Science.gov

Sample records for agents including drugs

  1. Drosophila modifier screens to identify novel neuropsychiatric drugs including aminergic agents for the possible treatment of Parkinson’s disease and depression

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Hakeem O.; Terrell, Ashley; Lam, Hoa A.; Djapri, Christine; Jang, Jennifer; Hadi, Richard; Roberts, Logan; Shahi, Varun; Chou, Man-Ting; Biedermann, Traci; Huang, Brian; Lawless, George M.; Maidment, Nigel T.; Krantz, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Small molecules that increase the presynaptic function of aminergic cells may provide neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease as well as treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depression. Model genetic organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster may enhance the detection of new drugs via modifier or “enhancer/suppressor” screens, but this technique has not been applied to processes relevant to psychiatry. To identify new aminergic drugs in vivo, we used a mutation in the Drosophila vesicular monoamine transporter (dVMAT) as a sensitized genetic background, and performed a suppressor screen. We fed dVMAT mutant larvae ~1000 known drugs and quantitated rescue (suppression) of an amine-dependent locomotor deficit in the larva. To determine which drugs might specifically potentiate neurotransmitter release, we performed an additional secondary screen for drugs that require presynaptic amine storage to rescue larval locomotion. Using additional larval locomotion and adult fertility assays, we validated that at least one compound previously used clinically as an antineoplastic agent potentiates the presynaptic function of aminergic circuits. We suggest that structurally similar agents might be used to development treatments for Parkinson’s disease, depression and ADHD and that modifier screens in Drosophila provide a new strategy to screen for neuropsychiatric drugs. More generally, our findings demonstrate the power of physiologically based screens for identifying bioactive agents for select neurotransmitter systems. PMID:23229049

  2. 13 CFR 107.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including... Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES SBA Financial Assistance for... Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. (a) Agents....

  3. 13 CFR 108.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent. 108.1620 Section 108.1620 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM SBA...

  4. [Biophysical Characterization of Biopharmaceuticals, Including Antibody Drugs].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals, including antibody drugs, are now popular because of their high specificity with low adverse effects, especially in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases. However, because the active pharmaceutical ingredients of biopharmaceuticals are proteins, biophysical characterization of these therapeutic proteins should be required. In this manuscript, methods of chemical and physical characterization of therapeutic proteins are described. In terms of chemical characterization, analysis of chemical modifications of the constituent amino acids is explained. Physical characterization includes higher order structural analysis and assessment of protein aggregates. Quantification methods of aggregates with different sizes, recently encouraged by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are introduced. As for the stability of therapeutic proteins, the importance of chemical and physical stability is explained. Finally, the contribution of colloidal and structural stability to the production of an antibody drug less prone to aggregation is introduced.

  5. 7 CFR 4290.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Functions of agents, including Central Registration..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Financial Assistance for RBICs (Leverage) Funding Leverage by Use of Guaranteed Trust Certificates (âtcsâ) § 4290.1620 Functions of...

  6. Broad-Spectrum Drugs Against Viral Agents

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, Mary E.; Wong, Jonathan P.

    2008-01-01

    Development of antivirals has focused primarily on vaccines and on treatments for specific viral agents. Although effective, these approaches may be limited in situations where the etiologic agent is unknown or when the target virus has undergone mutation, recombination or reassortment. Augmentation of the innate immune response may be an effective alternative for disease amelioration. Nonspecific, broad-spectrum immune responses can be induced by double-stranded (ds)RNAs such as poly (ICLC), or oligonucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated deocycytidyl-deoxyguanosinyl (CpG) motifs. These may offer protection against various bacterial and viral pathogens regardless of their genetic makeup, zoonotic origin or drug resistance. PMID:19325820

  7. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including...) COSMETICS GENERAL Requirements for Specific Cosmetic Products § 700.13 Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic preparations also regarded as drugs. (a)...

  8. 7 CFR 4290.1620 - Functions of agents, including Central Registration Agent, Selling Agent and Fiscal Agent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Financial Assistance for RBICs (Leverage) Funding Leverage by Use of Guaranteed Trust Certificates (âtcsâ) § 4290.1620 Functions of agents... to: (i) Establish performance criteria for Poolers. (ii) Monitor and evaluate the financial...

  9. Thalidomide-derived immunomodulatory drugs as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Galustian, Christine; Labarthe, Marie-Christine; Bartlett, J Blake; Dalgleish, Angus G

    2004-12-01

    Thalidomide, a drug originally used to treat morning sickness, was removed from the market place in the early 1960s after it was found to cause serious congenital birth defects. However, thalidomide has recently been investigated in a new light following its activity in a number of chronic diseases. Moreover, like thalidomide itself, its second-generation immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) analogues have been shown to act as powerful anticancer agents and are clearly active in the treatment of patients with relapsed multiple myeloma. These new drugs, in particular the second-generation IMiDs, lenalidomide (CC-5013, REVLIMID; Celgene Corp., NJ, USA) and CC-4047 (ACTIMID; Celgene Corp.), offer improvements over thalidomide (a first-generation IMiD) in terms of efficacy and safety in human studies. The key to the therapeutic potential of IMiDs lies in the fact that the drugs have multiple mechanisms of action, which may produce both anti-inflammatory and antitumour effects. These effects are probably contextual, depending both on the cell type and the stimulus involved. Mechanisms associated with IMiD activity include TNF-alpha-inhibitory, T cell costimulatory and antiangiogenic activities. Studies of the mechanisms of action of these drugs are ongoing and will facilitate the continued development of this class of compound in a number of diseases.

  10. Drug-drug and food-drug pharmacokinetic interactions with new insulinotropic agents repaglinide and nateglinide.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the current knowledge on drug-drug and food-drug interactions with repaglinide and nateglinide. These two meglitinide derivatives, commonly called glinides, have been developed for improving insulin secretion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. They are increasingly used either in monotherapy or in combination with other oral antihyperglycaemic agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Compared with sulfonylureas, glinides have been shown to (i) provide a better control of postprandial hyperglycaemia, (ii) overcome some adverse effects, such as hypoglycaemia, and (iii) have a more favourable safety profile, especially in patients with renal failure. The meal-related timing of administration of glinides and the potential influence of food and meal composition on their bioavailability may be important. In addition, some food components (e.g. grapefruit juice) may cause pharmacokinetic interactions. Because glinides are metabolised via cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 isoenzyme, they are indeed exposed to pharmacokinetic interactions. In addition to CYP3A4, repaglinide is metabolised via CYP2C8, while nateglinide metabolism also involves CYP2C9. Furthermore, both compounds and their metabolites may undergo specialised transport/uptake in the intestine, another source of pharmacokinetic interactions. Clinically relevant drug-drug interactions are those that occur when glinides are administered together with other glucose-lowering agents or compounds widely coadministered to diabetic patients (e.g. lipid-lowering agents), with drugs that are known to induce (risk of lower glinide plasma levels and thus of deterioration of glucose control) or inhibit (risk of higher glinide plasma levels leading to hypoglycaemia) CYP isoenzymes concerned in their metabolism, or with drugs that have a narrow efficacy : toxicity ratio. Pharmacokinetic interactions reported in the literature appear to be more frequent and more important with repaglinide than with

  11. Statistical Agent Based Modelization of the Phenomenon of Drug Abuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Clemente, Riccardo; Pietronero, Luciano

    2012-07-01

    We introduce a statistical agent based model to describe the phenomenon of drug abuse and its dynamical evolution at the individual and global level. The agents are heterogeneous with respect to their intrinsic inclination to drugs, to their budget attitude and social environment. The various levels of drug use were inspired by the professional description of the phenomenon and this permits a direct comparison with all available data. We show that certain elements have a great importance to start the use of drugs, for example the rare events in the personal experiences which permit to overcame the barrier of drug use occasionally. The analysis of how the system reacts to perturbations is very important to understand its key elements and it provides strategies for effective policy making. The present model represents the first step of a realistic description of this phenomenon and can be easily generalized in various directions.

  12. Hepatotoxicity by Drugs: The Most Common Implicated Agents

    PubMed Central

    Björnsson, Einar S.

    2016-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an underreported and underestimated adverse drug reaction. Information on the documented hepatotoxicity of drugs has recently been made available by a website that can be accessed in the public domain: LiverTox (http://livertox.nlm.nih.gov). According to critical analysis of the hepatotoxicity of drugs in LiverTox, 53% of drugs had at least one case report of convincing reports of liver injury. Only 48 drugs had more than 50 case reports of DILI. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is the most commonly implicated agent leading to DILI in the prospective series. In a recent prospective study, liver injury due to amoxicillin-clavulanate was found to occur in approximately one out of 2300 users. Drugs with the highest risk of DILI in this study were azathioprine and infliximab. PMID:26861310

  13. Bioengineered Colorectal Cancer Drugs: Orally Delivered Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Zhang, Xiaoying; Prakash, Satya

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal inflammation is one of the major factors that increase colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence worldwide. Inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract is directly linked to tumor development at the early stages of the disease, thus a key issue toward the prevention and the treatment of colonic neoplasia. Thus, the use of anti-inflammatory drugs has emerged first as a strategy to reduce chronic inflammation in case of many inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but it has proven its efficacy by reducing the risk of colonic neoplasia. This comprehensive review highlights the role of chronic inflammation, mainly in IBD, in the development of CRC including molecular and immune mechanisms that have tumorigenic effects. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that several bioactive and phytochemical compounds used as anti-inflammatory drugs have also antitumoral attributes. The uses of orally delivered cytokines and small molecules, as well as key dietary supplementation as anti-inflammatory therapeutics are discussed. In addition, comprehensive knowledge about CRC and intestinal inflammation, and the importance of the intestinal mucosal wall as a mucosal immunological barrier that comes into play during interactions with gut microbiota (pathogens and commensal), luminal secretions (bile acids, and bacterial and epithelial metabolites), and ingested chemicals (food components, high fat content, heterocyclic amines, and low intake of dietary fiber) are underscored. The multifunctionality of several anti-inflammatory drugs opens a line for their application in the treatment and prevention not only in IBD but also in CRC. Current bioengineering approaches for oral delivery of anti-inflammatory agents including cytokines, genetically modified bacteria, or small molecule inhibitors of inflammation directly contribute to the early management of CRC. Limitations of the current therapeutics, which stem from the lack of complete understanding of the complex molecular interactions

  14. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  15. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  16. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  17. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  18. Drug Discovery and Development of Antimalarial Agents: Recent Advances.

    PubMed

    Thota, Sreekanth; Yerra, Rajeshwar

    2016-01-01

    Malaria, a deadly infectious parasitic disease, is a major issue of public health in the world today and already produces serious economic constraints in the endemic countries. Most of the malarial infections and deaths are due to Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax species. The recent emergence of resistance necessitates the search for new antimalarial drugs, which overcome the resistance and act through new mechanisms. Although much effort has been directed towards the discovery of novel antimalarial drugs. 4-anilino quinolone triazines as potent antimalarial agents, their in silico modelling and bioevaluation as Plasmodium falciparum transketolase and β-hematin inhibitors has been reported. This review is primarily focused on the drug discovery of the recent advances in the development of antimalarial agents and their mechanism of action.

  19. Stabilizing Agents for Drug Nanocrystals: Effect on Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Tuomela, Annika; Hirvonen, Jouni; Peltonen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Drug nanocrystals are a versatile option for drug delivery purposes, and while the number of poorly soluble drug materials is all the time increasing, more research in this area is performed. Drug nanocrystals have a simple structure—a solid drug core is surrounded by a layer of stabilizing agent. However, despite the considerably simple structure, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer for a certain drug can be challenging. Mostly, the stabilizer selection is based purely on the requirement of physical stability, e.g., maintaining the nanosized particle size as long as possible after the formation of drug nanocrystals. However, it is also worth taking into account that stabilizer can affect the bioavailability in the final formulation via interactions with cells and cell layers. In addition, formation of nanocrystals is only one process step, and for the final formulation, more excipients are often added to the composition. The role of the stabilizers in the final formulation can be more than only stabilizing the nanocrystal particle size. A good example is the stabilizer’s role as cryoprotectant during freeze drying. In this review, the stabilizing effect, role of stabilizers in final nanocrystalline formulations, challenges in reaching in vitro–in vivo correlation with nanocrystalline products, and stabilizers’ effect on higher bioavailability are discussed. PMID:27213435

  20. 21 CFR 1405.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 1405.215 Section 1405.215 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY...

  1. The effects of nanoparticle drug loading on the pharmacokinetics of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Petschauer, Jennifer S.; Madden, Andrew J.; Kirschbrown, Whitney P.; Song, Gina; Zamboni, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Major advances in carrier-mediated agents, which include nanoparticles, nanosomes and conjugates, have revolutionized drug delivery capabilities over the past decade. While providing numerous advantages, such as greater solubility, duration of exposure and delivery to the site of action over their small-molecule counterparts, there is substantial variability in systemic clearance and distribution, tumor delivery and pharmacologic effects (efficacy and toxicity) of these agents. This review provides an overview of factors that affect the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of carrier-mediated agents in preclinical models and patients. PMID:25707978

  2. 49 CFR 40.341 - Must service agents comply with DOT drug and alcohol testing requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Must service agents comply with DOT drug and... Responsibilities of Service Agents § 40.341 Must service agents comply with DOT drug and alcohol testing... requirements of this part and the DOT agency drug and alcohol testing regulations. (b) If you do not...

  3. Novel drug delivery approaches on antiviral and antiretroviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pooja; Chawla, Anuj; Arora, Sandeep; Pawar, Pravin

    2012-01-01

    Viruses have the property to replicate very fast in host cell. It can attack any part of host cell. Therefore, the clinical efficacy of antiviral drugs and its bioavailability is more important concern taken into account to treat viral infections. The oral and parenteral routes of drug administration have several shortcomings, however, which could lead to the search for formulating better delivery systems. Now, a day's novel drug delivery systems (NDDS) proved to be a better approach to enhance the effectiveness of the antivirals and improve the patient compliance and decrease the adverse effect. The NDDS have reduced the dosing frequency and shorten the duration of treatment, thus, which could lead the treatment more cost-effective. The development of NDDS for antiviral and antiretroviral therapy aims to deliver the drug devoid of toxicity, with high compatibility and biodegradability, targeting the drug to specific sites for viral infection and in some instances it also avoid the first pass metabolism effect. This article aims to discuss the usefulness of novel delivery approaches of antiviral agents such as niosomes, microspheres, microemulsions, nanoparticles that are used in the treatment of various Herpes viruses and in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. PMID:23057001

  4. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, Albert T

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10(-21)), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  5. Mass spectrometry in identification of ecotoxicants including chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Albert T. . E-mail: lebedev@org.chem.msu.ru

    2005-09-01

    Mass spectrometry is a unique tool to detect and identify trace levels of organic and bioorganic compounds as well as microorganisms in the environment. The range of potential chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents is very broad. An important advantage of mass spectrometry over other techniques involves potential for full spectrum detection of chemical and biological agents including mid-spectrum materials (i.e. bioactive peptides, toxins, etc.) for which biological approaches are inadequate. Being very fast (seconds and minutes), extremely sensitive (zeptomoles 10{sup -21}), and informative (detailed qualitative and quantitative composition of mixtures containing hundreds of chemicals), mass spectrometry is a principal analytical tool at the sites of destruction of CW. Due to its unique features, mass spectrometry is applied not only for the detection of CW agents, but for the analysis of products of metabolism and degradation of these agents in organisms or environment as well. The present paper deals with some examples of successful application of mass spectrometry for the analyses of ecotoxicants, chemical warfare agents, explosives, and microorganisms including biology warfare agents.

  6. 34 CFR 86.100 - What must the IHE's drug prevention program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? 86.100 Section 86.100 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.100 What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? The IHE's drug prevention program must,...

  7. Towards engineering hormone-binding globulins as drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wee Lee; Zhou, Aiwu; Read, Randy J

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of many diseases such as cancer requires the use of drugs that can cause severe side effects. Off-target toxicity can often be reduced simply by directing the drugs specifically to sites of diseases. Amidst increasingly sophisticated methods of targeted drug delivery, we observed that Nature has already evolved elegant means of sending biological molecules to where they are needed. One such example is corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the major carrier of the anti-inflammatory hormone, cortisol. Targeted release of cortisol is triggered by cleavage of CBG's reactive centre loop by elastase, a protease released by neutrophils in inflamed tissues. This work aimed to establish the feasibility of exploiting this mechanism to carry therapeutic agents to defined locations. The reactive centre loop of CBG was altered with site-directed mutagenesis to favour cleavage by other proteases, to alter the sites at which it would release its cargo. Mutagenesis succeeded in making CBG a substrate for either prostate specific antigen (PSA), a prostate-specific serine protease, or thrombin, a key protease in the blood coagulation cascade. PSA is conspicuously overproduced in prostatic hyperplasia and is, therefore, a good way of targeting hyperplastic prostate tissues. Thrombin is released during clotting and consequently is ideal for conferring specificity to thrombotic sites. Using fluorescence-based titration assays, we also showed that CBG can be engineered to bind a new compound, thyroxine-6-carboxyfluorescein, instead of its physiological ligand, cortisol, thereby demonstrating that it is possible to tailor the hormone binding site to deliver a therapeutic drug. In addition, we proved that the efficiency with which CBG releases bound ligand can be increased by introducing some well-placed mutations. This proof-of-concept study has raised the prospect of a novel means of targeted drug delivery, using the serpin conformational change to combat the problem of

  8. Towards Engineering Hormone-Binding Globulins as Drug Delivery Agents

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wee Lee; Zhou, Aiwu; Read, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of many diseases such as cancer requires the use of drugs that can cause severe side effects. Off-target toxicity can often be reduced simply by directing the drugs specifically to sites of diseases. Amidst increasingly sophisticated methods of targeted drug delivery, we observed that Nature has already evolved elegant means of sending biological molecules to where they are needed. One such example is corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the major carrier of the anti-inflammatory hormone, cortisol. Targeted release of cortisol is triggered by cleavage of CBG's reactive centre loop by elastase, a protease released by neutrophils in inflamed tissues. This work aimed to establish the feasibility of exploiting this mechanism to carry therapeutic agents to defined locations. The reactive centre loop of CBG was altered with site-directed mutagenesis to favour cleavage by other proteases, to alter the sites at which it would release its cargo. Mutagenesis succeeded in making CBG a substrate for either prostate specific antigen (PSA), a prostate-specific serine protease, or thrombin, a key protease in the blood coagulation cascade. PSA is conspicuously overproduced in prostatic hyperplasia and is, therefore, a good way of targeting hyperplastic prostate tissues. Thrombin is released during clotting and consequently is ideal for conferring specificity to thrombotic sites. Using fluorescence-based titration assays, we also showed that CBG can be engineered to bind a new compound, thyroxine-6-carboxyfluorescein, instead of its physiological ligand, cortisol, thereby demonstrating that it is possible to tailor the hormone binding site to deliver a therapeutic drug. In addition, we proved that the efficiency with which CBG releases bound ligand can be increased by introducing some well-placed mutations. This proof-of-concept study has raised the prospect of a novel means of targeted drug delivery, using the serpin conformational change to combat the problem of

  9. 34 CFR 86.100 - What must the IHE's drug prevention program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? 86... PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.100 What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? The IHE's drug prevention program must, at a minimum, include the following: (a) The annual...

  10. 28 CFR 83.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Requirements for Recipients Other...

  11. 31 CFR 20.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other...

  12. 22 CFR 1509.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true What must I include in my drug-free awareness... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  13. 22 CFR 1008.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true What must I include in my drug-free awareness... FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  14. 20 CFR 439.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  15. 43 CFR 43.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other...

  16. 29 CFR 1472.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?...

  17. 32 CFR 26.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c... that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  18. 32 CFR 26.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c... that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  19. 21 CFR 1405.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  20. 29 CFR 1472.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?...

  1. 2 CFR 182.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... establish an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What must I include in my drug-free... AGREEMENTS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements...

  2. 45 CFR 630.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  3. 13 CFR 147.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... establish an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What must I include in my drug... ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Requirements for...

  4. 29 CFR 1472.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?...

  5. 21 CFR 1405.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  6. 21 CFR 1405.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  7. 32 CFR 26.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c... that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  8. 14 CFR 1267.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... establish an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true What must I include in my drug-free... ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements...

  9. 45 CFR 630.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  10. 14 CFR 1267.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... establish an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What must I include in my drug-free... ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements...

  11. 13 CFR 147.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... establish an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What must I include in my drug... ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Requirements for...

  12. 45 CFR 630.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  13. 13 CFR 147.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... establish an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What must I include in my drug... ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Requirements for...

  14. 34 CFR 84.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  15. 45 CFR 1155.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  16. 45 CFR 1173.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  17. New agents for the treatment of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hoagland, Daniel T; Liu, Jiuyu; Lee, Robin B; Lee, Richard E

    2016-07-01

    Inadequate dosing and incomplete treatment regimens, coupled with the ability of the tuberculosis bacilli to cause latent infections that are tolerant of currently used drugs, have fueled the rise of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). Treatment of MDR-TB infections is a major clinical challenge that has few viable or effective solutions; therefore patients face a poor prognosis and years of treatment. This review focuses on emerging drug classes that have the potential for treating MDR-TB and highlights their particular strengths as leads including their mode of action, in vivo efficacy, and key medicinal chemistry properties. Examples include the newly approved drugs bedaquiline and delaminid, and other agents in clinical and late preclinical development pipeline for the treatment of MDR-TB. Herein, we discuss the challenges to developing drugs to treat tuberculosis and how the field has adapted to these difficulties, with an emphasis on drug discovery approaches that might produce more effective agents and treatment regimens. PMID:27151308

  18. 34 CFR 86.100 - What must the IHE's drug prevention program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? 86.100 Section 86.100 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.100 What must the IHE's drug prevention program include?...

  19. 34 CFR 86.100 - What must the IHE's drug prevention program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must the IHE's drug prevention program include? 86.100 Section 86.100 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education DRUG AND ALCOHOL ABUSE PREVENTION Institutions of Higher Education § 86.100 What must the IHE's drug prevention program include?...

  20. [The actual Russian legislation in sphere of turn-over of drug agents and psychotropic substances].

    PubMed

    Abramov, A Yu; Kosolapova, N V; Mikhaiylova, Yu V

    2014-01-01

    The drug abuse is a social occurrence. Hence, the social economic methods are the first of all means of combating this evil. At the same time, measures of especially juridical character possess significant value since they develop corresponding legal base for applying another measures. In the Russian Federation, during fifteen years the new policy of public regulation and normative legal base in the area of legal turn-over of drug agents, psychotropic substances and their precursors were developed factually from zero ground. However, the current national legislation is not deprived of some flaws and contradictions. Frequently a uniform practice of interpretation and application of legal rules regulating the controlled turn-over is lacking. On the one hand, this circumstance decreases effectiveness of action of such rules and on the other hand favors development of situations for outflow of pharmaceuticals from legal turn-over to illegal traffic. The becoming of the Russian legislation in the area of turn-over of drug agents, precursors and psychotropic substances relates to the period of late 1990s when the Federal Law No 3 FZ "On drug agents and psychotropic substances" of January 8 1998 was developed and passed by the State Duma of the Russian Federation. The given law completely conforms to principles of legal regulation of turn-over of drug agents and psychotropic substances determined by the Constitution of the Russian Federation (provisions 76, 90, 104, 105) and federal laws ("On the government of the Russian Federation" of December 17 1997, "On the ombudsman in the Russian Federation" of February 26 1997). The main characteristic of legal rules included into given group of sources of law is that they contain regulations of general disposition as basic ones for inferior sources of law. The analysis of basic Federal law No 3 FZ "On drug agents and psychotropic substances" of January 8 1998 makes it possible to conclude that in in Russia the international legal

  1. Hydrogels synthesised through photoinitiator-free photopolymerisation technique for delivering drugs including a tumour-tracing porphyrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Loo-Teck; Swami, Salesh; Gordon-Thomson, Clare

    2006-05-01

    Hydrogels were synthesised using the photoinitiator-free photopolymerisation technique involving interactions between donor/acceptor pairs for delivering drugs of different molecular weights including a porphyrin used as a tumour-tracing agent. N-(5-hydroxy) pentylmaleimide, an acceptor, formed hydrogels with N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and N-vinylcaprolactum. Glucosamine, an effective H-donor in enhancing polymerisation as shown by Differential Photocalorimetric results, was found unsuitable for hydrogel preparation. Drugs of different molecular weights releasing at the same rate was discussed. The hydrogels were found to have no toxic effects and were biocompatible with a human keratinocyte cell line.

  2. Pro-drugs for indirect cannabinoids as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John

    2008-10-01

    Medicinal cannabis, cannabis extracts, and other cannabinoids are currently in use or under clinical trial investigation for the control of nausea, emesis and wasting in patients undergoing chemotherapy, the control of neuropathic pain and arthritic pain, and the control of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. The further development of medicinal cannabinoids has been challenged with problems. These include the psychoactivity of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists and the lack of availability of highly selective cannabinoid receptor full agonists (for the CB1 or CB2 receptor), as well as problems of pharmacokinetics. Global activation of cannabinoid receptors is usually undesirable, and so enhancement of local endocannabinoid receptor activity with indirect cannabimimetics is an attractive strategy for therapeutic modulation of the endocannabinoid system. However, existing drugs of this type tend to be metabolized by the same enzymes as their target endocannabinoids and are not yet available in a form that is clinically useful. A potential solution to these problems may now have been suggested by the discovery that paracetamol (acetaminophen) exerts its analgesic (and probably anti-pyretic) effects by its degradation into an anandamide (an endocannabinoid) reuptake inhibitor (AM404) within the body, thus classifying it as pro-drug for an indirect cannabimimetic. Given the proven efficacy and safety of paracetamol, the challenge now is to develop related drugs, or entirely different substrates, into pro-drug indirect cannabimimetics with a similar safety profile to paracetamol but at high effective dose titrations.

  3. Pro-drugs for indirect cannabinoids as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Ashton, John

    2008-10-01

    Medicinal cannabis, cannabis extracts, and other cannabinoids are currently in use or under clinical trial investigation for the control of nausea, emesis and wasting in patients undergoing chemotherapy, the control of neuropathic pain and arthritic pain, and the control of the symptoms of multiple sclerosis. The further development of medicinal cannabinoids has been challenged with problems. These include the psychoactivity of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists and the lack of availability of highly selective cannabinoid receptor full agonists (for the CB1 or CB2 receptor), as well as problems of pharmacokinetics. Global activation of cannabinoid receptors is usually undesirable, and so enhancement of local endocannabinoid receptor activity with indirect cannabimimetics is an attractive strategy for therapeutic modulation of the endocannabinoid system. However, existing drugs of this type tend to be metabolized by the same enzymes as their target endocannabinoids and are not yet available in a form that is clinically useful. A potential solution to these problems may now have been suggested by the discovery that paracetamol (acetaminophen) exerts its analgesic (and probably anti-pyretic) effects by its degradation into an anandamide (an endocannabinoid) reuptake inhibitor (AM404) within the body, thus classifying it as pro-drug for an indirect cannabimimetic. Given the proven efficacy and safety of paracetamol, the challenge now is to develop related drugs, or entirely different substrates, into pro-drug indirect cannabimimetics with a similar safety profile to paracetamol but at high effective dose titrations. PMID:18855592

  4. Drug Abuse Education Program. Drug Abuse Education, Grades 5,7,9. Bibliography Included.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltimore City Public Schools, MD.

    A drug abuse education program was implemented in grades five, seven, and nine in the Baltimore City Public Schools. Unit plans outline the curriculum content and learning activities for each of the three grades. The major objective in grade five is to familiarize pupils with various medically used drugs and to develop an understanding that they…

  5. Metabolic Network Analysis-Based Identification of Antimicrobial Drug Targets in Category A Bioterrorism Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Lee, Deok-Sun; Burd, Henry; Blank, William; Kapatral, Vinayak

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents. PMID:24454817

  6. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong-Yeol; Lee, Deok-Sun; Burd, Henry; Blank, William; Kapatral, Vinayak

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents.

  7. Plant Alkaloids as Antiplatelet Agent: Drugs of the Future in the Light of Recent Developments

    PubMed Central

    Ain, Qurrat-Ul-; Khan, Haroon; Mubarak, Mohammad S.; Pervaiz, Aini

    2016-01-01

    An alkaloid is a class of naturally occurring organic nitrogen-containing compounds that are frequently found in the plant kingdom. Many alkaloids are valuable medicinal agents that can be utilized to treat various diseases including malaria, diabetics, cancer, cardiac dysfunction etc. Similarly, platelet aggregation beyond the purpose of homeostasis is the underlying cause of blood clotting related diseases. This review presents a thorough understanding of alkaloids as antiplatelet agents with a possible mechanism of action based on the literature of the last decade. In addition, this review will address the antiplatelet activity of alkaloids and their medicinal usage as potent antiplatelet agents with a description of structural relationship activity and possible lead compounds for future drug discovery. PMID:27713699

  8. Polysaccharide based nanogels in the drug delivery system: Application as the carrier of pharmaceutical agents.

    PubMed

    Debele, Tilahun Ayane; Mekuria, Shewaye Lakew; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih

    2016-11-01

    Polysaccharide-based nanoparticles have fascinated attention as a vesicle of different pharmaceutical agents due to their unique multi-functional groups in addition to their physicochemical properties, including biocompatibility and biodegradability. The existence of multi-functional groups on the polysaccharide backbone permits facile chemical or biochemical modification to synthesize polysaccharide based nanoparticles with miscellaneous structures. Polysaccharide-based nanogels have high water content, large surface area for multivalent bioconjugation, tunable size, and interior network for the incorporation of different pharmaceutical agents. These unique properties offer great potential for the utilization of polysaccharide-based nanogels in the drug delivery systems. Hence, this review describes chemistry of certain common polysaccharides, several methodologies used to synthesize polysaccharide nanoparticles and primarily focused on the polysaccharide (or polysaccharide derivative) based nanogels as the carrier of pharmaceutical agents. PMID:27524098

  9. 13 CFR 147.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What must I include in my drug... ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Requirements for...

  10. 14 CFR 1267.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What must I include in my drug-free... ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements...

  11. 22 CFR 312.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... drug-free workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 312.215 Section 312.215 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR...

  12. 24 CFR 21.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free... of Housing and Urban Development GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE...

  13. 29 CFR 1472.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 1472... CONCILIATION SERVICE GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE)...

  14. 22 CFR 210.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  15. 22 CFR 312.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a... programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true What must I include in my drug-free...

  16. 22 CFR 312.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a... programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  17. 49 CFR 32.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  18. 45 CFR 1155.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  19. 22 CFR 1008.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  20. 45 CFR 1155.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  1. 2 CFR 1401.315 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What must I include in my...

  2. 29 CFR 94.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a... programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?...

  3. 22 CFR 1008.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true What must I include in my drug-free...

  4. 49 CFR 32.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  5. 2 CFR 1401.315 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c... that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What must I include in my...

  6. 2 CFR 1401.315 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What must I include in my...

  7. 29 CFR 94.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a... programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?...

  8. 2 CFR 182.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What must I include in my...

  9. 34 CFR 84.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness...

  10. 34 CFR 84.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness...

  11. 22 CFR 1509.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  12. 24 CFR 21.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c) Any... may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What must I include in my...

  13. 34 CFR 84.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness...

  14. 22 CFR 133.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  15. 29 CFR 94.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a... programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?...

  16. 22 CFR 312.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a... programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true What must I include in my drug-free...

  17. 7 CFR 3021.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a... programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness...

  18. 22 CFR 1509.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true What must I include in my drug-free...

  19. 22 CFR 133.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  20. 22 CFR 1509.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true What must I include in my drug-free...

  1. 7 CFR 3021.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a... programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness...

  2. 22 CFR 1008.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true What must I include in my drug-free...

  3. 22 CFR 133.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  4. 49 CFR 32.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  5. 45 CFR 1155.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  6. 2 CFR 182.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c... that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What must I include in my...

  7. 49 CFR 32.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free...

  8. 29 CFR 94.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a... programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?...

  9. 7 CFR 3021.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a... programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness...

  10. 2 CFR 182.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and (d) The... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What must I include in my drug-free... GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS Reserved GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE...

  11. 45 CFR 630.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness...) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL...

  12. Anti-Obesity Agents and the US Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Casey, Martin F; Mechanick, Jeffrey I

    2014-09-01

    Despite the growing market for obesity care, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved only two new pharmaceutical agents-lorcaserin and combination phentermine/topiramate-for weight reduction since 2000, while removing three agents from the market in the same time period. This article explores the FDA's history and role in the approval of anti-obesity medications within the context of a public health model of obesity. Through the review of obesity literature and FDA approval documents, we identified two major barriers preventing fair evaluation of anti-obesity agents including: (1) methodological pitfalls in clinical trials and (2) misaligned values in the assessment of anti-obesity agents. Specific recommendations include the use of adaptive (Bayesian) design protocols, value-based analyses of risks and benefits, and regulatory guidance based on a comprehensive, multi-platform obesity disease model. Positively addressing barriers in the FDA approval process of anti-obesity agents may have many beneficial effects within an obesity disease model. PMID:26626768

  13. Drug Susceptibility Testing of 31 Antimicrobial Agents on Rapidly Growing Mycobacteria Isolates from China

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Hui; Li, Guilian; Zhao, Xiuqin; Liu, Haican; Wan, Kanglin; Yu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Several species of rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are now recognized as human pathogens. However, limited data on effective drug treatments against these organisms exists. Here, we describe the species distribution and drug susceptibility profiles of RGM clinical isolates collected from four southern Chinese provinces from January 2005 to December 2012. Methods. Clinical isolates (73) were subjected to in vitro testing with 31 antimicrobial agents using the cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth microdilution method. The isolates included 55 M. abscessus, 11 M. fortuitum, 3 M. chelonae, 2 M. neoaurum, and 2 M. septicum isolates. Results. M. abscessus (75.34%) and M. fortuitum (15.07%), the most common species, exhibited greater antibiotic resistance than the other three species. The isolates had low resistance to amikacin, linezolid, and tigecycline, and high resistance to first-line antituberculous agents, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, rifapentine, dapsone, thioacetazone, and pasiniazid. M. abscessus and M. fortuitum were highly resistant to ofloxacin and rifabutin, respectively. The isolates showed moderate resistance to the other antimicrobial agents. Conclusions. Our results suggest that tigecycline, linezolid, clofazimine, and cefmetazole are appropriate choices for M. abscessus infections. Capreomycin, sulfamethoxazole, tigecycline, clofazimine, and cefmetazole are potentially good choices for M. fortuitum infections. Our drug susceptibility data should be useful to clinicians. PMID:26351633

  14. Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G.; Zuniga, Edison S.; Ojima, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various “molecularly targeted cancer therapies” have been developed for use in specific cancers, including tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. In general, such a drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic “warhead” connected through a “smart” linker to form a conjugate. When a multi-functionalized nanomaterial is used as the vehicle, a “Trojan Horse” approach can be used for mass delivery of cytotoxic “warheads” to maximize the efficacy. Exploitation of the special properties of fluorine has proven successful in the development of new and effective biochemical tools as well as therapeutic agents. Fluorinated congeners can also serve as excellent probes for the investigation of biochemical mechanisms. 19F-NMR can provide unique and powerful tools for mechanistic investigations in chemical biology. This account presents our recent progress, in perspective, on the molecular approaches to the design and development of novel tumor-targeted drug delivery systems for new generation chemotherapy by exploiting the unique nature of fluorine. PMID:23935213

  15. Polymeric protective agents for nanoparticles in drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Mogoşanu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Bejenaru, Cornelia; Bejenaru, Ludovic Everard

    2016-08-30

    Surface modification/functionalization of nanoparticles (NPs) using polymeric protective agents is an issue of great importance and actuality for drug delivery and targeting. Improving the blood circulation half-life of surface-protected nanocarriers is closely related to the elimination of main biological barriers and limiting factors (protein absorption and opsonization), due to the phagocytic activity of reticuloendothelial system. For passive or active targeted delivery, in biomedical area, surface-functionalized NPs with tissue-recognition ligands were designed and optimized as a result of modern research techniques. Also, multi-functionalized nanostructures are characterized by enhanced bioavailability, efficacy, targeted localization, active cellular uptake, and low side effects. Surface-protected NPs are obtained from biocompatible, biodegradable and less toxic natural polymers (dextran, β-cyclodextrin, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, heparin, gelatin) or synthetic polymers, such as poly(lactic acid), poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid, poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(alkyl cyanoacrylates). PEGylation is one of the most important functionalization methods providing steric stabilization, long circulating and 'stealth' properties for both polymeric and inorganic-based nanosystems. In addition, for their antimicrobial, antiviral and antitumor effects, cutting-edge researches in the field of pharmaceutical nanobiotechnology highlighted the importance of noble metal (platinum, gold, silver) NPs decorated with biopolymers. PMID:26972379

  16. Drug-induced lupus: Including anti-tumour necrosis factor and interferon induced.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Fernández, S; Ahijón-Lana, M; Isenberg, D A

    2014-05-01

    Drug-induced lupus erythematosus is defined as a syndrome with clinical and serological features similar to systemic lupus erythematosus that is temporally related to continuous drug exposure and which resolves after discontinuation of this drug. More than 90 drugs, including biological modulators such as tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitors and interferons, have been identified as likely 'culprits'. While there are no standard diagnostic criteria for drug-induced lupus erythematosus, guidelines that can help to distinguish drug-induced lupus erythematosus from systemic lupus erythematosus have been proposed and several different patterns of drug-induced lupus erythematosus are emerging. Distinguishing drug-induced lupus erythematosus from systemic lupus erythematosus is important because the prognosis of drug-induced lupus erythematosus is usually good when the drug is withdrawn. This review discusses the differences between drug-induced lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus, the mechanisms of action of drug-induced lupus erythematosus and drugs that are usually associated with drug-induced lupus erythematosus, with particular focus on the biological treatments.

  17. Local drug delivery agents as adjuncts to endodontic and periodontal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Puri, K; Puri, N

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In the treatment of intracanal and periodontal infections, the local application of antibiotics and other therapeutic agents in the root canal or in periodontal pockets may be a promising approach to achieve sustained/controlled drug release, high antimicrobial activity and low systemic side effects. The conventional method for the elimination of subgingival microbial infection includes mechanical debridement, irrigation with antimicrobial agents or surgical access. But, the effectiveness of conventional nonsurgical treatment is limited by lack of accessibility to bacteria in deeper periodontal pockets, and/or does not completely eliminate intracanal microorganisms. Surgical intervention may be beneficial but cannot be done in all cases, medically compromised cases and also in patients not willing to be subjected to surgical therapy. Development of local drug delivery systems provides an answer to all such difficulties. This comprehensive review tries to cover the detailed information about the latest advances in the various local drug delivery systems, their indications, contraindications and their advantages over systemic drug therapy. PMID:24868252

  18. 22 CFR 210.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 210.215 Section 210.215 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 210.215 What must I include in...

  19. 22 CFR 133.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement? 133.205 Section 133.205 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE MISCELLANEOUS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 133.205 What must I include in...

  20. 22 CFR 133.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 133.215 Section 133.215 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE MISCELLANEOUS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 133.215 What must I include in my...

  1. 22 CFR 210.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement? 210.205 Section 210.205 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 210.205 What must I include in...

  2. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F N; Hamed, Maha I; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Hedrick, Victoria E; Paul, Lake N; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin's ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  3. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Hamed, Maha I.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin’s ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  4. 31 CFR 20.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement? 20.205 Section 20.205 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 20.205...

  5. 10 CFR 607.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement? 607.205 Section 607.205 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  6. 10 CFR 607.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 607.215 Section 607.215 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than...

  7. 28 CFR 83.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b..., and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I include in my...

  8. 31 CFR 20.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b..., and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I include in my...

  9. 31 CFR 20.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b..., and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I include in my...

  10. 15 CFR 29.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b..., and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What must I include in my...

  11. 28 CFR 83.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b..., and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I include in my...

  12. 28 CFR 83.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b..., and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I include in my...

  13. 31 CFR 20.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b..., and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What must I include in my...

  14. 15 CFR 29.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b..., and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What must I include in my...

  15. 15 CFR 29.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b..., and employee assistance programs; and (d) The penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What must I include in my...

  16. 28 CFR 83.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement? 83.205 Section 83.205 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENT-WIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Requirements for Recipients Other...

  17. 32 CFR 26.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement? 26.205 Section 26.205 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients...

  18. 15 CFR 29.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement? 29.205 Section 29.205 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 29.205 What must...

  19. 40 CFR 36.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 36.215 Section 36.215 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other...

  20. 15 CFR 29.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 29.215 Section 29.215 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other Than Individuals § 29.215 What must...

  1. 40 CFR 36.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement? 36.205 Section 36.205 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other...

  2. 32 CFR 26.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 26.215 Section 26.215 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients...

  3. 38 CFR 48.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement? 48.205 Section 48.205 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other...

  4. 38 CFR 48.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness program? 48.215 Section 48.215 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements for Recipients Other...

  5. New investigational drugs with single-agent activity in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, A M; Kumar, S

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) is rapidly evolving. In the United States, four drugs (panobinostat, ixazomib, daratumumab and elotuzumab) were approved for the treatment of MM in 2015. As a result of improved diagnosis and therapy, there has been a dramatic improvement in the outcome of MM in the last decade, probably more than any other malignancy. Numerous agents continue to be studied in preclinical models and in clinical trials, with many demonstrating clinical efficacy that appears promising enough to have a trajectory for regulatory approval. The purpose of this article is to summarize the current data and provide perspective on new investigational agents with promising single-agent activity in MM. The agents reviewed include Isatuximab, an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody; marizomib, a new proteasome inhibitor; oprozomib, an oral proteasome inhibitor; filanesib (ARRY-520), a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor; dinaciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor; venetoclax (ABT-199), a selective BCL-2 inhibitor; and LGH-447, pan PIM kinase inhibitor. PMID:27471867

  6. The program of criminal undercover agents sources in the drug trade.

    PubMed

    Hess, Alex; Amir, Menachem

    2002-01-01

    Information and intelligence have always been, and will remain the most essential components of policing, and indeed all law enforcement and security work, including the variety of drug control efforts. Sources of information are many and varied, ranging from everyday interactions of officers of the law with the public, anonymous reports, the use of paid and unpaid informants from the criminal underworld, to the law enforcement and security services' use of agents. This presentation, based on interviews with "handlers" of informants who are offenders and who supply information and evidence against other criminals, who may have been his former "comrades" explores: the dilemmas that the informer, and the handler face at each stage of the "operation" from recruitment to operation in the field, until the agent "fingers" the targets, and becomes a State witness. During each stage of the operation the "agents" motivations, fears, sense of betrayal (being betrayed and betraying others), being a "snitch", the need to protect identity as well as dependency upon the "handler" are the primary issues to be considered and resolved. The "handler" may have to tolerate the agent's commission of crimes during the operation and often may also have to "treat" the informant's spouse. Borrowed identity, which is the main meaning and dynamic of the informant's actions, and of any undercover work, will also be analyzed.

  7. Genome Sequencing of Four Strains of Rickettsia prowazekii, the Causative Agent of Epidemic Typhus, Including One Flying Squirrel Isolate.

    PubMed

    Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Ge, Hong; Butani, Amy; Osborne, Brian; Verratti, Kathleen; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Pop, Mihai; Read, Timothy D; Richards, Allen L

    2013-01-01

    Rickettsia prowazekii is a notable intracellular pathogen, the agent of epidemic typhus, and a potential biothreat agent. We present here whole-genome sequence data for four strains of R. prowazekii, including one from a flying squirrel. PMID:23814035

  8. Activity of 129 Single-Agent Drugs in 228 Phase I and II Clinical Trials in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kortuem, K. Martin; Zidich, Kaitlyn; Schuster, Steven R.; Khan, Meaghan L.; Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H.; Mikhael, Joseph R.; Fonseca, Rafael; Stewart, A. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Background More than 400 preclinical studies report ≥ 1 compound as cytotoxic to multiple myeloma (MM) cells; however, few of these agents became relevant in the clinic. Thus, the utility of such assays in predicting future clinical value is debatable. Patients and Methods We examined the application of early-phase trial experiences to predict future clinical adoption. We identified 129 drugs explored as single agents in 228 trials involving 7421 patients between 1961 and 2013. Results All drugs in common use in MM (melphalan, dexamethasone, prednisone, cyclophosphamide, bendamustine, thalidomide, lenalidomide, pomalidomide, bortezomib, carfilzomib, and doxorubicin) demonstrated a best reported response rate of ≥ 22%. Older agents, including teniposide, fotemustine, paclitaxel, and interferon, also appear active by this criterion; however, if mean response rates from all reported trials for an agent are considered, then only drugs with a mean response rate of 15% partial response are in clinical use. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that thresholds of 20% for best or 15% for mean response are highly predictive of future clinical success. Below these thresholds, no drug has yet reached regulatory approval or widespread use in the clinic. Thus, this benchmark provides 1 element of the framework for guiding choice of drugs for late-stage clinical testing. PMID:24565465

  9. Nanocarrier-mediated co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lin; Gao, Zhonggao; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming

    2015-05-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drug in cancer treatment is often hampered by drug resistance of tumor cells, which is usually caused by abnormal gene expression. RNA interference mediated by siRNA and miRNA can selectively knock down the carcinogenic genes by targeting specific mRNAs. Therefore, combining chemotherapeutic drugs with gene agents could be a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Due to poor stability and solubility associated with gene agents and drugs, suitable protective carriers are needed and have been widely researched for the co-delivery. In this review, we summarize the most commonly used nanocarriers for co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents, as well as the advances in co-delivery systems. PMID:26579443

  10. Nanocarrier-mediated co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Lin; Gao, Zhonggao; Huang, Wei; Jin, Mingji; Wang, Qiming

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drug in cancer treatment is often hampered by drug resistance of tumor cells, which is usually caused by abnormal gene expression. RNA interference mediated by siRNA and miRNA can selectively knock down the carcinogenic genes by targeting specific mRNAs. Therefore, combining chemotherapeutic drugs with gene agents could be a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Due to poor stability and solubility associated with gene agents and drugs, suitable protective carriers are needed and have been widely researched for the co-delivery. In this review, we summarize the most commonly used nanocarriers for co-delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene agents, as well as the advances in co-delivery systems. PMID:26579443

  11. Calixdrugs: calixarene-based clusters of established therapeutic drug agents.

    PubMed

    Nasuhi Pur, Fazel

    2016-08-01

    Calixdrugs are calix[4]arene-based clusters (chaliced shapes) of established therapeutic drugs (e.g., penicillin, cephalosporin, tyrosol, and carboplatin) that are innovatively named calixpenam, calixcephem, calixtyrosol, and calixplatin, respectively. Going over the structures of cluster compounds, the calixarene scaffold lies at the heart of the structure (chaliced shape of drug), and it is an integral part of the cluster. In fact, the monomer drugs contribute as 1/4 of the corresponding cluster. In addition, probably because of the multivalency, spatial preorganization, and synergistic effect of four impacted drug units in the structures of calixdrugs, they are more effective in interactions with the target sites over their corresponding monomers. PMID:27017350

  12. Drug therapy reviews: clinical use of hemostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Lowe, G D; Lawson, D H

    1978-04-01

    Systemic hemostatic agents are reviewed. Among the agents discussed are vitamin K preparations (phytonadione, menadione, menadione sodium bisulfite, menadiol sodium diphosphate); and blood products (whole blood, plasma, cryoprecipitate, factor VIII concentrates, factor IX concentrates and fibrinogen concentrates). Normal and abnormal hemostasis and fibrinolysis are discussed, as is the general management of systemic hemostatic defects. Specific disorders covered are clotting factor deficiencies, hemophilia A, factor VIII inhibitors, von Willebrand disease, hemophilia B (Christmas disease), other congenital coagulation disorders, acquired deficiency of factors II, VII, IX and X, and defibrination syndrome.

  13. Novel paramagnetic contrast agents for molecular imaging and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Gregory M; Winter, Patrick; Caruthers, Shelton; Schmeider, Anne; Crowder, Kathy; Morawski, Anne; Zhang, Huiying; Scott, Michael J; Wickline, Samuel A

    2004-12-01

    Molecular biology and genomic sciences are revealing the early biological signatures for many diseases. In response, the Molecular Imaging community is rapidly developing contrast agents to visualize the nascent pathological changes and to concomitantly deliver treatment directly to the site of disease. The evaluation, development and use of these new agents require a complementary understanding of contrast chemistry and imaging techniques. The fundamental issues surrounding magnetic contrast agent development, rational drug delivery, MR molecular imaging, and their interdependence are elucidated.

  14. 34 CFR 84.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy... in the workplace. (Authority: E.O.s 12549 and 12689; 20 U.S.C. 1082, 1094, 1221e-3 and 3474; and Sec... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must I include in my drug-free awareness...

  15. [Evaluation of the safety of innovative drugs against viruses and infectious agents].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsu; Yusa, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Nana

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several novel cellular therapy products and biological drugs are being developed to treat various previously untreatable diseases. One of the most important issues regarding these innovations is how to ensure safety over infectious agents, including viruses and prions, in the earliest treatments with these products. The object of this study is a risk assessment of cases of human infectious with the agents and to present a sample risk management plan based on a collaboration among the National Institute of Health Sciences, universities, marketing authorization holders, and scientific societies. There are three subjects of study: (1) the viral safety of cellular therapy products, (2) the viral safety of biological drugs, and (3) the safety of prions. In this report, we describe the objects of the study, the project members, the study plan outline, and the ongoing plans. The results of the viral risk identification and the risk analysis of cellular therapy products will also be described, based on a review of the literature and case reports obtained during the first year of this project. PMID:24340664

  16. [Evaluation of the safety of innovative drugs against viruses and infectious agents].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsu; Yusa, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Nana

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several novel cellular therapy products and biological drugs are being developed to treat various previously untreatable diseases. One of the most important issues regarding these innovations is how to ensure safety over infectious agents, including viruses and prions, in the earliest treatments with these products. The object of this study is a risk assessment of cases of human infectious with the agents and to present a sample risk management plan based on a collaboration among the National Institute of Health Sciences, universities, marketing authorization holders, and scientific societies. There are three subjects of study: (1) the viral safety of cellular therapy products, (2) the viral safety of biological drugs, and (3) the safety of prions. In this report, we describe the objects of the study, the project members, the study plan outline, and the ongoing plans. The results of the viral risk identification and the risk analysis of cellular therapy products will also be described, based on a review of the literature and case reports obtained during the first year of this project.

  17. Matricellular proteins in drug delivery: Therapeutic targets, active agents, and therapeutic localization.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Andrew J; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix is composed of a complex array of molecules that together provide structural and functional support to cells. These properties are mainly mediated by the activity of collagenous and elastic fibers, proteoglycans, and proteins such as fibronectin and laminin. ECM composition is tissue-specific and could include matricellular proteins whose primary role is to modulate cell-matrix interactions. In adults, matricellular proteins are primarily expressed during injury, inflammation and disease. Particularly, they are closely associated with the progression and prognosis of cardiovascular and fibrotic diseases, and cancer. This review aims to provide an overview of the potential use of matricellular proteins in drug delivery including the generation of therapeutic agents based on the properties and structures of these proteins as well as their utility as biomarkers for specific diseases.

  18. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of antifungal agents: guidelines from the British Society for Medical Mycology

    PubMed Central

    Ashbee, H. Ruth; Barnes, Rosemary A.; Johnson, Elizabeth M.; Richardson, Malcolm D.; Gorton, Rebecca; Hope, William W.

    2014-01-01

    The burden of human disease related to medically important fungal pathogens is substantial. An improved understanding of antifungal pharmacology and antifungal pharmacokinetics–pharmacodynamics has resulted in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) becoming a valuable adjunct to the routine administration of some antifungal agents. TDM may increase the probability of a successful outcome, prevent drug-related toxicity and potentially prevent the emergence of antifungal drug resistance. Much of the evidence that supports TDM is circumstantial. This document reviews the available literature and provides a series of recommendations for TDM of antifungal agents. PMID:24379304

  19. Development of drug-approval regulations for medical countermeasures against CBRN agents in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimazawa, Rumiko; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    To develop approval regulations for drugs against chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) agents in Japan, and to help inform arguments about the development of anti-CBRN agents, we analyzed documentation describing approval processes and data for drugs against CBRN agents. Sixteen countermeasure products against 10 CBRN agents have been approved in Japan. Approval schemes were grouped into 3 categories: application for off-label uses, expedited review for antiterrorism measures, and expedited review. Ten drug applications were designated "priority reviews," and the median review time was 4.4 months. No application relied exclusively on clinical trials to expose patients to CBRN threats. Clinical experience with drugs in victims of unexpected exposure was not necessarily important for approval. The United States is the most advanced country in terms of developing medical countermeasure products against CBRN agents. Japan has similarities with the US in approved products and application packages, but there were 3 unapproved products or indications that were approved under the Animal Rule in the US. The Animal Rule might encourage development of a novel product by providing efficacy evaluation in animal studies. The US also has regulations that do not exist in Japan that authorize administration of an investigational drug outside a clinical trial for patients. Introduction of the Animal Rule and expanded access of investigational drugs could contribute to development and approvals of novel countermeasure products and improve an emergency response in a crisis in Japan.

  20. New hopes from old drugs: revisiting DNA-binding small molecules as anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Gurova, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    Most of the anticancer chemotherapeutic drugs that are broadly and successfully used today are DNA-damaging agents. Targeting of DNA has been proven to cause relatively potent and selective destruction of tumor cells. However, the clinical potential of DNA-damaging agents is limited by the adverse side effects and increased risk of secondary cancers that are consequences of the agents' genotoxicity. In this review, we present evidence that those agents capable of targeting DNA without inducing DNA damage would not be limited in these ways, and may be as potent as DNA-damaging agents in the killing of tumor cells. We use as an example literature data and our own research of the well-known antimalarial drug quinacrine, which binds to DNA without inducing DNA damage, yet modulates a number of cellular pathways that impact tumor cell survival. PMID:20001804

  1. Double layered hydroxides as potential anti-cancer drug delivery agents.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Ufana; Ashraf, S M

    2013-04-01

    The emergence of nanotechnology has changed the scenario of the medical world by revolutionizing the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of cancer. This nanotechnology has been proved miraculous in detecting cancer cells, delivering chemotherapeutic agents and monitoring treatment from non-specific to highly targeted killing of tumor cells. In the past few decades, a number of inorganic materials have been investigated such as calcium phosphate, gold, carbon materials, silicon oxide, iron oxide, and layered double hydroxide (LDH) for examining their efficacy in targeting drug delivery. The reason behind the selection of these inorganic materials was their versatile and unique features efficient in drug delivery, such as wide availability, rich surface functionality, good biocompatibility, potential for target delivery, and controlled release of the drug from these inorganic nanomaterials. Although, the drug-LDH hybrids are found to be quite instrumental because of their application as advanced anti-cancer drug delivery systems, there has not been much research on them. This mini review is set to highlight the advancement made in the use of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as anti-cancer drug delivery agents. Along with the advantages of LDHs as anti-cancer drug delivery agents, the process of interaction of some of the common anti-cancer drugs with LDH has also been discussed.

  2. Drug forecast – the peptide deformylase inhibitors as antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Guay, David R P

    2007-01-01

    The relatively rapid development of microbial resistance after the entry of every new antimicrobial into the marketplace necessitates a constant supply of new agents to maintain effective pharmacotherapy. Despite extensive efforts to identify novel lead compounds from molecular targets, only the peptide deformylase inhibitors (PDIs) have shown any real promise, with some advancing to phase I human trials. Bacterial peptide deformylase, which catalyzes the removal of the N-formyl group from N-terminal methionine following translation, is essential for bacterial protein synthesis, growth, and survival. The majority of PDIs are pseudopeptide hydroxamic acids and two of these (IV BB-83698 and oral NVP LBM-415) entered phase I human trials. However, agents to the present have suffered from major potential liabilities. Their in vitro activity has been limited to gram-positive aerobes and some anaerobes and has been quite modest against the majority of such species (MIC90 values ranging from 1–8 mg/L). They have exerted bacteriostatic, not bacteriocidal, activity, thus reducing their potential usefulness in the management of serious infections in the immunocompromised. The relative ease with which microorganisms have been able to develop resistance and the multiple available mechanisms of resistance (mutations in fmt, defB, folD genes; AcrAB/TolC efflux pump; overexpression of peptide deformylase) are worrisome. These could portend a short timespan of efficacy after marketing. Despite these current liabilities, further pursuit of more potent and broader spectrum PDIs which are less susceptible to bacterial mechanisms of resistance is still warranted. PMID:18472972

  3. 14 CFR § 1267.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... establish an ongoing drug-free awareness program to inform employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What must I include in my drug-free... ADMINISTRATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Requirements...

  4. Molecular Diagnostic and Drug Delivery Agents based on Aptamer-Nanomaterial Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Heon; Yigit, Mehmet V.; Mazumdar, Debapriya; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress in an emerging area of designing aptamer and nanomaterial conjugates as molecular diagnostic and drug delivery agents in biomedical applications is summarized. Aptamers specific for a wide range of targets are first introduced and compared to antibodies. Methods of integrating these aptamers with a variety of nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, each with unique optical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties, are reviewed. Applications of these systems as fluorescent, colorimetric, magnetic resonance imaging, and electrochemical sensors in medical diagnostics are given, along with new applications as smart drug delivery agents. PMID:20338204

  5. The Next Generation of Platinum Drugs: Targeted Pt(II) Agents, Nanoparticle Delivery, and Pt(IV) Prodrugs

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan; Lippard, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    The platinum drugs, cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin, prevail in the treatment of cancer,, but new platinum agents have been very slow to enter the clinic. Recently, however, there has been a surge of activity, based on a great deal of mechanistic information, aimed at developing non-classical platinum complexes that operate via mechanisms of action distinct from those of the approved drugs. The use of nanodelivery devices has also grown and many different strategies have been explored to incorporate platinum warheads into nanomedicine constructs. In this review, we discuss these efforts to create the next generation of platinum anticancer drugs. The introduction provides the reader with a brief overview of the use, development, and mechanism of action of the approved platinum drugs to provide the context in which more recent research has flourished. We then describe approaches that explore non-classical platinum(II) complexes with trans geometry and with a monofunctional coordination mode, polynuclear platinum(II) compounds, platinum(IV) prodrugs, dual-treat agents, and photoactivatable platinum(IV) complexes. Nanodelivery particles designed to deliver platinum(IV) complexes will also be discussed, including carbon nanotubes, carbon nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, upconversion nanoparticles, and polymeric micelles. Additional nanoformulations including supramolecular self-assembled structures, proteins, peptides, metal-organic frameworks, and coordination polymers will then be described. Finally, the significant clinical progress made by nanoparticle formulations of platinum(II) agents will be reviewed. We anticipate that such a synthesis of disparate research efforts will not only help to generate new drug development ideas and strategies, but also reflect our optimism that the next generation of platinum cancer drugs is about to arrive. PMID:26865551

  6. Targeted delivery of anticancer agents via a dual function nanocarrier with an interfacial drug-interactive motif.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Zhao, Wenchen; Liu, Hao; Marquez, Rebecca; Lu, Jianqin; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Yifei; Li, Jiang; Gao, Xiang; Venkataramanan, Raman; Xu, Liang; Li, Song

    2014-11-10

    We have developed a dual-function drug carrier, polyethylene glycol (PEG)-derivatized farnesylthiosalicylate (FTS). Here we report that incorporation of a drug-interactive motif (Fmoc) into PEG5k-FTS2 led to further improvement in both drug loading capacity and formulation stability. Doxorubicin (DOX) formulated in PEG5k-Fmoc-FTS2 showed sustained release kinetics slower than those of DOX loaded in PEG5k-FTS2. The maximum tolerated dose of DOX- or paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded PEG5k-Fmoc-FTS2 was significantly higher than that of the free drug. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies showed that DOX/PEG5k-Fmoc-FTS2 mixed micelles were able to retain DOX in the bloodstream for a significant amount of time and efficiently deliver the drug to tumor sites. More importantly, drug (DOX or PTX)-loaded PEG5k-Fmoc-FTS2 led to superior antitumor activity over other treatments including drugs formulated in PEG5k-FTS2 in breast cancer and prostate cancer models. Our improved dual function carrier with a built-in drug-interactive motif represents a simple and effective system for targeted delivery of anticancer agents.

  7. Adenine: an important drug scaffold for the design of antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changyuan; Song, Zhendong; Yu, Haiqing; Liu, Kexin; Ma, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Adenine derivatives, in particular the scaffold bearing the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPS), possess significant antiviral and cytostatic activity. Till now, several effective adenine derivatives have been marketed for the treatment of HIV, HBV, CMV and other virus-infected diseases. These compounds are represented by tenofovir (PMPA), a medicine for both HIV and HBV, and adefovir as an anti-HBV agent. More than this, other analogs, such as GS9148, GS9131, and GS7340, are also well-known anti-viral agents that have been progressed to the clinical studies for their excellent activity. In general, the structures of these compounds include an adenine nucleobase linked to a phosphonate side chain. Considerable structural modifications on the scaffold itself and the peripheral sections were made. The structure-activity relationships (SARs) of this skeleton will provide valuable clues to identify more effective adenine derivatives as antiviral drugs. Here, we systematically summarized the SARs of the adenine derivatives, and gave important information for further optimizing this template. PMID:26579473

  8. Biodirected synthesis of Miconazole-conjugated bacterial silver nanoparticles and their application as antifungal agents and drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C Ganesh; Poornachandra, Y

    2015-01-01

    The recent strategy to improve the efficacy of drugs is to combine them with metal nanoparticles for the control of microbial infections. Considering this fact, we developed a low cost and eco-friendly method for silver nanoparticles synthesis using the cell free supernatant of Delftia sp. strain KCM-006 and their application as antifungal agents and as a drug carrier. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis revealed the formation of spherical and monodispersed silver nanoparticles with an average size of 9.8 nm. The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be photoluminescent, highly stable and crystalline in nature having a zeta potential of -31 mV. The silver nanoparticles exhibited very good antifungal activity against various pathogenic Candida strains. Furthermore, the efficacy of nanoparticles was increased by conjugating the antifungal drug Miconazole to silver nanoparticles which exhibited significant fungicidal activity, inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis and biofilm inhibition by increasing ROS levels. In addition, the cell viability and immunocytochemistry analysis against different normal cell lines including Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO), human lung cell line (MRC5) and human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) demonstrated that these nanoparticles were non-toxic up to a concentration of 20 μM. In conclusion, these results suggest that the synthesized nanoparticles find application as both antifungal agents and drug delivery vehicles. This is a first report on the preparation of silver nanoparticles using culture supernatant from Delftia sp. and also on the conjugation of Miconazole, an antifungal drug, to the bacterial silver nanoparticles.

  9. Polymer-drug compatibility: a guide to the development of delivery systems for the anticancer agent, ellipticine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jubo; Xiao, Yuehua; Allen, Christine

    2004-01-01

    To establish a method for predicting polymer-drug compatibility as a means to guide formulation development, we carried out physicochemical analyses of polymer-drug pairs and compared the difference in total and partial solubility parameters of polymer and drug. For these studies, we employed a range of biodegradable polymers and the anticancer agent Ellipticine as the model drug. The partial and total solubility parameters for the polymer and drug were calculated using the group contribution method. Drug-polymer pairs with different enthalpy of mixing values were analyzed by physicochemical techniques including X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared. Polymers identified to be compatible [i.e., polycaprolactone (PCL) and poly-beta-benzyl-L-aspartate (PBLA)] and incompatible [i.e., poly (d,l-lactide (PLA)], by the above mentioned methods, were used to formulate Ellipticine. Specifically, Ellipticine was loaded into PBLA, PCL, and PLA films using a solvent casting method to produce a local drug formulation; while, polyethylene oxide (PEO)-b-polycaprolactone (PCL) and PEO-b-poly (d,l-lactide) (PLA) copolymer micelles were prepared by both dialysis and dry down methods resulting in a formulation for systemic administration. The drug release profiles for all formulations and the drug loading efficiency for the micelle formulations were also measured. In this way, we compared formulation characteristics with predictions from physicochemical analyses and comparison of total and partial solubility parameters. Overall, a good correlation was obtained between drug formulation characteristics and findings from our polymer-drug compatibility studies. Further optimization of the PEO-b-PCL micelle formulation for Ellipticine was also performed. PMID:14648643

  10. Factors determining drug residence in skin during transdermal absorption: studies on beta-blocking agents.

    PubMed

    Yagi, S; Nakayama, K; Kurosaki, Y; Higaki, K; Kimura, T

    1998-11-01

    The factors determining drug residence in skin during penetration across rat abdominal skin were investigated using five beta-blocking agents with different lipophilicities as model drugs in vivo and in vitro. The amount of beta-blocking agent in the skin at steady state correlated well with lipophilicity. The distribution of beta-blocking agents to the stratum corneum and the contribution of intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum to their skin distribution were also correlated with their lipophilicity, suggesting that the stratum corneum, especially intercellular lipids in the stratum corneum, would be responsible for the residence of beta-blocking agents in the skin. Furthermore, cholesterol-3-sulfate, palmitic acid, stearic acid and oleic acid were found to interact with the beta-blocking agents, which are cationized under the physiological condition, and were assumed to play an important role in the skin accumulation. On the other hand, the binding to keratinocyte was so small that keratinocyte might have little effect on the skin accumulation of the beta-blocking agents. Drug transport from the stratum corneum to viable skin was suggested to be regulated by the lipophilicity of these agents. To investigate the residence of these drugs in viable skin, in vitro transport studies using stripped skin were performed. The transport rate constant across viable skin to receptor cells (k23) was inversely correlated with the lipophilicity of the drugs. The elimination rate constants from viable skin (k(vs)) obtained in the in vivo study were much smaller than the values of k23 obtained in the in vitro study, and they were inversely correlated with the binding to cytosol components of viable skin but not the lipophilicity. The viable skin-to-muscle concentration ratio of these drugs, obtained at the beta-phase of the plasma concentration-time curve after intravenous administration, was also inversely correlated with the binding to the cytosol components of viable

  11. Chromatographic immunoassays: strategies and recent developments in the analysis of drugs and biological agents.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryan; Rodriguez, Elliott; Suresh, Doddavenkatanna; Hage, David S

    2015-01-01

    A chromatographic immunoassay is a technique in which an antibody or antibody-related agent is used as part of a chromatographic system for the isolation or measurement of a specific target. Various binding agents, detection methods, supports and assay formats have been developed for this group of methods, and applications have been reported that range from drugs, hormones and herbicides to peptides, proteins and bacteria. This review discusses the general principles and applications of chromatographic immunoassays, with an emphasis being given to methods and formats that have been developed for the analysis of drugs and biological agents. The relative advantages or limitations of each format are discussed. Recent developments and research in this field, as well as possible future directions, are also considered.

  12. An analysis of FDA-approved drugs for infectious disease: antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S; Patridge, Eric; Plummer, Mark; Hoyer, Denton

    2014-09-01

    Drugs targeting infectious diseases have greatly improved public health. A study to evaluate all US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved new molecular entities (NMEs) reveals that the number of new agents targeting infectious disease peaked during the 1990s and declined rapidly thereafter. Molecules targeting bacterial pathogens represent the most common component of anti-infectives followed by antivirals and antifungals. Focusing on antibacterial agents, an increase in new NMEs predominated from the 1960s through to the 1990s, dropping sharply thereafter. Obsolescence and resistance has eliminated one-third of these drugs. Consequently, the arsenal of antibiotics peaked in 2000 and is declining. Likewise, the number of organizations awarded at least one NME for a bacterial indication has declined to a level not seen in more than a half century. PMID:25043770

  13. Drug-resistant tuberculosis in subjects included in the Second National Survey on Antituberculosis Drug Resistance in Porto Alegre, Brazil*, **

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Vania Celina Dezoti; Moreira, José da Silva; Ribeiro, Marta Osório; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Braga, José Ueleres

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) among tuberculosis patients in a major Brazilian city, evaluated via the Second National Survey on Antituberculosis Drug Resistance, as well as the social, demographic, and clinical characteristics of those patients. METHODS: Clinical samples were collected from tuberculosis patients seen between 2006 to 2007 at three hospitals and five primary health care clinics participating in the survey in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. The samples were subjected to drug susceptibility testing. The species of mycobacteria was confirmed using biochemical methods. RESULTS: Of the 299 patients included, 221 (73.9%) were men and 77 (27.3%) had a history of tuberculosis. The mean age was 36 years. Of the 252 patients who underwent HIV testing, 66 (26.2%) tested positive. The prevalence of MDR-TB in the sample as a whole was 4.7% (95% CI: 2.3-7.1), whereas it was 2.2% (95% CI: 0.3-4.2) among the new cases of tuberculosis and 12.0% (95% CI: 4.5-19.5) among the patients with a history of tuberculosis treatment. The multivariate analysis showed that a history of tuberculosis and a longer time to diagnosis were both associated with MDR-TB. CONCLUSIONS: If our results are corroborated by other studies conducted in Brazil, a history of tuberculosis treatment and a longer time to diagnosis could be used as predictors of MDR-TB. PMID:24831400

  14. VEGF pathway targeting agents, vessel normalization and tumor drug uptake: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Arjaans, Marlous; Schröder, Carolina P.; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Dafni, Urania; Kleibeuker, Josée E.; de Vries, Elisabeth G.E.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway targeting agents have been combined with other anticancer drugs, leading to improved efficacy in carcinoma of the cervix, stomach, lung, colon and rectum, ovary, and breast. Vessel normalization induced by VEGF pathway targeting agents influences tumor drug uptake. Following bevacizumab treatment, preclinical and clinical studies have shown a decrease in tumor delivery of radiolabeled antibodies and two chemotherapeutic drugs. The decrease in vessel pore size during vessel normalization might explain the decrease in tumor drug uptake. Moreover, the addition of bevacizumab to cetuximab, or panitumumab in colorectal cancer patients or to trastuzumab in breast cancer patients, did not improve efficacy. However, combining bevacizumab with chemotherapy did increase efficacy in some cancer types. Novel biomarkers to select patients who may benefit from combination therapies, such as the effect of an angiogenesis inhibitor on tumor perfusion, requires innovative trial designs and large clinical trials. Small imaging studies with radiolabeled drugs could be used in the interphase to gain further insight into the interplay between VEGF targeted therapy, vessel normalization and tumor drug delivery. PMID:26789111

  15. 49 CFR 40.15 - May an employer use a service agent to meet DOT drug and alcohol testing requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May an employer use a service agent to meet DOT... Responsibilities § 40.15 May an employer use a service agent to meet DOT drug and alcohol testing requirements? (a... DOT agency drug and alcohol testing regulations, consistent with the requirements of Subpart Q...

  16. 36 CFR 1212.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free... penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... drug-free awareness program? 1212.215 Section 1212.215 Parks, Forests, and Public Property...

  17. 36 CFR 1212.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free... penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... drug-free awareness program? 1212.215 Section 1212.215 Parks, Forests, and Public Property...

  18. 36 CFR 1212.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free... penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... drug-free awareness program? 1212.215 Section 1212.215 Parks, Forests, and Public Property...

  19. 38 CFR 48.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c... that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... drug-free awareness program? 48.215 Section 48.215 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...

  20. 38 CFR 48.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c... that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... drug-free awareness program? 48.215 Section 48.215 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...

  1. 38 CFR 48.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free workplace; (c... that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... drug-free awareness program? 48.215 Section 48.215 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...

  2. Photophysical characterization of anticancer drug valrubicin in rHDL nanoparticles and its use as an imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sunil; Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Bermudez, Jaclyn; Sabnis, Nirupama; Duggal, Divya; Kimball, Joseph D; Lacko, Andras G; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles are target-specific drug delivery agents that are increasingly used in cancer therapy to enhance bioavailability and to reduce off target toxicity of anti-cancer agents. Valrubicin is an anti-cancer drug, currently approved only for vesicular bladder cancer treatment because of its poor water solubility. On the other hand, valrubicin carrying reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticles appear ideally suited for extended applications, including systemic cancer chemotherapy. We determined selected fluorescence properties of the free (unencapsulated) drug vs. valrubicin incorporated into rHDL nanoparticles. We have found that upon encapsulation into rHDL nanoparticles the quantum yield of valrubicin fluorescence increased six fold while its fluorescence lifetime increased about 2 fold. Accordingly, these and potassium iodide (KI) quenching data suggest that upon incorporation, valrubicin is localized deep in the interior of the nanoparticle, inside the lipid matrix. Fluorescence anisotropy of the rHDL valrubicin nanoparticles was also found to be high along with extended rotational correlation time. The fluorescence of valrubicin could also be utilized to assess its distribution upon delivery to prostate cancer (PC3) cells. Overall the fluorescence properties of the rHDL: valrubicin complex reveal valuable novel characteristics of this drug delivery vehicle that may be particularly applicable when used in systemic (intravenous) therapy. PMID:26735001

  3. Photophysical characterization of anticancer drug valrubicin in rHDL nanoparticles and its use as an imaging agent.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sunil; Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Bermudez, Jaclyn; Sabnis, Nirupama; Duggal, Divya; Kimball, Joseph D; Lacko, Andras G; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2016-02-01

    Nanoparticles are target-specific drug delivery agents that are increasingly used in cancer therapy to enhance bioavailability and to reduce off target toxicity of anti-cancer agents. Valrubicin is an anti-cancer drug, currently approved only for vesicular bladder cancer treatment because of its poor water solubility. On the other hand, valrubicin carrying reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticles appear ideally suited for extended applications, including systemic cancer chemotherapy. We determined selected fluorescence properties of the free (unencapsulated) drug vs. valrubicin incorporated into rHDL nanoparticles. We have found that upon encapsulation into rHDL nanoparticles the quantum yield of valrubicin fluorescence increased six fold while its fluorescence lifetime increased about 2 fold. Accordingly, these and potassium iodide (KI) quenching data suggest that upon incorporation, valrubicin is localized deep in the interior of the nanoparticle, inside the lipid matrix. Fluorescence anisotropy of the rHDL valrubicin nanoparticles was also found to be high along with extended rotational correlation time. The fluorescence of valrubicin could also be utilized to assess its distribution upon delivery to prostate cancer (PC3) cells. Overall the fluorescence properties of the rHDL: valrubicin complex reveal valuable novel characteristics of this drug delivery vehicle that may be particularly applicable when used in systemic (intravenous) therapy.

  4. Full circle-old drugs prove more beneficial than newer agents for schizophrenia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Veronin, Michael A; Colson, Kendra; Roffman, Michael E; Roman, Marian W

    2012-11-01

    A 55-year-old female with a diagnosis of schizophrenia currently resides in an assisted living facility in a large metropolitan suburb. For approximately 25 years, the patient was relegated to a life of poor symptom control and social adjustment, largely due to nonadherence, relapse, and rehospitalization. The patient experienced a trial-and-error approach to drug therapy, which resulted in reliance on the older or first generation agents for symptom improvement. This case supports the assertion that the second-generation or atypical antipsychotics used to treat schizophrenia are no better than older drugs in terms of efficacy or tolerability.

  5. 45 CFR 630.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE... criminal drug statute occurring in the workplace and must do so no more than five calendar days after...

  6. Importance of Relating Efficacy Measures to Unbound Drug Concentrations for Anti-Infective Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Schmidt, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY For the optimization of dosing regimens of anti-infective agents, it is imperative to have a good understanding of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). Whenever possible, drug efficacy needs to be related to unbound concentrations at the site of action. For anti-infective drugs, the infection site is typically located outside plasma, and a drug must diffuse through capillary membranes to reach its target. Disease- and drug-related factors can contribute to differential tissue distribution. As a result, the assumption that the plasma concentration of drugs represents a suitable surrogate of tissue concentrations may lead to erroneous conclusions. Quantifying drug exposure in tissues represents an opportunity to relate the pharmacologically active concentrations to an observed pharmacodynamic parameter, such as the MIC. Selection of an appropriate specimen to sample and the advantages and limitations of the available sampling techniques require careful consideration. Ultimately, the goal will be to assess the appropriateness of a drug and dosing regimen for a specific pathogen and infection. PMID:23554417

  7. 34 CFR 86.100 - What must the IHE's drug prevention program include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees on its property or as part of... Federal law for the unlawful possession or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol; (3) A description of the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol; (4) A...

  8. 36 CFR 1212.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... workplace; (c) Any available drug counseling, rehabilitation, and employee assistance programs; and (d) The... drug-free awareness program? 1212.215 Section 1212.215 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION GENERAL RULES GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE...

  9. Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs, Including LSD, PCP, Ketamine, Dextromethorphan. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    Research is developing a clearer picture of the dangers of mind-altering drugs. The goal of this report is to present the latest information to providers to help them strengthen their prevention and treatment efforts. A description is presented of dissociative drugs, and consideration is given as to why people take hallucinogens. The physical…

  10. Anti-platelet agents augment cisplatin nanoparticle cytotoxicity by enhancing tumor vasculature permeability and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ambarish; Sarangi, Sasmit; Chien, Kelly; Sengupta, Poulomi; Papa, Anne-Laure; Basu, Sudipta; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2014-11-01

    Tumor vasculature is critically dependent on platelet mediated hemostasis and disruption of the same can augment delivery of nano-formulation based chemotherapeutic agents which depend on enhanced permeability and retention for tumor penetration. Here, we evaluated the role of Clopidogrel, a well-known inhibitor of platelet aggregation, in potentiating the tumor cytotoxicity of cisplatin nano-formulation in a murine breast cancer model. In vivo studies in murine syngeneic 4T1 breast cancer model showed a significant greater penetration of macromolecular fluorescent nanoparticles after clopidogrel pretreatment. Compared to self-assembling cisplatin nanoparticles (SACNs), combination therapy with clopidogrel and SACN was associated with a 4 fold greater delivery of cisplatin to tumor tissue and a greater reduction in tumor growth as well as higher survival rate. Clopidogrel enhances therapeutic efficiency of novel cisplatin based nano-formulations agents by increasing tumor drug delivery and can be used as a potential targeting agent for novel nano-formulation based chemotherapeutics.

  11. Development and Optimization of a Doxorubicin Loaded Poly Lactic Acid Contrast Agent for Ultrasound Directed Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eisenbrey, J.R.; Burstein, O. Mualem; Kambhampati, R.; Forsberg, F.; Liu, J-B.; Wheatley, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    An echogenic, intravenous drug delivery platform is proposed in which an encapsulated chemotherapeutic can travel to a desired location and drug delivery can be triggered using external, focused ultrasound at the area of interest. Three methods of loading poly lactic acid (PLA) shelled ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) with doxorubicin are presented. Effects on encapsulation efficiency, in vitro enhancement, stability, particle size, morphology and release during UCA rupture are compared by loading method and drug concentration. An agent containing doxorubicin within the shell was selected as an ideal candidate for future hepatocellular carcinoma studies. The agent achieved a maximal drug load of 6.2 mg Dox/g PLA with an encapsulation efficiency of 20.5%, showed a smooth surface morphology and tight size distribution (poly dispersity index = 0.309) with a peak size of 1865 nm. Acoustically, the agent provided 19 dB of enhancement in vitro at a dosage of 10 µg/ml, with a half life of over 15 mins. In vivo, the agent provided ultrasound enhancement of 13.4 ± 1.6 dB within the ascending aorta of New Zealand rabbits at a dose of 0.15 ml/kg. While the drug-incorporated agent is thought to be well suited for future drug delivery experiments, this study has shown that agent properties can be tailored for specific applications based on choice of drug loading method. PMID:20060024

  12. Biodirected synthesis of Miconazole-conjugated bacterial silver nanoparticles and their application as antifungal agents and drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C Ganesh; Poornachandra, Y

    2015-01-01

    The recent strategy to improve the efficacy of drugs is to combine them with metal nanoparticles for the control of microbial infections. Considering this fact, we developed a low cost and eco-friendly method for silver nanoparticles synthesis using the cell free supernatant of Delftia sp. strain KCM-006 and their application as antifungal agents and as a drug carrier. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis revealed the formation of spherical and monodispersed silver nanoparticles with an average size of 9.8 nm. The synthesized nanoparticles were found to be photoluminescent, highly stable and crystalline in nature having a zeta potential of -31 mV. The silver nanoparticles exhibited very good antifungal activity against various pathogenic Candida strains. Furthermore, the efficacy of nanoparticles was increased by conjugating the antifungal drug Miconazole to silver nanoparticles which exhibited significant fungicidal activity, inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis and biofilm inhibition by increasing ROS levels. In addition, the cell viability and immunocytochemistry analysis against different normal cell lines including Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO), human lung cell line (MRC5) and human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) demonstrated that these nanoparticles were non-toxic up to a concentration of 20 μM. In conclusion, these results suggest that the synthesized nanoparticles find application as both antifungal agents and drug delivery vehicles. This is a first report on the preparation of silver nanoparticles using culture supernatant from Delftia sp. and also on the conjugation of Miconazole, an antifungal drug, to the bacterial silver nanoparticles. PMID:25460601

  13. Balancing stealth and echogenic properties in an ultrasound contrast agent with drug delivery potential.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, Lauren J; Alfego, David; Andorko, James I; Eisenbrey, John R; Teraphongphom, Nutte; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2016-10-01

    Contrast agents are currently being modified to combine diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. For ultrasound (US) imaging with polymeric contrast agents, it is necessary to modify the shell to create "stealth" microbubbles but without these modifications sacrificing the agent's ability to interact with the focused US beam. We hypothesize that addition of the classic immune shielding molecule polyethylene glycol (PEG) to a polylactide (PLA) microbubble shell will affect the acoustic and physical properties of the resulting agents. In an effort to determine the best formulation to achieve a balance between stealth and acoustic activity, we compared two PEGylation techniques; addition of increasing amounts of PEG-PLA copolymer and employing incorporation of a PEG lipid (LipidPEG) into the shell. Loss of acoustic enhancement occurred in a dose-dependent manner for both types of PEGylated agents (loss of signal occurred at >5 wt% PEG-PLA and >1 wt% LipidPEG), while immune activation was also reduced in a dose-dependent manner for the PEG-PLA agents. This study shows that the balance between acoustic behavior and improved immune avoidance was scalable and successful to different degrees with both PEGylation methods, and was best achieved using for PEG-PLA at 5 wt% and for LipidPEG at 1 wt%. Studies are ongoing to evaluate the best method for the targeting and drug delivery capabilities of these agents for applications in cancer treatment. This study represents the basis for understanding the consequences of making modifications to the native polymeric shell.

  14. Balancing stealth and echogenic properties in an ultrasound contrast agent with drug delivery potential.

    PubMed

    Jablonowski, Lauren J; Alfego, David; Andorko, James I; Eisenbrey, John R; Teraphongphom, Nutte; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2016-10-01

    Contrast agents are currently being modified to combine diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. For ultrasound (US) imaging with polymeric contrast agents, it is necessary to modify the shell to create "stealth" microbubbles but without these modifications sacrificing the agent's ability to interact with the focused US beam. We hypothesize that addition of the classic immune shielding molecule polyethylene glycol (PEG) to a polylactide (PLA) microbubble shell will affect the acoustic and physical properties of the resulting agents. In an effort to determine the best formulation to achieve a balance between stealth and acoustic activity, we compared two PEGylation techniques; addition of increasing amounts of PEG-PLA copolymer and employing incorporation of a PEG lipid (LipidPEG) into the shell. Loss of acoustic enhancement occurred in a dose-dependent manner for both types of PEGylated agents (loss of signal occurred at >5 wt% PEG-PLA and >1 wt% LipidPEG), while immune activation was also reduced in a dose-dependent manner for the PEG-PLA agents. This study shows that the balance between acoustic behavior and improved immune avoidance was scalable and successful to different degrees with both PEGylation methods, and was best achieved using for PEG-PLA at 5 wt% and for LipidPEG at 1 wt%. Studies are ongoing to evaluate the best method for the targeting and drug delivery capabilities of these agents for applications in cancer treatment. This study represents the basis for understanding the consequences of making modifications to the native polymeric shell. PMID:27388945

  15. Distribution of drug-resistant bacteria and rational use of clinical antimicrobial agents

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, CHENLIANG; CHEN, XIAOBING; WU, LIWEN; QU, JING

    2016-01-01

    Open wound may lead to infection in patients. Due to overuse of medication, certain bacteria have become resistant to drugs currently available. The aim of the present study was to provide a guide to ameliorate the appropriate and rational use of clinical antimicrobial agents by analyzing the distribution of drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria in patients. Between October 2013 and January 2015, 126 patients were selected at the Department of Orthopedics. Wound secretion samples were collected, and the pathogen bacteria isolated and identified. Identification was performed using an automated identification instrument and the Kirby-Bauer antibiotic method was used to evaluate the bacterial resistance. Of the 126 patients, 118 patients were infected (infection rate, 93.65%). Additionally, 47 strains of gram-positive pathogenic bacteria (39.83%) and 71 strains of pathogenic-gram negative bacteria (60.17%) were identified. The bacteria were most likely to be resistant to penicillin while sensitive to vancomycin and imipenem. Some bacteria were resistant to several antibacterial agents. The results showed that existing risk factors at the Department of Orthopedics were complex and any non-standard procedures were able to cause bacterial infection. There were obvious dissimilarities among infectious bacteria with regard to their sensitivity to various antibacterial agents. Manipulation techniques during the treatment process were performed in a sterile manner and the use of antibacterial agents was required to be strictly in accordance with the results of drug sensitivity tests to provide effective etiologic information and a treatment plan for clinical trials and to reduce the risk of infection by multi-resistant bacteria. PMID:27313667

  16. Editorial: Current status and perspective on drug targets in tubercle bacilli and drug design of antituberculous agents based on structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Haruaki

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, tuberculosis (TB) remains the most frequent and important infectious disease causing morbidity and death. However, the development of new drugs for the treatment and prophylaxis of TB, particularly those truly active against dormant and persistent types of tubercle bacilli, has been slow, although some promising drugs, such as diarylquinoline TMC207, nitroimidazopyran PA-824, nitroimidazo-oxazole Delamanid (OPC-67683), oxazolidinone PNU-100480, ethylene diamine SQ-109, and pyrrole derivative LL3858, are currently under phase 1 to 3 clinical trials. Therefore, novel types of antituberculous drug, which act on unique drug targets in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) pathogens, particularly drug targets related to the establishment of mycobacterial dormancy in the host's macrophages, are urgently needed. In this context, it should be noted that current anti-TB drugs mostly target the metabolic reactions and proteins which are essential for the growth of MTB in extracellular milieus. It may also be promising to develop another type of drug that exerts an inhibitory action against bacterial virulence factors which cross-talk and interfere with signaling pathways of MTB-infected immunocompetent host cells, such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and NK cells, thereby changing the intracellular milieus that are favorable to intramacrophage survival and the growth of infected bacilli. This special issue contains ten review articles, dealing with recent approaches to identify and establish novel drug targets in MTB for the development of new and unique antitubercular drugs, including those related to mycobacterial dormancy and crosstalk with cellular signaling pathways. In addition, this special issue contains some review papers with special reference to the drug design based on quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, especially three-dimensional (3D)-QSAR. New, critical information on the entire genome of MTB and mycobacterial virulence genes is

  17. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety.

  18. The Interactions of P-Glycoprotein with Antimalarial Drugs, Including Substrate Affinity, Inhibition and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Crowe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The combination of passive drug permeability, affinity for uptake and efflux transporters as well as gastrointestinal metabolism defines net drug absorption. Efflux mechanisms are often overlooked when examining the absorption phase of drug bioavailability. Knowing the affinity of antimalarials for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may assist in the determination of drug absorption and pharmacokinetic drug interactions during oral absorption in drug combination therapies. Concurrent administration of P-gp inhibitors and P-gp substrate drugs may also result in alterations in the bioavailability of some antimalarials. In-vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers were used here as a model for potential drug absorption related problems and P-gp mediated transport of drugs. Artemisone had the highest permeability at around 50 x 10(-6) cm/sec, followed by amodiaquine around 20 x 10(-6) cm/sec; both mefloquine and artesunate were around 10 x 10(-6) cm/sec. Methylene blue was between 2 and 6 x 10(-6) cm/sec depending on the direction of transport. This 3 fold difference was able to be halved by use of P-gp inhibition. MRP inhibition also assisted the consolidation of the methylene blue transport. Mefloquine was shown to be a P-gp inhibitor affecting our P-gp substrate, Rhodamine 123, although none of the other drugs impacted upon rhodamine123 transport rates. In conclusion, mefloquine is a P-gp inhibitor and methylene blue is a partial substrate; methylene blue may have increased absorption if co-administered with such P-gp inhibitors. An upregulation of P-gp was observed when artemisone and dihydroartemisinin were co-incubated with mefloquine and amodiaquine. PMID:27045516

  19. The Interactions of P-Glycoprotein with Antimalarial Drugs, Including Substrate Affinity, Inhibition and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Crowe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The combination of passive drug permeability, affinity for uptake and efflux transporters as well as gastrointestinal metabolism defines net drug absorption. Efflux mechanisms are often overlooked when examining the absorption phase of drug bioavailability. Knowing the affinity of antimalarials for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may assist in the determination of drug absorption and pharmacokinetic drug interactions during oral absorption in drug combination therapies. Concurrent administration of P-gp inhibitors and P-gp substrate drugs may also result in alterations in the bioavailability of some antimalarials. In-vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers were used here as a model for potential drug absorption related problems and P-gp mediated transport of drugs. Artemisone had the highest permeability at around 50 x 10(-6) cm/sec, followed by amodiaquine around 20 x 10(-6) cm/sec; both mefloquine and artesunate were around 10 x 10(-6) cm/sec. Methylene blue was between 2 and 6 x 10(-6) cm/sec depending on the direction of transport. This 3 fold difference was able to be halved by use of P-gp inhibition. MRP inhibition also assisted the consolidation of the methylene blue transport. Mefloquine was shown to be a P-gp inhibitor affecting our P-gp substrate, Rhodamine 123, although none of the other drugs impacted upon rhodamine123 transport rates. In conclusion, mefloquine is a P-gp inhibitor and methylene blue is a partial substrate; methylene blue may have increased absorption if co-administered with such P-gp inhibitors. An upregulation of P-gp was observed when artemisone and dihydroartemisinin were co-incubated with mefloquine and amodiaquine.

  20. The Interactions of P-Glycoprotein with Antimalarial Drugs, Including Substrate Affinity, Inhibition and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Senarathna, S M D K Ganga; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Crowe, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The combination of passive drug permeability, affinity for uptake and efflux transporters as well as gastrointestinal metabolism defines net drug absorption. Efflux mechanisms are often overlooked when examining the absorption phase of drug bioavailability. Knowing the affinity of antimalarials for efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may assist in the determination of drug absorption and pharmacokinetic drug interactions during oral absorption in drug combination therapies. Concurrent administration of P-gp inhibitors and P-gp substrate drugs may also result in alterations in the bioavailability of some antimalarials. In-vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers were used here as a model for potential drug absorption related problems and P-gp mediated transport of drugs. Artemisone had the highest permeability at around 50 x 10−6 cm/sec, followed by amodiaquine around 20 x 10−6 cm/sec; both mefloquine and artesunate were around 10 x 10−6 cm/sec. Methylene blue was between 2 and 6 x 10−6 cm/sec depending on the direction of transport. This 3 fold difference was able to be halved by use of P-gp inhibition. MRP inhibition also assisted the consolidation of the methylene blue transport. Mefloquine was shown to be a P-gp inhibitor affecting our P-gp substrate, Rhodamine 123, although none of the other drugs impacted upon rhodamine123 transport rates. In conclusion, mefloquine is a P-gp inhibitor and methylene blue is a partial substrate; methylene blue may have increased absorption if co-administered with such P-gp inhibitors. An upregulation of P-gp was observed when artemisone and dihydroartemisinin were co-incubated with mefloquine and amodiaquine. PMID:27045516

  1. Recent progress in the drug development of coumarin derivatives as potent antituberculosis agents.

    PubMed

    Keri, Rangappa S; Sasidhar, B S; Nagaraja, Bhari Mallanna; Santos, M Amélia

    2015-07-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a challenging worldwide health problem and mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) remains one of the most deadly human pathogens. TB is the second leading infectious cause of mortality today behind only HIV/AIDS. The impetus for developing new structural classes of antituberculosis drugs comes from the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains. The development of MDR strains to commonly used drugs is due to, longer durations of therapy as results of resistance, and the resurgence of the disease in immune compromised patients. Therefore, there is an urgent need to explore new antitubercular (anti-TB) agents. Ironically, the low number of potentially new chemical entities which can act as anti-TB candidates is of great importance at present situation. Considering the severity of the problem, WHO has prepared a strategic plan in Berlin declaration 2007 to stop TB, globally. Among the oxygen heterocycles, coumarin derivatives are important motifs, which can be widely found in many natural products, and many of them displaying diverse biological activities. This spectacular spectrum of applications has intrigued organic and medicinal chemists for decades to explore the natural coumarins or their synthetic analogs for their applicability as anti-TB drugs. To pave the way for the future research, there is a need to collect the latest information in this promising area. In the present review, we collated published reports on coumarin derivatives to shed light on the insights on different types of methods reported for their preparations, characterizations and anti-TB applications, so that its full therapeutic potential class of compounds can be utilized for the treatment of tuberculosis. Therefore, the objective of this review is to focus on important coumarin analogs with anti-TB activities, and structure-activity relationships (SAR) for designing the better anti-TB agents. It is hoped that, this review will be helpful for new thoughts in the

  2. Evolution of contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Paefgen, Vera; Doleschel, Dennis; Kiessling, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most frequently used diagnostic methods. It is a non-invasive, comparably inexpensive imaging method with a broad spectrum of applications, which can be increased even more by using bubbles as contrast agents (CAs). There are various different types of bubbles: filled with different gases, composed of soft- or hard-shell materials, and ranging in size from nano- to micrometers. These intravascular CAs enable functional analyses, e.g., to acquire organ perfusion in real-time. Molecular analyses are achieved by coupling specific ligands to the bubbles’ shell, which bind to marker molecules in the area of interest. Bubbles can also be loaded with or attached to drugs, peptides or genes and can be destroyed by US pulses to locally release the entrapped agent. Recent studies show that US CAs are also valuable tools in hyperthermia-induced ablation therapy of tumors, or can increase cellular uptake of locally released drugs by enhancing membrane permeability. This review summarizes important steps in the development of US CAs and introduces the current clinical applications of contrast-enhanced US. Additionally, an overview of the recent developments in US probe design for functional and molecular diagnosis as well as for drug delivery is given. PMID:26441654

  3. Antiparkinson drugs used as prophylactics for nerve agents: studies of cognitive side effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Myhrer, Trond; Enger, Siri; Aas, Pål

    2008-06-01

    Antiparkinson agents possess excellent anticonvulsant properties against nerve agent-induced seizures by exerting both cholinergic and glutamatergic antagonisms. It is important, however, that drugs used as prophylactics not by themselves cause impairment of cognitive capability. The purpose of the present study was to make a comparative assessment of potential cognitive effects of benactyzine (0.3 mg/kg), biperiden (0.11 mg/kg), caramiphen (10 mg/kg), procyclidine (3 mg/kg), and trihexyphenidyl (0.12 mg/kg) separately and each in combination with physostigmine (0.1 mg/kg). The results showed that benactyzine, caramiphen, and trihexyphenidyl reduced rats' innate preference for novelty, whereas biperiden and procyclidine did not. When benactyzine, caramiphen, and trihexyphenidyl were combined with physostigmine the cognitive impairment disappeared. This counteracting effect, however, caused changes in locomotor and rearing activities not seen by each drug alone. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and anticholinergics used as prophylactics can offset each other, but exceptions are observed in a previous study when a very potent anticholinergic (scopolamine) or a high dose of procyclidine still results in cognitive deficits in spite of coadministration with physostigmine. Among the present drugs tested, procyclidine appears to be a robust anticonvulsant with few cognitive side effects.

  4. Requirements for Foreign and Domestic Establishment Registration and Listing for Human Drugs, Including Drugs That Are Regulated Under a Biologics License Application, and Animal Drugs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-31

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing drug establishment registration and drug listing. These amendments reorganize, modify, and clarify current regulations concerning who must register establishments and list human drugs, human drugs that are also biological products, and animal drugs. The final rule requires electronic submission, unless waived in certain circumstances, of registration and listing information. This rulemaking pertains to finished drug products and to active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) alone or together with one or more other ingredients. The final rule describes how and when owners or operators of establishments at which drugs are manufactured or processed must register their establishments with FDA and list the drugs they manufacture or process. In addition, the rule makes certain changes to the National Drug Code (NDC) system. We are taking this action to improve management of drug establishment registration and drug listing requirements and make these processes more efficient and effective for industry and for us. This action also supports implementation of the electronic prescribing provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) and the availability of current drug labeling information through DailyMed, a computerized repository of drug information maintained by the National Library of Medicine. PMID:27580511

  5. Requirements for Foreign and Domestic Establishment Registration and Listing for Human Drugs, Including Drugs That Are Regulated Under a Biologics License Application, and Animal Drugs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-08-31

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing drug establishment registration and drug listing. These amendments reorganize, modify, and clarify current regulations concerning who must register establishments and list human drugs, human drugs that are also biological products, and animal drugs. The final rule requires electronic submission, unless waived in certain circumstances, of registration and listing information. This rulemaking pertains to finished drug products and to active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) alone or together with one or more other ingredients. The final rule describes how and when owners or operators of establishments at which drugs are manufactured or processed must register their establishments with FDA and list the drugs they manufacture or process. In addition, the rule makes certain changes to the National Drug Code (NDC) system. We are taking this action to improve management of drug establishment registration and drug listing requirements and make these processes more efficient and effective for industry and for us. This action also supports implementation of the electronic prescribing provisions of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) and the availability of current drug labeling information through DailyMed, a computerized repository of drug information maintained by the National Library of Medicine.

  6. 45 CFR 630.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE... the statement; and (2) Must notify you in writing if he or she is convicted for a violation of...

  7. 45 CFR 630.205 - What must I include in my drug-free workplace statement?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE... the statement; and (2) Must notify you in writing if he or she is convicted for a violation of...

  8. DNA sequence analyses of blended herbal products including synthetic cannabinoids as designer drugs.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Jun; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro

    2013-04-10

    In recent years, various herbal products adulterated with synthetic cannabinoids have been distributed worldwide via the Internet. These herbal products are mostly sold as incense, and advertised as not for human consumption. Although their labels indicate that they contain mixtures of several potentially psychoactive plants, and numerous studies have reported that they contain a variety of synthetic cannabinoids, their exact botanical contents are not always clear. In this study, we investigated the origins of botanical materials in 62 Spice-like herbal products distributed on the illegal drug market in Japan, by DNA sequence analyses and BLAST searches. The nucleotide sequences of four regions were analyzed to identify the origins of each plant species in the herbal mixtures. The sequences of "Damiana" (Turnera diffusa) and Lamiaceae herbs (Mellissa, Mentha and Thymus) were frequently detected in a number of products. However, the sequences of other plant species indicated on the packaging labels were not detected. In a few products, DNA fragments of potent psychotropic plants were found, including marijuana (Cannabis sativa), "Diviner's Sage" (Salvia divinorum) and "Kratom" (Mitragyna speciosa). Their active constituents were also confirmed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), although these plant names were never indicated on the labels. Most plant species identified in the products were different from the plants indicated on the labels. The plant materials would be used mainly as diluents for the psychoactive synthetic compounds, because no reliable psychoactive effects have been reported for most of the identified plants, with the exception of the psychotropic plants named above. PMID:23092848

  9. DNA sequence analyses of blended herbal products including synthetic cannabinoids as designer drugs.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Jun; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kikura-Hanajiri, Ruri; Goda, Yukihiro

    2013-04-10

    In recent years, various herbal products adulterated with synthetic cannabinoids have been distributed worldwide via the Internet. These herbal products are mostly sold as incense, and advertised as not for human consumption. Although their labels indicate that they contain mixtures of several potentially psychoactive plants, and numerous studies have reported that they contain a variety of synthetic cannabinoids, their exact botanical contents are not always clear. In this study, we investigated the origins of botanical materials in 62 Spice-like herbal products distributed on the illegal drug market in Japan, by DNA sequence analyses and BLAST searches. The nucleotide sequences of four regions were analyzed to identify the origins of each plant species in the herbal mixtures. The sequences of "Damiana" (Turnera diffusa) and Lamiaceae herbs (Mellissa, Mentha and Thymus) were frequently detected in a number of products. However, the sequences of other plant species indicated on the packaging labels were not detected. In a few products, DNA fragments of potent psychotropic plants were found, including marijuana (Cannabis sativa), "Diviner's Sage" (Salvia divinorum) and "Kratom" (Mitragyna speciosa). Their active constituents were also confirmed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), although these plant names were never indicated on the labels. Most plant species identified in the products were different from the plants indicated on the labels. The plant materials would be used mainly as diluents for the psychoactive synthetic compounds, because no reliable psychoactive effects have been reported for most of the identified plants, with the exception of the psychotropic plants named above.

  10. Drug Development for Hypertension: Do We Need Another Antihypertensive Agent for Resistant Hypertension?

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo; Calhoun, David A

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of resistant hypertension is seemingly much lower than had been reported in early studies. Recent analyses suggest that <5 % of treated hypertensive patients remain uncontrolled if fully adherent to an optimized antihypertensive treatment. However, these patients do have increased cardiovascular risk and need effective therapeutic approaches. Drug development is a high-risk, complex, lengthy, and very expensive process. In this article, we discuss the factors that should be considered in the process of developing a new agent for treatment of resistant hypertension.

  11. Drug Development for Hypertension: Do We Need Another Antihypertensive Agent for Resistant Hypertension?

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo; Calhoun, David A

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of resistant hypertension is seemingly much lower than had been reported in early studies. Recent analyses suggest that <5 % of treated hypertensive patients remain uncontrolled if fully adherent to an optimized antihypertensive treatment. However, these patients do have increased cardiovascular risk and need effective therapeutic approaches. Drug development is a high-risk, complex, lengthy, and very expensive process. In this article, we discuss the factors that should be considered in the process of developing a new agent for treatment of resistant hypertension. PMID:26949263

  12. Bitter melon extracts enhance the activity of chemotherapeutic agents through the modulation of multiple drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kwatra, Deep; Venugopal, Anand; Standing, David; Ponnurangam, Sivapriya; Dhar, Animesh; Mitra, Ashim; Anant, Shrikant

    2013-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that extracts of bitter melon (BME) can be used as a preventive/therapeutic agent in colon cancers. Here, we determined BME effects on anticancer activity and bioavailability of doxorubicin (DOX) in colon cancer cells. BME enhanced the effect of DOX on cell proliferation and sensitized the cells toward DOX upon pretreatment. Furthermore, there was both increased drug uptake and reduced drug efflux. We also observed a reduction in the expression of multidrug resistance conferring proteins (MDRCP) P-glycoprotein, MRP-2, and BCRP. Further BME suppressed DOX efflux in MDCK cells overexpressing the three efflux proteins individually, suggesting that BME is a potent inhibitor of MDR function. Next, we determined the effect of BME on PXR, a xenobiotic sensing nuclear receptor and a transcription factor that controls the expression of the three MDR genes. BME suppressed PXR promoter activity thereby suppressing its expression. Finally, we determined the effect of AMPK pathway on drug efflux because we have previously demonstrated that BME affects the pathway. However, inhibiting AMPK did not affect drug resistance, suggesting that BME may use different pathways for the anticancer and MDR modulating activities. Together, these results suggest that BME can enhance the bioavailability and efficacy of conventional chemotherapy.

  13. DrugLogit: logistic discrimination between drugs and nondrugs including disease-specificity by assigning probabilities based on molecular properties.

    PubMed

    García-Sosa, Alfonso T; Oja, Mare; Hetényi, Csaba; Maran, Uko

    2012-08-27

    The increasing knowledge of both structure and activity of compounds provides a good basis for enhancing the pharmacological characterization of chemical libraries. In addition, pharmacology can be seen as incorporating both advances from molecular biology as well as chemical sciences, with innovative insight provided from studying target-ligand data from a ligand molecular point of view. Predictions and profiling of libraries of drug candidates have previously focused mainly on certain cases of oral bioavailability. Inclusion of other administration routes and disease-specificity would improve the precision of drug profiling. In this work, recent data are extended, and a probability-based approach is introduced for quantitative and gradual classification of compounds into categories of drugs/nondrugs, as well as for disease- or organ-specificity. Using experimental data of over 1067 compounds and multivariate logistic regressions, the classification shows good performance in training and independent test cases. The regressions have high statistical significance in terms of the robustness of coefficients and 95% confidence intervals provided by a 1000-fold bootstrapping resampling. Besides their good predictive power, the classification functions remain chemically interpretable, containing only one to five variables in total, and the physicochemical terms involved can be easily calculated. The present approach is useful for an improved description and filtering of compound libraries. It can also be applied sequentially or in combinations of filters, as well as adapted to particular use cases. The scores and equations may be able to suggest possible routes for compound or library modification. The data is made available for reuse by others, and the equations are freely accessible at http://hermes.chem.ut.ee/~alfx/druglogit.html.

  14. A polyethylenimine functionalized porous/hollow nanoworm as a drug delivery system and a bioimaging agent.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Cai, Chuanjie; Wang, Qian; Cai, Dongqing; Qian, Junchao; Chi, Yu; Zheng, Kang; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Guilong; Zhong, Kai; Wu, Zhengyan

    2016-03-21

    A wormstructured and nanosized porous/hollow polyethyleneimine (PEI) functionalized Gd2O3/Fe3O4 composite was fabricated as a drug carrier and a bioimaging agent. The effect of PEI's chain length on the size and morphology of the nanoworm was investigated and the results indicated that the nanoworm modified with PEI (10,000 molecular weight) (designated as p-nanoworm) possessed a suitable size and a porous/hollow structure. Meanwhile, the p-nanoworm could effectively prevent the leakage of Gd ions under different pH conditions because of plenty of amino groups on their surface. Compared with contrast agents of clinical use, the p-nanoworm displayed MR enhancement with a high r1 relaxivity of 5.58 s(-1) mM(-1) per gadolinium atom. Cisplatin (CDDP), a clinical anticancer drug, could be easily loaded into the pores and lumen of the p-nanoworm (p-nanoworm-CDDP) and also controllably released by adjusting the pH value. Cell assay suggested that the p-nanoworm possessed satisfactory biocompatibility and meanwhile could promote CDDP uptake of HeLa cells and enhance the inhibition effect on HeLa cells. In addition, p-nanoworm-CDDP showed a negligible cytotoxicity on normal human cells, indicating that the side effect of CDDP is reduced. Thus, the p-nanoworm could have a potential application for the diagnosis and therapy of cancer.

  15. Alternative matrices for therapeutic drug monitoring of immunosuppressive agents using LC–MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Ghareeb, Mwlod; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs used in solid organ transplants typically have narrow therapeutic windows and high intra- and intersubject variability. To ensure satisfactory exposure, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) plays a pivotal role in any successful posttransplant maintenance therapy. Currently, recommendations for optimum immunosuppressant concentrations are based on blood/plasma measurements. However, they introduce many disadvantages, including poor prediction of allograft survival and toxicity, a weak correlation with drug concentrations at the site of action and the invasive nature of the sample collection. Thus, alternative matrices have been investigated. This paper reviews tandem-mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS) methods used for the quantification of immunosuppressant drugs utilizing nonconventional matrices, namely oral fluids, fingerprick blood and intracellular and intratissue sampling. The advantages, disadvantages and clinical application of such alternative mediums are discussed. Additionally, sample extraction techniques and basic chromatography information regarding these methods are presented in tabulated form. PMID:25966013

  16. Alternative matrices for therapeutic drug monitoring of immunosuppressive agents using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Ghareeb, Mwlod; Akhlaghi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs used in solid organ transplants typically have narrow therapeutic windows and high intra- and intersubject variability. To ensure satisfactory exposure, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) plays a pivotal role in any successful posttransplant maintenance therapy. Currently, recommendations for optimum immunosuppressant concentrations are based on blood/plasma measurements. However, they introduce many disadvantages, including poor prediction of allograft survival and toxicity, a weak correlation with drug concentrations at the site of action and the invasive nature of the sample collection. Thus, alternative matrices have been investigated. This paper reviews tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods used for the quantification of immunosuppressant drugs utilizing nonconventional matrices, namely oral fluids, fingerprick blood and intracellular and intratissue sampling. The advantages, disadvantages and clinical application of such alternative mediums are discussed. Additionally, sample extraction techniques and basic chromatography information regarding these methods are presented in tabulated form.

  17. A team agent approach to postmarketing surveillance of adverse drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanqing; Ying, Hao; Barth-Jones, Daniel; Yen, John; Zhu, Shizhou; Miller, Richard; Michael Massanari, R

    2005-01-01

    Current postmarketing surveillance methods largely rely on spontaneous reports which suffer from serious underreporting, latency, and inconsistent reporting. Thus they are not ideal for rapidly identifying rare adverse drug reactions (ADRs). We propose an active, multi-agent computer software system, where each agent is empowered with teamwork capabilities such as anticipating information needs, identifying relevant ADR information, and continuously monitoring and proactively sharing such information in a collaborative fashion with other agents. The main purpose of this system is to help regulatory authorities (e.g., FDA in the U.S.) find previously unrecognized ADRs as early as possible. Another objective is to promote increased filing of on-line ADR reports thereby, addressing the severe underreporting problem with the current system. The proposed system has the potential to significantly accelerate the process of ADR discovery and response by utilizing electronic patient data distributed across many different sources and locations more effectively. Our preliminary system design is presented and some issues related to it are discussed. PMID:17281878

  18. Current state of evidence on 'off-label' therapeutic options for systemic lupus erythematosus, including biological immunosuppressive agents, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland--a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Aringer, M; Burkhardt, H; Burmester, G R; Fischer-Betz, R; Fleck, M; Graninger, W; Hiepe, F; Jacobi, A M; Kötter, I; Lakomek, H J; Lorenz, H M; Manger, B; Schett, G; Schmidt, R E; Schneider, M; Schulze-Koops, H; Smolen, J S; Specker, C; Stoll, T; Strangfeld, A; Tony, H P; Villiger, P M; Voll, R; Witte, T; Dörner, T

    2012-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can be a severe and potentially life-threatening disease that often represents a therapeutic challenge because of its heterogeneous organ manifestations. Only glucocorticoids, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide and very recently belimumab have been approved for SLE therapy in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Dependence on glucocorticoids and resistance to the approved therapeutic agents, as well as substantial toxicity, are frequent. Therefore, treatment considerations will include 'off-label' use of medication approved for other indications. In this consensus approach, an effort has been undertaken to delineate the limits of the current evidence on therapeutic options for SLE organ disease, and to agree on common practice. This has been based on the best available evidence obtained by a rigorous literature review and the authors' own experience with available drugs derived under very similar health care conditions. Preparation of this consensus document included an initial meeting to agree upon the core agenda, a systematic literature review with subsequent formulation of a consensus and determination of the evidence level followed by collecting the level of agreement from the panel members. In addition to overarching principles, the panel have focused on the treatment of major SLE organ manifestations (lupus nephritis, arthritis, lung disease, neuropsychiatric and haematological manifestations, antiphospholipid syndrome and serositis). This consensus report is intended to support clinicians involved in the care of patients with difficult courses of SLE not responding to standard therapies by providing up-to-date information on the best available evidence.

  19. Plasma sterilization of poly lactic acid ultrasound contrast agents: surface modification and implications for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Hsu, Jennifer; Wheatley, Margaret A

    2009-11-01

    Poly lactic acid (PLA) ultrasound contrast agents (CA) have been developed previously in our laboratory for ultrasound (US) imaging, as well as surface coated with doxorubicin to create a potential targeted platform of chemotherapeutic delivery using focused US. However, we have previously found it impossible to sterilize these agents while at the same time maintaining their acoustic properties, a task that would probably require fabrication within a clean facility. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of using plasma to sterilize these CA while maintaining maximum echogenicity, a step that would greatly facilitate in vivo investigations. Effects of plasma exposure time (1, 3 and 6 min) and intensity (low-10 mA, 6.8 W; medium-15 mA, 10.5 W; and high-25 mA, 18 W) on the CAs' acoustic properties, surface morphology, zeta potential, capacity to carry chemotherapeutics and overall sterility are described. Both increases in plasma intensity and exposure time increased CA zeta potential and also significantly increased drug payload. High-intensity plasma exposure for 3 min was found to be an optimal sterilization protocol for maximal (100%) preservation of CA echogenicity. Plasma exposure resulted in sterile samples and maintained original CA enhancement of 20 dB and acoustic half-life over 75 min, while increasing CA zeta potential by 11 mV and doxorubicin loading efficiency by 10%. This study not only shows how a highly temperature- and pressure-sensitive agent can be sterilized using plasma, but also that surface modification can be used to increase surface binding of the drug. PMID:19766380

  20. Rural-urban migration including formal and informal workers in the urban sector: an agent-based numerical simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branco, Nilton; Oliveira, Tharnier; Silveira, Jaylson

    2012-02-01

    The goal of this work is to study rural-urban migration in the early stages of industrialization. We use an agent-based model and take into account the existence of informal and formal workers on the urban sector and possible migration movements, dependent on the agents' social and private utilities. Our agents are place on vertices of a square lattice, such that each vertex has only one agent. Rural, urban informal and urban formal workers are represented by different states of a three-state Ising model. At every step, a fraction a of the agents may change sectors or migrate. The total utility of a given agent is then calculated and compared to a random utility, in order to check if this agent turns into an actual migrant or changes sector. The dynamics is carried out until an equilibrium state is reached and equilibrium variables are then calculated and compared to available data. We find that a generalized Harris-Todaro condition is satisfied [1] on these equilibrium regimes, i.e, the ratio between expected wages between any pair of sectors reach a constant value. [4pt] [1] J. J. Silveira, A. L. Esp'indola and T. J. Penna, Physica A, 364, 445 (2006).

  1. In vitro bactericidal activity of aminoglycosides, including the next-generation drug plazomicin, against Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Steven C; Carlson, Steve A

    2015-01-01

    Plazomicin is a next-generation aminoglycoside with a potentially unique set of clinical characteristics compared with other aminoglycosides. This study assessed the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of plazomicin against 15 clinical isolates as well as three reference strains representing Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis and Brucella suis. These data were compared with those obtained for six other aminoglycosides and two aminocyclitols. Plazomicin and gentamicin were the only drugs demonstrating bactericidal activity towards two of the three Brucella spp., whilst plazomicin was the only drug exhibiting bactericidal activity against B. suis. This is the first study to assess the bactericidal nature of plazomicin against Brucella spp. in vitro. PMID:25459738

  2. US Food and Drug Administration regulations governing label claims for food products, including probiotics.

    PubMed

    Saldanha, Leila G

    2008-02-01

    The US Congress has granted the Food and Drug Administration the authority to permit manufacturers to use claims in food labels that fit into the following broad categories: health claims, structure/function claims, nutrient content claims, and dietary guidance messages. This article outlines the scope and evolution of these claims and how they are used in the marketing of probiotics. Probiotics are live microorganisms (in most cases, bacteria) that are similar to beneficial microorganisms found in the human gut.

  3. Surgical treatment of complications of pulmonary tuberculosis, including drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Madansein, Rajhmun; Parida, Shreemanta; Padayatchi, Nesri; Singh, Nalini; Master, Iqbal; Naidu, Kantharuben; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Surgery for drug-resistant tuberculosis has been shown to be safe and effective, with similar level of mortalities associated with surgical intervention observed with that for lung cancer. While surgery has been an option to treat TB in the pre-antibiotic era, it is now increasingly used to treat complications of pulmonary TB, particularly in patients with drug-resistant TB who do not respond to medical treatment. The two most frequent indications for lung resection in drug- resistant TB, are i) failed medical treatment with persistent sputum positivity or ii) patients who have had medical treatment and are sputum negative, but with persistent localized cavitary disease or bronchiectasis. Massive hemoptysis is a potentially life-threatening complication of TB. Lung resection is potentially curative in patients with massive hemoptysis and cavitary or bronchiectatic disease. Bronchial artery embolization in these patients has a high success rate but bears also the risk of recurrence. Lung resection can be safely undertaken in selected patients with HIV co-infection and pulmonary complications of TB. Ambulatory drainage is a novel, safe, affordable and effective method of draining a chronic TB associated empyema thoracis. We review here the current surgical treatment of the complications of pulmonary TB and discuss the experience from the Durban Cardiothoracic Surgery Unit for the surgical treatment of patients with complicated pulmonary TB. PMID:25809758

  4. [Up-to-date drug treatment of disseminated lung cancer--which other drugs are available in addition to conventional cytotoxic agents?].

    PubMed

    Koivunen, Jussi; Knuuttila, Aija; Mali, Pekka

    2016-01-01

    In addition to conventional cytotoxic agents, novel drug treatments have in the last few years been introduced for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Whereas some of the novel treatments have brought significant improvement in treatment outcome, the benefit brought about by the treatment has in some cases been quite small in comparison with the costs and adverse effects. In the present review we explore the goals of drug treatments of disseminated lung cancer, assessment of therapeutic benefits as well as most significant research results of novel drug treatments of the lastfew years In addition, we evaluate the effect of the novel drug treatments on Finnish treatment practices.

  5. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—diclofenac as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2016-01-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a well-known and widely used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), with a range of actions which are of interest in an oncological context. While there has long been an interest in the use of NSAIDs in chemoprevention, there is now emerging evidence that such drugs may have activity in a treatment setting. DCF, which is a potent inhibitor of COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 synthesis, displays a range of effects on the immune system, the angiogenic cascade, chemo- and radio-sensitivity and tumour metabolism. Both pre-clinical and clinical evidence of these effects, in multiple cancer types, is assessed and summarised and relevant mechanisms of action outlined. Based on this evidence the case is made for further clinical investigation of the anticancer effects of DCF, particularly in combination with other agents - with a range of possible multi-drug and multi-modality combinations outlined in the supplementary materials accompanying the main paper. PMID:26823679

  6. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  7. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  8. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  9. 21 CFR 700.13 - Use of mercury compounds in cosmetics including use as skinbleaching agents in cosmetic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and lotions; hair shampoos, hair sets and rinses, hair straighteners, hair coloring, and other... containing mercury as a skin-bleaching agent and offered for sale as skin-bleaching, beauty, or...

  10. Update on medical and regulatory issues pertaining to compounded and FDA-approved drugs, including hormone therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, JoAnn V.; Pickar, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: We review the historical regulation of drug compounding, concerns about widespread use of non-Food and Drug Admiistration (FDA)-approved compounded bioidentical hormone therapies (CBHTs), which do not have proper labeling and warnings, and anticipated impact of the 2013 Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) on compounding. Methods: US government websites were searched for documents concerning drug compounding regulation and oversight from 1938 (passage of Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act [FDCA]) through 2014, including chronologies, Congressional testimony, FDA guidelines and enforcements, and reports. The FDCA and DQSA were reviewed. PubMed and Google were searched for articles on compounded drugs, including CBHT. Results: Congress explicitly granted the FDA limited oversight of compounded drugs in a 1997 amendment to the FDCA, but the FDA has encountered obstacles in exercising that authority. After 64 patient deaths and 750 adversely affected patients from the 2012 meningitis outbreak due to contaminated compounded steroid injections, Congress passed the DQSA, authorizing the FDA to create a voluntary registration for facilities that manufacture and distribute sterile compounded drugs in bulk and reinforcing FDCA regulations for traditional compounding. Given history and current environment, concerns remain about CBHT product regulation and their lack of safety and efficacy data. Conclusions: The DQSA and its reinforcement of §503A of the FDCA solidifies FDA authority to enforce FDCA provisions against compounders of CBHT. The new law may improve compliance and accreditation by the compounding industry; support state and FDA oversight; and prevent the distribution of misbranded, adulterated, or inconsistently compounded medications, and false and misleading claims, thus reducing public health risk. PMID:26418479

  11. Functional gold nanoparticles as potent antimicrobial agents against multi-drug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoning; Robinson, Sandra M; Gupta, Akash; Saha, Krishnendu; Jiang, Ziwen; Moyano, Daniel F; Sahar, Ali; Riley, Margaret A; Rotello, Vincent M

    2014-10-28

    We present the use of functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to combat multi-drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria. Tuning of the functional groups on the nanoparticle surface provided gold nanoparticles that were effective against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive uropathogens, including multi-drug-resistant pathogens. These AuNPs exhibited low toxicity to mammalian cells, and bacterial resistance was not observed after 20 generations. A strong structure-activity relationship was observed as a function of AuNP functionality, providing guidance to activity prediction and rational design of effective antimicrobial nanoparticles.

  12. Anionic cyclodextrins as versatile hosts for pharmaceutical nanotechnology: Synthesis, drug delivery, enantioselectivity, contrast agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Mavridis, Irene M; Yannakopoulou, Konstantina

    2015-08-15

    The review presents a full library of single-isomer primary rim per-carboxylate- and per-sulfate-α-, -β- and -γ-cyclodextrin (CD) derivatives and their potential for pharmaceutical nanotechnology. Recent advances in cyclodextrin chemistry have enabled robust methods for the synthesis of single-isomer anionic CDs. Numerous nanobio-applications have been already reported for these negatively charged derivatives, which alone or in combination with other biodegradable molecular platforms can become important carriers for targeted drug delivery and release. Specialized applications are also discussed, such as chiral separations, as well as the ability of per-6-carboxylated-cyclodextrins to coordinate with metal cations and especially with lanthanide cations that makes them candidates as contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  13. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—mebendazole as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Pantziarka, Pan; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vidula; Sukhatme, Vikas P

    2014-01-01

    Mebendazole, a well-known anti-helminthic drug in wide clinical use, has anti-cancer properties that have been elucidated in a broad range of pre-clinical studies across a number of different cancer types. Significantly, there are also two case reports of anti-cancer activity in humans. The data are summarised and discussed in relation to suggested mechanisms of action. Based on the evidence presented, it is proposed that mebendazole would synergise with a range of other drugs, including existing chemotherapeutics, and that further exploration of the potential of mebendazole as an anti-cancer therapeutic is warranted. A number of possible combinations with other drugs are discussed in the Appendix. PMID:25075217

  14. 'Genipin' - the natural water soluble cross-linking agent and its importance in the modified drug delivery systems: an overview.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Balamurugan; Sreedharan, Rajesh; Elumalai, Manogaran

    2014-01-01

    One of the popular approaches in controlling drug delivery from the polymeric carriers is suitably achieved by the inclusion of crosslinking agents into the formulations at different concentrations. Nevertheless, addition of the chemical crosslinkers such as glutaraldehyde, formaldehyde etc, used in the drug delivery systems causes very serious cytotoxic reactions. These chemical crosslinking agents did not offer any significant advantageous effects when compared to the natural crosslinking agents for instance genipin, which is quite less toxic, biocompatible and offers very stable crosslinked products. Based on the earlier reports the safety of this particular natural crosslinker is very well established, since it has been widely used as a Chinese traditional medicine for long-time, isolated from fruits of the plant Gardenia jasminoides Ellis. This concise article largely portrayed the value of this unique natural crosslinker, utilized in controlling the drug delivery from the various formulations. PMID:24041312

  15. In vitro drug susceptibility of 40 international reference rapidly growing mycobacteria to 20 antimicrobial agents

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Hui; Li, Guilian; Wan, Li; Jiang, Yi; Liu, Haican; Zhao, Xiuqin; Zhao, Zhongfu; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) are human pathogens that are relatively easily identified by acid-fast staining but are proving difficult to treat in the clinic. In this study, we performed susceptibility testing of 40 international reference RGM species against 20 antimicrobial agents using the cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton (CAMH) broth microdilution based on the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay recommended by the guidelines of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The results demonstrated that RGM organisms were resistant to the majority of first-line antituberculous agents but not to second-line fluoroquinolones or aminoglycosides. Three drugs (amikacin, tigecycline and linezolid) displayed potent antimycobacterial activity against all tested strains. Capreomycin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin emerged as promising candidates for the treatment of RGM infections, and cefoxitin and meropenem were active against most strains. Mycobacterium chelonae (M. chelonae), M. abscessus, M. bolletii, M. fortuitum, M. boenickei, M. conceptionense, M. pseudoshottsii, M. septicum and M. setense were the most resistant RGM species. These results provide significant insight into the treatment of RGM species and will assist optimization of clinical criteria. PMID:26629031

  16. Experimental design and instability analysis of coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of drugs and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Si, Ting; Zhang, Leilei; Li, Guangbin; Roberts, Cynthia J; Yin, Xiezhen; Xu, Ronald

    2013-07-01

    Recent developments in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy requires multilayered microparticles that encapsulate several imaging and therapeutic agents in the same carrier. However, commonly used microencapsulation processes have multiple limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency and loss of bioactivity for the encapsulated biological cargos. To overcome these limitations, we have carried out both experimental and theoretical studies on coaxial electrospray of multilayered microparticles. On the experimental side, an improved coaxial electrospray setup has been developed. A customized coaxial needle assembly combined with two ring electrodes has been used to enhance the stability of the cone and widen the process parameter range of the stable cone-jet mode. With this assembly, we have obtained poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with fine morphology and uniform size distribution. On the theoretical side, an instability analysis of the coaxial electrified jet has been performed based on the experimental parameters. The effects of process parameters on the formation of different unstable modes have been studied. The reported experimental and theoretical research represents a significant step toward quantitative control and optimization of the coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of multiple drugs and imaging agents in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy.

  17. Experimental design and instability analysis of coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of drugs and imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Si, Ting; Zhang, Leilei; Li, Guangbin; Roberts, Cynthia J.; Yin, Xiezhen

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Recent developments in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy requires multilayered microparticles that encapsulate several imaging and therapeutic agents in the same carrier. However, commonly used microencapsulation processes have multiple limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency and loss of bioactivity for the encapsulated biological cargos. To overcome these limitations, we have carried out both experimental and theoretical studies on coaxial electrospray of multilayered microparticles. On the experimental side, an improved coaxial electrospray setup has been developed. A customized coaxial needle assembly combined with two ring electrodes has been used to enhance the stability of the cone and widen the process parameter range of the stable cone-jet mode. With this assembly, we have obtained poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles with fine morphology and uniform size distribution. On the theoretical side, an instability analysis of the coaxial electrified jet has been performed based on the experimental parameters. The effects of process parameters on the formation of different unstable modes have been studied. The reported experimental and theoretical research represents a significant step toward quantitative control and optimization of the coaxial electrospray process for microencapsulation of multiple drugs and imaging agents in multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy. PMID:23864011

  18. STAT3 Inhibition by Microtubule-Targeted Drugs: Dual Molecular Effects of Chemotherapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Chaudhury, Mousumi; Frank, David A.

    2011-01-01

    To improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer therapies, it is necessary to identify molecular targets that are essential to a tumor cell but dispensable in a normal cell. Increasing evidence indicates that the transcription factor STAT3, which regulates the expression of genes controlling proliferation, survival, and self-renewal, constitutes such a target. Recently it has been found that STAT3 can associate with the cytoskeleton. Since many of the tumors in which STAT3 is activated, such as breast cancer and ovarian cancer, are responsive to drugs that target microtubules, we examined the effect of these compounds on STAT3. We found that microtubule stabilizers, such as paclitaxel, or microtubule inhibitors, such as vinorelbine, decrease the activating tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3 in tumor cells and inhibit the expression of STAT3 target genes. Paclitaxel decreases the association between STAT3 and microtubules, and appears to decrease STAT3 phosphorylation through induction of a negative feedback regulator. The cytotoxic activity of paclitaxel in breast cancer cell lines correlates with its ability to decrease STAT3 phosphorylation. However, consistent with the necessity for expression of a negative regulator, treatment of resistant MDA-MB-231 cells with the DNA demethylating agent 5-azacytidine restores the ability of paclitaxel to block STAT3-dependent gene expression. Finally, the combination of paclitaxel and agents that directly target STAT3 has beneficial effects in killing STAT3-dependent cell lines. Thus, microtubule-targeted agents may exert some of their effects by inhibiting STAT3, and understanding this interaction may be important for optimizing rational targeted cancer therapies. PMID:21949561

  19. Computational Study of Anticancer Drug Resistance Caused by 10 Topisomerase I Mutations, Including 7 Camptothecin Analogs and Lucanthone.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, Kelly; Wu, Chun

    2016-09-26

    Although Camptothecin and its analogs as Topoisomerase I poisons can effectively treat cancers, serious drug resistance has been identified for this class of drugs. Recent computational studies have indicated that the mutations near the active binding site of the drug can significantly weaken the drug binding and cause drug resistance. However, only Topotecan and three mutations have been previously analyzed. Here we present a comprehensive binding study of 10 Topoisomerase I mutants (N722S, N722A, D533G, D533N, G503S, G717V, T729A, F361S, G363C, and R364H) and 8 poisons including 7 Camptothecin analogs as well as a new generation Topoisomerase I drug, Lucanthone. Utilizing Glide docking followed by MMGBSA calculations, we determined the binding energy for each complex. We examine the relative binding energy changes with reference to the wild type, which are linked to the degree of drug resistance. On this set of mutant complexes, Topotecan and Camptothecin showed much smaller binding energies than a set of new Camptothecin derivatives (Lurtotecan, SN38, Gimatecan, Exatecan, and Belotecan) currently under clinical trials. We observed that Lucanthone exhibited comparable results to Topotecan and Camptothecin, indicating that it may serve as a promising candidate for future studies as a Topoisomerase I poison. Our docked results on Topotecan were also validated by a set of molecular dynamics simulations. In addition to a good agreement on the MMGBSA binding energy change, our simulation data also shows there is larger conformation fluctuation upon the mutations. These results may be utilized to further advancements of Topoisomerase I drugs that are resistant to mutations.

  20. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—nitroglycerin as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Sukhatme, Vidula; Bouche, Gauthier; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P; Pantziarka, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Nitroglycerin (NTG), a drug that has been in clinical use for more than a century, has a range of actions which make it of particular interest in an oncological setting. It is generally accepted that the main mechanism of action of NTG is via the production of nitric oxide (NO), which improves cardiac oxygenation via multiple mechanisms including improved blood flow (vasodilation), decreased platelet aggregation, increased erythrocyte O2 release and decreased mitochondrial utilization of oxygen. Its vasoactive properties mean that it has the potential to exploit more fully the enhanced permeability and retention effect in delivering anti-cancer drugs to tumour tissues. Moreover NTG can reduce HIF-1α levels in hypoxic tumour tissues and this may have anti-angiogenic, pro-apoptotic and anti-efflux effects. Additionally NTG may enhance anti-tumour immunity. Pre-clinical and clinical data on these anti-cancer properties of NTG are summarised and discussed. While there is evidence of a positive action as a monotherapy in prostate cancer, there are mixed results in NSCLC where initially positive results have yet to be fully replicated. Based on the evidence presented, a case is made that further exploration of the clinical benefits that may accrue to cancer patients is warranted. Additionally, it is proposed that NTG may synergise with a number of other drugs, including other repurposed drugs, and these are discussed in the supplementary material appended to this paper. PMID:26435741

  1. [Antiplatelet therapy: resistance to traditional antiaggregation drugs and role of new antiplatelet agents].

    PubMed

    del Castillo-Carnevali, Hugo; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Zamorano Gómez, José Luis

    2014-09-01

    Platelet aggregation plays a key role in the development of major cardiovascular events (MACE) related to atherothrombosis. Since the appearance of coronary stenting, the importance of measuring and modulating platelet activity has considerably increased in the scientific literature during the last decade. Double antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel administrated to stent carriers has widely demonstrated its efficacy in the prevention of MACE compared with aspirin alone. These benefits are also present when a conservatory approach is chosen for acute coronary syndrome management. However, there are an important number of patients who develop MACE despite optimal dual antiplatelet therapy, most likely related to an incomplete platelet activity inhibition. Many studies suggest an important inter-individual variability in the response to the drugs, maybe related, at least in part, to the use of different assessment techniques of platelet aggregation. Other authors suggest an incomplete platelet inhibition as a possible explanation for the presence of MACE in patients under optimal antiplatelet therapy. Resistance to usual drugs has become a clinically relevant issue that requires an individual approach where new antiplatelet agents, such as prasugrel or ticagrelor, could play an important role as stated in current consensus documents. PMID:24342012

  2. Recent Development of Multifunctional Agents as Potential Drug Candidates for the Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guzior, Natalia; ckowska,, Anna Wię; Panek, Dawid; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a complex and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The available therapy is limited to the symptomatic treatment and its efficacy remains unsatisfactory. In view of the prevalence and expected increase in the incidence of AD, the development of an effective therapy is crucial for public health. Due to the multifactorial aetiology of this disease, the multi-target-directed ligand (MTDL) approach is a promising method in search for new drugs for AD. This review updates information on the development of multifunctional potential anti-AD agents published within the last three years. The majority of the recently reported structures are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, often endowed with some additional properties. These properties enrich the pharmacological profile of the compounds giving hope for not only symptomatic but also causal treatment of the disease. Among these advantageous properties, the most often reported are an amyloid-β anti-aggregation activity, inhibition of β-secretase and monoamine oxidase, an antioxidant and metal chelating activity, NO-releasing ability and interaction with cannabinoid, NMDA or histamine H3 receptors. The majority of novel molecules possess heterodimeric structures, able to interact with multiple targets by combining different pharmacophores, original or derived from natural products or existing therapeutics (tacrine, donepezil, galantamine, memantine). Among the described compounds, several seem to be promising drug candidates, while others may serve as a valuable inspiration in the search for new effective therapies for AD. PMID:25386820

  3. [Antiplatelet therapy: resistance to traditional antiaggregation drugs and role of new antiplatelet agents].

    PubMed

    del Castillo-Carnevali, Hugo; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Zamorano Gómez, José Luis

    2014-09-01

    Platelet aggregation plays a key role in the development of major cardiovascular events (MACE) related to atherothrombosis. Since the appearance of coronary stenting, the importance of measuring and modulating platelet activity has considerably increased in the scientific literature during the last decade. Double antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel administrated to stent carriers has widely demonstrated its efficacy in the prevention of MACE compared with aspirin alone. These benefits are also present when a conservatory approach is chosen for acute coronary syndrome management. However, there are an important number of patients who develop MACE despite optimal dual antiplatelet therapy, most likely related to an incomplete platelet activity inhibition. Many studies suggest an important inter-individual variability in the response to the drugs, maybe related, at least in part, to the use of different assessment techniques of platelet aggregation. Other authors suggest an incomplete platelet inhibition as a possible explanation for the presence of MACE in patients under optimal antiplatelet therapy. Resistance to usual drugs has become a clinically relevant issue that requires an individual approach where new antiplatelet agents, such as prasugrel or ticagrelor, could play an important role as stated in current consensus documents.

  4. Recent development of multifunctional agents as potential drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Guzior, Natalia; Wieckowska, Anna; Panek, Dawid; Malawska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. The available therapy is limited to the symptomatic treatment and its efficacy remains unsatisfactory. In view of the prevalence and expected increase in the incidence of AD, the development of an effective therapy is crucial for public health. Due to the multifactorial aetiology of this disease, the multi-target-directed ligand (MTDL) approach is a promising method in search for new drugs for AD. This review updates information on the development of multifunctional potential anti-AD agents published within the last three years. The majority of the recently reported structures are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, often endowed with some additional properties. These properties enrich the pharmacological profile of the compounds giving hope for not only symptomatic but also causal treatment of the disease. Among these advantageous properties, the most often reported are an amyloid-β antiaggregation activity, inhibition of β-secretase and monoamine oxidase, an antioxidant and metal chelating activity, NOreleasing ability and interaction with cannabinoid, NMDA or histamine H3 receptors. The majority of novel molecules possess heterodimeric structures, able to interact with multiple targets by combining different pharmacophores, original or derived from natural products or existing therapeutics (tacrine, donepezil, galantamine, memantine). Among the described compounds, several seem to be promising drug candidates, while others may serve as a valuable inspiration in the search for new effective therapies for AD. PMID:25386820

  5. In Vitro selectivity of an acyclic cucurbit[n]uril molecular container towards neuromuscular blocking agents relative to commonly used drugs.

    PubMed

    Ganapati, Shweta; Zavalij, Peter Y; Eikermann, Matthias; Isaacs, Lyle

    2016-01-28

    An acyclic cucurbit[n]uril (CB[n]) based molecular container (2, a.k.a. Calabadion 2) binds to both amino-steroidal and benzylisoquinolinium type neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) in vitro, and reverses the effect of these drugs in vivo displaying faster recovery times than placebo and the γ-cyclodextrin (CD) based and clinically used reversal agent Sugammadex. In this study we have assessed the potential for other drugs commonly used during and after surgery (e.g. antibiotics, antihistamines, and antiarrhythmics) to interfere with the ability of 2 to bind NMBAs rocuronium and cisatracurium in vitro. We measured the binding affinities (Ka, M(-1)) of twenty seven commonly used drugs towards 2 and simulated the equilibrium between 2, NMBA, and drug based on their standard clinical dosages to calculate the equilibrium concentration of 2·NMBA in the presence of the various drugs. We found that none of the 27 drugs studied possess the combination of a high enough binding affinity with 2 and a high enough standard dosage to be able to promote the competitive dissociation (a.k.a. displacement interactions) of the 2·NMBA complex with the formation of the 2·drug complex. Finally, we used the simulations to explore how the potential for displacement interactions is affected by a number of factors including the Ka of the 2·NMBA complex, the Ka of the AChR·NMBA complex, the Ka of the 2·drug complex, and the dosage of the drug. PMID:26648135

  6. In Vitro selectivity of an acyclic cucurbit[n]uril molecular container towards neuromuscular blocking agents relative to commonly used drugs.

    PubMed

    Ganapati, Shweta; Zavalij, Peter Y; Eikermann, Matthias; Isaacs, Lyle

    2016-01-28

    An acyclic cucurbit[n]uril (CB[n]) based molecular container (2, a.k.a. Calabadion 2) binds to both amino-steroidal and benzylisoquinolinium type neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) in vitro, and reverses the effect of these drugs in vivo displaying faster recovery times than placebo and the γ-cyclodextrin (CD) based and clinically used reversal agent Sugammadex. In this study we have assessed the potential for other drugs commonly used during and after surgery (e.g. antibiotics, antihistamines, and antiarrhythmics) to interfere with the ability of 2 to bind NMBAs rocuronium and cisatracurium in vitro. We measured the binding affinities (Ka, M(-1)) of twenty seven commonly used drugs towards 2 and simulated the equilibrium between 2, NMBA, and drug based on their standard clinical dosages to calculate the equilibrium concentration of 2·NMBA in the presence of the various drugs. We found that none of the 27 drugs studied possess the combination of a high enough binding affinity with 2 and a high enough standard dosage to be able to promote the competitive dissociation (a.k.a. displacement interactions) of the 2·NMBA complex with the formation of the 2·drug complex. Finally, we used the simulations to explore how the potential for displacement interactions is affected by a number of factors including the Ka of the 2·NMBA complex, the Ka of the AChR·NMBA complex, the Ka of the 2·drug complex, and the dosage of the drug.

  7. Use of eptifibatide as a bridge antiplatelet agent for intrathecal drug delivery system placement.

    PubMed

    Sisk, Joseph; Palma, Michael; Cooper, Christopher; Eltahawy, Ehab; Atallah, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Use of antiplatelet agents is becoming increasingly common, and their management may require new strategies if neuroaxial techniques are to be employed in patients who will not tolerate discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy. The patient was a 46-year-old man with a past medical history significant for coronary artery disease and who had undergone 14 stents. He developed stent thrombosis (ST) while on clopidogrel. Following the ST, he was subsequently placed on prasugrel. While on prasugrel, the patient presented for an intrathecal drug delivery system (IDDS) trial and placement due to severe peripheral neuropathy unresponsive to several conservative medical treatments. He had previously undergone an unsuccessful spinal cord stimulator trial and received no pain relief. In consultation with his outside cardiologist, the patient received permission to hold his prasugrel for 7 days prior to his intrathecal pump trial. During the trial period's inpatient hospitalization, the patient developed chest pain. In consultation with the cardiology service in our institution, it was decided antiplatelet therapy should be re-instituted. The patient was bridged to his IDDS placement after the trial with intravenous eptifibatide. The eptifibatide drip was administered 6 hours prior to the IDDS implant. Functional platelet count was checked one hour before the IDDS was placed and the pump was placed without incident. The eptifibatide drip was reinstituted one hour after the IDDS implantation. The patient was observed for 24 hours on the eptifibatide drip, transitioned to his home dose of prasugrel, and discharged home. At outpatient follow-up one week later, the patient demonstrated no neurologic or hemorrhagic complications and was satisfied with the pain control provided by the IDDS. Prasugrel is an irreversible platelet inhibitor, which prevents ADP-induced platelet aggregation by binding the P2Y12 receptor. Patients taking prasugrel will have deficient platelet activity until

  8. An overview of anthrax infection including the recently identified form of disease in injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Caitlin W.; Sweeney, Daniel A.; Cui, Xizhong; Li, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Bacillus anthracis infection (anthrax) can be highly lethal. Two recent outbreaks related to contaminated mail in the USA and heroin in the UK and Europe and its potential as a bioterrorist weapon have greatly increased concerns over anthrax in the developed world. Methods This review summarizes the microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of anthrax. Results and conclusions Anthrax, a gram-positive bacterium, has typically been associated with three forms of infection: cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and inhalational. However, the anthrax outbreak among injection drug users has emphasized the importance of what is now considered a fourth disease form (i.e., injectional anthrax) that is characterized by severe soft tissue infection. While cutaneous anthrax is most common, its early stages are distinct and prompt appropriate treatment commonly produces a good outcome. However, early symptoms with the other three disease forms can be nonspecific and mistaken for less lethal conditions. As a result, patients with gastrointestinal, inhalational, or injectional anthrax may have advanced infection at presentation that can be highly lethal. Once anthrax is suspected, the diagnosis can usually be made with gram stain and culture from blood or tissue followed by confirmatory testing (e.g., PCR). While antibiotics are the mainstay of anthrax treatment, use of adjunctive therapies such as anthrax toxin antagonists are a consideration. Prompt surgical therapy appears to be important for successful management of injectional anthrax. PMID:22527064

  9. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    SciTech Connect

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C.; Sudano, Isabella; Luescher, Thomas F.; Camici, Giovanni G.

    2010-01-22

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 {+-} 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% {+-} 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 {+-} 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  10. Successful Treatment with an Antihypertensive Drug Regimen Including Eplerenone in a Patient with Malignant Phase Hypertension with Renal Failure.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumihiko; Goto, Masahide; Wada, Yoshiki; Hasebe, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    A 28-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the treatment of congestive heart failure and severe hypertension. The patient was diagnosed with malignant phase hypertension based on the presence of marked hypertension with left ventricular hypertrophy, exudate retinopathy, and renal failure. Intensive therapy for hypertension and heart failure with a combination of antihypertensive drugs including nitroglycerin, nifedipine, eplerenone and candesartan successfully lowered his blood pressure and further improved the renal function. Eplerenone could be one of the choices of antihypertensive drugs in combination therapy in patients with malignant phase hypertension with progressive heart and renal failure.

  11. Biomedical effects of chemical-threat-agent antidote and pretreatment drugs. An abstracted bibliography. Volume 1. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, J.M.; Reams, G.G.; DeJohn, C.A.

    1986-04-01

    The bibliographic abstracts in this report are part of a project to assess biomedical effects of chemical-warfare antidote agents and related pre-treatment drugs. Specific attention is focused on the biomedical effects in the following general areas: vision, auditory, spatial orientation, musculoskeletal, cardipulmonary, cognitive performance, pharmacology, cutaneous stimuli, and cortical effects. In some cases, the bibliography addresses other therapeutic drugs that may be used simultaneously with chemical-warfare antidotes.

  12. Simultaneous determination of four anti-dandruff agents including octopirox in shampoo products by reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chao, L

    2001-06-01

    A method based on reversed-phase liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for the simultaneous identification and quantitative determination of four anti-dandruff agents such as salicylic acid, ketoconazole, climbazole, octopirox in commercial anti-dandruff shampoo products. A symmetry C18 column (5 microm, 250 mm x 4.6 mm i.d.) was used at temperature of 35 degrees C, mobile phase with flow rate of 0.8 mL min(-1) was acetonitrile: water (containing 10 mm potassium dihydrogen phosphate, pH 4.0, adjusted with orthophosphoric acid) = 60 : 40 (V/V) and UV detection at 224 nm and 305 nm. Samples were extracted with mobile phase by stirring and ultrasonic method. The average recoveries of four anti-dandruff agents were 98.0-104.1%. The relative standard deviations for samples were 0.11-0.90%. The method is simple, rapid and reproducible. PMID:18498472

  13. Synergistic interactions in two-drug and three-drug combinations (thymol, EDTA and vancomycin) against multi drug resistant bacteria including E. coli.

    PubMed

    Hamoud, Razan; Zimmermann, Stefan; Reichling, Jürgen; Wink, Michael

    2014-03-15

    Combinations of two or more drugs, which affect different targets, have frequently been used as a new approach against resistant bacteria. In our work we studied the antimicrobial activity (MIC, MBC) of individual drugs (the phenolic monoterpene thymol, EDTA and vancomycin), of two-drug interactions between thymol and EDTA in comparison with three-drug interactions with vancomycin against sensitive and resistant bacteria. Thymol demonstrated moderate bactericidal activity (MBC between 60 and 4000μg/ml) while EDTA only exhibited bacteriostatic activity over a range of 60-4000μg/ml. MICs of vancomycin were between 0.125 and 16μg/ml against Gram-positive and between 32 and 128μg/ml against Gram-negative bacteria. Checkerboard dilution and time-kill curve assays were performed to evaluate the mode of interaction of several combinations against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA NCTC 10442) and Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922). Checkerboard data indicate indifferent interaction against Gram-positive (FICI=1-1.3) and synergy against Gram-negative bacteria (FICI≈0.4), while time kill analyses suggest synergistic effect in different combinations against both types of bacteria. It is remarkable that the combinations could enhance the sensitivity of E. coli to vancomycin 16-fold to which it is normally insensitive. We have provided proof for the concept, that combinations of known antibiotics with modern phytotherapeutics can expand the spectrum of useful therapeutics.

  14. Xanthones from Mangosteen Extracts as Natural Chemopreventive Agents: Potential Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shan, T.; Ma, Q.; Guo, K.; Liu, J.; Li, W.; Wang, F.; Wu, E.

    2011-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the treatment and management of malignant tumors still remain a formidable challenge for public health. New strategies for cancer treatment are being developed, and one of the most promising treatment strategies involves the application of chemopreventive agents. The search for novel and effective cancer chemopreventive agents has led to the identification of various naturally occurring compounds. Xanthones, from the pericarp, whole fruit, heartwood, and leaf of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn., GML), are known to possess a wide spectrum of pharmacologic properties, including anti-oxidant, anti-tumor, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-viral activities. The potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities of xanthones have been demonstrated in different stages of carcinogenesis (initiation, promotion, and progression) and are known to control cell division and growth, apoptosis, inflammation, and metastasis. Multiple lines of evidence from numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have confirmed that xanthones inhibit proliferation of a wide range of human tumor cell types by modulating various targets and signaling transduction pathways. Here we provide a concise and comprehensive review of preclinical data and assess the observed anticancer effects of xanthones, supporting its remarkable potential as an anticancer agent. PMID:21902651

  15. Borrelia burgdorferi, the Causative Agent of Lyme Disease, Forms Drug-Tolerant Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bijaya; Brown, Autumn V.; Matluck, Nicole E.; Hu, Linden T.

    2015-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease, which affects an estimated 300,000 people annually in the United States. When treated early, the disease usually resolves, but when left untreated, it can result in symptoms such as arthritis and encephalopathy. Treatment of the late-stage disease may require multiple courses of antibiotic therapy. Given that antibiotic resistance has not been observed for B. burgdorferi, the reason for the recalcitrance of late-stage disease to antibiotics is unclear. In other chronic infections, the presence of drug-tolerant persisters has been linked to recalcitrance of the disease. In this study, we examined the ability of B. burgdorferi to form persisters. Killing growing cultures of B. burgdorferi with antibiotics used to treat the disease was distinctly biphasic, with a small subpopulation of surviving cells. Upon regrowth, these cells formed a new subpopulation of antibiotic-tolerant cells, indicating that these are persisters rather than resistant mutants. The level of persisters increased sharply as the culture transitioned from the exponential to stationary phase. Combinations of antibiotics did not improve killing. Daptomycin, a membrane-active bactericidal antibiotic, killed stationary-phase cells but not persisters. Mitomycin C, an anticancer agent that forms adducts with DNA, killed persisters and eradicated growing and stationary cultures of B. burgdorferi. Finally, we examined the ability of pulse dosing an antibiotic to eliminate persisters. After addition of ceftriaxone, the antibiotic was washed away, surviving persisters were allowed to resuscitate, and the antibiotic was added again. Four pulse doses of ceftriaxone killed persisters, eradicating all live bacteria in the culture. PMID:26014929

  16. Borrelia burgdorferi, the Causative Agent of Lyme Disease, Forms Drug-Tolerant Persister Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bijaya; Brown, Autumn V; Matluck, Nicole E; Hu, Linden T; Lewis, Kim

    2015-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease, which affects an estimated 300,000 people annually in the United States. When treated early, the disease usually resolves, but when left untreated, it can result in symptoms such as arthritis and encephalopathy. Treatment of the late-stage disease may require multiple courses of antibiotic therapy. Given that antibiotic resistance has not been observed for B. burgdorferi, the reason for the recalcitrance of late-stage disease to antibiotics is unclear. In other chronic infections, the presence of drug-tolerant persisters has been linked to recalcitrance of the disease. In this study, we examined the ability of B. burgdorferi to form persisters. Killing growing cultures of B. burgdorferi with antibiotics used to treat the disease was distinctly biphasic, with a small subpopulation of surviving cells. Upon regrowth, these cells formed a new subpopulation of antibiotic-tolerant cells, indicating that these are persisters rather than resistant mutants. The level of persisters increased sharply as the culture transitioned from the exponential to stationary phase. Combinations of antibiotics did not improve killing. Daptomycin, a membrane-active bactericidal antibiotic, killed stationary-phase cells but not persisters. Mitomycin C, an anticancer agent that forms adducts with DNA, killed persisters and eradicated growing and stationary cultures of B. burgdorferi. Finally, we examined the ability of pulse dosing an antibiotic to eliminate persisters. After addition of ceftriaxone, the antibiotic was washed away, surviving persisters were allowed to resuscitate, and the antibiotic was added again. Four pulse doses of ceftriaxone killed persisters, eradicating all live bacteria in the culture. PMID:26014929

  17. Borrelia burgdorferi, the Causative Agent of Lyme Disease, Forms Drug-Tolerant Persister Cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bijaya; Brown, Autumn V; Matluck, Nicole E; Hu, Linden T; Lewis, Kim

    2015-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the causative agent of Lyme disease, which affects an estimated 300,000 people annually in the United States. When treated early, the disease usually resolves, but when left untreated, it can result in symptoms such as arthritis and encephalopathy. Treatment of the late-stage disease may require multiple courses of antibiotic therapy. Given that antibiotic resistance has not been observed for B. burgdorferi, the reason for the recalcitrance of late-stage disease to antibiotics is unclear. In other chronic infections, the presence of drug-tolerant persisters has been linked to recalcitrance of the disease. In this study, we examined the ability of B. burgdorferi to form persisters. Killing growing cultures of B. burgdorferi with antibiotics used to treat the disease was distinctly biphasic, with a small subpopulation of surviving cells. Upon regrowth, these cells formed a new subpopulation of antibiotic-tolerant cells, indicating that these are persisters rather than resistant mutants. The level of persisters increased sharply as the culture transitioned from the exponential to stationary phase. Combinations of antibiotics did not improve killing. Daptomycin, a membrane-active bactericidal antibiotic, killed stationary-phase cells but not persisters. Mitomycin C, an anticancer agent that forms adducts with DNA, killed persisters and eradicated growing and stationary cultures of B. burgdorferi. Finally, we examined the ability of pulse dosing an antibiotic to eliminate persisters. After addition of ceftriaxone, the antibiotic was washed away, surviving persisters were allowed to resuscitate, and the antibiotic was added again. Four pulse doses of ceftriaxone killed persisters, eradicating all live bacteria in the culture.

  18. L-DOPA-Coated Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles as Dual MRI Contrast Agents and Drug-Delivery Vehicles.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Birgitte Hjelmeland; Singh, Gurvinder; Hak, Sjoerd; Bandyopadhyay, Sulalit; Augestad, Ingrid Lovise; Peddis, Davide; Sandvig, Ioanna; Sandvig, Axel; Glomm, Wilhelm Robert

    2016-01-20

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles (MONPs) are capable of time-dependent magnetic resonance imaging contrast switching as well as releasing a surface-bound drug. MONPs give T2/T2* contrast, but dissolve and release T1-active Mn(2+) and L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine. Complementary images are acquired with a single contrast agent, and applications toward Parkinson's disease are suggested.

  19. Rapid chemotherapy-induced acute endothelial progenitor cell mobilization: implications for antiangiogenic drugs as chemosensitizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Yuval; Henke, Erik; Roodhart, Jeanine; Mancuso, Patrizia; Langenberg, Marlies; Colleoni, Marco; Daenen, Laura G.; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Emmenegger, Urban; Tang, Terence; Zhu, Zhenping; Witte, Larry; Strieter, Robert M.; Bertolini, Francesco; Voest, Emile; Benezra, Robert; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain how antiangiogenic drugs enhance the treatment efficacy of cytotoxic chemotherapy including impairing the ability of chemotherapy-responsive tumors to regrow after therapy. With respect to the latter, we show that certain chemotherapy drugs, e.g. paclitaxel, can rapidly induce pro-angiogenic bone marrow derived circulating endothelial cell (CEP) mobilization, and subsequent tumor homing, whereas others, e.g. gemcitabine, did not. Acute CEP mobilization was mediated, at least in part, by systemic induction of SDF-1α and could be prevented by various procedures such as treatment with anti-VEGFR2 blocking antibodies or by paclitaxel treatment in CEP-deficient Id-mutant mice, both of which resulted in enhanced anti-tumor effects mediated by paclitaxel, but not gemcitabine. PMID:18772115

  20. Clostridium difficile Drug Pipeline: Challenges in Discovery and Development of New Agents

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade Clostridium difficile has become a bacterial pathogen of global significance. Epidemic strains have spread throughout hospitals, while community acquired infections and other sources ensure a constant inoculation of spores into hospitals. In response to the increasing medical burden, a new C. difficile antibiotic, fidaxomicin, was approved in 2011 for the treatment of C. difficile-associated diarrhea. Rudimentary fecal transplants are also being trialed as effective treatments. Despite these advances, therapies that are more effective against C. difficile spores and less damaging to the resident gastrointestinal microbiome and that reduce recurrent disease are still desperately needed. However, bringing a new treatment for C. difficile infection to market involves particular challenges. This review covers the current drug discovery pipeline, including both small molecule and biologic therapies, and highlights the challenges associated with in vitro and in vivo models of C. difficile infection for drug screening and lead optimization. PMID:25760275

  1. Inhibition of collagen peptidase in HeLa cells and human tumours by compounds including drugs used in cancer therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Boggust, W. A.; McGauley, H.

    1978-01-01

    Collagen-peptidase activity in extracts of HeLa cells and human tumours is inactivated by Razoxane (ICRF-159), cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, thiotepa, aprotinin, EDTA and phenanthroline. As this activity, in association with other enzymes, may contribute to tissue lysis in cancers, chemical intervention may reduce invasiveness and modify the processes of infiltration and metastasis. Accordingly, some drugs used in therapy or for the prevention of metastasis may produce their observed effects by a combination of factors including enzyme inhibition. PMID:212092

  2. Intestinal transport of gentamicin with a novel, glycosteroid drug transport agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelrod, H. R.; Kim, J. S.; Longley, C. B.; Lipka, E.; Amidon, G. L.; Kakarla, R.; Hui, Y. W.; Weber, S. J.; Choe, S.; Sofia, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective was to investigate the ability of a glycosteroid (TC002) to increase the oral bioavailability of gentamicin. METHODS: Admixtures of gentamicin and TC002 were administered to the rat ileum by injection and to dogs by ileal or jejunal externalized ports, or PO. Bioavailability of gentamicin was determined by HPLC. 3H-TC002 was injected via externalized cannulas into rat ileum or jejunum, or PO and its distribution and elimination was determined. The metabolism of TC002 in rats was evaluated by solid phase extraction and HPLC analysis of plasma, urine and feces following oral or intestinal administration. RESULTS: The bioavailability of gentamicin was substantially increased in the presence of TC002 in both rats and dogs. The level of absorption was dependent on the concentration of TC002 and site of administration. Greatest absorption occurred following ileal orjejunal administration. TC002 was significantly more efficacious than sodium taurocholate, but similar in cytotoxicity. TC002 remained primarily in the GI tract following oral or intestinal administration and cleared rapidly from the body. It was only partly metabolized in the GI tract, but was rapidly and completely converted to its metabolite in plasma and urine. CONCLUSIONS: TC002 shows promise as a new drug transport agent for promoting intestinal absorption of polar molecules such as gentamicin.

  3. Graphene nanoribbons as a drug delivery agent for lucanthone mediated therapy of glioblastoma multiforme

    DOE PAGES

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Surhland, Cassandra; Sanchez, Zina; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Suresh Kumar, M. A.; Lee, Stephen; Peña, Louis A.; Waring, Michael; Sitharaman, Balaji; Naidu, Mamta

    2014-08-13

    We report use of PEG-DSPE coated oxidized graphene nanoribbons (O-GNR-PEG-DSPE) as agent for delivery of anti-tumor drug Lucanthone (Luc) into Glioblastoma Multiformae (GBM) cells targeting base excision repair enzyme APE-1 (Apurinic endonuclease-1). Lucanthone, an endonuclease inhibitor of APE-1, was loaded onto O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs using a simple non-covalent method. We found its uptake by GBM cell line U251 exceeding 67% and 60% in APE-1-overexpressing U251, post 24 hours (h). However, their uptake was ~38% and 29% by MCF-7 and rat glial progenitor cells (CG-4), respectively. TEM analysis of U251 showed large aggregates of O-GNR-PEG-DSPE in vesicles. Luc-O-GNR-PEG-DSPE was significantly toxic to U251more » but showed little / no toxicity when exposed to MCF-7/CG-4 cells. This differential uptake effect can be exploited to use O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs as a vehicle for Luc delivery to GBM, while reducing nonspecific cytotoxicity to the surrounding healthy tissue. In conclusion, cell death in U251 was necrotic, probably due to oxidative degradation of APE-1.« less

  4. Graphene nanoribbons as a drug delivery agent for lucanthone mediated therapy of glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Surhland, Cassandra; Sanchez, Zina; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Suresh Kumar, M. A.; Lee, Stephen; Peña, Louis A.; Waring, Michael; Sitharaman, Balaji; Naidu, Mamta

    2014-08-13

    We report use of PEG-DSPE coated oxidized graphene nanoribbons (O-GNR-PEG-DSPE) as agent for delivery of anti-tumor drug Lucanthone (Luc) into Glioblastoma Multiformae (GBM) cells targeting base excision repair enzyme APE-1 (Apurinic endonuclease-1). Lucanthone, an endonuclease inhibitor of APE-1, was loaded onto O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs using a simple non-covalent method. We found its uptake by GBM cell line U251 exceeding 67% and 60% in APE-1-overexpressing U251, post 24 hours (h). However, their uptake was ~38% and 29% by MCF-7 and rat glial progenitor cells (CG-4), respectively. TEM analysis of U251 showed large aggregates of O-GNR-PEG-DSPE in vesicles. Luc-O-GNR-PEG-DSPE was significantly toxic to U251 but showed little / no toxicity when exposed to MCF-7/CG-4 cells. This differential uptake effect can be exploited to use O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs as a vehicle for Luc delivery to GBM, while reducing nonspecific cytotoxicity to the surrounding healthy tissue. In conclusion, cell death in U251 was necrotic, probably due to oxidative degradation of APE-1.

  5. Mithramycin, an agent for developing new therapeutic drugs for neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Osada, Nobuhiro; Kosuge, Yasuhiro; Ishige, Kumiko; Ito, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Mithramycin A (MTM) has been shown to inhibit cancer growth by blocking the binding of Sp-family transcription factors to gene regulatory elements and is used for the treatment of leukemia and testicular cancer in the United States. In contrast, MTM has also been shown to exert neuroprotective effects in normal cells. An earlier study showed that MTM protected primary cortical neurons against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Recently, we demonstrated that MTM suppressed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced neuronal death in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and cultured hippocampal cells through attenuation of ER stress-associated signal proteins. We also found that MTM decreased neuronal death in area CA1 of the hippocampus after transient global ischemia/reperfusion in mice and restored the ischemia/reperfusion-induced impairment of long-term potentiation in this area. MTM has been shown to prolong the survival of Huntington's disease model mice and to attenuate dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice after repeated administration of methamphetamine. In this review, we provide an up to date overview of neuroprotective effects of MTM and less toxic MTM analogs, MTM SK and MTM SDK, on some of the neurodegenerative diseases and discuss the promise of MTM as an agent for developing new therapeutic drugs for such diseases. PMID:23902990

  6. Graphene Nanoribbons as a Drug Delivery Agent for Lucanthone Mediated Therapy of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Surhland, Cassandra; Sanchez, Zina; Chaudhary, Pankaj; Kumar, M.A. Suresh; Lee, Stephen; Peña, Louis A.; Waring, Michael; Sitharaman, Balaji; Naidu, Mamta

    2014-01-01

    We report use of PEG-DSPE coated oxidized graphene nanoribbons (O-GNR-PEG-DSPE) as agent for delivery of anti-tumor drug Lucanthone (Luc) into Glioblastoma Multiformae (GBM) cells targeting base excision repair enzyme APE-1 (Apurinic endonuclease-1). Lucanthone, an endonuclease inhibitor of APE-1, was loaded onto O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs using a simple non-covalent method. We found its uptake by GBM cell line U251 exceeding 67% and 60% in APE-1-overexpressing U251, post 24 hours (h). However, their uptake was ~38% and 29% by MCF-7 and rat glial progenitor cells (CG-4), respectively. TEM analysis of U251 showed large aggregates of O-GNR-PEG-DSPE in vesicles. Luc-O-GNR-PEG-DSPE was significantly toxic to U251 but showed little / no toxicity when exposed to MCF-7/CG-4 cells. This differential uptake effect can be exploited to use O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs as a vehicle for Luc delivery to GBM, while reducing nonspecific cytotoxicity to the surrounding healthy tissue. Cell death in U251 was necrotic, probably due to oxidative degradation of APE-1. PMID:25131339

  7. New Pyrrole Derivatives with Potent Tubulin Polymerization Inhibiting Activity As Anticancer Agents Including Hedgehog-Dependent Cancer

    PubMed Central

    La Regina, Giuseppe; Bai, Ruoli; Coluccia, Antonio; Famiglini, Valeria; Pelliccia, Sveva; Passacantilli, Sara; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Ruggieri, Vitalba; Sisinni, Lorenza; Bolognesi, Alessio; Rensen, Whilelmina Maria; Miele, Andrea; Nalli, Marianna; Alfonsi, Romina; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Gulino, Alberto; Brancale, Andrea; Novellino, Ettore; Dondio, Giulio; Vultaggio, Stefania; Varasi, Mario; Mercurio, Ciro; Hamel, Ernest; Lavia, Patrizia; Silvestri, Romano

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized 3-aroyl-1-arylpyrrole (ARAP) derivatives as potential anticancer agents having different substituents at the pendant 1-phenyl ring. Both the 1-phenyl ring and 3-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)carbonyl moieties were mandatory to achieve potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, binding of colchicine to tubulin, and cancer cell growth. ARAP 22 showed strong inhibition of the P-glycoprotein-overexpressing NCI-ADR-RES and Messa/Dx5MDR cell lines. Compounds 22 and 27 suppressed in vitro the Hedgehog signaling pathway, strongly reducing luciferase activity in SAG treated NIH3T3 Shh-Light II cells, and inhibited the growth of medulloblastoma D283 cells at nanomolar concentrations. ARAPs 22 and 27 represent a new potent class of tubulin polymerization and cancer cell growth inhibitors with the potential to inhibit the Hedgehog signaling pathway. PMID:25025991

  8. Unique drug screening approach for prion diseases identifies tacrolimus and astemizole as antiprion agents.

    PubMed

    Karapetyan, Yervand Eduard; Sferrazza, Gian Franco; Zhou, Minghai; Ottenberg, Gregory; Spicer, Timothy; Chase, Peter; Fallahi, Mohammad; Hodder, Peter; Weissmann, Charles; Lasmézas, Corinne Ida

    2013-04-23

    Prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) are incurable and rapidly fatal neurodegenerative diseases. Because prion protein (PrP) is necessary for prion replication but dispensable for the host, we developed the PrP-FRET-enabled high throughput assay (PrP-FEHTA) to screen for compounds that decrease PrP expression. We screened a collection of drugs approved for human use and identified astemizole and tacrolimus, which reduced cell-surface PrP and inhibited prion replication in neuroblastoma cells. Tacrolimus reduced total cellular PrP levels by a nontranscriptional mechanism. Astemizole stimulated autophagy, a hitherto unreported mode of action for this pharmacophore. Astemizole, but not tacrolimus, prolonged the survival time of prion-infected mice. Astemizole is used in humans to treat seasonal allergic rhinitis in a chronic setting. Given the absence of any treatment option for CJD patients and the favorable drug characteristics of astemizole, including its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, it may be considered as therapy for CJD patients and for prophylactic use in familial prion diseases. Importantly, our results validate PrP-FEHTA as a method to identify antiprion compounds and, more generally, FEHTA as a unique drug discovery platform. PMID:23576755

  9. New perspective for an old antidiabetic drug: metformin as anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Leone, Alessandra; Di Gennaro, Elena; Bruzzese, Francesca; Avallone, Antonio; Budillon, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Metformin, an inexpensive, well-tolerated oral agent that is commonly used in the first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes, has become the focus of intense research as a potential anticancer agent. This research reflects a convergence of epidemiologic, clinical, and preclinical evidence, suggesting that metformin may lower cancer risk in diabetics and improve outcomes of many common cancers. Notably, metformin mediates an approximately 30 % reduction in the lifetime risk of cancer in diabetic patients. There is growing recognition that metformin may act (1) directly on cancer cells, primarily by impacting mitochondrial respiration leading to the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which controls energy homeostasis in cells, but also through other mechanisms or (2) indirectly on the host metabolism, largely through AMPK-mediated reduction in hepatic gluconeogenesis, leading to reduced circulating insulin levels and decreased insulin/IGF-1 receptor-mediated activation of the PI3K pathway. Support for this comes from the observation that metformin inhibits cancer cell growth in vitro and delays the onset of tobacco carcinogen-induced lung cancer in mice and that metformin and its analog phenformin delay spontaneous tumor development cancer-prone transgenic mice. The potential for both direct antitumor effects and indirect host-mediated effects has sparked enormous interest, but has led to added challenges in translating preclinical findings to the clinical setting. Nonetheless, the accumulation of evidence has been sufficient to justify initiation of clinical trials of metformin as an anticancer agent in the clinical setting, including a large-scale adjuvant study in breast cancer, with additional studies planned.

  10. Connectivity mapping using a combined gene signature from multiple colorectal cancer datasets identified candidate drugs including existing chemotherapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background While the discovery of new drugs is a complex, lengthy and costly process, identifying new uses for existing drugs is a cost-effective approach to therapeutic discovery. Connectivity mapping integrates gene expression profiling with advanced algorithms to connect genes, diseases and small molecule compounds and has been applied in a large number of studies to identify potential drugs, particularly to facilitate drug repurposing. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a commonly diagnosed cancer with high mortality rates, presenting a worldwide health problem. With the advancement of high throughput omics technologies, a number of large scale gene expression profiling studies have been conducted on CRCs, providing multiple datasets in gene expression data repositories. In this work, we systematically apply gene expression connectivity mapping to multiple CRC datasets to identify candidate therapeutics to this disease. Results We developed a robust method to compile a combined gene signature for colorectal cancer across multiple datasets. Connectivity mapping analysis with this signature of 148 genes identified 10 candidate compounds, including irinotecan and etoposide, which are chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat CRCs. These results indicate that we have discovered high quality connections between the CRC disease state and the candidate compounds, and that the gene signature we created may be used as a potential therapeutic target in treating the disease. The method we proposed is highly effective in generating quality gene signature through multiple datasets; the publication of the combined CRC gene signature and the list of candidate compounds from this work will benefit both cancer and systems biology research communities for further development and investigations. PMID:26356760

  11. In Vitro Dissolution of Fluconazole and Dipyridamole in Gastrointestinal Simulator (GIS), Predicting in Vivo Dissolution and Drug-Drug Interaction Caused by Acid-Reducing Agents.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kazuki; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gregory E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-07-01

    Weakly basic drugs typically exhibit pH-dependent solubility in the physiological pH range, displaying supersaturation or precipitation along the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, their oral bioavailabilities may be affected by coadministration of acid-reducing agents that elevate gastric pH. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of a multicompartmental in vitro dissolution apparatus, Gastrointestinal Simulator (GIS), in predicting in vivo dissolution of certain oral medications. In vitro dissolution studies of fluconazole, a BCS class I, and dipyridamole, a BCS class II weak bases (class IIb), were performed in the GIS as well as United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus II and compared with the results of clinical drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies. In both USP apparatus II and GIS, fluconazole completely dissolved within 60 min regardless of pH, reflecting no DDI between fluconazole and acid-reducing agents in a clinical study. On the other hand, seven-fold and 15-fold higher concentrations of dipyridamole than saturation solubility were observed in the intestinal compartments in GIS with gastric pH 2.0. Precipitation of dipyridamole was also observed in the GIS, and the percentage of dipyridamole in solution was 45.2 ± 7.0%. In GIS with gastric pH 6.0, mimicking the coadministration of acid-reducing agents, the concentration of dipyridamole was equal to its saturation solubility, and the percentage of drug in solution was 9.3 ± 2.7%. These results are consistent with the clinical DDI study of dipyridamole with famotidine, which significantly reduced the Cmax and area under the curve. An In situ mouse infusion study combined with GIS revealed that high concentration of dipyridamole in the GIS enhanced oral drug absorption, which confirmed the supersaturation of dipyridamole. In conclusion, GIS was shown to be a useful apparatus to predict in vivo dissolution for BCS class IIb drugs.

  12. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug activated gene-1 (NAG-1) modulators from natural products as anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min Hye; Kim, Jinwoong; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Khan, Shabana I

    2014-04-01

    Natural products are rich sources of gene modulators that may be useful in prevention and treatment of cancer. Recently, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) activated gene-1 (NAG-1) has been focused as a target of action against diverse cancers like colorectal, pancreatic, prostate, and breast. A variety of natural agents have been reported to play a pivotal role in regulation of NAG-1 through multiple transcriptional mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to review the NAG-1 modulators derived from natural products including plants, marine organisms, and microorganisms. Plant extracts belonging to the families of Fabaceae (Astragalus membranaceus), Ranunculaceae (Coptis chinensis), Menispermaceae (Coscinium fenestratum), Umbelliferae (Pleurospermum kamtschaticum), Lamiaceae (Marubium vulgare), and Rosaceae (Prunus serotina) increased the protein expression of NAG-1 in human colon cancer or hepatocarcinoma cells. Phytochemicals in the class of flavonoids (apigenin, quercetin, isoliquiritigenin, and 2'-hydroxyflavanone), isoflavonoids (formononetin and genistein), catechins (epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate), stilbenoids (resveratrol and pinosylvin), phenolics (6-gingerol), phloroglucinols (rottlerin and aspidin PB), terpenoids (18 α-glycyrrhetinic acid, platycodin D, pseudolaric acid B, and xanthorrhizol), alkaloids (berberine, capsaicin, and indole-3-carbinol), lignans (isochaihulactone), anthraquinones (damnacanthal), and allyl sulfides (diallyl disulfide) elicited NAG-1 overexpression in various cancer cells. Pectenotoxin-2 from marine organisms and prodigiosin and anisomycin from microorganisms were also reported as NAG-1 modulators. Several transcription factors including EGR-1, p53, ATF-3, Sp1 and PPARγ were involved in natural products-induced NAG-1 transcriptional signaling pathway. PMID:24530873

  13. Rapid viral expansion and short drug half-life explain the incomplete effectiveness of current herpes simplex virus 2-directed antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Joshua T; Swan, David A; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna

    2013-12-01

    The nucleoside analogues acyclovir (ACV) and famciclovir (FCV) reduce the frequency and severity of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) genital shedding, yet despite their high potency in vitro and a lack of induced drug resistance, frequent episodes of breakthrough mucosal shedding occur. We tested a published stochastic, spatial mathematical model of HSV-2 replication and spread, in concert with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic equations, against virologic data from clinical trials of twice-daily acyclovir and famciclovir suppression. The model reproduced the key features of clinical trial data, including genital shedding episode rate, expansion and decay dynamics, and heterogeneous peak viral production and duration. In simulations, these agents shortened episode duration by limiting the extent of viral production by 1 to 2 log units and limiting the formation of secondary ulcers by ∼50%. However, drug concentrations were noninhibitory during 42% of the dosing cycle. Even if drug concentrations were high at episode initiation, prolonged episodes often ensued due to drug decay over ensuing hours and subsequent rebound of rapidly replicating HSV-2. The local CD8(+) T-cell density was more predictive of episode viral production (R(2) = 0.42) and duration (R(2) = 0.21) than the drug concentration at episode onset (R(2) = 0.14 and 0.05, respectively), though the model projected that an agent with an equivalent potency but a two times longer half-life would decrease shedding by 80% compared to that of standard twice-daily regimens. Therefore, long half-life is a key characteristic of any agent that might fully suppress HSV-2 reactivations.

  14. Monitoring drug and antidrug levels: a rational approach in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with biologic agents who experience inadequate response while being on a stable biologic treatment.

    PubMed

    Mazilu, Diana; Opriş, Daniela; Gainaru, Cecilia; Iliuta, Mihaela; Apetrei, Natalia; Luca, Giorgiana; Borangiu, Andreea; Gudu, Tania; Peltea, Alexandra; Groseanu, Laura; Constantinescu, Cosmin; Saulescu, Ioana; Bojinca, Violeta; Balanescu, Andra; Predeteanu, Denisa; Ionescu, Ruxandra

    2014-01-01

    Clinical response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with biologic agents can be influenced by their pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity. The present study evaluated the concordance between serum drug and antidrug levels as well as the clinical response in RA patients treated with biological agents who experience their first disease exacerbation while being on a stable biologic treatment. 154 RA patients treated with rituximab (RTX), infliximab (IFX), adalimumab (ADL), or etanercept (ETN) were included. DAS28, SDAI, and EULAR response were assessed at baseline and reevaluated at precise time intervals. At the time of their first sign of inadequate response, patients were tested for both serum drug level and antidrug antibodies level. At the next reevaluation, patients retreated with RTX that had detectable drug level had a better EULAR response (P = 0.038) with lower DAS28 and SDAI scores (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03). The same tendency was observed in patients treated with IFX and ETN regarding EULAR response (P = 0.002 and P = 0.023), DAS28 score (P = 0.002 and P = 0.003), and SDAI score (P = 0.001 and P = 0.026). Detectable biologic drug levels correlated with a better clinical response in patients experiencing their first RA inadequate response while being on a stable biologic treatment with RTX, IFX, and ETN.

  15. Identification of thioridazine, an antipsychotic drug, as an antiglioblastoma and anticancer stem cell agent using public gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H-W; Liang, Y-H; Kuo, Y-L; Chuu, C-P; Lin, C-Y; Lee, M-H; Wu, A T H; Yeh, C-T; Chen, E I-T; Whang-Peng, J; Su, C-L; Huang, C-Y F

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a common and malignant tumor with a poor prognosis. Glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) have been reported to be involved in tumorigenesis, tumor maintenance and therapeutic resistance. Thus, to discover novel candidate therapeutic drugs for anti-GBM and anti-GSCs is an urgent need. We hypothesized that if treatment with a drug could reverse, at least in part, the gene expression signature of GBM and GSCs, this drug may have the potential to inhibit pathways essential in the formation of GBM and thereby treat GBM. Here, we collected 356 GBM gene signatures from public databases and queried the Connectivity Map. We systematically evaluated the in vitro antitumor effects of 79 drugs in GBM cell lines. Of the drugs screened, thioridazine was selected for further characterization because it has potent anti-GBM and anti-GSCs properties. When investigating the mechanisms underlying the cytocidal effects of thioridazine, we found that thioridazine induces autophagy in GBM cell lines, and upregulates AMPK activity. Moreover, LC3-II was upregulated in U87MG sphere cells treated with thioridazine. In addition, thioridazine suppressed GBM tumorigenesis and induced autophagy in vivo. We not only repurposed the antipsychotic drug thioridazine as a potent anti-GBM and anti-GSCs agent, but also provided a new strategy to search for drugs with anticancer and anticancer stem cell properties.

  16. 41 CFR 105-74.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free... penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... my drug-free awareness program? 105-74.215 Section 105-74.215 Public Contracts and...

  17. 41 CFR 105-74.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free... penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... my drug-free awareness program? 105-74.215 Section 105-74.215 Public Contracts and...

  18. 41 CFR 105-74.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free... penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... my drug-free awareness program? 105-74.215 Section 105-74.215 Public Contracts and...

  19. 41 CFR 105-74.215 - What must I include in my drug-free awareness program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... employees about— (a) The dangers of drug abuse in the workplace; (b) Your policy of maintaining a drug-free... penalties that you may impose upon them for drug abuse violations occurring in the workplace. ... my drug-free awareness program? 105-74.215 Section 105-74.215 Public Contracts and...

  20. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  1. Medication huddles slash adverse drug events (ADE), promote safety culture across all hospital units, including the ED.

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    To make a big dent in adverse drug events (ADE), Nationwide Children's Hospital devised medication huddles: a process that takes place after every reported ADE. A core huddle team meets with clinicians from the specific unit involved to discuss why the ADE occurred, and what can be done to prevent future events. In three years, the approach has reduced ADEs by 74%, and the rate of ADEs per 1,000 dispensed doses has decreased by 85%. * Administrators say a safety culture that encourages error reporting is key to making the process work. * To facilitate the huddle discussions, developers created a data collection tool that prompts huddle participants to describe the ADE, what factors were involved, and potential solutions. * While the medication huddles were first implemented in the hospital's critical care units, the process has since been expanded to include all areas of the hospital, including the ED. PMID:24640292

  2. A polymer-based drug delivery system for the antineoplastic agent bis(maltolato)oxovanadium in mice.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J K; Min, W; Cruz, T F; Cindric, S; Arsenault, L; Von Hoff, D D; Degan, D; Hunter, W L; Burt, H M

    1997-01-01

    Using vanadyl sulphate, sodium orthovanadate or bis(maltolato)oxovanadium (BMOV), Cruz TF, Morgan A, Min W (1995, Mol Cell Biochem 153: 161-166) have recently demonstrated the antineoplastic effects of vanadium in mice. In this study, the antineoplastic effects of BMOV against human tumour cell lines was confirmed, and this effect was shown to depend on the prolonged exposure of the cells to the drug. We have investigated a polymeric drug delivery system for the sustained delivery of BMOV as an antineoplastic agent in mice. The objective was to design and evaluate an injectable polymer-BMOV paste that would act as a drug implant for the slow but sustained release of BMOV in the mice. In vitro studies showed that the biodegradable polymer poly (Ghlr epsilon epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) released BMOV in a sustained manner with rates of drug release increasing with increased loading of the drug in the polymer. In vivo studies showed that PCL-BMOV paste implants produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of MDAY-D2 tumour growth via systemic drug delivery. Further in vivo studies showed that 5% BMOV-loaded PCL (containing 20% methoxypolyethylene glycol) was effective in preventing tumour regrowth of resected RIF tumour masses in mice when the PCL-BMOV paste was applied to the resected site for localized drug delivery. The results confirm the potential of vanadium as an antineoplastic agent and show that the injectable PCL-BMOV formulation releases a chemotherapeutic dose of vanadium for the systemic treatment of whole tumours as well as the localized treatment of resected RIF tumours.

  3. A polymer-based drug delivery system for the antineoplastic agent bis(maltolato)oxovanadium in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J. K.; Min, W.; Cruz, T. F.; Cindric, S.; Arsenault, L.; Von Hoff, D. D.; Degan, D.; Hunter, W. L.; Burt, H. M.

    1997-01-01

    Using vanadyl sulphate, sodium orthovanadate or bis(maltolato)oxovanadium (BMOV), Cruz TF, Morgan A, Min W (1995, Mol Cell Biochem 153: 161-166) have recently demonstrated the antineoplastic effects of vanadium in mice. In this study, the antineoplastic effects of BMOV against human tumour cell lines was confirmed, and this effect was shown to depend on the prolonged exposure of the cells to the drug. We have investigated a polymeric drug delivery system for the sustained delivery of BMOV as an antineoplastic agent in mice. The objective was to design and evaluate an injectable polymer-BMOV paste that would act as a drug implant for the slow but sustained release of BMOV in the mice. In vitro studies showed that the biodegradable polymer poly (Ghlr epsilon epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) released BMOV in a sustained manner with rates of drug release increasing with increased loading of the drug in the polymer. In vivo studies showed that PCL-BMOV paste implants produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of MDAY-D2 tumour growth via systemic drug delivery. Further in vivo studies showed that 5% BMOV-loaded PCL (containing 20% methoxypolyethylene glycol) was effective in preventing tumour regrowth of resected RIF tumour masses in mice when the PCL-BMOV paste was applied to the resected site for localized drug delivery. The results confirm the potential of vanadium as an antineoplastic agent and show that the injectable PCL-BMOV formulation releases a chemotherapeutic dose of vanadium for the systemic treatment of whole tumours as well as the localized treatment of resected RIF tumours. Images Figure 3 PMID:9083337

  4. Mechanical and dynamic characteristics of encapsulated microbubbles coupled by magnetic nanoparticles as multifunctional imaging and drug delivery agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Yin, Leilei; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Wu, Junru; Xu, Di; Zhang, Dong

    2014-11-01

    Development of magnetic encapsulated microbubble agents that can integrate multiple diagnostic and therapeutic functions is a key focus in both biomedical engineering and nanotechnology and one which will have far-reaching impact on medical diagnosis and therapies. However, properly designing multifunctional agents that can satisfy particular diagnostic/therapeutic requirements has been recognized as rather challenging, because there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of how the integration of magnetic nanoparticles to microbubble encapsulating shells affects their mechanical properties and dynamic performance in ultrasound imaging and drug delivery. Here, a multifunctional imaging contrast and in-situ gene/drug delivery agent was synthesized by coupling super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into albumin-shelled microbubbles. Systematical studies were performed to investigate the SPIO-concentration-dependence of microbubble mechanical properties, acoustic scattering response, inertial cavitation activity and ultrasound-facilitated gene transfection effect. These demonstrated that, with the increasing SPIO concentration, the microbubble mean diameter and shell stiffness increased and ultrasound scattering response and inertial cavitation activity could be significantly enhanced. However, an optimized ultrasound-facilitated vascular endothelial growth factor transfection outcome would be achieved by adopting magnetic albumin-shelled microbubbles with an appropriate SPIO concentration of 114.7 µg ml-1. The current results would provide helpful guidance for future development of multifunctional agents and further optimization of their diagnostic/therapeutic performance in clinic.

  5. Drug-drug interactions with sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, new oral glucose-lowering agents for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2014-04-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporters type 2 (SGLT2) reduce hyperglycaemia by decreasing renal glucose threshold and thereby increasing urinary glucose excretion. They are proposed as a novel approach for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus. They have proven their efficacy in reducing glycated haemoglobin, without inducing hypoglycaemia, as monotherapy or in combination with various other glucose-lowering agents, with the add-on value of promoting some weight loss and lowering arterial blood pressure. As they may be used concomitantly with many other drugs, we review the potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) regarding the three leaders in the class (dapagliglozin, canagliflozin and empagliflozin). Most of the available studies were performed in healthy volunteers and have assessed the pharmacokinetic interferences with a single administration of the SGLT2 inhibitor. The exposure [assessed by peak plasma concentrations (Cmax) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)] to each SGLT2 inhibitor tested was not significantly influenced by the concomitant administration of other glucose-lowering agents or cardiovascular agents commonly used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Reciprocally, these medications did not influence the pharmacokinetic parameters of dapagliflozin, canagliflozin or empagliflozin. Some modest changes were not considered as clinically relevant. However, drugs that could specifically interfere with the metabolic pathways of SGLT2 inhibitors [rifampicin, inhibitors or inducers of uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT)] may result in significant changes in the exposure of SGLT2 inhibitors, as shown for dapagliflozin and canagliflozin. Potential DDIs in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving chronic treatment with an SGLT2 inhibitor deserve further attention, especially in individuals treated with several medications or in more fragile patients with hepatic and/or renal impairment.

  6. Studies in Multifunctional Drug Development: Preparation and Evaluation of 11beta-Substituted Estradiol-Drug Conjugates, Cell Membrane Targeting Imaging Agents, and Target Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, KinhLuan Lenny D.

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease in the United State. Despite extensive research in development of antitumor drugs, most of these therapeutic entities often possess nonspecific toxicity, thus they can only be used to treat tumors in higher doses or more frequently. Because of the cytotoxicity and severe side effects, the drug therapeutic window normally is limited. Beside the toxicity issue, antitumor drug are also not selectively taken up by tumor cells, thus the necessitating concentrations that would eradicate the tumor can often not be used. In addition, tumor cells tend to develop resistance against the anticancer drugs after prolonged treatment. Therefore, alleviating the systemic cytotoxicity and side effects, improving in tumor selectivity, high potency, and therapeutic efficacy are still major obstacles in the area of anticancer drug development. A more promising approach for developing a selective agent for cancer is to conjugate a potent therapeutic drug, or an imaging agent with a targeting group, such as antibody or a high binding-specificity small molecule, that selectively recognize the overexpressed antigens or proteins on tumor cells. My research combines several approaches to describe this strategy via using different targeting molecules to different diseases, as well as different potent cytotoxic drugs for different therapies. Three studies related to the preparation and biological evaluation of new therapeutic agents, such as estradiol-drug hybrids, cell membrane targeted molecular imaging agents, and multifunctional NPs will be discussed. The preliminary results of these studies indicated that our new reagents achieved their initial objectives and can be further improved for optimized synthesis and in vivo experiments. The first study describes the method in which we employed a modular assembly approach to synthesize a novel 11beta-substituted steroidal anti-estrogen. The key intermediate was synthesized

  7. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1992-03-01

    In recent years, introduction of new and more effective agents has improved the overall therapy for parasitic infections. This field, however, is still plagued by numerous problems, including the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents (especially with malaria), unavailability of agents in the United States or lack of approval by the Food and Drug Administration, and major toxicities or lack of experience in pregnant women and children, which limits use in these groups of patients. Widespread resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and other agents has complicated the treatment and prophylaxis of this type of malaria. A combination of quinine and Fansidar is usually effective oral therapy for falciparum malaria; quinidine may be administered if intravenous therapy is needed. Mefloquine, which is currently recommended for prophylaxis against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, is also effective for single-dose oral treatment, although this regimen has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Metronidazole has been widely used for treatment of gastroenteritis due to Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia (not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the latter) and is considered safe and effective. A new macrolide, azithromycin, has been reported to be effective for cryptosporidiosis in experimental animals; currently, no effective therapy is available for human infections. Combinations of sulfonamides with other antifolates, trimethoprim or pyrimethamine, are recommended therapy for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia or toxoplasmosis, respectively. Therapies for the various types of leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are complex, often toxic, and often of limited efficacy. The benzimidazoles are effective for roundworm infections, although thiabendazole has severe toxic effects. The recent introduction of ivermectin has revolutionized the treatment and control of onchocerciasis. Another relatively new agent, praziquantel

  8. Therapeutic drug monitoring: antiarrhythmic drugs.

    PubMed

    Campbell, T J; Williams, K M

    2001-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents are traditionally classified according to Vaughan Williams into four classes of action. Class I antiarrhythmic agents include most of the drugs traditionally thought of as antiarrhythmics, and have as a common action, blockade of the fast-inward sodium channel on myocardium. These agents have a very significant toxicity, and while they are being used less, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) does significantly increase the safety with which they can be administered. Class II agents are antisympathetic drugs, particularly the b-adrenoceptor blockers. These are generally safe agents which do not normally require TDM. Class III antiarrhythmic agents include sotalol and amiodarone. TDM can be useful in the case of amiodarone to monitor compliance and toxicity but is generally of little value for sotalol. Class IV antiarrhythmic drugs are the calcium channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem. These are normally monitored by haemodynamic effects, rather than using TDM. Other agents which do not fall neatly into the Vaughan Williams classification include digoxin and perhexiline. TDM is very useful for monitoring the administration (and particularly the safety) of both of these agents.

  9. Therapeutic drug monitoring: antiarrhythmic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, T J; Williams, K M

    2001-01-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents are traditionally classified according to Vaughan Williams into four classes of action. Class I antiarrhythmic agents include most of the drugs traditionally thought of as antiarrhythmics, and have as a common action, blockade of the fast-inward sodium channel on myocardium. These agents have a very significant toxicity, and while they are being used less, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) does significantly increase the safety with which they can be administered. Class II agents are antisympathetic drugs, particularly the b-adrenoceptor blockers. These are generally safe agents which do not normally require TDM. Class III antiarrhythmic agents include sotalol and amiodarone. TDM can be useful in the case of amiodarone to monitor compliance and toxicity but is generally of little value for sotalol. Class IV antiarrhythmic drugs are the calcium channel blockers verapamil and diltiazem. These are normally monitored by haemodynamic effects, rather than using TDM. Other agents which do not fall neatly into the Vaughan Williams classification include digoxin and perhexiline. TDM is very useful for monitoring the administration (and particularly the safety) of both of these agents. PMID:11564050

  10. Cysteine-modifying agents: a possible approach for effective anticancer and antiviral drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Casini, Angela; Scozzafava, Andrea; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2002-01-01

    Modification of cysteine residues in proteins, due to a) the participation of the thiol moiety of this amino acid in oxido-reduction reactions, b) its ability to strongly coordinate transition metal ions, or c) its nucleophilic nature and facile reaction with electrophiles, may be critically important for the design of novel types of pharmacological agents. Application of such procedures recently led to the design of novel antivirals, mainly based on the reaction of zinc finger proteins with disulfides and related derivatives. This approach was particularly successful for developing novel antiviral agents for human immunodeficiency virus and human papilloma virus. Several new anticancer therapeutic approaches, mainly targeting tubulin, have also been reported. Thus, this unique amino acid offers very interesting possibilities for developing particularly useful pharmacological agents, which generally possess a completely different mechanism of action compared with classic agents in clinical use, thus avoiding major problems such as multidrug resistance (for antiviral and anticancer agents) or high toxicity. PMID:12426135

  11. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and class labeling of gadolinium-based contrast agents by the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lucie; Krefting, Ira; Gorovets, Alex; Marzella, Louis; Kaiser, James; Boucher, Robert; Rieves, Dwaine

    2012-10-01

    In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration requested that manufacturers of all approved gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), drugs widely used in magnetic resonance imaging, use nearly identical text in their product labeling to describe the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). Accumulating information about NSF risks led to revision of the labeling text for all of these drugs in 2010. The present report summarizes the basis and purpose of this class-labeling approach and describes some of the related challenges, given the evolutionary nature of the NSF risk evidence. The class-labeling approach for presentation of product risk is designed to decrease the occurrence of NSF and to enhance the safe use of GBCAs in radiologic practice.

  12. Small-Molecule Anticonvulsant Agents with Potent in vitro Neuroprotection and Favorable Drug-like Properties

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Garry R.; Brenneman, Douglas E.; Zhang, Yan; Du, Yanming; Reitz, Allen B.

    2014-01-01

    Severe seizure activity is associated with reoccurring cycles of excitotoxicity and oxidative stress that result in progressive neuronal damage and death. Intervention with these pathological processes is a compelling disease-modifying strategy for the treatment of seizure disorders. We have optimized a series of small molecules for neuroprotective and anticonvulsant activity as well as altered their physical properties to address potential metabolic liabilities, to improve CNS penetration and to prolong the duration of action in vivo. Utilizing phenotypic screening of hippocampal cultures with nutrient medium depleted of antioxidants as a disease model, cell death and decreased neuronal viability produced by acute treatment with glutamate or hydrogen peroxide were prevented. Modifications to our previously reported proof of concept compounds have resulted in a lead which has full neuroprotective action at < 1 nM and antiseizure activity across six animal models, including the kindled rat, and displays excellent pharmacokinetics including high exposure to the brain. These modifications have also eliminated the requirement for a chiral molecule, removing the possibility of racemization and making large scale synthesis more easily accessible. These studies strengthen our earlier findings which indicate that potent, multifunctional neuroprotective anticonvulsants are feasible within a single molecular entity which also possesses favorable CNS-active drug properties in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24277343

  13. Cationic albumin-conjugated chelating agent as a novel brain drug delivery system in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Kamalinia, Golnaz; Khodagholi, Fariba; Shaerzadeh, Fatemeh; Tavssolian, Faranak; Chaharband, Farkhondeh; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Amini, Mohsen; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2015-11-01

    The critical role of metal ions and in particular iron in oxidative stress and protein aggregation offers chelation therapy as a sensible pharmaceutical strategy in oxidative stress-induced neuronal damages. In this research, we conjugated an iron-chelating agent, deferasirox, to cationized human serum albumin molecules in order to develop a novel brain delivery system for the management of neurodegenerative disorders due to the significant role of oxidative stress-induced neuronal injury in such diseases. Cationized albumin is known to be able to transport to brain tissue via adsorptive-mediated transcytosis. The developed structures were molecularly characterized, and their conjugation ratio was determined. PC12 cell line was utilized to evaluate the neuroprotective features of these newly developed molecules in the presence of hydrogen peroxide neuronal damage and to identify the mechanisms behind the observed neuronal protection including apoptotic and autophagic pathways. Furthermore, a rat model of Alzheimer's disease was utilized to evaluate the impact of conjugated structures in vivo. Data analysis revealed that the conjugated species were able to hinder apoptotic cell death while enhancing autophagic process. The developed conjugated species were also able to attenuate amyloid beta-induced learning deficits when administered peripherally.

  14. Anti-biofilm agents: recent breakthrough against multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Chung, Pooi Y; Toh, Yien S

    2014-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen that causes potentially life-threatening nosocomial- and community-acquired infections, such as osteomyelitis and endocarditis. Staphylococcus aureus has the ability to form multicellular, surface-adherent communities called biofilms, which enables it to survive in various sources of stress, including antibiotics, nutrient limitations, heat shock, and immune responses. Biofilm-forming capacity is now recognized as an important virulence determinant in the development of staphylococcal device-related infections. In light of the projected increase in the numbers of elderly patients who will require semi-permanent indwelling medical devices such as artificial knees and hips, we can anticipate an expanded need for new agents and treatment options to manage biofilm-associated infections in an expanding at-risk population. With better understanding of staphylococcal biofilm formation and growth, novel strategies that target biofilm-associated infections caused by S. aureus have recently been described and seem promising as future anti-biofilm therapies. PMID:24453168

  15. Delivery of antifibroblast agents as adjuncts to filtration surgery. Part I--Periocular clearance of cobalt-57 bleomycin in experimental drug delivery: pilot study in the rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, J.S.; Litin, B.S.; Woolfenden, J.M.; Chvapil, M.; Herschler, J.

    1986-10-01

    Antitumor and antifibroblast agents show promise as adjuncts after glaucoma filtration surgery in reducing postoperative scarring and failure. We used nuclear imaging in rabbits to investigate periocular clearance of one such agent (/sup 57/Co-bleomycin). Sub-Tenon injection was compared to other delivery techniques. Our results showed that a collagen sponge and a silastic disc implant with a microhole prolonged drug delivery when compared to sub-Tenon injection alone or injection with a viscosity enhancing agent (0.5% sodium hyaluronate). We theorize that if an antifibroblast agent can be delivered in small and sustained amounts after filtration surgery, this may prolong bleb longevity and avoid unnecessary drug toxicity.

  16. [Anxiolytic agents and hypnotic drugs in Bretagne. Pharmaco-epidemiological study].

    PubMed

    Nguyen, J M; Allain, H; Martinet, J P; Beneton, C; Reymann, J M; Decombe, R

    1991-01-01

    A pharmacoepidemiological survey was carried out in a rural region of France (Brittany) with the help of 54 general practitioners, all of whom belong to a clinical research group. The aim of the survey was 3-fold: to determine the frequency (incidence and prevalence) of anxiolytic and hypnotic drug prescriptions, the sociological characteristics of these drug consumers, and the indications and reasons for prescribing this class of drugs. The population of hypnotic drug and sedative consumers was strikingly dominated by women, 60 years old and over, retired or without a profession. Prescription analysis revealed that these drugs were essentially benzodiazepines whose prevalence and incidence were 17 and 1.76%, respectively. A high frequency of prescription renewals (78%) and an elevated percentage of long-term treatments (more than 9 years) were also noted. Insomnia and dependence are the two main "risk factors" for drug treatments lasting more than one year.

  17. The alkaline single cell electrophoresis assay with eight mouse organs: results with 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Matsusaka, N; Madarame, H; Miyamae, Y; Ishida, K; Satoh, M; Sekihashi, K; Sasaki, Y F

    2000-04-13

    The genotoxicity of 22 mono-functional alkylating agents (including 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines) and 10 DNA crosslinkers selected from IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) groups 1, 2A, and 2B was evaluated in eight mouse organs with the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) (comet) assay. Groups of four mice were treated once intraperitoneally at the dose at which micronucleus tests had been conducted, and the stomach, colon, liver, kidney, bladder, lung, brain, and bone marrow were sampled 3, 8, and/or 24 h later. All chemicals were positive in the SCGE assay in at least one organ. Of the 22 mono-functional alkylating agents, over 50% were positive in all organs except the brain and bone marrow. The two subsets of mono-functional alkylating agents differed in their bone marrow genotoxicity: only 1 of the 9 dialkyl N-nitrosoamines was positive in bone marrow as opposed to 8 of the 13 other alkylating agents, reflecting the fact that dialkyl N-nitrosoamines are poor micronucleus inducers in hematopoietic cells. The two groups of mono-functional alkylating agents also differ in hepatic carcinogenicity in spite of the fact that they are similar in hepatic genotoxicity. While dialkyl N-nitrosoamines produce tumors primarily in mouse liver, only one (styrene-7,8-oxide) out of 10 of the other type of mono-functional alkylating agents is a mouse hepatic carcinogen. Taking into consideration our previous results showing high concordance between hepatic genotoxicity and carcinogenicity for aromatic amines and azo compounds, a possible explanation for the discrepancy might be that chemicals that require metabolic activation show high concordance between genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in the liver. A high percent of the 10 DNA crosslinkers were positive in the SCGE assay in the gastrointestinal mucosa, but less than 50% were positive in the liver and lung. In this study, we allowed 10 min alkali-unwinding to obtain low and stable control values

  18. Does Dispersion Dominate over H-Bonds in Drug-Surface Interactions? The Case of Silica-Based Materials As Excipients and Drug-Delivery Agents.

    PubMed

    Delle Piane, Massimo; Corno, Marta; Ugliengo, Piero

    2013-05-14

    Amorphous silica is widely employed in pharmaceutical formulations both as a tableting, anticaking agent and as a drug delivery system, whereas MCM-41 mesoporous silica has been recently proposed as an efficient support for the controlled release of drugs. Notwithstanding the relevance of this topic, the atomistic details about the specific interactions between the surfaces of the above materials and drugs and the energetic of adsorption are almost unknown. In this work, we resort to a computational ab initio approach, based on periodic Density Functional Theory (DFT), to study the adsorption behavior of two popular drugs (aspirin and ibuprofen) on two models of an amorphous silica surface characterized by different hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties due to different SiOH surface groups' density. Particular effort was devoted to understand the role of dispersive (vdW) interactions in the adsorption mechanism and their interplay with H-bond interactions. On the hydrophilic silica surface, the H-bond pattern of the Si-OH groups rearranges to comply with the formation of new H-bond interactions triggered by the adsorbed drug. The interaction energy of ibuprofen with the hydrophilic model of the silica surface is computed to be very close to the sublimation energy of the ibuprofen molecular crystal, accounting for the experimental evidence of ibuprofen crystal amorphization induced by the contact with the mesoporous silica material. For both surface models, dispersion interactions play a crucial role in dictating the features of the drug/silica system, and they become dominant for the hydrophobic surface. It was proved that a competition may exist between directional H-bonds and nonspecific dispersion driven interactions, with important structural and energetic consequences for the adsorption. The results of this work emphasize the inadequacy of plain DFT methods to model adsorption processes involving inorganic surfaces and drugs of moderate size, due to the missing

  19. Engineered reversal of drug resistance in cancer cells—metastases suppressor factors as change agents

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Kumar, Akinchan; Mann, Anita; Aggarwal, Suruchi; Kumar, Maneesh; Roy, Sumitabho Deb; Pore, Subrata Kumar; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Mahesh Kumar, Jerald; Thakur, Ram Krishna; Chowdhury, Shantanu

    2014-01-01

    Building molecular correlates of drug resistance in cancer and exploiting them for therapeutic intervention remains a pressing clinical need. To identify factors that impact drug resistance herein we built a model that couples inherent cell-based response toward drugs with transcriptomes of resistant/sensitive cells. To test this model, we focused on a group of genes called metastasis suppressor genes (MSGs) that influence aggressiveness and metastatic potential of cancers. Interestingly, modeling of 84 000 drug response transcriptome combinations predicted multiple MSGs to be associated with resistance of different cell types and drugs. As a case study, on inducing MSG levels in a drug resistant breast cancer line resistance to anticancer drugs caerulomycin, camptothecin and topotecan decreased by more than 50–60%, in both culture conditions and also in tumors generated in mice, in contrast to control un-induced cells. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of engineered reversal of drug resistance in cancer cells based on a model that exploits inherent cellular response profiles. PMID:24157835

  20. Changing Drug Users' Risk Environments: Peer Health Advocates as Multi-level Community Change Agents

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Margaret R.; Convey, Mark; Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Li, Jianghong; Radda, Kim; Martinez, Maria; Robles, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Peer delivered, social oriented HIV prevention intervention designs are increasingly popular for addressing broader contexts of health risk beyond a focus on individual factors. Such interventions have the potential to affect multiple social levels of risk and change, including at the individual, network, and community levels, and reflect social ecological principles of interaction across social levels over time. The iterative and feedback dynamic generated by this multi-level effect increases the likelihood for sustained health improvement initiated by those trained to deliver the peer intervention. The Risk Avoidance Partnership (RAP), conducted with heroin and cocaine/crack users in Hartford, Connecticut, exemplified this intervention design and illustrated the multi-level effect on drug users' risk and harm reduction at the individual level, the social network level, and the larger community level. Implications of the RAP program for designing effective prevention programs and for analyzing long-term change to reduce HIV transmission among high-risk groups are discussed from this ecological and multi-level intervention perspective. PMID:19326208

  1. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)-clarithromycin as an anti-cancer agent.

    PubMed

    Van Nuffel, An Mt; Sukhatme, Vidula; Pantziarka, Pan; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P; Bouche, Gauthier

    2015-01-01

    Clarithromycin (CAM) is a well-known macrolide antibiotic available as a generic drug. CAM is traditionally used for many types of bacterial infections, treatment of Lyme disease and eradication of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori. Extensive preclinical and clinical data demonstrate a potential role for CAM to treat various tumours in combination with conventional treatment. The mechanisms of action underlying the anti-tumour activity of CAM are multiple and include prolonged reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, autophagy inhibition, and anti-angiogenesis. Here, we present an overview of the current preclinical (in vitro and in vivo) and clinical evidence supporting the role of CAM in cancer. Overall these findings justify further research with CAM in many tumour types, with multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), and lung cancer having the highest level of evidence. Finally, a series of proposals are being made to further investigate the use of CAM in clinical trials which offer the greatest prospect of clinical benefit to patients. PMID:25729426

  2. Repurposing Drugs in Oncology (ReDO)—clarithromycin as an anti-cancer agent

    PubMed Central

    Van Nuffel, An MT; Sukhatme, Vidula; Pantziarka, Pan; Meheus, Lydie; Sukhatme, Vikas P; Bouche, Gauthier

    2015-01-01

    Clarithromycin (CAM) is a well-known macrolide antibiotic available as a generic drug. CAM is traditionally used for many types of bacterial infections, treatment of Lyme disease and eradication of gastric infection with Helicobacter pylori. Extensive preclinical and clinical data demonstrate a potential role for CAM to treat various tumours in combination with conventional treatment. The mechanisms of action underlying the anti-tumour activity of CAM are multiple and include prolonged reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, autophagy inhibition, and anti-angiogenesis. Here, we present an overview of the current preclinical (in vitro and in vivo) and clinical evidence supporting the role of CAM in cancer. Overall these findings justify further research with CAM in many tumour types, with multiple myeloma, lymphoma, chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), and lung cancer having the highest level of evidence. Finally, a series of proposals are being made to further investigate the use of CAM in clinical trials which offer the greatest prospect of clinical benefit to patients. PMID:25729426

  3. Study of anti-angiogenic drugs by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy of a contrast agent in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, G.; D'Andrea, C.; Ferrari, R.; Pifferi, A.; Cubeddu, R.; Caronia, D.; Martinelli, M.; Giavazzi, R.

    2007-07-01

    We used two fluorescence techniques based on the Indocyanine Green contrast agent to study the effectiveness of antiangionenic drugs in mice. To this purpose, the volume of the active vasculature in different tumor models implanted in mice was assessed by means of a low noise fluorescence imaging setup and by a photon counting system working in transmittance geometry. Using a first tumor model (carcinoma MDA-MB-435) we observed that mice treated with a Vascular Disrupting Agent (ZD6126) showed a reduction in fluorescence emission of the contrast agent with respect to control mice. This was a clear indication of the vascular shutdown that took place in tumors. The effectiveness of the treatment was also confirmed by histological sections. Then, in a second experiment we considered a second tumor model (carcinoma 1A9-VS1) overexpressing the Vascular Endotelial Growth Factor (VEGF121), which is used by tumor cells to promote angiogenesis. We measured the Indocyanine Green fluorescence in mice treated with an antioangiogenic drug (Avastin TM) and in control mice. In tumors of treated mice we observed an ICG emission lower than the one detected in control mice. This demonstrated that VEGF activity was effectively blocked by the treatment with Avastin. In conclusion, ICG fluorescence provides a simple and reliable way to assess the effectiveness of vascular targeting therapies. Measurements of the fluorescence signal can be repeated every 24 hours, thus allowing oncologists to perform longitudinal studies on the same animals.

  4. QuBiLs-MAS method in early drug discovery and rational drug identification of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Medina Marrero, R; Marrero-Ponce, Y; Barigye, S J; Echeverría Díaz, Y; Acevedo-Barrios, R; Casañola-Martín, G M; García Bernal, M; Torrens, F; Pérez-Giménez, F

    2015-01-01

    The QuBiLs-MAS approach is used for the in silico modelling of the antifungal activity of organic molecules. To this effect, non-stochastic (NS) and simple-stochastic (SS) atom-based quadratic indices are used to codify chemical information for a comprehensive dataset of 2478 compounds having a great structural variability, with 1087 of them being antifungal agents, covering the broadest antifungal mechanisms of action known so far. The NS and SS index-based antifungal activity classification models obtained using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) yield correct classification percentages of 90.73% and 92.47%, respectively, for the training set. Additionally, these models are able to correctly classify 92.16% and 87.56% of 706 compounds in an external test set. A comparison of the statistical parameters of the QuBiLs-MAS LDA-based models with those for models reported in the literature reveals comparable to superior performance, although the latter were built over much smaller and less diverse datasets, representing fewer mechanisms of action. It may therefore be inferred that the QuBiLs-MAS method constitutes a valuable tool useful in the design and/or selection of new and broad spectrum agents against life-threatening fungal infections. PMID:26567876

  5. QuBiLs-MAS method in early drug discovery and rational drug identification of antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Medina Marrero, R; Marrero-Ponce, Y; Barigye, S J; Echeverría Díaz, Y; Acevedo-Barrios, R; Casañola-Martín, G M; García Bernal, M; Torrens, F; Pérez-Giménez, F

    2015-01-01

    The QuBiLs-MAS approach is used for the in silico modelling of the antifungal activity of organic molecules. To this effect, non-stochastic (NS) and simple-stochastic (SS) atom-based quadratic indices are used to codify chemical information for a comprehensive dataset of 2478 compounds having a great structural variability, with 1087 of them being antifungal agents, covering the broadest antifungal mechanisms of action known so far. The NS and SS index-based antifungal activity classification models obtained using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) yield correct classification percentages of 90.73% and 92.47%, respectively, for the training set. Additionally, these models are able to correctly classify 92.16% and 87.56% of 706 compounds in an external test set. A comparison of the statistical parameters of the QuBiLs-MAS LDA-based models with those for models reported in the literature reveals comparable to superior performance, although the latter were built over much smaller and less diverse datasets, representing fewer mechanisms of action. It may therefore be inferred that the QuBiLs-MAS method constitutes a valuable tool useful in the design and/or selection of new and broad spectrum agents against life-threatening fungal infections.

  6. ZnO nanoparticles as drug delivery agent for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhar-e-Alam, M.; Rahim, S.; Atif, M.; Hammad Aziz, M.; Imran Malick, M.; Zaidi, S. S. Z.; Suleman, R.; Majid, A.

    2014-02-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) limits the success of many tumoricidal drugs. Non-significant accumulation of the drug into the target site is one major problem in photodynamic therapy. Nanoparticles are extensively used as efficient drug carriers in various local infectious and premalignant biological tissues. Due to their unique physical and chemical properties, PEGylated zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) exhibit high drug loading capacities, sustained drug release profiles and long-term anticancer efficacy. (Polyethylene glycol) PEG-zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized using the aquis chemical technique. Morphology/structural analysis of the said nanoparticles was confirmed by applying many techniques, e.g. scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and XRD. Average grain size of the nanoparticles, which was ≈100 nm, was calculated by applying the Scherrer formula. The PEGylated ZnO NPs were loaded with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) to enhance the capability of drug carrying potency. Current work focused on the comparison of the cell killing effect (apoptosis/necrosis) by functionalizing different nanostructures via PEGylated ZnO NPs and bare ZnO NPs using the free-standing drug delivery procedure. ZnO NPs were used as anticancer drug vehicles because of their biocompatibility and bio-safety profile. The apoptotic effect of PEGylated tumoricidal drugs has been studied in human muscle carcinoma (RD cell line) in the dark as well as under laser exposure. It was concluded that PpIX localization was a significant time greater using encapsulation as compared to a conventional drug delivery system. This new technique may find excellent opportunities in the field of nanomedicine, especially in a multidrug delivery system.

  7. Clinical evaluation of a frozen commercially prepared microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of seven antifungal agents, including the new triazoles posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Messer, S A; Boyken, L; Huynh, H; Hollis, R J

    2002-05-01

    A commercially prepared frozen broth microdilution panel (Trek Diagnostic Systems, Westlake, Ohio) was compared with a reference microdilution panel for antifungal susceptibility testing of two quality control (QC) strains and 99 clinical isolates of Candida spp. The antifungal agents tested included amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole, ravuconazole, and voriconazole. Microdilution testing was performed according to NCCLS recommendations. MIC endpoints were read visually after 48 h of incubation and were assessed independently for each microdilution panel. The MICs for the QC strains were within published limits for both the reference and Trek microdilution panels. Discrepancies among MIC endpoints of no more than 2 dilutions were used to calculate the percent agreement. Acceptable levels of agreement between the Trek and reference panels were observed for all antifungal agents tested against the 99 clinical isolates. The overall agreement for each antifungal agent ranged from 96% for ravuconazole to 100% for amphotericin B. The Trek microdilution panel appears to be a viable alternative to frozen microdilution panels prepared in-house. PMID:11980944

  8. Applications of new drug delivery technologies to Parkinson's disease and dopaminergic agents.

    PubMed

    Stahl, S M

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in drug delivery technology are creating novel therapeutic approaches to the treatment of Parkinson's disease with levodopa and dopamine agonists. This article reviews those technologies which can be applied to Parkinson's disease, both for targetting the central nervous system with drugs, as well as for matching the appropriate rate controlled delivery with therapeutic needs. In particular, the possibility exists for eliminating erratic highs and lows of drug delivery to the brain, and to substitute rate controlled, constant drug delivery. Clinical investigations now in progress suggest that new technologies which deliver constant dopaminergic stimulation to patients with Parkinson's disease may not only eliminate the unpredictable swings in therapeutic efficacy in Parkinson patients with the "on/off" effect, but may even have a role in the future in preventing such fluctuations from developing in patients chronically treated with dopaminergic therapies. PMID:3042910

  9. Magnetothermal release of payload from iron oxide/silica drug delivery agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, T. T.; Knoppe, S.; Bloemen, M.; Brullot, W.; Strobbe, R.; Locquet, J.-P.; Verbiest, T.

    2016-10-01

    The release of covalently bound Rhodamine B from iron oxide/mesoporous silica core/shell nanoparticles under magnetically induced heating was studied. The system acts as a model to study drug delivery and payload release under magnetothermal heating.

  10. Drug Dependence in Michigan Including A Study of Attitudes and Actions of the Young People of Michigan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogg, Richard A.; And Others

    A 1968 study was undertaken in Michigan with the following objectives: 1) to determine drug utilization rates for public high school seniors; 2) to determine demographic, sociological, and social-psychological correlates of drug utilization; and 3) to acquire information relevant to present and future health education programs. A questionnaire…

  11. A Drug-Sensitized Zebrafish Screen Identifies Multiple Genes, Including GINS3, as Regulators of Myocardial Repolarization

    PubMed Central

    Milan, David J.; Kim, Albert M.; Winterfield, Jeffrey R.; Jones, Ian L.; Pfeufer, Arne; Sanna, Serena; Arking, Dan E.; Amsterdam, Adam H.; Sabeh, Khaled M.; Mably, John D.; Rosenbaum, David S.; Peterson, Randall T.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Kääb, Stefan; Roden, Dan M.; MacRae, Calum A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cardiac repolarization, the process by which cardiomyocytes return to their resting potential after each beat, is a highly regulated process that is critical for heart rhythm stability. Perturbations of cardiac repolarization increase the risk for life-threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. While genetic studies of familial long QT syndromes have uncovered several key genes in cardiac repolarization, the major heritable contribution to this trait remains unexplained. Identification of additional genes may lead to a better understanding of the underlying biology, aid in identification of patients at risk for sudden death, and potentially enable new treatments for susceptible individuals. Methods and Results We extended and refined a zebrafish model of cardiac repolarization by using fluorescent reporters of transmembrane potential. We then conducted a drug-sensitized genetic screen in zebrafish, identifying 15 genes, including GINS3, that affect cardiac repolarization. Testing these genes for human relevance in two concurrently completed genome wide association studies revealed that the human GINS3 ortholog is located in the 16q21 locus which is strongly associated with QT interval. Conclusions This sensitized zebrafish screen identified 15 novel myocardial repolarization genes. Among these genes is GINS3, the human ortholog of which is a major locus in two concurrent human genome wide association studies of QT interval. These results reveal a novel network of genes that regulate cardiac repolarization. PMID:19652097

  12. A High-Throughput In Vitro Drug Screen in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Identifies BMS-754807 as a Promising Therapeutic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Halvorson, Kyle G.; Barton, Kelly L.; Schroeder, Kristin; Misuraca, Katherine L.; Hoeman, Christine; Chung, Alex; Crabtree, Donna M.; Cordero, Francisco J.; Singh, Raj; Spasojevic, Ivan; Berlow, Noah; Pal, Ranadip; Becher, Oren J.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) represent a particularly lethal type of pediatric brain cancer with no effective therapeutic options. Our laboratory has previously reported the development of genetically engineered DIPG mouse models using the RCAS/tv-a system, including a model driven by PDGF-B, H3.3K27M, and p53 loss. These models can serve as a platform in which to test novel therapeutics prior to the initiation of human clinical trials. In this study, an in vitro high-throughput drug screen as part of the DIPG preclinical consortium using cell-lines derived from our DIPG models identified BMS-754807 as a drug of interest in DIPG. BMS-754807 is a potent and reversible small molecule multi-kinase inhibitor with many targets including IGF-1R, IR, MET, TRKA, TRKB, AURKA, AURKB. In vitro evaluation showed significant cytotoxic effects with an IC50 of 0.13 μM, significant inhibition of proliferation at a concentration of 1.5 μM, as well as inhibition of AKT activation. Interestingly, IGF-1R signaling was absent in serum-free cultures from the PDGF-B; H3.3K27M; p53 deficient model suggesting that the antitumor activity of BMS-754807 in this model is independent of IGF-1R. In vivo, systemic administration of BMS-754807 to DIPG-bearing mice did not prolong survival. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that tumor tissue drug concentrations of BMS-754807 were well below the identified IC50, suggesting that inadequate drug delivery may limit in vivo efficacy. In summary, an unbiased in vitro drug screen identified BMS-754807 as a potential therapeutic agent in DIPG, but BMS-754807 treatment in vivo by systemic delivery did not significantly prolong survival of DIPG-bearing mice. PMID:25748921

  13. Studies in Multifunctional Drug Development: Preparation and Evaluation of 11beta-Substituted Estradiol-Drug Conjugates, Cell Membrane Targeting Imaging Agents, and Target Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, KinhLuan Lenny D.

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease in the United State. Despite extensive research in development of antitumor drugs, most of these therapeutic entities often possess nonspecific toxicity, thus they can only be used to treat tumors in higher doses or more frequently. Because of the cytotoxicity and severe side effects, the drug therapeutic window normally is limited. Beside the toxicity issue, antitumor drug are also not selectively taken up by tumor cells, thus the necessitating concentrations that would eradicate the tumor can often not be used. In addition, tumor cells tend to develop resistance against the anticancer drugs after prolonged treatment. Therefore, alleviating the systemic cytotoxicity and side effects, improving in tumor selectivity, high potency, and therapeutic efficacy are still major obstacles in the area of anticancer drug development. A more promising approach for developing a selective agent for cancer is to conjugate a potent therapeutic drug, or an imaging agent with a targeting group, such as antibody or a high binding-specificity small molecule, that selectively recognize the overexpressed antigens or proteins on tumor cells. My research combines several approaches to describe this strategy via using different targeting molecules to different diseases, as well as different potent cytotoxic drugs for different therapies. Three studies related to the preparation and biological evaluation of new therapeutic agents, such as estradiol-drug hybrids, cell membrane targeted molecular imaging agents, and multifunctional NPs will be discussed. The preliminary results of these studies indicated that our new reagents achieved their initial objectives and can be further improved for optimized synthesis and in vivo experiments. The first study describes the method in which we employed a modular assembly approach to synthesize a novel 11beta-substituted steroidal anti-estrogen. The key intermediate was synthesized

  14. The influence of polymeric excipients on the process of pharmaceutical availability of therapeutic agents from a model drug form. Part I. In formulations with controlled disintegration and release time.

    PubMed

    Nachajski, Michal Jakub; Zgoda, Marian Mikołaj

    2010-01-01

    Pre-formulation research was conducted on the application of Ex. Echinaceae aq. siccum in the production of a quickly disintegrating suspension tablet, a lozenge with kariostatic sugar alcohols (mannitol, sorbitol), and, above all, a solid drug form with controlled release of therapeutic agents included in the extract. Morphological parameters of tablets obtained in the course of experiment were estimated and the profiles of the release (diffusion) ofhydrophilic therapeutic agents into model receptor fluids with varying values of osmolarity (0.1 mol HCl approximately 200 mOsm/l, hypotonic hydrating fluid approximately 143 mOsm/l, and compensatory paediatric fluid approximately 272 mOsm/l) were examined. The study focused on the technological problem of determining the effect of hydrogel Carbopol structure on the ordering of diffusion ofhydrophilic therapeutic agents from a model drug form (a tablet) into model fluids with variable osmolarity. PMID:20649091

  15. [A new approach to overcoming the drug resistance of the causative agents of malaria].

    PubMed

    Orlov, V S; Rabinovich, S A

    1990-01-01

    Progressively expanding area of multiresistant falciparum malaria and the profile of its resistance to drugs successively implemented into practice necessitate the elaboration of approaches to the "revival" of the drugs used. As with neoplastic cells, a correlation between plasmodium multiresistance with increased "outflow" of specific drugs from the cell is suggested, which is blocked by inhibition of Ca2+ transport. Reversion of resistance to chloroquine by a combination with Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil, tricyclic antidepressants (desipramine, protritreline, etc.), tricyclic antihistamine drugs (cyproheptadine), and reversion of resistance to sulfadoxine in combination with the antihistamine drug ketodiphene have been shown in vivo and in vitro. The function of Ca2+ channels is directly related to Ca2(+)-, Mg2(+)-dependent ATPase. Ph-metric techniques elaborated in the USSR make it possible to evaluate its activity, determine the inhibitors, differentiate them according to the effect. The authors have established reversion of P. berghei resistance to chloroquine, with the tricyclic antidepressants azaphen, aminazin, triftazin correlating with the degree of Ca2+, Mg2(+)-ATPase inhibition and to praziquantel, whose effect might be associated with the increased permeability of the cellular membrane to Ca2+. The inhibitors of Ca2+ transport have various parasitocidal activities which might be accounted for by the deficiency of this cation necessary for plasmodium development. The task is to elaborate safe optimum antimalarial drug/modulator of Ca2+ transport combinations. Multiresistance (genetically predetermined multifactorial cellular changes) may be associated with enhanced synthesis of transmembrane glycoprotein with varying molecular mass depending on the direction of resistance. PMID:2266896

  16. Novel drug delivery systems for actinides (uranium and plutonium) decontamination agents.

    PubMed

    Fattal, Elias; Tsapis, Nicolas; Phan, Guillaume

    2015-08-01

    The possibility of accidents in the nuclear industry or of nuclear terrorist attacks makes the development of new decontamination strategies crucial. Among radionuclides, actinides such as uranium and plutonium and their different isotopes are considered as the most dangerous contaminants, plutonium displaying mostly a radiological toxicity whereas uranium exhibits mainly a chemical toxicity. Contamination occurs through ingestion, skin or lung exposure with subsequent absorption and distribution of the radionuclides to different tissues where they induce damaging effects. Different chelating agents have been synthesized but their efficacy is limited by their low tissue specificity and high toxicity. For these reasons, several groups have developed smart delivery systems to increase the local concentration of the chelating agent or to improve its biodistribution. The aim of this review is to highlight these strategies.

  17. Role of anti-diabetic drugs as therapeutic agents in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Syed Mohd. Danish; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Waseem, Shah Mohammad Abbas; Shakil, Shazi; Abuzenadah, Adel M.; Biswas, Deboshree; Tabrez, Shams; Ashraf, Ghulam Md.; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad

    2015-01-01

    Recent data have suggested a strong possible link between Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Alzheimer's disease (AD), although exact mechanisms linking the two are still a matter of research and debate. Interestingly, both are diseases with high incidence and prevalence in later years of life. The link appears so strong that some scientists use Alzheimer's and Type 3 Diabetes interchangeably. In depth study of recent data suggests that the anti diabetic drugs not only have possible role in treatment of Alzheimer's but may also arrest the declining cognitive functions associated with it. The present review gives an insight into the possible links, existing therapeutics and clinical trials of anti diabetic drugs in patients suffering from AD primarily or as co-morbidity. It may be concluded that the possible beneficial effects and usefulness of the current anti diabetic drugs in AD cannot be neglected and further research is required to achieve positive results. Currently, several drug trials are in progress to give conclusive evidence based data. PMID:27152105

  18. 2'-Deoxyguanosine as a surrogate trapping agent for DNA reactive drug metabolites.

    PubMed

    Häkkinen, Merja R; Laine, Jaana E; Juvonen, Risto O; Auriola, Seppo; Häyrinen, Jukka; Pasanen, Markku

    2011-11-10

    Drug metabolism can result in the production of highly reactive metabolites that may form adducts with cellular macromolecules, and thus initiate adverse drug reactions, cause toxicity, and even require the withdrawal of drug from the market. In this study, a 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG)-based chemical trapping test system was developed for use as a fast screening tool for DNA adducting metabolites of new drug candidates. Reactive metabolites were generated from parent compounds in in vitro incubations with phenobarbital-induced mouse liver microsomes, human liver microsomes and different recombinant human CYP enzymes in the presence of dG. The formed dG-adducts were separated, characterized and their stability was studied by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The method was evaluated with six test compounds, aflatoxin B1, estrone, clozapine, tolcapone, ticlopidine and imipramine. Estrone and aflatoxin B1 formed dG adducts with phenobarbital-induced mouse liver microsomes, human liver microsomes and human recombinant CYP enzymes. Adduct formation was also observed with tolcapone when phenobarbital-induced mouse liver microsomes were used as the enzyme source. The stability of each formed adduct was independent of the different enzyme sources. No dG-adducts were identified with ticlopidine, clozapine and imipramine. Compared to other classical DNA reactivity tests, e.g. Ames test, the present surrogate endpoint, the dG adduct, is faster, enables the characterization of the formed compounds, and also permits the investigation of more unstable adducts.

  19. Fabrication of biodendrimeric β-cyclodextrin via click reaction with potency of anticancer drug delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Toomari, Yousef; Namazi, Hassan; Entezami, Ali Akbar

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was the synthesis of biodendrimeric β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) on the secondary face with encapsulation efficacy, with β-CDs moiety to preserve the biocompatibility properties, also particularly growth their loading capacity for drugs with certain size. The new dendrimer, having 14 β-CD residues attached to the core β-CD in secondary face (11), was prepared through click reaction. The encapsulation property of the prepared compound was evaluated by methotrexate (MTX) drug molecule. Characterization of compound 11 was performed with (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and FTIR and its supramolecular inclusion complex structure was determined using FTIR, DLS, DSC and SEM techniques. In vitro cytotoxicity test results showed that compound 11 has very low or no cytotoxic effect on T47D cancer cells. In vitro drug release study at pHs 3, 5 and 7.4 showed that the release process was noticeably pH dependent and the dendrimer could be used as an appropriate controlled drug delivery system (DDS) for cancer treatment. PMID:26056989

  20. Pharmacokinetic characterization of hydroxylpropyl-beta-cyclodextrin-included complex of cryptotanshinone, an investigational cardiovascular drug purified from Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza).

    PubMed

    Pan, Y; Bi, H-C; Zhong, G-P; Chen, X; Zuo, Z; Zhao, L-Z; Gu, L-Q; Liu, P-Q; Huang, Z-Y; Zhou, S-F; Huang, M

    2008-04-01

    1. The study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetics of cryptotanshinone in a hydroxylpropyl-beta-cyclodextrin-included complex in dogs and rats. 2. Animals were administrated the inclusion complex of cryptotanshinone and the concentrations of cryptotanshinone and its major metabolite tanshinone IIA were determined by a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. 3. Cryptotanshinone in inclusion complex was absorbed slowly after an oral dose, and the C(max) and AUC(0-)(t) were dose-proportional. The bioavailability of cryptotanshinone in rats was (6.9% +/- 1.9%) at 60 mg kg(-1) and (11.1% +/- 1.8%) in dogs at 53.4 mg kg(-1). The t(1/2) of the compound in rats and dogs was 5.3-7.4 and 6.0-10.0 h, respectively. Cryptotanshinone showed a high accumulation in the intestine, lung and liver after oral administration, while the lung, liver and heart had the highest level following intravenous dose. Excretion data in rats showed that cryptotanshinone and its metabolites were mainly eliminated from faeces and bile, and the dose recovery rate was 0.02, 2.2, and 14.9% in urine, bile, and faeces, respectively. 4. The disposition of cryptotanshinone in an inclusion complex was dose-independent and the bioavailability was increased compared with that without cyclodextrin used to formulate the drug. Cryptotanshinone was distributed extensively into different organs. Excretion of cryptotanshinone and its metabolites into urine was extremely low, and they were mainly excreted into faeces and bile. PMID:18340563

  1. Cannabinergic aminoalkylindoles, including AM678=JWH018 found in 'Spice', examined using drug (Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol) discrimination for rats.

    PubMed

    Järbe, Torbjörn U C; Deng, Hongfen; Vadivel, Subramanian K; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2011-09-01

    We examined four different cannabinergic aminoalkylindole ligands, including one drug (AM678=JWH018) found in herbal 'Spice' concoctions, for their ability to substitute for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and the ability of the cannabinoid receptor 1-selective antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant to block the substitution, 30 and 90 min after intraperitoneal injection. Rats trained to discriminate the effects of vehicle from those produced by 3 mg/kg of THC were used. The order of potency was: AM5983≥AM678>AM2233>WIN55212-2 at both test intervals. AM5983 and AM678 appeared eight times more potent than THC, followed by AM2233 (about twice as potent as THC), and WIN55212-2 approximately THC at the 30-min test interval. The aminoalkylindoles showed reduced potency (i.e. an increased ED50 value) at the longer injection-to-test interval of 90 min compared with testing at 30 min. The rightward shifts by coadministration of rimonabant were approximately 8-fold to 12-fold for AM5983 and AM678, compared with an approximately 3-fold rightward shift for the WIN55212-2 curve. AM2233 (1.8 mg/kg) substitution was also blocked by 1 mg/kg of rimonabant. In conclusion, AM5983 and AM678=JWH018 are potent cannabimimetics derived from an aminoalkylindole template. WIN55212-2 seemed to interact differently with rimonabant, compared with either AM5983 or AM678, indicating potential differences in the mechanism(s) of action among cannabinergic aminoalkylindoles.

  2. Sarcoma Cell Line Screen of Oncology Drugs and Investigational Agents Identifies Patterns Associated with Gene and microRNA Expression.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Polley, Eric; Kunkel, Mark; Evans, David; Silvers, Thomas; Delosh, Rene; Laudeman, Julie; Ogle, Chad; Reinhart, Russell; Selby, Michael; Connelly, John; Harris, Erik; Monks, Anne; Morris, Joel

    2015-11-01

    The diversity in sarcoma phenotype and genotype make treatment of this family of diseases exceptionally challenging. Sixty-three human adult and pediatric sarcoma lines were screened with 100 FDA-approved oncology agents and 345 investigational agents. The investigational agents' library enabled comparison of several compounds targeting the same molecular entity allowing comparison of target specificity and heterogeneity of cell line response. Gene expression was derived from exon array data and microRNA expression was derived from direct digital detection assays. The compounds were screened against each cell line at nine concentrations in triplicate with an exposure time of 96 hours using Alamar blue as the endpoint. Results are presented for inhibitors of the following targets: aurora kinase, IGF-1R, MEK, BET bromodomain, and PARP1. Chemical structures, IC50 heat maps, concentration response curves, gene expression, and miR expression heat maps are presented for selected examples. In addition, two cases of exceptional responders are presented. The drug and compound response, gene expression, and microRNA expression data are publicly available at http://sarcoma.cancer.gov. These data provide a unique resource to the cancer research community. PMID:26351324

  3. Investigations on nanoconfinement of low-molecular antineoplastic agents into biocompatible magnetic matrices for drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Tomoiaga, Alina Maria; Cioroiu, Bogdan Ionel; Nica, Valentin; Vasile, Aurelia

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles are employed as biocompatible matrices to host low-molecular antineoplastic drugs. 5-Fluorouracil is a well-known antimetabolite drug used to treat many malignancies: colon, rectal, breast, head and neck, pancreatic, gastric, esophageal, liver and G-U (bladder, penile, vulva, prostate), skin cancers (basal cell and keratosis). Unfortunately severe gastrointestinal, hematological, neural, cardiac and dermatological toxic effects are often registered due to its cytotoxicity. Thus, this work focuses on development of a magnetic silica nanosystem, capable of hosting high amounts of 5-fluorouracil and delivers it in a targeted manner, under the influence of external magnetic field. There are few reports on nanoconfinement of this particular small molecule antimetabolite on mesoporous silica hosts. Therefore we have investigated different ways to confine high amounts of 5-FU within amino-modified and non-modified mesopores of the silica shell, from water and ethanol, under magnetic stirring and ultrasound irradiation. Also, we have studied the adsorption process from water as a function of pH in order to rationalize drug-support interactions. It is shown that nature of the solvent has great influence on diffusion of small molecules into mesopores, which is slower from alcoholic solutions. More importantly, sonication is proven as an excellent alternative to long adsorption tests, since the time necessary to reach equilibrium is drastically reduced to 1h and higher amounts of drug may be immobilized within the mesopores of amino-modified magnetic silica nanoparticles. These results are highly important for optimization of drug immobilization process in order to attain desired release profile. PMID:23777792

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Curcumin-Functionalized HP-β-CD-Modified GoldMag Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Agents.

    PubMed

    Lian, Ting; Peng, Mingli; Vermorken, Alphons J M; Jin, Yanyan; Luo, Zhiyi; Van de Ven, Wim J M; Wan, Yinsheng; Hou, Peng; Cui, Yali

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenol extracted from turmeric (Curcuma longa), has emerged as a potent multimodal cancer-preventing agent. It may attenuate the spread of cancer and render chemotherapy more effective. However, curcumin is neither well absorbed nor well retained in the blood, resulting in low efficacy. In an attempt to enhance the potency and to improve the bioavailability of curcumin, new delivery agents, hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD)-modified GoldMag nanoparticles (CD-GMNs) were designed and synthesized to incorporate curcumin. The CD-GMNs were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Thermo-gravimetric Analysis (TGA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Dynamic Light Scattering measurements (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) analyses. For the magnetic carrier of CD-GMNs, the content of HP-β-CD was 26.9 wt%. CD-GMNs have a saturation magnetization of 22.7 emu/g with an average hydrodynamic diameter of 80 nm. The curcumin loading, encapsulation efficiency and releasing properties in vitro were also investigated. The results showed that the drug encapsulation ratio was 88% and the maximum curcumin loading capacity of CD-GMNs was 660 μg/5 mg. In vitro drug release studies showed a controlled and pH-sensitive curcumin release over a period of one week. Collectively, our data suggest that HP-β-CD-modified GoldMag nanoparticles can be considered to form a promising delivery system for curcumin to tumor sites. Targeting can be achieved by the combined effects of the application of an external magnetic field and the effect on drug release of lower pH values often found in the tumor microenvironment.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Curcumin-Functionalized HP-β-CD-Modified GoldMag Nanoparticles as Drug Delivery Agents.

    PubMed

    Lian, Ting; Peng, Mingli; Vermorken, Alphons J M; Jin, Yanyan; Luo, Zhiyi; Van de Ven, Wim J M; Wan, Yinsheng; Hou, Peng; Cui, Yali

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin, a polyphenol extracted from turmeric (Curcuma longa), has emerged as a potent multimodal cancer-preventing agent. It may attenuate the spread of cancer and render chemotherapy more effective. However, curcumin is neither well absorbed nor well retained in the blood, resulting in low efficacy. In an attempt to enhance the potency and to improve the bioavailability of curcumin, new delivery agents, hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD)-modified GoldMag nanoparticles (CD-GMNs) were designed and synthesized to incorporate curcumin. The CD-GMNs were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Thermo-gravimetric Analysis (TGA), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Dynamic Light Scattering measurements (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) analyses. For the magnetic carrier of CD-GMNs, the content of HP-β-CD was 26.9 wt%. CD-GMNs have a saturation magnetization of 22.7 emu/g with an average hydrodynamic diameter of 80 nm. The curcumin loading, encapsulation efficiency and releasing properties in vitro were also investigated. The results showed that the drug encapsulation ratio was 88% and the maximum curcumin loading capacity of CD-GMNs was 660 μg/5 mg. In vitro drug release studies showed a controlled and pH-sensitive curcumin release over a period of one week. Collectively, our data suggest that HP-β-CD-modified GoldMag nanoparticles can be considered to form a promising delivery system for curcumin to tumor sites. Targeting can be achieved by the combined effects of the application of an external magnetic field and the effect on drug release of lower pH values often found in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27427699

  6. Drug-specific [sup 19]F NMR and dynamic [sup 18]F PET imaging of the cytostatic agent 5-fluorouracil

    SciTech Connect

    Bellemann, M.E.; Brix, G.; Haberkorn, U.; Ostertag, H.J.; Lorenz, W.J. )

    1994-12-01

    The spatial distribution of the antineoplastic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been mapped both with [sup 19]F NMR and [sup 18]F PET imaging techniques. For [sup 19]F NMR imaging of 5-FU and its major catabolite [alpha]-fluoro-[beta]-alanine (FBAL), a fast gradient-echo pulse sequence was employed. A chemical-shift selective saturation pulse was used to suppress either the 5-FU or the FBAL resonance before the other component of the [sup 19]F NMR spectrum was images. This approach yielded selective 5-FU and FBAL NMR images free of chemical-shift artifacts in readout and slice-selection direction. In phantom experiments, [sup 19]F 5-FU and FBAL images with a spatial resolution of 12.5 x 12.5 x 20 mm[sup 3] were obtained in 32 min from model solutions with drug and catabolite concentrations similar to those estimated in animals and patients undergoing i.v. chemotherapy with 5-FU. The biodistribution of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in rats shortly after administration of the drug demonstrated the good vascularization of the transplanted tumors. The metabolic turnover of the cytostatic agent started about 10--20 min p.i. and was predominant in the tumor and liver tissue. The rapid adjustment of the [sup 18]F metabolite concentrations in the transplanted tumors to a steady state provides evidence of anabolic tumor activity, which supports the hypothesis of 5-FU trapping in malignant cells based on [sup 19]F NMR spectroscopy data. The high uptake of 5-[[sup 18]F]FU in the liver, on the other hand, mainly reflects the catabolization of 5-FU to the noncytotoxic FBAL, which leads to a reduced bioavailability of the drug.

  7. Spectinamides: A New Class of Semisynthetic Anti-Tuberculosis Agents that Overcome Native Drug Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Vaddady, Pavan K; Zheng, Zhong; Qi, Jianjun; Akbergenov, Rashid; Das, Sourav; Madhura, Dora B.; Rathi, Chetan; Trivedi, Ashit; Villellas, Cristina; Lee, Robin. B.; Rakesh; Waidyarachchi, Samanthi L.; Sun, Dianqing; McNeil, Michael R.; Ainsa, Jose A.; Boshoff, Helena I.; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Although the classical antibiotic spectinomycin is a potent bacterial protein synthesis inhibitor, poor antimycobacterial activity limits its clinical application for treating tuberculosis. Using structure-based design, a novel semisynthetic series of spectinomycin analogs was generated with selective ribosomal inhibition and excellent narrow-spectrum antitubercular activity. In multiple murine infection models, these spectinamides were well tolerated, significantly reduced lung mycobacterial burden and increased survival. In vitro studies demonstrated a lack of cross-resistance with existing tuberculosis therapeutics, activity against MDR/XDR-tuberculosis, and an excellent pharmacological profile. Key to their potent antitubercular properties was their structural modification to evade the Rv1258c efflux pump, which is upregulated in MDR strains and is implicated in macrophage induced drug tolerance. The antitubercular efficacy of spectinamides demonstrates that synthetic modifications to classical antibiotics can overcome the challenge of intrinsic efflux pump-mediated resistance and expands opportunities for target based tuberculosis drug discovery. PMID:24464186

  8. Interspecies pharmacokinetics as applied to the hard drug photosensitizing agent meta(tetrahydroxphenyl)chlorin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronn, Avigdor M.; Lofgren, Lennart A.; Westerborn, Anders

    1996-01-01

    Having successfully completed an extensive three year study of the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of m-THPC as a photosensitizer in three different animal models (rabbit, dog and nude rats) we began a phase one human trial in two centers. At the Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden ten patients were selected for the treatment of bronchial, prostate, skin, laryngeal and nasopharyngeal tumors while at Long Island Jewish Medical Center Hospital four patients were treated for laryngeal cancers. These studies were designed to study the optimal parameters for human treatment and as such relied on data from the animal studies mentioned above. De-escalating drug doses of 0.3, 0.15, 0.075 and 0.0375 mg/kg were chosen and the pharmacokinetics of the patients plasma, tumor and adjacent healthy tissues were measured spectrofluorometrically following chemical extraction of the drug. The half life of the drug in our Cotton tail rabbit model was measured as 24.7 hours as opposed to the human half life of 44.5 hours within the studied dosing range. This illustrates the extreme care that must be exercised before translating animal pharmacokinetics data to human dosing decision.

  9. Drug interactions of anti-microbial agents used in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guastaldi, Rosimeire Barbosa Fonseca; Secoli, Silvia Regina

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed potential drug interactions (PDIs) of antimicrobials used in patients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and identified associated factors. The sample consisted of 70 patients admitted to a hospital in São Paulo. The PDIs were analyzed through the consultation of the Drug Interactions Facts and Drug Interactions Handbook. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used. Half of the sample was exposed to 13 PDIs, which occurred with fluconazole (53.8%), ciprofloxacin (30.8%) and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (15.4%). Most (92.3%) were of moderate severity, with good evidence (61.6%), early delayed effect (61.5%) and need to have their therapy monitored (76.9%). Patients with four or more medications (p<0.001), aged between 40-49 years of age (p <0.001), and being male (p<0.001) were associated with PDIs. A PDI may result in adverse outcomes, impacting patients' morbidity and mortality. Combination regimens can be safe, provided there is careful monitoring by professionals involved in care delivery. PMID:21876949

  10. Rhizopus arrhizus in Italy as the causative agent of primary cerebral zygomycosis in a drug addict.

    PubMed

    Oliveri, S; Cammarata, E; Augello, G; Mancuso, P; Tropea, R; Ajello, L; Padhye, A A

    1988-09-01

    A rare case of primary cerebral zygomycosis in an Italian drug addict is described. The diagnosis was based on the histologic detection of broad, aseptate, hyaline mycelium in fluid aspirated from a brain mass detected by computerized axial tomography. The zygomycete isolated from the clinical specimen was identified as Rhizopus arrhizus var arrhizus. The patient had no known predisposing condition that would have suppressed his immunological defenses. Once the diagnosis was established, treatment with amphotericin B was initiated, but the patient died during the first day of treatment. PMID:3181379

  11. SuperCYP: a comprehensive database on Cytochrome P450 enzymes including a tool for analysis of CYP-drug interactions

    PubMed Central

    Preissner, Saskia; Kroll, Katharina; Dunkel, Mathias; Senger, Christian; Goldsobel, Gady; Kuzman, Daniel; Guenther, Stefan; Winnenburg, Rainer; Schroeder, Michael; Preissner, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Much of the information on the Cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) is spread across literature and the internet. Aggregating knowledge about CYPs into one database makes the search more efficient. Text mining on 57 CYPs and drugs led to a mass of papers, which were screened manually for facts about metabolism, SNPs and their effects on drug degradation. Information was put into a database, which enables the user not only to look up a particular CYP and all metabolized drugs, but also to check tolerability of drug-cocktails and to find alternative combinations, to use metabolic pathways more efficiently. The SuperCYP database contains 1170 drugs with more than 3800 interactions including references. Approximately 2000 SNPs and mutations are listed and ordered according to their effect on expression and/or activity. SuperCYP (http://bioinformatics.charite.de/supercyp) is a comprehensive resource focused on CYPs and drug metabolism. Homology-modeled structures of the CYPs can be downloaded in PDB format and related drugs are available as MOL-files. Within the resource, CYPs can be aligned with each other, drug-cocktails can be ‘mixed’, SNPs, protein point mutations, and their effects can be viewed and corresponding PubMed IDs are given. SuperCYP is meant to be a platform and a starting point for scientists and health professionals for furthering their research. PMID:19934256

  12. Workshop report: the 2012 antimicrobial agents in veterinary medicine: exploring the consequences of antimicrobial drug use: a 3-D approach.

    PubMed

    Martinez, M; Blondeau, J; Cerniglia, C E; Fink-Gremmels, J; Guenther, S; Hunter, R P; Li, X-Z; Papich, M; Silley, P; Soback, S; Toutain, P-L; Zhang, Q

    2014-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global challenge that impacts both human and veterinary health care. The resilience of microbes is reflected in their ability to adapt and survive in spite of our best efforts to constrain their infectious capabilities. As science advances, many of the mechanisms for microbial survival and resistance element transfer have been identified. During the 2012 meeting of Antimicrobial Agents in Veterinary Medicine (AAVM), experts provided insights on such issues as use vs. resistance, the available tools for supporting appropriate drug use, the importance of meeting the therapeutic needs within the domestic animal health care, and the requirements associated with food safety and food security. This report aims to provide a summary of the presentations and discussions occurring during the 2012 AAVM with the goal of stimulating future discussions and enhancing the opportunity to establish creative and sustainable solutions that will guarantee the availability of an effective therapeutic arsenal for veterinary species.

  13. Wittig Derivatization of Sesquiterpenoid Polygodial Leads to Cytostatic Agents with Activity Against Drug Resistant Cancer Cells and Capable of Pyrrolylation of Primary Amines

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Ramesh; De Carvalho, Annelise; Medellin, Derek C.; Middleton, Kelsey N.; Hague, Frédéric; Volmar, Marie N. M.; Frolova, Liliya V.; Rossato, Mateus F.; De La Chapa, Jorge J.; Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F.; Pillai, Akshita; Kälin, Roland E.; Mathieu, Véronique; Rogelj, Snezna; Gonzales, Cara B.; Calixto, João B.; Evidente, Antonio; Gautier, Mathieu; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar; Glass, Rainer; Burth, Patricia; Pelly, Stephen C.; van Otterlo, Willem A. L.; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Many types of cancer, including glioma, melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), among others, are resistant to proapoptotic stimuli and thus poorly responsive to current therapies based on the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. The current investigation describes the synthesis and anticancer evaluation of unique C12-Wittig derivatives of polygodial, a terpenenoid dialdehyde isolated from Persicaria hydropiper (L.) Delabre. These compounds were found to undergo an unprecedented pyrrole formation with primary amines in a chemical model system, a reaction that could be relevant in the biological environment and lead to the pyrrolation of lysine residues in the target proteins. The anticancer evaluation of these compounds revealed their promising activity against cancer cells displaying various forms of drug resistance, including resistance to proapoptotic agents. Mechanistic studies indicated that compared to the parent polygodial, which displays fixative general cytotoxic action against human cells, the C12-Wittig derivatives exerted their antiproliferative action mainly through cytostatic effects explaining their activity against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. The possibility for an intriguing covalent modification of proteins through a novel pyrrole formation reaction, as well as useful activities against drug resistant cancer cells, make the described polygodial-derived chemical scaffold an interesting new chemotype warranting thorough investigation. PMID:26360047

  14. Wittig derivatization of sesquiterpenoid polygodial leads to cytostatic agents with activity against drug resistant cancer cells and capable of pyrrolylation of primary amines.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Ramesh; De Carvalho, Annelise; Medellin, Derek C; Middleton, Kelsey N; Hague, Frédéric; Volmar, Marie N M; Frolova, Liliya V; Rossato, Mateus F; De La Chapa, Jorge J; Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F; Pillai, Akshita; Kälin, Roland E; Mathieu, Véronique; Rogelj, Snezna; Gonzales, Cara B; Calixto, João B; Evidente, Antonio; Gautier, Mathieu; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar; Glass, Rainer; Burth, Patricia; Pelly, Stephen C; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2015-10-20

    Many types of cancer, including glioma, melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), among others, are resistant to proapoptotic stimuli and thus poorly responsive to current therapies based on the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. The current investigation describes the synthesis and anticancer evaluation of unique C12-Wittig derivatives of polygodial, a sesquiterpenoid dialdehyde isolated from Persicaria hydropiper (L.) Delabre. These compounds were found to undergo an unprecedented pyrrole formation with primary amines in a chemical model system, a reaction that could be relevant in the biological environment and lead to the pyrrolation of lysine residues in the target proteins. The anticancer evaluation of these compounds revealed their promising activity against cancer cells displaying various forms of drug resistance, including resistance to proapoptotic agents. Mechanistic studies indicated that compared to the parent polygodial, which displays fixative general cytotoxic action against human cells, the C12-Wittig derivatives exerted their antiproliferative action mainly through cytostatic effects explaining their activity against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. The possibility for an intriguing covalent modification of proteins through a novel pyrrole formation reaction, as well as useful activities against drug resistant cancer cells, make the described polygodial-derived chemical scaffold an interesting new chemotype warranting thorough investigation.

  15. Antidiabetic and antimalarial biguanide drugs are metal-interactive antiproteolytic agents.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Deacon; Raymer, Michael L; Lockwood, Thomas D

    2003-08-15

    Various biguanide derivatives are used as antihyperglycemic and antimalarial drugs (e.g., 1,1-dimethyl biguanide (metformin), phenylethyl biguanide (phenformin), N-(4-chlorophenyl)-N'-(isopropyl)-imidodicarbonimidic diamide (proguanil)); however, no common mechanism has been suggested in these controversial therapeutic actions. Biguanides bind endogenous metals that inhibit cysteine proteases independently, e.g., Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+). Here, various biguanide derivatives are reported to be metal-interactive inhibitors of cathepsin B from mammals and falcipain-2 from Plasmodium falciparum. Structural homologies were identified among the Phe-Arg protease substrate motif and the metal complexes of phenformin and proguanil. Molecular modeling revealed that the position of the scissile amide substrate bond corresponds to the biguanide-complexed inhibitory metal when the phenyl groups are homologously aligned. Binding of the phenformin-metal complex within the active site of human cathepsin B was modeled with computational docking. A major binding mode involved binding of the drug phenyl group at the protease S2 subsite, and the complexed inhibitory metal shared between the drug and the protease Cys29-His199 catalytic pair. Cysteine protease inhibition was assayed with carbobenzyloxy-PHE-ARG-7-aminomethylcoumarin substrate. In the absence of metal ions, phenformin was a weakly competitive protease inhibitor (apparent K(i) several microM); however, metformin was noninhibitory. In contrast, the metal complexes of both metformin and phenformin were protease inhibitors with potency at therapeutic concentrations. Biguanide-metal complexes were more potent cysteine protease inhibitors than either the biguanide or metal ions alone, i.e., synergistic. Similar to chloroquine, therapeutic extracellular concentrations of metformin, phenformin, and proguanil caused metal-interactive inhibition of lysosomal protein degradation as bioassayed in primary tissue using perfused

  16. Design, development, drug-likeness, and molecular docking studies of novel piperidin-4-imine derivatives as antitubercular agents

    PubMed Central

    Revathi, Rajappan; Venkatesha Perumal, Ramachandran; Pai, Karkala Sreedhara Ranganath; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Kini, Suvarna Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major grievous diseases worldwide. The emergence of resistance to antituberculosis drugs emphasize the necessity to discover new therapeutic agents for preferential tuberculosis therapy. In this study, various novel 1-(1H-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl) piperidin-4-imine derivatives were developed and checked for favorable pharmacokinetic parameters based on drug-likeness explained by Lipinski’s rule of five. All 20 of the novel chemical entities were found to possess a favorable pharmacokinetic profile since they were not violating Lipinski’s rule of five. The title compounds were also synthesized, characterized, and tested for ex vivo antitubercular activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv (ATCC27294). The results revealed that four compounds (2-[1-(1H-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)piperidin-4-ylidene] hydrazinecarbothioamide, 2-[1-(1H-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)piperidin-4-ylidene]-N-hydroxy-hydrazinecarbo-thioamide, 1-[1-(1H-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)piperidin-4-ylidene]guanidine, and 2-[1-(1H-benzimidazol-2-ylmethyl)piperidin-4-ylidene]hydrazinecarboxamide) were the most potent (minimum inhibitory concentration 6.25 µg/mL) antitubercular agents, with less toxicity (selectivity index more than 10). The molecules were also subjected to three-dimensional molecular docking on the crystal structure of enoyl-acyl carrier protein (EACP) reductase enzyme (code 1ZID, Protein Data Bank), which represents a good prediction of the interactions between the molecules and EACP reductase with minimum binding energy. PMID:26229439

  17. Tumor vascular-targeted co-delivery of anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapeutic agents by mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for synergetic therapy of tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyu; Wu, Meiying; Pan, Limin; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the drawback of drug non-selectivity in traditional chemotherapy, the construction of multifunctional targeting drug delivery systems is one of the most effective and prevailing approaches. The intratumoral anti-angiogenesis and the tumor cell-killing are two basic approaches in fighting tumors. Herein we report a novel tumor vascular-targeting multidrug delivery system using mesoporous silica nanoparticles as carrier to co-load an antiangiogenic agent (combretastatin A4) and a chemotherapeutic drug (doxorubicin) and conjugate with targeting molecules (iRGD peptide) for combined anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapy. Such a dual-loaded drug delivery system is capable of delivering the two agents at tumor vasculature and then within tumors through a differentiated drug release strategy, which consequently results in greatly improved antitumor efficacy at a very low doxorubicin dose of 1.5 mg/kg. The fast release of the antiangiogenic agent at tumor vasculatures led to the disruption of vascular structure and had a synergetic effect with the chemotherapeutic drug slowly released in the following delivery of chemotherapeutic drug into tumors.

  18. Important drug interactions and reactions in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Aria, Nancy; Kauffman, C Lisa

    2003-01-01

    A constantly expanding pharmacological armamentarium increases the concern for serious drug interactions. This article discusses drug metabolism and how the cytochrome P-450 family facilitates drug biotransformation. Clinically significant drug interactions involving antifungal drugs, antibiotics, retinoids, and immunosuppressive agents, as well as topical anesthetics and various foods, are included.

  19. Despite 2007 law requiring FDA hotline to be included in print drug ads, reporting of adverse events by consumers still low.

    PubMed

    Du, Dongyi; Goldsmith, John; Aikin, Kathryn J; Encinosa, William E; Nardinelli, Clark

    2012-05-01

    In 2007 the federal government began requiring drug makers to include in their print direct-to-consumer advertisements information for consumers on how to contact the Food and Drug Administration directly, either by phone or through the agency's website, to report any adverse events that they experienced after taking a prescription drug. Adverse events can range from minor skin problems like itching to serious injuries or illness that result in hospitalization, permanent disability, or even death. Even so, current rates of adverse event reporting are low. We studied adverse event reports about 123 drugs that came from patients before and after the enactment of the print advertising requirement and estimated that requirement's impact with model simulations. We found that if monthly spending on print direct-to-consumer advertising increased from zero to $7.7 million per drug, the presence of the Food and Drug Administration contact information tripled the increase in patient-reported adverse events, compared to what would have happened in the absence of the law. However, the absolute monthly increase was fewer than 0.24 reports per drug, suggesting that the public health impact of the increase was small and that the adverse event reporting rate would still be low. The study results suggest that additional measures, such as more publicity about the Adverse Event Reporting System or more consumer education, should be considered to promote patient reporting of adverse events.

  20. Semi-synthetic ocotillol analogues as selective ABCB1-mediated drug resistance reversal agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guan-Nan; Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J.; Si, Rui; Patel, Bhargav A.; Xu, Jinyi; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of ATP-Binding Cassette transporters leads to multidrug resistance in cancer cells and results in the failure of chemotherapy. In this in-vitro study, we investigated whether or not (20S, 24R/S)-epoxy-12β, 25-dihydroxy-dommarane-3β-amine (ORA and OSA), a pair of semi-synthetic ocotillol analogue epimers, could inhibit the ABCB1 transporter. ORA (1 μM and 3 μM) significantly reversed the resistance to paclitaxel and vincristine in ABCB1-overexpressing SW620/Ad300 and HEK/ABCB1 cells, whereas OSA had no significant effects. In addition, ORA (3 μM) significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of [3H]-paclitaxel by suppressing the efflux function of ABCB1. Meanwhile, both ORA (3 μM) and OSA (3 μM) did not significantly alter the expression level or the subcellular location of ABCB1 protein. Moreover, the ABCB1 ATPase study suggested that ORA had a stronger stimulatory effect on the ATPase activity than OSA. ORA also exhibited a higher docking score as compared with OSA inside transmembrane domain of ABCB1. Overall, we concluded that ORA reverse ABCB1-mediated MDR by competitively inhibiting the ABCB1 drug efflux function. PMID:26296969

  1. Drug leads agents from methanol extract of Nigerian bee (Apis mellifera) propolis

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Bashir; Shittu, Oluwatosin Kudirat; Abubakar, Asmau Niwoye; Olalekan, Ibrahim Azeez; Jimoh, Adisa Mohammed; Abdulazeez, Adeniyi Kamoru

    2016-01-01

    Background: Propolis is a bee (Apis mellifera) product of plant origin with varied chemical composition depending on the ecology of the botanical origin. It has been reported in literature to possess various therapeutic effects both traditionally, clinical trial, and animal study. Objectives: In the present study bioactive principle in methanol extract of Nigerian bee (A. mellifera) propolis was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) study. Materials and Methods: The methanol extract of Nigerian bee (A. mellifera) propolis was characterized for its chemical composition by preliminary phytochemicals screening and GC/MS analysis using standard procedures and methods. Results: Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of flavonoids, saponins, alkaloids, tannins, cardiac glycosides, anthraquinones phlobatannins, and steroids while GC/MS chromatogram revealed nineteen peaks representing 60 different chemical compounds. The first compounds identified with less retention time (RT) (13.33s) were methyl tetradecanoate, tridecanoic acid, methyl ester, decanoic acid, methyl ester while squalene, all-trans-squalene, 2,6,10-dodecatrien-1-ol, 3,7,11-trimethyl-, (E,E)- and farnesol isomer a took longest RT (23.647s) to identify. Methyl 14-methylpentadecanoate, hexadecanoic acid methyl ester, methyl isoheptadecanoate, and methyl tridecanoate were the most concentrated constituent as revealed by there peak height (26.01%) while eicosanoic acid was the least concentrated (peak height 0.81%) constituent of Nigerian bee propolis. Conclusion: The presence of these chemical principles is an indication that methanol extract of Nigeria bee propolis, if properly screened could yield a drug of pharmaceutical importance. PMID:27069724

  2. New developments in anti-sickling agents: can drugs directly prevent the polymerization of sickle haemoglobin in vivo?

    PubMed

    Oder, Esther; Safo, Martin K; Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Kato, Gregory J

    2016-10-01

    The hallmark of sickle cell disease is the polymerization of sickle haemoglobin due to a point mutation in the β-globin gene (HBB). Under low oxygen saturation, sickle haemoglobin assumes the tense (T-state) deoxygenated conformation that can form polymers, leading to rigid erythrocytes with impaired blood vessel transit, compounded or initiated by adhesion of erythrocytes to endothelium, neutrophils and platelets. This process results in vessel occlusion and ischaemia, with consequent acute pain, chronic organ damage, morbidity and mortality. Pharmacological agents that stabilize the higher oxygen affinity relaxed state (R-state) and/or destabilize the lower oxygen affinity T-state of haemoglobin have the potential to delay the sickling of circulating red cells by slowing polymerization kinetics. Relevant classes of agents include aromatic aldehydes, thiol derivatives, isothiocyanates and acyl salicylates derivatives. The aromatic aldehyde, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) increases oxygen affinity of sickle haemoglobin and reduces hypoxia-induced sickling in vitro and protects sickle cell mice from effects of hypoxia. It has completed pre-clinical testing and has entered clinical trials as treatment for sickle cell disease. A related molecule, GBT440, has shown R-state stabilization and increased oxygen affinity in preclinical testing. Allosteric modifiers of haemoglobin as direct anti-sickling agents target the fundamental pathophysiological mechanism of sickle cell disease. PMID:27605087

  3. New developments in anti-sickling agents: can drugs directly prevent the polymerization of sickle haemoglobin in vivo?

    PubMed

    Oder, Esther; Safo, Martin K; Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Kato, Gregory J

    2016-10-01

    The hallmark of sickle cell disease is the polymerization of sickle haemoglobin due to a point mutation in the β-globin gene (HBB). Under low oxygen saturation, sickle haemoglobin assumes the tense (T-state) deoxygenated conformation that can form polymers, leading to rigid erythrocytes with impaired blood vessel transit, compounded or initiated by adhesion of erythrocytes to endothelium, neutrophils and platelets. This process results in vessel occlusion and ischaemia, with consequent acute pain, chronic organ damage, morbidity and mortality. Pharmacological agents that stabilize the higher oxygen affinity relaxed state (R-state) and/or destabilize the lower oxygen affinity T-state of haemoglobin have the potential to delay the sickling of circulating red cells by slowing polymerization kinetics. Relevant classes of agents include aromatic aldehydes, thiol derivatives, isothiocyanates and acyl salicylates derivatives. The aromatic aldehyde, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) increases oxygen affinity of sickle haemoglobin and reduces hypoxia-induced sickling in vitro and protects sickle cell mice from effects of hypoxia. It has completed pre-clinical testing and has entered clinical trials as treatment for sickle cell disease. A related molecule, GBT440, has shown R-state stabilization and increased oxygen affinity in preclinical testing. Allosteric modifiers of haemoglobin as direct anti-sickling agents target the fundamental pathophysiological mechanism of sickle cell disease.

  4. Applications of docking and molecular dynamic studies on the search for new drugs against the biological warfare agents Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Guimarães, Ana Paula; Cortopassi, Wilian Augusto; Oliveira, Aline Alves; Ramalho, Teodorico Castro

    2013-12-01

    The fear of biological warfare agents (BWA) use by terrorists is the major concern of the security agencies and health authorities worldwide today. The non-existence of vaccines or drugs against most BWA and the possibility of genetic modified strains has turned the search for new drugs to a state of urgency. Fast in silico techniques are, therefore, perfect tools for this task once they can quickly provide structures of several new lead compounds for further experimental work. Here we try to present a mini-review on docking and molecular dynamics simulations studies applied to the drug design against the BWA Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis.

  5. Lemongrass essential oil gel as a local drug delivery agent for the treatment of periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Warad, Shivaraj B.; Kolar, Sahana S.; Kalburgi, Veena; Kalburgi, Nagaraj B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: It has been long recognized that periodontal diseases are infections of the periodontium, comprising the bacterial etiology, an immune response, and tissue destruction. Treatment strategies aiming primarily at suppressing or eliminating specific periodontal pathogens include adjunct use of local and systemic antibiotics as part of nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Unwanted side effects and resistance of microorganisms toward antibiotics due to their widespread use have modified the general perception about their efficacy. Research in phytosciences has revealed various medicinal plants offering a new choice of optional antimicrobial therapy. Cymbopogon citratus, Stapf. (lemongrass) is a popular medicinal plant. At a concentration ≤2%, lemongrass essential oil inhibits the growth of several kinds of microorganisms including periodontal pathogens, especially the reference strains Actinomyces naeslundii and Porphyromonas gingivalis, which were resistant to tetracycline hydrochloride. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of locally delivered 2% lemongrass essential oil in gel form as an adjunct to scaling and root planing, as compared to scaling and root planing alone for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: 2% Lemongrass essential oil gel was prepared and placed in moderate to deep periodontal pockets after scaling and root planing. Results: Statistically significant reduction in probing depth and gingival index and gain in relative attachment level were noted in the experimental group as compared to the control group at 1 and 3 months. Conclusion: Locally delivered 2% lemongrass essential oil gel offers a new choice of safe and effective adjunct to scaling and root planing in periodontal therapy. PMID:24991068

  6. DNA compaction by mononuclear platinum cancer drug cisplatin and the trisplatinum anticancer agent BBR3464: Differences and similarities.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, T; Dubey, P; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2012-02-01

    Cisplatin, a mononuclear platinum compound, which is known as a cancer drug for long time, can exhibit considerable side effects and is also not effective in many types of cancer. Therefore, the alternative platinum anticancer agents that can act at a much lower dose limit compared to the dose relevant for cisplatin treatment have been searched for. BBR3464, a trinuclear platinum compound, is found to exhibit cytotoxic effects at 10 to 1000 times lower dose limit, even in cisplatin-resistant cancer cells. The primary cellular target for cisplatin and BBR3464 is thought to be DNA. Herein, we report the nature of DNA structural changes that are induced by cisplatin and BBR3464, considering the same DNA sequence and similar sample deposition methods for comparison purpose. We have applied high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to obtain an idea about the molecular basis of BBR3464's effectiveness at the lower dose limit. We show from the molecularly resolved AFM images that both the compounds can compact the whole dsDNA molecules, though the degree of compaction in case of BBR3464 treatment is significantly higher. Furthermore, local compaction in terms of loop structure formation could be induced by both BBR3464 and cisplatin, though BBR3464 generated microloops and macroloops both, whereas cisplatin could generate primarily the microloops. It is a significant observation that BBR3464 could induce relatively drastic DNA structural changes in terms of loop formation as well as overall DNA compaction at a molar ratio, which is 50 times less than that applied for cisplatin treatment. Implications of such structural changes in cytotoxic effects of the platinum anticancer agents will be mentioned.

  7. Biological Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Z Index Contact Us FAQs What's New Biological Agents This page requires that javascript be enabled ... and Health Topics A-Z Index What's New Biological agents include bacteria, viruses, fungi, other microorganisms and ...

  8. Quality improvement in breast cancer project: compliance with antiresorptive agents and changing patterns of drug use.

    PubMed

    Borden, Charles P; Shapiro, Charles L; Ramirez, Maria Teresa; Kotur, Linda; Farrar, William

    2014-02-01

    The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute participated in NCCN's Quality Improvement in Breast Cancer initiative. The Opportunities for Improvement (OFI) team elected to improve concordance with the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Breast Cancer recommendation that all patients diagnosed with skeletal metastases receive bisphosphonates. Assembling a multidisciplinary team of clinicians, researchers, and administrative stakeholders, the OFI team followed Six Sigma's approach to problem-solving known as DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control). Baseline concordance was 79%, which was below the recommended target range. Initial analysis quickly revealed that 5 cases were concordant, resulting in a new baseline of 89%. The key root cause identified for the remaining gap was lack of documentation. The solution included education regarding documentation for existing staff, in addition to hard-wiring the material into new physician orientation, discussion of all patients with bone disease at tumor board meetings, and improved consistency with use of the new electronic medical record system. After implementation, the reported concordance was 92%, and the lack of documentation problem decreased from 11% in the baseline study to 6%. The team concluded that use of the NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database as an opportunity for clinical quality improvement initiatives not only is possible but also should be an essential element of any clinical program looking to continuously improve. PMID:24614050

  9. Preparation and performance of a colorimetric biosensor using acetylcholinesterase and indoxylacetate for assay of nerve agents and drugs

    PubMed Central

    Vlcek, Vitezslav

    2014-01-01

    Different toxic compounds can target the cholinergic nervous system. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7) is one of the most crucial components of the cholinergic nervous system and thus many of the toxins interact with this enzyme. As to inhibitors, nerve agents used as chemical warfare, some insecticides, and drugs influencing the cholinergic system are common examples of AChE inhibitors. Once inhibited by a neurotoxic compound, a serious cholinergic crisis can occur. On the other hand, sensitivity of AChE to the inhibition can be used for analytical purposes. In this study, a simple disposable biosensor with AChE as a recognition element was devised. AChE was immobilized onto a cellulose matrix and indoxylacetate was used as a chromogenic substrate. The enzyme reaction was assessed by the naked eye using arbitrary units and pyridostigmine, tacrine, paraoxon, carbofuran, soman and VX were assayed as selected inhibitors. A good stability of the biosensors was found, with no aging over a quarter of a year and minimal sensitivity to the interference of organic solvents. The limit of detection ranged from 10 to 100 nmol/L for the compounds tested with a sample volume of 40 µL. PMID:26109903

  10. Express analysis of explosives, chemical warfare agents and drugs with multicapillary column gas chromatography and ion mobility increment spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buryakov, Igor A

    2004-02-01

    Description of a gas chromatograph designed for express analysis of explosives (2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate), chemical warfare agents (mustard gas, lewisite, sarin) and drugs (heroin, cocaine hydrochloride, crack) is given. The devices comprises a multicapillary chromatographic column and an ion mobility increment spectrometer (MCC-IMIS). The main analytical characteristics of an IMIS (estimated detection limit (DL), linear dynamic range (LDR), speed of response) and a chromatographic column (separation power, degree of separation, a number of possible peaks at a chromatogram section, divided by analysis time) are determined. The maximum value of DL equal to 5 pg/ml was registered for cis-alpha-LW, and the lowest one of 0.001 pg/ml was for cocaine. The maximum value of LDR equal to 1000 was registered for sarin and the lowest one of 150 was for the ions of lewisite. Speed of response of one compound detection with the IMIS was 0.7 s. PMID:14698239

  11. The abuse of diuretics as performance-enhancing drugs and masking agents in sport doping: pharmacology, toxicology and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cadwallader, Amy B; de la Torre, Xavier; Tieri, Alessandra; Botrè, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Diuretics are drugs that increase the rate of urine flow and sodium excretion to adjust the volume and composition of body fluids. There are several major categories of this drug class and the compounds vary greatly in structure, physicochemical properties, effects on urinary composition and renal haemodynamics, and site and mechanism of action. Diuretics are often abused by athletes to excrete water for rapid weight loss and to mask the presence of other banned substances. Because of their abuse by athletes, diuretics have been included on The World Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA) list of prohibited substances; the use of diuretics is banned both in competition and out of competition and diuretics are routinely screened for by anti-doping laboratories. This review provides an overview of the pharmacology and toxicology of diuretics and discusses their application in sports. The most common analytical strategies currently followed by the anti-doping laboratories accredited by the WADA are discussed along with the challenges laboratories face for the analysis of this diverse class of drugs. PMID:20718736

  12. Agent-Based Model Forecasts Aging of the Population of People Who Inject Drugs in Metropolitan Chicago and Changing Prevalence of Hepatitis C Infections

    PubMed Central

    Prachand, Nikhil; Hailegiorgis, Atesmachew; Dahari, Harel; Major, Marian E.

    2015-01-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for blood-borne pathogens transmitted during the sharing of contaminated injection equipment, particularly hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV prevalence is influenced by a complex interplay of drug-use behaviors, social networks, and geography, as well as the availability of interventions, such as needle exchange programs. To adequately address this complexity in HCV epidemic forecasting, we have developed a computational model, the Agent-based Pathogen Kinetics model (APK). APK simulates the PWID population in metropolitan Chicago, including the social interactions that result in HCV infection. We used multiple empirical data sources on Chicago PWID to build a spatial distribution of an in silico PWID population and modeled networks among the PWID by considering the geography of the city and its suburbs. APK was validated against 2012 empirical data (the latest available) and shown to agree with network and epidemiological surveys to within 1%. For the period 2010–2020, APK forecasts a decline in HCV prevalence of 0.8% per year from 44(±2)% to 36(±5)%, although some sub-populations would continue to have relatively high prevalence, including Non-Hispanic Blacks, 48(±5)%. The rate of decline will be lowest in Non-Hispanic Whites and we find, in a reversal of historical trends, that incidence among non-Hispanic Whites would exceed incidence among Non-Hispanic Blacks (0.66 per 100 per years vs 0.17 per 100 person years). APK also forecasts an increase in PWID mean age from 35(±1) to 40(±2) with a corresponding increase from 59(±2)% to 80(±6)% in the proportion of the population >30 years old. Our studies highlight the importance of analyzing subpopulations in disease predictions, the utility of computer simulation for analyzing demographic and health trends among PWID and serve as a tool for guiding intervention and prevention strategies in Chicago, and other major cities. PMID:26421722

  13. Comparison of inhibition kinetics of several organophosphates, including some nerve agent surrogates, using human erythrocyte and rat and mouse brain acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Coban, Alper; Carr, Russell L; Chambers, Howard W; Willeford, Kenneth O; Chambers, Janice E

    2016-04-25

    Because testing of nerve agents is limited to only authorized facilities, our laboratory developed several surrogates that resemble nerve agents because they phosphylate the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) with the same moiety as the actual nerve agents. The inhibition kinetic parameters were determined for AChE by surrogates of cyclosarin (NCMP), sarin (NIMP, PIMP and TIMP) and VX (NEMP and TEMP) and other organophosphorus compounds derived from insecticides. All compounds were tested with rat brain and a subset was tested with mouse brain and purified human erythrocyte AChE. Within the compounds tested on all AChE sources, chlorpyrifos-oxon had the highest molecular rate constant followed by NCMP and NEMP. This was followed by NIMP then paraoxon and DFP with rat and mouse brain AChE but DFP was a more potent inhibitor than NIMP and paraoxon with human AChE. With the additional compounds tested only in rat brain, TEMP was slightly less potent than NEMP but more potent than PIMP which was more potent than NIMP. Methyl paraoxon was slightly less potent than paraoxon but more potent than TIMP which was more potent than DFP. Overall, this study validates that the pattern of inhibitory potencies of our surrogates is comparable to the pattern of inhibitory potencies of actual nerve agents (i.e., cyclosarin>VX>sarin), and that these are more potent than insecticidal organophosphates.

  14. Newer drugs for arthritis.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, D C

    1977-01-01

    The major area of new drug discoveries for the treatment of arthritis is in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIA). Unfortunately, as yet no new and safe drug of major significance has appeared. Aspirin still ranks high beside the newcomers. Indomethacin, ibuprofen, naproxen, fenoprofen and tolmetin are described and their roles in therapy are discussed. A further group of older drugs receiving new application in the treatment of arthritis is presented. These include penicillamine and the immunosuppressive drugs. Gold and chloroquin are also discussed to put these agents in their proper perspective.

  15. Antibiotic-loaded, silver core-embedded mesoporous silica nanovehicles as a synergistic antibacterial agent for the treatment of drug-resistant infections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Ding, Xiali; Chen, Yuan; Guo, Mingquan; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Xiaokui; Gu, Hongchen

    2016-09-01

    Drug-resistant bacterial infections have become one of the most serious risks in public health as they make the conventional antibiotics less efficient. There is an urgent need for developing new generations of antibacterial agents in this field. In this work, a nanoplatform of LEVO-loaded and silver core-embedded mesoporous silica nanovehicles (Ag@MSNs@LEVO) is demonstrated as a synergistic antibacterial agent for the treatment of drug-resistant infections both in vitro and in vivo. The combination of the inner Ag core and the loaded antibiotic drug in mesopores endows the single-particle nanoplatform with a synergistic effect on killing the drug-resistant bacteria. The nanoplatform of Ag@MSNs@LEVO exhibits superior antibacterial activity to LEVO-loaded MSNs (MSNs@LEVO) and silver core-embedded MSNs (Ag@MSNs) in vitro. In the in vivo acute peritonitis model, the infected drug-resistant Escherichia coli GN102 in peritoneal cavity of the mice is reduced by nearly three orders of magnitude and the aberrant pathological feature of spleen and peritoneum disappears after treatment with Ag@MSNs@LEVO. Importantly, this nanopaltform renders no obvious toxic side effect to the mice during the tested time. There is no doubt that this study strongly indicates a promising potential of Ag@MSNs@LEVO as a synergistic and safety therapy tool for the clinical drug-resistant infections. PMID:27294538

  16. Acylation of SC4 dodecapeptide increases bactericidal potency against Gram-positive bacteria, including drug-resistant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lockwood, Nathan A; Haseman, Judith R; Tirrell, Matthew V; Mayo, Kevin H

    2004-01-01

    We have conjugated dodecyl and octadecyl fatty acids to the N-terminus of SC4, a potently bactericidal, helix-forming peptide 12-mer (KLFKRHLKWKII), and examined the bactericidal activities of the resultant SC4 'peptide-amphiphile' molecules. SC4 peptide-amphiphiles showed up to a 30-fold increase in bactericidal activity against Gram-positive strains (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes and Bacillus anthracis), including S. aureus strains resistant to conventional antibiotics, but little or no increase in bactericidal activity against Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Fatty acid conjugation improved endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) neutralization by 3- to 6-fold. Although acylation somewhat increased lysis of human erythrocytes, it did not increase lysis of endothelial cells, and the haemolytic effects occurred at concentrations 10- to 100-fold higher than those required for bacterial cell lysis. For insight into the mechanism of action of SC4 peptide-amphiphiles, CD, NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy studies were performed in micelle and liposome models of eukaryotic and bacterial cell membranes. CD indicated that SC4 peptide-amphiphiles had the strongest helical tendencies in liposomes mimicking bacterial membranes, and strong membrane integration of the SC4 peptide-amphiphiles was observed using tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy under these conditions; results that correlated with the increased bactericidal activities of SC4 peptide-amphiphiles. NMR structural analysis in micelles demonstrated that the two-thirds of the peptide closest to the fatty acid tail exhibited a helical conformation, with the positively-charged side of the amphipathic helix interacting more with the model membrane surface. These results indicate that conjugation of a fatty acid chain to the SC4 peptide enhances membrane interactions, stabilizes helical structure in the membrane-bound state and increases bactericidal potency. PMID:14609430

  17. Electrodes for high-definition transcutaneous DC stimulation for applications in drug delivery and electrotherapy, including tDCS.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Preet; Bansal, Varun; Patel, Jinal; Ho, Johnson S; Diaz, Julian; Datta, Abhishek; Bikson, Marom

    2010-07-15

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation is applied in a range of biomedical applications including transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). tDCS is a non-invasive procedure where a weak direct current (<2 mA) is applied across the scalp to modulate brain function. High-definition tDCS (HD-tDCS) is a technique used to increase the spatial focality of tDCS by passing current across the scalp using <12 mm diameter electrodes. The purpose of this study was to design and optimize "high-definition" electrode-gel parameters for electrode durability, skin safety and subjective pain. Anode and cathode electrode potential, temperature, pH and subjective sensation over time were assessed during application of 2 mA direct current, for up to 22 min on agar gel or subject forearms. A selection of five types of solid-conductors (Ag pellet, Ag/AgCl pellet, rubber pellet, Ag/AgCl ring and Ag/AgCl disc) and seven conductive gels (Signa, Spectra, Tensive, Redux, BioGel, Lectron and CCNY-4) were investigated. The Ag/AgCl ring in combination with CCNY-4 gel resulted in the most favorable outcomes. Under anode stimulations, electrode potential and temperature rises were generally observed in all electrode-gel combinations except for Ag/AgCl ring and disc electrodes. pH remained constant for all solid-conductors except for both Ag and rubber pellet electrodes with Signa and CCNY-4 gels. Sensation ratings were independent of stimulation polarity. Ag/AgCl ring electrodes were found to be the most comfortable followed by Ag, rubber and Ag/AgCl pellet electrodes across all gels.

  18. Biomedical HIV prevention including pre-exposure prophylaxis and opiate agonist therapy for women who inject drugs: State of research and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Page, Kimberly; Tsui, Judith; Maher, Lisa; Choopanya, Kachit; Vanichseni, Suphak; Mock, Philip A.; Celum, Connie; Martin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Women who inject drugs are at higher risk of HIV compared to their male counterparts as a result of multiple factors including biological, behavioral and socio-structural, yet comparatively little effort has been invested in testing and delivering prevention methods that directly target this group. In this paper, we discuss the need for expanded prevention interventions for women who inject drugs, focusing on two safe, effective, and approved, yet underutilized biomedical prevention methods: opiate agonist therapy (OAT) and oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). While both interventions are well researched they have not been well examined in the context of gender. We discuss the drivers of women injectors’ higher HIV risk, review the effectiveness of OAT and PrEP interventions among women, and explain why these new HIV prevention tools should be prioritized for women who inject drugs. There is substantial potential for impact of OAT and PrEP programs for women who inject drugs in the context of broader gender-responsive HIV prevention initiatives. While awaiting efficacy data on other biomedical approaches in the HIV prevention research ‘pipeline’, we propose that the scale up and implementation of these proven, safe, and effective interventions are needed now. PMID:25978484

  19. New insights toward the discovery of antibacterial agents: multi-tasking QSBER model for the simultaneous prediction of anti-tuberculosis activity and toxicological profiles of drugs.

    PubMed

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Kleandrova, Valeria V; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2013-03-12

    Tuberculosis (TB) constitutes one of the most dangerous and serious health problems around the world. It is a very lethal disease caused by microorganisms of the genus mycobacterium, principally Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) which affects humans. A very active field for the search of more efficient anti-TB chemotherapies is the use in silico methodologies for the discovery of potent anti-TB agents. The battle against MTB by using antimicrobial chemotherapies will depend on the design of new chemicals with high anti-TB activity and low toxicity as possible. Multi-target methodologies focused on quantitative-structure activity relationships (mt-QSAR) have played a very important role for the rationalization of drug design, providing a better understanding about the molecular patterns related with diverse pharmacological profiles including antimicrobial activity. Nowadays, almost all mt-QSAR models have considered the study of biological activity or toxicity separately. In the present study, we develop by the first time, a unified multitasking model based on quantitative-structure biological effect relationships (mtk-QSBER) for the simultaneous prediction of anti-TB activity and toxicity against Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus. The mtk-QSBER model was created by using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) for the classification of compounds as positive (high biological activity and/or low toxicity) or negative (otherwise) under many experimental conditions. Our mtk-QSBER model, correctly classified more than 90% of the case in the whole database (more than 12,000 cases), serving as a powerful tool for the computer-assisted screening of potent and safe anti-TB drugs.

  20. [The theory and practice of the creation of antisignature oligodeoxyribonucleotides as universal antimicrobial agents (the principles of a drug technology of the 21st century)].

    PubMed

    Skrypal', I H

    1997-01-01

    Gene-directed and anti-sense (mRNA-directed) synthetic oligonucleotides (SO) have a common main shortcoming. That is the necessity to introduce intercalators to their composition for the stronger interaction with targets to prevent their separation from the latter by DNA-polymerase and RNA-polymerase complexes which work on genome or with mRNA by ribosomes moving along them. Intercalation leads to considerable loss of SO selectivity in respect to the target. The author substantiates advantages of another type of SO which action is directed to blocking of the function of signature sequences of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) that completely ceases the self-assembly of ribosomal subunits and totally excludes the process of translation and synthesis of proteins. Such type SO advantages are as follows: a) a short chain which includes 8-13 nucleotides altogether; b) absence of the necessity of intercalation; c) high specificity in respect to targets; d) high stability in respect to nucleases action under modification by one of the methods of internucleotide bonds and, e) a possibility to deliver any microorganism to the cells when allowing for auxotrophy of the latter in respect to one or another substance. It is foreseen that antisignature SO can become most promising among the drugs called to block the functions of nucleic acids of the agents of the disease.

  1. Determination of drugs in surface water and wastewater samples by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: Methods and preliminary results including toxicity studies with Vibrio fischeri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farre, M.; Ferrer, I.; Ginebreda, A.; Figueras, M.; Olivella, L.; Tirapu, L.; Vilanova, M.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work a combined analytical method involving toxicity and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) was developed for the determination of pharmaceutical compounds in water samples. The drugs investigated were the analgesics: ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, and diclofenac, the decomposition product of the acetyl salicylic acid: salicylic acid and one lipid lowering agent, gemfibrozil. The selected compounds are acidic substances, very polar and all of them are analgesic compounds that can be purchased without medical prescription. The developed protocol consisted, first of all, on the use Microtox?? and ToxAlert??100 toxicity tests with Vibrio fischeri for the different pharmaceutical drugs. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) values and the toxicity units (TU) were determined for every compound using both systems. Sample enrichment of water samples was achieved by solid-phase extraction procedure (SPE), using the Merck LiChrolut?? EN cartridges followed by LC-ESI-MS. Average recoveries loading 1 l of samples with pH=2 varied from 69 to 91% and the detection limits in the range of 15-56 ng/l. The developed method was applied to real samples from wastewater and surface-river waters of Catalonia (north-east of Spain). One batch of samples was analyzed in parallel also by High Resolution Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (HRGC-MS) and the results have been compared with the LC-ESI-MS method developed in this work. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nano carriers that enable co-delivery of chemotherapy and RNAi agents for treatment of drug-resistant cancers.

    PubMed

    Tsouris, Vasilios; Joo, Min Kyung; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan; Won, You-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells exhibit drug resistant phenotypes that decrease the efficacy of chemotherapeutic treatments. The drug resistance has a genetic basis that is caused by an abnormal gene expression. There are several types of drug resistance: efflux pumps reducing the cellular concentration of the drug, alterations in membrane lipids that reduce cellular uptake, increased or altered drug targets, metabolic alteration of the drug, inhibition of apoptosis, repair of the damaged DNA, and alteration of the cell cycle checkpoints (Gottesman et al., 2002; Holohan et al., 2013). siRNA is used to silence the drug resistant phenotype and prevent this drug resistance response. Of the listed types of drug resistance, pump-type resistance (e.g., high expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins such as P-glycoproteins (Pgp; also known as multi-drug resistance protein 1 or MDR1, encoded by the ATP-Binding Cassette Sub-Family B Member 1 (ABCB1) gene)) and apoptosis inhibition (e.g., expression of anti-apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2) are the most frequently targeted for gene silencing. The co-delivery of siRNA and chemotherapeutic drugs has a synergistic effect, but many of the current projects do not control the drug release from the nanocarrier. This means that the drug payload is released before the drug resistance proteins have degraded and the drug resistance phenotype has been silenced. Current research focuses on cross-linking the carrier's polymers to prevent premature drug release, but these carriers still rely on environmental cues to release the drug payload, and the drug may be released too early. In this review, we studied the release kinetics of siRNA and chemotherapeutic drugs from a broad range of carriers. We also give examples of carriers used to co-deliver siRNA and drugs to drug-resistant tumor cells, and we examine how modifications to the carrier affect the delivery. Lastly, we give our recommendations for the future directions of the co-delivery of si

  3. Parenteral patent drug S/GSK1265744 has the potential to be an effective agent in pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Taha, Huda; Morgan, James; Das, Archik; Das, Satyajit

    2013-12-01

    The continuing HIV epidemic has driven advancements in antiretroviral therapy. New therapeutic targets have been identified over the past years, one of which has been the Integrase enzyme. This is responsible for integrating HIV pro-DNA into the host cell genome and has proved a successful drug target. Efforts have also been made to improve the pharmacokinetic parameters of current drug therapy and utilise these techniques in maximising drug therapeutic effect whilst minimising adverse events. An exciting example of new technologies is that of nanotechnology where drugs can be specifically targeted to certain tissues and drug delivery can be improved by utilising biological molecules and structures. Pre-exposure prophylaxis is also an area of much interest currently both on an individual and population level. Compliance is however a major issue with daily medication to prevent HIV acquisition as has been demonstrated with contraceptive agents. However if long acting compounds can be developed, compliance can be improved. The patent drug currently being developed through nanotechnology as an analogue of Dolutegravir, GSK1265744 LAP (Long Acting Parenteral) has shown promise as a Long Acting Integrase Inhibitor with potential action both as a therapeutic agent but also in pre-exposure prophylaxis. The favourable pharmacokinetic profile and therapeutic efficacy in comparison to other compounds of the same class demonstrate it to be a promising advance. However given current limitations in study material, further randomised studies with long term follow up are required to fully evaluate the value of the patent drug GSK1265744 LAP in action in both seropositive and seronegative individuals.

  4. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of phase II drug metabolizing/antioxidant enzymes gene response by anticancer agent sulforaphane in rat lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Khor, Tin Oo; Yang, Qian; Huang, Ying; Wu, Tien-Yuan; Saw, Constance Lay-Lay; Lin, Wen; Androulakis, Ioannis P; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2012-10-01

    This study assesses the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of Nrf2-mediated increased expression of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) and antioxidant enzymes which represents an important component of cancer chemoprevention in rat lymphocytes following intravenous (iv) administration of an anticancer phytochemical sulforaphane (SFN). SFN was administered intravenously to four groups of male Sprague-Dawley JVC rats each group comprising four animals. Blood samples were drawn at selected time points. Plasma were obtained from half of each of the blood samples and analyzed using a validated LC-MS/MS method. Lymphocytes were collected from the remaining blood samples using Ficoll-Paque Plus centrifuge medium. Lymphocyte RNAs were extracted and converted to cDNA, quantitative real-time PCR analyses were performed, and fold changes were calculated against those at time zero for the relative expression of Nrf2-target genes of phase II DME/antioxidant enzymes. PK-PD modeling was conducted based on Jusko's indirect response model (IDR) using GastroPlus and bootstrap method. SFN plasma concentration declined biexponentially and the pharmacokinetic parameters were generated. Rat lymphocyte mRNA expression levels showed no change for GSTM1, SOD, NF-κB, UGT1A1, or UGT1A6. Moderate increases (2-5-fold) over the time zero were seen for HO-1, Nrf2, and NQO1, and significant increases (>5-fold) for GSTT1, GPx1, and Maf. PK-PD analyses using GastroPlus and the bootstrap method provided reasonable fitting for the PK and PD profiles and parameter estimates. Our present study shows that SFN could induce Nrf2-mediated phase II DME/antioxidant mRNA expression for NQO1, GSTT1, Nrf2, GPx, Maf, and HO-1 in rat lymphocytes after iv administration, suggesting that Nrf2-mediated mRNA expression in lymphocytes may serve as surrogate biomarkers. The PK-PD IDR model simultaneously linking the plasma concentrations of SFN and the PD response of lymphocyte mRNA expression is

  5. Natural products as antimitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Dall'Acqua, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Natural products still play an important role in the medicinal chemistry, especially in some therapeutic areas. As example more than 60% of currently-used anticancer agents are derives from natural sources including plants, marine organisms or micro-organism. Thus natural products (NP) are an high-impact source of new "lead compounds" or new potential therapeutic agents despite the large development of biotechnology and combinatorial chemistry in the drug discovery and development. Many examples of anticancer drugs as paclitaxel, combretastatin, bryostatin and discodermolide have shown the importance of NP in the anticancer chemotherapy through many years. Many organisms have been studied as sources of drugs namely plants, micro-organisms and marine organisms and the obtained NP can be considered a group of "privileged chemical structures" evolved in nature to interact with other organisms. For this reason NP are a good starting points for pharmaceutical research and also for library design. Tubulin and microtubules are one of the most studied targets for the search of anticancer compounds. Microtubule targeting agents (MTA) also named antimitotic agents are compounds that are able to perturb mitosis but are also able to arrest cell growing during interphase. The anticancer drugs, taxanes and vinca alkaloids have established tubulin as important target in cancer therapy. More recently the vascular disrupting agents (VDA) combretastatin analogues were studied for their antimitotics properties. This review will consider the anti mitotic NP and their potential impact in the development of new therapeutic agents.

  6. Getting Acquainted: An Induction Training Guide for First-Year Extension Agents. Suggestions for Completing Certain Learning Experiences Included in the Induction Training Guide; a Supplement to "Getting Acquainted."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collings, Mary Louise; Gassie, Edward W.

    An induction guide to help the extension agent get acquainted with his role and suggestions for completing learning experiences that are included in the guide comprise this two-part publication. The training guide learning experiences, a total of 25, are made up of: Objectives of the New Worker; When Completed; Learning Experiences; Person(s)…

  7. The enhanced inhibitory effect of different antitumor agents in self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems on human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Ujhelyi, Zoltán; Kalantari, Azin; Vecsernyés, Miklós; Róka, Eszter; Fenyvesi, Ferenc; Póka, Róbert; Kozma, Bence; Bácskay, Ildikó

    2015-07-21

    The aim of this study was to develop topical self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS) containing antitumor agents (bleomycin, cisplatin and ifosfamide) and to investigate their inhibitory potential in SMEDDS on human cervical cancer HeLa cells. The physicochemical properties of cytostatic drug loaded SMEDDS were characterized. The cytotoxicity of main components of SMEDDS was also investigated. Their IC50 values were determined. HeLa cells were treated by different concentrations of cisplatin, bleomycin and ifosfamide alone and in various SMEDDS. The inhibitory effect on cell growth was analyzed by MTT cell viability assay. Inflammation is a driving force that accelerates cancer development. The inhibitory effect of these antitumor agents has also been tested on HeLa cells in the presence of inflammatory mediators (IL-1-β, TNF-α) as an in vitro model of inflamed human cervix. Significant differences in the cytotoxicity of cytostatic drugs alone and in SMEDDS have been found in a concentration-dependent manner. The self-micro emulsifying system may potentiate the effectiveness of bleomycin, cisplatin and ifosfamide topically. The effect of SMEDDS containing antitumor agents was decreased significantly in the presence of inflammatory mediators. According to our experiments, the optimal SMEDDS formulation is 1:1:2:6:2 ratios of Isopropyl myristate, Capryol 90, Kolliphor RH 40, Cremophor RH40, Transcutol HP and Labrasol. It can be concluded that SMEDDS may increase the inhibitory effect of bleomycin, ifosfamide and cisplatin on human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Inflammation on HeLa cells hinders the effectiveness of SMEDDS containing antitumor agents. Our results might ensure useful data for development of optimal antitumor formulations.

  8. Agent-based model forecasts aging of the population of people who inject drugs in metropolitan Chicago and changing prevalence of hepatitis C infections

    SciTech Connect

    Gutfraind, Alexander; Boodram, Basmattee; Prachand, Nikhil; Hailegiorgis, Atesmachew; Dahari, Harel; Major, Marian E.; Kaderali, Lars

    2015-09-30

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for blood-borne pathogens transmitted during the sharing of contaminated injection equipment, particularly hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV prevalence is influenced by a complex interplay of drug-use behaviors, social networks, and geography, as well as the availability of interventions, such as needle exchange programs. To adequately address this complexity in HCV epidemic forecasting, we have developed a computational model, the Agent-based Pathogen Kinetics model (APK). APK simulates the PWID population in metropolitan Chicago, including the social interactions that result in HCV infection. We used multiple empirical data sources on Chicago PWID to build a spatial distribution of an in silico PWID population and modeled networks among the PWID by considering the geography of the city and its suburbs. APK was validated against 2012 empirical data (the latest available) and shown to agree with network and epidemiological surveys to within 1%. For the period 2010–2020, APK forecasts a decline in HCV prevalence of 0.8% per year from 44(±2)% to 36(±5)%, although some sub-populations would continue to have relatively high prevalence, including Non-Hispanic Blacks, 48(±5)%. The rate of decline will be lowest in Non-Hispanic Whites and we find, in a reversal of historical trends, that incidence among non-Hispanic Whites would exceed incidence among Non-Hispanic Blacks (0.66 per 100 per years vs 0.17 per 100 person years). APK also forecasts an increase in PWID mean age from 35(±1) to 40(±2) with a corresponding increase from 59(±2)% to 80(±6)% in the proportion of the population >30 years old. Our research highlight the importance of analyzing sub-populations in disease predictions, the utility of computer simulation for analyzing demographic and health trends among PWID and serve as a tool for guiding intervention and prevention strategies in Chicago, and other major cities.

  9. Agent-based model forecasts aging of the population of people who inject drugs in metropolitan Chicago and changing prevalence of hepatitis C infections

    DOE PAGES

    Gutfraind, Alexander; Boodram, Basmattee; Prachand, Nikhil; Hailegiorgis, Atesmachew; Dahari, Harel; Major, Marian E.; Kaderali, Lars

    2015-09-30

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk for blood-borne pathogens transmitted during the sharing of contaminated injection equipment, particularly hepatitis C virus (HCV). HCV prevalence is influenced by a complex interplay of drug-use behaviors, social networks, and geography, as well as the availability of interventions, such as needle exchange programs. To adequately address this complexity in HCV epidemic forecasting, we have developed a computational model, the Agent-based Pathogen Kinetics model (APK). APK simulates the PWID population in metropolitan Chicago, including the social interactions that result in HCV infection. We used multiple empirical data sources on Chicago PWID tomore » build a spatial distribution of an in silico PWID population and modeled networks among the PWID by considering the geography of the city and its suburbs. APK was validated against 2012 empirical data (the latest available) and shown to agree with network and epidemiological surveys to within 1%. For the period 2010–2020, APK forecasts a decline in HCV prevalence of 0.8% per year from 44(±2)% to 36(±5)%, although some sub-populations would continue to have relatively high prevalence, including Non-Hispanic Blacks, 48(±5)%. The rate of decline will be lowest in Non-Hispanic Whites and we find, in a reversal of historical trends, that incidence among non-Hispanic Whites would exceed incidence among Non-Hispanic Blacks (0.66 per 100 per years vs 0.17 per 100 person years). APK also forecasts an increase in PWID mean age from 35(±1) to 40(±2) with a corresponding increase from 59(±2)% to 80(±6)% in the proportion of the population >30 years old. Our research highlight the importance of analyzing sub-populations in disease predictions, the utility of computer simulation for analyzing demographic and health trends among PWID and serve as a tool for guiding intervention and prevention strategies in Chicago, and other major cities.« less

  10. Suspected nosocomial infections with multi-drug resistant E. coli, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strains, in an equine clinic.

    PubMed

    Walther, Birgit; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Stamm, Ivonne; Gehlen, Heidrun; Barton, Ann Kristin; Janssen, Traute; Wieler, Lothar H; Guenther, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae such as Escherichia coli are common commensals as well as opportunistic and obligate pathogens. They cause a broad spectrum of infectious diseases in various hosts, including hospital-associated infections. In recent years, the rise of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli in companion animals (dogs, cats and horses) has been striking. However, reports on nosocomial infections are mostly anecdotic. Here we report on the suspected nosocomial spread of both ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing multi-drug resistant E. coli isolates in three equine patients within an equine clinic. Unlike easy-to-clean hospitalization opportunities available for small animal settings like boxes and cages made of ceramic floor tiles or stainless steel, clinical settings for horses are challenging environments for infection control programs due to unavoidable extraneous material including at least hay and materials used for horse bedding. The development of practice-orientated recommendations is needed to improve the possibilities for infection control to prevent nosocomial infections with multi-drug resistant and other transmissible pathogens in equine clinical settings.

  11. Antibacterial agents in the cinema.

    PubMed

    García Sánchez, J E; García Sánchez, E; Merino Marcos, M L

    2006-12-01

    Numerous procedures used as antibacterial therapy are present in many films and include strategies ranging from different antimicrobial drugs to surgery and supporting measures. Films also explore the correct use and misuse of antimicrobial agents. Side effects and other aspects related to antibacterial therapy have also been reflected in some films. This article refers to the presence of antibacterial agents in different popular movies. There are movies in which antibacterial agents form part of the central plot, while in others it is merely an important part of the plot. In still others, its presence is isolated, and in these it plays an ambient or anecdotal role.

  12. In Vivo and In Vitro Antimalarial Properties of Azithromycin-Chloroquine Combinations That Include the Resistance Reversal Agent Amlodipine ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Marcus R.; Henrich, Philipp P.; Sidhu, Amar bir Singh; Johnson, David; Hardink, Joel; Van Deusen, Jeffrey; Lin, Jian; Gore, Katrina; O'Brien, Connor; Wele, Mamadou; Djimde, Abdoulaye; Chandra, Richa; Fidock, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence of emerging Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapies, documented in western Cambodia, underscores the continuing need to identify new antimalarial combinations. Given recent reports of the resurgence of chloroquine-sensitive P. falciparum parasites in Malawi, after the enforced and prolonged withdrawal of this drug, and indications of a possible synergistic interaction with the macrolide azithromycin, we sought to further characterize chloroquine-azithromycin combinations for their in vitro and in vivo antimalarial properties. In vitro 96-h susceptibility testing of chloroquine-azithromycin combinations showed mostly additive interactions against freshly cultured P. falciparum field isolates obtained from Mali. Some evidence of synergy, however, was apparent at the fractional 90% inhibitory concentration level. Additional in vitro testing highlighted the resistance reversal properties of amlodipine for both chloroquine and quinine. In vivo experiments, using the Peters 4-day suppressive test in a P. yoelii mouse model, revealed up to 99.9% suppression of parasitemia following treatment with chloroquine-azithromycin plus the R enantiomer of amlodipine. This enantiomer was chosen because it does not manifest the cardiac toxicities observed with the racemic mixture. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses in this rodent model and subsequent extrapolation to a 65-kg adult led to the estimation that 1.8 g daily of R-amlodipine would be required to achieve similar efficacy in humans, for whom this is likely an unsafe dose. While these data discount amlodipine as an additional partner for chloroquine-based combination therapy, our studies continue to support azithromycin as a safe and effective addition to antimalarial combination therapies. PMID:21464242

  13. Sucrose esters with various hydrophilic-lipophilic properties: novel controlled release agents for oral drug delivery matrix tablets prepared by direct compaction.

    PubMed

    Chansanroj, K; Betz, G

    2010-08-01

    Sucrose esters (SE) are esters of sucrose and fatty acids with various hydrophilic-lipophilic properties which have attracted interest from being used in pharmaceutical applications. This study aimed to gain insight into the use of SE as controlled release agents for direct compacted matrix tablets. The study focused on the effect of hydrophilic-lipophilic properties on tableting properties and drug release. Sucrose stearate with hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) values ranging from 0 to 16 was systematically tested. Tablet formulations contained SE, metoprolol tartrate as a highly soluble model drug and dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate as a tablet formulation filler in the ratio 1:1:2. The compaction behaviour of matrix tablets was compared with the compacts of individual starting materials as reference. SE incorporation improved the plasticity, compressibility and lubricating property of powder mixtures. The hydrophilic-lipophilic properties of SE affected tableting properties, drug release rate and release mechanism. Increasing hydrophilicity corresponding to the increased monoesters in SE composition increased the relative porosity, elastic recovery and tensile strength of the tablets due to the increased hydrogen bonding between the monoesters. This also facilitated the swelling behaviour of SE, which sustained the drug release rate. A sustained release effect prevailed in tablets containing SE with HLB values of 3-16. The ability to improve the tableting properties as well as sustain the drug release rate of the highly soluble model drug via gelation of SE highlights SE as promising controlled release regulators for direct compacted matrix tablets comprising drugs with various solubilities according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. PMID:20132913

  14. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (epoetin and darbepoetin) for treating cancer treatment-induced anaemia (including review of technology appraisal no. 142): a systematic review and economic model.

    PubMed Central

    Crathorne, Louise; Huxley, Nicola; Haasova, Marcela; Snowsill, Tristan; Jones-Hughes, Tracey; Hoyle, Martin; Briscoe, Simon; Coelho, Helen; Long, Linda; Medina-Lara, Antonieta; Mujica-Mota, Ruben; Napier, Mark; Hyde, Chris

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anaemia is a common side effect of cancer treatments and can lead to a reduction in quality of life. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are licensed for use in conjunction with red blood cell transfusions to improve cancer treatment-induced anaemia (CIA). OBJECTIVE To investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of ESAs in anaemia associated with cancer treatment (specifically chemotherapy). DATA SOURCES The following databases were searched from 2004 to 2013: The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Web of Science, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, British Nursing Index, Health Management Information Consortium, Current Controlled Trials and ClinicalTrials.gov. The US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency websites were also searched. Bibliographies of included papers were scrutinised for further potentially includable studies. REVIEW METHODS The clinical effectiveness review followed principles published by the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), or systematic reviews of RCTs, of ESAs (epoetin or darbepoetin) for treating people with CIA were eligible for inclusion in the review. Comparators were best supportive care, placebo or other ESAs. Anaemia- and malignancy-related outcomes, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. When appropriate, data were pooled using meta-analysis. An empirical health economic model was developed comparing ESA treatment with no ESA treatment. The model comprised two components: one evaluating short-term costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) (while patients are anaemic) and one evaluating long-term QALYs. Costs and benefits were discounted at 3.5% per annum. Probabilistic and univariate deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS Of 1457 titles and abstracts screened, 23 studies assessing ESAs within their licensed

  15. Doxorubicin-CdS nanoparticles: a potential anticancer agent for enhancing the drug uptake of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingyuan; Wu, Chunhui; Dai, Yongyuan; Zhang, Renyun; Wang, Xuemei; Fu, Degang; Chen, Baoan

    2007-02-01

    A novel strategy of enhancing the drug uptake by cancer cells through the combination of anticancer drug doxorubicin with cadium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles has been explored by using confocal fluorescence scanning microscopy as well as electrochemical studies, which demonstrates that CdS nanoparticles can readily conjugate with doxorubicin on the targeted cancer cells and facilitate the uptake of drug molecules in the human leukemia K562 cells. Besides, our observations also indicate that the aggregation of the leukemia cells occured when CdS nanoparticles were introduced into the relative target system together with doxorubicin, suggesting that the specific association of CdS nanoparticles with biologically active molecules on the surface of leukemia K562 cells may change some biorecognition or signal transfer pathway among cancer cells. It is suggested that the competitive binding of CdS nanoparticles with accompanying anticancer drug to the membrane of leukemia K562 cells could efficiently prevent the drug release by the drug resistant leukemia cells and thus inhibit the relative multidrug resistance (MDR) of targeted cancer cells.

  16. Trafficking of drug candidates relevant for sports drug testing: detection of non-approved therapeutics categorized as anabolic and gene doping agents in products distributed via the Internet.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Geyer, Hans; Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2011-05-01

    Identifying the use of non-approved drugs by cheating athletes has been a great challenge for doping control laboratories. This is due to the additional complexities associated with identifying relatively unknown and uncharacterized compounds and their metabolites as opposed to known and well-studied therapeutics. In 2010, the prohibited drug candidates and gene doping substances AICAR and GW1516, together with the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-2866 were obtained by the Cologne Doping Control Laboratory from Internet suppliers and their structure, quantity, and formulation elucidated. All three compounds proved authentic as determined by liquid chromatography-high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry and comparison to reference material. While AICAR was provided as a colourless powder in 100 mg aliquots, GW1516 was obtained as an orange/yellow suspension in water/glycerol (150 mg/ml), and MK-2866 (25 mg/ml) was shipped dissolved in polyethylene glycol (PEG) 300. In all cases, the quantified amounts were considerably lower than indicated on the label. The substances were delivered via courier, with packaging identifying them as containing 'amino acids' and 'green tea extract', arguably to circumvent customs control. Although all of the substances were declared 'for research only', their potential misuse in illicit performance-enhancement cannot be excluded; moreover sports drug testing authorities should be aware of the facile availability of black market copies of these drug candidates.

  17. Bioanalytical procedures for detection of chemical agents in hair in the case of drug-facilitated crimes.

    PubMed

    Kintz, Pascal

    2007-08-01

    The use of a drug to modify a person's behavior for criminal gain is not a recent phenomenon. However, the recent increase in reports of drug-facilitated crimes (sexual assault, robbery) has caused alarm in the general public. The drugs involved can be pharmaceuticals, such as benzodiazepines (flunitrazepam, lorazepam, etc.), hypnotics (zopiclone, zolpidem), sedatives (neuroleptics, some anti-H1) or anaesthetics (gamma-hydroxybutyrate, ketamine), drugs of abuse, such as cannabis, ecstasy or LSD, or more often ethanol. To perform successful toxicological examinations, the analyst must follow some important rules: (1) obtain as soon as possible the corresponding biological specimens (blood and urine); (2) collect hair about 1 month after the alleged event; (3) use sophisticated analytical techniques (gas or liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, MS/MS, headspace gas chromatography); and (4) take care in the interpretation of the findings. Drugs used to facilitate sexual assaults can be difficult to detect (active products at low doses, chemical instability), possess amnesic properties and can be rapidly cleared from the body (short half-life). In these situations, blood or even urine can be of low interest. This is the reason why some laboratories have developed an original approach based on hair testing. Hair was suggested as a valuable specimen in situations where, as a result of a delay in reporting the crime, natural processes have eliminated the drug from typical biological specimens. While there are a lot of papers that have focused on the identification of drugs in hair following chronic drug use, those dealing with a single dose are very scarce. The experience of the author and a review of the existing literature will be presented for cases involving benzodiazepines, hypnotics, gamma-hydroxybutyrate and various sedatives or chemical weapons. The expected concentrations in hair are in the low picogram/milligram range for most compounds

  18. [Decorporation agents for internal radioactive contamination].

    PubMed

    Ohmachi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    When radionuclides are accidentally ingested or inhaled, blood circulation or tissue/organ deposition of the radionuclides causes systemic or local radiation effects. In such cases, decorporation therapy is used to reduce the health risks due to their intake. Decorporation therapy includes reduction and/or inhibition of absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, isotopic dilution, and the use of diuretics, adsorbents, and chelating agents. For example, penicillamine is recommended as a chelating agent for copper contamination, and diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid is approved for the treatment of internal contamination with plutonium. During chelation therapy, the removal effect of the drugs should be monitored using a whole-body counter and/or bioassay. Some authorities, such as the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements and International Atomic Energy Agency, have reported recommended decorporation agents for each radionuclide. However, few drugs are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, and many are off-label-use agents. Because many decontamination agents are drugs that have been available for a long time and have limited efficacy, the development of new, higher-efficacy drugs has been carried out mainly in the USA and France. In this article, in addition to an outline of decorporation agents for internal radioactive contamination, an outline of our research on decorporation agents for actinide (uranium and plutonium) contamination and for radio-cesium contamination is also presented. PMID:25832835

  19. Controlled nail delivery of a novel lipophilic antifungal agent using various modern drug carrier systems as well as in vitro and ex vivo model systems.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Sandy; Meyer, Jean-Philippe; Kiesow, Andreas; Mrestani, Yahya; Wohlrab, Johannes; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2014-04-28

    The penetration behavior into human nails and animal hoof membranes of a novel antifungal agent (EV-086K) for the treatment of onychomycosis was investigated in this study. The new drug provides a high lipophilicity which is adverse for penetration into nails. Therefore, four different formulations were developed, with particular focus on a colloidal carrier system (CCS) due to its penetration enhancing properties. On the one hand, ex vivo penetration experiments on human nails were performed. Afterwards the human nail plates were cut by cryomicrotome in order to quantify the drug concentration in the dorsal, intermediate and ventral nail layer using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection. On the other hand, equine and bovine hoof membranes were used to determine the in vitro penetration of the drug into the acceptor compartment of an online diffusion cell coupled with Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. In combination, both results should exhibit a correlation between the EV-086K penetration behavior in human nail plates and animal hoof membranes. The investigations showed that the developed CCS could increase drug delivery through the human nail most compared to other formulations (nail lacquer, solution and hydrogel). Using animal hooves in the online diffusion cell, we were able to calculate pharmacokinetic data of the penetration process, especially diffusion and permeability coefficients. Finally, a qualitative correlation between the penetration results of human nails and equine hooves was established. PMID:24560884

  20. Controlled nail delivery of a novel lipophilic antifungal agent using various modern drug carrier systems as well as in vitro and ex vivo model systems.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Sandy; Meyer, Jean-Philippe; Kiesow, Andreas; Mrestani, Yahya; Wohlrab, Johannes; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2014-04-28

    The penetration behavior into human nails and animal hoof membranes of a novel antifungal agent (EV-086K) for the treatment of onychomycosis was investigated in this study. The new drug provides a high lipophilicity which is adverse for penetration into nails. Therefore, four different formulations were developed, with particular focus on a colloidal carrier system (CCS) due to its penetration enhancing properties. On the one hand, ex vivo penetration experiments on human nails were performed. Afterwards the human nail plates were cut by cryomicrotome in order to quantify the drug concentration in the dorsal, intermediate and ventral nail layer using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection. On the other hand, equine and bovine hoof membranes were used to determine the in vitro penetration of the drug into the acceptor compartment of an online diffusion cell coupled with Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy. In combination, both results should exhibit a correlation between the EV-086K penetration behavior in human nail plates and animal hoof membranes. The investigations showed that the developed CCS could increase drug delivery through the human nail most compared to other formulations (nail lacquer, solution and hydrogel). Using animal hooves in the online diffusion cell, we were able to calculate pharmacokinetic data of the penetration process, especially diffusion and permeability coefficients. Finally, a qualitative correlation between the penetration results of human nails and equine hooves was established.

  1. Potential Drug - Drug Interactions among Medications Prescribed to Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Barna

    2014-01-01

    Context: Drug-drug interactions(DDIs) are significant but avoidable causes of iatrogenic morbidity and hospital admission. Aim: To detect potential drug-drug interactions among medications received by hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: Patients of both sex and all adult age groups, who were attending medicine out -patient department (OPD) of a tertiary care teaching rural hospital since last six months and were being prescribed antihypertensive drug/s for essential hypertension, were selected for the study. Hypertensive patient with co-morbities diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart diseases, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal diseases were also included in the study. Potential drug drug interactions were checked with medscape drug interaction software. Results: With the help of medscape drug interaction software, 71.50% prescriptions were identified having atleast one drug-drug interaction. Total 918 DDIs were found in between 58 drug pairs. 55.23% DDIs were pharmacodynamic, 4.79% pharmacokinetic type of DDIs. 32.24% DDIs were found affecting serum potassium level. 95.42% DDIs were found significant type of DDIs. Drug drug interaction between atenolol & amlodipine was the most common DDI (136) followed by metoprolol and amlodine (88) in this study. Atenolol and amlodipine ( 25.92%) was the most common drugs to cause DDIs in our study. Conclusion: We detected a significant number of drug drug interaction in hypertensive patients. These interactions were between antihypertensive agents or between hypertensive and drug for co-morbid condition. PMID:25584241

  2. Does isoniazid chemoprophylaxis increase the frequency of hepatotoxicity in patients receiving anti-TNF-α agent with a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug?

    PubMed Central

    Cansu, Döndü Üsküdar; Güncan, Sabri; Bilge, N. Şule Yaşar; Kaşifoğlu, Timuçin; Korkmaz, Cengiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of isoniazid (INH)-related hepatotoxicity in patients with rheumatologic diseases receiving tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) antagonists along with a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD). Material and Methods We have retrospectively evaluated 87 patients receiving anti-TNFα agents who were followed up between June 2005 and February 2010 at our rheumatology department. Sixty-one of 87 patients have received INH prophylaxis for 9 months for latent tuberculosis infection. Results A total of 61 (70.1%) of 87 patients used INH prophylaxis (Group I), while the remaining 26 (29.9%) (Group II) had not; 53 patients had used any DMARD in Group I, while 21 patients had used in Group II. No significant differences were found among Group I and II with respect to clinical features. When two groups were compared, in Group I, elevations of liver enzymes were detected in five patients (8.1%) who had normal baseline values. Among these patients, hepatotoxicity developed in two patients. Hepatotoxicity developed one patient in Group II (p=0.85). Conclusion INH chemoprophylaxis was well tolerated in patients using anti-TNF-α agent and a DMARD. It seems not to be a strong risk factor for hepatotoxicity. However, comorbidities and other drugs used may be additional factors in the elevation of transaminases.

  3. Multifunctional PEG modified DOX loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticle@CuS nanohybrids as photo-thermal agent and thermal-triggered drug release vehicle for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lingjie; Wu, Ming; Zeng, Yongyi; Zhang, Da; Zheng, Aixian; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a multi-therapeutic mode with a controlled fashion is a key improvement in nanomedicine. Here, we synthesized polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) @CuS nanohybrids as efficient drug delivery carriers, combined with photothermal therapy and chemotherapy to enhance the therapeutic efficacy on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The physical properties of the nanohybrids were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption and desorption experiments and by the Vis-NIR absorption spectra. The results showed that the doxorubicin could be stored in the inner pores of mesoporous silica nanoparticles; the CuS nanoparticles, which are coated on the surface of a mesoporous silica nanoparticle, could serve as efficient photothermal therapy (PTT) agents; the loaded drug release could be easily triggered by NIR irradiation. The combination of the PTT treatment with controlled chemotherapy could further enhance the cancer ablation ability compared to any of the single approaches alone. Hence, the reported PEG-modified DOX-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticle@CuS nanohybrids might be very promising therapeutic agents for HCC treatment.

  4. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug activated gene-1 (NAG-1) modulators from natural products as anti-cancer agents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are rich source of gene modulators for prevention and treatment of cancer. In recent days, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) activated gene-1 (NAG-1) has been focused as a new target of diverse cancers like colorectal, pancreatic, prostate, and breast. A variety of natural...

  5. New approaches to drug discovery and development: a mechanism-based approach to pharmaceutical research and its application to BNP7787, a novel chemoprotective agent.

    PubMed

    Hausheer, Frederick H; Kochat, Harry; Parker, Aulma R; Ding, Daoyuan; Yao, Shije; Hamilton, Susan E; Petluru, Pavankumar N; Leverett, Betsy D; Bain, Stacey H; Saxe, Jeffrey D

    2003-07-01

    Any approach applied to drug discovery and development by the medical community and pharmaceutical industry has a direct impact on the future availability of improved, novel, and curative therapies for patients with cancer. By definition, drug discovery is a complex learning process whereby research efforts are directed toward uncovering and assimilating new knowledge to create and develop a drug for the purpose of providing benefit to a defined patient population. Accordingly, a highly desirable technology or approach to drug discovery should facilitate both effective learning and the application of newly discovered observations that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. However, some believe that drug discovery is largely accomplished by serendipity and therefore appropriately addressed by screening a large number of compounds. Clearly, this approach has not generated an abundance of new drugs for cancer patients and suggests that a tangibly different approach in drug discovery is warranted. We employ an alternative approach to drug discovery, which is based on the elucidation and exploitation of biological, pharmacological, and biochemical mechanisms that have not been previously recognized or fully understood. Mechanism-based drug discovery involves the combined application of physics-based computer simulations and laboratory experimentation. There is increasing evidence that agreement between simulations based on the laws of physics and experimental observations results in a higher probability that such observations are more accurate and better understood as compared with either approach used alone. Physics-based computer simulation applied to drug discovery is now considered by experts in the field to be one of the ultimate methodologies for drug discovery. However, the ability to perform truly comprehensive physics-based molecular simulations remains limited by several factors, including the enormous computer-processing power that is required to perform

  6. Synthetic agents in the context of metabolic/bariatric surgery: expanding the scope and impact of diabetes drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Janero, David R

    2014-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) - particularly with concurrent obesity ('diabesity') - is an intensifying global public-health problem. Medical needs and market opportunities in the T2D space have propelled discovery efforts aimed at inventing new synthetic T2D drugs differentiable by improved safety and efficacy and/or the ability to modulate emerging T2D targets. Particularly for moderately and severely obese individuals, weight-loss (bariatric) surgery offers an effective means of reducing obesity-driven T2D that is superior in many respects to medical T2D management. Yet, not all overweight or obese individuals with T2D qualify for bariatric surgery, and current healthcare resources are inadequate for applying surgical T2D control to more than a very small segment of qualified patients. Bariatric surgery is no guarantee of 'curative' T2D abrogation, significant rates of T2D non-remission or re-emergence having been observed in diabesity patients following bariatric procedures. Preoperative glucose control by oral hypoglycemic drugs reduces the chance of T2D recurrence post-surgery, and diabesity patients in whom glycemic indices have been improved by bariatric surgery may still require some level of T2D pharmacotherapy. Laboratory and clinical data indicate that synthetic T2D drugs can improve T2D-related outcomes following bariatric procedures, and current T2D drug-discovery efforts are being informed by the metabolic advantages associated with bariatric surgery. These circumstances intensify the need for and extend the impact of T2D drug discovery by demonstrating multiple levels of interplay between medical and surgical approaches to improve the health of individuals with diabesity and, perhaps, approach the overarching goal of decreasing long-term cardiovascular mortality. PMID:24397872

  7. Recent approaches for reducing hemolytic activity of chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Jeswani, Gunjan; Alexander, Amit; Saraf, Shailendra; Saraf, Swarnlata; Qureshi, Azra; Ajazuddin

    2015-08-10

    Drug induced hemolysis is a frequent complication associated with chemotherapy. It results from interaction of drug with erythrocyte membrane and leads to cell lysis. In recent past, various approaches were made to reduce drug-induced hemolysis, which includes drug polymer conjugation, drug delivery via colloidal carriers and hydrogels, co-administration of botanical agents and modification in molecular chemistry of drug molecules. The basic concept behind these strategies is to protect the red blood cells from membrane damaging effects of drugs. There are several examples of drug polymer conjugate that either are approved by Food and Drug Administration or are under clinical trial for delivering drugs with reduced toxicities. Likewise, colloidal carriers are also used successfully nowadays for the delivery of various chemotherapeutic agents like gemcitabine and amphotericin B with remarkable decrease in their hemolytic activity. Similarly, co-administration of botanical agents with drugs works as secondary system proving protection and strength to erythrocyte membranes. In addition to the above statement, interaction hindrance between RBC and drug molecule by molecular modification plays an important role in reducing hemolysis. This review predominantly describes the above recent approaches explored to achieve the reduced hemolytic activity of drugs especially chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26047758

  8. Mechanism of Adefovir, Tenofovir and Entecavir Resistance: Molecular Modeling Studies of How A Novel Anti-HBV Agent (FMCA) Can Overcome the Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Rawal, R K; Konreddy, A K; Chu, C K

    2015-01-01

    Regardless of significant improvement in the area of anti-HBV therapy, resistance and cross-resistance against available therapeutic agents are the major consideration in drug discovery of new agents. The present study is to obtain the insight of the molecular basis of drug resistance conferred by the B and C domain mutations of HBV-polymerase on the binding affinity of four anti-HBV agents [Adefovir (ADV), Tenofovir (TNF), Entecavir (ETV) & 2'-Fluoro-6'-methylene-carbocyclic adenosine (FMCA)]. In this regard, homology modeled structure of HBV polymerase was used for minimization, conformational search and Glide XP docking followed by binding energy calculation on wild-type as well as on mutant HBV-polymerases (N236T, L180M+M204V+S202G & A194T). Our studies suggest a significant correlation between the fold resistances and the binding affinity of anti-HBV nucleosides. The domain B residue, L180 is indirectly associated with other active-site hydrophobic residues such as A87, F88 and M204, whereas the domain C residue, M204 is closely associated with sugar/pseudosugar ring positioning in the active site. These hydrophobic residues can directly influence the interaction of the incoming nucleoside triphosphates and change the binding efficacy. The carbohydrate ring part of natural substrate dATP, dGTP, FMCA and ETV, are occupied in similar passion in the grooves of HBV polymerase active site. The exocyclic double bond of Entecavir and FMCA occupies in the backside hydrophobic pocket (made by residues A87, F88, L180and M204), which enhances the overall binding affinity. Additional hydrogen bonding interaction of 2'-fluorine of FMCA with R41 residue of polymerase promotes a positive binding in wild-type as well as in ADVr, ETVr and TNFr with respect to that of entecavir. PMID:26336997

  9. Biomedical HIV Prevention Including Pre-exposure Prophylaxis and Opiate Agonist Therapy for Women Who Inject Drugs: State of Research and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Page, Kimberly; Tsui, Judith; Maher, Lisa; Choopanya, Kachit; Vanichseni, Suphak; Mock, Philip A; Celum, Connie; Martin, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Women who inject drugs (WWID) are at higher risk of HIV compared with their male counterparts as a result of multiple factors, including biological, behavioral, and sociostructural factors, yet comparatively little effort has been invested in testing and delivering prevention methods that directly target this group. In this article, we discuss the need for expanded prevention interventions for WWID, focusing on 2 safe, effective, and approved, yet underutilized biomedical prevention methods: opiate agonist therapy (OAT) and oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Although both interventions are well researched, they have not been well examined in the context of gender. We discuss the drivers of women injectors' higher HIV risk, review the effectiveness of OAT and PrEP interventions among women, and explain why these new HIV prevention tools should be prioritized for WWID. There is substantial potential for impact of OAT and PrEP programs for WWID in the context of broader gender-responsive HIV prevention initiatives. Although awaiting efficacy data on other biomedical approaches in the HIV prevention research "pipeline," we propose that the scale-up and implementation of these proven, safe, and effective interventions are needed now.

  10. Peptide-Decorated Gold Nanoparticles as Functional Nano-Capping Agent of Mesoporous Silica Container for Targeting Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ganchao; Xie, Yusheng; Peltier, Raoul; Lei, Haipeng; Wang, Ping; Chen, Jun; Hu, Yi; Wang, Feng; Yao, Xi; Sun, Hongyan

    2016-05-11

    A stimuli-responsive drug delivery system (DDS) with bioactive surface is constructed by end-capping mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with functional peptide-coated gold nanoparticles (GNPs). MSNs are first functionalized with acid-labile α-amide-β-carboxyl groups to carry negative charges, and then capped with positively charged GNPs that are decorated with oligo-lysine-containing peptide. The resulting hybrid delivery system exhibits endo/lysosomal pH triggered drug release, and the incorporation of RGD peptide facilitates targeting delivery to αvβ3 integrin overexpressing cancer cells. The system can serve as a platform for preparing diversified multifunctional nanocomposites using various functional inorganic nanoparticles and bioactive peptides. PMID:27102225

  11. Peptide-Decorated Gold Nanoparticles as Functional Nano-Capping Agent of Mesoporous Silica Container for Targeting Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ganchao; Xie, Yusheng; Peltier, Raoul; Lei, Haipeng; Wang, Ping; Chen, Jun; Hu, Yi; Wang, Feng; Yao, Xi; Sun, Hongyan

    2016-05-11

    A stimuli-responsive drug delivery system (DDS) with bioactive surface is constructed by end-capping mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with functional peptide-coated gold nanoparticles (GNPs). MSNs are first functionalized with acid-labile α-amide-β-carboxyl groups to carry negative charges, and then capped with positively charged GNPs that are decorated with oligo-lysine-containing peptide. The resulting hybrid delivery system exhibits endo/lysosomal pH triggered drug release, and the incorporation of RGD peptide facilitates targeting delivery to αvβ3 integrin overexpressing cancer cells. The system can serve as a platform for preparing diversified multifunctional nanocomposites using various functional inorganic nanoparticles and bioactive peptides.

  12. A New Application of Lipid Nanoemulsions as Coating Agent, Providing Zero-Order Hydrophilic Drug Release from Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Nicolas; de Crevoisier, Astrid; Schmitt, Sabrina; Vandamme, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate potential of nanoemulsions as a coating material for the tablets. The nanoemulsion of size less than 100 nm was prepared using a simple and low-energy spontaneous emulsification method. Conventional tablets containing theophylline as a model hydrophilic drug were prepared. The theophylline tablets were coated with the nanoemulsion using a fluid bed coater. The effect of different levels of the nanoemulsion coating on the theophylline release was evaluated. The theophylline tablets containing different levels of the nanoemulsion coating could be successfully prepared. Interestingly, the coating of tablet with the nanoemulsion resulted in zero-order release of theophylline from the tablets. The noncoated theophylline tablets release the entire drug in less than 2 minutes, whereas nanoemulsion coating delayed the release of theophylline from tablets. This investigation establishes the proof of concept for the potential of nanoemulsions as a coating material for tablets. PMID:22272376

  13. The effect of keratolytic agents on the permeability of three imidazole antimycotic drugs through the human nail.

    PubMed

    Quintanar-Guerrero, D; Ganem-Quintanar, A; Tapia-Olguín, P; Kalia, Y N; Buri, P

    1998-07-01

    The permeability of three imidazole antimycotics (miconazole nitrate, ketoconazole, and itraconazole) through the free edge of healthy human nail was evaluated in vitro using side-by-side diffusion cells. The influence of keratolytic substances (papain, urea, and salicylic acid) on the permeability of the antimycotics was also studied. The results suggested that the nail constituted an impermeable barrier for these antimycotics; it could be considered that the nail behaved as a hydrophilic gel membrane, through which drugs of low solubility could not permeate. The use of ethanol did not promote the passage of any of the antimycotic drugs. Although scanning electron microscopy indicated that the keratolytic substances had a significant effect on the nail surface (papain > salicylic acid > urea), the passage of the three antimycotics was not improved by pretreatment with salicylic acid alone (20% for 10 days), or by the application of the drug in a 40% urea solution. It was found that only the combined effects of papain (15% for 1 day) and salicylic acid (20% for 10 days) were capable of enhancing the permeability of the antimycotic.

  14. A Novel Hypoxia-Selective Epigenetic Agent RRx-001 Triggers Apoptosis and Overcomes Drug Resistance in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Deepika Sharma; Ray, Arghya; Das, Abhishek; Song, Yan; Oronsky, Bryan; Richardson, Paul; Scicinski, Jan; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C.

    2016-01-01

    The hypoxic bone-marrow (BM) microenvironment confers growth/survival and drug-resistance in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. Novel therapies targeting the MM cell in its hypoxic-BM milieu may overcome drug resistance. Recent studies led to the development of a novel molecule RRx-001 with hypoxia-selective epigenetic and Nitric Oxide-donating properties. Here we demonstrate that RRx-001 decreases the viability of MM cell lines and primary patient cells, as well as overcomes drug-resistance. RRx-001 inhibits MM cell growth in the presence of BM stromal cells. RRx-001 induced apoptosis is associated with: 1) activation of caspases; 2) release of ROS and nitrogen-species; 3) induction of DNA damage via ATM/γ-H2AX; and 4) decrease in DNA methytransferase (DNMT) and global methylation. RNA interference study shows a predominant role of DNMT1 in MM cell survival versus DNMT3a or DNMT3b. Deubiquitylating enzyme USP7 stimulates DNMT1 activity; and conversely, USP7-siRNA reduced DNMT1 activity and decreased MM cell viability. RRx-001 plus USP7 inhibitor P5091 triggered synergistic anti-MM activity. MM xenograft studies show that RRx-001 is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth, and enhances survival. Combining RRx-001 with pomalidomide, bortezomib or SAHA induces synergistic anti-MM activity. Our results provide the rationale for translation of RRx-001, either alone or in combination, to clinical evaluation in MM. PMID:27118403

  15. [Daptomycin: revitalizing a former drug due to the need of new active agents against grampositive multiresistant bacterias].

    PubMed

    Hernández Martí, V; Romá Sánchez, E; Salavert Lletí, M; Bosó Ribelles, V; Poveda Andrés, J L

    2007-09-01

    The development of mechanisms of resistance of many Gram-positive bacterial strains that cause complicated skin and soft tissue infections, as well as sepsis and bacteremia, has necessitated the search for new drugs that will improve treatment strategies. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide antibacterial that was launched for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. The drug's mechanism of action is different from that of any other antibiotic. It binds to bacterial membranes and causes a rapid depolarization of membrane potential. This loss of membrane potential causes inhibition of protein, DNA and RNA synthesis, which results in bacterial cell death. The in vitro spectrum of activity of daptomycin encompasses most clinically relevant aerobic Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. Compared to other antibiotics with a similar antibacterial spectrum, daptomycin does not cause nephrotoxicity. Taking these and other characteristics into consideration, daptomycin appears to be a good alternative to other drugs used in the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and in Gram-positive bacteremial infections.

  16. In Vitro Interactions between Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Antifungal Agents against Planktonic and Biofilm Forms of Trichosporon asahii

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Lin; Lu, Xuelian

    2016-01-01

    Increasing drug resistance has brought enormous challenges to the management of Trichosporon spp. infections. The in vitro antifungal activities of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) against Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. were recently discovered. In the present study, the in vitro interactions between three NSAIDs (aspirin, ibuprofen and diclofenac sodium) and commonly used antifungal agents (fluconazole, itraconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin and amphotericin B) against planktonic and biofilm cells of T. asahii were evaluated using the checkerboard microdilution method. The spectrophotometric method and the XTT reduction assay were used to generate data on biofilm cells. The fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) and the ΔE model were compared to interpret drug interactions. Using the FICI, the highest percentages of synergistic effects against planktonic cells (86.67%) and biofilm cells (73.33%) were found for amphotericin B/ibuprofen, and caspofungin/ibuprofen showed appreciable percentages (73.33% for planktonic form and 60.00% for biofilm) as well. We did not observe antagonism. The ΔE model gave consistent results with FICI (86.67%). Our findings suggest that amphotericin B/ibuprofen and caspofungin/ibuprofen combinations have potential effects against T. asahii. Further in vivo and animal studies to investigate associated mechanisms need to be conducted. PMID:27275608

  17. Role of ligand-based drug design methodologies toward the discovery of new anti- Alzheimer agents: futures perspectives in Fragment-Based Ligand Design.

    PubMed

    Speck-Planche, A; Luan, F; Cordeiro, M N D S

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a degenerative disease affecting the brain, is the single most common source of dementia in adults. The cause and the progression of AD still remains a mystery among medical experts. As a result, a cure has not yet been discovered, even after decade's worth of research that started since 1906, when the disease was first identified. Despite the efforts of the scientific community, several of the biological receptors associated with AD have not been sufficiently studied to date, limiting in turn the design of new and more potent anti-AD agents. Thus, the search for new drug candidates as inhibitors of different targets associated with AD constitutes an essential part towards the discovery of new and more efficient anti-AD therapies. The present work is focused on the role of the Ligand-Based Drug Design (LBDD) methodologies which have been applied for the elucidation of new molecular entities with high inhibitory activity against targets related with AD. Particular emphasis is given also to the current state of fragment-based ligand approaches as alternatives of the Fragment-Based Drug Discovery (FBDD) methodologies. Finally, several guidelines are offered to show how the use of fragment-based descriptors can be determinant for the design of multi-target inhibitors of proteins associated with AD. PMID:22376033

  18. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  19. Ion Channel Blockers as Antimicrobial Agents, Efflux Inhibitors, and Enhancers of Macrophage Killing Activity against Drug Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Machado, Diana; Pires, David; Perdigão, João; Couto, Isabel; Portugal, Isabel; Martins, Marta; Amaral, Leonard; Anes, Elsa; Viveiros, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Given the ability of M. tuberculosis to survive as an intracellular pathogen and its propensity to develop resistance to the existing antituberculosis drugs, its treatment requires new approaches. Here the antimycobacterial properties of verapamil, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and haloperidol were investigated against a panel of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains, both in vitro and on human-infected macrophages. These compounds are efflux inhibitors that share among them the characteristic of being ion channel blockers. In vitro, all compounds exhibited synergistic inhibitory activities when combined with isoniazid and rifampicin, and were able to inhibit active efflux, demonstrating their role as efflux inhibitors. Gene expression analysis showed that M. tuberculosis efflux genes were overexpressed in response to antibiotic exposure, in vitro and within macrophages, irrespective of their resistance pattern. These compounds displayed a rapid and high killing activity against M. tuberculosis, associated with a decrease in intracellular ATP levels demonstrating that the bactericidal action of the ion channel blockers against M. tuberculosis clinical strains is associated with their interference with energy metabolism. The compounds led to a decrease in the intracellular mycobacterial load by increasing phagosome acidification and activating lysosomal hydrolases. The results presented in this study enable us to propose the following mechanism of action for these compounds: a) in the bacteria, the compounds generate a cascade of events involving the inhibition of the respiratory chain complexes and energy production for efflux activity. Indirectly, this reduce the resistance level to antituberculosis drugs potentiating their activity; b) on the host cell, the treatment with the ion channel blockers increases phagosome acidification and induces the expression of phagosomal hydrolases, leading to bacterial growth restriction irrespective of their

  20. Cannabinergic aminoalkylindoles, including AM678=JWH018 found in ‘Spice’, examined using drug (Δ9-THC) discrimination for rats

    PubMed Central

    Järbe, Torbjörn U.C.; Deng, Hongfeng; Vadivel, Subramanian K.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2011-01-01

    We examined four different cannabinergic aminoalkylindole ligands, including one drug (AM678=JWH018) found in herbal ‘Spice’ concoctions, for their ability to substitute for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and the ability of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) selective antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant to block the substitution 30 and 90 min after i.p. injection. Rats trained to discriminate the effects of vehicle from those produced by 3 mg/kg THC were used. The order of potency was: AM5983≥AM678>AM2233>WIN55,212-2 at both test intervals. AM5983 and AM678 appeared 8 times more potent than THC, followed by AM2233 (about twice as potent as THC), and WIN55,212-2≈THCat the 30 min-test interval. The aminoalkylindoles showed reduced potency (i.e., an increased ED50 value) at the longer injection-to-test interval of 90 min compared to testing at 30 min. The rightward shifts by co-administration of rimonabant were approximately 8 to 12-fold for AM5983 and AM678, compared to an approximately 3-fold rightward shift for the WIN55,212-2 curve. AM2233 (1.8 mg/kg) substitution was also blocked by 1 mg/kg rimonabant. In conclusion, AM5983 and AM678=JWH018 are potent cannabimimetics derived from an aminoalkylindole template. WIN55,212-2 seemed to interact differently with rimonabant, compared to either AM5983 or AM678, indicating potential differences in the mechanism(s) of action between cannabinergic aminoalkylindoles. PMID:21836461

  1. Nanostructured nanoparticles of self-assembled lipid pro-drugs as a route to improved chemotherapeutic agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sagnella, Sharon M.; Gong, Xiaojuan; Moghaddam, Minoo J.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Kimpton, Kathleen; Waddington, Lynne J.; Krodkiewska, Irena; Drummond, Calum J.

    2014-09-24

    We demonstrate that oral delivery of self-assembled nanostructured nanoparticles consisting of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) lipid prodrugs results in a highly effective, target-activated, chemotherapeutic agent, and offers significantly enhanced efficacy over a commercially available alternative that does not self-assemble. The lipid prodrug nanoparticles have been found to significantly slow the growth of a highly aggressive mouse 4T1 breast tumour, and essentially halt the growth of a human MDA-MB-231 breast tumour in mouse xenografts. Systemic toxicity is avoided as prodrug activation requires a three-step, enzymatic conversion to 5-FU, with the third step occurring preferentially at the tumour site. Additionally, differences in the lipid prodrug chemical structure and internal nanostructure of the nanoparticle dictate the enzymatic conversion rate and can be used to control sustained release profiles. Thus, we have developed novel oral nanomedicines that combine sustained release properties with target-selective activation.

  2. Sunscreening Agents

    PubMed Central

    Martis, Jacintha; Shobha, V; Sham Shinde, Rutuja; Bangera, Sudhakar; Krishnankutty, Binny; Bellary, Shantala; Varughese, Sunoj; Rao, Prabhakar; Naveen Kumar, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing incidence of skin cancers and photodamaging effects caused by ultraviolet radiation has increased the use of sunscreening agents, which have shown beneficial effects in reducing the symptoms and reoccurrence of these problems. Many sunscreen compounds are in use, but their safety and efficacy are still in question. Efficacy is measured through indices, such as sun protection factor, persistent pigment darkening protection factor, and COLIPA guidelines. The United States Food and Drug Administration and European Union have incorporated changes in their guidelines to help consumers select products based on their sun protection factor and protection against ultraviolet radiation, whereas the Indian regulatory agency has not yet issued any special guidance on sunscreening agents, as they are classified under cosmetics. In this article, the authors discuss the pharmacological actions of sunscreening agents as well as the available formulations, their benefits, possible health hazards, safety, challenges, and proper application technique. New technologies and scope for the development of sunscreening agents are also discussed as well as the role of the physician in patient education about the use of these agents. PMID:23320122

  3. Switching the Loaded Agent from Epirubicin to Cisplatin: Salvage Transcatheter Arterial Chemoembolization with Drug-eluting Microspheres for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Akihiko Hori, Shinich

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: There is no consensus on switching anticancer agents loaded onto drug carriers in transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to evaluate the safety and clinical outcomes of TACE with cisplatin-loaded microspheres (CLM-TACE) in HCC patients refractory to TACE with epirubicin-loaded microspheres (ELM-TACE). Methods: Between February 2008 and June 2010, 85 patients with unresectable HCC refractory to ELM-TACE were enrolled to undergo CLM-TACE. The number of ELM-TACE sessions until judgment of resistance ranged from 1 to 4 (median, 2.1). CLM-TACE was performed using 50-100-{mu}m superabsorbent polymer microspheres loaded with 1 mg cisplatin/1 mg microspheres together with hepatic arterial infusion of 25 mg cisplatin and 500 mg 5-fluorouracil per patient. Tumor responses were evaluated by computed tomography according to the European Association for the Study of the Liver criteria. Results: The median number of CLM-TACE treatment sessions was 1.8 (range, 1-5), and the mean total dose of cisplatin per session was 42.8 mg (range, 30.0-59.0). After 6 months, 3 (3.5%) patients achieved complete response, 31 (36.5%) had partial response, 15 (17.6%) had stable disease, and 36 (42.4%) had progressive disease. The median overall survival and time to treatment failure after initial CLM-TACE were 13.3 and 7.2 months, respectively. Overall, 9.4% of patients experienced grade 3/4 adverse events. Conclusions: witching the loaded agent from epirubicin to cisplatin is a safe, well-tolerated, and efficacious treatment strategy for salvage TACE with drug-eluting microspheres in HCC patients refractory to ELM-TACE.

  4. Drug-induced hair loss.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Hair loss can have major psychological consequences. It can be due to a wide variety of causes, including hormonal disorders, dietary factors, infections, inflammation, trauma, emotional factors, and cancer. Drugs can also induce hair loss, by interacting with the hair growth cycle. Drug-induced hair loss may be immediate or delayed, sudden or gradual, and diffuse or localised. It is usually reversible after drug discontinuation. The drugs most often implicated in hair loss are anticancer agents, interferon, azole antifungals, lithium, immunosuppressants, and many other drugs belonging to a variety of pharmacological classes. PMID:27280198

  5. Drug-induced hair loss.

    PubMed

    2016-05-01

    Hair loss can have major psychological consequences. It can be due to a wide variety of causes, including hormonal disorders, dietary factors, infections, inflammation, trauma, emotional factors, and cancer. Drugs can also induce hair loss, by interacting with the hair growth cycle. Drug-induced hair loss may be immediate or delayed, sudden or gradual, and diffuse or localised. It is usually reversible after drug discontinuation. The drugs most often implicated in hair loss are anticancer agents, interferon, azole antifungals, lithium, immunosuppressants, and many other drugs belonging to a variety of pharmacological classes.

  6. Emerging importance of mismatch repair components including UvrD helicase and their cross-talk with the development of drug resistance in malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Moaz; Tuteja, Renu

    2014-12-01

    Human malaria is an important parasitic infection responsible for a significant number of deaths worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. The recent scenario has worsened mainly because of the emergence of drug-resistant malaria parasites having the potential to spread across the world. Drug-resistant parasites possess a defective mismatch repair (MMR); therefore, it is essential to explore its mechanism in detail to determine the underlying cause. Recently, artemisinin-resistant parasites have been reported to exhibit nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in MMR pathways such as MutL homolog (MLH) and UvrD. Plasmodium falciparum MLH is an endonuclease required to restore the defective MMR in drug-resistant W2 strain of P. falciparum. Although the role of helicases in eukaryotic MMR has been questioned, the identification and characterization of the UvrD helicase and their cross-talk with MLH in P. falciparum suggests the possible involvement of UvrD in MMR. A comparative genome-wide analysis revealed the presence of the UvrD helicase in Plasmodium species, while it is absent in human host. Therefore, PfUvrD may emerge as a suitable drug target to control malaria. This review study is focused on recent developments in MMR biochemistry, emerging importance of the UvrD helicase, possibility of its involvement in MMR and the emerging cross-talk between MMR components and drug resistance in malaria parasite. PMID:25771870

  7. Evaluation of iron-chelating agents in cultured heart muscle cells. Identification of a potential drug for chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sciortino, C V; Byers, B R; Cox, P

    1980-12-01

    Primary cultures of neonatal rat cardiac muscle cells incorporated radioiron from both [55Fe]transferrin and 59FeCl3 (added simultaneously). To evaluate the effect of iron chelators on such uptake, deferri chelators were added 6 hr after addition of the radioiron sources. The microbial chelator agrobactin was significantly more effective than the drug defoxamine in reduction of 55Fe uptake from [55Fe]transferrin; both chelators halted 59Fe3+ uptake. Agrobactin may have potential in chelation therpay for iron-overload disease. Certain other microbial chelators lowered radioiron uptake from either [55Fe]transferrin of 59FeCl3. These chelators should be useful inhibitors for studies of animal cell iron uptake and intracellular iron flow.

  8. Combating high-priority biological agents: What to do with drug-allergic patients and those for whom vaccination is contraindicated?

    PubMed

    Gruchalla, Rebecca S; Jones, James

    2003-10-01

    The threat of bioterrorism continues to be a very real one. Regularly, there are news stories on bioterrorism-related topics: What biologic weapons will our enemies likely use to attack the United States? How prepared is our country to successfully counter such attacks? Although these critical questions are being addressed by the leaders of our country, allergists-immunologists, too, will have to grapple with difficult questions during these uncertain and frightening times. We care for a special group of patients with various allergic and immunologic disorders. Some of our patients have immunodeficiency disorders that might preclude them from receiving life-saving vaccines. Our patients with drug allergies are fearful that should they become infected with a biologic agent, they will not be able to receive appropriate treatment. In this article we focus on the various vaccine-related and antibiotic-related adverse effects that the allergist-immunologist might see during treatment of infections caused by Category A agents. Where possible, potential management approaches are outlined. PMID:14564343

  9. New 64Cu PET imaging agents for personalised medicine and drug development using the hexa-aza cage, SarAr.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolo, Nadine; Sargeson, Alan M; Smith, Suzanne V

    2006-09-01

    The success of positron emission tomography (PET) in personalised medicine and drug development requires radioisotopes that provide high quality images and flexible chemistry for a broad application. 64Cu is arguably one of the most suitable PET isotopes for imaging with the evolving target agents, but there are not many appropriate chelating agents for 64Cu and this has limited its wider application. The bi-functional chelator, SarAr is known to bind 64Cu2+ quantitatively (i.e. one metal per ligand present) and rapidly (<2 min) at 10(-6) M over a range of pH (4-9). In this paper the conjugation of SarAr to the whole and fragmented antibody is described. Conjugation of the SarAr to the protein does not impair its coordination of the 64Cu. It complexes the 64Cu2+ rapidly, quantitatively and essentially irreversibly at pH 5. Animal studies show that the 64Cu-SarAr-immunoconjugates maintain their specificity for the target and are stable in vivo. Also, SarAr is a platform technology, is easy to use in a kit formulation and is readily adaptable for the wider application in 64Cu PET imaging.

  10. Preparation of thermo-responsive graft copolymer by using a novel macro-RAFT agent and its application for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Cunfeng; Yu, Shirong; Liu, Cheng; Deng, Yuanming; Xu, Yiting; Chen, Xiaoling; Dai, Lizong

    2016-05-01

    A methodology to prepare thermo-responsive graft copolymer by using a novel macro-RAFT agent was proposed. The macro-RAFT agent with pendant dithioester (ZC(S)SR) was facilely prepared via the combination of RAFT polymerization and esterification reaction. By means of ZC(S)SR-initiated RAFT polymerization, the thermo-responsive graft copolymer consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-hydroxylethyl methacrylate) (P(MMA-co-HEMA)) backbone and hydrophilic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) side chains was constructed through the "grafting from" approach. The chemical compositions and molecular weight distributions of the synthesized polymers were respectively characterized by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Self-assembly behavior of the amphiphilic graft copolymers (P(MMA-co-HEMA)-g-PNIPAAm) was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and spectrofluorimeter. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) value was 0.052 mg mL(-1). These micelles have thermo-responsibility and a low critical solution temperature (LCST) of 33.5°C. Further investigation indicated that the guest molecule release property of these micelles, which can be well described by a first-order kinetic model, was significantly affected by temperature. Besides, the micelles exhibited excellent biocompatibility and cellular uptake property. Hence, these micelles are considered to have potential application in controlled drug delivery.

  11. TiO2 nanotube arrays deposited on Ti substrate by anodic oxidation and their potential as a long-term drug delivery system for antimicrobial agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseke, Claus; Hage, Felix; Vorndran, Elke; Gbureck, Uwe

    2012-05-01

    Nanotube arrays on medical titanium surfaces were fabricated by two different anodization methods and their potential for storage and release of antimicrobial substances was evaluated. The treatment of the Ti surfaces in fluoride containing electrolytes on water as well as on polyethylene glycol basis led to the formation of TiO2 nanotubes with up to 6.54 μm length and average diameters of up to 160 nm. Drug release experiments with the model antibiotic vancomycin and with antibacterial silver ions showed that the increased surface area of the anodized samples enabled them to be loaded with up to 450% more active agent than the untreated Ti surfaces. Significant surface-dependent differences in the release kinetics of vancomycin were observed. In comparison to surfaces anodized in an aqueous electrolyte, the release of the antibiotic from surfaces anodized in an electrolyte based on ethylene glycol was significantly retarded, with a release of noticeable amounts over a period of more than 300 days. Loading of nanotube surfaces fabricated in aqueous electrolyte with silver ions revealed increased amounts of adsorbed silver by up to 230%, while the release kinetics showed significant differences in comparison to untreated Ti. It was concluded that nanotube arrays on favored medical implant materials have a high potential for loading with antimicrobial agents and also provide the possibility of tailored release kinetics by variation of anodization parameters.

  12. Phosphorodiamidates as a promising new phosphate prodrug motif for antiviral drug discovery: application to anti-HCV agents.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Christopher; Madela, Karolina; Aljarah, Mohamed; Bourdin, Claire; Arrica, Maria; Barrett, Emma; Jones, Sarah; Kolykhalov, Alexander; Bleiman, Blair; Bryant, K Dawn; Ganguly, Babita; Gorovits, Elena; Henson, Geoffrey; Hunley, Damound; Hutchins, Jeff; Muhammad, Jerry; Obikhod, Aleksandr; Patti, Joseph; Walters, C Robin; Wang, Jin; Vernachio, John; Ramamurty, Changalvala V S; Battina, Srinivas K; Chamberlain, Stanley

    2011-12-22

    We herein report phosphorodiamidates as a significant new phosphate prodrug motif. Sixty-seven phosphorodiamidates are reported of two 6-O-alkyl 2'-C-methyl guanosines, with significant variation in the diamidate structure. Both symmetrical and asymmetric phosphorodiamidates are reported, derived from various esterified amino acids, both d and l, and also from various simple amines. All of the compounds were evaluated versus hepatitis C virus in replicon assay, and nanomolar activity levels were observed. Many compounds were noncytotoxic at 100 μM, leading to high antiviral selectivities. The agents are stable in acidic, neutral, and moderately basic media and in selected biological media but show efficient processing by carboxypeptidases and efficiently yield the free nucleoside monophosphate in cells. On the basis of in vitro data, eight leads were selected for additional in vivo evaluation, with the intent of selecting one candidate for progression toward clinical studies. This phosphorodiamidate prodrug method may have broad application outside of HCV and antivirals as it offers many of the advantages of phosphoramidate ProTides but without the chirality issues present in most cases.

  13. Drug-induced infertility.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, J F; Davis, L J

    1984-02-01

    Primary infertility may result from the use of various drugs. This phenomenon may be the result of an effect on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis or a direct toxic effect on the gonads. Some of the drugs considered in this article demonstrate sex-related differences in their ability to cause infertility; there also may be age-related differences. The drugs described in this review, in regard to their association with the development of infertility, include various individual antineoplastic agents (cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil, busulphan, and methotrexate) and combinations of these chemotherapeutic drugs, glucocorticosteroids, hormonal steroids (diethylstilbestrol, medroxyprogesterone acetate, estrogen, and the constituents of oral contraceptives), antibiotics (sulfasalazine and co-trimoxazole), thyroid supplements, spironolactone, cimetidine, colchicine, marihuana, opiates, and neuroleptic agents.

  14. One-step fabrication of triple-layered microcapsules by a tri-axial flow focusing device for microencapsulation of soluble drugs and imaging agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shuai; Wu, Qiang; Lei, Fan; Li, Guangbin; Si, Ting; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the microencapsulation of water-soluble drug (doxorubicin, Dox) and imaging agent (perfluorocarbon, PFC) is performed by a novel liquid driven tri-axial flow focusing (LDTFF) device. The formation of stable triple-layered cone-jet mode can be observed in the simple well-assembled LDTFF device, providing an easy approach to fabricate mono-disperse triple-layered microcapsules with high encapsulation efficiency, high throughput and low cost in just one step. The fluorescence images show that the microcapsules have a satisfactory core-shell structure. The SEM micrographs show spherical and smooth surface views of the triple-layered microcapsules after being stirred 72h to remove the organic solvent totally. The results of thermo-responsive release experiments of the produced triple-layered microcapsules show these multifunctional capsules can be well stimulated when the environment temperature is beyond 55 degree centigrade. In a word, this novel approach has a great potential in applications such as drug delivery and image-guided therapy.

  15. The level of intracellular glutathione is a key regulator for the induction of stress-activated signal transduction pathways including Jun N-terminal protein kinases and p38 kinase by alkylating agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, D; Bender, K; Knebel, A; Angel, P

    1997-01-01

    Monofunctional alkylating agents like methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) are potent inducers of cellular stress leading to chromosomal aberrations, point mutations, and cell killing. We show that these agents induce a specific cellular stress response program which includes the activation of Jun N-terminal kinases/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and the upstream kinase SEK1/MKK4 and which depends on the reaction mechanism of the alkylating agent in question. Similar to another inducer of cellular stress, UV irradiation, damage of nuclear DNA by alkylation is not involved in the MMS-induced response. However, in contrast to UV and other inducers of the JNK/SAPKs and p38 pathways, activation of growth factor and G-protein-coupled receptors does not play a role in the MMS response. We identified the intracellular glutathione (GSH) level as critical for JNK/SAPK activation by MMS: enhancing the GSH level by pretreatment of the cells with GSH or N-acetylcysteine inhibits, whereas depletion of the cellular GSH pool causes hyperinduction of JNK/SAPK activity by MMS. In light of the JNK/SAPK-dependent induction of c-jun and c-fos transcription, and the Jun/Fos-induced transcription of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, these data provide a potential critical role of JNK/SAPK and p38 in the induction of a cellular defense program against cytotoxic xenobiotics such as MMS. PMID:9234735

  16. Versatile, Reversible, and Reusable Gel of a Monocholesteryl Conjugated Calix[4]arene as Functional Material to Store and Release Dyes and Drugs Including Doxorubicin, Curcumin, and Tocopherol.

    PubMed

    Bandela, Anil Kumar; Hinge, Vijaya Kumar; Yarramala, Deepthi S; Rao, Chebrolu Pulla

    2015-06-01

    Gels are interesting soft materials owing to their functional properties leading to potential applications. This paper deals with the synthesis of monocholesteryl derivatized calix[4]arene (G) and its instantaneous gelation at a minimum gelator concentration of 0.6% in 1:1 v/v THF/acetonitrile. The gel shows remarkable thermoreversibility by exhibiting Tgel→sol at ∼48 °C and is demonstrated for several cycles. The gel shows an organized network of nanobundles, while that of the sol shows spherical nanoaggregates in microscopy. A bundle with ∼12 nm diameter possessing hydrophobic pockets in itself is obtained from computationally modeled gel, and hence the gel is suitable for storage and release applications. The guest-entrapped gels exhibit the same microstructures as that observed with simple gels, while fluorescence spectra and molecular mechanics suggests that the drug molecules occupy the hydrophobic pockets. All the entrapped drug molecules are released into water, suggesting a complete recovery of the trapped species. The reusability of the gel for the storage and release of the drug into water is demonstrated for four consecutive cycles, and hence the gel formed from G acts as a functional material that finds application in drug delivery.

  17. Drug delivery to the ear.

    PubMed

    Hoskison, E; Daniel, M; Al-Zahid, S; Shakesheff, K M; Bayston, R; Birchall, J P

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery to the ear is used to treat conditions of the middle and inner ear such as acute and chronic otitis media, Ménière's disease, sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus. Drugs used include antibiotics, antifungals, steroids, local anesthetics and neuroprotective agents. A literature review was conducted searching Medline (1966-2012), Embase (1988-2012), the Cochrane Library and Ovid (1966-2012), using search terms 'drug delivery', 'middle ear', 'inner ear' and 'transtympanic'. There are numerous methods of drug delivery to the middle ear, which can be categorized as topical, systemic (intravenous), transtympanic and via the Eustachian tube. Localized treatments to the ear have the advantages of targeted drug delivery allowing higher therapeutic doses and minimizing systemic side effects. The ideal scenario would be a carrier system that could cross the intact tympanic membrane loaded with drugs or biochemical agents for the treatment of middle and inner ear conditions.

  18. Melatonin, a potent agent in antioxidative defense: Actions as a natural food constituent, gastrointestinal factor, drug and prodrug

    PubMed Central

    Hardeland, Rüdiger; Pandi-Perumal, SR

    2005-01-01

    Melatonin, originally discovered as a hormone of the pineal gland, is also produced in other organs and represents, additionally, a normal food constituent found in yeast and plant material, which can influence the level in the circulation. Compared to the pineal, the gastrointestinal tract contains several hundred times more melatonin, which can be released into the blood in response to food intake and stimuli by nutrients, especially tryptophan. Apart from its use as a commercial food additive, supraphysiological doses have been applied in medical trials and pure preparations are well tolerated by patients. Owing to its amphiphilicity, melatonin can enter any body fluid, cell or cell compartment. Its properties as an antioxidant agent are based on several, highly diverse effects. Apart from direct radical scavenging, it plays a role in upregulation of antioxidant and downregulation of prooxidant enzymes, and damage by free radicals can be reduced by its antiexcitatory actions, and presumably by contributions to appropriate internal circadian phasing, and by its improvement of mitochondrial metabolism, in terms of avoiding electron leakage and enhancing complex I and complex IV activities. Melatonin was shown to potentiate effects of other antioxidants, such as ascorbate and Trolox. Under physiological conditions, direct radical scavenging may only contribute to a minor extent to overall radical detoxification, although melatonin can eliminate several of them in scavenger cascades and potentiates the efficacy of antioxidant vitamins. Melatonin oxidation seems rather important for the production of other biologically active metabolites such as N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and N1-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK), which have been shown to also dispose of protective properties. Thus, melatonin may be regarded as a prodrug, too. AMK interacts with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, conveys protection to mitochondria, inhibits and downregulates

  19. Novel extraction and application of okra gum as a film coating agent using theophylline as a model drug.

    PubMed

    Ogaji, Ikoni J; Hoag, Stephen W

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of extraction and application of okra gum as an aqueous film coating agent. Powdered okra pods dispersed in demineralized water was heated at 80 ± 2(o)C for 30 minutes in the presence of sodium chloride. The filtrate was successively centrifuged at 4000 rpm for 30, 60, or 120 minutes and freeze dried. The samples were used as film former at different concentrations in aqueous film coating operations. Near infrared (nIR) absorption spectra, photomicrographs, and some physicochemical properties of the coated tablets were evaluated. The okra gum samples had different nIR spectra and possessed good processing and application quality due to relatively low viscosity. A six-fold concentration of this gum from the novel extraction yielded glossy theophylline tablets within a short time. A t (18) = 2.895, P < 0.005, t critical = 1.734 were obtained for the independent analysis of the hardness of core and coated theophylline tablets. A 3.0% concentration of the okra samples at a flow rate of 3 ml/min for 100 minutes showed that F = 3.798, DF = 29, P < 0.035, F critical = 3.354 in tablet hardness among samples and F = 15.632, DF = 29, P < 0.0001, F critical = 2.152 were obtained on film thickness among tablet samples during the coating and drying operation. Novel extraction process enhanced the film coating potential of okra gum by delivering more solids on the substrate at a shorter time with improved operation efficiency. PMID:24959415

  20. Novel extraction and application of okra gum as a film coating agent using theophylline as a model drug.

    PubMed

    Ogaji, Ikoni J; Hoag, Stephen W

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of extraction and application of okra gum as an aqueous film coating agent. Powdered okra pods dispersed in demineralized water was heated at 80 ± 2(o)C for 30 minutes in the presence of sodium chloride. The filtrate was successively centrifuged at 4000 rpm for 30, 60, or 120 minutes and freeze dried. The samples were used as film former at different concentrations in aqueous film coating operations. Near infrared (nIR) absorption spectra, photomicrographs, and some physicochemical properties of the coated tablets were evaluated. The okra gum samples had different nIR spectra and possessed good processing and application quality due to relatively low viscosity. A six-fold concentration of this gum from the novel extraction yielded glossy theophylline tablets within a short time. A t (18) = 2.895, P < 0.005, t critical = 1.734 were obtained for the independent analysis of the hardness of core and coated theophylline tablets. A 3.0% concentration of the okra samples at a flow rate of 3 ml/min for 100 minutes showed that F = 3.798, DF = 29, P < 0.035, F critical = 3.354 in tablet hardness among samples and F = 15.632, DF = 29, P < 0.0001, F critical = 2.152 were obtained on film thickness among tablet samples during the coating and drying operation. Novel extraction process enhanced the film coating potential of okra gum by delivering more solids on the substrate at a shorter time with improved operation efficiency.

  1. Analytics of nonpeptidic erythropoietin mimetic agents in sports drug testing employing high-resolution/high-accuracy liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Matthias; Dib, Josef; Tretzel, Laura; Piper, Thomas; Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2016-09-01

    Since its release as anti-anemic drug, recombinant erythropoietin (rEPO) gradually entered the illicit way to sports competitions as endurance-enhancing drug. Novel modifications biopharmaceutically introduced into the rEPO molecule in the form of carbohydrate or polyethylene glycol moieties made robust and sensitive test methods vital to doping controls in order to provide the necessary tools enabling the conviction of dishonest athletes. Modern protein analysis by means of gel electrophoretic separation and western blotting represents the status quo in rEPO anti-doping analysis. However, new therapeutically promising erythropoietin receptor activating compounds have been developed that exhibit cytokine hormone-mimicking properties but lack any protein structure. Progression to evade parenteral application and substitute for rEPO by low molecular mass and orally available compounds is still one of the major objectives in pharmaceutical research. In this approach, four promising in-house synthesized nonpeptidic erythropoietin mimetic agents, namely compound 129, compound 163, A1B10C1, and A5B10C4 were thoroughly evaluated by employing high-resolution/high-accuracy liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry experiments. Characteristic product ions were determined supporting the identification of these drugs and putative metabolites as well as related compounds in future doping controls. Test methods employing direct urine injection and receptor affinity purification strategies were assessed, which demonstrated that EPO receptor purification is of limited utility for nonpeptidic EPOR agonists while direct urine injection allowed for comprehensive method characterization. Thereby, achieved limits of detection were 1 ng/mL for compounds 129/163 and 5 ng/mL for A1B10C1/A5B10C4. PMID:27438721

  2. Evaluation of acetylcholine, seizure activity and neuropathology following high-dose nerve agent exposure and delayed neuroprotective treatment drugs in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Acon-Chen, Cindy; Koenig, Jeffrey A; Smith, Garrett R; Truitt, Amber R; Thomas, Thaddeus P; Shih, Tsung-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Organophosphorus nerve agents such as soman (GD) inhibit acetylcholinesterase, producing an excess of acetylcholine (ACh), which results in respiratory distress, convulsions and status epilepticus that leads to neuropathology. Several drugs (topiramate, clobazam, pregnanolone, allopregnanolone, UBP 302, cyclopentyladenosine [CPA], ketamine, midazolam and scopolamine) have been identified as potential neuroprotectants that may terminate seizures and reduce brain damage. To systematically evaluate their efficacy, this study employed in vivo striatal microdialysis and liquid chromatography to respectively collect and analyze extracellular ACh in freely moving rats treated with these drugs 20 min after seizure onset induced by a high dose of GD. Along with microdialysis, EEG activity was recorded and neuropathology assessed at 24 h. GD induced a marked increase of ACh, which peaked at 30 min post-exposure to 800% of control levels and then steadily decreased toward baseline levels. Approximately 40 min after treatment, only midazolam (10 mg/kg) and CPA (60 mg/kg) caused a significant reduction of ACh levels, with CPA reducing ACh levels more rapidly than midazolam. Both drugs facilitated a return to baseline levels at least 55 min after treatment. At 24 h, only animals treated with CPA (67%), midazolam (18%) and scopolamine (27%) exhibited seizure termination. While all treatments except for topiramate reduced neuropathology, CPA, midazolam and scopolamine showed the greatest reduction in pathology. Our results suggest that delayed treatment with CPA, midazolam, or scopolamine is effective at reducing GD-induced seizure activity and neuropathology, with CPA and midazolam capable of facilitating a reduction in GD-induced ACh elevation. PMID:27329284

  3. Antibiotic Conjugated Fluorescent Carbon Dots as a Theranostic Agent for Controlled Drug Release, Bioimaging, and Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vaibhav; Khade, Monika; Goshi, Ekta; Sharon, Madhuri

    2014-01-01

    A novel report on microwave assisted synthesis of bright carbon dots (C-dots) using gum arabic (GA) and its use as molecular vehicle to ferry ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, a broad spectrum antibiotic, is reported in the present work. Density gradient centrifugation (DGC) was used to separate different types of C-dots. After careful analysis of the fractions obtained after centrifugation, ciprofloxacin was attached to synthesize ciprofloxacin conjugated with C-dots (Cipro@C-dots conjugate). Release of ciprofloxacin was found to be extremely regulated under physiological conditions. Cipro@C-dots were found to be biocompatible on Vero cells as compared to free ciprofloxacin (1.2 mM) even at very high concentrations. Bare C-dots (∼13 mg mL−1) were used for microbial imaging of the simplest eukaryotic model—Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). Bright green fluorescent was obtained when live imaging was performed to view yeast cells under fluorescent microscope suggesting C-dots incorporation inside the cells. Cipro@C-dots conjugate also showed enhanced antimicrobial activity against both model gram positive and gram negative microorganisms. Thus, the Cipro@C-dots conjugate paves not only a way for bioimaging but also an efficient new nanocarrier for controlled drug release with high antimicrobial activity, thereby serving potential tool for theranostics. PMID:24744921

  4. Synthesis, spectroscopic, structural and thermal characterizations of vanadyl(IV) adenine complex prospective as antidiabetic drug agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2015-01-01

    The vanadyl(IV) adenine complex; [VO(Adn)2]ṡSO4; was synthesized and characterized. The molar conductivity of this complex was measured in DMSO solution that showed an electrolyte nature. Spectroscopic investigation of the green solid complex studied here indicate that the adenine acts as a bidentate ligand, coordinated to vanadyl(IV) ions through the nitrogen atoms N7 and nitrogen atom of amino group. Thus, from the results presented the vanadyl(IV) complex has square pyramid geometry. Further characterizations using thermal analyses and scanning electron techniques was useful. The aim of this paper was to introduce a new drug model for the diabetic complications by synthesized a novel mononuclear vanadyl(IV) adenine complex to mimic insulin action and reducing blood sugar level. The antidiabetic ability of this complex was investigated in STZ-induced diabetic mice. The results suggested that VO(IV)/adenine complex has antidiabetic activity, it improved the lipid profile, it improved liver and kidney functions, also it ameliorated insulin hormone and blood glucose levels. The vanadyl(IV) complex possesses an antioxidant activity and this was clear through studying SOD, CAT, MDA, GSH and methionine synthase. The current results support the therapeutic potentiality of vanadyl(IV)/adenine complex for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  5. New metal based drug as a therapeutic agent: Spectral, electrochemical, DNA-binding, surface morphology and photoluminescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muslu, Harun; Gölcü, Ayşegül

    2015-07-01

    Cu(II) complexes of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) Meloxicam (H2MLX) was synthesized and characterized via spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The thermal behavior of the complex was also analyzed. The photoluminescence properties of the compounds were analyzed under different conditions. The electrochemical properties of both ligand and complex have been analyzed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) using glassy carbon electrode. The biological activities of the compounds were evaluated through examining their capacity to bind to fish sperm double strand DNA (FSdsDNA) with absorption spectroscopy and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Absorption studies of the interaction of the H2MLX and its Cu(II) complex with FSdsDNA have indicated that these compounds could bind to FSdsDNA, and the binding constants were calculated. The morphology of the FSdsDNA, H2MLX, and Cu(II) complex were analyzed thanks to using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the DPV technique, pencil graphite electrode was used as a working electrode. The decrease in the intensity of the guanine oxidation signals was used as an indicator for the interaction mechanism.

  6. New approaches to drug discovery and development: a mechanism-based approach to pharmaceutical research and its application to BNP7787, a novel chemoprotective agent.

    PubMed

    Hausheer, Frederick H; Kochat, Harry; Parker, Aulma R; Ding, Daoyuan; Yao, Shije; Hamilton, Susan E; Petluru, Pavankumar N; Leverett, Betsy D; Bain, Stacey H; Saxe, Jeffrey D

    2003-07-01

    Any approach applied to drug discovery and development by the medical community and pharmaceutical industry has a direct impact on the future availability of improved, novel, and curative therapies for patients with cancer. By definition, drug discovery is a complex learning process whereby research efforts are directed toward uncovering and assimilating new knowledge to create and develop a drug for the purpose of providing benefit to a defined patient population. Accordingly, a highly desirable technology or approach to drug discovery should facilitate both effective learning and the application of newly discovered observations that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. However, some believe that drug discovery is largely accomplished by serendipity and therefore appropriately addressed by screening a large number of compounds. Clearly, this approach has not generated an abundance of new drugs for cancer patients and suggests that a tangibly different approach in drug discovery is warranted. We employ an alternative approach to drug discovery, which is based on the elucidation and exploitation of biological, pharmacological, and biochemical mechanisms that have not been previously recognized or fully understood. Mechanism-based drug discovery involves the combined application of physics-based computer simulations and laboratory experimentation. There is increasing evidence that agreement between simulations based on the laws of physics and experimental observations results in a higher probability that such observations are more accurate and better understood as compared with either approach used alone. Physics-based computer simulation applied to drug discovery is now considered by experts in the field to be one of the ultimate methodologies for drug discovery. However, the ability to perform truly comprehensive physics-based molecular simulations remains limited by several factors, including the enormous computer-processing power that is required to perform

  7. Fetal drug therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, M I; Pryde, P G; Reichler, A; Bardicef, M; Johnson, M P

    1993-01-01

    Fetal drug therapy encompasses several areas, including the prevention of external genital masculinization in 21-hydroxylase deficiency syndrome (congenital adrenal hyperplasia), biochemical amelioration of methylmalonic acidemia, and biotin-responsive multiple carboxylase deficiency. The correction of cardiac arrhythmias has become relatively commonplace, and a reduction in the risks of neural tube defects is now possible with the use of preconceptual and early conceptual folic acid. Similarly, fetal function can be altered by the induction of fetal lung maturity using a number of agents; corticosteroids are the most common fetal pharmaceutic agent, and a number of other agents have also been tried. The most common route of administering pharmaceutic agents is through the mother and the placenta, although the direct administration of certain agents is becoming more common. Images PMID:8236974

  8. Prior antipsychotic drug treatment prevents response to novel antipsychotic agent in the methylazoxymethanol acetate model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kathryn M; Cook, James M; Poe, Michael M; Grace, Anthony A

    2014-03-01

    Trials of novel compounds for the treatment of schizophrenia are typically tested in patients following brief withdrawal of ongoing medication despite known long-term changes in the dopamine (DA) system following chronic antipsychotic drug therapy. The present study explored the impact of withdrawal from repeated haloperidol (HAL) treatment, as well as the response to a novel α5 gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A)) receptor positive allosteric modulator (α5PAM), on the activity of the DA system in the methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. Electrophysiological recordings were conducted from DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area of MAM and saline (SAL) rats following 7-day withdrawal from repeated HAL (21 d, 0.6 mg/kg, orally). In separate animals, amphetamine-induced locomotion was measured to assess changes in DA behavioral sensitivity. SAL rats withdrawn from HAL demonstrated reduced spontaneous DA neuron activity along with an enhanced locomotor response to amphetamine, indicative of the development of DA supersensitivity. Both α5PAM treatment and ventral hippocampal (vHPC) inactivation reversed the DA neuron depolarization block following HAL withdrawal in SAL rats. In contrast, MAM rats withdrawn from HAL exhibited reduced spontaneous DA activity and enhanced locomotor response to amphetamine compared with untreated SAL rats; however, this condition was unresponsive to α5PAM treatment or vHPC inactivation. Withdrawal from prior HAL treatment interferes with the therapeutic actions of this novel treatment in the MAM model of schizophrenia. Consequently, testing novel compounds on chronically treated schizophrenia patients may be ineffective.

  9. LC-MS/MS structural characterization of stress degradation products including the development of a stability indicating assay of Darunavir: An anti-HIV drug.

    PubMed

    Rao, R Nageswara; Ramachandra, B; Sravan, B; Khalid, Sara

    2014-02-01

    Darunavir, an anti-HIV drug was subjected to forced degradation under acid, base, thermal and neutral hydrolysis, oxidation and photolysis as prescribed by ICH guidelines. Four major degradation products were formed under acid and base hydrolysis, while stable under neutral and thermal hydrolysis, oxidative and photolysis. The drug and its degradation products were separated on Hiber, LiChrospher® 60, RP-select B, C8 column (250mm×4.6mm i.d., 5μm) using 10mM ammonium acetate: acetonitrile (52:48, v/v) as mobile phase in an isocratic elution mode by LC. The degradation products were characterized by LC-MS/MS and fragmentation pathways were proposed. The proposed structures of degradation products were confirmed by HRMS and the LC method was validated with respect to specificity, linearity, accuracy, recovery, LOD and LOQ. PMID:24252722

  10. Impact of a treatment including tenofovir plus didanosine on the selection of the 65R mutation in highly drug-experienced HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, Nicola; Seminari, Elena; Fusetti, Giuliana; Salpietro, Stefania; Boeri, Enzo; Galli, Andrea; Lazzarin, Adriano; Clementi, Massimo; Castagna, Antonella

    2004-11-01

    Data from 20 highly drug-experienced HIV-infected patients receiving tenofovir plus didanosine as part of a salvage regimen were analysed. At baseline, all but one patient harboured a virus bearing at least one nucleoside excision mutation (NEM); in 13 cases (65%) three or more NEM were detectable. After a median of 26 weeks of treatment, two patients (10%) selected the 65R mutation. These results support the hypothesis that NEM hinder the selection of this mutation.

  11. A novel hybrid drug between two potent anti-tubulin agents as a potential prolonged anticancer approach.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Paolo; Pavan, Barbara; Simoni, Daniele; Baruchello, Riccardo; Rondanin, Riccardo; Mischiati, Carlo; Feriotto, Giordana; Ferraro, Luca; Hsu, Lih-Ching; Lee, Ray M; Dalpiaz, Alessandro

    2016-08-25

    We report the design, synthesis and biological characterisation of a novel hybrid drug by conjugation of two tubulin inhibitors, a hemiasterlin derivative A (H-Mpa-Tle-Aha-OH), obtained by condensation of three non-natural amino acids, and cis-3,4',5-trimethoxy-3'aminostilbene (B). As we have previously demonstrated synergy between A and B, we used a monocarbonyl derivative of triethylene glycol as linker (L) to synthesise compounds A-L and A-L-B; via HPLC we analysed the release of its potential hydrolysis products A, A-L, B and B-L in physiological fluids: the hybrid A-L-B undergo hydrolysis in rat whole blood of the ester bond between A and L (half-life=118.2±9.5min) but not the carbamate bond between B and L; the hydrolysis product B-L was further hydrolyzed, but with a slower rate (half-life=288±12min). The compound A-L was the faster hydrolyzed conjugate (half-life=25.4±1.1min). The inhibitory activity of the compounds against SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell growth was analysed. The IC50 values were 7.48±1.27nM for A, 40.3±6.28nM for B, 738±38.5nM for A-L and 37.9±2.11nM for A-L-B. The anticancer effect of A-L-B was evidenced to be obtained via microtubule dynamics suppression. Finally, we stated the expression of the active efflux transporters P-gp (ABCB1) and MRP1 (ABCC1) in the human normal colon epithelial NCM460 cell line by reverse-transcription PCR. Via permeation studies across NCM460 monolayers we demonstrate the poor aptitude of A to interact with active efflux transporters (AET): indeed, the ratio between its permeability coefficients for the basolateral (B)→apical (A) and B→A transport was 1.5±0.1, near to the ratio of taltobulin (1.12±0.06), an hemiasterlin derivative able to elude AETs, and significantly different form the ratio of celiprolol (3.4±0.2), an AET substrate. PMID:27262542

  12. What do you do with the antiplatelet agents in patients with drug eluting stents who then receive a mechanical valve?

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Michele; Serraino, Giuseppe Filiberto; Spadafora, Andrea; Renzulli, Attilio

    2012-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAT) with aspirin and clopidogrel is a cornerstone of treatment during and after percutaneous coronary interventions with drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) is the recommended treatment for patients with mechanical heart valves. When patients with DES need a mechanical heart valve or vice versa, we face the difficult choice of their antithrombotic therapy. Different institutions empirically follow a combination of OAC and single or DAT, the so-called triple antithrombotic therapy (TT) aiming to find the best balance between the thrombotic and bleeding risk for this subset of patients. A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether there is an optimal antithrombotic management for patients with DES undergoing mechanical heart valve or vice versa. Altogether, more than 148 papers were found using the reported search, of which 16 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that DES implantation in patients who could potentially need valve surgery in the future should be discouraged and bare-metal stent or an aortic bioprosthesis preferred. However, in high-risk patients with DES, the recommendation is to postpone elective surgery for 1 year and, if surgery cannot be deferred, continue aspirin during the perioperative period. Moreover, when OAC is given in combination with clopidogrel and/or low-dose aspirin, the target INR should be 2.0–2.5 (Class IIb, level of evidence C). As per the long-term management, antithrombotic management with DAT alone in mechanical aortic valve replacement might be possible, but there is not enough evidence to support it. The available evidence suggests that triple anticoagulation (OAC + DAT) is associated with the best

  13. Drug-Drug Interaction between the Direct-Acting Antiviral Regimen of Ombitasvir-Paritaprevir-Ritonavir plus Dasabuvir and the HIV Antiretroviral Agent Dolutegravir or Abacavir plus Lamivudine.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Amit; Trinh, Roger; Zhao, Weihan; Podsadecki, Thomas; Menon, Rajeev

    2016-10-01

    The direct-acting antiviral regimen of 25 mg ombitasvir-150 mg paritaprevir-100 mg ritonavir once daily (QD) plus 250 mg dasabuvir twice daily (BID) is approved for the treatment of hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection, including patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. This study was performed to evaluate the pharmacokinetic, safety, and tolerability effects of coadministering the regimen of 3 direct-acting antivirals with two antiretroviral therapies (dolutegravir or abacavir plus lamivudine). Healthy volunteers (n = 24) enrolled in this phase I, single-center, open-label, multiple-dose study received 50 mg dolutegravir QD for 7 days or 300 mg abacavir plus 300 mg lamivudine QD for 4 days, the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen for 14 days, followed by the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen with dolutegravir or abacavir plus lamivudine for 10 days. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated to compare combination therapy with 3-direct-acting-antiviral or antiretroviral therapy alone, and safety/tolerability were assessed throughout the study. Coadministration of the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen increased the geometric mean maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and the area under the curve (AUC) of dolutegravir by 22% (central value ratio [90% confidence intervals], 1.219 [1.153, 1.288]) and 38% (1.380 [1.295, 1.469]), respectively. Abacavir geometric mean Cmax and AUC values decreased by 13% (0.873 [0.777, 0.979]) and 6% (0.943 [0.901, 0.986]), while those for lamivudine decreased by 22% (0.778 [0.719, 0.842]) and 12% (0.876 [0.821, 0.934]). For the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen, geometric mean Cmax and AUC during coadministration were within 18% of measurements made during administration of the 3-direct-acting-antiviral regimen alone, although trough concentrations for paritaprevir were 34% (0.664 [0.585, 0.754]) and 27% (0.729 [0.627, 0.847]) lower with dolutegravir and abacavir-lamivudine, respectively. All study treatments were generally

  14. Emerging Drugs for Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Theresa; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Sen, H. Nida

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the Field Uveitis is a challenging disease covering both infectious and noninfectious conditions. The current treatment strategies are hampered by the paucity of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and few trials comparing efficacy of different agents. Areas Covered in this Review This review describes the current and future treatments of uveitis. A literature search was performed in PUBMED from 1965 to 2010 on drugs treating ocular inflammation with emphasis placed on more recent, larger studies. What the Reader Will Gain Readers should gain a basic understanding of current treatment strategies beginning with corticosteroids and transitioning to steroid sparing agents. Steroid sparing agents include the antimetabolites which include methotrexate, azathioprine, and mycophenolate mofetil; the calcineurin inhibitors which include cyclosporine, tacrolimus; alkylating agents which include cyclophosphamide and chlorambucil; and biologics which include the TNF-α inhibitors infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept; daclizumab, interferon α2a, and rituximab. Take Home Message Newer agents are typically formulated from existing drugs or developed based on new advances in immunology. Future treatment will require a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in autoimmune diseases and better delivery systems in order to provide targeted treatment with minimal side effects. PMID:21210752

  15. Antidiabetic Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on antidiabetic agents is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  16. An overview of the causes of current practices in Pratinidhi Dravyas (substitution of drugs) in Ayurveda including newer techniques for their evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pravin R.; Patel, Bhupesh R.; Shukla, Vinay J.

    2012-01-01

    Many Pratinidhi Dravyas in Ayurvedic classics are mentioned and certainly are based on a methodical approach, which involves many aspects. These principles on which Pratinidhis were decided are quoted nowhere; so both to understand the established Pratinidhis and to find new ones a rational approach is the need of the hour. This article is an effort in the direction to study this concept meticulously in light of modern techniques for its better understanding and application. As there are very few established parameters, which help for selection and evaluation of Pratinidhi Dravyas. A rational technique like Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy may be incorporated to set a new dimension. As most of the routine analytical techniques are separation based, overall component load cannot be predicted. Thus, it is prime necessity to compare the drugs with a whole aspect, which goes in hand by hand with a holistic approach of Ayurveda “Treat the man as Whole – Take the drug as whole.” PMID:23723663

  17. Direct anti-HCV agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingquan

    2016-01-01

    Unlike human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a curable disease. Current direct antiviral agent (DAA) targets are focused on HCV NS3/4A protein (protease), NS5B protein (polymerase) and NS5A protein. The first generation of DAAs includes boceprevir and telaprevir, which are protease inhibitors and were approved for clinical use in 2011. The cure rate for genotype 1 patients increased from 45% to 70% when boceprevir or telaprevir was added to standard PEG-IFN/ribavirin. More effective and less toxic second generation DAAs supplanted these drugs by 2013. The second generation of DAAs includes sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), simeprevir (Olysio), and fixed combination medicines Harvoni and Viekira Pak. These drugs increase cure rates to over 90% without the need for interferon and effectively treat all HCV genotypes. With these drugs the "cure HCV" goal has become a reality. Concerns remain about drug resistance mutations and the high cost of these drugs. The investigation of new HCV drugs is progressing rapidly; fixed dose combination medicines in phase III clinical trials include Viekirax, asunaprevir+daclatasvir+beclabuvir, grazoprevir+elbasvir and others.

  18. Direct anti-HCV agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingquan

    2015-01-01

    Unlike human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a curable disease. Current direct antiviral agent (DAA) targets are focused on HCV NS3/4A protein (protease), NS5B protein (polymerase) and NS5A protein. The first generation of DAAs includes boceprevir and telaprevir, which are protease inhibitors and were approved for clinical use in 2011. The cure rate for genotype 1 patients increased from 45% to 70% when boceprevir or telaprevir was added to standard PEG-IFN/ribavirin. More effective and less toxic second generation DAAs supplanted these drugs by 2013. The second generation of DAAs includes sofosbuvir (Sovaldi), simeprevir (Olysio), and fixed combination medicines Harvoni and Viekira Pak. These drugs increase cure rates to over 90% without the need for interferon and effectively treat all HCV genotypes. With these drugs the “cure HCV” goal has become a reality. Concerns remain about drug resistance mutations and the high cost of these drugs. The investigation of new HCV drugs is progressing rapidly; fixed dose combination medicines in phase III clinical trials include Viekirax, asunaprevir+daclatasvir+beclabuvir, grazoprevir+elbasvir and others. PMID:26904396

  19. Drug-induced cutaneous vasculitides.

    PubMed

    Antiga, E; Verdelli, A; Bonciani, D; Bonciolini, V; Quintarelli, L; Volpi, W; Fabbri, P; Caproni, M

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous vasculitides (CV) can be idiopathic or secondary to several triggers, including drugs, which account for up to 30% of all the cases of CV. Several drugs can induce CV, including some medications commonly used in dermatology, including minocycline, and several new drugs, such as anti-TNF agents. Different pathomecanisms are involved in the development of drug-induced CV, including the formation and deposition of immune complexes, the induction of neutrophil apoptosis, the formation of neoantigens between the drugs and proteins from the host, the shift of the immune response, and others. Although the diagnosis is difficult, because the clinical picture of drug-induced CV is in general indistinguishable from that of other forms of CV, it is important to recognize such entities in order to correctly manage the patient. Anamnesis, diagnostic algorithms to assess the likelihood of the association between a drug and a cutaneous reaction, skin biopsy and laboratory testing (including the search for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) are useful tools to make a diagnosis of drug-induced CV. About the therapy, while in idiopathic vasculitides the treatment is usually more aggressive and long-lasting, very often requiring a maintenance therapy with immunosuppressive drugs, in drug-induced CV the discontinuation of the suspected drug alone is usually enough to achieve complete remission, making the prognosis usually very good.

  20. Drug Induced Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwaiblmair, Martin; Behr, Werner; Haeckel, Thomas; Märkl, Bruno; Foerg, Wolfgang; Berghaus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of therapeutic drugs, the list of drugs that is responsible for severe pulmonary disease also grows. Many drugs have been associated with pulmonary complications of various types, including interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, and pleural effusions. Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD) can be caused by chemotherapeutic agents, antibiotics, antiarrhythmic drugs, and immunosuppressive agents. There are no distinct physiologic, radiographic or pathologic patterns of DILD, and the diagnosis is usually made when a patient with interstitial lung disease (ILD) is exposed to a medication known to result in lung disease. Other causes of ILD must be excluded. Treatment is avoidance of further exposure and systemic corticosteroids in patients with progressive or disabling disease. PMID:22896776

  1. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, J S; Hooper, D C

    1989-01-01

    The fluoroquinolones, a new class of potent orally absorbed antimicrobial agents, are reviewed, considering structure, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum, variables affecting activity in vitro, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, emergence of resistance, and tolerability. The primary bacterial target is the enzyme deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase. Bacterial resistance occurs by chromosomal mutations altering deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase and decreasing drug permeation. The drugs are bactericidal and potent in vitro against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus spp., and Neisseria spp., have good activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci, and (with several exceptions) are less potent against streptococci and have fair to poor activity against anaerobic species. Potency in vitro decreases in the presence of low pH, magnesium ions, or urine but is little affected by different media, increased inoculum, or serum. The effects of the drugs in combination with a beta-lactam or aminoglycoside are often additive, occasionally synergistic, and rarely antagonistic. The agents are orally absorbed, require at most twice-daily dosing, and achieve high concentrations in urine, feces, and kidney and good concentrations in lung, bone, prostate, and other tissues. The drugs are efficacious in treatment of a variety of bacterial infections, including uncomplicated and complicated urinary tract infections, bacterial gastroenteritis, and gonorrhea, and show promise for therapy of prostatitis, respiratory tract infections, osteomyelitis, and cutaneous infections, particularly when caused by aerobic gram-negative bacilli. Fluoroquinolones have also proved to be efficacious for prophylaxis against travelers' diarrhea and infection with gram-negative bacilli in neutropenic patients. The drugs are effective in eliminating carriage of Neisseria meningitidis. Patient tolerability appears acceptable, with gastrointestinal or central nervous

  2. White Paper: Recommendations on the Conduct of Superiority and Organism-Specific Clinical Trials of Antibacterial Agents for the Treatment of Infections Caused by Drug-Resistant Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is a critical need for new pathways to develop antibacterial agents to treat life-threatening infections caused by highly resistant bacteria. Traditionally, antibacterial agents have been studied in noninferiority clinical trials that focus on one site of infection (eg, pneumonia, intra-abdominal infection). Conduct of superiority trials for infections caused by highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria represents a new, and as yet, untested paradigm for antibacterial drug development. We sought to define feasible trial designs of antibacterial agents that could enable conduct of superiority and organism-specific clinical trials. These recommendations are the results of several years of active dialogue among the white paper's drafters as well as external collaborators and regulatory officials. Our goal is to facilitate conduct of new types of antibacterial clinical trials to enable development and ultimately approval of critically needed new antibacterial agents. PMID:22891041

  3. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  4. Drug abuse and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, C G; Asch, R H

    1987-09-01

    It is clear that a number of CNS agents, including drugs of abuse, can inhibit reproductive function. Figure 1 shows the chemical diversity of some of the drug groups that affect reproductive hormones. Their structural dissimilarity to the steroid hormones is also readily apparent in the figure. These chemically diverse drugs share an important pharmacologic property: they are highly potent neuroactive drugs, and they can disrupt hypothalamic-pituitary function. Although it is frequently difficult to distinguish between direct drug actions on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and subsequent effects on gonadal hormones and sex accessory gland function, the distinction is an important one. Most neuroactive drugs produce only transient effects on the central nervous pathways necessary for normal gonadotropin secretion. The disruptive effects of these drugs are likely to be transient and completely reversible, and tolerance to the inhibitory drug effects may occur even with continued drug use. Under these circumstances, normal adults may experience only subtle changes in sexual function. However, individuals with compromised reproductive function may exhibit major problems. It is also likely that adolescents may be at substantial risk for reproductive damage from these neuroactive drugs since the endocrine events associated with puberty are dependent on the normal development of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis.

  5. Drugs in salmonid aquaculture--a review.

    PubMed

    Burka, J F; Hammell, K L; Horsberg, T E; Johnson, G R; Rainnie, D J; Speare, D J

    1997-10-01

    In contrast to mammalian therapeutics, the use of pharmaceutical substances is rather limited in fish. It is basically restricted to anaesthetic agents and anti-infective agents for parasitic and microbial diseases. Anaesthetic agents are used primarily in fish farm and laboratory settings to provide analgesia and immobilization of fish for minor procedures. The anti-infective agents are used for controlling diseases and the choice of drug depends on efficacy, ease of application, human safety, target animal safety including stress to the fish, environmental impact, regulatory approval, costs, and implications for marketing the fish. In this article, the major drugs used in salmonids in North America and Europe will be reviewed and some insight into future directions for drug development and use for the salmonid industry will be introduced. The mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, side effects, and uses of the drugs are emphasized.

  6. Comparison of LC-MS-MS and GC-MS Analysis of Benzodiazepine Compounds Included in the Drug Demand Reduction Urinalysis Program.

    PubMed

    Perez, Erick Roman; Knapp, Joshua A; Horn, Carl K; Stillman, Stedra L; Evans, James E; Arfsten, Darryl P

    2016-04-01

    Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) offers specific advantages over gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) such as the ability to identify and measure a broader range of compounds with minimal sample preparation. Comparative analysis of LC-MS-MS versus GC-MS was performed for urinalysis detection of five benzodiazepine compounds currently part of the Department of Defense (DoD) Drug Demand Reduction Program (DDRP) testing panel; alpha-hydroxyalprazolam, oxazepam, lorazepam, nordiazepam and temazepam. In the analyses of internally prepared control urine samples at concentrations around the DDRP administrative decision point for benzodiazepines (100 ng/mL), both technologies produced comparable results with average accuracies between 99.7 and 107.3% and average coefficients of variation (%CV) <9%. Analysis of service member specimens that screened positive for benzodiazepines using both technologies produced comparable results for all analytes. Different degrees of matrix effect were observed for all analytes in the LC-MS-MS analysis. However, the effects were controlled by using deuterated internal standards (ISTDs). Additionally, there was a 39% increase in nordiazepam mean concentration analyzed by LC-MS-MS due to suppression of the ISTD ion by the flurazepam metabolite 2-hydroxyethylflurazepam. The ease and speed of sample extraction, the broader range of compounds that can be analyzed and shorter run time make the LC-MS-MS technology a suitable and expedient alternative confirmation technology for benzodiazepine testing. PMID:26755538

  7. Chemically modified tetracyclines: The novel host modulating agents

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Devulapalli Narasimha; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kapalavai, Vasavi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal pathogens and destructive host responses are involved in the initiation and progression of periodontitis. The emergence of host response modulation as a treatment concept has resulted from our improved understanding of the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. A variety of drugs have been evaluated as host modulation agents (HMA), including Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS), bisphosphonates, tetracyclines, enamel matrix proteins and bone morphogenetic proteins. Chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) are one such group of drugs which have been viewed as potential host modulating agents by their anticollagenolytic property. The CMTs are designed to be more potent inhibitors of pro inflammatory mediators and can increase the levels of anti inflammatory mediators. PMID:26392682

  8. Chemically modified tetracyclines: The novel host modulating agents.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Devulapalli Narasimha; Sanivarapu, Sahitya; Moogla, Srinivas; Kapalavai, Vasavi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal pathogens and destructive host responses are involved in the initiation and progression of periodontitis. The emergence of host response modulation as a treatment concept has resulted from our improved understanding of the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. A variety of drugs have been evaluated as host modulation agents (HMA), including Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDS), bisphosphonates, tetracyclines, enamel matrix proteins and bone morphogenetic proteins. Chemically modified tetracyclines (CMTs) are one such group of drugs which have been viewed as potential host modulating agents by their anticollagenolytic property. The CMTs are designed to be more potent inhibitors of pro inflammatory mediators and can increase the levels of anti inflammatory mediators. PMID:26392682

  9. New drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Rech, Megan A; Donahey, Elisabeth; Cappiello Dziedzic, Jacqueline M; Oh, Laura; Greenhalgh, Elizabeth

    2015-02-01

    Drug abuse is a common problem and growing concern in the United States, and over the past decade, novel or atypical drugs have emerged and have become increasingly popular. Recognition and treatment of new drugs of abuse pose many challenges for health care providers due to lack of quantitative reporting and routine surveillance, and the difficulty of detection in routine blood and urine analyses. Furthermore, street manufacturers are able to rapidly adapt and develop new synthetic isolates of older drugs as soon as law enforcement agencies render them illegal. In this article, we describe the clinical and adverse effects and purported pharmacology of several new classes of drugs of abuse including synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, salvia, desomorphine, and kratom. Because many of these substances can have severe or life-threatening adverse effects, knowledge of general toxicology is key in recognizing acute intoxication and overdose; however, typical toxidromes (e.g., cholinergic, sympathomimetic, opioid, etc.) are not precipitated by many of these agents. Medical management of patients who abuse or overdose on these drugs largely consists of supportive care, although naloxone may be used as an antidote for desomorphine overdose. Symptoms of aggression and psychosis may be treated with sedation (benzodiazepines, propofol) and antipsychotics (haloperidol or atypical agents such as quetiapine or ziprasidone). Other facets of management to consider include treatment for withdrawal or addiction, nutrition support, and potential for transmission of infectious diseases. PMID:25471045

  10. Novel combination of mitochondrial division inhibitor 1 (mdivi-1) and platinum agents produces synergistic pro-apoptotic effect in drug resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Wang, Jingnan; Roginskaya, Vera; McDermott, Lee A; Edwards, Robert P; Stolz, Donna B; Llambi, Fabien; Green, Douglas R; Van Houten, Bennett

    2014-06-30

    Overcoming platinum drug resistance represents a major clinical challenge in cancer treatment. We discovered a novel drug combination using cisplatin and a class of thioquinazolinone derivatives including mdivi-1 (mitochondrial division inhibitor-1), that induces synergistic apoptosis in platinum resistant tumor cells, including those from cisplatin-refractory endstage ovarian cancer patients. However, through study of the combination effect on Drp1 (the reported target of mdivi-1) knockout MEF cells and the functional analysis of mdivi-1 analogs, we revealed that the synergism between mdivi-1 and cisplatin is Drp1-independent. Mdivi-1 impairs DNA replication and its combination with cisplatin induces a synergistic increase of replication stress and DNA damage, causing a preferential upregulation of a BH3-only protein Noxa. Mdivi-1 also represses mitochondrial respiration independent of Drp1, and the combination of mdivi-1 and cisplatin triggers substantial mitochondrial uncoupling and swelling. Upregulation of Noxa and simultaneous mitochondrial swelling causes synergistic induction of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), proceeding robust mitochondrial apoptotic signaling independent of Bax/Bak. Thus, the novel mode of MOMP induction by the combination through the "dual-targeting" potential of mdivi-1 on DNA replication and mitochondrial respiration suggests a novel class of compounds for platinum-based combination option in the treatment of platinum as well as multidrug resistant tumors.

  11. Selection of drug-resistant HIV-1 during the early phase of viral decay is uncommon in treatment-naïve patients initiated on a three- or four-drug antiretroviral regimen including lamivudine.

    PubMed

    Bergroth, Tobias; Ekici, Halime; Gisslén, Magnus; Loes, Sabine Kinloch-de; Goh, Li-Ean; Freedman, Andrew; Lampe, Fiona; Johnson, Margaret A; Sönnerborg, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Therapy failure due to drug resistance development is a common phenomenon in HIV-infected patients. However, when the drug pressure leads to the earliest selection of drug-resistant HIV-1 populations is still unclear. In this study, the extent to which selection of the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase M184I/V mutations occur during the initial phase of viral decay in treatment-naïve HIV-1 infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) was examined. Plasma virus from three cohorts of treatment-naïve patients initiating quadruple (n = 43), triple (n = 14) or dual (n = 15) lamivudine-containing ART were analyzed for M184I/V during the first 6 months of therapy using direct sequencing and a sensitive selective real-time PCR method. Among quadruple ART patients, who all were treated at primary HIV-1 infection, only one patient developed M184V after 6 weeks of therapy, having had wild-type virus at baseline. No mutations were found in chronically infected patients on triple ART. In patients on dual therapy, M184I/V mutants were found frequently. Selection of M184I/V mutants was found to be rare during the initial phase of viral decay after initiation of ART in adherent patients given a three or four-drug combination, in contrast to those receiving a less potent regimen. The results suggest that triple and quadruple lamivudine + PI or PI/r containing ART given to treatment-naïve adherent patients is potent enough to prevent development of resistance during the first months of therapy.

  12. The development and assessment of high-throughput mass spectrometry-based methods for the quantification of a nanoparticle drug delivery agent in cellular lysate.

    PubMed

    Buse, Joshua; Purves, Randy W; Verrall, Ronald E; Badea, Ildiko; Zhang, Haixia; Mulligan, Christopher C; Peru, Kerry M; Bailey, Jonathan; Headley, John V; El-Aneed, Anas

    2014-11-01

    The safe use of lipid-based drug delivery agents requires fast and sensitive qualitative and quantitative assessment of their cellular interactions. Many mass spectrometry (MS) based analytical platforms can achieve such task with varying capabilities. Therefore, four novel high-throughput MS-based quantitative methods were evaluated for the analysis of a small organic gene delivery agent: N,N-bis(dimethylhexadecyl)-1,3-propane-diammonium dibromide (G16-3). Analysis utilized MS instruments that detect analytes using low-resolution tandem MS (MS/MS) analysis (i.e. QTRAP or linear ion trap in this work) or high-resolution MS analysis (i.e. time of flight (ToF) or Orbitrap). Our results indicate that the validated fast chromatography (FC)-QTRAP-MS/MS, FC- LTQ-Orbitrap-MS, desorption electrospray ionization-collision-induced dissociation (CID)-MS/MS and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-ToF/ToF-MS MS methods were superior in the area of method development and sample analysis time to a previously developed liquid chromatography (LC)-CID-MS/MS. To our knowledge, this is the first evaluation of the abilities of five MS-based quantitative methods that target a single pharmaceutical analyte. Our findings indicate that, in comparison to conventional LC-CID-MS/MS, the new MS-based methods resulted in a (1) substantial reduction in the analysis time, (2) reduction in the time required for method development and (3) production of either superior or comparable quantitative data. The four new high-throughput MS methods, therefore, were faster, more efficient and less expensive than a conventional LC-CID-MS/MS for the quantification of the G16-3 analyte within tissue culture. When applied to cellular lysate, no significant change in the concentration of G16-3 gemini surfactant within PAM212 cells was observed between 5 and 53 h, suggesting the absence of any metabolism/excretion from PAM212 cells.

  13. Prescription of and Adherence to Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Gastroprotective Agents in At-Risk Gastrointestinal Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lanas, Angel; Polo-Tomás, Mónica; Roncales, Pilar; Gonzalez, Miguel A; Zapardiel, Javier

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with gastrointestinal (GI) risk factors who take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should also take gastroprotective agents (GPAs). No studies have evaluated adherence and reasons for non-adherence to GPA and NSAID therapies. METHODS: This was a prospective, multicenter, observational, longitudinal study. Patients attending rheumatology/orthopedic clinics who were co-prescribed NSAID plus GPA for at least 15 days and had risk factors for GI complications were followed up by telephone call. Optimal adherence was defined as taking the drug for ≥80% of prescribed days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with non-adherence. RESULTS: Of 1,232 patients interviewed, 192 were excluded because of inaccurate data. Of the remaining 1,040 patients, 74% were prescribed low-dose NSAIDs and 99.8% were prescribed a standard or high-dose GPA. In all, 70% of NSAIDs and 63.1% of GPA prescriptions were short term (<30 days). The majority of patients who were prescribed either an NSAID (92.5%) or GPA (85.9%) started therapy. Optimal adherence to GPA or NSAIDs was reported by 79.7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 76.9−82.2%) and 84.1% (95% CI: 81.7−86.3%) of patients, respectively. More adverse events occurred among patients who reported non-optimal adherence than among patients with optimal adherence to GPA (22.1 vs. 1.9%, P<0.0001). As reasons for non-adherence, patients most frequently cited infrequent/low-intensity rheumatic pain (NSAIDs) or forgetfulness (GPAs). Adverse events and short-term treatment were independent factors associated with poor adherence for both NSAIDs and GPAs. History of uncomplicated peptic ulcer and frequent dosing were additional factors associated with non-adherence to NSAIDs. CONCLUSIONS: Most frequent reasons for non-adherence are infrequent/low-intensity rheumatic pain (NSAIDs) or forgetfulness (GPAs). Short-term treatment and adverse events were associated with poor

  14. Thyroid Dysfunction from Antineoplastic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P. Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%–50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient’s quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  15. Thyroid dysfunction from antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Hamnvik, Ole-Petter Riksfjord; Larsen, P Reed; Marqusee, Ellen

    2011-11-01

    Unlike cytotoxic agents that indiscriminately affect rapidly dividing cells, newer antineoplastic agents such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with thyroid dysfunction. These include tyrosine kinase inhibitors, bexarotene, radioiodine-based cancer therapies, denileukin diftitox, alemtuzumab, interferon-α, interleukin-2, ipilimumab, tremelimumab, thalidomide, and lenalidomide. Primary hypothyroidism is the most common side effect, although thyrotoxicosis and effects on thyroid-stimulating hormone secretion and thyroid hormone metabolism have also been described. Most agents cause thyroid dysfunction in 20%-50% of patients, although some have even higher rates. Despite this, physicians may overlook drug-induced thyroid dysfunction because of the complexity of the clinical picture in the cancer patient. Symptoms of hypothyroidism, such as fatigue, weakness, depression, memory loss, cold intolerance, and cardiovascular effects, may be incorrectly attributed to the primary disease or to the antineoplastic agent. Underdiagnosis of thyroid dysfunction can have important consequences for cancer patient management. At a minimum, the symptoms will adversely affect the patient's quality of life. Alternatively, such symptoms can lead to dose reductions of potentially life-saving therapies. Hypothyroidism can also alter the kinetics and clearance of medications, which may lead to undesirable side effects. Thyrotoxicosis can be mistaken for sepsis or a nonendocrinologic drug side effect. In some patients, thyroid disease may indicate a higher likelihood of tumor response to the agent. Both hypothyroidism and thyrotoxicosis are easily diagnosed with inexpensive and specific tests. In many patients, particularly those with hypothyroidism, the treatment is straightforward. We therefore recommend routine testing for thyroid abnormalities in patients receiving these antineoplastic agents. PMID:22010182

  16. Dipeptidylpeptidase-4 inhibitors (gliptins): focus on drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2010-09-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are generally treated with many pharmacological compounds and are exposed to a high risk of drug-drug interactions. Indeed, blood glucose control usually requires a combination of various glucose-lowering agents, and the recommended global approach to reduce overall cardiovascular risk generally implies administration of several protective compounds, including HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), antihypertensive compounds and antiplatelet agents. New compounds have been developed to improve glucose-induced beta-cell secretion and glucose control, without inducing hypoglycaemia or weight gain, in patients with T2DM. Dipeptidylpeptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors are novel oral glucose-lowering agents, which may be used as monotherapy or in combination with other antidiabetic compounds, metformin, thiazolidinediones or even sulfonylureas. Sitagliptin, vildagliptin and saxagliptin are already on the market, either as single agents or in fixed-dose combined formulations with metformin. Other compounds, such as alogliptin and linagliptin, are in a late phase of development. This review summarizes the available data on drug-drug interactions reported in the literature for these five DDP-4 inhibitors: sitagliptin, vildagliptin, saxagliptin, alogliptin and linagliptin. Possible pharmacokinetic interferences have been investigated between each of these compounds and various pharmacological agents, which were selected because there are other glucose-lowering agents (metformin, glibenclamide [glyburide], pioglitazone/rosiglitazone) that may be prescribed in combination with DPP-4 inhibitors, other drugs that are currently used in patients with T2DM (statins, antihypertensive agents), compounds that are known to interfere with the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system (ketoconazole, diltiazem, rifampicin [rifampin]) or with P-glycoprotein transport (ciclosporin), or agents with a narrow therapeutic safety window (warfarin, digoxin). Generally

  17. Colloidal microgels in drug delivery applications

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei V.

    2005-01-01

    Colloidal microgels have recently received attention as environmentally responsive systems and now are increasingly used in applications as carriers for therapeutic drugs and diagnostic agents. Synthetic microgels consist of a crosslinked polymer network that provides a depot for loaded drugs, protection against environmental hazards and template for post-synthetic modification or vectorization of the drug carriers. The aim of this manuscript is to review recent attempts to develop new microgel formulations for oral drug delivery, to design metal-containing microgels for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, and to advance approaches including the systemic administration of microgels. Novel nanogel drug delivery systems developed in the authors’ laboratory are discussed in details including aspects of their synthesis, vectorization and recent applications for encapsulation of low molecular weight drugs or formulation of biological macromolecules. The findings reviewed here are encouraging for further development of the nanogels as intelligent drug carriers with such features as targeted delivery and triggered drug release. PMID:17168773

  18. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  19. Hydroxypyridonate chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Scarrow, Robert C.; White, David L.

    1987-01-01

    Chelating agents having 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (HOPO) and related moieties incorporated within their structures, including polydentate HOPO-substituted polyamines such as spermidine and spermine, and HOPO-substituted desferrioxamine. The chelating agents are useful in selectively removing certain cations from solution, and are particularly useful as ferric ion and actinide chelators. Novel syntheses of the chelating agents are provided.

  20. Lipid-lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Ewang-Emukowhate, Mfon; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2013-09-01

    The role of lipid lowering in reducing the risk of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established. Treatment particularly aimed at decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is effective in reducing the risk of death from coronary heart disease and stroke. Statins form the cornerstone of treatment. However, in some individuals with a high risk of CVD who are unable to achieve their target LDL-C due to either intolerance or lack of efficacy, there is the need for alternative therapies. This review provides an overview of the different classes of currently available lipid-lowering medications including statins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants (resins), and omega-3 fatty acids. Data are presented on their indications, pharmacology, and the relevant end point clinical trial data with these drugs. It also discusses the human trial data on some novel therapeutic agents that are being developed including those for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia--the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen and the microsomal transfer protein inhibitor lomitapide. Data are presented on phase II and III trials on agents with potentially wider applications, cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 inhibitors. The data on a licensed gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency are also presented. PMID:23811423

  1. Lipid-lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Ewang-Emukowhate, Mfon; Wierzbicki, Anthony S

    2013-09-01

    The role of lipid lowering in reducing the risk of mortality and morbidity from cardiovascular disease (CVD) is well established. Treatment particularly aimed at decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is effective in reducing the risk of death from coronary heart disease and stroke. Statins form the cornerstone of treatment. However, in some individuals with a high risk of CVD who are unable to achieve their target LDL-C due to either intolerance or lack of efficacy, there is the need for alternative therapies. This review provides an overview of the different classes of currently available lipid-lowering medications including statins, fibrates, bile acid sequestrants (resins), and omega-3 fatty acids. Data are presented on their indications, pharmacology, and the relevant end point clinical trial data with these drugs. It also discusses the human trial data on some novel therapeutic agents that are being developed including those for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia--the antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen and the microsomal transfer protein inhibitor lomitapide. Data are presented on phase II and III trials on agents with potentially wider applications, cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors and proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 inhibitors. The data on a licensed gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency are also presented.

  2. Wide complex tachycardia in the presence of class I antiarrhythmic agents: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Bhaskar; Lazzara, Ralph; Stavrakis, Stavros

    2014-05-01

    We present two patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation on class 1C antiarrhythmic drugs without concomitant atrioventricular (AV) nodal blocking agents who developed atrial flutter with 1:1 AV conduction. Their electrocardiogram revealed wide complex tachycardia with rates >200/minute. Atrial flutter with 1:1 conduction in the presence of class IC antiarrhythmic drugs may present a diagnostic challenge. These cases illustrate the importance of coadministering an AV nodal blocking agent with class IC antiarrhythmic agents in patients with atrial fibrillation. The differential diagnosis of wide complex tachycardia in patients taking class IC agents should include atrial flutter with 1:1 AV conduction.

  3. Diagnosis of drug-induced psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Abel, E A

    1992-12-01

    Certain drugs have been reported to precipitate or to exacerbate psoriasis. These cases occur mostly in patients with a history of psoriasis, although occasionally the new onset of psoriasis has followed treatment with certain drugs. The suspect drugs include lithium, beta adrenergic antagonists, antimalarials, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), in addition to various miscellaneous agents, including tetracycline. Evidence for these reports must be critically examined based on clinical and histological data, time course between drug intake and psoriasis exacerbation or resistance to psoriasis therapy, and response to drug rechallenge when available. The clinical context must be taken into consideration, including effects of concomitant antipsoriatic therapy, and the possible role of other triggering factors, such as infection. Controlled, prospective studies of the use of NSAID in patients with psoriasis may help to clarify their varied cutaneous effects. Further knowledge of the mechanisms involved in drug exacerbation of psoriasis may help to elucidate the etiopathogenesis of this chronic skin disorder.

  4. Agent Orange

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index Agent Orange Agent Orange Home Facts about Herbicides Veterans' Diseases Birth Defects Benefits Exposure Locations Provider ... millions of gallons of Agent Orange and other herbicides on trees and vegetation during the Vietnam War. ...

  5. Controlled drugs.

    PubMed

    2016-05-18

    Essential facts Controlled drugs are defined and governed by the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and associated regulations. Examples of controlled drugs include morphine, pethidine and methadone. Since 2012, appropriately qualified nurses and midwives can prescribe controlled drugs for medical conditions within their competence. There are some exceptions when treating addiction. PMID:27191427

  6. Examination of the regulatory frameworks applicable to biologic drugs (including stem cells and their progeny) in Europe, the U.S., and Australia: part I--a method of manual documentary analysis.

    PubMed

    Ilic, Nina; Savic, Snezana; Siegel, Evan; Atkinson, Kerry; Tasic, Ljiljana

    2012-12-01

    Recent development of a wide range of regulatory standards applicable to production and use of tissues, cells, and other biologics (or biologicals), as advanced therapies, indicates considerable interest in the regulation of these products. The objective of this study was to analyze and compare high-tier documents within the Australian, European, and U.S. biologic drug regulatory environments using qualitative methodology. Cohort 1 of the selected 18 high-tier regulatory documents from the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) regulatory frameworks were subject to a manual documentary analysis. These documents were consistent with the legal requirements for manufacturing and use of biologic drugs in humans and fall into six different categories. Manual analysis included a terminology search. The occurrence, frequency, and interchangeable use of different terms and phrases were recorded in the manual documentary analysis. Despite obvious differences, manual documentary analysis revealed certain consistency in use of terminology across analyzed frameworks. Phrase search frequencies have shown less uniformity than the search of terms. Overall, the EMA framework's documents referred to "medicinal products" and "marketing authorization(s)," the FDA documents discussed "drug(s)" or "biologic(s)," and the TGA documents referred to "biological(s)." Although high-tier documents often use different terminology they share concepts and themes. Documents originating from the same source have more conjunction in their terminology although they belong to different frameworks (i.e., Good Clinical Practice requirements based on the Declaration of Helsinki, 1964). Automated (software-based) documentary analysis should be obtained for the conceptual and relational analysis.

  7. Oral low-dose glucocorticoids should be included in any recommendation for the use of non-biologic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Roberto; Todoerti, Monica; Scirè, Carlo Alberto; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    At present, growing scientific evidence from the medical literature and expert opinion provides strong consideration for a mandatory role of glucocorticoids (GCs) in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Earlier application strategies were based on initial high doses, with subsequent tapering schedules, resulting in dose-related side effects. Recent low-dose GC schemes are more feasible in routine care, while providing evidence of clinical, functional and structural efficacy. Thus, initial low-dose GC 'bridging' treatment on a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug background should be included in any existing recommendations for RA management, as very recently advocated by the EULAR Task Force 2013 updated guidelines. Long-term low-dose therapy appears to provide acceptable safety, leading to long-standing slowing of structural damage, seen even after GC therapy withdrawal. Gaps in knowledge about the optimal method to taper and possibly discontinue GC treatment remain, and this topic should be addressed in clinical trials and observational studies. Recent efforts in GC medication have also included the introduction of a modified-release drug formulation capable of drug delivery consistent with chronobiological pathogenetic rhythms of disease, which has been quite efficacious in controlling the signs and symptoms related to pathways of circadian cytokines. Long-term data will further clarify the add-on benefits of such modified-release formulations.

  8. Potential drug-drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Tognini, Sara; Calsolaro, Valeria; Polini, Antonio; Monzani, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug-drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug-drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug-drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with behavioral symptoms considering both physiological and pathological changes in AD patients, and potential pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic drug interaction mechanisms.

  9. Potential drug-drug interactions in Alzheimer patients with behavioral symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Tognini, Sara; Calsolaro, Valeria; Polini, Antonio; Monzani, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    The use of multi drug regimens among the elderly population has increased tremendously over the last decade although the benefits of medications are always accompanied by potential harm, even when prescribed at recommended doses. The elderly populations are particularly at an increased risk of adverse drug reactions considering comorbidity, poly-therapy, physiological changes affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs and, in some cases, poor compliance due to cognitive impairment and/or depression. In this setting, drug-drug interaction may represent a serious and even life-threatening clinical condition. Moreover, the inability to distinguish drug-induced symptoms from a definitive medical diagnosis often results in addition of yet another drug to treat the symptoms, which in turn increases drug-drug interactions. Cognitive enhancers, including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, are the most widely prescribed agents for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, including psychotic symptoms and behavioral disorders, represent noncognitive disturbances frequently observed in AD patients. Antipsychotic drugs are at high risk of adverse events, even at modest doses, and may interfere with the progression of cognitive impairment and interact with several drugs including anti-arrhythmics and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Other medications often used in AD patients are represented by anxiolytic, like benzodiazepine, or antidepressant agents. These agents also might interfere with other concomitant drugs through both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms. In this review we focus on the most frequent drug-drug interactions, potentially harmful, in AD patients with behavioral symptoms considering both physiological and pathological changes in AD patients, and potential pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic drug interaction mechanisms. PMID:26392756

  10. New Antithrombotic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Eikelboom, John W.; Samama, Meyer Michel

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on new antithrombotic drugs that are in or are entering phase 3 clinical testing. Development of these new agents was prompted by the limitations of existing antiplatelet, anticoagulant, or fibrinolytic drugs. Addressing these unmet needs, this article (1) outlines the rationale for development of new antithrombotic agents; (2) describes the new antiplatelet, anticoagulant, and fibrinolytic drugs; and (3) provides clinical perspectives on the opportunities and challenges faced by these novel agents. PMID:22315258

  11. Hypersensitivity reactions to biologic agents.

    PubMed

    Vultaggio, Alessandra; Castells, Mariana C

    2014-08-01

    Biologic agents (BAs) are important therapeutic tools; their use has rapidly expanded and they are used in oncology, immunology, and inflammatory diseases. Their use may be limited, however, by adverse drug reactions. This article reviews the current literature on clinical presentation and pathogenic mechanisms of both acute and delayed reactions. In addition, procedures for management of BA-induced reactions, including preventive and diagnostic work-up, are provided. Lastly, this article summarizes the current knowledge of desensitization to several widely used monoclonal antibodies.

  12. Allergic rhinitis: meaningful and less meaningful combination treatments including reminiscences.

    PubMed

    Szelenyi, I

    2014-06-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) results from a complex allergen-driven mucosal inflammation in the nasal cavity. Current guideline-based therapy for allergic rhinitis include oral and nasal antihistamines, topical and systemic glucocorticoids, decongestants, antimuscarinic agents, mast cell stabilizing drugs, leukotriene-receptor antagonists, and others. In spite of guideline recommendations, most patients are using multiple therapies in an attempt to achieve symptom control. Therefore, more effective therapies for the management of AR are clearly required. Recently, a novel fixed dose combination containing azelastine and fluticasone propionate has successfully been introduced. At present, it represents the only meaningful topical drug combination. Perhaps, it will be followed by others. PMID:24974572

  13. [New agents for hypercholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Pintó, Xavier; García Gómez, María Carmen

    2016-02-19

    An elevated proportion of high cardiovascular risk patients do not achieve the therapeutic c-LDL goals. This owes to physicians' inappropriate or insufficient use of cholesterol lowering medications or to patients' bad tolerance or therapeutic compliance. Another cause is an insufficient efficacy of current cholesterol lowering drugs including statins and ezetimibe. In addition, proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 inhibitors are a new cholesterol lowering medications showing safety and high efficacy to reduce c-LDL in numerous already performed or underway clinical trials, potentially allowing an optimal control of hypercholesterolemia in most patients. Agents inhibiting apolipoprotein B synthesis and microsomal transfer protein are also providing a new potential to decrease cholesterol in patients with severe hypercholesterolemia and in particular in homozygote familial hypercholesterolemia. Last, cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors have shown powerful effects on c-HDL and c-LDL, although their efficacy in cardiovascular prevention and safety has not been demonstrated yet. We provide in this article an overview of the main characteristics of therapeutic agents for hypercholesterolemia, which have been recently approved or in an advanced research stage.

  14. Large Scale Solid Phase Synthesis of Peptide Drugs: Use of Commercial Anion Exchange Resin as Quenching Agent for Removal of Iodine during Disulphide Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, K. M. Bhaskara; Kumari, Y. Bharathi; Mallikharjunasarma, Dokka; Bulliraju, Kamana; Sreelatha, Vanjivaka; Ananda, Kuppanna

    2012-01-01

    The S-acetamidomethyl (Acm) or trityl (Trt) protecting groups are widely used in the chemical synthesis of peptides that contain one or more disulfide bonds. Treatment of peptides containing S-Acm protecting group with iodine results in simultaneous removal of the sulfhydryl protecting group and disulfide formation. However, the excess iodine needs to be quenched or adsorbed as quickly as possible after completion of the disulfide bond formation in order to minimize side reactions that are often associated with the iodination step. We report here a simple method for simultaneous quenching and removal of iodine and isolation of disulphide bridge peptides. The use of excess inexpensive anion exchange resin to the oxidized peptide from the aqueous acetic acid/methanol solution affords quantitative removal of iodine and other color impurities. This improves the resin life time of expensive chromatography media that is used in preparative HPLC column during the purification of peptide using preparative HPLC. Further, it is very useful for the conversion of TFA salt to acetate in situ. It was successfully applied commercially, to the large scale synthesis of various peptides including Desmopressin, Oxytocin, and Octreotide. This new approach offers significant advantages such as more simple utility, minimal side reactions, large scale synthesis of peptide drugs, and greater cost effectiveness. PMID:23118772

  15. 21 CFR 181.28 - Release agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Release agents. 181.28 Section 181.28 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PRIOR-SANCTIONED FOOD INGREDIENTS Specific Prior-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.28 Release agents....

  16. Antineoplastic Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  17. Integrating subpathway analysis to identify candidate agents for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiye; Li, Mi; Wang, Yun; Liu, Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second most common cause of cancer-associated death worldwide, characterized by a high invasiveness and resistance to normal anticancer treatments. The need to develop new therapeutic agents for HCC is urgent. Here, we developed a bioinformatics method to identify potential novel drugs for HCC by integrating HCC-related and drug-affected subpathways. By using the RNA-seq data from the TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) database, we first identified 1,763 differentially expressed genes between HCC and normal samples. Next, we identified 104 significant HCC-related subpathways. We also identified the subpathways associated with small molecular drugs in the CMap database. Finally, by integrating HCC-related and drug-affected subpathways, we identified 40 novel small molecular drugs capable of targeting these HCC-involved subpathways. In addition to previously reported agents (ie, calmidazolium), our method also identified potentially novel agents for targeting HCC. We experimentally verified that one of these novel agents, prenylamine, induced HCC cell apoptosis using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, an acridine orange/ethidium bromide stain, and electron microscopy. In addition, we found that prenylamine not only affected several classic apoptosis-related proteins, including Bax, Bcl-2, and cytochrome c, but also increased caspase-3 activity. These candidate small molecular drugs identified by us may provide insights into novel therapeutic approaches for HCC. PMID:27022281

  18. Alcohol and Other Drug Use Among Undergraduates at Indiana University, Bloomington, Including a Comparison Between I.U. Students and the State's High School Population. Indiana Studies in Higher Education, No. 49.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Linda Morton

    The use of alcohol and six classes of illicit drugs among 485 undergraduates at Indiana University, Bloomington, was studied in 1981-1982 and compared to a state study of alcohol/drug use by high school students. Attention was focused on the following questions: When does drug experimentation begin, and which drugs are currently most popular? How…

  19. Drug-induced hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Amacher, David E; Chalasani, Naga

    2014-05-01

    Several drugs have been associated with the potential for drug-induced hepatic steatosis (DIHS) and/or phospholipidosis (DIPL), a lysosomal storage disorder. Drug-induced hepatic steatosis is generally a chronic but reversible affliction and may involve drug accumulation in the liver. Fat accumulation may be either macrovesicular or microvesicular in nature. Commonly used medications associated with DIHS include amiodarone, valproate, tamoxifen, methotrexate, and some chemotherapeutic and antiretroviral agents. Two recently approved medications for the treatment of hereditary homozygous hypercholesterolemia have also been noted to cause hepatic steatosis. For some compounds such as methotrexate and tamoxifen, the underlying metabolic risk factors such as obesity and metabolic syndrome may exacerbate their potential to cause DIHS and its progression. In this article, the authors discuss the preclinical screening and mechanisms of DIHS and DIPL, and review specific examples of drugs commonly used in clinical practice that are known to cause DIHS. PMID:24879984

  20. Nanosize drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    Nanosize materials provide hopes, speculations and chances for an unprecedented change in drug delivery in near future. Nanotechnology is an emerging field to produce nanomaterials for drug delivery that can offer a new tool, opportunities and scope to provide more focused and fine-tuned treatment of diseases at a molecular level, enhancing the therapeutic potential of drugs so that they become less toxic and more effective. Nanodimensional drug delivery systems are of great scientific interest as they project their tremendous utility because of their capability of altering biodistribution of therapeutic agents so that they can concentrate more in the target tissues. Nanosize drug delivery systems generally focus on formulating bioactive molecules in biocompatible nanosystems such as nanocrystals, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructure lipid carriers, lipid drug conjugates, nanoliposomes, dendrimers, nanoshells, emulsions, nanotubes, quantum dots etc. Extensively versatile molecules like synthetic chemicals to naturally occurring complex macromolecules such as nucleic acids and proteins could be dispensed in such formulations maintaining their stability and efficacy. Empty viral capsids are being tried to deliver drug as these uniformly sized bionanomaterials can be utilized to load drug to improve solubility, reduce toxicity and provide site specific targeting. Nanomedicines offer a wide scope for delivery of smart materials from tissue engineering to more recently artificial RBCs. Nanocomposites are the future hope for tailored and personalized medicines as well as for bone repairing and rectification of cartilage impairment. Nanosize drug delivery systems are addressing the challenges to overcome the delivery problems of wide ranges of drugs through their narrow submicron particle size range, easily manipulatable surface characteristics in achievement of versatile tissue targeting (includes active and passive drug targeting), controlled and sustained drug

  1. [Drug dependence and psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Giraud, M J; Lemonnier, E; Bigot, T

    1994-11-01

    Although the utility of psychotropic drugs has been well demonstrated, caution must still be exercised in their use. Among their potential risks, drug dependency must be kept in mind. This risk is well accepted with regard to benzodiazepines, and it appeared useful to study the potential risk for antidepressants, neuroleptics and thymoregulatory agents. Whatever the drug, the predominant factor appears to be psychological dependency. Prevention of drug dependency is most often achieved by informing the patient, limiting the length of use of the drug, making regular reevaluation of symptoms and of drug indication, and frequently be establishing a "treatment contract". The importance of the patient-physician relationship in the prescription of such treatment must be underlined. PMID:7984941

  2. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated.

  3. Drug shortages: a complex health care crisis.

    PubMed

    Fox, Erin R; Sweet, Burgunda V; Jensen, Valerie

    2014-03-01

    National tracking of drug shortages began in 2001. However, a significant increase in the number of shortages began in late 2009, with numbers reaching what many have termed crisis level. The typical drug in short supply is a generic product administered by injection. Common classes of drugs affected by shortages include anesthesia medications, antibiotics, pain medications, nutrition and electrolyte products, and chemotherapy agents. The economic and clinical effects of drug shortages are significant. The financial effect of drug shortages is estimated to be hundreds of millions of dollars annually for health systems across the United States. Clinically, patients have been harmed by the lack of drugs or inferior alternatives, resulting in more than 15 documented deaths. Drug shortages occur for a variety of reasons. Generic injectable drugs are particularly susceptible to drug shortages because there are few manufacturers of these products and all manufacturers are running at full capacity. In addition, some manufacturers have had production problems, resulting in poor quality product. Although many suppliers are working to upgrade facilities and add additional manufacturing lines, these activities take time. A number of stakeholder organizations have been involved in meetings to further determine the causes and effects of drug shortages. A new law was enacted in July 2012 that granted the Food and Drug Administration additional tools to address the drug shortage crisis. The future of drug shortages is unknown, but there are hopeful indications that quality improvements and additional capacity may decrease the number of drug shortages in the years to come.

  4. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  5. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly. PMID:26576135

  6. Pharmacologic Agents for Chronic Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Jae

    2015-10-01

    Chronic diarrhea is usually associated with a number of non-infectious causes. When definitive treatment is unavailable, symptomatic drug therapy is indicated. Pharmacologic agents for chronic diarrhea include loperamide, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, diosmectite, cholestyramine, probiotics, antispasmodics, rifaximin, and anti-inflammatory agents. Loperamide, a synthetic opiate agonist, decreases peristaltic activity and inhibits secretion, resulting in the reduction of fluid and electrolyte loss and an increase in stool consistency. Cholestyramine is a bile acid sequestrant that is generally considered as the first-line treatment for bile acid diarrhea. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists have significant benefits in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) with diarrhea. Ramosetron improves stool consistency as well as global IBS symptoms. Probiotics may have a role in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. However, data on the role of probiotics in the treatment of chronic diarrhea are lacking. Diosmectite, an absorbent, can be used for the treatment of chronic functional diarrhea, radiation-induced diarrhea, and chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. Antispasmodics including alverine citrate, mebeverine, otilonium bromide, and pinaverium bromide are used for relieving diarrheal symptoms and abdominal pain. Rifaximin can be effective for chronic diarrhea associated with IBS and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Budesonide is effective in both lymphocytic colitis and collagenous colitis. The efficacy of mesalazine in microscopic colitis is weak or remains uncertain. Considering their mechanisms of action, these agents should be prescribed properly.

  7. Combinatorial nanocarrier based drug delivery approach for amalgamation of anti-tumor agents in bresat cancer cells: an improved nanomedicine strategies

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Chandran; Rayappan, Kathirvel; Thangam, Ramar; Bhanumathi, Ramasamy; Shanthi, Krishnamurthy; Vivek, Raju; Thirumurugan, Ramasamy; Bhattacharyya, Atanu; Sivasubramanian, Srinivasan; Gunasekaran, Palani; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy of multiple drugs through a single system is exhibiting high therapeutic effects. We investigate nanocarrier mediated inhibitory effects of topotecan (TPT) and quercetin (QT) on triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) (MDA-MB-231) and multi drug resistant (MDR) type breast cancer cells (MCF-7) with respect to cellular uptake efficiency and therapeutic mechanisms as in vitro and in vivo. The synthesized mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) pores used for loading TPT; the outer of the nanoparticles was decorated with poly (acrylic acid) (PAA)-Chitosan (CS) as anionic inner-cationic outer layer respectively and conjugated with QT. Subsequently, grafting of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide on the surface of nanocarrier (CPMSN) thwarted the uptake by normal cells, but facilitated their uptake in cancer cells through integrin receptor mediated endocytosis and the dissociation of nanocarriers due to the ability to degrade of CS and PAA in acidic pH, which enhance the intracellular release of drugs. Subsequently, the released drugs induce remarkable molecular activation as well as structural changes in tumor cell endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and mitochondria that can trigger cell death. The valuable CPMSNs may open up new avenues in developing targeted therapeutic strategies to treat cancer through serving as an effective drug delivery podium. PMID:27725731

  8. Reversal agents in anaesthesia and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Nibedita; Dongare, Pradeep A; Mishra, Rajeeb Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advent of short and ultra-short acting drugs, an in-depth knowledge of the reversal agents used is a necessity for any anaesthesiologist. Reversal agents are defined as any drug used to reverse the effects of anaesthetics, narcotics or potentially toxic agents. The controversy on the routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade still exists. The advent of newer reversal agents like sugammadex have made the use of steroidal neuromuscular blockers like rocuronium feasible in rapid sequence induction situations. We made a review of the older reversal agents and those still under investigation for drugs that are regularly used in our anaesthesia practice. PMID:26644615

  9. Anticancer agents derived from natural cinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping; Shi, Yaling; Wang, Jinfeng; Shen, Xiuxiu; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the most dangerous disease that causes deaths all over the world. Natural products have afforded a rich source of drugs in a number of therapeutic fields including anticancer agents. Many significant drugs have been derived from natural sources by structural optimization of natural products. Cinnamic acid has gained great interest due to its antiproliferative, antioxidant, antiangiogenic and antitumorigenic potency. Currently it has been observed that cinnamic acid and its analogs such as caffeic acid, sinapic acid, ferulic acid, and isoferulic acid display various pharmacological activities, such as immunomodulation, anti-inflammation, anticancer and antioxidant. They have served to be the major sources of potential leading anticancer compounds. In this review, we focus on the anticancer potency of cinnamic acid derivatives and novel strategies to design these derivatives. We hope this review will be useful for researchers who are interested in developing anticancer agents.

  10. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action.

  11. Development of anticancer agents: wizardry with osmium.

    PubMed

    Hanif, Muhammad; Babak, Maria V; Hartinger, Christian G

    2014-10-01

    Platinum compounds are one of the pillars of modern cancer chemotherapy. The apparent disadvantages of existing chemotherapeutics have led to the development of novel anticancer agents with alternative modes of action. Many complexes of the heavy metal osmium (Os) are potent growth inhibitors of human cancer cells and are active in vivo, often superior or comparable to cisplatin, as the benchmark metal-based anticancer agent, or clinically tested ruthenium (Ru) drug candidates. Depending on the choice of ligand system, osmium compounds exhibit diverse modes of action, including redox activation, DNA targeting or inhibition of protein kinases. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the development of osmium anticancer drug candidates and discuss their cellular mechanisms of action. PMID:24955838

  12. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations. PMID:23636733

  13. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations.

  14. New antiobesity agents: lorcaserin (Belviq) and phentermine/topiramate ER (Qsymia).

    PubMed

    Shyh, Grace; Cheng-Lai, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for a wide range of conditions, including cardiovascular disease. Although lifestyle modifications remain the cornerstone for the management of obesity, pharmacologic agents may be a helpful addition to patients who have comorbidities and do not respond adequately to diet and exercise. Lorcaserin and phentermine/topiramate ER are 2 long-awaited agents, approved in 2012 for obesity management, 13 years since orlistat received US Food and Drug Administration approval in 1999. Lorcaserin is a serotonin agonist, whereas phentermine/topiramate is a combination of a sympathomimetic agent and an antiepileptic drug; both these agents have been shown to reduce weight significantly and improve cardiovascular and metabolic parameters, such as blood pressure, lipids, and HbA1C. This article reviews the pharmacology and clinical efficacy and safety of each of these agents. The differences among the three available agents for long-term management of obesity will also be examined. PMID:24304809

  15. A Food and Drug Administration-approved Asthma Therapeutic Agent Impacts Amyloid β in the Brain in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Yukiko; Takeda, Shuko; Cho, Hansang; Wegmann, Susanne; Shoup, Timothy M.; Takahashi, Kazue; Irimia, Daniel; Elmaleh, David R.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Hudry, Eloise

    2015-01-01

    Interfering with the assembly of Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides from monomer to oligomeric species and fibrils or promoting their clearance from the brain are targets of anti-Aβ-directed therapies in Alzheimer disease. Here we demonstrate that cromolyn sodium (disodium cromoglycate), a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug already in use for the treatment of asthma, efficiently inhibits the aggregation of Aβ monomers into higher-order oligomers and fibrils in vitro without affecting Aβ production. In vivo, the levels of soluble Aβ are decreased by over 50% after only 1 week of daily intraperitoneally administered cromolyn sodium. Additional in vivo microdialysis studies also show that this compound decreases the half-life of soluble Aβ in the brain. These data suggest a clear effect of a peripherally administered, Food and Drug Administration-approved medication on Aβ economy, supporting further investigation of the potential long-term efficacy of cromolyn sodium in Alzheimer disease. PMID:25468905

  16. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Sarabjeet Singh; Fenniri, Hicham; Singh, Baljit

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles hold tremendous potential as an effective drug delivery system. In this review we discussed recent developments in nanotechnology for drug delivery. To overcome the problems of gene and drug delivery, nanotechnology has gained interest in recent years. Nanosystems with different compositions and biological properties have been extensively investigated for drug and gene delivery applications. To achieve efficient drug delivery it is important to understand the interactions of nanomaterials with the biological environment, targeting cell-surface receptors, drug release, multiple drug administration, stability of therapeutic agents and molecular mechanisms of cell signalling involved in pathobiology of the disease under consideration. Several anti-cancer drugs including paclitaxel, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and dexamethasone have been successfully formulated using nanomaterials. Quantom dots, chitosan, Polylactic/glycolic acid (PLGA) and PLGA-based nanoparticles have also been used for in vitro RNAi delivery. Brain cancer is one of the most difficult malignancies to detect and treat mainly because of the difficulty in getting imaging and therapeutic agents past the blood-brain barrier and into the brain. Anti-cancer drugs such as loperamide and doxorubicin bound to nanomaterials have been shown to cross the intact blood-brain barrier and released at therapeutic concentrations in the brain. The use of nanomaterials including peptide-based nanotubes to target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor and cell adhesion molecules like integrins, cadherins and selectins, is a new approach to control disease progression. PMID:18053152

  17. Drugs Approved for Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for neuroblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  18. Drugs Approved for Retinoblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for retinoblastoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  20. Lipoidal Soft Hybrid Biocarriers of Supramolecular Construction for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dinesh; Sharma, Deepak; Singh, Gurmeet; Singh, Mankaran; Rathore, Mahendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Lipid-based innovations have achieved new heights during the last few years as an essential component of drug development. The current challenge of drug delivery is liberation of drug agents at the right time in a safe and reproducible manner to a specific target site. A number of novel drug delivery systems has emerged encompassing various routes of administration, to achieve controlled and targeted drug delivery. Microparticulate lipoidal vesicular system represents a unique technology platform suitable for the oral and systemic administration of a wide variety of molecules with important therapeutic biological activities, including drugs, genes, and vaccine antigens. The success of liposomes as drug carriers has been reflected in a number of liposome-based formulations, which are commercially available or are currently undergoing clinical trials. Also, novel lipid carrier-mediated vesicular systems are originated. This paper has focused on the lipid-based supramolecular vesicular carriers that are used in various drug delivery and drug targeting systems. PMID:22888455