOS induction levels were measured by beta-galactosidase assays in cisplatin-treated and untreated E. coli PQ30 that has the lacZ gene fused to the sfiA promoter. Comparative studies were carried out with derivatives of PQ30 constructed by P1 transduction that have transposon insertions in the polB gene, the recB gene blocking the RecBCD pathway of HR and genes of the RecFOR pathway of HR. Resistance of E. coli strains to cisplatin as determined by plating experiments decreased in the following order: parent PQ30 strain, polB > recO, recR, recF > recB. Both the RecBCD and RecFOR pathways of HR are important for survival when E. coli is exposed to cisplatin, because treatment of double mutants deficient in both pathways reduced colony forming ability to 37% in 6-9min in comparison to 39-120min for single mutants. Pol II and RecF appear to function in two distinct pathways to initiate replication blocked due to damage caused by cisplatin because function of Pol II was required for survival in mutants deficient in the RecFOR pathway after 2h of cisplatin treatment. In contrast, Pol II was not required for survival in recB mutants. SOS induction was delayed in RecFOR deficient mutants but occurred at high levels in the recB mutant soon after cisplatin treatment in a RecFOR-dependent way. An SfiA independent, DNA damage dependent pathway is apparently responsible for the filamentous cells observed after cisplatin or MMC

  7. NCX-4040, a nitric oxide-releasing aspirin, sensitizes drug-resistant human ovarian xenograft tumors to cisplatin by depletion of cellular thiols

    PubMed Central

    Bratasz, Anna; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Wasowicz, Tomasz; Bobko, Andrey; Khramtsov, Valery V; Ignarro, Louis J; Kuppusamy, Periannan

    2008-01-01

    Background Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of mortality among gynecological cancers in the world. The high mortality rate is associated with lack of early diagnosis and development of drug resistance. The antitumor efficacy and mechanism of NCX-4040, a nitric oxide-releasing aspirin derivative, against ovarian cancer is studied. Methods NCX-4040, alone or in combination with cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum, cDDP), was studied in cisplatin-sensitive (A2780 WT) and cisplatin-resistant (A2780 cDDP) cell lines as well as xenograft tumors grown in nude mice. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was used for measurements of nitric oxide and redox state. Immunoblotting analysis of A2780 cDDP tumor xenografts from mice was used for mechanistic studies. Results Cells treated with NCX-4040 (25 μM) showed a significant reduction of cell viability (A2780 WT, 34.9 ± 8.7%; A2780 cDDP, 41.7 ± 7.6%; p < 0.05). Further, NCX-4040 significantly enhanced the sensitivity of A2780 cDDP cells (cisplatin alone, 80.6 ± 11.8% versus NCX-4040+cisplatin, 26.4 ± 7.6%; p < 0.01) and xenograft tumors (cisplatin alone, 74.0 ± 4.4% versus NCX-4040+cisplatin, 56.4 ± 7.8%; p < 0.05), to cisplatin treatment. EPR imaging of tissue redox and thiol measurements showed a 5.5-fold reduction (p < 0.01) of glutathione in NCX-4040-treated A2780 cDDP tumors when compared to untreated controls. Immunoblotting analysis of A2780 cDDP tumor xenografts from mice treated with NCX-4040 and cisplatin revealed significant downregulation of pEGFR (Tyr845 and Tyr992) and pSTAT3 (Tyr705 and Ser727) expression. Conclusion The results suggested that NCX-4040 could resensitize drug-resistant ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin possibly by depletion of cellular thiols. Thus NCX-4040 appears to be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of human ovarian carcinoma and cisplatin-resistant malignancies. PMID:18302761

  8. Coordination of platinum therapeutic agents to met-rich motifs of human copper transport protein1.

    PubMed

    Crider, Sarah E; Holbrook, Robert J; Franz, Katherine J

    2010-01-01

    Platinum therapeutic agents are widely used in the treatment of several forms of cancer. Various mechanisms for the transport of the drugs have been proposed including passive diffusion across the cellular membrane and active transport via proteins. The copper transport protein Ctr1 is responsible for high affinity copper uptake but has also been implicated in the transport of cisplatin into cells. Human hCtr1 contains two methionine-rich Mets motifs on its extracellular N-terminus that are potential platinum-binding sites: the first one encompasses residues 7-14 with amino acid sequence Met-Gly-Met-Ser-Tyr-Met-Asp-Ser and the second one spans residues 39-46 with sequence Met-Met-Met-Met-Pro-Met-Thr-Phe. In these studies, we use liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry to compare the binding interactions between cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin with synthetic peptides corresponding to hCtr1 Mets motifs. The interactions of cisplatin and carboplatin with Met-rich motifs that contain three or more methionines result in removal of the carrier ligands of both platinum complexes. In contrast, oxaliplatin retains its cyclohexyldiamine ligand upon platinum coordination to the peptide.

  9. Reversal of radiation-induced cisplatin resistance in murine fibrosarcoma cells by selective modulation of the cyclic GMP-dependent transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Eichholtz-Wirth, H.

    1995-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance, induced in murine fibrosarcoma cells (SSK) in vitro or in vivo by low-dose irradiation, can be overcome by activation of the cyclic GMP(cGMP)-dependent transduction pathway. This is mediated either by stimulating cGMP formation with sodium nitroprusside or by replacing cGMP with a selective activator of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase, 8-bromo-cGMP. The cyclic AMP-dependent transduction pathway is not involved in cisplatin resistance. Instead, activation of cAMP sensitises both parental and resistant SSK cells equally to the action of cisplatin. There is a 1.8 to 2.5-fold increase in drug toxicity, depending on the activating agent. Enhancement of cisplatin sensitivity is induced by specific inhibition of cAMP hydrolysis, increase in cAMP formation or by increasing the activation potential to cAMP-dependent protein kinase by specific cAMP analogues. Cells that have lost cisplatin resistance respond to cGMP- or cAMP-elevating agents in the same way as the parental SSK cells. The radiation sensitivity is unchanged in all cell lines, even after activation of cAMP or cGMP. These results suggest that specific DNA repair pathways are altered by radiation but affected only in cisplatin damage repair, which is regulated by cGMP. Although there is ample cooperativity and interaction between the cAMP- and the cGMP-dependent transduction pathways, specific substrate binding by cGMP appears to play an important role in radiation-induced cisplatin resistance. PMID:7640207

  10. Bioresorbable polymersomes for targeted delivery of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Matthew A; Hillmyer, Marc A; Kokkoli, Efrosini

    2013-04-17

    Nontoxic bioresorbable polymersomes have been developed that efficiently and site-selectively tether targeting peptides under mild conditions with no toxic catalysts. The binding and release properties of these polymersomes have been evaluated when targeting DLD-1 human colon cancer cells overexpressing the α(5)β(1) integrin. The delivery efficacy to these cells is markedly improved over commonly used RGD targeting peptides by use of an α(5)β(1)-specific targeting peptide, PR_b. Release profiles in buffered solution from pH 7.4 to 4.5 were evaluated and compared to release after binding to cells, and enzymatic degradation was identified as a major cause of rapid payload release in the cell. Intracellular trafficking and release were imaged via confocal microscopy in live cells and colocalization with organelles was evaluated quantitatively over time. Finally, the anticancer drug cisplatin was encapsulated in the PR_b functionalized polymersomes and the presence of PR_b greatly improved delivery efficacy, with increased cisplatin-induced losses to targeted DLD-1 colon cancer cell viability. When delivered to CACO-2 model human epithelial cells expressing low levels of α(5)β(1) integrin, low toxicity was maintained, suggesting that targeting was specific to α(5)β(1) overexpressing cells. These results demonstrate that PR_b-functionalized bioresorbable polymersomes may be an attractive route to minimizing the dose-limiting side effects associated with existing approaches to cisplatin chemotherapy.

  11. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced cell death in malignant mesothelioma cells: role of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) and caspases.

    PubMed

    Cregan, Inez L; Dharmarajan, Arun M; Fox, Simon A

    2013-02-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive and highly chemoresistant tumour. Although cisplatin is used in frontline therapy of this disease treatment remains palliative at best. The biochemical pathways activated by cisplatin and the mechanisms of resistance in mesothelioma cells are poorly understood. Overexpression of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) has been described in clinical mesothelioma tumours and proposed as therapeutic targets. In this study, we examined cisplatin-induced cell death pathways and IAPs in three mesothelioma-derived cell lines. Cisplatin induced cell death in mesothelioma cell lines was characterised by biochemical mechanisms classically associated with apoptosis including: mitochondrial depolarisation, phosphatidylserine translocation and caspase activation. Surprisingly mRNA expression of IAPs in mesothelioma was not upregulated relative to primary mesothelial cells except for survivin which was higher in the most resistant cell line. In contrast, protein expression of both XIAP and survivin was upregulated in all mesothelioma cells, consistent with post-translational regulation. Knockdown of either XIAP or survivin by RNAi did not affect the sensitivity to cisplatin in any of the cell lines. Survivin RNAi did, however, inhibit proliferation in the highest expressing cell line, ONE58. The pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD and the more selective caspase 3/7 inhibitor z-DEVD had no effect upon the sensitivity of any of the cell lines to cisplatin indicating that caspase-independent pathways predominate. The findings of the present study provide insights into cisplatin-induced mechanisms in mesothelioma cells and show that alternative pathways are operating which may provide new options for targeting this extremely resistant tumour.

  12. Induction of Activating Transcription Factor 3 Is Associated with Cisplatin Responsiveness in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Bar, Jair; Hasim, Mohamed S; Baghai, Tabassom; Niknejad, Nima; Perkins, Theodore J; Stewart, David J; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S; Villeneuve, Patrick J; Dimitroulakos, Jim

    2016-09-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer deaths, with platin-based combination chemotherapy the most efficacious therapies. Gains in overall survival are modest, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic approaches including the development of next-generation platin combination regimens. The goal of this study was to identify novel regulators of platin-induced cytotoxicity as potential therapeutic targets to further enhance platin cytotoxicity. Employing RNA-seq transcriptome analysis comparing two parental NSCLC cell lines Calu6 and H23 to their cisplatin-resistant sublines, Calu6cisR1 and H23cisR1, activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) was robustly induced in cisplatin-treated parental sensitive cell lines but not their resistant sublines, and in three of six tumors evaluated, but not in their corresponding normal adjacent lung tissue (0/6). Cisplatin-induced JNK activation was a key regulator of this ATF3 induction. Interestingly, in both resistant sublines, this JNK induction was abrogated, and the expression of an activated JNK construct in these cells enhanced both cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and ATF3 induction. An FDA-approved drug compound screen was employed to identify enhancers of cisplatin cytotoxicity that were dependent on ATF3 gene expression. Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, was identified in this screen and demonstrated synergistic cytotoxicity with cisplatin in both the parental Calu6 and H23 cell lines and importantly in their resistant sublines as well that was dependent on ATF3 expression. Thus, we have identified ATF3 as an important regulator of cisplatin cytotoxicity and that ATF3 inducers in combination with platins are a potential novel therapeutic approach for NSCLC. PMID:27659012

  13. Getting Acquainted: An Induction Training Guide for First-Year Extension Agents. Suggestions for Completing Certain Learning Experiences Included in the Induction Training Guide; a Supplement to "Getting Acquainted."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Mary Louise; Gassie, Edward W.

    An induction guide to help the extension agent get acquainted with his role and suggestions for completing learning experiences that are included in the guide comprise this two-part publication. The training guide learning experiences, a total of 25, are made up of: Objectives of the New Worker; When Completed; Learning Experiences; Person(s)…

  14. Detouring of cisplatin to access mitochondrial genome for overcoming resistance.

    PubMed

    Marrache, Sean; Pathak, Rakesh K; Dhar, Shanta

    2014-07-22

    Chemoresistance of cisplatin therapy is related to extensive repair of cisplatin-modified DNA in the nucleus by the nucleotide excision repair (NER). Delivering cisplatin to the mitochondria to attack mitochondrial genome lacking NER machinery can lead to a rationally designed therapy for metastatic, chemoresistant cancers and might overcome the problems associated with conventional cisplatin treatment. An engineered hydrophobic mitochondria-targeted cisplatin prodrug, Platin-M, was constructed using a strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition chemistry. Efficient delivery of Platin-M using a biocompatible polymeric nanoparticle (NP) based on biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-polyethyleneglycol functionalized with a terminal triphenylphosphonium cation, which has remarkable activity to target mitochondria of cells, resulted in controlled release of cisplatin from Platin-M locally inside the mitochondrial matrix to attack mtDNA and exhibited otherwise-resistant advanced cancer sensitive to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Identification of an optimized targeted-NP formulation with brain-penetrating properties allowed for delivery of Platin-M inside the mitochondria of neuroblastoma cells resulting in ∼17 times more activity than cisplatin. The remarkable activity of Platin-M and its targeted-NP in cisplatin-resistant cells was correlated with the hyperpolarization of mitochondria in these cells and mitochondrial bioenergetics studies in the resistance cells further supported this hypothesis. This unique dual-targeting approach to controlled mitochondrial delivery of cisplatin in the form of a prodrug to attack the mitochondrial genome lacking NER machinery and in vivo distribution of the delivery vehicle in the brain suggested previously undescribed routes for cisplatin-based therapy.

  15. Detouring of cisplatin to access mitochondrial genome for overcoming resistance

    PubMed Central

    Marrache, Sean; Pathak, Rakesh K.; Dhar, Shanta

    2014-01-01

    Chemoresistance of cisplatin therapy is related to extensive repair of cisplatin-modified DNA in the nucleus by the nucleotide excision repair (NER). Delivering cisplatin to the mitochondria to attack mitochondrial genome lacking NER machinery can lead to a rationally designed therapy for metastatic, chemoresistant cancers and might overcome the problems associated with conventional cisplatin treatment. An engineered hydrophobic mitochondria-targeted cisplatin prodrug, Platin-M, was constructed using a strain-promoted alkyne–azide cycloaddition chemistry. Efficient delivery of Platin-M using a biocompatible polymeric nanoparticle (NP) based on biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-polyethyleneglycol functionalized with a terminal triphenylphosphonium cation, which has remarkable activity to target mitochondria of cells, resulted in controlled release of cisplatin from Platin-M locally inside the mitochondrial matrix to attack mtDNA and exhibited otherwise-resistant advanced cancer sensitive to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Identification of an optimized targeted-NP formulation with brain-penetrating properties allowed for delivery of Platin-M inside the mitochondria of neuroblastoma cells resulting in ∼17 times more activity than cisplatin. The remarkable activity of Platin-M and its targeted-NP in cisplatin-resistant cells was correlated with the hyperpolarization of mitochondria in these cells and mitochondrial bioenergetics studies in the resistance cells further supported this hypothesis. This unique dual-targeting approach to controlled mitochondrial delivery of cisplatin in the form of a prodrug to attack the mitochondrial genome lacking NER machinery and in vivo distribution of the delivery vehicle in the brain suggested previously undescribed routes for cisplatin-based therapy. PMID:25002500

  16. Essential role for acid sphingomyelinase-inhibited autophagy in melanoma response to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Cervia, Davide; Assi, Emma; De Palma, Clara; Giovarelli, Matteo; Bizzozero, Laura; Pambianco, Sarah; Di Renzo, Ilaria; Zecchini, Silvia; Moscheni, Claudia; Vantaggiato, Chiara; Procacci, Patrizia; Clementi, Emilio; Perrotta, Cristiana

    2016-05-01

    The sphingolipid metabolising enzyme Acid Sphingomyelinase (A-SMase) has been recently shown to inhibit melanoma progression and correlate inversely to tumour grade. In this study we have investigated the role of A-SMase in the chemo-resistance to anticancer treatmentusing mice with melanoma allografts and melanoma cells differing in terms of expression/activity of A-SMase. Since autophagy is emerging as a key mechanism in tumour growth and chemo-resistance, we have also investigated whether an action of A-SMase in autophagy can explain its role. Melanoma sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin in terms of cell viability/apoptosis, tumour growth, and animal survival depended directly on the A-SMase levels in tumoural cells. A-SMase action was due to inhibition of autophagy through activation of Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Treatment of melanoma-bearing mice with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine restored sensitivity to cisplatin of tumours expressing low levels of A-SMase while no additive effects were observed in tumours characterised by sustained A-SMase levels. The fact that A-SMase in melanomas affects mTOR-regulated autophagy and plays a central role in cisplatin efficacy encourages pre-clinical testing on the modulation of A-SMase levels/activity as possible novel anti-neoplastic strategy. PMID:27107419

  17. β-caryophyllene ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in a cannabinoid 2 receptor-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Béla; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Kechrid, Malek; Patel, Vivek; Tanashian, Galin; Wink, David A.; Gertsch, Jürg; Pacher, Pál

    2012-01-01

    (E)-β-caryophyllene (BCP) is a natural sequiterpene found in many essential oils of spice (best known for contributing to the spiciness of black pepper) and food plants with recognized anti-inflammatory properties. Recently it was shown that BCP is a natural agonist of endogenous cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptors, which are expressed in immune cells and mediate anti-inflammatory effects. In this study we aimed to test the effects of BCP in a clinically relevant murine model of nephropathy (induced by the widely used antineoplastic drug cisplatin) in which the tubular injury is largely dependent on inflammation and oxidative/nitrative stress. β-caryophyllene dose-dependently ameliorated cisplatin-induced kidney dysfunction, morphological damage, and renal inflammatory response (chemokines MCP-1 and MIP-2, cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, adhesion molecule ICAM-1, and neutrophil and macrophage infiltration). It also markedly mitigated oxidative/nitrative stress (NOX-2, NOX-4 expression, 4-HNE and 3-NT content) and cell death. The protective effects of BCP against biochemical and histological markers of nephropathy were absent in CB2 knockout mice. Thus, BCP may be an excellent therapeutic agent to prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through a CB2 receptor dependent pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of BCP in humans it has tremendous therapeutic potential in multitude of diseases associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:22326488

  18. Essential role for acid sphingomyelinase-inhibited autophagy in melanoma response to cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Cervia, Davide; Assi, Emma; De Palma, Clara; Giovarelli, Matteo; Bizzozero, Laura; Pambianco, Sarah; Di Renzo, Ilaria; Zecchini, Silvia; Moscheni, Claudia; Vantaggiato, Chiara; Procacci, Patrizia; Clementi, Emilio; Perrotta, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    The sphingolipid metabolising enzyme Acid Sphingomyelinase (A-SMase) has been recently shown to inhibit melanoma progression and correlate inversely to tumour grade. In this study we have investigated the role of A-SMase in the chemo-resistance to anticancer treatmentusing mice with melanoma allografts and melanoma cells differing in terms of expression/activity of A-SMase. Since autophagy is emerging as a key mechanism in tumour growth and chemo-resistance, we have also investigated whether an action of A-SMase in autophagy can explain its role. Melanoma sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin in terms of cell viability/apoptosis, tumour growth, and animal survival depended directly on the A-SMase levels in tumoural cells. A-SMase action was due to inhibition of autophagy through activation of Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Treatment of melanoma-bearing mice with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine restored sensitivity to cisplatin of tumours expressing low levels of A-SMase while no additive effects were observed in tumours characterised by sustained A-SMase levels. The fact that A-SMase in melanomas affects mTOR-regulated autophagy and plays a central role in cisplatin efficacy encourages pre-clinical testing on the modulation of A-SMase levels/activity as possible novel anti-neoplastic strategy. PMID:27107419

  19. Dose and schedule-finding study of oral topotecan and weekly cisplatin in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gelderblom, H; Sparreboom, A; Jonge, M J A de; Loos, W J; Wilms, E; Mantel, M A; Hennis, B; Camlett, I; Verweij, J; Burg, M E L van der

    2001-01-01

    Both weekly cisplatin chemotherapy and single agent topotecan have proven to be effective in recurrent ovarian cancer. Preclinical data show synergism between cisplatin and topotecan. Side effects for this combination are drug sequence dependent and predominantly haematologic. Since preclinical data suggest that Cremophor EL (CrEL), the formulation vehicle of paclitaxel, has a protective effect on haematological toxicity of cisplatin, CrEL was added to the combination cisplatin and topotecan. In this phase I study, escalating doses of oral topotecan administered on day 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, 16, 29, 30, 36, 37, 43, 44 were combined with weekly cisplatin 70 mg m−2d−1on day 1, 8, 15, 29, 36, 43 (scheme A) or with the presumably less myelotoxic sequence weekly cisplatin day 2, 9, 16, 30, 37, 44 (scheme B). In scheme C, CrEL 12 ml was administered prior to cisplatin in the sequence of Scheme A. 18 patients have received a total of 85 courses. In scheme A 4/10 patients, all treated with topotecan 0.45 mg m−2d−1, experienced DLT: 1 patient had vomiting grade 4, 1 patient had grade 4 neutropenia >5 days, 1 patient had >2 weeks delay due to thrombocytopenia and 1 patient due to neutropenia. Both patients in scheme B (topotecan 0.45 mg m−2d−1) had DLT due to a delay > 2 weeks because of prolonged haematological toxicity. No DLT was observed in the first 3 patients in scheme C (topotecan 0.45 mg m−2d−1). However, 2 out of 3 patients treated at dose level topotecan 0.60 mg m−2d−1in scheme C experienced DLT due to >2 weeks delay because of persistent thrombocytopenia or neutropenia. We conclude that there is a modest clinical effect of CrEL on haematological toxicity for this cisplatin-based combination regimen, which seems to reduce these side effects but does not really enable an increase of the oral topotecan dose. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign  http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11710824

  20. Improved efficacy of cisplatin in combination with a nano-formulation of pentacyclic triterpenediol.

    PubMed

    Alam, Noor; Qayum, Arem; Kumar, Ashok; Khare, Vaibhav; Sharma, Parduman Raj; Andotra, Samar Singh; Singh, Shashank K; Koul, Surinder; Gupta, Prem N

    2016-11-01

    Cisplatin is widely used for the treatment of various cancers including cervical, ovarian, lung and head and neck, however, its clinical success is limited owing to the dose-dependent adverse effects, mainly nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity. In order to address this limitation, the present study was undertaken to investigate growth inhibitory effect of cisplatin in combination with a triterpenediol (3a, 24-dihydroxyurs-12-ene and 3a, 24-dihydroxyolean-12-ene, TPD) on human ovarian cancer cell line. Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles loaded with TPD (TPD-PLGA-NPs) were successfully developed by emulsion solvent evaporation method. The TPD-PLGA-NPs were characterized for size distribution and zeta potential which was in order of 152.56±3.01nm and -17.36±0.37mV respectively. The morphological evaluation was carried out by transmission electron microscopy and the formulation was also characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The drug loading of the optimized formulation was 51.03±1.52μg/mg and the formulation exhibited sustained drug release profile. The in vitro cellular uptake study of coumarin-6 loaded PLGA nanoparticles in OVCAR-5 cells demonstrated a time dependent increase in uptake efficiency. Further, growth inhibitory effect of cisplatin was investigated in combination with TPD-PLGA-NPs. The combination index (CI) was <1, indicating a synergistic interaction. Further, at 75% of cell growth inhibition (ED75) the dose of cisplatin was reduced to 3.8 folds using this combination. The results indicated the potential of cisplatin and TPD-PLGA-NPs combination in order to reduce to dose limiting toxicities of the former. PMID:27524002

  1. Long-term results of a randomized trial comparing cisplatin with cisplatin and cyclophosphamide with cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, and adriamycin in advanced ovarian cancer. GICOG (Gruppo Interregionale Cooperativo Oncologico Ginecologia), Italy.

    PubMed

    1992-05-01

    We report the long-term results of a randomized trial comparing cisplatin (P) with cisplatin and cyclophosphamide (CP) with cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, and adriamycin (CAP) in advanced ovarian cancer. Overall, this update confirms previously published data on 529 cases. Median survival times for the three treatments--CAP, CP, and P--are, respectively, 23, 20, and 19 months. The differences among the three arms are still nonsignificant and the estimated percentage survival at 7 years and confidence limits are, respectively, 21.7 (14.9-28.4), 17.0 (11.0-22.9), and 12.2 (6.9-17.4). According to the results of the Cox regression model on prognostic factors, higher grading, a larger residual tumor size, and performance status less than 80 (Karnovsky) all were independently associated with a poorer outcome, while a serous histotype was related to a better prognosis. The other variables (age, stage, center, type of surgery) initially included in the model did not appear to be significantly related to prognosis. The implications of these long-terms results relative to the application of combination chemotherapy with CAP or CP are discussed.

  2. Arctigenin enhances chemosensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin through inhibition of the STAT3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiangyang; Zhu, Fenfen; Zhao, Zhihui; Liu, Chang; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2011-10-01

    Arctigenin is a dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan isolated from Bardanae fructus, Arctium lappa L, Saussureamedusa, Torreya nucifera, and Ipomea cairica. It has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory activities, which is mainly mediated through its inhibitory effect on nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (NF-κB). But the role of arctigenin in JAK-STAT3 signaling pathways is still unclear. In present study, we investigated the effect of arctigenin on signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway and evaluated whether suppression of STAT3 activity by arctigenin could sensitize cancer cells to a chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. Our results show that arctigenin significantly suppressed both constitutively activated and IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation in cancer cells. Inhibition of STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation was found to be achieved through suppression of Src, JAK1, and JAK2, while suppression of STAT3 serine phosphorylation was mediated by inhibition of ERK activation. Pervanadate reversed the arctigenin-induced downregulation of STAT3 activation, suggesting the involvement of a protein tyrosine phosphatase. Indeed, arctigenin can obviously induce the expression of the PTP SHP-2. Furthermore, the constitutive activation level of STAT3 was found to be correlated to the resistance of cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Arctigenin dramatically promoted cisplatin-induced cell death in cancer cells, indicating that arctigenin enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin mainly via STAT3 suppression. These observations suggest a novel anticancer function of arctigenin and a potential therapeutic strategy of using arctigenin in combination with chemotherapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  3. Pilot study of local hyperthermia, radiation therapy, etanidazole, and cisplatin for advanced superficial tumours.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, B A; Herman, T S; Hansen, J L; Buswell, L; Zouranjian, P S; Fraser, S M; Teicher, B A; Svensson, G K; Coleman, C N

    1995-01-01

    Five patients (six hyperthermia sites) with advanced superficial tumours were treated with combined etanidazole, cisplatin, local hyperthermia, and radiation therapy as part of a Phase I pilot study. Treatment was given once weekly and consisted of etanidazole 3 gm/m2 IV bolus, cisplatin 50 mg/m2 IV bolus, hyperthermia for 60 min with a target temperature of 43 degrees C, and radiation therapy 500 cGy/fraction (median total dose 3000 cGy) for a total of six weeks. Blood levels of etanidazole were taken during treatment at week 1 and week 4. Etanidazole drug exposure was calculated using the trapezoidal rule and expressed as the area under the curve (AUC) of plasma concentration x time. Five of six treatment sites had received prior irradiation. Prior chemotherapy had been given in three patients and tamoxifen therapy given in the other two patients. The median follow-up time is 34 months; 3/5 patients have died of disease. The most significant toxicity was grade I or II nausea and vomiting associated with 19/32 treatments (59%) and a second degree burn in 2/6 fields. None of the five patients experienced peripheral neuropathy, skin ulceration, or needed surgical repair. In addition, there was mild renal toxicity; pharmacokinetic analysis showed a 28-75% increase in the week 1 to week 4 AUC in three patients, all of whom had a decrease in creatinine clearance over the same time of 15-47%. This pilot study suggests this combined modality therapy can be delivered without major complications and that renal function, determined by creatinine clearance, affects clearance of etanidazole and alters the AUC. Therefore, monitoring renal function is important in patients receiving etanidazole in addition to other nephrotoxic agents such as cisplatin. The impact of etanidazole on the therapeutic index of hyperthermia, radiation therapy and cisplatin may be worth of study, especially since a positive interaction between these modalities is found in laboratory models. PMID

  4. Metabolism of cisplatin in the organs of Rattus norvegicus: role of Glutathione S-transferase P1.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Ritika; Khan, Amir Riyaz; Poonia, Anuj; Mishra, Pankaj Kishor; Singh, Simendra

    2015-03-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play an important role in the biotransformation of endogenous compounds and xenobiotics as well as in the metabolic inactivation of pharmacologically active substances, including anticancer drugs. Using cisplatin as the prototype drug, we investigated if any correlation exists between GSH levels, GSTs/GSTP1 activity and the fate of cisplatin in different organs of Rattus norvegicus. GSH-cisplatin complex was prepared, purified by anion-exchange chromatography and subjected to mass spectroscopic analysis which confirmed the structure to be diglutathione-monoplatinum (diglutathionylplatinum). Purified diglutathionylplatinum was used to quantify metabolite formed in different tissue homogenates. Specific GSTP1 activity was found to be highest in kidneys, which correlated positively with the levels of metabolite formed in renal tissues. Altogether, our results showed that cisplatin metabolism in different organs of rats correlated positively with specific GSTP1 activities and this enzyme may be a critical determinant of extent of cellular uptake or retention of cisplatin in renal and liver tissues.

  5. Cetuximab and Cisplatin Show Different Combination Effect in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells Lines via Inactivation of EGFR/AKT Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jiajia; Yin, Li; Wu, Jing; Zhang, Nan; Huang, Teng; Ding, Kai; Cao, Haixia; Xu, Lin; He, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a common malignant cancer in South China. Cisplatin is a classical chemotherapeutic employed for NPC treatment. Despite the use of cisplatin-based concurrent chemoradiotherapy, distant failure still confuses clinicians and the outcome of metastatic NPC remains disappointing. Hence, a potent systemic therapy is needed for this cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) represents a promising new therapeutic target in cancer. We predicted that combining the conventional cytotoxic drug cisplatin with the novel molecular-targeted agent cetuximab demonstrates a strong antitumor effect on NPC cells. In this study, we selected HNE1 and CNE2 cells, which have been proved to possess different EGFR expression levels, to validate our conjecture. The two-drug regimen showed a significant synergistic effect in HNE1 cells but an additive effect in CNE2 cells. Our results showed that cisplatin-induced apoptosis was significantly enhanced by cetuximab in the high EGFR-expressing HNE1 cells but not in CNE2 cells. Further molecular mechanism study indicated that the EGFR/AKT pathway may play an important role in cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial-mediated intrinsic pathway and lead to the different antitumor effects of this two-drug regimen between HNE1 and CNE2 cells. Thus, the regimen may be applied in personalized NPC treatments. PMID:27313893

  6. Inhibition of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation and synergism of cisplatin with silvestrol and episilvestrol isolated from Aglaia stellatopilosa

    PubMed Central

    DAKER, MAELINDA; YEO, JIUN-TZEN; BAKAR, NORHASIMAH; ABDUL RAHMAN, ASMA' SAIYIDATINA AISHAH ABDUL; AHMAD, MUNIRAH; YEO, TIONG-CHIA; KHOO, ALAN SOO-BENG

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a type of tumour that arises from the epithelial cells that line the surface of the nasopharynx. NPC is treated with radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. However, current strategies are often associated with potential toxicities. This has prompted efforts to identify alternative methods of treatment. The present study aimed to investigate silvestrol and episilvestrol-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation in human NPC cells. The growth kinetics of NPC cells treated with silvestrol or episilvestrol were monitored dynamically using a real-time, impedance-based cell analyzer, and dose-response profiles were generated using a colorimetric cell viability assay. Furthermore, apoptosis was evaluated using flow cytometry and high content analysis. In addition, flow cytometry was performed to determine cell cycle distribution. Finally, the effects of combining silvestrol or episilvestrol with cisplatin on NPC cells was examined. Apoptosis was not observed in silvestrol and episilvestrol-treated NPC cells, although cell cycle perturbation was evident. Treatment with both compounds induced a significant increase in the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase, as compared with the control. In vitro cultures combining silvestrol or episilvestrol with cisplatin showed synergistic effects against NPC cells. The results of the present study suggested that silvestrol and episilvestrol had an anti-tumour activity in NPC cells. Silvestrol and episilvestrol, particularly in combination with cisplatin, merit further investigation, so as to determine the cellular mechanisms underlying their action(s) as anti-NPC agents. PMID:27284293

  7. Anti-tumor Efficiency of Lipid-coated Cisplatin Nanoparticles Co-loaded with MicroRNA-375.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tan; Zhao, Pengxuan; Rong, Zhao; Li, Bin; Xue, Huiying; You, Jia; He, Chuanchuan; Li, Weijie; He, Xingxing; Lee, Robert J; Ma, Xiang; Xiang, Guangya

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment is its insensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we report the development of novel lipid-coated cisplatin nanoparticles co-loaded with microRNA-375 (NPC/miR-375) as a potential treatment for chemotherapy insensitive HCC. The NPC/miR-375 was fabricated by mixing two reverse microemulsions containing KCl solution and a highly soluble cis-diaminedihydroplatinum (II) coated with a cationic lipid layer. Subsequently, the miR-375 was incorporated into the lipid-coated cisplatin nanoparticles. The NPC/miR375 nanoparticles were expected to further decrease cell proliferation and to enhance the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin in chemotherapy resistant HCC cells. In vitro analysis of intracellular trafficking revealed that NPC/miR-375 were able to escape from the late endosomes instead of lysosomes thus avoiding degradation of the miR-375 in lysosomes. Importantly, NPC/miR-375 enhanced apoptosis and induced cell cycle arrest in HCC cells in vitro. In the double oncogenes Akt/Ras-induced primary HCC mouse model, multiple doses of NPC/miR-375 significantly inhibited tumor growth and delayed the tumor relapse. Our results indicate that cisplatin nanoparticles co-loaded with miR-375 represent a potential therapeutic agent for chemotherapy-insensitive HCC.

  8. Regulation of the high-affinity copper transporter (hCtr1) expression by cisplatin and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zheng Dong; Long, Yan; Chen, Helen H W; Savaraj, Niramol; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2014-01-01

    Platinum-based antitumor agents have been the mainstay in cancer chemotherapy for many human malignancies. Drug resistance is an important obstacle to achieving the maximal therapeutic efficacy of these drugs. Understanding how platinum drugs enter cells is of great importance in improving therapeutic efficacy. It has been demonstrated that human high-affinity copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) is involved in transporting cisplatin into cells to elicit cytotoxic effects, although other mechanisms may exist. In this communication, we demonstrate that cisplatin transcriptionally induces the expression of hCtr1 in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Cisplatin functions as a competitor for hCtr1-mediated copper transport, resulting in reduced cellular copper levels and leading to upregulated expression of Sp1, which is a positive regulator for hCtr1 expression. Thus, regulation of hCtr1 expression by cisplatin is an integral part of the copper homeostasis regulation system. We also demonstrate that Ag(I) and Zn(II), which are known to suppress hCtr1-mediated copper transport, can also induce hCtr1/Sp1 expression. In contrast, Cd(II), another inhibitor of copper transport, downregulates hCtr1 expression by suppressing Sp1 expression. Collectively, our results demonstrate diverse mechanisms of regulating copper metabolism by these heavy metals.

  9. Anti-tumor Efficiency of Lipid-coated Cisplatin Nanoparticles Co-loaded with MicroRNA-375

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tan; Zhao, Pengxuan; Rong, Zhao; Li, Bin; Xue, Huiying; You, Jia; He, Chuanchuan; Li, Weijie; He, Xingxing; Lee, Robert J.; Ma, Xiang; Xiang, Guangya

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment is its insensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we report the development of novel lipid-coated cisplatin nanoparticles co-loaded with microRNA-375 (NPC/miR-375) as a potential treatment for chemotherapy insensitive HCC. The NPC/miR-375 was fabricated by mixing two reverse microemulsions containing KCl solution and a highly soluble cis-diaminedihydroplatinum (II) coated with a cationic lipid layer. Subsequently, the miR-375 was incorporated into the lipid-coated cisplatin nanoparticles. The NPC/miR375 nanoparticles were expected to further decrease cell proliferation and to enhance the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin in chemotherapy resistant HCC cells. In vitro analysis of intracellular trafficking revealed that NPC/miR-375 were able to escape from the late endosomes instead of lysosomes thus avoiding degradation of the miR-375 in lysosomes. Importantly, NPC/miR-375 enhanced apoptosis and induced cell cycle arrest in HCC cells in vitro. In the double oncogenes Akt/Ras-induced primary HCC mouse model, multiple doses of NPC/miR-375 significantly inhibited tumor growth and delayed the tumor relapse. Our results indicate that cisplatin nanoparticles co-loaded with miR-375 represent a potential therapeutic agent for chemotherapy-insensitive HCC. PMID:26722380

  10. Anti-tumor Efficiency of Lipid-coated Cisplatin Nanoparticles Co-loaded with MicroRNA-375.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tan; Zhao, Pengxuan; Rong, Zhao; Li, Bin; Xue, Huiying; You, Jia; He, Chuanchuan; Li, Weijie; He, Xingxing; Lee, Robert J; Ma, Xiang; Xiang, Guangya

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment is its insensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we report the development of novel lipid-coated cisplatin nanoparticles co-loaded with microRNA-375 (NPC/miR-375) as a potential treatment for chemotherapy insensitive HCC. The NPC/miR-375 was fabricated by mixing two reverse microemulsions containing KCl solution and a highly soluble cis-diaminedihydroplatinum (II) coated with a cationic lipid layer. Subsequently, the miR-375 was incorporated into the lipid-coated cisplatin nanoparticles. The NPC/miR375 nanoparticles were expected to further decrease cell proliferation and to enhance the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin in chemotherapy resistant HCC cells. In vitro analysis of intracellular trafficking revealed that NPC/miR-375 were able to escape from the late endosomes instead of lysosomes thus avoiding degradation of the miR-375 in lysosomes. Importantly, NPC/miR-375 enhanced apoptosis and induced cell cycle arrest in HCC cells in vitro. In the double oncogenes Akt/Ras-induced primary HCC mouse model, multiple doses of NPC/miR-375 significantly inhibited tumor growth and delayed the tumor relapse. Our results indicate that cisplatin nanoparticles co-loaded with miR-375 represent a potential therapeutic agent for chemotherapy-insensitive HCC. PMID:26722380

  11. Common variants in ACYP2 influence susceptibility to cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Robinson, Giles W; Huang, Jie; Lim, Joshua Yew-Suang; Zhang, Hui; Bass, Johnnie K; Broniscer, Alberto; Chintagumpala, Murali; Bartels, Ute; Gururangan, Sri; Hassall, Tim; Fisher, Michael; Cohn, Richard; Yamashita, Tetsuji; Teitz, Tal; Zuo, Jian; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Gajjar, Amar; Stewart, Clinton F; Yang, Jun J

    2015-03-01

    Taking a genome-wide association study approach, we identified inherited genetic variations in ACYP2 associated with cisplatin-related ototoxicity (rs1872328: P = 3.9 × 10(-8), hazard ratio = 4.5) in 238 children with newly diagnosed brain tumors, with independent replication in 68 similarly treated children. The ACYP2 risk variant strongly predisposed these patients to precipitous hearing loss and was related to ototoxicity severity. These results point to new biology underlying the ototoxic effects of platinum agents.

  12. S-1 plus cisplatin with concurrent radiotherapy versus cisplatin alone with concurrent radiotherapy in Chinese patients with nonsmall-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Junfei; Xu, Jinquan; Wang, Xuehui; Zhao, Dejun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of S-1 plus cisplatin combined with concurrent radiotherapy (SCCCR) versus cisplatin alone combined with concurrent radiotherapy (CCCR) in Chinese patients with unresectable stage III nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Between January 2012 and December 2014, 72 eligible Chinese patients with NSCLC were included and randomly divided into 2 groups, each having 36 patients. Patients in the SCCCR group received S-1 plus cisplatin with concurrent, radiotherapy. The other 36 patients in the CCCR group were administered cisplatin with concurrent radiotherapy. The primary outcome was the overall response rate. The secondary outcomes were overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and adverse events. Results: The 3-year overall response rates for the SCCCR and CCCR groups were 60.1% and 53.3%, respectively (P = 0.041). The median OS was 35.1 (range, 6.5–47.2) months and 24.6 (range, 2.8–24.3) months for the SCCCR and CCCR groups, respectively (P = 0.016). The median PFS for the SCCCR and CCCR groups was 31.4 (range, 5.6–39.3) months and 22.3 (range, 2.4–36.5) months, respectively (P = 0.023). The toxicity profiles were similar for both groups. Conclusion: The efficacy and safety of SCCCR was more encouraging compared to those of CCCR in Chinese NSCLC patients. In addition, the toxicities in both groups were tolerable. PMID:27603346

  13. The nm23-H1 gene as a predictor of sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Iizuka, N; Hirose, K; Noma, T; Hazama, S; Tangoku, A; Hayashi, H; Abe, T; Yamamoto, K; Oka, M

    1999-01-01

    Recently, nm23-H1, an anti-metastasis gene, has been reported to correlate with sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents including cisplatin in human breast and ovarian carcinoma cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate a role for nm23-H1 in responsiveness to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The expression of nm23-H1 protein was examined immunohistochemically in 32 eligible patients with OSCC who underwent adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin, etoposide, and 5-fluorouracil after tumour resection. Fifteen (46.9%) of 32 patients were positive for nm23-H1 staining and 17 (53.1%) were negative. Both disease-free survival and overall survival rates of nm23-H1-negative patients were significantly shorter than in nm23-H1-positive patients (P < 0.01 for both). There was no significant difference in clinicopathologic characteristics between nm23-H1-positive and nm23-H1-negative groups. Multivariate analysis also showed that nm23-H1 expression was the most significant factor for overall survival of OSCC patients included in this study (P = 0.0007). To further study the role of nm23-H1, a human OSCC cell line (YES-2) was transfected with a plasmid containing a fragment of the nm23-H1 cDNA in an antisense orientation. Reduced expression of nm23-H1 protein in the antisense-transfected (AS) clones was found by Western blot analysis as compared to wild-type YES-2 and YES-2/Neo (clone transfected with the neomycin resistance gene alone). MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazol)-2,5-diphenyl-2H tetrazolium bromide) assay showed that reduced expression of the nm23-H1 protein in AS clones was consistent with the degree of increased resistance to cisplatin but not etoposide or 5-fluorouracil. These data support the conclusion that reduced expression of nm23-H1 may be associated with resistance to cisplatin, suggesting the value of nm23-H1 expression as a prognostic marker for OSCC patients who are to undergo cisplatin

  14. Randomised comparison of cisplatin with cyclophosphamide/cisplatin and with cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/cisplatin in advanced ovarian cancer. Gruppo Interegionale Cooperativo Oncologico Ginecologia.

    PubMed

    1987-08-15

    565 patients with stage III-IV epithelial ovarian cancer were randomly assigned to receive cisplatin (P), cyclophosphamide and cisplatin (CP), or cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (CAP). Data on 531 patients were analysed. Treatment with CAP resulted in a significantly higher overall (complete and partial) response rate (66 vs 56 vs 49% for CAP, CP, and P, respectively), but the rate of complete surgical response for the three treatment arms was similar (26, 21, and 20%). Size of residual tumour after first surgery and Karnofsky index were the best predictors of complete remission. Survival and disease-free survival were not significantly different in the three arms, although progression-free survival was significantly longer after CAP. However, tumour size, cell type, and Karnofsky index, but not therapy, were independent predictors for survival. Haematological toxicity was highest with CAP. The addition of cyclophosphamide or doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide to cisplatin does not substantially increase the number of potentially curable, advanced ovarian cancer patients.

  15. mTOR is a Promising Therapeutic Target Both in Cisplatin-Sensitive and Cisplatin-Resistant Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Mabuchi, Seiji; Kawase, Chiaki; Altomare, Deborah A.; Morishige, Kenichirou; Sawada, Kenjiro; Hayashi, Masami; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Yamoto, Mareo; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; Schilder, Russell J.; Ohmichi, Masahide; Testa, Joseph R.; Kimura, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    Translational Relevance Clear cell carcinoma (CCC) of the ovary is a distinctive subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer associated with a poorer sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy and a worse prognosis than the more common serous adenocarcinoma (SAC). To improve survival, the development of new treatment strategies that target CCC more effectively is necessary. Our results show that mTOR is more frequently activated in CCCs than in SACs. Our data have relevance for the design of future clinical studies of first-line treatment for patients with CCC of the ovary. Moreover, the finding of increased expression of phospho-mTOR and greater sensitivity to RAD001 in cisplatin-resistant CCC cells than in cisplatin-sensitive cells suggests a novel treatment option for patients with recurrent disease after cisplatin-based first-line chemotherapy. Purpose mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) plays a central role in cell proliferation and is regarded as a promising target in cancer therapy including for ovarian cancer. This study aims to examine the role of mTOR as a therapeutic target in clear cell carcinoma (CCC) of the ovary which is regarded as aggressive, chemo-resistant histological subtype. Experimental Design Using tissue microarrays of 98 primary ovarian cancers (52 clear cell carcinomas and 46 serous adenocarcinomas), the expression of phospho-mTOR was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Then, the growth-inhibitory effect of mTOR inhibition by RAD001 (everolimus) was examined using 2 pairs of cisplatin-sensitive parental (RMG1 and KOC7C) and cisplatin-resistant human CCC cell lines (RMG1-CR and KOC7C-CR) both in vitro and in vivo. Results Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated mTOR was more frequently activated in CCCs than in serous adenocarcinomas (86.6% vs 50%). Treatment with RAD001 markedly inhibited the growth of both RMG1 and KOC7C cells both in vitro and in vivo. Increased expression of phospho-mTOR was observed in cisplatin-resistant RMG1-CR and KOC7C

  16. Curcumin downregulates p38 MAPK-dependent X-ray repair cross-complement group 1 (XRCC1) expression to enhance cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chun-Liang; Jian, Yi-Jun; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chen, Wen-Ching; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chang, Po-Yuan; Liao, Kai-Sheng; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Cisplatin is a well-studied and widely used chemotherapeutic agent and is effective in the treatment of the advanced human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Curcumin is a yellow pigment derived from the rhizome of Curcuma longa and has been proved to have antioxidant and antitumor properties. XRCC1 is an important scaffold protein involved in base excision repair and plays an important role in the development of lung cancer. In this study, we characterize the role of curcumin in the cytotoxicity, p38 MAPK activation, and XRCC1 expression affected by cisplatin in NSCLC cells. We show that curcumin enhanced the cytotoxicity induced by cisplatin in two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1703. Treatment with cisplatin alone increased XRCC1 mRNA and protein expression through p38 MAPK activation. Moreover, SB2023580 (p38 inhibitor) decreased the XRCC1 mRNA and protein stability upon cisplatin treatment. Knockdown of XRCC1 in NSCLC cells by transfection of XRCC1 siRNA or inactivation of p38 MAPK resulted in enhancing the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition induced by cisplatin. Curcumin inhibited the expression of XRCC1 in cisplatin-exposed NSCLC cells. Furthermore, transfection with constitutive active MKK6 or HA-p38 MAPK vectors rescued the XRCC1 protein level and also the cell survival suppressed by cisplatin and curcumin combination in A549 and H1703 cells. These findings suggested that the downregulation of XRCC1 expression by curcumin can enhance the chemosensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells. PMID:27026405

  17. Phase II trial of cisplatin and tegafur (Ftorafur) as initial therapy in squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Baron, M; Vicente, J; Tomas, M; Martin, G; Martorell, V; Garcia-Giron, C; Garrido, P; Gavilan, J; Zamora, P

    1990-08-01

    Cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil infusion combination produces a high response rate in squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Tegafur (Ftorafur) is an analog of 5-fluorouracil, and its oral form is well absorbed. This agent has a moderate toxicity. We report a study to determine the efficacy of the cisplatin (100 mg/m2, day 1) and tegafur (1,000 mg/m2 daily for 21 days) combination. Thirty-nine patients entered the study; 36 were evaluable for response. Overall response was 94%, with a 22% complete response. Toxicity was moderate. We conclude that the cisplatin and tegafur combination is active in untreated patients with head and neck cancer.

  18. X-ray analysis of the effect of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron on gastrointestinal motility in rats repeatedly treated with the antitumoral drug cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Vera, Gema; López-Pérez, Ana Esther; Martínez-Villaluenga, María; Cabezos, Pablo Antonio; Abalo, Raquel

    2014-08-01

    Cancer chemotherapy is associated with the development of numerous adverse effects, including nausea, emesis and other alterations in gastrointestinal (GI) motility. The administration of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists has provided a clinical advance in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced vomiting but these drugs lose efficacy throughout chronic treatment. The effects of these drugs in experimental animals under chronic administration are not well known. Our aim was to study, using radiographic methods, the effect of the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist granisetron on GI dysmotility induced in the rat by repeated cisplatin administration. First, invasive methods were used to select a dose of granisetron capable of reducing increased stomach weight due to acute cisplatin administration (6 mg/kg, ip). Second, rats received two intraperitoneal (ip) injections once a week for 4 weeks: granisetron (1 mg/kg, ip) or saline and, thirty min later, saline or cisplatin (2 mg/kg, ip). Body weight gain was measured throughout treatment. Radiological techniques were used to determine the acute (after first dose) and chronic (after last dose) effects of cisplatin and/or granisetron on GI motility. Repeated cisplatin-induced weight loss which granisetron did not prevent. Gastric emptying was delayed after the first cisplatin administration. Granisetron completely prevented this effect. After weekly administration, cisplatin-induced gastric dysmotility was enhanced and granisetron was not capable of completely preventing this effect. Granisetron prevents gastric emptying alterations, but its efficacy decreases throughout antineoplastic treatment. This might be due to the enhanced effect of cisplatin. PMID:24798399

  19. Ameliorative effect of fisetin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats via modulation of NF-κB activation and antioxidant defence.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Bidya Dhar; Kalvala, Anil Kumar; Koneru, Meghana; Mahesh Kumar, Jerald; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Rachamalla, Shyam Sunder; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a dose-dependent side effect of cisplatin limiting its clinical usage in the field of cancer chemotherapy. Fisetin is a bioactive flavonoid with recognized antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, we investigated the potential renoprotective effect and underlying mechanism of fisetin using rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The elevation in serum biomarkers of renal damage (blood urea nitrogen and creatinine); degree of histopathological alterations and oxidative stress were significantly restored towards normal in fisetin treated, cisplatin challenged animals. Fisetin treatment also significantly attenuated the cisplatin-induced IκBα degradation and phosphorylation and blocked the NF-κB (p65) nuclear translocation, with subsequent elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-α, protein expression of iNOS and myeloperoxidase activities. Furthermore, fisetin markedly attenuated the translocation of cytochrome c protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol; decreased the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins including Bax, cleaved caspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and p53; and prevented the decline of anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2. The cisplatin-induced mRNA expression of NOX2/gp91phox and NOX4/RENOX and the NADPH oxidase enzyme activity were also significantly lowered by fisetin treatment. Moreover, the evaluated mitochondrial respiratory enzyme activities and mitochondrial antioxidants were restored by fisetin treatment. Estimation of platinum concentration in kidney tissues revealed that fisetin treatment along with cisplatin did not alter the cisplatin uptake in kidney tissues. In conclusion, these findings suggest that fisetin may be used as a promising adjunct candidate for cisplatin use.

  20. Quantitative Imaging of Chemical Composition in Single Cells by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry: Cisplatin Affects Calcium Stores in Renal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Subhash

    2010-01-01

    A detailed protocol for quantitative single cell mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) analysis is described in this chapter with examples of the treatment of cells with anticancer drug, cisplatin. Cisplatin, cis-diamminedichloridoplatinum (ii) (CDDP), is widely used for the treatment of many malignancies, including testicular, ovarian, bladder, cervical, head and neck, and small cell and non-small cell lung cancers. The possibility of renal injury by cisplatin treatment is a major dose-limiting factor in this cancer therapy. At present, the mechanisms of cisplatin-induced renal cytotoxicity are poorly understood. In this work, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used for investigating cisplatin-induced alterations in intracellular chemical composition in a well established model (LLC-PK1 cell line) for studying renal injury. The cells were cryogenically prepared by the sandwich freeze-fracture method for subcellular imaging analysis of chemical composition (total concentrations of K+, Na+ and Ca2+) in individual cells. The single cell analysis of these diffusible ions necessitates the use of reliable cryogenic sample preparations for SIMS. The sandwich freeze-fracture method offers a simple approach for cryogenically preserving diffusible ions and molecules inside the cells for SIMS analysis. A CAMECA IMS 3f SIMS ion microscope instrument capable of producing chemical images of single cells with 500 nm spatial resolution was used in the study. In cisplatin treated cells, SIMS imaging showed the presence of detectable amount of platinum at mass 195, as 195Pt+ secondary ions in individual cells. SIMS observations also revealed that individual cells differed in their response to cisplatin. While the chemical composition of some cells was unaffected by cisplatin, others showed a reduction in cytoplasmic calcium stores that was not associated with changes in their intracellular K or Na concentrations. Another population of cells displayed an increased in cytoplasmic

  1. Reactive oxygen species-mediated synergistic and preferential induction of cell death and reduction of clonogenic resistance in breast cancer cells by combined cisplatin and FK228.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Lenora Ann; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2016-10-10

    Safe and effective combination chemotherapy regimens against breast cancer are lacking. We used our cellular system, consisting of the non-cancerous human breast epithelial MCF10A cell line and its derived tumorigenic, oncogenic H-Ras-expressing, MCF10A-Ras cell line, to investigate the effectiveness of a combination chemotherapy regimen in treating breast cancer cells using two FDA-approved agents, cisplatin and FK228. Cisplatin and FK228 significantly, synergistically, and preferentially induced death and reduced drug resistance of MCF10A-Ras versus MCF10A cells. The ERK-Nox-ROS pathway played a major role in both synergistic cell death induction and GSH-level reduction, which contributed to the synergistic suppression of drug resistance in cells. Enhancement of the Ras-ERK-Nox pathway by combined cisplatin and FK228 significantly increased ROS levels, leading to induction of death, reduction of drug resistance, and induction of DNA damage and oxidation in cancerous MCF10A-Ras cells. Furthermore, synergistic induction of cell death and reduction of drug resistance by combined cisplatin and FK228 in breast cells is independent of their estrogen receptor status. Our study suggests that combined cisplatin and FK228 should be considered in clinical trials as a new regimen for therapeutic control of breast cancers. PMID:27477899

  2. Study of the Effect of Route of Administration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Cisplatin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Fatma E; Sobh, Mohamed-A; Abouelkheir, Mohamed; Khater, Youmna; Mahmoud, Khalid; Saad, Mohamed-Ahdy; Sobh, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to ameliorate cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). The present study compares the efficacy of different routes of MSCs administration on kidney damage and regeneration after cisplatin-induced AKI. Methods A single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin (5 mg/kg) was used to induce AKI in 160 rats. MSCs (5×106) were given by either intravenous, intra-arterial or kidney sub capsular injection one day after cisplatin injection. Suitable control groups were included. Rats were sacrificed at 4, 7, 11 and 30 days after cisplatin injection. Kidney function parameters, kidney tissue oxidative stress markers, and scoring for renal tissue injury, regeneration and chronicity were all determined. Results MSCs by any routes were able to ameliorate kidney function deterioration and renal tissue damage induced by cisplatin. The overall results of the three routes were equal. Differences between the different routes in one parameter were transient and inconsistent with other parameters. Conclusions Changing the route of MSCs injection does not have a major influence on the outcome. Future evaluation should focus on differences between the routes of administration considering the long term safety. PMID:27426089

  3. Probe DNA-Cisplatin Interaction with Solid-State Nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Ying; Li, Wei; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Pengye; Bai, Xuedong; Shan, Xinyan; Lu, Xinghua; Nanopore Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of DNA-cisplatin interaction is essential for clinical application and novel drug design. As an emerging single-molecule technology, solid-state nanopore has been employed in biomolecule detection and probing DNA-molecule interactions. Herein, we reported a real-time monitoring of DNA-cisplatin interaction by employing solid-state SiN nanopores. The DNA-cisplatin interacting process is clearly classified into three stages by measuring the capture rate of DNA-cisplatin adducts. In the first stage, the negative charged DNA molecules were partially discharged due to the bonding of positive charged cisplatin and forming of mono-adducts. In the second stage, forming of DNA-cisplatin di-adducts with the adjacent bases results in DNA bending and softening. The capture rate increases since the softened bi-adducts experience a lower barrier to thread into the nanopores. In the third stage, complex structures, such as micro-loop, are formed and the DNA-cisplatin adducts are aggregated. The capture rate decreases to zero as the aggregated adduct grows to the size of the pore. The characteristic time of this stage was found to be linear with the diameter of the nanopore and this dynamic process can be described with a second-order reaction model. We are grateful to Laboratory of Microfabrication, Dr. Y. Yao, and Prof. R.C. Yu (Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for technical assistance.

  4. Persistence of cisplatin-induced mutagenicity in hematopoietic stem cells: implications for secondary cancer risk following chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dertinger, Stephen D; Avlasevich, Svetlana L; Torous, Dorothea K; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Phonethepswath, Souk; Labash, Carson; Carlson, Kristine; Mereness, Jared; Cottom, John; Palis, James; MacGregor, James T

    2014-08-01

    Cisplatin is a cytostatic agent used in the treatment of many types of cancer, but its use is associated with increased incidences of secondary leukemia. We evaluated cisplatin's in vivo genotoxic potential by analyzing peripheral blood for Pig-a mutant phenotype erythrocytes and for chromosomal damage in the form of micronuclei. Mutant phenotype reticuloyte and erythrocyte frequencies, based on anti-CD59 antibody labeling and flow cytometric analysis, were determined in male Sprague Dawley rats treated for 28 consecutive days (days 1-28) with up to 0.4 mg cisplatin/kg/day, and sampled on days -4, 15, 29, and 56. Vehicle and highest dose groups were evaluated at additional time points post-treatment up to 6 months. Day 4 and 29 blood samples were also analyzed for micronucleated reticulocyte frequency using flow cytometry and anti-CD71-based labeling. Mutant phenotype reticulocytes were significantly elevated at doses ≥0.1 mg/kg/day, and mutant phenotype erythrocytes were elevated at doses ≥0.05 mg/kg/day. In the 0.4 mg/kg/day group, these effects persisted for the 6 month observation period. Cisplatin also induced a modest but statistically significant increase in micronucleus frequency at the highest dose tested. The prolonged persistence in the production of mutant erythrocytes following cisplatin exposure suggests that this drug mutates hematopoietic stem cells and that this damage may ultimately contribute to the increased incidence of secondary leukemias seen in patients cured of primary malignancies with platinum-based regimens.

  5. The leader peptide of a human rec. MnSOD as molecular carrier which delivers high amounts of Cisplatin into tumor cells inducing a fast apoptosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Antonella; Schiattarella, Antonietta; Mancini, Roberto; Morelli, Franco; Capasso, Clemente; De Luca, Viviana; Gori, Enrico; Mancini, Aldo

    2011-01-15

    The leader peptide of a recombinant MnSOD (rMnSOD-Lp) constitutes the carrier that allows rMnSOD to penetrate tumor cells. A synthetic preparation of rMnSOD-Lp was ⁶⁸Ga labeled (rMnSOD-Lp- ⁶⁸Ga) and injected into animals bearing spontaneous mammary cancers, followed by PET examinations, which demonstrated unambiguously the tumor sites in all the animals, suggesting that if rMnSOD-Lp was able to transport the radioisotope into tumor cells, it would also be able to deliver cytotoxic molecules. The rMnSOD-Lp was, therefore, conjugated to cisplatin (rMnSOD-Lp-CC) and added to cultured tumor cells. Equal concentrations of cisplatin were used for the tests. After treating the ovarian cancer cells with 11.1 μg of cisplatin alone, analysis by atomic absorbance spectrophotometry was able to detect only 6 ng of platinum, whereas when the same cells were treated with the same amount of cisplatin conjugated to leader peptide rMnSOD, 387 ng of platinum were detected, i.e., an amount 80 times greater. Only the tumor cells died following treatment with rMnSOD-Lp-CC; molecular analysis revealed that its addition generated an increasing expression of Erk-2 and Bax products, which could be inhibited only by a selective MAP/ERK kinase inhibitor (PD98059), revealing that rMnSOD-Lp-CC has an apoptotic function, exactly as occurs when using the cisplatin alone. Data are statistically significant and indicate that by using rMnSOD-Lp-CC, the cisplatin can be transformed from an agent with antireplicative activity into a specific and selective antitumor molecule, increasing its therapeutic index. We think that rMnSOD-Lp-CC deserves to be considered as a new antitumor agent.

  6. FOXO3a reactivation mediates the synergistic cytotoxic effects of rapamycin and cisplatin in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Liang; Wang Huiming; Zhou Lin; Yu Da

    2011-02-15

    FOXO3a, a well-known transcriptional regulator, controls a wide spectrum of biological processes. The Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway inactivates FOXO3a via phosphorylation-induced nuclear exclusion and degradation. A loss or gain of FOXO3a activity has been correlated with efficiency of chemotherapies in various cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Therefore, in the current study, we have investigated the FOXO3a activity modulating and antitumor effects of rapamycin and cisplatin in OSCC cells. Cisplatin inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent way in OSCC Tca8113 cells. Rapamycin alone had no effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Rapamycin downregulated the expression of S-phase kinase associated protein-2 (Skp2) and increased the FOXO3a protein stability but induced the upregulation of feedback Akt activation-mediated FOXO3a phosphorylation. Cisplatin decreased the phosphorylation of FOXO3a via Akt inhibition. Rapamycin combined with cisplatin as its feedback Akt activation inhibitor revealed the most dramatic FOXO3a nuclear localization and reactivation with the prevention of its feedback loop and exposed significant synergistic effects of decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in vitro and decreased tumor size in vivo. Furthermore, the downstream effects of FOXO3a reactivation were found to be accumulation of p27 and Bim. In conclusion, rapamycin/cisplatin combination therapy boosts synergistic antitumor effects through the significant FOXO3a reactivation in OSCC cells. These results may represent a novel mechanism by which rapamycin/cisplatin combination therapy proves to be a potent molecular-targeted strategy for OSCC.

  7. Transportan 10 improves the anticancer activity of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Izabela, Rusiecka; Jarosław, Ruczyński; Magdalena, Alenowicz; Piotr, Rekowski; Ivan, Kocić

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine whether cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) such as transportan 10 (TP10) or protein transduction domain (PTD4) may improve the anticancer activity of cisplatin (cPt). The complexes of TP10 or PTD4 with cPt were used in the experiments. They were carried out on two non-cancer (HEK293 (human embryonic kidney) and HEL299 (human embryo lung)) and two cancer (HeLa (human cervical cancer) and OS143B (human osteosarcoma 143B)) cell lines. Both complexes were tested (MTT assay) with respect to their anticancer or cytotoxic actions. TAMRA (fluorescent dye)-stained preparations were visualized in a fluorescence microscope. The long-term effect of TP10 + cPt and its components on non-cancer and cancer cell lines was observed in inverted phase contrast microscopy. In the MTT test (cell viability assay), the complex of TP10 + cPt produced a more potent effect on the cancer cell lines (HeLa, OS143B) in comparison to that observed after separate treatment with TP10 or cPt. At the same time, the action of the complex and its components was rather small on non-cancer cell lines. On the other hand, a complex of another CPP with cPt, i.e., PTD4 + cPt, was without a significant effect on the cancer cell line (OS143B). The images of the fluorescent microscopy showed TAMRA-TP10 or TAMRA-TP10 + cPt in the interior of the HeLa cells. In the case of TAMRA-PTD4 or TAMRA-PTD4 + cPt, only the first compound was found inside the cancer cell line. In contrast, none of the tested compounds gained access to the interior of the non-cancer cells (HEK293, HEL299). Long-term incubation with the TP10 + cPt (estimated by inverted phase contrast microscopy) lead to an enhanced action of the complex on cell viability (decrease in the number of cells and change in their morphology) as compared with that produced by each single agent. With regard to the tested CPPs, only TP10 improved the anticancer activity of cisplatin if both compounds were used in the form of a

  8. Systems biology of cisplatin resistance: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Michels, J; Brenner, C; Szabadkai, G; Harel-Bellan, A; Castedo, M; Kroemer, G

    2014-01-01

    The platinum derivative cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), best known as cisplatin, is currently employed for the clinical management of patients affected by testicular, ovarian, head and neck, colorectal, bladder and lung cancers. For a long time, the antineoplastic effects of cisplatin have been fully ascribed to its ability to generate unrepairable DNA lesions, hence inducing either a permanent proliferative arrest known as cellular senescence or the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Accumulating evidence now suggests that the cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of cisplatin involves both a nuclear and a cytoplasmic component. Despite the unresolved issues regarding its mechanism of action, the administration of cisplatin is generally associated with high rates of clinical responses. However, in the vast majority of cases, malignant cells exposed to cisplatin activate a multipronged adaptive response that renders them less susceptible to the antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of the drug, and eventually resume proliferation. Thus, a large fraction of cisplatin-treated patients is destined to experience therapeutic failure and tumor recurrence. Throughout the last four decades great efforts have been devoted to the characterization of the molecular mechanisms whereby neoplastic cells progressively lose their sensitivity to cisplatin. The advent of high-content and high-throughput screening technologies has accelerated the discovery of cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic pathways that may be targeted to prevent or reverse cisplatin resistance in cancer patients. Still, the multifactorial and redundant nature of this phenomenon poses a significant barrier against the identification of effective chemosensitization strategies. Here, we discuss recent systems biology studies aimed at deconvoluting the complex circuitries that underpin cisplatin resistance, and how their findings might drive the development of rational approaches to tackle this clinically relevant

  9. Systems biology of cisplatin resistance: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, L; Vitale, I; Michels, J; Brenner, C; Szabadkai, G; Harel-Bellan, A; Castedo, M; Kroemer, G

    2014-01-01

    The platinum derivative cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II), best known as cisplatin, is currently employed for the clinical management of patients affected by testicular, ovarian, head and neck, colorectal, bladder and lung cancers. For a long time, the antineoplastic effects of cisplatin have been fully ascribed to its ability to generate unrepairable DNA lesions, hence inducing either a permanent proliferative arrest known as cellular senescence or the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Accumulating evidence now suggests that the cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of cisplatin involves both a nuclear and a cytoplasmic component. Despite the unresolved issues regarding its mechanism of action, the administration of cisplatin is generally associated with high rates of clinical responses. However, in the vast majority of cases, malignant cells exposed to cisplatin activate a multipronged adaptive response that renders them less susceptible to the antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of the drug, and eventually resume proliferation. Thus, a large fraction of cisplatin-treated patients is destined to experience therapeutic failure and tumor recurrence. Throughout the last four decades great efforts have been devoted to the characterization of the molecular mechanisms whereby neoplastic cells progressively lose their sensitivity to cisplatin. The advent of high-content and high-throughput screening technologies has accelerated the discovery of cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic pathways that may be targeted to prevent or reverse cisplatin resistance in cancer patients. Still, the multifactorial and redundant nature of this phenomenon poses a significant barrier against the identification of effective chemosensitization strategies. Here, we discuss recent systems biology studies aimed at deconvoluting the complex circuitries that underpin cisplatin resistance, and how their findings might drive the development of rational approaches to tackle this clinically relevant

  10. Dramatic Response to Cisplatin Window Therapy in a Boy With Advanced Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Trizzino, Antonino; Ziino, Ottavio; Parafioriti, Antonina; Podda, Marta; Tropia, Serena; Luksch, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is the second most common type of primary bone malignancy, and retains a high propensity to metastasize; the prognosis of patients with disseminated disease is very poor, with an event-free survival rate of <20%. Current multimodality treatment for ES consists of combined chemotherapy before and concurrent with surgery and local radiotherapy for the involved bone. Cisplatin is one of the most widely used drugs for the treatment of bone tumors in children, but is not currently used in ES. We describe a child with multifocal ES, treated with a phase II trial including a single-drug window therapy, which displayed a dramatic response to 2 courses of cisplatin and had a favorable outcome. PMID:23892353

  11. Transarterial Chemoembolization Using Cisplatin Powder in a Rabbit Model of Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morimoto, Kengo Sakaguchi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Kiyosei; Anai, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Takayuki; Satake, Mitsuo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the pharmacological advantages of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) with cisplatin powder for hypervascular hepatic tumors in animal experiments. VX2 tumors were transplanted to the livers of nine rabbits. Cisplatin (1 mg/kg) was infused into the proper hepatic artery. In the cisplatin-HAI group, cisplatin solution was infused. In the cisplatin-GS-TACE group, after infusion of cisplatin solution, gelatin sponge particles were used for embolization. In the cisplatin-Lp-TACE group, after infusion of a cisplatin powder and lipiodol (10 mg/ml) suspension, gelatin sponge particles were used for embolization. Before and after administration, platinum concentrations in plasma were measured. Using liver specimens that were excised 60 min after infusion, platinum concentrations in tumorous and nontumorous liver tissues were measured. The mean platinum concentration in tumorous tissue was 0.88 {mu}g/ml for the cisplatin-HAI group, 1.23 {mu}g/ml for the cisplatin-GS-TACE group, and 12.65 {mu}g/ml for the cisplatin-Lp-TACE group. The platinum concentration for the cisplatin-Lp-TACE group was significantly higher than that for the cisplatin-HAI group (p = 0.004) and the cisplatin-GS-TAE group (p = 0.004). The mean platinum concentration in nontumorous liver tissue was 0.98 {mu}g/ml for the cisplatin-HAI group, 1.13 {mu}g/ml for the cisplatin-GS-TACE group, and 1.09 {mu}g/ml for the cisplatin-Lp-TACE group; no significant differences were seen. At both 5 and 10 min after infusion, the platinum concentrations for the cisplatin-Lp-TACE group were lower than those for the other two groups. The present results suggest that TACE using cisplatin powder/lipiodol suspension and gelatin sponge for hypervascular hepatic tumors has a number of pharmacological advantages.

  12. Magnesium protects against cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury without compromising cisplatin-mediated killing of an ovarian tumor xenograft in mice.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Malvika H; Chatterjee, Prodyot K; Xue, Xiangying; Gupta, Madhu; Rosales, Ivy; Yeboah, Michael M; Kohn, Nina; Metz, Christine N

    2015-07-01

    Cisplatin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic for ovarian and other cancers, leads to hypomagnesemia in most patients and causes acute kidney injury (AKI) in 25-30% of patients. Previously, we showed that magnesium deficiency worsens cisplatin-induced AKI and magnesium replacement during cisplatin treatment protects against cisplatin-mediated AKI in non-tumor-bearing mice (Solanki MH, Chatterjee PK, Gupta M, Xue X, Plagov A, Metz MH, Mintz R, Singhal PC, Metz CN. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 307: F369-F384, 2014). This study investigates the role of magnesium in cisplatin-induced AKI using a human ovarian tumor (A2780) xenograft model in mice and the effect of magnesium status on tumor growth and the chemotherapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in vivo. Tumor progression was unaffected by magnesium status in saline-treated mice. Cisplatin treatment reduced tumor growth in all mice, irrespective of magnesium status. In fact, cisplatin-treated magnesium-supplemented mice had reduced tumor growth after 3 wk compared with cisplatin-treated controls. While magnesium status did not interfere with tumor killing by cisplatin, it significantly affected renal function following cisplatin. Cisplatin-induced AKI was enhanced by magnesium deficiency, as evidenced by increased blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, and other markers of renal damage. This was accompanied by reduced renal mRNA expression of the cisplatin efflux transporter Abcc6. These effects were significantly reversed by magnesium replacement. On the contrary, magnesium status did not affect the mRNA expression of cisplatin uptake or efflux transporters by the tumors in vivo. Finally, magnesium deficiency enhanced platinum accumulation in the kidneys and renal epithelial cells, but not in the A2780 tumor cells. These findings demonstrate the renoprotective role of magnesium during cisplatin AKI, without compromising the chemotherapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in an ovarian tumor-bearing mouse model.

  13. Relative Contributions of Radiation and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy to Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, Ying J. Tward, Jonathan D.; Szabo, Aniko; Bentz, Brandon G.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in patients with head-and-neck cancer and treated with radiation therapy (RT) or concomitant cisplatin-based chemoradiation, the relationship among SNHL and radiation dose to the cochlea, the use of two common cisplatin dose regimens. Methods and Materials: A total of 62 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with curative intent were included in this prospective study. Of the patients, 21 received RT alone, 27 received 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly cisplatin, 13 received 100 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks during RT, and 1 received RT with weekly epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor antibody. The effect of chemotherapy and RT dose on hearing was determined using a model that accounted for the age and variability between each ear for each patient. Results: We constructed a model to predict dose-dependent hearing loss for RT or cisplatin-based chemotherapy either alone or in combination. For patients only receiving RT, no significant hearing loss was found at doses to the cochlea of less than 40 Gy. Patients receiving 100 mg/m{sup 2} or 40 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin chemotherapy had an estimated +21.5 dB and +9.5 dB hearing loss at 8,000 Hz with low radiation doses (10 Gy), which rose to +38.4 dB and +18.9 dB for high radiation doses (40 Gy). Conclusions: Use of RT alone with doses of less than 40 Gy did not result in clinically significant hearing loss. High-frequency SNHL was profoundly damaged in patients who received concomitant cisplatin when doses of 100 mg/m{sup 2} were used. The threshold cochlear dose for hearing loss with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and RT was predicted to be 10 Gy. The inner ear radiation dose constraints and cisplatin dose intensity should be considered in the treatment of advanced head-and-neck cancer.

  14. Radiotherapy and Concomitant Intra-Arterial Docetaxel Combined With Systemic 5-Fluorouracil and Cisplatin for Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Preliminary Report-Improvement of Locoregional Control of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Oikawa, Hirobumi Nakamura, Ryuji; Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Kohji; Sato, Hiroaki; Ehara, Shigeru

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To confirm the advantage of chemoradiotherapy using intra-arterial docetaxel with intravenous cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. Patients and Methods: A total of 26 oropharyngeal cancer patients (1, 2, 2, and 21 patients had Stage I, II, III, and IVa-IVc, respectively) were treated with two sessions of this chemoradiotherapy regimen. External beam radiotherapy was delivered using large portals that included the primary site and the regional lymph nodes initially (range, 40-41.4 Gy) and the metastatic lymph nodes later (60 or 72 Gy). All tumor-supplying branches of the carotid arteries were cannulated, and 40 mg/m{sup 2} docetaxel was individually infused on Day 1. The other systemic chemotherapy agents included 60 mg/m{sup 2} cisplatin on Day 2 and 500 mg/m{sup 2} 5-fluorouracil on Days 2-6. Results: The primary response of the tumor was complete in 21 (81%), partial in 4 (15%), and progressive in 1 patient. Grade 4 mucositis, leukopenia, and dermatitis was observed in 3, 2, and 1 patients, respectively. During a median follow-up of 10 months, the disease recurred at the primary site and at a distant organ in 2 (8%) and 3 (12%) patients, respectively. Three patients died because of cancer progression. Two patients (8%) with a partial response were compromised by lethal bleeding from the tumor bed or chemotherapeutic toxicity. The 3-year locoregional control rate and the 3-year overall survival rate was 73% and 77%, respectively. Conclusion: This method resulted in an excellent primary tumor response rate (96%) and moderate acute toxicity. Additional follow-up is required to ascertain the usefulness of this modality.

  15. Cisplatin resistance associated with PARP hyperactivation.

    PubMed

    Michels, Judith; Vitale, Ilio; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Adam, Julien; Olaussen, Ken André; Kepp, Oliver; Senovilla, Laura; Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Guegan, Justine; Enot, David Pierre; Talbot, Monique; Robin, Angélique; Girard, Philippe; Oréar, Cédric; Lissa, Delphine; Sukkurwala, Abdul Qader; Garcia, Pauline; Behnam-Motlagh, Parviz; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Wu, Gen Sheng; Brenner, Catherine; Dessen, Philippe; Saparbaev, Murat; Soria, Jean-Charles; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-04-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma patients are frequently treated with cisplatin (CDDP), most often yielding temporary clinical responses. Here, we show that PARP1 is highly expressed and constitutively hyperactivated in a majority of human CDDP-resistant cancer cells of distinct histologic origin. Cells manifesting elevated intracellular levels of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins (PAR(high)) responded to pharmacologic PARP inhibitors as well as to PARP1-targeting siRNAs by initiating a DNA damage response that translated into cell death following the activation of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Moreover, PARP1-overexpressing tumor cells and xenografts displayed elevated levels of PAR, which predicted the response to PARP inhibitors in vitro and in vivo more accurately than PARP1 expression itself. Thus, a majority of CDDP-resistant cancer cells appear to develop a dependency to PARP1, becoming susceptible to PARP inhibitor-induced apoptosis.

  16. Carboplatin versus cisplatin: density functional approach to their molecular properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornaghi, Elena; Andreoni, Wanda; Carloni, Paolo; Hutter, Jürg; Parrinello, Michele

    1995-12-01

    Carboplatin is a platinum-based drug in common clinical use. Here we present the first ab initio calculation of its molecular properties, namely structural, electronic and vibrational. Comparison of the calculated molecular structure with experimental data taken in the solid phase shows quite good agreement. Comparison of our results on its parent complex, cisplatin, is particularly instructive. Unlike the chlorine ligands in cisplatin, the substituting dicarboxylate strongly participates in the chemically active orbitals.

  17. The Akt inhibitor MK-2206 enhances the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel (Taxol) and cisplatin in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying-Hsi; Chen, Bert Yu-Hung; Lai, Wei-Ting; Wu, Shao-Fu; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Hsu, Lih-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway are commonly observed in human cancers and contribute to chemotherapy resistance. Combination therapy, involving the use of molecular targeted agents and traditional cytotoxic drugs, may represent a promising strategy to lower resistance and enhance cytotoxicity. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of an Akt inhibitor, MK-2206, in increasing the cytotoxic effect of either paclitaxel (Taxol) or cisplatin against the ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 (with constitutively active Akt) and ES2 (with inactive Akt). Sequential treatment of Taxol or cisplatin, followed by MK-2206, induced a synergistic inhibition of cell proliferation and effectively promoted cell death, either by inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream effectors 4E-BP1 and p70S6K in SKOV3 cells or by restoring p53 levels, which were downregulated after Taxol or cisplatin treatment, in ES2 cells. Combination treatment also downregulated the pro-survival protein Bcl-2 in both SKOV3 and ES2 cells, which may have contributed to cell death. In addition, we discovered that Taxol/MK-2206 or cisplatin/MK-2206 combination treatment resulted in significant enhancement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by MK-2206, in both SKOV3 and ES2 cells; however, MK-2206-induced growth inhibition was reversed by a ROS scavenger only in ES2 cells. MK-2206 also suppressed DNA repair, particularly in SKOV3 cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the Akt inhibitor MK-2206 enhances the efficacy of cytotoxic agents in both Akt-active and Akt-inactive ovarian cancer cells but through different mechanisms.

  18. Current status of novel agents in advanced gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nishi

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal (GE) adenocarcinomas are highly lethal malignancies and despite multiple chemotherapy options, 5-year survival rates remain dismal. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment but patients are often limited by toxicity and poor performance status. Because of molecular heterogeneity, it is essential to classify tumors based on the underlying oncogenic pathways and develop targeted therapies that act on individual tumors. Trastuzumab, a human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) monoclonal antibody, was the first such agent shown to improve response rate, progression free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) when added to cisplatin based chemotherapy in patients with HER2 over-expressing GE junction (GEJ) and gastric adenocarcinomas. However, HER2 over expressing GE tumors are in the minority and the need for additional targeted agents is urgent. Though many agents are in development, incorporating targeted therapy in the treatment of GE cancers comes with a unique set of challenges. In this review, we outline oncogenic pathways relevant to GE adenocarcinomas, including HER2, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and c-Met, and discuss recent trials with agents targeting these pathways. PMID:25642339

  19. Systemic mesenchymal stem cells reduce growth rate of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pengfei; Chen, Mo; Wang, Li; Ning, Yanxia; Liang, Jie; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Congjian; Chen, Sifeng; Yao, Liangqing

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is one of the most malignant cancers in women and resistant to chemotherapy is the major obstacle for the five-year survival rate. Cisplatin is one of the effective anticancer drug used in the ovarian cancer. To find a good strategy to cure the tumors which is resistant to cisplatin, the cisplatin-resistant 3SKOV3 cells were selected from SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, the isolated mesenchymal stem cells were infused systemically to try to cure the transplanted tumor induced by 3SKOV3 cells in nude mice. The morphology and cell membrane CD44 expression were investigated by microscope and flow cytometry. The biological behaviors of resistant 3SKOV3 and its parental SKOV3 cells, including proliferation, adhesion, and cell cycle were determined by CCK8, absorbance assay and FCM methods. The transplanted tumors were set up in nude mice with 3SKOV3 cells injection. The growth rate of transplanted tumors was detected following with MSCs injection. The 3SKOV3 cells have different morphologic manifestation and expressed high level of CD44 molecule. At the same time, 3SKOV3 cells have less adhesion ability and less S-phase ratio. The isolated MSCs from bone marrow could inhibit the growth of transplanted tumor via systemic injection. The cisplatin-resistant 3SKOV3 cells have the different biological behaviors as its parental SKOV3 cells. The present study indicated that systemic MSCs have the therapeutic role on ovarian cancer. However, further investigations are in progress to elucidate the underlying mechanism.

  20. Telomerase activity and telomere length in human tumor cells with acquired resistance to anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Smith, V; Dai, F; Spitz, M; Peters, G J; Fiebig, H H; Hussain, A; Burger, A M

    2009-11-01

    Telomeres and telomerase are targets for anticancer drug development and specific inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation. However, it has been reported that standard cytotoxic agents can affect telomere length and telomerase activity suggesting that they also have of a role in drug resistance. in this study, telomere lengths and telomerase activity as well as drug efflux pump expression, glutathione (GSH) levels and polyadenosine-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage were assessed in a panel of human tumor cell lines made resistant to vindesine, gemcitabine and cisplatin. these included two lung cancer cell lines resistant to vindesine (LXFL 529L/Vind, LXFA 526L/Vind), a renal cancer cell line (RXF944L/Gem) and an ovarian cancer cell line (AG6000) resistant to gemcitabine, and one resistant to cisplatin (ADDP). The resistant clones were compared to their parental lines and evaluated for cross resistance to other cytotoxic agents. Several drug specific resistance patterns were found, and various complex patterns of cross resistance emerged from some cell lines, but these mechanisms of resistance could not be related to drug efflux pump expression, GSH levels or pARp cleavage. However, all displayed changes in telomerase activity and/or telomere length. Our studies present evidence that telomere maintenance should be taken into consideration in efforts not only to overcome drug resistance, but also to optimize the use of telomere-based therapeutics.

  1. Cisplatin DNA damage and repair maps of the human genome at single-nucleotide resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinchuan; Lieb, Jason D.; Sancar, Aziz; Adar, Sheera

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a major anticancer drug that kills cancer cells by damaging their DNA. Cancer cells cope with the drug by removal of the damages with nucleotide excision repair. We have developed methods to measure cisplatin adduct formation and its repair at single-nucleotide resolution. “Damage-seq” relies on the replication-blocking properties of the bulky base lesions to precisely map their location. “XR-seq” independently maps the removal of these damages by capturing and sequencing the excised oligomer released during repair. The damage and repair maps we generated reveal that damage distribution is essentially uniform and is dictated mostly by the underlying sequence. In contrast, cisplatin repair is heterogeneous in the genome and is affected by multiple factors including transcription and chromatin states. Thus, the overall effect of damages in the genome is primarily driven not by damage formation but by the repair efficiency. The combination of the Damage-seq and XR-seq methods has the potential for developing novel cancer therapeutic strategies. PMID:27688757

  2. Efficacy of cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel regimen for carcinoma of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Belani, C P; Luketich, J D; Landreaneau, R J; Kim, R; Ramanathan, R K; Day, R; Ferson, P F; Keenan, R J; Posner, M; Seeger, J; Lembersky, B

    1997-12-01

    Eighteen patients with esophageal carcinoma (16 adenocarcinoma, two squamous cell carcinoma) were treated with two cycles of induction chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Princeton, NJ) 175 mg/m2 (3-hour infusion), cisplatin 20 mg/m2/d x 4 days, and 5-fluorouracil 1 g/m2/d (continuous infusion x 4 days) separated by a 28-day interval before surgical resection. After resection, patients received two more cycles of the same regimen. A thorough staging evaluation was performed before patients were enrolled in the study. The salient chemotherapy toxicities included grade 3 nausea (two patients), grade 3 vomiting (two patients), grades 3 and 4 diarrhea (one patient each), and grades 3 and 4 neutropenia (two and 10 patients, respectively). No deaths occurred due to toxicity. Surgical resection was attempted in all 18 patients (100%) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy. Esophageal resection was successfully completed in 17 patients. Liver metastases were noted at laparotomy in the one patient who subsequently did not undergo esophageal resection. Surgical complications were minor, and no postoperative deaths occurred. Fifteen patients received two additional cycles of the paclitaxel/5-fluorouracil/cisplatin regimen postoperatively, two received only one cycle, and one refused further therapy. Of 15 patients alive, 14 show no evidence of disease. The 1-year actuarial survival rate of this group of patients is 82%. In conclusion, the paclitaxel/5-fluorouracil/cisplatin combination is well tolerated and is an active regimen in esophageal carcinoma. PMID:9427275

  3. Galectin-1-Induced Autophagy Facilitates Cisplatin Resistance of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Chi; Davuluri, Goutham Venkata Naga; Chen, Cheng-Hao; Shiau, Dong-Che; Chen, Chien-Chin; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chang, Chih-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in Taiwan. Although chemotherapy is the primary treatment for HCC patients, drug resistance often leads to clinical failure. Galectin-1 is a beta-galactoside binding lectin which is up-regulated in HCC patients and promotes tumor growth by mediating cancer cell adhesion, migration and proliferation, but its role in chemoresistance of HCC is poorly understood. In this study we found that galectin-1 is able to lead to chemoresistance against cisplatin treatment, and subsequent inhibition has reversed the effect of cell death in HCC cells. Moreover, galectin-1 was found to induce autophagic flux in HCC cells. Inhibition of autophagy by inhibitors or knockdown of Atg5 cancels galectin-1-induced cisplatin resistance in HCC cells. Increase of mitophagy triggered by galectin-1 was found to reduce the mitochondrial potential loss and apoptosis induced by cisplatin treatment. Finally, using an in situ hepatoma mouse model, we clearly demonstrated that inhibition of galectin-1 by thiodigalactoside could significantly augment the anti-HCC effect of cisplatin. Taken together, our findings offer a new insight into the chemoresistance galectin-1 causes against cisplatin treatment, and points to a potential approach to improve the efficacy of cisplatin in the treatment of HCC patients. PMID:26859293

  4. Ethoxyquin provides neuroprotection against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Carozzi, Valentina Alda; Reed, Nicole; Mi, Ruifa; Marmiroli, Paola; Cavaletti, Guido; Hoke, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Ethoxyquin was recently identified as a neuroprotective compound against toxic neuropathies and efficacy was demonstrated against paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. In this study we examined the efficacy of ethoxyquin in preventing neurotoxicity of cisplatin in rodent models of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and explored its mechanism of action. Ethoxyquin prevented neurotoxicity of cisplatin in vitro in a sensory neuronal cell line and primary rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. In vivo, chronic co-administration of ethoxyquin partially abrogated cisplatin-induced behavioral, electrophysiological and morphological abnormalities. Furthermore, ethoxyquin did not interfere with cisplatin’s ability to induce tumor cell death in ovarian cancer cell line in vitro and in vivo. Finally, ethoxyquin reduced the levels of two client proteins (SF3B2 and ataxin-2) of a chaperone protein, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) when co-administered with cisplatin in vitro. These results implied that the neuroprotective effect of ethoxyquin is mediated through these two client proteins of Hsp90. In fact, reducing levels of SF3B2 in tissue-cultured neurons was effective against neurotoxicity of cisplatin. These findings suggest that ethoxyquin or other compounds that inhibit chaperone activity of Hsp90 and reduce levels of its client protein, SF3B2 may be developed as an adjuvant therapy to prevent neurotoxicity in cisplatin-based chemotherapy protocols. PMID:27350330

  5. Perillyl alcohol and methyl jasmonate sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Laxmi; Hall, Casey; Elegbede, John Abiodun; Carper, Stephen W

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the United States. Several treatment options exist, with different side effects. To alleviate the side effects, several research groups have studied chemotherapeutic effects of plant compounds on cancer cells. These could be used as an alternative treatment option either alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic drugs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of a combination of perillyl alcohol (POH), methyl jasmonate (MJ) with cisplatin to define the most effective schedule and to investigate the mechanism of action in breast cancer cells. POH and MJ treatment (20% decrease in cell viability concentration) enhanced the cytotoxicity for subsequent exposure to cisplatin in MDA-MB-435 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Combination treatment of POH and MJ blocked cells at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and the addition of cisplatin forced the cells to progress through the cell cycle and induced apoptosis. Apoptotic mechanistic studies indicated that POH and MJ treatment activated tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and this was further increased by the addition of cisplatin. It was also found that mitochondrial membrane potential decreased with POH and MJ treatment; this effect was further enhanced by cisplatin treatment. These findings contributed to a better understanding of molecular mechanism of apoptosis in combination treatment of POH, MJ, and cisplatin. Results also showed that the combination treatment of three drugs is more effective than single drug alone or two drugs together.

  6. Phase I trial of cisplatin, pemetrexed, and imatinib mesylate in chemo-naïve patients with unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, AS; Harun, N; Lee, J.J; Heymach, J; Pisters, K; Hong, WK; Fujimoto, J; Wistuba, I

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted a phase I trial of cisplatin-pemetrexed-imatinib mesylate, an oral PDGFR inhibitor, in chemo-naive MPM patients. Methods A standard 3+3 dose-escalating trial was used with the endpoints of MTD, response rate, survival, safety/toxicity and tumor PDGFR levels. Results 17 MPM patients were enrolled. The most common (any grade) side effects were nausea, fatigue, hypomagnesemia, and anemia. The MTD was established at dose level 3 (imatinib 600 mg) with the DLT nausea and vomiting. The median PFS was 7.9 months and median OS was 8.8 months. Sarcomatoid patients have worse PFS (p=0.01) and OS (p=0.009), while better ECOG PS 0–1 predicted for improved OS (p=0.001) and PFS (p=0.013). The 6 patients who completed all 6 treatment cycles had better OS (p=0.006), their median PFS was 9.6 months and OS was 22.4 months. In the translational studies, 14 patients had adequate tumor tissue that could be assessed for IHC and FISH. Patients with higher than median p- PDGFRα IHC expression had a better OS (p=0.013). When assessed as a continuous variable, higher p-PDGFRα in tumor cells correlated with an improved OS (p=0.045). None of the other 8 IHC biomarkers were predictive or prognostic for survival. Twelve patients had successful PDGFRB FISH results, but none met the criteria of ≥ 4 copies of PDGFRB gene, thus a correlation with clinical outcomes could not be done. Conclusions Cisplatin-pemetrexed-imatinib mesylate has clinical benefit in some MPM patients but was not well-tolerated. Further investigation into alternative anti-angiogenic agents, including PDGFRα inhibitors is warranted. PMID:24492162

  7. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis in non-small-cell lung cancer cells is dependent on Bax- and Bak-induction pathway and synergistically activated by BH3-mimetic ABT-263 in p53 wild-type and mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masaru; Nakajima, Wataru; Seike, Masahiro; Gemma, Akihiko; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-29

    Cisplatin is a highly effective anticancer drug for treatment of various tumors including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and is especially useful in cases nonresponsive to molecular-targeted drugs. Accumulating evidence has shown that cisplatin activates the p53-dependent apoptotic pathway, but it also induces apoptosis in p53-mutated cancer cells. Here we demonstrated that DNA-damage inducible proapoptotic BH3 (Bcl-2 homology region 3)-only Bcl-2 family members, Noxa, Puma, Bim and Bid, are not involved in cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human NSCLC cell lines. In contrast, the expression of proapoptotic multidomain Bcl-2-family members, Bak and Bax, was induced by cisplatin in p53-dependent and -independent manners, respectively. Moreover, in wild-type p53-expressing cells, cisplatin mainly used the Bak-dependent apoptotic pathway, but this apoptotic pathway shifted to the Bax-dependent pathway by loss-of-function of p53. Furthermore, both Bak- and Bax-induced apoptosis was enhanced by the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, Bcl-XL knockdown, but not by Mcl-1 knockdown. From this result, we tested the effect of ABT-263 (Navitoclax), the specific inhibitor of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, but not Mcl-1, and found that ABT-263 synergistically enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells in the presence or absence of p53. These results indicate a novel regulatory system in cisplatin-induced NSCLC cell apoptosis, and a candidate efficient combination chemotherapy method against lung cancers.

  8. Low-dose cisplatin converts the tumor microenvironment into a permissive state for HSVtk-induced antitumor immunity in HPV16-related tonsillar carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goh, Ah Ra; Shin, Seung-Pil; Jung, Na-Rae; Ryu, Chang-Hwan; Eom, Hyeon Seok; Lee, John H; Choi, Kyungho; Lee, Sang-Jin; Jung, Yuh-S

    2015-01-28

    An adenovirus harboring the HSV thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene under the regulation of a trans-splicing ribozyme that targets telomerase is cytotoxic to cancer cells because it inhibits DNA replication (Ad5mTR). Furthermore, it induces anti-tumor immunity by activating cytotoxic T cells. Because multiple chemotherapeutic agents also activate cytotoxic T-cell immunity during the direct killing process of tumor cells, we herein explored whether low-dose cisplatin could synergize with cytotoxic Ad5mTR to potentiate its therapeutic effect by boosting anti-tumor immunity in a murine HPV16-associated tonsillar carcinoma model. Tumor regression was enhanced when low-dose (1 mg/kg) cisplatin was added to suicide gene therapy using Ad5mTR. Meanwhile, 1 mg/kg cisplatin alone had no tumor-suppressive effects and did not result in any systemic toxicity. Thus, cisplatin along with Ad5mTR improved tumor clearance by increasing the number of E7-specific CD8+ T cells. Specifically, analysis of the tumors and lymph nodes supported improved immune clearance by increasing the number of E7-specific CD8+ T cells inside tumors (40%, P < 0.05) as a result of the combination of suicide gene and cisplatin therapy. These results suggest that a low dose of cisplatin potentiates CD8+ T-cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity, and its addition to the HSVtk-based adenovirus results in additional therapeutic benefits for HPV16-positive head and neck cancer patients.

  9. Effect of Gingerol on Cisplatin-Induced Pica Analogous to Emesis Via Modulating Expressions of Dopamine 2 Receptor, Dopamine Transporter and Tyrosine Hydroxylase in the Vomiting Model of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Weibin; Cai, Xinrui; Wang, Yingying; Zhang, Xinying; Zhao, Hongmin; Qian, Qiuhai; Yang, Zhihong; Liu, Zhantao; Hasegawa, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Gingerol, the generic term for pungent constituents in ginger, has been used for treating vomiting in China. We are going to investigate the mechanisms of inhibitive effect of gingerol on cisplatin-induced pica behaviour by studying on both peripheral and central levels, and the effects of gingerol on homeostasis of dopamine (DA) transmission: dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), dopamine transporter (DAT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Methods The antiemetic effect of gingerol was investigated on a vomiting model in rats induced by cisplatin 3 mg·kg−1 intraperitoneal injection (i.p.). Rats were randomly divided into the normal control group (C), simple gingerol control group (CG), cisplatin control group (V), cisplatin + metoclopramide group (M), cisplatin + low-dose gingerol group (GL), cisplatin + middle-dose gingerol group (GM) and cisplatin + high-dose gingerol group (GH). In observation period, rats in Groups C and V were pretreated with sterile saline 3 mL i.g.; rats in Group CG were pretreated with gingerol 40 mg·kg−1 i.g.; rats in Group M were pretreated with metoclopramide 2.5 mg·kg−1 i.g.; rats in Groups GL, GM and GH were pretreated with gingerol 10, 20 and 40 mg·kg−1 i.g. for 3 days, respectively. Cisplatin (3 mg·kg−1, i.p.) was administered one time after each treatment with the antiemetic agent or its vehicle except the Groups C and CG. The distribution of D2R, DAT and TH in the area postrema and ileum were measured by immunohistochemistry and quantitated based on the image analysis, and the expression of DAT and TH in the area postrema and ileum were measured by RT-PCR. The weights of kaolin eaten of the remaining rats were observed in every 6 h continuously for 72 h. Results The weight of kaolin eaten in rats induced by cisplatin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with gingerol in a dose-dependent manner during the 0–24 h and 24–72 h periods (P < 0.05). Gingerol markedly improved gastric emptying induced by cisplatin in

  10. Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) enhance cytotoxicity of cisplatin to hepatocellular cells by microdomain disruption on plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shengyong; Chen, Xinhua; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Guo, Danjing; Xu, Yuning; Wu, Liming; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-08-15

    Previous studies showed nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) can ablate solid tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but its effect on cell membrane is not fully understood. We hypothesized nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on outer-cellular membrane with direct mechanical force and as a result the plasma membrane permeability increases to facilitate the small molecule intake. Three HCC cells were pulsed one pulse per minute, an interval longer than nanopore resealing time. The cationized ferritin was used to mark up the electronegative microdomains, propidium iodide (PI) for membrane permeabilization, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for the negative cell surface charge and cisplatin for inner-cellular cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that the ferritin marked-microdomain and negative cell surface charge were disrupted by nsPEF caused-mechanical force. The cell uptake of propidium and cytotoxicity of DNA-targeted cisplatin increased with a dose effect. Cisplatin gains its maximum inner-cellular cytotoxicity when combining with nsPEF stimulation. We conclude that nsPEF disrupt the microdomains on the outer cellular membrane directly and increase the membrane permeabilization for PI and cisplatin. The microdomain disruption and membrane infiltration changes are caused by the mechanical force from the changes of negative cell surface charge. PMID:27375200

  11. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  12. Overcoming cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer cells by targeting HIF-1-regulated cancer metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ai, Zhihong; Lu, Yang; Qiu, Songbo; Fan, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Cisplatin is currently one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating ovarian cancer; however, resistance to cisplatin is common. In this study, we explored an experimental strategy for overcoming cisplatin resistance of human ovarian cancer from the new perspective of cancer cell metabolism. By using two pairs of genetically matched cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines, we tested the hypothesis that downregulating hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), which regulates metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis, is a promising strategy for overcoming cisplatin resistance of human ovarian cancer cells. We found that cisplatin downregulated the level of the regulatable α subunit of HIF-1, HIF-1α, in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cells through enhancing HIF-1α degradation but did not downregulate HIF-1α in their cisplatin-resistant counterparts. Overexpression of a degradation-resistant HIF-1α (HIF-1α ΔODD) reduced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in cisplatin-sensitive cells, whereas genetic knockdown of HIF-1α or pharmacological promotion of HIF-1α degradation enhanced response to cisplatin in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. We further demonstrated that knockdown of HIF-1α improved the response of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by redirecting the aerobic glycolysis in the resistant cancer cells toward mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, leading to cell death through overproduction of reactive oxygen species. Our findings suggest that the HIF-1α-regulated cancer metabolism pathway could be a novel target for overcoming cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer.

  13. Influence of mitochondrion-toxic agents on the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Ohnsorge, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease may be induced or worsened by mitochondrion-toxic agents. Mitochondrion-toxic agents may be classified as those with or without a clinical effect, those which induce cardiac disease only in humans or animals or both, as prescribed drugs, illicit drugs, exotoxins, or nutritiants, as those which affect the heart exclusively or also other organs, as those which are effective only in patients with a mitochondrial disorder or cardiac disease or also in healthy subjects, or as solid, liquid, or volatile agents. In humans, cardiotoxic agents due to mitochondrial dysfunction include anthracyclines (particularly doxorubicin), mitoxantrone, cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, fluorouracil, imatinib, bortezomib, trastuzumab, arsenic trioxide, cyclosporine-A, zidovudine, lamotrigine, glycosides, lidocain, isoproterenol, nitroprusside, pivalic acid, alcohol, cocaine, pesticides, cadmium, mycotoxins, cyanotoxins, meat meal, or carbon monoxide. Even more agents exhibit cardiac abnormalities due to mitochondrion-toxicity only in animals or tissue cultures. The mitochondrion-toxic effect results from impairment of the respiratory chain, the oxidative phosphorylation, the Krebs cycle, or the β-oxidation, from decrease of the mitochondrion-membrane potential, from increased oxidative stress, reduced anti-oxidative capacity, or from induction of apoptosis. Cardiac abnormalities induced via these mechanisms include cardiomyopathy, myocarditis, coronary heart disease, arrhythmias, heart failure, or Takotsubo syndrome. Discontinuation of the cardiotoxic agent results in complete recovery in the majority of the cases. Antioxidants and nutritiants may be of additional help. Particularly coenzyme-Q, riboflavin, vitamin-E, vitamin-C, L-carnitine, vitamin-D, thiamin, folic acid, omega-3 fatty acids, and D-ribose may alleviate mitochondrial cardiotoxic effects.

  14. The effect of thymoquinone treatment on the combined renal and pulmonary toxicity of cisplatin and diesel exhaust particles

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Badreldin H; Shalaby, Asem; Manoj, Priyadarsini; Waly, Mostafa I; Yasin, Javed; Fahim, Mohamed; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2015-01-01

    Particulate air pollution (PAP) exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with renal disease. However, there are only a few studies on the interaction between PAP and renal injury, and none on agents that may ameliorate it. We studied the interaction between cisplatin (CP) nephrotoxicity and a single exposure to diesel exhaust particle (DEP) in rats 24 h before sacrifice, and assessed the effect of co-treatment with the active ingredient in Nigella Sativa seed oil, thymoquinone (TQ) thereon. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with CP (6 mg/kg) and four days later, they were exposed intratracheally to DEP (0.5 mg/kg), and were sacrificed 24 h later. Oral TQ (20 mg/kg) was given daily throughout the experimental period. CP alone caused several physiological, biochemical, and histopathological changes that included reduced growth and creatinine clearance, and raised plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP), creatinine and urea concentrations, and urinary N-acetyl-b-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activities. It adversely affected several indices of oxidative damage in the kidneys, and induced renal tubular necrosis. Most of these actions were significantly potentiated in rats given both CP and DEP. TQ significantly abrogated many of the effects of CP and DEP, given alone and in combination. These results provide experimental evidence that subjects with renal diseases can be at higher risk from PAP, and that TQ, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, can be considered a useful agent in patients with renal diseases and exposed to PAP. PMID:25925792

  15. The effect of thymoquinone treatment on the combined renal and pulmonary toxicity of cisplatin and diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Ali, Badreldin H; Al Za'abi, Mohammed; Shalaby, Asem; Manoj, Priyadarsini; Waly, Mostafa I; Yasin, Javed; Fahim, Mohamed; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2015-12-01

    Particulate air pollution (PAP) exposure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with renal disease. However, there are only a few studies on the interaction between PAP and renal injury, and none on agents that may ameliorate it. We studied the interaction between cisplatin (CP) nephrotoxicity and a single exposure to diesel exhaust particle (DEP) in rats 24 h before sacrifice, and assessed the effect of co-treatment with the active ingredient in Nigella Sativa seed oil, thymoquinone (TQ) thereon. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with CP (6 mg/kg) and four days later, they were exposed intratracheally to DEP (0.5 mg/kg), and were sacrificed 24 h later. Oral TQ (20 mg/kg) was given daily throughout the experimental period. CP alone caused several physiological, biochemical, and histopathological changes that included reduced growth and creatinine clearance, and raised plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP), creatinine and urea concentrations, and urinary N-acetyl-b-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) activities. It adversely affected several indices of oxidative damage in the kidneys, and induced renal tubular necrosis. Most of these actions were significantly potentiated in rats given both CP and DEP. TQ significantly abrogated many of the effects of CP and DEP, given alone and in combination. These results provide experimental evidence that subjects with renal diseases can be at higher risk from PAP, and that TQ, pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies, can be considered a useful agent in patients with renal diseases and exposed to PAP.

  16. Single-agent cytarabine is insufficient for the treatment of human mantle cell lymphoma in mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Klanova, M; Soukup, T; Molinsky, J; Lateckova, L; Vockova, P; Alam, M; Zivny, J; Trneny, M; Klener, P

    2016-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an aggressive type of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma with adverse prognosis. It was demonstrated that alternation of CHOP and DHAP chemotherapy improved outcome of mantle cell lymphoma patients. However, which components of DHAP, cisplatin, cytarabine, or both, were responsible for the improved outcome remained unclear. To answer this question, antitumor efficacies of equally toxic doses of cytarabine, cisplatin, and three different combinations were compared in vivo using mouse xenograft models of mantle cell lymphoma. We demonstrated that cisplatin, alone or with cytarabine, is significantly superior to single-agent cytarabine in both eliminating lymphoma cells and suppressing their proliferation rate. PMID:27468882

  17. Phase II Trial of Preoperative Irinotecan-Cisplatin Followed by Concurrent Irinotecan-Cisplatin and Radiotherapy for Resectable Locally Advanced Gastric and Esophagogastric Junction Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, Fernando; Galan, Maica; Tabernero, Josep; Cervantes, Andres; Vega-Villegas, M. Eugenia; Gallego, Javier; Laquente, Berta; Rodriguez, Edith; Carrato, Alfredo; Escudero, Pilar; Massuti, Bartomeu; Alonso-Orduna, Vicente; Cardenal, Adelaida; Saenz, Alberto; Giralt, Jordi; Yuste, Ana Lucia

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine in a Phase II trial whether preoperative irinotecan-cisplatin (IC) followed by concurrent IC therapy and radiotherapy (IC/RT) improved outcome in patients with resectable, locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma (GC) or esophagogastric junction cancer (EGJC). Patients and Methods: Patients with resectable Stage II-IV, M0 GC or EGJC made up the study population. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR). Two courses of IC (irinotecan, 65mg/m{sup 2}; cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 8 every 21 days) were given. Patients without progression then received IC/RT, consisting of daily radiotherapy (45Gy) with concurrent IC (irinotecan, 65mg/m{sup 2}; cisplatin, 30mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22). Surgical resection was performed, if feasible, 5-8 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: Twenty-three patients were included in the study: 10 with EGJC and 13 with GC. Two patients (9%) achieved pCR. The incidences of Grade 3-4 toxicities were as follows: IC: neutropenia 35% (febrile 13%), anemia 22%, diarrhea 22%, emesis 8%; IC/RT: neutropenia 52% (febrile 5%), asthenia 19%, anemia 9%, emesis 9%, diarrhea 5%, cardiotoxicity 5%. No patients died during IC or IC/RT. R0 resection was achieved in 15 patients (65%). Median survival was 14.5 months, and the actuarial 2-year survival rate was 35%. Conclusions: Preoperative IC followed by IC/RT resulted in moderate response and resection rates with mild toxicity in patients with GC and EGJC.

  18. Discovery – Cisplatin and The Treatment of Testicular and Other Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Prior to the discovery of cisplatin in 1965, men with testicular cancer had few medical options. Now, thanks to NCI research, cisplatin and similar chemotherapy drugs are known for curing testicular and other forms of cancer.

  19. Cisplatin enhances the formation of DNA single- and double-strand breaks by hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Rezaee, Mohammad; Sanche, Léon; Hunting, Darel J

    2013-03-01

    The synergistic interaction of cisplatin with ionizing radiation is the clinical rationale for the treatment of several cancers including head and neck, cervical and lung cancer. The underlying molecular mechanism of the synergy has not yet been identified, although both DNA damage and repair processes are likely involved. Here, we investigate the indirect effect of γ rays on strand break formation in a supercoiled plasmid DNA (pGEM-3Zf-) covalently modified by cisplatin. The yields of single- and double-strand breaks were determined by irradiation of DNA and cisplatin/DNA samples with (60)Co γ rays under four different scavenging conditions to examine the involvement of hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals in inducing the DNA damage. At 5 mM tris in an N2 atmosphere, the presence of an average of two cisplatins per plasmid increased the yields of single- and double-strand breaks by factors of 1.9 and 2.2, respectively, relative to the irradiated unmodified DNA samples. Given that each plasmid of 3,200 base pairs contained an average of two cisplatins, this represents an increase in radiosensitivity of 3,200-fold on a per base pair basis. When hydrated electrons were scavenged by saturating the samples with N2O, these enhancement factors decreased to 1.5 and 1.2, respectively, for single- and double-strand breaks. When hydroxyl radicals were scavenged using 200 mM tris, the respective enhancement factors were 1.2 and 1.6 for single- and double-strand breaks, respectively. Furthermore, no enhancement in DNA damage by cisplatin was observed after scavenging both hydroxyl radicals and hydrated electrons. These findings show that hydrated electrons can induce both single- and double-strand breaks in the platinated DNA, but not in unmodified DNA. In addition, cisplatin modification is clearly an extremely efficient means of increasing the formation of both single- and double-strand breaks by the hydrated electrons and hydroxyl radicals created by ionizing

  20. Knockdown of the FoxM1 enhances the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to cisplatin by targeting Mcl-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomei; Liang, Jun; Liu, Ying-Xun; Wang, Yuming; Yang, Xiao-Hui; Bao-Hongluan; Zhang, Gui-Lling; Du, Juan; Wu, Xia-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a main obstacle for effective treatment of gastric cancer, the mechanism of which is still poorly understood. Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) plays an important role in chemo-resistance of various tumors. This study aimed to explore whether FoxM1 mediated resistance of the gastric cancer cell line SGC7901 to the chemotherapy agent cisplatin (DDP). In the study, we detected FoxM1 and Mcl-1 expression via real time-PCR and western blot and demonstrated that FoxM1 is overexpressed in cisplatin-resistance GC cells and Mcl-1 expression is regulated by FoxM1. We examined SGC7901/DDP cell viability by MTT assay, which revealed that suppression of the FoxM1/Mcl-1 pathway impaired cell viability and thus increased sensitivity to cisplatin in gastric cancer cells. Taken together, the study implied that the FoxM1/Mcl-1 pathway may overcome cispaltin resistance of gastric cancer and provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27455555

  1. Persistent GP130/STAT3 Signaling Contributes to the Resistance of Doxorubicin, Cisplatin, and MEK Inhibitor in Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaojuan; Xiao, Hui; Wang, Ruoning; Liu, Lingling; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh

    2016-01-01

    To test the role of STAT3 in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells, genetic approaches were used to either knockdown the expression of STAT3 and GP130, an upstream activator of STAT3 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or express persistently active STAT3 protein. Knockdown expression of GP130 or STAT3 sensitized cells to anti-cancer drugs doxorubicin, cisplatin, and MEK inhibitor AZD6244. On the other hand, expression of the constitutively active STAT3 protein reduced the sensitivity of rhabdomyosarcoma cells to those drugs. In addition, we tested a small molecule STAT3 inhibitor LY5 and a GP130 inhibitor bazedoxifene in rhabdomyosarcoma cells. Our data demonstrated that the combination of LY5 or bazedoxifene with doxorubicin, cisplatin, and AZD6244 showed stronger inhibitory effects than single agent alone. In summary, our results demonstrated that GP130/STAT3 signaling contributes to the resistance of these drugs in rhabdomyosarcoma cells. They also suggested a potentially novel cancer therapeutic strategy using the combination of inhibitors of GP130/STAT3 signaling with doxorubicin, cisplatin, or AZD6244 for rhabdomyosarcoma treatments. PMID:26373715

  2. Hydroxyl radical scavenger ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by preventing oxidative stress, redox state unbalance, impairment of energetic metabolism and apoptosis in rat kidney mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Santos, N A G; Bezerra, C S Catão; Martins, N M; Curti, C; Bianchi, M L P; Santos, A C

    2008-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is the major dose-limiting factor of cisplatin chemotherapy. Reactive oxygen species generated in mitochondria are thought to be the main cause of cellular damage in such injury. The present study examined, in vivo, the protective potential of the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimethylthiourea (DMTU) against cisplatin-induced effects on renal mitochondrial bioenergetics, redox state and oxidative stress. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 220 g) were divided into four groups of eight animals each. The control group was treated only with an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of saline solution (1 ml/100 g body weight). The second group was given only DMTU (500 mg/kg body weight, i.p, followed by 125 mg/Kg, i.p., twice a day until they were killed). The third group was given a single injection of cisplatin (10 mg/kg body weight, i.p.). The fourth group was given DMTU (500 mg/kg body weight, i.p.), just before the cisplatin injection (10 mg/kg body weight, i.p.), followed by injections of DMTU (125 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) twice a day until they were killed. Animals were killed 72 h after the treatment. Besides not presenting any direct effect on mitochondria, DMTU substantially inhibited cisplatin-induced mitochondrial injury and cellular death by apoptosis, suppressing the occurrence of acute renal failure. All the following cisplatin-induced effects were prevented by DMTU: (1) increased plasmatic levels of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN); (2) decreased ATP content, calcium uptake and electrochemical potential; (3) oxidation of lipids, including cardiolipin; and oxidation of proteins, including sulfhydryl, and aconitase enzyme, as well as accumulation of carbonyl proteins; (4) depletion of the antioxidant defense (NADPH and GSH) and (5) increased activity of the apoptosis executioner caspase-3. Our findings show the important role played by mitochondria and hydroxyl radicals in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, as well as the effectiveness of DMTU in

  3. Hydroxyl radical scavenger ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by preventing oxidative stress, redox state unbalance, impairment of energetic metabolism and apoptosis in rat kidney mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Santos, N A G; Bezerra, C S Catão; Martins, N M; Curti, C; Bianchi, M L P; Santos, A C

    2008-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is the major dose-limiting factor of cisplatin chemotherapy. Reactive oxygen species generated in mitochondria are thought to be the main cause of cellular damage in such injury. The present study examined, in vivo, the protective potential of the hydroxyl radical scavenger dimethylthiourea (DMTU) against cisplatin-induced effects on renal mitochondrial bioenergetics, redox state and oxidative stress. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 220 g) were divided into four groups of eight animals each. The control group was treated only with an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of saline solution (1 ml/100 g body weight). The second group was given only DMTU (500 mg/kg body weight, i.p, followed by 125 mg/Kg, i.p., twice a day until they were killed). The third group was given a single injection of cisplatin (10 mg/kg body weight, i.p.). The fourth group was given DMTU (500 mg/kg body weight, i.p.), just before the cisplatin injection (10 mg/kg body weight, i.p.), followed by injections of DMTU (125 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) twice a day until they were killed. Animals were killed 72 h after the treatment. Besides not presenting any direct effect on mitochondria, DMTU substantially inhibited cisplatin-induced mitochondrial injury and cellular death by apoptosis, suppressing the occurrence of acute renal failure. All the following cisplatin-induced effects were prevented by DMTU: (1) increased plasmatic levels of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN); (2) decreased ATP content, calcium uptake and electrochemical potential; (3) oxidation of lipids, including cardiolipin; and oxidation of proteins, including sulfhydryl, and aconitase enzyme, as well as accumulation of carbonyl proteins; (4) depletion of the antioxidant defense (NADPH and GSH) and (5) increased activity of the apoptosis executioner caspase-3. Our findings show the important role played by mitochondria and hydroxyl radicals in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, as well as the effectiveness of DMTU in

  4. Quantitative evaluation of cellular uptake, DNA incorporation and adduct formation in cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines: Comparison of different Pt-containing drugs.

    PubMed

    Corte-Rodríguez, M; Espina, M; Sierra, L M; Blanco, E; Ames, T; Montes-Bayón, M; Sanz-Medel, A

    2015-11-01

    The use of Pt-containing compounds as chemotherapeutic agents facilitates drug monitoring by using highly sensitive elemental techniques like inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). However, methodological problems arise when trying to compare different experiments due to the high variability of biological parameters. In this work we have attempted to identify and correct such variations in order to compare the biological behavior of cisplatin, oxaliplatin and pyrodach-2 (a novel platinum-containing agent). A detailed study to address differential cellular uptake has been conducted in three different cell lines: lung adenocarcinoma (A549); cisplatin-sensitive ovarian carcinoma (A2780); and cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma (A2780cis). The normalization of Pt results to cell mass, after freeze-drying, has been used to minimize the errors associated with cell counting. Similarly, Pt accumulation in DNA has been evaluated by referencing the Pt results to the DNA concentration, as measured by (31)P monitoring using flow-injection and ICP-MS detection. These strategies have permitted to address significantly lower Pt levels in the resistant cells when treated with cisplatin or oxaliplatin as well as an independent behaviour from the cell type (sensitive or resistant) for pyrodach-2. Similarly, different levels of incorporation in DNA have been found for the three drugs depending on the cell model revealing a different behavior regarding cell cisplatin resistance. Further speciation experiments (by using complementary HPLC-ICP-MS and HPLC-ESI-Q-TOF MS) have shown that the main target in DNA is still the N7 of the guanine but with different kinetics of the ligand exchange mechanism for each of the compounds under evaluation.

  5. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of the novel chemoprotector BNP7787 in combination with cisplatin and attempt to eliminate the hydration schedule

    PubMed Central

    Boven, E; Westerman, M; van Groeningen, C J; Verschraagen, M; Ruijter, R; Zegers, I; van der Vijgh, W J F; Giaccone, G

    2005-01-01

    BNP7787 (disodium 2,2′-dithio-bis-ethane sulphonate; Tavocept™) is a novel agent developed to protect against cisplatin (cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum(II))-associated chronic toxicities. In this study, we determined the recommended dose of BNP7787 when preceding a fixed dose of cisplatin, the pharmacokinetics (PKs) and the possible reduction of saline hydration. Patients with advanced solid tumours received BNP7787 in escalating doses of 4.1–41 g m−2 as a 15-min intravenous (i.v.) infusion followed by cisplatin 75 mg m−2 as a 60-min i.v. infusion together with pre- and postcisplatin saline hydration in a volume of 2200 ml; cycles were repeated every 3 weeks. PK was carried out using BNP7787, cisplatin and the combination. Twenty-five patients were enrolled in stage I of the study to determine the recommended dose of BNP7787. No dose-limiting toxicity was reached. The highest dose level of 41 g m−2 resulted in a low incidence of grade 2 toxicities, being nausea and vomiting, dry mouth or bad taste and i.v. injection site discomfort. Doses of BNP7787 ⩾18.4 g m−2 did not show a drug interaction between BNP7787 and cisplatin. In stage II of the study, patients received a fixed dose of BNP7787 of 18.4 g m−2 preceding cisplatin and were entered in prespecified reduced saline hydration steps. A total of 21 patients in cohorts of six to nine patients received reduced saline hydration of 1600 ml (step A), 1000 ml (step B) and 500 ml (step C). In step C, two out of six evaluable patients experienced grade 1 nephrotoxicity. Cisplatin acute toxicities in all 46 patients were as expected. Only five patients complained of paresthesias grade 1 and six developed slight audiometric changes. Partial tumour response was observed in four patients and stable disease in 15 patients. In conclusion, BNP7787 was tolerated well up to doses of 41 g m−2. The recommended dose of 18.4 g m−2 enabled safe reduction of the saline hydration

  6. Effect of cisplatin on intracellular folate compounds in L1210 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vitols, K.S.; Monteiano, Y.D.

    1987-05-01

    The biologically active form of the anticancer agent Cisplatin, cis-diamminediaquaplatinum(II)-ion, reacts rapidly with tetrahydrofolate at pH 7 and 37/sup 0/C to form a stable complex. The purified platinum-tetrahydrofolate derivative has also been shown to inhibit the dihydrofolate reductase and the folate transport system of L1210 cells. To determine whether platinum-tetrahydrofolate complex formation would be observed under in vivo conditions, intracellular folates of L1210 cells were labeled by growth on (/sup 3/H)folate and then analyzed by reverse phase HPLC. No evidence for the intracellular formation of platinum tetrahydrofolate was found in cells grown for 48 in the presence of 10/sup -7/ M Cisplatin. The profile of intracellular folate monoglutamates, however, was distinctly different. The level of 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate was decreased, and increases were seen in the levels of tetrahydrofolate and its 5-formyl and 10-formyl derivatives. These changes in intracellular folates are compared to those seen when L1210 cells are treated with the antifolate drug, Methotrexate, and the implications for cell kill are examined.

  7. Platinum-containing compound platinum pyrithione is stronger and safer than cisplatin in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chong; Chen, Xin; Zang, Dan; Lan, Xiaoying; Liao, Siyan; Yang, Changshan; Zhang, Peiquan; Wu, Jinjie; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Ningning; Liao, Yuning; Huang, Hongbiao; Shi, Xianping; Jiang, Lili; Liu, Xiuhua; He, Zhimin; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2016-09-15

    DNA is the well-known molecular target of current platinum-based anticancer drugs; consequently, their clinical use is severely restricted by their systemic toxicities and drug resistance originating from non-selective DNA damage. Various strategies have been developed to circumvent the shortcomings of platinum-based chemotherapy but the inherent problem remains unsolved. Here we report that platinum pyrithione (PtPT), a chemically well-characterized synthetic complex of platinum, inhibits proteasome function and thereby exhibits greater and more selective cytotoxicity to multiple cancer cells than cisplatin, without showing discernible DNA damage both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, unlike the classical proteasome inhibitor bortezomib/Velcade which inhibits the proteasome via blocking the peptidase activity of 20S proteasomes, PtPT primarily deactivates 26S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases USP14 and UCHL5. Furthermore, PtPT can selectively induce cytotoxicity and proteasome inhibition in cancer cells from leukemia patients but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy humans. In nude mice, PtPT also remarkably inhibited tumor xenograft growth, without showing the adverse effects that were induced by cisplatin. Hence, we have discovered a new platinum-based anti-tumor agent PtPT which targets 26S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases rather than DNA in the cell and thereby exerts safer and more potent anti-tumor effects, identifying a highly translatable new platinum-based anti-cancer strategy. PMID:27381943

  8. X-ray microimaging of cisplatin distribution in ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyozuka, Yasuhiko; Takemoto, Kuniko; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Guttmann, Peter; Tsubura, Airo; Kihara, Hiroshi

    2000-05-01

    X-ray microscopy has the possibility to be in use for elemental analysis of tissue and cells especially under physiological conditions with high lateral resolution. In X-ray microimaging cisdiamminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin: CDDP), an anticancer agent, which has a platinum atom at its functional center gives sufficient contrast against organic material at sub-cellular level. We analyzed the enhance effect and intracellular distribution of CDDP in human ovarian cancer cells with the transmission X-ray microscope at BESSY, Berlin. Two human ovarian cancer cell lines (MN-1 and EC) were treated with 1 and 10 μg/ml of CDDP for 4 hours and compared with untreated cells X-ray images of CDDP-treated samples show clearly labeled nucleoli, periphery of the nucleus and mitochondria, in a concentration-dependent manner. CDDP binds to DNA molecules via the formation of intra- or-inter-strand cross-links. Higher contrasts at the periphery of nucleus and nucleoli suggest the distribution of tightly packed heterochromatin. In addition, results show the possibility that CDDP binds to mitochondrial DNA. Biological function of cisplatin is not only the inhibition of DNA replication but is suggested to disturb mitochondrial function and RNA synthesis in the nucleolus.

  9. Concurrent cisplatin, 5-FU, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Roof, Kevin S. . E-mail: kroof@sero.net; Coen, John; Lynch, Thomas J.; Wright, Cameron; Fidias, Panos; Willett, Christopher G.; Choi, Noah C.

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: Phase I-II data regarding neoadjuvant cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), paclitaxel, and radiation (PFT-R) from our institution demonstrated encouraging pathologic complete response (pCR) rates. This article updates our experience with PFT-R, and compares these results to our experience with cisplatin, 5-FU, and radiation therapy (PF-R) in locally advanced esophageal cancer. Patients and Methods: We searched the Massachusetts General Hospital cancer registry for esophageal cancer patients treated with radiation therapy and chemotherapy between 1994-2002. Records of patients treated with curative, neoadjuvant therapy were examined for chemotherapeutic regimen. Outcomes of patients treated with PF-R or PFT-R were assessed for response to therapy, toxicity, and survival. Results: A total of 177 patients were treated with neoadjuvant therapy with curative intent; 164 (93%) received PF-R (n = 81) or PFT-R (n = 83). Median overall survival was 24 months. After a median follow-up of 54 months for surviving patients, 3-year overall survival was 40% with no significant difference between PF-R (39%) and PFT-R (42%). Conclusions: Our findings failed to demonstrate an improvement in pCR or survival with PFT-R vs. PF-R. These results do not support this regimen of concurrent neoadjuvant PFT-R in esophageal cancer, and suggest that further investigations into alternative regimens and novel agents are warranted.

  10. Anticancer effect of bromelain with and without cisplatin or 5-FU on malignant peritoneal mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Krishna; Ehteda, Anahid; Akhter, Javid; Chua, Terence C; Morris, David L

    2014-02-01

    Malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare neoplasm of the peritoneum, causally related to asbestos exposure. Nonspecific symptoms with a late diagnosis results in poor survival (<1 year). Treatment with cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy has improved survival in some patients (median 3-5 years). Hence, new therapies are urgently needed. MUC1 is a glycosylation-dependent protein that confers tumours with invasiveness, metastasis and chemoresistance. Bromelain (cysteine proteinase) hydrolyses glycosidic bonds. Therefore, we investigated the antitumour effect of bromelain on MUC1-expressing MPM cell lines. MUC1 expressions in cells were assessed using immunofluorescent probes with cells grown on cover slips and western blot analysis on cell lysates. The cell lines were treated with various concentrations of bromelain and after 4 and 72 h, their viability was assessed using standard sulforhodamine assays. The cells were also treated with combinations of bromelain and cytotoxic drugs (cisplatin or 5-FU) and their viability was assessed at 72 h. Finally, with western blotting, the effects of bromelain on cellular survival proteins were investigated. PET cells expressed more MUC1 compared with YOU cells. The cell viability of both PET and YOU cells was adversely affected by bromelain, with PET cells being slightly resistant. The addition of bromelain increased the cytotoxicity of cisplatin significantly in both cell lines. However, 5-FU with bromelain did not show any significant increase in cytotoxicity. Bromelain-induced cell death is by apoptosis and autophagy. Bromelain has the potential of being developed as a therapeutic agent in MPM.

  11. DNA damage response (DDR) pathway engagement in cisplatin radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sears, Catherine R; Cooney, Sean A; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Mendonca, Marc S; Turchi, John J

    2016-04-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) are commonly treated with a platinum-based chemotherapy such as cisplatin (CDDP) in combination with ionizing radiation (IR). Although clinical trials have demonstrated that the combination of CDDP and IR appear to be synergistic in terms of therapeutic efficacy, the mechanism of synergism remains largely uncharacterized. We investigated the role of the DNA damage response (DDR) in CDDP radiosensitization using two NSCLC cell lines. Using clonogenic survival assays, we determined that the cooperative cytotoxicity of CDDP and IR treatment is sequence dependent, requiring administration of CDDP prior to IR (CDDP-IR). We identified and interrogated the unique time and agent-dependent activation of the DDR in NSCLC cells treated with cisplatin-IR combination therapy. Compared to treatment with CDDP or IR alone, CDDP-IR combination treatment led to persistence of γH2Ax foci, a marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), for up to 24h after treatment. Interestingly, pharmacologic inhibition of DDR sensor kinases revealed the persistence of γ-H2Ax foci in CDDP-IR treated cells is independent of kinase activation. Taken together, our data suggest that delayed repair of DSBs in NSCLC cells treated with CDDP-IR contributes to CDDP radiosensitization and that alterations of the DDR pathways by inhibition of specific DDR kinases can augment CDDP-IR cytotoxicity by a complementary mechanism. PMID:26991853

  12. [Outpatient reinduction therapy with gemcitabine, dexamethasone, Cisplatin (GDP) for patients with relapsed and refractory lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Aota, Yasuo; Tanaka, Masaru; Watanabe, Naoki; Tomomatu, Jyunichi; Gotoh, Akihiko; Komatu, Norio

    2015-01-01

    For younger patients with relapsed or refractory lymphomas who respond to salvage therapy, autologous stem cell trans- plantation(ASCT)is the standard of care. Recently, it was demonstrated that the gemcitabine/dexamethasone/cisplatin (GDP) regimen for patients with relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) prior to ASCT was not inferior to the standard dexamethasone/cytarabine/cisplatin (DHAP) regimen for patients with relapsed and refractory aggressive lymphoma. In Japan, most patients who receive CDDP-containing regimens are hospitalized because of the substantial transfusions required for preventing renal dysfunction. We initiated GDP therapy combined with a short period of hydration and the administration of a magnesium agent and mannitol for 5 patients with relapsed and refractory aggressive lymphoma. In 4 cases, GDP was safely administered on an outpatient basis. Furthermore, peripheral blood stem cells were successfully collected in 2 patients. After stem cell harvest, ASCT was performed in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, with the patient remaining in complete remission (CR) after ASCT.

  13. Transarterial Chemoembolization With Cisplatin as Second-Line Treatment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Unresponsive to Chemoembolization With Epirubicin-Lipiodol Emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Noboru Osuga, Keigo; Higashihara, Hiroki; Tomoda, Kaname; Mikami, Koji; Nakazawa, Tetsuro; Nakamura, Hironobu; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the efficacy of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) using cisplatin as a second-line treatment for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) unresponsive to TACE using epirubicin-Lipiodol emulsion at our institution. Materials and Methods: Between January 2006 and March 2009, 51 patients with unresectable HCC underwent TACE using cisplatin. All patients had shown persistent viable tumor or tumor progression after at least 2 sessions of TACE using epirubicin-Lipiodol emulsion. TACE procedures consisted of arterial injection of a mixture of Lipiodol and cisplatin (30-100 mg [mean 57 {+-} 21]) (n = 29) or arterial infusion of cisplatin (30-100 mg [mean 87 {+-} 19]) solution (n = 22) followed by injection of 1-mm porous gelatin particles. Early tumor response was assessed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria. Overall survival and progression-free survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was assessed according to NCI-CTCAE version 3 criteria. Results: Response rates were 11.8 and 27.5% by RECIST and EASL criteria, respectively. Overall survival rates were 61.9, 48.2, and 28.9% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively, and the median survival time was 15.4 months. Progression-free survival rate was 35.2% at 1 year, and median progression-free survival time was 3.1 months. No major complications were observed, and the occurrence of postembolization syndrome was minimal. Grade 3 to 4 toxicities included thrombocytopenia (5.8%), increased aspartate aminotransferase (AST) level (35.3%), and increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level (23.5%). Conclusions: witching the TACE anticancer drug from epirubicin to cisplatin might be the feasible option for advanced HCC, even when considered resistant to the initial form of TACE.

  14. Characterization of cannabinoid-induced relief of neuropathic pain in a rat model of cisplatin-induced neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Vera, Gema; Cabezos, Pablo Antonio; Martín, María Isabel; Abalo, Raquel

    2013-04-01

    Clinical use of antineoplastic drugs is associated with the development of numerous adverse effects that many patients find intolerable, including peripheral neuropathy. Cannabinoids have relieved neuropathic pain in different animal models. But their therapeutic activities could be affected by their psychoactive properties. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of cannabinoids in cisplatin-evoked neuropathy. For this purpose, the non-selective agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN), the CB1-selective agonist ACEA or the CB2-selective agonist JWH133 (or their vehicle) was either systemically administered at a non-psychoactive dose or locally injected in cisplatin-treated rats. Selective CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid antagonists (AM251 and SR144528, respectively) were used to characterize cannabinoid effects. Cisplatin-treated rats showed mechanical allodynia but not thermal hyperalgesia. Cannabinoid agonists alleviated mechanical allodynia. This effect was mediated by both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors when the cannabinoid was systemically applied. At the dose used, cannabinoid agonists had no psychoactive effect. The local effect of the drug involved the activation of peripheral CB1 receptors whereas involvement of CB2 receptors was less clear. In a rat model of cisplatin-induced neuropathy, cannabinoids have an antinociceptive effect, but the cannabinoid receptors involved could be different depending on the route of administration. Non-psychoactive doses of cannabinoid agonists are capable of alleviating the signs of peripheral neuropathy when systemically applied. Interestingly, local administration of selective CB1 agonists or systemic administration of CB2 agonists, which are non-psychoactive, may serve as new therapeutic alternatives for symptom management in painful neuropathy associated with cisplatin treatment. PMID:23454533

  15. DFT study of cisplatin@carbon nanohorns complexes.

    PubMed

    De Souza, Leonardo A; Nogueira, Camila A S; Lopes, Juliana F; Dos Santos, Hélio F; De Almeida, Wagner B

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports a quantum chemical investigation of the inclusion complex formation between a carbon nanohorn structure and cisplatin molecule, using the density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP functional and 6-31G(d,p)/LanL2DZ standard basis sets. The inclusion of the drug in host molecules such as carbon nanohorns (CNHs), aims to reduce the toxicity and enhance the effectiveness of cisplatin. In this work we carried out a search for minimum energy structures on the potential energy surface (PES) for CNH-cisplatin interaction, and then calculated the stabilization energy, charge distribution and NMR spectra, which can be of great aid for the experimental identification of the inclusion compound. Our results indicate that the CNH and cisplatin can indeed form stable inclusion complex, with the calculated (1)H NMR and (15)N NMR chemical shifts for cisplatin atoms revealing very substantial changes due to complex formation (~20ppm) that can be easily experimentally observed, which is helpful to the spectra assignment and the inclusion compound structural elucidation. PMID:24091348

  16. Structural changes of linear DNA molecules induced by cisplatin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhiguo; Liu, Ruisi; Zhou, Zhen; Zu, Yuangang; Xu, Fengjie

    2015-02-20

    Interaction between long DNA molecules and activated cisplatin is believed to be crucial to anticancer activity. However, the exact structural changes of long DNA molecules induced by cisplatin are still not very clear. In this study, structural changes of long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) induced by activated cisplatin have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that long DNA molecules gradually formed network structures, beads-on-string structures and their large aggregates. Electrostatic and coordination interactions were considered as the main driving forces producing these novel structures. An interesting finding in this study is the beads-on-string structures. Moreover, it is worth noting that the beads-on-string structures were linked into the networks, which can be ascribed to the strong DNA–DNA interactions. This study expands our knowledge of the interactions between DNA molecules and cisplatin. - Highlights: • We investigate structural changes of dsDNA and ssDNA induced by cisplatin. • AFM results indicated long dsDNA formed network, beads-on-string and aggregates. • ssDNA can form very similar structures as those of long linear dsDNA. • A possible formation process of theses novel structure is proposed.

  17. Melatonin sensitizes human cervical cancer HeLa cells to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis: effects on oxidative stress and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Pariente, Roberto; Pariente, José A; Rodríguez, Ana B; Espino, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin has antitumor activity via several mechanisms including its antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects as well as its potent antioxidant actions, although recent evidence has indicated that melatonin may perform pro-oxidant actions in tumor cells. Therefore, melatonin may be useful in the treatment of tumors in association with chemotherapy drugs. This study was intended to evaluate the in vitro effect of melatonin on the cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic actions of various chemotherapeutic agents in cervical cancer HeLa cells. Herein, we found that both melatonin and three of the chemotherapeutic drugs tested, namely cisplatin (CIS), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and doxorubicin, induced a decrease in HeLa cell viability. Furthermore, melatonin significantly increased the cytotoxic effect of such chemotherapeutic agents. Consistently, costimulation of HeLa cells with any chemotherapeutic agent in the presence of melatonin further increased caspase-3 activation, particularly in CIS- and 5-FU-challenged cells. Likewise, concomitant treatments with melatonin and CIS significantly enhanced the ratio of cells entering mitochondrial apoptosis due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, substantially augmented the population of apoptotic cells, and markedly enlarged DNA fragmentation compared to the treatments with CIS alone. Nonetheless, melatonin only displayed moderate chemosensitizing effects in 5-FU-stimulated HeLa cells, as suggested by slight increments in the percentage of cells stimulated for ROS production and in the proportion of early apoptotic cells compared to the treatments with 5-FU alone. In summary, our findings provided evidence that in vitro melatonin strongly enhances CIS-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HeLa cells and, hence, the indoleamine could be potentially applied to cervical cancer treatment as a powerful synergistic agent.

  18. The Essential Role of H19 Contributing to Cisplatin Resistance by Regulating Glutathione Metabolism in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Hong; Suo, Sha-Sha; Xu, Xiao-Li; Ni, Mao-Wei; Gu, Lin-Hui; Chen, Wei; Wang, Liang-Yan; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yue-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Primary and acquired drug resistance is one of the main obstacles encountered in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) chemotherapy. Cisplatin induces DNA damage through cross-linking and long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) play an important role in chemical induced DNA-damage response, which suggests that lincRNAs may be also associated with cisplatin resistance. However, the mechanism of long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) acting on cisplatin resistance is not well understood. Here, we showed that expression of lin-RECK-3, H19, LUCAT1, LINC00961, and linc-CARS2-2 was enhanced in cisplatin-resistant A2780-DR cells, while transcriptome sequencing showed decreased Linc-TNFRSF19-1 and LINC00515 expression. Additionally, we verified that different H19 expression levels in HGSC tissues showed strong correlation with cancer recurrence. H19 knockdown in A2780-DR cells resulted in recovery of cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative proteomics analysis indicated that six NRF2-targeted proteins, including NQO1, GSR, G6PD, GCLC, GCLM and GSTP1 involved in the glutathione metabolism pathway, were reduced in H19-knockdown cells. Furthermore, H19-knockdown cells were markedly more sensitive to hydrogen-peroxide treatment and exhibited lower glutathione levels. Our results reveal a previously unknown link between H19 and glutathione metabolism in the regulation of cancer-drug resistance. PMID:27193186

  19. Evaluation of Hybrid Theoretical Approaches for Structural Determination of a Glycine-Linked Cisplatin Derivative via Infrared Multiple Photon Dissociation (IRMPD) Action Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    He, C C; Kimutai, B; Bao, X; Hamlow, L; Zhu, Y; Strobehn, S F; Gao, J; Berden, G; Oomens, J; Chow, C S; Rodgers, M T

    2015-11-01

    To gain a better understanding of the binding mechanism and assist in the optimization of chemical probing and drug design applications, experimental and theoretical studies of a series of amino acid-linked cisplatin derivatives are being pursued. Glyplatin (glycine-linked cisplatin) was chosen for its structural simplicity and to enable backbone effects to be separated from side-chain effects on the structure and reactivity of ornithine- and lysine-linked cisplatin (Ornplatin and Lysplatin, respectively). Infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments were performed on Glyplatin to characterize its structure and guide the selection of the most effective hybrid theoretical approach for determining its structure and IR spectrum. The simplicity of the Glyplatin system allows a wide variety of density functionals, treatments of the Pt center including the use of all-electron basis sets vs valence basis sets combined with an effective core potential (ECP), and basis sets for all other atoms to be evaluated at a reasonable computational cost. The results for Glyplatin provide the foundation for calculations of more complex amino acid-linked cisplatin derivatives such as Ornplatin and Lysplatin. Present results suggest that the B3LYP/mDZP/def2-TZVP hybrid method can be effectively employed for structural and IR characterization of more complex amino acid-linked cisplatin complexes and their nucleic acid derivatives.

  20. Antidiabetic Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antidiabetic agents is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  1. Prevention of cisplatin nephrotoxicity: state of the art and recommendations from the European Society of Clinical Pharmacy Special Interest Group on Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Launay-Vacher, Vincent; Rey, Jean-Baptiste; Isnard-Bagnis, Corinne; Deray, Gilbert; Daouphars, Mikael

    2008-05-01

    Antineoplastic drugs used in the treatment of cancers present with variable renal tolerance profiles. Among drugs with a potential for renal toxicity, platinum salts, and especially cisplatin is a well-known agent that may induce acute and chronic renal failure. The mechanisms of its renal toxicity and the means of its prevention are presented in this article which represent the Clinical Recommendation from the Special Interest Group on Cancer Care of the European Society of Clinical Pharmacy (ESCP).

  2. Ruthenium(II) Complexes with 2-Phenylimidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline Derivatives that Strongly Combat Cisplatin-Resistant Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Leli; Chen, Yu; Liu, Jiangping; Huang, Huaiyi; Guan, Ruilin; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin was the first metal-based therapeutic agent approved for the treatment of human cancers, but its clinical activity is greatly limited by tumor drug resistance. This work utilized the parent complex [Ru(phen)2(PIP)]2+ (1) to develop three Ru(II) complexes (2–4) with different positional modifications. These compounds exhibited similar or superior cytotoxicities compared to cisplatin in HeLa, A549 and multidrug-resistant (A549R) tumor cell lines. Complex 4, the most potent member of the series, was highly active against A549R cancer cells (IC50 = 0.8 μM). This complex exhibited 178-fold better activity than cisplatin (IC50 = 142.5 μM) in A549R cells. 3D multicellular A549R tumor spheroids were also used to confirm the high proliferative and cytotoxic activity of complex 4. Complex 4 had the greatest cellular uptake and had a tendency to accumulate in the mitochondria of A549R cells. Further mechanistic studies showed that complex 4 induced A549R cell apoptosis via inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), elevated intracellular ROS levels, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell cycle arrest, making it an outstanding candidate for overcoming cisplatin resistance. PMID:26763798

  3. [Hypomagnesemia in patients of gynecologic neoplasms following chemotherapy with cisplatin].

    PubMed

    Li, L; Huang, W; Zhu, B

    1995-06-01

    Serum magnesium in 79 patients of gynecologic neoplasms treated with cisplatin and their controls was measured. The results showed: (1) the average value of serum magnesium in patients following chemotherapy with cisplatin was significantly lower than in the controls; (2) the incidence of hypomagnesemia was positively correlated with the number of the courses and the total dosages of chemotherapy, being 52.9% after one to three courses of treatment and 92.0% after more than six courses of treatment; (3) the incidence of hypomagnesemia was directly related with the severity of gastrointestinal disorders; (4) serum magnesium following cisplatin chemotherapy was not correlated with serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Hypomagnesemia is clinically characterized by symptoms of the nervous system which are found in 14.0% of hypomagnesemic patients. PMID:7555373

  4. New cytostatic agents for the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Devriendt, D; Klastersky, J

    1997-01-01

    Chemotherapy plays a definite role in the management of head and neck cancers, especially in combination with radiotherapy in patients with possibly curable disease. As far as new agents are concerned, the combinations of paclitaxel or docetaxel and gemcitabine with cisplatin or carboplatin deserve special attention. These regimens should be compared to the more classical combinations of cisplatin with Sefluorouracil or Ifosfamide in phase III trials. A special emphasis should be placed on the evaluation of these new agents in combination with radiotherapy, since all have strong radiopotentiating properties.

  5. Paclitaxel- and/or cisplatin-induced ocular neurotoxicity: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Li, Yanping; Li, Junyu; Pi, Guoliang; Tan, Wenyong

    2014-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) and/or cisplatin (CDDP), as important cytotoxic anti-cancer agents, are widely used to treat various solid tumors. Both may cause moderate or severe neurotoxicity, but ocular neurotoxicity is also occasionally reported. A patient diagnosed with nasopharyngeal cancer suffering acute ocular neurotoxicity 10 days after paclitaxel and CDDP administration at the recommended dose is described in the present case report, and PTX- and/or CDDP-induced ocular neurotoxicity are summarized according to previous reports. Possible mechanisms and the potential diagnostic, therapeutic and predictive strategies of PTX- and/or CDDP-induced ocular neurotoxicity are reviewed, to help the oncologist to take the infrequent toxicity of cytotoxic drugs into account and improve patient safety during anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25114574

  6. EMT transcription factors snail and slug directly contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a molecular process through which an epithelial cell undergoes transdifferentiation into a mesenchymal phenotype. The role of EMT in embryogenesis is well-characterized and increasing evidence suggests that elements of the transition may be important in other processes, including metastasis and drug resistance in various different cancers. Methods Agilent 4 × 44 K whole human genome arrays and selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry were used to investigate mRNA and protein expression in A2780 cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines. Invasion and migration were assessed using Boyden chamber assays. Gene knockdown of snail and slug was done using targeted siRNA. Clinical relevance of the EMT pathway was assessed in a cohort of primary ovarian tumours using data from Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 plus 2.0 arrays. Results Morphological and phenotypic hallmarks of EMT were identified in the chemoresistant cells. Subsequent gene expression profiling revealed upregulation of EMT-related transcription factors including snail, slug, twist2 and zeb2. Proteomic analysis demonstrated up regulation of Snail and Slug as well as the mesenchymal marker Vimentin, and down regulation of E-cadherin, an epithelial marker. By reducing expression of snail and slug, the mesenchymal phenotype was largely reversed and cells were resensitized to cisplatin. Finally, gene expression data from primary tumours mirrored the finding that an EMT-like pathway is activated in resistant tumours relative to sensitive tumours, suggesting that the involvement of this transition may not be limited to in vitro drug effects. Conclusions This work strongly suggests that genes associated with EMT may play a significant role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, therefore potentially leading to the development of predictive biomarkers of drug response or novel therapeutic strategies for overcoming drug resistance. PMID

  7. Lipocalin 2 Enhances Migration and Resistance against Cisplatin in Endometrial Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Hiroyasu; Yamada, Yasushi; Kobara, Hisanori; Asaka, Ryoichi; Ando, Hirofumi; Higuchi, Shotaro; Ida, Koichi; Mvunta, David Hamisi; Shiozawa, Tanri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is a secretory protein that is involved in various physiological processes including iron transport. We previously identified LCN2 as an up-regulated gene in endometrial carcinoma, and found that the overexpression of LCN2 and its receptor, SLC22A17, was associated with a poor prognosis. However, the functions and mechanism of action of LCN2 currently remain unclear. Methods The LCN2-overexpressing endometrial carcinoma cell lines, HHUA and RL95-2, and LCN2-low-expressing one, HEC1B, were used. The effects of LCN2 on cell migration, cell viability, and apoptosis under various stresses, including ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and cisplatin treatment, were examined using the scratch wound healing assay, WST-1 assay, and Apostrand assay, respectively. Results LCN2-silencing using shRNA method significantly reduced the migration ability of cells (p<0.05). Cytotoxic stresses significantly decreased the viability of LCN2-silenced cells more than that of control cells. In contrast, LCN2 overexpression was significantly increased cisplatin resistance. These effects were canceled by the addition of the iron chelator, deferoxamine. After UV irradiation, the expression of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) was decreased in LCN2-silenced cells, and the PI3K inhibitor canceled the difference induced in UV sensitivity by LCN2. The cisplatin-induced expression of pAkt was not affected by LCN2; however, the expression of p53 and p21 was increased by LCN2-silencing. Conclusions These results indicated that LCN2 was involved in the migration and survival of endometrial carcinoma cells under various stresses in an iron-dependent manner. The survival function of LCN2 may be exerted through the PI3K pathway and suppression of the p53-p21 pathway. These functions of LCN2 may increase the malignant potential of endometrial carcinoma cells. PMID:27168162

  8. Honey feeding protects kidney against cisplatin nephrotoxicity through suppression of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Rania; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Ranganathan, Punithavathi; Mohamed, Riyaz; El-Hamamy, Mahmoud M I; Dessouki, Amina A; Ibrahim, Abdelazim; Ramesh, Ganesan

    2015-08-01

    Cisplatin is a highly effective chemotherapeutic drug used to treat a wide variety of solid tumors. However, its use was limited due its dose-limiting toxicity to the kidney. Currently, there are no therapies available to treat or prevent cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Honey is a naturally occurring complex liquid and widely used in traditional Ayurvedic medicine to treat many illnesses. However, its effect on cisplatin nephrotoxicity is unknown. To determine the role of honey in cisplatin nephrotoxicity, animals were pretreated orally for a week and then cisplatin was administered. Honey feeding was continued for another 3 days. Our results show that animals with cisplatin-induced kidney dysfunction, as determined by increased serum creatinine, which received honey feeding had less kidney dysfunction. Improved kidney function was associated with better preservation of kidney morphology in honey-treated group as compared to the cisplatin alone-treated group. Interestingly, honey feeding significantly reduced cisplatin-induced tubular epithelial cell death, immune infiltration into the kidney as well as cytokine and chemokine expression and excretion as compared to cisplatin treated animals. Western blot analysis shows that cisplatin-induced increase in phosphorylation of NFkB was completely suppressed with honey feeding. In conclusion, honey feeding protects the kidney against cisplatin nephrotoxicity through suppression of inflammation and NFkB activation.

  9. Randomized comparison of cisplatin plus epirubicin or doxorubicin for advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma. A multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Homesley, H D; Harry, D S; O'Toole, R V; Hoogstraten, B; Franklin, E W; Cavanagh, D; Nahhas, W A; Smith, J J; Lovelace, J V

    1992-04-01

    Stage III and IV epithelial ovarian cancer patients were prospectively randomized to receive eight courses of 60 mg/m2 of cisplatin plus either 75 mg/m2 of epirubicin (62 patients) or 60 mg/m2 of doxorubicin (54 patients). Clinical response rates for cisplatin/epirubicin of 42% [15% complete response (CR) and 27% partial response (PR)] and for cisplatin/doxorubicin of 55% (24% CR and 31% PR) were not statistically different (p = 0.14). The negative second look rate was 35% (10/29) for cisplatin/doxorubicin and 17% (5/30) for cisplatin/epirubicin (p = 0.12). The progression-free interval for cisplatin/epirubicin (13 months) was not statistically different (p = 0.09) from that for cisplatin/doxorubicin (19 months). The median survivals for cisplatin/epirubicin (756 days) and cisplatin/doxorubicin (739 days) were similar (p = 0.70). Cardiotoxicity was greater for the cisplatin/doxorubicin group (p = 0.0003). With similar survival and less cardiotoxicity, the cisplatin/epirubicin regimen had the more favorable therapeutic index.

  10. Increase of intracellular cisplatin levels and radiosensitization by ultrasound in combination with microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Lammertink, Bart H A; Bos, Clemens; van der Wurff-Jacobs, Kim M; Storm, Gert; Moonen, Chrit T; Deckers, Roel

    2016-09-28

    The possibility to enhance drug delivery by using ultrasound in combination with microbubbles (USMB) is extensively studied. So far, these studies have focused on the delivery and efficacy of a single drug, e.g. in chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the intracellular delivery of cisplatin by USMB and the subsequent increased efficacy in combination with radiotherapy in a head and neck cancer cell line in vitro. After USMB-mediated intracellular delivery was verified using the model-drug SYTOX® Green, we investigated the efficacy of cisplatin when combined with USMB and radiotherapy and measured whether intracellular cisplatin concentration was enhanced after applying USMB. In addition, the effect of USMB on cisplatin and radiotherapy-induced DNA damage was studied. Flow cytometry showed that USMB treatment increased the average percentage SYTOX® Green positive cells from 2.2% to 34.5%. Clonogenic assays demonstrated that exposure to USMB significantly increased the efficacy of cisplatin combined with radiotherapy. The enhanced efficacy was associated with increased intracellular cisplatin levels, which were 2.7-fold higher when cisplatin was combined with USMB. As a result, an 82% increase in levels of DNA double strand breaks was found when cisplatin was combined with USMB, compared to cisplatin only (p<0.05). In conclusion, cisplatin uptake was significantly increased by USMB, which resulted in enhanced levels of DNA damage and increased efficacy of cisplatin in combination with radiotherapy in vitro. PMID:27476609

  11. Neoadjuvant Paclitaxel Poliglumex (PPX), Cisplatin, and Radiation (RT) for Esophageal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ng, T.; Fontaine, J.; Dipetrillo, T.; Suntharalingam, M.; Horiba, N.; Oldenburg, N.; Oconnor, B.; Perez, K.; Birnbaum, A.; Battafarano, R.; Burrows, W.; Safran, H.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Paclitaxel poliglumex (PPX) is a drug conjugate that links paclitaxel to poly-L-glutamic acid thereby increasing its radiation enhancement factor to 4.0–8.0 compared to 1.5–2.0 for paclitaxel. In previous phase I studies, The Brown University Oncology Group evaluated PPX with concurrent radiation and PPX/cisplatin/RT. A phase II study was subsequently performed to evaluate the pathologic response rate of neoadjuvant PPX, cisplatin, and radiation for patients with esophageal cancer. Methods: Eligible patients had pathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus or GE junction with no evidence of distant metastasis. Patients received weekly PPX 50 mg/m2 and cisplatin 25 mg/m2 for 6 weeks with concurrent 50.4 Gy of radiation. Six to eight weeks after completion of chemoradiotherapy, patients underwent surgical resection. Results: The study has completed accrual of 40 patients, 37 with adenocarcinoma and 3 with squamous cell cancer. The median age is 62 years. Toxicity data are available for the first 35 patients. Four of 35 patients experienced grade 4 non-hematologic toxicities, which included electrolyte abnormalities, glucose intolerance, hypersensitivity reaction, and thromboembolus. Eleven of 35 patients had grade 3 non-hematologic toxicities including electrolyte abnormalities (n=5), nausea (n=3), dysphagia (n=2), fatigue (n=2), glucose intolerance (n=2), and hypersensitivity reaction (n=1). Grade 3 anorexia was reported in only 1 patient who subsequently was given TPN. No patients required a feeding tube. There were no grade 4 hematologic toxicities; grade 3 hematologic toxicities included neutropenia (n=2) and anemia (n=1). Of the first 28 patients undergoing surgery, all with adenocarcinoma, 7 of 28 (25%) have had a pathologic complete response. Conclusion: PPX, cisplatin and concurrent radiation is a well tolerated, easily administered regimen for esophageal cancer with a very low incidence of significant

  12. Functional mechanotransduction is required for cisplatin-induced hair cell death in the zebrafish lateral line.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andrew J; Hailey, Dale W; Stawicki, Tamara M; Wu, Patricia; Coffin, Allison B; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W; Simon, Julian A; Ou, Henry C

    2013-03-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs, is known to cause inner ear hair cell damage and hearing loss. Despite much investigation into mechanisms of cisplatin-induced hair cell death, little is known about the mechanism whereby cisplatin is selectively toxic to hair cells. Using hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line, we found that chemical inhibition of mechanotransduction with quinine and EGTA protected against cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Furthermore, we found that the zebrafish mutants mariner (myo7aa) and sputnik (cad23) that lack functional mechanotransduction were resistant to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. Using a fluorescent analog of cisplatin, we found that chemical or genetic inhibition of mechanotransduction prevented its uptake. These findings demonstrate that cisplatin-induced hair cell death is dependent on functional mechanotransduction in the zebrafish lateral line. PMID:23467357

  13. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1992-03-01

    In recent years, introduction of new and more effective agents has improved the overall therapy for parasitic infections. This field, however, is still plagued by numerous problems, including the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents (especially with malaria), unavailability of agents in the United States or lack of approval by the Food and Drug Administration, and major toxicities or lack of experience in pregnant women and children, which limits use in these groups of patients. Widespread resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and other agents has complicated the treatment and prophylaxis of this type of malaria. A combination of quinine and Fansidar is usually effective oral therapy for falciparum malaria; quinidine may be administered if intravenous therapy is needed. Mefloquine, which is currently recommended for prophylaxis against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, is also effective for single-dose oral treatment, although this regimen has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Metronidazole has been widely used for treatment of gastroenteritis due to Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia (not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the latter) and is considered safe and effective. A new macrolide, azithromycin, has been reported to be effective for cryptosporidiosis in experimental animals; currently, no effective therapy is available for human infections. Combinations of sulfonamides with other antifolates, trimethoprim or pyrimethamine, are recommended therapy for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia or toxoplasmosis, respectively. Therapies for the various types of leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are complex, often toxic, and often of limited efficacy. The benzimidazoles are effective for roundworm infections, although thiabendazole has severe toxic effects. The recent introduction of ivermectin has revolutionized the treatment and control of onchocerciasis. Another relatively new agent, praziquantel

  14. Characterisation of cisplatin-induced transcriptomics responses in primary mouse hepatocytes, HepG2 cells and mouse embryonic stem cells shows conservation of regulating transcription factor networks.

    PubMed

    Rieswijk, Linda; Lizarraga, Daneida; Brauers, Karen J J; Kleinjans, Jos C S; van Delft, Joost H M

    2014-01-01

    The toxic mechanisms of cisplatin have been frequently studied in many species and in vitro cell models. The Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre focuses on developing in vitro alternatives using genomics technologies for animal-based assays on, e.g. genotoxic hazards. Models such as human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cells, mouse primary hepatocytes (PMH) and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) are used. Our aim was to identify possibly robust conserved mechanisms between these models using cisplatin as model genotoxic agent. Transcriptomic data newly generated from HepG2 cells and PMH exposed to 7 µM cisplatin for 12, 24 and 48h and 24 and 48h, respectively, were compared with published data from mESC exposed to 5 µM cisplatin for 2-24h. Due to differences in response time between models and marginal changes after shorter exposure periods, we focused on 24 and 48h. At gene level, 44 conserved differentially expressed genes (DEG), involved in processes such as apoptosis, cell cycle, DNA damage response and DNA repair, were found. Functional analysis shows that limited numbers of pathways are conserved. Transcription factor (TF) network analysis indicates 12 common TF networks responding among all models and time points. Four TF, HNF4-α, SP1, c-MYC and p53, capable of regulating ±50% of all DEG, seem of equal importance in all models and exposure periods. Here we showed that transcriptomic responses across several in vitro cell models following exposure to cisplatin are mainly determined by a conserved complex network of 4 TFs. These conserved responses are hypothesised to provide most relevant information for human toxicity prediction and may form the basis for new in vitro alternatives of risk assessment.

  15. Phase I trial of dacomitinib, a pan-human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) inhibitor, with concurrent radiotherapy and cisplatin in patients with locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (XDC-001).

    PubMed

    Prawira, Amy; Brana-Garcia, Irene; Spreafico, Anna; Hope, Andrew; Waldron, John; Razak, Albiruni R Abdul; Chen, Eric X; Jang, Raymond; O'Sullivan, Brian; Giuliani, Meredith; Bayley, Andrew; Cho, John; Wang, Lisa; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Weinreb, Ilan; Siu, Lillian L; Hansen, Aaron R

    2016-10-01

    Background Curative-intent, non-surgical treatment options for locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LA-SCCHN) include radiotherapy with/without chemotherapy or radiotherapy with cetuximab. This single institution phase I dose escalation trial tested the pan-human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, dacomitinib, in combination with standard cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods Patients received oral dacomitinib once daily at 3 protocol-defined dose levels (15 mg, 30 mg, and 45 mg). Cisplatin was given intravenously at 100 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was delivered using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to a dose of 70Gy in 35 daily fractions to the primary and nodal disease. Dose escalation was performed using a standard 3 + 3 design. Results Twelve patients with LA-SCCHN were enrolled between January 2013 and August 2014. No dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) were observed in the 15 mg and 30 mg dose levels. In the 45 mg dose level, one of four evaluable patients developed a DLT with intolerable grade 2 diarrhea requiring discontinuation of therapy. Adverse events (AEs) attributed to dacomitinib alone include diarrhea, hypertension, and acneiform and maculopapular rash. The most common non-hematological AEs include weight loss, diarrhea, dry mouth, mucositis, nausea, hypoalbuminemia, and hyponatremia. Frequency and severity of AEs did not increase with increasing dose levels of dacomitinib. All patients completed the full course of radiotherapy on schedule and the median dose of cisplatin was 200 mg/m(2), which is comparable to historical standards. Of the 10 patients evaluable for response, 1 patient relapsed with metastatic disease. Conclusions The triple combination has a tolerable side effect profile and dose levels 15 mg and 30 mg were cleared safely. The addition of dacomitinib did not preclude delivery of standard chemoradiotherapy. Studies testing the

  16. Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Signaling Pathway in Cisplatin-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yunguang; Zheng Siyuan; Torossian, Artour; Speirs, Christina K.; Schleicher, Stephen; Giacalone, Nicholas J.; Carbone, David P.; Zhao Zhongming; Lu Bo

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The development of drug-resistant phenotypes has been a major obstacle to cisplatin use in non-small-cell lung cancer. We aimed to identify some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie cisplatin resistance using microarray expression analysis. Methods and Materials: H460 cells were treated with cisplatin. The differences between cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells and parental H460 cells were studied using Western blot, MTS, and clonogenic assays, in vivo tumor implantation, and microarray analysis. The cisplatin-R cells were treated with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 and siRNA targeting IGF-1 receptor. Results: Cisplatin-R cells illustrated greater expression of the markers CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase, more rapid in vivo tumor growth, more resistance to cisplatin- and etoposide-induced apoptosis, and greater survival after treatment with cisplatin or radiation than the parental H460 cells. Also, cisplatin-R demonstrated decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and increased activation of IGF-1 receptor signaling compared with parental H460 cells in the presence of IGF-1. Human recombinant IGF binding protein-3 reversed cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-R cells and targeting of IGF-1 receptor using siRNA resulted in sensitization of cisplatin-R-cells to cisplatin and radiation. Conclusions: The IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to cisplatin-R to cisplatin and radiation. Thus, this pathway represents a potential target for improved lung cancer response to treatment.

  17. Spectrum of cisplatin-induced mutations in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Burnouf, D.; Duane, M.; Fuchs, R.P.

    1987-06-01

    Using a forward-mutation assay based on the inactivation of the tetracycline-resistance gene located on plasmid pBR322, we have determined the mutation spectrum induced in Escherichia coli by cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)), a widely used antitumor drug. Cisplatin is known to form mainly intrastrand diadducts at ApG and GpG sites. We found that cisplatin efficiently induces mutations in an SOS-dependent way (i.e., dependent upon UV irradiation of the host bacteria). More than 90% of the mutations are single-base-pair substitutions occurring at the potential sites of cisplatin adducts (ApG and GpG). Taking into account the relative proportions of ApG and GpG adducts, we found that the ApG adducts are at least 5 times more mutagenic than the GpG adducts. Moreover, a strong mutation specificity was seen at the 5' side of the ApG adducts (A X T----T X A transversions). The observation that most mutations occur at the 5' end of the adduct at both ApG and GpG sites is discussed in relation to recent structural data.

  18. Membrane Transporters as Mediators of Cisplatin Effects and Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ciarimboli, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    Transporters are important mediators of specific cellular uptake and thus, not only for effects, but also for side effects, metabolism, and excretion of many drugs such as cisplatin. Cisplatin is a potent cytostatic drug, whose use is limited by its severe acute and chronic nephro-, oto-, and peripheral neurotoxicity. For this reason, other platinum derivatives, such as carboplatin and oxaliplatin, with less toxicity but still with antitumoral action have been developed. Several transporters, which are expressed on the cell membranes, have been associated with cisplatin transport across the plasma membrane and across the cell: the copper transporter 1 (Ctr1), the copper transporter 2 (Ctr2), the P-type copper-transporting ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B, the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2), and the multidrug extrusion transporter 1 (MATE1). Some of these transporters are also able to accept other platinum derivatives as substrate. Since membrane transporters display a specific tissue distribution, they can be important molecules that mediate the entry of platinum derivatives in target and also nontarget cells possibly mediating specific effects and side effects of the chemotherapeutic drug. This paper summarizes the literature on toxicities of cisplatin compared to that of carboplatin and oxaliplatin and the interaction of these platinum derivatives with membrane transporters. PMID:24278698

  19. Spontaneous and cisplatin-induced recombination in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nowosielska, Anetta; Calmann, Melissa A; Zdraveski, Zoran; Essigmann, John M; Marinus, M G

    2004-07-01

    To measure cisplatin (cis-diaminodichloroplatinum(II))-induced recombination, we have used a qualitative intrachromosomal assay utilizing duplicate inactive lac operons containing non-overlapping deletions and selection for Lac+ recombinants. The two operons are separated by one Mb and conversion of one of them yields the Lac+ phenotype. Lac+ formation for both spontaneous and cisplatin-induced recombination requires the products of the recA, recBC, ruvA, ruvB, ruvC, priA and polA genes. Inactivation of the recF, recO, recR and recJ genes decreased cisplatin-induced, but not spontaneous, recombination. The dependence on PriA and RecBC suggests that recombination is induced following stalling or collapse of replication forks at DNA lesions to form double strand breaks. The lack of recombination induction by trans-DDP suggests that the recombinogenic lesions for cisplatin are purine-purine intrastrand crosslinks. PMID:15177181

  20. Development and characterization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with a cisplatin-bearing polymer coating for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Unterweger, Harald; Tietze, Rainer; Janko, Christina; Zaloga, Jan; Lyer, Stefan; Dürr, Stephan; Taccardi, Nicola; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Hoppe, Alexander; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Schubert, Dirk W; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Alexiou, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    A highly selective and efficient cancer therapy can be achieved using magnetically directed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) bearing a sufficient amount of the therapeutic agent. In this project, SPIONs with a dextran and cisplatin-bearing hyaluronic acid coating were successfully synthesized as a novel cisplatin drug delivery system. Transmission electron microscopy images as well as X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the individual magnetite particles were around 4.5 nm in size and monocrystalline. The small crystallite sizes led to the superparamagnetic behavior of the particles, which was exemplified in their magnetization curves, acquired using superconducting quantum interference device measurements. Hyaluronic acid was bound to the initially dextran-coated SPIONs by esterification. The resulting amide bond linkage was verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The additional polymer layer increased the vehicle size from 22 nm to 56 nm, with a hyaluronic acid to dextran to magnetite weight ratio of 51:29:20. A maximum payload of 330 μg cisplatin/mL nanoparticle suspension was achieved, thus the particle size was further increased to around 77 nm with a zeta potential of -45 mV. No signs of particle precipitation were observed over a period of at least 8 weeks. Analysis of drug-release kinetics using the dialysis tube method revealed that these were driven by inverse ligand substitution and diffusion through the polymer shell as well as enzymatic degradation of hyaluronic acid. The biological activity of the particles was investigated in a nonadherent Jurkat cell line using flow cytometry. Further, cell viability and proliferation was examined in an adherent PC-3 cell line using xCELLigence analysis. Both tests demonstrated that particles without cisplatin were biocompatible with these cells, whereas particles with the drug induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, with secondary necrosis after prolonged incubation. In

  1. Development and characterization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with a cisplatin-bearing polymer coating for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Unterweger, Harald; Tietze, Rainer; Janko, Christina; Zaloga, Jan; Lyer, Stefan; Dürr, Stephan; Taccardi, Nicola; Goudouri, Ourania-Menti; Hoppe, Alexander; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Schubert, Dirk W; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Alexiou, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    A highly selective and efficient cancer therapy can be achieved using magnetically directed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) bearing a sufficient amount of the therapeutic agent. In this project, SPIONs with a dextran and cisplatin-bearing hyaluronic acid coating were successfully synthesized as a novel cisplatin drug delivery system. Transmission electron microscopy images as well as X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the individual magnetite particles were around 4.5 nm in size and monocrystalline. The small crystallite sizes led to the superparamagnetic behavior of the particles, which was exemplified in their magnetization curves, acquired using superconducting quantum interference device measurements. Hyaluronic acid was bound to the initially dextran-coated SPIONs by esterification. The resulting amide bond linkage was verified using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The additional polymer layer increased the vehicle size from 22 nm to 56 nm, with a hyaluronic acid to dextran to magnetite weight ratio of 51:29:20. A maximum payload of 330 μg cisplatin/mL nanoparticle suspension was achieved, thus the particle size was further increased to around 77 nm with a zeta potential of −45 mV. No signs of particle precipitation were observed over a period of at least 8 weeks. Analysis of drug-release kinetics using the dialysis tube method revealed that these were driven by inverse ligand substitution and diffusion through the polymer shell as well as enzymatic degradation of hyaluronic acid. The biological activity of the particles was investigated in a nonadherent Jurkat cell line using flow cytometry. Further, cell viability and proliferation was examined in an adherent PC-3 cell line using xCELLigence analysis. Both tests demonstrated that particles without cisplatin were biocompatible with these cells, whereas particles with the drug induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, with secondary necrosis after prolonged incubation

  2. Measures of renal function in patients with cisplatin-related chronic renal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, E.; Jacob, J.; Brawley, O.

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with advanced stage refractory ovarian cancer were studied to determine if chronic stable cisplatin-related renal dysfunction was present. Medical histories were examined to determine the types of therapy previously received as well as the total previous platinum doses received that ranged from 200 to 2,100 mg/m2. Standard assessments of renal function were made prior to administering current chemotherapy or immunotherapy to the patient, which included 24-hour creatinine clearance, serum creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). For patients with a 24-hour creatinine clearance of less than 60 mL/minute, serum creatinine was highly variable (range: 0.9 to 2.0 mg/dL) and was not related to the degree of diminution in the 24-hour creatinine clearance value. Conversely, for patients with a serum creatinine of less than 1.5, the 24-hour creatinine clearance values varied by almost three-fold, ranging between 46 and 120 mL/minute. Two patients with serum creatinines of less than 1 had creatinine clearances of less than 50 mL per minute. Similarly, BUN measurements did not correlate with 24-hour creatinine clearance values, and the 24-hour creatinine clearance value was not related to the total cumulative platinum dose. We conclude that patients who receive substantive doses of cisplatin may experience chronic stable cisplatin-related renal dysfunction and that serum creatinine cannot be relied on to assess the degree of renal compromise. In such patients, we recommended that the 24-hour creatinine clearance value should be used when medical management is influenced by renal function. PMID:1865503

  3. miR-218 suppresses tumor growth and enhances the chemosensitivity of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hang; Hou, Lei; Xiong, Yu-Mei; Huang, Jun-Xiang; She, Ying-Jun; Bi, Xiao-Bao; Song, Xing-Rong

    2015-02-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that microRNA-218 (miR-218) acts as a tumor suppressor and is involved in tumor progression, development and metastasis and confers sensitivity to certain chemotherapeutic drugs in several types of cancer. However, our knowledge concerning the exact roles played by miR-218 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain relatively unclear. Thus, the aims of this study were to detect the expression of miR-218 in human ESCC tissues and explore its effects on the biological features and chemosensitivity to cisplatin (CDDP) in an ESCC cell line (Eca109), so as to provide new insights for ESCC treatment. Here, we found increased expression of miR-218 in the ESCC tissues compared with that in the matched non-tumor tissues, and its expression level was correlated with key pathological characteristics including clinical stage, tumor depth and metastasis. We also found that enforced expression of miR-218 significantly decreased cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion, induced cell apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase, as well as suppressed tumor growth in a nude mouse model. In addition, our results showed that miR-218 mimics increased the sensitivity to the antitumor effect of CDDP in the human Eca109 cells. Importantly, this study also showed that miR-218 regulated the expression of phosphorylated PI3K, AKT and mTOR, which may contribute to suppressed tumor growth of ESCC and enhanced sensitivity of ESCC cells. These findings suggest that miR-218 is a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of ESCC.

  4. Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Combination With Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer: Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda Viani, Gustavo; Afonso, Sergio Luis; Cardoso Tavares, Vivian; Bernardes Godoi da Silva, Lucas; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose by describing the dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) of weekly gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck (LAHN) cancer concomitant to irradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients with LAHN cancer were enrolled in a prospective, dose-escalation Phase I study. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria score. Maximum tolerated dose was defined when DLT developed in 2 of 6 patients. The starting dose of cisplatin was 20 mg/m{sup 2} and that of gemcitabine was 10 mg/m{sup 2} in 3 patients, with a subsequent dose escalation of 10 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin only for 3 new patients. In the next levels, only a dose escalation of gemcitabine with 10 mg/m{sup 2} for each new cohort was used (Level 1, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 20 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; Level 2, 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin; and Level 3, 20 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin). Radiation therapy was administered by use of a conformal technique over a period of 6 to 7 weeks in 2.0-Gy daily fractions for 5 consecutive days per week to a total dose of 70 Gy. Results: From 2008 to 2009, 12 patients completing 3 dose levels were included in the study. At Dose Level 3, 1 of 3 patients had DLT with Grade 3 mucositis. Of the next 3 required patients, 2 showed DLT with Grade 3 dermatitis. At a follow-up of 3 months, 10 of 12 evaluable patients (83.3%) obtained a complete response and 1 patient (8.3%) obtained a partial response. Among the complete responders, at a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 6-14 months), 9 patients are alive and disease free. Conclusion: Gemcitabine at low doses combined with cisplatin is a potent radiosensitizer effective in patients with LAHN cancer. The recommended Phase II dose is 10 mg/m{sup 2} of gemcitabine and 30 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin with an acceptable tolerability profile.

  5. Anti-apoptotic effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Beom; Jun, Hyoung-Oh; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Kyu-Won; Min, Bon Hong; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2013-12-01

    Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is known to protect various retinal cells. It was also reported to be overexpressed in several types of malignant tumors, whose chemoresistance correlates with the expression of clusterin. Herein, we investigated the effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells. Firstly, evaluation of clusterin expression demonstrated that it was highly expressed in human retinoblastoma tissues and cell lines (SNUOT-Rb1 and Y79) particularly in the area between viable cells around vessels and necrotic zones in the relatively avascular area in human retinoblastoma tissues. Furthermore, the effects of cisplatin on retinoblastoma cells were evaluated. Cisplatin (1 µg/ml) significantly affected cell viability of SNUOT-Rb1 cells by inducing caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Notably, the cell death due to cisplatin was prevented by 5 µg/ml of clusterin administered 4 h prior to cisplatin treatment by inhibiting cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, overexpression of clusterin exerted its anti-apoptotic effect on cisplatin-induced apoptosis, and effectively prevented cisplatin-induced cell death. These data suggest that clusterin, found to be expressed in human retinoblastoma, may exert anti-apoptotic effects on cisplatin-induced apoptosis and prevent cell death. Therefore, clusterin can contribute to cisplatin resistance of retinoblastoma.

  6. Cisplatin Concentrations in Long and Short Duration Infusion: Implications for the Optimal Time of Radiation Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Binu Susan; Das, Saikat; Isaiah, Rajesh; John, Subashini; Prabha, Ratna; Fleming, Denise Helen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cisplatin has radiosensitizing properties and the best sensitization to radiotherapy occurs with a higher plasma concentration of cisplatin. To our knowledge the optimal time sequence between chemotherapy and administration of radiation therapy, to obtain maximum effect from concurrent chemoradiation is unclear. Aim The aim of this study was to measure the two cisplatin infusion regimens in order to determine the total and free cisplatin post infusion concentration changes over time. These changes may have clinical implications on the optimum time of administration of post infusion radiation therapy. Materials and Methods Two cohorts of patients were recruited and both, total and free plasma concentration of cisplatin following long and short durations of intravenous infusion was determined. Blood samples were collected at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 and 5 hours from the start of the infusion in the 1hour infusion group and at 2, 3, 3.5, 4, 6 and 24 hours from the start of the infusion, in the 3 hour infusion group. Total and free cisplatin concentrations were measured using a validated HPLC-UV method. Results The highest concentration of total and free cisplatin was achieved at the end of the infusion in both regimens. Total cisplatin concentration declined 30 minutes after the end of infusion in both the groups. After 1hour of discontinuing cisplatin, the free cisplatin concentration also declined significantly. Conclusion We conclude that radiation should be administered within 30 minutes of completion of the infusion irrespective of the duration of infusion. PMID:27630935

  7. Anti-apoptotic effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun Beom; Jun, Hyoung-Oh; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Kyu-Won; Min, Bon Hong; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2013-12-01

    Clusterin is a cytoprotective chaperone protein that is known to protect various retinal cells. It was also reported to be overexpressed in several types of malignant tumors, whose chemoresistance correlates with the expression of clusterin. Herein, we investigated the effect of clusterin on cisplatin-induced cell death of retinoblastoma cells. Firstly, evaluation of clusterin expression demonstrated that it was highly expressed in human retinoblastoma tissues and cell lines (SNUOT-Rb1 and Y79) particularly in the area between viable cells around vessels and necrotic zones in the relatively avascular area in human retinoblastoma tissues. Furthermore, the effects of cisplatin on retinoblastoma cells were evaluated. Cisplatin (1 µg/ml) significantly affected cell viability of SNUOT-Rb1 cells by inducing caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Notably, the cell death due to cisplatin was prevented by 5 µg/ml of clusterin administered 4 h prior to cisplatin treatment by inhibiting cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, overexpression of clusterin exerted its anti-apoptotic effect on cisplatin-induced apoptosis, and effectively prevented cisplatin-induced cell death. These data suggest that clusterin, found to be expressed in human retinoblastoma, may exert anti-apoptotic effects on cisplatin-induced apoptosis and prevent cell death. Therefore, clusterin can contribute to cisplatin resistance of retinoblastoma. PMID:24085287

  8. Elemental bioimaging of Cisplatin in Caenorhabditis elegans by LA-ICP-MS

    PubMed Central

    Crone, Barbara; Aschner, Michael; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Karst, Uwe; Bornhorst, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (Cisplatin) is one of the most important and frequently used cytostatic drugs for the treatment of various solid tumors. Herein, a laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) method incorporating a fast and simple sample preparation protocol was developed for the elemental mapping of Cisplatin in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). The method allows imaging of the spatially-resolved elemental distribution of platinum in the whole organism with respect to the anatomic structure in L4 stage worms at a lateral resolution of 5 µm. In addition, a dose- and time-dependent Cisplatin uptake was corroborated quantitatively by a total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (TXRF) method, and the elemental mapping indicated that Cisplatin is located in the intestine and in the head of the worms. Better understanding of the distribution of Cisplatin in this well-established model organism will be instrumental in deciphering Cisplatin toxicity and pharmacokinetics. Since the cytostatic effect of Cisplatin is based on binding the DNA by forming intra- and interstrand crosslinks, the response of poly(ADP-ribose)metabolism enzyme 1 (pme-1) deletion mutants to Cisplatin was also examined. Loss of pme-1, which is the C. elegans ortholog of human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) led to disturbed DNA damage response. With respect to survival and brood size, pme-1 deletion mutants were more sensitive to Cisplatin as compared to wildtype worms, while Cisplatin uptake was indistinguishable. PMID:25996669

  9. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (epoetin and darbepoetin) for treating cancer treatment-induced anaemia (including review of technology appraisal no. 142): a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Crathorne, Louise; Huxley, Nicola; Haasova, Marcela; Snowsill, Tristan; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Hoyle, Martin; Briscoe, Simon; Coelho, Helen; Long, Linda; Medina-Lara, Antonieta; Mujica-Mota, Ruben; Napier, Mark; Hyde, Chris

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anaemia is a common side effect of cancer treatments and can lead to a reduction in quality of life. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are licensed for use in conjunction with red blood cell transfusions to improve cancer treatment-induced anaemia (CIA). OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ESAs in anaemia associated with cancer treatment (specifically chemotherapy). DATA SOURCES The following databases were searched from 2004 to 2013: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, British Nursing Index, Health Management Information Consortium, Current Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov. The US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency websites were also searched. Bibliographies of included papers were scrutinised for further potentially includable studies. REVIEW METHODS The clinical effectiveness review followed principles published by the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), or systematic reviews of RCTs, of ESAs (epoetin or darbepoetin) for treating people with CIA were eligible for inclusion in the review. Comparators were best supportive care, placebo or other ESAs. Anaemia- and malignancy-related outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. When appropriate, data were pooled using meta-analysis. An empirical health economic model was developed comparing ESA treatment with no ESA treatment. The model comprised two components: one evaluating short-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (while patients are anaemic) and one evaluating long-term QALYs. Costs and benefits were discounted at 3.5% per annum. Probabilistic and univariate deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS Of 1457 titles and abstracts screened, 23 studies assessing ESAs within their licensed

  10. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Scarrow, Robert C.; White, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided.

  11. FXR agonists enhance the sensitivity of biliary tract cancer cells to cisplatin via SHP dependent inhibition of Bcl-xL expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhan, Ming; Li, Qi; Chen, Wei; Chu, Huiling; Huang, Qihong; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Man, Mohan; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Chemoresistance is common in patients with biliary tract cancer (BTC) including gallbladder cancer (GBC) and cholangiocarcinoma (CC). Therefore, it is necessary to identify effective chemotherapeutic agents for BTC. In the present study, we for the first time tested the effect of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists GW4064 and CDCA (chenodeoxycholic acid) in combination with cisplatin (CDDP) on increasing the chemosensitivity in BTC. Our results show that co-treatment of CDDP with FXR agonists remarkably enhance chemosensitivity of BTC cells. Mechanistically, we found that activation of FXR induced expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP), which in turn inhibited signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and resulted in down-regulation of Bcl-xL expression in BTC cells, leading to increased susceptibility to CDDP. Moreover, the experiments on tumor-bearing mice showed that GW4064/CDDP co-treatment inhibited the tumor growth in vivo by up-regulating SHP expression and down-regulating STAT3 phosphorylation. These results suggest CDDP in combination with FXR agonists could be a potential new therapeutic strategy for BTC. PMID:27127878

  12. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura following salvage chemotherapy with paclitaxel, ifosfamide and cisplatin in a patient with a refractory germ cell tumor: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    ULAS, ARIFE; SILAY, KAMILE; AKINCI, SEMA; AKINCI, MUHAMMED BULENT; SENDUR, MEHMET ALI; DEDE, DIDEM SENER; POLAT, YUNUS HALIL; YALCIN, BULENT

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare form of thrombotic microangiopathy that is characterized by microvascular thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, hemolysis and end organ damage. An extensive variety of drugs, including certain chemotherapeutic agents, have been associated with TTP. However, paclitaxel, cisplatin and ifosfamide regimen (TIP)-induced TTP has not previously been described. The present study reports the case of a 43-year-old patient with a refractory testicular germ cell tumor who developed acute TTP during TIP chemotherapy. Following the third cycle of TIP chemotherapy, the patient developed fever, anemia, thrombocytopenia and confusion. A diagnosis of TTP was established. Plasmapheresis was initiated as daily treatment in the first week, then continued every other day for 4 weeks. TIP chemotherapy was discontinued. The patient's clinical and neurological symptoms improved markedly after a week. Renal function and hemolysis improved, and the patient was discharged in a stable condition. The patient did not develop any complications and has been in remission for 5 months. The Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a likely association between TTP and the TIP chemotherapy regimen in this patient. This case is also investigated with regard to the associated literature to increase the awareness of TTP following chemotherapy. PMID:26622823

  13. Sodium selenosulfate at an innocuous dose markedly prevents cisplatin-induced gastrointestinal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Sun, Kang; Ni, Lijuan; Wang, Xufang; Wang, Dongxu; Zhang, Jinsong

    2012-02-01

    Our previous studies in mice revealed that two weeks short-term toxicity of sodium selenosulfate was significantly lower than that of sodium selenite, but selenium repletion efficacy of both compounds was equivalent. In addition, we showed that sodium selenosulfate reduced nephrotoxicity of cisplatin (CDDP) without compromising its anticancer activity, thus leading to a dramatic increase of cancer cure rate from 25% to 75%. Hydration has been used in clinical practice to reduce CDDP-induced nephrotoxicity, but it cannot mitigate CDDP-induced gastrointestinal toxicity. The present work investigated whether sodium selenosulfate is a potential preventive agent for the gastrointestinal toxicity. In tumor-bearing mice, sodium selenosulfate was administered at a dose of 9.5 μmol/kg daily for 11 days, CDDP alone resulted in diarrhea by 88% on day 12, whereas the co-administration of CDDP and sodium selenosulfate dramatically reduced diarrhea to 6% (p < 0.0001). Such a prominent protective effect promoted us to evaluate the safety potential of long-term sodium selenosulfate application. Mice were administered with sodium selenosulfate or sodium selenite for 55 days at the doses of 12.7 and 19 μmol/kg. The low-dose sodium selenite caused growth suppression and hepatotoxicity which were aggravated by the high-dose, leading to 40% mortality rate, but no toxic symptoms were observed in the two sodium selenosulfate groups. Altogether these results clearly show that sodium selenosulfate at an innocuous dose can markedly prevent CDDP-induced gastrointestinal toxicity. -- Highlights: ►Cisplatin resulted in diarrhea in mice by 88%. ►i.p. selenosulfate at 9.5 μmol/kg daily for 11 days reduced diarrhea to 6%. ►i.p. selenosulfate at 19 μmol/kg daily for 55 days was not toxic. ►i.p. selenite at 19 μmol/kg daily for 55 days was lethal. ►Innocuous dose of selenosulfate greatly prevents cisplatin-induced diarrhea.

  14. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  15. Quantitative imaging of platinum based on laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to investigate toxic side effects of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Köppen, C; Reifschneider, O; Castanheira, I; Sperling, M; Karst, U; Ciarimboli, G

    2015-12-01

    This work presents a quantitative bioimaging method for platinum based on laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and its application for a biomedical study concerning toxic side effects of cisplatin. To trace the histopathology back to cisplatin, platinum was localized and quantified in major functional units of testicle, cochlea, kidney, nerve and brain sections from cisplatin treated mice. The direct consideration of the histology enables precise interpretation of the Pt images and the novel quantitative evaluation approach allows significantly more precise investigations than the pure image. For the first time, platinum was detected and quantified in all major injured structures including organ of Corti of cochlea and seminiferous tubule of testicle. In this way, proximal tubule in kidney, Leydig cells in testicle, stria vascularis and organ of Corti in cochlea and nerve fibers in sciatic nerves are confirmed as targets of cisplatin in these organs. However, the accumulation of platinum in almost all investigated structures also raises questions about more complex pathogenesis including direct and indirect interruption of several biological processes.

  16. Prospective Pilot Study of Consolidation Chemotherapy With Docetaxel and Cisplatin After Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyun Chan; Lee, Seok Ho; Lee, Yuna; Park, Se Hoon Park, Jinny; Cho, Eun Kyung; Shin, Dong Bok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Seon Tae

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: With the improvement concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in the management of patients with locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), distant failures have become a more relevant problem in terms of survival. The primary objective of this Phase II study is to assess the feasibility of docetaxel and cisplatin consolidation after primary CCRT for patients with HNSCC. Methods and Materials: Patients with locoregionally advanced HNSCC received chemotherapy with three cycles of cisplatin, 100 mg/m{sup 2}, on Days 1, 22, and 43. Concurrent radiotherapy to the primary tumor and neck was given in a daily dose of 2 Gy to a total dose of 70-70.2 Gy over 7 weeks. After completion of CCRT, patients without evidence of disease progression received an additional four cycles of consolidation chemotherapy with docetaxel, 75 mg/m{sup 2}, and cisplatin, 75 mg/m{sup 2}, every 3 weeks. Results: Of 33 patients, 27 (81%) completed CCRT. After CCRT, three complete and 19 partial responses were recorded, giving an overall response rate of 67%. Of 19 patients who went to the consolidation phase, only 4 (21%) received all four cycles of docetaxel and cisplatin. Causes of failure of consolidation chemotherapy were toxicity in 11 patients, including three treatment-related deaths, and progression in 4 patients. Three patients died of sepsis during the consolidation phase. Median survival was 11 months for all patients and 8 months for those treated with consolidation chemotherapy. Conclusion: The poor compliance and high incidence of severe toxicities prompted no further evaluation of this consolidation chemotherapy after CCRT.

  17. A Store-and-Forward Tele-Audiology Solution to Promote Efficient Screenings for Ototoxicity during Cisplatin Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dille, Marilyn F.; McMillan, Garnett P.; Helt, Wendy J.; Konrad-Martin, Dawn; Jacobs, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Tele-audiology improves access, controls cost, and improves efficiency of many aspects within health care. We have developed and validated a device, the ototoxicity identification device (OtoID), which enables remote hearing monitoring by a patient during chemotherapy treatment. Aspects of the design such as patient self-testing and texting of results to the audiology clinic are important features of this device. Purpose The purpose of this article is to present the efficacy and effectiveness of the OtoID hearing screener. Research Design A repeated measures design was used in this study. Study Sample Twenty-one veterans undergoing cisplatin chemotherapy were recruited in this study. Data Collection and Analysis Participants were tested using the OtoID at each cisplatin treatment by an audiologist using the manual mode of test and the participant using the automated mode of test. Test sensitivity and specificity were developed from the detection (yes/no) of an American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) change in hearing. Results The OtoID had a test sensitivity of 80.6% and specificity of 85.3%. A logistic regression model analysis of the probability of an ASHA shift identified by the automated OtoID was conducted. Separate models were fit to establish effects of age, average baseline thresholds in the sensitive range for ototoxicity (SRO), and dose of cisplatin on the probability of a positive hearing change result. Interactions were also included to evaluate these effects on the sensitivity and false-positive rates of the automated test. Results indicated no statistically significant effects of age, of baseline hearing in the SRO frequencies, or of cisplatin dose. Conclusions The OtoID automated test can be recommended for use. The automated test provides significant personnel efficiencies. The modem with simple text messaging function recently added to the device improves on these efficiencies. PMID:26415968

  18. Enhanced gastric retention of solid resin beads as a marker for emetic potential of agents in rats.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kentaro; Takagi, Kan; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2012-01-01

    Whereas nausea and emesis are burdensome side effects that lead to poor treatment compliance especially in chemotherapy, it is difficult to predict the emetic potential of agents in rats and mice because rodents do not vomit. We examined the effect of emetics on gastric retention and role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT)3 receptor in chemotherapeutic-induced enhancement of gastric retention in rats. The gastric retention of solid material was determined using resin beads, which were suitable to beads made with metals or glasses in size, hardness and weight. Each rat was orally given distilled water (0.5 ml/rat) containing 40 resin beads via a plastic feeding tube. The stomach was removed at 1 hr post-dose and cut along the greater curvature under carbon dioxide anesthesia. Beads were given immediately after administration of the drugs except with cisplatin, when there was a 1 hr delay. Cancer chemotherapeutics including cisplatin(0.1-3 mg/kg i.v.) and doxorubicin(0.3-10 mg/kg i.v.) and a nauseant, copper sulfate(1-30 mg/kg p.o.) enhanced gastric retention of beads. Ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently antagonized the enhanced gastric retention by cisplatin and doxorubicin. The copper sulfate-induced enhancement was also reversed by ondansetron. Our results suggest that 5-HT3 receptors mediate the cancer chemotherapeutic-enhanced gastric retention of solid material in rats. This implicates that the gastric retention of solid material is a useful marker to predict the potential of compounds to induce nausea and/or emesis in non-vomiting rodents. PMID:22687994

  19. Expression of magnesium transporter genes in head and neck cancer patients underwent neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Jung; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Chien, Li-Sheng; Lin, Jin-Ching; Jiang, Rong-San; Liu, Shih-An

    2015-10-01

    We aimed to investigate expression of magnesium transporter genes in patients with head and neck cancer who underwent cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy and their association with serum magnesium level. Head and neck cancer patients scheduled to undergo neoadjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy were eligible for enrollment. Blood samples were obtained at three time points: prior to, during, and after completion of chemotherapy. Expression levels of magnesium transporter genes were determined by quantitative real-time PCR. A total of 23 patients were included in the final analysis. The average serum magnesium levels dropped 6.98 and 5.20% during and after completion of chemotherapy. There were neither significant associations between serum magnesium level and demographic variables nor tumor-related variables. SLC41A1 expression level was positively correlated with serum magnesium whereas TRPM6 expression level was negatively correlated with serum magnesium. Serum magnesium level decreased during cisplatin-based chemotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Further studies are warranted to investigate optimal magnesium measurement and substitution protocol.

  20. RasGAP-derived peptide GAP159 enhances cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HCT116 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Shenghua; He, Hongwei; Zhang, Caixia; Chen, Yi; Yu, Dongke; Chen, Jianhua; Shao, Rongguang

    2014-01-01

    To increase the efficacy of currently used anti-cancer genotoxins, one of the current efforts is to find agents that can sensitize cancer cells to genotoxins so that the efficacious doses of genotoxins can be lowered to reduce deleterious side-effects. In this study, we reported that a synthetic RasGAP-derived peptide GAP159 could enhance the effect of chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin (CDDP) in human colon carcinoma HCT116 cells. Our results showed that GAP159 significantly increased the CDDP-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HCT116 cells. This synergistic effect was associated with the inhibitions of phospho-AKT, phospho-ERK and NF-κB. In mouse colon tumor CT26 animal models, GAP159 combined with CDDP significantly suppressed CT26 tumor growth, and GAP159 alone showed slight inhibitory effect. Our data suggests that co-treatment of GAP159 and chemotherapeutics will become a potential therapeutic strategy for colon cancers. PMID:26579374

  1. Cisplatin-induced antitumor immunomodulation: a review of preclinical and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    de Biasi, Andreas R; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2014-11-01

    Contrary to the long held belief that chemotherapy is immunosuppressive, emerging evidence indicates that the anticancer activity of cisplatin is not limited to its ability to inhibit mitosis, but that cisplatin also has important immunomodulatory effects. We therefore methodically examined the relevant preclinical literature and identified four main mechanisms of cisplatin-induced antitumor immunomodulation: (i) MHC class I expression upregulation; (ii) recruitment and proliferation of effector cells; (iii) upregulation of the lytic activity of cytotoxic effectors; and (iv) downregulation of the immunosuppressive microenvironment. Cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy's antitumor immunomodulatory effects are also beginning to be harnessed in the clinic; we therefore additionally reviewed the applicable clinical literature and discussed how monitoring various components of the immune system (and their responses to cisplatin) can add new levels of sophistication to disease monitoring and prognostication. In summation, this growing body of literature on cisplatin-induced antitumor immunomodulation ultimately highlights the therapeutic potential of synergistic strategies that combine traditional chemotherapy with immunotherapy.

  2. New potential for enhancing concomitant chemoradiotherapy with FDA approved concentrations of cisplatin via the photoelectric effect.

    PubMed

    Altundal, Yucel; Cifter, Gizem; Detappe, Alexandre; Sajo, Erno; Tsiamas, Panagiotis; Zygmanski, Piotr; Berbeco, Ross; Cormack, Robert A; Makrigiorgos, Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-02-01

    We predict, for the first time, that by using United States Food and Drug Administration approved concentrations of cisplatin, major radiosensitization may be achieved via photoelectric mechanism during concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Our analytical calculations estimate that radiotherapy (RT) dose to cancer cells may be enhanced via this mechanism by over 100% during CCRT. The results proffer new potential for significantly enhancing CCRT via an emerging clinical scenario, where the cisplatin is released in-situ from RT biomaterials loaded with cisplatin nanoparticles.

  3. Antiemetic role of thalidomide in a rat model of cisplatin-induced emesis.

    PubMed

    Han, Zheng-xiang; Xu, Jie; Wang, Hong-mei; Ma, Jan; Sun, Xuan; Du, Xiu-ping

    2014-09-01

    The efficacy of thalidomide to attenuate cisplatin-induced emesis was evaluated in a rat model. Four groups were utilized: control group (peritoneal injection and gastric lavage with normal saline), cisplatin group (peritoneal injection of cisplatin at 10 mg/kg and gastric lavage with normal saline), thalidomide group (cisplatin as above and gastric lavage with thalidomide at 10 mg/kg), and granisetron group (positive control for antiemetic effects; cisplatin given as above and gastric lavage done with granisetron at 0.5 mg/kg). The cisplatin-induced kaolin consumption (pica behavior) was used as a model of emesis in patients. The animals' kaolin and food intakes were measured. Further, medulla and gastric tissues were obtained 5 and 33 h after peritoneal injections to quantify the levels of Substance P and Neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). The cisplatin-induced kaolin consumption was significantly (p < 0.05 vs. cisplatin group) attenuated by thalidomide 72 h after the injection. The levels of Substance P in the medulla and gastric tissue were increased 5 h after the injection in both cisplatin and thalidomide groups, however, returned faster to normal levels in the thalidomide group (p < 0.05 vs. cisplatin group). Further, levels of NK-1R in the cisplatin, thalidomide, and granisetron group were significantly increased at both 5 and 33 h (p < 0.05 vs. control group), with no obvious difference among these three groups. In conclusion, thalidomide attenuates animal equivalent of cisplatin-induced emesis, and this beneficial effect is associated with decreased levels of Substance P levels in the medulla and gastric tissue.

  4. Multiple Condensation Reactions Involving Pt(II) /Pd(II) -OH2 , Pt-NH3 , and Cytosine-NH2 Groups: New Twists in Cisplatin-Nucleobase Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yin-Bandur, Lu; Sanz Miguel, Pablo J; Rodríguez-Santiago, Luis; Sodupe, Mariona; Berghaus, Melanie; Lippert, Bernhard

    2016-09-12

    The coordination chemistry of the antitumor agent cisplatin and related complexes with DNA and its constituents, that is, the nucleobases, appears to be dominated by 1:1 and 1:2 adducts of the types cis-[Pta2 (nucleobase)X] and cis-[Pta2 (nucleobase)2 ] (a=NH3 or amine; a2 =diamine or diimine; X=Cl, OH or OH2 ). Here, we have studied the interactions of the putative 1:1 adducts cis-[Pta2 (1-MeC-N3)(OH2 )](2+) (with a=NH3 , a2 =2,2'-bpy (2,2'-bipyridine), 1-MeC=model nucleobase 1-methylcytosine) with additional cis-[Pt(NH3 )2 (OH2 )2 ](2+) or its kinetically superior analogues [Pd(en)(OH2 )2 ](2+) (en=ethylenediamine) and [Pd(2,2'-bpy)(OH2 )2 ](2+) . Depending upon the conditions applied different compounds of different nuclearity are formed. Without exception they represent condensation products of the components, containing μ-1-MeC-H , μ-OH(-) , as well as μ-NH2 (-) bridges. In the presence of Ag(+) ions, the isolated products in several cases display additionally Pt→Ag dative bonds. On the basis of the cytosine-containing structures established by X-ray crystallography, it is proposed that any of the feasible initial 1:1 nucleobase adducts of cisplatin could form dinuclear Pt complexes upon reaction with additional hydrolyzed cisplatin, thereby generating nucleobase adducts other than the presently established ones. Two findings appear to be of particular significance: First, hydrolyzed cisplatin can have a moderately accelerating effect on the formation of a secondary nucleobase product. Second, NH3 ligands of the cisplatin moiety can be converted into bridging amido ligands following condensation with the diaqua species of cisplatin.

  5. Characterization of a DNA damage-recognition protein mammalian cells that binds specifically to intrastrand d(GpG) and d(ApG) DNA adducts of the anticancer drug cisplatin

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, B.A.; Augot, M.; Bellon, S.F.; Treiber, D.K.; Toney, J.H.; Lippard, S.J.; Essigmann, J.M. )

    1990-06-19

    A factor has been identified in extracts from human HeLa and hamster V79 cells that retards the electrophoretic mobility of several DNA restriction fragments modified with the antitumor drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin). Binding of the factor to cisplatin-modified DNA was sensitive to pretreatment with proteinase K, establishing that the factor is a protein. Gel mobility shifts were observed with probes containing as few as seven Pt atoms per kilobase of duplex DNA. By competition experiments the dissociation constant, K{sub d}, of the protein from cisplatin-modified DNA was estimated to be (1-20) {times} 10{sup {minus}10} M. Protein binding is selective for DNA modified with cisplatin, (Pt(en)Cl{sub 2}) (en, ethylenediamine), and (Pt(dach)Cl{sub 2}) (dach, 1,2-diaminocyclohexane) but not with chemotherapeutically inactive trans-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) or monofunctionally coordinating (Pt(dien)Cl)Cl (dien, diethylenetriamine) complexes. The protein binds specifically to 1,2-intrastrand d(GpG) and d(ApG) cross-links formed by cisplatin. The apparent molecular weight of the protein is 91,000, as determined by sucrose gradient centrifugation of a preparation partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation. Binding of the protein to platinum-modified DNA does not require cofactors but is sensitive to treatment with 5 mM MnCl{sub 2}, CdCl{sub 2}, CoCl{sub 2}, or ZnCl{sub 2} and with 1 mM HgCl{sub 2}. This protein, alone or in conjunction with other cellular constituents, could be of general importance in the initial stages of processing of mammalian DNA damaged by cisplatin or other genotoxic agents and may belong to a wider class of such cellular damage-recognition proteins (DRPs).

  6. Remotely Triggered Cisplatin Release from Carbon Nanocapsules by Radiofrequency Fields

    PubMed Central

    Raoof, Mustafa; Cisneros, Brandon T.; Guven, Adem; Corr, Stuart J.; Wilson, Lon J.; Curley, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery is limited by its peri-vascular sequestration, thus necessitating a strategy to trigger drug release from such intra-tumoral nanocarrier-drug depots. In our efforts to explore remotely-activated nanocarriers, we have developed carbon nanocapsules comprised of an ultrashort carbon nanotube shell (US-tubes) loaded with cisplatin (CDDP@US-tubes) and covered with a Pluronic surfactant wrapping to minimize passive release. We demonstrate here that non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) field activation of the CDDP@US-tubes produces heat that causes Pluronic disruption which triggers cisplatin release in an RF-dependent manner. Furthermore, release-dependent cytotoxicity is demonstrated in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. PMID:23228421

  7. Genotoxic effects of cisplatin in somatic tissue of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster transdihybrid for mwh and flr were exposed to varying concentrations of cisplatin by feeding on dry media wetted with aqueous solutions of the test compound. Larval feeding continued until pupation, and surviving transdihybrid adults were collected seven days following commencement of feeding. Wings of adults were removed and scored under 400X magnification for the presence of twin spots and single spots comprised of clones of cells possessing malformed wing hairs. Cisplatin was found to induce both twin spots and single spots, and significant linear concentration-response relationships were obtained with respect to the induction of all endpoints. This capacity to induce mitotic exchange in the somatic tissue of Drosophila compares well with the compound's reported ability to induce chromosome breaks in Drosophila germ cells. However, not all compounds possess similar genotoxic profiles in the somatic an germ tissue of Drosophila.

  8. Cerebellum neurotransmission during postnatal development: [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] vs cisplatin and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Piccolini, Valeria Maria; Esposito, Alessandra; Dal Bo, Veronica; Insolia, Violetta; Bottone, Maria Grazia; De Pascali, Sandra Angelica; Fanizzi, Francesco Paolo; Bernocchi, Graziella

    2015-02-01

    Several chemotherapeutic drugs are known to cause neurotoxicity. Platinum-based agents in use or in clinical trials display neurotoxic potential accompanied by neurological complications; recent studies have identified a large number of behavioural issues in paediatric oncology patients. To understand the toxicity of platinum drugs at the molecular and cellular levels, this study compares the possible cytotoxic effects of an older platinum compound, cisplatin and a new platinum compound, [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)], on the CNS of postnatally developing rats, which is much more vulnerable to injury than the CNS of adult rats. Since several drugs interact with neurotransmitters during neuronal maturation, we performed immunostainings with antibodies raised against markers of glutamate and GABA, the major neurotransmitters in the cerebellum. After a single injection of cisplatin at postnatal day 10 (PD10), the labelling of Purkinje cells with the neurotransmitter markers evidenced alterations between PD11 and PD30, i.e. atrophy of the dendrite tree, changes in the distribution of synaptic contacts of parallel and climbing fibres, delay in the elimination of transient synapses on cell soma and severely impaired pinceau formation at the axon hillock. After treatment with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)], the sole relevant change concerned the timing of climbing fibres elimination; the transient synapses disappearance on the Purkinje cell soma was delayed in some cells; instead, the growth of Purkinje cell dendrite tree was normal as was the formation of inhibitory synaptic contacts on these neurons. These findings add new evidence not only on the lower neurotoxicity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] vs cisplatin but also on the involvement of neurotransmitters and relative synaptic connections in the maturation of central nerve tissue.

  9. Emodin mitigates the oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in osteosarcoma MG63 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li; Hu, Rui; Tu, Song; Cheng, Wen-Jun; Zheng, Qiong; Wang, Jun-Wen; Kan, Wu-Sheng; Ren, Yi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Previously, the application of cisplatin in chemotherapy was limited due to the significant side effects on normal cell growth. In the present study, the concomitant application of emodin with cisplatin was demonstrated to ameliorate cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and markedly suppress tumor cell proliferation for the first time. Human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells were treated with cisplatin alone or in combination with emodin. The cell viability was determined by MTS assays and the augmentation of reactive oxygen species were determined by fluorogenic probes; in addition, a stable MG-63 subline bearing antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven luciferase expression was developed to monitor the activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-ARE signaling pathway. The results indicated that cisplatin or emodin may inhibit MG-63 cell proliferation in a time- or dose-dependent manner, respectively. Concomitant treatment with cisplatin and emodin demonstrated synergic anti-tumor effects. Cisplatin augmented reactive oxygen species in the MG-63 cells, followed by the translocation of Nrf2 from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which triggered ARE-driven luciferase expression. The addition of emodin diminished the previously described phenomenon, resulting in decreased ROS augmentation, translocation of Nrf2 and ARE-driven luciferase activity. In conclusion, emodin could ameliorate cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and protect the cells from oxidative stress-induced damage. The findings of the present study provide a novel strategy for the treatment of osteosarcoma using emodin and cisplatin.

  10. Origanum majorana Attenuates Nephrotoxicity of Cisplatin Anticancer Drug through Ameliorating Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Amel M; Desouky, Shreen; Marzouk, Mohamed; Sayed, Amany A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that cisplatin is an important anticancer drug, its clinical utilization is limited by nephrotoxicity during long term medication. Combined cisplatin chemotherapy with plant extracts can diminish toxicity and enhance the antitumor efficacy of the drug. This study evaluated the effect of Originum majorana ethanolic extract (OMEE) on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Eighteen male rats were divided into three groups as follows: a control group, a group treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg body weight), and a group that received both cisplatin and OMEE (500 mg/kg body weight) for 14 days. Cisplatin induced a significant increase in creatinine, urea, uric acid, blood urea nitrogen, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide levels. However, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase levels were significantly diminished. Conversely, OMEE significantly modulated the renal and oxidative markers negatively impacted by cisplatin. OMEE significantly reduced the effects of cisplatin-induced changes in renal and oxidative markers, possibly through its free radical scavenging activity. Thus, OMEE may be combined with cisplatin to alleviate nephrotoxicity in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27164131

  11. Origanum majorana Attenuates Nephrotoxicity of Cisplatin Anticancer Drug through Ameliorating Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Amel M.; Desouky, Shreen; Marzouk, Mohamed; Sayed, Amany A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that cisplatin is an important anticancer drug, its clinical utilization is limited by nephrotoxicity during long term medication. Combined cisplatin chemotherapy with plant extracts can diminish toxicity and enhance the antitumor efficacy of the drug. This study evaluated the effect of Originum majorana ethanolic extract (OMEE) on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Eighteen male rats were divided into three groups as follows: a control group, a group treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg body weight), and a group that received both cisplatin and OMEE (500 mg/kg body weight) for 14 days. Cisplatin induced a significant increase in creatinine, urea, uric acid, blood urea nitrogen, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide levels. However, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase levels were significantly diminished. Conversely, OMEE significantly modulated the renal and oxidative markers negatively impacted by cisplatin. OMEE significantly reduced the effects of cisplatin-induced changes in renal and oxidative markers, possibly through its free radical scavenging activity. Thus, OMEE may be combined with cisplatin to alleviate nephrotoxicity in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27164131

  12. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of cisplatin treatment combined with anaesthetics on EAT cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Brozovic, Gordana; Orsolic, Nada; Knezevic, Fabijan; Horvat Knezevic, Anica; Benkovic, Vesna; Sakic, Katarina; Hrgovic, Zlatko; Bendelja, Kreso; Fassbender, Walter J

    2009-06-01

    In this study, DNA damage in tumour cells, as well as irreversible cell damage leading to apoptosis induced in vivo by the combined application of cisplatin and inhalation anaesthetics, was investigated. The genotoxicity of anaesthetics on Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells of mice, alone or in combined application with cisplatin, was estimated by using the alkaline comet assay. The percentage of EAT cell apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. Groups of EAT-bearing mice were (i) treated intraperitoneally with cisplatin, (ii) exposed to repeated anaesthesia with inhalation anaesthetic, and (iii) subjected to combined treatment of exposure to anaesthetics after cisplatin for 3 days. Sevoflurane, halothane and isoflurane caused strong genotoxic effects on tumour cells in vivo. The tested anaesthetics alone showed no direct effect on programmed cell death although sevoflurane and especially halothane decreased the number of living EAT cells in peritoneal cavity lavage. Repeated anaesthesia with isoflurane had stimulatory effects on EAT cell proliferation and inhibited tumour cell apoptosis (6.11%), compared to the control group (10.26%). Cisplatin caused massive apoptosis of EAT cells (41.14%) and decreased the number of living EAT cells in the peritoneal cavity. Combined cisplatin and isoflurane treatment additionally increased EAT cell apoptosis to 51.32%. Combined treatment of mice with cisplatin and all anaesthetics increased the number of living tumour cells in the peritoneal cavity compared to cisplatin treatment of mice alone. These results suggest that the inhalation of anaesthetics may protect tumour cells from the cisplatin-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects.

  13. Emodin mitigates the oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in osteosarcoma MG63 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li; Hu, Rui; Tu, Song; Cheng, Wen-Jun; Zheng, Qiong; Wang, Jun-Wen; Kan, Wu-Sheng; Ren, Yi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Previously, the application of cisplatin in chemotherapy was limited due to the significant side effects on normal cell growth. In the present study, the concomitant application of emodin with cisplatin was demonstrated to ameliorate cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and markedly suppress tumor cell proliferation for the first time. Human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells were treated with cisplatin alone or in combination with emodin. The cell viability was determined by MTS assays and the augmentation of reactive oxygen species were determined by fluorogenic probes; in addition, a stable MG-63 subline bearing antioxidant response element (ARE)-driven luciferase expression was developed to monitor the activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-ARE signaling pathway. The results indicated that cisplatin or emodin may inhibit MG-63 cell proliferation in a time- or dose-dependent manner, respectively. Concomitant treatment with cisplatin and emodin demonstrated synergic anti-tumor effects. Cisplatin augmented reactive oxygen species in the MG-63 cells, followed by the translocation of Nrf2 from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, which triggered ARE-driven luciferase expression. The addition of emodin diminished the previously described phenomenon, resulting in decreased ROS augmentation, translocation of Nrf2 and ARE-driven luciferase activity. In conclusion, emodin could ameliorate cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and protect the cells from oxidative stress-induced damage. The findings of the present study provide a novel strategy for the treatment of osteosarcoma using emodin and cisplatin. PMID:27602124

  14. Arsenic Trioxide Amplifies Cisplatin Toxicity in Human Tubular Cells Transformed by HPV-16 E6/E7 for Further Therapeutic Directions in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Samriti; Bandi, Sriram; Viswanathan, Preeti; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA integrations may affect therapeutic responses in cancers through ATM network-related DNA damage response (DDR). We studied whether cisplatin-induced DDR was altered in human HK-2 renal tubular cells immortalized by HPV16 E6/E7 genes. Cytotoxicity assays utilized thiazolyl blue dye and DDR was identified by gene expression differences, double-strand DNA breaks, ATM promoter activity, and analysis of cell cycling and side population cells. After cisplatin, HK-2 cells showed greater ATM promoter activity indicating activation of this network, but DDR was muted, since little γH2AX was expressed, DNA strand breaks were absent and cells continued cycling. When HK-2 cells were treated with the MDM2 antagonist inducing p53, nutlin-3, or p53 transcriptional activator, tenovin-1, cell growth decreased but cisplatin toxicity was unaffected. By contrast, arsenic trioxide, which by inhibiting wild-type p53-induced phosphatase-1 that serves responses downstream of p53, and by depolymerizing tubulin, synergistically enhanced cisplatin cytotoxicity including loss of SP cells. Our findings demonstrated that HPV16 E6/E7 altered DDR through p53-mediated cell growth controls, which may be overcome by targeting of WIP1 and other processes, and thus should be relevant for treating renal cell carcinoma. PMID:25444910

  15. Propofol depresses cisplatin cytotoxicity via the inhibition of gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Xiyan; Wang, Qin; Ge, Hui; Tao, Liang

    2016-06-01

    The general anesthetic, propofol, affects chemotherapeutic activity, however, the mechanism underlying its effects remains to be fully elucidated. Our previous study showed that tramadol and flurbiprofen depressed the cytotoxicity of cisplatin via the inhibition of gap junction (GJ) intercellular communication (GJIC) in connexin (Cx)32 HeLa cells. The present study investigated whether the effects of propofol on the cytotoxicity of cisplatin were mediated by GJ in U87 glioma cells and Cx26‑transfected HeLa cells. Standard colony formation assay was used to determine the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. Parachute dye coupling assay was used to measure GJ function, and western blot analysis was used to determine the expression levels of Cx32. The results revealed that exposure of the U87 glioma cells and the Cx26-transfected HeLa cells to cisplatin for 1 h reduced clonogenic survival in low density cultures (without GJs) and high density cultures (with GJs). However, the toxic effect was higher in the high density culture. In addition, pretreatment of the cells with propofol significantly reduced cisplatin‑induced cytotoxicity, but only in the presence of functional GJs. Furthermore, propofol significantly inhibited dye coupling through junctional channels, and a long duration of exposure of the cells to propofol downregulated the expression levels of Cx43 and Cx26. These results demonstrated that the inhibition of GJIC by propofol affected the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. The present study provides evidence of a novel mechanism underlying the effects of analgesics in counteracting chemotherapeutic efficiency. PMID:27082707

  16. Effect of Cisplatin on Parotid Gland Function in Concomitant Radiochemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, Jeremias; Setz, Juergen; Gerlach, Reinhard; Vordermark, Dirk; Gernhardt, Christian R.; Kuhnt, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of concomitant radiochemotherapy with cisplatin on parotid gland tissue complication probability. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with either radiotherapy (n = 61) or concomitant radiochemotherapy with cisplatin (n = 36) for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively evaluated. The dose and volume distributions of the parotid glands were noted in dose-volume histograms. Stimulated salivary flow rates were measured before, during the 2nd and 6th weeks and at 4 weeks and 6 months after the treatment. The data were fit using the normal tissue complication probability model of Lyman. Complication was defined as a reduction of the salivary flow rate to less than 25% of the pretreatment flow rate. Results: The normal tissue complication probability model parameter TD{sub 50} (the dose leading to a complication probability of 50%) was found to be 32.2 Gy at 4 weeks and 32.1 Gy at 6 months for concomitant radiochemotherapy and 41.1 Gy at 4 weeks and 39.6 Gy at 6 months for radiotherapy. The tolerated dose for concomitant radiochemotherapy was at least 7 to 8 Gy lower than for radiotherapy alone at TD{sub 50}. Conclusions: In this study, the concomitant radiochemotherapy tended to cause a higher probability of parotid gland tissue damage. Advanced radiotherapy planning approaches such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy may be partiticularly important for parotid sparing in radiochemotherapy because of cisplatin-related increased radiosensitivity of glands.

  17. Hydration with magnesium and mannitol without furosemide prevents the nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin and pemetrexed in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muraki, Keiko; Koyama, Ryo; Honma, Yuichiro; Yagishita, Shigehiro; Shukuya, Takehito; Ohashi, Rina; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Kido, Kenji; Iwakami, Shin-ichiro; Sasaki, Shinichi; Iwase, Akihiko

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the effect of hydration with magnesium and mannitol without furosemide on the nephrotoxocity accompanying combination chemotherapy using cisplatin and pemetrexed in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Fifty patients with NSCLC who received cisplatin plus pemetrexed, using either old hydration protocol including normal saline with mannitol and furosemide, or a new one including normal saline with magnesium and mannitol without furosemide were retrospectively analyzed. Nephrotoxicity was compared between patients treated using the old protocol and those treated with the new protocol. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the independent factors associated with protection against nephrotoxicity in patients with NSCLC who received cisplatin plus pemetrexed. Results Thirty patients received the old hydration protocol, while 20 patients were treated using the new hydration protocol. The patients treated using the new hydration protocol showed a significantly greater increase in creatinine clearance (P=0.0004) and a decrease in the serum creatinine level (P=0.0148) after one course of chemotherapy compared with those treated using the old hydration protocol. There were no differences in the chemotherapeutic response or overall survival between the groups (P=0.572). The new hydration protocol with supplemented magnesium with mannitol without furosemide was an independent factor for the protection against nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin and pemetrexed in patients with advanced NSCLC [HR 0.232 (95% CI: 0.055-0.986), P=0.039]. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the new hydration protocol comprising supplementation with magnesium without furosemide could prevent the nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin and pemetrexed without affecting the treatment outcome. PMID:23205279

  18. Weekly nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel in combination with cisplatin versus weekly solvent-based paclitaxel plus cisplatin as first-line therapy in Chinese patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-ying; Yao, Zhi-hua; Tang, Hong; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xiao-san; Yao, Shu-na; Yang, Shu-jun; Liu, Yan-yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective More effective regimens for advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are urgently needed. Therefore, a retrospective study concerning the efficacy and safety of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel plus cisplatin (nab-TP) versus solvent-based paclitaxel plus cisplatin (sb-TP) as a first-line therapy was conducted in Chinese patients with advanced ESCC. Methods From June 2009 to June 2015, 32 patients were treated with nab-paclitaxel (125 mg/m2) on the first and eighth days (30 minutes infusion) and cisplatin (75 mg/m2) on the second day every 21 days (nab-TP arm). Also, 43 patients were treated with solvent-based paclitaxel (80 mg/m2) intravenously on the first and eighth days and the same dose of cisplatin (sb-TP arm). The two groups were compared in terms of objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and safety profile. OS and PFS were estimated using Kaplan–Meier methods to determine associations between chemotherapy regimens and survival outcomes. Results Nab-TP demonstrated a higher ORR (50% vs 30%; P=0.082) and disease control rate (81% vs 65%; P=0.124) than sb-TP. Median OS was similar for nab-TP and sb-TP (12.5 vs 10.7 months; P=0.269). However, nab-TP resulted in a longer median PFS (6.1 months [95% confidence interval: 5.3–6.9]) than sb-TP (5.0 months [95% confidence interval: 4.4–5.6]) (P=0.029). The most common adverse events included anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia in both the groups and no statistically significant differences were observed between the groups. With statistically significant differences, significantly less grade ≥3 peripheral neuropathy, arthralgia, and myalgia occurred in the nab-TP arm (all P<0.05). Dose reduction, treatment delays, and second-line therapy were similar between the two regimens. There were no treatment-related deaths in either group. Conclusion Nab-paclitaxel plus cisplatin is found

  19. Dihydroartemisinin potentiates the anticancer effect of cisplatin via mTOR inhibition in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells: involvement of apoptosis and autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xue; Li, Ling; Jiang, Hong; Jiang, Keping; Jin, Ye; Zheng, Jianhua

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • Phosphorylation of mTOR is abnormal activation in SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cells. • Downregulation of mTOR by DHA helps to sensitize the SKOV3/DDP cells to chemotherapy. • DHA has the potential of induce autophagy in cancer cells. - Abstract: Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) exhibits anticancer activity in tumor cells but its mechanism of action is unclear. Cisplatin (DDP) is currently the best known chemotherapeutic available for ovarian cancer. However, tumors return de novo with acquired resistance over time. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important kinase that regulates cell apoptosis and autophagy, and its dysregulation has been observed in chemoresistant human cancers. Here, we show that compared with control ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3), mTOR phosphorylation was abnormally activated in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3/DDP) following cisplatin monotherapy. Treatment with cisplatin combined with DHA could enhance cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition in SKOV3/DDP cells. This mechanism is at least partially due to DHA deactivation of mTOR kinase and promotion of apoptosis. Although autophagy was also induced by DHA, the reduced cell death was not found by suppressing autophagic flux by Bafilomycin A1 (BAF). Taken together, we conclude that inhibition of cisplatin-induced mTOR activation is one of the main mechanisms by which DHA dramatically promotes its anticancer effect in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells.

  20. Preliminary results of a phase I/II trial of paclitaxel in patients with relapsed or cisplatin-refractory testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Bokemeyer, C; Schmoll, H J; Natt, F; Knoche, M; Beyer, J; Souchon, R

    1994-01-01

    Paclitaxel represents a novel antitumour agent with demonstrated activity in cisplatin-sensitive tumours, particularly ovarian cancer. In addition, responses to paclitaxel have been observed in patients with cisplatin-refractory ovarian cancer. The role of paclitaxel in the treatment of testicular cancer has not been explored so far. Despite the generally high cure rates in patients with metastatic testicular cancer, patients with relapsed disease not responding to platin-based salvage chemotherapy have an extremely poor prognosis. In a phase I/II trial 10 patients with relapsed, cisplatin-refractory malignant germ-cell tumours were treated with paclitaxel as 6-h infusions (8 patients) or 3-h infusions (2 patients) at doses from 135 mg/m2 to 310 mg/m2 at 3-week intervals. Three patients achieved a response to paclitaxel, but disease recurred shortly in two patients after two and four cycles of therapy, respectively. One patient has remained in marker-negative partial response for more than 5 months. The toxicity of paclitaxel was tolerable for a dose range from 135 mg/m2 to 225 mg/m2. Granulocytopenia, WHO grades 3 and 4, occurred in all patients but was of short duration (median 3 days; range: 2-7 days). Other toxicities such as mucositis (5 patients grade 1), neurotoxicity (1 patient grade 1, 2 patients grade 2), infection (1 patient grade 3) and diarrhoea (1 patient grade 2) were not dose-limiting. There were no hypersensitivity reactions, but 1 patient developed severe myalgias during therapy with paclitaxel. Six patients with documented cisplatin-refractory disease were retreated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy after paclitaxel treatment and, in 4 of these, tumour responses of 3, 4, 5 and more than 5 months duration were achieved. In order to explore the role of paclitaxel in relapsed and/or cisplatin-refractory testicular cancer a phase II study using a 3-h infusion of 225 mg/m2 paclitaxel every 3 weeks, conducted by the German Testicular Cancer Study Group

  1. Chrysin protects against cisplatin-induced colon. toxicity via amelioration of oxidative stress and apoptosis: Probable role of p38MAPK and p53

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Rehan; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Qamar, Wajhul; Lateef, Abdul; Tahir, Mir; Rehman, Muneeb U; Ali, Farrah; Sultana, Sarwat

    2012-02-01

    Cisplatin, an antineoplastic drug, is widely used as a foremost therapy against numerous forms of cancer but it has pronounced adverse effects viz., nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity etc. CDDP-induced emesis and diarrhea are also marked toxicities that may be due to intestinal injury. Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavone commonly found in many plants possesses multiple biological activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of chrysin against CDDP-induced colon toxicity. The plausible mechanism of CDDP-induced colon toxicity and damage includes oxidative stress, activation of p38MAPK and p53, and colonic epithelial cell apoptosis via upregulating the expression of Bak and cleaved caspase-3. Chrysin was administered to Wistar rats once daily for 14 consecutive days at the doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight orally in corn oil. On day 14, a single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin was given at the dose of 7.5 mg/kg body weight and animals were euthanized after 24 h of cisplatin injection. Chrysin ameliorated CDDP-induced lipid peroxidation, xanthine oxidase activity, glutathione depletion, decrease in antioxidant (catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and glucose-6 phosphate dehydrogenase) and phase-II detoxifying (glutathione-S-transferase and quinone reductase) enzyme activities. Chrysin also attenuated goblet cell disintegration, expression of phospho-p38MAPK and p53, and apoptotic tissue damage which were induced by CDDP. Histological findings further supported the protective effects of chrysin against CDDP-induced colonic damage. The results of the present study suggest that the protective effect of chrysin against CDDP-induced colon toxicity was related with attenuation of oxidative stress, activation of p38MAPK and p53, and apoptotic tissue damage. Highlights: ► Cisplatin-induced colon toxicity is associated with oxidative stress and

  2. Selenium Protects Retinal Cells from Cisplatin-Induced Alterations in Carbohydrate Residues

    PubMed Central

    Akşit, Dilek; Yazıcı, Alper; Akşit, Hasan; Sarı, Esin S.; Yay, Arzu; Yıldız, Onur; Kılıç, Adil; Ermiş, Sıtkı S.; Seyrek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Investigate alterations in the expression and localization of carbohydrate units in rat retinal cells exposed to cisplatin toxicity. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate putative protective effects of selenium on retinal cells subjected to cisplatin. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Eighteen healthy Wistar rats were divided into three equal groups: 1. Control, 2. Cisplatin and 3. Cisplatin+selenium groups. After anesthesia, the right eye of each rat was enucleated. Results: Histochemically, retinal cells of control groups reacted with α-2,3-bound sialic acid-specific Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA) strongly, while cisplatin reduced the staining intensity for MAA. However, selenium administration alleviated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for MAA in retinal cells. The staining intensity for N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc residues) specific Griffonia simplicifolia-1 (GSL–1) was relatively slight in control animals and cisplatin reduced this slight staining for GSL-1 further. Selenium administration mitigated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for GSL-1. A diffuse staining for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) specific wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was observed throughout the retina of the control animals. In particular, cells localized in the inner plexiform and photoreceptor layers are reacted strongly with WGA. Compared to the control animals, binding sites for WGA in the retina of rats given cisplatin were remarkably decreased. However, the retinal cells of rats given selenium reacted strongly with WGA. Conclusion: Cisplatin reduces α-2,3-bound sialic acid, GlcNAc and GalNAc residues in certain retinal cells. However, selenium alleviates the reducing effect of cisplatin on carbohydrate residues in retinal cells.

  3. Selenium Protects Retinal Cells from Cisplatin-Induced Alterations in Carbohydrate Residues

    PubMed Central

    Akşit, Dilek; Yazıcı, Alper; Akşit, Hasan; Sarı, Esin S.; Yay, Arzu; Yıldız, Onur; Kılıç, Adil; Ermiş, Sıtkı S.; Seyrek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Investigate alterations in the expression and localization of carbohydrate units in rat retinal cells exposed to cisplatin toxicity. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate putative protective effects of selenium on retinal cells subjected to cisplatin. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Eighteen healthy Wistar rats were divided into three equal groups: 1. Control, 2. Cisplatin and 3. Cisplatin+selenium groups. After anesthesia, the right eye of each rat was enucleated. Results: Histochemically, retinal cells of control groups reacted with α-2,3-bound sialic acid-specific Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA) strongly, while cisplatin reduced the staining intensity for MAA. However, selenium administration alleviated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for MAA in retinal cells. The staining intensity for N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc residues) specific Griffonia simplicifolia-1 (GSL–1) was relatively slight in control animals and cisplatin reduced this slight staining for GSL-1 further. Selenium administration mitigated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for GSL-1. A diffuse staining for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) specific wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was observed throughout the retina of the control animals. In particular, cells localized in the inner plexiform and photoreceptor layers are reacted strongly with WGA. Compared to the control animals, binding sites for WGA in the retina of rats given cisplatin were remarkably decreased. However, the retinal cells of rats given selenium reacted strongly with WGA. Conclusion: Cisplatin reduces α-2,3-bound sialic acid, GlcNAc and GalNAc residues in certain retinal cells. However, selenium alleviates the reducing effect of cisplatin on carbohydrate residues in retinal cells. PMID:27606141

  4. Nuclear microprobe determination of platinum quantitative distribution in rat brain tumors after cisplatin or carboplatin injection for PAT treatment of glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.; Biston, M.-C.; Devès, G.; Bohic, S.; Carmona, A.

    2005-04-01

    Conventional radiotherapy of high-grade glioma is unsuccessful since less than 50% of patients survive at 6 months, therefore glioma treatment is still challenging. A new radiotherapy procedure has been recently proposed, the photoactivation therapy (PAT), associating synchrotron radiation with a chemotherapy agent, such as cisplatin. PAT aims at using the monochromaticity and the very high brilliance of the synchrotron radiation for selective excitation of a high-Z compound introduced in tumor cell DNA to maximize the photoelectric effect probability, thus increasing local toxicity. Synchrotron irradiation of cisplatin at the platinum absorption K-edge resulted in a dramatic increase in life span relative to median survival time in the F98 glioma model in Fisher rat. In the purpose to optimize the platinum concentration into the tumor, the platinum content of irradiated target needs to be quantified. These results will enable to correlate injected dose to cellular platinum content in the tumor at the time of irradiation, and to study the spatial diffusion and distribution of the platinum into the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissues from the point of injection. Male Fisher 344 rats were inoculated with 103 F98 glioma cells. Thirteen days after stereotactic inoculation, intracerebral injection at the tumor site of 40 μg of carboplatin and 3 or 5 μg of cisplatin was performed. Platinum quantitative distribution in tumors and adjacent brain tissues was determined using μ-PIXE and μ-RBS analysis.

  5. Targeting human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) to mitochondria enhances cisplatin cytotoxicity in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihong; Mizumachi, Takatsugu; Carcel-Trullols, Jaime; Li, Liwen; Naito, Akihiro; Spencer, Horace J; Spring, Paul M; Smoller, Bruce R; Watson, Amanda J; Margison, Geoffrey P; Higuchi, Masahiro; Fan, Chun-Yang

    2007-08-01

    Many chemoradiation therapies cause DNA damage through oxidative stress. An important cellular mechanism that protects cells against oxidative stress involves DNA repair. One of the primary DNA repair mechanisms for oxidative DNA damage is base excision repair (BER). BER involves the tightly coordinated function of four enzymes (glycosylase, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, polymerase and ligase), in which 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 initiates the cycle. An imbalance in the production of any one of these enzymes may result in the generation of more DNA damage and increased cell killing. In this study, we targeted mitochondrial DNA to enhance cancer chemotherapy by over-expressing a human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) gene in the mitochondria of human hepatoma cells. Increased hOGG1 transgene expression was achieved at RNA, protein and enzyme activity levels. In parallel, we observed enhanced mitochondrial DNA damage, increased mitochondrial respiration rate, increased membrane potential and elevated free radical production. A greater proportion of the hOGG1-over-expressing hepatoma cells experienced apoptosis. Following exposure to a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, cisplatin, cancer cells over-expressing hOGG1 displayed much shortened long-term survival when compared with control cells. Our results suggest that over-expression of hOGG1 in mitochondria may promote mitochondrial DNA damage by creating an imbalance in the BER pathway and sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin. These findings support further evaluation of hOGG1 over-expression strategies for cancer therapy.

  6. Evaluation of amifostine for protection against cisplatin-induced serious hearing loss in children treated for average-risk or high-risk medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, James G.; Bass, Johnnie K.; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Huang, Jie; Chintagumpala, Murali; Bouffet, Eric; Hassall, Tim; Gururangan, Sridharan; Heath, John A.; Kellie, Stewart; Cohn, Richard; Fisher, Michael J.; Panandiker, Atmaram Pai; Merchant, Thomas E.; Srinivasan, Ashok; Wetmore, Cynthia; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Stewart, Clinton F.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Broniscer, Alberto; Gajjar, Amar

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate amifostine for protection from cisplatin-induced serious hearing loss in patients with average-risk medulloblastoma by extending a previous analysis to a much larger sample size. In addition, this study aimed to assess amifostine with serious hearing loss in patients with high-risk medulloblastoma treated with cisplatin. Methods Newly diagnosed medulloblastoma patients (n = 379; ages 3–21 years), enrolled on one of 2 sequential St. Jude clinical protocols that included 4 courses of 75 mg/m2 cisplatin, were compared for hearing loss by whether or not they received 600 mg/m2 of amifostine immediately before and 3 hours into each cisplatin infusion. Amifostine administration was not randomized. The last audiological evaluation between 5.5 and 24.5 months following protocol treatment initiation was graded using the Chang Ototoxicity Scale. A grade of ≥2b (loss requiring a hearing aid or deafness) was considered a serious event. Results Among average-risk patients (n = 263), amifostine was associated with protection from serious hearing loss (adjusted OR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.14–0.64). For high-risk patients (n = 116), however, there was not sufficient evidence to conclude that amifostine prevented serious hearing loss (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.31–2.54). Conclusions Although patients in this study were not randomly assigned to amifostine treatment, we found evidence in favor of amifostine administration for protection against cisplatin-induced serious hearing loss in average-risk but not in high-risk, medulloblastoma patients. PMID:24414535

  7. Suppression of Poly(rC)-Binding Protein 4 (PCBP4) reduced cisplatin resistance in human maxillary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yumi; Narita, Norihiko; Nomi, Nozomi; Sugimoto, Chizuru; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Yamada, Takechiyo; Karaya, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Hideki; Fujieda, Shigeharu

    2015-07-21

    Cisplatin plays an important role in the therapy for human head and neck cancers. However, cancer cells develop cisplatin resistance, leading to difficulty in treatment and poor prognosis. To analyze cisplatin-resistant mechanisms, a cisplatin-resistant cell line, IMC-3CR, was established from the IMC-3 human maxillary cancer cell line. Flow cytometry revealed that, compared with IMC-3 cells, cisplatin more dominantly induced cell cycle G2/M arrest rather than apoptosis in IMC-3CR cells. That fact suggests that IMC-3CR cells avoid cisplatin-induced apoptosis through induction of G2/M arrest, which allows cancer cells to repair damaged DNA and survive. In the present study, we specifically examined Poly(rC)-Binding Protein 4 (PCBP4), which reportedly induces G2/M arrest. Results showed that suppression of PCBP4 by RNAi reduced cisplatin-induced G2/M arrest and enhanced apoptosis in IMC-3CR cells, resulting in the reduction of cisplatin resistance. In contrast, overexpression of PCBP4 in IMC-3 cells induced G2/M arrest after cisplatin treatment and enhanced cisplatin resistance. We revealed that PCBP4 combined with Cdc25A and suppressed the expression of Cdc25A, resulting in G2/M arrest. PCBP4 plays important roles in the induction of cisplatin resistance in human maxillary cancers. PCBP4 is a novel molecular target for the therapy of head and neck cancers, especially cisplatin-resistant cancers.

  8. Pretreatment with Darbepoetin Attenuates Renal Injury in a Rat Model of Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dae Eun; Jeong, Jin Young; Lim, Beom Jin; Lee, Kang Wook; Shin, Young-Tai

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims Darbepoetin alfa (DPO) exhibits comparable renoprotective effects to erythropoietin (EPO) in several animal models of acute renal injury. We examined whether DPO also attenuated renal injury in a rat model of cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Methods Male Spague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: untreated, DPO-treated, cisplatin-injected, and DPO-treated cisplatin-injected. DPO pretreatment was conducted 24 hours after and just before cisplatin administration. Ninety-six hours after cisplatin administration, animals in all experimental groups were sacrificed. We examined serology; real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for TNF-α, Bcl-2, and MCP-1 gene expression; and Western blots for caspase-3. We also conducted terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and light microscopy. Results Pretreatment with DPO significantly reduced the levels of blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, the magnitude of renal tubular epithelial damage, and renal gene expression of TNF-α, Fas, and MCP-1 in kidneys injured by cisplatin. Pretreatment with DPO significantly increased Bcl-2 mRNA levels in kidneys injured by cisplatin, and significantly reduced activated caspase-3 and TUNEL-positive cells. Conclusions DPO exhibits a renoprotective effect in experimental cisplatin-induced renal injury, the mechanism of which may involve DPO antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic effects. PMID:19721861

  9. Cisplatin-Conjugated Porous Gelatin Particles: Assessment of Optimal Conditions for Binding and Release

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, Shinichi Nitta, Norihisa; Sonoda, Akinaga; Nitta-Seko, Ayumi; Tanaka, Toyohiko; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the optimal conditions for binding cisplatin and porous gelatin particles (PGPs) and to establish in vivo drug release pharmacokinetics. PGPs were immersed in cisplatin solutions under different conditions: concentration, immersion time, and temperature. Thereafter, PGPs were washed in distilled water to remove uncombined cisplatin and were then freeze-dried. The platinum concentration (PC) in the PGPs was then measured. For the in vivo release test, 50 mg/kg of the cisplatin-conjugated PGPs was implanted subcutaneously in the abdominal region of two rabbits. PCs in the blood were measured at different time intervals. PCs significantly increased in direct proportion to the concentration and immersion time (p < 0.01). Although PC increased at higher solution temperature, it was not a linear progression. For the in vivo release test, platinum was released from cisplatin-conjugated PGPs after 1 day, and the peak PC was confirmed 2 days after implantation. Platinum in the blood was detected until 7 days after implantation in one rabbit and 15 days after administration in the other rabbit. Platinum binding with PGPs increased with a higher concentration of cisplatin solution at a higher temperature over a longer duration of time. Release of cisplatin from cisplatin-conjugated PGPs was confirmed in vivo.

  10. Effect of diabetes on biodistribution, nephrotoxicity and antitumor activity of cisplatin in mice.

    PubMed

    da Silva Faria, Marcia C; Santos, Neife A G Dos; Carvalho Rodrigues, Maria A; Rodrigues, Jairo Lisboa; Barbosa Junior, Fernando; Santos, Antonio Cardozo Dos

    2015-03-01

    Both types of diabetes are associated with higher incidence of some types of cancer. Treating cancer in diabetic patients without aggravating diabetes-related complications is a challenge for clinicians. Additionally, little is known about how diabetes affects the treatment of cancer. One of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs is cisplatin, which is nephrotoxic. Studies suggest that diabetes acts as a protective factor against the nephrotoxicity of cisplatin, but the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated yet. This renal protection has been attributed to decreased accumulation of cisplatin in the kidneys, which could be associated with deficient active transport of proximal tubular cells or to pharmacokinetic alterations caused by diabetes. However, it is uncertain if diabetes also compromises the antitumor activity of cisplatin. To address this issue, we developed a mouse model bearing cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, Sarcoma 180 and streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Four groups of treatment were defined: (i) control, (ii) diabetic, (iii) cisplatin and (iv) diabetic treated with cisplatin. The following parameters were evaluated: renal function, oxidative stress, apoptosis, renal histopathology, tumor remission, survival rate, genotoxicity and platinum concentration in tumor and several organs. Results indicate that diabetes protects against the renal damage induced by cisplatin, while also compromises its antitumor effectiveness. This is the first study to demonstrate this effect. PMID:25665769

  11. Controlled Release and Antitumor Effect of Pluronic F127 Mixed with Cisplatin in a Rabbit Model

    SciTech Connect

    Sonoda, Akinaga Nitta, Norihisa; Ohta, Shinich; Nitta-Seko, Ayumi; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate pluronic F127 for the controlled release of cisplatin in a rabbit model. Pluronic F127 becomes liquid at temperatures <25{sup o}C and converts to a gelatinous state at temperatures between 25 and 60{sup o}C. Six Japanese white rabbits were injected with pluronic + cisplatin (n = 3, renal group A) or saline + cisplatin (n = 3, renal group B) to measure the platinum concentration in kidneys. Another 25 rabbits with VX2 liver tumors were divided into five equal groups. They were injected with saline, saline + cisplatin, iodized oil + cisplatin, pluronic alone, or pluronic + cisplatin and labeled as liver groups A, B, C, D, and E, respectively. The antitumor effect of pluronic was then assessed. In the presence of pluronic, the platinum concentration in the kidneys of rabbits remained relatively high. In animals with liver tumors, the delivery of pluronic + cisplatin produced higher tumor reduction rates (P < 0.05) than in the other groups, without apparent damage to normal liver tissue. We conclude that pluronic is useful for the controlled release of cisplatin in a rabbit model.

  12. ABT737 enhances cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Zhongqi; Yu, Huimei; Cui, Ni; Kong, Xianggui; Liu, Xiaomin; Chang, Yulei; Wu, Yao; Sun, Liankun; Wang, Guangyi

    2015-07-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma responses weakly to cisplatin. Mitochondrial dynamics participate in the response to various stresses, and mainly involve mitophagy and mitochondrial fusion and fission. Bcl-2 family proteins play critical roles in orchestrating mitochondrial dynamics, and are involved in the resistance to cisplatin. Here we reported that ABT737, combined with cisplatin, can promote cholangiocarcinoma cells to undergo apoptosis. We found that the combined treatment decreased the Mcl-1 pro-survival form and increased Bak. Cells undergoing cisplatin treatment showed hyperfused mitochondria, whereas fragmentation was dominant in the mitochondria of cells exposed to the combined treatment, with higher Fis1 levels, decreased Mfn2 and OPA1 levels, increased ratio of Drp1 60 kD to 80 kD form, and more Drp1 located on mitochondria. More p62 aggregates were observed in cells with fragmented mitochondria, and they gradually translocated to mitochondria. Mitophagy was induced by the combined treatment. Knockdown p62 decreased the Drp1 ratio, increased Tom20, and increased cell viability. Our data indicated that mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in the response of cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin. ABT737 might enhance cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and the balance within Bcl-2 family proteins. Furthermore, p62 seems to be critical in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • Cholangiocarcinoma may adapt to cisplatin through mitochondrial fusion. • ABT737 sensitizes cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin by promoting fission and mitophagy. • p62 might participate in the regulation of mitochondrial fission and mitophagy.

  13. D-methionine protects against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity in the hippocampus of the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Hinduja, Sneha; Kraus, Kari Suzanne; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Salvi, Richard J

    2015-04-01

    The hippocampus plays an important role in memory, mood, and spatial navigation. In the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus, in the subgranular zone (SGZ), new cells are generated, which differentiate and mature into new neurons. Cisplatin, a highly effective antineoplastic drug with nephrotoxic and ototoxic side effects, induces apoptosis and suppresses neurogenesis in the hippocampus leading to memory impairment. Previous studies have shown that the antioxidant D-methionine protects against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity suggesting that it might also prevent neurogenesis from being suppressed by cisplatin treatment. To test this hypothesis, rats were treated with cisplatin, D-methionine, cisplatin plus D-methionine, or saline (controls). Seven days after treatment, the rats were sacrificed, and hippocampal sections immunolabeled for doublecortin (DCX) to identify neuronal precursor cells and maturing neurons in the SGZ. Cisplatin significantly reduced the number of DCX-labeled cells (~80 %) relative to controls. In contrast, DCX cell counts in rats treated with D-methionine prior to cisplatin were similar to controls. The treatment with D-methionine alone did not affect the number of DCX cells. These results indicate that D-methionine prevents the dramatic cisplatin-induced decrease of neurogenesis.

  14. Teratogenic effect of cisplatin in rats and the protective role of sodium selenate.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohammed S; Morgan, Ashraf M; Mekawy, Mohey M; Zaki, Amr R; Ghazi, Zeinab M

    2016-05-01

    Eighty pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. They were allotted to four equal groups. The first group served as a control without any treatment while the other groups were given cisplatin, sodium selenate, and cisplatin+sodium selenate, respectively. Cisplatin was injected intraperitoneally in a dose of 5mg/kgb wt. on the 12th day of gestation while sodium selenate was administered orally in a dose of 0.5mg/kgb wt throughout gestation. Animals were sacrificed on the 20th day of gestation for fetal examination. Cisplatin produced significant elevation in the percentages of late resorption sites and dead foetuses compared with the control group. The mean foetal and placental weights were significantly reduced. Dwarf foetuses and subcutaneous (s/c) haemorrhage were also recorded in cisplatin-treated group. Visceral abnormalities were revealed in the form of dilated nares, anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia, dilated brain ventricles, hypertrophy of the heart, hypoplasia of the lung, hepatomegaly and dilated renal pelvis. Skeletal examination showed wide open fontanel, incomplete ossification of parietal and interparietal bones, incomplete ossification of sternum, reduction in the number or even complete absence of phalanges, sacral and/or caudal vertebrae. Histopathological examination of placentas in cisplatin-treated group revealed severe pathological alterations. Administration of sodium selenate significantly alleviated the afore-mentioned adverse effects of cisplatin on the fetuses and their placentas so we conclude that sodium selenate as an antioxidant has an effective protective role in cisplatin teratogenic effects.

  15. Cisplatin upregulates mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase and peroxynitrite formation to promote renal injury

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Michaela; Sola, Anna

    2009-01-15

    The mitochondria are a critical target for cisplatin-associated nephrotoxicity. Though nitric oxide formation has been implicated in the toxicity of cisplatin, this formation has not so far been related to a possible activation of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mNOS). We show here that the upregulation of oxide mNOS and peroxynitrite formation in cisplatin treatment are key events that influence the development of the harmful parameters described in cisplatin-associated kidney failure. We confirm this by isolating the mitochondrial fraction of the kidney and across different access routes such as the use of a specific inhibitor of neuronal NOS, L-NPA, a peroxynitrite scavenger, FeTMPyP, and a peroxynitrite donor, SIN-1. The in vitro studies corroborated the information obtained in the in vivo experiments. The administration of cisplatin reveals a clear upregulation in the transcription of neuronal NOS and an increase in the levels of nitrites in the mitochondrial fractions of the kidneys. The upregulated transcription directly affects the cytoskeleton structure and the apoptosis. The inhibition of neuronal NOS reduces the levels of nitrites, cell death, and cytoskeleton derangement. Peroxynitrite is involved in the mechanism promoting the NOS transcription. In addition, in controls SIN-1 imitates the effects of cisplatin. In summary, we demonstrate that upregulation of mNOS in cisplatin treatment is a key component in both the initiation and the spread of cisplatin-associated damage in the kidney. Furthermore, peroxynitrite formation is directly involved in this process.

  16. Resveratrol ameliorates cisplatin-induced oxidative injury in New Zealand rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cigremis, Yilmaz; Akgoz, Muslum; Ozen, Hasan; Karaman, Musa; Kart, Asım; Gecer, Murat; Atalan, Gultekin

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the preventive role of resveratrol in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The study used groups of New Zealand rabbits that were treated as follows: group C (cisplatin treated), group R (resveratrol treated), group R+C (resveratrol + cisplatin treatment), and group E (control group). Kidney levels of glutathione were significantly lower in group C than in groups E and R, whereas glutathione levels in group R+C were found to be similar to the control values. Malondialdehyde levels in group C were significantly higher than in groups E and R. However, malondialdehyde levels in group R+C were similar to group E. Kidney levels of nitric oxide were significantly higher in the cisplatin group than in the control, whereas nitric oxide levels were at basal values in group R+C. Cisplatin treatment significantly reduced kidney levels of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activity compared with those of group E, whereas resveratrol treatment significantly increased levels of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activity in group R+C. However, cisplatin injection did not affect mRNA levels of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, or catalase enzymes. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses indicated that cisplatin caused kidney damage, which was mostly prevented by resveratrol treatment. In conclusion, resveratrol ameliorates cisplatin-induced oxidative injury in the kidney of rabbit.

  17. Induction chemotherapy with carboplatin-paclitaxel followed by standard radiotherapy with concurrent daily low-dose cisplatin plus weekly paclitaxel for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ardizzoni, Andrea; Scolaro, Tindaro; Mereu, Carlo; Cafferata, Mara Argenide; Tixi, Lucia; Bacigalupo, Almalina; Tiseo, Marcello; Monetti, Francesco; Rosso, Riccardo

    2005-02-01

    Both induction chemotherapy and concurrent platinating agents have been shown to improve results of thoracic irradiation in the treatment of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This phase II study investigated activity and feasibility of a novel chemoradiation regimen, including platinum and paclitaxel, both as induction chemotherapy and concurrently with thoracic radiotherapy. Previously untreated patients with histologically/cytologically proven unresectable stage I-III NSCLC were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 2 courses of 200 mg/m2 paclitaxel and carboplatin at AUC of 6 mg/mL/min every 3 weeks. From day 43, continuous thoracic irradiation (60 Gy in 30 fractions radiotherapy for 6 weeks) was given concurrently with daily cisplatin at a dose of 5 mg/m2 intravenously and weekly paclitaxel at a dose of 45 mg/m2 for 6 weeks. Fifteen patients were accrued in the first stage of the trial. According to the previous statistical considerations, accrual at the second stage of the study was halted as a result of the achievement an insufficient number of successes. Major toxicity of combined chemoradiation was grade III-IV esophagitis requiring hospitalization for artificial nutrition, which occurred in 58% of patients. Other toxicities included grade II-IV fatigue in 75% of patients and grade I-IV neuromuscular toxicity in 67%. Only 7 patients completed the treatment program as scheduled. Eight patients (53.3%; 95% confidence interval, 26.5-78.7%) had a major response (5 partial response, 3 complete response), 2 patients had disease progression, and 1 was stable at the end of treatment. Four patients died early. With a median follow up of 38 months, the median survival was 12 months. A combined chemoradiation program, including platinum and paclitaxel, appears difficult to deliver at full dose as a result of toxicity, mainly esophagitis. More active and less toxic combined modality treatments need to be developed for inoperable NSCLC.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of paclitaxel plus cisplatin in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Earle, C C; Evans, W K

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of combination chemotherapy with paclitaxel/cisplatin, compared with standard etoposide/cisplatin in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We obtained the primary survival and resource utilization data from a large three-arm randomized trial comparing: paclitaxel 135 mg m−2 by 24-h intravenous (i.v.) infusion + cisplatin; paclitaxel 250 mg m−2 by 24-h i.v. infusion + cisplatin + granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF); and standard etoposide/cisplatin in patients with stage IIIb or IV NSCLC. We also modelled the regimens with paclitaxel 135 mg m−2 + cisplatin administered as an outpatient by 3-h infusion, as clinical data suggest that this is equivalent to 24-h infusion. We collected costing data from the Ottawa Regional Cancer Centre and applied it to the resources consumed in the randomized trial. We integrated these data into the Statistics Canada POpulation HEalth Model (POHEM), which generated hypothetical cohorts of patients treated with each regimen. The POHEM model assigned diagnostic work-up, treatment, disease progression and survival characteristics to each individual in these cohorts and tabulated the costs associated with each. We did sensitivity analyses around the costs of chemotherapy and its administration, and the survival differences between the two regimens. All costs are in 1997 Canadian dollars ($1.00 Canadian ˜ £0.39 sterling). The perspective is that of the Canadian health care system. In the trial, the two paclitaxel-containing arms had almost identical survival curves with a median survival of 9.7 months compared with 7.4 months for etoposide/cisplatin. As administered in the trial, paclitaxel/cisplatin cost $76 370 per life-year gained (LYG) and paclitaxel/cisplatin/G-CSF $138 578 per LYG relative to etoposide/cisplatin. However, when modelled as an outpatient 3-h infusion, paclitaxel/cisplatin was moderately cost-effective at $30 619 per LYG

  19. Combination of gambogic acid with cisplatin enhances the antitumor effects on cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells by downregulating MRP2 and LRP expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wendian; Zhou, Hechao; Yu, Ying; Li, Jingjing; Li, Haiwen; Jiang, Danxian; Chen, Zihong; Yang, Donghong; Xu, Zumin; Yu, Zhonghua

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance is a main clinical problem of lung cancer therapy. Gambogic acid (GA) could prohibit the proliferation of a variety of human cancer cells. However, the effects of GA on cisplatin-resistant lung cancer are still unclear. The objective of the present study was to find out the antitumor effects of GA on cisplatin-resistant human lung cancer A549/DDP cells and further explore its underlying mechanisms. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay was used to observe the impacts of GA and/or cisplatin on the proliferation of lung cancer cells; flow cytometry was used to detect the effects of GA on cell cycle and apoptosis; Western blot was used to examine the effects of GA on the expression of lung resistance protein (LRP) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) protein in A549/DDP cells. Our results showed that GA dose- and time-dependently prohibited the proliferation and induced significant cell apoptosis in A549 and A549/DDP cells. GA also induced G0/G1 arrest in both A549/DDP and A549 cells. Moreover, GA upregulated protein expression level of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax and downregulated protein expression level of pro-caspase-9 and Bcl-2 in time- and dose-dependent way in A549/DDP cells. GA combined with cisplatin enhanced the cells apoptotic rate and reduced the cisplatin resistance index in A549/DDP cells. In addition, GA reduced the MRP2 and LRP protein expression level in A549/DDP cells. GA inhibits the proliferation, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in A549/DDP cells. Combination of GA with cisplatin enhances the antitumor effects on cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells by downregulating MRP2 and LRP expression. PMID:27330316

  20. Chemotherapeutic response to cisplatin-like drugs in human breast cancer cells probed by vibrational microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Batista de Carvalho, A L M; Pilling, M; Gardner, P; Doherty, J; Cinque, G; Wehbe, K; Kelley, C; Batista de Carvalho, L A E; Marques, M P M

    2016-06-23

    Studies of drug-cell interactions in cancer model systems are essential in the preclinical stage of rational drug design, which relies on a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying cytotoxic activity and biological effects, at a molecular level. This study aimed at applying complementary vibrational spectroscopy methods to evaluate the cellular impact of two Pt(ii) and Pd(ii) dinuclear chelates with spermine (Pt2Spm and Pd2Spm), using cisplatin (cis-Pt(NH3)2Cl2) as a reference compound. Their effects on cellular metabolism were monitored in a human triple-negative metastatic breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231) by Raman and synchrotron-radiation infrared microspectroscopies, for different drug concentrations (2-8 μM) at 48 h exposure. Multivariate data analysis was applied (unsupervised PCA), unveiling drug- and concentration-dependent effects: apart from discrimination between control and drug-treated cells, a clear separation was obtained for the different agents studied - mononuclear vs. polynuclear, and Pt(ii) vs. Pd(ii). Spectral biomarkers of drug action were identified, as well as the cellular response to the chemotherapeutic insult. The main effect of the tested compounds was found to be on DNA, lipids and proteins, the Pd(ii) agent having a more significant impact on proteins while its Pt(ii) homologue affected the cellular lipid content at lower concentrations, which suggests the occurrence of distinct and unconventional pathways of cytotoxicity for these dinuclear polyamine complexes. Raman and FTIR microspectroscopies were confirmed as powerful non-invasive techniques to obtain unique spectral signatures of the biochemical impact and physiological reaction of cells to anticancer agents. PMID:27063935